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Sample records for included cortical layers

  1. Cortical layers, rhythms and BOLD signals.

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    Scheeringa, René; Fries, Pascal

    2017-11-03

    This review investigates how laminar fMRI can complement insights into brain function derived from the study of rhythmic neuronal synchronization. Neuronal synchronization in various frequency bands plays an important role in neuronal communication between brain areas, and it does so on the backbone of layer-specific interareal anatomical projections. Feedforward projections originate predominantly in supragranular cortical layers and terminate in layer 4, and this pattern is reflected in inter-laminar and interareal directed gamma-band influences. Thus, gamma-band synchronization likely subserves feedforward signaling. By contrast, anatomical feedback projections originate predominantly in infragranular layers and terminate outside layer 4, and this pattern is reflected in inter-laminar and interareal directed alpha- and/or beta-band influences. Thus, alpha-beta band synchronization likely subserves feedback signaling. Furthermore, these rhythms explain part of the BOLD signal, with independent contributions of alpha-beta and gamma. These findings suggest that laminar fMRI can provide us with a potentially useful method to test some of the predictions derived from the study of neuronal synchronization. We review central findings regarding the role of layer-specific neuronal synchronization for brain function, and regarding the link between neuronal synchronization and the BOLD signal. We discuss the role that laminar fMRI could play by comparing it to invasive and non-invasive electrophysiological recordings. Compared to direct electrophysiological recordings, this method provides a metric of neuronal activity that is slow and indirect, but that is uniquely non-invasive and layer-specific with potentially whole brain coverage. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cornu Ammonis Regions–Antecedents of Cortical Layers?

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    Audrey Mercer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Studying neocortex and hippocampus in parallel, we are struck by the similarities. All three to four layered allocortices and the six layered mammalian neocortex arise in the pallium. All receive and integrate multiple cortical and subcortical inputs, provide multiple outputs and include an array of neuronal classes. During development, each cell positions itself to sample appropriate local and distant inputs and to innervate appropriate targets. Simpler cortices had already solved the need to transform multiple coincident inputs into serviceable outputs before neocortex appeared in mammals. Why then do phylogenetically more recent cortices need multiple pyramidal cell layers? A simple answer is that more neurones can compute more complex functions. The dentate gyrus and hippocampal CA regions—which might be seen as hippocampal antecedents of neocortical layers—lie side by side, albeit around a tight bend. Were the millions of cells of rat neocortex arranged in like fashion, the surface area of the CA pyramidal cell layers would be some 40 times larger. Even if evolution had managed to fold this immense sheet into the space available, the distances between neurones that needed to be synaptically connected would be huge and to maintain the speed of information transfer, massive, myelinated fiber tracts would be needed. How much more practical to stack the “cells that fire and wire together” into narrow columns, while retaining the mechanisms underlying the extraordinary precision with which circuits form. This demonstrably efficient arrangement presents us with challenges, however, not the least being to categorize the baffling array of neuronal subtypes in each of five “pyramidal layers.” If we imagine the puzzle posed by this bewildering jumble of apical dendrites, basal dendrites and axons, from many different pyramidal and interneuronal classes, that is encountered by a late-arriving interneurone insinuating itself into a

  3. Cortical layers: Cyto-, myelo-, receptor- and synaptic architecture in human cortical areas.

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    Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Zilles, Karl

    2017-08-12

    Cortical layers have classically been identified by their distinctive and prevailing cell types and sizes, as well as the packing densities of cell bodies or myelinated fibers. The densities of multiple receptors for classical neurotransmitters also vary across the depth of the cortical ribbon, and thus determine the neurochemical properties of cyto- and myeloarchitectonic layers. However, a systematic comparison of the correlations between these histologically definable layers and the laminar distribution of transmitter receptors is currently lacking. We here analyze the densities of 17 different receptors of various transmitter systems in the layers of eight cytoarchitectonically identified, functionally (motor, sensory, multimodal) and hierarchically (primary and secondary sensory, association) distinct areas of the human cerebral cortex. Maxima of receptor densities are found in different layers when comparing different cortical regions, i.e. laminar receptor densities demonstrate differences in receptorarchitecture between isocortical areas, notably between motor and primary sensory cortices, specifically the primary visual and somatosensory cortices, as well as between allocortical and isocortical areas. Moreover, considerable differences are found between cytoarchitectonical and receptor architectonical laminar patterns. Whereas the borders of cyto- and myeloarchitectonic layers are well comparable, the laminar profiles of receptor densities rarely coincide with the histologically defined borders of layers. Instead, highest densities of most receptors are found where the synaptic density is maximal, i.e. in the supragranular layers, particularly in layers II-III. The entorhinal cortex as an example of the allocortex shows a peculiar laminar organization, which largely deviates from that of all the other cortical areas analyzed here. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Automatic segmentation of human cortical layer-complexes and architectural areas using diffusion MRI and its validation

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    Matteo Bastiani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, several magnetic resonance imaging contrast mechanisms have been shown to distinguish cortical substructure corresponding to selected cortical layers. Here, we investigate cortical layer and area differentiation by automatized unsupervised clustering of high resolution diffusion MRI data. Several groups of adjacent layers could be distinguished in human primary motor and premotor cortex. We then used the signature of diffusion MRI signals along cortical depth as a criterion to detect area boundaries and find borders at which the signature changes abruptly. We validate our clustering results by histological analysis of the same tissue. These results confirm earlier studies which show that diffusion MRI can probe layer-specific intracortical fiber organization and, moreover, suggests that it contains enough information to automatically classify architecturally distinct cortical areas. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the automatic clustering approach and its appeal for MR-based cortical histology.

  5. Modeling Electric Double-Layers Including Chemical Reaction Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2014-01-01

    A physicochemical and numerical model for the transient formation of an electric double-layer between an electrolyte and a chemically-active flat surface is presented, based on a finite elements integration of the nonlinear Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including chemical reactions. The model works...

  6. Reduction in spontaneous firing of mouse excitatory layer 4 cortical neurons following visual classical conditioning

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    Bekisz, Marek; Shendye, Ninad; Raciborska, Ida; Wróbel, Andrzej; Waleszczyk, Wioletta J.

    2017-08-01

    The process of learning induces plastic changes in neuronal network of the brain. Our earlier studies on mice showed that classical conditioning in which monocular visual stimulation was paired with an electric shock to the tail enhanced GABA immunoreactivity within layer 4 of the monocular part of the primary visual cortex (V1), contralaterally to the stimulated eye. In the present experiment we investigated whether the same classical conditioning paradigm induces changes of neuronal excitability in this cortical area. Two experimental groups were used: mice that underwent 7-day visual classical conditioning and controls. Patch-clamp whole-cell recordings were performed from ex vivo slices of mouse V1. The slices were perfused with the modified artificial cerebrospinal fluid, the composition of which better mimics the brain interstitial fluid in situ and induces spontaneous activity. The neuronal excitability was characterized by measuring the frequency of spontaneous action potentials. We found that layer 4 star pyramidal cells located in the monocular representation of the "trained" eye in V1 had lower frequency of spontaneous activity in comparison with neurons from the same cortical region of control animals. Weaker spontaneous firing indicates decreased general excitability of star pyramidal neurons within layer 4 of the monocular representation of the "trained" eye in V1. Such effect could result from enhanced inhibitory processes accompanying learning in this cortical area.

  7. Pyramidal Neurons in Different Cortical Layers Exhibit Distinct Dynamics and Plasticity of Apical Dendritic Spines

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    Michelle Tjia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian cerebral cortex is typically organized in six layers containing multiple types of neurons, with pyramidal neurons (PNs being the most abundant. PNs in different cortical layers have distinct morphology, physiology and functional roles in neural circuits. Therefore, their development and synaptic plasticity may also differ. Using in vivo transcranial two-photon microscopy, we followed the structural dynamics of dendritic spines on apical dendrites of layer (L 2/3 and L5 PNs at different developmental stages. We show that the density and dynamics of spines are significantly higher in L2/3 PNs than L5 PNs in both adolescent (1 month old and adult (4 months old mice. While spine density of L5 PNs decreases during adolescent development due to a higher rate of spine elimination than formation, there is no net change in the spine density along apical dendrites of L2/3 PNs over this period. In addition, experiences exert differential impact on the dynamics of apical dendritic spines of PNs resided in different cortical layers. While motor skill learning promotes spine turnover on L5 PNs in the motor cortex, it does not change the spine dynamics on L2/3 PNs. In addition, neonatal sensory deprivation decreases the spine density of both L2/3 and L5 PNs, but leads to opposite changes in spine dynamics among these two populations of neurons in adolescence. In summary, our data reveal distinct dynamics and plasticity of apical dendritic spines on PNs in different layers in the living mouse cortex, which may arise from their distinct functional roles in cortical circuits.

  8. Spatial and Feature-Based Attention in a Layered Cortical Microcircuit Model

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    Wagatsuma, Nobuhiko; Potjans, Tobias C.; Diesmann, Markus; Sakai, Ko; Fukai, Tomoki

    2013-01-01

    Directing attention to the spatial location or the distinguishing feature of a visual object modulates neuronal responses in the visual cortex and the stimulus discriminability of subjects. However, the spatial and feature-based modes of attention differently influence visual processing by changing the tuning properties of neurons. Intriguingly, neurons' tuning curves are modulated similarly across different visual areas under both these modes of attention. Here, we explored the mechanism underlying the effects of these two modes of visual attention on the orientation selectivity of visual cortical neurons. To do this, we developed a layered microcircuit model. This model describes multiple orientation-specific microcircuits sharing their receptive fields and consisting of layers 2/3, 4, 5, and 6. These microcircuits represent a functional grouping of cortical neurons and mutually interact via lateral inhibition and excitatory connections between groups with similar selectivity. The individual microcircuits receive bottom-up visual stimuli and top-down attention in different layers. A crucial assumption of the model is that feature-based attention activates orientation-specific microcircuits for the relevant feature selectively, whereas spatial attention activates all microcircuits homogeneously, irrespective of their orientation selectivity. Consequently, our model simultaneously accounts for the multiplicative scaling of neuronal responses in spatial attention and the additive modulations of orientation tuning curves in feature-based attention, which have been observed widely in various visual cortical areas. Simulations of the model predict contrasting differences between excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the two modes of attentional modulations. Furthermore, the model replicates the modulation of the psychophysical discriminability of visual stimuli in the presence of external noise. Our layered model with a biologically suggested laminar structure describes

  9. Autosomal dominant epilepsy with auditory features : a new LGI1 family including a phenocopy with cortical dysplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Karl Martin; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Cohen, Rony; Appenzeller, Silke; de Kovel, Carolien G.F.; Rosenow, Felix; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor; Sheintuch, Liron; Veksler, Ronel; Friedman, Alon; Afawi, Zaid; Helbig, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    We report a new family with autosomal dominant epilepsy with auditory features (ADEAF) including focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) in the proband. We aim to identify the molecular cause in this family and clarify the relationship between FCD and ADEAF. A large Iranian Jewish family including 14

  10. Damping of double wall panels including a viscothermal air layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Stainhaouer, G.; Bakamidis, S.; Charalabopoulou, F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the dynamic behaviour of double wall panels, with emphasis on damping and sound radiation. It will be shown that a narrow air layer separating the two plates of a panel significantly alters the mentioned quantities by its viscothermal properties. Numerical and experimental

  11. Orexin-dependent activation of layer VIb enhances cortical network activity and integration of non-specific thalamocortical inputs.

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    Hay, Y Audrey; Andjelic, Sofija; Badr, Sammy; Lambolez, Bertrand

    2015-11-01

    Neocortical layer VI is critically involved in thalamocortical activity changes during the sleep/wake cycle. It receives dense projections from thalamic nuclei sensitive to the wake-promoting neuropeptides orexins, and its deepest part, layer VIb, is the only cortical lamina reactive to orexins. This convergence of wake-promoting inputs prompted us to investigate how layer VIb can modulate cortical arousal, using patch-clamp recordings and optogenetics in rat brain slices. We found that the majority of layer VIb neurons were excited by nicotinic agonists and orexin through the activation of nicotinic receptors containing α4-α5-β2 subunits and OX2 receptor, respectively. Specific effects of orexin on layer VIb neurons were potentiated by low nicotine concentrations and we used this paradigm to explore their intracortical projections. Co-application of nicotine and orexin increased the frequency of excitatory post-synaptic currents in the ipsilateral cortex, with maximal effect in infragranular layers and minimal effect in layer IV, as well as in the contralateral cortex. The ability of layer VIb to relay thalamocortical inputs was tested using photostimulation of channelrhodopsin-expressing fibers from the orexin-sensitive rhomboid nucleus in the parietal cortex. Photostimulation induced robust excitatory currents in layer VIa neurons that were not pre-synaptically modulated by orexin, but exhibited a delayed, orexin-dependent, component. Activation of layer VIb by orexin enhanced the reliability and spike-timing precision of layer VIa responses to rhomboid inputs. These results indicate that layer VIb acts as an orexin-gated excitatory feedforward loop that potentiates thalamocortical arousal.

  12. Effects of Hypocretin/Orexin and Major Transmitters of Arousal on Fast Spiking Neurons in Mouse Cortical Layer 6B.

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    Wenger Combremont, Anne-Laure; Bayer, Laurence; Dupré, Anouk; Mühlethaler, Michel; Serafin, Mauro

    2016-08-01

    Fast spiking (FS) GABAergic neurons are thought to be involved in the generation of high-frequency cortical rhythms during the waking state. We previously showed that cortical layer 6b (L6b) was a specific target for the wake-promoting transmitter, hypocretin/orexin (hcrt/orx). Here, we have investigated whether L6b FS cells were sensitive to hcrt/orx and other transmitters associated with cortical activation. Recordings were thus made from L6b FS cells in either wild-type mice or in transgenic mice in which GFP-positive GABAergic cells are parvalbumin positive. Whereas in a control condition hcrt/orx induced a strong increase in the frequency, but not amplitude, of spontaneous synaptic currents, in the presence of TTX, it had no effect at all on miniature synaptic currents. Hcrt/orx effect was thus presynaptic although not by an action on glutamatergic terminals but rather on neighboring cells. In contrast, noradrenaline and acetylcholine depolarized and excited these cells through a direct postsynaptic action. Neurotensin, which is colocalized in hcrt/orx neurons, also depolarized and excited these cells but the effect was indirect. Morphologically, these cells exhibited basket-like features. These results suggest that hcrt/orx, noradrenaline, acetylcholine, and neurotensin could contribute to high-frequency cortical activity through an action on L6b GABAergic FS cells. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Autosomal dominant epilepsy with auditory features: a new LGI1 family including a phenocopy with cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Karl Martin; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Cohen, Rony; Appenzeller, Silke; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Rosenow, Felix; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor; Sheintuch, Liron; Veksler, Ronel; Friedman, Alon; Afawi, Zaid; Helbig, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    We report a new family with autosomal dominant epilepsy with auditory features (ADEAF) including focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) in the proband. We aim to identify the molecular cause in this family and clarify the relationship between FCD and ADEAF. A large Iranian Jewish family including 14 individuals with epileptic seizures was phenotyped including high-resolution 3-T MRI. We performed linkage analysis and exome sequencing. LGI1, KANK1 and RELN were Sanger sequenced. Seizure semiology of 11 individuals was consistent with ADEAF. The proband underwent surgery for right mesiotemporal FCD. 3-T MRIs in four individuals were unremarkable. Linkage analysis revealed peaks on chromosome 9p24 (LOD 2.43) and 10q22-25 (LOD 2.04). A novel heterozygous LGI1 mutation was identified in all affected individuals except for the proband indicating a phenocopy. Exome sequencing did not reveal variants within the chromosome 9p24 region. Closely located variants in KANK1 and a RELN variant did not segregate with the phenotype. We provide detailed description of the phenotypic spectrum within a large ADEAF family with a novel LGI1 mutation that was conspicuously absent in the proband with FCD, demonstrating that despite identical clinical symptoms, phenocopies in ADEAF families may exist. This family illustrates that rare epilepsy syndromes within a single family can have both genetic and structural etiologies.

  14. Cortical and thalamic contributions to response dynamics across layers of the primary somatosensory cortex during tactile discrimination.

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    Pais-Vieira, Miguel; Kunicki, Carolina; Tseng, Po-He; Martin, Joel; Lebedev, Mikhail; Nicolelis, Miguel A L

    2015-09-01

    Tactile information processing in the rodent primary somatosensory cortex (S1) is layer specific and involves modulations from both thalamocortical and cortico-cortical loops. However, the extent to which these loops influence the dynamics of the primary somatosensory cortex while animals execute tactile discrimination remains largely unknown. Here, we describe neural dynamics of S1 layers across the multiple epochs defining a tactile discrimination task. We observed that neuronal ensembles within different layers of the S1 cortex exhibited significantly distinct neurophysiological properties, which constantly changed across the behavioral states that defined a tactile discrimination. Neural dynamics present in supragranular and granular layers generally matched the patterns observed in the ventral posterior medial nucleus of the thalamus (VPM), whereas the neural dynamics recorded from infragranular layers generally matched the patterns from the posterior nucleus of the thalamus (POM). Selective inactivation of contralateral S1 specifically switched infragranular neural dynamics from POM-like to those resembling VPM neurons. Meanwhile, ipsilateral M1 inactivation profoundly modulated the firing suppression observed in infragranular layers. This latter effect was counterbalanced by contralateral S1 block. Tactile stimulus encoding was layer specific and selectively affected by M1 or contralateral S1 inactivation. Lastly, causal information transfer occurred between all neurons in all S1 layers but was maximal from infragranular to the granular layer. These results suggest that tactile information processing in the S1 of awake behaving rodents is layer specific and state dependent and that its dynamics depend on the asynchronous convergence of modulations originating from ipsilateral M1 and contralateral S1. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Fabrication of contacts for silicon solar cells including printing burn through layers

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    Ginley, David S; Kaydanova, Tatiana; Miedaner, Alexander; Curtis, Calvin J; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

    2014-06-24

    A method for fabricating a contact (240) for a solar cell (200). The method includes providing a solar cell substrate (210) with a surface that is covered or includes an antireflective coating (220). For example, the substrate (210) may be positioned adjacent or proximate to an outlet of an inkjet printer (712) or other deposition device. The method continues with forming a burn through layer (230) on the coating (220) by depositing a metal oxide precursor (e.g., using an inkjet or other non-contact printing method to print or apply a volume of liquid or solution containing the precursor). The method includes forming a contact layer (240) comprising silver over or on the burn through layer (230), and then annealing is performed to electrically connect the contact layer (240) to the surface of the solar cell substrate (210) through a portion of the burn through layer (230) and the coating (220).

  16. Histological features of layers and sublayers in cortical visual areas V1 and V2 of chimpanzees, macaque monkeys, and humans

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    Balaram P

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pooja Balaram, Nicole A Young, Jon H Kaas Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: The layers and sublayers of primary visual cortex, or V1, in primates are easily distinguishable compared to those in other cortical areas, and are especially distinct in anthropoid primates – monkeys, apes, and humans – where they also vary in histological appearance. This variation in primate-specific specialization has led to a longstanding confusion over the identity of layer 4 and its proposed sublayers in V1. As the application of different histological markers relate to the issue of defining and identifying layers and sublayers, we applied four traditional and four more recent histological markers to brain sections of V1 and adjoining secondary visual cortex (V2 in macaque monkeys, chimpanzees, and humans in order to compare identifiable layers and sublayers in both cortical areas across these species. The use of Nissl, neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN, Gallyas myelin, cytochrome oxidase (CO, acetylcholinesterase (AChE, nonphosphorylated neurofilament H (SMI-32, parvalbumin (PV, and vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2 preparations support the conclusion that the most popular scheme of V1 lamination, that of Brodmann, misidentifies sublayers of layer 3 (3Bβ and 3C as sublayers of layer 4 (4A and 4B, and that the specialized sublayer of layer 3 in monkeys, 3Bβ, is not present in humans. These differences in interpretation are important as they relate to the proposed functions of layer 4 in primate species, where layer 4 of V1 is a layer that receives and processes information from the visual thalamus, and layer 3 is a layer that transforms and distributes information to other cortical areas. Keywords: area 17, area 18, cortical layers, histology, immunohistochemistry

  17. Histological features of layers and sublayers in cortical visual areas V1 and V2 of chimpanzees, macaque monkeys, and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaram, Pooja; Young, Nicole A; Kaas, Jon H

    2014-09-01

    The layers and sublayers of primary visual cortex, or V1, in primates are easily distinguishable compared to those in other cortical areas, and are especially distinct in anthropoid primates - monkeys, apes, and humans - where they also vary in histological appearance. This variation in primate-specific specialization has led to a longstanding confusion over the identity of layer 4 and its proposed sublayers in V1. As the application of different histological markers relate to the issue of defining and identifying layers and sublayers, we applied four traditional and four more recent histological markers to brain sections of V1 and adjoining secondary visual cortex (V2) in macaque monkeys, chimpanzees, and humans in order to compare identifiable layers and sublayers in both cortical areas across these species. The use of Nissl, neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN), Gallyas myelin, cytochrome oxidase (CO), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), nonphosphorylated neurofilament H (SMI-32), parvalbumin (PV), and vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) preparations support the conclusion that the most popular scheme of V1 lamination, that of Brodmann, misidentifies sublayers of layer 3 (3Bβ and 3C) as sublayers of layer 4 (4A and 4B), and that the specialized sublayer of layer 3 in monkeys, 3Bβ, is not present in humans. These differences in interpretation are important as they relate to the proposed functions of layer 4 in primate species, where layer 4 of V1 is a layer that receives and processes information from the visual thalamus, and layer 3 is a layer that transforms and distributes information to other cortical areas.

  18. Roles of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors during the sensory stimulation-evoked field potential responses in mouse cerebellar cortical molecular layer.

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    Xu, Yin-Hua; Zhang, Guang-Jian; Zhao, Jing-Tong; Chu, Chun-Ping; Li, Yu-Zi; Qiu, De-Lai

    2017-11-01

    The functions of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) in cerebellar cortex have been widely studied under in vitro condition, but their roles during the sensory stimulation-evoked responses in the cerebellar cortical molecular layer in living animals are currently unclear. We here investigated the roles of NMDARs during the air-puff stimulation on ipsilateral whisker pad-evoked field potential responses in cerebellar cortical molecular layer in urethane-anesthetized mice by electrophysiological recording and pharmacological methods. Our results showed that cerebellar surface administration of NMDA induced a dose-dependent decrease in amplitude of the facial stimulation-evoked inhibitory responses (P1) in the molecular layer, accompanied with decreases in decay time, half-width and area under curve (AUC) of P1. The IC 50 of NMDA induced inhibition in amplitude of P1 was 46.5μM. In addition, application of NMDA induced significant increases in the decay time, half-width and AUC values of the facial stimulation-evoked excitatory responses (N1) in the molecular layer. Application of an NMDAR blocker, D-APV (250μM) abolished the facial stimulation-evoked P1 in the molecular layer. These results suggested that NMDARs play a critical role during the sensory information processing in cerebellar cortical molecular layer in vivo in mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Theoretical investigation of five-layer waveguide structure including two left-handed material layers for refractometric applications

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    Alkanoo, Anas A.; Taya, Sofyan A.

    2018-03-01

    A slab waveguide structure consisting of five layers is studied for optical sensing applications. The five-layer waveguide structure has a guiding dielectric film, two left-handed material (LHM) layers and two dielectric layers as a substrate and a cladding. The dispersion relation and the sensitivity to any change in the index of the analyte layer are derived. The sensitivity is explored with different parameters of the structure. It is found that the sensitivity of the proposed structure can be significantly improved with the increase of the index of the guiding layer and the decrease of the permittivity of the LHM layers. Moreover, it can be also improved with the increase of the thickness of the LHM layers.

  20. Iron accumulation in deep cortical layers accounts for MRI signal abnormalities in ALS: correlating 7 tesla MRI and pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Y Kwan

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cortical and spinal motor neuron dysfunction. Routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI studies have previously shown hypointense signal in the motor cortex on T(2-weighted images in some ALS patients, however, the cause of this finding is unknown. To investigate the utility of this MR signal change as a marker of cortical motor neuron degeneration, signal abnormalities on 3T and 7T MR images of the brain were compared, and pathology was obtained in two ALS patients to determine the origin of the motor cortex hypointensity. Nineteen patients with clinically probable or definite ALS by El Escorial criteria and 19 healthy controls underwent 3T MRI. A 7T MRI scan was carried out on five ALS patients who had motor cortex hypointensity on the 3T FLAIR sequence and on three healthy controls. Postmortem 7T MRI of the brain was performed in one ALS patient and histological studies of the brains and spinal cords were obtained post-mortem in two patients. The motor cortex hypointensity on 3T FLAIR images was present in greater frequency in ALS patients. Increased hypointensity correlated with greater severity of upper motor neuron impairment. Analysis of 7T T(2(*-weighted gradient echo imaging localized the signal alteration to the deeper layers of the motor cortex in both ALS patients. Pathological studies showed increased iron accumulation in microglial cells in areas corresponding to the location of the signal changes on the 3T and 7T MRI of the motor cortex. These findings indicate that the motor cortex hypointensity on 3T MRI FLAIR images in ALS is due to increased iron accumulation by microglia.

  1. cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits α7 nicotinic receptor activity in layer 1 cortical interneurons through activation of D1/D5 dopamine receptors.

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    Komal, Pragya; Estakhr, Jasem; Kamran, Melad; Renda, Anthony; Nashmi, Raad

    2015-08-15

    Protein kinases can modify the function of many proteins including ion channels. However, the role of protein kinase A in modifying nicotinic receptors in the CNS has never been investigated. We showed through whole-cell recordings of layer 1 prefrontal cortical interneurons that α7 nicotinic responses are negatively modulated by protein kinase A. Furthermore, we show that stimulation of dopamine receptors can similarly attenuate α7 nicotinic responses through the activation of protein kinase A. These results suggest how the interaction of the cholinergic and dopaminergic systems may influence neuronal excitability in the brain. Phosphorylation of ion channels, including nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), by protein kinases plays a key role in the modification of synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability. α7 nAChRs are the second most prevalent nAChR subtype in the CNS following α4β2. Serine 365 in the M3-M4 cytoplasmic loop of the α7 nAChR is a phosphorylation site for protein kinase A (PKA). D1/D5 dopamine receptors signal through the adenylate cyclase-PKA pathway and play a key role in working memory and attention in the prefrontal cortex. Thus, we examined whether the dopaminergic system, mediated through PKA, functionally interacts with the α7-dependent cholinergic neurotransmission. In layer 1 interneurons of mouse prefrontal cortex, α7 nicotinic currents were decreased upon stimulation with 8-Br-cAMP, a PKA activator. In HEK 293T cells, dominant negative PKA abolished 8-Br-cAMP's effect of diminishing α7 nicotinic currents, while a constitutively active PKA catalytic subunit decreased α7 currents. In brain slices, the PKA inhibitor KT-5720 nullified 8-Br-cAMP's effect of attenuating α7 nicotinic responses, while applying a PKA catalytic subunit in the pipette solution decreased α7 currents. 8-Br-cAMP stimulation reduced surface expression of α7 nAChRs, but there was no change in single-channel conductance. The D1/D5 dopamine

  2. Slow Bursting Neurons of Mouse Cortical Layer 6b Are Depolarized by Hypocretin/Orexin and Major Transmitters of Arousal.

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    Wenger Combremont, Anne-Laure; Bayer, Laurence; Dupré, Anouk; Mühlethaler, Michel; Serafin, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Neurons firing spontaneously in bursts in the absence of synaptic transmission have been previously recorded in different layers of cortical brain slices. It has been suggested that such neurons could contribute to the generation of alternating UP and DOWN states, a pattern of activity seen during slow-wave sleep. Here, we show that in layer 6b (L6b), known from our previous studies to contain neurons highly responsive to the wake-promoting transmitter hypocretin/orexin (hcrt/orx), there is a set of neurons, endowed with distinct intrinsic properties, which displayed a strong propensity to fire spontaneously in rhythmic bursts. In response to small depolarizing steps, they responded with a delayed firing of action potentials which, upon higher depolarizing steps, invariably inactivated and were followed by a depolarized plateau potential and a depolarizing afterpotential. These cells also displayed a strong hyperpolarization-activated rectification compatible with the presence of an I h current. Most L6b neurons with such properties were able to fire spontaneously in bursts. Their bursting activity was of intrinsic origin as it persisted not only in presence of blockers of ionotropic glutamatergic and GABAergic receptors but also in a condition of complete synaptic blockade. However, a small number of these neurons displayed a mix of intrinsic bursting and synaptically driven recurrent UP and DOWN states. Most of the bursting L6b neurons were depolarized and excited by hcrt/orx through a direct postsynaptic mechanism that led to tonic firing and eventually inactivation. Similarly, they were directly excited by noradrenaline, histamine, dopamine, and neurotensin. Finally, the intracellular injection of these cells with dye and their subsequent Neurolucida reconstruction indicated that they were spiny non-pyramidal neurons. These results lead us to suggest that the propensity for slow rhythmic bursting of this set of L6b neurons could be directly impeded by hcrt

  3. Contributions of Early Versus Later-Generated Cortical Layers to the Development of Laminar Patterns of Ferret Somatosensory Cortex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Noctor, Stephen C

    1998-01-01

    .... While it is recognized that the early-generated components of cerebral cortex are essential for the formation of important architectural structures, the contributions of later generated cortical...

  4. Layer 6 cortical neurons require Reelin-Dab1 signaling for cellular orientation, Golgi deployment, and directed neurite growth into the marginal zone.

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    O'Dell, Ryan S; Ustine, Candida J M; Cameron, David A; Lawless, Sean M; Williams, Rebecca M; Zipfel, Warren R; Olson, Eric C

    2012-07-07

    The secreted ligand Reelin is believed to regulate the translocation of prospective layer 6 (L6) neocortical neurons into the preplate, a loose layer of pioneer neurons that overlies the ventricular zone. Recent studies have also suggested that Reelin controls neuronal orientation and polarized dendritic growth during this period of early cortical development. To explicitly characterize and quantify how Reelin controls this critical aspect of neurite initiation and growth we used a new ex utero explant model of early cortical development to selectively label a subset of L6 cortical neurons for complete 3-D reconstruction. The total neurite arbor sizes of neurons in Reelin-deficient (reeler mutant) and Dab1-deficient (Reelin-non-responsive scrambler mutant) cortices were quantified and unexpectedly were not different than control arbor lengths (p = 0.51). For each mutant, however, arbor organization was markedly different: mutant neurons manifested more primary processes (neurites emitted directly from the soma) than wild type, and these neurites were longer and displayed less branching. Reeler and scrambler mutant neurites extended tangentially rather than radially, and the Golgi apparatus that normally invests the apical neurite was compact in both reeler and scrambler mutants. Mutant cortices also exhibited a neurite "exclusion zone" which was relatively devoid of L6 neuron neurites and extended at least 15 μm beneath the pial surface, an area corresponding to the marginal zone (MZ) in the wild type explants. The presence of an exclusion zone was also indicated in the orientation of mutant primary neurite and neuronal somata, which failed to adopt angles within ~20˚ of the radial line to the pial surface. Injection of recombinant Reelin to reeler, but not scrambler, mutant cortices fully rescued soma orientation, Golgi organization, and dendritic projection defects within four hrs. These findings indicate Reelin promotes directional dendritic growth into

  5. Layer 6 cortical neurons require Reelin-Dab1 signaling for cellular orientation, Golgi deployment, and directed neurite growth into the marginal zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Dell Ryan S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The secreted ligand Reelin is believed to regulate the translocation of prospective layer 6 (L6 neocortical neurons into the preplate, a loose layer of pioneer neurons that overlies the ventricular zone. Recent studies have also suggested that Reelin controls neuronal orientation and polarized dendritic growth during this period of early cortical development. To explicitly characterize and quantify how Reelin controls this critical aspect of neurite initiation and growth we used a new ex utero explant model of early cortical development to selectively label a subset of L6 cortical neurons for complete 3-D reconstruction. Results The total neurite arbor sizes of neurons in Reelin-deficient (reeler mutant and Dab1-deficient (Reelin-non-responsive scrambler mutant cortices were quantified and unexpectedly were not different than control arbor lengths (p = 0.51. For each mutant, however, arbor organization was markedly different: mutant neurons manifested more primary processes (neurites emitted directly from the soma than wild type, and these neurites were longer and displayed less branching. Reeler and scrambler mutant neurites extended tangentially rather than radially, and the Golgi apparatus that normally invests the apical neurite was compact in both reeler and scrambler mutants. Mutant cortices also exhibited a neurite “exclusion zone” which was relatively devoid of L6 neuron neurites and extended at least 15 μm beneath the pial surface, an area corresponding to the marginal zone (MZ in the wild type explants. The presence of an exclusion zone was also indicated in the orientation of mutant primary neurite and neuronal somata, which failed to adopt angles within ~20˚ of the radial line to the pial surface. Injection of recombinant Reelin to reeler, but not scrambler, mutant cortices fully rescued soma orientation, Golgi organization, and dendritic projection defects within four hrs. Conclusions These findings

  6. MEMLS3&a: Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks adapted to include backscattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Proksch

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS was originally developed for microwave emissions of snowpacks in the frequency range 5–100 GHz. It is based on six-flux theory to describe radiative transfer in snow including absorption, multiple volume scattering, radiation trapping due to internal reflection and a combination of coherent and incoherent superposition of reflections between horizontal layer interfaces. Here we introduce MEMLS3&a, an extension of MEMLS, which includes a backscatter model for active microwave remote sensing of snow. The reflectivity is decomposed into diffuse and specular components. Slight undulations of the snow surface are taken into account. The treatment of like- and cross-polarization is accomplished by an empirical splitting parameter q. MEMLS3&a (as well as MEMLS is set up in a way that snow input parameters can be derived by objective measurement methods which avoid fitting procedures of the scattering efficiency of snow, required by several other models. For the validation of the model we have used a combination of active and passive measurements from the NoSREx (Nordic Snow Radar Experiment campaign in Sodankylä, Finland. We find a reasonable agreement between the measurements and simulations, subject to uncertainties in hitherto unmeasured input parameters of the backscatter model. The model is written in Matlab and the code is publicly available for download through the following website: http://www.iapmw.unibe.ch/research/projects/snowtools/memls.html.

  7. Comparison of the Upper Marginal Neurons of Cortical Layer 2 with Layer 2/3 Pyramidal Neurons in Mouse Temporal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huan; Hasegawa, Kayoko; Liu, Mingsheng; Song, Wen-Jie

    2017-01-01

    Layer 2/3 (L2/3) excitatory neurons in the neocortex make major contributions to corticocortical connections and therefore function to integrate information across cortical areas and hemispheres. Recent evidence suggests that excitatory neurons in L2/3 can have different properties. Sparse evidence from previous studies suggests that L2 neurons located at the border between L1 and L2 (referred to as L2 marginal neurons, L2MNs), have a morphology distinct from a typical pyramidal neuron. However, whether the membrane properties and input/output properties of L2MNs are different from those of typical pyramidal neurons in L2/3 is unknown. Here we addressed these questions in a slice preparation of mouse temporal cortex. We found that L2MNs were homogeneous in intrinsic membrane properties but appeared diverse in morphology. In agreement with previous studies, L2MNs either had oblique apical dendrites or had no obvious apical dendrites. The tufts of both apical and basal dendrites of these neurons invaded L1 extensively. All L2MNs showed a regular firing pattern with moderate adaptation. Compared with typical L2/3 pyramidal neurons that showed regular spiking (RS) activity (neurons), L2MNs showed a higher firing rate, larger sag ratio, and higher input resistance. No difference in the amplitude of excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs and IPSPs, respectively), evoked by stimulation of L1, was found between the two types of neurons, but the IPSPs in L2MNs had a slower time course than those in L2/3 RS cells. In paired recordings, unitary EPSPs showed no significant differences between synapses formed by L2MNs and those formed by L2/3 RS neurons. However, short-term synaptic depression (STSD) examined with a L2MN as the presynaptic neuron was greater when another L2MN was the postsynaptic neuron than when a L2/3 RS neuron was the postsynaptic neuron. The distinct morphological features of L2MNs found here have developmental implications, and the

  8. Comparison of the Upper Marginal Neurons of Cortical Layer 2 with Layer 2/3 Pyramidal Neurons in Mouse Temporal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Luo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Layer 2/3 (L2/3 excitatory neurons in the neocortex make major contributions to corticocortical connections and therefore function to integrate information across cortical areas and hemispheres. Recent evidence suggests that excitatory neurons in L2/3 can have different properties. Sparse evidence from previous studies suggests that L2 neurons located at the border between L1 and L2 (referred to as L2 marginal neurons, L2MNs, have a morphology distinct from a typical pyramidal neuron. However, whether the membrane properties and input/output properties of L2MNs are different from those of typical pyramidal neurons in L2/3 is unknown. Here we addressed these questions in a slice preparation of mouse temporal cortex. We found that L2MNs were homogeneous in intrinsic membrane properties but appeared diverse in morphology. In agreement with previous studies, L2MNs either had oblique apical dendrites or had no obvious apical dendrites. The tufts of both apical and basal dendrites of these neurons invaded L1 extensively. All L2MNs showed a regular firing pattern with moderate adaptation. Compared with typical L2/3 pyramidal neurons that showed regular spiking (RS activity (neurons, L2MNs showed a higher firing rate, larger sag ratio, and higher input resistance. No difference in the amplitude of excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs and IPSPs, respectively, evoked by stimulation of L1, was found between the two types of neurons, but the IPSPs in L2MNs had a slower time course than those in L2/3 RS cells. In paired recordings, unitary EPSPs showed no significant differences between synapses formed by L2MNs and those formed by L2/3 RS neurons. However, short-term synaptic depression (STSD examined with a L2MN as the presynaptic neuron was greater when another L2MN was the postsynaptic neuron than when a L2/3 RS neuron was the postsynaptic neuron. The distinct morphological features of L2MNs found here have developmental implications

  9. Fabrication of Polymer Solar Cells Using Aqueous Processing for All Layers Including the Metal Back Electrode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Roar; Helgesen, Martin; Jørgensen, Mikkel

    2011-01-01

    The challenges of printing all layers in polymer solar cells from aqueous solution are met by design of inks for the electron-, hole-, active-, and metallic back electrode-layers. The conversion of each layer to an insoluble state after printing enables multilayer formation from the same solvent ...... (water). The photograph here was taken just before screen printing of the aqueous silver ink.......The challenges of printing all layers in polymer solar cells from aqueous solution are met by design of inks for the electron-, hole-, active-, and metallic back electrode-layers. The conversion of each layer to an insoluble state after printing enables multilayer formation from the same solvent...

  10. Metallic layer-by-layer photonic crystals for linearly-polarized thermal emission and thermophotovoltaic device including same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Constant, Kristen P.

    2016-07-26

    Metallic thermal emitters consisting of two layers of differently structured nickel gratings on a homogeneous nickel layer are fabricated by soft lithography and studied for polarized thermal radiation. A thermal emitter in combination with a sub-wavelength grating shows a high extinction ratio, with a maximum value close to 5, in a wide mid-infrared range from 3.2 to 7.8 .mu.m, as well as high emissivity up to 0.65 at a wavelength of 3.7 .mu.m. All measurements show good agreement with theoretical predictions. Numerical simulations reveal that a high electric field exists within the localized air space surrounded by the gratings and the intensified electric-field is only observed for the polarizations perpendicular to the top sub-wavelength grating. This result suggests how the emissivity of a metal can be selectively enhanced at a certain range of wavelengths for a given polarization.

  11. Modelling of bypass transition including the pseudolaminar part of the boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prihoda, J.; Hlava, T. [Ceska Akademie Ved, Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. of Thermomechanics; Kozel, K. [Ceske Vysoke Uceni Technicke, Prague (Czech Republic). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering

    1999-12-01

    The boundary-layer transition in turbomachinery is accelerated by a number of parameters, especially by the free-stream turbulence. This so-called bypass transition is usually modelled by means of one-equation or two-equation turbulence models based on turbulent viscosity. Using of transport equations for turbulent energy and for dissipation rate in these models is questionable before the onset of the last stage of the transition, i.e. before the formation of turbulent spots. Used approximations of production and turbulent diffusion are the weak points of turbulence models with turbulent viscosity in the pseudolaminar boundary layer, as the Boussinesq assumption on turbulent viscosity is not fulfilled in this part of the boundary layer. In order to obtain a more reliable prediction of the transitional boundary layer, Mayle and Schulz (1997) proposed for the solution of pseudolaminar boundary layer a special `laminar-kinetic-energy` equation based on the analysis of laminar boundary layer in flows with velocity fluctuations. The effect of production and turbulent diffusion on the development of turbulent energy in the pseudolaminar boundary layer was tested using a two-layer turbulence model. (orig.)

  12. Modelling of bypass transition including the pseudolaminar part of the boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prihoda, J.; Hlava, T. (Ceska Akademie Ved, Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. of Thermomechanics); Kozel, K. (Ceske Vysoke Uceni Technicke, Prague (Czech Republic). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering)

    1999-01-01

    The boundary-layer transition in turbomachinery is accelerated by a number of parameters, especially by the free-stream turbulence. This so-called bypass transition is usually modelled by means of one-equation or two-equation turbulence models based on turbulent viscosity. Using of transport equations for turbulent energy and for dissipation rate in these models is questionable before the onset of the last stage of the transition, i.e. before the formation of turbulent spots. Used approximations of production and turbulent diffusion are the weak points of turbulence models with turbulent viscosity in the pseudolaminar boundary layer, as the Boussinesq assumption on turbulent viscosity is not fulfilled in this part of the boundary layer. In order to obtain a more reliable prediction of the transitional boundary layer, Mayle and Schulz (1997) proposed for the solution of pseudolaminar boundary layer a special 'laminar-kinetic-energy' equation based on the analysis of laminar boundary layer in flows with velocity fluctuations. The effect of production and turbulent diffusion on the development of turbulent energy in the pseudolaminar boundary layer was tested using a two-layer turbulence model. (orig.)

  13. mGluR5 Exerts Cell-Autonomous Influences on the Functional and Anatomical Development of Layer IV Cortical Neurons in the Mouse Primary Somatosensory Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester-Rosado, Carlos J; Sun, Hao; Huang, Jui-Yen; Lu, Hui-Chen

    2016-08-24

    Glutamate neurotransmission refines synaptic connections to establish the precise neural circuits underlying sensory processing. Deleting metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) in mice perturbs cortical somatosensory map formation in the primary somatosensory (S1) cortex at both functional and anatomical levels. To examine the cell-autonomous influences of mGluR5 signaling in the morphological and functional development of layer IV spiny stellate glutamatergic neurons receiving sensory input, mGluR5 genetic mosaic mice were generated through in utero electroporation. In the S1 cortex of these mosaic brains, we found that most wild-type neurons were located in barrel rings encircling thalamocortical axon (TCA) clusters while mGluR5 knock-out (KO) neurons were placed in the septal area, the cell-sparse region separating barrels. These KO neurons often displayed a symmetrical dendritic morphology with increased dendritic complexity, in contrast to the polarized pattern of wild-type neurons. The dendritic spine density of mGluR5 KO spiny stellate neurons was significantly higher than in wild-type neurons. Whole-cell electrophysiological recordings detected a significant increase in the frequencies of spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic events in mGluR5 KO neurons compared with neighboring wild-type neurons. Our mosaic analysis provides strong evidence supporting the cell-autonomous influence of mGluR5 signaling on the functional and anatomical development of cortical glutamatergic neurons. Specifically, mGluR5 is required in cortical glutamatergic neurons for the following processes: (1) the placement of cortical glutamatergic neurons close to TCA clusters; (2) the regulation of dendritic complexity and outgrowth toward TCA clusters; (3) spinogenesis; and (4) tuning of excitatory inputs. Glutamatergic transmission plays a critical role in cortical circuit formation. Its dysfunction has been proposed as a core factor in the etiology of many

  14. The changing roles of neurons in the cortical subplate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Friedlander

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurons may serve different functions over the course of an organism’s life. Recent evidence suggests that cortical subplate neurons including those that reside in the white matter may perform longitudinal multi-tasking at different stages of development. These cells play a key role in early cortical development in coordinating thalamocortical reciprocal innervation. At later stages of development, they become integrated within the cortical microcircuitry. This type of longitudinal multi-tasking can enhance the capacity for information processing by populations of cells serving different functions over the lifespan. Subplate cells are initially derived when cells from the ventricular zone underlying the cortex migrate to the cortical preplate that is subsequently split by the differentiating neurons of the cortical plate with some neurons locating in the marginal zone and others settling below in the subplate (SP. While the cortical plate neurons form most of the cortical layers (layers 2-6, the marginal zone neurons form layer 1 and the SP neurons become interstitial cells of the white matter as well as forming a compact sublayer along the bottom of layer 6. After serving as transient innervation targets for thalamocortical axons, most of these cells die and layer 4 neurons become innervated by thalamic axons. However, 10-20% survives, remaining into adulthood along the bottom of layer 6 and as a scattered population of interstitial neurons in the white matter. Surviving subplate cells’ axons project throughout the overlying laminae, reaching layer 1 and issuing axon collaterals within white matter and in lower layer 6. This suggests that they participate in local synaptic networks, as well. Moreover, they receive excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs, potentially monitoring outputs from axon collaterals of cortical efferents, from cortical afferents and/or from each other. We explore our understanding of the functional connectivity of

  15. Neonatal mouse cortical but not isogenic human astrocyte feeder layers enhance the functional maturation of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischka, Fritz W; Efthymiou, Anastasia; Zhou, Qiong; Nieves, Michael D; McCormack, Nikki M; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Sukumar, Gauthaman; Dalgard, Clifton L; Doughty, Martin L

    2018-04-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived neurons and astrocytes are attractive cellular tools for nervous system disease modeling and drug screening. Optimal utilization of these tools requires differentiation protocols that efficiently generate functional cell phenotypes in vitro. As nervous system function is dependent on networked neuronal activity involving both neuronal and astrocytic synaptic functions, we examined astrocyte effects on the functional maturation of neurons from human iPS cell-derived neural stem cells (NSCs). We first demonstrate human iPS cell-derived NSCs can be rapidly differentiated in culture to either neurons or astrocytes with characteristic cellular, molecular and physiological features. Although differentiated neurons were capable of firing multiple action potentials (APs), few cells developed spontaneous electrical activity in culture. We show spontaneous electrical activity was significantly increased by neuronal differentiation of human NSCs on feeder layers of neonatal mouse cortical astrocytes. In contrast, co-culture on feeder layers of isogenic human iPS cell-derived astrocytes had no positive effect on spontaneous neuronal activity. Spontaneous electrical activity was dependent on glutamate receptor-channel function and occurred without changes in I Na , I K , V m , and AP properties of iPS cell-derived neurons. These data demonstrate co-culture with neonatal mouse cortical astrocytes but not human isogenic iPS cell-derived astrocytes stimulates glutamatergic synaptic transmission between iPS cell-derived neurons in culture. We present RNA-sequencing data for an immature, fetal-like status of our human iPS cell-derived astrocytes as one possible explanation for their failure to enhance synaptic activity in our co-culture system. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. MeCP2 mutation results in compartment-specific reductions in dendritic branching and spine density in layer 5 motor cortical neurons of YFP-H mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Stuss

    Full Text Available Rett Syndrome (RTT is a neurodevelopmental disorder predominantly caused by mutations in the X-linked gene MECP2. A primary feature of the syndrome is the impaired maturation and maintenance of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system (CNS. Different RTT mouse models have shown that particular Mecp2 mutations have highly variable effects on neuronal architecture. Distinguishing MeCP2 mutant cellular phenotypes therefore demands analysis of specific mutations in well-defined neuronal subpopulations. We examined a transgenically labeled subset of cortical neurons in YFP-H mice crossed with the Mecp2(tm1.1Jae mutant line. YFP(+ Layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the motor cortex of wildtype and hemizygous mutant male mice were examined for differences in dendrite morphology and spine density. Total basal dendritic length was decreased by 18.6% due to both shorter dendrites and reduced branching proximal to the soma. Tangential dendrite lengths in the apical tuft were reduced by up to 26.6%. Spine density was reduced by 47.4% in the apical tuft and 54.5% in secondary apical dendrites, but remained unaffected in primary apical and proximal basal dendrites. We also found that MeCP2 mutation reduced the number of YFP(+ cells in YFP-H mice by up to 72% in various cortical regions without affecting the intensity of YFP expression in individual cells. Our results support the view that the effects of MeCP2 mutation are highly context-dependent and cannot be generalized across mutation types and cell populations.

  17. Contributions of Early Versus Later-Generated Cortical Layers to the Development of Laminar Patterns in Ferret Somatosensory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-17

    Sheng, J.G., Mrak, R.E., and Griffin, W.S.T. S100 protein expression in Alzheimer Disease: Potential role in the pathogenesis of neuritic plaques. J...Variance Observations Hypothesized Mean Difference eft tStat P(T<=t) one-tail t Critical one-tail P(T<=t) two-tail t Critical two-tail Layer 4 t-Test: Two...0.869353949 3.182449291 181 Mean Variance Observations Hypothesized Mean Difference eft tStat P(T<=t) one-tail t Critical one-tail P(T<=t) two-tail t

  18. Hydrography, Washburn Countys Hydro Layer was developed in 1997 utilizing 1996 Orthophotos. This layer includes Lake, Rivers, Streams and Ponds within Washburn County., Published in 1997, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Washburn County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Hydrography dataset current as of 1997. Washburn Countys Hydro Layer was developed in 1997 utilizing 1996 Orthophotos. This layer includes Lake, Rivers, Streams and...

  19. Electric Power Plants and Generation Stations, Power Plants - is a seperate layer, however, we have them included in local building layer as well, Published in 2010, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Effingham County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Electric Power Plants and Generation Stations dataset current as of 2010. Power Plants - is a seperate layer, however, we have them included in local building layer...

  20. Can a one-layer optical skin model including melanin and inhomogeneously distributed blood explain spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectra?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Hanna; Pettersson, Anders; Larsson, Marcus; Strömberg, Tomas

    2011-02-01

    Model based analysis of calibrated diffuse reflectance spectroscopy can be used for determining oxygenation and concentration of skin chromophores. This study aimed at assessing the effect of including melanin in addition to hemoglobin (Hb) as chromophores and compensating for inhomogeneously distributed blood (vessel packaging), in a single-layer skin model. Spectra from four humans were collected during different provocations using a twochannel fiber optic probe with source-detector separations 0.4 and 1.2 mm. Absolute calibrated spectra using data from either a single distance or both distances were analyzed using inverse Monte Carlo for light transport and Levenberg-Marquardt for non-linear fitting. The model fitting was excellent using a single distance. However, the estimated model failed to explain spectra from the other distance. The two-distance model did not fit the data well at either distance. Model fitting was significantly improved including melanin and vessel packaging. The most prominent effect when fitting data from the larger separation compared to the smaller separation was a different light scattering decay with wavelength, while the tissue fraction of Hb and saturation were similar. For modeling spectra at both distances, we propose using either a multi-layer skin model or a more advanced model for the scattering phase function.

  1. Radio Transmitters and Tower Locations, Layer includes all towers identified visually and include cellular and other communication towers., Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Noble County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Radio Transmitters and Tower Locations dataset current as of 2008. Layer includes all towers identified visually and include cellular and other communication towers..

  2. [Cortical blindness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokron, S

    2014-02-01

    Cortical blindness refers to a visual loss induced by a bilateral occipital lesion. The very strong cooperation between psychophysics, cognitive psychology, neurophysiology and neuropsychology these latter twenty years as well as recent progress in cerebral imagery have led to a better understanding of neurovisual deficits, such as cortical blindness. It thus becomes possible now to propose an earlier diagnosis of cortical blindness as well as new perspectives for rehabilitation in children as well as in adults. On the other hand, studying complex neurovisual deficits, such as cortical blindness is a way to infer normal functioning of the visual system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Lithospheric layering in the North American craton revealed by including Short Period Constraints in Full Waveform Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, C.; Calo, M.; Bodin, T.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    Recent receiver function studies of the North American craton suggest the presence of significant layering within the cratonic lithosphere, with significant lateral variations in the depth of the velocity discontinuities. These structural boundaries have been confirmed recently using a transdimensional Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach (TMCMC), inverting surface wave dispersion data and converted phases simultaneously (Calò et al., 2016; Roy and Romanowicz 2017). The lateral resolution of upper mantle structure can be improved with a high density of broadband seismic stations, or with a sparse network using full waveform inversion based on numerical wavefield computation methods such as the Spectral Element Method (SEM). However, inverting for discontinuities with strong topography such as MLDS's or LAB, presents challenges in an inversion framework, both computationally, due to the short periods required, and from the point of view of stability of the inversion. To overcome these limitations, and to improve resolution of layering in the upper mantle, we are developing a methodology that combines full waveform inversion tomography and information provided by short period seismic observables. We have extended the 30 1D radially anisotropic shear velocity profiles of Calò et al. 2016 to several other stations, for which we used a recent shear velocity model (Clouzet et al., 2017) as constraint in the modeling. These 1D profiles, including both isotropic and anisotropic discontinuities in the upper mantle (above 300 km depth) are then used to build a 3D starting model for the full waveform tomographic inversion. This model is built after 1) homogenization of the layered 1D models and 2) interpolation between the 1D smooth profiles and the model of Clouzet et al. 2017, resulting in a smooth 3D starting model. Waveforms used in the inversion are filtered at periods longer than 30s. We use the SEM code "RegSEM" for forward computations and a quasi-Newton inversion

  4. Synaptic Conductance Estimates of the Connection Between Local Inhibitor Interneurons and Pyramidal Neurons in Layer 2/3 of a Cortical Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Jochen H.O.; Meyer, H. S.; Schmitt, Arno C.; Straehle, Jakob; Weitbrecht, Trinh; Sakmann, Bert; Helmstaedter, Moritz

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of a principal whisker yields sparse action potential (AP) spiking in layer 2/3 (L2/3) pyramidal neurons in a cortical column of rat barrel cortex. The low AP rates in pyramidal neurons could be explained by activation of interneurons in L2/3 providing inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. L2/3 interneurons classified as local inhibitors based on their axonal projection in the same column were reported to receive strong excitatory input from spiny neurons in L4, which are also the main source of the excitatory input to L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Here, we investigated the remaining synaptic connection in this intracolumnar microcircuit. We found strong and reliable inhibitory synaptic transmission between intracolumnar L2/3 local-inhibitor-to-L2/3 pyramidal neuron pairs [inhibitory postsynaptic potential (IPSP) amplitude −0.88 ± 0.67 mV]. On average, 6.2 ± 2 synaptic contacts were made by L2/3 local inhibitors onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons at 107 ± 64 µm path distance from the pyramidal neuron soma, thus overlapping with the distribution of synaptic contacts from L4 spiny neurons onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons (67 ± 34 µm). Finally, using compartmental simulations, we determined the synaptic conductance per synaptic contact to be 0.77 ± 0.4 nS. We conclude that the synaptic circuit from L4 to L2/3 can provide efficient shunting inhibition that is temporally and spatially aligned with the excitatory input from L4 to L2/3. PMID:25761638

  5. A fast vibro-acoustic response analysis method for double wall structures including a viscothermal air layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Grooteman, F.P.

    2000-01-01

    The damping behaviour of a thin air layer between two flexible panels can be used to reduce sound radiation of structural excited panels. The numerical model of the double wall panels takes into account full acousto-elastic interaction and viscothermal wave propagation in the air layer. This means

  6. Separating semiconductor devices from substrate by etching graded composition release layer disposed between semiconductor devices and substrate including forming protuberances that reduce stiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Nielson, Gregory N; Cederberg, Jeffrey G; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis

    2015-05-12

    A method includes etching a release layer that is coupled between a plurality of semiconductor devices and a substrate with an etch. The etching includes etching the release layer between the semiconductor devices and the substrate until the semiconductor devices are at least substantially released from the substrate. The etching also includes etching a protuberance in the release layer between each of the semiconductor devices and the substrate. The etch is stopped while the protuberances remain between each of the semiconductor devices and the substrate. The method also includes separating the semiconductor devices from the substrate. Other methods and apparatus are also disclosed.

  7. Cortical Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, James A; Wilson, Stuart P

    2016-12-01

    In this article, we review functional organization in sensory cortical regions-how the cortex represents the world. We consider four interrelated aspects of cortical organization: (1) the set of receptive fields of individual cortical sensory neurons, (2) how lateral interaction between cortical neurons reflects the similarity of their receptive fields, (3) the spatial distribution of receptive-field properties across the horizontal extent of the cortical tissue, and (4) how the spatial distributions of different receptive-field properties interact with one another. We show how these data are generally well explained by the theory of input-driven self-organization, with a family of computational models of cortical maps offering a parsimonious account for a wide range of map-related phenomena. We then discuss important challenges to this explanation, with respect to the maps present at birth, maps present under activity blockade, the limits of adult plasticity, and the lack of some maps in rodents. Because there is not at present another credible general theory for cortical map development, we conclude by proposing key experiments to help uncover other mechanisms that might also be operating during map development. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Influence of interface-included disorder on classical quantum conductivity of CdTe:In epitaxial layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusakowski, J.; Karpierz, K.; Grynberg, M.; Karczewski, G.; Wojtowicz, T.; Contreras, S.; Callen, O.

    1997-01-01

    An influence of disorder originated from the substrate/layer interface on electrical properties of CdTe:In layers was investigated by means of the Hall effect and magnetoresistance measurements at low temperatures. An estimation of a scattering rate due to interface induced disorder is given. Characteristic features of a magnetic field dependence of magnetoresistance are explained by an influence of quantum interference of scattered electron waves both in the hopping and the free electron conductivity regimes. (author)

  9. Calculation of the flow field including boundary layer effects for supersonic mixed compression inlets at angles of attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadyak, J.; Hoffman, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    The flow field in supersonic mixed compression aircraft inlets at angle of attack is calculated. A zonal modeling technique is employed to obtain the solution which divides the flow field into different computational regions. The computational regions consist of a supersonic core flow, boundary layer flows adjacent to both the forebody/centerbody and cowl contours, and flow in the shock wave boundary layer interaction regions. The zonal modeling analysis is described and some computational results are presented. The governing equations for the supersonic core flow form a hyperbolic system of partial differential equations. The equations for the characteristic surfaces and the compatibility equations applicable along these surfaces are derived. The characteristic surfaces are the stream surfaces, which are surfaces composed of streamlines, and the wave surfaces, which are surfaces tangent to a Mach conoid. The compatibility equations are expressed as directional derivatives along streamlines and bicharacteristics, which are the lines of tangency between a wave surface and a Mach conoid.

  10. Specific pattern of maturation and differentiation in the formation of cortical tubers in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) : Evidence from layer-specific marker expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mühlebner, Angelika; Iyer, Anand M.; Van Scheppingen, Jackelien; Anink, Jasper J.; Jansen, Floor E.; Veersema, Tim J.; Braun, Kees P.; Spliet, Wim G M; Van Hecke, Wim; Söylemezoǧlu, Figen; Feucht, Martha; Krsek, Pavel; Zamecnik, Josef; Bien, Christian G.; Polster, Tilman; Coras, Roland; Blümcke, Ingmar; Aronica, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multisystem disorder that results from mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 genes, leading to constitutive activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Cortical tubers represent typical lesions of the central nervous system

  11. Direct Current Coupled Recordings of Cortical Spreading Depression Using Silicone Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azat Nasretdinov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiological assessment of infraslow (<0.1 Hz brain activities such as cortical spreading depression (SD, which occurs in a number of pathologies including migraine, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury (TBI and brain ischemia requires direct current (DC coupled recordings of local field potentials (LFPs. Here, we describe how DC-coupled recordings can be performed using high-density iridium electrode arrays (silicone probes. We found that the DC voltage offset of the silicone probe is large and often exceeds the amplifier input range. Introduction of an offset compensation chain at the signal ground efficiently minimized the DC offsets. Silicone probe DC-coupled recordings across layers of the rat visual and barrel cortices revealed that epipial application of KCl, dura incision or pinprick TBI induced SD which preferentially propagated through the supragranular layers and further spread to the granular and infragranular layers attaining maximal amplitudes of ~−30 mV in the infragranular layers. SD at the superficial cortical layers was nearly two-fold longer than at the deep cortical layers. Continuous epipial KCl evoked multiple recurrent SDs which always started in the supragranular layers but often failed to propagate through the deeper cortical layers. Intracortical KCl injection into the infragranular layers evoked SD which also started in the supragranular layers and spread to the granular and infragranular layers, further indicating that the supragranular layers are particularly prone to SD. Thus, DC-coupled recordings with silicone probes after offset compensation can be successfully used to explore the spatial—temporal dynamics of SD and other slow brain activities.

  12. Enhancement of Faraday effect in one-dimensional magneto-optical photonic crystal including a magnetic layer with wavelength dependent off-diagonal elements of dielectric constant tensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inui, Chie; Ozaki, Shinsuke; Kura, Hiroaki; Sato, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    Optical and magneto-optical properties of one-dimensional magneto-optical photonic crystal (1-D MPC) prepared by the sol-gel dip-coating method, including a magnetic defect layer composed of mixture of CoFe 2 O 4 and SiO 2 , are investigated from both the experimental and theoretical standpoints. The resonant transmission of light was observed around 570 nm in the photonic band gap. The Faraday rotation angle θ F showed two maxima at 490 and 640 nm, and the wavelength dependence of θ F above 760 nm was similar to that of the CoFe 2 O 4 +SiO 2 single-layer film. The two maxima of θ F are attributed to the enhanced Faraday rotation of nonmagnetic TiO 2 layers in the cavity structure and that in magnetic CoFe 2 O 4 +SiO 2 layer through the light localization in MPC. The maximum value of θ F due to the magnetic CoFe 2 O 4 +SiO 2 layer in the MPC was 22-times larger than that in the single-layer film. The simulation study of MPC with CoFe 2 O 4 +SiO 2 magnetic defect layer, based on the matrix approach method, showed that the resonant light transmission was accompanied by the localization of electric field, and large enhancement of θ F appeared at different wavelengths so as to agree with the experimental features. This can be explained in terms of the wavelength dependent off-diagonal components of the dielectric constant tensor in addition to the large extinction coefficient in the CoFe 2 O 4 +SiO 2 magnetic defect layer. - Highlights: → 1-D magnetic photonic crystal (MPC) prepared by sol-gel method. → Enhancement of Faraday rotation due to the magnetic defect layer of CoFe 2 O 4 . → Shift of wavelength of Faraday rotation maximum from resonant light transmission.

  13. Cortical Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Cortical Visual Impairment En Español Read in Chinese What is cortical visual impairment? Cortical visual impairment (CVI) is a decreased ...

  14. Repair of Neocortex in a Model of Cortical Dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-27

    postnatally. MAM treatment on E24 leads to disorganized cortical laminae, abnormal radial morphology, precocious differentiation of radial glia, and dispersal...of Cajal Retzius cells. MAM treatment on E33 leads to less severe effects including diminished layer 4, widespread termination of thalamocortical...as dyslexia , intractable epilepsy, and schizophrenia which has been linked to abnormal reelin expression (Grayson et al., 2005; Brigman et al., 2006

  15. Discrimination of cortical laminae using MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troebinger, Luzia; López, José David; Lutti, Antoine; Bestmann, Sven; Barnes, Gareth

    2014-11-15

    Typically MEG source reconstruction is used to estimate the distribution of current flow on a single anatomically derived cortical surface model. In this study we use two such models representing superficial and deep cortical laminae. We establish how well we can discriminate between these two different cortical layer models based on the same MEG data in the presence of different levels of co-registration noise, Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and cortical patch size. We demonstrate that it is possible to make a distinction between superficial and deep cortical laminae for levels of co-registration noise of less than 2mm translation and 2° rotation at SNR > 11 dB. We also show that an incorrect estimate of cortical patch size will tend to bias layer estimates. We then use a 3D printed head-cast (Troebinger et al., 2014) to achieve comparable levels of co-registration noise, in an auditory evoked response paradigm, and show that it is possible to discriminate between these cortical layer models in real data. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cortical visual impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Koželj, Urša

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we discuss cortical visual impairment, diagnosis that is in the developed world in first place, since 20 percent of children with blindness or low vision are diagnosed with it. The objectives of the thesis are to define cortical visual impairment and the definition of characters suggestive of the cortical visual impairment as well as to search for causes that affect the growing diagnosis of cortical visual impairment. There are a lot of signs of cortical visual impairment. ...

  17. Contextual control of audiovisual integration in low-level sensory cortices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Atteveldt, N.; Peterson, Bradley S; Schroeder, Charles E

    Potential sources of multisensory influences on low-level sensory cortices include direct projections from sensory cortices of different modalities, as well as more indirect feedback inputs from higher order multisensory cortical regions. These multiple architectures may be functionally

  18. Contextual control of audiovisual integration in low-level sensory cortices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Atteveldt, Nienke M; Peterson, Bradley S; Schroeder, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    Potential sources of multisensory influences on low-level sensory cortices include direct projections from sensory cortices of different modalities, as well as more indirect feedback inputs from higher order multisensory cortical regions. These multiple architectures may be functionally

  19. Characterization of the Embryogenic Tissue of the Norway Spruce Including a Transition Layer between the Tissue and the Culture Medium by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kořínek, R.; Mikulka, J.; Hřib, J.; Hudec, J.; Havel, L.; Bartušek, K.

    2017-02-01

    The paper describes the visualization of the cells (ESEs) and mucilage (ECMSN) in an embryogenic tissue via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) relaxometry measurement combined with the subsequent multi-parametric segmentation. The computed relaxometry maps T1 and T2 show a thin layer (transition layer) between the culture medium and the embryogenic tissue. The ESEs, mucilage, and transition layer differ in their relaxation times T1 and T2; thus, these times can be used to characterize the individual parts within the embryogenic tissue. The observed mean values of the relaxation times T1 and T2 of the ESEs, mucilage, and transition layer are as follows: 1469 ± 324 and 53 ± 10 ms, 1784 ± 124 and 74 ± 8 ms, 929 ± 164 and 32 ± 4.7 ms, respectively. The multi-parametric segmentation exploiting the T1 and T2 relaxation times as a classifier shows the distribution of the ESEs and mucilage within the embryogenic tissue. The discussed T1 and T2 indicators can be utilized to characterize both the growth-related changes in an embryogenic tissue and the effect of biotic/abiotic stresses, thus potentially becoming a distinctive indicator of the state of any examined embryogenic tissue.

  20. Development of symmetric composition-gradient materials including hard particles in its surface layer; Hyosobu ni koshitsu ryushi wo fukumu taishogata sosei keisha zairyo no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Development of new materials with both thermal resistance and thermal shock resistance was studied on the basis of symmetric ceramics/metal/ceramics gradient composition. Al2O3/TiC/Ni/TiC/Al2O3 was used as material model of basic composition, and the system was selected where WC-Co system alloy hard particles were dispersed into the Al2O3 ceramic surface layer. The layered material was sintered in N2 gas atmosphere by SHS/HIP method using exothermic caused by nitriding reaction. Since cracks were generated in some specimens of 5-layer structure, improved specimens of 7-layer structure were prepared. To examine the effect of a particle size on toughness, WC-Co system alloy specimens with different particle sizes were also prepared. As a result, no cracks were found, and residual stress and fracture toughness were affected by particle size. In addition, the following were studied: technique of mass production, observation of fine structures, analysis of thermal stress, thermal shock resistance, and friction and abrasion characteristics. 13 refs., 65 figs., 15 tabs.

  1. Fire Hydrants, Fire hydrants outside the City of Wichita. Primary attributes include hydrant number and ID. Layer is under development by Sedgwick County Fire Department. Primary attributes include GPS status, feature-mapped-to, hydrants ID, address, situs city, mai, Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Fire Hydrants dataset current as of 2008. Fire hydrants outside the City of Wichita. Primary attributes include hydrant number and ID. Layer is under development by...

  2. Layer- and Cell Type-Specific Modulation of Excitatory Neuronal Activity in the Neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Radnikow

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available From an anatomical point of view the neocortex is subdivided into up to six layers depending on the cortical area. This subdivision has been described already by Meynert and Brodmann in the late 19/early 20. century and is mainly based on cytoarchitectonic features such as the size and location of the pyramidal cell bodies. Hence, cortical lamination is originally an anatomical concept based on the distribution of excitatory neuron. However, it has become apparent in recent years that apart from the layer-specific differences in morphological features, many functional properties of neurons are also dependent on cortical layer or cell type. Such functional differences include changes in neuronal excitability and synaptic activity by neuromodulatory transmitters. Many of these neuromodulators are released from axonal afferents from subcortical brain regions while others are released intrinsically. In this review we aim to describe layer- and cell-type specific differences in the effects of neuromodulator receptors in excitatory neurons in layers 2–6 of different cortical areas. We will focus on the neuromodulator systems using adenosine, acetylcholine, dopamine, and orexin/hypocretin as examples because these neuromodulator systems show important differences in receptor type and distribution, mode of release and functional mechanisms and effects. We try to summarize how layer- and cell type-specific neuromodulation may affect synaptic signaling in cortical microcircuits.

  3. Modeling the effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation on cortical circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Steve K; Hill, Sean L; Tononi, Giulio

    2005-07-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is commonly used to activate or inactivate specific cortical areas in a noninvasive manner. Because of technical constraints, the precise effects of TMS on cortical circuits are difficult to assess experimentally. Here, this issue is investigated by constructing a detailed model of a portion of the thalamocortical system and examining the effects of the simulated delivery of a TMS pulse. The model, which incorporates a large number of physiological and anatomical constraints, includes 33,000 spiking neurons arranged in a 3-layered motor cortex and over 5 million intra- and interlayer synaptic connections. The model was validated by reproducing several results from the experimental literature. These include the frequency, timing, dose response, and pharmacological modulation of epidurally recorded responses to TMS (the so-called I-waves), as well as paired-pulse response curves consistent with data from several experimental studies. The modeled responses to simulated TMS pulses in different experimental paradigms provide a detailed, self-consistent account of the neural and synaptic activities evoked by TMS within prototypical cortical circuits.

  4. Characterization of the Embryogenic Tissue of the Norway Spruce Including a Transition Layer between the Tissue and the Culture Medium by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kořínek, Radim; Mikulka, J.; Hřib, J.; Hudec, Jiří; Havel, L.; Bartušek, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2017), s. 19-26 ISSN 1335-8871 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22777S; GA ČR GA13-09086S; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Norway spruce * ESEs * mucilage * transition layer * MRI relaxometry Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.344, year: 2016

  5. Are the Symptoms of Parkinsonism Cortical in Origin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon W. Arbuthnott

    Full Text Available We present three reasons to suspect that the major deleterious consequence of dopamine loss from the striatum is a cortical malfunction. We suggest that it is cortex, rather than striatum, that should be considered as the source of the debilitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD since: 1. Cortical synapses onto striatal dendritic spines are lost in PD. 2. All known treatments of the symptoms of PD disrupt beta oscillations. Oscillations that are also disrupted following antidromic activation of cortical neurons. 3. The final output of basal ganglia directly modulates thalamic connections to layer I of frontal cortical areas, regions intimately associated with motor behaviour.These three reasons combined with evidence that the current summary diagram of the basal ganglia involvement in PD is imprecise at best, suggest that a re-orientation of the treatment strategies towards cortical, rather than striatal malfunction, is overdue. Keywords: Parkinson's disease, Deep brain stimulation, Layer I, Motor cortex

  6. Wireless cortical implantable systems

    CERN Document Server

    Majidzadeh Bafar, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Cortical Implantable Systems examines the design for data acquisition and transmission in cortical implants. The first part of the book covers existing system-level cortical implants, as well as future devices. The authors discuss the major constraints in terms of microelectronic integration. The second part of the book focuses on system-level as well as circuit and system level solutions to the development of ultra low-power and low-noise microelectronics for cortical implants. Existing solutions are presented and novel methods and solutions proposed. The third part of the book focuses on the usage of digital impulse radio ultra wide-band transmission as an efficient method to transmit cortically neural recorded data at high data-rate to the outside world. Original architectural and circuit and system solutions are discussed.

  7. Role of Cortical Cell Type and Morphology in Sub- and Suprathreshold Uniform Electric Field Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radman, Thomas; Ramos, Raddy L; Brumberg, Joshua C; Bikson, Marom

    2009-01-01

    Background The neocortex is the most common target of sub-dural electrotherapy and non-invasive brain stimulation modalities including transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial current simulation (TCS). Specific neuronal elements targeted by cortical stimulation are considered to underlie therapeutic effects, but the exact cell-type(s) affected by these methods remains poorly understood. Objective We determined if neuronal morphology or cell type predicted responses to sub- and suprathreshold uniform electric fields. Methods We characterized the effects of sub- and supra-threshold electrical stimulation on identified cortical neurons in vitro. Uniform electric fields were applied to rat motor cortex brain slices, while recording from interneurons and pyramidal cells across cortical layers, using whole cell patch clamp. Neuron morphology was reconstructed following intracellular dialysis of biocytin. Based solely on volume-weighted morphology, we developed a parsimonious model of neuronal soma polarization by sub-threshold electric fields. Results We found that neuronal morphology correlated with somatic sub-threshold polarization. Based on neuronal morphology, we predict layer V pyramidal neuronal soma to be the most sensitive to polarization by optimally oriented sub-threshold fields. Supra-threshold electric field action potential threshold was shown to reflect both direct cell polarization and synaptic (network) activation. Layer V/VI neuron absolute electric field action potential thresholds were lower than Layer II/III pyramidal neurons and interneurons. Compared to somatic current injection, electric fields promoted burst firing and modulated action potential firing times. PMID:20161507

  8. Dense neuron clustering explains connectivity statistics in cortical microcircuits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V Klinshov

    Full Text Available Local cortical circuits appear highly non-random, but the underlying connectivity rule remains elusive. Here, we analyze experimental data observed in layer 5 of rat neocortex and suggest a model for connectivity from which emerge essential observed non-random features of both wiring and weighting. These features include lognormal distributions of synaptic connection strength, anatomical clustering, and strong correlations between clustering and connection strength. Our model predicts that cortical microcircuits contain large groups of densely connected neurons which we call clusters. We show that such a cluster contains about one fifth of all excitatory neurons of a circuit which are very densely connected with stronger than average synapses. We demonstrate that such clustering plays an important role in the network dynamics, namely, it creates bistable neural spiking in small cortical circuits. Furthermore, introducing local clustering in large-scale networks leads to the emergence of various patterns of persistent local activity in an ongoing network activity. Thus, our results may bridge a gap between anatomical structure and persistent activity observed during working memory and other cognitive processes.

  9. Visual Information Present in Infragranular Layers of Mouse Auditory Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Ryan J; Hasenstaub, Andrea R

    2018-03-14

    The cerebral cortex is a major hub for the convergence and integration of signals from across the sensory modalities; sensory cortices, including primary regions, are no exception. Here we show that visual stimuli influence neural firing in the auditory cortex of awake male and female mice, using multisite probes to sample single units across multiple cortical layers. We demonstrate that visual stimuli influence firing in both primary and secondary auditory cortex. We then determine the laminar location of recording sites through electrode track tracing with fluorescent dye and optogenetic identification using layer-specific markers. Spiking responses to visual stimulation occur deep in auditory cortex and are particularly prominent in layer 6. Visual modulation of firing rate occurs more frequently at areas with secondary-like auditory responses than those with primary-like responses. Auditory cortical responses to drifting visual gratings are not orientation-tuned, unlike visual cortex responses. The deepest cortical layers thus appear to be an important locus for cross-modal integration in auditory cortex. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The deepest layers of the auditory cortex are often considered its most enigmatic, possessing a wide range of cell morphologies and atypical sensory responses. Here we show that, in mouse auditory cortex, these layers represent a locus of cross-modal convergence, containing many units responsive to visual stimuli. Our results suggest that this visual signal conveys the presence and timing of a stimulus rather than specifics about that stimulus, such as its orientation. These results shed light on both how and what types of cross-modal information is integrated at the earliest stages of sensory cortical processing. Copyright © 2018 the authors 0270-6474/18/382854-09$15.00/0.

  10. Decreased cortical thickness in central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macey, Paul M; Moiyadi, Ammar S; Kumar, Rajesh; Woo, Mary A; Harper, Ronald M

    2012-08-01

    Central hypoventilation syndrome (CHS) is a rare condition characterized by hypoventilation during sleep, reduced ventilatory responsiveness to CO(2) and O(2), impaired perception of air hunger, and autonomic abnormalities. Neural impairments accompany the condition, including structural injury, impaired cerebral autoregulation, and dysfunctional autonomic control. The hypoventilation may induce cortical hypoxic injury, additional to consequences of maldevelopment from PHOX2B mutations present in most CHS subjects. We assessed cortical injury in clinically diagnosed CHS using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans, collected from 14 CHS (mean age ± standard deviation [SD] 17.7 ± 5.0 years; 6 female) and 29 control (mean age ± SD, 17.9 ± 4.3 years; 12 female) subjects. We measured group differences in mean cortical thickness and age-thickness correlations using FreeSurfer software, accounting for age and sex (0.1 false discovery rate). Reduced thickness in CHS appeared in the dorsomedial frontal cortex and anterior cingulate; medial prefrontal, parietal, and posterior cingulate cortices; the insular cortex; anterior and lateral temporal lobes; and mid- and accessory motor strips. Normal age-related cortical thinning in multiple regions did not appear in CHS. The cortical thinning may contribute to CHS cardiovascular and memory deficits and may impair affect and perception of breathlessness. Extensive axonal injury in CHS is paralleled by reduced cortical tissue and absence of normal developmental patterns.

  11. Plasticity-Driven Self-Organization under Topological Constraints Accounts for Non-random Features of Cortical Synaptic Wiring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Daniel; Triesch, Jochen

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the structure and dynamics of cortical connectivity is vital to understanding cortical function. Experimental data strongly suggest that local recurrent connectivity in the cortex is significantly non-random, exhibiting, for example, above-chance bidirectionality and an overrepresentation of certain triangular motifs. Additional evidence suggests a significant distance dependency to connectivity over a local scale of a few hundred microns, and particular patterns of synaptic turnover dynamics, including a heavy-tailed distribution of synaptic efficacies, a power law distribution of synaptic lifetimes, and a tendency for stronger synapses to be more stable over time. Understanding how many of these non-random features simultaneously arise would provide valuable insights into the development and function of the cortex. While previous work has modeled some of the individual features of local cortical wiring, there is no model that begins to comprehensively account for all of them. We present a spiking network model of a rodent Layer 5 cortical slice which, via the interactions of a few simple biologically motivated intrinsic, synaptic, and structural plasticity mechanisms, qualitatively reproduces these non-random effects when combined with simple topological constraints. Our model suggests that mechanisms of self-organization arising from a small number of plasticity rules provide a parsimonious explanation for numerous experimentally observed non-random features of recurrent cortical wiring. Interestingly, similar mechanisms have been shown to endow recurrent networks with powerful learning abilities, suggesting that these mechanism are central to understanding both structure and function of cortical synaptic wiring.

  12. Business and Commerce, We maintain a "Common Place" point layer which includes business names and locations across the county. This data layer is tied to our address points., Published in 2013, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Brown County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Business and Commerce dataset current as of 2013. We maintain a "Common Place" point layer which includes business names and locations across the county. This data...

  13. The Computational Properties of a Simplified Cortical Column Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Nicholas; Iyer, Ramakrishnan; Koch, Christof; Mihalas, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    The mammalian neocortex has a repetitious, laminar structure and performs functions integral to higher cognitive processes, including sensory perception, memory, and coordinated motor output. What computations does this circuitry subserve that link these unique structural elements to their function? Potjans and Diesmann (2014) parameterized a four-layer, two cell type (i.e. excitatory and inhibitory) model of a cortical column with homogeneous populations and cell type dependent connection probabilities. We implement a version of their model using a displacement integro-partial differential equation (DiPDE) population density model. This approach, exact in the limit of large homogeneous populations, provides a fast numerical method to solve equations describing the full probability density distribution of neuronal membrane potentials. It lends itself to quickly analyzing the mean response properties of population-scale firing rate dynamics. We use this strategy to examine the input-output relationship of the Potjans and Diesmann cortical column model to understand its computational properties. When inputs are constrained to jointly and equally target excitatory and inhibitory neurons, we find a large linear regime where the effect of a multi-layer input signal can be reduced to a linear combination of component signals. One of these, a simple subtractive operation, can act as an error signal passed between hierarchical processing stages.

  14. Cortical high-density counterstream architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, Nikola T; Ercsey-Ravasz, Mária; Van Essen, David C; Knoblauch, Kenneth; Toroczkai, Zoltán; Kennedy, Henry

    2013-11-01

    Small-world networks provide an appealing description of cortical architecture owing to their capacity for integration and segregation combined with an economy of connectivity. Previous reports of low-density interareal graphs and apparent small-world properties are challenged by data that reveal high-density cortical graphs in which economy of connections is achieved by weight heterogeneity and distance-weight correlations. These properties define a model that predicts many binary and weighted features of the cortical network including a core-periphery, a typical feature of self-organizing information processing systems. Feedback and feedforward pathways between areas exhibit a dual counterstream organization, and their integration into local circuits constrains cortical computation. Here, we propose a bow-tie representation of interareal architecture derived from the hierarchical laminar weights of pathways between the high-efficiency dense core and periphery.

  15. Effect of convection on the thermal structure of the troposphere and lower stratosphere including the tropical tropopause layer in the South Asian monsoon region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhsin, M.; Sunilkumar, S. V.; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Parameswaran, K.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.; Emmanuel, Maria

    2018-04-01

    Influence of convection on the thermal structure of Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere (TLS) is investigated using radiosonde data, obtained from Trivandrum (8.5°N, 76.9°E), Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E), Bhubaneswar (20.25°N, 85.83°E), Kolkata (22.65°N, 88.45°E) and Singapore (1.37°N, 103.98°E), collected during different convective categories classified based on the altitude of deep convective cloud tops (CT) in the period 2008-2014. During deep convective events, the temperature showed lower tropospheric cooling, an upper tropospheric warming and an anomalous cooling (warming) below (above) the cold point tropopause (CPT) with respect to the clear-sky value. While warming in the upper troposphere is strongest (∼2-4 K) around 10-12 km, anomalous cooling (warming) below (above) the CPT is maximum around 15.5 km (17.5 km) with values in the range of-2 to -4 K (3-6 K). These temperature perturbations are observed 5-6 days prior to the convective events. In response to deep convection, surface cooling up to ∼ -4 K is also observed. This study showed that the magnitude of cold and warm anomalies increases with strength of convection. During deep convection, the potential temperature (θ) shows a decrease (<5 K) in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) from the TTL-base up to CPT compared to that on clear-sky days, confirming the vertical mixing of convective air from the lower atmosphere to the TTL-levels. Correlation analysis between different TTL parameters suggests that, as the cloud top altitude increases, along with the adiabatic process, diabatic process also plays a major role in the TTL. An interesting feature observed during deep convection is the ascent of TTL-base by ∼1.5 km and descent of CPT and TTL-top by 0.5 km, which effectively thins the TTL by ∼2 km.

  16. Local-circuit phenotypes of layer 5 neurons in motor-frontal cortex of YFP-H mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianing Yu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Layer 5 pyramidal neurons comprise an important but heterogeneous group of cortical projection neurons. In motor-frontal cortex, these neurons are centrally involved in the cortical control of movement. Recent studies indicate that local excitatory networks in mouse motor-frontal cortex are dominated by descending pathways from layer 2/3 to 5. However, those pathways were identified in experiments involving unlabeled neurons in wild type mice. Here, to explore the possibility of class-specific connectivity in this descending pathway, we mapped the local sources of excitatory synaptic input to a genetically labeled population of cortical neurons: YFP-positive layer 5 neurons of YFP-H mice. We found, first, that in motor cortex, YFP-positive neurons were distributed in a double blade, consistent with the idea of layer 5B having greater thickness in frontal neocortex. Second, whereas unlabeled neurons in upper layer 5 received their strongest inputs from layer 2, YFP-positive neurons in the upper blade received prominent layer 3 inputs. Third, YFP-positive neurons exhibited distinct electrophysiological properties, including low spike frequency adaptation, as reported previously. Our results with this genetically labeled neuronal population indicate the presence of distinct local-circuit phenotypes among layer 5 pyramidal neurons in mouse motor-frontal cortex, and present a paradigm for investigating local circuit organization in other genetically labeled populations of cortical neurons.

  17. State-dependent intrinsic predictability of cortical network dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Fakhraei

    Full Text Available The information encoded in cortical circuit dynamics is fleeting, changing from moment to moment as new input arrives and ongoing intracortical interactions progress. A combination of deterministic and stochastic biophysical mechanisms governs how cortical dynamics at one moment evolve from cortical dynamics in recently preceding moments. Such temporal continuity of cortical dynamics is fundamental to many aspects of cortex function but is not well understood. Here we study temporal continuity by attempting to predict cortical population dynamics (multisite local field potential based on its own recent history in somatosensory cortex of anesthetized rats and in a computational network-level model. We found that the intrinsic predictability of cortical dynamics was dependent on multiple factors including cortical state, synaptic inhibition, and how far into the future the prediction extends. By pharmacologically tuning synaptic inhibition, we obtained a continuum of cortical states with asynchronous population activity at one extreme and stronger, spatially extended synchrony at the other extreme. Intermediate between these extremes we observed evidence for a special regime of population dynamics called criticality. Predictability of the near future (10-100 ms increased as the cortical state was tuned from asynchronous to synchronous. Predictability of the more distant future (>1 s was generally poor, but, surprisingly, was higher for asynchronous states compared to synchronous states. These experimental results were confirmed in a computational network model of spiking excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Our findings demonstrate that determinism and predictability of network dynamics depend on cortical state and the time-scale of the dynamics.

  18. The retrosplenial cortex: A memory gateway between the cortical default mode network and the medial temporal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaboodvand, Neda; Bäckman, Lars; Nyberg, Lars; Salami, Alireza

    2018-01-23

    The default mode network (DMN) involves interacting cortical areas, including the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and the retrosplenial cortex (RSC), and subcortical areas, including the medial temporal lobe (MTL). The degree of functional connectivity (FC) within the DMN, particularly between MTL and medial-parietal subsystems, relates to episodic memory (EM) processes. However, past resting-state studies investigating the link between posterior DMN-MTL FC and EM performance yielded inconsistent results, possibly reflecting heterogeneity in the degree of connectivity between MTL and specific cortical DMN regions. Animal work suggests that RSC has structural connections to both cortical DMN regions and MTL, and may thus serve as an intermediate layer that facilitates information transfer between cortical and subcortical DMNs. We studied 180 healthy old adults (aged 64-68 years), who underwent comprehensive assessment of EM, along with resting-state fMRI. We found greater FC between MTL and RSC than between MTL and the other cortical DMN regions (e.g., PCC), with the only significant association with EM observed for MTL-RSC FC. Mediational analysis showed that MTL-cortical DMN connectivity increased with RSC as a mediator. Further analysis using a graph-theoretical approach on DMN nodes revealed the highest betweenness centrality for RSC, confirming that a high proportion of short paths among DMN regions pass through RSC. Importantly, the degree of RSC mediation was associated with EM performance, suggesting that individuals with greater mediation have an EM advantage. These findings suggest that RSC forms a critical gateway between MTL and cortical DMN to support EM in older adults. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Cortical myoclonus and cerebellar pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, MAJ; Thom, M; Ellison, DW; Wilkins, P; Barnes, D; Thompson, PD; Brown, P

    2000-01-01

    Objective To study the electrophysiologic and pathologic findings in three patients with cortical myoclonus. In two patients the myoclonic ataxic syndrome was associated with proven celiac disease. Background: The pathologic findings in conditions associated with cortical myoclonus commonly involve

  20. Cortical myoclonus and cerebellar pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, M. A.; Thom, M.; Ellison, D. W.; Wilkins, P.; Barnes, D.; Thompson, P. D.; Brown, P.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the electrophysiologic and pathologic findings in three patients with cortical myoclonus. In two patients the myoclonic ataxic syndrome was associated with proven celiac disease. BACKGROUND: The pathologic findings in conditions associated with cortical myoclonus commonly involve

  1. Cortical maturation and myelination in healthy toddlers and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoni, Sean C L; Dean, Douglas C; Remer, Justin; Dirks, Holly; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan

    2015-07-15

    The maturation of cortical structures, and the establishment of their connectivity, are critical neurodevelopmental processes that support and enable cognitive and behavioral functioning. Measures of cortical development, including thickness, curvature, and gyrification have been extensively studied in older children, adolescents, and adults, revealing regional associations with cognitive performance, and alterations with disease or pathology. In addition to these gross morphometric measures, increased attention has recently focused on quantifying more specific indices of cortical structure, in particular intracortical myelination, and their relationship to cognitive skills, including IQ, executive functioning, and language performance. Here we analyze the progression of cortical myelination across early childhood, from 1 to 6 years of age, in vivo for the first time. Using two quantitative imaging techniques, namely T1 relaxation time and myelin water fraction (MWF) imaging, we characterize myelination throughout the cortex, examine developmental trends, and investigate hemispheric and gender-based differences. We present a pattern of cortical myelination that broadly mirrors established histological timelines, with somatosensory, motor and visual cortices myelinating by 1 year of age; and frontal and temporal cortices exhibiting more protracted myelination. Developmental trajectories, defined by logarithmic functions (increasing for MWF, decreasing for T1), were characterized for each of 68 cortical regions. Comparisons of trajectories between hemispheres and gender revealed no significant differences. Results illustrate the ability to quantitatively map cortical myelination throughout early neurodevelopment, and may provide an important new tool for investigating typical and atypical development. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Frontal cortical control of posterior sensory and association cortices through the claustrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael G; Mathur, Brian N

    2018-04-06

    The claustrum is a telencephalic gray matter nucleus that is richly interconnected with the neocortex. This structure subserves top-down executive functions that require frontal cortical control of posterior cortical regions. However, functional anatomical support for the claustrum allowing for long-range intercortical communication is lacking. To test this, we performed a channelrhodopsin-assisted long-circuit mapping strategy in mouse brain slices. We find that anterior cingulate cortex input to the claustrum is transiently amplified by claustrum neurons that, in turn, project to parietal association cortex or to primary and secondary visual cortices. Additionally, we observe that claustrum drive of cortical neurons in parietal association cortex is layer-specific, eliciting action potential generation briefly in layers II/III, IV, and VI but not V. These data are the first to provide a functional anatomical substrate through claustrum that may underlie top-down functions, such as executive attention or working memory, providing critical insight to this most interconnected and enigmatic nucleus.

  3. Trajectories of cortical surface area and cortical volume maturation in normal brain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Ducharme

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a report of developmental trajectories of cortical surface area and cortical volume in the NIH MRI Study of Normal Brain Development. The quality-controlled sample included 384 individual typically-developing subjects with repeated scanning (1–3 per subject, total scans n=753 from 4.9 to 22.3 years of age. The best-fit model (cubic, quadratic, or first-order linear was identified at each vertex using mixed-effects models, with statistical correction for multiple comparisons using random field theory. Analyses were performed with and without controlling for total brain volume. These data are provided for reference and comparison with other databases. Further discussion and interpretation on cortical developmental trajectories can be found in the associated Ducharme et al.׳s article “Trajectories of cortical thickness maturation in normal brain development – the importance of quality control procedures” (Ducharme et al., 2015 [1].

  4. Electrophysiological Data and the Biophysical Modelling of Local Cortical Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Pinotsis

    2014-03-01

    neuroscience, see e.g. [2] for a review. In summary, neural fields include horizontal intrinsic connections within layers or laminae of the cortical sheet and prescribe the time evolution of cell activity – such as mean depolarization or (average action potential density. These models characterize current fluxes as continuous processes on the cortical sheet, using partial differential equations (PDEs. The key advance that neural field models offer, over other population models (like neural masses, is that they embody spatial parameters (like the density and extent of lateral connections. This allows one to model responses not just in time but also over space. Conversely, these models are particularly useful for explaining observed cortical responses over different spatial scales; for example, with high-density recordings, at the epidural or intracortical level. However, the impact of spatially extensive dynamics is not restricted to expression over space but can also have profound effects on temporal (e.g., spectral responses at one point (or averaged locally over the cortical surface. This means that neural field models may also play a key role in the modelling of non-invasive electrophysiological data that does not resolve spatial activity directly. Our overview comprises two parts: in the first part, we use neural fields to simulate neural activity and distinguish the effects of post synaptic filtering on predicted responses in terms of synaptic rate constants that correspond to different timescales and distinct neurotransmitters. This application of neural fields follows the tradition of many studies, in which neural fields (and mean field models in general have been used to explain cortical activity based on qualitative changes of models activity induced by changes in model parameters, like synaptic efficacy and connection strengths, see e.g.[3–8] . We will focus on the links between neuronal oscillations – mediated by the lateral propagation of neuronal spiking

  5. Decreased prefrontal cortical dopamine transmission in alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendran, Rajesh; Mason, Neale Scott; Paris, Jennifer; Himes, Michael L; Douaihy, Antoine B; Frankle, W Gordon

    2014-08-01

    Basic studies have demonstrated that optimal levels of prefrontal cortical dopamine are critical to various executive functions such as working memory, attention, inhibitory control, and risk/reward decisions, all of which are impaired in addictive disorders such as alcoholism. Based on this and imaging studies of alcoholism that have demonstrated less dopamine in the striatum, the authors hypothesized decreased dopamine transmission in the prefrontal cortex in persons with alcohol dependence. To test this hypothesis, amphetamine and [11C]FLB 457 positron emission tomography were used to measure cortical dopamine transmission in 21 recently abstinent persons with alcohol dependence and 21 matched healthy comparison subjects. [11C]FLB 457 binding potential, specific compared to nondisplaceable uptake (BPND), was measured in subjects with kinetic analysis using the arterial input function both before and after 0.5 mg kg-1 of d-amphetamine. Amphetamine-induced displacement of [11C]FLB 457 binding potential (ΔBPND) was significantly smaller in the cortical regions in the alcohol-dependent group compared with the healthy comparison group. Cortical regions that demonstrated lower dopamine transmission in the alcohol-dependent group included the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, orbital frontal cortex, temporal cortex, and medial temporal lobe. The results of this study, for the first time, unambiguously demonstrate decreased dopamine transmission in the cortex in alcoholism. Further research is necessary to understand the clinical relevance of decreased cortical dopamine as to whether it is related to impaired executive function, relapse, and outcome in alcoholism.

  6. Renal cortical scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locher, J.Th.

    2002-01-01

    In this report the renal cortical scintigraphy with 99m Tc-DMSA (Dimercaptosuccinic acid) like a 'gold standard' for the diagnosis of pyelonephritis in children is presented. The role of the vesicoureteral reflux, the level of C-reactive protein and other urinary tract anomaly to the pyelonephritis development is considered. The administrated doses for children and adults, procedure of the study and the SPECT possibilities are given. A four-grade scale describing the grade of parenchymal damage is shown. The correlation between the radiopharmaceutical accumulation in the functioning renal cortex and the intrarenal blood flow and proximal tubular cell membrane transport function is discussed. Because of the slow transfer of activity from blood to kidney, imaging should be delayed for 3 hours after injection. The renal cortical scintigraphy with 99m Tc-DMSA is a primary method for an early diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis because animal experiences have demonstrated a high sensitivity and specificity for DMSA scanning when correlated with histopathology. The results from several multiple-center study for the specificity and sensitivity of the method are discussed. The necessity for the renal cortical scintigraphy standardization is outlined

  7. SLEEP AND OLFACTORY CORTICAL PLASTICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan eBarnes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In many systems, sleep plays a vital role in memory consolidation and synaptic homeostasis. These processes together help store information of biological significance and reset synaptic circuits to facilitate acquisition of information in the future. In this review, we describe recent evidence of sleep-dependent changes in olfactory system structure and function which contribute to odor memory and perception. During slow-wave sleep, the piriform cortex becomes hypo-responsive to odor stimulation and instead displays sharp-wave activity similar to that observed within the hippocampal formation. Furthermore, the functional connectivity between the piriform cortex and other cortical and limbic regions is enhanced during slow-wave sleep compared to waking. This combination of conditions may allow odor memory consolidation to occur during a state of reduced external interference and facilitate association of odor memories with stored hedonic and contextual cues. Evidence consistent with sleep-dependent odor replay within olfactory cortical circuits is presented. These data suggest that both the strength and precision of odor memories is sleep-dependent. The work further emphasizes the critical role of synaptic plasticity and memory in not only odor memory but also basic odor perception. The work also suggests a possible link between sleep disturbances that are frequently co-morbid with a wide range of pathologies including Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and depression and the known olfactory impairments associated with those disorders.

  8. Cortical morphology of visual creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansler, David A; Moore, Dana W; Susmaras, Teresa M; Jerram, Matthew W; Sousa, Janelle; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2011-07-01

    The volume of cortical tissue devoted to a function often influences the quality of a person's ability to perform that function. Up to now only white matter correlates of creativity have been reported, and we wanted to learn if the creative visuospatial performance on the figural Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT) is associated with measurements of cerebral gray matter volume in the regions of the brain that are thought to be important in divergent reasoning and visuospatial processing. Eighteen healthy college educated men (mean age=40.78; 15 right-handers) were recruited (via advertisement) as participants. High-resolution MRI scans were acquired on a 1.5T MRI scanner. Voxel-based morphometry regression analyses of TTCT to cortical volume were restrained within the anatomic regions identified. One significant positive focus of association with TTCT emerged within the right parietal lobe gray matter (MNI coordinates: 44, -24, 63; 276 voxels). Based on theories of parietal lobe function and the requirements of the TTCT, the area observed may be related due to its dominant role in global aspects of attention and visuospatial processing including the capacity for manipulating spatial representations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Microenvironments to study migration and somal translocation in cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shifang; Fan, Wenqiang; Guo, Xiang; Xue, Longjian; Berninger, Benedikt; Salierno, Marcelo J; Del Campo, Aránzazu

    2018-02-01

    Migrating post-mitotic neurons of the developing cerebral cortex undergo terminal somal translocation (ST) when they reach their final destination in the cortical plate. This process is crucial for proper cortical layering and its perturbation can lead to brain dysfunction. Here we present a reductionist biomaterials platform that faithfully supports and controls the distinct phases of terminal ST in vitro. We developed microenvironments with different adhesive molecules to support neuronal attachment, neurite extension, and migration in distinct manners. Efficient ST occurred when the leading process of migratory neurons crossed from low-to high-adhesive areas on a substrate, promoting spreading of the leading growth cone. Our results indicate that elementary adhesive cell-substrate interactions strongly influence migratory behavior and the final positioning of neurons during their developmental journey. This in vitro model allows advanced experimentation to reveal the microenvironmental requirements underlying cortical layer development and disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cortical Spiking Network Interfaced with Virtual Musculoskeletal Arm and Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dura-Bernal, Salvador; Zhou, Xianlian; Neymotin, Samuel A.; Przekwas, Andrzej; Francis, Joseph T.; Lytton, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Embedding computational models in the physical world is a critical step towards constraining their behavior and building practical applications. Here we aim to drive a realistic musculoskeletal arm model using a biomimetic cortical spiking model, and make a robot arm reproduce the same trajectories in real time. Our cortical model consisted of a 3-layered cortex, composed of several hundred spiking model-neurons, which display physiologically realistic dynamics. We interconnected the cortical model to a two-joint musculoskeletal model of a human arm, with realistic anatomical and biomechanical properties. The virtual arm received muscle excitations from the neuronal model, and fed back proprioceptive information, forming a closed-loop system. The cortical model was trained using spike timing-dependent reinforcement learning to drive the virtual arm in a 2D reaching task. Limb position was used to simultaneously control a robot arm using an improved network interface. Virtual arm muscle activations responded to motoneuron firing rates, with virtual arm muscles lengths encoded via population coding in the proprioceptive population. After training, the virtual arm performed reaching movements which were smoother and more realistic than those obtained using a simplistic arm model. This system provided access to both spiking network properties and to arm biophysical properties, including muscle forces. The use of a musculoskeletal virtual arm and the improved control system allowed the robot arm to perform movements which were smoother than those reported in our previous paper using a simplistic arm. This work provides a novel approach consisting of bidirectionally connecting a cortical model to a realistic virtual arm, and using the system output to drive a robotic arm in real time. Our techniques are applicable to the future development of brain neuroprosthetic control systems, and may enable enhanced brain-machine interfaces with the possibility for finer control of

  11. Cortical spiking network interfaced with virtual musculoskeletal arm and robotic arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador eDura-Bernal

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Embedding computational models in the physical world is a critical step towards constraining their behavior and building practical applications. Here we aim to drive a realistic musculoskeletal arm model using a biomimetic cortical spiking model, and make a robot arm reproduce the same trajectories in real time. Our cortical model consisted of a 3-layered cortex, composed of several hundred spiking model-neurons, which display physiologically realistic dynamics. We interconnected the cortical model to a two-joint musculoskeletal model of a human arm, with realistic anatomical and biomechanical properties. The virtual arm received muscle excitations from the neuronal model, and fed back proprioceptive information, forming a closed-loop system. The cortical model was trained using spike timing-dependent reinforcement learning to drive the virtual arm in a 2D reaching task. Limb position was used to simultaneously control a robot arm using an improved network interface. Virtual arm muscle activations responded to motoneuron firing rates, with virtual arm muscles lengths encoded via population coding in the proprioceptive population. After training, the virtual arm performed reaching movements which were smoother and more realistic than those obtained using a simplistic arm model. This system provided access to both spiking network properties and to arm biophysical properties, including muscle forces. The use of a musculoskeletal virtual arm and the improved control system allowed the robot arm to perform movements which were smoother than those reported in our previous paper using a simplistic arm.This work provides a novel approach consisting of bidirectionally connecting a cortical model to a realistic virtual arm, and using the system output to drive a robotic arm in real time. Our techniques are applicable to the future development of brain neuro-prosthetic control systems, and may enable enhanced brain-machine interfaces with the possibility

  12. Network Supervision of Adult Experience and Learning Dependent Sensory Cortical Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David T

    2017-06-18

    The brain is capable of remodeling throughout life. The sensory cortices provide a useful preparation for studying neuroplasticity both during development and thereafter. In adulthood, sensory cortices change in the cortical area activated by behaviorally relevant stimuli, by the strength of response within that activated area, and by the temporal profiles of those responses. Evidence supports forms of unsupervised, reinforcement, and fully supervised network learning rules. Studies on experience-dependent plasticity have mostly not controlled for learning, and they find support for unsupervised learning mechanisms. Changes occur with greatest ease in neurons containing α-CamKII, which are pyramidal neurons in layers II/III and layers V/VI. These changes use synaptic mechanisms including long term depression. Synaptic strengthening at NMDA-containing synapses does occur, but its weak association with activity suggests other factors also initiate changes. Studies that control learning find support of reinforcement learning rules and limited evidence of other forms of supervised learning. Behaviorally associating a stimulus with reinforcement leads to a strengthening of cortical response strength and enlarging of response area with poor selectivity. Associating a stimulus with omission of reinforcement leads to a selective weakening of responses. In some preparations in which these associations are not as clearly made, neurons with the most informative discharges are relatively stronger after training. Studies analyzing the temporal profile of responses associated with omission of reward, or of plasticity in studies with different discriminanda but statistically matched stimuli, support the existence of limited supervised network learning. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:977-1008, 2017. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. A Laminar Organization for Selective Cortico-Cortical Communication

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    Rinaldo D. D’Souza

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The neocortex is central to mammalian cognitive ability, playing critical roles in sensory perception, motor skills and executive function. This thin, layered structure comprises distinct, functionally specialized areas that communicate with each other through the axons of pyramidal neurons. For the hundreds of such cortico-cortical pathways to underlie diverse functions, their cellular and synaptic architectures must differ so that they result in distinct computations at the target projection neurons. In what ways do these pathways differ? By originating and terminating in different laminae, and by selectively targeting specific populations of excitatory and inhibitory neurons, these “interareal” pathways can differentially control the timing and strength of synaptic inputs onto individual neurons, resulting in layer-specific computations. Due to the rapid development in transgenic techniques, the mouse has emerged as a powerful mammalian model for understanding the rules by which cortical circuits organize and function. Here we review our understanding of how cortical lamination constrains long-range communication in the mammalian brain, with an emphasis on the mouse visual cortical network. We discuss the laminar architecture underlying interareal communication, the role of neocortical layers in organizing the balance of excitatory and inhibitory actions, and highlight the structure and function of layer 1 in mouse visual cortex.

  14. Cortical cartography and Caret software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Essen, David C

    2012-08-15

    Caret software is widely used for analyzing and visualizing many types of fMRI data, often in conjunction with experimental data from other modalities. This article places Caret's development in a historical context that spans three decades of brain mapping--from the early days of manually generated flat maps to the nascent field of human connectomics. It also highlights some of Caret's distinctive capabilities. This includes the ease of visualizing data on surfaces and/or volumes and on atlases as well as individual subjects. Caret can display many types of experimental data using various combinations of overlays (e.g., fMRI activation maps, cortical parcellations, areal boundaries), and it has other features that facilitate the analysis and visualization of complex neuroimaging datasets. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Posterior Thalamic Nucleus Modulation of Tactile Stimuli Processing in Rat Motor and Primary Somatosensory Cortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Casas-Torremocha

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rodents move rhythmically their facial whiskers and compute differences between signals predicted and those resulting from the movement to infer information about objects near their head. These computations are carried out by a large network of forebrain structures that includes the thalamus and the primary somatosensory (S1BF and motor (M1wk cortices. Spatially and temporally precise mechanorreceptive whisker information reaches the S1BF cortex via the ventroposterior medial thalamic nucleus (VPM. Other whisker-related information may reach both M1wk and S1BF via the axons from the posterior thalamic nucleus (Po. However, Po axons may convey, in addition to direct sensory signals, the dynamic output of computations between whisker signals and descending motor commands. It has been proposed that this input may be relevant for adjusting cortical responses to predicted vs. unpredicted whisker signals, but the effects of Po input on M1wk and S1BF function have not been directly tested or compared in vivo. Here, using electrophysiology, optogenetics and pharmacological tools, we compared in adult rats M1wk and S1BF in vivo responses in the whisker areas of the motor and primary somatosensory cortices to passive multi-whisker deflection, their dependence on Po activity, and their changes after a brief intense activation of Po axons. We report that the latencies of the first component of tactile-evoked local field potentials in M1wk and S1BF are similar. The evoked potentials decrease markedly in M1wk, but not in S1BF, by injection in Po of the GABAA agonist muscimol. A brief high-frequency electrical stimulation of Po decreases the responsivity of M1wk and S1BF cells to subsequent whisker stimulation. This effect is prevented by the local application of omega-agatoxin, suggesting that it may in part depend on GABA release by fast-spiking parvalbumin (PV-expressing cortical interneurons. Local optogenetic activation of Po synapses in different

  16. Mild Malformation of Cortical Development with Oligodendroglial Hyperplasia in Frontal Lobe Epilepsy: A New Clinico-Pathological Entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, Johannes; Coras, Roland; Rössler, Karl; Pieper, Tom; Kudernatsch, Manfred; Holthausen, Hans; Winkler, Peter; Woermann, Friedrich; Bien, Christian G; Polster, Tilman; Schulz, Reinhard; Kalbhenn, Thilo; Urbach, Horst; Becker, Albert; Grunwald, Thomas; Huppertz, Hans-Juergen; Gil-Nagel, Antonio; Toledano, Rafael; Feucht, Martha; Mühlebner, Angelika; Czech, Thomas; Blümcke, Ingmar

    2017-01-01

    The histopathological spectrum of human epileptogenic brain lesions is widespread including common and rare variants of cortical malformations. However, 2-26% of epilepsy surgery specimens are histopathologically classified as nonlesional. We hypothesized that these specimens include also new diagnostic entities, in particular when presurgical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can identify abnormal signal intensities within the anatomical region of seizure onset. In our series of 1381 en bloc resected epilepsy surgery brain specimens, 52 cases could not be histopathologically classified and were considered nonlesional (3.7%). An increase of Olig2-, and PDGFR-alpha-immunoreactive oligodendroglia was observed in white matter and deep cortical layers in 22 of these patients (42%). Increased proliferation activity as well as heterotopic neurons in white matter were additional histopathological hallmarks. All patients suffered from frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) with a median age of epilepsy onset at 4 years and 16 years at epilepsy surgery. Presurgical MRI suggested focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) in all patients. We suggest to classify this characteristic histopathology pattern as "mild malformation of cortical development with oligodendroglial hyperplasia (MOGHE)." Further insights into pathomechanisms of MOGHE may help to bridge the diagnostic gap in children and young adults with difficult-to-treat FLE. © 2016 International Society of Neuropathology.

  17. Cortical Control of Zona Incerta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthó, Péter; Slézia, Andrea; Varga, Viktor; Bokor, Hajnalka; Pinault, Didier; Buzsáki, György; Acsády, László

    2009-01-01

    The zona incerta (ZI) is at the crossroad of almost all major ascending and descending fiber tracts and targets numerous brain centers from the thalamus to the spinal cord. Effective ascending drive of ZI cells has been described, but the role of descending cortical signals in patterning ZI activity is unknown. Cortical control over ZI function was examined during slow cortical waves (1-3 Hz), paroxysmal high-voltage spindles (HVSs), and 5-9 Hz oscillations in anesthetized rats. In all conditions, rhythmic cortical activity significantly altered the firing pattern of ZI neurons recorded extracellularly and labeled with the juxtacellular method. During slow oscillations, the majority of ZI neurons became synchronized to the depth-negative phase (“up state”) of the cortical waves to a degree comparable to thalamocortical neurons. During HVSs, ZI cells displayed highly rhythmic activity in tight synchrony with the cortical oscillations. ZI neurons responded to short epochs of cortical 5-9 Hz oscillations, with a change in the interspike interval distribution and with an increase in spectral density in the 5-9 Hz band as measured by wavelet analysis. Morphological reconstruction revealed that most ZI cells have mediolaterally extensive dendritic trees and very long dendritic segments. Cortical terminals established asymmetrical synapses on ZI cells with very long active zones. These data suggest efficient integration of widespread cortical signals by single ZI neurons and strong cortical drive. We propose that the efferent GABAergic signal of ZI neurons patterned by the cortical activity can play a critical role in synchronizing thalamocortical and brainstem rhythms. PMID:17301175

  18. Somatostatin-expressing inhibitory interneurons in cortical circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Yavorska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cortical inhibitory neurons exhibit remarkable diversity in their morphology, connectivity, and synaptic properties. Here, we review the function of somatostatin-expressing (SOM inhibitory interneurons, focusing largely on sensory cortex. SOM neurons also comprise a number of subpopulations that can be distinguished by their morphology, input and output connectivity, laminar location, firing properties, and expression of molecular markers. Several of these classes of SOM neurons show unique dynamics and characteristics, such as facilitating synapses, specific axonal projections, intralaminar input, and top-down modulation, which suggest possible computational roles. SOM cells can be differentially modulated by behavioral state depending on their class, sensory system, and behavioral paradigm. The functional effects of such modulation have been studied with optogenetic manipulation of SOM cells, which produces effects on learning and memory, task performance, and the integration of cortical activity. Different classes of SOM cells participate in distinct disinhibitory circuits with different inhibitory partners and in different cortical layers. Through these disinhibitory circuits, SOM cells help encode the behavioral relevance of sensory stimuli by regulating the activity of cortical neurons based on subcortical and intracortical modulatory input. Associative learning leads to long-term changes in the strength of connectivity of SOM cells with other neurons, often influencing the strength of inhibitory input they receive. Thus despite their heterogeneity and variability across cortical areas, current evidence shows that SOM neurons perform unique neural computations, forming not only distinct molecular but also functional subclasses of cortical inhibitory interneurons.

  19. Cortical spatiotemporal dimensionality reduction for visual grouping

    OpenAIRE

    Cocci, Giacomo; Barbieri, Davide; Citti, Giovanna; Sarti, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The visual systems of many mammals, including humans, are able to integrate the geometric information of visual stimuli and perform cognitive tasks at the first stages of the cortical processing. This is thought to be the result of a combination of mechanisms, which include feature extraction at the single cell level and geometric processing by means of cell connectivity. We present a geometric model of such connectivities in the space of detected features associated with spatiotemporal visua...

  20. Cortico-cortical communication dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per E Roland

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available IIn principle, cortico-cortical communication dynamics is simple: neurons in one cortical area communicate by sending action potentials that release glutamate and excite their target neurons in other cortical areas. In practice, knowledge about cortico-cortical communication dynamics is minute. One reason is that no current technique can capture the fast spatio-temporal cortico-cortical evolution of action potential transmission and membrane conductances with sufficient spatial resolution. A combination of optogenetics and monosynaptic tracing with virus can reveal the spatio-temporal cortico-cortical dynamics of specific neurons and their targets, but does not reveal how the dynamics evolves under natural conditions. Spontaneous ongoing action potentials also spread across cortical areas and are difficult to separate from structured evoked and intrinsic brain activity such as thinking. At a certain state of evolution, the dynamics may engage larger populations of neurons to drive the brain to decisions, percepts and behaviors. For example, successfully evolving dynamics to sensory transients can appear at the mesoscopic scale revealing how the transient is perceived. As a consequence of these methodological and conceptual difficulties, studies in this field comprise a wide range of computational models, large-scale measurements (e.g., by MEG, EEG, and a combination of invasive measurements in animal experiments. Further obstacles and challenges of studying cortico-cortical communication dynamics are outlined in this critical review.

  1. Hiperostosis cortical infantil

    OpenAIRE

    Salvador Javier Santos Medina; Orelvis Pérez Duerto

    2015-01-01

    La enfermedad de Caffey, o hiperostosis cortical infantil, es una rara enfermedad ósea autolimitada, que aparece de preferencia en lactantes con signos inespecíficos sistémicos; el más relevante es la reacción subperióstica e hiperostosis en varios huesos del cuerpo, con predilección en el 75-80 % de los casos por la mandíbula. Su pronóstico es bueno, la mayoría no deja secuelas. El propósito del presente trabajo es describir las características clínicas, presentes en un lactante de cinco mes...

  2. Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Henrique de Gobbi Porto

    Full Text Available Abstract Progressive posterior cortical dysfunction (PPCD is an insidious syndrome characterized by prominent disorders of higher visual processing. It affects both dorsal (occipito-parietal and ventral (occipito-temporal pathways, disturbing visuospatial processing and visual recognition, respectively. We report a case of a 67-year-old woman presenting with progressive impairment of visual functions. Neurologic examination showed agraphia, alexia, hemispatial neglect (left side visual extinction, complete Balint's syndrome and visual agnosia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed circumscribed atrophy involving the bilateral parieto-occipital regions, slightly more predominant to the right . Our aim was to describe a case of this syndrome, to present a video showing the main abnormalities, and to discuss this unusual presentation of dementia. We believe this article can contribute by improving the recognition of PPCD.

  3. Modeling cortical circuits.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

    2010-09-01

    The neocortex is perhaps the highest region of the human brain, where audio and visual perception takes place along with many important cognitive functions. An important research goal is to describe the mechanisms implemented by the neocortex. There is an apparent regularity in the structure of the neocortex [Brodmann 1909, Mountcastle 1957] which may help simplify this task. The work reported here addresses the problem of how to describe the putative repeated units ('cortical circuits') in a manner that is easily understood and manipulated, with the long-term goal of developing a mathematical and algorithmic description of their function. The approach is to reduce each algorithm to an enhanced perceptron-like structure and describe its computation using difference equations. We organize this algorithmic processing into larger structures based on physiological observations, and implement key modeling concepts in software which runs on parallel computing hardware.

  4. Probing region-specific microstructure of human cortical areas using high angular and spatial resolution diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Manisha; Nauen, David W; Troncoso, Juan C; Mori, Susumu

    2015-01-15

    Regional heterogeneity in cortical cyto- and myeloarchitecture forms the structural basis of mapping of cortical areas in the human brain. In this study, we investigate the potential of diffusion MRI to probe the microstructure of cortical gray matter and its region-specific heterogeneity across cortical areas in the fixed human brain. High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data at an isotropic resolution of 92-μm and 30 diffusion-encoding directions were acquired using a 3D diffusion-weighted gradient-and-spin-echo sequence, from prefrontal (Brodmann area 9), primary motor (area 4), primary somatosensory (area 3b), and primary visual (area 17) cortical specimens (n=3 each) from three human subjects. Further, the diffusion MR findings in these cortical areas were compared with histological silver impregnation of the same specimens, in order to investigate the underlying architectonic features that constitute the microstructural basis of diffusion-driven contrasts in cortical gray matter. Our data reveal distinct and region-specific diffusion MR contrasts across the studied areas, allowing delineation of intracortical bands of tangential fibers in specific layers-layer I, layer VI, and the inner and outer bands of Baillarger. The findings of this work demonstrate unique sensitivity of diffusion MRI to differentiate region-specific cortical microstructure in the human brain, and will be useful for myeloarchitectonic mapping of cortical areas as well as to achieve an understanding of the basis of diffusion NMR contrasts in cortical gray matter. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. How the cortex gets its folds: an inside-out, connectivity-driven model for the scaling of mammalian cortical folding

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno eMota; Bruno eMota; Suzana eHerculano-Houzel; Suzana eHerculano-Houzel

    2012-01-01

    Larger mammalian cerebral cortices tend to have increasingly folded surfaces, often considered to result from the lateral expansion of the grey matter (GM), which, in a volume constrained by the cranium, causes mechanical compression that is relieved by inward folding of the white matter (WM), or to result from differential expansion of cortical layers. Across species, thinner cortices, presumably more pliable, would offer less resistance and hence become more folded than thicker cortices of ...

  6. Parcellating cortical functional networks in individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Danhong; Buckner, Randy L; Fox, Michael D; Holt, Daphne J; Holmes, Avram J; Stoecklein, Sophia; Langs, Georg; Pan, Ruiqi; Qian, Tianyi; Li, Kuncheng; Baker, Justin T; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Wang, Kai; Wang, Xiaomin; Hong, Bo; Liu, Hesheng

    2015-12-01

    The capacity to identify the unique functional architecture of an individual's brain is a crucial step toward personalized medicine and understanding the neural basis of variation in human cognition and behavior. Here we developed a cortical parcellation approach to accurately map functional organization at the individual level using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). A population-based functional atlas and a map of inter-individual variability were employed to guide the iterative search for functional networks in individual subjects. Functional networks mapped by this approach were highly reproducible within subjects and effectively captured the variability across subjects, including individual differences in brain lateralization. The algorithm performed well across different subject populations and data types, including task fMRI data. The approach was then validated by invasive cortical stimulation mapping in surgical patients, suggesting potential for use in clinical applications.

  7. Cortical-Cortical Interactions And Sensory Information Processing in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-30

    Additionally, these cortical areas have been implicated from significantly elevated TOJ thresholds (worse performance) in subjects with dyslexia [5...of the fact that above-average TOJ thresholds occur in subjects with known damage to these same cortical areas ( dyslexia [5], dystonia [6-8], and...Tomma-Halme J, Lahti-Nuuttila P, Service E, Virsu V: Rate of information segregation in developmentally dyslexic children . Brain Lang 2000, 75:66-81

  8. The cortical signature of impaired gesturing: Findings from schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Verena Viher

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is characterized by deficits in gesturing that is important for nonverbal communication. Research in healthy participants and brain-damaged patients revealed a left-lateralized fronto-parieto-temporal network underlying gesture performance. First evidence from structural imaging studies in schizophrenia corroborates these results. However, as of yet, it is unclear if cortical thickness abnormalities contribute to impairments in gesture performance. We hypothesized that patients with deficits in gesture production show cortical thinning in 12 regions of interest (ROIs of a gesture network relevant for gesture performance and recognition. Forty patients with schizophrenia and 41 healthy controls performed hand and finger gestures as either imitation or pantomime. Group differences in cortical thickness between patients with deficits, patients without deficits, and controls were explored using a multivariate analysis of covariance. In addition, the relationship between gesture recognition and cortical thickness was investigated. Patients with deficits in gesture production had reduced cortical thickness in eight ROIs, including the pars opercularis of the inferior frontal gyrus, the superior and inferior parietal lobes, and the superior and middle temporal gyri. Gesture recognition correlated with cortical thickness in fewer, but mainly the same, ROIs within the patient sample. In conclusion, our results show that impaired gesture production and recognition in schizophrenia is associated with cortical thinning in distinct areas of the gesture network.

  9. Is More Cortical Bone Decortication Effective on Guided Bone Augmentation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Ahmet Hüseyin; Alan, Hilal; Özgür, Cem; Vardi, Nigar; Asutay, Fatih; Güler, Çiğdem

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the possible effect of more cortical bone decortication (CBD) on guided bone augmentation. A total of 16 New Zealand rabbits and 32 titanium domes were used. No cortical bone decortication was applied to the control group and in the study groups, the cortical bones were decorticated with a round burr (Group A: 1 hole with bleeding, Group B: 5 holes with bleeding, Group C: a thin layer of compact bone was completely removed with no bleeding). Then 2 titanium domes were placed on the calvarium of each rabbit with hydroxyapatite/beta-tricalcium phosphate. After 3 months, the animals were sacrificed and specimens were sent for histological and histomorphometric analysis. Histological and histomorphometric analysis showed that bone decortication with burr significantly increased new bone regeneration in all the experimental groups compared with the control group (P guided bone augmentation. However, a greater amount of CBD does not have a greater effect.

  10. Cortical activity in tinnitus patients and its modification by phonostimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Pawlak-Osińska

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to observe spontaneous cortical activity and cortical activity modulated by tinnitus-matched sound in tinnitus patients and healthy subjects with no otoneurologic symptoms. METHOD: Data were prospectively collected from 50 tinnitus patients and 25 healthy subjects. Cortical activity was recorded in all subjects with eyes closed and open and during photostimulation, hyperventilation and acoustic stimulation using 19-channel quantitative electroencephalography. The sound applied in the tinnitus patients was individually matched with the ability to mask or equal the tinnitus. The maximal and mean amplitude of the delta, theta, alpha and beta waves and the type and amount of the pathologic EEG patterns were noted during each recording. Differences in cortical localization and the influence of sound stimuli on spontaneous cortical activity were evaluated between the groups. RESULTS: The tinnitus group exhibited decreased delta activity and increased alpha and beta activity. Hyperventilation increased the intensity of the differences. The tinnitus patients had more sharp-slow waves and increased slow wave amplitude. Sound stimuli modified the EEG recordings; the delta and beta wave amplitudes were increased, whereas the alpha-1 wave amplitude was decreased. Acoustic stimulation only slightly affected the temporal region. CONCLUSION: Cortical activity in the tinnitus patients clearly differed from that in healthy subjects, i.e., tinnitus is not a “phantom” sign. The changes in cortical activity included decreased delta wave amplitudes, increased alpha-1, beta-1 and beta-h wave amplitudes and pathologic patterns. Cortical activity modifications occurred predominantly in the temporal region. Acoustic stimulation affected spontaneous cortical activity only in tinnitus patients, and although the applied sound was individually matched, the pathologic changes were only slightly improved.

  11. Functional cortical mapping of scale illusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li-qun; Kuriki, Shinya

    2011-01-01

    We have studied cortical activation using 1.5 T fMRI during 'Scale Illusion', a kind of auditory illusion, in which subjects perceive smooth melodies while listening to dichotic irregular pitch sequences consisting of scale tones, in repeated phrases composed of eight tones. Four male and four female subjects listened to different stimuli, that including illusion-inducing tone sequence, monaural tone sequence and perceived pitch sequence with a control of white noises delivered to the right and left ears in random order. 32 scans with a repetition time (TR) 3 s Between 3 s interval for each type of the four stimuli were performed. In BOLD signals, activation was observed in the prefrontal and temporal cortices, parietal lobule and occipital areas by first-level group analysis. However, there existed large intersubject variability such that systematic tendency of the activation was not clear. The study will be continued to obtain larger number of subjects for group analysis. (author)

  12. Massive cortical reorganization in sighted Braille readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siuda-Krzywicka, Katarzyna; Bola, Łukasz; Paplińska, Małgorzata; Sumera, Ewa; Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Marchewka, Artur; Śliwińska, Magdalena W; Amedi, Amir; Szwed, Marcin

    2016-03-15

    The brain is capable of large-scale reorganization in blindness or after massive injury. Such reorganization crosses the division into separate sensory cortices (visual, somatosensory...). As its result, the visual cortex of the blind becomes active during tactile Braille reading. Although the possibility of such reorganization in the normal, adult brain has been raised, definitive evidence has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate such extensive reorganization in normal, sighted adults who learned Braille while their brain activity was investigated with fMRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Subjects showed enhanced activity for tactile reading in the visual cortex, including the visual word form area (VWFA) that was modulated by their Braille reading speed and strengthened resting-state connectivity between visual and somatosensory cortices. Moreover, TMS disruption of VWFA activity decreased their tactile reading accuracy. Our results indicate that large-scale reorganization is a viable mechanism recruited when learning complex skills.

  13. Hiperostosis cortical infantil

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    Salvador Javier Santos Medina

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Caffey, o hiperostosis cortical infantil, es una rara enfermedad ósea autolimitada, que aparece de preferencia en lactantes con signos inespecíficos sistémicos; el más relevante es la reacción subperióstica e hiperostosis en varios huesos del cuerpo, con predilección en el 75-80 % de los casos por la mandíbula. Su pronóstico es bueno, la mayoría no deja secuelas. El propósito del presente trabajo es describir las características clínicas, presentes en un lactante de cinco meses de edad, atendido en el Hospital Pediátrico Provincial “Mártires de Las Tunas” con este diagnóstico, quien ingresó en el servicio de miscelánea B por una celulitis facial. Presentaba aumento de volumen en la región geniana izquierda, febrícola e inapetencia. Se impuso tratamiento con cefazolina y se egresó a los siete días. Acudió nuevamente con tumefacción blanda y difusa de ambas hemicaras, irritabilidad y fiebre. Se interconsultó con cirugía maxilofacial, se indicaron estudios sanguíneos y radiológicos. Se diagnosticó como enfermedad de Caffey, basado en la edad del niño, tumefacción facial sin signos inflamatorios agudos e hiperostosis en ambas corticales mandibulares a la radiografía AP mandíbula; unido a anemia ligera, leucocitosis y eritrosedimentación acelerada. El paciente se trató sintomáticamente y con antinflamatorios no esteroideos. Esta rara entidad se debe tener presente en casos de niños y lactantes con irritabilidad y fiebre inespecífica

  14. Optical modulator including grapene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  15. [Visualization of local cortical defects in Charcot foot using microcomputed tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senck, S; Plank, B; Kastner, J; Ramadani, F; Trieb, K; Hofstaetter, S G

    2015-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathic osteoarthropathy (Charcot's foot) fractures cause chronic destruction of soft tissue and bone structure. To improve an early diagnosis of Charcot foot, modern diagnostic imaging is mainly based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), for example in relation to the detection of cortical bone fractures. In this study we investigated the cortical microstructure in cases of Charcot foot with respect to fractures and porosity in order to visualize local cortical defects. This may substantiate recent efforts in a reclassification based on MRI. Using microcomputed tomography (microCT) we investigated bone parameters, such as cortical thickness and porosity in order to quantify the local metatarsal microstructure in cases of Charcot foot. All bone samples showed a high degree of cortical porosity including pores that perforated the cortical bone. The data suggest that areas with reduced cortical thickness coincide with large cortical pores that may serve as initial points for fractures. Whether the detected microfractures are physiological or artefacts of preparation could not be determined. By means of microCT we were able to visualize and quantify the extent of cortical porosity for the first time in high resolution. The data suggest that both cortical fractures and cortical porosity play an important role in the pathogenesis in cases of Charcot foot.

  16. The range of peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer and optic disc parameters in children aged up to but not including 18 years of age, as measured by optical coherence tomography: protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creavin, Alexandra L; Williams, Cathy; Tilling, Kate; Timpson, Nicholas; Higgins, Julian P T

    2016-04-30

    The parameters of the optic disc and peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer (pRNFL) in children may vary with disease processes that contribute to visual impairment and blindness and so could be useful as an objective measure in at-risk children. There is no standardised reference for the normal parameters of the optic disc and pRNFL in children; however, there are a large number of small individual studies that have been undertaken to look at these measures. A systematic review of current literature on the range of pRNFL and optic disc parameters in children aged less than 18 years will be performed. Studies will be considered for review if they report numerical data on optic disc and pRNFL parameters, measured using optical coherence tomography. Outcome measures will include mean pRNFL thickness and cup-disc ratio. The bibliographic databases Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, Scopus and Web of Science will be systematically searched from 1991. Screening of search results will be conducted by two authors working independently, as will extraction of primary and secondary outcome data. Ten per cent of all other data extraction will be checked by a second author. Results will be compiled and presented in evidence tables. Where possible and appropriate, study-specific estimates will be combined to obtain an overall summary estimate of pRNFL thickness and cup-disc ratio across studies and results will be presented by age of population. Subgroup analyses will be undertaken for children of different ethnicities. This review aims to provide an overview of the parameters of the optic disc and pRNFL in children of different ages in order to identify gaps in knowledge and to improve understanding of what might be considered within/outside the range of normality. The findings will be presented in peer-reviewed journals and will be presented at conferences. PROSPERO CRD42016033068.

  17. Noncontact ultrasound imaging applied to cortical bone phantoms

    OpenAIRE

    Bulman, J. B.; Ganezer, K. S.; Halcrow, P. W.; Neeson, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to take the first steps toward applying noncontact ultrasound (NCU) to the tasks of monitoring osteoporosis and quantitative ultrasound imaging (QUS) of cortical bone. The authors also focused on the advantages of NCU, such as its lack of reliance on a technologist to apply transducers and a layer of acoustical coupling gel, the ability of the transducers to operate autonomously as specified by preprogrammed software, and the likely reduction in statisti...

  18. Cortical Correlates of Fitts’ Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eIfft

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fitts' law describes the fundamental trade-off between movement accuracy and speed: It states that the duration of reaching movements is a function of target size and distance. While Fitts' law has been extensively studied in ergonomics and has guided the design of human-computer interfaces, there have been few studies on its neuronal correlates. To elucidate sensorimotor cortical activity underlying Fitts’ law, we implanted two monkeys with multielectrode arrays in the primary motor (M1 and primary somatosensory (S1 cortices. The monkeys performed reaches with a joystick-controlled cursor towards targets of different size. The reaction time, movement time and movement velocity changed with target size, and M1 and S1 activity reflected these changes. Moreover, modifications of cortical activity could not be explained by changes of movement parameters alone, but required target size as an additional parameter. Neuronal representation of target size was especially prominent during the early reaction time period where it influenced the slope of the firing rate rise preceding movement initiation. During the movement period, cortical activity was mostly correlated with movement velocity. Neural decoders were applied to simultaneously decode target size and motor parameters from cortical modulations. We suggest using such classifiers to improve neuroprosthetic control.

  19. Neocortical layer 6, a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex M Thomson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This review attempts to summarise some of the major areas of neocortical research as it pertains to layer 6. After a brief summary of the development of this intriguing layer, the major pyramidal cell classes to be found in layer 6 are described and compared. The connections made and received by these different classes of neurones are then discussed and the possible functions of these connections, with particular reference to the shaping of responses in visual cortex and thalamus. Inhibition in layer 6 is discussed where appropriate, but not in great detail. Many types of interneurones are to be found in each cortical layer and layer 6 is no exception, but the functions of each type remain to be elucidated.

  20. Neurodevelopmental origins of abnormal cortical morphology in dissociative identity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinders, A A T S; Chalavi, S; Schlumpf, Y R; Vissia, E M; Nijenhuis, E R S; Jäncke, L; Veltman, D J; Ecker, C

    2018-02-01

    To examine the two constitutes of cortical volume (CV), that is, cortical thickness (CT) and surface area (SA), in individuals with dissociative identity disorder (DID) with the view of gaining important novel insights into the underlying neurobiological mechanisms mediating DID. This study included 32 female patients with DID and 43 matched healthy controls. Between-group differences in CV, thickness, and SA, the degree of spatial overlap between differences in CT and SA, and their relative contribution to differences in regional CV were assessed using a novel spatially unbiased vertex-wise approach. Whole-brain correlation analyses were performed between measures of cortical anatomy and dissociative symptoms and traumatization. Individuals with DID differed from controls in CV, CT, and SA, with significantly decreased CT in the insula, anterior cingulate, and parietal regions and reduced cortical SA in temporal and orbitofrontal cortices. Abnormalities in CT and SA shared only about 3% of all significantly different cerebral surface locations and involved distinct contributions to the abnormality of CV in DID. Significant negative associations between abnormal brain morphology (SA and CV) and dissociative symptoms and early childhood traumatization (0 and 3 years of age) were found. In DID, neuroanatomical areas with decreased CT and SA are in different locations in the brain. As CT and SA have distinct genetic and developmental origins, our findings may indicate that different neurobiological mechanisms and environmental factors impact on cortical morphology in DID, such as early childhood traumatization. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Enhanced Burst-Suppression and Disruption of Local Field Potential Synchrony in a Mouse Model of Focal Cortical Dysplasia Exhibiting Spike-Wave Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Williams

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs are a common cause of brain seizures and are often associated with intractable epilepsy. Here we evaluated aberrant brain neurophysiology in an in vivo mouse model of FCD induced by neonatal freeze lesions (FLs to the right cortical hemisphere (near S1. Linear multi-electrode arrays were used to record extracellular potentials from cortical and subcortical brain regions near the FL in anesthetized mice (5-13 months old followed by 24 h cortical EEG recordings. Results indicated that FL animals exhibit a high prevalence of spontaneous spike-wave discharges (SWDs, predominately during sleep (EEG, and an increase in the incidence of hyper-excitable burst/suppression activity under general anesthesia (extracellular recordings, 0.5-3.0% isoflurane. Brief periods of burst activity in the local field potential (LFP typically presented as an arrhythmic pattern of increased theta-alpha spectral peaks (4-12 Hz on a background of low-amplitude delta activity (1-4 Hz, were associated with an increase in spontaneous spiking of cortical neurons, and were highly synchronized in control animals across recording sites in both cortical and subcortical layers (average cross-correlation values ranging from +0.73 to +1.0 with minimal phase shift between electrodes. However, in FL animals, cortical vs. subcortical burst activity was strongly out of phase with significantly lower cross-correlation values compared to controls (average values of -0.1 to +0.5, P<0.05 between groups. In particular, a marked reduction in the level of synchronous burst activity was observed the closer the recording electrodes were to the malformation (Pearson’s Correlation = 0.525, P<0.05. In a subset of FL animals (3/9, burst activity also included a spike or spike-wave pattern similar to the SWDs observed in unanesthetized animals. In summary, neonatal FLs increased the hyperexcitable pattern of burst activity induced by anesthesia and disrupted field

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury Increases Cortical Glutamate Network Activity by Compromising GABAergic Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, David; Walker, Kendall; Andresen, Lauren; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Hampton, David; Tesco, Giuseppina; Dulla, Chris G

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major risk factor for developing pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Although disruptions in brain circuitry are associated with TBI, the precise mechanisms by which brain injury leads to epileptiform network activity is unknown. Using controlled cortical impact (CCI) as a model of TBI, we examined how cortical excitability and glutamatergic signaling was altered following injury. We optically mapped cortical glutamate signaling using FRET-based glutamate biosensors, while simultaneously recording cortical field potentials in acute brain slices 2-4 weeks following CCI. Cortical electrical stimulation evoked polyphasic, epileptiform field potentials and disrupted the input-output relationship in deep layers of CCI-injured cortex. High-speed glutamate biosensor imaging showed that glutamate signaling was significantly increased in the injured cortex. Elevated glutamate responses correlated with epileptiform activity, were highest directly adjacent to the injury, and spread via deep cortical layers. Immunoreactivity for markers of GABAergic interneurons were significantly decreased throughout CCI cortex. Lastly, spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current frequency decreased and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current increased after CCI injury. Our results suggest that specific cortical neuronal microcircuits may initiate and facilitate the spread of epileptiform activity following TBI. Increased glutamatergic signaling due to loss of GABAergic control may provide a mechanism by which TBI can give rise to post-traumatic epilepsy. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Mitotic events in cerebellar granule progenitor cells that expand cerebellar surface area are critical for normal cerebellar cortical lamination in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joshua C; Leung, Mark; Gokozan, Hamza Numan; Gygli, Patrick Edwin; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Czeisler, Catherine; Otero, José Javier

    2015-03-01

    Late embryonic and postnatal cerebellar folial surface area expansion promotes cerebellar cortical cytoarchitectural lamination. We developed a streamlined sampling scheme to generate unbiased estimates of murine cerebellar surface area and volume using stereologic principles. We demonstrate that, during the proliferative phase of the external granular layer (EGL) and folial surface area expansion, EGL thickness does not change and thus is a topological proxy for progenitor self-renewal. The topological constraints indicate that, during proliferative phases, migration out of the EGL is balanced by self-renewal. Progenitor self-renewal must, therefore, include mitotic events yielding 2 cells in the same layer to increase surface area (β events) and mitotic events yielding 2 cells, with 1 cell in a superficial layer and 1 cell in a deeper layer (α events). As the cerebellum grows, therefore, β events lie upstream of α events. Using a mathematical model constrained by the measurements of volume and surface area, we could quantify intermitotic times for β events on a per-cell basis in postnatal mouse cerebellum. Furthermore, we found that loss of CCNA2, which decreases EGL proliferation and secondarily induces cerebellar cortical dyslamination, shows preserved α-type events. Thus, CCNA2-null cerebellar granule progenitor cells are capable of self-renewal of the EGL stem cell niche; this is concordant with prior findings of extensive apoptosis in CCNA2-null mice. Similar methodologies may provide another layer of depth to the interpretation of results from stereologic studies.

  4. Biomechanics of single cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernick, Kristin B; Prevost, Thibault P; Suresh, Subra; Socrate, Simona

    2011-03-01

    This study presents experimental results and computational analysis of the large strain dynamic behavior of single neurons in vitro with the objective of formulating a novel quantitative framework for the biomechanics of cortical neurons. Relying on the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique, novel testing protocols are developed to enable the characterization of neural soma deformability over a range of indentation rates spanning three orders of magnitude, 10, 1, and 0.1 μm s(-1). Modified spherical AFM probes were utilized to compress the cell bodies of neonatal rat cortical neurons in load, unload, reload and relaxation conditions. The cell response showed marked hysteretic features, strong non-linearities, and substantial time/rate dependencies. The rheological data were complemented with geometrical measurements of cell body morphology, i.e. cross-diameter and height estimates. A constitutive model, validated by the present experiments, is proposed to quantify the mechanical behavior of cortical neurons. The model aimed to correlate empirical findings with measurable degrees of (hyper)elastic resilience and viscosity at the cell level. The proposed formulation, predicated upon previous constitutive model developments undertaken at the cortical tissue level, was implemented in a three-dimensional finite element framework. The simulated cell response was calibrated to the experimental measurements under the selected test conditions, providing a novel single cell model that could form the basis for further refinements. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Abnormalities of cortical structures in adolescent-onset conduct disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y; Guo, X; Zhang, J; Gao, J; Wang, X; Situ, W; Yi, J; Zhang, X; Zhu, X; Yao, S; Huang, B

    2015-12-01

    Converging evidence has revealed both functional and structural abnormalities in adolescents with early-onset conduct disorder (EO-CD). The neurological abnormalities underlying EO-CD may be different from that of adolescent-onset conduct disorder (AO-CD) patients. However, the cortical structure in AO-CD patients remains largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the cortical alterations in AO-CD patients. We investigated T1-weighted brain images from AO-CD patients and age-, gender- and intelligence quotient-matched controls. Cortical structures including thickness, folding and surface area were measured using the surface-based morphometric method. Furthermore, we assessed impulsivity and antisocial symptoms using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) and the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD). Compared with the controls, we found significant cortical thinning in the paralimbic system in AO-CD patients. For the first time, we observed cortical thinning in the precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) in AO-CD patients which has not been reported in EO-CD patients. Prominent folding abnormalities were found in the paralimbic structures and frontal cortex while diminished surface areas were shown in the precentral and inferior temporal cortex. Furthermore, cortical thickness of the paralimbic structures was found to be negatively correlated with impulsivity and antisocial behaviors measured by the BIS and APSD, respectively. The present study indicates that AO-CD is characterized by cortical structural abnormalities in the paralimbic system, and, in particular, we highlight the potential role of deficient structures including the precuneus and PCC in the etiology of AO-CD.

  6. Noncontact ultrasound imaging applied to cortical bone phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulman, J B; Ganezer, K S; Halcrow, P W; Neeson, Ian

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this paper was to take the first steps toward applying noncontact ultrasound (NCU) to the tasks of monitoring osteoporosis and quantitative ultrasound imaging (QUS) of cortical bone. The authors also focused on the advantages of NCU, such as its lack of reliance on a technologist to apply transducers and a layer of acoustical coupling gel, the ability of the transducers to operate autonomously as specified by preprogrammed software, and the likely reduction in statistical and systematic errors associated with the variability in the pressure applied by the clinician to the transmitting transducer that NCU might provide. The authors also undertook this study in order to find additional applications of NCU beyond its past limited usage in assessing the severity of third degree burns. A noncontact ultrasound imaging system using a pair of specially designed broadband, 1.5 MHz noncontact piezoelectric transducers and cortical bone phantoms, were used to determine bone mineral density (BMD), speed of sound (SOS), integrated response (IR), and ultrasonic transmittance. Air gaps of greater than 3 cm, two transmission and two reflection paths, and a digital signal processor were also used in the collection of data from phantoms of nominal mass densities that varied from 1.17 to 2.25 g/cm(3) and in bone mineral density from 0 to 1.7 g/cm(3). Good correlations between known BMD and measured SOS, IR, and transmittance were obtained for all 17 phantoms, and methods for quantifying and minimizing sources of systematic errors were outlined. The BMD of the phantom sets extended through most of the in vivo range found in cortical bone. A total of 16-20 repeated measurements of the SOS, thickness, and IR for the phantom set that were conducted over a period of several months showed a small variation in the range of measurements of ±1%-2%. These NCU data were shown to be in agreement with similar results using contact ultrasound to be within 1%-2%. Transmittance

  7. Integrating microRNA and mRNA expression profiles of neuronal progenitors to identify regulatory networks underlying the onset of cortical neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barker Jeffery L

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cortical development is a complex process that includes sequential generation of neuronal progenitors, which proliferate and migrate to form the stratified layers of the developing cortex. To identify the individual microRNAs (miRNAs and mRNAs that may regulate the genetic network guiding the earliest phase of cortical development, the expression profiles of rat neuronal progenitors obtained at embryonic day 11 (E11, E12 and E13 were analyzed. Results Neuronal progenitors were purified from telencephalic dissociates by a positive-selection strategy featuring surface labeling with tetanus-toxin and cholera-toxin followed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Microarray analyses revealed the fractions of miRNAs and mRNAs that were up-regulated or down-regulated in these neuronal progenitors at the beginning of cortical development. Nearly half of the dynamically expressed miRNAs were negatively correlated with the expression of their predicted target mRNAs. Conclusion These data support a regulatory role for miRNAs during the transition from neuronal progenitors into the earliest differentiating cortical neurons. In addition, by supplying a robust data set in which miRNA and mRNA profiles originate from the same purified cell type, this empirical study may facilitate the development of new algorithms to integrate various "-omics" data sets.

  8. Increased cortical porosity and reduced cortical thickness of the proximal femur are associated with nonvertebral fracture independent of Fracture Risk Assessment Tool and Garvan estimates in postmenopausal women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Kral

    Full Text Available The Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX and Garvan Calculator have improved the individual prediction of fracture risk. However, additional bone measurements that might enhance the predictive ability of these tools are the subject of research. There is increasing interest in cortical parameters, especially cortical porosity. Neither FRAX nor Garvan include measurements of cortical architecture, important for bone strength, and providing independent information beyond the conventional approaches. We tested the hypothesis that cortical parameters are associated with fracture risk, independent of FRAX and Garvan estimates. This nested case-control study included 211 postmenopausal women aged 54-94 years with nonvertebral fractures, and 232 controls from the Tromsø Study in Norway. We assessed FRAX and Garvan 10-year risk estimates for fragility fracture, and quantified femoral subtrochanteric cortical porosity, thickness, and area from computed tomography images using StrAx1.0 software. Per standard deviation higher cortical porosity, thinner cortices, and smaller cortical area, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval for fracture was 1.71 (1.38-2.11, 1.79 (1.44-2.23, and 1.52 (1.19-1.95, respectively. Cortical porosity and thickness, but not area, remained associated with fracture when adjusted for FRAX and Garvan estimates. Adding cortical porosity and thickness to FRAX or Garvan resulted in greater area under the receiver operating characteristic curves. When using cortical porosity (>80th percentile or cortical thickness (20%, 45.5% and 42.7% of fracture cases were identified, respectively. Using the same cutoffs for cortical porosity or thickness combined with Garvan (threshold >25%, 51.2% and 48.3% were identified, respectively. Specificity for all combinations ranged from 81.0-83.6%. Measurement of cortical porosity or thickness identified 20.4% and 17.5% additional fracture cases that, were unidentified using FRAX alone, and 16.6% and 13

  9. Mnemonic Encoding and Cortical Organization in Parietal and Prefrontal Cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, Nicolas Y; Hodnefield, Jonathan M; Freedman, David J

    2017-06-21

    Persistent activity within the frontoparietal network is consistently observed during tasks that require working memory. However, the neural circuit mechanisms underlying persistent neuronal encoding within this network remain unresolved. Here, we ask how neural circuits support persistent activity by examining population recordings from posterior parietal (PPC) and prefrontal (PFC) cortices in two male monkeys that performed spatial and motion direction-based tasks that required working memory. While spatially selective persistent activity was observed in both areas, robust selective persistent activity for motion direction was only observed in PFC. Crucially, we find that this difference between mnemonic encoding in PPC and PFC is associated with the presence of functional clustering: PPC and PFC neurons up to ∼700 μm apart preferred similar spatial locations, and PFC neurons up to ∼700 μm apart preferred similar motion directions. In contrast, motion-direction tuning similarity between nearby PPC neurons was much weaker and decayed rapidly beyond ∼200 μm. We also observed a similar association between persistent activity and functional clustering in trained recurrent neural network models embedded with a columnar topology. These results suggest that functional clustering facilitates mnemonic encoding of sensory information. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Working memory refers to our ability to temporarily store and manipulate information. Numerous studies have observed that, during working memory, neurons in higher cortical areas, such as the parietal and prefrontal cortices, mnemonically encode the remembered stimulus. However, several recent studies have failed to observe mnemonic encoding during working memory, raising the question as to why mnemonic encoding is observed during some, but not all, conditions. In this study, we show that mnemonic encoding occurs when a cortical area is organized such that nearby neurons preferentially respond to the same

  10. Computational Study of Subdural Cortical Stimulation: Effects of Simulating Anisotropic Conductivity on Activation of Cortical Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon Seo

    Full Text Available Subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS is an appealing method in the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of SuCS have been applied to determine the optimal design for electrotherapy. To achieve a better understanding of computational modeling on the stimulation effects of SuCS, the influence of anisotropic white matter conductivity on the activation of cortical neurons was investigated in a realistic head model. In this paper, we constructed pyramidal neuronal models (layers 3 and 5 that showed primary excitation of the corticospinal tract, and an anatomically realistic head model reflecting complex brain geometry. The anisotropic information was acquired from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI and then applied to the white matter at various ratios of anisotropic conductivity. First, we compared the isotropic and anisotropic models; compared to the isotropic model, the anisotropic model showed that neurons were activated in the deeper bank during cathodal stimulation and in the wider crown during anodal stimulation. Second, several popular anisotropic principles were adapted to investigate the effects of variations in anisotropic information. We observed that excitation thresholds varied with anisotropic principles, especially with anodal stimulation. Overall, incorporating anisotropic conductivity into the anatomically realistic head model is critical for accurate estimation of neuronal responses; however, caution should be used in the selection of anisotropic information.

  11. Cortical cartography reveals political and physical maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, David W; Gaillard, William Davis; Bookheimer, Susan Y; Meador, Kimford J; Ojemann, Jeffrey G

    2014-05-01

    Advances in functional imaging have provided noninvasive techniques to probe brain organization of multiple constructs including language and memory. Because of high overall rates of agreements with older techniques, including Wada testing and cortical stimulation mapping (CSM), some have proposed that those approaches should be largely abandoned because of their invasiveness, and replaced with noninvasive functional imaging methods. High overall agreement, however, is based largely on concordant language lateralization in series dominated by cases of typical cerebral dominance. Advocating a universal switch from Wada testing and cortical stimulation mapping to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) or magnetoencephalography (MEG) ignores the differences in specific expertise across epilepsy centers, many of which often have greater skill with one approach rather than the other, and that Wada, CSM, fMRI, and MEG protocols vary across institutions resulting in different outcomes and reliability. Specific patient characteristics also affect whether Wada or CSM might influence surgical management, making it difficult to accept broad recommendations against currently useful clinical tools. Although the development of noninvasive techniques has diminished the frequency of more invasive approaches, advocating their use to replace Wada testing and CSM across all epilepsy surgery programs without consideration of the different skills, protocols, and expertise at any given center site is ill-advised. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  12. SmI cortical barrels in an Australian marsupial, Trichosurus vulpecula (brush-tailed possum): structural organization, patterned distribution, and somatotopic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, W L

    1993-11-15

    This study reports on the cerebral cortex of an Australian marsupial, Trichosurus vulpecula (brush-tailed possum). It consists of an analysis of layer IV of somatosensory cortex in tangential sections of flattened specimens and in oblique radial sections stained to show Nissl substance or myelin, or tested for succinic dehydrogenase. It includes results of electrophysiological mapping experiments that ascertained the somatotopic significance of the cytoarchitecture of this cortical region. Layer IV has two interlocking cytoarchitectural fields: one granular (the barrelfield, comprising cell-dense barrels 150 to 500 microns in diameter) and one dysgranular. Only neurons within the granular field responded to light cutaneous stimulation. In the barrelfield cell-sparse septa (about 100 microns wide), low in succinic dehydrogenase activity and containing many radial myelinated axons, separate adjoining barrels. Possum barrels are "solid," lacking the prominent hollows characteristic of most rodent barrels. In some specimens three to five small neuronal "lobules" may constitute each large barrel. In tangential sections the size, shape, and arrangement of barrels combine to form a histological caricature of the possum's body, especially of the face and forepaw. Six rows of "mystacial barrels" are homeomorphic to the six rows of large mystacial vibrissae, and "forepaw barrels" are homeomorphic to the glabrous palmar and apical digital pads. Correlating cortical recording sites and receptive fields confirmed that individual barrels represent specific cutaneous regions. These results show that the cortical barrels of brush-tailed possums are remarkably similar to those of rodents, in structure, arrangement, and functional significance.

  13. Cortical columns for quick brains

    OpenAIRE

    Stoop, Ralph L.; Saase, Victor; Wagner, Clemens; Stoop, Britta; Stoop, Ruedi

    2012-01-01

    It is widely believed that the particular wiring observed within cortical columns boosts neural computation. We use rewiring of neural networks performing real-world cognitive tasks to study the validity of this argument. In a vast survey of wirings within the column we detect, however, no traces of the proposed effect. It is on the mesoscopic inter-columnar scale that the existence of columns - largely irrespective of their inner organization - enhances the speed of information transfer and ...

  14. Immunodissection and culture of rabbit cortical collecting tubule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spielman, W.S.; Sonnenburg, W.K.; Allen, M.L.; Arend, L.J.; Gerozissis, K.; Smith, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody designated IgG 3 (rct-30) has been prepared that reacts specifically with an antigen on the surface of all cells comprising the cortical and medullary rabbit renal collecting tubule including the arcades. Plastic culture dishes coated with IgG 3 (rct-30) were used to isolate collecting tubule cells from collagenase dispersions of rabbit renal cortical cells by immunoadsorption. Typically, 10 6 rabbit cortical collecting tubule (RCCT) cells were obtained from 5 g of renal cortex (2 kidneys). Between 20 and 30% of the RCCT cells were reactive with peanut lectin suggesting that RCCT cells are a mixture of principal and intercalated cells. Approximately 10 7 RCCT cells were obtained after 4 to 5 days in primary culture. Moreover, RCCT cells continued to proliferate after passaging with a doubling time of ∼32 h. RCCT cells passaged once and then cultured 4-5 days were found 1) to synthesize cAMP in response to arginine vasopressin (AVP), prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ), isoproterenol, and parathyroid hormone, but not calcitonin, prostaglandin D 2 , or prostaglandin I, and 2) to release PGE 2 in response to bradykinin but not arginine vasopressin or isoproterenol. The results indicate that cultured RCCT cells retain many of the hormonal, histochemical, and morphological properties expected for a mixture of principal and intercalated rabbit cortical collecting tubule epithelia. RCCT cells should prove useful both for studying hormonal interactions in the cortical collecting tubule and as a starting population for isolating intercalated collecting tubule epithelia

  15. Cognitive reserve and cortical thickness in preclinical Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Corinne; Soldan, Anja; Zhu, Yuxin; Wang, Mei-Cheng; Brown, Timothy; Miller, Michael; Albert, Marilyn

    2017-04-01

    This study examined whether cognitive reserve (CR) alters the relationship between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of cortical thickness and risk of progression from normal cognition to the onset of clinical symptoms associated with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The analyses included 232 participants from the BIOCARD study. Participants were cognitively normal and largely middle aged (M age = 56.5) at their baseline MRI scan. After an average of 11.8 years of longitudinal follow-up, 48 have developed clinical symptoms of MCI or dementia (M time from baseline to clinical symptom onset = 7.0 years). Mean thickness was measured over eight 'AD vulnerable' cortical regions, and cognitive reserve was indexed by a composite score consisting of years of education, reading, and vocabulary measures. Using Cox regression models, CR and cortical thickness were each independently associated with risk of clinical symptom onset within 7 years of baseline, suggesting that the neuronal injury occurring proximal to symptom onset has a direct association with clinical outcomes, regardless of CR. In contrast, there was a significant interaction between CR and mean cortical thickness for risk of progression more than 7 years from baseline, suggesting that individuals with high CR are better able to compensate for cortical thinning that is beginning to occur at the very earliest phase of AD.

  16. Lateral thinking, from the Hopfield model to cortical dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akrami, Athena; Russo, Eleonora; Treves, Alessandro

    2012-01-24

    Self-organizing attractor networks may comprise the building blocks for cortical dynamics, providing the basic operations of categorization, including analog-to-digital conversion, association and auto-association, which are then expressed as components of distinct cognitive functions depending on the contents of the neural codes in each region. To assess the viability of this scenario, we first review how a local cortical patch may be modeled as an attractor network, in which memory representations are not artificially stored as prescribed binary patterns of activity as in the Hopfield model, but self-organize as continuously graded patterns induced by afferent input. Recordings in macaques indicate that such cortical attractor networks may express retrieval dynamics over cognitively plausible rapid time scales, shorter than those dominated by neuronal fatigue. A cortical network encompassing many local attractor networks, and incorporating a realistic description of adaptation dynamics, may be captured by a Potts model. This network model has the capacity to engage long-range associations into sustained iterative attractor dynamics at a cortical scale, in what may be regarded as a mathematical model of spontaneous lateral thought. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neural Coding. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A Multimodal Perspective on the Composition of Cortical Oscillations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim C Ronnqvist

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An expanding corpus of research details the relationship between functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI measures and neuronal network oscillations. Typically, integrated electroencephalography (EEG and fMRI, or parallel magnetoencephalography (MEG and fMRI are used to draw inference about the consanguinity of BOLD and electrical measurements. However, there is a relative dearth of information about the relationship between E/MEG and the focal networks from which these signals emanate. Consequently, the genesis and composition of E/MEG oscillations requires further clarification.Here we aim to contribute to understanding through a series of parallel measurements of primary motor cortex (M1 oscillations, using human MEG and in-vitro rodent local field potentials. We compare spontaneous activity in the ~10Hz mu and 15-30Hz beta frequency ranges and compare MEG signals with independent and integrated layers III and V (LIII/LV from in vitro recordings. We explore the mechanisms of oscillatory generation, using specific pharmacological modulation with the GABA-A alpha-1 subunit modulator zolpidem. Finally, to determine the contribution of cortico-cortical connectivity, we recorded in-vitro M1, during an incision to sever lateral connections between M1 and S1 cortices.We demonstrate that frequency distribution of MEG signals appear have closer statistically similarity with signals from integrated rather than independent LIII/LV laminae. GABAergic modulation in both modalities elicited comparable changes in the power of the beta band. Finally, cortico-cortical connectivity in SMC appears to directly influence the power of the mu rhythm in LIII.These findings suggest that the MEG signal is an amalgam of outputs from LIII and LV, that multiple frequencies can arise from the same cortical area and that in vitro and MEG M1 oscillations are driven by comparable mechanisms. Finally, cortico-cortical connectivity is reflected in the power of the SMC mu

  18. Cortical deafness to dissonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, I; Blood, A J; Penhune, V; Zatorre, R

    2001-05-01

    Ordinary listeners, including infants, easily distinguish consonant from dissonant pitch combinations and consider the former more pleasant than the latter. The preference for consonance over dissonance was tested in a patient, I.R., who suffers from music perception and memory disorders as a result of bilateral lesions to the auditory cortex. In Experiment 1, I.R. was found to be unable to distinguish consonant from dissonant versions of musical excerpts taken from the classical repertoire by rating their pleasantness. I.R.'s indifference to dissonance was not due to a loss of all affective responses to music, however, since she rated the same excerpts as happy or sad, as normal controls do. In Experiment 2, I.R.'s lack of responsiveness to varying degrees of dissonance was replicated with chord sequences which had been used in a previous study using PET, in examining emotional responses to dissonance. A CT scan of I.R.'s brain was co-registered with the PET activation data from normal volunteers. Comparison of I.R.'s scan with the PET data revealed that the damaged areas overlapped with the regions identified to be involved in the perceptual analysis of the musical input, but not with the paralimbic regions involved in affective responses. Taken together, the findings suggest that dissonance may be computed bilaterally in the superior temporal gyri by specialized mechanisms prior to its emotional interpretation.

  19. Review: Cortical construction in autism spectrum disorder: columns, connectivity and the subplate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutsler, Jeffrey J; Casanova, Manuel F

    2016-02-01

    The cerebral cortex undergoes protracted maturation during human development and exemplifies how biology and environment are inextricably intertwined in the construction of complex neural circuits. Autism spectrum disorders are characterized by a number of pathological changes arising from this developmental process. These include: (i) alterations to columnar structure that have significant implications for the organization of cortical circuits and connectivity; (ii) alterations to synaptic spines on individual cortical units that may underlie specific types of connectional changes; and (iii) alterations within the cortical subplate, a region that plays a role in proper cortical development and in regulating interregional communication in the mature brain. Although the cerebral cortex is not the only structure affected in the disorder, it is a fundamental contributor to the behaviours that characterize autism. These alterations to cortical circuitry likely underlie the behavioural phenotype in autism and contribute to the unique pattern of deficits and strengths that characterize cognitive functioning. Recent findings within the cortical subplate may indicate that alterations to cortical construction begin prenatally, before activity-dependent connections are established, and are in need of further study. A better understanding of cortical development in autism spectrum disorders will draw bridges between the microanatomical computational circuitry and the atypical behaviours that arise when that circuitry is modified. In addition, it will allow us to better exploit the constructional plasticity within the brain to design more targeted interventions that better manage atypical cortical construction and that can be applied very early in postnatal life. © 2015 British Neuropathological Society.

  20. The turtle visual system mediates a complex spatiotemporal transformation of visual stimuli into cortical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseini, Mahmood S; Pobst, Jeff; Wright, Nathaniel C; Clawson, Wesley; Shew, Woodrow; Wessel, Ralf

    2018-02-01

    The three-layered visual cortex of turtle is characterized by extensive intracortical axonal projections and receives non-retinotopic axonal projections from lateral geniculate nucleus. What spatiotemporal transformation of visual stimuli into cortical activity arises from such tangle of malleable cortical inputs and intracortical connections? To address this question, we obtained band-pass filtered extracellular recordings of neural activity in turtle dorsal cortex during visual stimulation of the retina. We discovered important spatial and temporal features of stimulus-modulated cortical local field potential (LFP) recordings. Spatial receptive fields span large areas of the visual field, have an intricate internal structure, and lack directional tuning. The receptive field structure varies across recording sites in a distant-dependent manner. Such composite spatial organization of stimulus-modulated cortical activity is accompanied by an equally multifaceted temporal organization. Cortical visual responses are delayed, persistent, and oscillatory. Further, prior cortical activity contributes globally to adaptation in turtle visual cortex. In conclusion, these results demonstrate convoluted spatiotemporal transformations of visual stimuli into stimulus-modulated cortical activity that, at present, largely evade computational frameworks.

  1. Toward more versatile and intuitive cortical brain machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Richard A.; Kellis, Spencer; Klaes, Christian; Aflalo, Tyson

    2015-01-01

    Brain machine interfaces have great potential in neuroprosthetic applications to assist patients with brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases. One type of BMI is a cortical motor prosthetic which is used to assist paralyzed subjects. Motor prosthetics to date have typically used the motor cortex as a source of neural signals for controlling external devices. The review will focus on several new topics in the arena of cortical prosthetics. These include using 1) recordings from cortical areas outside motor cortex; 2) local field potentials (LFPs) as a source of recorded signals; 3) somatosensory feedback for more dexterous control of robotics; and 4) new decoding methods that work in concert to form an ecology of decode algorithms. These new advances hold promise in greatly accelerating the applicability and ease of operation of motor prosthetics. PMID:25247368

  2. FOCAL CORTICAL DYSPLASIAS: CLINICAL AND ELECTRO-NEUROIMAGING CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of a notable advance made in epileptology, resistant epilepsies account for approximately 30 % of all forms of epilepsy particularly in patients with focal seizures. One of the main causes of therapy-resistant focal epilepsies is focal cortical dysplasias (FCD. This term was first introduced by D. Taylor et al. in 1971. FCD belongs to abnormal cortical development. Among all abnormalities of cortical development, FCD in surgically treated children amounts to 75 %. FCD is the most common cause of resistant epilepsy in children and the most frequent reason for diagnosing cryptogenic focal epilepsy with intractable seizures. The author gives a detailed literature review dedicated to FCD as a cause of resistant epilepsy, including the classification and histologic characteristics of FCD, its clinical manifestations and prognosis, and approaches to medical and surgical treatments. 

  3. [Cortical representation of nonclassical parts of the visual system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukanidina, V E; Zagorul'ko, T M

    1978-01-01

    Cortical evoked potentials and extracellular evoked neuronal activity have been investigated in unanesthetized d-curarine immobilized rats during stimulation of the superior colliculi. The focus of responses was found in the lateral part of the visual neocortex (area 18a according to Krieg [5]). The evoked potential includes a negative and subsequent positive waves, its latency being equal to 7.9 +/- 2.8 msec. With deepening the electrode the amplitude of the response decreases, although its polarity remains unchanged. The neuronal activity is of phasic character. During simultaneous record of the evoked potentials and neuronal activity, temporal correlation between impulse activity and the ascending part of the main negative wave of the EP is observed. The data obtained indicate imcomplete overlapping of the retino-geniculo-cortical and retino-tecto-thalamo-cortical channels in the visual system of rats.

  4. Investigation of cortical thickness abnormalities in lithium-free adults with bipolar type I disorder using cortical pattern matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foland-Ross, Lara C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Sugar, Catherine A.; Madsen, Sarah K.; Shen, Jim K.; Penfold, Conor; Ahlf, Kyle; Rasser, Paul E.; Fischer, Jeffrey; Yang, Yilan; Townsend, Jennifer; Bookheimer, Susan Y.; Altshuler, Lori L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Several lines of evidence implicate gray matter abnormalities in the prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex in patients with bipolar disorder. Findings however, have been largely inconsistent across studies. Differences in patients’ medication status or mood state, or the application of traditional volumetric methods that are insensitive to subtle neuroanatomic differences may have contributed to these inconsistent findings. Given this, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in conjunction with cortical pattern matching methods to assess cortical thickness abnormalities in euthymic bipolar subjects who were not treated with lithium. Method Sixty-five subjects, including 34 lithium-free euthymic subjects with bipolar (type I) disorder and 31 healthy subjects were scanned using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Data were processed to measure cortical gray matter thickness. Cortical pattern matching methods associated homologous brain regions across subjects. Spatially normalized thickness maps were analyzed to assess illness effects and associations with clinical variables. Results Relative to healthy subjects, euthymic bipolar I subjects had significantly thinner gray matter in bilateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann Areas 11, 10, 8 and 44) and left anterior cingulate cortex (Brodmann Areas 24/32). Additionally, thinning in these regions was more pronounced in patients with a history of psychosis. No areas of thicker cortex were detected in bipolar subjects versus healthy subjects. Conclusions Using a technique that is highly sensitive to subtle neuroanatomic differences, significant regional cortical thinning was found in euthymic subjects with bipolar disorder. Clinical implications are discussed. PMID:21285139

  5. Bayesian automated cortical segmentation for neonatal MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Zane; Paquette, Natacha; Ganesh, Bhavana; Wang, Yalin; Ceschin, Rafael; Nelson, Marvin D.; Macyszyn, Luke; Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Panigrahy, Ashok; Lepore, Natasha

    2017-11-01

    Several attempts have been made in the past few years to develop and implement an automated segmentation of neonatal brain structural MRI. However, accurate automated MRI segmentation remains challenging in this population because of the low signal-to-noise ratio, large partial volume effects and inter-individual anatomical variability of the neonatal brain. In this paper, we propose a learning method for segmenting the whole brain cortical grey matter on neonatal T2-weighted images. We trained our algorithm using a neonatal dataset composed of 3 fullterm and 4 preterm infants scanned at term equivalent age. Our segmentation pipeline combines the FAST algorithm from the FSL library software and a Bayesian segmentation approach to create a threshold matrix that minimizes the error of mislabeling brain tissue types. Our method shows promising results with our pilot training set. In both preterm and full-term neonates, automated Bayesian segmentation generates a smoother and more consistent parcellation compared to FAST, while successfully removing the subcortical structure and cleaning the edges of the cortical grey matter. This method show promising refinement of the FAST segmentation by considerably reducing manual input and editing required from the user, and further improving reliability and processing time of neonatal MR images. Further improvement will include a larger dataset of training images acquired from different manufacturers.

  6. Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials in Unsuccessful Cochlear Implant Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munivrana, Boska; Mildner, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    In some cochlear implant users, success is not achieved in spite of optimal clinical factors (including age at implantation, duration of rehabilitation and post-implant hearing level), which may be attributed to disorders at higher levels of the auditory pathway. We used cortical auditory evoked potentials to investigate the ability to perceive…

  7. Construction of 4D high-definition cortical surface atlases of infants: Methods and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Wang, Li; Shi, Feng; Gilmore, John H; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-10-01

    In neuroimaging, cortical surface atlases play a fundamental role for spatial normalization, analysis, visualization, and comparison of results across individuals and different studies. However, existing cortical surface atlases created for adults are not suitable for infant brains during the first two postnatal years, which is the most dynamic period of postnatal structural and functional development of the highly-folded cerebral cortex. Therefore, spatiotemporal cortical surface atlases for infant brains are highly desired yet still lacking for accurate mapping of early dynamic brain development. To bridge this significant gap, leveraging our infant-dedicated computational pipeline for cortical surface-based analysis and the unique longitudinal infant MRI dataset acquired in our research center, in this paper, we construct the first spatiotemporal (4D) high-definition cortical surface atlases for the dynamic developing infant cortical structures at seven time points, including 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months of age, based on 202 serial MRI scans from 35 healthy infants. For this purpose, we develop a novel method to ensure the longitudinal consistency and unbiasedness to any specific subject and age in our 4D infant cortical surface atlases. Specifically, we first compute the within-subject mean cortical folding by unbiased groupwise registration of longitudinal cortical surfaces of each infant. Then we establish longitudinally-consistent and unbiased inter-subject cortical correspondences by groupwise registration of the geometric features of within-subject mean cortical folding across all infants. Our 4D surface atlases capture both longitudinally-consistent dynamic mean shape changes and the individual variability of cortical folding during early brain development. Experimental results on two independent infant MRI datasets show that using our 4D infant cortical surface atlases as templates leads to significantly improved accuracy for spatial normalization

  8. Double layers in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlqvist, P.

    1982-01-01

    For more than a decade it has been realised that electrostatic double layers are likely to occur in space. The author briefly discusses the theoretical background of such double layers. Most of the paper is devoted to an account of the observational evidence for double layers in the ionosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth. Several different experiments are reviewed including rocket and satellite measurements and ground based observations. It is concluded that the observational evidence for double layers in space is very strong. The experimental results indicate that double layers with widely different properties may exist in space. (Auth.)

  9. Cortical spatiotemporal dimensionality reduction for visual grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocci, Giacomo; Barbieri, Davide; Citti, Giovanna; Sarti, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    The visual systems of many mammals, including humans, are able to integrate the geometric information of visual stimuli and perform cognitive tasks at the first stages of the cortical processing. This is thought to be the result of a combination of mechanisms, which include feature extraction at the single cell level and geometric processing by means of cell connectivity. We present a geometric model of such connectivities in the space of detected features associated with spatiotemporal visual stimuli and show how they can be used to obtain low-level object segmentation. The main idea is to define a spectral clustering procedure with anisotropic affinities over data sets consisting of embeddings of the visual stimuli into higher-dimensional spaces. Neural plausibility of the proposed arguments will be discussed.

  10. On the growth and form of cortical convolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallinen, Tuomas; Chung, Jun Young; Rousseau, François; Girard, Nadine; Lefèvre, Julien; Mahadevan, L.

    2016-06-01

    The rapid growth of the human cortex during development is accompanied by the folding of the brain into a highly convoluted structure. Recent studies have focused on the genetic and cellular regulation of cortical growth, but understanding the formation of the gyral and sulcal convolutions also requires consideration of the geometry and physical shaping of the growing brain. To study this, we use magnetic resonance images to build a 3D-printed layered gel mimic of the developing smooth fetal brain; when immersed in a solvent, the outer layer swells relative to the core, mimicking cortical growth. This relative growth puts the outer layer into mechanical compression and leads to sulci and gyri similar to those in fetal brains. Starting with the same initial geometry, we also build numerical simulations of the brain modelled as a soft tissue with a growing cortex, and show that this also produces the characteristic patterns of convolutions over a realistic developmental course. All together, our results show that although many molecular determinants control the tangential expansion of the cortex, the size, shape, placement and orientation of the folds arise through iterations and variations of an elementary mechanical instability modulated by early fetal brain geometry.

  11. Responses of vibrissa-sensitive cortical neurons in normal and prenatally x-irradiated rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, M.; Kawabata, M.; Shoji, R.

    1979-01-01

    Rats were irradiated by 200 R of x ray on day 17 of gestation through the body wall of the mother. When they underwent the following electrophysiological tests at the age of 3 to 4 month, the somatosensory cortex showed a lack of layers II, III, IV, and Va. Spike responses to quick whisker deflections were recorded from single cells in the somatosenory cortex of normal and prenatally x-irradiated rats. For the irradiated rats the response latency was prolonged when compared to the normal controls. Cortical laminar analysis of field potentials revealed that there was no difference in the latency of these potentials between the two groups, suggesting that vibrissal sensory signals reach the cortical level normally even in the irradiated rats. The prolonged latency of the irradiated cortical neuronal response could thus be ascribed to an abnormal intracortical delay, which was most likely associated with the failure of development of layer IV stellate cells in these preparations

  12. Molecular Disorganization of Axons Adjacent to Human Cortical Microinfarcts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Coban

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cortical microinfarcts (CMIs are microscopically identified wedge-shaped ischemic lesions that occur at or near the cortical surface and result from occlusion of penetrating arterioles. These microscopic lesions can be observed with high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging in aging brains and in patients with cerebrovascular disease. Recent studies have suggested that strategically located microinfarcts strongly correlate with cognitive deficits, which can contribute to Alzheimer’s disease as well as other forms of dementia. We have recently shown that the molecular organization of axons into functional microdomains is altered in areas adjacent to white matter lacunar and microinfarcts, creating a peri-infarct penumbral injury in surviving axons. Whether similar changes in nodal, adjacent paranodal, and proximal axon initial segment molecular organization occur in the cortex adjacent to human CMIs is not known. Paraffin-embedded sections of autopsy brain tissue from five patients with CMIs were immunofluorescently labeled for nodal and paranodal markers including beta-IV spectrin, ankyrin-G, and contactin-associated protein. High magnification images from the peri-infarct cortical tissue were generated using confocal microscopy. In surviving cortical tissue adjacent to microinfarcts, we observed a dramatic loss of axon initial segments, suggesting that neuronal firing capacity in adjacent cortical tissue is likely compromised. The number of identifiable nodal/paranodal complexes in surviving cortical tissue is reduced adjacent to microinfarcts, while the average paranodal length is increased indicating a breakdown of axoglial contact. This axonal microdomain disorganization occurs in the relative absence of changes in the structural integrity of myelinated axons as measured by myelin basic protein and neurofilament staining. These findings indicate that the molecular organization of surviving axons adjacent to human CMIs is abnormal

  13. [Infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey's disease)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovská, M; Stejskal, J; Koutecký, J

    1980-02-01

    A 3-month old infant was found to suffer from a solid painless soft tissue swelling situated in his left scapular region and accompanied by pronounced anaemia and raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The ominous clinical course as well as X-ray pictures of the scapula gave rise to a suspicion of a malignant tumour development. Biopsy from the surface of the bone gave no unambiguous answer. A histological examination of the whole surgically removed shoulder blade revealed the presence of infantile cortical hyperostosis.

  14. MRI of focal cortical dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.C.P.; Hatfield, G.A.; Bourgeois, B.; Park, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    We studied nine cases of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) by MRI, with surface-rendered 3D reconstructions. One case was also examined using single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy (MRS). The histological features were reviewed and correlated with the MRI findings. The gyri affected by FCD were enlarged and the signal of the cortex was slightly increased on T1-weighted images. The gray-white junction was indistinct. Signal from the subcortical white matter was decreased on T1- and increased on T2-weighted images in most cases. Contrast enhancement was seen in two cases. Proton MRS showed a spectrum identical to that of normal brain. (orig.) (orig.)

  15. How the Venetian Blind Percept Emergesfrom the Laminar Cortical Dynamics of 3D Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eGrossberg

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The 3D LAMINART model of 3D vision and figure-ground perception is used to explain and simulate a key example of the Venetian blind effect and show how it is related to other well-known perceptual phenomena such as Panum's limiting case. The model shows how identified neurons that interact in hierarchically organized laminar circuits of the visual cortex can simulate many properties of 3D vision percepts, notably consciously seen surface percepts, which are predicted to arise when filled-in surface representations are integrated into surface-shroud resonances between visual and parietal cortex. The model describes how monocular and binocular oriented filtering interacts with later stages of 3D boundary formation and surface filling-in in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN and cortical areas V1, V2, and V4. It proposes how interactions between layers 4, 3B, and 2/3 in V1 and V2 contribute to stereopsis, and how binocular and monocular information combine to form 3D boundary and surface representations. The model suggests how surface-to-boundary feedback from V2 thin stripes to pale stripes enables computationally complementary boundary and surface formation properties to generate a single consistent percept, eliminate redundant 3D boundaries, and trigger figure-ground perception. The model also shows how false binocular boundary matches may be eliminated by Gestalt grouping properties. In particular, a disparity filter, which helps to solve the Correspondence Problem by eliminating false matches, is predicted to be realized as part of the boundary grouping process in layer 2/3 of cortical area V2. The model has been used to simulate the consciously seen 3D surface percepts in 18 psychophysical experiments. These percepts include the Venetian blind effect, Panum's limiting case, contrast variations of dichoptic masking and the correspondence problem, the effect of interocular contrast differences on stereoacuity, stereopsis with polarity

  16. Communication and wiring in the cortical connectome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, Julian M L; Kisvárday, Zoltán F

    2012-01-01

    In cerebral cortex, the huge mass of axonal wiring that carries information between near and distant neurons is thought to provide the neural substrate for cognitive and perceptual function. The goal of mapping the connectivity of cortical axons at different spatial scales, the cortical connectome, is to trace the paths of information flow in cerebral cortex. To appreciate the relationship between the connectome and cortical function, we need to discover the nature and purpose of the wiring principles underlying cortical connectivity. A popular explanation has been that axonal length is strictly minimized both within and between cortical regions. In contrast, we have hypothesized the existence of a multi-scale principle of cortical wiring where to optimize communication there is a trade-off between spatial (construction) and temporal (routing) costs. Here, using recent evidence concerning cortical spatial networks we critically evaluate this hypothesis at neuron, local circuit, and pathway scales. We report three main conclusions. First, the axonal and dendritic arbor morphology of single neocortical neurons may be governed by a similar wiring principle, one that balances the conservation of cellular material and conduction delay. Second, the same principle may be observed for fiber tracts connecting cortical regions. Third, the absence of sufficient local circuit data currently prohibits any meaningful assessment of the hypothesis at this scale of cortical organization. To avoid neglecting neuron and microcircuit levels of cortical organization, the connectome framework should incorporate more morphological description. In addition, structural analyses of temporal cost for cortical circuits should take account of both axonal conduction and neuronal integration delays, which appear mostly of the same order of magnitude. We conclude the hypothesized trade-off between spatial and temporal costs may potentially offer a powerful explanation for cortical wiring patterns.

  17. Cortical Gyrification Patterns Associated with Trait Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Miskovich, Tara A.; Pedersen, Walker S.; Belleau, Emily L.; Shollenbarger, Skyler; Lisdahl, Krista M.; Larson, Christine L.

    2016-01-01

    Dispositional anxiety is a stable personality trait that is a key risk factor for internalizing disorders, and understanding the neural correlates of trait anxiety may help us better understand the development of these disorders. Abnormal cortical folding is thought to reflect differences in cortical connectivity occurring during brain development. Therefore, assessing gyrification may advance understanding of cortical development and organization associated with trait anxiety. Previous liter...

  18. Loss of nonphosphorylated neurofilament immunoreactivity in temporal cortical areas in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangavel, R; Sahu, S K; Van Hoesen, G W; Zaheer, A

    2009-05-05

    The distribution of immunoreactive neurons with nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein (SMI32) was studied in temporal cortical areas in normal subjects and in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). SMI32 immunopositive neurons were localized mainly in cortical layers II, III, V and VI, and were medium to large-sized pyramidal neurons. Patients with AD had prominent degeneration of SMI32 positive neurons in layers III and V of Brodmann areas 38, 36, 35 and 20; in layers II and IV of the entorhinal cortex (Brodmann area 28); and hippocampal neurons. Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) were stained with Thioflavin-S and with an antibody (AT8) against hyperphosphorylated tau. The NFT distribution was compared to that of the neuronal cytoskeletal marker SMI32 in these temporal cortical regions. The results showed that the loss of SMI32 immunoreactivity in temporal cortical regions of AD brain is paralleled by an increase in NFTs and AT8 immunoreactivity in neurons. The SMI32 immunoreactivity was drastically reduced in the cortical layers where tangle-bearing neurons are localized. A strong SMI32 immunoreactivity was observed in numerous neurons containing NFTs by double-immunolabeling with SMI32 and AT8. However, few neurons were labeled by AT8 and SMI32. These results suggest that the development of NFTs in some neurons results from some alteration in SMI32 expression, but does not account for all, particularly, early NFT-related changes. Also, there is a clear correlation of NFTs with selective population of pyramidal neurons in the temporal cortical areas and these pyramidal cells are specifically prone to formation of paired helical filaments. Furthermore, these pyramidal neurons might represent a significant portion of the neurons of origin of long corticocortical connection, and consequently contribute to the destruction of memory-related input to the hippocampal formation.

  19. Triple-layer appearance of Brodmann area 4 at thin-section double inversion-recovery MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eung Yeop; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Chang, Jong-Hee; Yoo, Eunhye; Lee, Jae-Wook; Park, Hae-Jeong

    2009-02-01

    To investigate whether thin-section axial double inversion-recovery (DIR) brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 3.0 T can help distinguish the primary motor cortex (PMC), or Brodmann area 4, from other selected cortical regions, including the primary sensory cortex (PSC), or Brodmann areas 1-3, on the basis of the presence of a "triple-layer" appearance. This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board; informed consent was obtained from patients. This study included 191 patients (94 female, age range, 5-80 years; 97 male, age range, 5-76 years) with normal findings at 3.0-T MR imaging. The presence or absence of a triple-layer appearance within selected cortical regions on DIR images was graded independently by two neuroradiologists as definitely present (grade 2), probably present (grade 1), or definitely absent (grade 0). Ten additional patients with tumors underwent DIR imaging and intraoperative cortical mapping for further validation of the PMC. A myelin-stained brain specimen image in a patient not imaged with DIR was correlated with a representative set of DIR images. A triple-layer appearance was found in the PMC bilaterally in 184 of 191 patients; grade 0 was assigned in only seven patients, who were all younger than 10 years. Grades were significantly lower in patients younger than 10 years than in others (P .0018). Interobserver agreement was excellent (weighted kappa = 0.843). The PMC determined on DIR images was confirmed with cortical mapping in all 10 patients with tumors. Triple-layer appearance was not present in the other cortical regions examined, including the PSC (P < .01). The triple-layer appearance on DIR images corresponded to the myelin band within the PMC present on the myelin-stained specimen image. A triple-layer appearance was found in the PMC at thin-section 3.0-T DIR imaging but not in other examined brain regions and therefore might be useful as an adjunct sign for identification of motor regions.

  20. Mouse embryonic retina delivers information controlling cortical neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Bonetti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The relative contribution of extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms to cortical development is an intensely debated issue and an outstanding question in neurobiology. Currently, the emerging view is that interplay between intrinsic genetic mechanisms and extrinsic information shape different stages of cortical development. Yet, whereas the intrinsic program of early neocortical developmental events has been at least in part decoded, the exact nature and impact of extrinsic signaling are still elusive and controversial. We found that in the mouse developing visual system, acute pharmacological inhibition of spontaneous retinal activity (retinal waves-RWs during embryonic stages increase the rate of corticogenesis (cell cycle withdrawal. Furthermore, early perturbation of retinal spontaneous activity leads to changes of cortical layer structure at a later time point. These data suggest that mouse embryonic retina delivers long-distance information capable of modulating cell genesis in the developing visual cortex and that spontaneous activity is the candidate long-distance acting extrinsic cue mediating this process. In addition, these data may support spontaneous activity to be a general signal coordinating neurogenesis in other developing sensory pathways or areas of the central nervous system.

  1. Hyperfixation of Tc-99m ECD in subacute cortical infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Seung; Kweon, Sun Uck; Ryu, Jin Sook; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Lee, Hee Kyung [College of Medicine, Ulsan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    It has been known that hyperfixation of Tc-99m ECD (HF) is not shown in subacute cerebral infarction because the brain distribution of Tc-99m ECD reflects not only perfusion but also the metabolic status of brain tissue. However, we observed several cases with HF in the subacute pure cortical infarction. To find out the cause of HF in subacute cortical infarction. We assessed the difference in associated cerebral hemodynamics and clinical findings between the subacute cortical infarctions with and without HF. We reviewed 16 patients (63.8{+-}8.6 yr, M/F: 15/1) with pure cortical infarction not involving adjacent subcortical white matter on MRI. All patients underwent acetazolamide stress brain perfusion SPECT using Tc-99m ECD and MRI at subacute period (7.3{+-}4.4 days from ictus). Uptake of Tc-99m ECD in infarcted cortex was assessed visually comparing the contralateral side. To assess the difference in associate clinical findings between the infarctions with and without HF, rCVR of the cerebral territory including infarcted cortex, extent of Gd-enhancement on MRI. Intervals between SPECT and ictus, and the presence of associated ICA stenosis were evaluated. Infarctions were focal (n=8) or multifocal (n=8) and located in frontoparietal cortices on MRI. Twelve patients were accompanied with ipsilateral ICA stenosis. Resting SPECT showed increased cortical uptake (=HF) in 7 patients and decreased in 9. rCVR of the MCA territory was preserved in all of the 7 patients with HF, compared with 4 of the 9 patients without HF (p=0.03). Gd-enhancement was minimal in all of the 7 patients with HF, compared with of the 0 patients without HF (p=0.03). Presence of ipsilateral ICA stenosis and intervals from ictus were not different (p>0.1) Subacute cerebral cortical infarction with HF was more frequently associated with preserved rCVR and minimal destruction of the blood-brain barrier than that without HF. Our findings suggest that HF may result from luxury perfusion of

  2. Dynacortin contributes to cortical viscoelasticity and helps define the shape changes of cytokinesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Kristine D; Chaney, Charles; Delannoy, Michael; Kuo, Scot C; Robinson, Douglas N

    2004-01-01

    During cytokinesis, global and equatorial pathways deform the cell cortex in a stereotypical manner, which leads to daughter cell separation. Equatorial forces are largely generated by myosin-II and the actin crosslinker, cortexillin-I. In contrast, global mechanics are determined by the cortical cytoskeleton, including the actin crosslinker, dynacortin. We used direct morphometric characterization and laser-tracking microrheology to quantify cortical mechanical properties of wild-type and cortexillin-I and dynacortin mutant Dictyostelium cells. Both cortexillin-I and dynacortin influence cytokinesis and interphase cortical viscoelasticity as predicted from genetics and biochemical data using purified dynacortin proteins. Our studies suggest that the regulation of cytokinesis ultimately requires modulation of proteins that control the cortical mechanical properties that establish the force-balance that specifies the shapes of cytokinesis. The combination of genetic, biochemical, and biophysical observations suggests that the cell's cortical mechanical properties control how the cortex is remodeled during cytokinesis. PMID:15014435

  3. Amygdala lesions do not compromise the cortical network for false-belief reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spunt, Robert P; Elison, Jed T; Dufour, Nicholas; Hurlemann, René; Saxe, Rebecca; Adolphs, Ralph

    2015-04-14

    The amygdala plays an integral role in human social cognition and behavior, with clear links to emotion recognition, trust judgments, anthropomorphization, and psychiatric disorders ranging from social phobia to autism. A central feature of human social cognition is a theory-of-mind (ToM) that enables the representation other people's mental states as distinct from one's own. Numerous neuroimaging studies of the best studied use of ToM--false-belief reasoning--suggest that it relies on a specific cortical network; moreover, the amygdala is structurally and functionally connected with many components of this cortical network. It remains unknown whether the cortical implementation of any form of ToM depends on amygdala function. Here we investigated this question directly by conducting functional MRI on two patients with rare bilateral amygdala lesions while they performed a neuroimaging protocol standardized for measuring cortical activity associated with false-belief reasoning. We compared patient responses with those of two healthy comparison groups that included 480 adults. Based on both univariate and multivariate comparisons, neither patient showed any evidence of atypical cortical activity or any evidence of atypical behavioral performance; moreover, this pattern of typical cortical and behavioral response was replicated for both patients in a follow-up session. These findings argue that the amygdala is not necessary for the cortical implementation of ToM in adulthood and suggest a reevaluation of the role of the amygdala and its cortical interactions in human social cognition.

  4. Meta-structure and tunable optical device including the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seunghoon; Papadakis, Georgia Theano; Atwater, Harry

    2017-12-26

    A meta-structure and a tunable optical device including the same are provided. The meta-structure includes a plurality of metal layers spaced apart from one another, an active layer spaced apart from the plurality of metal layers and having a carrier concentration that is tuned according to an electric signal applied to the active layer and the plurality of metal layers, and a plurality of dielectric layers spaced apart from one another and each having one surface contacting a metal layer among the plurality of metal layers and another surface contacting the active layer.

  5. Topological insulator homojunctions including magnetic layers: the example of n-p type (n-QLs Bi.sub.2./sub.Se.sub.3./sub./Mn-Bi.sub.2./sub.Se.sub.3./sub.) heterostructures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vališka, M.; Warmuth, J.; Michiardi, M.; Vondráček, Martin; Ngankeu, A.S.; Holý, V.; Sechovský, V.; Springholz, G.; Bianchi, M.; Wiebe, J.; Hofmann, P.; Honolka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 108, č. 26 (2016), 1-4, č. článku 262402. ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA MŠk LO1409; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-30062S Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) Fellowship J. E. Purkyně Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : topological insulator * Mn-Bi2Se 3 * homojunction * ARPES Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.411, year: 2016

  6. Cortical thickness and brain volumetric analysis in body dysmorphic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Sarah K; Zai, Alex; Pirnia, Tara; Arienzo, Donatello; Zhan, Liang; Moody, Teena D; Thompson, Paul M; Feusner, Jamie D

    2015-04-30

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) suffer from preoccupations with perceived defects in physical appearance, causing severe distress and disability. Although BDD affects 1-2% of the population, the neurobiology is not understood. Discrepant results in previous volumetric studies may be due to small sample sizes, and no study has investigated cortical thickness in BDD. The current study is the largest neuroimaging analysis of BDD. Participants included 49 medication-free, right-handed individuals with DSM-IV BDD and 44 healthy controls matched by age, sex, and education. Using high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, we computed vertex-wise gray matter (GM) thickness on the cortical surface and GM volume using voxel-based morphometry. We also computed volumes in cortical and subcortical regions of interest. In addition to group comparisons, we investigated associations with symptom severity, insight, and anxiety within the BDD group. In BDD, greater anxiety was significantly associated with thinner GM in the left superior temporal cortex and greater GM volume in the right caudate nucleus. There were no significant differences in cortical thickness, GM volume, or volumes in regions of interest between BDD and control subjects. Subtle associations with clinical symptoms may characterize brain morphometric patterns in BDD, rather than large group differences in brain structure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Frontal Cortical Atrophy as a Predictor of Poststroke Apathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, Ján; Mikula, Peter; Budiš, Jaroslav; Valkovič, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to identify associations between the symptoms of poststroke apathy and sociodemographic, stroke-related (severity of stroke, degree of disability, and performance in activities of daily living), and radiological correlates. We determined the degree of cortical and subcortical brain atrophy, the severity of white matter and basal ganglia lesions on baseline computed tomography (CT) scans, and the localization of acute ischemia on control CT or magnetic resonance imaging scans in subacute stages of stroke. During follow-up examinations, in addition to the assessment of apathy symptoms using the Apathy Scale, we also evaluated symptoms of depression and anxiety using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The study included 47 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke. Correlates significantly associated with apathy, determined at baseline and during follow-up, were entered into the "predictive" and "associative" multiple regression models, respectively. Frontal cortical atrophy and symptoms of depression were most strongly associated with poststroke apathy symptoms. In order to model an interrelation between both cortical atrophy and white matter lesions and aging, we supplemented 2 additional "predictive" models using interaction variables, whereby we confirmed the role of frontal cortical atrophy as a predictor of poststroke apathy also as a function of the increasing age of patients. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Cortical network architecture for context processing in primate brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Zenas C; Nagasaka, Yasuo; Fujii, Naotaka

    2015-09-29

    Context is information linked to a situation that can guide behavior. In the brain, context is encoded by sensory processing and can later be retrieved from memory. How context is communicated within the cortical network in sensory and mnemonic forms is unknown due to the lack of methods for high-resolution, brain-wide neuronal recording and analysis. Here, we report the comprehensive architecture of a cortical network for context processing. Using hemisphere-wide, high-density electrocorticography, we measured large-scale neuronal activity from monkeys observing videos of agents interacting in situations with different contexts. We extracted five context-related network structures including a bottom-up network during encoding and, seconds later, cue-dependent retrieval of the same network with the opposite top-down connectivity. These findings show that context is represented in the cortical network as distributed communication structures with dynamic information flows. This study provides a general methodology for recording and analyzing cortical network neuronal communication during cognition.

  9. Synaptic transmission and plasticity in an active cortical network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Reig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cerebral cortex is permanently active during both awake and sleep states. This ongoing cortical activity has an impact on synaptic transmission and short-term plasticity. An activity pattern generated by the cortical network is a slow rhythmic activity that alternates up (active and down (silent states, a pattern occurring during slow wave sleep, anesthesia and even in vitro. Here we have studied 1 how network activity affects short term synaptic plasticity and, 2 how synaptic transmission varies in up versus down states. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Intracellular recordings obtained from cortex in vitro and in vivo were used to record synaptic potentials, while presynaptic activation was achieved either with electrical or natural stimulation. Repetitive activation of layer 4 to layer 2/3 synaptic connections from ferret visual cortex slices displayed synaptic augmentation that was larger and longer lasting in active than in silent slices. Paired-pulse facilitation was also significantly larger in an active network and it persisted for longer intervals (up to 200 ms than in silent slices. Intracortical synaptic potentials occurring during up states in vitro increased their amplitude while paired-pulse facilitation disappeared. Both intracortical and thalamocortical synaptic potentials were also significantly larger in up than in down states in the cat visual cortex in vivo. These enhanced synaptic potentials did not further facilitate when pairs of stimuli were given, thus paired-pulse facilitation during up states in vivo was virtually absent. Visually induced synaptic responses displayed larger amplitudes when occurring during up versus down states. This was further tested in rat barrel cortex, where a sensory activated synaptic potential was also larger in up states. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results imply that synaptic transmission in an active cortical network is more secure and efficient due to larger amplitude of

  10. Cortical Divergent Projections in Mice Originate from Two Sequentially Generated, Distinct Populations of Excitatory Cortical Neurons with Different Initial Axonal Outgrowth Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Yumiko; Namikawa, Tomohiro; Yamauchi, Kenta; Kawaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-05-01

    Excitatory cortical neurons project to various subcortical and intracortical regions, and exhibit diversity in their axonal connections. Although this diversity may develop from primary axons, how many types of axons initially occur remains unknown. Using a sparse-labeling in utero electroporation method, we investigated the axonal outgrowth of these neurons in mice and correlated the data with axonal projections in adults. Examination of lateral cortex neurons labeled during the main period of cortical neurogenesis (E11.5-E15.5) indicated that axonal outgrowth commonly occurs in the intermediate zone. Conversely, the axonal direction varied; neurons labeled before E12.5 and the earliest cortical plate neurons labeled at E12.5 projected laterally, whereas neurons labeled thereafter projected medially. The expression of Ctip2 and Satb2 and the layer destinations of these neurons support the view that lateral and medial projection neurons are groups of prospective subcortical and callosal projection neurons, respectively. Consistently, birthdating experiments demonstrated that presumptive lateral projection neurons were generated earlier than medial projection neurons, even within the same layer. These results suggest that the divergent axonal connections of excitatory cortical neurons begin from two types of primary axons, which originate from two sequentially generated distinct subpopulations: early-born lateral (subcortical) and later-born medial (callosal) projection neuron groups. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. The cortical contrast accumulation from brain computed tomography after endovascular treatment predicts symptomatic hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J M; Park, K Y; Lee, W J; Byun, J S; Kim, J K; Park, M S; Ahn, S W; Shin, H W

    2015-11-01

    The prognostic value of contrast accumulation from non-contrast brain computed tomography taken immediately after endovascular reperfusion treatment in acute ischaemic stroke patients to predict symptomatic hemorrhage was studied. Between July 2007 and August 2014, acute anterior circulation ischaemic stroke patients who were treated by intra-arterial thrombolysis or thrombectomy were included. Contrast accumulation was defined as a high attenuation area from non-contrast brain computed tomography immediately taken after endovascular reperfusion treatment, and patients were categorized into three groups according to the presence and location of contrast: (i) negative, (ii) cortical involvement and (iii) non-cortical involvement. The rates of symptomatic hemorrhage after 24 h and functional outcome at discharge were compared between patients with and without cortical involvement. Of 64 patients who were treated by endovascular intervention, contrast accumulation was detected in 56, including 33 patients with cortical involvement and 23 patients without cortical involvement. The cortical involvement pattern was more frequently associated with symptomatic hemorrhage (13 vs. 1 patient, P = 0.003) and with grave outcome at discharge with modified Rankin Scale 5 or 6 (14 vs. 4, P = 0.048) than the non-cortical involvement group. Multivariate logistic regression analysis including initial collateral status and occlusion site disclosed that cortical involvement pattern independently predicted symptomatic hemorrhage after endovascular treatment (odds ratio 19.0, confidence interval 1.6-227.6, P = 0.020). Our study provides evidence that the cortical involvement of contrast accumulation is associated with symptomatic hemorrhage after endovascular reperfusion treatment. © 2015 EAN.

  12. Revisiting the enigmatic cortical calretinin-expressing interneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno eCauli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cortical calretinin (CR-expressing interneurons represent a heterogeneous subpopulation of about 10-30% of GABAergic interneurons, which altogether total ca. 12-20% of all cortical neurons. In the rodent neocortex, CR cells display different somatodendritic morphologies ranging from bipolar to multipolar but the bipolar cells and their variations dominate. They are also diverse at the molecular level as they were shown to express numerous neuropeptides in different combinations including vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP, cholecystokinin (CCK, neurokinin B (NKB corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF, enkephalin (Enk but also neuropeptide Y (NPY and somatostatin (SOM to a lesser extent. CR-expressing interneurons exhibit different firing behaviors such as adapting, bursting or irregular. They mainly originate from the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE but a subpopulation also derives from the dorsal part of the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE. Cortical GABAergic CR-expressing interneurons can be divided in two main populations: VIP-bipolar interneurons deriving from the CGE and SOM-Martinotti-like interneurons originating in the dorsal MGE. Although bipolar cells account for the majority of CR-expressing interneurons, the roles they play in cortical neuronal circuits and in the more general metabolic physiology of the brain remain elusive and enigmatic. The aim of this review is, firstly, to provide a comprehensive view of the morphological, molecular and electrophysiological features defining this cell type. We will, secondly, also summarize what is known about their place in the cortical circuit, their modulation by subcortical afferents and the functional roles they might play in neuronal processing and energy metabolism.

  13. Cortical atrophy in presymptomatic Alzheimer's disease presenilin 1 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Yakeel T; Stern, Chantal E; Reiman, Eric M; Brickhouse, Michael; Ruiz, Adriana; Sperling, Reisa A; Lopera, Francisco; Dickerson, Bradford C

    2013-05-01

    Sporadic late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia has been associated with a 'signature' of cortical atrophy in paralimbic and heteromodal association regions measured with MRI. To investigate whether a similar pattern of cortical atrophy is present in presymptomatic presenilin 1 E280A mutation carriers an average of 6 years before clinical symptom onset. 40 cognitively normal volunteers from a Colombian population with familial AD were included; 18 were positive for the AD-associated presenilin 1 mutation (carriers, mean age=38) whereas 22 were non-carriers. T1-weighted volumetric MRI images were acquired and cortical thickness was measured. A priori regions of interest from our previous work were used to obtain thickness from AD-signature regions. Compared to non-carriers, presymptomatic presenilin 1 mutation carriers exhibited thinner cortex within the AD-signature summary measure (p<0.008). Analyses of individual regions demonstrated thinner angular gyrus, precuneus and superior parietal lobule in carriers compared to non-carriers, with trend-level effects in the medial temporal lobe. Results demonstrate that cognitively normal individuals genetically determined to develop AD have a thinner cerebral cortex than non-carriers in regions known to be affected by typical late-onset sporadic AD. These findings provide further support for the hypothesis that cortical atrophy is present in preclinical AD more than 5 years prior to symptom onset. Further research is needed to determine whether this method could be used to characterise the age-dependent trajectory of cortical atrophy in presymptomatic stages of AD.

  14. Differential alterations of cortical glutamatergic binding sites in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalmers, D.T.; Dewar, D.; Graham, D.I.; Brooks, D.N.; McCulloch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Involvement of cortical glutamatergic mechanisms in senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT) has been investigated with quantitative ligand-binding autoradiography. The distribution and density of Na(+)-dependent glutamate uptake sites and glutamate receptor subtypes--kainate, quisqualate, and N-methyl-D-aspartate--were measured in adjacent sections of frontal cortex obtained postmortem from six patients with SDAT and six age-matched controls. The number of senile plaques was determined in the same brain region. Binding of D-[3H]aspartate to Na(+)-dependent uptake sites was reduced by approximately 40% throughout SDAT frontal cortex relative to controls, indicating a general loss of glutamatergic presynaptic terminals. [3H]Kainate receptor binding was significantly increased by approximately 70% in deep layers of SDAT frontal cortex compared with controls, whereas this binding was unaltered in superficial laminae. There was a positive correlation (r = 0.914) between kainate binding and senile plaque number in deep cortical layers. Quisqualate receptors, as assessed by 2-amino-3-hydroxy-5-[3H]methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid binding, were unaltered in SDAT frontal cortex compared with controls. There was a small reduction (25%) in N-methyl-D-aspartate-sensitive [3H]glutamate binding only in superficial cortical layers of SDAT brains relative to control subjects. [3H]Glutamate binding in SDAT subjects was unrelated to senile plaque number in superficial cortical layers (r = 0.104). These results indicate that in the presence of cortical glutamatergic terminal loss in SDAT plastic alterations occur in some glutamate receptor subtypes but not in others

  15. A Turing Reaction-Diffusion Model for Human Cortical Folding Patterns and Cortical Pattern Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurdal, Monica K.; Striegel, Deborah A.

    2011-11-01

    Modeling and understanding cortical folding pattern formation is important for quantifying cortical development. We present a biomathematical model for cortical folding pattern formation in the human brain and apply this model to study diseases involving cortical pattern malformations associated with neural migration disorders. Polymicrogyria is a cortical malformation disease resulting in an excessive number of small gyri. Our mathematical model uses a Turing reaction-diffusion system to model cortical folding. The lateral ventricle (LV) and ventricular zone (VZ) of the brain are critical components in the formation of cortical patterning. In early cortical development the shape of the LV can be modeled with a prolate spheroid and the VZ with a prolate spheroid surface. We use our model to study how global cortex characteristics, such as size and shape of the LV, affect cortical pattern formation. We demonstrate increasing domain scale can increase the number of gyri and sulci formed. Changes in LV shape can account for sulcus directionality. By incorporating LV size and shape, our model is able to elucidate which parameters can lead to excessive cortical folding.

  16. Layer Specific Development of Neocortical Pyramidal to Fast Spiking Cells Synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga eVoinova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available All cortical neurons are engaged in inhibitory feedback loops which ensure excitation-inhibition balance and are key elements for the development of coherent network activity. The resulting network patterns are strongly dependent on the strength and dynamic properties of these excitatory-inhibitory loops which show pronounced regional and developmental diversity. We therefore compared the properties and postnatal maturation of two different synapses between rat neocortical pyramidal cells (layer 2/3 and layer 5, respectively and fast spiking (FS interneurons in the corresponding layer. At P14, both synapses showed synaptic depression upon repetitive activation. Synaptic release properties between layer 2/3 pyramidal cells and FS cells were stable from P14 to P28. In contrast, layer 5 pyramidal to FS cell connections showed a significant increase in paired pulse ratio by P28. Presynaptic calcium dynamics did also change at these synapses, including the sensitivity to exogenously loaded calcium buffers and expression of presynaptic calcium channels subtypes. These results underline the large variety of properties at different, yet similar, synapses in the neocortex. They also suggest that postnatal maturation of the brain goes along with increasing differences between synaptically driven network activity in layer 5 and layer 2/3.

  17. Cortical heterotopia in Aicardi's syndrome - CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besenski, N.; Bosnjak, V.; Ligutic, I.; Marusic-Della Marina, B.

    1988-01-01

    The case of 5-month-old female infant with Aicardi's syndrome is presented. The main clinical features were severe developmental retardation and intractable epileptic seizures. Ophthalmoscopic examination revealed pathognomonic choriorethinopathy. Ultrasonic examination of the brain detected agenesis of the corpus callosum, whereas CT showed a coexisting malformation of the brain, i.e. cortical heterotopia of the gray matter. Agenesis of the corpus callosum is an entity well-recognized by sonography. However, ultrasonography is an insufficient modality for the visualization of cortical heterotopia which is common to all cases of Aicardi's syndrome. Therefore, in cases of suspected Aicardi's syndrome CT is recommended, as it enables the diagnosis of cortical heterotopia. (orig.)

  18. Reye's syndrome with cortical laminar necrosis: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, T.; Takahashi, S.; Ishii, K.; Higano, S.; Matsumoto, K.; Sakamoto, K.; Haginoya, K.; Iinuma, K.

    1996-01-01

    Serial MRI findings are described in two patients with Reye's syndrome, demonstrating diffuse cortical and white matter changes. In the acute stage, T2-weighted images showed subtle but definite laminar high signal and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images laminar enhancement, along the entire cerebral cortex bilaterally. In the chronic stage, unenhanced T1-weighted images showed diffuse cortical laminar high signal. These characteristic MRI features seemed very similar to those of laminar cortical necrosis in hypoxic brain damage. MRI also displayed delayed white matter changes with cerebral atrophy. (orig.)

  19. Towards a unified scheme of cortical lamination for primary visual cortex of primates: insights from NeuN and VGLUT2 immunoreactivity

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    Pooja eBalaram

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary visual cortex (V1 is clearly distinguishable from other cortical areas by its distinctive pattern of neocortical lamination across mammalian species. In some mammals, primates in particular, the layers of V1 are further divided into a number of sublayers based on their anatomical and functional characteristics. While these sublayers are easily recognizable across a range of primates, the exact number of divisions in each layer and their relative position within the depth of V1 has been inconsistently reported, largely due to conflicting schemes of nomenclature for the V1 layers. This conflict centers on the definition of layer 4 in primate V1, and the subdivisions of layer 4 that can be consistently identified across primate species. Brodmann’s (1909 laminar scheme for V1 delineates three subdivisions of layer 4 in primates, based on cellular morphology and geniculate inputs in anthropoid monkeys. In contrast, Hässler’s (1967 laminar scheme delineates a single layer 4 and multiple subdivisions of layer 3, based on comparisons of V1 lamination across the primate lineage. In order to clarify laminar divisions in primate visual cortex, we performed NeuN and VGLUT2 immunohistochemistry in V1 of chimpanzees, Old World macaque monkeys, New World squirrel, owl, and marmoset monkeys, prosimian galagos and mouse lemurs, and nonprimate, but highly visual, tree shrews. By comparing the laminar divisions identified by each method across species, we find that Hässler’s (1967 laminar scheme for V1 provides a more consistent representation of neocortical layers across all primates, including humans, and facilitates comparisons of V1 lamination with nonprimate species. These findings, along with many others, support the consistent use of Hässler’s laminar scheme in V1 research.

  20. Cortical Surface Thickness in the Middle-Aged Brain with White Matter Hyperintense Lesions

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    Ying Zhuang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Previous voxel-based morphometry (VBM studies have suggested that cortical atrophy is regionally distributed in middle-aged subjects with white matter hyperintense (WMH lesions. However, few studies have assessed cortical thickness in middle-aged WMH subjects. In this study, we examined cortical thickness as well as cortical morphometry associated with the presence of WMH lesion load in middle-aged subjects.Participants and methods: Thirty-six middle-aged subjects with WMH lesions (WMH group and without clinical cognitive impairment, and 34 demographically matched healthy control subjects (HCS group participated in the study. Cortical thickness was estimated using an automated Computational Anatomy Toolbox (CAT12 as the distance between the gray-white matter border and the pial surface. Individual WMH lesions were manually segmented, and WMH loads were measured. Statistical cortical maps were created to estimate differences in cortical thickness between groups based on this cortex-wide analysis. The relationship between WMH lesion loads and cerebral cortical thickness was also analyzed in CAT12.Results: Cortical thickness was significantly lower in the WMH group than in the controls in multimodal integration regions, including the right and left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC, right and left frontal operculum (fO, right and left operculum parietale (OP, right and left middle temporal gyrus (MTG, and left superior temporal gyrus (STG; P < 0.01, family-wise error (FWE-corrected. Additionally, cortical thickness was also lower in the recognition regions that contained the right temporal pole (TP, the right and left fusiform gyrus, and the left rolandic operculum (RO; P < 0.01, FWE-corrected. The results revealed that in the left superior parietal lobule (SPL, cortical thickness was higher in the WMH group than in the HCS group (P < 0.01, FWE-corrected. A voxel-wise negative correlation was found between cortical

  1. Effects of Parecoxib and Fentanyl on nociception-induced cortical activity

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    Wang Ying-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analgesics, including opioids and non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs reduce postoperative pain. However, little is known about the quantitative effects of these drugs on cortical activity induced by nociceptive stimulation. The aim of the present study was to determine the neural activity in response to a nociceptive stimulus and to investigate the effects of fentanyl (an opioid agonist and parecoxib (a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor on this nociception-induced cortical activity evoked by tail pinch. Extracellular recordings (electroencephalogram and multi-unit signals were performed in the area of the anterior cingulate cortex while intracellular recordings were made in the primary somatosensory cortex. The effects of parecoxib and fentanyl on induced cortical activity were compared. Results Peripheral nociceptive stimulation in anesthetized rats produced an immediate electroencephalogram (EEG desynchronization resembling the cortical arousal (low-amplitude, fast-wave activity, while the membrane potential switched into a persistent depolarization state. The induced cortical activity was abolished by fentanyl, and the fentanyl's effect was reversed by the opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone. Parecoxib, on the other hand, did not significantly affect the neural activity. Conclusion Cortical activity was modulated by nociceptive stimulation in anesthetized rats. Fentanyl showed a strong inhibitory effect on the nociceptive-stimulus induced cortical activity while parecoxib had no significant effect.

  2. Methods for estimating cortical motor representation size and location in navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julkunen, Petro

    2014-07-30

    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is used for locating and outlining cortical representation areas, e.g., of motor function and speech. At present there are no standard methods of measuring the size of the cortical representation areas mapped with nTMS. The aim was to compare four computation methods for estimating muscle representation size and location for nTMS studies. The motor cortex of six subjects was mapped to outline the motor cortical representation of hand muscles. Four methods were compared to assess cortical representation size in nTMS. These methods included: (1) spline interpolation method, (2) convex hull method, which outlines all positive motor responses, (3) Voronoi tessellation method, which assigns a specific cortical area for each stimulus location, and (4) average point-area method, which computes an average representation area for each stimulus with the assumption of evenly spaced stimulus locations, i.e., the use of a grid. All applied methods demonstrated good repeatability in measuring muscle representation size and location, while the spline interpolation and the convex hull method demonstrated systematically larger representation areas (pmotor cortical muscle representation size and location with nTMS, e.g., to study cortical plasticity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Isolated Hand Palsy Due to Small Cortical Infarcts: A Report of Two Cases

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    Meliha Tan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The cortical motor hand area is a knob-like structure of the precentral gyrus, with an inverted omega or horizontal epsilon shape. Isolated hand weakness is infrequently observed and is usually due to small cortical infarcts of this hand knob structure. Isolated hand palsy is sometimes restricted to radial-sided fingers or ulnar sided-fingers. Uniform weakness in all fingers may also occur. We present 2 patients with small cortical infarcts of the cortical hand knob due to different etiologies. A 61-year-old male had right hand weakness restricted to his first and second digits. He had a small cortical infarct on the hand knob area due to emboli from ulcerative plaque of the ipsilateral internal carotid artery. The other patient, a 23-year-old female with sickle cell anemia, had uniform left hand weakness due to an epsilon-shaped infarct on the right precentral gyrus. An obstruction of the small cerebral artery supply to the hand knob area due to sickle cell anemia was the likely pathogenic mechanism. It is suggested that isolated hand weakness due to small cortical infarcts may have different etiologies, most commonly homodynamic or embolic processes. Conditions that rarely cause brain infarction, such as sickle cell anemia, deserve clinical attention. Investigations of strokes must include anemia tests. Patients with predominant weakness of the radial group of fingers due to cortical infarct must be checked for embolism

  4. Effect of electrode density and measurement noise on the spatial resolution of cortical potential distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryynänen, Outi R M; Hyttinen, Jari A K; Laarne, Päivi H; Malmivuo, Jaakko A

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the spatial resolution of electroencephalography (EEG) by means of inverse cortical EEG solution. The main interest was to study how the number of measurement electrodes and the amount of measurement noise affects the spatial resolution. A three-layer spherical head model was used to obtain the source-field relationship of cortical potentials and scalp EEG field. Singular value decomposition was used to evaluate the spatial resolution with various measurement noise estimates. The results suggest that as the measurement noise increases the advantage of dense electrode systems is decreased. With low realistic measurement noise, a more accurate inverse cortical potential distribution can be obtained with an electrode system where the distance between two electrodes is as small as 16 mm, corresponding to as many as 256 measurement electrodes. In clinical measurement environments, it is always beneficial to have at least 64 measurement electrodes.

  5. Cortical effect of oxaliplatin associated with sustained neuropathic pain: exacerbation of cortical activity and down-regulation of potassium channel expression in somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Karine; Calvino, Bernard; Dubacq, Sophie; Roualle-de-Rouville, Marie; Sordoillet, Vallier; Rivals, Isabelle; Pezet, Sophie

    2012-08-01

    Oxaliplatin is a third-generation platinum-based chemotherapy drug that has gained importance in the treatment of advanced metastatic colorectal cancer. Its dose-limiting side effect is the production of chronic peripheral neuropathy. Using a modified model of oxaliplatin-induced sensory neuropathy, we investigated plastic changes at the cortical level as possible mechanisms underlying the chronicity of pain sensation in this model. Changes in gene expression were studied using DNA microarray which revealed that when oxaliplatin-treated animals displayed clinical neuropathic pain symptoms, including mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity, approximately 900 were down-regulated in the somatosensory cortex. Because of the known role of potassium channels in neuronal excitability, the study further focussed on the down-regulation of these channels as the possible molecular origin of cortical hyperexcitability. Quantification of the magnitude of neuronal extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in cortical neurons as a marker of neuronal activity revealed a 10-fold increase induced by oxaliplatin treatment, suggesting that neurons of cortical areas involved in transmission of painful stimuli undergo a chronic cortical excitability. We further demonstrated, using cortical injection of lentiviral vector shRNA against Kv2.2, that down-regulation of this potassium channel in naive animals induced a sustained thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity. In conclusion, although the detailed mechanisms leading to this cortical excitability are still unknown, our study demonstrated that a cortical down regulation of potassium channels could underlie pain chronicity in this model of chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2012 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. ERK is involved in the reorganization of somatosensory cortical maps in adult rats submitted to hindlimb unloading.

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    Erwan Dupont

    Full Text Available Sensorimotor restriction by a 14-day period of hindlimb unloading (HU in the adult rat induces a reorganization of topographic maps and receptive fields. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Interest was turned towards a possible implication of intracellular MAPK signaling pathway since Extracellular-signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 is known to play a significant role in the control of synaptic plasticity. In order to better understand the mechanisms underlying cortical plasticity in adult rats submitted to a sensorimotor restriction, we analyzed the time-course of ERK1/2 activation by immunoblot and of cortical reorganization by electrophysiological recordings, on rats submitted to hindlimb unloading over four weeks. Immunohistochemistry analysis provided evidence that ERK1/2 phosphorylation was increased in layer III neurons of the somatosensory cortex. This increase was transient, and parallel to the changes in hindpaw cortical map area (layer IV. By contrast, receptive fields were progressively enlarged from 7 to 28 days of hindlimb unloading. To determine whether ERK1/2 was involved in cortical remapping, we administered a specific ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD-98059 through osmotic mini-pump in rats hindlimb unloaded for 14 days. Results demonstrate that focal inhibition of ERK1/2 pathway prevents cortical reorganization, but had no effect on receptive fields. These results suggest that ERK1/2 plays a role in the induction of cortical plasticity during hindlimb unloading.

  7. Cortical thinning in cognitively normal elderly cohort of 60 to 89 year old from AIBL database and vulnerable brain areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhongmin S.; Avinash, Gopal; Yan, Litao; McMillan, Kathryn

    2014-03-01

    Age-related cortical thinning has been studied by many researchers using quantitative MR images for the past three decades and vastly differing results have been reported. Although results have shown age-related cortical thickening in elderly cohort statistically in some brain regions under certain conditions, cortical thinning in elderly cohort requires further systematic investigation. This paper leverages our previously reported brain surface intensity model (BSIM)1 based technique to measure cortical thickness to study cortical changes due to normal aging. We measured cortical thickness of cognitively normal persons from 60 to 89 years old using Australian Imaging Biomarkers and Lifestyle Study (AIBL) data. MRI brains of 56 healthy people including 29 women and 27 men were selected. We measured average cortical thickness of each individual in eight brain regions: parietal, frontal, temporal, occipital, visual, sensory motor, medial frontal and medial parietal. Unlike the previous published studies, our results showed consistent age-related thinning of cerebral cortex in all brain regions. The parietal, medial frontal and medial parietal showed fastest thinning rates of 0.14, 0.12 and 0.10 mm/decade respectively while the visual region showed the slowest thinning rate of 0.05 mm/decade. In sensorimotor and parietal areas, women showed higher thinning (0.09 and 0.16 mm/decade) than men while in all other regions men showed higher thinning than women. We also created high resolution cortical thinning rate maps of the cohort and compared them to typical patterns of PET metabolic reduction of moderate AD and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The results seemed to indicate vulnerable areas of cortical deterioration that may lead to brain dementia. These results validate our cortical thickness measurement technique by demonstrating the consistency of the cortical thinning and prediction of cortical deterioration trend with AIBL database.

  8. Perceptual incongruence influences bistability and cortical activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, G.J.; Tong, F.; Hagoort, P.; van Ee, R.

    2009-01-01

    We employed a parametric psychophysical design in combination with functional imaging to examine the influence of metric changes in perceptual incongruence on perceptual alternation rates and cortical responses. Subjects viewed a bistable stimulus defined by incongruent depth cues; bistability

  9. Autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico

    2016-09-01

    The term 'cortical tremor' was first introduced by Ikeda and colleagues to indicate a postural and action-induced shivering movement of the hands which mimics essential tremor, but presents with the electrophysiological findings of cortical reflex myoclonus. The association between autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus and epilepsy (ADCME) was first recognized in Japanese families and is now increasingly reported worldwide, although it is described using different acronyms (BAFME, FAME, FEME, FCTE and others). The disease usually takes a benign course, although drug-resistant focal seizures or slight intellectual disability occur in some cases. Moreover, a worsening of cortical tremor and myoclonus is common in advanced age. Although not yet recognized by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), this is a well-delineated epilepsy syndrome with remarkable features that clearly distinguishes it from other myoclonus epilepsies. Moreover, genetic studies of these families show heterogeneity and different susceptible chromosomal loci have been identified.

  10. Cortical electrophysiological network dynamics of feedback learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, M.X.; Wilmes, K.A.; van de Vijver, I.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the neurophysiological mechanisms of learning is important for both fundamental and clinical neuroscience. We present a neurophysiologically inspired framework for understanding cortical mechanisms of feedback-guided learning. This framework is based on dynamic changes in systems-level

  11. The Diversity of Cortical Inhibitory Synapses

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    Yoshiyuki eKubota

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The most typical and well known inhibitory action in the cortical microcircuit is a strong inhibition on the target neuron by axo-somatic synapses. However, it has become clear that synaptic inhibition in the cortex is much more diverse and complicated. Firstly, at least ten or more inhibitory non-pyramidal cell subtypes engage in diverse inhibitory functions to produce the elaborate activity characteristic of the different cortical states. Each distinct non-pyramidal cell subtype has its own independent inhibitory function. Secondly, the inhibitory synapses innervate different neuronal domains, such as axons, spines, dendrites and soma, and their IPSP size is not uniform. Thus cortical inhibition is highly complex, with a wide variety of anatomical and physiological modes. Moreover, the functional significance of the various inhibitory synapse innervation styles and their unique structural dynamic behaviors differ from those of excitatory synapses. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the inhibitory mechanisms of the cortical microcircuit.

  12. Cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, F-E; Lubrano, V; Lauwers-Cances, V; Giussani, C; Démonet, J-F

    2008-01-15

    Distinct functional pathways for processing words and numbers have been hypothesized from the observation of dissociated impairments of these categories in brain-damaged patients. We aimed to identify the cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading process in patients operated on for various brain lesions. Direct cortical electrostimulation was prospectively used in 60 brain mappings. We used object naming and two reading tasks: alphabetic script (sentences and number words) and Arabic number reading. Cortical areas involved in Arabic number reading were identified according to location, type of interference, and distinctness from areas associated with other language tasks. Arabic number reading was sustained by small cortical areas, often extremely well localized (area (Brodmann area 45), the anterior part of the dominant supramarginal gyrus (Brodmann area 40; p area (Brodmann area 37; p areas.

  13. Focal Cortical Hypometabolism and Infantile Spasms

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence and prognostic significance of focal defects in cerebral cortical glucose metabolism were evaluated in infants with newly diagnosed symptomatic and cryptogenic infantile spasms examined at Turku and Helsinki Universities, Finland.

  14. The effect of binaural beats on verbal working memory and cortical connectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Beauchene, Christine; Abaid, Nicole; Moran, Rosalyn; Diana, Rachel A.; Leonessa, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Synchronization in activated regions of cortical networks affect the brain's frequency response, which has been associated with a wide range of states and abilities, including memory. A non-invasive method for manipulating cortical synchronization is binaural beats. Binaural beats take advantage of the brain's response to two pure tones, delivered independently to each ear, when those tones have a small frequency mismatch. The mismatch between the tones is interpreted as a beat fre...

  15. FOSB proteins in the orbitofrontal and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices of human alcoholics

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Henriksson, Richard; Ohnishi, Yoshinori N.; Ohnishi, Yoko H.; Harper, Clive; Sheedy, Donna; Garrick, Therese; Nyberg, Fred; Nestler, Eric J.; Bakalkin, Georgy; Yakovleva, Tatjana

    2009-01-01

    The transcription factor DeltaFosB is accumulated in the addiction circuitry, including the orbitofrontal and medial prefrontal cortices of rodents chronically exposed to ethanol or other drugs of abuse, and has been suggested to play a direct role in addiction maintenance. To address this hypothesis in the context of substance dependence in humans, we compared the immunoreactivities of FOSB proteins in the orbitofrontal and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices (OFC and DLPFC respectively) betwee...

  16. Cortical Neural Computation by Discrete Results Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castejon, Carlos; Nuñez, Angel

    2016-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems we face in neuroscience is to understand how the cortex performs computations. There is increasing evidence that the power of the cortical processing is produced by populations of neurons forming dynamic neuronal ensembles. Theoretical proposals and multineuronal experimental studies have revealed that ensembles of neurons can form emergent functional units. However, how these ensembles are implicated in cortical computations is still a mystery. Although cell ensembles have been associated with brain rhythms, the functional interaction remains largely unclear. It is still unknown how spatially distributed neuronal activity can be temporally integrated to contribute to cortical computations. A theoretical explanation integrating spatial and temporal aspects of cortical processing is still lacking. In this Hypothesis and Theory article, we propose a new functional theoretical framework to explain the computational roles of these ensembles in cortical processing. We suggest that complex neural computations underlying cortical processing could be temporally discrete and that sensory information would need to be quantized to be computed by the cerebral cortex. Accordingly, we propose that cortical processing is produced by the computation of discrete spatio-temporal functional units that we have called "Discrete Results" (Discrete Results Hypothesis). This hypothesis represents a novel functional mechanism by which information processing is computed in the cortex. Furthermore, we propose that precise dynamic sequences of "Discrete Results" is the mechanism used by the cortex to extract, code, memorize and transmit neural information. The novel "Discrete Results" concept has the ability to match the spatial and temporal aspects of cortical processing. We discuss the possible neural underpinnings of these functional computational units and describe the empirical evidence supporting our hypothesis. We propose that fast-spiking (FS

  17. Characterization of early cortical population response to thalamocortical input in vitro

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    Michael Raymond Heliodor Hill

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro thalamocortical slice preparation of mouse barrel cortex allows for stimulation of the cortex through its natural afferent thalamocortical pathway. This preparation was used here to investigate the first stage of cortical processing in the large postsynaptic dendritic networks as revealed by voltage sensitive dye imaging. We identified the precise location and dimensions of two clearly distinguishable dendritic networks, one in the granular layer IV and one in the infragranular layer V and VI and showed that they have different physiological properties. DiI fluorescent staining further revealed that thalamocortical axons project on to these two networks in the typical barrel like form, not only in the granular but also in the infragranular layer. Finally we investigated the short term dynamics of both the voltage sensitive dye imaging signal and the local field potential in response to a train of eight-pulses at various frequencies in both these layers. We found evidence of differences in the plasticity between the first two response peaks compared to the remaining six peaks as well as differences in short term plasticity between the voltage sensitive dye imaging response and the local field potential. Our findings suggest, that at least early cortical processing takes place in two separate dendritic networks that may stand at the beginning of further parallel computation. The detailed characterization of the parameters of these networks may provide tools for further research into the complex dynamics of large dendritic networks and their role in cortical computation.

  18. Cortical swallowing processing in early subacute stroke

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    Fischer Maren

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysphagia is a major complication in hemispheric as well as brainstem stroke patients causing aspiration pneumonia and increased mortality. Little is known about the recovery from dysphagia after stroke. The aim of the present study was to determine the different patterns of cortical swallowing processing in patients with hemispheric and brainstem stroke with and without dysphagia in the early subacute phase. Methods We measured brain activity by mean of whole-head MEG in 37 patients with different stroke localisation 8.2 +/- 4.8 days after stroke to study changes in cortical activation during self-paced swallowing. An age matched group of healthy subjects served as controls. Data were analyzed by means of synthetic aperture magnetometry and group analyses were performed using a permutation test. Results Our results demonstrate strong bilateral reduction of cortical swallowing activation in dysphagic patients with hemispheric stroke. In hemispheric stroke without dysphagia, bilateral activation was found. In the small group of patients with brainstem stroke we observed a reduction of cortical activation and a right hemispheric lateralization. Conclusion Bulbar central pattern generators coordinate the pharyngeal swallowing phase. The observed right hemispheric lateralization in brainstem stroke can therefore be interpreted as acute cortical compensation of subcortically caused dysphagia. The reduction of activation in brainstem stroke patients and dysphagic patients with cortical stroke could be explained in terms of diaschisis.

  19. Reversible cortical blindness in a case of hepatic encephalopathy

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    Amlan Kanti Biswas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy is a frequent and often fatal manifestation of chronic liver disease. The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is believed to be multifactorial including impaired blood-brain barrier function, imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in cortex, accumulation of various toxic and false neurotransmitters, and lack of nutrients like oxygen and glucose. Signs and symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy varies and commonly ranges from personality changes, disturbed consciousness, sleep pattern alternation, intellectual deterioration, speech disturbances, asterixis to frank coma and even death. Reversible or transient cortical blindness is rare manifestation of hepatic encephalopathy. It may even precede the phase of altered consciousness in such patients. Very few similar cases have been reported worldwide. Hence, we would like to report a case of transient cortical blindness in a patient of hepatic encephalopathy.

  20. Cortical neuroplasticity in patients recovering from acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Kirsten; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Frederiksen, Jette L.

    2008-01-01

    Patients with optic neuritis (ON) undergo cortical and subcortical neuroplasticity as revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, the effect of the heterogeneity of scotomas his not been adequately addressed previously. We introduce a new method of modelling scotomas in f......MRI, to reveal a clearer pattern of neuroplasticity, across a mixed patient population. A longitudinal fMRI-study of visual function in 19 ON patients examined at four timepoints between presentation and 6 months was performed. Four different models were compared. The first model included the four different...... Cortical neuroplasticity during recovery. Moreover, inferences from the fourth model can be extended to the general Population of patients recovering from ON. In Conclusion, we present a method of accommodating subject-specific differences between patients with acute ON by inclusion of an HMD...

  1. MRI of fibrous cortical defect and non-ossifying fibroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishima, Yoshiko; Aoki, Takatoshi; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Nakata, Hajime; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Toshitaka [Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-02-01

    Fibrous cortical defect and non-ossifying fibroma are the benign fibrous lesions of bone commonly involving children. Their diagnosis is usually done with radiography, and MR examinations are rarely performed. We evaluated MRI findings of 11 lesions in 10 cases of fibrous cortical defect and non-ossifying fibroma. Signal intensity of the lesions was varied and large lesions (2 cm<) tended to show heterogeneous signal intensity on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images corresponding to a mixture of components including fibrous tissue, hemosiderin and foam cells. MRI helps to delineate the extent of the involved bone and to assess the various histological components of the lesions. However, their diagnosis is basically made on the radiographic findings and the role of MRI is limited. (author)

  2. Is There a Canonical Cortical Circuit for the Cholinergic System? Anatomical Differences Across Common Model Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Jennifer J; Disney, Anita A

    2018-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is believed to act as a neuromodulator in cortical circuits that support cognition, specifically in processes including learning, memory consolidation, vigilance, arousal and attention. The cholinergic modulation of cortical processes is studied in many model systems including rodents, cats and primates. Further, these studies are performed in cortical areas ranging from the primary visual cortex to the prefrontal cortex and using diverse methodologies. The results of these studies have been combined into singular models of function-a practice based on an implicit assumption that the various model systems are equivalent and interchangeable. However, comparative anatomy both within and across species reveals important differences in the structure of the cholinergic system. Here, we will review anatomical data including innervation patterns, receptor expression, synthesis and release compared across species and cortical area with a focus on rodents and primates. We argue that these data suggest no canonical cortical model system exists for the cholinergic system. Further, we will argue that as a result, care must be taken both in combining data from studies across cortical areas and species, and in choosing the best model systems to improve our understanding and support of human health.

  3. Is There a Canonical Cortical Circuit for the Cholinergic System? Anatomical Differences Across Common Model Systems

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    Jennifer J. Coppola

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh is believed to act as a neuromodulator in cortical circuits that support cognition, specifically in processes including learning, memory consolidation, vigilance, arousal and attention. The cholinergic modulation of cortical processes is studied in many model systems including rodents, cats and primates. Further, these studies are performed in cortical areas ranging from the primary visual cortex to the prefrontal cortex and using diverse methodologies. The results of these studies have been combined into singular models of function—a practice based on an implicit assumption that the various model systems are equivalent and interchangeable. However, comparative anatomy both within and across species reveals important differences in the structure of the cholinergic system. Here, we will review anatomical data including innervation patterns, receptor expression, synthesis and release compared across species and cortical area with a focus on rodents and primates. We argue that these data suggest no canonical cortical model system exists for the cholinergic system. Further, we will argue that as a result, care must be taken both in combining data from studies across cortical areas and species, and in choosing the best model systems to improve our understanding and support of human health.

  4. Migraine with brainstem aura: Why not a cortical origin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarquay, Geneviève; Ducros, Anne; Montavont, Alexandra; Mauguiere, François

    2017-01-01

    Background Migraine with brainstem aura is defined as a migraine with aura including at least two of the following symptoms: dysarthria, vertigo, tinnitus, hypacusis, diplopia, ataxia and/or decreased level of consciousness. Aim The aim of this study is to review data coming from clinical observations and functional mapping that support the role of the cerebral cortex in the initiation of brainstem aura symptoms. Results Vertigo can result from a vestibular cortex dysfunction, while tinnitus and hypacusis can originate within the auditory cortex. Diplopia can reflect a parieto-occipital involvement. Dysarthria can be caused by dysfunctions located in precentral gyri. Ataxia can reflect abnormal processing of vestibular, sensory, or visual inputs by the parietal lobe. Alteration of consciousness can be caused by abnormal neural activation within specific consciousness networks that include prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices. Conclusion Any symptom of so-called brainstem aura can originate within the cortex. Based on these data, we suggest that brainstem aura could have a cortical origin. This hypothesis would explain the co-occurrence of typical and brainstem aura during attacks and would fit with the theory of cortical spreading depression. We propose that migraine with brainstem aura should be classified as a typical migraine aura.

  5. Automatic Detection of Cortical Bones Haversian Osteonal Boundaries

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    Ilige Hage

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to automatically detect cement lines in decalcified cortical bone sections stained with H&E. Employed is a methodology developed previously by the authors and proven to successfully count and disambiguate the micro-architectural features (namely Haversian canals, canaliculi, and osteocyte lacunae present in the secondary osteons/Haversian system (osteon of cortical bone. This methodology combines methods typically considered separately, namely pulse coupled neural networks (PCNN, particle swarm optimization (PSO, and adaptive threshold (AT. In lieu of human bone, slides (at 20× magnification from bovid cortical bone are used in this study as proxy of human bone. Having been characterized, features with same orientation are used to detect the cement line viewed as the next coaxial layer adjacent to the outermost lamella of the osteon. Employed for this purpose are three attributes for each and every micro-sized feature identified in the osteon lamellar system: (1 orientation, (2 size (ellipse perimeter and (3 Euler number (a topological measure. From a training image, automated parameters for the PCNN network are obtained by forming fitness functions extracted from these attributes. It is found that a 3-way combination of these features attributes yields good representations of the overall osteon boundary (cement line. Near-unity values of classical metrics of quality (precision, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and dice suggest that the segments obtained automatically by the optimized artificial intelligent methodology are of high fidelity as compared with manual tracing. For bench marking, cement lines segmented by k-means did not fare as well. An analysis based on the modified Hausdorff distance (MHD of the segmented cement lines also testified to the quality of the detected cement lines vis-a-vis the k-means method.

  6. Children with Epilepsy and Anxiety: Subcortical and Cortical Differences

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    Jones, Jana E.; Jackson, Daren C.; Chambers, Karlee L.; Dabbs, Kevin; Hsu, David A.; Stafstrom, Carl E.; Seidenberg, Michael; Hermann, Bruce P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective Using a hypothesis driven approach, subcortical and cortical regions implicated in anxiety disorders in the general population were examined in children with recent-onset epilepsy with versus without anxiety compared to controls. This study reports frequency of anxiety disorders while examining familial, clinical and demographic variables associated with anxiety in children with epilepsy. Method Participants included 88 children with epilepsy aged 8–18 years; 25 with a current anxiety disorder and 63 children with epilepsy no current anxiety disorder. 49 controls without anxiety disorders were included. T1 volumetric MRI scans were collected; subcortical volumes and cortical thickness were computed using the FreeSurfer image analysis suite. Analyses focused on adjusted measures of subcortical volumes and cortical thickness. Results Relative to controls, larger left amygdala volumes were found in the Epilepsy Anxiety group compared to the Epilepsy No Anxiety group (p = 0.027). In the hippocampus there were no significant differences between groups. Examination of cortical thickness demonstrated that the Epilepsy Anxiety group showed thinning in left medial orbitofrontal (p=0.001), right lateral orbitofrontal (p=0.017), and right frontal pole (p=0.009). There were no differences between groups in age, sex, IQ, age of onset, medications, or duration of epilepsy. There were more family members with a history of anxiety disorders in the Epilepsy Anxiety group compared to the Epilepsy No Anxiety group (p=0.005). Significance Anxiety is a common psychiatric comorbidity in children with recent-onset epilepsy with volumetric enlargement of the amygdala and thinner cortex in orbital and other regions of prefrontal cortex, suggesting structural abnormalities in brain regions that are part of the dysfunctional networks reported in individuals with anxiety disorders in the general population. These findings are evident early in the course of epilepsy, are

  7. Minimally conscious state or cortically mediated state?

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    Naccache, Lionel

    2018-04-01

    Durable impairments of consciousness are currently classified in three main neurological categories: comatose state, vegetative state (also recently coined unresponsive wakefulness syndrome) and minimally conscious state. While the introduction of minimally conscious state, in 2002, was a major progress to help clinicians recognize complex non-reflexive behaviours in the absence of functional communication, it raises several problems. The most important issue related to minimally conscious state lies in its criteria: while behavioural definition of minimally conscious state lacks any direct evidence of patient's conscious content or conscious state, it includes the adjective 'conscious'. I discuss this major problem in this review and propose a novel interpretation of minimally conscious state: its criteria do not inform us about the potential residual consciousness of patients, but they do inform us with certainty about the presence of a cortically mediated state. Based on this constructive criticism review, I suggest three proposals aiming at improving the way we describe the subjective and cognitive state of non-communicating patients. In particular, I present a tentative new classification of impairments of consciousness that combines behavioural evidence with functional brain imaging data, in order to probe directly and univocally residual conscious processes.

  8. Pitch perception prior to cortical maturation

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    Lau, Bonnie K.

    Pitch perception plays an important role in many complex auditory tasks including speech perception, music perception, and sound source segregation. Because of the protracted and extensive development of the human auditory cortex, pitch perception might be expected to mature, at least over the first few months of life. This dissertation investigates complex pitch perception in 3-month-olds, 7-month-olds and adults -- time points when the organization of the auditory pathway is distinctly different. Using an observer-based psychophysical procedure, a series of four studies were conducted to determine whether infants (1) discriminate the pitch of harmonic complex tones, (2) discriminate the pitch of unresolved harmonics, (3) discriminate the pitch of missing fundamental melodies, and (4) have comparable sensitivity to pitch and spectral changes as adult listeners. The stimuli used in these studies were harmonic complex tones, with energy missing at the fundamental frequency. Infants at both three and seven months of age discriminated the pitch of missing fundamental complexes composed of resolved and unresolved harmonics as well as missing fundamental melodies, demonstrating perception of complex pitch by three months of age. More surprisingly, infants in both age groups had lower pitch and spectral discrimination thresholds than adult listeners. Furthermore, no differences in performance on any of the tasks presented were observed between infants at three and seven months of age. These results suggest that subcortical processing is not only sufficient to support pitch perception prior to cortical maturation, but provides adult-like sensitivity to pitch by three months.

  9. Cortical activation following a balance disturbance.

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    Quant, S; Adkin, A L; Staines, W R; McIlroy, W E

    2004-04-01

    Although recent work suggests that cortical processing can be involved in the control of balance responses, the central mechanisms involved in these reactions remain unclear. We presently investigated the characteristics of scalp-recorded perturbation-evoked responses (PERs) following a balance disturbance. Eight young adults stabilized an inverted pendulum using their ankle musculature while seated. When perturbations were applied to the pendulum, subjects were instructed to return (active condition) or not return (passive condition) the pendulum to its original stable position. Primary measures included peak latency and amplitude of early PERs (the first negative peak between 100 and 150 ms, N1), amplitude of late PERs (between 200 and 400 ms) and onset and initial amplitude of ankle muscle responses. Based on the timing of PERs, we hypothesized that N1 would represent sensory processing of the balance disturbance and that late PERs would be linked to the sensorimotor processing of balance corrections. Our results revealed that N1 was maximal over frontal-central electrode sites (FCz and Cz). Average N1 measures at FCz, Cz, and CPz were comparable between active and passive tasks ( p>0.05). In contrast, the amplitude of late PERs at Cz was less positive for the active condition than for the passive ( psensory representation of early PERs. Differences in late PERs may represent sensorimotor processing related to the execution of balance responses.

  10. The relationship between age and the mandibular cortical bone thickness by using panoramic radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yun Suk; Kim, Kyoung A; Koh, Kwang Joon

    2010-01-01

    This study was to determine the relationship between age and the mandibular cortical bone thickness on panoramic radiograph. Panoramic radiographs of 360 patients (180 men and 180 women) over 20 years old, who visited the Chonbuk National University Hospital from January to December in 2007, were assessed. The subjects were divided into 5 age groups. Five indices such as cortical bone thickness at the gonion (GI), antegonion (AI), and below the mental foramen (MI), the panoramic mandibular index (PMI), the mandibular cortical index (MCI) were measured on panoramic radiographs. All five indices including GI, AI, MI, PMI, and MCI showed significant differences between third decade and over 8 decade groups (p,0.05). PMI, MI and GI showed significant differences with gender statistically (p<0.05). The mandibular cortical bone thickness showed negative correlation with age, and the value of the thickness (PMI, MI, and GI) was greater in men than in women.

  11. Autaptic self-inhibition of cortical GABAergic neurons: synaptic narcissism or useful introspection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleuze, Charlotte; Pazienti, Antonio; Bacci, Alberto

    2014-06-01

    Fast synaptic inhibition sculpts all forms of cortical activity by means of a specialized connectivity pattern between highly heterogeneous inhibitory interneurons and principal excitatory cells. Importantly, inhibitory neurons connect also to each other extensively, following a detailed blueprint, and, indeed, specific forms of disinhibition affect important behavioral functions. Here we discuss a peculiar form of cortical disinhibition: the massive autaptic self-inhibition of parvalbumin-(PV) positive basket cells. Despite being described long ago, autaptic inhibition onto PV basket cells is rarely included in cortical circuit diagrams, perhaps because of its still elusive function. We propose here a potential dual role of autaptic feedback inhibition in temporally coordinating PV basket cells during cortical network activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The relationship between age and the mandibular cortical bone thickness by using panoramic radiograph

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    Kim, Yun Suk; Kim, Kyoung A; Koh, Kwang Joon [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, and Institute of Oral Bio Science, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    This study was to determine the relationship between age and the mandibular cortical bone thickness on panoramic radiograph. Panoramic radiographs of 360 patients (180 men and 180 women) over 20 years old, who visited the Chonbuk National University Hospital from January to December in 2007, were assessed. The subjects were divided into 5 age groups. Five indices such as cortical bone thickness at the gonion (GI), antegonion (AI), and below the mental foramen (MI), the panoramic mandibular index (PMI), the mandibular cortical index (MCI) were measured on panoramic radiographs. All five indices including GI, AI, MI, PMI, and MCI showed significant differences between third decade and over 8 decade groups (p,0.05). PMI, MI and GI showed significant differences with gender statistically (p<0.05). The mandibular cortical bone thickness showed negative correlation with age, and the value of the thickness (PMI, MI, and GI) was greater in men than in women.

  13. Adolescent brain maturation and cortical folding: evidence for reductions in gyrification.

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    Daniel Klein

    Full Text Available Evidence from anatomical and functional imaging studies have highlighted major modifications of cortical circuits during adolescence. These include reductions of gray matter (GM, increases in the myelination of cortico-cortical connections and changes in the architecture of large-scale cortical networks. It is currently unclear, however, how the ongoing developmental processes impact upon the folding of the cerebral cortex and how changes in gyrification relate to maturation of GM/WM-volume, thickness and surface area. In the current study, we acquired high-resolution (3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data from 79 healthy subjects (34 males and 45 females between the ages of 12 and 23 years and performed whole brain analysis of cortical folding patterns with the gyrification index (GI. In addition to GI-values, we obtained estimates of cortical thickness, surface area, GM and white matter (WM volume which permitted correlations with changes in gyrification. Our data show pronounced and widespread reductions in GI-values during adolescence in several cortical regions which include precentral, temporal and frontal areas. Decreases in gyrification overlap only partially with changes in the thickness, volume and surface of GM and were characterized overall by a linear developmental trajectory. Our data suggest that the observed reductions in GI-values represent an additional, important modification of the cerebral cortex during late brain maturation which may be related to cognitive development.

  14. Osmosis in Cortical Collecting Tubules

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    Schafer, James A.; Troutman, Susan L.; Andreoli, Thomas E.

    1974-01-01

    The present experiments were designed to evaluate the effects of varying the osmolality of luminal solutions on the antidiuretic hormone (ADH)-independent water and solute permeability properties of isolated rabbit cortical collecting tubules. In the absence of ADH, the osmotic water permeability coefficient (cm s–1) Pfl→b, computed from volume flows from hypotonic lumen to isotonic bath, was 20 ± 4 x 10–4 (SEM); the value of Pfb→l in the absence of ADH, computed from volume flows from isotonic bath to hypertonic lumen, was 88 ± 15 x 10–4 cm s–1. We also measured apparent urea permeability coefficients (cm s–1) from 14C-urea fluxes from lumen to bath (P DDurea l→b) and from bath to lumen (P DDurea b→l). For hypotonic luminal solutions and isotonic bathing solutions, P DDurea l→b was 0.045 ± 0.004 x 10–4 and was unaffected by ADH. The ADH-independent values of P DDurea l→b and P urea b→l were, respectively, 0.216 ± 0.022 x 10–4 cm s–1 and 0.033 ± 0.002 x 10–4 cm s–1 for isotonic bathing solutions and luminal solutions made hypertonic with urea, i.e., there was an absolute increase in urea permeability and asymmetry of urea fluxes. Significantly, P DDurea l→b did not rise when luminal hypertonicity was produced by sucrose; and, bathing fluid hypertonicity did not alter tubular permeability to water or to urea. We interpret these data to indicate that luminal hypertonicity increased the leakiness of tight junctions to water and urea but not sucrose. Since the value of Pfb→l in the absence of ADH, when tight junctions were open to urea, was approximately half of the value of Pfl→b in the presence of ADH, when tight junctions were closed to urea, we conclude that tight junctions are negligible paracellular shunts for lumen to bath osmosis with ADH. These findings, together with those in the preceding paper, are discussed in terms of a solubility-diffusion model for water permeation in which ADH increases water solubility in

  15. Folding of the Cerebral Cortex Requires Cdk5 in Upper-Layer Neurons in Gyrencephalic Mammals

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    Yohei Shinmyo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Folds in the cerebral cortex in mammals are believed to be key structures for accommodating increased cortical neurons in the cranial cavity. However, the mechanisms underlying cortical folding remain largely unknown, mainly because genetic manipulations for the gyrencephalic brain have been unavailable. By combining in utero electroporation and the CRISPR/Cas9 system, we succeeded in efficient gene knockout of Cdk5, which is mutated in some patients with classical lissencephaly, in the gyrencephalic brains of ferrets. We show that Cdk5 knockout in the ferret cerebral cortex markedly impaired cortical folding. Furthermore, the results obtained from the introduction of dominant-negative Cdk5 into specific cortical layers suggest that Cdk5 function in upper-layer neurons is more important for cortical folding than that in lower-layer neurons. Cdk5 inhibition induced severe migration defects in cortical neurons. Taken together, our findings suggest that the appropriate positioning of upper-layer neurons is critical for cortical folding.

  16. Toward a Proprioceptive Neural Interface that Mimics Natural Cortical Activity.

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    Tomlinson, Tucker; Miller, Lee E

    2016-01-01

    The dramatic advances in efferent neural interfaces over the past decade are remarkable, with cortical signals used to allow paralyzed patients to control the movement of a prosthetic limb or even their own hand. However, this success has thrown into relief, the relative lack of progress in our ability to restore somatosensation to these same patients. Somatosensation, including proprioception, the sense of limb position and movement, plays a crucial role in even basic motor tasks like reaching and walking. Its loss results in crippling deficits. Historical work dating back decades and even centuries has demonstrated that modality-specific sensations can be elicited by activating the central nervous system electrically. Recent work has focused on the challenge of refining these sensations by stimulating the somatosensory cortex (S1) directly. Animals are able to detect particular patterns of stimulation and even associate those patterns with particular sensory cues. Most of this work has involved areas of the somatosensory cortex that mediate the sense of touch. Very little corresponding work has been done for proprioception. Here we describe the effort to develop afferent neural interfaces through spatiotemporally precise intracortical microstimulation (ICMS). We review what is known of the cortical representation of proprioception, and describe recent work in our lab that demonstrates for the first time, that sensations like those of natural proprioception may be evoked by ICMS in S1. These preliminary findings are an important first step to the development of an afferent cortical interface to restore proprioception.

  17. Posterior Cortical Atrophy: Visuomotor Deficits in Reaching and Grasping

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    Benjamin P Meek

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA is a rare clinical syndrome characterised by the predominance of higher-order visual disturbances such as optic ataxia, a characteristic of Balint’s syndrome. Deficits result from progressive neurodegeneration of occipito-temporal and occipito-parietal cortices. The current study sought to explore the visuomotor functioning of four individuals with PCA by testing their ability to reach out and grasp real objects under various viewing conditions. Experiment 1 had participants reach out and grasp simple, rectangular blocks under visually- and memory-guided conditions. Experiment 2 explored participants’ abilities to accurately reach for objects located in their visual periphery. This investigation revealed that PCA patients demonstrate many of the same deficits that have been previously reported in other individuals with optic ataxia, such as ‘magnetic misreaching’ – a pathological reaching bias towards the point of visual fixation when grasping peripheral targets. Unlike many other individuals with optic ataxia, however, the patients in the current study also show symptoms indicative of damage to the more perceptual stream of visual processing, including abolished grip scaling during memory-guided grasping and deficits in face and object identification. These investigations are the first to perform a quantitative analysis of the visuomotor deficits exhibited by patients with Posterior Cortical Atrophy. Critically, this study helps characterize common symptoms of PCA, a vital first step for generating effective diagnostic criteria and therapeutic strategies for this understudied neurodegenerative disorder.

  18. Cortical Neural Activity Predicts Sensory Acuity Under Optogenetic Manipulation.

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    Briguglio, John J; Aizenberg, Mark; Balasubramanian, Vijay; Geffen, Maria N

    2018-02-21

    Excitatory and inhibitory neurons in the mammalian sensory cortex form interconnected circuits that control cortical stimulus selectivity and sensory acuity. Theoretical studies have predicted that suppression of inhibition in such excitatory-inhibitory networks can lead to either an increase or, paradoxically, a decrease in excitatory neuronal firing, with consequent effects on stimulus selectivity. We tested whether modulation of inhibition or excitation in the auditory cortex of male mice could evoke such a variety of effects in tone-evoked responses and in behavioral frequency discrimination acuity. We found that, indeed, the effects of optogenetic manipulation on stimulus selectivity and behavior varied in both magnitude and sign across subjects, possibly reflecting differences in circuitry or expression of optogenetic factors. Changes in neural population responses consistently predicted behavioral changes for individuals separately, including improvement and impairment in acuity. This correlation between cortical and behavioral change demonstrates that, despite the complex and varied effects that these manipulations can have on neuronal dynamics, the resulting changes in cortical activity account for accompanying changes in behavioral acuity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Excitatory and inhibitory interactions determine stimulus specificity and tuning in sensory cortex, thereby controlling perceptual discrimination acuity. Modeling has predicted that suppressing the activity of inhibitory neurons can lead to increased or, paradoxically, decreased excitatory activity depending on the architecture of the network. Here, we capitalized on differences between subjects to test whether suppressing/activating inhibition and excitation can in fact exhibit such paradoxical effects for both stimulus sensitivity and behavioral discriminability. Indeed, the same optogenetic manipulation in the auditory cortex of different mice could improve or impair frequency discrimination

  19. Late onset cerebellar cortical degeneration in a koala.

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    Kuwamura, M; Murai, F; Nishioka, S; Aoki, M; Ohashi, F; Yamate, J; Kotani, T; Summers, B A

    2009-08-01

    A 10-year-old male koala started to fall from the tree while sleeping. Subsequently, the koala often fell down while walking and showed a gait abnormality, abnormal nystagmus and hypersalivation. At 12 years of age, the koala became ataxic and seemed blind. At 13 years of age, the koala exhibited signs of dysstasia and was euthanased. Necropsy revealed marked symmetrical atrophy of the cerebellum. Histopathologically, a severe loss of Purkinje and granule cells was evident in the cerebellum, while the molecular layer was more cellular than normal with cells resembling small neurons, which were positively stained with parvalbumin immunohistochemistry. Reactive Bergmann glial cells (astrocytes) were present adjacent to the depleted Purkinje cell zone. The very late onset and slow progression of the cerebellar cortical degeneration in this case is particularly interesting and appears to be the first report in the koala.

  20. Calcium dynamics of cortical astrocytic networks in vivo.

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    Hajime Hirase

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Large and long-lasting cytosolic calcium surges in astrocytes have been described in cultured cells and acute slice preparations. The mechanisms that give rise to these calcium events have been extensively studied in vitro. However, their existence and functions in the intact brain are unknown. We have topically applied Fluo-4 AM on the cerebral cortex of anesthetized rats, and imaged cytosolic calcium fluctuation in astrocyte populations of superficial cortical layers in vivo, using two-photon laser scanning microscopy. Spontaneous [Ca(2+](i events in individual astrocytes were similar to those observed in vitro. Coordination of [Ca(2+](i events among astrocytes was indicated by the broad cross-correlograms. Increased neuronal discharge was associated with increased astrocytic [Ca(2+](i activity in individual cells and a robust coordination of [Ca(2+](i signals in neighboring astrocytes. These findings indicate potential neuron-glia communication in the intact brain.

  1. What Is the Evidence for Inter-laminar Integration in a Prefrontal Cortical Minicolumn?

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    Ioan Opris

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this perspective article is to examine columnar inter-laminar integration during the executive control of behavior. The integration hypothesis posits that perceptual and behavioral signals are integrated within the prefrontal cortical inter-laminar microcircuits. Inter-laminar minicolumnar activity previously recorded from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC of nonhuman primates, trained in a visual delay match-to-sample (DMS task, was re-assessed from an integrative perspective. Biomorphic multielectrode arrays (MEAs played a unique role in the in vivo recording of columnar cell firing in the dlPFC layers 2/3 and 5/6. Several integrative aspects stem from these experiments: 1. Functional integration of perceptual and behavioral signals across cortical layers during executive control. The integrative effect of dlPFC minicolumns was shown by: (i increased correlated firing on correct vs. error trials; (ii decreased correlated firing when the number of non-matching images increased; and (iii similar spatial firing preference across cortical-striatal cells during spatial-trials, and less on object-trials. 2. Causal relations to integration of cognitive signals by the minicolumnar turbo-engines. The inter-laminar integration between the perceptual and executive circuits was facilitated by stimulating the infra-granular layers with firing patterns obtained from supra-granular layers that enhanced spatial preference of percent correct performance on spatial trials. 3. Integration across hierarchical levels of the brain. The integration of intention signals (visual spatial, direction with movement preparation (timing, velocity in striatum and with the motor command and posture in midbrain is also discussed. These findings provide evidence for inter-laminar integration of executive control signals within brain’s prefrontal cortical microcircuits.

  2. Effect of Anatomically Realistic Full-Head Model on Activation of Cortical Neurons in Subdural Cortical Stimulation—A Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Donghyeon; Jun, Sung Chan

    2016-06-01

    Electrical brain stimulation (EBS) is an emerging therapy for the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of EBS have been used to determine the optimal parameters for highly cost-effective electrotherapy. Recent notable growth in computing capability has enabled researchers to consider an anatomically realistic head model that represents the full head and complex geometry of the brain rather than the previous simplified partial head model (extruded slab) that represents only the precentral gyrus. In this work, subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) was found to offer a better understanding of the differential activation of cortical neurons in the anatomically realistic full-head model than in the simplified partial-head models. We observed that layer 3 pyramidal neurons had comparable stimulation thresholds in both head models, while layer 5 pyramidal neurons showed a notable discrepancy between the models; in particular, layer 5 pyramidal neurons demonstrated asymmetry in the thresholds and action potential initiation sites in the anatomically realistic full-head model. Overall, the anatomically realistic full-head model may offer a better understanding of layer 5 pyramidal neuronal responses. Accordingly, the effects of using the realistic full-head model in SuCS are compelling in computational modeling studies, even though this modeling requires substantially more effort.

  3. Automated cortical bone segmentation for multirow-detector CT imaging with validation and application to human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Jin, Dakai; Chen, Cheng; Letuchy, Elena M; Janz, Kathleen F; Burns, Trudy L; Torner, James C; Levy, Steven M; Saha, Punam K

    2015-08-01

    thicker cortex (mean difference 0.33 mm and effect size 0.92 at the anterior region) with lower bone mineral density (mean difference -28.73 mg/cm(3) and effect size 1.35 at the posterior region) as compared to females. The algorithm presented is suitable for fully automated segmentation of cortical bone in MD-CT imaging of the distal tibia with high accuracy and reproducibility. Analysis of data from a pilot study demonstrated that the cortical bone indices allow quantification of gender differences in cortical bone from MD-CT imaging. Application to larger population groups, including those with compromised bone, is needed.

  4. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is characterized by a delay in cortical maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, P; Eckstrand, K; Sharp, W; Blumenthal, J; Lerch, J P; Greenstein, D; Clasen, L; Evans, A; Giedd, J; Rapoport, J L

    2007-12-04

    There is controversy over the nature of the disturbance in brain development that underpins attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In particular, it is unclear whether the disorder results from a delay in brain maturation or whether it represents a complete deviation from the template of typical development. Using computational neuroanatomic techniques, we estimated cortical thickness at >40,000 cerebral points from 824 magnetic resonance scans acquired prospectively on 223 children with ADHD and 223 typically developing controls. With this sample size, we could define the growth trajectory of each cortical point, delineating a phase of childhood increase followed by adolescent decrease in cortical thickness (a quadratic growth model). From these trajectories, the age of attaining peak cortical thickness was derived and used as an index of cortical maturation. We found maturation to progress in a similar manner regionally in both children with and without ADHD, with primary sensory areas attaining peak cortical thickness before polymodal, high-order association areas. However, there was a marked delay in ADHD in attaining peak thickness throughout most of the cerebrum: the median age by which 50% of the cortical points attained peak thickness for this group was 10.5 years (SE 0.01), which was significantly later than the median age of 7.5 years (SE 0.02) for typically developing controls (log rank test chi(1)(2) = 5,609, P processes including attention and motor planning. Neuroanatomic documentation of a delay in regional cortical maturation in ADHD has not been previously reported.

  5. PET in malformations of cortical development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouilleret, V.; O'Brien, T.J.; Bouilleret, V.; Bouilleret, V.; Chiron, C.; Chiron, C.

    2009-01-01

    Within the group of malformations of cortical development, focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) are an increasingly recognized cause of intractable epilepsy that can be cured by surgery. The success of cortical resection for intractable epilepsy is highly dependent on the accurate pre-surgical delineation of the regions responsible for generating seizures. [ 18 F]-FDG PET, which images cerebral metabolism studying brain glucose uptake, is the most established functional imaging modality in the evaluation of patients with epilepsy. The aim of this article is to review [ 18 F]-FDG PET usefulness as a pre-surgical tool in the evaluation of medically refractory partial epilepsy. It has an established place in assisting in the localisation and definition of FCD in patients with no lesion, or only a subtle abnormality, on MRI. The role of FDG-PET in defining the extent of the surgical resection is still uncertain and needs to be the focus of future research. (authors)

  6. Paradiaphyseal calcific tendinitis with cortical bone erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, P; Bardin, T; Laredo, J D; Ziza, J M; D'Anglejan, G; Lansaman, J; Bucki, B; Forest, M; Kuntz, D

    1994-05-01

    To determine the clinical, radiologic, and histologic features of calcific tendinitis with cortical bone erosion. The records of 6 patients with paradiaphyseal calcific tendinitis and adjacent bone cortex erosion were reviewed. Calcific tendinitis involved the linea aspera in 4 patients, the bicipital groove in 1 patient, and the deltoid insertion in another. Calcium deposits were associated with cortical bone erosions, revealed on plain radiographs in 4 patients and computed tomography scans in 2. Bone scans were performed in 2 patients and showed local hyperfixation of the isotope. In 4 patients, suspicion of a neoplasm led to a biopsy. Calcium deposits appeared to be surrounded by a foreign body reaction with numerous giant cells. Apatite crystals were identified by transmission electron microscopy and elemental analysis in 1 surgical sample. Paradiaphyseal calcific tendinitis with cortical bone erosion is an uncommon presentation of apatite deposition disease.

  7. Towards an optimal paradigm for simultaneously recording cortical and brainstem auditory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidelman, Gavin M

    2015-02-15

    Simultaneous recording of brainstem and cortical event-related brain potentials (ERPs) may offer a valuable tool for understanding the early neural transcription of behaviorally relevant sounds and the hierarchy of signal processing operating at multiple levels of the auditory system. To date, dual recordings have been challenged by technological and physiological limitations including different optimal parameters necessary to elicit each class of ERP (e.g., differential adaptation/habitation effects and number of trials to obtain adequate response signal-to-noise ratio). We investigated a new stimulus paradigm for concurrent recording of the auditory brainstem frequency-following response (FFR) and cortical ERPs. The paradigm is "optimal" in that it uses a clustered stimulus presentation and variable interstimulus interval (ISI) to (i) achieve the most ideal acquisition parameters for eliciting subcortical and cortical responses, (ii) obtain an adequate number of trials to detect each class of response, and (iii) minimize neural adaptation/habituation effects. Comparison between clustered and traditional (fixed, slow ISI) stimulus paradigms revealed minimal change in amplitude or latencies of either the brainstem FFR or cortical ERP. The clustered paradigm offered over a 3× increase in recording efficiency compared to conventional (fixed ISI presentation) and thus, a more rapid protocol for obtaining dual brainstem-cortical recordings in individual listeners. We infer that faster recording of subcortical and cortical potentials might allow more complete and sensitive testing of neurophysiological function and aid in the differential assessment of auditory function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Bottom Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, John H.; Lentz, Steven J.

    2018-01-01

    The oceanic bottom boundary layer extracts energy and momentum from the overlying flow, mediates the fate of near-bottom substances, and generates bedforms that retard the flow and affect benthic processes. The bottom boundary layer is forced by winds, waves, tides, and buoyancy and is influenced by surface waves, internal waves, and stratification by heat, salt, and suspended sediments. This review focuses on the coastal ocean. The main points are that (a) classical turbulence concepts and modern turbulence parameterizations provide accurate representations of the structure and turbulent fluxes under conditions in which the underlying assumptions hold, (b) modern sensors and analyses enable high-quality direct or near-direct measurements of the turbulent fluxes and dissipation rates, and (c) the remaining challenges include the interaction of waves and currents with the erodible seabed, the impact of layer-scale two- and three-dimensional instabilities, and the role of the bottom boundary layer in shelf-slope exchange.

  9. Associative Memory Extinction Is Accompanied by Decayed Plasticity at Motor Cortical Neurons and Persistent Plasticity at Sensory Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Ge, Rongjing; Zhao, Shidi; Liu, Yulong; Zhao, Xin; Huang, Li; Guan, Sodong; Lu, Wei; Cui, Shan; Wang, Shirlene; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Associative memory is essential for cognition, in which associative memory cells and their plasticity presumably play important roles. The mechanism underlying associative memory extinction vs. maintenance remains unclear, which we have studied in a mouse model of cross-modal associative learning. Paired whisker and olfaction stimulations lead to a full establishment of odorant-induced whisker motion in training day 10, which almost disappears if paired stimulations are not given in a week, and then recovers after paired stimulation for an additional day. In mice that show associative memory, extinction and recovery, we have analyzed the dynamical plasticity of glutamatergic neurons in layers II-III of the barrel cortex and layers IV-V of the motor cortex. Compared with control mice, the rate of evoked spikes as well as the amplitude and frequency of excitatory postsynaptic currents increase, whereas the amplitude and frequency of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSC) decrease at training day 10 in associative memory mice. Without paired training for a week, these plastic changes are persistent in the barrel cortex and decayed in the motor cortex. If paired training is given for an additional day to revoke associative memory, neuronal plasticity recovers in the motor cortex. Our study indicates persistent neuronal plasticity in the barrel cortex for cross-modal memory maintenance as well as the dynamical change of neuronal plasticity in the motor cortex for memory retrieval and extinction. In other words, the sensory cortices are essential for long-term memory while the behavior-related cortices with the inability of memory retrieval are correlated to memory extinction.

  10. Detection and quantification of regional cortical gray matter damage in multiple sclerosis utilizing gradient echo MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortical gray matter (GM damage is now widely recognized in multiple sclerosis (MS. The standard MRI does not reliably detect cortical GM lesions, although cortical volume loss can be measured. In this study, we demonstrate that the gradient echo MRI can reliably and quantitatively assess cortical GM damage in MS patients using standard clinical scanners. High resolution multi-gradient echo MRI was used for regional mapping of tissue-specific MRI signal transverse relaxation rate values (R2* in 10 each relapsing–remitting, primary-progressive and secondary-progressive MS subjects. A voxel spread function method was used to correct artifacts induced by background field gradients. R2* values from healthy controls (HCs of varying ages were obtained to establish baseline data and calculate ΔR2* values – age-adjusted differences between MS patients and HC. Thickness of cortical regions was also measured in all subjects. In cortical regions, ΔR2* values of MS patients were also adjusted for changes in cortical thickness. Symbol digit modalities (SDMT and paced auditory serial addition (PASAT neurocognitive tests, as well as Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg test results were also obtained on all MS subjects. We found that ΔR2* values were lower in multiple cortical GM and normal appearing white matter (NAWM regions in MS compared with HC. ΔR2* values of global cortical GM and several specific cortical regions showed significant (p < 0.05 correlations with SDMT and PASAT scores, and showed better correlations than volumetric measures of the same regions. Neurological tests not focused on cognition (Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg tests showed no correlation with cortical GM ΔR2* values. The technique presented here is robust and reproducible. It requires less than 10 min and can be implemented on any MRI scanner. Our results show that quantitative tissue-specific R2

  11. Femoral cortical thickness influences the pattern of proximal femoral periprosthetic fractures with a cemented stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jarrad; Clement, Nicholas; Nasserallah, Michael; Millar, Michael; Joseph, Sam

    2018-02-08

    Periprosthetic fractures of the proximal femur place a significant burden on the patients who endure them, as well as the medical health system that supports them. The purpose of this study was to determine whether femoral cortical thickness, as an absolute measurement, is a predictor of periprosthetic fracture pattern. A cohort of 102 patients who had sustained a periprosthetic hip fracture were retrospectively identified. This included 58 males and 44 females with a mean age of 79.8 years. The femoral periprosthetic fracture pattern was classified based on the Vancouver classification system. Stem fixation was recorded and femoral cortical thickness measured. Patients were grouped into cemented and cementless stems. The relationship between cortical thickness and periprosthetic fracture pattern was assessed using the primary stem fixation method. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to identify a threshold in the cortical thickness that predicted fracture pattern. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for confounding variables to assess the independent influence of cortical thickness on the risk of sustaining a Vancouver type A, B or C. There were 65 (63.7%) patients in the cemented group and 37 (36.3%) in the cementless group. The pattern of periprosthetic fractures around cemented stems was significantly (p pattern. In contrast, no association between femoral cortical thickness and fracture pattern assessment was demonstrated in the cementless group (p = 0.82 Chi square). Comparing the rate of type A fracture patterns between the groups illustrated a significantly decreased risk in the cemented group with a cortical thickness of > 7 mm (odds ratio 0.03, p  6.3 mm. In contrast, the ROC curve analysis did not find cortical thickness to be a predictor of fracture pattern in the cementless group. When adjusting for confounding variables, multinomial logistic regression demonstrated a cortical thickness of 6

  12. Cortical control of upright stance in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Recep A; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L; Paloski, William H

    2018-01-01

    This study examined differences between young and elderly volunteers in cortical involvement to human posture control during quiet stance with normal and altered sensory stimulation (Experiment-1), and biomechanical perturbations (Experiment-2). The primary focus of the first part was to monitor changes in cortical activity when unexpectedly altering the sensory conditions of upright stance, such as switching from stable (eyes open, fixed support surface) to less-stable (eyes closed, sway-referenced support surface) conditions. Our results demonstrate increased cortical activations in delta (0.2-4 Hz) and gamma (30-50 Hz) oscillations, primarily over central-frontal, central, and central parietal cortices during challenging postural conditions. While increased delta rhythms were observed in both groups during challenging sensory conditions, elderly individuals also showed increased gamma band activity over sensorimotor and parietal cortices, when compared to the younger group. To our knowledge, this study is the first to show age differences in balance related cortical activations during continuous postural tasks with challenging sensory conditions. Preliminary correlations also suggest that increased cerebral activity became more relevant to the control of Center of Mass (COM) dynamics when upright stance is threatened. The results of Experiment-2 also showed for the first time that oscillatory rhythms of the cortex are coherent with muscle firing characteristics suggesting increased corticospinal drive from leg motor cortex to lower limb motoneurons following postural perturbations. Finally, perturbation evoked potential (PEP) analyses suggest that, rather than motor system malfunctioning, impairments in perceptual processing of sensory afference forms the basis of prolonged muscle response delays during perturbed balance in the elderly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mean field methods for cortical network dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, J.; Lerchner, Alexander; Ahmadi, M.

    2004-01-01

    We review the use of mean field theory for describing the dynamics of dense, randomly connected cortical circuits. For a simple network of excitatory and inhibitory leaky integrate- and-fire neurons, we can show how the firing irregularity, as measured by the Fano factor, increases with the stren......We review the use of mean field theory for describing the dynamics of dense, randomly connected cortical circuits. For a simple network of excitatory and inhibitory leaky integrate- and-fire neurons, we can show how the firing irregularity, as measured by the Fano factor, increases...

  14. Cortical networks for visual self-recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Motoaki

    2007-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews recent developments regarding the brain mechanisms of visual self-recognition. A special cognitive mechanism for visual self-recognition has been postulated based on behavioral and neuropsychological evidence, but its neural substrate remains controversial. Recent functional imaging studies suggest that multiple cortical mechanisms play self-specific roles during visual self-recognition, reconciling the existing controversy. Respective roles for the left occipitotemporal, right parietal, and frontal cortices in symbolic, visuospatial, and conceptual aspects of self-representation have been proposed. (author)

  15. Cortical Thickness Changes Associated with Photoparoxysmal Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanganu, Alexandru; Groppa, Stanislav A; Deuschl, Günther

    2014-01-01

    Photoparoxysmal response (PPR) is an EEG trait of spike and spike-wave discharges in response to photic stimulation that is closely linked to idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). In our previous studies we showed that PPR is associated with functional alterations in the occipital and frontal...... cortices. The aim of the present study was to determine structural changes associated with PPR. For this purpose we analysed the cortical thickness as derived from T1 MRI images in PPR-positive-subjects (n = 12; 15.5 ± 8.6 years; 4 males), PPR-positive-IGE-patients (n = 12; 14.9 ± 2.7 years; 4 males...

  16. Focal cortical dysplasia alters electrophysiological cortical hubs in the resting-state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Seung-Hyun; Jeong, Woorim; Chung, Chun Kee

    2015-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that epilepsy patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) have different electrophysiological functional cortical hubs from those of healthy controls. Resting-state functional networks in the theta, alpha, beta and gamma frequency bands were evaluated in 35 epilepsy patients with histopathologically verified FCD as a single pathology and in 46 age-matched healthy controls. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), we investigated the network differences between the two groups by comparing the nodal efficiency (Enodal) and betweenness centrality (BC) values at the source level. The FCD patients had significant Enodal increases in the functional cortical hubs in the left anterior, middle, and posterior cortices and the medial orbital superior frontal cortex in the beta band. The left posterior cingulate cortex showed significant BC increases in the theta, alpha, and beta bands. There was a negative correlation between Enodal and age at seizure onset. Cortical dysplasia alters whole brain functional cortical hubs compared to healthy controls. The age at seizure onset was negatively correlated with Enodal in the beta band in FCD patients. Our study for the first time investigated the functional cortical hubs and their alteration in the resting-state functional network in epilepsy patients with FCD using noninvasive MEG signals. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Dennis P [Maplewood, MN; Schmoeckel, Alison K [Stillwater, MN; Vernstrom, George D [Cottage Grove, MN; Atanasoski, Radoslav [Edina, MN; Wood, Thomas E [Stillwater, MN; Yang, Ruizhi [Halifax, CA; Easton, E Bradley [Halifax, CA; Dahn, Jeffrey R [Hubley, CA; O'Neill, David G [Lake Elmo, MN

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  18. The Adobe Photoshop layers book

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Layers are the building blocks for working in Photoshop. With the correct use of the Layers Tool, you can edit individual components of your images nondestructively to ensure that your end result is a combination of the best parts of your work. Despite how important it is for successful Photoshop work, the Layers Tool is one of the most often misused and misunderstood features within this powerful software program. This book will show you absolutely everything you need to know to work with layers, including how to use masks, blending, modes and layer management. You'll learn professional tech

  19. A sharp cadherin-6 gene expression boundary in the developing mouse cortical plate demarcates the future functional areal border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terakawa, Youhei W; Inoue, Yukiko U; Asami, Junko; Hoshino, Mikio; Inoue, Takayoshi

    2013-10-01

    The mammalian cerebral cortex can be tangentially subdivided into tens of functional areas with distinct cyto-architectures and neural circuitries; however, it remains elusive how these areal borders are genetically elaborated during development. Here we establish original bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mouse lines that specifically recapitulate cadherin-6 (Cdh6) mRNA expression profiles in the layer IV of the somatosensory cortex and by detailing their cortical development, we show that a sharp Cdh6 gene expression boundary is formed at a mediolateral coordinate along the cortical layer IV as early as the postnatal day 5 (P5). By further applying mouse genetics that allows rigid cell fate tracing with CreERT2 expression, it is demonstrated that the Cdh6 gene expression boundary set at around P4 eventually demarcates the areal border between the somatosensory barrel and limb field at P20. In the P6 cortical cell pellet culture system, neurons with Cdh6 expression preferentially form aggregates in a manner dependent on Ca(2+) and electroporation-based Cdh6 overexpression limited to the postnatal stages perturbs area-specific cell organization in the barrel field. These results suggest that Cdh6 expression in the nascent cortical plate may serve solidification of the protomap for cortical functional areas.

  20. Development of Cortical GABAergic Innervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex M Thomson

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The mature neocortex contains many different classes of GABAergic inhibitory interneurones, distributed, with some degree of selectivity, through six layers and through many different regions. Some of the events in the early lives of these neurones that may determine their ultimate destination, their maturation and their selective innervation of targets appropriate for each subtype, are discussed. Both time and place of birth influence the class of interneurone that an early post-mitotic interneuronal precursor will become, driven by the selective expression of different combinations of transcription factors in different regions of their birth-places in the ganglionic eminence and ventricular zone. The long distance migration of these precursors along tangential routes in marginal, subventricular and intermediate zones and their final radial movement, into the developing cortex, is regulated by chemical cues, both attractant and repellent. Once they arrive at their final destination, they must integrate into the developing circuitry. As they mature within the cortex, their axons grow and branch in highly specific patterns that may be partially determined by the genetic blueprint for each interneuronal class and partly by the environment in which they find themselves. Finally, as each interneurone class begins to form synapses with only certain postsynaptic targets, cell-cell recognition, most probably via protein-protein interactions across the synaptic cleft, facilitate the formation of appropriate synapses.

  1. Changes in cortical plasticity across the lifespan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina eFreitas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Deterioration of motor and cognitive performance with advancing age is well documented, but its cause remains unknown. Animal studies dating back to the late 1970’s reveal that age-associated neurocognitive changes are linked to age-dependent changes in synaptic plasticity, including alterations of long-term potentiation and depression (LTP and LTD. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques enable measurement of LTP- and LTD-like mechanisms of plasticity, in vivo, in humans, and may thus provide valuable insights. We examined the effects of a 40-second train of continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS to the motor cortex (600 stimuli, 3 pulses at 50 Hz applied at a frequency of 5 Hz on cortico-spinal excitability as measured by the motor evoked potentials (MEPs induced by single-pulse TMS before and after cTBS in the contralateral first dorsal interosseus muscle. Thirty-six healthy individuals aged 19 to 81 years old were studied in two sites (Boston, USA and Barcelona, Spain. The findings did not differ across study sites. We found that advancing age is negatively correlated with the duration of the effect of cTBS (r = -0.367; p = 0.028 and the overall amount of corticomotor suppression induced by cTBS (r = -0.478; p = 0.003, and positively correlated with the maximal suppression of amplitude on motor evoked responses in the target muscle (r = 0.420; p = 0.011. We performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-based individual morphometric analysis in a subset of subjects to demonstrate that these findings are not explained by age-related brain atrophy or differences in scalp-to-brain distance that could have affected the TBS effects. Our findings provide empirical evidence that the mechanisms of cortical plasticity area are altered with aging and their efficiency decreases across the human lifespan. This may critically contribute to motor and possibly cognitive decline.

  2. Rehabilitation of cortical blindness secondary to stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Tarek A-Z K

    2010-01-01

    Cortical blindness is a rare complication of posterior circulation stroke. However, its complex presentation with sensory, physical, cognitive and behavioural impairments makes it one of the most challenging. Appropriate approach from a rehabilitation standpoint was never reported. Our study aims to discuss the rehabilitation methods and outcomes of a cohort of patients with cortical blindness. The notes of all patients with cortical blindness referred to a local NHS rehabilitation service in the last 6~years were examined. Patients' demographics, presenting symptoms, scan findings, rehabilitation programmes and outcomes were documented. Seven patients presented to our service, six of them were males. The mean age was 63. Patients 1, 2 and 3 had total blindness with severe cognitive and behavioural impairments, wandering and akathisia. All of them failed to respond to any rehabilitation effort and the focus was on damage limitation. Pharmacological interventions had a modest impact on behaviour and sleep pattern. The 3 patients were discharged to a nursing facility. Patients 4, 5, 6 and 7 had partial blindness with variable severity. All of them suffered from significant memory impairment. However, none suffered from any behavioural, physical or other cognitive impairment. Rehabilitation efforts on 3 patients were carried out collaboratively between brain injury occupational therapists and sensory disability officers. All patients experienced significant improvement in handicap and they all maintained community placements. This small cohort of patients suggests that the rehabilitation philosophy and outcomes of these 2 distinct groups of either total or partial cortical blindness differ significantly.

  3. Cortical mechanisms of mirror therapy after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Holly E; Borrelli, Mimi R; Borchert, Robin J; Bradbury, David; Ward, Nick S

    2015-06-01

    Mirror therapy is a new form of stroke rehabilitation that uses the mirror reflection of the unaffected hand in place of the affected hand to augment movement training. The mechanism of mirror therapy is not known but is thought to involve changes in cerebral organization. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to measure changes in cortical activity during mirror training after stroke. In particular, we examined movement-related changes in the power of cortical oscillations in the beta (15-30 Hz) frequency range, known to be involved in movement. Ten stroke patients with upper limb paresis and 13 healthy controls were recorded using MEG while performing bimanual hand movements in 2 different conditions. In one, subjects looked directly at their affected hand (or dominant hand in controls), and in the other, they looked at a mirror reflection of their unaffected hand in place of their affected hand. The movement-related beta desynchronization was calculated in both primary motor cortices. Movement-related beta desynchronization was symmetrical during bilateral movement and unaltered by the mirror condition in controls. In the patients, movement-related beta desynchronization was generally smaller than in controls, but greater in contralesional compared to ipsilesional motor cortex. This initial asymmetry in movement-related beta desynchronization between hemispheres was made more symmetrical by the presence of the mirror. Mirror therapy could potentially aid stroke rehabilitation by normalizing an asymmetrical pattern of movement-related beta desynchronization in primary motor cortices during bilateral movement. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Spontaneously emerging cortical representations of visual attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenet, Tal; Bibitchkov, Dmitri; Tsodyks, Misha; Grinvald, Amiram; Arieli, Amos

    2003-10-01

    Spontaneous cortical activity-ongoing activity in the absence of intentional sensory input-has been studied extensively, using methods ranging from EEG (electroencephalography), through voltage sensitive dye imaging, down to recordings from single neurons. Ongoing cortical activity has been shown to play a critical role in development, and must also be essential for processing sensory perception, because it modulates stimulus-evoked activity, and is correlated with behaviour. Yet its role in the processing of external information and its relationship to internal representations of sensory attributes remains unknown. Using voltage sensitive dye imaging, we previously established a close link between ongoing activity in the visual cortex of anaesthetized cats and the spontaneous firing of a single neuron. Here we report that such activity encompasses a set of dynamically switching cortical states, many of which correspond closely to orientation maps. When such an orientation state emerged spontaneously, it spanned several hypercolumns and was often followed by a state corresponding to a proximal orientation. We suggest that dynamically switching cortical states could represent the brain's internal context, and therefore reflect or influence memory, perception and behaviour.

  5. Development of auditory cortical synaptic receptive fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froemke, Robert C; Jones, Bianca J

    2011-11-01

    The central nervous system is plastic throughout life, but is most sensitive to the statistics of the sensory environment during critical periods of early postnatal development. In the auditory cortex, various forms of acoustic experience have been found to shape the formation of receptive fields and influence the overall rate of cortical organization. The synaptic mechanisms that control cortical receptive field plasticity are beginning to be described, particularly for frequency tuning in rodent primary auditory cortex. Inhibitory circuitry plays a major role in critical period regulation, and new evidence suggests that the formation of excitatory-inhibitory balance determines the duration of critical period plasticity for auditory cortical frequency tuning. Cortical inhibition is poorly tuned in the infant brain, but becomes co-tuned with excitation in an experience-dependent manner over the first postnatal month. We discuss evidence suggesting that this may be a general feature of the developing cortex, and describe the functional implications of such transient excitatory-inhibitory imbalance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Critical fluctuations in cortical models near instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aburn, M.J.; Holmes, C.A.; Roberts, J.A.; Boonstra, T.W.; Breakspear, M.

    2012-01-01

    Computational studies often proceed from the premise that cortical dynamics operate in a linearly stable domain, where fluctuations dissipate quickly and show only short memory. Studies of human electroencephalography (EEG), however, have shown significant autocorrelation at time lags on the scale

  7. [Research advances on cortical functional and structural deficits of amblyopia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y; Liu, L Q

    2017-05-11

    Previous studies have observed functional deficits in primary visual cortex. With the development of functional magnetic resonance imaging and electrophysiological technique, the research of the striate, extra-striate cortex and higher-order cortical deficit underlying amblyopia reaches a new stage. The neural mechanisms of amblyopia show that anomalous responses exist throughout the visual processing hierarchy, including the functional and structural abnormalities. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge about structural and functional deficits of brain regions associated with amblyopia. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2017, 53: 392 - 395) .

  8. Depth-dependent flow and pressure characteristics in cortical microvascular networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franca Schmid

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A better knowledge of the flow and pressure distribution in realistic microvascular networks is needed for improving our understanding of neurovascular coupling mechanisms and the related measurement techniques. Here, numerical simulations with discrete tracking of red blood cells (RBCs are performed in three realistic microvascular networks from the mouse cerebral cortex. Our analysis is based on trajectories of individual RBCs and focuses on layer-specific flow phenomena until a cortical depth of 1 mm. The individual RBC trajectories reveal that in the capillary bed RBCs preferentially move in plane. Hence, the capillary flow field shows laminar patterns and a layer-specific analysis is valid. We demonstrate that for RBCs entering the capillary bed close to the cortical surface (< 400 μm the largest pressure drop takes place in the capillaries (37%, while for deeper regions arterioles are responsible for 61% of the total pressure drop. Further flow characteristics, such as capillary transit time or RBC velocity, also vary significantly over cortical depth. Comparison of purely topological characteristics with flow-based ones shows that a combined interpretation of topology and flow is indispensable. Our results provide evidence that it is crucial to consider layer-specific differences for all investigations related to the flow and pressure distribution in the cortical vasculature. These findings support the hypothesis that for an efficient oxygen up-regulation at least two regulation mechanisms must be playing hand in hand, namely cerebral blood flow increase and microvascular flow homogenization. However, the contribution of both regulation mechanisms to oxygen up-regulation likely varies over depth.

  9. Chemical solution seed layer for rabits tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit; Paranthaman, Mariappan; Wee, Sung-Hun

    2014-06-10

    A method for making a superconducting article includes the steps of providing a biaxially textured substrate. A seed layer is then deposited. The seed layer includes a double perovskite of the formula A.sub.2B'B''O.sub.6, where A is rare earth or alkaline earth metal and B' and B'' are different rare earth or transition metal cations. A superconductor layer is grown epitaxially such that the superconductor layer is supported by the seed layer.

  10. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xunming

    2010-02-23

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  11. The relationship between neuropsychological tests of visuospatial function and lobar cortical thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Davor N; Miller, Justin B; Caldwell, Jessica Z K; Bird, Christopher; Banks, Sarah J

    2017-11-07

    Tests of visuospatial function are often administered in comprehensive neuropsychological evaluations. These tests are generally considered assays of parietal lobe function; however, the neural correlates of these tests, using modern imaging techniques, are not well understood. In the current study we investigated the relationship between three commonly used tests of visuospatial function and lobar cortical thickness in each hemisphere. Data from 374 patients who underwent a neuropsychological evaluation and MRI scans in an outpatient dementia clinic were included in the analysis. We examined the relationships between cortical thickness, as assessed with Freesurfer, and performance on three tests: Judgment of Line Orientation (JoLO), Block Design (BD) from the Fourth edition of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, and Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised Copy Trial (BVMT-R-C) in patients who showed overall average performance on these tasks. Using a series of multiple regression models, we assessed which lobe's overall cortical thickness best predicted test performance. Among the individual lobes, JoLO performance was best predicted by cortical thickness in the right temporal lobe. BD performance was best predicted by cortical thickness in the right parietal lobe, and BVMT-R-C performance was best predicted by cortical thickness in the left parietal lobe. Performance on constructional tests of visuospatial function appears to correspond best with underlying cortical thickness of the parietal lobes, while performance on visuospatial judgment tests appears to correspond best to temporal lobe thickness. Future research using voxel-wise and connectivity techniques and including more diverse samples will help further understanding of the regions and networks involved in visuospatial tests.

  12. Assessment of cortical maturation with prenatal MRI. Part I: normal cortical maturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogliarini, Celine; Chaumoitre, Katia; Chapon, Frederique; Levrier, Olivier; Girard, Nadine; Fernandez, Carla; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2005-01-01

    Cortical maturation, especially gyral formation, follows a temporospatial schedule and is a good marker of fetal maturation. Although ultrasonography is still the imaging method of choice to evaluate fetal anatomy, MRI has an increasingly important role in the detection of brain abnormalities, especially of cortical development. Knowledge of MRI techniques in utero with the advantages and disadvantages of some sequences is necessary, in order to try to optimize the different magnetic resonance sequences to be able to make an early diagnosis. The different steps of cortical maturation known from histology represent the background necessary for the understanding of maturation in order to be then able to evaluate brain maturation through neuroimaging. Illustrations of the normal cortical maturation are given for each step accessible to MRI for both the cerebral hemispheres and the posterior fossa. (orig.)

  13. Cortical inactivation by cooling in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben eCoomber

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Reversible inactivation of the cortex by surface cooling is a powerful method for studying the function of a particular area. Implanted cooling cryoloops have been used to study the role of individual cortical areas in auditory processing of awake-behaving cats. Cryoloops have also been used in rodents for reversible inactivation of the cortex, but recently there has been a concern that the cryoloop may also cool non-cortical structures either directly or via the perfusion of blood, cooled as it passed close to the cooling loop. In this study we have confirmed that the loop can inactivate most of the auditory cortex without causing a significant reduction in temperature of the auditory thalamus or other sub-cortical structures. We placed a cryoloop on the surface of the guinea pig cortex, cooled it to 2°C and measured thermal gradients across the neocortical surface. We found that the temperature dropped to 20-24°C among cells within a radius of about 2.5mm away from the loop. This temperature drop was sufficient to reduce activity of most cortical cells and led to the inactivation of almost the entire auditory region. When the temperature of thalamus, midbrain, and middle ear were measured directly during cortical cooling, there was a small drop in temperature (about 4°C but this was not sufficient to directly reduce neural activity. In an effort to visualise the extent of neural inactivation we measured the uptake of thallium ions following an intravenous injection. This confirmed that there was a large reduction of activity across much of the ipsilateral cortex and only a small reduction in subcortical structures.

  14. Wall Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-14

    Mathematical Sciences Institute. Ithaca, NY: Cornell. Guckenheimer, J. & Labouriau, 1. 1990. Bifurcation of the Hodgkin - Huxley equations: a new vt.vist. In...olm es -____ II_ John Guckenheimer Avwi tI.,,ti 1it y ’odes ,Av9L! an.,I/or Dist Special •D L 2 Narrative Philip Holmes is continuing to study the...not localized in spae like the structur observed in the turbulent baft y layer. Wavelet bases, having compact support, seem much more appropriate. J

  15. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  16. Role of Somatostatin-Positive Cortical Interneurons in the Generation of Sleep Slow Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Chadd M; Peelman, Kayla; Bellesi, Michele; Marshall, William; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2017-09-20

    During non-rapid eye-movement (NREM) sleep, cortical and thalamic neurons oscillate every second or so between ON periods, characterized by membrane depolarization and wake-like tonic firing, and OFF periods, characterized by membrane hyperpolarization and neuronal silence. Cortical slow waves, the hallmark of NREM sleep, reflect near-synchronous OFF periods in cortical neurons. However, the mechanisms triggering such OFF periods are unclear, as there is little evidence for somatic inhibition. We studied cortical inhibitory interneurons that express somatostatin (SOM), because ∼70% of them are Martinotti cells that target diffusely layer I and can block excitatory transmission presynaptically, at glutamatergic terminals, and postsynaptically, at apical dendrites, without inhibiting the soma. In freely moving male mice, we show that SOM+ cells can fire immediately before slow waves and their optogenetic stimulation during ON periods of NREM sleep triggers long OFF periods. Next, we show that chemogenetic activation of SOM+ cells increases slow-wave activity (SWA), slope of individual slow waves, and NREM sleep duration; whereas their chemogenetic inhibition decreases SWA and slow-wave incidence without changing time spent in NREM sleep. By contrast, activation of parvalbumin+ (PV+) cells, the most numerous population of cortical inhibitory neurons, greatly decreases SWA and cortical firing, triggers short OFF periods in NREM sleep, and increases NREM sleep duration. Thus SOM+ cells, but not PV+ cells, are involved in the generation of sleep slow waves. Whether Martinotti cells are solely responsible for this effect, or are complemented by other classes of inhibitory neurons, remains to be investigated. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Cortical slow waves are a defining feature of non-rapid eye-movement (NREM) sleep and are thought to be important for many of its restorative benefits. Yet, the mechanism by which cortical neurons abruptly and synchronously cease firing, the

  17. Multilayer article having stabilized zirconia outer layer and chemical barrier layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor); Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A multilayer article includes a substrate that includes at least one of a ceramic compound and a Si-containing metal alloy. An outer layer includes stabilized zirconia. Intermediate layers are located between the outer layer and the substrate and include a mullite-containing layer and a chemical barrier layer. The mullite-containing layer includes 1) mullite or 2) mullite and an alkaline earth metal aluminosilicate. The chemical barrier layer is located between the mullite-containing layer and the outer layer. The chemical barrier layer includes at least one of mullite, hafnia, hafnium silicate and rare earth silicate (e.g., at least one of RE.sub.2 SiO.sub.5 and RE.sub.2 Si.sub.2 O.sub.7 where RE is Sc or Yb). The multilayer article is characterized by the combination of the chemical barrier layer and by its lack of a layer consisting essentially of barium strontium aluminosilicate between the mullite-containing layer and the chemical barrier layer. Such a barium strontium aluminosilicate layer may undesirably lead to the formation of a low melting glass or unnecessarily increase the layer thickness with concomitant reduced durability of the multilayer article. In particular, the chemical barrier layer may include at least one of hafnia, hafnium silicate and rare earth silicate.

  18. Doped LZO buffer layers for laminated conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [Knoxville, TN; Schoop, Urs [Westborough, MA; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Thieme, Cornelis Leo Hans [Westborough, MA; Verebelyi, Darren T [Oxford, MA; Rupich, Martin W [Framingham, MA

    2010-03-23

    A laminated conductor includes a metallic substrate having a surface, a biaxially textured buffer layer supported by the surface of the substrate, the biaxially textured buffer layer comprising LZO and a dopant for mitigating metal diffusion through the LZO, and a biaxially textured conductor layer supported by the biaxially textured buffer layer.

  19. Reproductive experience modified dendritic spines on cortical pyramidal neurons to enhance sensory perception and spatial learning in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jeng-Rung; Lim, Seh Hong; Chung, Sin-Cun; Lee, Yee-Fun; Wang, Yueh-Jan; Tseng, Guo-Fang; Wang, Tsyr-Jiuan

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral adaptations during motherhood are aimed at increasing reproductive success. Alterations of hormones during motherhood could trigger brain morphological changes to underlie behavioral alterations. Here we investigated whether motherhood changes a rat’s sensory perception and spatial memory in conjunction with cortical neuronal structural changes. Female rats of different statuses, including virgin, pregnant, lactating, and primiparous rats were studied. Behavioral test showed that the lactating rats were most sensitive to heat, while rats with motherhood and reproduction experience outperformed virgin rats in a water maze task. By intracellular dye injection and computer-assisted 3-dimensional reconstruction, the dendritic arbors and spines of the layer III and V pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex and CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons were revealed for closer analysis. The results showed that motherhood and reproductive experience increased dendritic spines but not arbors or the lengths of the layer III and V pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex and CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons. In addition, lactating rats had a higher incidence of spines than pregnant or primiparous rats. The increase of dendritic spines was coupled with increased expression of the glutamatergic postsynaptic marker protein (PSD-95), especially in lactating rats. On the basis of the present results, it is concluded that motherhood enhanced rat sensory perception and spatial memory and was accompanied by increases in dendritic spines on output neurons of the somatosensory cortex and CA1 hippocampus. The effect was sustained for at least 6 weeks after the weaning of the pups. PMID:27784858

  20. Heritability of cortical thickness changes over time in twin pairs discordant for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Anna M; van Haren, Neeltje E M; van Baal, G Caroline M; Brouwer, Rachel M; Brans, Rachel G H; Schnack, Hugo G; Kahn, René S; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

    2016-06-01

    Cortical thickness and surface area changes have repeatedly been found in schizophrenia. Whether progressive loss in cortical thickness and surface area are mediated by genetic or disease related factors is unknown. Here we investigate to what extent genetic and/or environmental factors contribute to the association between change in cortical thickness and surface area and liability to develop schizophrenia. Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging study over a 5-year interval. Monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs discordant for schizophrenia were compared with healthy control twin pairs using repeated measures analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA) and structural equation modeling (SEM). Twins discordant for schizophrenia and healthy control twins were recruited from the twin cohort at the University Medical Centre Utrecht, The Netherlands. A total of 90 individuals from 46 same sex twin pairs were included: 9 MZ and 10 DZ discordant for schizophrenia and 14 MZ and 13 (11 complete and 2 incomplete) DZ healthy twin-pairs. Age varied between 19 and 57years. Higher genetic liability for schizophrenia was associated with progressive global thinning of the cortex, particularly of the left superior temporal cortex. Higher environmental liability for schizophrenia was associated with global attenuated thinning of the cortex, and including of the left superior temporal cortex. Cortical surface area change was heritable, but not significantly associated with higher genetic or environmental liability for schizophrenia. Excessive cortical thinning, particularly of the left superior temporal cortex, may represent a genetic risk marker for schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Altered cortical thickness and attentional deficits in adolescent girls and women with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Laura A; Stefan, Mihaela; Lee, Seonjoo; Wang, Zhishun; Terranova, Kate; Attia, Evelyn; Marsh, Rachel

    2018-05-01

    Frontostriatal and frontoparietal abnormalities likely contribute to deficits in control and attentional processes in individuals with bulimia nervosa and to the persistence of dysregulated eating across development. This study assessed these processes and cortical thickness in a large sample of adolescent girls and women with bulimia nervosa compared with healthy controls. We collected anatomical MRI data from adolescent girls and women (ages 12-38 yr) with full or subthreshold bulimia nervosa and age-matched healthy controls who also completed the Conners Continuous Performance Test-II (CPT-II). Groups were compared on task performance and cortical thickness. Mediation analyses explored associations among cortical thickness, CPT-II variables, bulimia nervosa symptoms and age. We included 60 girls and women with bulimia nervosa and 54 controls in the analyses. Compared with healthy participants, those with bulimia nervosa showed increased impulsivity and inattention on the CPT-II, along with reduced thickness of the right pars triangularis, right superior parietal and left dorsal posterior cingulate cortices. In the bulimia nervosa group, exploratory analyses revealed that binge eating frequency correlated inversely with cortical thickness of frontoparietal and insular regions and that reduced frontoparietal thickness mediated the association between age and increased symptom severity and inattention. Binge eating frequency also mediated the association between age and lower prefrontal cortical thickness. These findings are applicable to only girls and women with bulimia nervosa, and our cross-sectional design precludes understanding of whether cortical thickness alterations precede or result from bulimia nervosa symptoms. Structural abnormalities in the frontoparietal and posterior cingulate regions comprising circuits that support control and attentional processes should be investigated as potential contributors to the maintenance of bulimia nervosa and useful

  2. Altered cortical thickness and attentional deficits in adolescent girls and women with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Laura A; Stefan, Mihaela; Lee, Seonjoo; Wang, Zhishun; Terranova, Kate; Attia, Evelyn; Marsh, Rachel

    2018-01-12

    Frontostriatal and frontoparietal abnormalities likely contribute to deficits in control and attentional processes in individuals with bulimia nervosa and to the persistence of dysregulated eating across development. This study assessed these processes and cortical thickness in a large sample of adolescent girls and women with bulimia nervosa compared with healthy controls. We collected anatomical MRI data from adolescent girls and women (ages 12-38 yr) with full or subthreshold bulimia nervosa and age-matched healthy controls who also completed the Conners Continuous Performance Test-II (CPT-II). Groups were compared on task performance and cortical thickness. Mediation analyses explored associations among cortical thickness, CPT-II variables, bulimia nervosa symptoms and age. We included 60 girls and women with bulimia nervosa and 54 controls in the analyses. Compared with healthy participants, those with bulimia nervosa showed increased impulsivity and inattention on the CPT-II, along with reduced thickness of the right pars triangularis, right superior parietal and left dorsal posterior cingulate cortices. In the bulimia nervosa group, exploratory analyses revealed that binge eating frequency correlated inversely with cortical thickness of frontoparietal and insular regions and that reduced frontoparietal thickness mediated the association between age and increased symptom severity and inattention. Binge eating frequency also mediated the association between age and lower prefrontal cortical thickness. These findings are applicable to only girls and women with bulimia nervosa, and our cross-sectional design precludes understanding of whether cortical thickness alterations precede or result from bulimia nervosa symptoms. Structural abnormalities in the frontoparietal and posterior cingulate regions comprising circuits that support control and attentional processes should be investigated as potential contributors to the maintenance of bulimia nervosa and useful

  3. The effect of binaural beats on verbal working memory and cortical connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchene, Christine; Abaid, Nicole; Moran, Rosalyn; Diana, Rachel A.; Leonessa, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Objective. Synchronization in activated regions of cortical networks affect the brain’s frequency response, which has been associated with a wide range of states and abilities, including memory. A non-invasive method for manipulating cortical synchronization is binaural beats. Binaural beats take advantage of the brain’s response to two pure tones, delivered independently to each ear, when those tones have a small frequency mismatch. The mismatch between the tones is interpreted as a beat frequency, which may act to synchronize cortical oscillations. Neural synchrony is particularly important for working memory processes, the system controlling online organization and retention of information for successful goal-directed behavior. Therefore, manipulation of synchrony via binaural beats provides a unique window into working memory and associated connectivity of cortical networks. Approach. In this study, we examined the effects of different acoustic stimulation conditions during an N-back working memory task, and we measured participant response accuracy and cortical network topology via EEG recordings. Six acoustic stimulation conditions were used: None, Pure Tone, Classical Music, 5 Hz binaural beats, 10 Hz binaural beats, and 15 Hz binaural beats. Main results. We determined that listening to 15 Hz binaural beats during an N-Back working memory task increased the individual participant’s accuracy, modulated the cortical frequency response, and changed the cortical network connection strengths during the task. Only the 15 Hz binaural beats produced significant change in relative accuracy compared to the None condition. Significance. Listening to 15 Hz binaural beats during the N-back task activated salient frequency bands and produced networks characterized by higher information transfer as compared to other auditory stimulation conditions.

  4. The effect of binaural beats on verbal working memory and cortical connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchene, Christine; Abaid, Nicole; Moran, Rosalyn; Diana, Rachel A; Leonessa, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Synchronization in activated regions of cortical networks affect the brain's frequency response, which has been associated with a wide range of states and abilities, including memory. A non-invasive method for manipulating cortical synchronization is binaural beats. Binaural beats take advantage of the brain's response to two pure tones, delivered independently to each ear, when those tones have a small frequency mismatch. The mismatch between the tones is interpreted as a beat frequency, which may act to synchronize cortical oscillations. Neural synchrony is particularly important for working memory processes, the system controlling online organization and retention of information for successful goal-directed behavior. Therefore, manipulation of synchrony via binaural beats provides a unique window into working memory and associated connectivity of cortical networks. In this study, we examined the effects of different acoustic stimulation conditions during an N-back working memory task, and we measured participant response accuracy and cortical network topology via EEG recordings. Six acoustic stimulation conditions were used: None, Pure Tone, Classical Music, 5 Hz binaural beats, 10 Hz binaural beats, and 15 Hz binaural beats. We determined that listening to 15 Hz binaural beats during an N-Back working memory task increased the individual participant's accuracy, modulated the cortical frequency response, and changed the cortical network connection strengths during the task. Only the 15 Hz binaural beats produced significant change in relative accuracy compared to the None condition. Listening to 15 Hz binaural beats during the N-back task activated salient frequency bands and produced networks characterized by higher information transfer as compared to other auditory stimulation conditions.

  5. Serotonin modulation of cortical neurons and networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celada, Pau; Puig, M. Victoria; Artigas, Francesc

    2013-01-01

    The serotonergic pathways originating in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MnR, respectively) are critically involved in cortical function. Serotonin (5-HT), acting on postsynaptic and presynaptic receptors, is involved in cognition, mood, impulse control and motor functions by (1) modulating the activity of different neuronal types, and (2) varying the release of other neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine and dopamine. Also, 5-HT seems to play an important role in cortical development. Of all cortical regions, the frontal lobe is the area most enriched in serotonergic axons and 5-HT receptors. 5-HT and selective receptor agonists modulate the excitability of cortical neurons and their discharge rate through the activation of several receptor subtypes, of which the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT3 subtypes play a major role. Little is known, however, on the role of other excitatory receptors moderately expressed in cortical areas, such as 5-HT2C, 5-HT4, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors are key players and exert opposite effects on the activity of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The activation of 5-HT1A receptors in mPFC hyperpolarizes pyramidal neurons whereas that of 5-HT2A receptors results in neuronal depolarization, reduction of the afterhyperpolarization and increase of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and of discharge rate. 5-HT can also stimulate excitatory (5-HT2A and 5-HT3) and inhibitory (5-HT1A) receptors in GABA interneurons to modulate synaptic GABA inputs onto pyramidal neurons. Likewise, the pharmacological manipulation of various 5-HT receptors alters oscillatory activity in PFC, suggesting that 5-HT is also involved in the control of cortical network activity. A better understanding of the actions of 5-HT in PFC may help to develop treatments for mood and cognitive disorders associated with an abnormal function of the frontal lobe

  6. Cortical complexity in cetacean brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hof, Patrick R; Chanis, Rebecca; Marino, Lori

    2005-11-01

    Cetaceans (dolphins, whales, and porpoises) have a long, dramatically divergent evolutionary history compared with terrestrial mammals. Throughout their 55-60 million years of evolution, cetaceans acquired a compelling set of characteristics that include echolocation ability (in odontocetes), complex auditory and communicative capacities, and complex social organization. Moreover, although cetaceans have not shared a common ancestor with primates for over 90 million years, they possess a set of cognitive attributes that are strikingly convergent with those of many primates, including great apes and humans. In contrast, cetaceans have evolved a highly unusual combination of neurobiological features different from that of primates. As such, cetacean brains offer a critical opportunity to address questions about how complex behavior can be based on very different neuroanatomical and neurobiological evolutionary products. Cetacean brains and primate brains are arguably most meaningfully conceived as alternative evolutionary routes to neurobiological and cognitive complexity. In this article, we summarize data on brain size and hemisphere surface configuration in several cetacean species and present an overview of the cytoarchitectural complexity of the cerebral cortex of the bottlenose dolphin. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Cortical spreading depolarization: Pathophysiology, implications, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Daniel R; Fujii, Tatsuhiro; Ohiorhenuan, Ifije; Liu, Charles Y

    2016-02-01

    Cortical spreading depolarization (CSD) is a spreading loss of ion homeostasis, altered vascular response, change in synaptic architecture, and subsequent depression in electrical activity following an inciting neurological injury. First described by Leão in 1944, this disturbance in neuronal electrophysiology has since been demonstrated in a number of animal studies, and recently a few human studies that examine the occurrence of this depolarizing phenomenon in the setting of a variety of pathological states, including migraines, cerebrovascular accidents, epilepsy, intracranial hemorrhages, and traumatic brain injuries. The onset of CSD has been demonstrated experimentally following a disruption in the neuronal environment leading to glutamate-induced toxicity. This initial event leads to pathological changes in the activity of ion channels that maintain membrane potential. Recovery mechanisms such as sodium-potassium pumps that aim to restore homeostasis fail, leading to osmolar shifts of fluid, swelling of the neuron, and ultimately a measurable depression in cortical activity that spreads in the order of millimeters per minute. Equally important is the resulting change in vascular response. In healthy tissue, increased electrical activity is coupled with release of vasodilatory factors such as nitric oxide and arachidonic acid metabolites that increase local blood flow to meet increased energy expenditure. In damaged tissue, not only is the restorative vascular response lacking but a vasoconstrictive response is promoted and the ischemia that follows adds to the severity of the initial injury. Tissue threatened by this ischemic response is then at elevated risk for CSD propagation and falls into a vicious cycle of electrical and hemodynamic disturbance. Efforts have been made to halt this spreading cortical depression using N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists and other ion channel blockers to minimize the damaging effects of CSD that can persist long

  8. Cortical pattern separation and item-specific memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidgeon, Laura M; Morcom, Alexa M

    2016-05-01

    Pattern separation and pattern completion are fundamental brain processes thought to be critical for episodic memory encoding and retrieval, and for discrimination between similar memories. These processes are best understood in the hippocampus, but are proposed to occur throughout the brain, in particular in sensory regions. Cortical, as well as hippocampal, pattern separation may therefore support formation of event-unique memory traces. Using fMRI, we investigated cortical pattern separation and pattern completion and their relationship to encoding activity predicting subsequent item-specific compared to gist memory. During scanning, participants viewed images of novel objects, repeated objects, and objects which were both perceptually and conceptually similar to previously presented images, while performing a size judgement task. In a later surprise recognition test, they judged whether test items were 'same' 'similar' or 'new' relative to studied items. Activity consistent with pattern separation - responses to similar items as if novel - was observed in bilateral occipito-temporal cortex. Activity consistent with pattern completion - responses to similar items as if repeated - was observed in left prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Curve fitting analysis further revealed that graded responses to change in image conceptual and perceptual similarity in bilateral prefrontal and right parietal regions met specific computational predictions for pattern separation for one or both of these similarity dimensions. Functional overlap between encoding activity predicting subsequent item-specific recognition and pattern separation activity was also observed in left occipital cortex and bilateral inferior frontal cortex. The findings suggest that extrahippocampal regions including sensory and prefrontal cortex contribute to pattern separation and pattern completion of visual input, consistent with the proposal that cortical pattern separation contributes to formation of

  9. Cortical and subcortical mechanisms of brain-machine interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesotti, Silvia; Martuzzi, Roberto; Schurger, Aaron; Blefari, Maria Laura; Del Millán, José R; Bleuler, Hannes; Blanke, Olaf

    2017-06-01

    Technical advances in the field of Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs) enable users to control a variety of external devices such as robotic arms, wheelchairs, virtual entities and communication systems through the decoding of brain signals in real time. Most BMI systems sample activity from restricted brain regions, typically the motor and premotor cortex, with limited spatial resolution. Despite the growing number of applications, the cortical and subcortical systems involved in BMI control are currently unknown at the whole-brain level. Here, we provide a comprehensive and detailed report of the areas active during on-line BMI control. We recorded functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data while participants controlled an EEG-based BMI inside the scanner. We identified the regions activated during BMI control and how they overlap with those involved in motor imagery (without any BMI control). In addition, we investigated which regions reflect the subjective sense of controlling a BMI, the sense of agency for BMI-actions. Our data revealed an extended cortical-subcortical network involved in operating a motor-imagery BMI. This includes not only sensorimotor regions but also the posterior parietal cortex, the insula and the lateral occipital cortex. Interestingly, the basal ganglia and the anterior cingulate cortex were involved in the subjective sense of controlling the BMI. These results inform basic neuroscience by showing that the mechanisms of BMI control extend beyond sensorimotor cortices. This knowledge may be useful for the development of BMIs that offer a more natural and embodied feeling of control for the user. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2971-2989, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cortical Reorganization in Dual Innervation by Single Peripheral Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mou-Xiong; Shen, Yun-Dong; Hua, Xu-Yun; Hou, Ao-Lin; Zhu, Yi; Xu, Wen-Dong

    2017-09-21

    Functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury and repair is related with cortical reorganization. However, the mechanism of innervating dual targets by 1 donor nerve is largely unknown. To investigate the cortical reorganization when the phrenic nerve simultaneously innervates the diaphragm and biceps. Total brachial plexus (C5-T1) injury rats were repaired by phrenic nerve-musculocutaneous nerve transfer with end-to-side (n = 15) or end-to-end (n = 15) neurorrhaphy. Brachial plexus avulsion (n = 5) and sham surgery (n = 5) rats were included for control. Behavioral observation, electromyography, and histologic studies were used for confirming peripheral nerve reinnervation. Cortical representations of the diaphragm and reinnervated biceps were studied by intracortical microstimulation techniques before and at months 0.5, 3, 5, 7, and 10 after surgery. At month 0.5 after complete brachial plexus injury, the motor representation of the injured forelimb disappeared. The diaphragm representation was preserved in the "end-to-side" group but absent in the "end-to-end" group. Rhythmic contraction of biceps appeared in "end-to-end" and "end-to-side" groups, and the biceps representation reappeared in the original biceps and diaphragm areas at months 3 and 5. At month 10, it was completely located in the original biceps area in the "end-to-end" group. Part of the biceps representation remained in the original diaphragm area in the "end-to-side" group. Destroying the contralateral motor cortex did not eliminate respiration-related contraction of biceps. The brain tends to resume biceps representation from the original diaphragm area to the original biceps area following phrenic nerve transfer. The original diaphragm area partly preserves reinnervated biceps representation after end-to-side transfer. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  11. Stability of mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Christopher; Krothapalli, A

    1993-01-01

    The research program for the first year of this project (see the original research proposal) consists of developing an explicit marching scheme for solving the parabolized stability equations (PSE). Performing mathematical analysis of the computational algorithm including numerical stability analysis and the determination of the proper boundary conditions needed at the boundary of the computation domain are implicit in the task. Before one can solve the parabolized stability equations for high-speed mixing layers, the mean flow must first be found. In the past, instability analysis of high-speed mixing layer has mostly been performed on mean flow profiles calculated by the boundary layer equations. In carrying out this project, it is believed that the boundary layer equations might not give an accurate enough nonparallel, nonlinear mean flow needed for parabolized stability analysis. A more accurate mean flow can, however, be found by solving the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations. The advantage of the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations is that its accuracy is consistent with the PSE method. Furthermore, the method of solution is similar. Hence, the major part of the effort of the work of this year has been devoted to the development of an explicit numerical marching scheme for the solution of the Parabolized Navier-Stokes equation as applied to the high-seed mixing layer problem.

  12. Clinical and imaging characteristics of localized megalencephaly: a retrospective comparison of diffuse hemimegalencephaly and multilobar cortical dysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahashi, Masumi; Tsushima, Yoshito; Amanuma, Makoto; Endo, Keigo [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Sato, Noriko; Ota, Miho [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Radiology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Yagishita, Akira [Tokyo Metropolitan Neurological Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Kokubunji, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Yoshiaki; Sugai, Kenji; Sasaki, Masayuki [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Child Neurology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Natsume, Jun [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    Hemimegalencephaly is a well-known congenital malformation. However, localized megalencephaly, which may be one of the subtypes of hemimegalencephaly, has not been separately investigated. In the present study, we attempted to characterize the clinical and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of localized megalencephaly in comparison with ordinary diffuse hemimegalencephaly and multilobar cortical dysplasia. MR findings for 43 patients with hemimegalencephaly and ten with multilobar cortical dysplasia, which is the differential diagnosis of localized megalencephaly, were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical findings such as the onset and severity of seizures and imaging findings including the affected area of the brain, structures outside of the hemisphere, and interval morphological changes were examined. Of the 43 patients, 11 showed signs of localized megalencephaly (25.6%). Localized megalencephaly was predominantly seen on the left side (72.7%) and had a tendency toward severe-grade seizures compared to multilobar cortical dysplasia. The frequencies of the extracerebral abnormalities in the diffuse hemimegalencephaly, localized megalencephaly, and multilobar cortical dysplasia groups were 84.4%, 36.4%, and 0.0%, respectively. There were three localized megalencephaly patients whose affected areas shrank and whose images were similar to those of multilobar cortical dysplasia. Localized megalencephaly accounts for one quarter of all hemimegalencephaly cases in this study. The incidence of extracerebral abnormalities in patients with localized hemimegalencephaly was almost half that of patients with diffuse hemimegalencephaly. Extracerebral abnormalities were absent in patients with multilobar cortical dysplasia. Associated extracerebral abnormalities may be a clue to differentiating localized megalencephaly from multilobar cortical dysplasia. (orig.)

  13. Organic photovoltaic cells utilizing ultrathin sensitizing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Barry P [Princeton, NJ; Forrest, Stephen R [Princeton, NJ

    2011-05-24

    A photosensitive device includes a series of organic photoactive layers disposed between two electrodes. Each layer in the series is in direct contact with a next layer in the series. The series is arranged to form at least one donor-acceptor heterojunction, and includes a first organic photoactive layer comprising a first host material serving as a donor, a thin second organic photoactive layer comprising a second host material disposed between the first and a third organic photoactive layer, and the third organic photoactive layer comprising a third host material serving as an acceptor. The first, second, and third host materials are different. The thin second layer serves as an acceptor relative to the first layer or as a donor relative to the third layer.

  14. Processes for multi-layer devices utilizing layer transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Kim, Bongsang; Cederberg, Jeffrey; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

    2015-02-03

    A method includes forming a release layer over a donor substrate. A plurality of devices made of a first semiconductor material are formed over the release layer. A first dielectric layer is formed over the plurality of devices such that all exposed surfaces of the plurality of devices are covered by the first dielectric layer. The plurality of devices are chemically attached to a receiving device made of a second semiconductor material different than the first semiconductor material, the receiving device having a receiving substrate attached to a surface of the receiving device opposite the plurality of devices. The release layer is etched to release the donor substrate from the plurality of devices. A second dielectric layer is applied over the plurality of devices and the receiving device to mechanically attach the plurality of devices to the receiving device.

  15. Multichannel time domain fNIRS mapping of cortical activation and superficial systemic responses during neuromuscular electrical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re, R.; Muthalib, M.; Zucchelli, L.; Perrey, S.; Contini, D.; Caffini, M.; Spinelli, L.; Kerr, G.; Torricelli, A.

    2013-06-01

    We recorded maps of cortical and systemic hemodynamic responses (oxy-hemoglobin, O2Hb and deoxy-hemoglobin, HHb) during incremental neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) of the right forearm in nine subjects by a 32- channel time domain fNIRS (TD-fNIRS) instrument. Statistical parametric maps (SPM) relative to the different current stimulations (under and over the maximal tolerated intensity-MTI) versus the 10%MTI were generated. Exploiting the temporal information contained in the TD-fNIRS signal it was possible to create different maps referring to the deeper (cortical activations) and the more superficial (systemic changes) head layers. The increasing of the stimulation current on the right forearm muscle produced a significantly larger bilateral sensorimotor and prefrontal cortical activations (i.e. increase in the O2Hb and decrease in HHb) than the systemic changes. Physiological parameters (heart rate, breathing rate and skin conductance) were also monitored.

  16. Perceptual incongruence influences bistability and cortical activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gijs Joost Brouwer

    Full Text Available We employed a parametric psychophysical design in combination with functional imaging to examine the influence of metric changes in perceptual incongruence on perceptual alternation rates and cortical responses. Subjects viewed a bistable stimulus defined by incongruent depth cues; bistability resulted from incongruence between binocular disparity and monocular perspective cues that specify different slants (slant rivalry. Psychophysical results revealed that perceptual alternation rates were positively correlated with the degree of perceived incongruence. Functional imaging revealed systematic increases in activity that paralleled the psychophysical results within anterior intraparietal sulcus, prior to the onset of perceptual alternations. We suggest that this cortical activity predicts the frequency of subsequent alternations, implying a putative causal role for these areas in initiating bistable perception. In contrast, areas implicated in form and depth processing (LOC and V3A were sensitive to the degree of slant, but failed to show increases in activity when these cues were in conflict.

  17. Plasticity of cortical excitatory-inhibitory balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froemke, Robert C

    2015-07-08

    Synapses are highly plastic and are modified by changes in patterns of neural activity or sensory experience. Plasticity of cortical excitatory synapses is thought to be important for learning and memory, leading to alterations in sensory representations and cognitive maps. However, these changes must be coordinated across other synapses within local circuits to preserve neural coding schemes and the organization of excitatory and inhibitory inputs, i.e., excitatory-inhibitory balance. Recent studies indicate that inhibitory synapses are also plastic and are controlled directly by a large number of neuromodulators, particularly during episodes of learning. Many modulators transiently alter excitatory-inhibitory balance by decreasing inhibition, and thus disinhibition has emerged as a major mechanism by which neuromodulation might enable long-term synaptic modifications naturally. This review examines the relationships between neuromodulation and synaptic plasticity, focusing on the induction of long-term changes that collectively enhance cortical excitatory-inhibitory balance for improving perception and behavior.

  18. Permanent Cortical Blindness After Bronchial Artery Embolization

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    Doorn, Colette S. van, E-mail: cvandoorn@gmail.com; De Boo, Diederick W., E-mail: d.w.deboo@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Weersink, Els J. M., E-mail: e.j.m.weersink@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Pulmonology (Netherlands); Delden, Otto M. van, E-mail: o.m.vandelden@amc.uva.nl; Reekers, Jim A., E-mail: j.a.reekers@amc.uva.nl; Lienden, Krijn P. van, E-mail: k.p.vanlienden@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    A 35-year-old female with a known medical history of cystic fibrosis was admitted to our institution for massive hemoptysis. CTA depicted a hypertrophied bronchial artery to the right upper lobe and showed signs of recent bleeding at that location. Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) was performed with gelfoam slurry, because pronounced shunting to the pulmonary artery was present. Immediately after BAE, the patient developed bilateral cortical blindness. Control angiography showed an initially not opacified anastomosis between the embolized bronchial artery and the right subclavian artery, near to the origin of the right vertebral artery. Cessation of outflow in the bronchial circulation reversed the flow through the anastomosis and allowed for spill of embolization material into the posterior circulation. Unfortunately the cortical blindness presented was permanent.

  19. Reduced cortical thickness in gambling disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence; Chamberlain, Samuel R

    2015-01-01

    Gambling disorder has recently been recognized as a prototype 'behavioral addiction' by virtue of its inclusion in the DSM-5 category of 'Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders.' Despite its newly acquired status and prevalence rate of 1-3 % globally, relatively little is known regarding...... the neurobiology of this disorder. The aim of this study was to explore cortical morphometry in untreated gambling disorder, for the first time. Subjects with gambling disorder (N = 16) free from current psychotropic medication or psychiatric comorbidities, and healthy controls (N = 17), were entered...... into the study and undertook magnetic resonance imaging (3T MRI). Cortical thickness was quantified using automated segmentation techniques (FreeSurfer), and group differences were identified using permutation cluster analysis, with stringent correction for multiple comparisons. Gambling disorder was associated...

  20. Metrics for cortical map organization and lateralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, S A; Levitan, S; Reggia, J A

    1998-01-01

    Cerebral lateralization refers to the poorly understood fact that some functions are better controlled by one side of the brain than the other (e.g. handedness, language). Of particular concern here are the asymmetries apparent in cortical topographic maps that can be demonstrated electrophysiologically in mirror-image locations of the cerebral cortex. In spite of great interest in issues surrounding cerebral lateralization, methods for measuring the degree of organization and asymmetry in cortical maps are currently quite limited. In this paper, several measures are developed and used to assess the degree of organization, lateralization, and mirror symmetry in topographic map formation. These measures correct for large constant displacements as well as curving of maps. The behavior of the measures is tested on several topographic maps obtained by self-organization of an initially random artificial neural network model of a bihemispheric brain, and the results are compared with subjective assessments made by humans.

  1. An autopsied case of MV2K + C-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease presenting with widespread cerebral cortical involvement and Kuru plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yasushi; Saito, Yufuko; Aiba, Ikuko; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Mimuro, Maya; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Mari

    2017-06-01

    MV2-type sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), which was previously called "Kuru-plaque variant", was gradually revealed to have a wide spectrum and has been classified into three pathological subtypes: MV2K, MV2C and MV2K + C. We herein describe the detailed clinical findings and neuropathologic observations from an autopsied MV2K + C-type Japanese sCJD case with widespread cerebral cortical pathology and Kuru plaques. In the early stages of the disease, the patient exhibited gait disturbance with ataxia and dysarthria as well as gradual appearance of cognitive dysfunction. Diffusion-weighted images (DWI) on MRI revealed extensive cerebral cortical hyperintensity. Pathologic investigation revealed extensive spongiform change in the cerebral cortex, particularly in the deeper layers. Vacuole size varied, and some were confluent. Prion protein (PrP) immunostaining revealed extensive PrP deposition in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, brainstem and spinal cord. In the cerebral cortex, synaptic-type, Kuru plaque-like, and coarse plaque-type PrP depositions were mainly observed, along with some perivacuolar-type PrP depositions. Kuru plaques and coarse plaque-type PrP depositions also were observed in the cerebellar cortex. PrP gene analysis revealed no mutations, and polymorphic codon 129 exhibited Met/Val heterozygosity. Western blot analysis revealed a mixture of intermediate-type PrP Sc and type 2 PrP Sc . Based on previous reports regarding MV2-type sCJD and the clinicopathologic findings of the present case, we speculated that it may be possible to clinically distinguish each MV2 subtype. Clinical presentation of the MV2K + C subtype includes predominant cerebral cortical involvement signs with ataxia and DWI hyperintensity of the cerebral cortex on MRI. © 2016 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  2. Evolving Models of Pavlovian Conditioning: Cerebellar Cortical Dynamics in Awake Behaving Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel M. ten Brinke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three decades of electrophysiological research on cerebellar cortical activity underlying Pavlovian conditioning have expanded our understanding of motor learning in the brain. Purkinje cell simple spike suppression is considered to be crucial in the expression of conditional blink responses (CRs. However, trial-by-trial quantification of this link in awake behaving animals is lacking, and current hypotheses regarding the underlying plasticity mechanisms have diverged from the classical parallel fiber one to the Purkinje cell synapse LTD hypothesis. Here, we establish that acquired simple spike suppression, acquired conditioned stimulus (CS-related complex spike responses, and molecular layer interneuron (MLI activity predict the expression of CRs on a trial-by-trial basis using awake behaving mice. Additionally, we show that two independent transgenic mouse mutants with impaired MLI function exhibit motor learning deficits. Our findings suggest multiple cerebellar cortical plasticity mechanisms underlying simple spike suppression, and they implicate the broader involvement of the olivocerebellar module within the interstimulus interval.

  3. Anti-correlated cortical networks arise from spontaneous neuronal dynamics at slow timescales.

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    Kodama, Nathan X; Feng, Tianyi; Ullett, James J; Chiel, Hillel J; Sivakumar, Siddharth S; Galán, Roberto F

    2018-01-12

    In the highly interconnected architectures of the cerebral cortex, recurrent intracortical loops disproportionately outnumber thalamo-cortical inputs. These networks are also capable of generating neuronal activity without feedforward sensory drive. It is unknown, however, what spatiotemporal patterns may be solely attributed to intrinsic connections of the local cortical network. Using high-density microelectrode arrays, here we show that in the isolated, primary somatosensory cortex of mice, neuronal firing fluctuates on timescales from milliseconds to tens of seconds. Slower firing fluctuations reveal two spatially distinct neuronal ensembles, which correspond to superficial and deeper layers. These ensembles are anti-correlated: when one fires more, the other fires less and vice versa. This interplay is clearest at timescales of several seconds and is therefore consistent with shifts between active sensing and anticipatory behavioral states in mice.

  4. Role of secondary sensory cortices in emotional memory storage and retrieval in rats.

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    Sacco, Tiziana; Sacchetti, Benedetto

    2010-08-06

    Visual, acoustic, and olfactory stimuli associated with a highly charged emotional situation take on the affective qualities of that situation. Where the emotional meaning of a given sensory experience is stored is a matter of debate. We found that excitotoxic lesions of auditory, visual, or olfactory secondary sensory cortices impaired remote, but not recent, fear memories in rats. Amnesia was modality-specific and not due to an interference with sensory or emotional processes. In these sites, memory persistence was dependent on ongoing protein kinase Mzeta activity and was associated with an increased activity of layers II-IV, thus suggesting a synaptic strengthening of corticocortical connections. Lesions of the same areas left intact the memory of sensory stimuli not associated with any emotional charge. We propose that secondary sensory cortices support memory storage and retrieval of sensory stimuli that have acquired a behavioral salience with the experience.

  5. Reward-timing-dependent bidirectional modulation of cortical microcircuits during optical single-neuron operant conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hira, Riichiro; Ohkubo, Fuki; Masamizu, Yoshito; Ohkura, Masamichi; Nakai, Junichi; Okada, Takashi; Matsuzaki, Masanori

    2014-11-24

    Animals rapidly adapt to environmental change. To reveal how cortical microcircuits are rapidly reorganized when an animal recognizes novel reward contingency, we conduct two-photon calcium imaging of layer 2/3 motor cortex neurons in mice and simultaneously reinforce the activity of a single cortical neuron with water delivery. Here we show that when the target neuron is not relevant to a pre-trained forelimb movement, the mouse increases the target neuron activity and the number of rewards delivered during 15-min operant conditioning without changing forelimb movement behaviour. The reinforcement bidirectionally modulates the activity of subsets of non-target neurons, independent of distance from the target neuron. The bidirectional modulation depends on the relative timing between the reward delivery and the neuronal activity, and is recreated by pairing reward delivery and photoactivation of a subset of neurons. Reward-timing-dependent bidirectional modulation may be one of the fundamental processes in microcircuit reorganization for rapid adaptation.

  6. Motor cortical plasticity in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udupa, Kaviraja; Chen, Robert

    2013-09-04

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), there are alterations of the basal ganglia (BG) thalamocortical networks, primarily due to degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. These changes in subcortical networks lead to plastic changes in primary motor cortex (M1), which mediates cortical motor output and is a potential target for treatment of PD. Studies investigating the motor cortical plasticity using non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have found altered plasticity in PD, but there are inconsistencies among these studies. This is likely because plasticity depends on many factors such as the extent of dopaminergic loss and disease severity, response to dopaminergic replacement therapies, development of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID), the plasticity protocol used, medication, and stimulation status in patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS). The influences of LID and DBS on BG and M1 plasticity have been explored in animal models and in PD patients. In addition, many other factors such age, genetic factors (e.g., brain derived neurotropic factor and other neurotransmitters or receptors polymorphism), emotional state, time of the day, physical fitness have been documented to play role in the extent of plasticity induced by TMS in human studies. In this review, we summarize the studies that investigated M1 plasticity in PD and demonstrate how these afore-mentioned factors affect motor cortical plasticity in PD. We conclude that it is important to consider the clinical, demographic, and technical factors that influence various plasticity protocols while developing these protocols as diagnostic or prognostic tools in PD. We also discuss how the modulation of cortical excitability and the plasticity with these non-invasive brain stimulation techniques facilitate the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD and help design potential therapeutic possibilities in this disorder.

  7. Perinatal cortical growth and childhood neurocognitive abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathbone, R.; Counsell, S.J.; Kapellou, O.; Dyet, L.; Kennea, N.; Hajnal, J.; Allsop, J.M.; Cowan, F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This observational cohort study addressed the hypothesis that after preterm delivery brain growth between 24 and 44 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA) is related to global neurocognitive ability in later childhood. Methods: Growth rates for cerebral volume and cortical surface area were estimated in 82 infants without focal brain lesions born before 30 weeks PMA by using 217 magnetic resonance images obtained between 24 and 44 weeks PMA. Abilities were assessed at 2 years using the Griffiths Mental Development Scale and at 6 years using the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence–Revised (WPPSI-R), the Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment (NEPSY), and the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (MABC). Analysis was by generalized least-squares regression. Results: Mean test scores approximated population averages. Cortical growth was directly related to the Griffiths Developmental Quotient (DQ), the WPPSI-R full-scale IQ, and a NEPSY summary score but not the MABC score and in exploration of subtests to attention, planning, memory, language, and numeric and conceptual abilities but not motor skills. The mean (95% confidence interval) estimated reduction in cortical surface area at term corrected age associated with a 1 SD fall in test score was as follows: DQ 7.0 (5.8–8.5); IQ 6.0 (4.9–7.3); and NEPSY 9.1 (7.5–11.0) % · SD−1. Total brain volume growth was not correlated with any test score. Conclusions: The rate of cerebral cortical growth between 24 and 44 weeks PMA predicts global ability in later childhood, particularly complex cognitive functions but not motor functions. PMID:21998316

  8. Intermediate Latency-Evoked Potentials of Multimodal Cortical Vestibular Areas: Galvanic Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kammermeier

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionHuman multimodal vestibular cortical regions are bilaterally anterior insulae and posterior opercula, where characteristic vestibular-related cortical potentials were previously reported under acoustic otolith stimulation. Galvanic vestibular stimulation likely influences semicircular canals preferentially. Galvanic stimulation was compared to previously established data under acoustic stimulation.Methods14 healthy right-handed subjects, who were also included in the previous acoustic potential study, showed normal acoustic and galvanic vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials. They received 2,000 galvanic binaural bipolar stimuli for each side during EEG recording.ResultsVestibular cortical potentials were found in all 14 subjects and in the pooled data of all subjects (“grand average” bilaterally. Anterior insula and posterior operculum were activated exclusively under galvanic stimulation at 25, 35, 50, and 80 ms; frontal regions at 30 and 45 ms. Potentials at 70 ms in frontal regions and at 110 ms at all of the involved regions could also be recorded; these events were also found using acoustic stimulation in our previous study.ConclusionGalvanic semicircular canal stimulation evokes specific potentials in addition to those also found with acoustic otolith stimulation in identically located regions of the vestibular cortex. Vestibular cortical regions activate differently by galvanic and acoustic input at the peripheral sensory level.SignificanceDifferential effects in vestibular cortical-evoked potentials may see clinical use in specific vertigo disorders.

  9. Donders is dead: cortical traveling waves and the limits of mental chronometry in cognitive neuroscience.

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    Alexander, David M; Trengove, Chris; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2015-11-01

    An assumption nearly all researchers in cognitive neuroscience tacitly adhere to is that of space-time separability. Historically, it forms the basis of Donders' difference method, and to date, it underwrites all difference imaging and trial-averaging of cortical activity, including the customary techniques for analyzing fMRI and EEG/MEG data. We describe the assumption and how it licenses common methods in cognitive neuroscience; in particular, we show how it plays out in signal differencing and averaging, and how it misleads us into seeing the brain as a set of static activity sources. In fact, rather than being static, the domains of cortical activity change from moment to moment: Recent research has suggested the importance of traveling waves of activation in the cortex. Traveling waves have been described at a range of different spatial scales in the cortex; they explain a large proportion of the variance in phase measurements of EEG, MEG and ECoG, and are important for understanding cortical function. Critically, traveling waves are not space-time separable. Their prominence suggests that the correct frame of reference for analyzing cortical activity is the dynamical trajectory of the system, rather than the time and space coordinates of measurements. We illustrate what the failure of space-time separability implies for cortical activation, and what consequences this should have for cognitive neuroscience.

  10. Intralaminar and medial thalamic influence on cortical synchrony, information transmission and cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri B Saalmann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The intralaminar and medial thalamic nuclei are part of the higher-order thalamus, which receives little sensory input, and instead forms extensive cortico-thalamo-cortical pathways. The large mediodorsal thalamic nucleus predominantly connects with the prefrontal cortex, the adjacent intralaminar nuclei connect with fronto-parietal cortex, and the midline thalamic nuclei connect with medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe. Taking into account this connectivity pattern, it is not surprising that the intralaminar and medial thalamus has been implicated in a variety of cognitive functions, including memory processing, attention and orienting, as well as reward-based behavior. This review addresses how the intralaminar and medial thalamus may regulate information transmission in cortical circuits. A key neural mechanism may involve intralaminar and medial thalamic neurons modulating the degree of synchrony between different groups of cortical neurons according to behavioral demands. Such a thalamic-mediated synchronization mechanism may give rise to large-scale integration of information across multiple cortical circuits, consequently influencing the level of arousal and consciousness. Overall, the growing evidence supports a general role for the higher-order thalamus in the control of cortical information transmission and cognitive processing.

  11. Right temporal cortical hypertrophy in resilience to trauma: an MRI study

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    André Sevenius Nilsen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: In studies employing physiological measures such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, it is often hard to distinguish what constitutes risk-resilience factors to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD following trauma exposure and what the effects of trauma exposure and PTSD are. Objective: We aimed to investigate whether there were observable morphological differences in cortical and sub-cortical regions of the brain, 7–8 years after a single potentially traumatic event. Methods: Twenty-four participants, who all directly experienced the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, and 25 controls, underwent structural MRI using a 3T scanner. We generated cortical thickness maps and parcellated sub-cortical volumes for analysis. Results: We observed greater cortical thickness for the trauma-exposed participants relative to controls, in a right lateralized temporal lobe region including anterior fusiform gyrus, and superior, middle, and inferior temporal gyrus. Conclusions: We observed greater thickness in the right temporal lobe which might indicate that the region could be implicated in resilience to the long-term effects of a traumatic event. We hypothesize this is due to altered emotional semantic memory processing. However, several methodological and confounding issues warrant caution in interpretation of the results.

  12. Cortical compression rapidly trimmed transcallosal projections and altered axonal anterograde transport machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Jin; Wang, Yueh-Jan; Tseng, Guo-Fang

    2017-10-24

    Trauma and tumor compressing the brain distort underlying cortical neurons. Compressed cortical neurons remodel their dendrites instantly. The effects on axons however remain unclear. Using a rat epidural bead implantation model, we studied the effects of unilateral somatosensory cortical compression on its transcallosal projection and the reversibility of the changes following decompression. Compression reduced the density, branching profuseness and boutons of the projection axons in the contralateral homotopic cortex 1week and 1month post-compression. Projection fiber density was higher 1-month than 1-week post-compression, suggesting adaptive temporal changes. Compression reduced contralateral cortical synaptophysin, vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1) and postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD95) expressions in a week and the first two marker proteins further by 1month. βIII-tubulin and kinesin light chain (KLC) expressions in the corpus callosum (CC) where transcallosal axons traveled were also decreased. Kinesin heavy chain (KHC) level in CC was temporarily increased 1week after compression. Decompression increased transcallosal axon density and branching profuseness to higher than sham while bouton density returned to sham levels. This was accompanied by restoration of synaptophysin, VGLUT1 and PSD95 expressions in the contralateral cortex of the 1-week, but not the 1-month, compression rats. Decompression restored βIII-tubulin, but not KLC and KHC expressions in CC. However, KLC and KHC expressions in the cell bodies of the layer II/III pyramidal neurons partially recovered. Our results show cerebral compression compromised cortical axonal outputs and reduced transcallosal projection. Some of these changes did not recover in long-term decompression. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cortical Reorganization following Injury Early in Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moran Artzi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The brain has a remarkable capacity for reorganization following injury, especially during the first years of life. Knowledge of structural reorganization and its consequences following perinatal injury is sparse. Here we studied changes in brain tissue volume, morphology, perfusion, and integrity in children with hemiplegia compared to typically developing children, using MRI. Children with hemiplegia demonstrated reduced total cerebral volume, with increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and reduced total white matter volumes, with no differences in total gray matter volume, compared to typically developing children. An increase in cortical thickness at the hemisphere contralateral to the lesion (CLH was detected in motor and language areas, which may reflect compensation for the gray matter loss in the lesion area or retention of ipsilateral pathways. In addition, reduced cortical thickness, perfusion, and surface area were detected in limbic areas. Increased CSF volume and precentral cortical thickness and reduced white matter volume were correlated with worse motor performance. Brain reorganization of the gray matter within the CLH, while not necessarily indicating better outcome, is suggested as a response to neuronal deficits following injury early in life.

  14. Cerebral cortical registration of subliminal visceral stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Mark K; Shaker, Reza

    2002-02-01

    Although brain registration of subliminal somatic stimulations such as masked visual stimuli and their influence on electrical and hemodynamic measures of cerebral activity have been reported previously, there have been no reports on cerebral cortical registration of subliminal visceral stimulation. Because studies evaluating the consequences of subliminal somatic stimulation have shown that subliminal stimulation can effect behavior, it is conceivable that such subliminal messages from the intestine could potentially influence intestinal sensory/motor function or effect the perception/interpretation of sensory signals originating from the gut. We studied the cerebral cortical functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) response to subliminal, liminal, and supraliminal rectal distention in healthy volunteers. Study findings indicate that subliminal afferent signals originating from the gut are registered in the cerebral cortex without reaching the level of awareness. Locations of cortical activity caused by intestinal subliminal stimulation are similar to those of liminal and supraliminal stimulation but their intensity and volume are significantly lower (P Subliminal afferent signals originating from the gut are registered in the cerebral cortex and induce changes in measures of brain activity, such as hemodynamic changes detectable by fMRI.

  15. Rab3A, a possible marker of cortical granules, participates in cortical granule exocytosis in mouse eggs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bello, Oscar Daniel; Cappa, Andrea Isabel; Paola, Matilde de; Zanetti, María Natalia [Instituto de Histología y Embriología, CONICET – Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Av. Libertador 80, 5500 Mendoza (Argentina); Fukuda, Mitsunori [Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Fissore, Rafael A. [Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 661 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Mayorga, Luis S. [Instituto de Histología y Embriología, CONICET – Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Av. Libertador 80, 5500 Mendoza (Argentina); Michaut, Marcela A., E-mail: mmichaut@gmail.com [Instituto de Histología y Embriología, CONICET – Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Av. Libertador 80, 5500 Mendoza (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo (Argentina)

    2016-09-10

    Fusion of cortical granules with the oocyte plasma membrane is the most significant event to prevent polyspermy. This particular exocytosis, also known as cortical reaction, is regulated by calcium and its molecular mechanism is still not known. Rab3A, a member of the small GTP-binding protein superfamily, has been implicated in calcium-dependent exocytosis and is not yet clear whether Rab3A participates in cortical granules exocytosis. Here, we examine the involvement of Rab3A in the physiology of cortical granules, particularly, in their distribution during oocyte maturation and activation, and their participation in membrane fusion during cortical granule exocytosis. Immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis showed that Rab3A and cortical granules have a similar migration pattern during oocyte maturation, and that Rab3A is no longer detected after cortical granule exocytosis. These results suggested that Rab3A might be a marker of cortical granules. Overexpression of EGFP-Rab3A colocalized with cortical granules with a Pearson correlation coefficient of +0.967, indicating that Rab3A and cortical granules have almost a perfect colocalization in the egg cortical region. Using a functional assay, we demonstrated that microinjection of recombinant, prenylated and active GST-Rab3A triggered cortical granule exocytosis, indicating that Rab3A has an active role in this secretory pathway. To confirm this active role, we inhibited the function of endogenous Rab3A by microinjecting a polyclonal antibody raised against Rab3A prior to parthenogenetic activation. Our results showed that Rab3A antibody microinjection abolished cortical granule exocytosis in parthenogenetically activated oocytes. Altogether, our findings confirm that Rab3A might function as a marker of cortical granules and participates in cortical granule exocytosis in mouse eggs. - Highlights: • Rab3A has a similar migration pattern to cortical granules in mouse oocytes. • Rab3A can be a marker of

  16. Precise temporal association between cortical potentials evoked by motor imagination and afference induces cortical plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Kristensen, Signe Rom; Niazi, Imran Khan; Farina, Dario

    2012-04-01

    In monkeys, the repeated activation of somatosensory afferents projecting onto the motor cortex (M1) has a pivotal role in motor skill learning. Here we investigate if sensory feedback that is artificially generated at specific times during imagination of a dorsiflexion task leads to reorganization of the human M1. The common peroneal nerve was stimulated to generate an afferent volley timed to arrive during specific phases of the cortical potential generated when a movement was imagined (50 repetitions). The change in the output of M1 was quantified by applying single transcranial magnetic stimuli to the area of M1 controlling the tibialis anterior muscle. The results demonstrated that the concomitance between the cognitive process of movement (motor imagination) and the ascending volley due to the peripheral nerve stimulation can lead to significant increases in cortical excitability. These increases were critically dependent on the timing between the peripherally generated afferent volley and the cortical potential generated during the imagined movement. Only if the afferent volley arrived during the peak negative deflection of the potential, were significant alterations in motor cortical output attained. These results demonstrate that an artificially generated signal (the peripheral afferent volley) can interact with a physiologically generated signal in humans leading to plastic changes within the M1, the final output stage for movement generation within the human brain. The results presented may have implications in systems for artificially inducing cortical plasticity in patients with motor impairments (neuromodulation).

  17. NMDA receptors mediate neuron-to-glia signaling in mouse cortical astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalo, Ulyana; Pankratov, Yuri; Kirchhoff, Frank; North, R Alan; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2006-03-08

    Chemical transmission between neurons and glial cells is an important element of integration in the CNS. Here, we describe currents activated by NMDA in cortical astrocytes, identified in transgenic mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein under control of the human glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter. Astrocytes were studied by whole-cell voltage clamp either in slices or after gentle nonenzymatic mechanical dissociation. Acutely isolated astrocytes showed a three-component response to glutamate. The initial rapid component was blocked by 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6-nitro-2,3-dioxo-benzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide (NBQX), which is an antagonist of AMPA receptors (IC50, 2 microM), and the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP-5 blocked the later sustained component (IC50, 0.6 microM). The third component of glutamate application response was sensitive to D,L-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate, a glutamate transporter blocker. Fast application of NMDA evoked concentration-dependent inward currents (EC50, 0.3 microM); these showed use-dependent block by (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo [a,d] cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK-801). These NMDA-evoked currents were linearly dependent on membrane potential and were not affected by extracellular magnesium at concentrations up to 10 mM. Electrical stimulation of axons in layer IV-VI induced a complex inward current in astrocytes situated in the cortical layer II, part of which was sensitive to MK-801 at holding potential -80 mV and was not affected by the AMPA glutamate receptor antagonist NBQX. The fast miniature spontaneous currents were observed in cortical astrocytes in slices as well. These currents exhibited both AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated components. We conclude that cortical astrocytes express functional NMDA receptors that are devoid of Mg2+ block, and these receptors are involved in neuronal-glial signal transmission.

  18. Spray coated nanosilver functional layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzemiński, J.; Szałapak, J.; Dybowska-Sarapuk, L.; Jakubowska, M.

    2016-09-01

    Silver coatings are highly conductive functional layers. There are many different ways to product the silver coating but most of them need vacuum or high temperature. Spray coating is a technique that is free of this disadvantages - it doesn't need a cleanroom or high temperature. What's more the layer thickness is about 10 μm. In this article the spray coating process of silver nanolayer is described. Four different inks were tested and measured. The layer resistance was measured and show as a graph. After the layer resistance was measured the adhesion test was performed. The pull-off test was performed on testing machine with special self made module. To conclude the article include the test and measurements of spray coated nanosilver functional layers. The layers was examined for the current conductivity and adhesion force.

  19. Resistor mesh model of a spherical head: part 2: a review of applications to cortical mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauveau, N; Morucci, J P; Franceries, X; Celsis, P; Rigaud, B

    2005-11-01

    A resistor mesh model (RMM) has been validated with reference to the analytical model by consideration of a set of four dipoles close to the cortex. The application of the RMM to scalp potential interpolation was detailed in Part 1. Using the RMM and the same four dipoles, the different methods of cortical mapping were compared and have shown the potentiality of this RMM for obtaining current and potential cortical distributions. The lead-field matrices are well-adapted tools, but the use of a square matrix of high dimension does not permit the inverse solution to be improved in the presence of noise, as a regularisation technique is necessary with noisy data. With the RMM, the transfer matrix and the cortical imaging technique proved to be easy to implement. Further development of the RMM will include application to more realistic head models with more accurate conductivities.

  20. Golgi and computer morphometric analysis of cortical dendrites in metabolic storage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, S; Becker, L E; Chan, F W; Augustin, R

    1985-06-01

    Golgi and computer morphometric analysis of neuronal dendrites was done on four cases, one each of Tay-Sachs disease, infantile type 2 sialidosis, Hurler's syndrome, and Sanfilippo's syndrome. There were large meganeurites on pyramidal neurons in Tay-Sachs disease, and small ones in Hurler's and Sanfilippo's syndromes. All the meganeurites in these three diseases were predominantly distal to the soma in layer 3, but close to it in layer 5. These findings may be accounted for by different rates of ganglioside accumulation and cortical neuronal morphogenesis. Computer morphometric analysis revealed atrophic or less developed layer 5 dendritic length and branching in Tay-Sachs disease, sialidosis, and Hurler's syndrome compared with tissues from control patients. These dendritic changes may be secondary to ganglioside accumulation or due to abnormal surface membrane production during dendritic development. This study contributes to an understanding of how enzyme deficiency is translated into abnormal cell structure and, presumably, function.

  1. Reflective article having a sacrificial cathodic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; Buchanan, Michael J.; Scott, Matthew S.; Rearick, Brian K.; Medwick, Paul A.; McCamy, James W.

    2017-09-12

    The present invention relates to reflective articles, such as solar mirrors, that include a sacrificial cathodic layer. The reflective article, more particularly includes a substrate, such as glass, having a multi-layered coating thereon that includes a lead-free sacrificial cathodic layer. The sacrificial cathodic layer includes at least one transition metal, such as a particulate transition metal, which can be in the form of flakes (e.g., zinc flakes). The sacrificial cathodic layer can include an inorganic matrix formed from one or more organo-titanates. Alternatively, the sacrificial cathodic layer can include an organic polymer matrix (e.g., a crosslinked organic polymer matrix formed from an organic polymer and an aminoplast crosslinking agent). The reflective article also includes an outer organic polymer coating, that can be electrodeposited over the sacrificial cathodic layer.

  2. Regional cortical volume and cognitive functioning following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, Gershon; Bigler, Erin D; Abildskov, Tracy; Maller, Jerome J; O'Sullivan, Richard; Ponsford, Jennie L

    2013-10-01

    There has been limited examination of the effect of brain pathology on subsequent function. The current study examined the relationships between regional variation in grey matter volume, age and cognitive impairment using a semi-automated image analysis tool. This study included 69 individuals with mild-to-severe TBI, 41 of whom also completed neuropsychological tests of attention, working memory, processing speed, memory and executive functions. A widespread reduction in grey matter volume was associated with increasing age. Regional volumes that were affected also related to the severity of injury, whereby the most severe TBI participants displayed the most significant pathology. Poorer retention of newly learned material was associated with reduced cortical volume in frontal, parietal, and occipital brain regions. In addition, poorer working memory and executive control performance was found for individuals with lower cortical volume in temporal, parietal, and occipital regions. These findings are largely in line with previous literature, which suggests that frontal, temporal, and parietal regions are integral for the encoding of memories into long-term storage, memory retrieval, and working memory. The present study suggests that automated image analysis methods may be used to explore the relationships between regional variation in grey matter volume and cognitive function following TBI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Coordinated Scaling of Cortical and Cerebellar Numbers of Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2010-01-01

    While larger brains possess concertedly larger cerebral cortices and cerebella, the relative size of the cerebral cortex increases with brain size, but relative cerebellar size does not. In the absence of data on numbers of neurons in these structures, this discrepancy has been used to dispute the hypothesis that the cerebral cortex and cerebellum function and have evolved in concert and to support a trend towards neocorticalization in evolution. However, the rationale for interpreting changes in absolute and relative size of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum relies on the assumption that they reflect absolute and relative numbers of neurons in these structures across all species – an assumption that our recent studies have shown to be flawed. Here I show for the first time that the numbers of neurons in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum are directly correlated across 19 mammalian species of four different orders, including humans, and increase concertedly in a similar fashion both within and across the orders Eulipotyphla (Insectivora), Rodentia, Scandentia and Primata, such that on average a ratio of 3.6 neurons in the cerebellum to every neuron in the cerebral cortex is maintained across species. This coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons provides direct evidence in favor of concerted function, scaling and evolution of these brain structures, and suggests that the common notion that equates cognitive advancement with neocortical expansion should be revisited to consider in its stead the coordinated scaling of neocortex and cerebellum as a functional ensemble. PMID:20300467

  4. Coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Herculano-Houzel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available While larger brains possess concertedly larger cerebral cortices and cerebella, the relative size of the cerebral cortex increases with brain size, but relative cerebellar size does not. In the absence of data on numbers of neurons in these structures, this discrepancy has been used to dispute the hypothesis that the cerebral cortex and cerebellum function and have evolved in concert and to support a trend towards neocorticalization in evolution. However, the rationale for interpreting changes in absolute and relative size of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum relies on the assumption that they reflect absolute and relative numbers of neurons in these structures across all species – an assumption that our recent studies have shown to be flawed. Here I show for the first time that the numbers of neurons in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum are directly correlated across 19 mammalian species of 4 different orders, including humans, and increase concertedly in a similar fashion both within and across the orders Eulipotyphla (Insectivora, Rodentia, Scandentia and Primata, such that on average a ratio of 3.6 neurons in the cerebellum to every neuron in the cerebral cortex is maintained across species. This coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons provides direct evidence in favor of concerted function, scaling and evolution of these brain structures, and suggests that the common notion that equates cognitive advancement with neocortical expansion should be revisited to consider in its stead the coordinated scaling of neocortex and cerebellum as a functional ensemble.

  5. Early-onset Alzheimer disease clinical variants: Multivariate analyses of cortical thickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridgway, G.R.; Lehmann, M.; Barnes, J.; Rohrer, J.D.; Warren, J.D.; Crutch, S.J.; Fox, N.C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess patterns of reduced cortical thickness in different clinically defined variants of early-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) and to explore the hypothesis that these variants span a phenotypic continuum rather than represent distinct subtypes. Methods: The case-control study included

  6. Diminution of the NMDA receptor NR2B subunit in cortical and subcortical areas of WAG/Rij rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Fariba; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi; Jafarian, Maryam; Mohamadpour, Maliheh; Kazemi, Hadi; Joghataei, Mohammad-Taghi; Gorji, Ali

    2013-12-01

    Modulation of glutamatergic NMDA receptors affects the synchronization of spike discharges in in WAG/Rij rats, a valid genetic animal model of absence epilepsy. In this study, we describe the alteration of NR2B subunit of NMDA receptors expression in WAG/Rij rats in different somatosensory cortical layers and in hippocampal CA1 area. Experimental groups were divided into four groups of six rats of both WAG/Rij and Wistar strains with 2 and 6 months of age. The distribution of NR2B receptors was assessed by immunohistochemical staining in WAG/Rij and compared with age-matched Wistar rats. The expression of NR2B subunit was significantly decreased in different somatosensory cortical layers in 2- and 6-month-old WAG/Rij rats. In addition, the distribution of NR2B in hippocampal CA1 area was lower in 6-month-old WAG/Rij compared with age-matched Wistar rats. The reduction of NR2B receptors in different brain areas points to disturbance of glutamate receptors expression in cortical and subcortical areas in WAG/Rij rats. An altered subunit assembly of NMDA receptors may underlie cortical hyperexcitability in absence epilepsy. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Age Effects on Cortical Thickness in Cognitively Normal Elderly Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Hurtz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Atrophy in both grey and white matter is found in normal aging. The prefrontal cortex and the frontal lobe white matter are thought to be the most affected regions. Our aim was to examine the effects of normal aging on cortical grey matter using a 3D quantitative cortical mapping method. Methods: We analyzed 1.5-tesla brain magnetic resonance imaging data from 44 cognitively normal elderly subjects using cortical pattern matching and cortical thickness analyses. Linear regression analysis was used to study the effect of age on cortical thickness. 3D map-wide correction for multiple comparisons was conducted with permutation analyses using a threshold of p Results: We found a significant negative association between age and cortical thickness in the right hemisphere (pcorrected = 0.009 and a trend level association in the left hemisphere (pcorrected = 0.081. Age-related changes were greatest in the sensorimotor, bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate and supplementary motor cortices, and the right posterior middle and inferior frontal gyri. Age effects greater in the medial than lateral visual association cortices were also seen bilaterally. Conclusion: Our novel method further validates that normal aging results in diffuse cortical thinning that is most pronounced in the frontal and visual association cortices.

  8. Dynamic Causal Modeling of the Cortical Responses to Wrist Perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical perturbations applied to the wrist joint typically evoke a stereotypical sequence of cortical and muscle responses. The early cortical responses (<100 ms are thought be involved in the “rapid” transcortical reaction to the perturbation while the late cortical responses (>100 ms are related to the “slow” transcortical reaction. Although previous studies indicated that both responses involve the primary motor cortex, it remains unclear if both responses are engaged by the same effective connectivity in the cortical network. To answer this question, we investigated the effective connectivity cortical network after a “ramp-and-hold” mechanical perturbation, in both the early (<100 ms and late (>100 ms periods, using dynamic causal modeling. Ramp-and-hold perturbations were applied to the wrist joint while the subject maintained an isometric wrist flexion. Cortical activity was recorded using a 128-channel electroencephalogram (EEG. We investigated how the perturbation modulated the effective connectivity for the early and late periods. Bayesian model comparisons suggested that different effective connectivity networks are engaged in these two periods. For the early period, we found that only a few cortico-cortical connections were modulated, while more complicated connectivity was identified in the cortical network during the late period with multiple modulated cortico-cortical connections. The limited early cortical network likely allows for a rapid muscle response without involving high-level cognitive processes, while the complexity of the late network may facilitate coordinated responses.

  9. Cortical thickness abnormalities in late adolescence with online gaming addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kai; Cheng, Ping; Dong, Tao; Bi, Yanzhi; Xing, Lihong; Yu, Dahua; Zhao, Limei; Dong, Minghao; von Deneen, Karen M; Liu, Yijun; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Online gaming addiction, as the most popular subtype of Internet addiction, had gained more and more attention from the whole world. However, the structural differences in cortical thickness of the brain between adolescents with online gaming addiction and healthy controls are not well unknown; neither was its association with the impaired cognitive control ability. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans from late adolescence with online gaming addiction (n = 18) and age-, education- and gender-matched controls (n = 18) were acquired. The cortical thickness measurement method was employed to investigate alterations of cortical thickness in individuals with online gaming addiction. The color-word Stroop task was employed to investigate the functional implications of the cortical thickness abnormalities. Imaging data revealed increased cortical thickness in the left precentral cortex, precuneus, middle frontal cortex, inferior temporal and middle temporal cortices in late adolescence with online gaming addiction; meanwhile, the cortical thicknesses of the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), insula, lingual gyrus, the right postcentral gyrus, entorhinal cortex and inferior parietal cortex were decreased. Correlation analysis demonstrated that the cortical thicknesses of the left precentral cortex, precuneus and lingual gyrus correlated with duration of online gaming addiction and the cortical thickness of the OFC correlated with the impaired task performance during the color-word Stroop task in adolescents with online gaming addiction. The findings in the current study suggested that the cortical thickness abnormalities of these regions may be implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of online gaming addiction.

  10. Cortical thickness abnormalities in late adolescence with online gaming addiction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yuan

    Full Text Available Online gaming addiction, as the most popular subtype of Internet addiction, had gained more and more attention from the whole world. However, the structural differences in cortical thickness of the brain between adolescents with online gaming addiction and healthy controls are not well unknown; neither was its association with the impaired cognitive control ability. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans from late adolescence with online gaming addiction (n = 18 and age-, education- and gender-matched controls (n = 18 were acquired. The cortical thickness measurement method was employed to investigate alterations of cortical thickness in individuals with online gaming addiction. The color-word Stroop task was employed to investigate the functional implications of the cortical thickness abnormalities. Imaging data revealed increased cortical thickness in the left precentral cortex, precuneus, middle frontal cortex, inferior temporal and middle temporal cortices in late adolescence with online gaming addiction; meanwhile, the cortical thicknesses of the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, insula, lingual gyrus, the right postcentral gyrus, entorhinal cortex and inferior parietal cortex were decreased. Correlation analysis demonstrated that the cortical thicknesses of the left precentral cortex, precuneus and lingual gyrus correlated with duration of online gaming addiction and the cortical thickness of the OFC correlated with the impaired task performance during the color-word Stroop task in adolescents with online gaming addiction. The findings in the current study suggested that the cortical thickness abnormalities of these regions may be implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of online gaming addiction.

  11. Focal cortical dysplasia type IIb: completeness of cortical, not subcortical, resection is necessary for seizure freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jan; Urbach, Horst; Niehusmann, Pitt; von Lehe, Marec; Elger, Christian E; Wellmer, Jörg

    2011-08-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia type IIb (FCD IIb) lesions are highly epileptogenic and frequently cause pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Complete surgical resection leads to seizure freedom in most cases. However, the term "complete" resection is controversial with regard to the necessity of performing resections of the subcortical zone, which is frequently seen in these lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We retrospectively analyzed 50 epilepsy patients with histologically proven FCD IIb. The extent of surgical resection was determined by SPM5-based coregistration of the preoperative and postoperative MRI scans. Postoperative outcome was analyzed with regard to (1) the completeness of the resection of the cortical abnormality and (2) the completeness of the resection of the subcortical abnormality. Complete resection of the cortical abnormality led to postoperative seizure freedom (Engel class Ia) in 34 of 37 patients (92%), whereas incomplete cortical resection achieved this in only one of 13 patients (8%, p < 0.001). Among the patients with complete cortical resection, 36 had FCDs with a subcortical hyperintensity according to MRI. In this group, complete resection of the subcortical abnormality did not result in a better postoperative outcome than incomplete resection (90% vs. 93% for Engel class Ia, n.s.). Complete resection of the MRI-documented cortical abnormality in FCD IIb is crucial for a favorable postoperative outcome. However, resection of the subcortical hyperintense zone is not essential for seizure freedom. Therefore, sparing of the subcortical white matter may reduce the surgical risk of encroaching on relevant fiber tracts. In addition, these findings give an interesting insight into the epileptogenic propensity of different parts of these lesions. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  12. Focal malformations of cortical development: new vistas for molecular pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, K-C; Crino, P B

    2013-11-12

    Focal malformations of cortical development (FMCD) are highly associated with several neurological disorders including intractable epilepsy and neurocognitive disabilities. Over the past decade, several FMCD subtypes have been linked to hyperactivation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling cascade. In view of the roles that mTOR plays in cell proliferation, size, motility, and stem cell phenotype, many of the features of FMCD such as cytomegaly, disorganized lamination, and expression of stem cell markers can be explained by enhanced mTOR signaling. FMCD result from several distinct and fascinating molecular mechanisms including biallelic gene inactivation, somatic mutation, and potentially, viral infection. These mechanisms have been directly linked to mTOR activation. Perhaps most compelling, pharmacological inhibition of mTOR has been implemented successfully in clinical trials for select FMCD and provides a new vista for treatment. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Functional cortical hubs in the eyes-closed resting human brain from an electrophysiological perspective using magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Seung-Hyun; Jeong, Woorim; Seol, Jaeho; Kwon, Jiyeon; Chung, Chun Kee

    2013-01-01

    It is not clear whether specific brain areas act as hubs in the eyes-closed (EC) resting state, which is an unconstrained state free from any passive or active tasks. Here, we used electrophysiological magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals to study functional cortical hubs in 88 participants. We identified several multispectral cortical hubs. Although cortical hubs vary slightly with different applied measures and frequency bands, the most consistent hubs were observed in the medial and posterior cingulate cortex, the left dorsolateral superior frontal cortex, and the left pole of the middle temporal cortex. Hubs were characterized as connector nodes integrating EC resting state functional networks. Hubs in the gamma band were more likely to include midline structures. Our results confirm the existence of multispectral cortical cores in EC resting state functional networks based on MEG and imply the existence of optimized functional networks in the resting brain.

  14. Address Points, The Address Point layer contains an address point for almost every structure over 200 square feet and for some vacant properties. Attributes include addresses, sub-units, address use, LAT/LONG, 10-digit SDAT taxpins, political areas and more., Published in 2013, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Baltimore County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Address Points dataset current as of 2013. The Address Point layer contains an address point for almost every structure over 200 square feet and for some vacant...

  15. Government Buildings, Leased, County leased properties within Sedgwick County. This layer is maintained interactively by GIS staff using lease information provided by DIO Facilities Project Services. Primary attributes include property lease and group ID, building, address, parcel I, Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Government Buildings, Leased dataset current as of 2008. County leased properties within Sedgwick County. This layer is maintained interactively by GIS staff using...

  16. Three-dimensional distribution of cortical synapses: a replicated point pattern-based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eAnton-Sanchez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The biggest problem when analyzing the brain is that its synaptic connections are extremely complex. Generally, the billions of neurons making up the brain exchange information through two types of highly specialized structures: chemical synapses (the vast majority and so-called gap junctions (a substrate of one class of electrical synapse. Here we are interested in exploring the three-dimensional spatial distribution of chemical synapses in the cerebral cortex. Recent research has showed that the three-dimensional spatial distribution of synapses in layer III of the neocortex can be modeled by a random sequential adsorption (RSA point process, i.e., synapses are distributed in space almost randomly, with the only constraint that they cannot overlap. In this study we hypothesize that RSA processes can also explain the distribution of synapses in all cortical layers. We also investigate whether there are differences in both the synaptic density and spatial distribution of synapses between layers. Using combined focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM, we obtained three-dimensional samples from the six layers of the rat somatosensory cortex and identified and reconstructed the synaptic junctions. A total volume of tissue of approximately 4500 μm3 and around 4000 synapses from three different animals were analyzed. Different samples, layers and/or animals were aggregated and compared using RSA replicated spatial point processes. The results showed no significant differences in the synaptic distribution across the different rats used in the study. We found that RSA processes described the spatial distribution of synapses in all samples of each layer. We also found that the synaptic distribution in layers II to VI conforms to a common underlying RSA process with different densities per layer. Interestingly, the results showed that synapses in layer I had a slightly different spatial distribution from the other layers.

  17. Oil layer physics and hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirverdyan, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The bases of oil layer physics, including physical and hydrodynamic concepts are presented. Special attention is given rheologic characteristics of layer fluids and models. The basic positions of a classic filtraton theory of non-compressed, slightly compressed and immiscible uncompressed fluids are examined. A filtraton theory of fluids with and without phase transitions included is given. The basic filtration positions of muturally soluable liquids is examined. Problems of water-oil displacement and well waterflooding are noted.

  18. Critical fluctuations in cortical models near instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Aburn

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Computational studies often proceed from the premise that cortical dynamics operate in a linearly stable domain, where fluctuations dissipate quickly and show only short memory. Studies of human EEG, however, have shown significant autocorrelation at time lags on the scale of minutes, indicating the need to consider regimes where nonlinearities influence the dynamics. Statistical properties such as increased autocorrelation length, increased variance, power-law scaling and bistable switching have been suggested as generic indicators of the approach to bifurcation in nonlinear dynamical systems. We study temporal fluctuations in a widely-employed computational model (the Jansen-Rit model of cortical activity, examining the statistical signatures that accompany bifurcations. Approaching supercritical Hopf bifurcations through tuning of the background excitatory input, we find a dramatic increase in the autocorrelation length that depends sensitively on the direction in phase space of the input fluctuations and hence on which neuronal subpopulation is stochastically perturbed. Similar dependence on the input direction is found in the distribution of fluctuation size and duration, which show power law scaling that extends over four orders of magnitude at the Hopf bifurcation. We conjecture that the alignment in phase space between the input noise vector and the center manifold of the Hopf bifurcation is directly linked to these changes. These results are consistent with the possibility of statistical indicators of linear instability being detectable in real EEG time series. However, even in a simple cortical model, we find that these indicators may not necessarily be visible even when bifurcations are present because their expression can depend sensitively on the neuronal pathway of incoming fluctuations.

  19. Estimation of in vivo cortical bone thickness using ultrasonic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Isao; Horii, Kaoru; Hagino, Hiroshi; Miki, Takami; Matsukawa, Mami; Otani, Takahiko

    2015-07-01

    To verify the measurement of cortical bone thickness at the distal radius in vivo using an ultrasonic method. The method for estimating cortical bone thickness was derived from experiments with in vitro bovine specimens. Propagation time of echo waves and propagation time of slow waves were used for the estimation. The outside diameter of cortical bone and the cortical bone thickness at the distal 5.5 % site of radius were measured with the new ultrasonic bone measurement system, and the results were compared with X-ray pQCT clinical measurements. There was a high positive correlation (r: 0.76) between the cortical bone thickness measured by the new ultrasonic system and the X-ray pQCT results. We will be able to measure not only cancellous bone density but also cortical bone thickness in vivo using ultrasonic waves (without X-ray) safely and repeatedly.

  20. Analysis of cortical thickness in narcolepsy patients with cataplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Eun Yeon; Jeon, Seun; Lee, Minjoo; Kim, Sung Tae; Yoon, Uicheul; Koo, Dae Lim; Lee, Jong-Min; Hong, Seung Bong

    2011-10-01

    To investigate differences in cortical thickness in narcolepsy patients with cataplexy and control subjects. Cortical thickness was measured using a 3-D surface-based method that enables more accurate measurement in deep sulci and localized regional mapping. University hospital. We enrolled 28 patients with narcolepsy and cataplexy and 33 age-and sex-matched control subjects. Cortical thickness was measured using a direct method for calculating the distance between corresponding vertices from inner and outer cortical surfaces. We normalized cortical surfaces using 2-D surface registration and performed diffusion smoothing to reduce the variability of folding patterns and to increase the power of the statistical analysis. Localized cortical thinning in narcolepsy patients with cataplexy was found in orbitofrontal gyri, dorsolateral and medial prefrontal cortexes, insula, cingulate gyri, middle and inferior temporal gyri, and inferior parietal lobule of the right and left hemispheres at the level of a false discovery rate Pmemory, emotion, and sleepiness.

  1. Layering and Ordering in Electrochemical Double Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yihua [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Kawaguchi, Tomoya [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Pierce, Michael S. [Rochester Institute of Technology, School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester, New York 14623, United States; Komanicky, Vladimir [Faculty of Science, Safarik University, 041 54 Kosice, Slovakia; You, Hoydoo [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States

    2018-02-26

    Electrochemical double layers (EDL) form at electrified interfaces. While Gouy-Chapman model describes moderately charged EDL, formation of Stern layers was predicted for highly charged EDL. Our results provide structural evidence for a Stern layer of cations, at potentials close to hydrogen evolution in alkali fluoride and chloride electrolytes. Layering was observed by x-ray crystal truncation rods and atomic-scale recoil responses of Pt(111) surface layers. Ordering in the layer is confirmed by glancing-incidence in-plane diffraction measurements.

  2. Contextual control of audiovisual integration in low-level sensory cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Atteveldt, Nienke M; Peterson, Bradley S; Schroeder, Charles E

    2014-05-01

    Potential sources of multisensory influences on low-level sensory cortices include direct projections from sensory cortices of different modalities, as well as more indirect feedback inputs from higher order multisensory cortical regions. These multiple architectures may be functionally complementary, but the exact roles and inter-relationships of the circuits are unknown. Using a fully balanced context manipulation, we tested the hypotheses that: (1) feedforward and lateral pathways subserve speed functions, such as detecting peripheral stimuli. Multisensory integration effects in this context are predicted in peripheral fields of low-level sensory cortices. (2) Slower feedback pathways underpin accuracy functions, such as object discrimination. Integration effects in this context are predicted in higher-order association cortices and central/foveal fields of low-level sensory cortex. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare the effects of central versus peripheral stimulation on audiovisual integration, while varying speed and accuracy requirements for behavioral responses. We found that interactions of task demands and stimulus eccentricity in low-level sensory cortices are more complex than would be predicted by a simple dichotomy such as our hypothesized peripheral/speed and foveal/accuracy functions. Additionally, our findings point to individual differences in integration that may be related to skills and strategy. Overall, our findings suggest that instead of using fixed, specialized pathways, the exact circuits and mechanisms that are used for low-level multisensory integration are much more flexible and contingent upon both individual and contextual factors than previously assumed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Clinical significance of renal cortical thickness in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Mehmet; Aras, Bekir; Güneyli, Serkan; Yılmaz, Mümtaz

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlations between laboratory findings and ultrasonographic measurements of renal length and cortical thickness in patients receiving follow-up for chronic kidney disease (CKD). A total of 41 CKD patients (18 males and 23 females; mean age, 65.2 years; range, 42 to 85 years) with a low glomerular filtration rate who did not require renal replacement therapy were included in this prospective study. Patients were followed up with laboratory assays at bimonthly intervals and with ultrasonography performed twice a year. Renal cortical thickness, renal length, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values were compared using the paired-samples t test. Additionally, Pearson correlation analysis was conducted between renal length and cortical thickness measurements and eGFR values to assess kidney function. At the beginning of the study and after 24 months, mean eGFR values of the 41 patients were 35.92 mL/min and 28.38 mL/min, respectively. The mean renal length was 91.29 mm at the beginning of the study and 90.24 mm at the end of the study. The mean cortical thickness was 5.76±2.05 mm at the beginning of the study and 5.28±1.99 mm at the end of the study. A statistically significant positive association was found between eGFR and mean renal length (r=0.66, P<0.01) and between eGFR and mean cortical thickness (r=0.85, P<0.01), with the latter being more prominent. Our study suggests that ultrasonographic cortical thickness measurements may be an important imaging technique in the follow-up care of patients with CKD.

  4. Cerebral cortices of East african early hominids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, D

    1983-09-09

    An endocast of the frontal lobe of a reconstructed skull, which is approximately 2 million years old, from the Koobi Fora region of Kenya appears to represent the oldest human-like cortical sulcal pattern in the fossil record, while the endocast from another skull from the same region produces an endocast that appears apelike in its frontal lobe and similar to endocasts from earlier South African australopithecines. New analysis of paleoanatomical evidence thus indicates that at least two taxa of early hominids coexisted in East Africa.

  5. Response variability in balanced cortical networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerchner, Alexander; Ursta, C.; Hertz, J.

    2006-01-01

    We study the spike statistics of neurons in a network with dynamically balanced excitation and inhibition. Our model, intended to represent a generic cortical column, comprises randomly connected excitatory and inhibitory leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, driven by excitatory input from an external...... factors is possible. We find that the irregularity of spike trains is controlled mainly by the strength of the synapses relative to the difference between the firing threshold and the postfiring reset level of the membrane potential. For moderately strong synapses, we find spike statistics very similar...

  6. Regional vulnerability of longitudinal cortical association connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Ceschin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Preterm born children with spastic diplegia type of cerebral palsy and white matter injury or periventricular leukomalacia (PVL, are known to have motor, visual and cognitive impairments. Most diffusion tensor imaging (DTI studies performed in this group have demonstrated widespread abnormalities using averaged deterministic tractography and voxel-based DTI measurements. Little is known about structural network correlates of white matter topography and reorganization in preterm cerebral palsy, despite the availability of new therapies and the need for brain imaging biomarkers. Here, we combined novel post-processing methodology of probabilistic tractography data in this preterm cohort to improve spatial and regional delineation of longitudinal cortical association tract abnormalities using an along-tract approach, and compared these data to structural DTI cortical network topology analysis. DTI images were acquired on 16 preterm children with cerebral palsy (mean age 5.6 ± 4 and 75 healthy controls (mean age 5.7 ± 3.4. Despite mean tract analysis, Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS and voxel-based morphometry (VBM demonstrating diffusely reduced fractional anisotropy (FA reduction in all white matter tracts, the along-tract analysis improved the detection of regional tract vulnerability. The along-tract map-structural network topology correlates revealed two associations: (1 reduced regional posterior–anterior gradient in FA of the longitudinal visual cortical association tracts (inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, optic radiation, posterior thalamic radiation correlated with reduced posterior–anterior gradient of intra-regional (nodal efficiency metrics with relative sparing of frontal and temporal regions; and (2 reduced regional FA within frontal–thalamic–striatal white matter pathways (anterior limb/anterior thalamic radiation, superior longitudinal fasciculus and cortical spinal tract

  7. Atypical calcific tendinitis with cortical erosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, E.J. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); El-Khoury, G.Y. [Dept. of Radiology and Orthopaedics, Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Objective. To present and discuss six cases of calcific tendinitis in atypical locations (one at the insertion of the pectoralis major and five at the insertion of the gluteus maximus).Patients and results. All cases were associated with cortical erosions, and five had soft tissue calcifications. The initial presentation was confusing and the patients were suspected of having infection or neoplastic disease.Conclusion. Calcific tendinitis is a self-limiting condition. It is important to recognize the imaging features of this condition to avoid unnecessary investigation and surgery. (orig.)

  8. Music and learning-induced cortical plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantev, Christo; Ross, Bernhard; Fujioka, Takkao; Trainor, Laurel J; Schulte, Michael; Schulz, Matthias

    2003-11-01

    Auditory stimuli are encoded by frequency-tuned neurons in the auditory cortex. There are a number of tonotopic maps, indicating that there are multiple representations, as in a mosaic. However, the cortical organization is not fixed due to the brain's capacity to adapt to current requirements of the environment. Several experiments on cerebral cortical organization in musicians demonstrate an astonishing plasticity. We used the MEG technique in a number of studies to investigate the changes that occur in the human auditory cortex when a skill is acquired, such as when learning to play a musical instrument. We found enlarged cortical representation of tones of the musical scale as compared to pure tones in skilled musicians. Enlargement was correlated with the age at which musicians began to practice. We also investigated cortical representations for notes of different timbre (violin and trumpet) and found that they are enhanced in violinists and trumpeters, preferentially for the timbre of the instrument on which the musician was trained. In recent studies we extended these findings in three ways. First, we show that we can use MEG to measure the effects of relatively short-term laboratory training involving learning to perceive virtual instead of spectral pitch and that the switch to perceiving virtual pitch is manifested in the gamma band frequency. Second, we show that there is cross-modal plasticity in that when the lips of trumpet players are stimulated (trumpet players assess their auditory performance by monitoring the position and pressure of their lips touching the mouthpiece of their instrument) at the same time as a trumpet tone, activation in the somatosensory cortex is increased more than it is during the sum of the separate lip and trumpet tone stimulation. Third, we show that musicians' automatic encoding and discrimination of pitch contour and interval information in melodies are specifically enhanced compared to those in nonmusicians in that

  9. Regional cortical and trabecular bone loss after spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Dudley-Javoroski, Shauna; Shields, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) triggers rapid loss of trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) in bone epiphyses and a loss of cortical cross-sectional area (CSA) in bone diaphyses, increasing fracture risk for people with SCI. The purpose of this study was to measure trabecular BMD and cortical CSA loss at several previously unexamined lower-limb sites (4% fibula, 12% femur, 86% tibia, cortical) in individuals with SCI. Using peripheral quantitative computed tomography, we scanned 13 participants wit...

  10. Cortical development in roots of the aquatic plant Pontederia cordata (Pontederiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seago, J L; Peterson, C A; Enstone, D E

    2000-08-01

    Adventitious roots of marsh-grown Pontederia cordata were examined to determine cortical development and structure. The innermost layer of the ground meristem forms the endodermis and aerenchymatous cortex. The outermost layer of the early ground meristem undergoes a precise pattern of oblique and periclinal cell divisions to produce a single or double layer of prohypodermis with an anchor cell for each radial file of aerenchyma cells. At maturity, endodermal cell walls are modified only by narrow Casparian bands. The central regions of the ground meristem become proaerenchyma and exhibit asymmetric cell division and expansion. They produce an aerenchymatous zone with barrel-shaped large cells and irregularly shaped small cells traversing the aerenchyma horizontally along radii; some crystalliferous cells with raphides are present in the aerenchyma. The walls of the hypodermis are modified early by polyphenols. The outermost layer of the hypodermis later matures into an exodermis with Casparian bands that are impermeable to berberine, an apoplastic tracer dye. The nonexodermal layer(s) of the hypodermis has suberin-modified walls. Radial files of aerenchyma are usually connected by narrow protuberances near their midpoints, the aerenchyma lacunae having been produced by expansion of cells along walls lining intercellular spaces. We are terming this type of aerenchyma development, which is neither schizogenous nor lysigenous, "differential expansion."

  11. Overweight is not associated with cortical thickness alterations in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Jane Sharkey

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionSeveral studies report an association between body mass index (BMI and cortical thickness in adults. Some studies demonstrate diffuse cortical thinning in obesity, while others report effects in areas that are associated with self-regulation, such as lateral prefrontal cortex. MethodsThis study used multilevel modelling of data from the NIH Pediatric MRI Data Repository, a mixed longitudinal and cross-sectional database, to examine the relationship between cortical thickness and body weight in children. Cortical thickness was computed at 81,942 vertices of 716 MRI scans from 378 children aged between 4 and 18 years. Body mass index Z score for age was computed for each participant. We preformed vertex-wise statistical analysis of the relationship between cortical thickness and BMI, accounting for age and gender. In addition, cortical thickness was extracted from regions of interest in prefrontal cortex and insula.ResultsNo significant association between cortical thickness and BMI was found, either by statistical parametric mapping or by region of interest analysis. Results remained negative when the analysis was restricted to children aged 12-18.ConclusionsThe correlation between BMI and cortical thickness was not found in this large pediatric sample. The association between BMI and cortical thinning develops after adolescence. This has implications for the nature of the relationship between brain anatomy and weight gain.

  12. Layer-by-Layer Proteomic Analysis of Mytilus galloprovincialis Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-xing; Bao, Lin-fei; Fan, Mei-hua; Li, Xiao-min; Wu, Chang-wen; Xia, Shu-wei

    2015-01-01

    Bivalve shell is a biomineralized tissue with various layers/microstructures and excellent mechanical properties. Shell matrix proteins (SMPs) pervade and envelop the mineral crystals and play essential roles in biomineralization. Despite that Mytilus is an economically important bivalve, only few proteomic studies have been performed for the shell, and current knowledge of the SMP set responsible for different shell layers of Mytilus remains largely patchy. In this study, we observed that Mytilus galloprovincialis shell contained three layers, including nacre, fibrous prism, and myostracum that is involved in shell-muscle attachment. A parallel proteomic analysis was performed for these three layers. By combining LC-MS/MS analysis with Mytilus EST database interrogations, a whole set of 113 proteins was identified, and the distribution of these proteins in different shell layers followed a mosaic pattern. For each layer, about a half of identified proteins are unique and the others are shared by two or all of three layers. This is the first description of the protein set exclusive to nacre, myostracum, and fibrous prism in Mytilus shell. Moreover, most of identified proteins in the present study are novel SMPs, which greatly extended biomineralization-related protein data of Mytilus. These results are useful, on one hand, for understanding the roles of SMPs in the deposition of different shell layers. On the other hand, the identified protein set of myostracum provides candidates for further exploring the mechanism of adductor muscle-shell attachment. PMID:26218932

  13. Cortical information flow in Parkinson's disease: a composite network/field model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cliff C. Kerr

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The basal ganglia play a crucial role in the execution of movements, as demonstrated by the severe motor deficits that accompany Parkinson's disease (PD. Since motor commands originate in the cortex, an important question is how the basal ganglia influence cortical information flow, and how this influence becomes pathological in PD. To explore this, we developed a composite neuronal network/neural field model. The network model consisted of 4950 spiking neurons, divided into 15 excitatory and inhibitory cell populations in the thalamus and cortex. The field model consisted of the cortex, thalamus, striatum, subthalamic nucleus, and globus pallidus. Both models have been separately validated in previous work. Three field models were used: one with basal ganglia parameters based on data from healthy individuals, one based on data from individuals with PD, and one purely thalamocortical model. Spikes generated by these field models were then used to drive the network model. Compared to the network driven by the healthy model, the PD-driven network had lower firing rates, a shift in spectral power towards lower frequencies, and higher probability of bursting; each of these findings is consistent with empirical data on PD. In the healthy model, we found strong Granger causality in the beta and low gamma bands between cortical layers, but this was largely absent in the PD model. In particular, the reduction in Granger causality from the main "input" layer of the cortex (layer 4 to the main "output" layer (layer 5 was pronounced. This may account for symptoms of PD that seem to reflect deficits in information flow, such as bradykinesia. In general, these results demonstrate that the brain's large-scale oscillatory environment, represented here by the field model, strongly influences the information processing that occurs within its subnetworks. Hence, it may be preferable to drive spiking network models with physiologically realistic inputs rather than

  14. Familiarity Detection is an Intrinsic Property of Cortical Microcircuits with Bidirectional Synaptic Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Humans instantly recognize a previously seen face as “familiar.” To deepen our understanding of familiarity-novelty detection, we simulated biologically plausible neural network models of generic cortical microcircuits consisting of spiking neurons with random recurrent synaptic connections. NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-dependent synaptic plasticity was implemented to allow for unsupervised learning and bidirectional modifications. Network spiking activity evoked by sensory inputs consisting of face images altered synaptic efficacy, which resulted in the network responding more strongly to a previously seen face than a novel face. Network size determined how many faces could be accurately recognized as familiar. When the simulated model became sufficiently complex in structure, multiple familiarity traces could be retained in the same network by forming partially-overlapping subnetworks that differ slightly from each other, thereby resulting in a high storage capacity. Fisher’s discriminant analysis was applied to identify critical neurons whose spiking activity predicted familiar input patterns. Intriguingly, as sensory exposure was prolonged, the selected critical neurons tended to appear at deeper layers of the network model, suggesting recruitment of additional circuits in the network for incremental information storage. We conclude that generic cortical microcircuits with bidirectional synaptic plasticity have an intrinsic ability to detect familiar inputs. This ability does not require a specialized wiring diagram or supervision and can therefore be expected to emerge naturally in developing cortical circuits. PMID:28534043

  15. mGluR5 ablation in cortical glutamatergic neurons increases novelty-induced locomotion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris P Jew

    Full Text Available The group I metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5 has been implicated in the pathology of various neurological disorders including schizophrenia, ADHD, and autism. mGluR5-dependent synaptic plasticity has been described at a variety of neural connections and its signaling has been implicated in several behaviors. These behaviors include locomotor reactivity to novel environment, sensorimotor gating, anxiety, and cognition. mGluR5 is expressed in glutamatergic neurons, inhibitory neurons, and glia in various brain regions. In this study, we show that deleting mGluR5 expression only in principal cortical neurons leads to defective cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R dependent synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex. These cortical glutamatergic mGluR5 knockout mice exhibit increased novelty-induced locomotion, and their locomotion can be further enhanced by treatment with the psychostimulant methylphenidate. Despite a modest reduction in repetitive behaviors, cortical glutamatergic mGluR5 knockout mice are normal in sensorimotor gating, anxiety, motor balance/learning and fear conditioning behaviors. These results show that mGluR5 signaling in cortical glutamatergic neurons is required for precisely modulating locomotor reactivity to a novel environment but not for sensorimotor gating, anxiety, motor coordination, several forms of learning or social interactions.

  16. Cortical changes in incipient Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestia, Annapaola; Drago, Valeria; Rasser, Paul E; Bonetti, Matteo; Thompson, Paul M; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2010-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is defined by memory impairment with no impact on daily activities. 10 to 15% of MCI convert to Alzheimer's disease (AD) per year. While structural changes in the cortex of AD patients have been extensively investigated, fewer studies analyzed changes in the years preceding conversion. 46 MCI patients and 20 healthy controls underwent structural 1.0T-weighted high-resolution MR scans at baseline and after 1.4 (SD 0.3) years. All subjects were assessed yearly for up to 4 years with a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Sixteen of the 46 patients converted to AD (cMCI) while 30 remained stable (sMCI). An accurate voxel-based statistical mesh-model technique (cortical pattern matching) with a related region-of-interest analysis based on networks defined from a Brodmann area atlas (BAs) were used to map gray matter changes over time. At baseline, cMCI patients had 10 to 30% less cortical gray matter volume than healthy controls in regions known to be affected by AD pathology (entorhinal, temporoparietal, posterior cingulate, and orbitofrontal cortex, p=0.0001). Over time, cMCI patients lost more gray matter than sMCI in all brain areas but mainly in the olfactory and in the polysynaptic hippocampal network (more than 8% gray matter loss, pgray matter loss in the olfactory and polysynaptic hippocampal network. These findings are in line with neuropathological knowledge.

  17. Autosomal dominant arteriopathy with sub cortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojeda, Adriana; Tiezzi, Gerardo; Uriarte, Ana M.; Eguren, Leonor

    2002-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with sub cortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CASADIL) is a systemic hereditary, vascular disease that involves small arteries. Recurrent ischemia, pseudo bulbar paralysis and dementia are characteristic. Other manifestations include migraine and depression. We report an Argentine family with VI generations with evidence of disease in IV. MR examinations were performed on 21 family members (both symptomatic and asymptomatic). The main findings on MR on symptomatic and asymptomatic patients were small lesions with high signal on T2 localised in periventricular white matter, brain stem, basal ganglia and thalamus, and confluent patches on white matter although with high signal on T2 images, usually symmetric. In conclusion we can assess that diffuse myelin loss and small infarcts occurring in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy well demonstrated with MR. In addition, some of the abnormalities in pre symptomatic patients can be identified on MR images. (author)

  18. Combined effects of physical exercise and education on age-related cortical thinning in cognitively normal individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin San; Shin, Hee Young; Kim, Hee Jin; Jang, Young Kyoung; Jung, Na-Yeon; Lee, Juyoun; Kim, Yeo Jin; Chun, Phillip; Yang, Jin-Ju; Lee, Jong-Min; Kang, Mira; Park, Key-Chung; Na, Duk L; Seo, Sang Won

    2016-04-11

    We investigated the association between self-reported physical exercise and cortical thickness in a large sample of cognitively normal individuals. We also determined whether a combination of physical exercise and education had more protective effects on age-related cortical thinning than either parameter alone. A total of 1,842 participants were included in this analysis. Physical exercise was assessed using a questionnaire regarding intensity, frequency, and duration. Cortical thickness was measured using a surface-based method. Longer duration of exercise (≥1 hr/day), but not intensity or frequency, was associated with increased mean cortical thickness globally (P-value = 0.013) and in the frontal regions (P-value = 0.007). In particular, the association of exercise with cortical thinning had regional specificity in the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal, precuneus, left postcentral, and inferior parietal regions. The combination of higher exercise level and higher education level showed greater global and frontal mean thickness than either parameter alone. Testing for a trend with the combination of high exercise level and high education level confirmed this finding (P-value = 0.001-0.003). Our findings suggest that combined exercise and education have important implications for brain health, especially considering the paucity of known protective factors for age-related cortical thinning.

  19. Transient synchronization of hippocampo-striato-thalamo-cortical networks during sleep spindle oscillations induces motor memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Arnaud; Pinsard, Basile; Boré, Arnaud; Carrier, Julie; Fogel, Stuart M; Doyon, Julien

    2018-04-01

    Sleep benefits motor memory consolidation. This mnemonic process is thought to be mediated by thalamo-cortical spindle activity during NREM-stage2 sleep episodes as well as changes in striatal and hippocampal activity. However, direct experimental evidence supporting the contribution of such sleep-dependent physiological mechanisms to motor memory consolidation in humans is lacking. In the present study, we combined EEG and fMRI sleep recordings following practice of a motor sequence learning (MSL) task to determine whether spindle oscillations support sleep-dependent motor memory consolidation by transiently synchronizing and coordinating specialized cortical and subcortical networks. To that end, we conducted EEG source reconstruction on spindle epochs in both cortical and subcortical regions using novel deep-source localization techniques. Coherence-based metrics were adopted to estimate functional connectivity between cortical and subcortical structures over specific frequency bands. Our findings not only confirm the critical and functional role of NREM-stage2 sleep spindles in motor skill consolidation, but provide first-time evidence that spindle oscillations [11-17 Hz] may be involved in sleep-dependent motor memory consolidation by locally reactivating and functionally binding specific task-relevant cortical and subcortical regions within networks including the hippocampus, putamen, thalamus and motor-related cortical regions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Unimodal primary sensory cortices are directly connected by long-range horizontal projections in the rat sensory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy eStehberg

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Research based on functional imaging and neuronal recordings in the barrel cortex subdivision of primary somatosensory cortex (SI of the adult rat has revealed novel aspects of structure-function relationships in this cortex. Specifically, it has demonstrated that single whisker stimulation evokes subthreshold neuronal activity that spreads symmetrically within gray matter from the appropriate barrel area, crosses cytoarchitectural borders of SI and reaches deeply into other unimodal primary cortices such as primary auditory (AI and primary visual (VI. It was further demonstrated that this spread is supported by a spatially matching underlying diffuse network of border-crossing, long-range projections that could also reach deeply into AI and VI. Here we seek to determine whether such a network of border-crossing, long-range projections is unique to barrel cortex or characterizes also other primary, unimodal sensory cortices and therefore could directly connect them. Using anterograde (BDA and retrograde (CTb tract-tracing techniques, we demonstrate that such diffuse horizontal networks directly and mutually connect VI, AI and SI. These findings suggest that diffuse, border-crossing axonal projections connecting directly primary cortices are an important organizational motif common to all major primary sensory cortices in the rat. Potential implications of these findings for topics including cortical structure-function relationships, multisensory integration, functional imaging and cortical parcellation are discussed.

  1. The Importance of Aging in Gray Matter Changes Within Tinnitus Patients Shown in Cortical Thickness, Surface Area and Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hye Bin; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2016-11-01

    Aging and sensorineural hearing loss are known to be involved in the development of chronic tinnitus. This study explores the structural changes of gray matter using surface base methods and focuses more specifically on changes in cortical thickness in 127 tinnitus patients. The linear relationships between cortical thickness and behavioral measures including aging, tinnitus loudness, tinnitus duration, tinnitus distress, and hearing loss were analyzed. Three dimensional T1-weighted MR images were acquired and cortical gray matter volumes were segmented using FreeSurfer on Talairach space. The results showed that cortical thickness and volume are negatively correlated to age in widespread regions of frontal cortices, and positively to bilateral entorhinal cortex and left rostral anterior cingulate cortex. The cortical thickness changes related to hearing loss overlap with those related to normal aging. The gray matter volumes of bilateral amygdalae, hippocampi, nuclei accumbens, and thalami are all significantly negatively correlated to age. Tinnitus-related distress level and subjective loudness were negatively correlated only to the thalamic volume. The results suggest that the primary factor of long-term structural changes in chronic tinnitus patients is age and age related hearing loss, rather than hearing loss per se. Tinnitus related factors such as subjective tinnitus loudness, tinnitus duration, and the level of chronic tinnitus related distress were not correlated to important morphometric changes in this study.

  2. Contralesional Cortical Structural Reorganization Contributes to Motor Recovery after Sub-Cortical Stroke: A Longitudinal Voxel-Based Morphometry Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jianxin; Ji, Qiling; Xin, Ruiqiang; Zhang, Dianping; Na, Xu; Peng, Ruchen; Li, Kuncheng

    2016-01-01

    Although changes in brain gray matter after stroke have been identified in some neuroimaging studies, lesion heterogeneity and individual variability make the detection of potential neuronal reorganization difficult. This study attempted to investigate the potential structural cortical reorganization after sub-cortical stroke using a longitudinal voxel-based gray matter volume (GMV) analysis. Eleven right-handed patients with first-onset, subcortical, ischemic infarctions involving the basal ganglia regions underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging in addition to National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and Motricity Index (MI) assessments in the acute (reorganization of the CL "cognitive" cortices might contribute to motor recovery after sub-cortical stroke.

  3. Risk factors associated with age-related nuclear and cortical cataract : a case-control study in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study, AREDS Report No. 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    To investigate possible risk factors for age-related nuclear and cortical cataracts in participants in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS). Case-control study. Of the 4757 persons enrolled in AREDS, 4477 age 60 to 80 years are included in the study. Slit-lamp lens photographs were used to classify participants into one of three nuclear opacity groups (moderate nuclear, mild nuclear, and controls), ignoring cortical opacities. Retroillumination lens photographs were used to classify participants into one of three cortical opacity groups (moderate cortical, mild cortical, and controls), ignoring nuclear opacities. Persons with moderate nuclear opacities were more likely to be female, nonwhite, and smokers and to have large drusen. Moderate nuclear opacities were less common in persons with higher educational status, a history of diabetes, and among those taking nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Moderate cortical opacities were associated with dark iris color, large drusen, weight change, and, at a borderline level of significance, higher levels of sunlight exposure and use of thyroid hormones. Moderate cortical opacities were less common in persons with higher educational status. Consistent findings have now been reported across many studies for gender, educational status, sunlight exposure, and smoking. Our findings that use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs is inversely associated with nuclear cataract and that dark iris color and use of thyroid hormones may increase cortical cataract risk are less well substantiated and require further investigation.

  4. Layer-by-layer self-assembled chitosan coating on electrospun nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    Croisier, Florence; Aqil, Abdelhafid; Detrembleur, Christophe; Jérôme, Christine

    2009-01-01

    By combining electrospinning technique and layer-by-layer deposition, we produced a new material made of multilayered, chitosan-based nanofibers. Layer-by-layer (LBL) is a well-known method for surface coating, based on electrostatic interactions. It enables the controllable deposition of a variety of polyions including synthetic and natural materials, with designable layer structure, defined wall thickness and size. Electrospinning (ESP) technique allows the fabrication of polymer fib...

  5. Fatigue crack growth behavior in equine cortical bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Debbie Renee

    2001-07-01

    Objectives for this research were to experimentally determine crack growth rates, da/dN, as a function of alternating stress intensity factor, DeltaK, for specimens from lateral and dorsal regions of equine third metacarpal cortical bone tissue, and to determine if the results were described by the Paris law. In one set of experiments, specimens were oriented for crack propagation in the circumferential direction with the crack plane transverse to the long axis of the bone. In the second set of experiments, specimens were oriented for radial crack growth with the crack plane parallel to the long axis of the bone. Results of fatigue tests from the latter specimens were used to evaluate the hypothesis that crack growth rates differ regionally. The final experiments were designed to determine if crack resistance was dependent on region, proportion of hooped osteons (those with circumferentially oriented collagen fibers in the outer lamellae) or number of osteons penetrated by the crack, and to address the hypothesis that hooped osteons resist invasion by cracks better than other osteonal types. The transverse crack growth data for dorsal specimens were described by the Paris law with an exponent of 10.4 and suggested a threshold stress intensity factor, DeltaKth, of 2.0 MPa·m1/2 and fracture toughness of 4.38 MPa·m 1/2. Similar results were not obtained for lateral specimens because the crack always deviated from the intended path and ran parallel to the loading direction. Crack growth for the dorsal and lateral specimens in the radial orientation was described by the Paris law with exponents of 8.7 and 10.2, respectively, and there were no regional differences in the apparent DeltaK th (0.5 MPa·m1/2) or fracture toughness (1.2 MPa·m 1/2). Crack resistance was not associated with cortical region, proportion of hooped osteons or the number of osteons penetrated by the crack. The extent to which cracks penetrate osteons was influenced by whether the collagen fiber

  6. Early and phasic cortical metabolic changes in vestibular neuritis onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandrini, Marco; Pagani, Marco; Napolitano, Bianca; Micarelli, Alessandro; Candidi, Matteo; Bruno, Ernesto; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Di Pietro, Barbara; Schillaci, Orazio

    2013-01-01

    Functional brain activation studies described the presence of separate cortical areas responsible for central processing of peripheral vestibular information and reported their activation and interactions with other sensory modalities and the changes of this network associated to strategic peripheral or central vestibular lesions. It is already known that cortical changes induced by acute unilateral vestibular failure (UVF) are various and undergo variations over time, revealing different cortical involved areas at the onset and recovery from symptoms. The present study aimed at reporting the earliest change in cortical metabolic activity during a paradigmatic form of UVF such as vestibular neuritis (VN), that is, a purely peripheral lesion of the vestibular system, that offers the opportunity to study the cortical response to altered vestibular processing. This research reports [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography brain scan data concerning the early cortical metabolic activity associated to symptoms onset in a group of eight patients suffering from VN. VN patients' cortical metabolic activity during the first two days from symptoms onset was compared to that recorded one month later and to a control healthy group. Beside the known cortical response in the sensorimotor network associated to vestibular deafferentation, we show for the first time the involvement of Entorhinal (BAs 28, 34) and Temporal (BA 38) cortices in early phases of symptomatology onset. We interpret these findings as the cortical counterparts of the attempt to reorient oneself in space counteracting the vertigo symptom (Bas 28, 34) and of the emotional response to the new pathologic condition (BA 38) respectively. These interpretations were further supported by changes in patients' subjective ratings in balance, anxiety, and depersonalization/derealization scores when tested at illness onset and one month later. The present findings contribute in expanding knowledge about

  7. Early and phasic cortical metabolic changes in vestibular neuritis onset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Alessandrini

    Full Text Available Functional brain activation studies described the presence of separate cortical areas responsible for central processing of peripheral vestibular information and reported their activation and interactions with other sensory modalities and the changes of this network associated to strategic peripheral or central vestibular lesions. It is already known that cortical changes induced by acute unilateral vestibular failure (UVF are various and undergo variations over time, revealing different cortical involved areas at the onset and recovery from symptoms. The present study aimed at reporting the earliest change in cortical metabolic activity during a paradigmatic form of UVF such as vestibular neuritis (VN, that is, a purely peripheral lesion of the vestibular system, that offers the opportunity to study the cortical response to altered vestibular processing. This research reports [(18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography brain scan data concerning the early cortical metabolic activity associated to symptoms onset in a group of eight patients suffering from VN. VN patients' cortical metabolic activity during the first two days from symptoms onset was compared to that recorded one month later and to a control healthy group. Beside the known cortical response in the sensorimotor network associated to vestibular deafferentation, we show for the first time the involvement of Entorhinal (BAs 28, 34 and Temporal (BA 38 cortices in early phases of symptomatology onset. We interpret these findings as the cortical counterparts of the attempt to reorient oneself in space counteracting the vertigo symptom (Bas 28, 34 and of the emotional response to the new pathologic condition (BA 38 respectively. These interpretations were further supported by changes in patients' subjective ratings in balance, anxiety, and depersonalization/derealization scores when tested at illness onset and one month later. The present findings contribute in expanding

  8. The Hole in the Ozone Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamers, Jeanne S.; Jacob, Anthony T.

    This document contains information on the hole in the ozone layer. Topics discussed include properties of ozone, ozone in the atmosphere, chlorofluorocarbons, stratospheric ozone depletion, effects of ozone depletion on life, regulation of substances that deplete the ozone layer, alternatives to CFCs and Halons, and the future of the ozone layer.…

  9. Computer modelling of RF ablation in cortical osteoid osteoma: Assessment of the insulating effect of the reactive zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irastorza, Ramiro M; Trujillo, Macarena; Martel Villagrán, Jose; Berjano, Enrique

    2016-05-01

    The aim was to study by computer simulations the insulating role of the reactive zone surrounding a cortical osteoid osteoma (OO) in terms of electrical and thermal performance during radiofrequency ablation (RFA). We modelled a cortical OO consisting of a nidus (10 mm diameter) enclosed by a reactive zone. The OO was near a layer of cortical bone 1.5 mm thick. Trabecular bone partially surrounds the OO and there was muscle around the cortical bone layer. We modelled RF ablations with a non-cooled-tip 17-gauge needle electrode (300 s duration and 90 °C target temperature). Sensitivity analyses were conducted assuming a reactive zone electrical conductivity value (σrz) within the limits of the cortical and trabecular bone, i.e. 0.02 S/m and 0.087 S/m, respectively. In this way we were really modelling the different degrees of osteosclerosis associated with the reactive zone. The presence of the reactive zone drastically reduced the maximum temperature reached outside it. The temperature drop was proportional to the thickness of the reactive zone: from 68 °C when it was absent to 44 °C when it is 7.5 mm thick. Higher nidus conductivity values (σn) implied higher temperatures, while lower temperatures meant higher σrz values. Changing σrz from 0.02 S/m to 0.087 S/m reduced lesion diameters from 2.4 cm to 1.8 cm. The computer results suggest that the reactive zone plays the role of insulator in terms of reducing the temperature in the surrounding area.

  10. Synchronous changes of cortical thickness and corresponding white matter microstructure during brain development accessed by diffusion MRI tractography from parcellated cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina eJeon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cortical thickness (CT changes during normal brain development is associated with complicated cellular and molecular processes including synaptic pruning and apoptosis. In parallel, the microstructural enhancement of developmental white matter (WM axons with their neuronal bodies in the cerebral cortex has been widely reported with measurements of metrics derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, especially fractional anisotropy (FA. We hypothesized that the changes of CT and microstructural enhancement of corresponding axons are highly interacted during development. DTI and T1-weighted images of 50 healthy children and adolescents between the ages of 7 to 25 years were acquired. With the parcellated cortical gyri transformed from T1-weighted images to DTI space as the tractography seeds, probabilistic tracking was performed to delineate the WM fibers traced from specific parcellated cortical regions. CT was measured at certain cortical regions and FA was measured from the WM fibers traced from same cortical regions. The CT of all frontal cortical gyri, includeing Brodmann areas 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 44, 45, 46 and 47, decreased significantly and heterogeneously; concurrently, significant and heterogeneous increases of FA of WM traced from corresponding regions were found. We further revealed significant correlation between the slopes of the CT decrease and the slopes of corresponding WM FA increase in all frontal cortical gyri, suggesting coherent cortical pruning and corresponding WM microstructural enhancement. Such correlation was not found in cortical regions other than frontal cortex. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of these synchronous changes may be associated with overlapping signaling pathways of axonal guidance, synaptic pruning, neuronal apoptosis and more prevalent interstitial neurons in the prefrontal cortex. Revealing the coherence of cortical and WM structural changes during development may open a new window for

  11. Cortical Interneuron Subtypes Vary in Their Axonal Action Potential Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Amanda E; Foust, Amanda J; Bal, Thierry; McCormick, David A

    2015-11-25

    The role of interneurons in cortical microcircuits is strongly influenced by their passive and active electrical properties. Although different types of interneurons exhibit unique electrophysiological properties recorded at the soma, it is not yet clear whether these differences are also manifested in other neuronal compartments. To address this question, we have used voltage-sensitive dye to image the propagation of action potentials into the fine collaterals of axons and dendrites in two of the largest cortical interneuron subtypes in the mouse: fast-spiking interneurons, which are typically basket or chandelier neurons; and somatostatin containing interneurons, which are typically regular spiking Martinotti cells. We found that fast-spiking and somatostatin-expressing interneurons differed in their electrophysiological characteristics along their entire dendrosomatoaxonal extent. The action potentials generated in the somata and axons, including axon collaterals, of somatostatin-expressing interneurons are significantly broader than those generated in the same compartments of fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons. In addition, action potentials back-propagated into the dendrites of somatostatin-expressing interneurons much more readily than fast-spiking interneurons. Pharmacological investigations suggested that axonal action potential repolarization in both cell types depends critically upon Kv1 channels, whereas the axonal and somatic action potentials of somatostatin-expressing interneurons also depend on BK Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. These results indicate that the two broad classes of interneurons studied here have expressly different subcellular physiological properties, allowing them to perform unique computational roles in cortical circuit operations. Neurons in the cerebral cortex are of two major types: excitatory and inhibitory. The proper balance of excitation and inhibition in the brain is critical for its operation. Neurons contain three main

  12. Gradient SiNO anti-reflective layers in solar selective coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Cao, Feng; Sun, Tianyi; Chen, Gang

    2017-08-01

    A solar selective coating includes a substrate, a cermet layer having nanoparticles therein deposited on the substrate, and an anti-reflection layer deposited on the cermet layer. The cermet layer and the anti-reflection layer may each be formed of intermediate layers. A method for constructing a solar-selective coating is disclosed and includes preparing a substrate, depositing a cermet layer on the substrate, and depositing an anti-reflection layer on the cermet layer.

  13. Layered-triangulations of 3-manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Jaco, William; Rubinstein, J. Hyam

    2006-01-01

    A family of one-vertex triangulations of 3-manifolds, layered-triangulations, is defined. Layered-triangulations are first described for handlebodies and then extended to all 3-manifolds via Heegaard splittings. A complete and detailed analysis of layered-triangulations is given in the cases of the solid torus and lens spaces, including the classification of all normal and almost normal surfaces in these triangulations. Minimal layered-triangulations of lens spaces provide a common setting fo...

  14. The association between intra- and juxta-cortical pathology and cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis by quantitative T2* mapping at 7 T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louapre, Céline; Govindarajan, Sindhuja T; Giannì, Costanza; Madigan, Nancy; Nielsen, A Scott; Sloane, Jacob A; Kinkel, Revere P; Mainero, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Using quantitative T 2 * at 7 Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated whether impairment in selective cognitive functions in multiple sclerosis (MS) can be explained by pathology in specific areas and/or layers of the cortex. Thirty-one MS patients underwent neuropsychological evaluation, acquisition of 7 T multi-echo T 2 * gradient-echo sequences, and 3 T anatomical images for cortical surfaces reconstruction. Seventeen age-matched healthy subjects served as controls. Cortical T 2 * maps were sampled at various depths throughout the cortex and juxtacortex. Relation between T 2 *, neuropsychological scores and a cognitive index (CI), calculated from a principal component analysis on the whole battery, was tested by a general linear model. Cognitive impairment correlated with T 2 * increase, independently from white matter lesions and cortical thickness, in cortical areas highly relevant for cognition belonging to the default-mode network (p < 0.05 corrected). Dysfunction in different cognitive functions correlated with longer T 2 * in selective cortical regions, most of which showed longer T 2 * relative to controls. For most tests, this association was strongest in deeper cortical layers. Executive dysfunction, however, was mainly related with pathology in juxtameningeal cortex. T 2 * explained up to 20% of the variance of the CI, independently of conventional imaging metrics (adjusted-R 2 : 52-67%, p < 5.10 - 4 ). Location of pathology across the cortical width and mantle showed selective correlation with impairment in differing cognitive domains. These findings may guide studies at lower field strength designed to develop surrogate markers of cognitive impairment in MS.

  15. The effect of cortical activation on orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, K-W; Cho, S-W; Oh, C-O; Ryu, Y-K; Ohshima, H; Jung, H-S

    2007-05-01

    Cortical activation is one of the procedures to accelerate tooth movement by manipulating the cortical bone. In this study, the effect of cortical activation on orthodontic tooth movement was investigated clinically and histologically in the surrounding bony tissue. In the lower and upper jaws of two beagle dogs, cortical activation was applied to the buccal and lingual side of the alveolar bone in the right jaw where 12 holes were made on each cortical plate 4 weeks after the extraction of all the second bicuspids while under deep anesthesia. All third bicuspids on both jaws were forced to move forward by a 150-g force using NiTi coil spring with/without guiding wire. The tooth movement was measured and the animals were killed after tooth movement. Rapid initial tooth movement was apparent after cortical activation. However, after 6 months of cortical activation, the cell number and cellular activity of the surrounding periodontal tissue were decreased. This experiment showed that rapid initial tooth movement was apparent following the application of orthodontic force after cortical activation but the cellular activity and fibroblast structure were abnormal in the surrounding periodontal tissue.

  16. Amygdala activation for eye contact despite complete cortical blindness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burra, N.; Hervais-Adelman, A.; Kerzel, D.; Tamietto, M.; de Gelder, B.; Pegna, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Cortical blindness refers to the loss of vision that occurs after destruction of the primary visual cortex. Although there is no sensory cortex and hence no conscious vision, some cortically blind patients show amygdala activation in response to facial or bodily expressions of emotion. Here we

  17. Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities and vertebral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocker, Laurens J.L. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kliniek Sint-Jan Radiologie, Brussels (Belgium); Compter, A.; Kappelle, L.J.; Worp, H.B. van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Luijten, P.R.; Hendrikse, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-09-15

    Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities are a newly recognised entity associated with atherothromboembolic cerebrovascular disease and worse physical functioning. We aimed to investigate the relationship of cerebellar cortical infarct cavities with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischaemia and with vascular risk factors. We evaluated the MR images of 46 patients with a recent vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke and a symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis ≥50 % from the Vertebral Artery Stenting Trial (VAST) for the presence of cerebellar cortical infarct cavities ≤1.5 cm. At inclusion in VAST, data were obtained on age, sex, history of vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke, and vascular risk factors. Adjusted risk ratios were calculated with Poisson regression analyses for the relation between cerebellar cortical infarct cavities and vascular risk factors. Sixteen out of 46 (35 %) patients showed cerebellar cortical infarct cavities on the initial MRI, and only one of these 16 patients was known with a previous vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke. In patients with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischaemia, risk factor profiles of patients with cerebellar cortical infarct cavities were not different from patients without these cavities. Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities are seen on MRI in as much as one third of patients with recently symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis. Since patients usually have no prior history of vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke, cerebellar cortical infarct cavities should be added to the spectrum of common incidental brain infarcts visible on routine MRI. (orig.)

  18. Differential effect of visual motion adaption upon visual cortical excitability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubeck, Astrid J.A.; Van Ombergen, Angelique; Ahmad, Hena; Bos, Jelte E.; Wuyts, Floris L.; Bronstein, Adolfo M.; Arshad, Qadeer

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to probe the effects of visual motion adaptation on early visual and V5/MT cortical excitability and 2) to investigate whether changes in cortical excitability following visual motion adaptation are related to the degree of visual dependency, i.e., an

  19. Differential effect of visual motion adaptation upon visual cortical excitability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubeck, A.J.A.; Ombergen, A. van; Ahmad, H.; Bos, J.E.; Wuyts, F.L.; Bronstein, A.; Arshad, Q.

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to probe the effects of visual motion adaptation on early visual and V5/MT cortical excitability and 2) to investigate whether changes in cortical excitability following visual motion adaptation are related to the degree of visual dependency, i.e., an

  20. Impaired response inhibition and excess cortical thickness as candidate endophenotypes for trichotillomania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odlaug, Brian L; Chamberlain, Samuel R; Derbyshire, Katie L; Leppink, Eric W; Grant, Jon E

    2014-12-01

    Trichotillomania is characterized by repetitive pulling out of one's own hair. Impaired response inhibition has been identified in patients with trichotillomania, along with gray matter density changes in distributed neural regions including frontal cortex. The objective of this study was to evaluate impaired response inhibition and abnormal cortical morphology as candidate endophenotypes for the disorder. Subjects with trichotillomania (N = 12), unaffected first-degree relatives of these patients (N = 10), and healthy controls (N = 14), completed the Stop Signal Task (SST), a measure of response inhibition, and structural magnetic resonance imaging scans. Group differences in SST performance and cortical thickness were explored using permutation testing. Groups differed significantly in response inhibition, with patients demonstrating impaired performance versus controls, and relatives occupying an intermediate position. Permutation cluster analysis revealed significant excesses of cortical thickness in patients and their relatives compared to controls, in right inferior/middle frontal gyri (Brodmann Area, BA 47 & 11), right lingual gyrus (BA 18), left superior temporal cortex (BA 21), and left precuneus (BA 7). No significant differences emerged between groups for striatum or cerebellar volumes. Impaired response inhibition and an excess of cortical thickness in neural regions germane to inhibitory control, and action monitoring, represent vulnerability markers for trichotillomania. Future work should explore genetic and environmental associations with these biological markers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dampened hippocampal oscillations and enhanced spindle activity in an asymptomatic model of developmental cortical malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eCid

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Developmental cortical malformations comprise a large spectrum of histopathological brain abnormalities and syndromes. Their genetic, developmental and clinical complexity suggests they should be better understood in terms of the complementary action of independently timed perturbations (i.e. the multiple-hit hypothesis. However, understanding the underlying biological processes remains puzzling. Here we induced developmental cortical malformations in offspring, after intraventricular injection of methylazoxymethanol (MAM in utero in mice. We combined extensive histological and electrophysiological studies to characterize the model. We found that MAM injections at E14 and E15 induced a range of cortical and hippocampal malformations resembling histological alterations of specific genetic mutations and transplacental mitotoxic agent injections. However, in contrast to most of these models, intraventricularly MAM-injected mice remained asymptomatic and showed no clear epilepsy-related phenotype as tested in long-term chronic recordings and with pharmacological manipulations. Instead, they exhibited a non-specific reduction of hippocampal-related brain oscillations (mostly in CA1; including theta, gamma and HFOs; and enhanced thalamocortical spindle activity during non-REM sleep. These data suggest that developmental cortical malformations do not necessarily correlate with epileptiform activity. We propose that the intraventricular in utero MAM approach exhibiting a range of rhythmopathies is a suitable model for multiple-hit studies of associated neurological disorders.

  2. Functional networks in parallel with cortical development associate with executive functions in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jidan; Rifkin-Graboi, Anne; Ta, Anh Tuan; Yap, Kar Lai; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Meaney, Michael J; Qiu, Anqi

    2014-07-01

    Children begin performing similarly to adults on tasks requiring executive functions in late childhood, a transition that is probably due to neuroanatomical fine-tuning processes, including myelination and synaptic pruning. In parallel to such structural changes in neuroanatomical organization, development of functional organization may also be associated with cognitive behaviors in children. We examined 6- to 10-year-old children's cortical thickness, functional organization, and cognitive performance. We used structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify areas with cortical thinning, resting-state fMRI to identify functional organization in parallel to cortical development, and working memory/response inhibition tasks to assess executive functioning. We found that neuroanatomical changes in the form of cortical thinning spread over bilateral frontal, parietal, and occipital regions. These regions were engaged in 3 functional networks: sensorimotor and auditory, executive control, and default mode network. Furthermore, we found that working memory and response inhibition only associated with regional functional connectivity, but not topological organization (i.e., local and global efficiency of information transfer) of these functional networks. Interestingly, functional connections associated with "bottom-up" as opposed to "top-down" processing were more clearly related to children's performance on working memory and response inhibition, implying an important role for brain systems involved in late childhood. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Hydroxyapatite as a bone graft substitute: Use in cortical and cancellous bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwala Sanjay

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Autogenous bone is regarded as the best bone graft material. Various grafting materials have been advocated to fill bony defects. Our purpose was to study the utility of amorphous hydroxyapatite as an autogenous bone graft substitute in cancellous and cortical bone. Methods : A prospective study was undertaken over a period of five years. Patients included were those which would otherwise require bone grafting in cancellous and cortical bone fractures (15 in each group. Hydroxyapatite (HA ceramic blocks of standard size (5mm x10m were either used alone or mixed with autogenous cancellous graft in metaphyseal locations, along with bone marrow (derived from reaming or drilling in intertrochanteric regions and mixed with cancellous graft in cortical areas. The results were assessed on standard radiographs. Biopsy of hydroxyapatite regenerated bone was taken at implant removal. Results: In cancellous areas as graft incorporation ensues over months the intrinsic structure of the hydroxyapatite blocks blurred with blunting of the sharp edges (on radiographs. Biopsy confirmed bone in-growth. In cortical areas the blocks did not show evidence of bone in-growth. Conclusion: Hydroxyapatite alone or when mixed with cancellous bone marrow is an effective adjuvant for autogenous bone grafts, especially in cancellous areas of bone. Mixing it with host marrow provides osteoinductive stimulus. It is biocompatible, osteoconductive but not osteogenic.

  4. Persistent renal cortical scintigram defects in children 2 years after urinary tract infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditchfield, Michael R.; Cook, David J.; Campo, John F. de [Department of Radiology, Royal Children' s Hospital, 3052, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Grimwood, Keith [Department of General Paediatrics, Royal Children' s Hospital, 3052, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Powell, Harley R.; Gulati, Sanjeev [Department of Nephrology, Royal Children' s Hospital, 3052, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Sloane, Robert [Department of General Paediatrics, Royal Children' s Hospital, 3052, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)

    2004-06-01

    Background: Renal cortical scintigraphic studies challenge the role of vesicoureteric reflux in renal scar development, emphasizing instead the part played by acute pyelonephritis. Objective: To determine the prevalence of renal cortical defects in a child cohort 2 years after the child's first diagnosed urinary tract infection and to analyze the relationship of these defects with acute illness variables, primary vesicoureteric reflux and recurrent infections. Materials and methods: In a prospective cohort study, 193 children younger than 5 years with their first proven urinary tract infection underwent renal sonography, voiding cystourethrogram, and renal cortical scintigraphy within 15 days of diagnosis. Two years later, 150 of the 193 children, or 77.7%, had a further renal cortical scintigram, including 75, or 86.2%, of the 87 children who had acute scintigraphic defects. The relationship of cortical defects to age, gender, pre-treatment symptom duration, hospitalization, presence and grade of vesicoureteric reflux, and recurrent urinary tract infections was evaluated. Results: Overall, 20 of the 150 (13.3%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 8.3, 19.8) children had persistent defects 2 years after infection. This included 20 of 75 (26.7%; 95% CI 17.1, 38.1) with initially abnormal scintigrams. No new defects were detected. Although acute defects were more common in the young, those with persistent defects were older (median ages 16.4 vs. 6.8 months, P=0.004) than those with transient abnormalities. After adjustment for age, persistent defects were no longer associated with gender and were not predicted by acute illness variables, primary vesicoureteric reflux or recurrent infections. (orig.)

  5. Persistent renal cortical scintigram defects in children 2 years after urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditchfield, Michael R.; Cook, David J.; Campo, John F. de; Grimwood, Keith; Powell, Harley R.; Gulati, Sanjeev; Sloane, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Background: Renal cortical scintigraphic studies challenge the role of vesicoureteric reflux in renal scar development, emphasizing instead the part played by acute pyelonephritis. Objective: To determine the prevalence of renal cortical defects in a child cohort 2 years after the child's first diagnosed urinary tract infection and to analyze the relationship of these defects with acute illness variables, primary vesicoureteric reflux and recurrent infections. Materials and methods: In a prospective cohort study, 193 children younger than 5 years with their first proven urinary tract infection underwent renal sonography, voiding cystourethrogram, and renal cortical scintigraphy within 15 days of diagnosis. Two years later, 150 of the 193 children, or 77.7%, had a further renal cortical scintigram, including 75, or 86.2%, of the 87 children who had acute scintigraphic defects. The relationship of cortical defects to age, gender, pre-treatment symptom duration, hospitalization, presence and grade of vesicoureteric reflux, and recurrent urinary tract infections was evaluated. Results: Overall, 20 of the 150 (13.3%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 8.3, 19.8) children had persistent defects 2 years after infection. This included 20 of 75 (26.7%; 95% CI 17.1, 38.1) with initially abnormal scintigrams. No new defects were detected. Although acute defects were more common in the young, those with persistent defects were older (median ages 16.4 vs. 6.8 months, P=0.004) than those with transient abnormalities. After adjustment for age, persistent defects were no longer associated with gender and were not predicted by acute illness variables, primary vesicoureteric reflux or recurrent infections. (orig.)

  6. Glutamate stimulates the formation of N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine in cortical neurons in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Harald S.; Lauritzen, L.; Strand, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The formation of anandamide (N-arachidonoylethanolamine), N-acylethanolamine, and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine was studied in primary cultures of rat cortical neurons. The cells were incubated for 22 h with [C]ethanolamine, [U-C]arachidonic acid, [H]arachidonic acid, [P]phosphate, [C]stearic acid......-acylethanolamine. Compound I could be labelled with [C]stearic acid and [H]myristic acid, but not with [H]- or [C]arachidonic acid. Exogenous [H]anandamide was metabolised with a t( 1/2 ) of 2.6 h. The labelling of the two compounds identified as N-acylethanolamine and N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine were more pronounced......, or [H]myristic acid. The lipids from the cells and media were separated by thin layer chromatography. [C]Ethanolamine labelling revealed two compounds (I and II), which on different thin layer chromatography systems migrated as N-acylethanolamine (0.06-0.55% of total radioactivity) and N...

  7. Ultrasonic wave propagation in viscoelastic cortical bone plate coupled with fluids: a spectral finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu-Hieu; Naili, Salah

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the ultrasonic wave propagation in the cortical layer of long bones which is known as being a functionally graded anisotropic material coupled with fluids. The viscous effects are taken into account. The geometrical configuration mimics the one of axial transmission technique used for evaluating the bone quality. We present a numerical procedure adapted for this purpose which is based on the spectral finite element method (FEM). By using a combined Laplace-Fourier transform, the vibroacoustic problem may be transformed into the frequency-wavenumber domain in which, as radiation conditions may be exactly introduced in the infinite fluid halfspaces, only the heterogeneous solid layer needs to be analysed using FEM. Several numerical tests are presented showing very good performance of the proposed approach. We present some results to study the influence of the frequency on the first arriving signal velocity in (visco)elastic bone plate.

  8. Premotor and Motor Cortices Encode Reward.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan Ramkumar

    Full Text Available Rewards associated with actions are critical for motivation and learning about the consequences of one's actions on the world. The motor cortices are involved in planning and executing movements, but it is unclear whether they encode reward over and above limb kinematics and dynamics. Here, we report a categorical reward signal in dorsal premotor (PMd and primary motor (M1 neurons that corresponds to an increase in firing rates when a trial was not rewarded regardless of whether or not a reward was expected. We show that this signal is unrelated to error magnitude, reward prediction error, or other task confounds such as reward consumption, return reach plan, or kinematic differences across rewarded and unrewarded trials. The availability of reward information in motor cortex is crucial for theories of reward-based learning and motivational influences on actions.

  9. Magnetoencephalography from signals to dynamic cortical networks

    CERN Document Server

    Aine, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    "Magnetoencephalography (MEG) provides a time-accurate view into human brain function. The concerted action of neurons generates minute magnetic fields that can be detected---totally noninvasively---by sensitive multichannel magnetometers. The obtained millisecond accuracycomplements information obtained by other modern brain-imaging tools. Accurate timing is quintessential in normal brain function, often distorted in brain disorders. The noninvasiveness and time-sensitivityof MEG are great assets to developmental studies, as well. This multiauthored book covers an ambitiously wide range of MEG research from introductory to advanced level, from sensors to signals, and from focal sources to the dynamics of cortical networks. Written by active practioners of this multidisciplinary field, the book contains tutorials for newcomers and chapters of new challenging methods and emerging technologies to advanced MEG users. The reader will obtain a firm grasp of the possibilities of MEG in the study of audition, vision...

  10. Superresolution improves MRI cortical segmentation with FACE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Manjón, José V.; Coupé, Pierrick

    Brain cortical surface extraction from MRI has applications for measurement of gray matter (GM) atrophy, functional mapping, source localization and preoperative neurosurgical planning. Accurate cortex segmentation requires high resolution morphological images and several methods for extracting...... the cerebral cortex have been developed during the last decade (Dale 1999, Kim 2005, Eskildsen 2006). In many studies, the resolution of the morphological image acquisition sequence is chosen to be relatively low (~1mm3) due to time and equipment constraints. To improve segmentation accuracy, such low...... the ability to effectively increase the image resolution while preserving sharp features of the underlying anatomy. In this study, we investigated the effect of applying superresolution as proposed in (Manjon 2010a) to the accuracy of cerebral cortex segmentation....

  11. Response variability in balanced cortical networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerchner, Alexander; Ursta, C.; Hertz, J.

    2006-01-01

    We study the spike statistics of neurons in a network with dynamically balanced excitation and inhibition. Our model, intended to represent a generic cortical column, comprises randomly connected excitatory and inhibitory leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, driven by excitatory input from an external...... population. The high connectivity permits a mean field description in which synaptic currents can be treated as gaussian noise, the mean and autocorrelation function of which are calculated self-consistently from the firing statistics of single model neurons. Within this description, a wide range of Fano...... factors is possible. We find that the irregularity of spike trains is controlled mainly by the strength of the synapses relative to the difference between the firing threshold and the postfiring reset level of the membrane potential. For moderately strong synapses, we find spike statistics very similar...

  12. Osteocyte lacunar properties in rat cortical bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach-Gansmo, Fiona Linnea; Weaver, James C.; Jensen, Mads Hartmann

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the roles of osteocytes in bone maintenance have gained increasing attention. Osteocytes reside in lacunae that are interconnected by canaliculi resulting in a vast cellular network within the mineralized bone matrix. As the structure of the lacuno-canalicular network is highly connected......-species but also inter-site variation in lacunar properties. Here, osteocyte lacunae in rat cortical bone have been studied using synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography (SR μCT) and backscattered electron (BE) microscopy. Quantitative lacunar geometric characteristics are reported based on the synchrotron...... radiation data, differentiating between circumferential lamellar bone and a central, more disordered bone type. From these studies, no significant differences were found in lacunar volumes between lamellar and central bone, whereas significant differences in lacunar orientation, shape and density values...

  13. Developmental changes in human dopamine neurotransmission: cortical receptors and terminators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothmond Debora A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dopamine is integral to cognition, learning and memory, and dysfunctions of the frontal cortical dopamine system have been implicated in several developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC is critical for working memory which does not fully mature until the third decade of life. Few studies have reported on the normal development of the dopamine system in human DLPFC during postnatal life. We assessed pre- and postsynaptic components of the dopamine system including tyrosine hydroxylase, the dopamine receptors (D1, D2 short and D2 long isoforms, D4, D5, catechol-O-methyltransferase, and monoamine oxidase (A and B in the developing human DLPFC (6 weeks -50 years. Results Gene expression was first analysed by microarray and then by quantitative real-time PCR. Protein expression was analysed by western blot. Protein levels for tyrosine hydroxylase peaked during the first year of life (p O-methyltransferase (p = 0.024 were significantly higher in neonates and infants as was catechol-O-methyltransferase protein (32 kDa, p = 0.027. In contrast, dopamine D1 receptor mRNA correlated positively with age (p = 0.002 and dopamine D1 receptor protein expression increased throughout development (p Conclusions We find distinct developmental changes in key components of the dopamine system in DLPFC over postnatal life. Those genes that are highly expressed during the first year of postnatal life may influence and orchestrate the early development of cortical neural circuitry while genes portraying a pattern of increasing expression with age may indicate a role in DLPFC maturation and attainment of adult levels of cognitive function.

  14. Lifespan anxiety is reflected in human amygdala cortical connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ye; Xu, Ting; Zhang, Wei; Zuo, Xi-Nian

    2016-03-01

    The amygdala plays a pivotal role in processing anxiety and connects to large-scale brain networks. However, intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) between amygdala and these networks has rarely been examined in relation to anxiety, especially across the lifespan. We employed resting-state functional MRI data from 280 healthy adults (18-83.5 yrs) to elucidate the relationship between anxiety and amygdala iFC with common cortical networks including the visual network, somatomotor network, dorsal attention network, ventral attention network, limbic network, frontoparietal network, and default network. Global and network-specific iFC were separately computed as mean iFC of amygdala with the entire cerebral cortex and each cortical network. We detected negative correlation between global positive amygdala iFC and trait anxiety. Network-specific associations between amygdala iFC and anxiety were also detectable. Specifically, the higher iFC strength between the left amygdala and the limbic network predicted lower state anxiety. For the trait anxiety, left amygdala anxiety-connectivity correlation was observed in both somatomotor and dorsal attention networks, whereas the right amygdala anxiety-connectivity correlation was primarily distributed in the frontoparietal and ventral attention networks. Ventral attention network exhibited significant anxiety-gender interactions on its iFC with amygdala. Together with findings from additional vertex-wise analysis, these data clearly indicated that both low-level sensory networks and high-level associative networks could contribute to detectable predictions of anxiety behaviors by their iFC profiles with the amygdala. This set of systems neuroscience findings could lead to novel functional network models on neural correlates of human anxiety and provide targets for novel treatment strategies on anxiety disorders. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Lifespan anxiety is reflected in human amygdala cortical connectivity

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    He, Ye; Xu, Ting; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The amygdala plays a pivotal role in processing anxiety and connects to large‐scale brain networks. However, intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) between amygdala and these networks has rarely been examined in relation to anxiety, especially across the lifespan. We employed resting‐state functional MRI data from 280 healthy adults (18–83.5 yrs) to elucidate the relationship between anxiety and amygdala iFC with common cortical networks including the visual network, somatomotor network, dorsal attention network, ventral attention network, limbic network, frontoparietal network, and default network. Global and network‐specific iFC were separately computed as mean iFC of amygdala with the entire cerebral cortex and each cortical network. We detected negative correlation between global positive amygdala iFC and trait anxiety. Network‐specific associations between amygdala iFC and anxiety were also detectable. Specifically, the higher iFC strength between the left amygdala and the limbic network predicted lower state anxiety. For the trait anxiety, left amygdala anxiety–connectivity correlation was observed in both somatomotor and dorsal attention networks, whereas the right amygdala anxiety–connectivity correlation was primarily distributed in the frontoparietal and ventral attention networks. Ventral attention network exhibited significant anxiety–gender interactions on its iFC with amygdala. Together with findings from additional vertex‐wise analysis, these data clearly indicated that both low‐level sensory networks and high‐level associative networks could contribute to detectable predictions of anxiety behaviors by their iFC profiles with the amygdala. This set of systems neuroscience findings could lead to novel functional network models on neural correlates of human anxiety and provide targets for novel treatment strategies on anxiety disorders. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1178–1193, 2016. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping

  16. Cortical hubs form a module for multisensory integration on top of the hierarchy of cortical networks.

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    Zamora-López, Gorka; Zhou, Changsong; Kurths, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Sensory stimuli entering the nervous system follow particular paths of processing, typically separated (segregated) from the paths of other modal information. However, sensory perception, awareness and cognition emerge from the combination of information (integration). The corticocortical networks of cats and macaque monkeys display three prominent characteristics: (i) modular organisation (facilitating the segregation), (ii) abundant alternative processing paths and (iii) the presence of highly connected hubs. Here, we study in detail the organisation and potential function of the cortical hubs by graph analysis and information theoretical methods. We find that the cortical hubs form a spatially delocalised, but topologically central module with the capacity to integrate multisensory information in a collaborative manner. With this, we resolve the underlying anatomical substrate that supports the simultaneous capacity of the cortex to segregate and to integrate multisensory information.

  17. The biology and dynamics of mammalian cortical granules

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    Liu Min

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cortical granules are membrane bound organelles located in the cortex of unfertilized oocytes. Following fertilization, cortical granules undergo exocytosis to release their contents into the perivitelline space. This secretory process, which is calcium dependent and SNARE protein-mediated pathway, is known as the cortical reaction. After exocytosis, the released cortical granule proteins are responsible for blocking polyspermy by modifying the oocytes' extracellular matrices, such as the zona pellucida in mammals. Mammalian cortical granules range in size from 0.2 um to 0.6 um in diameter and different from most other regulatory secretory organelles in that they are not renewed once released. These granules are only synthesized in female germ cells and transform an egg upon sperm entry; therefore, this unique cellular structure has inherent interest for our understanding of the biology of fertilization. Cortical granules are long thought to be static and awaiting in the cortex of unfertilized oocytes to be stimulated undergoing exocytosis upon gamete fusion. Not till recently, the dynamic nature of cortical granules is appreciated and understood. The latest studies of mammalian cortical granules document that this organelle is not only biochemically heterogeneous, but also displays complex distribution during oocyte development. Interestingly, some cortical granules undergo exocytosis prior to fertilization; and a number of granule components function beyond the time of fertilization in regulating embryonic cleavage and preimplantation development, demonstrating their functional significance in fertilization as well as early embryonic development. The following review will present studies that investigate the biology of cortical granules and will also discuss new findings that uncover the dynamic aspect of this organelle in mammals.

  18. A Mechanistic Link from GABA to Cortical Architecture and Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasinski, James; Logan, John P; Hinson, Emily L; Manners, Daniel; Divanbeighi Zand, Amir P; Makin, Tamar R; Emir, Uzay E; Stagg, Charlotte J

    2017-06-05

    Understanding both the organization of the human cortex and its relation to the performance of distinct functions is fundamental in neuroscience. The primary sensory cortices display topographic organization, whereby receptive fields follow a characteristic pattern, from tonotopy to retinotopy to somatotopy [1]. GABAergic signaling is vital to the maintenance of cortical receptive fields [2]; however, it is unclear how this fine-grain inhibition relates to measurable patterns of perception [3, 4]. Based on perceptual changes following perturbation of the GABAergic system, it is conceivable that the resting level of cortical GABAergic tone directly relates to the spatial specificity of activation in response to a given input [5-7]. The specificity of cortical activation can be considered in terms of cortical tuning: greater cortical tuning yields more localized recruitment of cortical territory in response to a given input. We applied a combination of fMRI, MR spectroscopy, and psychophysics to substantiate the link between the cortical neurochemical milieu, the tuning of cortical activity, and variability in perceptual acuity, using human somatosensory cortex as a model. We provide data that explain human perceptual acuity in terms of both the underlying cellular and metabolic processes. Specifically, higher concentrations of sensorimotor GABA are associated with more selective cortical tuning, which in turn is associated with enhanced perception. These results show anatomical and neurochemical specificity and are replicated in an independent cohort. The mechanistic link from neurochemistry to perception provides a vital step in understanding population variability in sensory behavior, informing metabolic therapeutic interventions to restore perceptual abilities clinically. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Laminar Profile of Spontaneous and Evoked Theta: Rhythmic Modulation of Cortical Processing During Word Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halgren, Eric; Kaestner, Erik; Marinkovic, Ksenija; Cash, Sydney S.; Wang, Chunmao; Schomer, Donald L.; Madsen, Joseph R.; Ulbert, Istvan

    2015-01-01

    Theta may play a central role during language understanding and other extended cognitive processing, providing an envelope for widespread integration of participating cortical areas. We used linear microelectrode arrays in epileptics to define the circuits generating theta in inferotemporal, perirhinal, entorhinal, prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices. In all locations, theta was generated by excitatory current sinks in middle layers which receive predominantly feedforward inputs, alternating with sinks in superficial layers which receive mainly feedback/associative inputs. Baseline and event-related theta were generated by indistinguishable laminar profiles of transmembrane currents and unit-firing. Word presentation could reset theta phase, permitting theta to contribute to late event-related potentials, even when theta power decreases relative to baseline. Limited recordings during sentence reading are consistent with rhythmic theta activity entrained by a given word modulating the neural background for the following word. These findings show that theta occurs spontaneously, and can be momentarily suppressed, reset and synchronized by words. Theta represents an alternation between feedforward/divergent and associative/convergent processing modes that may temporally organize sustained processing and optimize the timing of memory formation. We suggest that words are initially encoded via a ventral feedforward stream which is lexicosemantic in the anteroventral temporal lobe; its arrival may trigger a widespread theta rhythm which integrates the word within a larger context. PMID:25801916

  20. Neuroelectric Tuning of Cortical Oscillations by Apical Dendrites in Loop Circuits

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    David LaBerge

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bundles of relatively long apical dendrites dominate the neurons that make up the thickness of the cerebral cortex. It is proposed that a major function of the apical dendrite is to produce sustained oscillations at a specific frequency that can serve as a common timing unit for the processing of information in circuits connected to that apical dendrite. Many layer 5 and 6 pyramidal neurons are connected to thalamic neurons in loop circuits. A model of the apical dendrites of these pyramidal neurons has been used to simulate the electric activity of the apical dendrite. The results of that simulation demonstrated that subthreshold electric pulses in these apical dendrites can be tuned to specific frequencies and also can be fine-tuned to narrow bandwidths of less than one Hertz (1 Hz. Synchronous pulse outputs from the circuit loops containing apical dendrites can tune subthreshold membrane oscillations of neurons they contact. When the pulse outputs are finely tuned, they function as a local “clock,” which enables the contacted neurons to synchronously communicate with each other. Thus, a shared tuning frequency can select neurons for membership in a circuit. Unlike layer 6 apical dendrites, layer 5 apical dendrites can produce burst firing in many of their neurons, which increases the amplitude of signals in the neurons they contact. This difference in amplitude of signals serves as basis of selecting a sub-circuit for specialized processing (e.g., sustained attention within the typically larger layer 6-based circuit. After examining the sustaining of oscillations in loop circuits and the processing of spikes in network circuits, we propose that cortical functioning can be globally viewed as two systems: a loop system and a network system. The loop system oscillations influence the network system’s timing and amplitude of pulse signals, both of which can select circuits that are momentarily dominant in cortical activity.

  1. Functional specialisation within the cortical language network: effects of cortical dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberghe, R

    2007-01-01

    In the 1990's neuroanatomical models of language and semantic memory have been mainly based on functional neuroimaging studies of brain activity in healthy volunteers and correlational studies between structural lesions in patients and behavioral deficits. In this paper we present a novel approach where we test models that have been developed in healthy volunteers by means of functional imaging in patients in combination with behavioral studies. Study populations consist of patients with focal cortical stroke (n = 2), amnestic mild cognitive impairment (n = 14) and primary progressive aphasia (n = 18). The experiments provide converging evidence that 1. the integrity of the right mid- and anterior fusiform gyrus is required for full and detailed retrieval of knowledge of visual attributes of concrete entities 2. the left posterior superior temporal sulcus is critically involved in lexical-semantic retrieval 3. the anterior temporal pole to the left functions as an associative structure that links the representations of meaning that are distribured over the cortical brain surface. Our experiments also provide us with new insight into the degradation and re-organisation of the language system in cortical neurodegenerative disease.

  2. Linear stability analysis of interactions between mixing layer and boundary layer flows

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    Fengjun LIU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The linear instabilities of incompressible confluent mixing layer and boundary layer were analyzed. The mixing layers include wake, shear layer and their combination. The mean velocity profile of confluent flow is taken as a superposition of a hyperbolic and exponential function to model a mixing layer and the Blasius similarity solution for a flat plate boundary layer. The stability equation of confluent flow was solved by using the global numerical method. The unstable modes associated with both the mixing and boundary layers were identified. They are the boundary layer mode, mixing layer mode 1 (nearly symmetrical mode and mode 2 (nearly anti-symmetrical mode. The interactions between the mixing layer stability and the boundary layer stability were examined. As the mixing layer approaches the boundary layer, the neutral curves of the boundary layer mode move to the upper left, the resulting critical Reynolds number decreases, and the growth rate of the most unstable mode increases. The wall tends to stabilize the mixing layer modes at low frequency. In addition, the mode switching behavior of the relative level of the spatial growth rate between the mixing layer mode 1 and mode 2 with the velocity ratio is found to occur at low frequency.

  3. Flexible and Stable Value Coding Areas in Caudate Head and Tail Receive Anatomically Distinct Cortical and Subcortical Inputs

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    Whitney S. Griggs

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Anatomically distinct areas within the basal ganglia encode flexible- and stable-value memories for visual objects (Hikosaka et al., 2014, but an important question remains: do they receive inputs from the same or different brain areas or neurons? To answer this question, we first located flexible and stable value-coding areas in the caudate head (CDh and caudate tail (CDt of two rhesus macaque monkeys, and then injected different retrograde tracers into these areas of each monkey. We found that CDh and CDt received different inputs from several cortical and subcortical areas including temporal cortex, prefrontal cortex, cingulate cortex, amygdala, claustrum and thalamus. Superior temporal cortex and inferior temporal cortex projected to both CDh and CDt, with more CDt-projecting than CDh-projecting neurons. In superior temporal cortex and dorsal inferior temporal cortex, layers 3 and 5 projected to CDh while layers 3 and 6 projected to CDt. Prefrontal and cingulate cortex projected mostly to CDh bilaterally, less to CDt unilaterally. A cluster of neurons in the basolateral amygdala projected to CDt. Rostral-dorsal claustrum projected to CDh while caudal-ventral claustrum projected to CDt. Within the thalamus, different nuclei projected to either CDh or CDt. The medial centromedian nucleus and lateral parafascicular nucleus projected to CDt while the medial parafascicular nucleus projected to CDh. The inferior pulvinar and lateral dorsal nuclei projected to CDt. The ventral anterior and medial dorsal nuclei projected to CDh. We found little evidence of neurons projecting to both CDh and CDt across the brain. These data suggest that CDh and CDt can control separate functions using anatomically separate circuits. Understanding the roles of these striatal projections will be important for understanding how value memories are created and stored.

  4. Muscle volume is related to trabecular and cortical bone architecture in typically developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Deepti; Allerton, Brianne M; Kirby, Joshua T; Miller, Freeman; Rowe, David A; Pohlig, Ryan T; Modlesky, Christopher M

    2015-12-01

    Muscle is strongly related to cortical bone architecture in children; however, the relationship between muscle volume and trabecular bone architecture is poorly studied. The aim of this study was to determine if muscle volume is related to trabecular bone architecture in children and if the relationship is different than the relationship between muscle volume and cortical bone architecture. Forty typically developing children (20 boys and 20 girls; 6 to 12y) were included in the study. Measures of trabecular bone architecture [i.e., apparent trabecular bone volume to total volume (appBV/TV), trabecular number (appTb.N), trabecular thickness (appTb.Th) and trabecular separation (appTb.Sp)] in the distal femur, cortical bone architecture [cortical volume, total volume, section modulus (Z) and polar moment of inertia (J)] in the midfemur, muscle volume in the midthigh and femur length were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging. Total physical activity and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity were assessed using an accelerometer-based activity monitor worn around the waist for four days. Calcium intake was assessed using diet records. Relationships among the measures were tested using multiple linear regression analysis. Muscle volume was moderately-to-strongly related to measures of trabecular bone architecture [appBV/TV (r=0.81), appTb.N (r=0.53), appTb.Th (r=0.67), appTb.Sp (r=-0.71); all parchitecture [cortical volume (r=0.96), total volume (r=0.94), Z (r=0.94) and J (r=0.92; all parchitecture. Sex, physical activity and calcium intake were not related to any measure of bone architecture (p>0.05). Because muscle volume and femur length were strongly related (r=0.91, parchitecture (partial r=0.47 to 0.54; parchitecture in the distal femur of typically developing children. The relationship is weaker than the relationship between muscle volume in the midthigh and cortical bone architecture in the midfemur, but the discrepancy is driven, in large part, by the

  5. Ceramic substrate including thin film multilayer surface conductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Joseph Ambrose; Peterson, Kenneth A.

    2017-05-09

    A ceramic substrate comprises a plurality of ceramic sheets, a plurality of inner conductive layers, a plurality of vias, and an upper conductive layer. The ceramic sheets are stacked one on top of another and include a top ceramic sheet. The inner conductive layers include electrically conductive material that forms electrically conductive features on an upper surface of each ceramic sheet excluding the top ceramic sheet. The vias are formed in each of the ceramic sheets with each via being filled with electrically conductive material. The upper conductive layer includes electrically conductive material that forms electrically conductive features on an upper surface of the top ceramic sheet. The upper conductive layer is constructed from a stack of four sublayers. A first sublayer is formed from titanium. A second sublayer is formed from copper. A third sublayer is formed from platinum. A fourth sublayer is formed from gold.

  6. Progressive transcortical sensory aphasia and progressive ideational apraxia owing to temporoparietal cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funayama, Michitaka; Nakajima, Asuka

    2015-11-11

    In contrast to frontotemporal lobar degeneration, atrophy of the focal posterior lateral cortex has not been thoroughly studied. Three clinical types of focal cortical atrophy have been described: 1) logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia, which presents with impaired repetition despite normal articulation; 2) posterior cortical atrophy, which presents with prominent visuospatial deficits; and 3) primary progressive apraxia. All three clinical types are characterized by specific patterns of hypometabolism/hypoperfusion: the left posterior perisylvian area in the logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia, bilateral parietooccipital areas in posterior cortical atrophy, and the parietal cortex in primary progressive apraxia. However, not every patient clearly fits into one of these categories. Here we describe two patients with atypical focal cortical presentations. They presented with a history of a few years of progressive transcortical sensory aphasia characterized by fluent output with normal grammar and syntax, normal repetition, sentence comprehension deficits, and anomia without loss of word meaning. They also presented with progressive apraxia that began at the initial stages. Some forms of posterior symptoms including acalculia, agraphia, and visuospatial deficits were also observed. Hypoperfusion was noted mainly in the left temporoparietal region, which is slightly posterior to the perisylvian area. Although our cases lack in CSF findings and PIB scan, these two cases and previous reports might suggest the existence of a subgroup of patients presenting with transcortical sensory aphasia, apraxia, and posterior symptoms (acalculia, agraphia, and visuospatial deficits) in the setting of Alzheimer's disease. This subgroup may reflect the spectrum of clinical manifestations between logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia and posterior cortical atrophy.

  7. Prediction of cortical responses to simultaneous electrical stimulation of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halupka, Kerry J; Shivdasani, Mohit N; Cloherty, Shaun L; Grayden, David B; Wong, Yan T; Burkitt, Anthony N; Meffin, Hamish

    2017-02-01

    Simultaneous electrical stimulation of multiple electrodes has shown promise in diversifying the responses that can be elicited by retinal prostheses compared to interleaved single electrode stimulation. However, the effects of interactions between electrodes are not well understood and clinical trials with simultaneous stimulation have produced inconsistent results. We investigated the effects of multiple electrode stimulation of the retina by developing a model of cortical responses to retinal stimulation. Electrical stimuli consisting of temporally sparse, biphasic current pulses, with amplitudes sampled from a bi-dimensional Gaussian distribution, were simultaneously delivered to the retina across a 42-channel electrode array implanted in the suprachoroidal space of anesthetized cats. Visual cortex activity was recorded using penetrating microelectrode arrays. These data were used to identify a linear-nonlinear model of cortical responses to retinal stimulation. The ability of the model to generalize was tested by predicting responses to non-white patterned stimuli. The model accurately predicted two cortical activity measures: multi-unit neural responses and evoked potential responses to white noise stimuli. The model also provides information about electrical receptive fields, including the relative effects of each stimulating electrode on every recording site. We have demonstrated a simple model that accurately describes cortical responses to simultaneous stimulation of a suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis. Overall, our results demonstrate that cortical responses to simultaneous multi-electrode stimulation of the retina are repeatable and predictable, and that interactions between electrodes during simultaneous stimulation are predominantly linear. The model shows promise for determining optimal stimulation paradigms for exploiting interactions between electrodes to shape neural activity, thereby improving outcomes for patients with retinal prostheses.

  8. Evidence of functional connectivity between auditory cortical areas revealed by amplitude modulation sound processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéguin, Marie; Le Bouquin-Jeannès, Régine; Faucon, Gérard; Chauvel, Patrick; Liégeois-Chauvel, Catherine

    2007-02-01

    The human auditory cortex includes several interconnected areas. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in auditory cortical functions requires a detailed knowledge of neuronal connectivity between functional cortical regions. In human, it is difficult to track in vivo neuronal connectivity. We investigated the interarea connection in vivo in the auditory cortex using a method of directed coherence (DCOH) applied to depth auditory evoked potentials (AEPs). This paper presents simultaneous AEPs recordings from insular gyrus (IG), primary and secondary cortices (Heschl's gyrus and planum temporale), and associative areas (Brodmann area [BA] 22) with multilead intracerebral electrodes in response to sinusoidal modulated white noises in 4 epileptic patients who underwent invasive monitoring with depth electrodes for epilepsy surgery. DCOH allowed estimation of the causality between 2 signals recorded from different cortical sites. The results showed 1) a predominant auditory stream within the primary auditory cortex from the most medial region to the most lateral one whatever the modulation frequency, 2) unidirectional functional connection from the primary to secondary auditory cortex, 3) a major auditory propagation from the posterior areas to the anterior ones, particularly at 8, 16, and 32 Hz, and 4) a particular role of Heschl's sulcus dispatching information to the different auditory areas. These findings suggest that cortical processing of auditory information is performed in serial and parallel streams. Our data showed that the auditory propagation could not be associated to a unidirectional traveling wave but to a constant interaction between these areas that could reflect the large adaptive and plastic capacities of auditory cortex. The role of the IG is discussed.

  9. Cortical thickness maturation and duration of music training: health-promoting activities shape brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudziak, James J; Albaugh, Matthew D; Ducharme, Simon; Karama, Sherif; Spottswood, Margaret; Crehan, Eileen; Evans, Alan C; Botteron, Kelly N

    2014-11-01

    To assess the extent to which playing a musical instrument is associated with cortical thickness development among healthy youths. Participants were part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Study of Normal Brain Development. This study followed a longitudinal design such that participants underwent MRI scanning and behavioral testing on up to 3 separate visits, occurring at 2-year intervals. MRI, IQ, and music training data were available for 232 youths (334 scans), ranging from 6 to 18 years of age. Cortical thickness was regressed against the number of years that each youth had played a musical instrument. Next, thickness was regressed against an "Age × Years of Playing" interaction term. Age, gender, total brain volume, and scanner were controlled for in analyses. Participant ID was entered as a random effect to account for within-person dependence. False discovery rate correction was applied (p ≤ .05). There was no association between thickness and years playing a musical instrument. The "Age × Years of Playing" interaction was associated with thickness in motor, premotor, and supplementary motor cortices, as well as prefrontal and parietal cortices. Follow-up analysis revealed that music training was associated with an increased rate of thickness maturation. Results were largely unchanged when IQ and handedness were included as covariates. Playing a musical instrument was associated with more rapid cortical thickness maturation within areas implicated in motor planning and coordination, visuospatial ability, and emotion and impulse regulation. However, given the quasi-experimental nature of this study, we cannot rule out the influence of confounding variables. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of environmental risks and polygenic loading for schizophrenia on cortical thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Emma; Bois, Catherine; Gibson, Jude; Duff, Barbara; Watson, Andrew; Roberts, Neil; Brandon, Nicholas J; Dunlop, John; Hall, Jeremy; McIntosh, Andrew M; Whalley, Heather C; Lawrie, Stephen M

    2017-06-01

    There are established differences in cortical thickness (CT) in schizophrenia (SCZ) and bipolar (BD) patients when compared to healthy controls (HC). However, it is unknown to what extent environmental or genetic risk factors impact on CT in these populations. We have investigated the effect of Environmental Risk Scores (ERS) and Polygenic Risk Scores for SCZ (PGRS-SCZ) on CT. Structural MRI scans were acquired at 3T for patients with SCZ or BD (n=57) and controls (n=41). Cortical reconstructions were generated in FreeSurfer (v5.3). The ERS was created by determining exposure to cannabis use, childhood adverse events, migration, urbanicity and obstetric complications. The PGRS-SCZ were generated, for a subset of the sample (Patients=43, HC=32), based on the latest PGC GWAS findings. ANCOVAs were used to test the hypotheses that ERS and PGRS-SCZ relate to CT globally, and in frontal and temporal lobes. An increase in ERS was negatively associated with CT within temporal lobe for patients. A higher PGRS-SCZ was also related to global cortical thinning for patients. ERS effects remained significant when including PGRS-SCZ as a fixed effect. No relationship which survived FDR correction was found for ERS and PGRS-SCZ in controls. Environmental risk for SCZ was related to localised cortical thinning in patients with SCZ and BD, while increased PGRS-SCZ was associated with global cortical thinning. Genetic and environmental risk factors for SCZ appear therefore to have differential effects. This provides a mechanistic means by which different risk factors may contribute to the development of SCZ and BD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cortical sources of Vernier acuity in the human visual system: An EEG-source imaging study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chuan; Kim, Yee-Joon; Verghese, Preeti

    2017-01-01

    Vernier acuity determines the relative position of visual features with a precision better than the sampling resolution of cone receptors in the retina. Because Vernier displacement is thought to be mediated by orientation-tuned mechanisms, Vernier acuity is presumed to be processed in striate visual cortex (V1). However, there is considerable evidence suggesting that Vernier acuity is dependent not only on structures in V1 but also on processing in extrastriate cortical regions. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging–informed electroencephalogram source imaging to localize the cortical sources of Vernier acuity in observers with normal vision. We measured suprathreshold and near-threshold responses to Vernier onset/offset stimuli at different stages of the visual cortical hierarchy, including V1, hV4, lateral occipital cortex (LOC), and middle temporal cortex (hMT+). These responses were compared with responses to grating on/off stimuli, as well as to stimuli that control for lateral motion in the Vernier task. Our results show that all visual cortical regions of interest (ROIs) responded to both suprathreshold Vernier and grating stimuli. However, thresholds for Vernier displacement (Vernier acuity) were lowest in V1 and LOC compared with hV4 and hMT+, whereas all visual ROIs had identical thresholds for spatial frequency (grating acuity) and for relative motion. The cortical selectivity of sensitivity to Vernier displacement provides strong evidence that LOC, in addition to V1, is involved in Vernier acuity processing. The robust activation of LOC might be related to the sensitivity to the relative position of features, which is common to Vernier displacement and to some kinds of texture segmentation. PMID:28586896

  12. Similar Motor Cortical Control Mechanisms for Precise Limb Control during Reaching and Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovenko, Sergiy

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the course of evolution there has been a parallel development of the complexity and flexibility of the nervous system and the skeletomuscular system that it controls. This development is particularly evident for the cerebral cortical areas and the transformation of the use of the upper limbs from a purely locomotor function to one including, or restricted to, reaching and grasping. This study addresses the issue of whether the control of reaching has involved the development of new cortical circuits or whether the same neurons are used to control both locomotion and reaching. We recorded the activity of pyramidal tract neurons in the motor cortex of the cat both during voluntary gait modifications and during reaching. All cells showed generally similar patterns of activity in both tasks. More specifically, we showed that, in many cases, cells maintained a constant temporal relationship to the activity of synergistic muscle groups in each task. In addition, in some cells the relationship between the intensity of the cell discharge activity and the magnitude of the EMG activity was equally constant during gait modifications and reaching. As such, the results are compatible with the hypothesis that the corticospinal circuits used to control reaching evolved from those used to precisely modify gait. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In an article in 1989, Georgopoulos and Grillner (1989) proposed that the corticospinal control mechanisms used for reaching movements in primates may have evolved from those used to control precise modifications of gait during quadrupedal locomotion. In this article, we provide a test of this hypothesis by recording the activity of individual motor cortical cells during both behaviors. Our results are compatible with the hypothesis in that they demonstrate that individual cortical neurons exhibit similar qualitative and quantitative patterns during each behavior. Beyond a general similarity of activity patterns, we show that some cortical

  13. Strain rate influence on human cortical bone toughness: A comparative study of four paired anatomical sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Rémy; Follet, Hélène; Langer, Max; Meille, Sylvain; Chevalier, Jérôme; Rongiéras, Frédéric; Peyrin, Françoise; Mitton, David

    2017-07-01

    Bone fracture is a major health issue worldwide and consequently there have been extensive investigations into the fracture behavior of human cortical bone. However, the fracture properties of human cortical bone under fall-like loading conditions remains poorly documented. Further, most published research has been performed on femoral diaphyseal bone, whereas it is known that the femoral neck and the radius are the most vulnerable sites to fracture. Hence, the aim of this study is to provide information on human cortical bone fracture behavior by comparing different anatomical sites including the radius and the femoral neck acquired from 32 elderly subjects (50 - 98 y.o.). In order to investigate the intrinsic fracture behavior of human cortical bone, toughness experiments were performed at two different strain rates: standard quasi-static conditions, and a higher strain rate representative of a fall from a standing position. The tests were performed on paired femoral neck, femoral, tibial and radius diaphyseal samples. Linear elastic fracture toughness and the non-linear J-integral method were used to take into account both the elastic and non-elastic behavior of cortical bone. Under quasi-static conditions, the radius presents a significantly higher toughness than the other sites. At the higher strain rate, all sites showed a significantly lower toughness. Also, at the high strain rate, there is no significant difference in fracture properties between the four anatomical sites. These results suggest that regardless of the anatomical site (femur, femoral neck, tibia and radius), the bone has the same fracture properties under fall loading conditions. This should be considered in biomechanical models under fall-like loading conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Catalyst support structure, catalyst including the structure, reactor including a catalyst, and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Norman, Staci A.; Aston, Victoria J.; Weimer, Alan W.

    2017-05-09

    Structures, catalysts, and reactors suitable for use for a variety of applications, including gas-to-liquid and coal-to-liquid processes and methods of forming the structures, catalysts, and reactors are disclosed. The catalyst material can be deposited onto an inner wall of a microtubular reactor and/or onto porous tungsten support structures using atomic layer deposition techniques.

  15. Composite armor, armor system and vehicle including armor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Henry S.; Jones, Warren F.; Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Thinnes, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    Composite armor panels are disclosed. Each panel comprises a plurality of functional layers comprising at least an outermost layer, an intermediate layer and a base layer. An armor system incorporating armor panels is also disclosed. Armor panels are mounted on carriages movably secured to adjacent rails of a rail system. Each panel may be moved on its associated rail and into partially overlapping relationship with another panel on an adjacent rail for protection against incoming ordnance from various directions. The rail system may be configured as at least a part of a ring, and be disposed about a hatch on a vehicle. Vehicles including an armor system are also disclosed.

  16. Multi-layered proton-conducting electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae H.; Dorris, Stephen E.; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2017-06-27

    The present invention provides a multilayer anode/electrolyte assembly comprising a porous anode substrate and a layered solid electrolyte in contact therewith. The layered solid electrolyte includes a first dense layer of yttrium-doped barium zirconate (BZY), optionally including another metal besides Y, Ba, and Zr (e.g., a lanthanide metal such as Pr) on one surface thereof, a second dense layer of yttrium-doped barium cerate (BCY), and an interfacial layer between and contacting the BZY and BCY layers. The interfacial layer comprises a solid solution of the BZY and BCY electrolytes. The porous anode substrate comprises at least one porous ceramic material that is stable to carbon dioxide and water (e.g., porous BZY), as well as an electrically conductive metal and/or metal oxide (e.g., Ni, NiO, and the like).

  17. Physics of magnetospheric boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1995-01-01

    This final report was concerned with the ideas that: (1) magnetospheric boundary layers link disparate regions of the magnetosphere-solar wind system together; and (2) global behavior of the magnetosphere can be understood only by understanding its internal linking mechanisms and those with the solar wind. The research project involved simultaneous research on the global-, meso-, and micro-scale physics of the magnetosphere and its boundary layers, which included the bow shock, the magnetosheath, the plasma sheet boundary layer, and the ionosphere. Analytic, numerical, and simulation projects were performed on these subjects, as well as comparisons of theoretical results with observational data. Other related activity included in the research included: (1) prediction of geomagnetic activity; (2) global MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) simulations; (3) Alfven resonance heating; and (4) Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) effect. In the appendixes are list of personnel involved, list of papers published; and reprints or photocopies of papers produced for this report.

  18. Nanofibrillar scaffolds induce preferential activation of Rho GTPases in cerebral cortical astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiryaki, Volkan Mujdat; Ayres, Virginia M; Khan, Adeel A; Ahmed, Ijaz; Shreiber, David I; Meiners, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral cortical astrocyte responses to polyamide nanofibrillar scaffolds versus poly-L-lysine (PLL)-functionalized planar glass, unfunctionalized planar Aclar coverslips, and PLL-functionalized planar Aclar surfaces were investigated by atomic force microscopy and immunocytochemistry. The physical properties of the cell culture environments were evaluated using contact angle and surface roughness measurements and compared. Astrocyte morphological responses, including filopodia, lamellipodia, and stress fiber formation, and stellation were imaged using atomic force microscopy and phalloidin staining for F-actin. Activation of the corresponding Rho GTPase regulators was investigated using immunolabeling with Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoA. Astrocytes cultured on the nanofibrillar scaffolds showed a unique response that included stellation, cell–cell interactions by stellate processes, and evidence of depression of RhoA. The results support the hypothesis that the extracellular environment can trigger preferential activation of members of the Rho GTPase family, with demonstrable morphological consequences for cerebral cortical astrocytes. PMID:22915841

  19. Negative correlation of cortical thickness with the severity and duration of abdominal pain in Asian women with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Chian Sem; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Shiao, Chen-Yu; Hsu, Chien-Yeh; Cheng, Chiao-Wen; Yang, Kuo-Ching; Chiu, Hung-Wen; Hsu, Jung-Lung

    2017-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) manifests as chronic abdominal pain. One pathophysiological theory states that the brain-gut axis is responsible for pain control in the intestine. Although several studies have discussed the structural changes in the brain of IBS patients, most of these studies have been conducted in Western populations. Different cultures and sexes experience different pain sensations and have different pain responses. Accordingly, we aimed to identify the specific changes in the cortical thickness of Asian women with IBS and to compare these data to those of non-Asian women with IBS. Thirty Asian female IBS patients (IBS group) and 39 healthy individuals (control group) were included in this study. Brain structural magnetic resonance imaging was performed. We used FreeSurfer to analyze the differences in the cortical thickness and their correlations with patient characteristics. The left cuneus, left rostral middle frontal cortex, left supramarginal cortex, right caudal anterior cingulate cortex, and bilateral insula exhibited cortical thinning in the IBS group compared with those in the controls. Furthermore, the brain cortical thickness correlated negatively the severity as well as duration of abdominal pain. Some of our findings differ from those of Western studies. In our study, all of the significant brain regions in the IBS group exhibited cortical thinning compared with those in the controls. The differences in cortical thickness between the IBS patients and controls may provide useful information to facilitate regulating abdominal pain in IBS patients. These findings offer insights into the association of different cultures and sexes with differences in cortical thinning in patients with IBS.

  20. Bilateral Cerebellar Cortical Dysplasia without Other Malformations: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jung Seok; Ahn Kook Jin; Kim, Jee Young; Lee, Sun Jin; Park, Jeong Mi [Catholic University Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Recent advances in MRI have revealed congenital brain malformations and subtle developmental abnormalities of the cerebral and cerebellar cortical architecture. Typical cerebellar cortical dysplasia as a newly categorized cerebellar malformation, has been seen in patients with Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy. Cerebellar cortical dysplasia occurs at the embryonic stage and is often observed in healthy newborns. It is also incidentally and initially detected in adults without symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, cerebellar dysplasia without any related disorders is very rare. We describe the MRI findings in one patient with disorganized foliation of both cerebellar hemispheres without a related disorder or syndrome

  1. Adult Astrogenesis and the Etiology of Cortical Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal C. Mohn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As more evidence points to a clear role for astrocytes in synaptic processing, synaptogenesis and cognition, continuing research on astrocytic function could lead to strategies for neurodegenerative disease prevention. Reactive astrogliosis results in astrocyte proliferation early in injury and disease states and is considered neuroprotective, indicating a role for astrocytes in disease etiology. This review describes the different types of human cortical astrocytes and the current evidence regarding adult cortical astrogenesis in injury and degenerative disease. A role for disrupted astrogenesis as a cause of cortical degeneration, with a focus on the tauopathies and synucleinopathies, will also be considered.

  2. Cre-expressing neurons in the cortical white matter of Ntsr1-Cre GN220 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Sofie C; Granseth, Björn

    2018-03-23

    Genetically modified mouse strains that express Cre-recombinase in specific neuronal sub-populations have become widely used tools for investigating neuronal function. The Ntsr1-Cre GN220 mouse expresses this enzyme in corticothalamic neurons in layer 6 of cerebral cortex. We observed that about 7% of Cre-expressing cells in the primary visual cortex are found within the white matter bordering layer 6. By using the immunohistochemical marker for layer 6 neurons, Forkhead box protein 2 (FoxP2), and fluorescently conjugated latex beads injected into the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus, we show that about half of these cells are similar to and could belong to the layer 6 corticothalamic neuron population. The other half seems to be a distinct white matter (WM) neuron sub-population that we estimate to constitute 2-4% of the total cortical Cre-expressing population. Staining for the neuronal marker Neuronal nuclei (NeuN) revealed that about 15-40% of WM neurons are Cre-expressing. Thus, the potential contribution from WM neurons needs to be considered when interpreting the results from experiments using the Ntsr1-Cre GN220 mouse for investigating corticothalamic neuronal function. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Learning in AN Oscillatory Cortical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpetta, Silvia; Li, Zhaoping; Hertz, John

    We study a model of generalized-Hebbian learning in asymmetric oscillatory neural networks modeling cortical areas such as hippocampus and olfactory cortex. The learning rule is based on the synaptic plasticity observed experimentally, in particular long-term potentiation and long-term depression of the synaptic efficacies depending on the relative timing of the pre- and postsynaptic activities during learning. The learned memory or representational states can be encoded by both the amplitude and the phase patterns of the oscillating neural populations, enabling more efficient and robust information coding than in conventional models of associative memory or input representation. Depending on the class of nonlinearity of the activation function, the model can function as an associative memory for oscillatory patterns (nonlinearity of class II) or can generalize from or interpolate between the learned states, appropriate for the function of input representation (nonlinearity of class I). In the former case, simulations of the model exhibits a first order transition between the "disordered state" and the "ordered" memory state.

  4. Workbench surface editor of brain cortical surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Douglas E.; Nowinski, Wieslaw L.; Serra, Luis

    1996-04-01

    We have developed a 3D reach-in tool to manually reconstruct 3D cortical surface patches from 2D brain atlas images. The first application of our cortex editor is building 3D functional maps, specifically Brodmann's areas. This tool may also be useful in clinical practice to adjust incorrectly mapped atlas regions due to the deforming effect of lesions. The cortex editor allows a domain expert to control the correlation of control points across slices. Correct correlation has been difficult for 3D reconstruction algorithms because the atlas slices are far apart and because of the complex topology of the cortex which differs so much from slice to slice. Also, higher precision of the resulting surfaces is demanded since these define 3D brain atlas features upon which future stereotactic surgery may be based. The cortex editor described in this paper provides a tool suitable for a domain expert to use in defining the 3D surface of a Brodmann's area.

  5. Canonical Coordinates for Retino-Cortical Magnification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Florack

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A geometric model for a biologically-inspired visual front-end is proposed, based on an isotropic, scale-invariant two-form field. The model incorporates a foveal property typical of biological visual systems, with an approximately linear decrease of resolution as a function of eccentricity, and by a physical size constant that measures the radius of the geometric foveola, the central region characterized by maximal resolving power. It admits a description in singularity-free canonical coordinates generalizing the familiar log-polar coordinates and reducing to these in the asymptotic case of negligibly-sized geometric foveola or, equivalently, at peripheral locations in the visual field. It has predictive power to the extent that quantitative geometric relationships pertaining to retino-cortical magnification along the primary visual pathway, such as receptive field size distribution and spatial arrangement in retina and striate cortex, can be deduced in a principled manner. The biological plausibility of the model is demonstrated by comparison with known facts of human vision.

  6. Facilitating text reading in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Keir X X; Rajdev, Kishan; Shakespeare, Timothy J; Leff, Alexander P; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2015-07-28

    We report (1) the quantitative investigation of text reading in posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), and (2) the effects of 2 novel software-based reading aids that result in dramatic improvements in the reading ability of patients with PCA. Reading performance, eye movements, and fixations were assessed in patients with PCA and typical Alzheimer disease and in healthy controls (experiment 1). Two reading aids (single- and double-word) were evaluated based on the notion that reducing the spatial and oculomotor demands of text reading might support reading in PCA (experiment 2). Mean reading accuracy in patients with PCA was significantly worse (57%) compared with both patients with typical Alzheimer disease (98%) and healthy controls (99%); spatial aspects of passages were the primary determinants of text reading ability in PCA. Both aids led to considerable gains in reading accuracy (PCA mean reading accuracy: single-word reading aid = 96%; individual patient improvement range: 6%-270%) and self-rated measures of reading. Data suggest a greater efficiency of fixations and eye movements under the single-word reading aid in patients with PCA. These findings demonstrate how neurologic characterization of a neurodegenerative syndrome (PCA) and detailed cognitive analysis of an important everyday skill (reading) can combine to yield aids capable of supporting important everyday functional abilities. This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with PCA, 2 software-based reading aids (single-word and double-word) improve reading accuracy. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  7. Incidental Transient Cortical Blindness after Lung Resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oncel, Murat; Sunam, Guven Sadi; Varoglu, Asuman Orhan; Karabagli, Hakan; Yildiran, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    Transient vision loss after major surgical procedures is a rare clinical complication. The most common etiologies are cardiac, spinal, head, and neck surgeries. There has been no report on vision loss after lung resection. A 65-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with lung cancer. Resection was performed using right upper lobectomy with no complications. Cortical blindness developed 12 hours later in the postoperative period. Results from magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted investigations were normal. The neurologic examination was normal. The blood glucose level was 92 mg/dL and blood gas analysis showed a PO 2 of 82 mm Hg. After 24 hours, the patient began to see and could count fingers, and his vision was fully restored within 72 hours after this point. Autonomic dysfunction due to impaired microvascular structures in diabetes mellitus may induce posterior circulation dysfunction, even when the hemodynamic state is normal in the perioperative period. The physician must keep in mind that vision loss may occur after lung resection due to autonomic dysfunction, especially in older patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:28824977

  8. Cortical oscillatory activity during spatial echoic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Jochen; Walker, Florian; Leiberg, Susanne; Lutzenberger, Werner

    2005-01-01

    In human magnetoencephalogram, we have found gamma-band activity (GBA), a putative measure of cortical network synchronization, during both bottom-up and top-down auditory processing. When sound positions had to be retained in short-term memory for 800 ms, enhanced GBA was detected over posterior parietal cortex, possibly reflecting the activation of higher sensory storage systems along the hypothesized auditory dorsal space processing stream. Additional prefrontal GBA increases suggested an involvement of central executive networks in stimulus maintenance. The present study assessed spatial echoic memory with the same stimuli but a shorter memorization interval of 200 ms. Statistical probability mapping revealed posterior parietal GBA increases at 80 Hz near the end of the memory phase and both gamma and theta enhancements in response to the test stimulus. In contrast to the previous short-term memory study, no prefrontal gamma or theta enhancements were detected. This suggests that spatial echoic memory is performed by networks along the putative auditory dorsal stream, without requiring an involvement of prefrontal executive regions.

  9. Localization of cortical areas activated by thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roland, P E; Friberg, L

    1985-01-01

    These experiments were undertaken to demonstrate that pure mental activity, thinking, increases the cerebral blood flow and that different types of thinking increase the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in different cortical areas. As a first approach, thinking was defined as brain work in the....... The activation of the right midtemporal cortex was attributed to the retrieval of the nonverbal auditory memory.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)...... study was taken with the subjects at rest. Then the rCBF was measured during three different simple algorithm tasks, each consisting of retrieval of a specific memory followed by a simple operation on the retrieved information. Once started, the information processing went on in the brain without any......CBF increases extended over a few square centimeters of the cortex. The activation of the superior prefrontal cortex was attributed to the organization of thinking. The activation of the angular cortex in 50-3 thinking was attributed to the retrieval of the numerical memory and memory for subtractions...

  10. Pathogenetic mechanisms of focal cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Guerrini, Renzo; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2014-07-01

    Focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) constitute a prevalent cause of intractable epilepsy in children, and is one of the leading conditions requiring epilepsy surgery. Despite recent advances in the cellular and molecular biology of these conditions, the pathogenetic mechanisms of FCDs remain largely unknown. The purpose if this work is to review the molecular underpinnings of FCDs and to highlight potential therapeutic targets. A systematic review of the literature regarding the histologic, molecular, and electrophysiologic aspects of FCDs was conducted. Disruption of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling comprises a common pathway underlying the structural and electrical disturbances of some FCDs. Other mechanisms such as viral infections, prematurity, head trauma, and brain tumors are also posited. mTOR inhibitors (i.e., rapamycin) have shown positive results on seizure management in animal models and in a small cohort of patients with FCD. Encouraging progress has been achieved on the molecular and electrophysiologic basis of constitutive cells in the dysplastic tissue. Despite the promising results of mTOR inhibitors, large-scale randomized trials are in need to evaluate their efficacy and side effects, along with additional mechanistic studies for the development of novel, molecular-based diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  11. Directed paths in a layered environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, J; Janse van Rensburg, E J

    2008-01-01

    A polymer in a layered environment is modeled as a directed path in a layered square lattice composed of alternating A-layers of width w a and B-layers of width w b . In this paper we consider general cases of this model, where edges in the path interact with the layers, and vertices in the path interact with interfaces between adjacent layers. The phase diagram exhibits different regimes. In particular, we found that the path may be localized to one layer, be adsorbed on an interface between two layers or be delocalized across layers. We examine special aspects of the model in detail: the asymptotic regimes of the models are examined, and entropic forces on the interfaces are determined. We focus on several different cases, including models with layers of equal or similar width. More general models of layers with different but finite widths, or with one layer of infinite width, are also examined in detail. Several of these models exhibit phase behavior which relate to well-studied polymer phase behavior such as adsorption at an impenetrable wall, pinning at an interface between two immiscible solvents, steric stabilization of colloidal particles and sensitized flocculation of colloidal particles by polymers

  12. Cortical cell and neuron density estimates in one chimpanzee hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Christine E; Turner, Emily C; Sawyer, Eva Kille; Reed, Jamie L; Young, Nicole A; Flaherty, David K; Kaas, Jon H

    2016-01-19

    The density of cells and neurons in the neocortex of many mammals varies across cortical areas and regions. This variability is, perhaps, most pronounced in primates. Nonuniformity in the composition of cortex suggests regions of the cortex have different specializations. Specifically, regions with densely packed neurons contain smaller neurons that are activated by relatively few inputs, thereby preserving information, whereas regions that are less densely packed have larger neurons that have more integrative functions. Here we present the numbers of cells and neurons for 742 discrete locations across the neocortex in a chimpanzee. Using isotropic fractionation and flow fractionation methods for cell and neuron counts, we estimate that neocortex of one hemisphere contains 9.5 billion cells and 3.7 billion neurons. Primary visual cortex occupies 35 cm(2) of surface, 10% of the total, and contains 737 million densely packed neurons, 20% of the total neurons contained within the hemisphere. Other areas of high neuron packing include secondary visual areas, somatosensory cortex, and prefrontal granular cortex. Areas of low levels of neuron packing density include motor and premotor cortex. These values reflect those obtained from more limited samples of cortex in humans and other primates.

  13. Morphometric differences in planum temporale in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder revealed by statistical analysis of Labeled Cortical Depth Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Tilak eRatnanather

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Differences in cortical thickness in the lateral temporal lobe, including the planum temporale (PT, have been reported in MRI studies of schizophrenia (SCZ and bipolar disorder (BPD patients. Most of these studies have used a single-valued global or local measure for thickness. However, additional and complementary information can be obtained by generating Labelled Cortical Depth Maps (LCDMs, which are distances of labeled gray matter voxels from the nearest point on the gray/white matter (inner cortical surface. Statistical analyses of pooled and censored LCDM distances reveal subtle differences in PT between SCZ and BPD groups from data generated by Ratnanather et al. (Schizophrenia Research, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2013.08.014. These results confirm that the left PT (LPT is more sensitive than the right PT in distinguishing between SCZ, BPD and healthy controls. Also confirmed is a strong gender effect, with a thicker PT seen in males than in females. The differences between groups at smaller distances in the LPT revealed by pooled and censored LCDM analysis suggest that SCZ and BPD have different effects on the cortical mantle close to the gray/white matter surface. This is consistent with reported subtle changes in the cortical mantle observed in postmortem studies.

  14. Cortical desmoid of the humerus: radiographic and MRI correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Matthew; Counsel, Peter [Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Perth (Australia); Perth Radiological Clinic, Perth (Australia); Wood, David [Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Perth (Australia); Breidahl, William [Perth Radiological Clinic, Perth (Australia)

    2017-07-15

    Cortical desmoids are self-limiting fibro-osseous lesions commonly occurring at the medial supracondylar femur in active adolescents, at either the origin of the medial head of the gastrocnemius or at the insertion of the adductor magnus aponeurosis. Less commonly, in a similar demographic, cortical desmoids may occur in the proximal humerus medially at the insertion of the pectoralis major muscle or laterally at the insertion of the deltoid. The radiographic appearance of the proximal humerus cortical desmoid has been described previously, but not the MRI appearance. We present the radiographic and MRI appearances of a proximal humerus cortical desmoid in a young adolescent who presented for investigation of right shoulder pain. (orig.)

  15. Cortical laminar necrosis in brain infarcts: chronological changes on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komiyama, M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital, 2-13-22, Miyakojima-Hondouri, Miyakojima, Osaka 534 (Japan); Nishikawa, M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital, 2-13-22, Miyakojima-Hondouri, Miyakojima, Osaka 534 (Japan); Yasui, T. [Department of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital, 2-13-22, Miyakojima-Hondouri, Miyakojima, Osaka 534 (Japan)

    1997-07-10

    We studied the MRI characteristics of cortical laminar necrosis in ischaemic stroke. We reviewed 13 patients with cortical laminar high signal on T1-weighted images to analyse the chronological changes in signal intensity and contrast enhancement. High-density cortical lesions began to appear on T1-weighted images about 2 weeks after the ictus. At 1-2 months they were prominent. They began to fade from 3 months but could be seen up to 11 months. These cortical lesions showed isointensity or high intensity on T2-weighted images and did not show low intensity at any stage. Contrast enhancement of the laminar lesions was prominent at 1-2 months and became less apparent from 3 months, but could be seen up to 8 months. (orig.). With 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Hippocampo-cortical coupling mediates memory consolidation during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maingret, Nicolas; Girardeau, Gabrielle; Todorova, Ralitsa; Goutierre, Marie; Zugaro, Michaël

    2016-07-01

    Memory consolidation is thought to involve a hippocampo-cortical dialog during sleep to stabilize labile memory traces for long-term storage. However, direct evidence supporting this hypothesis is lacking. We dynamically manipulated the temporal coordination between the two structures during sleep following training on a spatial memory task specifically designed to trigger encoding, but not memory consolidation. Reinforcing the endogenous coordination between hippocampal sharp wave-ripples, cortical delta waves and spindles by timed electrical stimulation resulted in a reorganization of prefrontal cortical networks, along with subsequent increased prefrontal responsivity to the task and high recall performance on the next day, contrary to control rats, which performed at chance levels. Our results provide, to the best of our knowledge, the first direct evidence for a causal role of a hippocampo-cortical dialog during sleep in memory consolidation, and indicate that the underlying mechanism involves a fine-tuned coordination between sharp wave-ripples, delta waves and spindles.

  17. Cortical blindness in a boy with acute glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min-Hsien; Sheu, Ji-Nan; Wang, Shuoh-Jyh

    2003-01-01

    Post-infectious acute glomerulonephritis with hypertensive encephalopathy is characterized by episodic hypertension with headache, vomiting, and hematuria. The association between hypertensive encephalopathy and cortical blindness in children with acute glomerulonephritis is extremely rare. We report the case of a 10-year-old boy with acute glomerulonephritis who presented with gross hematuria, headache, vomiting, and oliguria, and developed transient cortical blindness as a complication of hypertensive encephalopathy. No occurrence of seizure was observed during the clinical course. T2-weighted cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed a high-intensity signal over cortical and subcortical areas of bilateral occipital regions. His vision recovered fully, 2 days after receiving antihypertensive therapy. The patient was well without complaint at 1-year follow-up. This case highlights the possibility that cortical blindness may develop as a complication of acute glomerulonephritis in children. Prevention of the occurrence of neurological deficits in children with acute glomerulonephritis and hypertensive encephalopathy requires careful evaluation and appropriate management of hypertension.

  18. Cortical desmoid of the humerus: radiographic and MRI correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, Matthew; Counsel, Peter; Wood, David; Breidahl, William

    2017-01-01

    Cortical desmoids are self-limiting fibro-osseous lesions commonly occurring at the medial supracondylar femur in active adolescents, at either the origin of the medial head of the gastrocnemius or at the insertion of the adductor magnus aponeurosis. Less commonly, in a similar demographic, cortical desmoids may occur in the proximal humerus medially at the insertion of the pectoralis major muscle or laterally at the insertion of the deltoid. The radiographic appearance of the proximal humerus cortical desmoid has been described previously, but not the MRI appearance. We present the radiographic and MRI appearances of a proximal humerus cortical desmoid in a young adolescent who presented for investigation of right shoulder pain. (orig.)

  19. Basic Ozone Layer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the ozone layer and how human activities deplete it. This page provides information on the chemical processes that lead to ozone layer depletion, and scientists' efforts to understand them.

  20. VSWI Wetlands Advisory Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset represents the DEC Wetlands Program's Advisory layer. This layer makes the most up-to-date, non-jurisdictional, wetlands mapping avaiable to the public...

  1. Flow of cortical activity underlying a tactile decision in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Zengcai V.; Li, Nuo; Huber, Daniel; Ophir, Eran; Gutnisky, Diego; Ting, Jonathan T.; Feng, Guoping; Svoboda, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Perceptual decisions involve distributed cortical activity. Does information flow sequentially from one cortical area to another, or do networks of interconnected areas contribute at the same time? Here we delineate when and how activity in specific areas drives a whisker-based decision in mice. A short-term memory component temporally separated tactile “sensation” and “action” (licking). Using optogenetic inhibition (spatial resolution, 2 mm; temporal resolution, 100 ms), we surveyed the neo...

  2. Cortical spreading depression in migraine-time to reconsider?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan J McComas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available New evidence concerning the pathophysiology of migraine has come from the results of therapeutic transcranial magnetic stimulation (tTMS. The instantaneous responses to single pulses applied during the aura or headache phase, together with a number of other observations, make it unlikely that cortical spreading depression is involved in migraine. tTMS is considered to act by abolishing abnormal impulse activity in cortical pyramidal neurons and a suggestion is made as to how this activity could arise.

  3. Working memory and left medial temporal cortical thickness

    OpenAIRE

    Pastura, Giuseppe; Kubo, Tadeu Takao Almodovar; Regalla, Maria Angélica; Mesquita, Cíntia Machado; Coutinho, Gabriel; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Figueiredo, Otávio; Mattos, Paulo; Araújo, Alexandra Prüfer de Queiroz Campos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To perform a pilot study to investigate the association between working memory and cortical thickness in a sample of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) children. Methods Seventeen children aged 7-10 years diagnosed with ADHD and 16 healthy children underwent a magnetic resonance scan for cortical thickness measurements. Data was correlated with working memory performance using the Backwards Digit Span subtest of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children. ...

  4. Loading and plotting of cortical surface representations in Nilearn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Huntenburg

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Processing neuroimaging data on the cortical surface traditionally requires dedicated heavy-weight software suites. Here, we present an initial support of cortical surfaces in Python within the neuroimaging data processing toolbox Nilearn. We provide loading and plotting functions for different surface data formats with minimal dependencies, along with examples of their application. Limitations of the current implementation and potential next steps are discussed.

  5. The double cortical line: a sign of osteopenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    The double cortical line is a radiographic sign of osteopenia which results from intracortical resorption of bone. This sign is frequently seen in humans with osteopenia but has received minimal attention in the veterinary literature. This report describes the double cortical line in cases of senile osteopenia, nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism, suspected renal secondary hyperparathyroidism and in the acetabulum following triple pelvic osteotomy for hip dysplasia

  6. Different Mode of Afferents Determines the Frequency Range of High Frequency Activities in the Human Brain: Direct Electrocorticographic Comparison between Peripheral Nerve and Direct Cortical Stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Physiological high frequency activities (HFA are related to various brain functions. Factors, however, regulating its frequency have not been well elucidated in humans. To validate the hypothesis that different propagation modes (thalamo-cortical vs. cortico-coritcal projections, or different terminal layers (layer IV vs. layer II/III affect its frequency, we, in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI, compared HFAs induced by median nerve stimulation with those induced by electrical stimulation of the cortex connecting to SI. We employed 6 patients who underwent chronic subdural electrode implantation for presurgical evaluation. We evaluated the HFA power values in reference to the baseline overriding N20 (earliest cortical response and N80 (late response of somatosensory evoked potentials (HFA(SEP(N20 and HFA(SEP(N80 and compared those overriding N1 and N2 (first and second responses of cortico-cortical evoked potentials (HFA(CCEP(N1 and HFA(CCEP(N2. HFA(SEP(N20 showed the power peak in the frequency above 200 Hz, while HFA(CCEP(N1 had its power peak in the frequency below 200 Hz. Different propagation modes and/or different terminal layers seemed to determine HFA frequency. Since HFA(CCEP(N1 and HFA induced during various brain functions share a similar broadband profile of the power spectrum, cortico-coritcal horizontal propagation seems to represent common mode of neural transmission for processing these functions.

  7. The cortical representation of sensory inputs arising from bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanusic, Jason J; Sahai, Vineet; Mahns, David A

    2009-05-07

    In the present study, we show that sensory information from bone reaches the discriminative areas of the somatosensory cortices by electrically stimulating the nerve to the cat humerus and recording evoked potentials on the surface of the primary (SI) and secondary (SII) somatosensory cortex. The SI focus was located over the rostral part of the postcruciate cortex, caudal to the lateral aspect of the cruciate sulcus. The SII focus was identified on the anterior ectosylvian gyrus, lateral to the suprasylvian sulcus. These foci were located adjacent to, or within areas that responded to stimulation of the median, ulnar and/or musculocutaneous nerves. The latency (6-11 ms) to onset of cortical responses in SI and SII were indistinguishable (unpaired t-test; P>0.05), and were consistent with activation of A delta fibers in the peripheral nerve. The amplitudes of the cortical responses were graded as a function of stimulus intensity, and may reflect a mechanism for intensity coding. We did not observe long latency cortical responses (50-300 ms) that would be consistent with C fiber activation in the peripheral nerve, and provide evidence that this may be attributable to inhibition of cortical responsiveness following the initial A delta response. Our finding of discrete, short latency evoked potentials (presumably of A delta origin) in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortices, following stimulation of a nerve innervating bone, may reflect a mechanism for the discriminative component of bone pain.

  8. Assessment of hearing threshold in adults with hearing loss using an automated system of cortical auditory evoked potential detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Alessandra Spada; Wieselberg, Margarita Bernal; Roque, Nayara; Carvalho, Sheila; Pucci, Beatriz; Gudayol, Nicolly; de Almeida, Kátia

    The use of hearing aids by individuals with hearing loss brings a better quality of life. Access to and benefit from these devices may be compromised in patients who present difficulties or limitations in traditional behavioral audiological evaluation, such as newborns and small children, individuals with auditory neuropathy spectrum, autism, and intellectual deficits, and in adults and the elderly with dementia. These populations (or individuals) are unable to undergo a behavioral assessment, and generate a growing demand for objective methods to assess hearing. Cortical auditory evoked potentials have been used for decades to estimate hearing thresholds. Current technological advances have lead to the development of equipment that allows their clinical use, with features that enable greater accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, and the possibility of automated detection, analysis, and recording of cortical responses. To determine and correlate behavioral auditory thresholds with cortical auditory thresholds obtained from an automated response analysis technique. The study included 52 adults, divided into two groups: 21 adults with moderate to severe hearing loss (study group); and 31 adults with normal hearing (control group). An automated system of detection, analysis, and recording of cortical responses (HEARLab ® ) was used to record the behavioral and cortical thresholds. The subjects remained awake in an acoustically treated environment. Altogether, 150 tone bursts at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000Hz were presented through insert earphones in descending-ascending intensity. The lowest level at which the subject detected the sound stimulus was defined as the behavioral (hearing) threshold (BT). The lowest level at which a cortical response was observed was defined as the cortical electrophysiological threshold. These two responses were correlated using linear regression. The cortical electrophysiological threshold was, on average, 7.8dB higher than the

  9. Layer-by-layer cell membrane assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matosevic, Sandro; Paegel, Brian M.

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic subcellular membrane systems, such as the nuclear envelope or endoplasmic reticulum, present a rich array of architecturally and compositionally complex supramolecular targets that are as yet inaccessible. Here we describe layer-by-layer phospholipid membrane assembly on microfluidic droplets, a route to structures with defined compositional asymmetry and lamellarity. Starting with phospholipid-stabilized water-in-oil droplets trapped in a static droplet array, lipid monolayer deposition proceeds as oil/water-phase boundaries pass over the droplets. Unilamellar vesicles assembled layer-by-layer support functional insertion both of purified and of in situ expressed membrane proteins. Synthesis and chemical probing of asymmetric unilamellar and double-bilayer vesicles demonstrate the programmability of both membrane lamellarity and lipid-leaflet composition during assembly. The immobilized vesicle arrays are a pragmatic experimental platform for biophysical studies of membranes and their associated proteins, particularly complexes that assemble and function in multilamellar contexts in vivo.

  10. Transfer entropy, symbolic transfer entropy and transcript mutual information indicators reveal a leading role of infragranular layers during slow oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núria Tort-Colet

    2015-04-01

    To determine the directionality of the information flow between different layers of the cortex and the connected thalamus during spontaneous activity we obtained multilayer local field potentials from the rat visual cortex and from its connected thalamus, the lateral geniculate nucleus, during deep anaesthesia. We analyzed directionality of information flow between thalamus, cortical infragranular layers (5 and 6 and supragranular layers (2/3 by means of three information theoretical indicators: transfer entropy, symbolic transfer entropy and transcript mutual information. These three indicators coincided in finding that infragranular layers lead the information flow during slow oscillations both towards supragranular layers and towards the thalamus.

  11. Psychophysiology and Imaging of Visual Cortical Functions in the Blind: A Review

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    Stephanie L. Simon-Dack

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and psychophysiological recordings of the congenitally blind have confirmed functional activation of the visual cortex but have not extensively explained the functional significance of these activation patterns in detail. This review systematically examines research on the role of the visual cortex in processing spatial and non-visual information, highlighting research on individuals with early and late onset blindness. Here, we concentrate on the methods utilized in studying visual cortical activation in early blind participants, including positron emissions tomography (PET, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, and electrophysiological data, specifically event-related potentials (ERPs. This paper summarizes and discusses findings of these studies. We hypothesize how mechanisms of cortical plasticity are expressed in congenitally in comparison to adventitiously blind and short-term visually deprived sighted participants and discuss potential approaches for further investigation of these mechanisms in future research.

  12. Linking cortical microtubule attachment and exocytosis [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivar Noordstra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Exocytosis is a fundamental cellular process whereby secreted molecules are packaged into vesicles that move along cytoskeletal filaments and fuse with the plasma membrane. To function optimally, cells are strongly dependent on precisely controlled delivery of exocytotic cargo. In mammalian cells, microtubules serve as major tracks for vesicle transport by motor proteins, and thus microtubule organization is important for targeted delivery of secretory carriers. Over the years, multiple microtubule-associated and cortical proteins have been discovered that facilitate the interaction between the microtubule plus ends and the cell cortex. In this review, we focus on mammalian protein complexes that have been shown to participate in both cortical microtubule capture and exocytosis, thereby regulating the spatial organization of secretion. These complexes include microtubule plus-end tracking proteins, scaffolding factors, actin-binding proteins, and components of vesicle docking machinery, which together allow efficient coordination of cargo transport and release.

  13. REVERSIBLE CORTICAL BLINDNESS FOLLOWING SUCCESSFUL SURGICAL REPAIR OF TWO STAB WOUNDS IN THE HEART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaiton A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a case of cortical blindness that followed successful surgical repair of two stab wounds in the heart in a 29-year old Libyan man. The patient presented in a state of pre cardiac arrest (shock and low cardiac output status, following multiple chest stab wounds. Chest tube was immediately inserted. Surgery was urgently performed suturing the two wounds; in the root of the aorta and in the left ventricle, and haemostasis was secured. Cardiac arrest was successfully prevented. The patient recovered smoothly, but 24 hours later he declared total blindness. Ophtalmic and neurological examinations and investigations that included fundoscopy, Electroencephalograms (EEGs and Computed Tomography Scans revealed no abnormalities, apart from absence of alpha waves in the EEGs. We diagnosed the case as cortical blindness and continued caring for the patient conservatively. Three days later, the patient regained his vision gradually and was discharged on the 7th postoperative day without any remarks.

  14. Adrenal Collision Tumor: Coexistence of Pigmented Adrenal Cortical Oncocytoma and Ganglioneuroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Seung Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Adrenal collision tumors (ACTs, in which distinct tumors coexist without intermingling in the same adrenal gland, are rare and their actual prevalence is unknown. ACTs commonly consist of adrenal cortical adenoma, pheochromocytoma, or metastatic malignant tumor. Case Report. A 32-year-old woman who had been experiencing gastric discomfort for one month was referred to our hospital with abnormal imaging findings. The physical examination and the laboratory data including endocrine studies were unremarkable. Abdomen computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed two adjacent masses in the left suprarenal fossa, and a laparoscopic left adrenalectomy was done. Histological and immunohistochemical (IHC examinations revealed two distinct tumors: a pigmented adrenal cortical oncocytoma (ACO and a ganglioneuroma, respectively. Conclusion. Both tumors are rare in the adrenal gland and exist as ACTs only exceptionally rarely. This is the first reported case of coexisting oncocytoma and ganglioneuroma in the same adrenal gland to our knowledge.

  15. How the Cortex Gets Its Folds: An Inside-Out, Connectivity-Driven Model for the Scaling of Mammalian Cortical Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Bruno; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2012-01-01

    Larger mammalian cerebral cortices tend to have increasingly folded surfaces, often considered to result from the lateral expansion of the gray matter (GM), which, in a volume constrained by the cranium, causes mechanical compression that is relieved by inward folding of the white matter (WM), or to result from differential expansion of cortical layers. Across species, thinner cortices, presumably more pliable, would offer less resistance and hence become more folded than thicker cortices of a same size. However, such models do not acknowledge evidence in favor of a tension-based pull onto the GM from the inside, holding it in place even when the constraint imposed by the cranium is removed. Here we propose a testable, quantitative model of cortical folding driven by tension along the length of axons in the WM that assumes that connections through the WM are formed early in development, at the same time as the GM becomes folded, and considers that axonal connections through the WM generate tension that leads to inward folding of the WM surface, which pulls the GM surface inward. As an important necessary simplifying hypothesis, we assume that axons leaving or entering the WM do so approximately perpendicularly to the WM–GM interface. Cortical folding is thus driven by WM connectivity, and is a function of the fraction of cortical neurons connected through the WM, the average length, and the average cross-sectional area of the axons in the WM. Our model predicts that the different scaling of cortical folding across mammalian orders corresponds to different combinations of scaling of connectivity, axonal cross-sectional area, and tension along WM axons, instead of being a simple function of the number of GM neurons. Our model also explains variations in average cortical thickness as a result of the factors that lead to cortical folding, rather than as a determinant of folding; predicts that for a same tension, folding increases with connectivity through the WM and

  16. PTSD as a Catalyst for the Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Reduced Cortical Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Erika J.; Sadeh, Naomi; Leritz, Elizabeth C.; Logue, Mark W.; Stoop, Tawni; McGlinchey, Regina; Milberg, William; Miller, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS), defined by a constellation of cardiometabolic pathologies, is highly prevalent among veterans, especially those with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and poses a major risk for adverse health outcomes, including neurodegeneration and mortality. Given this, we evaluated: (a) the association between MetS and neural integrity, indexed by cortical thickness; (b) the relationship between PTSD and MetS; and (c) if PTSD was associated with cortical thickness indirectly through MetS. Methods The sample consisted of 346 US military veterans (89.3% male; 71.4% white) who deployed to Iraq and/or Afghanistan. Neuroimaging data were available for 274 participants. Results In whole-brain analyses, MetS was negatively associated with cortical thickness in 2 left and 4 right hemisphere regions: (a) bilateral temporal lobe, including temporal pole, fusiform gyrus, and insula, and extending into occipital cortex (left hemisphere) and orbitofrontal cortex (right hemisphere); (b) bilateral precuneus, posterior cingulate, calcarine, and occipital-parietal cortex; and (c) right rostral anterior cingulate cortex and central sulcus/postcentral gyrus. Path models showed that PTSD predicted MetS (β = .19, p PTSD confers risk for cardiometabolic pathology and neurodegeneration and raise concern that this cohort may be aging pre-maturely and at risk for substantial medical and cognitive decline. This highlights the need to identify the molecular mechanisms linking PTSD to MetS and for effective interventions to reduce PTSD-related health comorbidities. PMID:26826875

  17. Automated classification of mandibular cortical bone on dental panoramic radiographs for early detection of osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiba, Kazuki; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hayashi, Tatsuro; Fukui, Tatsumasa; Hara, Takeshi; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Findings on dental panoramic radiographs (DPRs) have shown that mandibular cortical index (MCI) based on the morphology of mandibular inferior cortex was significantly correlated with osteoporosis. MCI on DPRs can be categorized into one of three groups and has the high potential for identifying patients with osteoporosis. However, most DPRs are used only for diagnosing dental conditions by dentists in their routine clinical work. Moreover, MCI is not generally quantified but assessed subjectively. In this study, we investigated a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system that automatically classifies mandibular cortical bone for detection of osteoporotic patients at early stage. First, an inferior border of mandibular bone was detected by use of an active contour method. Second, regions of interest including the cortical bone are extracted and analyzed for its thickness and roughness. Finally, support vector machine (SVM) differentiate cases into three MCI categories by features including the thickness and roughness. Ninety eight DPRs were used to evaluate our proposed scheme. The number of cases classified to Class I, II, and III by a dental radiologist are 56, 25 and 17 cases, respectively. Experimental result based on the leave-one-out cross-validation evaluation showed that the sensitivities for the classes I, II, and III were 94.6%, 57.7% and 94.1%, respectively. Distribution of the groups in the feature space indicates a possibility of MCI quantification by the proposed method. Therefore, our scheme has a potential in identifying osteoporotic patients at an early stage.

  18. Back contact buffer layer for thin-film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compaan, Alvin D.; Plotnikov, Victor V.

    2014-09-09

    A photovoltaic cell structure is disclosed that includes a buffer/passivation layer at a CdTe/Back contact interface. The buffer/passivation layer is formed from the same material that forms the n-type semiconductor active layer. In one embodiment, the buffer layer and the n-type semiconductor active layer are formed from cadmium sulfide (CdS). A method of forming a photovoltaic cell includes the step of forming the semiconductor active layers and the buffer/passivation layer within the same deposition chamber and using the same material source.

  19. High-Degree Neurons Feed Cortical Computations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Timme

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has shown that functional connectivity among cortical neurons is highly varied, with a small percentage of neurons having many more connections than others. Also, recent theoretical developments now make it possible to quantify how neurons modify information from the connections they receive. Therefore, it is now possible to investigate how information modification, or computation, depends on the number of connections a neuron receives (in-degree or sends out (out-degree. To do this, we recorded the simultaneous spiking activity of hundreds of neurons in cortico-hippocampal slice cultures using a high-density 512-electrode array. This preparation and recording method combination produced large numbers of neurons recorded at temporal and spatial resolutions that are not currently available in any in vivo recording system. We utilized transfer entropy (a well-established method for detecting linear and nonlinear interactions in time series and the partial information decomposition (a powerful, recently developed tool for dissecting multivariate information processing into distinct parts to quantify computation between neurons where information flows converged. We found that computations did not occur equally in all neurons throughout the networks. Surprisingly, neurons that computed large amounts of information tended to receive connections from high out-degree neurons. However, the in-degree of a neuron was not related to the amount of information it computed. To gain insight into these findings, we developed a simple feedforward network model. We found that a degree-modified Hebbian wiring rule best reproduced the pattern of computation and degree correlation results seen in the real data. Interestingly, this rule also maximized signal propagation in the presence of network-wide correlations, suggesting a mechanism by which cortex could deal with common random background input. These are the first results to show that the extent to

  20. Visual neglect in posterior cortical atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Katia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In posterior cortical atrophy (PCA, there is a progressive impairment of high-level visual functions and parietal damage, which might predict the occurrence of visual neglect. However, neglect may pass undetected if not assessed with specific tests, and might therefore be underestimated in PCA. In this prospective study, we aimed at establishing the side, the frequency and the severity of visual neglect, visual extinction, and primary visual field defects in an unselected sample of PCA patients. Methods Twenty-four right-handed PCA patients underwent a standardized battery of neglect tests. Visual fields were examined clinically by the confrontation method. Results Sixteen of the 24 patients (66% had signs of visual neglect on at least one test, and fourteen (58% also had visual extinction or hemianopia. Five patients (21% had neither neglect nor visual field defects. As expected, left-sided neglect was more severe than right-sided neglect. However, right-sided neglect resulted more frequently in this population (29% than in previous studies on focal brain lesions. Conclusion When assessed with specific visuospatial tests, visual neglect is frequent in patients with PCA. Diagnosis of neglect is important because of its negative impact on daily activities. Clinicians should consider the routine use of neglect tests to screen patients with high-level visual deficits. The relatively high frequency of right-sided neglect in neurodegenerative patients supports the hypothesis that bilateral brain damage is necessary for right-sided neglect signs to occur, perhaps because of the presence in the right hemisphere of crucial structures whose damage contributes to neglect.

  1. Equivalent physical models and formulation of equivalent source layer in high-resolution EEG imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Dezhong [School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu City, 610054, Sichuan Province (China); He Bin [The University of Illinois at Chicago, IL (United States)

    2003-11-07

    In high-resolution EEG imaging, both equivalent dipole layer (EDL) and equivalent charge layer (ECL) assumed to be located just above the cortical surface have been proposed as high-resolution imaging modalities or as intermediate steps to estimate the epicortical potential. Presented here are the equivalent physical models of these two equivalent source layers (ESL) which show that the strength of EDL is proportional to the surface potential of the layer when the outside of the layer is filled with an insulator, and that the strength of ECL is the normal current of the layer when the outside is filled with a perfect conductor. Based on these equivalent physical models, closed solutions of ECL and EDL corresponding to a dipole enclosed by a spherical layer are given. These results provide the theoretical basis of ESL applications in high-resolution EEG mapping.

  2. Equivalent physical models and formulation of equivalent source layer in high-resolution EEG imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Dezhong; He, Bin

    2003-11-07

    In high-resolution EEG imaging, both equivalent dipole layer (EDL) and equivalent charge layer (ECL) assumed to be located just above the cortical surface have been proposed as high-resolution imaging modalities or as intermediate steps to estimate the epicortical potential. Presented here are the equivalent physical models of these two equivalent source layers (ESL) which show that the strength of EDL is proportional to the surface potential of the layer when the outside of the layer is filled with an insulator, and that the strength of ECL is the normal current of the layer when the outside is filled with a perfect conductor. Based on these equivalent physical models, closed solutions of ECL and EDL corresponding to a dipole enclosed by a spherical layer are given. These results provide the theoretical basis of ESL applications in high-resolution EEG mapping.

  3. Cortical abnormalities in bipolar disorder: an MRI analysis of 6503 individuals from the ENIGMA Bipolar Disorder Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, D P; Westlye, L T; Doan, N T; Jahanshad, N; Cheung, J W; Ching, C R K; Versace, A; Bilderbeck, A C; Uhlmann, A; Mwangi, B; Krämer, B; Overs, B; Hartberg, C B; Abé, C; Dima, D; Grotegerd, D; Sprooten, E; Bøen, E; Jimenez, E; Howells, F M; Delvecchio, G; Temmingh, H; Starke, J; Almeida, J R C; Goikolea, J M; Houenou, J; Beard, L M; Rauer, L; Abramovic, L; Bonnin, M; Ponteduro, M F; Keil, M; Rive, M M; Yao, N; Yalin, N; Najt, P; Rosa, P G; Redlich, R; Trost, S; Hagenaars, S; Fears, S C; Alonso-Lana, S; van Erp, T G M; Nickson, T; Chaim-Avancini, T M; Meier, T B; Elvsåshagen, T; Haukvik, U K; Lee, W H; Schene, A H; Lloyd, A J; Young, A H; Nugent, A; Dale, A M; Pfennig, A; McIntosh, A M; Lafer, B; Baune, B T; Ekman, C J; Zarate, C A; Bearden, C E; Henry, C; Simhandl, C; McDonald, C; Bourne, C; Stein, D J; Wolf, D H; Cannon, D M; Glahn, D C; Veltman, D J; Pomarol-Clotet, E; Vieta, E; Canales-Rodriguez, E J; Nery, F G; Duran, F L S; Busatto, G F; Roberts, G; Pearlson, G D; Goodwin, G M; Kugel, H; Whalley, H C; Ruhe, H G; Soares, J C; Fullerton, J M; Rybakowski, J K; Savitz, J; Chaim, K T; Fatjó-Vilas, M; Soeiro-de-Souza, M G; Boks, M P; Zanetti, M V; Otaduy, M C G; Schaufelberger, M S; Alda, M; Ingvar, M; Phillips, M L; Kempton, M J; Bauer, M; Landén, M; Lawrence, N S; van Haren, N E M; Horn, N R; Freimer, N B; Gruber, O; Schofield, P R; Mitchell, P B; Kahn, R S; Lenroot, R; Machado-Vieira, R; Ophoff, R A; Sarró, S; Frangou, S; Satterthwaite, T D; Hajek, T; Dannlowski, U; Malt, U F; Arolt, V; Gattaz, W F; Drevets, W C; Caseras, X; Agartz, I; Thompson, P M; Andreassen, O A

    2018-04-01

    Despite decades of research, the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD) is still not well understood. Structural brain differences have been associated with BD, but results from neuroimaging studies have been inconsistent. To address this, we performed the largest study to date of cortical gray matter thickness and surface area measures from brain magnetic resonance imaging scans of 6503 individuals including 1837 unrelated adults with BD and 2582 unrelated healthy controls for group differences while also examining the effects of commonly prescribed medications, age of illness onset, history of psychosis, mood state, age and sex differences on cortical regions. In BD, cortical gray matter was thinner in frontal, temporal and parietal regions of both brain hemispheres. BD had the strongest effects on left pars opercularis (Cohen's d=-0.293; P=1.71 × 10 -21 ), left fusiform gyrus (d=-0.288; P=8.25 × 10 -21 ) and left rostral middle frontal cortex (d=-0.276; P=2.99 × 10 -19 ). Longer duration of illness (after accounting for age at the time of scanning) was associated with reduced cortical thickness in frontal, medial parietal and occipital regions. We found that several commonly prescribed medications, including lithium, antiepileptic and antipsychotic treatment showed significant associations with cortical thickness and surface area, even after accounting for patients who received multiple medications. We found evidence of reduced cortical surface area associated with a history of psychosis but no associations with mood state at the time of scanning. Our analysis revealed previously undetected associations and provides an extensive analysis of potential confounding variables in neuroimaging studies of BD.

  4. Risk Factors and Cognitive Relevance of Cortical Cerebral Microinfarcts in Patients With Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaolu; van Veluw, Susanne J; Wong, Adrian; Liu, Wenyan; Shi, Lin; Yang, Jie; Xiong, Yunyun; Lau, Alexander; Biessels, Geert Jan; Mok, Vincent C T

    2016-10-01

    It was recently demonstrated that cerebral microinfarcts (CMIs) can be detected in vivo using 3.0 tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging. We investigated the prevalence, risk factors, and the longitudinal cognitive consequence of cortical CMIs on 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging, in patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. A total of 231 patients undergoing 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging were included. Montreal Cognitive Assessment was used to evaluate global cognitive functions and cognitive domains (memory, language, and attention visuospatial and executive functions). Cognitive changes were represented by the difference in Montreal Cognitive Assessment score between baseline and 28-month after stroke/transient ischemic attack. The cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between cortical CMIs and cognitive functions were explored using ANCOVA and regression models. Cortical CMIs were observed in 34 patients (14.7%), including 13 patients with acute (hyperintense on diffusion-weighted imaging) and 21 with chronic CMIs (isointense on diffusion-weighted imaging). Atrial fibrillation was a risk factor for all cortical CMIs (odds ratio, 4.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-14.9; P=0.007). Confluent white matter hyperintensities was associated with chronic CMIs (odds ratio, 2.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-7.8; P=0.047). The presence of cortical CMIs at baseline was associated with worse visuospatial functions at baseline and decline over 28-month follow-up (β=0.5; 95% confidence interval, 0.1-1.0; P=0.008, adjusting for brain atrophy, white matter hyperintensities, lacunes, and microbleeds). Cortical CMIs are a common finding in patients with stroke/transient ischemic attack. Associations between CMI with atrial fibrillation and white matter hyperintensities suggest that these lesions have a heterogeneous cause, involving microembolism and cerebral small vessel disease. CMI seemed to preferentially impact visuospatial functions as assessed by a

  5. Technical Note: Cortical thickness and density estimation from clinical CT using a prior thickness-density relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humbert, Ludovic, E-mail: ludohumberto@gmail.com [Galgo Medical, Barcelona 08036 (Spain); Hazrati Marangalou, Javad; Rietbergen, Bert van [Orthopaedic Biomechanics, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven 5600 MB (Netherlands); Río Barquero, Luis Miguel del [CETIR Centre Medic, Barcelona 08029 (Spain); Lenthe, G. Harry van [Biomechanics Section, KU Leuven–University of Leuven, Leuven 3001 (Belgium)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Cortical thickness and density are critical components in determining the strength of bony structures. Computed tomography (CT) is one possible modality for analyzing the cortex in 3D. In this paper, a model-based approach for measuring the cortical bone thickness and density from clinical CT images is proposed. Methods: Density variations across the cortex were modeled as a function of the cortical thickness and density, location of the cortex, density of surrounding tissues, and imaging blur. High resolution micro-CT data of cadaver proximal femurs were analyzed to determine a relationship between cortical thickness and density. This thickness-density relationship was used as prior information to be incorporated in the model to obtain accurate measurements of cortical thickness and density from clinical CT volumes. The method was validated using micro-CT scans of 23 cadaver proximal femurs. Simulated clinical CT images with different voxel sizes were generated from the micro-CT data. Cortical thickness and density were estimated from the simulated images using the proposed method and compared with measurements obtained using the micro-CT images to evaluate the effect of voxel size on the accuracy of the method. Then, 19 of the 23 specimens were imaged using a clinical CT scanner. Cortical thickness and density were estimated from the clinical CT images using the proposed method and compared with the micro-CT measurements. Finally, a case-control study including 20 patients with osteoporosis and 20 age-matched controls with normal bone density was performed to evaluate the proposed method in a clinical context. Results: Cortical thickness (density) estimation errors were 0.07 ± 0.19 mm (−18 ± 92 mg/cm{sup 3}) using the simulated clinical CT volumes with the smallest voxel size (0.33 × 0.33 × 0.5 mm{sup 3}), and 0.10 ± 0.24 mm (−10 ± 115 mg/cm{sup 3}) using the volumes with the largest voxel size (1.0 × 1.0 × 3.0 mm{sup 3}). A trend for the

  6. THE CUTICULAR LAYER OF THE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mucous covering the skin, including scales if the fish has scales, is removed accidentally the fish usually die, especially when kept in confinement. (see van Oosten 1957 for review). According to. Whitear (1970) the cuticular layer in bony fish has a dual origin; one part is secreted from the surface epidermal cells and the ...

  7. On the homogeneity and heterogeneity of cortical thickness profiles in Homo sapiens sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koten, Jan Willem; Schüppen, André; Morozova, Maria; Lehofer, Agnes; Koschutnig, Karl; Wood, Guilherme

    2017-12-20

    Cortical thickness has been investigated since the beginning of the 20th century, but we do not know how similar the cortical thickness profiles among humans are. In this study, the local similarity of cortical thickness profiles was investigated using sliding window methods. Here, we show that approximately 5% of the cortical thickness profiles are similarly expressed among humans while 45% of the cortical thickness profiles show a high level of heterogeneity. Therefore, heterogeneity is the rule, not the exception. Cortical thickness profiles of somatosensory homunculi and the anterior insula are consistent among humans, while the cortical thickness profiles of the motor homunculus are more variable. Cortical thickness profiles of homunculi that code for muscle position and skin stimulation are highly similar among humans despite large differences in sex, education, and age. This finding suggests that the structure of these cortices remains well preserved over a lifetime. Our observations possibly relativize opinions on cortical plasticity.

  8. Cortical plasticity induced by spike-triggered microstimulation in primate somatosensory cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Song

    Full Text Available Electrical stimulation of the nervous system for therapeutic purposes, such as deep brain stimulation in the treatment of Parkinson's disease, has been used for decades. Recently, increased attention has focused on using microstimulation to restore functions as diverse as somatosensation and memory. However, how microstimulation changes the neural substrate is still not fully understood. Microstimulation may cause cortical changes that could either compete with or complement natural neural processes, and could result in neuroplastic changes rendering the region dysfunctional or even epileptic. As part of our efforts to produce neuroprosthetic devices and to further study the effects of microstimulation on the cortex, we stimulated and recorded from microelectrode arrays in the hand area of the primary somatosensory cortex (area 1 in two awake macaque monkeys. We applied a simple neuroprosthetic microstimulation protocol to a pair of electrodes in the area 1 array, using either random pulses or pulses time-locked to the recorded spiking activity of a reference neuron. This setup was replicated using a computer model of the thalamocortical system, which consisted of 1980 spiking neurons distributed among six cortical layers and two thalamic nuclei. Experimentally, we found that spike-triggered microstimulation induced cortical plasticity, as shown by increased unit-pair mutual information, while random microstimulation did not. In addition, there was an increased response to touch following spike-triggered microstimulation, along with decreased neural variability. The computer model successfully reproduced both qualitative and quantitative aspects of the experimental findings. The physiological findings of this study suggest that even simple microstimulation protocols can be used to increase somatosensory information flow.

  9. Superior cortical screw in osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae: A biomechanics and microstructure-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tianming; Zhang, Xuyang; Liu, Junhui; Li, Shengyun; Shan, Zhi; Fan, Shunwu; Zhao, Fengdong

    2018-01-31

    Osteoporosis reduces the bone-screw purchase, potentially reducing pullout strength and other biomechanical properties. However, the existing pedicle screw approach may not compensate for the detrimental effects of decreased vertebral bone mineral density. Two methods of screw insertion were performed in thirteen cadaveric osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae: Magerl's method in the left pedicle, and superior cortical screw method in the right (its entry point located vertically 3 mm above Magerl's point). Before screw fixations, the pedicle and its corresponding vertebral body were divided into six equal layers from cranial to caudal by performing micro-CT and tested for microstructure properties, such as bone mineral density, trabecular bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness, trabecular separation and trabecular number. Further, pedicle was horizontally divided into three regions and tested. After screw fixations, microstructure properties of the bone surrounding the screws were analyzed. Finally, the screw pullout strength was tested biomechanically. The bone structure is denser in the upper third of the pedicle and its corresponding vertebral body. A similar microstructure is seen within the pedicle. This study reveals that the pullout strength is significantly correlated to the bone mineral density, trabecular bone volume fraction and trabecular thickness. Biomechanical test showed pullout strength in the superior cortical screw group with mean 613.3 N (SD 200.4) was 22.4% higher than that in the Magerl group with mean 501.2 N (SD 256.6). The superior cortical screw method can be a reliable alternative, to provide better pullout strength for posterior lumbar instrumentation, especially in osteoporotic patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Linear distributed source modeling of local field potentials recorded with intra-cortical electrode arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikkert Hindriks

    Full Text Available Planar intra-cortical electrode (Utah arrays provide a unique window into the spatial organization of cortical activity. Reconstruction of the current source density (CSD underlying such recordings, however, requires "inverting" Poisson's equation. For inter-laminar recordings, this is commonly done by the CSD method, which consists in taking the second-order spatial derivative of the recorded local field potentials (LFPs. Although the CSD method has been tremendously successful in mapping the current generators underlying inter-laminar LFPs, its application to planar recordings is more challenging. While for inter-laminar recordings the CSD method seems reasonably robust against violations of its assumptions, is it unclear as to what extent this holds for planar recordings. One of the objectives of this study is to characterize the conditions under which the CSD method can be successfully applied to Utah array data. Using forward modeling, we find that for spatially coherent CSDs, the CSD method yields inaccurate reconstructions due to volume-conducted contamination from currents in deeper cortical layers. An alternative approach is to "invert" a constructed forward model. The advantage of this approach is that any a priori knowledge about the geometrical and electrical properties of the tissue can be taken into account. Although several inverse methods have been proposed for LFP data, the applicability of existing electroencephalographic (EEG and magnetoencephalographic (MEG inverse methods to LFP data is largely unexplored. Another objective of our study therefore, is to assess the applicability of the most commonly used EEG/MEG inverse methods to Utah array data. Our main conclusion is that these inverse methods provide more accurate CSD reconstructions than the CSD method. We illustrate the inverse methods using event-related potentials recorded from primary visual cortex of a macaque monkey during a motion discrimination task.

  11. Conversion Discriminative Analysis on Mild Cognitive Impairment Using Multiple Cortical Features from MR Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengwen Guo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging measurements derived from magnetic resonance imaging provide important information required for detecting changes related to the progression of mild cognitive impairment (MCI. Cortical features and changes play a crucial role in revealing unique anatomical patterns of brain regions, and further differentiate MCI patients from normal states. Four cortical features, namely, gray matter volume, cortical thickness, surface area, and mean curvature, were explored for discriminative analysis among three groups including the stable MCI (sMCI, the converted MCI (cMCI, and the normal control (NC groups. In this study, 158 subjects (72 NC, 46 sMCI, and 40 cMCI were selected from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. A sparse-constrained regression model based on the l2-1-norm was introduced to reduce the feature dimensionality and retrieve essential features for the discrimination of the three groups by using a support vector machine (SVM. An optimized strategy of feature addition based on the weight of each feature was adopted for the SVM classifier in order to achieve the best classification performance. The baseline cortical features combined with the longitudinal measurements for 2 years of follow-up data yielded prominent classification results. In particular, the cortical thickness produced a classification with 98.84% accuracy, 97.5% sensitivity, and 100% specificity for the sMCI–cMCI comparison; 92.37% accuracy, 84.78% sensitivity, and 97.22% specificity for the cMCI–NC comparison; and 93.75% accuracy, 92.5% sensitivity, and 94.44% specificity for the sMCI–NC comparison. The best performances obtained by the SVM classifier using the essential features were 5–40% more than those using all of the retained features. The feasibility of the cortical features for the recognition of anatomical patterns was certified; thus, the proposed method has the potential to improve the clinical diagnosis of sub-types of MCI and

  12. Spiral CT in kidney: assumption of renal function by objective evaluation of renal cortical enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Bo Yoon; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Joon Woo; Myung, Jae Sung; Sim, Jung Suk; Seong, Chang Kyu; Kim, Seung Hyup; Choi, Guk Myeong; Chi, Seong Whi

    2000-01-01

    To correlate the degree of renal cortical enhancement, objectively evaluated by means of spiral CT with the serum level of creatinine, and to determine the extent to which this degree of enhancement may be used to detect renal parenchymal disease. Eighty patients (M:F = 50:30; age + 25-19, (mean 53) years) with available serum level of creatinine who underwent spiral CT between September and October 1999 were included in this study. In fifty patients the findings suggested hepatic or biliary diseases such as hepatoma, biliary cancer, or stone, while in thirty, renal diseases such as cyst, hematoma, or stone appeared to be present. Spiral CT imaging of the cortical phase was obtained at 30-40 seconds after the injection of 120 ml of non-ionic media at a rate of 3 ml/sec. The degree of renal cortical enhancement was calculated by dividing the CT attenuation number of renal cortex at the level of the renal hilum by the CT attenuation number of aorta at the same level. The degree of renal cortical enhancement was compared with the serum level of creatinine, and the degree of renal cortical enhancement in renal parenchymal disease with that of the normal group. Among eighty patients there were five with renal parenchymal disease and 75 with normal renal function. The ratio of the CT attenuation number of renal cortex to that of aorta at the level of the renal hilum ranged between 0.49 and 0.99 (mean, 0.79; standard deviation, 0.15). while the serum level of creatinine ranged between 0.6 and 3.2 mg/dl. There was significant correlation (coefficient of -0.346) and a statistically significant probability of 0.002 between the ratio of the CT attenuation numbers and the serum level of creatinine. There was a significant difference (statistically significant probability of less than 0.01) between those with renal parenchymal disease and the normal group. The use of spiral CT to measure the degree of renal cortical enhancement provides not only an effective index for

  13. In vivo characterization of cortical and white matter neuroaxonal pathology in early multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granberg, Tobias; Fan, Qiuyun; Treaba, Constantina Andrada; Ouellette, Russell; Herranz, Elena; Mangeat, Gabriel; Louapre, Céline; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Klawiter, Eric C; Sloane, Jacob A; Mainero, Caterina

    2017-11-01

    Neuroaxonal pathology is a main determinant of disease progression in multiple sclerosis; however, its underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, including its link to inflammatory demyelination and temporal occurrence in the disease course are still unknown. We used ultra-high field (7 T), ultra-high gradient strength diffusion and T1/T2-weighted myelin-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging to characterize microstructural changes in myelin and neuroaxonal integrity in the cortex and white matter in early stage multiple sclerosis, their distribution in lesional and normal-appearing tissue, and their correlations with neurological disability. Twenty-six early stage multiple sclerosis subjects (disease duration ≤5 years) and 24 age-matched healthy controls underwent 7 T T2*-weighted imaging for cortical lesion segmentation and 3 T T1/T2-weighted myelin-sensitive imaging and neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging for assessing microstructural myelin, axonal and dendrite integrity in lesional and normal-appearing tissue of the cortex and the white matter. Conventional mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy metrics were also assessed for comparison. Cortical lesions were identified in 92% of early multiple sclerosis subjects and they were characterized by lower intracellular volume fraction (P = 0.015 by paired t-test), lower myelin-sensitive contrast (P = 0.030 by related-samples Wilcoxon signed-rank test) and higher mean diffusivity (P = 0.022 by related-samples Wilcoxon signed-rank test) relative to the contralateral normal-appearing cortex. Similar findings were observed in white matter lesions relative to normal-appearing white matter (all P multiple sclerosis subjects had diffusely lower intracellular volume fractions than the white matter in controls (P = 0.029 by unpaired t-test). Cortical thickness did not differ significantly between multiple sclerosis subjects and controls. Higher orientation dispersion in the left primary motor

  14. MS cortical lesions on DIR: not quite what they seem?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Sethi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Accurate identification and localization of cortical gray matter (CGM lesions in MS is important when determining their clinical relevance. Double inversion recovery (DIR scans have been widely used to detect MS CGM lesions. Phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR scans have a higher signal to noise, and can therefore be obtained at a higher resolution within clinically acceptable times. This enables detection of more CGM lesions depicting a clearer cortical and juxtacortical anatomy. In this study, we systematically investigated if the use of high resolution PSIR scans changes the classification of CGM lesions, when compared with standard resolution DIR scans. METHODS: 60 patients [30 RR(Relapsing remitting and 15 each with PP(Primary progressive and SP(Secondary progressive MS] were scanned on a 3T Philips Achieva MRI scanner. Images acquired included DIR (1×1×3 mm resolution and PSIR (0.5×0.5×2 mm. CGM lesions were detected and classified on DIR as intracortical (IC or leucocortical (LC. We then examined these lesions on corresponding slices of the high resolution PSIR scans and categorized them as IC, LC, Juxtacortical white matter (JC-WM, abutting but not entering cortex and other white matter (WM, not juxtacortical. Classifications using both scans were noted. RESULTS: 282 IC and 483 LC were identified on DIR. Of the IC lesions, 61% were confirmed as IC on PSIR, 35.5% were reclassified as LC and 3.5% as JC-WM or other WM only. Of the LC DIR lesions, 43.9% were confirmed at LC on PSIR, 16.1% were reclassified as IC and 40% as JC-WM or other WM only. Overall, 50% (381/765 of CGM lesions seen on DIR were reclassified, and 26.5% (203/765 affected WM only. CONCLUSIONS: When compared with higher resolution PSIR, a significant proportion of lesions classified as involving CGM on DIR appear to either contain more white matter than expected or to not involve CGM at all.

  15. Extended cortical activations during evaluating successive pain stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Carmen; Felden, Lisa; Preibisch, Christine; Nöth, Ulrike; Martin, Till; Anti, Sandra; Deichmann, Ralf; Oertel, Bruno G.

    2012-01-01

    Comparing pain is done in daily life and involves short-term memorizing and attention focusing. This event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging study investigated the short-term brain activations associated with the comparison of pain stimuli using a delayed discrimination paradigm. Fourteen healthy young volunteers compared two successive pain stimuli administered at a 10 s interval to the same location at the nasal mucosa. Fourteen age- and sex-matched subjects received similar pain stimuli without performing the comparison task. With the comparison task, the activations associated with the second pain stimulus were significantly greater than with the first stimulus in the anterior insular cortex and the primary somatosensory area. This was observed on the background of a generally increased stimulus-associated brain activation in the presence of the comparison task that included regions of the pain matrix (insular cortex, primary and secondary somatosensory area, midcingulate cortex, supplemental motor area) and regions associated with attention, decision making, working memory and body recognition (frontal and temporal gyri, inferior parietal lobule, precuneus, lingual cortices). This data provides a cerebral correlate for the role of pain as a biological alerting system that gains the subject's attention and then dominates most other perceptions and activities involving pain-specific and non-pain-specific brain regions. PMID:21768205

  16. Automated landmark identification for human cortical surface-based registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anticevic, Alan; Repovs, Grega; Dierker, Donna L; Harwell, John W; Coalson, Timothy S; Barch, Deanna M; Van Essen, David C

    2012-02-01

    Volume-based registration (VBR) is the predominant method used in human neuroimaging to compensate for individual variability. However, surface-based registration (SBR) techniques have an inherent advantage over VBR because they respect the topology of the convoluted cortical sheet. There is evidence that existing SBR methods indeed confer a registration advantage over affine VBR. Landmark-SBR constrains registration using explicit landmarks to represent corresponding geographical locations on individual and atlas surfaces. The need for manual landmark identification has been an impediment to the widespread adoption of Landmark-SBR. To circumvent this obstacle, we have implemented and evaluated an automated landmark identification (ALI) algorithm for registration to the human PALS-B12 atlas. We compared ALI performance with that from two trained human raters and one expert anatomical rater (ENR). We employed both quantitative and qualitative quality assurance metrics, including a biologically meaningful analysis of hemispheric asymmetry. ALI performed well across all quality assurance tests, indicating that it yields robust and largely accurate results that require only modest manual correction (<10 min per subject). ALI largely circumvents human error and bias and enables high throughput analysis of large neuroimaging datasets for inter-subject registration to an atlas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Cortical Representations during and after Stimulus Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke Esther van de Nieuwenhuijzen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Visual perception is a spatiotemporally complex process. In this study, we investigated cortical dynamics during and after stimulus presentation. We observed that visual category information related to the difference between faces and objects became apparent in the occipital lobe after 63 ms. Within the next 110 ms, activation spread out to include the temporal lobe before returning to residing mainly in the occipital lobe again. After stimulus offset, a peak in information was observed, comparable to the peak after stimulus onset. Moreover, similar processes, albeit not identical, seemed to underlie both peaks. Information about the categorical identity of the stimulus remained present until 677 ms after stimulus offset, during which period the stimulus had to be retained in working memory. Activation patterns initially resembled those observed during stimulus presentation. After about 200 ms, however, this representation changed and class-specific activity became more equally distributed over the four lobes. These results show that, although there are common processes underlying stimulus representation both during and after stimulus presentation, these representations change depending on the specific stage of perception and maintenance.

  18. Cortical tubers, cognition, and epilepsy in tuberous sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassiri, Janani; Snyder, Thomas J; Bhargava, Ravi; Wheatley, B Matt; Sinclair, D Barry

    2011-05-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is an autosomal-dominant genetic disorder characterized by hamartomatous growth in various organs. Patients who have this disorder exhibit a high rate of epilepsy and cognitive problems. We investigated number of tubers, location, seizure types, and cognitive outcome, and we analyzed the relationships among them in our tuberous sclerosis patients in the Comprehensive Epilepsy Program at the University of Alberta. We also examined the seizure outcome after tuber resection. Our study cohort included 24 patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. We obtained seizure history, electroencephalogram, and neuropsychologic parameters. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to examine tuber numbers and locations. Ten patients underwent surgical removal of tubers responsible for intractable epilepsy. A negative correlation was found between the number of tubers and intelligent quotient score. Epilepsy surgery led to freedom from seizures in this patient group. We demonstrated that the total number and location of cortical tubers play a significant role in the extent of mental retardation in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. In addition, patients with intractable seizures and well-defined epileptic focus had excellent surgical outcome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cortical visual impairment in children: identification, evaluation and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Sharon S

    2012-09-01

    Cortical visual impairment (CVI) is a major cause of visual loss in children worldwide. The definition of this condition is constantly evolving with respect to definition, identifying those at risk and technology for diagnosis. These advances can be used for early diagnosis, design of accommodations and services, as well as future therapies and prevention strategies. Clinical questionnaires are being developed and tested for reliability in an attempt to identify those at risk for CVI. The definition is constantly being modified and now includes deficits in vision-guided motor planning and higher level executive functions. Neuroimaging techniques, such as MRI, functional MRI, and diffusion tensor imaging; electrophysiologic testing, such as sweep visual-evoked potentials; and perceptual testing, allow for further refinements in correlating structural defects and deficits in function. Recent developments will allow identification of those children at risk for CVI and earlier interventions for specific deficits. A child's performance is built on previously mastered skills, making timely prediction of deficits and intervention essential.

  20. Facilitated early cortical processing of nude human bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, Jussi; Salminen, Nelli; Sams, Mikko; Hietanen, Jari K; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2015-07-01

    Functional brain imaging has identified specialized neural systems supporting human body perception. Responses to nude vs. clothed bodies within this system are amplified. However, it remains unresolved whether nude and clothed bodies are processed by same cerebral networks or whether processing of nude bodies recruits additional affective and arousal processing areas. We recorded simultaneous MEG and EEG while participants viewed photographs of clothed and nude bodies. Global field power revealed a peak ∼145ms after stimulus onset to both clothed and nude bodies, and ∼205ms exclusively to nude bodies. Nude-body-sensitive responses were centered first (100-200ms) in the extrastriate and fusiform body areas, and subsequently (200-300ms) in affective-motivational areas including insula and anterior cingulate cortex. We conclude that visibility of sexual features facilitates early cortical processing of human bodies, the purpose of which is presumably to trigger sexual behavior and ultimately ensure reproduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Distributed cortical networks for focused auditory attention and distraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinne, Teemu; Kirjavainen, Siiri; Salonen, Oili; Degerman, Alexander; Kang, Xiaojian; Woods, David L.; Alho, Kimmo

    2009-01-01

    We used behavioral measures and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the effects of parametrically varied task-irrelevant pitch changes in attended sounds on loudness-discrimination performance and brain activity in cortical surface maps. Ten subjects discriminated tone loudness in sequences that also included infrequent task-irrelevant pitch changes. Consistent with results of previous studies, the task-irrelevant pitch changes impaired performance in the loudness discrimination task. Auditory stimulation, attention-enhanced processing of sounds and motor responding during the loudness discrimination task activated supratemporal (auditory cortex) and inferior parietal areas bilaterally and left-hemisphere (contralateral to the hand used for responding) motor areas. Large pitch changes were associated with right hemisphere supratemporal activations as well as widespread bilateral activations in the frontal lobe and along the intraparietal sulcus. Loudness discrimination and distracting pitch changes activated common areas in the right supratemporal gyrus, left medial frontal cortex, left precentral gyrus, and left inferior parietal cortex. PMID:17368939

  2. Nanostructured layers of thermoelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Jeffrey J.; Lynch, Jared; Coates, Nelson; Forster, Jason; Sahu, Ayaskanta; Chabinyc, Michael; Russ, Boris

    2018-01-30

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to thermoelectric materials. In one aspect, a method includes providing a plurality of nanostructures. The plurality of nanostructures comprise a thermoelectric material, with each nanostructure of the plurality of nanostructures having first ligands disposed on a surface of the nanostructure. The plurality of nanostructures is mixed with a solution containing second ligands and a ligand exchange process occurs in which the first ligands disposed on the plurality of nanostructures are replaced with the second ligands. The plurality of nanostructures is deposited on a substrate to form a layer. The layer is thermally annealed.

  3. Election Districts and Precincts, Election districts within Sedgwick County, including voter precinct, BOE, BOCC, Council, Senate, and State Representative districts. This layer is maintained interactively by GIS staff. The cityhold cover is used as a source for features and attributes., Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Election Districts and Precincts dataset current as of 2008. Election districts within Sedgwick County, including voter precinct, BOE, BOCC, Council, Senate, and...

  4. Locomotion-Related Population Cortical Ca2+Transients in Freely Behaving Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quanchao; Yao, Jiwei; Guang, Yu; Liang, Shanshan; Guan, Jiangheng; Qin, Han; Liao, Xiang; Jin, Wenjun; Zhang, Jianxiong; Pan, Junxia; Jia, Hongbo; Yan, Junan; Feng, Zhengzhi; Li, Weibing; Chen, Xiaowei

    2017-01-01

    Locomotion involves complex neural activity throughout different cortical and subcortical networks. The primary motor cortex (M1) receives a variety of projections from different brain regions and is responsible for executing movements. The primary visual cortex (V1) receives external visual stimuli and plays an important role in guiding locomotion. Understanding how exactly the M1 and the V1 are involved in locomotion requires recording the neural activities in these areas in freely moving animals. Here, we used an optical fiber-based method for the real-time monitoring of neuronal population activities in freely moving mice. We combined the bulk loading of a synthetic Ca 2+ indicator and the optical fiber-based Ca 2+ recordings of neuronal activities. An optical fiber 200 μm in diameter can detect the coherent activity of a subpopulation of neurons. In layer 5 of the M1 and V1, we showed that population Ca 2+ transients reliably occurred preceding the impending locomotion. Interestingly, the M1 Ca 2+ transients started ~100 ms earlier than that in V1. Furthermore, the population Ca 2+ transients were robustly correlated with head movements. Thus, our work provides a simple but efficient approach for monitoring the cortical Ca 2+ activity of a local cluster of neurons during locomotion in freely moving animals.

  5. Unusual association of SCN2A epileptic encephalopathy with severe cortical dysplasia detected by prenatal MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Silvia; Marchionni, Enrica; Prudente, Sabrina; De Liso, Paola; Spalice, Alberto; Giancotti, Antonella; Manganaro, Lucia; Pizzuti, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    We present an atypical association of SCN2A epileptic encephalopathy with severe cortical dysplasia. SCN2A mutations are associated with epileptic syndromes from benign to extremely severe in absence of such macroscopic brain findings. Prenatal MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) in a 32 weeks fetus, with US (Ultrasonography) diagnosis of isolated ventriculomegaly showed CNS (Central Nervous System) dysplasia characterized by lack of differentiation between cortical and subcortical layers, pachygyria and corpus callosum dysgenesis. Postnatal MRI confirmed the prenatal findings. On day 6 the baby presented a focal status epilepticus, partially controlled by phenobarbital, phenytoin, and levetiracetam. After three weeks a moderate improvement in seizure control has been achieved with carbamazepine. Exome sequencing detected a de novo heterozygous mutation in the SCN2A gene, encoding the α II -subunit of a sodium channel. The patient findings expand the phenotype spectrum of SCN2A mutations to epileptic encephalopathies with macroscopic brain developmental features. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Progressive brain damage, synaptic reorganization and NMDA activation in a model of epileptogenic cortical dysplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Colciaghi

    Full Text Available Whether severe epilepsy could be a progressive disorder remains as yet unresolved. We previously demonstrated in a rat model of acquired focal cortical dysplasia, the methylazoxymethanol/pilocarpine - MAM/pilocarpine - rats, that the occurrence of status epilepticus (SE and subsequent seizures fostered a pathologic process capable of modifying the morphology of cortical pyramidal neurons and NMDA receptor expression/localization. We have here extended our analysis by evaluating neocortical and hippocampal changes in MAM/pilocarpine rats at different epilepsy stages, from few days after onset up to six months of chronic epilepsy. Our findings indicate that the process triggered by SE and subsequent seizures in the malformed brain i is steadily progressive, deeply altering neocortical and hippocampal morphology, with atrophy of neocortex and CA regions and progressive increase of granule cell layer dispersion; ii changes dramatically the fine morphology of neurons in neocortex and hippocampus, by increasing cell size and decreasing both dendrite arborization and spine density; iii induces reorganization of glutamatergic and GABAergic networks in both neocortex and hippocampus, favoring excitatory vs inhibitory input; iv activates NMDA regulatory subunits. Taken together, our data indicate that, at least in experimental models of brain malformations, severe seizure activity, i.e., SE plus recurrent seizures, may lead to a widespread, steadily progressive architectural, neuronal and synaptic reorganization in the brain. They also suggest the mechanistic relevance of glutamate/NMDA hyper-activation in the seizure-related brain pathologic plasticity.

  7. Progressive brain damage, synaptic reorganization and NMDA activation in a model of epileptogenic cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colciaghi, Francesca; Finardi, Adele; Nobili, Paola; Locatelli, Denise; Spigolon, Giada; Battaglia, Giorgio Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Whether severe epilepsy could be a progressive disorder remains as yet unresolved. We previously demonstrated in a rat model of acquired focal cortical dysplasia, the methylazoxymethanol/pilocarpine - MAM/pilocarpine - rats, that the occurrence of status epilepticus (SE) and subsequent seizures fostered a pathologic process capable of modifying the morphology of cortical pyramidal neurons and NMDA receptor expression/localization. We have here extended our analysis by evaluating neocortical and hippocampal changes in MAM/pilocarpine rats at different epilepsy stages, from few days after onset up to six months of chronic epilepsy. Our findings indicate that the process triggered by SE and subsequent seizures in the malformed brain i) is steadily progressive, deeply altering neocortical and hippocampal morphology, with atrophy of neocortex and CA regions and progressive increase of granule cell layer dispersion; ii) changes dramatically the fine morphology of neurons in neocortex and hippocampus, by increasing cell size and decreasing both dendrite arborization and spine density; iii) induces reorganization of glutamatergic and GABAergic networks in both neocortex and hippocampus, favoring excitatory vs inhibitory input; iv) activates NMDA regulatory subunits. Taken together, our data indicate that, at least in experimental models of brain malformations, severe seizure activity, i.e., SE plus recurrent seizures, may lead to a widespread, steadily progressive architectural, neuronal and synaptic reorganization in the brain. They also suggest the mechanistic relevance of glutamate/NMDA hyper-activation in the seizure-related brain pathologic plasticity.

  8. Juxtacortical Lesions and Cortical Thinning in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareto, D; Sastre-Garriga, J; Auger, C; Vives-Gilabert, Y; Delgado, J; Tintoré, M; Montalban, X; Rovira, A

    2015-12-01

    The role of juxtacortical lesions in brain volume loss in multiple sclerosis has not been fully clarified. The aim of this study was to explore the role of juxtacortical lesions on cortical atrophy and to investigate whether the presence of juxtacortical lesions is related to local cortical thinning in the early stages of MS. A total of 131 patients with clinically isolated syndrome or with relapsing-remitting MS were scanned on a 3T system. Patients with clinically isolated syndrome were classified into 3 groups based on the presence and topography of brain lesions: no lesions (n = 24), only non-juxtacortical lesions (n = 33), and juxtacortical lesions and non-juxtacortical lesions (n = 34). Patients with relapsing-remitting MS were classified into 2 groups: only non-juxtacortical lesions (n = 10) and with non-juxtacortical lesions and juxtacortical lesions (n = 30). A juxtacortical lesion probability map was generated, and cortical thickness was measured by using FreeSurfer. Juxtacortical lesion volume in relapsing-remitting MS was double that of patients with clinically isolated syndrome. The insula showed the highest density of juxtacortical lesions, followed by the temporal, parietal, frontal, and occipital lobes. Patients with relapsing-remitting MS with juxtacortical lesions showed significantly thinner cortices overall and in the parietal and temporal lobes compared with those with clinically isolated syndrome with normal brain MR imaging. The volume of subcortical structures (thalamus, pallidum, putamen, and accumbens) was significantly decreased in relapsing-remitting MS with juxtacortical lesions compared with clinically isolated syndrome with normal brain MR imaging. The spatial distribution of juxtacortical lesions was not found to overlap with areas of cortical thinning. Cortical thinning and subcortical gray matter volume loss in patients with a clinically isolated syndrome or relapsing-remitting MS was related to the presence of juxtacortical

  9. Asymptotic analysis and boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Cousteix, Jean

    2007-01-01

    This book presents a new method of asymptotic analysis of boundary-layer problems, the Successive Complementary Expansion Method (SCEM). The first part is devoted to a general comprehensive presentation of the tools of asymptotic analysis. It gives the keys to understand a boundary-layer problem and explains the methods to construct an approximation. The second part is devoted to SCEM and its applications in fluid mechanics, including external and internal flows. The advantages of SCEM are discussed in comparison with the standard Method of Matched Asymptotic Expansions. In particular, for the first time, the theory of Interactive Boundary Layer is fully justi