WorldWideScience

Sample records for include genetic predisposition

  1. Genetic predisposition to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Clare; Hodgson, Shirley

    2005-01-01

    Over recent decades a number of genes causing predisposition to cancer have been identified. Some of these cause rare autosomal dominant monogenic cancer predisposition syndromes. In the majority of families, the increased incidence of cancers is due to a multifactorial aetiology with a number of lower penetrance cancer predisposition genes interacting with environmental factors. Identification of those at increased risk of cancer on account of their family history is important, as genetic testing, enhanced surveillance, prophylactic surgery and chemoprophylaxis may be indicated. In this article the issues surrounding genetic predisposition to cancer are considered by examining two common cancers: colorectal and breast cancer.

  2. Genetic Predisposition to Rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awosika, Olabola; Oussedik, Elias

    2018-04-01

    Rosacea is a common inflammatory skin disease with a multifaceted pathophysiology, including environmental stressors and neurovascular and immune dysfunction affected by the presence of pathogens. The genetic component of this disorder is not well understood. However, a possible genetic origin in Northern European descendants, family inheritance, twin concordance, and genetic associations with autoimmune disorders attest the genetic predisposition to rosacea. Currently, one single-nucleotide polymorphism has been identified in association with rosacea and is intergenic between HLA-DRA and BTNL2. Additional associations with HLA alleles and immune-mediated disorders support the role of immune-regulating genes and innate and adaptive immunity in rosacea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic predisposition to obesity affects behavioural traits including food reward and anxiety-like behaviour in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Heike; Kraemer, Maria; Rabasa, Cristina; Askevik, Kaisa; Adan, Roger A H; Dickson, Suzanne L

    2017-06-15

    Here we sought to define behavioural traits linked to anxiety, reward, and exploration in different strains of rats commonly used in obesity research. We hypothesized that genetic variance may contribute not only to their metabolic phenotype (that is well documented) but also to the expression of these behavioural traits. Rat strains that differ in their susceptibility to develop an obese phenotype (Sprague-Dawley, Obese Prone, Obese Resistant, and Zucker rats) were exposed to a number of behavioural tests starting at the age of 8 weeks. We found a similar phenotype in the obesity susceptible models, Obese Prone and Zucker rats, with a lower locomotor activity, exploratory activity, and higher level of anxiety-like behaviour in comparison to the leaner Obese Resistant strain. We did not find evidence that rat strains with a genetic predisposition to obesity differed in their ability to experience reward from chocolate (in a condition place preference task). However, Zucker rats show higher motivated behaviour for sucrose compared to Obese Resistant rats when the effort required to obtain palatable food is relatively low. Together our data demonstrate that rat strains that differ in their genetic predisposition to develop obesity also differ in their performance in behavioural tests linked to anxiety, exploration, and reward and that these differences are independent of body weight. We conclude that genetic variations which determine body weight and the aforementioned behaviours co-exist but that future studies are required to identify whether (and which) common genes are involved. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic predisposition to kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Laura S; Linehan, W Marston

    2016-10-01

    Kidney cancer is not a single disease but is made up of a number of different types of cancer classified by histology that are disparate in presentation, clinical course, and genetic basis. Studies of families with inherited renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have provided the basis for our understanding of the causative genes and altered metabolic pathways in renal cancer with different histologies. Von Hippel-Lindau disease was the first renal cancer disorder with a defined genetic basis. Over the next two decades, the genes responsible for a number of other inherited renal cancer syndromes including hereditary papillary renal carcinoma, Birt-Hogg-Dube´syndrome, hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma, and succinate dehydrogenase-associated renal cancer were identified. Recently, renal cell carcinoma has been confirmed as part of the clinical phenotype in individuals from families with BAP1-associated tumor predisposition syndrome and MiTF-associated cancer syndrome. Here we summarize the clinical characteristics of and causative genes for these and other inherited RCC syndromes, the pathways that are dysregulated when the inherited genes are mutated, and recommended clinical management of patients with these inherited renal cancer syndromes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Cancer predisposition in children: genetics, phenotypes & screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, S.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the genetic, phenotypic and screening aspects of tumor predisposition syndromes in childhood cancer patients. In tumor predisposition syndromes, the same constitutional molecular defects that lead to the clinical phenotype predispose the patient to develop specific cancers.

  6. Genetic predisposition to bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to review the candidate gene and genome-wide association studies relevant to bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and to discuss the emerging understanding of the complexities involved in genetic predisposition to bronchopulmonary dysplasia and its outcomes. Genetic factors contribute much of the variance in risk for BPD. Studies to date evaluating single or a few candidate genes have not been successful in yielding results that are replicated in GWAS, perhaps due to more stringent p-value thresholds. GWAS studies have identified only a single gene (SPOCK2) at genome-wide significance in a European White and African cohort, which was not replicated in two North American studies. Pathway gene-set analysis in a North American cohort confirmed involvement of known pathways of lung development and repair (e.g., CD44 and phosphorus oxygen lyase activity) and indicated novel molecules and pathways (e.g., adenosine deaminase and targets of miR-219) involved in genetic predisposition to BPD. The genetic basis of severe BPD is different from that of mild/moderate BPD, and the variants/pathways associated with BPD vary by race/ethnicity. A pilot study of whole exome sequencing identified hundreds of genes of interest, and indicated the overall feasibility as well as complexity of this approach. Better phenotyping of BPD by severity and pathophysiology, and careful analysis of race/ethnicity is required to gain a better understanding of the genetic basis of BPD. Future translational studies are required for the identification of potential genetic predispositions (rare variants and dysregulated pathways) by next-generation sequencing methods in individual infants (personalized genomics). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic Predisposition to Obesity and Medicare Expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehby, George L; Domingue, Benjamin W; Ullrich, Fred; Wolinsky, Fredric D

    2017-12-12

    The relationship between obesity and health expenditures is not well understood. We examined the relationship between genetic predisposition to obesity measured by a polygenic risk score for body mass index (BMI) and Medicare expenditures. Biennial interview data from the Health and Retirement Survey for a nationally representative sample of older adults enrolled in fee-for-service Medicare were obtained from 1991 through 2010 and linked to Medicare claims for the same period and to Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) data. The study included 6,628 Medicare beneficiaries who provided 68,627 complete person-year observations during the study period. Outcomes were total and service-specific Medicare expenditures and indicators for expenditures exceeding the 75th and 90th percentiles. The BMI polygenic risk score was derived from GWAS data. Regression models were used to examine how the BMI polygenic risk score was related to health expenditures adjusting for demographic factors and GWAS-derived ancestry. Greater genetic predisposition to obesity was associated with higher Medicare expenditures. Specifically, a 1 SD increase in the BMI polygenic risk score was associated with a $805 (p genetic predisposition to obesity is associated with higher Medicare expenditures. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Radiosensitivity and cancer : genetic predisposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavin, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    This paper considers radiation exposure in terms of individual sensitivity to radiation and predisposition to cancer, A-T homozygotes have an increased predisposition to a number of types of cancer. Immunodeficiency is an important factor involved. Radiosensitivity, chromosomal breakage, defective DNA repair and other abnormalities may also contribute to the increased incidence of cancer

  9. Genetic predisposition to leukemia and other hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feurstein, Simone; Drazer, Michael W; Godley, Lucy A

    2016-10-01

    In this review, we provide an overview of familial myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)/acute leukemia (AL) and bone marrow failure syndromes, as well as insights into familial myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), familial multiple myeloma (MM), familial Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM), familial lymphoma, and cancer predisposition syndromes with increased risk of MDS/AL. This field will continue to accelerate as next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques identify novel predisposition alleles in families with a genetic predisposition to hematologic malignancies. Newly identified predisposition genes continue to inform the field of inherited leukemia and other hematologic malignancies. Current developments in clinical translation include techniques detailing the acquisition of appropriate germline material for patient work-ups, methods for genetic testing, and nuances essential for the treatment and clinical management of patients with a genetic predisposition to hematologic malignancies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic predisposition to obesity affects behavioural traits including food reward and anxiety-like behaviour in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, Heike; Kraemer, Maria; Rabasa, Cristina; Askevik, Kaisa; Adan, Roger A.H.; Dickson, Suzanne L.

    2017-01-01

    Here we sought to define behavioural traits linked to anxiety, reward, and exploration in different strains of rats commonly used in obesity research. We hypothesized that genetic variance may contribute not only to their metabolic phenotype (that is well documented) but also to the expression of

  11. Genetic predisposition to heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasotti, Michele; Repetto, Alessandra; Tavazzi, Luigi; Arbustini, Eloisa

    2004-09-01

    This review describes the numerous and complex molecular systems that are either known players or candidates in heart failure(HF). All systems whose genetic background has been investigated to date in HF are listed and discussed. Discussion also includes functional notes and known genetic polymorphisms already investigated in HF or candidates that have not yet been investigated. Despite substantial research on HF, relatively few coordinated studies have been conducted that assign precise risk to specific genetic polymorphisms. Identification of risk associated with genetic variations and subsequent translation of genetic knowledge into clinical practice will likely progress only in cases of large coordinated studies based on identical standards. The potential result will be a more accurate definition of HF identified as an evolving complex of cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Genetic predisposition to Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling, Jónrit; Petersen, Maria Skaalum; Grandjean, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the genetic variants of CYP2D6 and HFE are more frequent in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients compared with controls in a population where the prevalence of these variants and PD are increased. METHODS: Blood samples were collected from 79 PD patients and 154...

  13. Maternal care affects EEG properties of spike-wave seizures (including pre- and post ictal periods) in adult WAG/Rij rats with genetic predisposition to absence epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnikova, Evgenia; Rutskova, Elizaveta M; Raevsky, Vladimir V

    2016-10-01

    WAG/Rij rats have a genetic predisposition to absence epilepsy and develop spontaneous spike-wave discharges in EEG during late ontogenesis (SWD, EEG manifestation of absence epilepsy). Changes in an environment during early postnatal ontogenesis can influence the genetically predetermined absence epilepsy. Here we examined the effect of maternal environment during weaning period on the EEG manifestation of absence epilepsy in adulthood. Experiments were performed in the offspring of WAG/Rij and Wistar rats. The newborn pups were fostered to dams of the same (in-fostering) or another strain (cross-fostering). Age-matched control WAG/Rij and Wistar rats were reared by their biological mothers. Absence seizures were uncommon in Wistar and were not aggravated in both in- and cross-fostered groups. In WAG/Rij rats, fewer SWD were found in the cross-fostered as compared to the in-fostered group. The cross-fostered WAG/Rij rats showed higher percentage of short-lasting SWD with duration <2s. The mean frequency of EEG at the beginning of SWD in the cross-fostered WAG/Rij rats was lower than in control (8.82 vs 9.25Hz), but it was higher in a period of 1.5s before and after SWD. It was concluded that a healthier maternal environment is able to alleviate genetically predetermined absence seizures in adulthood through changes in EEG rhythmic activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Update on genetic predisposition to prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cussenot, Olivier; Cancel-Tassin, Géraldine

    2015-01-01

    Genetic predisposition to prostate cancer rarely corresponds to a high penetrance Mendelian pattern of inheritance. These hereditary forms are specific entities for which mutations in the BRCA2 gene, the HOXB13 gene (variant G84E) or, to a lesser extent BRCA1 gene, must be researched. In contrast, the genetic component of the majority of prostate cancer is polygenic, involving an unfavorable combination of common genetic variants, resulting from a mixture of the genetic inheritance of the father and the mother. One hundred of these genetic susceptibility variants have now been identified and validated. The main phenotypic trait associated with hereditary predisposition is the younger age at onset, which warrants special monitoring in order to stay in the window of curability at diagnosis. The psychological impact of a family history of prostate cancer or breast cancer favors the establishment of a dedicated monitoring and procedures for early diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic predisposition and implications for radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streffer, Christian [University Clinics, Essen, Essen (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    Treatments of cancer patients with ionizing radiation have shown in some cases severe acute radiation effects after radiation doses which are very well tolerated by most patients. Skin fibroblasts of these patients studied after in vitro irradiation also showed a high radiosensitivity frequently. It was found that these effects are based on genetic predisposition which was usually inherited from their parents. During recent years quite a number of these syndromes have been described in humans and often the responsible genes have been characterized: Ataxia telangiectasia, Bloom's syndrome, Fanconi anemia, Li Fraumeni syndrome, Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, Neurofibromatosis, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, Retinoblastoma. In most cases it was found that the regulation processes of DNA repair processes and of the cell cycle for cell proliferation are disturbed. Frequently these processes cannot be separated from each other. Quite a number of these syndromes also show genomic instability which can also be induced by radiation exposures. These Phenomena have mainly been studied by determining the rate of chromosomal aberrations many cell generations after the exposure took place. Genomic instability apparently plays an important role for the development of stochastic late effects for which multistep events are necessary. This is especially for carcinogenesis the case. In mice it has been shown that radiation-induced genomic instability can be transmitted to the next mouse generation. In mouse models and also with radiotherapy patients it has been shown that genetic predisposition not only increases radiosensitivity with respect to cell survival and chromosomal damage but also to carcinogenesis. This has been observed cf. with p53-knock out mice and with children after radiotherapy cf. treatment of retinoblastoma. In the children with a genetic predisposition for retinoblastoma secondary tumours occurred to a much higher rate than in those children with

  16. Genetic predisposition and implications for radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, Christian

    2000-01-01

    Treatments of cancer patients with ionizing radiation have shown in some cases severe acute radiation effects after radiation doses which are very well tolerated by most patients. Skin fibroblasts of these patients studied after in vitro irradiation also showed a high radiosensitivity frequently. It was found that these effects are based on genetic predisposition which was usually inherited from their parents. During recent years quite a number of these syndromes have been described in humans and often the responsible genes have been characterized: Ataxia telangiectasia, Bloom's syndrome, Fanconi anemia, Li Fraumeni syndrome, Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, Neurofibromatosis, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, Retinoblastoma. In most cases it was found that the regulation processes of DNA repair processes and of the cell cycle for cell proliferation are disturbed. Frequently these processes cannot be separated from each other. Quite a number of these syndromes also show genomic instability which can also be induced by radiation exposures. These Phenomena have mainly been studied by determining the rate of chromosomal aberrations many cell generations after the exposure took place. Genomic instability apparently plays an important role for the development of stochastic late effects for which multistep events are necessary. This is especially for carcinogenesis the case. In mice it has been shown that radiation-induced genomic instability can be transmitted to the next mouse generation. In mouse models and also with radiotherapy patients it has been shown that genetic predisposition not only increases radiosensitivity with respect to cell survival and chromosomal damage but also to carcinogenesis. This has been observed cf. with p53-knock out mice and with children after radiotherapy cf. treatment of retinoblastoma. In the children with a genetic predisposition for retinoblastoma secondary tumours occurred to a much higher rate than in those children with

  17. Genetic predisposition to breast cancer: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, our understanding of genetic predisposition to breast cancer has advanced significantly. Three classes of predisposition factors, categorized by their associated risks of breast cancer, are currently known. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are high-penetrance breast cancer predisposition genes identified by genome-wide linkage analysis and positional cloning. Mutational screening of genes functionally related to BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 has revealed four genes, CHEK2, ATM, BRIP1, and PALB2; mutations in these genes are rare and confer an intermediate risk of breast cancer. Association studies have further identified eight common variants associated with low-penetrance breast cancer predisposition. Despite these discoveries, most of the familial risk of breast cancer remains unexplained. In this review, we describe the known genetic predisposition factors, expound on the methods by which they were identified, and consider how further technological and intellectual advances may assist in identifying the remaining genetic factors underlying breast cancer susceptibility.

  18. Genetic predisposition syndromes and their management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euhus, David M; Robinson, Linda

    2013-04-01

    Apart from BRCA1, BRCA2, and TP53, more than a dozen breast cancer susceptibility genes have been identified. Recognizing affected individuals depends on evaluation of cancer family history and recognition of certain phenotypic markers on physical examination. Genetic testing provides a powerful tool for individualized risk stratification. Mutation carriers have several options for managing risk, including lifestyle alterations, enhanced surveillance, chemoprevention, and prophylactic surgery. Genetic counseling and testing should be considered in the initial evaluation of patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer because this information contributes to surgical decisions, radiation therapy options, and systemic therapy choices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Type 1 diabetes: from genetic predisposition to hypothetical environmental triggers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phlips, J-C; Radermecker, R P

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results in a progressive (complete in most cases) destruction of insulin-secreting beta cells from Langerhans islets. Even if the autoimmune process becomes to be well known, no one is yet sure what specifically prompts the autoimmune response that destroys the body's ability to produce insulin. Etiology of this complex disease combines a genetic predisposition and still (almost) unknown environmental factors that trigger autoimmuninty specifically targeting beta cells. Genetic HLA predispositions are clearly identified. However, only few people with apparent genetic predisposition to type 1 diabetes actually end up getting the disease. Moreover, the remarkable increase of type 1 diabetes prevalence observed in numerous countries can not be explained by genetics. Because genetic factors can't predict alone the development of type 1 diabetes, environmental factors must be involved such as viral infections, toxins from food, cow milk during childhood (instead of breast feeding) or vitamin D deficiency. This paper aims at describing the role of the genetic predisposition and the environmental hypothesis which can be involved in the development of type 1 diabetes. We will conclude by briefly describing clinical trials targeting either the immune response or the potentially toxic environment.

  20. Cannabis use and genetic predisposition for schizophrenia: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veling, W; Mackenbach, J P; van Os, J; Hoek, H W

    2008-09-01

    Cannabis use may be a risk factor for schizophrenia. Part of this association may be explained by genotype-environment interaction, and part of it by genotype-environment correlation. The latter issue has not been explored. We investigated whether cannabis use is associated with schizophrenia, and whether gene-environment correlation contributes to this association, by examining the prevalence of cannabis use in groups with different levels of genetic predisposition for schizophrenia. Case-control study of first-episode schizophrenia. Cases included all non-Western immigrants who made first contact with a physician for schizophrenia in The Hague, The Netherlands, between October 2000 and July 2005 (n=100; highest genetic predisposition). Two matched control groups were recruited, one among siblings of the cases (n=63; intermediate genetic predisposition) and one among immigrants who made contact with non-psychiatric secondary health-care services (n=100; lowest genetic predisposition). Conditional logistic regression analyses were used to predict schizophrenia as a function of cannabis use, and cannabis use as a function of genetic predisposition for schizophrenia. Cases had used cannabis significantly more often than their siblings and general hospital controls (59, 21 and 21% respectively). Cannabis use predicted schizophrenia [adjusted odds ratio (OR) cases compared to general hospital controls 7.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.7-22.6; adjusted OR cases compared to siblings 15.9 (95% CI 1.5-167.1)], but genetic predisposition for schizophrenia did not predict cannabis use [adjusted OR intermediate predisposition compared to lowest predisposition 1.2 (95% CI 0.4-3.8)]. Cannabis use was associated with schizophrenia but there was no evidence for genotype-environment correlation.

  1. Genetic Predisposition to High Blood Pressure Associates With Cardiovascular Complications Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qibin; Forman, John P.; Jensen, Majken K.; Flint, Alan; Curhan, Gary C.; Rimm, Eric B.; Hu, Frank B.; Qi, Lu

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension and type 2 diabetes (T2D) commonly coexist, and both conditions are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We aimed to examine the association between genetic predisposition to high blood pressure and risk of CVD in individuals with T2D. The current study included 1,005 men and 1,299 women with T2D from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses’ Health Study, of whom 732 developed CVD. A genetic predisposition score was calculated on the basis of 29 established blood pressure–associated variants. The genetic predisposition score showed consistent associations with risk of CVD in men and women. In the combined results, each additional blood pressure–increasing allele was associated with a 6% increased risk of CVD (odds ratio [OR] 1.06 [95% CI 1.03–1.10]). The OR was 1.62 (1.22–2.14) for risk of CVD comparing the extreme quartiles of the genetic predisposition score. The genetic association for CVD risk was significantly stronger in patients with T2D than that estimated in the general populations by a meta-analysis (OR per SD of genetic score 1.22 [95% CI 1.10–1.35] vs. 1.10 [1.08–1.12]; I2 = 71%). Our data indicate that genetic predisposition to high blood pressure is associated with an increased risk of CVD in individuals with T2D. PMID:22829449

  2. Genetic predisposition to bevacizumab-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Melissa K; Dao, Fanny; Olvera, Narciso; Konner, Jason A; Dickler, Maura N; Levine, Douglas A

    2017-12-01

    Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody to VEGF, has shown efficacy in ovarian, cervical and endometrial cancer in addition to several other solid tumors. Serious side effects include hypertension, proteinuria, bowel perforation, and thrombosis. We tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in hypertension-associated genes is associated with bevacizumab-induced hypertension (BIH). Patients with solid tumors treated with bevacizumab in combination with other therapy were identified from six clinical trials. Haplotype-tagging (ht) SNPs for 10 candidate genes associated with hypertension were identified through the International Hapmap Project. Germline DNA was genotyped for 103 htSNPs using mass spectrometry. Bevacizumab toxicities were identified from clinical trial reports. Haplotypes were reconstructed from diploid genotyping data and frequencies were compared using standard two-sided statistical tests. The study included 114 patients with breast, lung, ovarian, or other cancers, of whom 38 developed BIH. WNK1, KLKB1, and GRK4 were found to contain single loci associated with BIH. Haplotype analysis of WNK1, KLKB1, and GRK4 identified risk haplotypes in each gene associated with grade 3/4 BIH. A composite risk model was created based on these haplotypes. Patients with the highest risk score were the most likely to develop grade 3/4 BIH (OR=6.45; P=0.005; 95%CI, 1.86-22.39). We concluded that genetic variation in WNK1, KLKB1, and GRK4 may be associated with BIH. These genes are biologically plausible mediators due to their role in blood pressure control, regulating sodium homeostasis and vascular tone. This preliminary risk model performed better than population-based risk models and when further validated may help risk-stratify patients for BIH prior to initiating therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic predisposition and tumor radiation sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budach, W.

    1997-01-01

    Studies on normal tissue radiation sensitivity have demonstrated profound differences of individual sensivities. A number of genetic syndroms associated with abnormal radiation sensitivity have been discribed. Significant differences have also been detected in persons without known genetic disorders. The question arises as to whether tumors orginating from normal tissues with abnormal radiation sensitivity share this abnormal sensitivity and as to whether a general correlation between normal tissue sensitivity and tumor tissue sensitivity can be substantiated. Experimental studies on normal and tumor tissues of SCID- and C3H-mice demonstrated that the 2.7-fold enhanced radiation sensitivity of SCID normal tissues is also found in SCID tumors. Clinical investigations on cervical carcinoma and breast cancer patients revealed higher local tumor control rates in patients with more pronounced acute side effects. A weak trend towards the same relationship was found in head and neck cancer patients. Case reports on unusually severe acute radiation side effects or unexpected tumor remissions as well as few reports on radiotherapy in ataxia telangiectasia (AT) patients suggest a correlation between normal- and tumor-tissue radiation sensitivity. Studies on fibroblasts and tumor cells from the same patient support this hypothesis in soft tissue sarcoma patients, but do not so for head and neck cancer patients. Tumor cells exhibit a considerably higher variation of radiation sensitivities than normal tissue cells. Experimental and clinical data are compatible with the hypothesis that normal tissue radiation sensitivity predicts for tumor tissue sensitivity. However, in view of the larger heterogeneity of tumor cell radiation sensitivity as compared to normal tissue radiation sensitivity, the development of a clinically useful predictive test for tumor sensitivity based on normal cell sensitivity appears to be unrealistic. (orig./MG) [de

  4. Retinal vein occlusion: genetic predisposition and systemic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannaki, Kassiani; Politou, Marianna; Rouvas, Alexandros; Merkouri, Efrossyni; Travlou, Anthi; Theodosiadis, Panayiotis; Gialeraki, Argyri

    2013-04-01

    The role of systemic risk factors (age, smoking, diabetes, arterial hypertension) in the development of retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is well established. However, the association of RVO with genetic predisposition to thrombosis remains poorly understood. The aim of the study was to assess any possible additional effect of genetic predisposition to the already well known 'classical' risk factors of RVO in a cohort of elderly Greek patients. Fifty-one elderly patients with RVO and 51 healthy individuals matched for age and sex were evaluated for systemic risk factors (smoking, diabetes, dyslipidemia, arterial hypertension) and coagulation defects (lupus anticoagulant, natural inhibitors of coagulation). Additionally, genotyping was performed for mutations/polymorphisms involved in haemostasis such as: FV G1691A, FV G4070A, FIIG 20210A, MTHFR C677T and A1298C, PAI-1-675 4G/5G, F XIII exon 2G/T, EPCR A4600G and G4678C. We identified systemic risk factors in the majority of the patients Hypertension (P=0.001), dyslipidemia (P=0.029) and diabetes (P=0.01) are associated with RVO in the majority of the patients. The prevalence of prothrombotic risk factors was not significantly different in the patients with RVO compared to controls. Apart from systemic risk factors, genetic predisposition to thrombosis does not seem to have an important association with RVO in this group of elderly patients.

  5. Lung cancer, genetic predisposition and smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmborg, Jacob; Korhonen, Tellervo; Holst, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Background: We aimed to disentangle genetic and environmental causes in lung cancer while considering smoking status. Methods: Four Nordic twin cohorts (43 512 monozygotic (MZ) and 71 895 same sex dizygotic (DZ) twin individuals) had smoking data before cancer diagnosis. We used time......-to-event analyses accounting for censoring and competing risk of death to estimate incidence, concordance risk and heritability of liability to develop lung cancer by smoking status. Results: During a median of 28.5 years of follow-up, we recorded 1508 incident lung cancers. Of the 30 MZ and 28 DZ pairs concordant...... compared with the cumulative incidence for both MZ and DZ pairs. This ratio, the relative recurrence risk, significantly decreased by age for MZ but was constant for DZ pairs. Heritability of lung cancer was 0.41 (95% CI 0.26 to 0.56) for currently smoking and 0.37 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.49) for ever smoking...

  6. Genetic Predisposition to Dyslipidemia and Risk of Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, Cassandra N; Saftlas, Audrey F; Triche, Elizabeth W; Bjonnes, Andrew; Keating, Brendan; Saxena, Richa; Breheny, Patrick J; Dewan, Andrew T; Robinson, Jennifer G; Hoh, Josephine; Ryckman, Kelli K

    2015-07-01

    Large epidemiologic studies support the role of dyslipidemia in preeclampsia; however, the etiology of preeclampsia or whether dyslipidemia plays a causal role remains unclear. We examined the association between the genetic predisposition to dyslipidemia and risk of preeclampsia using validated genetic markers of dyslipidemia. Preeclampsia cases (n = 164) and normotensive controls (n = 110) were selected from live birth certificates to nulliparous Iowa women during the period August 2002 to May 2005. Disease status was verified by medical chart review. Genetic predisposition to dyslipidemia was estimated by 4 genetic risk scores (GRS) (total cholesterol (TC), LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides) on the basis of established loci for blood lipids. Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the relationships between each of the 4 genotype scores and preeclampsia. Replication analyses were performed in an independent, US population of preeclampsia cases (n = 516) and controls (n = 1,097) of European ancestry. The GRS related to higher levels of TC, LDL-C, and triglycerides demonstrated no association with the risk of preeclampsia in either the Iowa or replication population. The GRS related to lower HDL-C was marginally associated with an increased risk for preeclampsia (odds ratio (OR) = 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.99-1.07; P = 0.10). In the independent replication population, the association with the HDL-C GRS was also marginally significant (OR = 1.03, 95% CI: 1.00-1.06; P = 0.04). Our data suggest a potential effect between the genetic predisposition to dyslipidemic levels of HDL-C and an increased risk of preeclampsia, and, as such, suggest that dyslipidemia may be a component along the causal pathway to preeclampsia. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Evaluation of Genetic Predisposition for MYCN-Amplified Neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungate, Eric A; Applebaum, Mark A; Skol, Andrew D; Vaksman, Zalman; Diamond, Maura; McDaniel, Lee; Volchenboum, Samuel L; Stranger, Barbara E; Maris, John M; Diskin, Sharon J; Onel, Kenan; Cohn, Susan L

    2017-10-01

    To investigate genetic predispositions for MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma, we performed a meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies totaling 615 MYCN-amplified high-risk neuroblastoma cases and 1869 MYCN-nonamplified non-high-risk neuroblastoma cases as controls using a fixed-effects model with inverse variance weighting. All statistical tests were two-sided. We identified a novel locus at 3p21.31 indexed by the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs80059929 (odds ratio [OR] = 2.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.17 to 4.02, Pmeta = 6.47 × 10-12) associated with MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma, which was replicated in 127 MYCN-amplified cases and 254 non-high-risk controls (OR = 2.30, 95% CI = 1.12 to 4.69, Preplication = .02). To confirm this signal is exclusive to MYCN-amplified tumors, we performed a second meta-analysis comparing 728 MYCN-nonamplified high-risk patients to identical controls. rs80059929 was not statistically significant in MYCN-nonamplified high-risk patients (OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 0.90 to 1.71, Pmeta = .19). SNP rs80059929 is within intron 16 in the KIF15 gene. Additionally, the previously reported LMO1 neuroblastoma risk locus was statistically significant only in patients with MYCN-nonamplified high-risk tumors (OR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.53 to 0.75, Pmeta = 1.51 × 10-8; Pmeta = .95). Our results indicate that common genetic variation predisposes to different neuroblastoma genotypes, including the likelihood of somatic MYCN-amplification. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Genetic Predisposition to Central Obesity and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: Two Independent Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Qi, Qibin; Zheng, Yan; Ley, Sylvia H; Manson, JoAnn E; Hu, Frank B; Qi, Lu

    2015-07-01

    Abdominal obesity is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D). We aimed to examine the association between the genetic predisposition to central obesity, assessed by the waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) genetic score, and T2D risk. The current study included 2,591 participants with T2D and 3,052 participants without T2D of European ancestry from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS). Genetic predisposition to central obesity was estimated using a genetic score based on 14 established loci for the WHR. We found that the central obesity genetic score was linearly related to higher T2D risk. Results were similar in the NHS (women) and HPFS (men). In combined results, each point of the central obesity genetic score was associated with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.04 (95% CI 1.01-1.07) for developing T2D, and the OR was 1.24 (1.03-1.45) when comparing extreme quartiles of the genetic score after multivariate adjustment. The data indicate that genetic predisposition to central obesity is associated with higher T2D risk. This association is mediated by central obesity. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  9. Genetic Predisposition, Nongenetic Risk Factors, and Coronary Infarct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichopoulou, Antonia; Yiannakouris, Nikos; Bamia, Christina; Benetou, Vassiliki; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ordovas, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Using a genetic predisposition score (GPS), additively integrating the associations of 11 polymorphisms with coronary heart disease (CHD), we examined the consequences of the joint presence of a high GPS and nongenetic CHD risk factors. Methods Within the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition, 202 case patients with medically confirmed incident coronary infarct and 197 control subjects were identified in Greece. Each polymorphism contributed 1 unit (high-risk homozygous), one-half unit (heterozygous), or no units (low-risk homozygous) to the GPS. Odds ratios of coronary infarction for those at high risk because of genetic predisposition and simultaneous presence of an established CHD risk factor were estimated, compared with subjects at low risk, for both GPS and each CHD risk factor. Results The joint presence of a high GPS (≥3.5) and each studied CHD risk factor was in all instances associated with a significantly increased risk of coronary infarction. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) was 2.62 (1.14–6.02) for ever smoking, 2.88 (1.33–6.24) for hypertension, 3.50 (1.67–7.33) for low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) level, 3.05 (1.53–6.08) for high non-HDL level, and 3.66 (1.75–7.65) for poor adherence to the Mediterranean diet. The odds ratios were always lower and nonsignificant when the GPS was low. There was suggestive evidence for interaction of a high GPS with hypertension (P =.05) and non-HDL cholesterol level (P =.13). Conclusions Genetic predisposition may interact with hypertension and, perhaps, also with the level of non-HDL cholesterol, in the causation of CHD. Genetic predisposition and the other studied exposures seem to have converging effects. Thus, the GPS may identify individuals who could realize disproportional benefits by controlling their hypertension and, possibly, their non-HDL cholesterol level. PMID:18443266

  10. Spontaneous preterm birth: advances toward the discovery of genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Jerome F; Romero, Roberto; Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy; Haymond-Thornburg, Hannah; Modi, Bhavi P; Teves, Maria E; Pearson, Laurel N; York, Timothy P; Schenkein, Harvey A

    2018-03-01

    Evidence from family and twin-based studies provide strong support for a significant contribution of maternal and fetal genetics to the timing of parturition and spontaneous preterm birth. However, there has been only modest success in the discovery of genes predisposing to preterm birth, despite increasing sophistication of genetic and genomic technology. In contrast, DNA variants associated with other traits/diseases have been identified. For example, there is overwhelming evidence that suggests that the nature and intensity of an inflammatory response in adults and children are under genetic control. Because inflammation is often invoked as an etiologic factor in spontaneous preterm birth, the question of whether spontaneous preterm birth has a genetic predisposition in the case of pathologic inflammation has been of long-standing interest to investigators. Here, we review various genetic approaches used for the discovery of preterm birth genetic variants in the context of inflammation-associated spontaneous preterm birth. Candidate gene studies have sought genetic variants that regulate inflammation in the mother and fetus; however, the promising findings have often not been replicated. Genome-wide association studies, an approach to the identification of chromosomal loci responsible for complex traits, have also not yielded compelling evidence for DNA variants predisposing to preterm birth. A recent genome-wide association study that included a large number of White women (>40,000) revealed that maternal loci contribute to preterm birth. Although none of these loci harbored genes directly related to innate immunity, the results were replicated. Another approach to identify DNA variants predisposing to preterm birth is whole exome sequencing, which examines the DNA sequence of protein-coding regions of the genome. A recent whole exome sequencing study identified rare mutations in genes encoding for proteins involved in the negative regulation (dampening) of the

  11. Genetic predisposition to colorectal cancer: Implications for treatment and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Elena M; Yurgelun, Matthew B

    2016-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer diagnosed in men and women and approximately 5% of cases are associated with identifiable germline mutations associated with hereditary cancer syndromes. Lifetime risks for CRC can approach 50%-80% for mutation carriers in the absence of endoscopic and/or surgical intervention, and early identification of at-risk individuals can guide clinical interventions for cancer prevention and treatment. Personal and family history and molecular phenotype of CRC tumors are used in determining which patients should be referred for clinical genetic evaluation. Outcomes of genetic testing performed using next-generation sequencing (NGS) multigene panels suggest there can be significant overlap in clinical features among the various hereditary cancer syndromes. This review summarizes new developments in diagnosis and management of patients with genetic predisposition to CRC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Shared Genetic Predisposition in Peripartum and Dilated Cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, James S; Li, Jian; Mazaika, Erica; Yasso, Christopher M; DeSouza, Tiffany; Cappola, Thomas P; Tsai, Emily J; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Kamiya, Chizuko A; Mazzarotto, Francesco; Cook, Stuart A; Halder, Indrani; Prasad, Sanjay K; Pisarcik, Jessica; Hanley-Yanez, Karen; Alharethi, Rami; Damp, Julie; Hsich, Eileen; Elkayam, Uri; Sheppard, Richard; Kealey, Angela; Alexis, Jeffrey; Ramani, Gautam; Safirstein, Jordan; Boehmer, John; Pauly, Daniel F; Wittstein, Ilan S; Thohan, Vinay; Zucker, Mark J; Liu, Peter; Gorcsan, John; McNamara, Dennis M; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Arany, Zoltan

    2016-01-21

    Background Peripartum cardiomyopathy shares some clinical features with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, a disorder caused by mutations in more than 40 genes, including TTN, which encodes the sarcomere protein titin. Methods In 172 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, we sequenced 43 genes with variants that have been associated with dilated cardiomyopathy. We compared the prevalence of different variant types (nonsense, frameshift, and splicing) in these women with the prevalence of such variants in persons with dilated cardiomyopathy and with population controls. Results We identified 26 distinct, rare truncating variants in eight genes among women with peripartum cardiomyopathy. The prevalence of truncating variants (26 in 172 [15%]) was significantly higher than that in a reference population of 60,706 persons (4.7%, P=1.3×10(-7)) but was similar to that in a cohort of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (55 of 332 patients [17%], P=0.81). Two thirds of identified truncating variants were in TTN, as seen in 10% of the patients and in 1.4% of the reference population (P=2.7×10(-10)); almost all TTN variants were located in the titin A-band. Seven of the TTN truncating variants were previously reported in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. In a clinically well-characterized cohort of 83 women with peripartum cardiomyopathy, the presence of TTN truncating variants was significantly correlated with a lower ejection fraction at 1-year follow-up (P=0.005). Conclusions The distribution of truncating variants in a large series of women with peripartum cardiomyopathy was remarkably similar to that found in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. TTN truncating variants were the most prevalent genetic predisposition in each disorder.

  13. From a genetic predisposition to an interactive predisposition: rethinking the ethical implications of screening for gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabery, James

    2009-02-01

    In a widely acclaimed study from 2002, researchers found a case of gene-environment interaction for a gene controlling neuroenzymatic activity (low vs. high), exposure to childhood maltreatment, and antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). Cases of gene-environment interaction are generally characterized as evincing a genetic predisposition; for example, individuals with low neuroenzymatic activity are generally characterized as having a genetic predisposition to ASPD. I first argue that the concept of a genetic predisposition fundamentally misconstrues these cases of gene-environment interaction. This misconstrual will be diagnosed, and then a new concept--interactive predisposition--will be introduced. I then show how this conceptual shift reconfigures old questions and raises new questions for genetic screening. Attempts to screen embryos or fetuses for the gene associated with low neuroenzymatic activity with an eye toward selecting against the low-activity variant fall prey to the myth of pre-environmental prediction; attempts to screen newborns for the gene associated with low neuroenzymatic activity with an eye toward early intervention will have to face the interventionist's dilemma.

  14. Genetic predisposition to high blood pressure associates with cardiovascular complications among patients with type 2 diabetes: two independent studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qibin; Forman, John P; Jensen, Majken K; Flint, Alan; Curhan, Gary C; Rimm, Eric B; Hu, Frank B; Qi, Lu

    2012-11-01

    Hypertension and type 2 diabetes (T2D) commonly coexist, and both conditions are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We aimed to examine the association between genetic predisposition to high blood pressure and risk of CVD in individuals with T2D. The current study included 1,005 men and 1,299 women with T2D from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses' Health Study, of whom 732 developed CVD. A genetic predisposition score was calculated on the basis of 29 established blood pressure-associated variants. The genetic predisposition score showed consistent associations with risk of CVD in men and women. In the combined results, each additional blood pressure-increasing allele was associated with a 6% increased risk of CVD (odds ratio [OR] 1.06 [95% CI 1.03-1.10]). The OR was 1.62 (1.22-2.14) for risk of CVD comparing the extreme quartiles of the genetic predisposition score. The genetic association for CVD risk was significantly stronger in patients with T2D than that estimated in the general populations by a meta-analysis (OR per SD of genetic score 1.22 [95% CI 1.10-1.35] vs. 1.10 [1.08-1.12]; I² = 71%). Our data indicate that genetic predisposition to high blood pressure is associated with an increased risk of CVD in individuals with T2D.

  15. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in head and neck cancer patients: evidence for genetic predisposition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ruyck, K; de Gelder, V; Van Eijkeren, M; Boterberg, T; De Neve, W; Vral, A; Thierens, H

    2008-01-01

    The association between chromosomal radiosensitivity and genetic predisposition to head and neck cancer was investigated in this study. In all, 101 head and neck cancer patients and 75 healthy control individuals were included in the study. The G2 assay was used to measure chromosomal radiosensitivity. The results demonstrated that head and neck cancer patients had a statistically higher number of radiation-induced chromatid breaks than controls, with mean values of 1.23 and 1.10 breaks per cell, respectively (Pgenetic predisposition to head and neck cancer, and the genetic contribution is highest for oral cavity and pharynx cancer patients and for early onset and non- and light smoking patients. PMID:18414410

  16. Possible genetic predisposition to lymphedema after breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Beth; Lose, Felicity; Kedda, Mary-Anne; Francois, Mathias; Ferguson, Kaltin; Janda, Monika; Yates, Patsy; Spurdle, Amanda B; Hayes, Sandra C

    2012-03-01

    Known risk factors for secondary lymphedema only partially explain who develops lymphedema following cancer, suggesting that inherited genetic susceptibility may influence risk. Moreover, identification of molecular signatures could facilitate lymphedema risk prediction prior to surgery or lead to effective drug therapies for prevention or treatment. Recent advances in the molecular biology underlying development of the lymphatic system and related congenital disorders implicate a number of potential candidate genes to explore in relation to secondary lymphedema. We undertook a nested case-control study, with participants who had developed lymphedema after surgical intervention within the first 18 months of their breast cancer diagnosis serving as cases (n=22) and those without lymphedema serving as controls (n=98), identified from a prospective, population-based, cohort study in Queensland, Australia. TagSNPs that covered all known genetic variation in the genes SOX18, VEGFC, VEGFD, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, RORC, FOXC2, LYVE1, ADM, and PROX1 were selected for genotyping. Multiple SNPs within three receptor genes, VEGFR2, VEGFR3, and RORC, were associated with lymphedema defined by statistical significance (p2.0). These provocative, albeit preliminary, findings regarding possible genetic predisposition to secondary lymphedema following breast cancer treatment warrant further attention for potential replication using larger datasets.

  17. Diabetes genetic predisposition score and cardiovascular complications among patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qibin; Meigs, James B; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Hu, Frank B; Qi, Lu

    2013-03-01

    To examine the association between genetic predisposition to type 2 diabetes (T2D) and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) among patients with T2D. The current study included 1,012 men and 1,310 women with T2D from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses' Health Study, including 677 patients with CVD and 1,645 non-CVD control subjects. A genetic predisposition score (GPS) was calculated on the basis of 36 established independent diabetes-predisposing variants. Each additional diabetes-risk allele in the GPS was associated with a 3% increased risk of CVD (odds ratio [OR] 1.03 [95% CI 1.00-1.06]). The OR was 1.47 (1.11-1.95) for CVD risk by comparing extreme quartiles of the GPS (P for trend = 0.01). We also found that the GPS was positively associated with hemoglobin A(1c) levels (P = 0.009). Genetic predisposition to T2D is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular complications in patients with T2D.

  18. Genetic Predisposition to Ischemic Stroke: A Polygenic Risk Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachiya, Tsuyoshi; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Takahashi, Atsushi; Hata, Jun; Furukawa, Ryohei; Shiwa, Yuh; Yamaji, Taiki; Hara, Megumi; Tanno, Kozo; Ohmomo, Hideki; Ono, Kanako; Takashima, Naoyuki; Matsuda, Koichi; Wakai, Kenji; Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Ago, Tetsuro; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Fukushima, Akimune; Hozawa, Atsushi; Minegishi, Naoko; Satoh, Mamoru; Endo, Ryujin; Sasaki, Makoto; Sakata, Kiyomi; Kobayashi, Seiichiro; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Nakamura, Motoyuki; Hitomi, Jiro; Kita, Yoshikuni; Tanaka, Keitaro; Iso, Hiroyasu; Kitazono, Takanari; Kubo, Michiaki; Tanaka, Hideo; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Sobue, Kenji; Shimizu, Atsushi

    2017-02-01

    The prediction of genetic predispositions to ischemic stroke (IS) may allow the identification of individuals at elevated risk and thereby prevent IS in clinical practice. Previously developed weighted multilocus genetic risk scores showed limited predictive ability for IS. Here, we investigated the predictive ability of a newer method, polygenic risk score (polyGRS), based on the idea that a few strong signals, as well as several weaker signals, can be collectively informative to determine IS risk. We genotyped 13 214 Japanese individuals with IS and 26 470 controls (derivation samples) and generated both multilocus genetic risk scores and polyGRS, using the same derivation data set. The predictive abilities of each scoring system were then assessed using 2 independent sets of Japanese samples (KyushuU and JPJM data sets). In both validation data sets, polyGRS was shown to be significantly associated with IS, but weighted multilocus genetic risk scores was not. Comparing the highest with the lowest polyGRS quintile, the odds ratios for IS were 1.75 (95% confidence interval, 1.33-2.31) and 1.99 (95% confidence interval, 1.19-3.33) in the KyushuU and JPJM samples, respectively. Using the KyushuU samples, the addition of polyGRS to a nongenetic risk model resulted in a significant improvement of the predictive ability (net reclassification improvement=0.151; P<0.001). The polyGRS was shown to be superior to weighted multilocus genetic risk scores as an IS prediction model. Thus, together with the nongenetic risk factors, polyGRS will provide valuable information for individual risk assessment and management of modifiable risk factors. © 2016 The Authors.

  19. Genetic predisposition to dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes risk in two prospective cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qibin; Liang, Liming; Doria, Alessandro; Hu, Frank B; Qi, Lu

    2012-03-01

    Dyslipidemia has been associated with type 2 diabetes, but it remains unclear whether dyslipidemia plays a causal role in type 2 diabetes. We aimed to examine the association between the genetic predisposition to dyslipdemia and type 2 diabetes risk. The current study included 2,447 patients with type 2 diabetes and 3,052 control participants of European ancestry from the Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Genetic predisposition to dyslipidemia was estimated by three genotype scores of lipids (LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides) on the basis of the established loci for blood lipids. Linear relation analysis indicated that the HDL cholesterol and triglyceride genotype scores, but not the LDL cholesterol genotype score, were linearly related to elevated type 2 diabetes risk. Each point of the HDL cholesterol and triglyceride genotype scores was associated with a 3% (odds ratio [OR] 1.03 [95% CI 1.01-1.04]) and a 2% (1.02 [1.00-1.04]) increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, respectively. The ORs were 1.39 (1.17-1.65) and 1.19 (1.01-1.41) for type 2 diabetes by comparing extreme quartiles of the HDL cholesterol genotype score and triglyceride genotype score, respectively. In conclusion, genetic predisposition to low HDL cholesterol or high triglycerides is related to elevated type 2 diabetes risk.

  20. Genetic predisposition of stroke: understanding the evolving landscape through meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai-Dong; Yang, Chun-Min; Shu, Hai-Feng; Kuang, Yong-Qin; Yang, Tao; He, Wei-Qi; Zhao, Kai; Xia, Xun; Cheng, Jing-Min; Ma, Yuan; Gu, Jian-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Stroke, either ischemic or hemorrhagic, is the leading cause of death and morbidity worldwide. Identifying the risk factors is a prerequisite step for stroke prevention and treatment. It is believed that a major portion of the currently unidentified risk factors is of genetic origin. Consistent with this idea, numerous potential risk alleles for stroke have been reported, however, the genetic evidence so far is not conclusive. The major goal of this review is to update the current knowledge about the genetic predisposition to the common multifactorial stroke, and to provide a bird's-eye view of this fast moving field. We selectively review and meta-analyze the related English literatures in public domain (PubMed) from 2000 onward, including the original reports and meta-analyses, to evaluate the genetic risk factors of common multifactorial stroke. The results indicated that we reviewed and meta-analyzed original reports and existing meta-analyses that studied the genetic predisposition to the common multifactorial stroke. Some original reports and meta-analyses were specific for ischemic stroke and others were for hemorrhagic stroke only. We also evaluated the major evolving issues in this field and discussed the future directions. In conclusion, strong evidences suggest that genetic risk factors contribute to common multifactorial stroke, and many genetic risk genes have been implicated in the literatures. However, not a single risk allele has been conclusively approved.

  1. Genetic predisposition to acute kidney injury--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilander, Laura M; Kaunisto, Mari A; Pettilä, Ville

    2015-12-02

    The risk of an individual to develop an acute kidney injury (AKI), or its severity, cannot be reliably predicted by common clinical risk factors. Whether genetic risk factors have an explanatory role poses an interesting question, however. Thus, we conducted a systematic literature review regarding genetic predisposition to AKI or outcome of AKI patients. We searched Ovid SP (MEDLINE) and EMBASE databases and found 4027 references to AKI. Based on titles and abstracts, we approved 37 articles for further analysis. Nine were published only as abstracts, leaving 28 original articles in the final analysis. We extracted the first author, year of publication, study design, clinical setting, number of studied patients, patients with AKI, ethnicity of patients, studied polymorphisms, endpoints, AKI definition, phenotype, significant findings, and data for quality scoring from each article. We summarized the findings and scored the quality of articles. The articles were quite heterogeneous and of moderate quality (mean 6.4 of 10). Despite different gene polymorphisms with suggested associations with development or severity or outcome of AKI, definitive conclusions would require replication of associations in independent cohort studies and, preferably a hypothesis-free study design.

  2. Unclassified sequence variants (UVS and genetic predisposition to cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves-Jean Bignon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast and ovarian cancers are mainly attributable to predisposition genes whose germinal mutations are responsible for the disease. The most common genes associated with breast/ovarian cancer are BRCA1 and BRCA2 but at least 20 other genes of medium of high penetrance have been associated with these types of cancer. Lifetime risk of breast cancer for BRCA mutations carriers approaches 90%. Appropriate medical follow-up is therefore essential for women carrying mutations in these genes. BRCA mutational spectrum has not been entirely characterized but not all sequence variants are pathogenic. These are classified as benign polymorphisms or unclassified variants (UV with unknown pathological potential. To date, 43,5% of over 3500 genetic variants BRCA1 and BRCA2 are reported as having uncertain clinical significance. Whether one sequence variant has or not a pathogenicity implication is often a hard decision to take, involving important consequences for diagnosis and medical follow-up. Here we present several cases of unclassified sequence variants detection and interpretation by in-silico analysis.

  3. Measuring and Validating a General Cancer Predisposition Perception Scale: An Adaptation of the Revised-IPQ-Genetic Predisposition Scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Wing Tak Lam

    Full Text Available Illness perceptions are linked to individual help-seeking and preventive behaviors. Previous illness perception studies have identified five dimensions of illness-related experience and behaviour. The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R for genetic predisposition (IPQ-R-GP was developed to measure illness perceptions in those genetically-predisposed to blood disease. We adapted the IPQ-R-GP to measure perceptions of generalized cancer predisposition. This paper describes the development and validation of the Cancer Predisposition Perception Scale (CPPS.The draft CPPS scale was first administered to 167 well Hepatitis B carriers and 123 other healthy individuals and the factor structure was examined using Exploratory Factor Analysis. Then the factor structure was confirmed in a second sample comprising 148 healthy controls, 150 smokers and 152 passive smokers using Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA.Six-factors comprising 26 items provided optimal fit by eigen and scree-plot methods, accounting for 58.9% of the total variance. CFA indicated good fit of the six-factor model after further excluding three items. The six factors, Emotional representation (5 items, Illness coherence (4 items, Treatment control (3 items, Consequences (5 items, Internal locus of control (2 items and External locus of control (4 items demonstrated adequate-to-good subscale internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.63-0.90. Divergent validity was suggested by low correlations with optimism, self-efficacy, and scales for measuring physical and psychological health symptoms.The CPPS appears to be a valid measure of perceived predisposition to generic cancer risks and can be used to examine cancer-risk-related cognitions in individuals at higher and lower cancer risk.

  4. Measuring and Validating a General Cancer Predisposition Perception Scale: An Adaptation of the Revised-IPQ-Genetic Predisposition Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wendy Wing Tak; Liao, Qiuyan; Wong, Jennifer Hiu Fai; Lai, Ching Lung; Yuen, Man Fung; Tsang, Janice Wing Hang; Fielding, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Illness perceptions are linked to individual help-seeking and preventive behaviors. Previous illness perception studies have identified five dimensions of illness-related experience and behaviour. The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) for genetic predisposition (IPQ-R-GP) was developed to measure illness perceptions in those genetically-predisposed to blood disease. We adapted the IPQ-R-GP to measure perceptions of generalized cancer predisposition. This paper describes the development and validation of the Cancer Predisposition Perception Scale (CPPS). The draft CPPS scale was first administered to 167 well Hepatitis B carriers and 123 other healthy individuals and the factor structure was examined using Exploratory Factor Analysis. Then the factor structure was confirmed in a second sample comprising 148 healthy controls, 150 smokers and 152 passive smokers using Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). Six-factors comprising 26 items provided optimal fit by eigen and scree-plot methods, accounting for 58.9% of the total variance. CFA indicated good fit of the six-factor model after further excluding three items. The six factors, Emotional representation (5 items), Illness coherence (4 items), Treatment control (3 items), Consequences (5 items), Internal locus of control (2 items) and External locus of control (4 items) demonstrated adequate-to-good subscale internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.63-0.90). Divergent validity was suggested by low correlations with optimism, self-efficacy, and scales for measuring physical and psychological health symptoms. The CPPS appears to be a valid measure of perceived predisposition to generic cancer risks and can be used to examine cancer-risk-related cognitions in individuals at higher and lower cancer risk.

  5. Genetic predisposition increases the tic severity, rate of comorbidities, and psychosocial and educational difficulties in children with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysturoy, Absalon Niclas; Skov, Liselotte; Debes, Nanette Mol

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to examine whether there are differences in tic severity, comorbidities, and psychosocial and educational consequences in children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition to Tourette syndrome compared with children with Tourette syndrome without genetic predisposition to Tourette syndrome. A total of 314 children diagnosed with Tourette syndrome participated in this study. Validated diagnostic tools were used to assess tic severity, comorbidities, and cognitive performance. A structured interview was used to evaluate psychosocial and educational consequences related to Tourette syndrome. The children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition present with statistically significant differences in terms of severity of tics, comorbidities, and a range of psychosocial and educational factors compared with the children with Tourette syndrome without genetic predisposition. Professionals need to be aware of genetic predisposition to Tourette syndrome, as children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition have more severe symptoms than those children with Tourette syndrome who are without genetic predisposition. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Unraveling genetic predisposition to familial or early onset gastric cancer using germline whole-exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelaar, Ingrid P; van der Post, Rachel S; van Krieken, J Han Jm; Spruijt, Liesbeth; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy Ag; Kets, C Marleen; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Teodorczyk, Urszula; Aalfs, Cora M; van Hest, Liselotte P; Pinheiro, Hugo; Oliveira, Carla; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; de Ligt, Joep; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Hoischen, Alexander; Gilissen, Christian; van de Vorst, Maartje; Goeman, Jelle J; Schackert, Hans K; Ranzani, Guglielmina N; Molinaro, Valeria; Gómez García, Encarna B; Hes, Frederik J; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Genuardi, Maurizio; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Sijmons, Rolf H; Wagner, Anja; van der Kolk, Lizet E; Bjørnevoll, Inga; Høberg-Vetti, Hildegunn; van Kessel, Ad Geurts; Kuiper, Roland P; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2017-11-01

    Recognition of individuals with a genetic predisposition to gastric cancer (GC) enables preventive measures. However, the underlying cause of genetic susceptibility to gastric cancer remains largely unexplained. We performed germline whole-exome sequencing on leukocyte DNA of 54 patients from 53 families with genetically unexplained diffuse-type and intestinal-type GC to identify novel GC-predisposing candidate genes. As young age at diagnosis and familial clustering are hallmarks of genetic tumor susceptibility, we selected patients that were diagnosed below the age of 35, patients from families with two cases of GC at or below age 60 and patients from families with three GC cases at or below age 70. All included individuals were tested negative for germline CDH1 mutations before or during the study. Variants that were possibly deleterious according to in silico predictions were filtered using several independent approaches that were based on gene function and gene mutation burden in controls. Despite a rigorous search, no obvious candidate GC predisposition genes were identified. This negative result stresses the importance of future research studies in large, homogeneous cohorts.

  7. Association between pepsinogen C gene polymorphism and genetic predisposition to gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui-Jie; Guo, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Ming; Wang, Lan; Yuan, Yuan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To identify a molecular marker for gastric cancer, and to investigate the relationship between the polymorphism of pepsinogen C (PGC) gene and the genetic predisposition to gastric cancer. METHODS: A total of 289 cases were involved in this study. 115 cases came from Shenyang area, a low risk area of gastric cancer, including 42 unrelated controls and 73 patients with gastric cancer. 174 cases came from Zhuanghe area, a high-risk area of gastric cancer, including 113 unrelated controls, and 61 cases from gastric cancer kindred families. The polymorphism of PGC gene was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the relation between the genetic polymorphism of PGC and gastric cancer was examined. RESULTS: Four alleles, 310 bp (allele 1), 400 bp (allele 2), 450 bp (allele 3), and 480 bp (allele 4) were detected by PCR. The frequency of allele 1 was higher in patients with gastric cancer than that in controls. Genotypes containing homogenous allele 1 were significantly more frequent in patients with gastric cancer than that in controls (0.33, 0.14, χ2 = 3.86, P genetic predisposition to gastric cancer. The distribution of pepsinogen C gene polymorphism in Zhuanghe, a high-risk area of gastric cancer, is different from that in Shenyang, a low risk area of gastric cancer. PMID:12508350

  8. Genetic predisposition syndromes: when should they be considered in the work-up of MDS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babushok, Daria V; Bessler, Monica

    2015-03-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by cytopenias, ineffective hematopoiesis, myelodysplasia, and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). While sporadic MDS is primarily a disease of the elderly, MDS in children and young and middle-aged adults is frequently associated with underlying genetic predisposition syndromes. In addition to the classic hereditary bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFS) such as Fanconi Anemia and Dyskeratosis Congenita, in recent years there has been an increased awareness of non-syndromic familial MDS/AML predisposition syndromes such as those caused by mutations in GATA2, RUNX1, CEBPA, and SRP72 genes. Here, we will discuss the importance of recognizing an underlying genetic predisposition syndrome a patient with MDS, will review clinical scenarios when genetic predisposition should be considered, and will provide a practical overview of the common BMFS and familial MDS/AML syndromes which may be encountered in adult patients with MDS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Considerations for comprehensive assessment of genetic predisposition in familial breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Henry; Synder, Carrie; Wang, San Ming

    2015-01-01

    About 10-15% of breast cancer cases are family related, classified as familial breast cancer. The disease was first reported in 1866 and determined to be an autosomal dominant genetic disease in 1971. Germline mutations in BRCA1 were discovered and deemed as the first genetic predisposition for the disease in 1994. By now, genetic predispositions for about 40% of familial breast cancer families have been identified. New molecular genetic approaches currently under development should accelerate the process to identify the full spectrum of genetic predispositions for the disease, thereby enabling a better understanding of the genetic basis of the disease and therein providing benefit to high-risk patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Interaction between genetic predisposition to adiposity and dietary protein in relation to subsequent change in body weight and waist circumference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankarfeldt, Mikkel Z; Larsen, Sofus C; Ängquist, Lars; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Roswall, Nina; Overvad, Kim; Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre; Halkjær, Jytte; Tjønneland, Anne; Linneberg, Allan; Toft, Ulla; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Heitmann, Berit L; Astrup, Arne; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2014-01-01

    Genetic predisposition to adiposity may interact with dietary protein in relation to changes of anthropometry. To investigate the interaction between genetic predisposition to higher body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) or waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRBMI) and dietary protein in relation to subsequent change in body weight (ΔBW) or change in WC (ΔWC). Three different Danish cohorts were used. In total 7,054 individuals constituted the study population with information on diet, 50 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with BMI, WC or WHRBMI, as well as potential confounders. Mean follow-up time was ∼5 years. Four genetic predisposition-scores were based on the SNPs; a complete-score including all selected adiposity- associated SNPs, and three scores including BMI, WC or WHRBMI associated polymorphisms, respectively. The association between protein intake and ΔBW or ΔWC were examined and interactions between SNP-score and protein were investigated. Analyses were based on linear regressions using macronutrient substitution models and meta-analyses. When protein replaced carbohydrate, meta-analyses showed no associations with ΔBW (41.0 gram/y/5 energy% protein, [95% CI: -32.3; 114.3]) or ΔWC (genetic predisposition to general and abdominal adiposity, assessed by gene-scores, does not seem to modulate the influence of dietary protein on ΔBW or ΔWC.

  11. Genetic predisposition to higher blood pressure increases risk of incident hypertension and cardiovascular diseases in Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiangfeng; Huang, Jianfeng; Wang, Laiyuan; Chen, Shufeng; Yang, Xueli; Li, Jianxin; Cao, Jie; Chen, Jichun; Li, Ying; Zhao, Liancheng; Li, Hongfan; Liu, Fangcao; Huang, Chen; Shen, Chong; Shen, Jinjin; Yu, Ling; Xu, Lihua; Mu, Jianjun; Wu, Xianping; Ji, Xu; Guo, Dongshuang; Zhou, Zhengyuan; Yang, Zili; Wang, Renping; Yang, Jun; Yan, Weili; Gu, Dongfeng

    2015-10-01

    Although multiple genetic markers associated with blood pressure have been identified by genome-wide association studies, their aggregate effect on risk of incident hypertension and cardiovascular disease is uncertain, particularly among East Asian who may have different genetic and environmental exposures from Europeans. We aimed to examine the association between genetic predisposition to higher blood pressure and risk of incident hypertension and cardiovascular disease in 26 262 individuals in 2 Chinese population-based prospective cohorts. A genetic risk score was calculated based on 22 established variants for blood pressure in East Asian. We found the genetic risk score was significantly and independently associated with linear increases in blood pressure and risk of incident hypertension and cardiovascular disease (P range from 4.57×10(-3) to 3.10×10(-6)). In analyses adjusted for traditional risk factors including blood pressure, individuals carrying most blood pressure-related risk alleles (top quintile of genetic score distribution) had 40% (95% confidence interval, 18-66) and 26% (6-45) increased risk for incident hypertension and cardiovascular disease, respectively, when compared with individuals in the bottom quintile. The genetic risk score also significantly improved discrimination for incident hypertension and cardiovascular disease and led to modest improvements in risk reclassification for cardiovascular disease (all the Pgenetic predisposition to higher blood pressure is an independent risk factor for blood pressure increase and incident hypertension and cardiovascular disease and provides modest incremental information to cardiovascular disease risk prediction. The potential clinical use of this panel of blood pressure-associated polymorphisms remains to be determined. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Genetic predisposition to testicular germ-cell tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutke-Holzik, MF; Rapley, EA; Hoekstra, HJ; Sleijfer, DT; Nolte, IM; Sijmons, RH

    Testicular germ-cell tumours (TGCT) are the most common neoplasm in young men. Various studies have suggested the existence of an inherited predisposition to development of these tumours. Genome-wide screens subsequently provided evidence of a TGCT susceptibility gene on chromosome Xq27 (TGCT1) that

  13. Pediatric Predispositional Genetic Risk Communication: Potential Utility for Prevention and Control of Melanoma Risk as an Exemplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yelena P; Mays, Darren; Kohlmann, Wendy; Tercyak, Kenneth P

    2017-10-01

    Predispositional genetic testing among minor children is intensely debated due to the potential benefits and harms of providing this type of genetic information to children and their families. Existing guidelines on pediatric genetic testing state that predispositional testing could be appropriate for minors if preventive services exist that mitigate children's risk for or severity of the health condition in question. We use the example of hereditary melanoma to illustrate the rationale for and potential application of genetic risk communication for an adult-onset cancer to a pediatric population where childhood behaviors may reduce risk of disease later in life. We draw from the adult melanoma genetic risk communication and pediatric health behavior change literatures to suggest ways in which genetic test reporting and complementary education could be delivered to children who carry a hereditary risk for melanoma and their families in order to foster children's engagement in melanoma preventive behaviors. Genetic discoveries will continue to yield new opportunities to provide predispositional genetic risk information to unaffected individuals, including children, and could be delivered within programs that provide personalized and translational approaches to cancer prevention.

  14. A genetic predisposition score associates with reduced aerobic capacity in response to acute normobaric hypoxia in lowlanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masschelein, Evi; Puype, Joke; Broos, Siacia; Van Thienen, Ruud; Deldicque, Louise; Lambrechts, Diether; Hespel, Peter; Thomis, Martine

    2015-03-01

    Given the high inter-individual variability in the sensitivity to high altitude, we hypothesize the presence of underlying genetic factors. The aim of this study was to construct a genetic predisposition score based on previously identified high-altitude gene variants to explain the inter-individual variation in the reduced maximal O2 uptake (ΔVo2max) in response to acute hypoxia. Ninety-six healthy young male Belgian lowlanders were included. In both normobaric normoxia (Fio2=20.9%) and acute normobaric hypoxia (Fio2=10.7%-12.5%) Vo2max was measured. Forty-one SNPs in 21 genes were genotyped. A stepwise regression analysis was applied to detect a subset of SNPs to be associated with ΔVo2max. This subset of SNPs was included in the genetic predisposition score. A general linear model and regression analysis with age, weight, height, hypoxic protocol group, and Vo2max in normoxia as covariates were used to test the explained variance of the genetic predisposition score. A ROC analysis was performed to discriminate between the low- and high ΔVo2max subgroups. A stepwise regression analysis revealed a subset of SNPs [rs833070 (VEGFA), rs4253778 (PPARA), rs6735530 (EPAS1), rs4341 (ACE), rs1042713 (ADRB2), and rs1042714 (ADRB2)] to be associated with ΔVo2max. The genetic predisposition score was found to be an independent predictive variable with a partial explained variance of 23% (pgenetic predisposition score showed a significantly predictive value for ΔVo2max.

  15. The Changing Landscape of Genetic Testing for Inherited Breast Cancer Predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afghahi, Anosheh; Kurian, Allison W

    2017-05-01

    The advent of multiple-gene germline panel testing has led to significant advances in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer risk assessment. These include guideline-specific cancer risk management recommendations for patients and their families, such as screening with breast magnetic resonance imaging and risk-reducing surgeries, which have the potential to reduce substantially the morbidity and mortality associated with a hereditary cancer predisposition. However, controversy remains about the clinical validity and actionability of genetic testing in a broader patient population. We discuss events leading to the wider availability of commercialized multiple-gene germline panel testing, the recent data that support using this powerful tool to improve cancer risk assessment and reduction strategies, and remaining challenges to clinical optimization of this new genetic technology.

  16. KCNQ1OT1 hypomethylation: A Novel disguised genetic predisposition in sporadic pediatric adrenocortical tumors?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnen, Mark; Alders, Mariëlle; Zwaan, Christian M.; Wagner, Anja; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric adrenal tumors, other than neuroblastoma, are rare and can be associated with a genetic predisposition. In this report we describe two patients with an isolated and apparently sporadic adrenocortical tumor; one girl with a carcinoma, the other girl with an adenoma. In both patients genetic

  17. Genetic predisposition toward suicidal ideation in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hee-Ju; Bae, Kyung-Yeol; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Hong, Young Joon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Yoon, Jin-Sang; Kim, Jae-Min

    2017-11-07

    The genetic predisposition toward suicidal ideation has been explored to identify subgroups at high risk and to prevent suicide. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is associated with an increased risk of suicide, but few studies have explored the genetic predisposition toward suicide in ACS populations. Therefore, this longitudinal study explored the genetic predisposition toward suicidal ideation in ACS patients. In total, of 969 patients within 2 weeks after ACS, 711 were followed at 1 year after ACS. Suicidal ideation was evaluated with the relevant items on the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale. Ten genetic polymorphisms associated with serotonergic systems, neurotrophic factors, carbon metabolism, and inflammatory cytokines were examined. Associations between genetic polymorphisms and suicidal ideation within 2 weeks and 1 year of ACS were investigated using logistic regression models. The 5-HTTLPR s allele was significantly associated with suicidal ideation within 2 weeks of ACS after adjusting for covariates and after the Bonferroni correction. TNF-α -308 G/A , IL-1β -511 C/T , and IL-1β + 3953C/T were significantly associated with suicidal ideation within 2 weeks after ACS, but these associations did not reach significance after the Bonferroni correction in unadjusted analyses and after adjusting for covariance. However, no significant association between genetic polymorphisms and suicidal ideation was found at 1 year. Genetic predisposition, 5-HTTLPR s allele in particular, may confer susceptibility to suicidal ideation in ACS patients during the acute phase of ACS.

  18. Genetic predisposition for Type 2 diabetes, but not for overweight/obesity, is associated with a restricted adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arner, Peter; Arner, Erik; Hammarstedt, Ann; Smith, Ulf

    2011-04-12

    Development of Type 2 diabetes, like obesity, is promoted by a genetic predisposition. Although several genetic variants have been identified they only account for a small proportion of risk. We have asked if genetic risk is associated with abnormalities in storing excess lipids in the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. We recruited 164 lean and 500 overweight/obese individuals with or without a genetic predisposition for Type 2 diabetes or obesity. Adipose cell size was measured in biopsies from the abdominal adipose tissue as well as insulin sensitivity (HOMA index), HDL-cholesterol and Apo AI and Apo B. 166 additional non-obese individuals with a genetic predisposition for Type 2 diabetes underwent a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp to measure insulin sensitivity. Genetic predisposition for Type 2 diabetes, but not for overweight/obesity, was associated with inappropriate expansion of the adipose cells, reduced insulin sensitivity and a more proatherogenic lipid profile in non-obese individuals. However, obesity per se induced a similar expansion of adipose cells and dysmetabolic state irrespective of genetic predisposition. Genetic predisposition for Type 2 diabetes, but not obesity, is associated with an impaired ability to recruit new adipose cells to store excess lipids in the subcutaneous adipose tissue, thereby promoting ectopic lipid deposition. This becomes particularly evident in non-obese individuals since obesity per se promotes a dysmetabolic state irrespective of genetic predisposition. These results identify a novel susceptibility factor making individuals with a genetic predisposition for Type 2 diabetes particularly sensitive to the environment and caloric excess.

  19. Genetic predisposition for high stress reactivity amplifies effects of early-life adversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlwrick, Silja; Rechenberg, Alexandra; Matthes, Mariana; Burgstaller, Jessica; Schwarzbauer, Thomas; Chen, Alon; Touma, Chadi

    2016-08-01

    A dysregulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis and the experience of early-life adversity are both well-established risk factors for the development of affective disorders, such as major depression. However, little is known about the interaction of these two factors in shaping endophenotypes of the disease. Here, we studied the gene-environment interaction of a genetic predisposition for HPA axis dysregulation with early-life stress (ELS), assessing the short-, as well as the long-lasting consequences on emotional behavior, neuroendocrine functions and gene expression profiles. Three mouse lines, selectively bred for either high (HR), intermediate (IR), or low (LR) HPA axis reactivity, were exposed to one week of ELS using the limited nesting and bedding material paradigm. Measurements collected during or shortly after the ELS period showed that, regardless of genetic background, ELS exposure led to impaired weight gain and altered the animals' coping behavior under stressful conditions. However, only HR mice additionally showed significant changes in neuroendocrine stress responsiveness at a young age. Accordingly, adult HR mice also showed lasting consequences of ELS, including hyperactive stress-coping, HPA axis hyperreactivity, and gene expression changes in the Crh system, as well as downregulation of Fkbp5 in relevant brain regions. We suggest that the genetic predisposition for high stress reactivity interacts with ELS exposure by disturbing the suppression of corticosterone release during a critical period of brain development, thus exerting lasting programming effects on the HPA axis, presumably via epigenetic mechanisms. In concert, these changes lead to the emergence of important endophenotypes associated with affective disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Maxillary canine displacement and genetically determined predisposition to disturbed development of the dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Franka; Grabowski, Rosemarie

    2003-05-01

    The relationship between maxillary canine displacement and the simultaneous occurrence of "genetically determined predisposition to disturbed development of the dentition" as defined by Hoffmeister was investigated in 675 patients. Panoramic radiographs taken of each patient during the first and the second mixed dentition periods were evaluated. Canine inclination and the distance between the tip of the canine and a line connecting the cusps of the molars were computed in five different age groups according to Dausch-Neumann. Statistical analysis revealed 34 patients with "potential canine displacement", who exhibited further symptoms of "genetically determined predisposition to disturbed development of the dentition" significantly more frequently than the total group. The symptoms concerned were agenesia, displaced tooth buds, rotated or tilted incisors, aplasia and microdontia of lateral incisors. Careful follow-ups in patients with a predisposition to disturbed dental development enables risks to be anticipated and canine displacement to be detected at an early stage.

  1. Genetic counselling for hereditary predisposition to ovarian and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, J; Szecsei, C M

    2010-10-01

    Since the identification of BRCA 1 and 2 in 1995, testing for mutations in these genes has been offered to cancer patients and their families by clinical genetics services. These services are provided across Europe by a small number of health professionals, and are therefore low volume, and low capacity and patients experience considerable delays, both in seeing a clinician and in laboratory testing. The UK private sector, driven by consumer demand and professional competition, has significantly reduced these delays. The development of a new class of therapeutic agent, the PARP inhibitors, is likely to drive the BRCA testing services towards the UK private sector model with much faster turnaround times. Several new genetic tests are now available including CYP 2D6 genotype analysis and the BCtect test. The clinical interpretation of these tests is complex, and the professional community has been naturally cautious about adopting new tests in clinical care. This article will examine the consequences of expected changes in BRCA testing practice, and consider the positioning of new tests in the patient pathway, and the messages given by health professionals.

  2. Early environmental exposures influence schizophrenia expression even in the presence of strong genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husted, Janice A; Ahmed, Rashid; Chow, Eva W C; Brzustowicz, Linda M; Bassett, Anne S

    2012-05-01

    There are few studies of environmental factors in familial forms of schizophrenia. We investigated whether childhood adversity or environmental factors were associated with schizophrenia in a familial sample where schizophrenia is associated with the NOSA1P gene. We found that a cumulative adversity index including childhood illness, family instability and cannabis use was significantly associated with narrow schizophrenia, independent of NOSA1P risk genotype, previously measured childhood trauma, covariates and familial clustering (adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval)=1.55 (1.01, 2.38)). The results provide further support that early environmental exposures influence schizophrenia expression even in the presence of strong genetic predisposition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic predisposition to myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia in children and young adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babushok, Daria V.; Bessler, Monica; Olson, Timothy S.

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal blood disorder characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, cytopenias, dysplasia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). With the growing availability of clinical genetic testing, there is an increasing appreciation that a number of genetic predisposition syndromes may underlie apparent de novo presentations of MDS/AML, particularly in children and young adults. Recent findings of clonal hematopoiesis in acquired aplastic anemia add another facet to our understanding of the mechanisms of MDS/AML predisposition. As more predisposition syndromes are recognized, it is becoming increasingly important for hematologists and oncologists to have familiarity with the common as well as emerging syndromes, and to have a systematic approach to diagnosis and screening of at risk patient populations. Here, we provide a practical algorithm for approaching a patient with a suspected MDS/AML predisposition, and provide an in-depth review of the established and emerging familial MDS/AML syndromes caused by mutations in the ANKRD26, CEBPA, DDX41, ETV6, GATA2, RUNX1, SRP72 genes. Finally, we discuss recent data on the role of somatic mutations in malignant transformation in acquired aplastic anemia, and review the practical aspects of MDS/AML management in patients and families with predisposition syndromes. PMID:26693794

  4. Genetic predisposition to myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babushok, Daria V; Bessler, Monica; Olson, Timothy S

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal blood disorder characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, cytopenias, dysplasia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). With the growing availability of clinical genetic testing, there is an increasing appreciation that a number of genetic predisposition syndromes may underlie apparent de novo presentations of MDS/AML, particularly in children and young adults. Recent findings of clonal hematopoiesis in acquired aplastic anemia add another facet to our understanding of the mechanisms of MDS/AML predisposition. As more predisposition syndromes are recognized, it is becoming increasingly important for hematologists and oncologists to have familiarity with the common as well as emerging syndromes, and to have a systematic approach to diagnosis and screening of at risk patient populations. Here, we provide a practical algorithm for approaching a patient with a suspected MDS/AML predisposition, and provide an in-depth review of the established and emerging familial MDS/AML syndromes caused by mutations in the ANKRD26, CEBPA, DDX41, ETV6, GATA2, RUNX1, SRP72 genes. Finally, we discuss recent data on the role of somatic mutations in malignant transformation in acquired aplastic anemia, and review the practical aspects of MDS/AML management in patients and families with predisposition syndromes.

  5. Interaction between Genetic Predisposition to Adiposity and Dietary Protein in Relation to Subsequent Change in Body Weight and Waist Circumference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankarfeldt, Mikkel Z; Larsen, Sofus C; Angquist, Lars

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic predisposition to adiposity may interact with dietary protein in relation to changes of anthropometry. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the interaction between genetic predisposition to higher body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) or waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRBMI...

  6. Being at risk for cardiovascular disease: Perceptions and preventive behavior in people with and without a known genetic predisposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, E.A.M.; Henneman, L.; van der Weijden, T.; Marteau, T.M.; Timmermans, D.R.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares and explains differences in perceptions of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and preventive behaviors in people with and without a known genetic predisposition to CVD. A cross-sectional study using two samples was performed. The first sample (genetic predisposition; n=51)

  7. Modelling the Interplay between Lifestyle Factors and Genetic Predisposition on Markers of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Celia G; Solis-Trapala, Ivonne; Holzapfel, Christina; Ambrosini, Gina L; Fuller, Nicholas R; Loos, Ruth J F; Hauner, Hans; Caterson, Ian D; Jebb, Susan A

    2015-01-01

    The risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is determined by a complex interplay involving lifestyle factors and genetic predisposition. Despite this, many studies do not consider the relative contributions of this complex array of factors to identify relationships which are important in progression or prevention of complex diseases. We aimed to describe the integrated effect of a number of lifestyle changes (weight, diet and physical activity) in the context of genetic susceptibility, on changes in glycaemic traits in overweight or obese participants following 12-months of a weight management programme. A sample of 353 participants from a behavioural weight management intervention were included in this study. A graphical Markov model was used to describe the impact of the intervention, by dividing the effects into various pathways comprising changes in proportion of dietary saturated fat, physical activity and weight loss, and a genetic predisposition score (T2DM-GPS), on changes in insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IR), insulin secretion (HOMA-B) and short and long term glycaemia (glucose and HbA1c). We demonstrated the use of graphical Markov modelling to identify the importance and interrelationships of a number of possible variables changed as a result of a lifestyle intervention, whilst considering fixed factors such as genetic predisposition, on changes in traits. Paths which led to weight loss and change in dietary saturated fat were important factors in the change of all glycaemic traits, whereas the T2DM-GPS only made a significant direct contribution to changes in HOMA-IR and plasma glucose after considering the effects of lifestyle factors. This analysis shows that modifiable factors relating to body weight, diet, and physical activity are more likely to impact on glycaemic traits than genetic predisposition during a behavioural intervention.

  8. Developing national guidance on genetic testing for breast cancer predisposition: the role of economic evidence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sullivan, W.; Evans, D.G.; Newman, W.G.; Ramsden, S.C.; Scheffer, H.; Payne, K.

    2012-01-01

    Advancements in genetic testing to identify predisposition for hereditary breast cancer (HBC) mean that it is important to understand the incremental costs and benefits of the new technologies compared with current testing strategies. This study aimed to (1) identify and critically appraise existing

  9. Integrated screening concept in women with genetic predisposition for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bick, U.

    1997-01-01

    Breast cancer is in 5% of cases due to a genetic disposition. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are by far the most common breast cancer susceptibility genes. For a woman with a genetic predisposition, the individual risk of developing breast cancer sometime in her life is between 70 and 90%. Compared to the spontaneous forms of breast cancer, woman with a genetic predisposition often develop breast cancer at a much younger age. This is why conventional screening programs on the basis of mammography alone cannot be applied without modification to this high-risk group. In this article, an integrated screening concept for women with genetic prodisposition for breast cancer using breast self-examination, clinical examination, ultrasound, mammography and magnetic resonance imaging is introduced. (orig.) [de

  10. Genetic predisposition to salt-sensitivity : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeks, Esther; Kessels, Alfons G H; Kroon, Abraham A; van der Klauw, Melanie M; de Leeuw, Peter W

    PURPOSE: To assess the role of genetic polymorphisms in salt sensitivity of blood pressure. DATA IDENTIFICATION: We conducted a systematic review by searching the Medline literature from March 1993 to June 2003. Each paper was scrutinized and data concerning study population, method of salt

  11. Nutritional habits, lifestyle, and genetic predisposition in cardiovascular and metabolic traits in Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Sefayet; Erge, Sema; Cesuroglu, Tomris; Polimanti, Renato

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular and metabolic traits (CMT) are influenced by complex interactive processes including diet, lifestyle, and genetic predisposition. The present study investigated the interactions of these risk factors in relation to CMTs in the Turkish population. We applied bootstrap agglomerative hierarchical clustering and Bayesian network learning algorithms to identify the causative relationships among genes involved in different biological mechanisms (i.e., lipid metabolism, hormone metabolism, cellular detoxification, aging, and energy metabolism), lifestyle (i.e., physical activity, smoking behavior, and metropolitan residency), anthropometric traits (i.e., body mass index, body fat ratio, and waist-to-hip ratio), and dietary habits (i.e., daily intakes of macro- and micronutrients) in relation to CMTs (i.e., health conditions and blood parameters). We identified significant correlations between dietary habits (soybean and vitamin B12 intakes) and different cardiometabolic diseases that were confirmed by the Bayesian network-learning algorithm. Genetic factors contributed to these disease risks also through the pleiotropy of some genetic variants (i.e., F5 rs6025 and MTR rs180508). However, we also observed that certain genetic associations are indirect since they are due to the causative relationships among the CMTs (e.g., APOC3 rs5128 is associated with low-density lipoproteins cholesterol and, by extension, total cholesterol). Our study applied a novel approach to integrate various sources of information and dissect the complex interactive processes related to CMTs. Our data indicated that complex causative networks are present: causative relationships exist among CMTs and are affected by genetic factors (with pleiotropic and non-pleiotropic effects) and dietary habits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Is There a Genetic Predisposition to Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Rakesh; Dhillon, Mandeep Singh; Sharma, Siddhartha; Prabhakar, Sharad; Bhandari, Mohit

    2016-12-01

    Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are among the most common knee ligament injuries and frequently warrant reconstruction. The etiopathogenesis of these injuries has focused mainly on mechanism of trauma, patient sex, and anatomic factors as predisposing causes. Several genetic factors that could predispose to an ACL tear have recently been reported. This systematic review summarizes the current evidence for a genetic predisposition to ACL tears. The principal research question was to identify genetic factors, based on the available literature, that could predispose an individual to an ACL tear. Systematic review. The PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, and HuGE databases were searched; the search was run from the period of inception until June 21, 2015. A secondary search was performed by screening the references of full-text articles obtained and by manually searching selected journals. Articles were screened with prespecified inclusion criteria. The quality of studies included in the review was assessed for risk of bias by 2 reviewers using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. A total of 994 records were identified by the search, out of which 17 studies (16 case-control studies and 1 cross-sectional study) were included in the final review. Two studies observed a familial predisposition to an ACL tear. Fourteen studies looked at specific gene polymorphisms in 20 genes, from which different polymorphisms in 10 genes were positively associated with an ACL tear. In addition to these polymorphisms, 8 haplotypes were associated with ACL tear. One study looked at gene expression analysis. Although specific gene polymorphisms and haplotypes have been identified, it is difficult to come to a conclusion on the basis of the existing literature. Several sources of bias have been identified in these studies, and the results cannot be extrapolated to the general population. More studies are needed in larger populations of different ethnicities. Gene-gene interactions and gene

  13. Micro-social risk factors and genetic predisposition to micro-social risk factors and genetic predisposition to digestive diseases among adolescents living in georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikava, M; Bakradze, M; Varsimashvili, M

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the genetic predisposition to digestive diseases, micro-social stressors and other risk factors among adolescents and compare them to each other by strength of association with Chronic Digestive Diseases (CDD). One phase epidemiological research was conducted in population of adolescents aged 14-21 years, living in Georgia. The representative contigent - 430 adolescents were selected by the method of simple randomization. The two groups were separated from the research contingent: 84 adolescents with the CDD (the experimental group) and 346 condtionally healthy adolescents (the control group). The degree of relationship between the defined risk factor and CDD among adolescents was studied through case-control study method. Statistical processing of the obtained data was provided through SPSS v.11,5. The risk factors ranking was held according to decrease of OR values. Analysis of micro-social and hereditary risk factors showed that the associations between CDD and the combination of chronic psychological overloads, calculated together, is stronger (OR=15,3 (95% CI: 9,06-37,8)), than with genetic predisposition to digestive diseases (OR=11,5). From chronic psychological overloads, the most strong relationship with CDD have adolescents study overloads (OR=7,1) and conflict situations at the family (OR=6,0), as well as adolescents bad habits (OR=5,14) and unsatisfactory living conditions (OR=3,74). The listed above OR indicies may be used for planning preventive measures, needed for decrease CDD prevalence among adolescents.

  14. Bone sarcoma as a second malignant neoplasm in children: influence of radiation and genetic predisposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meadows, A.T.; Strong, L.C.; Li, F.P.; D'angio, G.J.; Schweisguth, O.; Freeman, A.I.; Jenkin, R.D.T.; Morris-Jones, P.; Nesbit, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    Osteosarcoma or chondrosarcoma developed as a second malignant neoplasm (SMN) in 40 of 188 individuals with SMN whose first neoplasm occurred in childhood. A genetic susceptibility to cancer was found in 23; the SMN developed in an irradiated field in 32; both factors were present in 16; neither in one. When a genetic predisposition was present, radiation shortened the interval to SMN. The intervals between tumors and the age at which the bone sarcomas developed in relation to genetic disease and therapy were analyzed by a two-mutation hypothesis

  15. Genetic predisposition and genomic instability: studies with mouse embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streffer, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Strahlenbiologie

    1999-07-01

    The preimplantation mouse embryo is a useful system for radiobiological studies. Chromosomal aberrations were determined after exposure to X-rays and neutrons during the zygote (1-cell stage). New aberrations developed and were expressed during the 2nd and 3rd mitosis after irradiation. These later aberration developed from DNA damage which was originally not a DSB. Further chromosomal aberrations were studied in fibroblasts of fetuses 19 days post conception. A significant increase of chromosome aberrations was found in the fetuses which were irradiated in the 1-cell stage and which had developed a malformation. These data can only be explained by the induction of a genome instability through the radiation exposure which had been performed many cell generations earlier. Until recently it was generally accepted that an exposure to ionizing radiation during the preimplantation period of mammalian development will not induce malformations. However, recently it could be shown that certain sensitive mouse strains exist in which malformations are induced by exposure to X-rays and neutrons during the preimplantation period. It was further demonstrated that this effect can be suppressed if the sensitive mouse strain is crossbred with mice from a resistant mouse strain. These data show that this radiation effect is due to a genetic phenomenon with a recessive trait. Studies on protein patterns in normal fetuses and in fetuses with the malformation showed that characteristic changes occur. There are proteins which are no longer expressed in the malformed fetuses and new proteins may appear. Certain changes in glycoproteins and phosphoproteins were found not only in liver of malformed fetuses but also in skin and kidney of these organisms. The analysis of the genome of these malformed fetuses have given evidence that changes in two or three genes are responsible for the radiation-induced malformation. It was possible to localize 1 gene on chromosome 13 and another gene on

  16. Genetic predisposition to chikungunya ? a blood group study in chikungunya affected families

    OpenAIRE

    Sudarsanareddy, Lokireddy; Sarojamma, Vemula; Ramakrishna, Vadde

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Chikungunya fever is a viral disease transmitted to humans by the bite of CHIKV virus infected Aedes mosquitoes. During monsoon outbreak of chikungunya fever, we carried out the genetic predisposition to chikungunya in disease affected 100 families by doing blood group (ABO) tests by focusing on individuals who were likely to have a risk of chikungunya and identified the blood group involved in susceptibility/resistance to chikungunya. In the present study, based on blood group antig...

  17. Childhood neuroendocrine tumours: a descriptive study revealing clues for genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diets, I J; Nagtegaal, I D; Loeffen, J; de Blaauw, I; Waanders, E; Hoogerbrugge, N; Jongmans, M C J

    2017-01-17

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are rare in children and limited data are available. We aimed to specify tumour and patient characteristics and to investigate the role of genetic predisposition in the aetiology of paediatric NETs. Using the Dutch Pathology Registry PALGA, we collected patient- and tumour data of paediatric NETs in the Netherlands between 1991 and 2013 (N=483). The incidence of paediatric NETs in the Netherlands is 5.40 per one million per year. The majority of NETs were appendiceal tumours (N=441;91.3%). Additional surgery in appendiceal NETs was indicated in 89 patients, but performed in only 27 of these patients. Four out of five patients with pancreatic NETs were diagnosed with Von Hippel-Lindau disease (N=2) and Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (N=2). In one patient with an appendiceal NET Familial Adenomatous Polyposis was diagnosed. On the basis of second primary tumours or other additional diagnoses, involvement of genetic predisposition was suggestive in several others. We identified a significant number of patients with a confirmed or suspected tumour predisposition syndrome and show that paediatric pancreatic NETs in particular are associated with genetic syndromes. In addition, we conclude that treatment guidelines for appendiceal paediatric NETs need revision and improved implementation.

  18. Statin-associated myopathy: from genetic predisposition to clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrablik, M; Zlatohlavek, L; Stulc, T; Adamkova, V; Prusikova, M; Schwarzova, L; Hubacek, J A; Ceska, R

    2014-01-01

    Statin-associated myopathy (SAM) represents a broad spectrum of disorders from insignificant myalgia to fatal rhabdomyolysis. Its frequency ranges from 1-5 % in clinical trials to 15-20 % in everyday clinical practice. To a large extent, these variations can be explained by the definition used. Thus, we propose a scoring system to classify statin-induced myopathy according to clinical and biochemical criteria as 1) possible, 2) probable or 3) definite. The etiology of this disorder remains poorly understood. Most probably, an underlying genetic cause is necessary for overt SAM to develop. Variants in a few gene groups that encode proteins involved in: i) statin metabolism and distribution (e.g. membrane transporters and enzymes; OATP1B1, ABCA1, MRP, CYP3A4), ii) coenzyme Q10 production (e.g. COQ10A and B), iii) energy metabolism of muscle tissue (e.g. PYGM, GAA, CPT2) and several others have been proposed as candidates which can predispose to SAM. Pharmacological properties of individual statin molecules (e.g. lipophilicity, excretion pathways) and patients´ characteristics influence the likelihood of SAM development. This review summarizes current data as well as our own results.

  19. Genetic predisposition to obesity is associated with insulin secretion in Chinese adults: The Cardiometabolic Risk in Chinese (CRC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jun; Sun, Yuting; Liu, Xuekui; Zhu, Yan; Pei, Ying; Wang, Yu; Qiu, Qinqin; Yang, Manqing; Qi, Lu

    2016-01-01

    The etiological role of obesity in determining diabetes risk among Asians may be different from that among Caucasians. The current study aimed to investigate the association between genetic predisposition to obesity and measures of insulin secretion and resistance in a large Chinese cohort. Study samples were from a community-based health examination survey in central China. A total of 2058 subjects with available biomarkers levels were included in the present study. A genetic risk score (GRS) of obesity was derived on the basis of thirteen Asian-specific body mass index (BMI)-associated variants. High obesity GRS was significantly associated with increased homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-B score (β=7.309; P=0.001) but not related to measures of insulin resistance. Adjustment for age, sex, BMI, and levels of lipids did not appreciably change the results. In addition, we found significant interactions between the obesity GRS and measures of body fat distribution including waist circumference (WC; P for interaction=0.004) and neck circumference (NC; P for interaction=0.014) on HOMA-B score. Our results suggest that genetic predisposition to obesity may affect beta cell function in Chinese; and body fat distribution may modify the genetic effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative phenotypic and cytochemical characteristics of lymphocytes of Wistar rats and rats with genetic predisposition to catalepsy after retabolil administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteleeva, N G; Shurlygina, A V; Trufakin, V A

    2013-11-01

    We studied the possibility of using anabolic steroid retabolil injections for complex correction of behavioral and immune parameters in rats with genetic predisposition to catalepsy. Subpopulation composition of lymphoid organ and blood cells was compared in rats with genetic predisposition to catalepsy and Wistar rats after retabolil administration. In rats predisposed to catalepsy, retabolil reduced the total content of thymus cells and increased absolute count of CD8 (+) thymocytes. In Wistar rats, retabolil increased the total cell count and the content of CD4 (+) thymocytes, but reduced the number of CD8 (+) cells. Therefore, changes in the subpopulation composition of thymus cells after retabolil administration were opposite in rats with genetic predisposition to catalepsy and Wistar rats. Retabolil injections reduced the severity of catalepsy response in rats with genetic predisposition. However, the time of freezing in Wistar rats significantly increased under these conditions.

  1. Interaction between genetic predisposition to obesity and dietary calcium in relation to subsequent change in body weight and waist circumference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sofus C; Angquist, Lars; Ahluwalia, Tarun Veer Singh

    2014-01-01

    Studies indicate an effect of dietary calcium on change in body weight (BW) and waist circumference (WC), but the results are inconsistent. Furthermore, a relation could depend on genetic predisposition to obesity.......Studies indicate an effect of dietary calcium on change in body weight (BW) and waist circumference (WC), but the results are inconsistent. Furthermore, a relation could depend on genetic predisposition to obesity....

  2. Significance of genetic predisposition and genomic instability for individual sensitivity to radiation. Implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, H.

    2001-01-01

    At its closed-door meeting on 20/21 January 2000 the Radiation Protection Committee dedicated much of its attention to the significance of genetic predisposition and genetic instability for individual radiation sensitivity and to the implication of this for radiation protection. The statements and contributions to the closing plenary discussion touched on many aspects of ethics, personal rights, occupational medicine and insurance issues relating to this subject, all of which extend far beyond the purely technical issues of radiation protection. The present volume contains the lecture manuscripts of the meeting as well as a summarising assessment by the Radiation Protection Committee [de

  3. Radiation-induced breast cancer: Influence of age at exposure, latency period, age, and genetic predisposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuni, H.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation induced breast cancer: Influence of age at exposure, time since exposure, attained age and genetic predisposition. The amount of undesirable effects of screening with mammography was estimated from mortality studies after radiation exposure. Newer incidence studies demonstrate, however, an underestimation of the health detriment by mortality studies, in particular with increasing age at exposure, which amounts about five- to sixfold after an exposure in an age of 45-50y. The multidimensional analysis of the discrete values of incidence after radiation exposure respecting age at exposure, time since exposure and attained age instead of calculating a steady function simply depending from age at exposure results in an increasing relative and absolute risk of cancer incidence (and mortality) with growing age after an exposure at an age above 40y. Some genes seems to be correlated with an predisposition of breast cancer. In women carrying BRCA-1 the radiosensitivity for induction of breast cancer may exceed the risk in the normal population by about two orders of magnitude. The resulting doubling dose amounts in the order of the natural and medical radiation exposure. At least in part the genetic predisposition is associated with an early onset of the cancer after an additional radiation exposure. This kind of health detriment was not considered in the former discussion of radiation hazards. (orig.) [de

  4. Epidemiology, major risk factors and genetic predisposition for breast cancer in the Pakistani population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaukat, Uzma; Ismail, Muhammad; Mehmood, Nasir

    2013-01-01

    Occurrence of breast cancer is related to genetic as well as cultural, environmental and life-style factors. Variations in diversity of these factors among different ethnic groups and geographical areas emphasize the immense need for studies in all racial-ethnic populations. The incidence of breast cancer in Pakistan is highest in Asians after Jews in Israel and 2.5 times higher than that in neighboring countries like Iran and India, accounting for 34.6% of female cancers. The Pakistani population is deficient in information regarding breast cancer etiology and epidemiology, but efforts done so far had suggested consanguinity as a major risk factor for frequent mutations leading to breast cancer and has also shed light on genetic origins in different ethnic groups within Pakistan. World-wide research efforts on different ethnicities have enhanced our understanding of genetic predisposition to breast cancer but despite these discoveries, 75% of the familial risk of breast cancer remains unexplained, highlighting the fact that the majority of breast cancer susceptibility genes remain unidentified. For this purpose Pakistani population provides a strong genetic pool to elucidate the genetic etiology of breast cancer because of cousin marriages. In this review, we describe the known breast cancer predisposition factors found in the local Pakistani population and the epidemiological research work done to emphasize the importance of exploring factors/variants contributing to breast cance, in order to prevent, cure and decrease its incidence in our country.

  5. Interaction between genetic predisposition to adiposity and dietary protein in relation to subsequent change in body weight and waist circumference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkel Z Ankarfeldt

    Full Text Available Genetic predisposition to adiposity may interact with dietary protein in relation to changes of anthropometry.To investigate the interaction between genetic predisposition to higher body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC or waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRBMI and dietary protein in relation to subsequent change in body weight (ΔBW or change in WC (ΔWC.Three different Danish cohorts were used. In total 7,054 individuals constituted the study population with information on diet, 50 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with BMI, WC or WHRBMI, as well as potential confounders. Mean follow-up time was ∼5 years. Four genetic predisposition-scores were based on the SNPs; a complete-score including all selected adiposity- associated SNPs, and three scores including BMI, WC or WHRBMI associated polymorphisms, respectively. The association between protein intake and ΔBW or ΔWC were examined and interactions between SNP-score and protein were investigated. Analyses were based on linear regressions using macronutrient substitution models and meta-analyses.When protein replaced carbohydrate, meta-analyses showed no associations with ΔBW (41.0 gram/y/5 energy% protein, [95% CI: -32.3; 114.3] or ΔWC (<-0.1 mm/y/5 energy % protein, [-1.1; 1.1]. Similarly, there were no interactions for any SNP-scores and protein for either ΔBW (complete SNP-score: 1.8 gram/y/5 energy% protein/risk allele, [-7.0; 10.6] or ΔWC (complete SNP-score: <0.1 mm/y/5 energy% protein/risk allele, [-0.1; 0.1]. Similar results were seen when protein replaced fat.This study indicates that the genetic predisposition to general and abdominal adiposity, assessed by gene-scores, does not seem to modulate the influence of dietary protein on ΔBW or ΔWC.

  6. Genetic Predisposition and Cellular Basis for Ischemia-induced ST Segment Changes and Arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dan; Viskin, Sami; Oliva, Antonio; Cordeiro, Jonathan M.; Guerchicoff, Alejandra; Pollevick, Guido D.; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Recent reports have highlighted the importance of a family history of sudden death as a risk for ventricular fibrillation in patients experiencing an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), pointing to the possibility of a genetic predisposition. This report briefly reviews two recent studies designed to examine the hypothesis that there is a genetic predisposition to the development of arrhythmias associated with AMI. Ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation (VT/VF) complicating AMI as well as the arrhythmias associated with Brugada syndrome, a genetic disorder linked to SCN5A mutations, have both been linked to phase 2 reentry. Because of these mechanistic similarities in arrhythmogenesis, we examined the contribution of SCN5A mutations to VT/VF complicating AMI in patients developing VF during AMI. A missense mutation in SCN5A was found in a patient who developed an arrhythmic electrical storm during an evolving MI. All VT/VF episodes were associated with ST segment changes and were initiated by short-coupled extrasystoles. The G400A mutation and a H558R polymorphism were on the same allele and functional expression in TSA201 demonstrated a loss of function of sodium channel activity. These results suggest that a subclinical mutation in SCN5A resulting in a loss of function may predispose to life-threatening arrhythmias during acute ischemia. In another cohort of patients who developed long QT intervals and Torsade de Pointes (TdP) arrhythmias in days 2–11 following an AMI, a genetic screen of all long QT genes was performed. Six of eight patients (75%) in this group displayed the same polymorphism in KCNH2, which encodes the α subunit of the rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium current, IKr. The K897T polymorphism was detected in only 3 of 14 patients with uncomplicated myocardial infarction (MI) and has been detected in 33% of the Caucasian population. Expression of this polymorphism has previously been shown to cause a loss of function in HERG current

  7. Being at risk for cardiovascular disease: perceptions and preventive behavior in people with and without a known genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, L; Henneman, L; van der Weijden, T; Marteau, T M; Timmermans, D R M

    2012-01-01

    This study compares and explains differences in perceptions of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and preventive behaviors in people with and without a known genetic predisposition to CVD. A cross-sectional study using two samples was performed. The first sample (genetic predisposition; n = 51) consisted of individuals recently diagnosed with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) through DNA testing. The second sample (no genetic predisposition; n = 49) was recruited among patients with CVD-risk profiles based on family history of CVD, cholesterol levels, and blood pressure, registered at general practices. Participants filled out a postal questionnaire asking about their perceived risk, causal attributions (i.e. genetic and lifestyle), and about perceived efficacy and adoption of preventive behavior (i.e. medication adherence and adoption of a healthy diet and being sufficiently active). Perceived comparative risk, genetic attributions of CVD, and perceived efficacy of medication were higher in the "genetic predisposition" sample than in the "no genetic predisposition" sample. The samples did not differ on lifestyle attributions, efficacy of a healthy lifestyle, or preventive behavior. Individual differences in perceived risk, genetic attributions, perceived efficacy of medication, and adoption of a healthy lifestyle were best explained by family history of CVD. Our findings suggest that in people diagnosed with a single gene disorder characterized by a family disease history such as FH, family disease history may be more important than DNA information in explaining perceptions of and responses to risk.

  8. A genetic predisposition score for muscular endophenotypes predicts the increase in aerobic power after training: the CAREGENE study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background It is widely accepted that genetic variability might explain a large part of the observed heterogeneity in aerobic capacity and its response to training. Significant associations between polymorphisms of different genes with muscular strength, anaerobic phenotypes and body composition have been reported. Muscular endophenotypes are positively correlated with aerobic capacity, therefore, we tested the association of polymorphisms in twelve muscular related genes on aerobic capacity and its response to endurance training. Methods 935 Coronary artery disease patients (CAD) who performed an incremental exercise test until exhaustion at baseline and after three months of training were included. Polymorphisms of the genes were detected using the invader assay. Genotype-phenotype association analyses were performed using ANCOVA. Different models for a genetic predisposition score (GPS) were constructed based on literature and own data and were related to baseline and response VO2 scores. Results Carriers of the minor allele in the R23K polymorphism of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (GR) and the ciliary neurotrophic factor gene (CNTF) had a significantly higher increase in peakVO2 after training (p genetic predisposition score (GPS) showed a significant predictive value for the increase in peakVO2. PMID:21967077

  9. Genetic predisposition, dietary restraint and disinhibition in relation to short and long-term weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, Sanne P M; Camps, Stefan G J A; Bouwman, Freek G; Mariman, Edwin C M; Westerterp, Klaas R

    2014-04-10

    Interindividual differences in response to weight loss and maintenance thereafter are ascribed to genetic predisposition and behavioral changes. To examine whether body weight and short and long-term body weight loss were affected by candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and changes in eating behavior or by an interaction between these genetic and behavioral factors. 150 healthy subjects (39 males, 111 females) aged 20-50 y with a BMI of 27-38 kg/m(2) followed a very low energy diet for 8-weeks, followed by a 3-month weight maintenance period. SNPs were selected from six candidate genes: ADRB2, FTO, MC4R, PPARG, PPARD, and PPARGC1A. Changes in eating behavior were determined with the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire. A high genetic predisposition score was associated with a high body weight at baseline and more short-term weight loss. From the six selected obesity-related SNPs, FTO was associated with increased body weight at baseline, and the effect allele of PPARGC1A was positively associated with short-term weight loss, when assessed for each SNP separately. Long-term weight loss was associated with a larger increase in dietary restraint and larger decrease in disinhibition. During long-term weight loss, genetic effects are dominated by changes in eating behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic predisposition to radiation induced sarcoma: possible role for BRCA and p53 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadouri, Luna; Sagi, Michal; Goldberg, Yael; Lerer, Israela; Hamburger, Tamar; Peretz, Tamar

    2013-07-01

    The estimated incidence of radiation-associated sarcoma (RAS) is 0.03-0.2 % in 5 years post treatment. Most cancer predisposing genes are involved in DNA repair; therefore, elevated RAS risk in these patients is plausible. Cases of angiosarcoma post breast cancer treatment were reported in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. We report the genetic evaluation of seven cases with suspected RAS from patients counseled in our cancer-genetic clinic. Of 2,885 breast cancer patient, 470 were BRCA1 or two mutation carriers and three were p53 mutation carriers. Of them seven developed sarcoma in the field of irradiation; five in the chest wall and two in other sites. Genetic evaluation revealed BRCA1 mutation in two, BRCA2 mutation in additional patient and a carrier of p53 mutation. The estimation of risk for RAS in patients with genetic predisposition is limited due to the rarity of this event, and the bias in referral to the clinic toward younger age. With these limitations the rate of RAS is 0.43 % (2/470, 95 % CI -0.17 to 1.02, SE = 0.3) in this group in a median follow-up of 8.2 years (range 1 month to 51 years). If we assume irradiation for the breast in 80 % of the patients than rate of RAS in group is proximately 0.53 % (2/376, 95 % CI -0.21 to 1.26, SE = 0.37). A BRCA1 carrier which had sarcoma after irradiation to head and neck carcinoma was not included in these analyses. In conclusion, we found a high frequency of BRCA1/2 mutation among our patients diagnosed with RAS. However, we estimated approximately twofold increase in the risk of RAS in BRCA1/2 carriers which was not significant compared to reports in general population. Therefore, RAS is a rare event in BRCA carriers as in the general population, and should not be considered in the decision regarding irradiation treatment in this population.

  11. Management of women who have a genetic predisposition for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatoi, Ismail; Anderson, William F

    2008-08-01

    The management of women who have a genetic predisposition for breast cancer requires careful planning. Women who have BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations are at increased risk for breast cancer and for other cancers as well, particularly ovarian cancer. Screening, prophlyactic surgery, and chemoprevention are commonly utilized strategies in the management of these patients, and women may choose more than one of these strategies. No randomized prospective trials have assessed the impact of these strategies specifically in mutation carriers. All patients should be informed that screening, prophylactic surgery, and chemoprevention have the potential for harm as well as benefit.

  12. Genetic screens to identify pathogenic gene variants in the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drost, Mark; Lützen, Anne; van Hees, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    In many individuals suspected of the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome, variants of unclear significance (VUS), rather than an obviously pathogenic mutations, are identified in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. The uncertainty of whether such VUS inactivate MMR, and therefore...... are pathogenic, precludes targeted healthcare for both carriers and their relatives. To facilitate the identification of pathogenic VUS, we have developed an in cellulo genetic screen-based procedure for the large-scale mutagenization, identification, and cataloging of residues of MMR genes critical for MMR gene...

  13. Cerebral small vessel disease in middle age and genetic predisposition to late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, James D; Su, Li; Mak, Elijah; Sheikh-Bahaei, Nasim; Wells, Katie; Ritchie, Karen; Waldman, Adam; Ritchie, Craig W; O'Brien, John T

    2018-02-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) and might contribute to the relationship between apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE ε4) and LOAD, in older people. However, it is unclear whether CSVD begins in middle age in individuals genetically predisposed to LOAD. We assessed the relationship between radiological markers of CSVD, white matter hyperintensities and microbleeds, and genetic predisposition to LOAD in a cross-sectional analysis of cognitively normal subjects aged 40-59 years recruited from the PREVENT Dementia study. Microbleed prevalence was 14.5%, and mean ± standard deviation white matter hyperintensity percentage of total brain volume was 0.41 ± 0.28%. There was no significant association between APOE ε4 carrier status or history of parental dementia and white matter hyperintensity volume (P = .713, .912 respectively) or microbleeds (P = .082, .562 respectively) on multiple regression. Genetic predisposition to LOAD, through APOE genotype or AD family history, is not associated with CSVD in middle age. Copyright © 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Genetic Predisposition in a Large Family with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing has become more widely used to reveal genetic defect in monogenic disorders. Retinitis pigmentosa (RP, the leading cause of hereditary blindness worldwide, has been attributed to more than 67 disease-causing genes. Due to the extreme genetic heterogeneity, using general molecular screening alone is inadequate for identifying genetic predispositions in susceptible individuals. In order to identify underlying mutation rapidly, we utilized next-generation sequencing in a four-generation Chinese family with RP. Two affected patients and an unaffected sibling were subjected to whole exome sequencing. Through bioinformatics analysis and direct sequencing confirmation, we identified p.R135W transition in the rhodopsin gene. The mutation was subsequently confirmed to cosegregate with the disease in the family. In this study, our results suggest that whole exome sequencing is a robust method in diagnosing familial hereditary disease.

  15. Recognition of genetic predisposition in pediatric cancer patients: An easy-to-use selection tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongmans, Marjolijn C J; Loeffen, Jan L C M; Waanders, Esmé; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Kuiper, Roland P; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2016-03-01

    Genetic predisposition for childhood cancer is under diagnosed. Identifying these patients may lead to therapy adjustments in case of syndrome-related increased toxicity or resistant disease and syndrome-specific screening programs may lead to early detection of a further independent malignancy. Cancer surveillance might also be warranted for affected relatives and detection of a genetic mutation can allow for reproductive counseling. Here we present an easy-to-use selection tool, based on a systematic review of pediatric cancer predisposing syndromes, to identify patients who may benefit from genetic counseling. The selection tool involves five questions concerning family history, the type of malignancy, multiple primary malignancies, specific features and excessive toxicity, which results in the selection of those patients that may benefit from referral to a clinical geneticist. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic predisposition for beta cell fragility underlies type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James; Tian, Lei; Schonefeldt, Susann; Delghingaro-Augusto, Viviane; Garcia-Perez, Josselyn E; Pasciuto, Emanuela; Di Marino, Daniele; Carr, Edward J; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Franckaert, Dean; Lagou, Vasiliki; Overbergh, Lut; Vandenbussche, Jonathan; Allemeersch, Joke; Chabot-Roy, Genevieve; Dahlstrom, Jane E; Laybutt, D Ross; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Socha, Luis; Gevaert, Kris; Jetten, Anton M; Lambrechts, Diether; Linterman, Michelle A; Goodnow, Chris C; Nolan, Christopher J; Lesage, Sylvie; Schlenner, Susan M; Liston, Adrian

    2016-05-01

    Type 1 (T1D) and type 2 (T2D) diabetes share pathophysiological characteristics, yet mechanistic links have remained elusive. T1D results from autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells, whereas beta cell failure in T2D is delayed and progressive. Here we find a new genetic component of diabetes susceptibility in T1D non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, identifying immune-independent beta cell fragility. Genetic variation in Xrcc4 and Glis3 alters the response of NOD beta cells to unfolded protein stress, enhancing the apoptotic and senescent fates. The same transcriptional relationships were observed in human islets, demonstrating the role of beta cell fragility in genetic predisposition to diabetes.

  17. Phenotypic Consequences of a Genetic Predisposition to Enhanced Nitric Oxide Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emdin, Connor A; Khera, Amit V; Klarin, Derek; Natarajan, Pradeep; Zekavat, Seyedeh M; Nomura, Akihiro; Haas, Mary; Aragam, Krishna; Ardissino, Diego; Wilson, James G; Schunkert, Heribert; McPherson, Ruth; Watkins, Hugh; Elosua, Roberto; Bown, Matthew J; Samani, Nilesh J; Baber, Usman; Erdmann, Jeanette; Gormley, Padhraig; Palotie, Aarno; Stitziel, Nathan O; Gupta, Namrata; Danesh, John; Saleheen, Danish; Gabriel, Stacey; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2018-01-16

    Nitric oxide signaling plays a key role in the regulation of vascular tone and platelet activation. Here, we seek to understand the impact of a genetic predisposition to enhanced nitric oxide signaling on risk for cardiovascular diseases, thus informing the potential utility of pharmacological stimulation of the nitric oxide pathway as a therapeutic strategy. We analyzed the association of common and rare genetic variants in 2 genes that mediate nitric oxide signaling (Nitric Oxide Synthase 3 [ NOS3 ] and Guanylate Cyclase 1, Soluble, Alpha 3 [ GUCY1A3 ]) with a range of human phenotypes. We selected 2 common variants (rs3918226 in NOS3 and rs7692387 in GUCY1A3 ) known to associate with increased NOS3 and GUCY1A3 expression and reduced mean arterial pressure, combined them into a genetic score, and standardized this exposure to a 5 mm Hg reduction in mean arterial pressure. Using individual-level data from 335 464 participants in the UK Biobank and summary association results from 7 large-scale genome-wide association studies, we examined the effect of this nitric oxide signaling score on cardiometabolic and other diseases. We also examined whether rare loss-of-function mutations in NOS3 and GUCY1A3 were associated with coronary heart disease using gene sequencing data from the Myocardial Infarction Genetics Consortium (n=27 815). A genetic predisposition to enhanced nitric oxide signaling was associated with reduced risks of coronary heart disease (odds ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31-0.45; P =5.5*10 -26 ], peripheral arterial disease (odds ratio 0.42; 95% CI, 0.26-0.68; P =0.0005), and stroke (odds ratio, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.37-0.76; P =0.0006). In a mediation analysis, the effect of the genetic score on decreased coronary heart disease risk extended beyond its effect on blood pressure. Conversely, rare variants that inactivate the NOS3 or GUCY1A3 genes were associated with a 23 mm Hg higher systolic blood pressure (95% CI, 12-34; P =5.6*10 -5

  18. Genetic Predisposition Increases the Tic Severity, Rate of Comorbidities, and Psychosocial and Educational Difficulties in Children With Tourette Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eysturoy, Absalon Niclas; Skov, Liselotte; Debes, Nanette Mol

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine whether there are differences in tic severity, comorbidities, and psychosocial and educational consequences in children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition to Tourette syndrome compared with children with Tourette syndrome without genetic predisposition...... to Tourette syndrome. A total of 314 children diagnosed with Tourette syndrome participated in this study. Validated diagnostic tools were used to assess tic severity, comorbidities, and cognitive performance. A structured interview was used to evaluate psychosocial and educational consequences related...... to Tourette syndrome. The children with Tourette syndrome and genetic predisposition present with statistically significant differences in terms of severity of tics, comorbidities, and a range of psychosocial and educational factors compared with the children with Tourette syndrome without genetic...

  19. Association between Maternal Fish Consumption and Gestational Weight Gain: Influence of Molecular Genetic Predisposition to Obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofus C Larsen

    Full Text Available Studies suggest that fish consumption can restrict weight gain. However, little is known about how fish consumption affects gestational weight gain (GWG, and whether this relationship depends on genetic makeup.To examine the association between fish consumption and GWG, and whether this relationship is dependent on molecular genetic predisposition to obesity.A nested case-cohort study based on the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC sampling the most obese women (n = 990 and a random sample of the remaining participants (n = 1,128. Replication of statistically significant findings was attempted in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC (n = 4,841. We included 32 body mass index (BMI associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and 5 SNPs found associated with GWG. BMI associated SNPs were combined in a genetic risk score (GRS. Associations between consumption of fish, GRS or individual variants and GWG were analysed, and interactions between fish and the GRS or individual variants were examined.In the DNBC, each portion/week (150 g of fatty fish was associated with a higher GWG of 0.58 kg (95% CI: 0.16, 0.99, P<0.01. For total fish and lean fish, similar patterns were observed, but these associations were not statistically significant. We found no association between GRS and GWG, and no interactions between GRS and dietary fish on GWG. However, we found an interaction between the PPARG Pro12Ala variant and dietary fish. Each additional Pro12Ala G-allele was associated with a GWG of -0.83 kg (95% CI: -1.29, -0.37, P<0.01 per portion/week of dietary fish, with the same pattern for both lean and fatty fish. In ALSPAC, we were unable to replicate these findings.We found no consistent evidence of association between fish consumption and GWG, and our results indicate that the association between dietary fish and GWG has little or no dependency on GRS or individual SNPs.

  20. Association between Maternal Fish Consumption and Gestational Weight Gain: Influence of Molecular Genetic Predisposition to Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sofus C; Ängquist, Lars; Laurin, Charles; Morgen, Camilla S; Jakobsen, Marianne U; Paternoster, Lavinia; Smith, George Davey; Olsen, Sjurdur F; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Nohr, Ellen A

    2016-01-01

    Studies suggest that fish consumption can restrict weight gain. However, little is known about how fish consumption affects gestational weight gain (GWG), and whether this relationship depends on genetic makeup. To examine the association between fish consumption and GWG, and whether this relationship is dependent on molecular genetic predisposition to obesity. A nested case-cohort study based on the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) sampling the most obese women (n = 990) and a random sample of the remaining participants (n = 1,128). Replication of statistically significant findings was attempted in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) (n = 4,841). We included 32 body mass index (BMI) associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 5 SNPs found associated with GWG. BMI associated SNPs were combined in a genetic risk score (GRS). Associations between consumption of fish, GRS or individual variants and GWG were analysed, and interactions between fish and the GRS or individual variants were examined. In the DNBC, each portion/week (150 g) of fatty fish was associated with a higher GWG of 0.58 kg (95% CI: 0.16, 0.99, P<0.01). For total fish and lean fish, similar patterns were observed, but these associations were not statistically significant. We found no association between GRS and GWG, and no interactions between GRS and dietary fish on GWG. However, we found an interaction between the PPARG Pro12Ala variant and dietary fish. Each additional Pro12Ala G-allele was associated with a GWG of -0.83 kg (95% CI: -1.29, -0.37, P<0.01) per portion/week of dietary fish, with the same pattern for both lean and fatty fish. In ALSPAC, we were unable to replicate these findings. We found no consistent evidence of association between fish consumption and GWG, and our results indicate that the association between dietary fish and GWG has little or no dependency on GRS or individual SNPs.

  1. Familiality analysis of provoked vestibulodynia treated by vestibulectomy supports genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Terry K; Allen-Brady, Kristina L; Monson, Martha A; Leclair, Catherine M; Sharp, Howard T; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A

    2016-05-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia is a poorly understood disease that affects 8-15% of women in their lifetime. There is significant inflammation and nerve growth in vestibular biopsies from affected women treated by vestibulectomy compared with matched female population controls without vestibulodynia. The triggers leading to this neurogenic inflammation are unknown, but they are likely multifactorial. Our objective was to determine whether vestibulodynia is more common in close and distantly related female relatives of women diagnosed with the disease and those specifically treated by vestibulectomy. Excess familial clustering would support a potential genetic predisposition for vestibulodynia and warrant further studies to isolate risk alleles. Using population-based genealogy linked to University of Utah Hospital CPT coded data, we estimated the relative risk of vestibulectomy in female relatives of affected women. We also compared the average pairwise relatedness of cases to the expected relatedness of the population and identified high-disease-burden pedigrees. A total of 183 potential vestibulectomy probands were identified using CPT codes. The relative risk of vestibulectomy was elevated in first-degree (20 [6.6-47], P genetic predisposition. Future studies will identify candidate genes by linkage analysis in affected families and sequencing of distantly related probands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Associated cancers in Waldenström macroglobulinemia: clues for common genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, Enrica; Varettoni, Marzia; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Arcaini, Luca; Ricci, Francesca; Pascutto, Cristiana; Rattotti, Sara; Vismara, Eleonora; Paris, Laura; Cazzola, Mario

    2013-12-01

    Several population-based and cohort studies have reported an increased risk of second cancers in lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs). The cause of second cancers in LPDs is probably multifactorial, and the relative contribution of treatments, genetic predisposition, and immune dysfunction typical of LPDs is still unclear. We retrospectively studied 230 patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) to assess the frequency, characteristics, and predictive factors of second cancers and to evaluate whether patients with WM are at higher risk of second cancers compared with an age- and sex-matched control population. In a competing-risk model, the cumulative incidence of solid cancers was 6% at 5 years, 11% at 10 years, and 17% at 15 years, whereas the incidence of hematologic malignancies was 4% at 5 years, 7% at 10 years, and 8% at 15 years. Compared with an age- and sex-matched population, the overall risk of second cancers was 1.7-fold higher than expected (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22-2.38; P = .002). Patients with WM were at increased risk for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) (standardized incidence ratio [SIR], 8.64; 95% CI, 3.88-19.22; P genetic predisposition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic predisposition of RSV infection-related respiratory morbidity in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drysdale, Simon B; Prendergast, Michael; Alcazar, Mireia; Wilson, Theresa; Smith, Melvyn; Zuckerman, Mark; Broughton, Simon; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Johnston, Sebastian L; Hodemaekers, Hennie M; Janssen, Riny; Bont, Louis; Greenough, Anne

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether prematurely born infants have a genetic predisposition to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection-related respiratory morbidity. One hundred and forty-six infants born at less than 36 weeks of gestation were prospectively followed. Nasopharygeal aspirates were obtained on every occasion the infants had a lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) regardless of need for admission. DNA was tested for 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Chronic respiratory morbidity was assessed using respiratory health-related questionnaires, parent-completed diary cards at a corrected age of 1 year and review of hospital notes. Lung function was measured at a post menstrual age (PMA) of 36 weeks and corrected age of 1 year. A SNP in ADAM33 was associated with an increased risk of developing RSV LRTIs, but not with significant differences in 36-week PMA lung function results. SNPs in several genes were associated with increased chronic respiratory morbidity (interleukin 10 (IL10), nitric oxide synthase 2A (NOS2A), surfactant protein C (SFTPC), matrix metalloproteinase 16 (MMP16) and vitamin D receptor (VDR)) and reduced lung function at 1 year (MMP16, NOS2A, SFTPC and VDR) in infants who had had RSV LRTIs. Our results suggest that prematurely born infants may have a genetic predisposition to RSV LRTIs and subsequent respiratory morbidity which is independent of premorbid lung function.

  4. Ethnic and population differences in the genetic predisposition to human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjecki, C; Alyass, A; Meyre, D

    2018-01-01

    Obesity rates have escalated to the point of a global pandemic with varying prevalence across ethnic groups. These differences are partially explained by lifestyle factors in addition to genetic predisposition to obesity. This review provides a comprehensive examination of the ethnic differences in the genetic architecture of obesity. Using examples from evolution, heritability, admixture, monogenic and polygenic studies of obesity, we provide explanations for ethnic differences in the prevalence of obesity. The debate over definitions of race and ethnicity, the advantages and limitations of multi-ethnic studies and future directions of research are also discussed. Multi-ethnic studies have great potential to provide a better understanding of ethnic differences in the prevalence of obesity that may result in more targeted and personalized obesity treatments. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  5. Functional and genetic predisposition to rhinovirus lower respiratory tract infections in prematurely born infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drysdale, Simon B; Alcazar, Mireia; Wilson, Theresa; Smith, Melvyn; Zuckerman, Mark; Hodemaekers, Hennie M; Janssen, Riny; Bont, Louis; Johnston, Sebastian L; Greenough, Anne

    2016-12-01

    Term born infants are predisposed to human rhinovirus (HRV) lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) by reduced neonatal lung function and genetic susceptibility. Our aim was to investigate whether prematurely born infants were similarly predisposed to HRV LRTIs or any other viral LRTIs. Infants born less than 36 weeks of gestational age were recruited. Prior to neonatal/maternity unit discharge, lung function (functional residual capacity by helium gas dilution and multiple breath washout, lung clearance index and compliance (C rs ), and resistance (R rs ) of the respiratory system) was assessed and DNA samples assessed for eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in seven genes: ADAM33, IL10, MMP16 NFκB1A,SFTPC, VDR, and NOS2A. Infants were prospectively followed until 1 year corrected age. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) were sent whenever an infant developed a LRTI and tested for 13 viruses. One hundred and thirty-nine infants were included in the analysis. Infants who developed HRV LRTIs had reduced C rs (1.6 versus 1.2 mL/cmH 2 O/kg, p = 0.044) at 36 weeks postmenstrual age. A SNP in the gene coding for the vitamin D receptor was associated with the development of HRV LRTIs and any viral LRTIs (p = 0.02). Prematurely born infants may have both a functional and genetic predisposition to HRV LRTIs. What is Known: • Term born infants are predisposed to rhinovirus lower respiratory tract (HRV LRTIs) infection by reduced neonatal lung function. • Term born infants requiring hospitalisation due to HRV bronchiolitis were more likely to have single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the IL-10 gene. What is New: • Prematurely born infants who developed a HRV LRTI had lower C rs before maternity unit discharge. • A SNP in the gene coding for the vitamin D receptor was associated with the development of HRV LRTIs and overall respiratory viral LRTIs in prematurely born infants.

  6. Association of Genetic Predisposition With Solitary Schwannoma or Meningioma in Children and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathmanaban, Omar N; Sadler, Katherine V; Kamaly-Asl, Ian D; King, Andrew T; Rutherford, Scott A; Hammerbeck-Ward, Charlotte; McCabe, Martin G; Kilday, John-Paul; Beetz, Christian; Poplawski, Nicola K; Evans, D Gareth; Smith, Miriam J

    2017-09-01

    predisposition gene. Twenty-five of 63 patients (40%) had a constitutional NF2 mutation, and 9 (14%) had a constitutional SMARCE1 mutation. In the cohort of those who developed a solitary schwannoma before age 25 years, 44 of 153 patients (29%) had an identifiable genetic predisposition. Twenty-four patients (55%) with a spinal schwannoma had a constitutional mutation, while only 20 (18%) with a cranial schwannoma had a constitutional predisposition (P < .001). Of 109 cranial schwannomas, 106 (97.2%) were vestibular. Four of 106 people (3.8%) with a cranial schwannoma had an LZTR1 mutation (3 were vestibular schwannomas and 1 was a nonvestibular schwannoma), and 9 (8.5%) had an NF2 mutation. A significant proportion of young people with an apparently sporadic solitary meningioma or schwannoma had a causative predisposition mutation. This finding has important clinical implications because of the risk of additional tumors and the possibility of familial disease. Young patients presenting with a solitary meningioma or schwannoma should be referred for genetic testing.

  7. Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Status and Longitudinal Changes in Weight and Waist Circumference:Influence of Genetic Predisposition to Adiposity

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Sofus C; Ängquist, Lars; Moldovan, Max; Huikari, Ville; Sebert, Sylvain; Cavadino, Alana; Singh Ahluwalia, Tarunveer; Skaaby, Tea; Linneberg, Allan; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Toft, Ulla; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the relationship between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and changes in measures of adiposity have shown inconsistent results, and interaction with genetic predisposition to obesity has rarely been examined. We examined whether 25(OH)D was associated with subsequent annual changes in body weight (ΔBW) or waist circumference (ΔWC), and whether the associations were modified by genetic predisposition to a high BMI, WC or waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRBMI). The study was ba...

  8. Is there a genetic predisposition to new-onset diabetes after kidney transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Yogesh N V; Abraham, Georgi; Sundaram, Varun; Reddy, Pooja P; Mathew, Milly; Nagarajan, Prethivee; Mehra, Nikita; Ramachandran, A; Ali, Asik Ali Mohammed; Reddy, Yuvaram N V

    2015-11-01

    Kidney transplant recipients may develop new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) and transplant-associated hyperglycemia (TAH) (NODAT or new-onset impaired glucose tolerance-IGT). We studied 251 consecutive renal transplant South Asian recipients for incidence of NODAT and its risk factors between June 2004 and January 2009. Pre-transplant glucose tolerance test (GTT) identified non-diabetics (n = 102, IGT-24, NGT-78) for analysis. Baseline immunosuppression along with either cyclosporine (CsA) (n = 70) or tacrolimus (Tac) (n = 32) was given. Patients underwent GTT 20 days (mean) post-transplant to identify NODAT, normal (N) or IGT. TAH was observed in 40.2% of the patients (40% in CsA and 40.6% in Tac) (P = 0.5). NODAT developed in 13.7% of the patients (12.9% in CsA and 15.6% in Tac) (P = 0.5). Overall, Hepatitis C (P = 0.007), human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B52 (P = 0.03) and lack of HLA A28 (A68/69) (P = 0.03) were associated with TAH. In the Tac group, higher Day 1 dosage (P genetic predisposition to NODAT and TAH in South Asia as seen by the HLA associations, and a predisposition exists to the individual diabetogenic effects of Tac and CsA based on HLA type. This could lead to more careful selection of calcineurin inhibitors based on HLA types in the South Asian population.

  9. Genetic predisposition to endocrine tumors: Diagnosis, surveillance and challenges in care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petr, Elisabeth Joye; Else, Tobias

    2016-10-01

    Endocrine tumor syndromes, eg, multiple endocrine neoplasia types 1 and 2, were among the first recognized hereditary predisposition syndromes to tumor development. Over time, the number of endocrine tumor syndromes has significantly expanded, eg, with the recent inclusion of hereditary paraganglioma syndromes. Associations of non-endocrine tumors with hereditary endocrine tumor syndromes and endocrine tumors with non-classical endocrine tumor syndromes have emerged. These findings have certainly expanded the scope of care, necessitating a multidisciplinary approach by a team of medical professionals and researchers, integrating shared patient decision-making at every step of surveillance, diagnosis, and treatment. In the absence of evidence-based guidelines, multiple aspects of patient care remain individualized, based on a patient's clinical presentation and family pedigree. This is particularly important when determining a surveillance plan for unaffected or disease-free mutation carriers. In this review, we describe the main endocrine tumor manifestations found in familial cancer syndromes in an organ-based approach, focusing on adrenocortical carcinoma, pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma, neuroendocrine tumors, differentiated thyroid cancer, and medullary thyroid cancer. We highlight the challenges in diagnosis, surveillance, and therapy unique to the patient population with hereditary syndromes. Furthermore, we underscore the importance of evaluating for genetic predisposition to tumor development, provide features that can identify index patients, and discuss the approach to screening surveillance for mutation carriers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A genetic predisposition score for muscular endophenotypes predicts the increase in aerobic power after training: the CAREGENE study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schepers Dirk

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is widely accepted that genetic variability might explain a large part of the observed heterogeneity in aerobic capacity and its response to training. Significant associations between polymorphisms of different genes with muscular strength, anaerobic phenotypes and body composition have been reported. Muscular endophenotypes are positively correlated with aerobic capacity, therefore, we tested the association of polymorphisms in twelve muscular related genes on aerobic capacity and its response to endurance training. Methods 935 Coronary artery disease patients (CAD who performed an incremental exercise test until exhaustion at baseline and after three months of training were included. Polymorphisms of the genes were detected using the invader assay. Genotype-phenotype association analyses were performed using ANCOVA. Different models for a genetic predisposition score (GPS were constructed based on literature and own data and were related to baseline and response VO2 scores. Results Carriers of the minor allele in the R23K polymorphism of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (GR and the ciliary neurotrophic factor gene (CNTF had a significantly higher increase in peakVO2 after training (p AMPD1 gene had a significantly lower relative increase (p 2. GPS of data driven models were significantly associated with the increase in peakVO2 after training. Conclusions In CAD patients, suggestive associations were found in the GR, CNTF and the AMPD1 gene with an improved change in aerobic capacity after three months of training. Additionally data driven models with a genetic predisposition score (GPS showed a significant predictive value for the increase in peakVO2.

  11. DNA and RNA analyses in detection of genetic predisposition to cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurzawski Grzegorz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the past decade many new molecular methods for DNA and RNA analysis have emerged. The most popular thus far have been SSCP, HET, CMC, DGGE, RFLP or ASA, which have now been replaced by methods that are more cost effective and less time consuming. Real-time amplification techniques and particularly those with the capacity of multiplexing have become commonly used in laboratory practice. Novel screening methods enable the very rapid examination of large patients series. Use of liquid handling robotics applied to the isolation of DNA or RNA, the normalisation of sample concentration, and standardization of target amplification by PCR have also contributed to a reduced risk of sample contamination and have resulted in laboratory analysis being easier and faster. The aim of this study is the introduction of a few modern techniques, most commonly used in detection of genetic predisposition to cancer.

  12. Diagnostic criteria, specific mutations, and genetic predisposition in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachet, Jean-Baptiste; Emile, Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    In 1998, gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) emerged as a distinct oncogenetic entity and subsequently became a paradigm of targeted therapies in solid tumors. Diagnosis of GIST relies on both histology and immunohistochemistry. Ninety-five percent of GISTs express either KIT or DOG-1. Approximately 80%–90% of GISTs harbor gain-of-function mutations of either KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha polypeptide (PDGFRA) receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK). More than 100 different mutations have been described, some of which are associated with specific clinical and/or histological characteristics. Detection of KIT or PDGFRA mutations is recommended in advanced GISTs because they are highly predictive of tumor response to RTK inhibitors, as well as in KIT-negative cases to confirm diagnosis. In most cases, GISTs are sporadic, but in rare cases, they are related with genetic predisposition, such as neurofibromatosis type 1, Carney triad, Carney–Stratakis syndrome, and inherited KIT or PDGFRA germline mutations. PMID:23776354

  13. The influence of genetic predisposition and autoimmune hepatitis inducing antigens in disease development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardtke-Wolenski, Matthias; Dywicki, Janine; Fischer, Katja; Hapke, Martin; Sievers, Maren; Schlue, Jerome; Anderson, Mark S; Taubert, Richard; Noyan, Fatih; Manns, Michael P; Jaeckel, Elmar

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is defined as a chronic liver inflammation with loss of tolerance against hepatocytes. The etiology and pathophysiology of AIH are still poorly understood because reliable animal models are limited. Therefore, we recently introduced a model of experimental murine AIH by a self-limited adenoviral infection with the AIH type 2 antigen formiminotransferase cyclodeaminase (FTCD). We could demonstrate that break of humoral tolerance towards liver specific autoantigens like FTCD and cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is not dependent on the genetic background. However, the development of AIH in autoantibody positive animals is determined by genetic background genes. We could also show that the break of humoral tolerance is necessary but not sufficient for the development of AIH. In contrast the break of tolerance against the ubiquitously expressed nuclear antigens (ANAs) is strictly dependent on genetic predisposition. Priming with the UGA suppressor tRNA-associated protein (soluble liver antigen; SLA) is a strong inducer of ANA reactivity, but not sufficient to cause AIH development thereby questioning the importance of anti-SLA immune response as an important driver in AIH. Monogenetic mutations such as Aire-deficiency can cause AIH in otherwise genetically resistant strains. The results have important implications for our understanding of the pathophysiology of AIH development and for the interpretation of humoral antibody responses in AIH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic predisposition of IL-10 promoter polymorphisms with risk of multiple sclerosis: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, V; Akram Husain, R S; Ahmed, Shiek Ssj

    2017-05-15

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a anti-inflammatory cytokine, which controls inflammation by inhibiting the synthesis of several cytokines produced by Th1 cells and macrophages. The association between Interleukin-10 promoter polymorphisms with the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) remains inconclusive. In this study, a meta-analysis has been performed to assess the relationship between IL-10 gene polymorphisms rs1800896, rs1800871 and rs1800872 with the risk of MS. Nine case-control studies were selected involving 2755 participants. The association between the polymorphisms and MS was examined by the pooled odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in allelic, homozygote, heterozygote, dominant and recessive genetic models. Of analyzed genetic models, the pooled ORs and CIs of each SNPs calculated based on random (I 2 >50) or fixed effects (I 2 0.05) of genetic predisposition with MS susceptibility across Asian and Caucasian populations. In addition, assessment based on funnel plot and Egger's linear regression test suggests no publication bias in all analyzed genetic models. Overall, our results demonstrated that rs1800896, rs1800871 and rs1800872 polymorphisms may not be the risk factor for the development of MS in both the populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baeyens, A

    2002-12-02

    The chromosomal radiosensitivity of breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition was investigated and compared to a group of healthy women. The chromosomal radiosensitivity was assessed with the G2 and the G0-micronucleus assay. For the G2 assay lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with a dose of 0.4 Gy (60)Co gamma-rays after 71 h incubation, and chromatid breaks were scored in 50 metaphases. For the micronucleus assay lymphocytes were exposed in vitro to 3.5 Gy (60)Co gamma-rays at a high dose rate or low dose rate. 70 h post-irradiation cultures were arrested and micronuclei were scored in 1000 binucleate cells. The results demonstrated that the group of breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition was on the average more radiosensitive than a population of healthy women, and this with the G2 as well as with the high dose rate and low dose rate micronucleus assay. With the G2 assay 43% of the patients were found to be radiosensitive. A higher proportion of the patients were radiosensitive with the micronucleus assay (45% with high dose rate and 61% with low dose rate). No correlation was found between the G2 and the G0-micronucleus chromosomal radiosensitivity. Out of the different subgroups considered, the group of the young breast cancer patients without family history showed the highest percentage of radiosensitive cases in the G2 (50%) as well as in the micronucleus assay (75-78%).

  16. Genetic Predisposition, Clinical Risk Factor Burden, and Lifetime Risk of Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Lu-Chen; Preis, Sarah R; Hulme, Olivia L; Larson, Martin G; Choi, Seung Hoan; Wang, Biqi; Trinquart, Ludovic; McManus, David D; Staerk, Laila; Lin, Honghuang; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Ellinor, Patrick T; Benjamin, Emelia J; Lubitz, Steven A

    2018-03-06

    The long-term probability of developing atrial fibrillation (AF) considering genetic predisposition and clinical risk factor burden is unknown. We estimated the lifetime risk of AF in individuals from the community-based Framingham Heart Study. Polygenic risk for AF was derived using a score of ≈1000 AF-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Clinical risk factor burden was calculated for each individual using a validated risk score for incident AF comprised of height, weight, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, current smoking status, antihypertensive medication use, diabetes mellitus, history of myocardial infarction, and history of heart failure. We estimated the lifetime risk of AF within tertiles of polygenic and clinical risk. Among 4606 participants without AF at 55 years of age, 580 developed incident AF (median follow-up, 9.4 years; 25th-75th percentile, 4.4-14.3 years). The lifetime risk of AF >55 years of age was 37.1% and was substantially influenced by both polygenic and clinical risk factor burden. Among individuals free of AF at 55 years of age, those in low-polygenic and clinical risk tertiles had a lifetime risk of AF of 22.3% (95% confidence interval, 15.4-9.1), whereas those in high-risk tertiles had a risk of 48.2% (95% confidence interval, 41.3-55.1). A lower clinical risk factor burden was associated with later AF onset after adjusting for genetic predisposition ( P <0.001). In our community-based cohort, the lifetime risk of AF was 37%. Estimation of polygenic AF risk is feasible and together with clinical risk factor burden explains a substantial gradient in long-term AF risk. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Chromosomal radiosensitivity in breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeyens, A; Thierens, H; Claes, K; Poppe, B; Messiaen, L; De Ridder, L; Vral, A

    2002-01-01

    The chromosomal radiosensitivity of breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition was investigated and compared to a group of healthy women. The chromosomal radiosensitivity was assessed with the G2 and the G0-micronucleus assay. For the G2 assay lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with a dose of 0.4 Gy 60Co γ-rays after 71 h incubation, and chromatid breaks were scored in 50 metaphases. For the micronucleus assay lymphocytes were exposed in vitro to 3.5 Gy 60Co γ-rays at a high dose rate or low dose rate. 70 h post-irradiation cultures were arrested and micronuclei were scored in 1000 binucleate cells. The results demonstrated that the group of breast cancer patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition was on the average more radiosensitive than a population of healthy women, and this with the G2 as well as with the high dose rate and low dose rate micronucleus assay. With the G2 assay 43% of the patients were found to be radiosensitive. A higher proportion of the patients were radiosensitive with the micronucleus assay (45% with high dose rate and 61% with low dose rate). No correlation was found between the G2 and the G0-micronucleus chromosomal radiosensitivity. Out of the different subgroups considered, the group of the young breast cancer patients without family history showed the highest percentage of radiosensitive cases in the G2 (50%) as well as in the micronucleus assay (75–78%). British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 1379–1385. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600628 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12454765

  18. Prostate-specific antigen velocity in a prospective prostate cancer screening study of men with genetic predisposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikropoulos, Christos; Selkirk, Christina G Hutten; Saya, Sibel

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and PSA-velocity (PSAV) have been used to identify men at risk of prostate cancer (PrCa). The IMPACT study is evaluating PSA screening in men with a known genetic predisposition to PrCa due to BRCA1/2 mutations. This analysis evaluates the utility of PS...... elevation in men with low PSAs. Interaction terms were included in the models to determine whether BRCA status influenced the predictiveness of PSA or PSAV. RESULTS: 1634 participants had ⩾3 PSA readings of whom 174 underwent PB and 45 PrCas diagnosed. In men with PSA >3.0 ng ml-l, PSAV...

  19. Genetic Predisposition to High Blood Pressure and Lifestyle Factors: Associations With Midlife Blood Pressure Levels and Cardiovascular Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazoki, Raha; Dehghan, Abbas; Evangelou, Evangelos; Warren, Helen; Gao, He; Caulfield, Mark; Elliott, Paul; Tzoulaki, Ioanna

    2018-02-13

    High blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Both heritable and lifestyle risk factors contribute to elevated BP levels. We aimed to investigate the extent to which lifestyle factors could offset the effect of an adverse BP genetic profile and its effect on CVD risk. We constructed a genetic risk score for high BP by using 314 published BP loci in 277 005 individuals without previous CVD from the UK Biobank study, a prospective cohort of individuals aged 40 to 69 years, with a median of 6.11 years of follow-up. We scored participants according to their lifestyle factors including body mass index, healthy diet, sedentary lifestyle, alcohol consumption, smoking, and urinary sodium excretion levels measured at recruitment. We examined the association between tertiles of genetic risk and tertiles of lifestyle score with BP levels and incident CVD by using linear regression and Cox regression models, respectively. Healthy lifestyle score was strongly associated with BP ( P genetic predisposition to high BP for risk stratification needs careful evaluation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Assessment of false-negative cases of breast MR imaging in women with a familial or genetic predisposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obdeijn, Inge-Marie A.; Loo, Claudette E.; Rijnsburger, Adriana J.; Wasser, Martin N. J. M.; Bergers, Elisabeth; Kok, Theo; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Boetes, Carla

    In order to assess the characteristics of malignant breast lesions those were not detected during screening by MR imaging. In the Dutch MRI screening study (MRISC), a non-randomized prospective multicenter study, women with high familial risk or a genetic predisposition for breast cancer were

  1. Assessment of false-negative cases of breast MR imaging in women with a familial or genetic predisposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.I.M. Obdeijn (Inge-Marie); C.E. Loo (Claudette); A.J. Rijnsburger (Rian); M.N.J.M. Wasser (Martin); E. Bergers (Elisabeth); T. Kok (Theo); J.G.M. Klijn (Jan); C. Boetes (Carla)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn order to assess the characteristics of malignant breast lesions those were not detected during screening by MR imaging. In the Dutch MRI screening study (MRISC), a non-randomized prospective multicenter study, women with high familial risk or a genetic predisposition for breast cancer

  2. Efficacy of MRI and mammography for breast-cancer screening in women with a familial or genetic predisposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kriege, M; Brekelmans, CTM; Boetes, C; Besnard, PE; Zonderland, HM; Obdeijn, IM; Manoliu, RA; Kok, T; Peterse, H; Tilanus-Linthorst, MMA; Muller, SH; Meijer, S; Oosterwijk, JC; Beex, LVAM; Tollenaar, RAEM; de Koning, HJ; Rutgers, EJT; Klijn, JGM

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The value of regular surveillance for breast cancer in women with a genetic or familial predisposition to breast cancer is currently unproven. We compared the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with that of mammography for screening in this group of high-risk women. METHODS:

  3. Efficacy of MRI and mammography for breast-cancer screening in women with a familial or genetic predisposition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kriege, M.; Brekelmans, C.T.; Boetes, C.; Besnard, P.E.; Zonderland, H.M.; Obdeijn, I.M.; Manoliu, R.A.; Kok, T.; Peterse, H.L.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M.M.; Muller, S.H.; Meijer, S.; Oosterwijk-Wakka, J.C.; Beex, L.V.A.M.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Koning, H.J. de; Rutgers, E.; Klijn, J.G.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The value of regular surveillance for breast cancer in women with a genetic or familial predisposition to breast cancer is currently unproven. We compared the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with that of mammography for screening in this group of high-risk women. METHODS:

  4. Childhood tumours with a high probability of being part of a tumour predisposition syndrome; reason for referral for genetic consultation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Floor A. M.; Hopman, Saskia M. J.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Berger, Lieke P. V.; Bleeker, Fonnet E.; Dommering, Charlotte J.; Jongmans, Marjolijn C. J.; Letteboer, Tom G. W.; Olderode-Berends, Maran J. W.; Wagner, Anja; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Merks, Johannes H. M.

    2017-01-01

    Recognising a tumour predisposition syndrome (TPS) in childhood cancer patients is of major clinical relevance. The presence of a TPS may be suggested by the type of tumour in the child. We present an overview of 23 childhood tumours that in themselves should be a reason to refer a child for genetic

  5. Interaction of genetic predisposition and environmental factors in the pathogenesis of idiopathic orthostatic intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Jacob, G.; Pohar, B.; Robertson, D.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The hemodynamic and autonomic abnormalities in idiopathic orthostatic intolerance (IOI) have been studied extensively. However, the mechanisms underlying these abnormalities are not understood. If genetic predisposition were important in the pathogenesis of IOI, monozygotic twins of patients with IOI should have similar hemodynamic and autonomic abnormalities. METHODS: We studied two patients with IOI and their identical twins. Both siblings in the first twin pair had orthostatic symptoms, significant orthostatic tachycardia, increased plasma norepinephrine levels with standing, and a greater than normal decrease in systolic blood pressure with trimethaphan infusion. RESULTS: Both siblings had a normal response of plasma renin activity to upright posture. In the second twin pair, only one sibling had symptoms of orthostatic intolerance, an orthostatic tachycardia, and raised plasma catecholamines with standing. The affected sibling had inappropriately low plasma renin activity with standing and was 8-fold more sensitive to the pressor effect of phenylephrine than the unaffected sibling. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that in some patients, IOI seems to be strongly influenced by genetic factors. In others, however, IOI may be mainly caused by nongenetic factors. These findings suggest that IOI is heterogenous, and that both genetic and environmental factors contribute individually or collectively to create the IOI phenotype.

  6. A genetic study and meta-analysis of the genetic predisposition of prostate cancer in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzec, Jacek; Mao, Xueying; Li, Meiling; Wang, Meilin; Feng, Ninghan; Gou, Xin; Wang, Guomin; Sun, Zan; Xu, Jianfeng; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhao, Shan-Chao; Ren, Guoping; Yu, Yongwei; Wu, Yudong; Wu, Ji; Xue, Yao; Zhou, Bo; Zhang, Yanling; Xu, Xingxing; Li, Jie; He, Weiyang; Benlloch, Sara; Ross-Adams, Helen; Chen, Li; Li, Jucong; Hong, Yingqia; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Cui, Xingang; Hou, Jianguo; Guo, Jianming; Xu, Lei; Yin, Changjun; Zhou, Yuanping; Neal, David E; Oliver, Tim; Cao, Guangwen; Zhang, Zhengdong; Easton, Douglas F; Chelala, Claude; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Eeles, Rosalind A; Zhang, Hongwei; Lu, Yong-Jie

    2016-04-19

    Prostate cancer predisposition has been extensively investigated in European populations, but there have been few studies of other ethnic groups. To investigate prostate cancer susceptibility in the under-investigated Chinese population, we performed single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis on a cohort of Chinese cases and controls and then meta-analysis with data from the existing Chinese prostate cancer genome-wide association study (GWAS). Genotyping 211,155 SNPs in 495 cases and 640 controls of Chinese ancestry identified several new suggestive Chinese prostate cancer predisposition loci. However, none of them reached genome-wide significance level either by meta-analysis or replication study. The meta-analysis with the Chinese GWAS data revealed that four 8q24 loci are the main contributors to Chinese prostate cancer risk and the risk alleles from three of them exist at much higher frequencies in Chinese than European populations. We also found that several predisposition loci reported in Western populations have different effect on Chinese men. Therefore, this first extensive single-nucleotide polymorphism study of Chinese prostate cancer in comparison with European population indicates that four loci on 8q24 contribute to a great risk of prostate cancer in a considerable large proportion of Chinese men. Based on those four loci, the top 10% of the population have six- or two-fold prostate cancer risk compared with men of the bottom 10% or median risk respectively, which may facilitate the design of prostate cancer genetic risk screening and prevention in Chinese men. These findings also provide additional insights into the etiology and pathogenesis of prostate cancer.

  7. Effects of early life trauma are dependent on genetic predisposition: a rat study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Vivienne A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trauma experienced early in life increases the risk of developing a number of psychological and/or behavioural disorders. It is unclear, however, how genetic predisposition to a behavioural disorder, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, modifies the long-term effects of early life trauma. There is substantial evidence from family and twin studies for susceptibility to ADHD being inherited, implying a strong genetic component to the disorder. In the present study we used an inbred animal model of ADHD, the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR, to investigate the long-term consequences of early life trauma on emotional behaviour in individuals predisposed to developing ADHD-like behaviour. Methods We applied a rodent model of early life trauma, maternal separation, to SHR and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY, the normotensive control strain from which SHR were originally derived. The effects of maternal separation (removal of pups from dam for 3 h/day during the first 2 weeks of life on anxiety-like behaviour (elevated-plus maze and depressive-like behaviour (forced swim test were assessed in prepubescent rats (postnatal day 28 and 31. Basal levels of plasma corticosterone were measured using radioimmunoassay. Results The effect of maternal separation on SHR and WKY differed in a number of behavioural measures. Similar to its reported effect in other rat strains, maternal separation increased the anxiety-like behaviour of WKY (decreased open arm entries but not SHR. Maternal separation increased the activity of SHR in the novel environment of the elevated plus-maze, while it decreased that of WKY. Overall, SHR showed a more active response in the elevated plus-maze and forced swim test than WKY, regardless of treatment, and were also found to have higher basal plasma corticosterone compared to WKY. Maternal separation increased basal levels of plasma corticosterone in SHR females only, possibly through adaptive

  8. Local-regional control in breast cancer patients with a possible genetic predisposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, Laura M.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Thames, Howard D.; Strom, Eric A.; McNeese, Marsha D.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Singletary, S. Eva; Heaton, Keith M.; Hunt, Kelly K.

    2000-01-01

    %, respectively. Conclusions: Patients with a possible genetic predisposition to breast cancer had low 5-year rates of local recurrence when treated with breast conserving surgery and radiation, but the local failure rate exceeded 50% when radiation was omitted. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that patients with an underlying genetic predisposition develop cancers with radiosensitive phenotypes

  9. Myc contribution to γ-ray induced thymic lymphomas in mice of different genetic predispositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Toshihiro

    2008-01-01

    Myc gene has been suggested to be one of radiation targets in early genesis of γ ray-induced thymic lymphoma where Myc trisomy often occurs, and Myc activation results in p53 activation and apoptosis. The purpose of this study is to see the effects of radiation and mutation on Myc activation in the mouse. The lymphoma was induced by a single exposure of 3 Gy γ ray in BALB/c Bcl11b/Rit+/- and MSM p53-/- mice at 4 weeks after birth and by 4 weekly exposures of 2.5 Gy in p53+/- mouse. Genetic allele analysis for trisomy identification in the lymphoma was done by quantitative PCR using brain DNA as a control. Myc trisomy was found in the lymphoma of p53+/- mouse in 62% (23/37 animals) and of p53+/+, 66% (23/25), a similar frequency, suggesting that the target of radiation was not only the Myc activation. In addition, Myc trisomy frequency was 15% (4/27) in the lymphoma of Bcl11b+/+p53+/- and 36% (9/25), in heterozygote Bcl11b+/-. This finding suggested that the functional failure of Bcl11b reduced the contribution of Myc trisomy to the genesis. It was concluded that contribution of Myc trisomy to genesis of the lymphoma was dependent on genetic predisposition, and Myc-activated-, Bcl11b/Rit1-signal pathways played a parallel role in the genesis. (R.T.)

  10. Genetic predisposition to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: Report on 500 patients from the Italian registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetica, Valentina; Sieni, Elena; Pende, Daniela; Danesino, Cesare; De Fusco, Carmen; Locatelli, Franco; Micalizzi, Concetta; Putti, Maria Caterina; Biondi, Andrea; Fagioli, Franca; Moretta, Lorenzo; Griffiths, Gillian M; Luzzatto, Lucio; Aricò, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare life-threatening disease affecting mostly children but also adults and characterized by hyperinflammatory features. A subset of patients, referred to as having familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL), have various underlying genetic abnormalities, the frequencies of which have not been systematically determined previously. This work aims to further our understanding of the pathogenic bases of this rare condition based on an analysis of our 25 years of experience. From our registry, we have analyzed a total of 500 unselected patients with HLH. Biallelic pathogenic mutations defining FHL were found in 171 (34%) patients; the proportion of FHL was much higher (64%) in patients given a diagnosis during the first year of life. Taken together, mutations of the genes PRF1 (FHL2) and UNC13D (FHL3) accounted for 70% of cases of FHL. Overall, a genetic diagnosis was possible in more than 90% of our patients with FHL. Perforin expression and the extent of degranulation have been more useful for diagnosing FHL than hemophagocytosis and the cytotoxicity assay. Of 281 (56%) patients classified as having "sporadic" HLH, 43 had monoallelic mutations in one of the FHL-defining genes. Given this gene dosage effect, FHL is not strictly recessive. We suggest that the clinical syndrome HLH generally results from the combined effects of an exogenous trigger and genetic predisposition. Within this combination, different weights of exogenous and genetic factors account for the wide disease spectrum that ranges from HLH secondary to severe infection to FHL. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Genetic Predisposition on Blood Lipid Traits Using Cumulative Risk Assessment in the Korean Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jin Go

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Dyslipidemia, mainly characterized by high triglyceride (TG and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C levels, is an important etiological factor in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Considering the relationship between childhood obesity and CVD risk, it would be worthwhile to evaluate whether previously identified lipid-related variants in adult subjects are associated with lipid variations in a childhood obesity study (n = 482. In an association analysis for 16 genome-wide association study (GWAS-based candidate loci, we confirmed significant associations of a genetic predisposition to lipoprotein concentrations in a childhood obesity study. Having two loci (rs10503669 at LPL and rs16940212 at LIPC that showed the strongest association with blood levels of TG and HDL-C, we calculated a genetic risk score (GRS, representing the sum of the risk alleles. It has been observed that increasing GRS is significantly associated with decreased HDL-C (effect size, -1.13 ± 0.07 compared to single nucleotide polymorphism combinations without two risk variants. In addition, a positive correlation was observed between allelic dosage score and risk allele (rs10503669 at LPL on high TG levels (effect size, 10.89 ± 0.84. These two loci yielded consistent associations in our previous meta-analysis. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the genetic architecture of circulating lipid levels (TG and HDL-C overlap to a large extent in childhood as well as in adulthood. Post-GWAS functional characterization of these variants is further required to elucidate their pathophysiological roles and biological mechanisms.

  12. Genetic predisposition and genomic instability in murine stem cells exposed to low LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.A.; Bowler, D.A.; Moore, S.R.; Papworth, D.; Kadhim, M.A.; Goodhead, D.T.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The contribution of genetic factors to the initiation of radiation-induced genomic instability remains poorly understood. Studies with high LET α-particles and very high doses of low LET radiation have described several common mouse strains that differ in their sensitivity to the induction of genomic instability and apoptosis. The aim here was to investigate whether low doses of low LET radiation would elucidate a similar genetic predisposition. To assess the influence of genetic factors on the initiation of genomic instability by low doses of low LET radiation, we irradiated stem cells from two mouse strains known to differ in susceptibility to radiation-induced delayed chromosomal instability. The frequency of delayed chromosomal aberrations was measured in bone marrow cells from CBA/H and C57BL/6 mice after exposure to 0.1 - 2 Gy of 250 kV X-rays. The yield of both chromosomal and chromatid-type aberrations were assessed 13-15 cell divisions post-irradiation in the clonal descendents of surviving stem cells. The apoptotic index of these surviving clones was scored as morphological changes by electron microscopy. At low doses, the frequency of cells with aberrations increased significantly in both strains, contrary to the strain differences observed with high LET α-particles in earlier studies (Watson et al. 1997). The percentage of apoptotic cells was similar between the strains at low doses, with both showing comparable levels of cells with aberrations and apoptotic cells. However, at higher doses, strain differences became evident: CBA/H cells had a substantially higher fraction of cells with aberrations to apoptotic cells, while the converse was true for C57/Bl/6. This data indicates that low doses may be insufficient to initiate the apoptotic pathway, while still resulting in significant induction of delayed chromosomal instability. Overall, these observations have important implications for low dose low LET radiation risk assessment and human

  13. Genetic predisposition to in situ and invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Elinor; Roylance, Rebecca; Petridis, Christos; Brook, Mark N; Nowinski, Salpie; Papouli, Efterpi; Fletcher, Olivia; Pinder, Sarah; Hanby, Andrew; Kohut, Kelly; Gorman, Patricia; Caneppele, Michele; Peto, Julian; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Johnson, Nichola; Swann, Ruth; Dwek, Miriam; Perkins, Katherine-Anne; Gillett, Cheryl; Houlston, Richard; Ross, Gillian; De Ieso, Paolo; Southey, Melissa C; Hopper, John L; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Wesseling, Jelle; Cornelissen, Sten; Keeman, Renske; Fasching, Peter A; Jud, Sebastian M; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Kerin, Michael J; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Benitez, Javier; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K; Lochmann, Magdalena; Brauch, Hiltrud; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Investigators, Kconfab; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Van Limbergen, Erik; Hatse, Sigrid; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Volorio, Sara; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona A; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devillee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Sherman, Mark E; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Shah, Mitul; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk; Couch, Fergus J; Hallberg, Emily; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dunning, Alison M; Hall, Per; Easton, Doug; Pharoah, Paul; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Tomlinson, Ian; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2014-04-01

    Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) accounts for 10-15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+) and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast cancer, but these studies included predominantly ductal (IDC) carcinomas. To identify novel common polymorphisms that predispose to ILC and LCIS, we pooled data from 6,023 cases (5,622 ILC, 401 pure LCIS) and 34,271 controls from 36 studies genotyped using the iCOGS chip. Six novel SNPs most strongly associated with ILC/LCIS in the pooled analysis were genotyped in a further 516 lobular cases (482 ILC, 36 LCIS) and 1,467 controls. These analyses identified a lobular-specific SNP at 7q34 (rs11977670, OR (95%CI) for ILC = 1.13 (1.09-1.18), P = 6.0 × 10(-10); P-het for ILC vs IDC ER+ tumors = 1.8 × 10(-4)). Of the 75 known breast cancer polymorphisms that were genotyped, 56 were associated with ILC and 15 with LCIS at Plobular breast cancer specific predisposition polymorphism at 7q34, and shown for the first time that common breast cancer polymorphisms predispose to LCIS. We have shown that many of the ER+ breast cancer predisposition loci also predispose to ILC, although there is some heterogeneity between ER+ lobular and ER+ IDC tumors. These data provide evidence for overlapping, but distinct etiological pathways within ER+ breast cancer between morphological subtypes.

  14. Genetic Predisposition to In Situ and Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, Christos; Brook, Mark N.; Nowinski, Salpie; Papouli, Efterpi; Fletcher, Olivia; Pinder, Sarah; Hanby, Andrew; Kohut, Kelly; Gorman, Patricia; Caneppele, Michele; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Johnson, Nichola; Swann, Ruth; Dwek, Miriam; Perkins, Katherine-Anne; Gillett, Cheryl; Houlston, Richard; Ross, Gillian; De Ieso, Paolo; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Wesseling, Jelle; Cornelissen, Sten; Keeman, Renske; Fasching, Peter A.; Jud, Sebastian M.; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Kerin, Michael J.; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Benitez, Javier; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Lochmann, Magdalena; Brauch, Hiltrud; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Investigators, kConFab; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Van Limbergen, Erik; Hatse, Sigrid; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Volorio, Sara; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Mclean, Catriona A.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devillee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Sherman, Mark E.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Shah, Mitul; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nicholas; Schoemaker, Minouk; Couch, Fergus J.; Hallberg, Emily; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dunning, Alison M.; Hall, Per; Easton, Doug; Pharoah, Paul; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Tomlinson, Ian; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) accounts for 10–15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+) and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast cancer, but these studies included predominantly ductal (IDC) carcinomas. To identify novel common polymorphisms that predispose to ILC and LCIS, we pooled data from 6,023 cases (5,622 ILC, 401 pure LCIS) and 34,271 controls from 36 studies genotyped using the iCOGS chip. Six novel SNPs most strongly associated with ILC/LCIS in the pooled analysis were genotyped in a further 516 lobular cases (482 ILC, 36 LCIS) and 1,467 controls. These analyses identified a lobular-specific SNP at 7q34 (rs11977670, OR (95%CI) for ILC = 1.13 (1.09–1.18), P = 6.0×10−10; P-het for ILC vs IDC ER+ tumors = 1.8×10−4). Of the 75 known breast cancer polymorphisms that were genotyped, 56 were associated with ILC and 15 with LCIS at Pbreast cancer specific predisposition polymorphism at 7q34, and shown for the first time that common breast cancer polymorphisms predispose to LCIS. We have shown that many of the ER+ breast cancer predisposition loci also predispose to ILC, although there is some heterogeneity between ER+ lobular and ER+ IDC tumors. These data provide evidence for overlapping, but distinct etiological pathways within ER+ breast cancer between morphological subtypes. PMID:24743323

  15. Diagnosis of genetic predisposition for lactose intolerance by high resolution melting analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacour, Hervé; Leduc, Amandine; Louçano-Perdriat, Andréa; Plantamura, Julie; Ceppa, Franck

    2017-02-01

    Lactose, the principle sugar in milk, is a disaccharide hydrolyzed by intestinal lactase into glucose and galactose, which are absorbed directly by diffusion in the intestine. The decline of lactase expression (or hypolactasia) in intestinal microvilli after weaning is a normal phenomenon in mammals known as lactase deficiency. It is observed in nearly 75% of the world population and is an inherited autosomal recessive trait with incomplete penetrance. It is caused by SNPs in a regulatory element for lactase gene. In Indo-European, lactase deficiency is associated with rs4982235 SNP (or -13910C>T). The aim of this study is to describe a method based on high resolution melting for rapidly detecting genetic predisposition to lactose intolerance. Analytical performance of the assay was assessed by evaluating within and betwwen-run precision and by comparing the results (n = 50 patients) obtained with the HRM assay to those obtained with the gold standard (Sanger sequencing of the region of interest). In silico prediction of HRM curves was performed to evaluate the potential impact of the other SNPs described within the PCR product on the HRM analytical performances. The assay has good performance (CV lactose intolerance.

  16. Genetic predisposition to albuminuria is associated with increased arterial stiffness: role of elastin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Ortega, M; García-Prieto, C F; Ruiz-Hurtado, G; Steireif, C; González, M C; Schulz, A; Kreutz, R; Fernández-Alfonso, M S; Arribas, S; Somoza, B

    2015-09-01

    The Munich Wistar Frömter (MWF) rat strain represents an experimental model to study cardiovascular alterations under conditions of progressive albuminuria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between genetic predisposition to albuminuria and the development of arterial stiffness and/or vascular remodelling. Experiments were performed in mesenteric arteries from 12-week-old MWF, Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and consomic MWF-6(SHR) and MWF-8(SHR) rats in which chromosomes 6 or 8 associated with albuminuria from MWF were replaced by the respective chromosome from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Incremental distensibility, wall stress and strain were reduced, and arterial stiffness was significantly increased in albuminuric MWF compared with WKY. Albuminuria suppression in both consomic strains was associated with lower β-values in MWF-8(SHR) and MWF-6(SHR) compared with MWF. Moreover, elastin content was significantly lower in MWF external elastic lamina compared with WKY and both consomic strains. In addition, a reduction in arterial external and internal diameter and cross-sectional area was detected in MWF compared with WKY, thus exhibiting an inward hypotrophic remodelling. However, these alterations remained unchanged in both consomic strains. These data demonstrate that albuminuria in MWF is associated with increased arterial stiffness due to a reduction of elastin content in the external elastic lamina. Moreover, inward hypotrophic remodelling in MWF is not directly associated with albuminuria. In contrast, we demonstrated that two major genetic loci affect both the development of albuminuria and arterial stiffness, thus linking albuminuria and impairment of mechanical properties of resistance arteries. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Television watching, leisure time physical activity, and the genetic predisposition in relation to body mass index in women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qibin; Li, Yanping; Chomistek, Andrea K; Kang, Jae H; Curhan, Gary C; Pasquale, Louis R; Willett, Walter C; Rimm, Eric B; Hu, Frank B; Qi, Lu

    2012-10-09

    Previous studies on gene-lifestyle interaction and obesity have focused mostly on the FTO gene and physical activity, whereas little attention has been paid to sedentary behavior as indicated by television (TV) watching. We analyzed interactions between TV watching, leisure time physical activity, and genetic predisposition in relation to body mass index (BMI) in 7740 women and 4564 men from 2 prospective cohorts: The Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Data on physical activity and TV watching were collected 2 years before assessment of BMI. A weighted genetic risk score was calculated on the basis of 32 established BMI-associated variants. In both women and men, the genetic associations with BMI strengthened with increased hours of TV watching. An increment of 10 points in the weighted genetic risk score was associated with 0.8 (SE, 0.4), 0.8 (SE, 0.2), 1.4 (SE, 0.2), 1.5 (SE, 0.2), and 3.4 (SE, 1.0) kg/m(2) higher BMI across the 5 categories of TV watching (0-1, 2-5, 6-20, 21-40, and >40 h/wk; P for interaction=0.001). In contrast, the genetic association with BMI weakened with increased levels of physical activity. An increment of 10 points in the weighted genetic risk score was associated with 1.5 (SE, 0.2), 1.3 (SE, 0.2), 1.2 (SE, 0.2), 1.2 (SE, 0.2), and 0.8 (SE, 0.2) kg/m(2) higher BMI across the quintiles of physical activity. The interactions of TV watching and physical activity with genetic predisposition in relation to BMI were independent of each other. A sedentary lifestyle, indicated by prolonged TV watching, may accentuate the predisposition to elevated adiposity, whereas greater leisure time physical activity may attenuate the genetic association.

  18. Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Status and Longitudinal Changes in Weight and Waist Circumference: Influence of Genetic Predisposition to Adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sofus C; Ängquist, Lars; Moldovan, Max; Huikari, Ville; Sebert, Sylvain; Cavadino, Alana; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh; Skaaby, Tea; Linneberg, Allan; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Toft, Ulla; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Power, Chris; Hyppönen, Elina; Heitmann, Berit L; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the relationship between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and changes in measures of adiposity have shown inconsistent results, and interaction with genetic predisposition to obesity has rarely been examined. We examined whether 25(OH)D was associated with subsequent annual changes in body weight (ΔBW) or waist circumference (ΔWC), and whether the associations were modified by genetic predisposition to a high BMI, WC or waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRBMI). The study was based on 10,898 individuals from the Danish Inter99, the 1958 British Birth Cohort and the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966. We combined 42 adiposity-associated Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) into four scores indicating genetic predisposition to BMI, WC and WHRBMI, or all three traits combined. Linear regression was used to examine the association between serum 25(OH)D and ΔBW or ΔWC, SNP-score × 25(OH)D interactions were examined, and results from the individual cohorts were meta-analyzed. In the meta-analyses, we found no evidence of an association between 25(OH)D and ΔBW (-9.4 gram/y per 10 nmol/L higher 25(OH)D [95% CI: -23.0, +4.3; P = 0.18]) or ΔWC (-0.06 mm/y per 10 nmol/L higher 25(OH)D [95% CI: -0.17, +0.06; P = 0.33]). Furthermore, we found no statistically significant interactions between the four SNP-scores and 25(OH)D in relation to ΔBW or ΔWC. Thus, in view of the narrow CIs, our results suggest that an association between 25(OH)D and changes in measures of adiposity is absent or marginal. Similarly, the study provided evidence that there is either no or very limited dependence on genetic predisposition to adiposity.

  19. Is There a Genetic Predisposition to Frozen Shoulder?: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodromidis, Apostolos D; Charalambous, Charalambos P

    2016-02-23

    Frozen shoulder is a common disorder that leads to substantial functional loss for patients by impairing activities of daily living. It also adversely affects patients and society by impairing the ability to work. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the evidence suggesting a genetic link to frozen shoulder. A literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases using relevant keywords revealed 5506 studies. After appropriate screening of titles, abstracts, and full studies, seven studies were analyzed. Three studies investigated rates of frozen shoulder among relatives. One study (n = 1828 twin pairs) showed an 11.6% prevalence in twin pairs and demonstrated a heritability of 42% for frozen shoulder after adjusting for age. A second study (n = 273) showed that 20% of patients with frozen shoulder had a positive family history involving a first-degree relative. The relative risk of frozen shoulder was 4:1 when all patients with frozen shoulder were compared with a control population. A third study (n = 87) showed that 29% of patients with frozen shoulder had a first-degree relative with frozen shoulder. Two studies evaluated racial predilection for frozen shoulder. One study (n = 50) reported a substantially higher number of white patients (76%) with frozen shoulder than black patients (24%). A second study (n = 87) showed that being born or having parents or grandparents born in the British Isles were risk factors for frozen shoulder. Four immunological studies investigated human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 as a risk factor for frozen shoulder. Meta-analysis of two of these studies with clearly defined controls showed significantly higher rates of HLA-B27 positivity in patients with frozen shoulder as compared with controls (p genetic predisposition to frozen shoulder. However, as there is a lack of unbiased genetic approaches, there is an opportunity for genome

  20. Genetic predisposition to increased blood cholesterol and triglyceride lipid levels and risk of Alzheimer disease: a Mendelian randomization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proitsi, Petroula; Lupton, Michelle K; Velayudhan, Latha; Newhouse, Stephen; Fogh, Isabella; Tsolaki, Magda; Daniilidou, Makrina; Pritchard, Megan; Kloszewska, Iwona; Soininen, Hilkka; Mecocci, Patrizia; Vellas, Bruno; Williams, Julie; Stewart, Robert; Sham, Pak; Lovestone, Simon; Powell, John F

    2014-09-01

    Although altered lipid metabolism has been extensively implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) through cell biological, epidemiological, and genetic studies, the molecular mechanisms linking cholesterol and AD pathology are still not well understood and contradictory results have been reported. We have used a Mendelian randomization approach to dissect the causal nature of the association between circulating lipid levels and late onset AD (LOAD) and test the hypothesis that genetically raised lipid levels increase the risk of LOAD. We included 3,914 patients with LOAD, 1,675 older individuals without LOAD, and 4,989 individuals from the general population from six genome wide studies drawn from a white population (total n=10,578). We constructed weighted genotype risk scores (GRSs) for four blood lipid phenotypes (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-c], low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-c], triglycerides, and total cholesterol) using well-established SNPs in 157 loci for blood lipids reported by Willer and colleagues (2013). Both full GRSs using all SNPs associated with each trait at pGenetic predisposition to increased blood cholesterol and triglyceride lipid levels is not associated with elevated LOAD risk. The observed epidemiological associations between abnormal lipid levels and LOAD risk could therefore be attributed to the result of biological pleiotropy or could be secondary to LOAD. Limitations of this study include the small proportion of lipid variance explained by the GRS, biases in case-control ascertainment, and the limitations implicit to Mendelian randomization studies. Future studies should focus on larger LOAD datasets with longitudinal sampled peripheral lipid measures and other markers of lipid metabolism, which have been shown to be altered in LOAD. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  1. Genetic predisposition to elevated levels of C-reactive protein is associated with a decreased risk for preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, Cassandra N; Smith, Caitlin J; Saftlas, Audrey F; Triche, Elizabeth W; Bjonnes, Andrew; Keating, Brendan J; Saxena, Richa; Breheny, Patrick J; Dewan, Andrew T; Robinson, Jennifer G; Hoh, Josephine; Ryckman, Kelli K

    2017-02-01

    To examine the association between genetic predisposition to elevated C-reactive protein (CRP)and risk for preeclampsia using validated genetic loci for C-reactive protein. Preeclampsia cases (n = 177) and normotensive controls (n = 116) were selected from live birth certificates to nulliparous Iowa women during the period August 2002-May 2005. Disease status was verified by the medical chart review. Genetic predisposition to CRP was estimated by a genetic risk score on the basis of established loci for CRP levels. Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the relationships between the genotype score and preeclampsia. Replication analyses were performed in an independent, US population of preeclampsia cases (n = 516) and controls (n = 1,097) of European ancestry. The genetic risk score (GRS) related to higher levels of CRP demonstrated a significantly decreased risk of preeclampsia (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.96). When the GRS was analyzed by quartile, an inverse linear trend was observed (p = 0.0006). The results were similar after adjustments for the body mass index (BMI), smoking, and leisure-time physical activity. In the independent replication population, the association with the CRP GRS was also marginally significant (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.92, 1.02). Meta-analysis of the two studies was statistically significant (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.90, 0.99). Our data suggest an inverse, counterintuitive association between the genetic predisposition to elevated levels of CRP and a decreased risk of preeclampsia. This suggests that the blood CRP level is a marker of preeclampsia, but it does not appear to be a factor on the causal pathway.

  2. Genetic predisposition to in situ and invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elinor Sawyer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC accounts for 10-15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+ and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS. Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast cancer, but these studies included predominantly ductal (IDC carcinomas. To identify novel common polymorphisms that predispose to ILC and LCIS, we pooled data from 6,023 cases (5,622 ILC, 401 pure LCIS and 34,271 controls from 36 studies genotyped using the iCOGS chip. Six novel SNPs most strongly associated with ILC/LCIS in the pooled analysis were genotyped in a further 516 lobular cases (482 ILC, 36 LCIS and 1,467 controls. These analyses identified a lobular-specific SNP at 7q34 (rs11977670, OR (95%CI for ILC = 1.13 (1.09-1.18, P = 6.0 × 10(-10; P-het for ILC vs IDC ER+ tumors = 1.8 × 10(-4. Of the 75 known breast cancer polymorphisms that were genotyped, 56 were associated with ILC and 15 with LCIS at P<0.05. Two SNPs showed significantly stronger associations for ILC than LCIS (rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2, P-het = 0.04 and rs889312/5q11/MAP3K1, P-het = 0.03; and two showed stronger associations for LCIS than ILC (rs6678914/1q32/LGR6, P-het = 0.001 and rs1752911/6q14, P-het = 0.04. In addition, seven of the 75 known loci showed significant differences between ER+ tumors with IDC and ILC histology, three of these showing stronger associations for ILC (rs11249433/1p11, rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2 and rs10995190/10q21/ZNF365 and four associated only with IDC (5p12/rs10941679; rs2588809/14q24/RAD51L1, rs6472903/8q21 and rs1550623/2q31/CDCA7. In conclusion, we have identified one novel lobular breast cancer specific predisposition polymorphism at 7q34, and shown for the first time that common breast cancer polymorphisms predispose to LCIS. We have shown that many of the ER+ breast cancer predisposition loci also predispose to ILC, although there is some heterogeneity

  3. Genetic predisposition to radiation-related cancer and potential implications for risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigurdson, A.J.; Stram, D.O.

    2012-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that risk estimates for cancer associated with radiation exposure incorporate individuals who are more and less inherently susceptible to the carcinogenic effects of radiation, and the technology to further evaluate this issue is now available. For example, genome-wide association scan studies could be undertaken to address, at least in part, the direction of causality in the observations of differential sensitivity to radiomimetic agents in cancer cases compared with normal individuals, thereby building on previous observations that sensitivity to these agents is higher in apparently normal individuals carrying gene mutations in NBS and ATM. Direct studies of risk of second cancers in relation to radiation are underway, and some results have been reported (e.g. for the PRDM1 gene as related to sensitivity to radiation-related cancers after treatment for Hodgkin’s lymphoma). It is important to understand the risk synergies between variants affecting associations with various cancers defining susceptibility in unexposed populations and the excess risk in populations therapeutically or occupationally exposed to radiation for the purpose of risk protection, especially as additional baseline risk variants are discovered in increasingly large-scale analyses. While there are studies that are beginning to address these questions, there have been no compelling new discoveries, to date, to indicate that predisposition information should be included in risk assessment. The conclusions in ICRP Publications 79 and 103 appear relevant today.

  4. AIRE genetic variants and predisposition to polygenic autoimmune disease: The case of Graves' disease and a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colobran, Roger; Giménez-Barcons, Mireia; Marín-Sánchez, Ana; Porta-Pardo, Eduard; Pujol-Borrell, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) is a transcriptional regulator that is crucial for establishing central tolerance as illustrated by the Mendelian Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy-Candidiasis-Ectodermal Dystrophy (APECED) syndrome associated with AIRE-inactivating recessive or dominant mutations. Polymorphisms in AIRE have been proposed to be implicated in genetic susceptibility to non-Mendelian organ specific autoimmune diseases. Because there is evidence that in predisposition to Graves' disease (GD) central tolerance is crucial, we investigated whether AIRE polymorphisms could modulate risk of GD. A case-control association study using 29 variants and conducted in 150 GD patients and 200 controls did not detect any significant association. This result is not exceptional: a systematic review of the literature, including GWAS, on the association of AIRE variants with organ specific autoimmune diseases did not show clear associations; similarly heterozygous recessive mutations are not associated to non-Mendelian autoimmunity. Dominant negative mutations of AIRE are associated to autoimmunity but as mild forms of APECED rather than to non-Mendelian organ specific autoimmunity. The lack of association of common AIRE polymorphisms with polygenic autoimmune diseases is counterintuitive as many other genes less relevant for immunological tolerance have been found to be associated. These findings give rise to the intriguing possibility that evolution has excluded functionally modifying polymorphisms in AIRE. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Integrated screening concept in women with genetic predisposition for breast cancer; Integriertes Frueherkennungskonzept bei Frauen mit genetischer Praedisposition fuer Brustkrebs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bick, U. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    1997-08-01

    Breast cancer is in 5% of cases due to a genetic disposition. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are by far the most common breast cancer susceptibility genes. For a woman with a genetic predisposition, the individual risk of developing breast cancer sometime in her life is between 70 and 90%. Compared to the spontaneous forms of breast cancer, woman with a genetic predisposition often develop breast cancer at a much younger age. This is why conventional screening programs on the basis of mammography alone cannot be applied without modification to this high-risk group. In this article, an integrated screening concept for women with genetic prodisposition for breast cancer using breast self-examination, clinical examination, ultrasound, mammography and magnetic resonance imaging is introduced. (orig.) [Deutsch] Mammakarzinome sind in etwa 5% auf eine genetische Disposition zurueckzufuehren. Am haeufigsten finden sich Mutationen im Bereich der Gene BRCA1 und BRCA2. Frauen mit einer genetischen Disposition erkranken in etwa 70-90% im Laufe ihres Lebens an einem Mammakarzinom. Das Erkrankungsalter bei diesen Frauen liegt in der Regel deutlich niedriger als bei den spontanen Formen des Mammakarzinoms, so dass vorhandene Frueherkennungskonzepte auf der Basis eines Mammographiescrennings nicht ohne weiteres auf dieses Hochrisikokollektiv uebertragbar sind. Im folgenden wird ein integriertes Konzept zur Frueherkennung bei Frauen mit genetischer Praedisposition fuer ein Mammakarzinom auf der Basis von Brustselbstuntersuchung, klinischer Untersuchung, Sonographie, Mammographie und Magnetresonanztomographie vorgestellt. (orig.)

  6. Habitual coffee consumption and genetic predisposition to obesity: gene-diet interaction analyses in three US prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiange; Huang, Tao; Kang, Jae H; Zheng, Yan; Jensen, Majken K; Wiggs, Janey L; Pasquale, Louis R; Fuchs, Charles S; Campos, Hannia; Rimm, Eric B; Willett, Walter C; Hu, Frank B; Qi, Lu

    2017-05-09

    Whether habitual coffee consumption interacts with the genetic predisposition to obesity in relation to body mass index (BMI) and obesity is unknown. We analyzed the interactions between genetic predisposition and habitual coffee consumption in relation to BMI and obesity risk in 5116 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS), in 9841 women from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS), and in 5648 women from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI). The genetic risk score was calculated based on 77 BMI-associated loci. Coffee consumption was examined prospectively in relation to BMI. The genetic association with BMI was attenuated among participants with higher consumption of coffee than among those with lower consumption in the HPFS (P interaction  = 0.023) and NHS (P interaction  = 0.039); similar results were replicated in the WHI (P interaction  = 0.044). In the combined data of all cohorts, differences in BMI per increment of 10-risk allele were 1.38 (standard error (SE), 0.28), 1.02 (SE, 0.10), and 0.95 (SE, 0.12) kg/m 2 for coffee consumption of  3 cup(s)/day, respectively (P interaction  coffee consumption among participants at lower genetic risk and slightly lower BMI with higher coffee consumption among those at higher genetic risk. Each increment of 10-risk allele was associated with 78% (95% confidence interval (CI), 59-99%), 48% (95% CI, 36-62%), and 43% (95% CI, 28-59%) increased risk for obesity across these subgroups of coffee consumption (P interaction  = 0.008). From another perspective, differences in BMI per increment of 1 cup/day coffee consumption were 0.02 (SE, 0.09), -0.02 (SE, 0.04), and -0.14 (SE, 0.04) kg/m 2 across tertiles of the genetic risk score. Higher coffee consumption might attenuate the genetic associations with BMI and obesity risk, and individuals with greater genetic predisposition to obesity appeared to have lower BMI associated with higher coffee consumption.

  7. Rooted in risk: genetic predisposition for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level associates with diminished low-density lipoprotein cholesterol response to statin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Roelof Aj; Postmus, Iris; Trompet, Stella; Barnes, Michael R; Warren, Helen; Arsenault, Benoit J; Chasman, Daniel I; Cupples, L Adrienne; Hitman, Graham A; Krauss, Ronald M; Li, Xiaohui; Psaty, Bruce M; Stein, Charles M; Rotter, Jerome I; Jukema, J Wouter

    2016-10-01

    To utilize previously reported lead SNPs for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) levels to find additional loci of importance to statin response, and examine whether genetic predisposition to LDL-c levels associates with differential statin response. We investigated effects on statin response of 59 LDL-c SNPs, by combining summary level statistics from the Global Lipids Genetics and Genomic Investigation of Statin Therapy consortia. Lead SNPs for APOE, SORT1 and NPC1L1 were associated with a decreased LDL-c response to statin treatment, as was overall genetic predisposition for increased LDL-c levels as quantified with 59 SNPs, with a 5.4% smaller statin response per standard deviation increase in genetically raised LDL-c levels. Genetic predisposition for increased LDL-c level may decrease efficacy of statin therapy.

  8. Genetic predisposition to an adverse lipid profile limits the improvement in total cholesterol in response to weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Celia G; Holzapfel, Christina; Loos, Ruth J F; Mander, Adrian P; Klopp, Norman; Illig, Thomas; Caterson, Ian D; Hauner, Hans; Jebb, Susan A

    2013-12-01

    Overweight and obesity are associated with a dyslipidaemia which can be improved by weight loss. Whether genetic predisposition to an adverse lipid profile modifies such beneficial effects of weight loss on lipid levels in overweight and obese individuals was examined. White European participants (n = 374) who completed a 12-month weight loss trial were genotyped for 36 lipid-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), previously identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Genetic predisposition scores (GPSs) were calculated for four lipid traits by summing the number of risk alleles (RA) for each participant. The associations of each GPS with four lipid traits were assessed at baseline, and with lipid changes in response to weight change after 12 months. At baseline, the trait-specific GPSs were associated with 0.11 ± 0.04 mM higher total cholesterol/RA (P = 0.004), 0.05 ± 0.02 mM higher low density lipoprotein cholesterol/RA (P = 0.005), 0.03 ± 0.007 mM lower high density lipoprotein cholesterol/RA (P = 0.00002) and 0.04 ± 0.01 mM higher triglyceride/RA (P = 0.00002). After the intervention, weight loss was associated with improvements in all lipids (P Genetic predisposition is an important determinant of lipid levels and appears to limit the improvement in TC and to some extent LDLC levels, but not in other plasma lipids, in response to weight loss. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 2013. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  9. Interaction between genetic predisposition to obesity and dietary calcium in relation to subsequent change in body weight and waist circumference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sofus C; Ängquist, Lars; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh; Skaaby, Tea; Roswall, Nina; Tjønneland, Anne; Halkjær, Jytte; Overvad, Kim; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Linneberg, Allan; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Toft, Ulla; Heitmann, Berit L; Sørensen, Thorkild Ia

    2014-04-01

    Studies indicate an effect of dietary calcium on change in body weight (BW) and waist circumference (WC), but the results are inconsistent. Furthermore, a relation could depend on genetic predisposition to obesity. The objective was to examine whether genetic predisposition to higher body mass index (BMI), WC, or waist-hip ratio (WHR) interacts with dietary calcium in relation to subsequent annual change in BW (ΔBW) and WC (ΔWC). The study was based on 7569 individuals from the MONItoring trends and determinants of CArdiovascular disease Study, a sample from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Study and the INTER99 study, with information on diet; 54 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with BMI, WC, or WHR adjusted for BMI; and potential confounders. The SNPs were combined in 4 scores as indicators of genetic predisposition; all SNPs in a general score and a score for each of 3 phenotypes: BMI, WC, and WHR. Linear regression was used to examine the association between calcium intake and ΔBW or ΔWC adjusted for concurrent ΔBW. SNP score × calcium interactions were examined by adding product terms to the models. We found a significant ΔBW of -0.076 kg (P = 0.021; 95% CI: -0.140, -0.012) per 1000 mg Ca. No significant association was observed between dietary calcium and ΔWC. In the analyses with ΔBW as outcome, we found no significant interactions between the developed predisposition scores and calcium. However, we found a significant interaction between a score of 6 WC-associated SNPs and calcium in relation to ΔWC. Each risk allele was associated with a ΔWC of -0.043 cm (P = 0.038; 95% CI: -0.083, -0.002) per 1000 mg Ca. Our study suggests that dietary calcium relates weakly to BW loss. We found no evidence of a general association between calcium and ΔWC, but calcium may reduce WC among people genetically predisposed to a high WC. However, further replication of this finding is needed.

  10. Evidence that periweaning failure-to-thrive syndrome (PFTS) has a genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, G; Marco, E; Magaña, V; González-Contreras, P; Swierczynski, G; Abellaneda, J M; Sáez-Acosta, A; Mrowiec, A; Pallarés, F J

    2015-06-06

    Genetic susceptibility or resistance to diseases is currently drawing increasing attention. This work describes two different breeding herds showing signs of periweaning failure-to-thrive syndrome (PFTS), an emergent swine disease. The disease was diagnosed based on clinical picture and confirmed by histopathology. The possibility of main infectious pathogens was ruled out by immunohistochemistry and PCR. In a simple approach, sires of the affected piglets have been determined using microsatellite paternity analysis, including a healthy group in each case. In each of the two farms, a single boar was found to have sired 45-50 per cent sick animals. Removal of this sire from two farms resulted in a significant decrease in the prevalence of the disease among the offspring, in accordance with other two cases diagnosed, although without including a control group. Since the analysed animals belonged to three different genetic lines, these findings point to the existence of individual genetic susceptibility to this syndrome. British Veterinary Association.

  11. Some Molecular and Clinical Aspects of Genetic Predisposition to Malignant Melanoma and Tumours of Various Site of Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dębniak Tadeusz

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Based on epidemiological data we can assume that at least some malignant melanoma (MM and breast cancer cases can be caused by the same genetic factors. CDKN2A, which encodes the p16 protein, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor suppressing cell proliferation, is regarded as a major melanoma susceptibility gene and the literature has also implicated this gene in predisposition to breast cancer. Genes also known to predispose to MM include XPD and MC1R. We studied CDKN2A/ARF, XPD and MC1R for their associations with melanoma and breast cancer risk in Polish patients and controls. We found that CDKN2A and ARF do not contribute significantly to either familial melanoma or malignant melanoma within the context of a cancer familial aggregation of disease with breast cancer. However, the common variant of the CDKN2A gene A148T, previously regarded as non-pathogenic, may predispose to malignant melanoma, early-onset breast cancer and lung cancer. Compound carriers of common XPD variants may be at slightly increased risk of breast cancer or late–onset malignant melanoma. Common recurrent variants of the MC1R gene (V60L, R151C, R163Q and R160W may predispose to malignant melanoma. In general, the establishment of surveillance protocols proposed as an option for carriers of common alterations in CDKN2A, XPD or MC1R variants requires additional studies. It is possible that missense variants of genes for which truncating mutations are clearly pathogenic may also be deleterious, but with reduced penetrance. This may be overlooked unless large numbers of patients and controls are studied. A registry that includes 2000 consecutive breast cancer cases, 3500 early onset breast cancer patients, 500 unselected malignant melanoma and over 700 colorectal cancer patients has been established in the International Hereditary Cancer Centre and can contribute to these types of large association studies.

  12. Prostate-specific antigen velocity in a prospective prostate cancer screening study of men with genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikropoulos, Christos; Selkirk, Christina G Hutten; Saya, Sibel; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Vertosick, Emily; Dadaev, Tokhir; Brendler, Charles; Page, Elizabeth; Dias, Alexander; Evans, D Gareth; Rothwell, Jeanette; Maehle, Lovise; Axcrona, Karol; Richardson, Kate; Eccles, Diana; Jensen, Thomas; Osther, Palle J; van Asperen, Christi J; Vasen, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Ringelberg, Janneke; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Hart, Rachel; Glover, Wayne; Lam, Jimmy; Taylor, Louise; Salinas, Monica; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Oldenburg, Rogier; Cremers, Ruben; Verhaegh, Gerald; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Cook, Jackie; Rosario, Derek J; Buys, Saundra S; Conner, Tom; Domchek, Susan; Powers, Jacquelyn; Ausems, Margreet Gem; Teixeira, Manuel R; Maia, Sofia; Izatt, Louise; Schmutzler, Rita; Rhiem, Kerstin; Foulkes, William D; Boshari, Talia; Davidson, Rosemarie; Ruijs, Marielle; Helderman-van den Enden, Apollonia Tjm; Andrews, Lesley; Walker, Lisa; Snape, Katie; Henderson, Alex; Jobson, Irene; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Liljegren, Annelie; Harris, Marion; Adank, Muriel A; Kirk, Judy; Taylor, Amy; Susman, Rachel; Chen-Shtoyerman, Rakefet; Pachter, Nicholas; Spigelman, Allan; Side, Lucy; Zgajnar, Janez; Mora, Josefina; Brewer, Carole; Gadea, Neus; Brady, Angela F; Gallagher, David; van Os, Theo; Donaldson, Alan; Stefansdottir, Vigdis; Barwell, Julian; James, Paul A; Murphy, Declan; Friedman, Eitan; Nicolai, Nicola; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Obeid, Elias; Murthy, Vedang; Copakova, Lucia; McGrath, John; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Strom, Sara; Kast, Karin; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Chamberlain, Anthony; Pope, Jenny; Newlin, Anna C; Aaronson, Neil; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Bangma, Chris; Castro, Elena; Dearnaley, David; Eyfjord, Jorunn; Falconer, Alison; Foster, Christopher S; Gronberg, Henrik; Hamdy, Freddie C; Johannsson, Oskar; Khoo, Vincent; Lubinski, Jan; Grindedal, Eli Marie; McKinley, Joanne; Shackleton, Kylie; Mitra, Anita V; Moynihan, Clare; Rennert, Gad; Suri, Mohnish; Tricker, Karen; Moss, Sue; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Vickers, Andrew; Lilja, Hans; Helfand, Brian T; Eeles, Rosalind A

    2018-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and PSA-velocity (PSAV) have been used to identify men at risk of prostate cancer (PrCa). The IMPACT study is evaluating PSA screening in men with a known genetic predisposition to PrCa due to BRCA1/2 mutations. This analysis evaluates the utility of PSA and PSAV for identifying PrCa and high-grade disease in this cohort. PSAV was calculated using logistic regression to determine if PSA or PSAV predicted the result of prostate biopsy (PB) in men with elevated PSA values. Cox regression was used to determine whether PSA or PSAV predicted PSA elevation in men with low PSAs. Interaction terms were included in the models to determine whether BRCA status influenced the predictiveness of PSA or PSAV. 1634 participants had ⩾3 PSA readings of whom 174 underwent PB and 45 PrCas diagnosed. In men with PSA >3.0 ng ml -l , PSAV was not significantly associated with presence of cancer or high-grade disease. PSAV did not add to PSA for predicting time to an elevated PSA. When comparing BRCA1/2 carriers to non-carriers, we found a significant interaction between BRCA status and last PSA before biopsy (P=0.031) and BRCA2 status and PSAV (P=0.024). However, PSAV was not predictive of biopsy outcome in BRCA2 carriers. PSA is more strongly predictive of PrCa in BRCA carriers than non-carriers. We did not find evidence that PSAV aids decision-making for BRCA carriers over absolute PSA value alone.

  13. Progressive Fibrosis Is Driven by Genetic Predisposition, Allo-immunity, and Inflammation in Pediatric Liver Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, S; Ambroise, J; Komuta, M; Latinne, D; Baldin, P; Reding, R; Smets, F; Stephenne, X; Sokal, E M

    2016-07-01

    To determine predisposing factors of idiopathic allograft fibrosis among pediatric liver transplant recipients. Protocol biopsies (PB) from stable liver transplant (LT) recipient children frequently exhibit idiopathic fibrosis. The relation between allograft inflammation, humoral immune response and fibrosis is uncertain. Also the role of HLA-DRB1 genotype has not been evaluated, though it's associated with fibrosis in autoimmune hepatitis. This observational study, included 89 stable LT recipient transplanted between 2004-2012 with mean follow-up of 4.3years, 281 serial PBs (3.1 biopsy/child) and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibody data. PBs were taken 1-2, 2-3, 3-5, 5-7, and 7-10years post-LT, and evaluated for inflammation and fibrosis using liver allograft fibrosis score (LAFSc). The evolution of fibrosis, inflammation and related predisposing factors were analysed. HLA-DRB1*03/04 allele and Class II DSA were significantly associated with portal fibrosis (p=0.03; p=0.03, respectively). Portal inflammation was predisposed by Class II DSA (p=0.02) and non-HLA antibody presence (p=0.01). Non-portal fibrosis wasn't predisposed by inflammation. Lobular inflammation was associated with non-HLA antibodies. We conclusively demonstrated that allograft inflammation results in fibrosis and is associated with post-LT Class II DSA and non-HLA antibodies. The HLA-DRB1*03/04 allele caused genetic predisposition for fibrosis. None. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Another Report of Acalculous Cholecystitis in a Greek Patient with Infectious Mononucleosis: A Matter of Luck or Genetic Predisposition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theocharis Koufakis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We here report a case of a young, male patient who presented with jaundice and was diagnosed with acalculous cholecystitis during the course of a primary Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV infection. The coexistence of cholestatic hepatitis and acalculous cholecystitis in patients with infectious mononucleosis is extremely uncommon and only few cases can be found in the literature. Moreover, almost one-fourth of the total reports of this rare entity are coming from Greece. Whether this is a result of physicians’ high index of suspicion due to previous reports or a consequence of genetic predisposition is an issue that deserves further investigation in the future. More studies are required in order to clarify the pathophysiological and genetic backgrounds that connect acalculous cholecystitis and EBV infection.

  15. Short-term psychological impact of the BRCA1/2 test result in women with breast cancer according to their perceived probability of genetic predisposition to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédart, A; Kop, J L; Depauw, A; Caron, O; Sultan, S; Leblond, D; Fajac, A; Buecher, B; Gauthier-Villars, M; Noguès, C; Flahault, C; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D; Dolbeault, S

    2013-03-19

    The effect of BRCA1/2 gene test result on anxiety, depression, cancer-related thought intrusion or avoidance and perceived control over cancer risk was assessed in breast cancer (BC) patients, according to their perceived probability of genetic predisposition to cancer. Two hundred and forty-three (89% response rate) women with BC completed questionnaires after an initial genetic counselling visit (T1), of which 180 (66%) completed questionnaires again after receiving the BRCA1/2 results (T2). The discrepancy between women's perceived probability of cancer genetic predisposition at T1 and the geneticist's computed estimates was assessed. In all, 74% of women received a negative uninformative (NU), 11% a positive BRCA1/2 and 15% an unclassified variant (UV) result. On hierarchical regression analysis, in women with a positive BRCA1/2 result (vs NU or UV), a lower perceived probability of cancer genetic predisposition than objective estimates at T1 predicted lower levels of anxiety at T2 (β=-0.28; Pgenetic predisposition than objective estimates at T1 predicted higher levels of anxiety (β=0.20; Pgenetic predisposition before testing.

  16. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome after gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist triggering and "freeze-all": in-depth analysis of genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Ribeiro, Samuel; Polyzos, Nikolaos P; Stouffs, Katrien; De Vos, Michel; Seneca, Sara; Tournaye, Herman; Blockeel, Christophe

    2015-07-01

    We report on the results of the whole-genome analysis performed in a patient who developed severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) following gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist triggering in a "freeze-all" protocol. A 30-year-old patient with polycystic ovary syndrome who developed severe early-onset OHSS with clinical ascites, and slight renal and hepatic dysfunction was admitted for monitoring and treatment with cabergoline and intravenous albumin. Exome sequencing to assess for any known genetic predisposition for OHSS was performed. No known genetic variants associated with OHSS predisposition were found. Case reports of severe OHSS following a "freeze-all" strategy are starting to arise, showing that OHSS has not been completely eliminated with this approach. Further studies should be conducted to confirm if such cases may be due to genetic predisposition or not.

  17. A Combination of Naltrexone + Varenicline Retards the Expression of a Genetic Predisposition Toward High Alcohol Drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, Janice C; Fischer, Stephen M; Nicholson, Emily R; Dilley, Julian E; Filosa, Nicholas J; Smith, Teal N; Rademacher, Logan C

    2017-03-01

    This study examined whether naltrexone (NTX) or varenicline (VAR), alone or in combination, can retard the phenotypic expression of a genetic predisposition toward high alcohol drinking in rats selectively bred for high alcohol intake when drug treatment is initiated prior to, or concomitantly with, the onset of alcohol drinking. Alcohol-naïve P rats were treated daily with NTX (15.0 mg/kg BW), VAR (1.0 mg/kg BW), a combination of NTX (15.0 mg/kg BW) + VAR (1.0 mg/kg BW), or vehicle (VEH) for 2 weeks prior to, or concomitantly with, their first opportunity to drink alcohol and throughout 21 days of daily 2-hour alcohol access. Drug treatment was then discontinued for 3 weeks followed by reinstatement of drug treatment for an additional 3 weeks. When P rats were pretreated with drug for 2 weeks prior to onset of alcohol access, only NTX + VAR in combination blocked the acquisition of alcohol drinking in alcohol-naïve P rats. When drug treatment was initiated concomitantly with the first opportunity to drink alcohol, NTX alone, VAR alone, and NTX + VAR blocked the acquisition of alcohol drinking. Following termination of drug treatment, NTX + VAR and VAR alone continued to reduce alcohol drinking but by the end of 3 weeks without drug treatment, alcohol intake in all groups was comparable to that seen in the vehicle-treated group as the expression of a genetic predisposition toward high alcohol drinking emerged in the drug-free P rats. After 3 weeks without drug treatment, reinstatement of NTX + VAR treatment again reduced alcohol intake. A combination of NTX + VAR, when administered prior to, or concomitantly with, the first opportunity to drink alcohol, blocks the acquisition of alcohol drinking during both initial access to alcohol and during a later period of alcohol access in P rats with a genetic predisposition toward high alcohol intake. The results suggest that NTX + VAR may be effective in curtailing alcohol drinking in individuals

  18. Genetic predisposition to advanced biological ageing increases risk for childhood-onset recurrent major depressive disorder in a large UK sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalek, Julia E; Kepa, Agnieszka; Vincent, John; Frissa, Souci; Goodwin, Laura; Hotopf, Matthew; Hatch, Stephani L; Breen, Gerome; Powell, Timothy R

    2017-04-15

    Previous studies have revealed increased biological ageing amongst major depressive disorder (MDD) patients, as assayed by shorter leukocyte telomere lengths (TL). Stressors such as childhood maltreatment are more common amongst MDD patients, and it has been suggested that this might contribute to shorter TL present amongst patients. However, to our knowledge, no study has yet tested for reverse causality, i.e. whether a genetic predisposition to shorter TL might predispose to MDD or an earlier onset of MDD. This study used a Mendelian randomisation design to investigate if shortened TL might increase risk for recurrent MDD in a relatively large UK sample (1628 MDD cases, 1140 controls). To achieve this, we used a subset of our sample, for which TL data was available, to identify a suitable instrumental variable. We performed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping on rs10936599, a SNP upstream of telomerase RNA component (TERC), and rs2736100, a SNP within telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), and attempted to replicate findings which identified these SNPs as predictors of TL. After which, we performed regressions to test if genetic risk for shortened TL increased risk for MDD, childhood-onset MDD or childhood/adolescent-onset MDD. T-carriers of rs10936599 demonstrated shorter TL compared to CC-carriers (p≤0.05; 3% of variance explained) and was subsequently used as our instrumental variable. We found that the T-allele of rs10936599 predicted increased risk for childhood-onset MDD relative to controls (p≤0.05), and increased risk for childhood-onset MDD relative to adult-onset MDD cases (p≤0.001), but rs10936599 did not predict adult-onset MDD risk. Limitations include a relatively small sample of early-onset cases, and the fact that age-of-onset was ascertained by retrospective recall. Genetic predisposition to advanced biological ageing, as assayed using rs10936599, predicted a small, but significant, increased risk for childhood

  19. Genetic predisposition to left ventricular dysfunction: a multigenic and multi-analytical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Avshesh; Srivastava, Anshika; Mittal, Tulika; Garg, Naveen; Mittal, Balraj

    2014-08-10

    Left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) is a complex, multifactorial condition, caused by mechanical, neurohormonal, and genetic factors. We have previously observed association of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and inflammatory pathway genes with LVD. Therefore the present study was undertaken to identify the combination of genetic variants and their possible interactions contributing towards genetic susceptibility to LVD in the background of coronary artery disease (CAD). The study included 230 healthy controls and 510 consecutive patients with angiographically confirmed CAD. Among them, 162 with reduced left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF≤45%) were categorized as having LVD. We analyzed 11 polymorphisms of RAAS, MMPs and inflammatory pathways. Single locus analysis showed that AT1 A1166C (p value<0.001; OR=3.67), MMP9 R668Q (p value=0.007; OR=3.48) and NFKB1-94 ATTG ins/del (p value=0.013; OR=2.01) polymorphisms were independently associated with LVD when compared with both non-LVD patients and healthy controls. High-order gene-gene interaction analysis, using classification and regression tree (CART) and multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) revealed that AT1 A1166C and NFKB1-94 ATTG ins/del polymorphisms jointly increased the risk of LVD to great extent (p-value=0.001; OR=8.55) and best four-factor interaction model consisted of AT1 A1166C, MMP7 A-181G, MMP9 R668Q and NFKB1-94 ATTG ins/del polymorphisms with testing accuracy of 0.566 and cross validation consistency (CVC)=9/10 (permutation p<0.001) showed increased risk for LVD respectively. AT1 A1166C independently and in combination with MMP9 R668Q and NFKB1-94 ATTG ins/del polymorphisms plays important role in conferring genetic susceptibility to LVD in CAD patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic predisposition to increased blood cholesterol and triglyceride lipid levels and risk of Alzheimer disease: a Mendelian randomization analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petroula Proitsi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although altered lipid metabolism has been extensively implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD through cell biological, epidemiological, and genetic studies, the molecular mechanisms linking cholesterol and AD pathology are still not well understood and contradictory results have been reported. We have used a Mendelian randomization approach to dissect the causal nature of the association between circulating lipid levels and late onset AD (LOAD and test the hypothesis that genetically raised lipid levels increase the risk of LOAD.We included 3,914 patients with LOAD, 1,675 older individuals without LOAD, and 4,989 individuals from the general population from six genome wide studies drawn from a white population (total n=10,578. We constructed weighted genotype risk scores (GRSs for four blood lipid phenotypes (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-c], low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-c], triglycerides, and total cholesterol using well-established SNPs in 157 loci for blood lipids reported by Willer and colleagues (2013. Both full GRSs using all SNPs associated with each trait at p<5×10-8 and trait specific scores using SNPs associated exclusively with each trait at p<5 × 10-8 were developed. We used logistic regression to investigate whether the GRSs were associated with LOAD in each study and results were combined together by meta-analysis. We found no association between any of the full GRSs and LOAD (meta-analysis results: odds ratio [OR]=1.005, 95% CI 0.82-1.24, p = 0.962 per 1 unit increase in HDL-c; OR=0.901, 95% CI 0.65-1.25, p=0.530 per 1 unit increase in LDL-c; OR=1.104, 95% CI 0.89-1.37, p=0.362 per 1 unit increase in triglycerides; and OR=0.954, 95% CI 0.76-1.21, p=0.688 per 1 unit increase in total cholesterol. Results for the trait specific scores were similar; however, the trait specific scores explained much smaller phenotypic variance.Genetic predisposition to increased blood cholesterol and

  1. The RadGenomics project. Prediction for radio-susceptibility of individuals with genetic predisposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    The ultimate goal of our project, named RadGenomics, is to elucidate the heterogeneity of the response to ionizing radiation arising from genetic variation among individuals, for the purpose of developing personalized radiation therapy regimens for cancer patients. Cancer patients exhibit patient-to-patient variability in normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. Several observations support the hypothesis that the radiosensitivity of normal tissue is influenced by genetic factors. The rapid progression of human genome sequencing and the recent development of new technologies in molecular biology are providing new opportunities for elucidating the genetic basis of individual differences in susceptibility to radiation exposure. The development of a sufficiently robust, predictive assay enabling individual dose adjustment would improve the outcome of radiation therapy in patients. Our strategy for identification of DNA polymorphisms that contribute to the individual radiosensitivity is as follows. First, we have been categorizing DNA samples obtained from cancer patients, who have been kindly introduced to us through many collaborators, according to their clinical characteristics including the method and effect of treatment and side effects as scored by toxicity criteria, and also the result of an in vitro radiosensitivity assay, e.g., the micronuclei assay of their lymphocytes. Second, we have identified candidate genes for genotyping mainly by using our custom-designed oligonucleotide array with RNA samples, in which the probes were obtained from more than 40 cancer and 3 fibroblast cell lines whose radiosensitivity level was quite heterogeneous. We have also been studying the modification of proteins after irradiation of cells which may be caused by mainly phosphorylation or dephosphorylation, using mass spectrometry. Genes encoding the modified proteins and/or other proteins with which they interact such as specific protein kinases and phosphatases are also

  2. Development of genetic testing for breast, ovarian and colorectal cancer predisposition: a step closer to targeted cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, D M

    2011-12-01

    Individuals who inherit a high penetrance cancer susceptibility gene represent a population in which cancer diagnoses occur at younger ages and much more frequently than in the general population. Screening regimens aimed at early detection of cancer may reduce cancer mortality but in order to reduce cancer incidence, surgery and medical therapies have been advocated. In high genetic risk patients, either surgical or medical intervention may provide long term protection against cancer and at young ages co-morbidities will be low. The use of genetic testing for high risk predisposition genes to refine risk estimates and inform choices about cancer prevention is now readily available in many countries and routinely used to target cancer prevention strategies. Surgical approaches to cancer prevention are currently the mainstay in many conditions where a high risk is identified but medical prevention strategies also have demonstrated some efficacy in lowering cancer risk. Using the genetic status of an individual to target cancer treatment and prevent recurrence is increasingly gaining momentum as clinical trials involving known high risk gene carriers are now being conducted using both established cytotoxic drugs and novel targeted agents. Translation of new mechanistic insights into beneficial clinical care strategies requires more research. Robust evidence supporting medical approaches to cancer prevention in particular will require well designed large international collaborative clinical trials.

  3. Genetic mapping of a third Li-Fraumeni syndrome predisposition locus to human chromosome 1q23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachinski, Linda L; Olufemi, Shodimu-Emmanuel; Zhou, Xiaojun; Wu, Chih-Chieh; Yip, Linwah; Shete, Sanjay; Lozano, Guillermina; Amos, Christopher I; Strong, Louise C; Krahe, Ralf

    2005-01-15

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous inherited cancer syndrome. Most cases ( approximately 70%) identified and characterized to date are associated with dominantly inherited germ line mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 (p53) in chromosome 17p13.1. In a subset of non-p53 patients with LFS, CHEK2 in chromosome 22q11 has been identified as another predisposing locus. Studying a series of non-p53 LFS kindred, we have shown that there is additional genetic heterogeneity in LFS kindred with inherited predisposition at loci other than p53 or CHEK2. Using a genome-wide scan for linkage with complementing parametric and nonparametric analysis methods, we identified linkage to a region of approximately 4 cM in chromosome 1q23, a genomic region not previously implicated in this disease. Identification ofa third predisposing gene and its underlying mutation(s) should provide insight into other genetic events that predispose to the genesis of the diverse tumor types associated with LFS and its variants.

  4. Childhood tumours with a high probability of being part of a tumour predisposition syndrome; reason for referral for genetic consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postema, Floor A M; Hopman, Saskia M J; Aalfs, Cora M; Berger, Lieke P V; Bleeker, Fonnet E; Dommering, Charlotte J; Jongmans, Marjolijn C J; Letteboer, Tom G W; Olderode-Berends, Maran J W; Wagner, Anja; Hennekam, Raoul C; Merks, Johannes H M

    2017-07-01

    Recognising a tumour predisposition syndrome (TPS) in childhood cancer patients is of major clinical relevance. The presence of a TPS may be suggested by the type of tumour in the child. We present an overview of 23 childhood tumours that in themselves should be a reason to refer a child for genetic consultation. We performed a PubMed search to review the incidence of TPSs in children for 85 tumour types listed in the International Classification of Childhood Cancer third edition (ICCC-3). The results were discussed during a national consensus meeting with representative clinical geneticists from all six academic paediatric oncology centres in The Netherlands. A TPS incidence of 5% or more was considered a high probability and therefore in itself a reason for referral to a clinical geneticist. The literature search resulted in data on the incidence of a TPS in 26 tumours. For 23/26 tumour types, a TPS incidence of 5% or higher was reported. In addition, during the consensus meeting the experts agreed that children with any carcinoma should always be referred for clinical genetic consultation as well, as it may point to a TPS. We present an overview of 23 paediatric tumours with a high probability of a TPS; this will facilitate paediatric oncologists to decide which patients should be referred for genetic consultation merely based on type of tumour. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic association of SNPs in the FTO gene and predisposition to obesity in Malaysian Malays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.D. Apalasamy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The common variants in the fat mass- and obesity-associated (FTO gene have been previously found to be associated with obesity in various adult populations. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and linkage disequilibrium (LD blocks in various regions of the FTO gene are associated with predisposition to obesity in Malaysian Malays. Thirty-one FTO SNPs were genotyped in 587 (158 obese and 429 non-obese Malaysian Malay subjects. Obesity traits and lipid profiles were measured and single-marker association testing, LD testing, and haplotype association analysis were performed. LD analysis of the FTO SNPs revealed the presence of 57 regions with complete LD (D’ = 1.0. In addition, we detected the association of rs17817288 with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The FTO gene may therefore be involved in lipid metabolism in Malaysian Malays. Two haplotype blocks were present in this region of the FTO gene, but no particular haplotype was found to be significantly associated with an increased risk of obesity in Malaysian Malays.

  6. Genetic association of SNPs in the FTO gene and predisposition to obesity in Malaysian Malays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apalasamy, Y.D.; Ming, M.F.; Rampal, S.; Bulgiba, A.; Mohamed, Z.

    2012-01-01

    The common variants in the fat mass- and obesity-associated (FTO) gene have been previously found to be associated with obesity in various adult populations. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks in various regions of the FTO gene are associated with predisposition to obesity in Malaysian Malays. Thirty-one FTO SNPs were genotyped in 587 (158 obese and 429 non-obese) Malaysian Malay subjects. Obesity traits and lipid profiles were measured and single-marker association testing, LD testing, and haplotype association analysis were performed. LD analysis of the FTO SNPs revealed the presence of 57 regions with complete LD (D' = 1.0). In addition, we detected the association of rs17817288 with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The FTO gene may therefore be involved in lipid metabolism in Malaysian Malays. Two haplotype blocks were present in this region of the FTO gene, but no particular haplotype was found to be significantly associated with an increased risk of obesity in Malaysian Malays

  7. Genetic association of SNPs in the FTO gene and predisposition to obesity in Malaysian Malays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apalasamy, Y.D. [Pharmacogenomics Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ming, M.F.; Rampal, S.; Bulgiba, A. [Julius Centre University of Malaya, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Mohamed, Z. [Pharmacogenomics Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2012-08-24

    The common variants in the fat mass- and obesity-associated (FTO) gene have been previously found to be associated with obesity in various adult populations. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks in various regions of the FTO gene are associated with predisposition to obesity in Malaysian Malays. Thirty-one FTO SNPs were genotyped in 587 (158 obese and 429 non-obese) Malaysian Malay subjects. Obesity traits and lipid profiles were measured and single-marker association testing, LD testing, and haplotype association analysis were performed. LD analysis of the FTO SNPs revealed the presence of 57 regions with complete LD (D' = 1.0). In addition, we detected the association of rs17817288 with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The FTO gene may therefore be involved in lipid metabolism in Malaysian Malays. Two haplotype blocks were present in this region of the FTO gene, but no particular haplotype was found to be significantly associated with an increased risk of obesity in Malaysian Malays.

  8. Is there a genetic predisposition for Turkish patients with sarcoidosis in the 329-bp region containing the BTNL2 rs2076530 polymorphism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Muhsin; Saydam, Faruk; Kurt, Emel; Değirmenci, Irfan; Tuncel, Tunç; Cilingir, Oğuz; Güneş, Hasan Veysi; Artan, Sevilhan

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a complex, multifactorial immune disorder with unknown etiology. A single nucleotide polymorphism (G→A, rs2076530) in the butyrophilin-like 2 (BTNL2) gene results in a truncating protein formation. It has been previously reported that this variation may be a risk factor for sarcoidosis in certain ethnic groups. This study was conducted to determine whether there is any genetic predisposition for the BTNL2 rs2076530 polymorphism in the 329-bp region in Turkish patients with sarcoidosis. DNA samples were obtained from volunteers including 53 Turkish patients with sarcoidosis and 52 healthy controls. Analysis of the 329-bp region was carried out by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing of genomic DNA. We did not find any genetic variation except the rs2076530 polymorphism in the 329-bp region. The AA genotype was associated with an increased risk of sarcoidosis in a recessive model [P = 0.027, OR 2.56 (95% CI 1.02-6.49)], but it did not include a risk for sarcoidosis in a dominant model (P = 0.885). Our results emphasize the recessive characteristic of the rs2076530 polymorphism in Turkish patients with sarcoidosis. The lack of any genetic variation except rs2076530 in the 329-bp region is another significant finding for Turkish patients.

  9. Genetic predisposition to higher body mass index or type 2 diabetes and leukocyte telomere length in the Nurses' Health Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmeng Du

    Full Text Available Although cross-sectional studies have linked higher body mass index (BMI and type 2 diabetes (T2D to shortened telomeres, whether these metabolic conditions play a causal role in telomere biology is unknown. We therefore examined whether genetic predisposition to higher BMI or T2D was associated with shortened leukocyte telomere length (LTL.We conducted an analysis of 3,968 women of European ancestry aged 43-70 years from the Nurses' Health Study, who were selected as cases or controls in genome-wide association studies and studies of telomeres and disease. Pre-diagnostic relative telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes, collected in 1989-1990, was measured by quantitative PCR. We combined information from multiple risk variants by calculating genetic risk scores based on 32 polymorphisms near 32 loci for BMI, and 36 polymorphisms near 35 loci for T2D.After adjustment for age and case-control status, there was no association between the BMI genetic risk score and LTL (β per standard deviation increase: -0.01; SE: 0.02; P = 0.52. Similarly, the T2D genetic score was not associated with LTL (β per standard deviation increase: -0.006; SE: 0.02; P = 0.69.In this population of middle-aged and older women of European ancestry, those genetically predisposed to higher BMI or T2D did not possess shortened telomeres. Although we cannot exclude weak or modest effects, our findings do not support a causal relation of strong magnitude between these metabolic conditions and telomere dynamics.

  10. Pros and cons of HaloPlex enrichment in cancer predisposition genetic diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnès Collet

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Panel sequencing is a practical option in genetic diagnosis. Enrichment and library preparation steps are critical in the diagnostic setting. In order to test the value of HaloPlex technology in diagnosis, we designed a custom oncogenetic panel including 62 genes. The procedure was tested on a training set of 71 controls and then blindly validated on 48 consecutive hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC patients tested negative for BRCA1/2 mutation. Libraries were sequenced on HiSeq2500 and data were analysed with our academic bioinformatics pipeline. Point mutations were detected using Varscan2, median size indels were detected using Pindel and large genomic rearrangements (LGR were detected by DESeq. Proper coverage was obtained. However, highly variable read depth was observed within genes. Excluding pseudogene analysis, all point mutations were detected on the training set. All indels were also detected using Pindel. On the other hand, DESeq allowed LGR detection but with poor specificity, preventing its use in diagnostics. Mutations were detected in 8% of BRCA1/2-negative HBOC cases. HaloPlex technology appears to be an efficient and promising solution for gene panel diagnostics. Data analysis remains a major challenge and geneticists should enhance their bioinformatics knowledge in order to ensure good quality diagnostic results.

  11. Genetic predisposition, parity, age at first childbirth and risk for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butt Salma

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have identified several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with the risk of breast cancer and parity and age at first childbirth are well established and important risk factors for breast cancer. The aim of the present study was to examine the interaction between these environmental factors and genetic variants on breast cancer risk. Methods The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS included 17 035 female participants, from which 728 incident breast cancer cases were matched to 1448 controls. The associations between 14 SNPs and breast cancer risk were investigated in different strata of parity and age at first childbirth. A logistic regression analysis for the per allele risk, adjusted for potential confounders yielded odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CI. Results Six of the previously identified SNPs showed a statistically significant association with breast cancer risk: rs2981582 (FGFR2, rs3803662 (TNRC9, rs12443621 (TNRC9, rs889312 (MAP3K1, rs3817198 (LSP1 and rs2107425 (H19. We could not find any statistically significant interaction between the effects of tested SNPs and parity/age at first childbirth on breast cancer risk after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Conclusions The results of this study are in agreement with previous studies of null interactions between tested SNPs and parity/age at first childbirth with regard to breast cancer risk.

  12. Molecular characterization of melanoma cases in Denmark suspected of genetic predisposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin A W Wadt

    Full Text Available Both environmental and host factors influence risk of cutaneous melanoma (CM, and worldwide, the incidence varies depending on constitutional determinants of skin type and pigmentation, latitude, and patterns of sun exposure. We performed genetic analysis of CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, MC1R, and MITFp.E318K in Danish high-risk melanoma cases and found CDKN2A germline mutations in 11.3% of CM families with three or more affected individuals, including four previously undescribed mutations. Rare mutations were also seen in CDK4 and BAP1, while MC1R variants were common, occurring at more than twice the frequency compared to Danish controls. The MITF p.E318K variant similarly occurred at an approximately three-fold higher frequency in melanoma cases than controls. To conclude, we propose that mutation screening of CDKN2A and CDK4 in Denmark should predominantly be performed in families with at least 3 cases of CM. In addition, we recommend that testing of BAP1 should not be conducted routinely in CM families but should be reserved for families with CM and uveal melanoma, or mesothelioma.

  13. Evidence of genetic predisposition for metabolically healthy obesity and metabolically obese normal weight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Lam Opal; Loos, Ruth JF; Oskari Kilpeläinen, Tuomas

    2018-01-01

    metabolically obese normal weight (MONW). Recent large-scale genomic studies have provided evidence that a number of genetic variants show an association with increased adiposity but a favorable cardiometabolic profile, an indicator for the genetic basis of the MHO and MONW phenotypes. Many of these loci...... storage capacity could lead to ectopic lipid accumulation in non-adipose tissues such as liver, muscle, heart, and pancreatic beta cells. Understanding the genetic aspects of the mechanisms that underpin MHO and MONW is crucial to define appropriate public health action points and to develop effective...

  14. Prenatal Methylmercury Exposure and Genetic Predisposition to Cognitive Deficit at Age 8 Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julvez, Jordi; Smith, George Davey; Golding, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive consequences at school age associated with prenatal methylmercury (MeHg) exposure may need to take into account nutritional and sociodemographic cofactors as well as relevant genetic polymorphisms....

  15. Genome sequencing of Ewing sarcoma patients reveals genetic predisposition | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The largest and most comprehensive genomic analysis of individuals with Ewing sarcoma performed to date reveals that some patients are genetically predisposed to developing the cancer.  Learn more...

  16. Genetic predisposition of variants in TLR2 and its co-receptors to severe malaria in Odisha, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Subhendu; Kar, Avishek; Tripathy, Sagnika; Mohapatra, Manoj K; Dhangadamajhi, Gunanidhi

    2016-02-01

    Although the role of TLRs signalling in malaria pathogenesis is well established, contribution of individual TLR to clinical outcome of malaria still remains inconclusive. Given the importance of TLR2 and its co-receptors in recognising distinct structural forms of key malaria toxins and mediating innate immune response, it is essential to delineate their genetic contribution. Variants in TLR1 (I602S) and TLR6 (P249S) were genotyped by PCR-RFLP methods, and TLR2 (I/D) was genotyped by PCR in 200 samples each from uncomplicated malaria (UM) and severe malaria (SM). Further, SM was categorised into its sub-clinical groups (CM and NCSM or SOD and MODS) and analysed. The results showed the PP genotype of TLR6 (P249S) to be significantly more common in UM (P genetic predisposition to SM and that its association with either TLR2 'D' or TLR1 '602S' modulates for CM development. The present study opens up several new avenues for their exploration and validation in future studies in different global settings for malaria.

  17. Differences in Common Genetic Predisposition to Ischemic Stroke by Age and Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traylor, Matthew; Rutten-Jacobs, Loes C A; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Malik, Rainer; Sudlow, Cathie; Rothwell, Peter M; Maguire, Jane M; Koblar, Simon A; Bevan, Steve; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Dichgans, Martin; Levi, Chris; Lewis, Cathryn M; Markus, Hugh S

    2015-11-01

    Evidence from epidemiological studies points to differences in factors predisposing to stroke by age and sex. Whether these arise because of different genetic influences remained untested. Here, we use data from 4 genome-wide association data sets to study the relationship between genetic influence on stroke with both age and sex. Using genomic-relatedness-matrix restricted maximum likelihood methods, we performed 4 analyses: (1) we calculated the genetic correlation between groups divided by age and (2) by sex, (3) we calculated the heritability of age-at-stroke-onset, and (4) we evaluated the evidence that heritability of stroke is greater in women than in men. We found that genetic factors influence age at stroke onset (h2 [SE]=18.0 [6.8]; P=0.0038), with a trend toward a stronger influence in women (women: h2 [SE]=21.6 [3.5]; Men: h2 [SE]=13.9 [2.8]). Although a moderate proportion of genetic factors was shared between sexes (rG [SE]=0.68 [0.16]) and between younger and older cases (rG [SE]=0.70 [0.17]), there was evidence to suggest that there are genetic susceptibility factors that are specific to sex (P=0.037) and to younger or older groups (P=0.056), particularly for women (P=0.0068). Finally, we found a trend toward higher heritability of stroke in women although this was not significantly greater than in men (P=0.084). Our results indicate that there are genetic factors that are either unique to or have a different effect between younger and older age groups and between women and men. Performing large, well-powered genome-wide association study analyses in these groups is likely to uncover further associations. © 2015 The Authors.

  18. [Genetic predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer: importance of test results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian-Reynier, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Oncogenetic consultations and predictive BRCA1/2 testing are intertwined processes and the specific impact of these genetic tests if performed alone through direct-to-consumer offers remains unknown. Noteworthy, the expectations of patients vary with their own status, whether they are affected or not by breast cancer at the time genetic testing is performed. The prescription of genetic tests for BCRA mutations has doubled in France between 2003 and 2009. There is a consensus on the fact that genetic results disclosure led to a significant increase in the knowledge and understanding that the patients have of the genetic risk and also changed the medical follow-up of these patients. Evaluating the psychological burden of tests disclosure did not reveal any major distress in patients who are followed by high-quality multidisciplinary teams. Longitudinal cohorts studies have now evaluated the perception and behaviour of these patients, and observed sociodemographic as well as geographic and psychosocial differences both in the acceptation of prophylactic strategies such as surgery, and time to surgery. © 2011 médecine/sciences - Inserm / SRMS.

  19. Dietary ascorbic acid and subsequent change in body weight and waist circumference: associations may depend on genetic predisposition to obesity - a prospective study of three independent cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Cross-sectional data suggests that a low level of plasma ascorbic acid positively associates with both Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist Circumference (WC). This leads to questions about a possible relationship between dietary intake of ascorbic acid and subsequent changes in anthropometry, and whether such associations may depend on genetic predisposition to obesity. Hence, we examined whether dietary ascorbic acid, possibly in interaction with the genetic predisposition to a high BMI, WC or waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHR), associates with subsequent annual changes in weight (∆BW) and waist circumference (∆WC). Methods A total of 7,569 participants’ from MONICA, the Diet Cancer and Health study and the INTER99 study were included in the study. We combined 50 obesity associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genetic scores: a score of all SNPs and a score for each of the traits (BMI, WC and WHR) with which the SNPs associate. Linear regression was used to examine the association between ascorbic acid intake and ΔBW or ΔWC. SNP-score × ascorbic acid interactions were examined by adding product terms to the models. Results We found no significant associations between dietary ascorbic acid and ∆BW or ∆WC. Regarding SNP-score × ascorbic acid interactions, each additional risk allele of the 14 WHR associated SNPs associated with a ∆WC of 0.039 cm/year (P = 0.02, 95% CI: 0.005 to 0.073) per 100 mg/day higher ascorbic acid intake. However, the association to ∆WC only remained borderline significant after adjustment for ∆BW. Conclusion In general, our study does not support an association between dietary ascorbic acid and ∆BW or ∆WC, but a diet with a high content of ascorbic acid may be weakly associated to higher WC gain among people who are genetically predisposed to a high WHR. However, given the quite limited association any public health relevance is questionable. PMID:24886192

  20. Dietary ascorbic acid and subsequent change in body weight and waist circumference: associations may depend on genetic predisposition to obesity--a prospective study of three independent cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sofus C; Angquist, Lars; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh; Skaaby, Tea; Roswall, Nina; Tjønneland, Anne; Halkjær, Jytte; Overvad, Kim; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Linneberg, Allan; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Toft, Ulla; Heitmann, Berit L; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2014-05-03

    Cross-sectional data suggests that a low level of plasma ascorbic acid positively associates with both Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist Circumference (WC). This leads to questions about a possible relationship between dietary intake of ascorbic acid and subsequent changes in anthropometry, and whether such associations may depend on genetic predisposition to obesity. Hence, we examined whether dietary ascorbic acid, possibly in interaction with the genetic predisposition to a high BMI, WC or waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHR), associates with subsequent annual changes in weight (∆BW) and waist circumference (∆WC). A total of 7,569 participants' from MONICA, the Diet Cancer and Health study and the INTER99 study were included in the study. We combined 50 obesity associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four genetic scores: a score of all SNPs and a score for each of the traits (BMI, WC and WHR) with which the SNPs associate. Linear regression was used to examine the association between ascorbic acid intake and ΔBW or ΔWC. SNP-score × ascorbic acid interactions were examined by adding product terms to the models. We found no significant associations between dietary ascorbic acid and ∆BW or ∆WC. Regarding SNP-score × ascorbic acid interactions, each additional risk allele of the 14 WHR associated SNPs associated with a ∆WC of 0.039 cm/year (P = 0.02, 95% CI: 0.005 to 0.073) per 100 mg/day higher ascorbic acid intake. However, the association to ∆WC only remained borderline significant after adjustment for ∆BW. In general, our study does not support an association between dietary ascorbic acid and ∆BW or ∆WC, but a diet with a high content of ascorbic acid may be weakly associated to higher WC gain among people who are genetically predisposed to a high WHR. However, given the quite limited association any public health relevance is questionable.

  1. Genetic predisposition to adiposity is associated with increased objectively assessed sedentary time in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnurr, Theresia Maria; Viitasalo, A; Eloranta, A-M

    2018-01-01

    Increased sedentariness has been linked to the growing prevalence of obesity in children, but some longitudinal studies suggest that sedentariness may be a consequence rather than a cause of increased adiposity. We used Mendelian randomization to examine the causal relations between body mass index......=0.072). Childhood BMI may have a causal influence on sedentary time but not on total physical activity or MVPA in young children. Our results provide important insights into the regulation of movement behaviour in childhood.International Journal of Obesity accepted article preview online, 26...... (BMI) and objectively assessed sedentary time and physical activity in 3-8 year-old children from one Finnish and two Danish cohorts [NTOTAL=679]. A genetic risk score (GRS) comprised of 15 independent genetic variants associated with childhood BMI was used as the instrumental variable to test causal...

  2. Evidence of genetic predisposition for metabolically healthy obesity and metabolically obese normal weight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Lam Opal; Loos, Ruth JF; Oskari Kilpeläinen, Tuomas

    2018-01-01

    and cardiovascular disease. However, many obese individuals, often called metabolically healthy obese (MHO), seem to be protected from these cardiometabolic complications. Conversely, there is a group of individuals who suffer from cardiometabolic complications despite being of normal weight; a condition termed...... metabolically obese normal weight (MONW). Recent large-scale genomic studies have provided evidence that a number of genetic variants show an association with increased adiposity but a favorable cardiometabolic profile, an indicator for the genetic basis of the MHO and MONW phenotypes. Many of these loci...... are located in or near genes that implicate pathways involved in adipogenesis, fat distribution, insulin signaling, and insulin resistance. It has been suggested that a threshold for subcutaneous adipose tissue expandability may be at play in the manifestation of MHO and MONW, where expiry of adipose tissue...

  3. Molecular Characterization of Melanoma Cases in Denmark Suspected of Genetic Predisposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadt, Karin A. W.; Aoude, Lauren G.; Krogh, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    Both environmental and host factors influence risk of cutaneousmelanoma (CM), and worldwide, the incidence varies depending on constitutional determinants of skin type and pigmentation, latitude, and patterns of sun exposure. We performed genetic analysis of CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, MC1R, and MITFp.E3...... cases of CM. In addition, we recommend that testing of BAP1 should not be conducted routinely in CM families but should be reserved for families with CM and uveal melanoma, or mesothelioma....

  4. Genetic predisposition for radiation-induced bone tumors; Genetische Veranlagung fuer strahleninduzierte Knochentumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosemann, M.; Luz, A.; Kuosaite, V.; Favor, J.; Atkinson, M.J. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie]|[Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Saeugetiergenetik

    1999-07-01

    The interaction between environmental factors and genetic determinants is crucial for the development of malignant tumours. However, the hereditary factors involved in the development of cancer that have been recognised so far are only responsible for at the most ten percent of tumours. It is still a matter of dispute whether the remaining 90 percent - so-called sporadic tumours - really have a cause that is free of genetic influence. There are good reasons for believing that there are a large number of genes in the human genome that confer resistance or susceptibility for tumorigenesis, and thus lead to natural genetic variability. (orig.) [German] Die Wechselwirkung von Umweltfaktoren und genetischen Determinanten ist entscheidend fuer die Entstehung von malignen Tumoren. Die bisher bekannten an der Krebsentstehung beteiligten erheblichen Faktoren sind allerdings fuer hoechstens zehn Prozent aller auftretenden Tumoren verantwortlich. Nach wie vor umstritten ist, ob die verbleibenden 90 Prozent - die sogenannten sporadischen Tumoren - tatsaechlich eine Ursache ohne erhebliche Komponente haben. Es gibt aber gute Gruende anzunehmen, dass im menschlichen Erbgut eine Vielzahl von Genen existiert, die Resistenz beziehungsweise Empfindlichkeit (Suszeptibilitaet) fuer die Tumorigenese vermitteln und so zu der natuerlichen genetischen Variabilitaet fuehren. (orig.)

  5. Younger age of onset and multiple primary lesions associated with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cases with a positive family history of the cancer suggests genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Nan; Wen, Xiaoduo; Zhang, Nan; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Liwei; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Na; Wen, Denggui

    2014-01-01

    Previous epidemiological studies have consistently found a positive family history of esophageal cancer is associated with a significantly increased risk of the cancer. However, whether the elevated risk could be attributed to common household exposure or inherited susceptibility is uncertain. This study aimed to highlight the effect of genetic predisposition by noting the significant differences in onset age and multiple primary cancers between esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cases with or without a positive family history of the cancer. Age at onset and the percentage of multiple primary cancers were compared between ESCCs with (n = 766) or without (n = 1 776) a positive family history of the cancer in a consecutive surgery cohort at the Department of Thoracic Surgery of Hebei Tumor Hospital and the Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University. Overall, ESCCs with a positive family history of the cancer featured both a significantly younger age of onset and significantly more multiple primary cancers than those with a negative family history (onset age 51.83 vs. 53.49 years old, P genetic predisposition. The results of subgroup analyses indicate a younger age of ESCC development results from the interaction of environmental and genetic risk factors, but multiple primary cancers may be related only to genetic predisposition.

  6. The Impact of Physical Activity and Dietary Measures on the Biochemical and Anthropometric Parameters in Obese Children. Is There Any Genetic Predisposition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlatohlávek, Lukáš; Hubáček, Jaroslav Alois; Vrablík, Michal; Pejšová, Hana; Lánská, Věra; Češka, Richard

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to monitor the importance of laboratory, anthropometric and genetic determination of the presence of risk factors for atherosclerosis, obesity, dyslipidemia and components of the metabolic syndrome in obese children and the response to dietary and regimen interventions in obese children. As a part of the study, 353 paediatric patients (46% boys, 54% girls) with obesity and dyslipidemia, aged 8-16 years, participated in a one-month lifestyle intervention programme. The programme involved a reduction of energy intake and supervised exercise programme consisting of 5 exercise units per day, each 50 minutes long. Standard biochemical methods were applied, including Lp-PLA2, as were anthropometric measurements and genetic analyses. During the reduction programme for the children there was a statistically significant decrease in all anthropometric indicators of bodyweight (pgenetic predisposition for obesity, as well as individuals with a better response to regimen interventions which could, among other things, be determined by the FTO and MC4R genotypes. Copyright© by the National Institute of Public Health, Prague 2015.

  7. Genetic predisposition to ischaemic stroke byRAGEandHMGB1gene variants in Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, You; Zhu, Jing; Chen, Linfa; Hu, Weidong; Wang, Mengxu; Li, Shengnan; Gu, Xuefeng; Tao, Hua; Zhao, Bin; Ma, Guoda; Li, Keshen

    2017-11-21

    Emerging evidence suggests that the multiligand receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and its ligand high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) contribute to the pathophysiology of ischaemic stroke (IS). The present study aimed to investigate the association of RAGE and HMGB1 variants with the risk of IS. A total of 1,034 patients and 1,015 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were genotyped to detect five genetic variants of the RAGE gene and four genetic variants of the HMGB1 gene using the Multiplex SNaPshot assay. We found that the rs2070600 variant of RAGE was associated with an increased risk of IS (OR = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.02-1.38, P = 0.043), whereas the rs2249825 variant of HMGB1 was associated with a decreased risk of IS (OR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.71-0.98, P = 0.041). Further stratification by IS subtypes revealed that the presence of the TT genotype of the RAGE rs2070600 variant confers a higher risk of the large artery atherosclerosis subtype of IS (P = 0.036). Moreover, patients with the variant T allele of the RAGE rs2070600 variant presented with reduced serum soluble RAGE production. Patients carrying the variant G allele of the HMGB1 rs2249825 variant exhibited significantly lower infarct volumes than those with the major CC genotype. These clues may help in the development of optimal personalized therapeutic approaches for IS patients.

  8. Personalized prostate cancer screening among men with high risk genetic predisposition- study protocol for a prospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer screening among the general population is highly debatable. Nevertheless, screening among high-risk groups is appealing. Prior data suggests that men carrying mutations in the BRCA1& 2 genes may be at increased risk of developing prostate cancer. Additionally, they appear to develop prostate cancer at a younger age and with a more aggressive course. However, prior studies did not systematically perform prostate biopsies and thus cannot determine the true prevalence of prostate cancer in this population. Methods This will be a prospective diagnostic trial of screening for prostate cancer among men with genetic predisposition. The target population is males (40–70 year old) carrying a BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 germ line mutation. They will be identified via our Genetic counseling unit. All men after signing an informed consent will undergo the following tests: PSA, free to total PSA, MRI of prostate and prostate biopsy. The primary endpoint will be to estimate the prevalence, stage and grade of prostate cancer in this population. Additionally, the study aims to estimate the impact of these germ line mutations on benign prostatic hyperplasia. Furthermore, this study aims to create a bio-bank of tissue, urine and serum of this unique cohort for future investigations. Finally, this study will identify an inception cohort for future interventional studies of primary and secondary prevention. Discussion The proposed research is highly translational and focuses not only on the clinical results, but on the future specimens that will be used to advance our understanding of prostate cancer patho-physiology. Most importantly, these high-risk germ-line mutation carriers are ideal candidates for primary and secondary prevention initiatives. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02053805. PMID:25047061

  9. The Synergistic Effect of TNFA and IL10 Promoter Polymorphisms on Genetic Predisposition to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolova, Irena; Miteva, Lyuba; Ivanova, Mariana; Kundurzhiev, Todor; Stoilov, Rumen; Stanilova, Spaska

    2018-02-01

    We investigated the individual and combined effect of functional TNFA -308G/A and IL10 -1082G/A single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and their genotypes on the susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a Bulgarian population. Genotyping for -1082A/G IL10 (rs1800896) and -308G/A TNFA (rs1800629) polymorphisms was performed for 154 SLE patients and 224 healthy controls. An association between SLE and the rs1800629 polymorphism was established under the allelic model (allele A vs. allele G; odds ratios [OR] = 2.317), the dominant model (GA+AA vs. GG; OR = 3.214), and the overdominant model (GA vs. AA+GG; OR = 3.494). There was no association between rs1800896 and SLE, although a tendency for genetic predisposition to SLE was observed for the IL10 -1082 GG genotype under the recessive genetic model (OR = 1.454). When analyzing the influence of the combined TNFA/IL10 genotypes on SLE occurrence, we found that the carriage of both high cytokine-producing genotypes of two SNPs (TNFA -308AA/GA and IL10 -1082GG) significantly increased the risk of developing SLE with OR of 9.026 (p = 0.006). Our findings suggest that the combinatorial complexity of TNFA and IL10 promoter polymorphisms impacts SLE susceptibility. Notably, we found that a TNFA promoter polymorphism is a leading risk factor for SLE susceptibility in a Bulgarian population, while the IL10 -1082 locus appears to act as a significant modifier.

  10. Genetic predisposition to alcoholism, schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease with psychodiagnostic characteristics in russian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Marusin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to identify genetic factors connected with personal features using the panel of 12 polymorphic markers associated with the risk of developing dementia in patients with Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and alcoholism.Materials and methods. The correlation among quantitative traits of personality, temperament and character determined with Cattell’s (the Sixteen personality factor questionnaire (16PF, Leonhard-Schmieschek’s, Spielberger-Khanin’s, and Eysenck’s (IQ tests were analyzed with polymorphic variants of 12 genes involved in the development of severe mental disorders such as alcoholism, schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. DNA samples of 150 students were genotyped using PCR-RPLF method. The data were processed by nonparametric statistical methods.Results. Interallelic nonrandom associations in paired combinations of GABRA2-PICALM, PICALMADCY3, CLU-CBX7 and CLU-ADCY3 polymorphisms were detected. This may indicate the adaptive selection influencing the maintenance of behavioral homeostasis in population. A number of statistically significant associations of genetic variation were found: CLU with perfectionism(Q3 of 16PF and the exaltation of the Leonhard’s tests, PICALM with tension (Q4 of 16PF and the imbalance of Leonhard’s tests, DISC1 with vigilance(L of 16PF, and exaltation, cyclothymia of Leonhard’s tests, ZNF804A with imbalance by Leonhard’s test, SLC6A4 with reasoning(B of 16PF test, ADCY3 with self-reliance(Q2 and extraversion(F2 of 16PF test, MIR9-2 emotional stability(C, liveliness(F, social boldness(H, extraversion(F2 of 16PF, and dysthymia, hyperthymia of Leonhard’s tests, with the personal anxiety of Spielberger-Khanin’s test, CBX7 with vigilance(L, warmth(A of 16PF test, SLC6A3 with IQ.Conclusion. These findings support the idea of overlapping genetic component in common mental and neurological disorders and variability of human cognitive and personality traits.

  11. A genetic risk tool for obesity predisposition assessment and personalized nutrition implementation based on macronutrient intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goni, Leticia; Cuervo, Marta; Milagro, Fermín I; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    There is little evidence about genetic risk score (GRS)-diet interactions in order to provide personalized nutrition based on the genotype. The aim of the study was to assess the value of a GRS on obesity prediction and to further evaluate the interactions between the GRS and dietary intake on obesity. A total of 711 seekers of a Nutrigenetic Service were examined for anthropometric and body composition measurements and also for dietary habits and physical activity. Oral epithelial cells were collected for the identification of 16 SNPs (related with obesity or lipid metabolism) using DNA zip-coded beads. Genotypes were coded as 0, 1 or 2 according to the number of risk alleles, and the GRS was calculated by adding risk alleles with such a criterion. After being adjusted for gender, age, physical activity and energy intake, the GRS demonstrated that individuals carrying >7 risk alleles had in average 0.93 kg/m(2) of BMI, 1.69 % of body fat mass, 1.94 cm of waist circumference and 0.01 waist-to-height ratio more than the individuals with ≤7 risk alleles. Significant interactions for GRS and the consumption of energy, total protein, animal protein, vegetable protein, total fat, saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, total carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates and fiber intake on adiposity traits were found after adjusted for confounders variables. The GRS confirmed that the high genetic risk group showed greater values of adiposity than the low risk group and demonstrated that macronutrient intake modifies the GRS association with adiposity traits.

  12. Nephron Deficiency and Predisposition to Renal Injury in a Novel One-Kidney Genetic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuexiang; Johnson, Ashley C; Williams, Jan M; White, Tiffani; Chade, Alejandro R; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Ruisheng; Roman, Richard J; Lee, Jonathan W; Kyle, Patrick B; Solberg-Woods, Leah; Garrett, Michael R

    2015-07-01

    Some studies have reported up to 40% of patients born with a single kidney develop hypertension, proteinuria, and in some cases renal failure. The increased susceptibility to renal injury may be due, in part, to reduced nephron numbers. Notably, children who undergo nephrectomy or adults who serve as kidney donors exhibit little difference in renal function compared with persons who have two kidneys. However, the difference in risk between being born with a single kidney versus being born with two kidneys and then undergoing nephrectomy are unclear. Animal models used previously to investigate this question are not ideal because they require invasive methods to model congenital solitary kidney. In this study, we describe a new genetic animal model, the heterogeneous stock-derived model of unilateral renal agenesis (HSRA) rat, which demonstrates 50%-75% spontaneous incidence of a single kidney. The HSRA model is characterized by reduced nephron number (more than would be expected by loss of one kidney), early kidney/glomerular hypertrophy, and progressive renal injury, which culminates in reduced renal function. Long-term studies of temporal relationships among BP, renal hemodynamics, and renal function demonstrate that spontaneous single-kidney HSRA rats are more likely than uninephrectomized normal littermates to exhibit renal impairment because of the combination of reduced nephron numbers and prolonged exposure to renal compensatory mechanisms (i.e., hyperfiltration). Future studies with this novel animal model may provide additional insight into the genetic contributions to kidney development and agenesis and the factors influencing susceptibility to renal injury in individuals with congenital solitary kidney. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  13. Utilizing Genetic Predisposition Score in Predicting Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Incidence: A Community-based Cohort Study on Middle-aged Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye Yin; Choi, Hyung Jin; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2015-08-01

    Contribution of genetic predisposition to risk prediction of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was investigated using a prospective study in middle-aged adults in Korea. From a community cohort of 6,257 subjects with 8 yr' follow-up, genetic predisposition score with subsets of 3, 18, 36 selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (genetic predisposition score; GPS-3, GPS-18, GPS-36) in association with T2DM were determined, and their effect was evaluated using risk prediction models. Rs5215, rs10811661, and rs2237892 were in significant association with T2DM, and hazard ratios per risk allele score increase were 1.11 (95% confidence intervals: 1.06-1.17), 1.09 (1.01-1.05), 1.04 (1.02-1.07) with GPS-3, GPS-18, GPS-36, respectively. Changes in AUC upon addition of GPS were significant in simple and clinical models, but the significance disappeared in full clinical models with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). For net reclassification index (NRI), significant improvement observed in simple (range 5.1%-8.6%) and clinical (3.1%-4.4%) models were no longer significant in the full models. Influence of genetic predisposition in prediction ability of T2DM incidence was no longer significant when HbA1c was added in the models, confirming HbA1c as a strong predictor for T2DM risk. Also, the significant SNPs verified in our subjects warrant further research, e.g. gene-environmental interaction and epigenetic studies.

  14. Genetic predisposition influences plasma lipids of participants on habitual diet, but not the response to reductions in dietary intake of saturated fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C.G.; Loos, R.J.F.; Olson, A.D.; Frost, G.S.; Griffin, B.A.; Lovegrove, J.A.; Sanders, T.A.B.; Jebb, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective SNPs identified from genome-wide association studies associate with lipid risk markers of cardiovascular disease. This study investigated whether these SNPs altered the plasma lipid response to diet in the ‘RISCK’ study cohort. Methods Participants (n = 490) from a dietary intervention to lower saturated fat by replacement with carbohydrate or monounsaturated fat, were genotyped for 39 lipid-associated SNPs. The association of each individual SNP, and of the SNPs combined (using genetic predisposition scores), with plasma lipid concentrations was assessed at baseline, and on change in response to 24 weeks on diets. Results The associations between SNPs and lipid concentrations were directionally consistent with previous findings. The genetic predisposition scores were associated with higher baseline concentrations of plasma total (P = 0.02) and LDL (P = 0.002) cholesterol, triglycerides (P = 0.001) and apolipoprotein B (P = 0.004), and with lower baseline concentrations of HDL cholesterol (P genetic predisposition was associated with an unfavourable plasma lipid profile at baseline, but did not influence the improvement in lipid profiles by the low-saturated-fat diets. PMID:21292264

  15. TNF-α Genetic Predisposition and Higher Expression of Inflammatory Pathway Components in Keratoconus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab, Muneeza; Tahir, Saira; Niazi, Muhammad Khizar; Ishaq, Mazhar; Hussain, Alamdar; Siddique, Pir Muhammad; Saeed, Sadia; Khan, Wajid Ali; Qamar, Raheel; Butt, Azeem Mehmood; Azam, Maleeha

    2017-07-01

    To date keratoconus (KC) pathogenesis is undefined; however, the involvement of inflammatory pathways in disease development is becoming apparent. In the present study, we investigated the role of a promoter region polymorphism rs1800629 (-308G>A) in the inflammatory pathway component TNF-α and its effects on the expression of TNF-α and downstream molecules tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 and 2 (TNFR1 and TNFR2), v-rel avian reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene homolog A (RELA), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in KC development. TNF-α promoter polymorphism rs1800629 (-308G>A), was genotyped in 257 sporadic KC patients and 253 healthy controls. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to assess for the -308G>A genotypes. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was carried out to compare the mRNA expression of TNF-α, TNFR1, TNFR2, RELA, and IL6 in the corneal tissues of 20 KC patients and 20 donor controls. The -308G>A genotype GA was found to be significantly associated with KC development (dominant model [odds ratio (OR) = 6.67 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.28-10.42), P A polymorphism is a significant genetic risk factor for the pathogenesis of KC. Moreover, this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was observed to be associated with deregulated expression of downstream molecules, thus further reinforcing the role of the inflammatory pathway components in the development of KC.

  16. Assessing the Genetic Predisposition of Education on Myopia: A Mendelian Randomization Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Lu, Yi; Kho, Pik Fang; Hewitt, Alex W; Wichmann, H-Erich; Yazar, Seyhan; Stambolian, Dwight; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Wojciechowski, Robert; Wang, Jie Jin; Mitchell, Paul; Mackey, David A; MacGregor, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Myopia is the largest cause of uncorrected visual impairments globally and its recent dramatic increase in the population has made it a major public health problem. In observational studies, educational attainment has been consistently reported to be correlated to myopia. Nonetheless, correlation does not imply causation. Observational studies do not tell us if education causes myopia or if instead there are confounding factors underlying the association. In this work, we use a two-step least squares instrumental-variable (IV) approach to estimate the causal effect of education on refractive error, specifically myopia. We used the results from the educational attainment GWAS from the Social Science Genetic Association Consortium to define a polygenic risk score (PGRS) in three cohorts of late middle age and elderly Caucasian individuals (N = 5,649). In a meta-analysis of the three cohorts, using the PGRS as an IV, we estimated that each z-score increase in education (approximately 2 years of education) results in a reduction of 0.92 ± 0.29 diopters (P = 1.04 × 10(-3) ). Our estimate of the effect of education on myopia was higher (P = 0.01) than the observed estimate (0.25 ± 0.03 diopters reduction per education z-score [∼2 years] increase). This suggests that observational studies may actually underestimate the true effect. Our Mendelian Randomization (MR) analysis provides new evidence for a causal role of educational attainment on refractive error. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  17. Genetic Predisposition To Acquire a Polybasic Cleavage Site for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naganori Nao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses with H5 and H7 hemagglutinin (HA subtypes evolve from low-pathogenic precursors through the acquisition of multiple basic amino acid residues at the HA cleavage site. Although this mechanism has been observed to occur naturally only in these HA subtypes, little is known about the genetic basis for the acquisition of the polybasic HA cleavage site. Here we show that consecutive adenine residues and a stem-loop structure, which are frequently found in the viral RNA region encoding amino acids around the cleavage site of low-pathogenic H5 and H7 viruses isolated from waterfowl reservoirs, are important for nucleotide insertions into this RNA region. A reporter assay to detect nontemplated nucleotide insertions and deep-sequencing analysis of viral RNAs revealed that an increased number of adenine residues and enlarged stem-loop structure in the RNA region accelerated the multiple adenine and/or guanine insertions required to create codons for basic amino acids. Interestingly, nucleotide insertions associated with the HA cleavage site motif were not observed principally in the viral RNA of other subtypes tested (H1, H2, H3, and H4. Our findings suggest that the RNA editing-like activity is the key mechanism for nucleotide insertions, providing a clue as to why the acquisition of the polybasic HA cleavage site is restricted to the particular HA subtypes.

  18. Analysis of the contribution of HLA genes to genetic predisposition in inflammatory bowel disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naom, I.; Haris, I.; Hodgson, S.V.; Mathew, C.G. [and others

    1996-07-01

    Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) of unknown etiology. First-degree relatives of IBD patients have a 10-fold increase in risk of developing the same disease, and distinct associations between specific HLA types and both CD and UC have been reported. We have evaluated the contribution of genes at the HLA locus to susceptibility in IBD by linkage analysis of highly informative microsatellite polymorphisms in 43 families with multiple affected cases. No evidence for linkage of HLA to IBD was obtained under any of the four models tested. Analysis of HLA haplotype sharing in affected relatives indicated that the relative risk to a sibling conferred by the HLA locus was 1.11 in UC and 0.75 in CD, with upper (95%) confidence limits of 2.41 and 1.37, respectively. This suggests that other genetic or environmental factors are responsible for most of the familial aggregation in IBD. 31 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Early environmental exposures influence schizophrenia expression even in the presence of strong genetic predisposition

    OpenAIRE

    Husted, Janice A.; Ahmed, Rashid; Chow, Eva W.C.; Brzustowicz, Linda M.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    There are few studies of environmental factors in familial forms of schizophrenia. We investigated whether childhood adversity or environmental factors were associated with schizophrenia in a familial sample where schizophrenia is associated with the NOSA1P gene. We found that a cumulative adversity index including childhood illness, family instability and cannabis use was significantly associated with narrow schizophrenia, independent of NOSA1P risk genotype, previously measured childhood tr...

  20. Genetic predisposition to preeclampsia is conferred by fetal DNA variants near FLT1, a gene involved in the regulation of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kathryn J; Saxena, Richa; Karumanchi, S Ananth

    2018-02-01

    Preeclampsia risk is influenced by both the mother's genetic background and the genetics of her fetus; however, the specific genes responsible for conferring preeclampsia risk have largely remained elusive. Evidence that preeclampsia has a genetic predisposition was first detailed in the early 1960s, and overall preeclampsia heritability is estimated at ∼55%. Many traditional gene discovery approaches have been used to investigate the specific genes that contribute to preeclampsia risk, but these have largely not been successful or reproducible. Over the past decade, genome-wide association studies have allowed for significant advances in the understanding of the genetic basis of many common diseases. Genome-wide association studies are predicated on the idea that the genetic basis of many common diseases are complex and polygenic with many variants, each with modest effects that contribute to disease risk. Using this approach in preeclampsia, a large genome-wide association study recently identified and replicated the first robust fetal genomic region associated with excess risk. A screen of >7 million genetic variants in 2658 offspring from preeclamptic women and 308,292 population controls identified a single association signal close to the Fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 gene, on chromosome 13. Fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 encodes soluble Fms-like tyrosine kinase 1, a splice variant of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor that exerts antiangiogenic activity by inhibiting signaling of proangiogenic factors. The Fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 pathway is central in preeclampsia pathogenesis because excess circulating soluble Fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 in the maternal plasma leads to the hallmark clinical features of preeclampsia, including hypertension and proteinuria. The success of this landmark fetal preeclampsia genome-wide association study suggests that well-powered, larger maternal and fetal genome-wide association study will be fruitful in identifying

  1. Environmental effect and genetic influence: a regional cancer predisposition survey in the Zonguldak region of Northwest Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Selahattin; Önen-Hall, A. Piril; Aydin, S. Nihal; Yakicier, Cengiz; Akarsu, Nurten; Tuncer, Murat

    2008-03-01

    The Cretaceous-Eocene volcano-sedimentary units of the Zonguldak region of the western Black Sea consist of subalkaline andesite and tuff, and sandstone dominated by smectite, kaolinite, accessory chlorite, illite, mordenite, and analcime associated with feldspar, quartz, opal-CT, amphibole, and calcite. Kaolinization, chloritization, sericitization, albitization, Fe-Ti-oxidation, and the presence of zeolite, epidote, and illite in andesitic rocks and tuffaceous materials developed as a result of the degradation of a glass shards matrix, enclosed feldspar, and clinopyroxene-type phenocrysts, due to alteration processes. The association of feldspar and glass with smectite and kaolinite, and the suborientation of feldspar-edged, subparallel kaolinite plates to fracture axes may exhibit an authigenic smectite or kaolinite. Increased alteration degree upward in which Al, Fe, and Ti are gained, and Si, Na, K, and Ca are depleted, is due to the alteration following possible diagenesis and hydrothermal activities. Micromorphologically, fibrous mordenite in the altered units and the presence of needle-type chrysotile in the residential buildings in which cancer cases lived were detected. In addition, the segregation pattern of cancer susceptibility in the region strongly suggested an environmental effect and a genetic influence on the increased cancer incidence in the region. The most likely diagnosis was Li-Fraumeni syndrome, which is one of the hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes; however, no mutations were observed in the p53 gene, which is the major cause of Li-Fraumeni syndrome. The micromorphology observed in the altered units in which cancer cases were detected may have a role in the expression of an unidentified gene, but does not explain alone the occurrence of cancer as a primary cause in the region.

  2. Television Watching, Leisure-Time Physical Activity and the Genetic Predisposition in Relation to Body Mass Index in Women and Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qibin; Li, Yanping; Chomistek, Andrea K.; Kang, Jae H.; Curhan, Gary C.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Willett, Walter C.; Rimm, Eric B.; Hu, Frank B.; Qi, Lu

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies on gene-lifestyle interaction and obesity have mostly focused on the FTO gene and physical activity, while little attention has been paid to sedentary behavior as indicated by television (TV) watching. Methods and Results We analyzed interactions between TV watching, leisure-time physical activity and genetic predisposition in relation to body mass index (BMI) in 7740 women and 4564 men from 2 prospective cohorts: the Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Data on physical activity and TV watching were collected 2 years prior to assessment of BMI. A weighted genetic risk score (GRS) was calculated on the basis of 32 established BMI-associated variants. In both women and men, the genetic associations with BMI strengthened with increased hours of TV watching. An increment of 10 points in the weighted GRS was associated with 0.8 [SE 0.4], 0.8 [0.2], 1.4 [0.2], 1.5 [0.2] and 3.4 [1.0] kg/m2 higher BMI across the 5 categories of TV watching (0-1, 2-5, 6-20, 21-40, and >40h/wk) (P for interaction=0.001). In contrast, the genetic association with BMI weakened with increased levels of physical activity. An increment of 10 points in the weighted GRS was associated with 1.5 [0.2], 1.3 [0.2], 1.2 [0.2], 1.2 [0.2] and 0.8 [0.2] kg/m2 higher BMI across the quintiles of physical activity. The interactions of TV watching and physical activity with genetic predisposition in relation to BMI were independent of each other. Conclusions Sedentary lifestyle indicated by prolonged TV watching may accentuate predisposition to elevated adiposity, whereas greater leisure-time physical activity may attenuate the genetic association. PMID:22949498

  3. Bovine neonatal pancytopenia (BNP): novel insights into the incidence, vaccination-associated epidemiological factors and a potential genetic predisposition for clinical and subclinical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demasius, W; Weikard, R; Kromik, A; Wolf, C; Müller, K; Kühn, C

    2014-06-01

    Bovine neonatal pancytopenia (BNP) is a haemorrhagic disease of newborn calves elicited by colostrum from specific cows. Two studies have indicated that BNP-inducing colostrum might be associated with alloantibodies directed against MHC class I in response to vaccination with a distinct inactivated viral vaccine. However, the proportion of alloantibody-producing individuals by far exceeds the proportion of clinical BNP cases in the vaccinated population. This raises the question about the incidence of subclinical, unrecognised cases and also suggests further factors involved in BNP pathogenesis, e.g., genetic predisposition. Our results on neonatal calves from a closely monitored resource population confirmed the hypothesis of a genetic predisposition for clinical BNP and suggest that the predisposition is also involved in subclinical BNP-cases. No indication was obtained for a higher frequency of subclinical BNP-cases compared with clinical cases. Neither time point nor frequency of vaccination was a relevant factor for BNP in our resource population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Childhood tumours with a high probability of being part of a tumour predisposition syndrome; reason for referral for genetic consultation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Floor A M; Hopman, Saskia M J; Aalfs, Cora M; Berger, Lieke P V; Bleeker, Fonnet E; Dommering, Charlotte J; Jongmans, Marjolijn C J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314344349; Letteboer, Tom G W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304815837; Olderode-Berends, Maran J W; Wagner, Anja; Hennekam, Raoul C; Merks, Johannes H M

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Recognising a tumour predisposition syndrome (TPS) in childhood cancer patients is of major clinical relevance. The presence of a TPS may be suggested by the type of tumour in the child. We present an overview of 23 childhood tumours that in themselves should be a reason to refer a

  5. Childhood tumours with a high probability of being part of a tumour predisposition syndrome; reason for referral for genetic consultation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Floor A. M.; Hopman, Saskia M. J.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Berger, Lieke P. V.; Bleeker, Fonnet E.; Dommering, Charlotte J.; Jongmans, Marjolijn C. J.; Letteboer, Tom G. W.; Olderode - Berends, Maran J.W.; Wagner, Anja; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Merks, Johannes H. M.

    Introduction: Recognising a tumour predisposition syndrome (TPS) in childhood cancer patients is of major clinical relevance. The presence of a TPS may be suggested by the type of tumour in the child. We present an overview of 23 childhood tumours that in themselves should be a reason to refer a

  6. ANALYSIS OF ACE, ACTN3, ENOS, PPARG, PPARA, HIF-15, PPARGC1B GENE POLYMORPHISMS FOR DETERMINATION A GENETIC PREDISPOSITION TO A VARIETY OF SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Drozdovska

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To establishing the possibility of assessing genetic iinherited predisposition to various sports, the differences in the distribution of genotypes of the complex polymorphisms in groups of athletes, specializing in sports with different types of energy supply of muscular work were studied. The paper examined the DNA 332 persons, of which 110 athletes involved in speed- power sports, 85 - in endurance sports , 51 - in sports that require a combination of strength and endurance, 86 - with no experience regular exercise.

  7. Physical activity attenuates the genetic predisposition to obesity in 20,000 men and women from EPIC-Norfolk prospective population study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengxu Li

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that multiple genetic loci identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS increase the susceptibility to obesity in a cumulative manner. It is, however, not known whether and to what extent this genetic susceptibility may be attenuated by a physically active lifestyle. We aimed to assess the influence of a physically active lifestyle on the genetic predisposition to obesity in a large population-based study.We genotyped 12 SNPs in obesity-susceptibility loci in a population-based sample of 20,430 individuals (aged 39-79 y from the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC-Norfolk cohort with an average follow-up period of 3.6 y. A genetic predisposition score was calculated for each individual by adding the body mass index (BMI-increasing alleles across the 12 SNPs. Physical activity was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Linear and logistic regression models were used to examine main effects of the genetic predisposition score and its interaction with physical activity on BMI/obesity risk and BMI change over time, assuming an additive effect for each additional BMI-increasing allele carried. Each additional BMI-increasing allele was associated with 0.154 (standard error [SE] 0.012 kg/m(2 (p = 6.73 x 10(-37 increase in BMI (equivalent to 445 g in body weight for a person 1.70 m tall. This association was significantly (p(interaction = 0.005 more pronounced in inactive people (0.205 [SE 0.024] kg/m(2 [p = 3.62 x 10(-18; 592 g in weight] than in active people (0.131 [SE 0.014] kg/m(2 [p = 7.97 x 10(-21; 379 g in weight]. Similarly, each additional BMI-increasing allele increased the risk of obesity 1.116-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.093-1.139, p = 3.37 x 10(-26 in the whole population, but significantly (p(interaction = 0.015 more in inactive individuals (odds ratio [OR] = 1.158 [95% CI 1.118-1.199; p = 1.93 x 10(-16] than in active individuals (OR = 1.095 (95% CI 1.068-1.123; p = 1

  8. Physical activity attenuates the genetic predisposition to obesity in 20,000 men and women from EPIC-Norfolk prospective population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengxu; Zhao, Jing Hua; Luan, Jian'an; Ekelund, Ulf; Luben, Robert N; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Loos, Ruth J F

    2010-08-31

    We have previously shown that multiple genetic loci identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) increase the susceptibility to obesity in a cumulative manner. It is, however, not known whether and to what extent this genetic susceptibility may be attenuated by a physically active lifestyle. We aimed to assess the influence of a physically active lifestyle on the genetic predisposition to obesity in a large population-based study. We genotyped 12 SNPs in obesity-susceptibility loci in a population-based sample of 20,430 individuals (aged 39-79 y) from the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk cohort with an average follow-up period of 3.6 y. A genetic predisposition score was calculated for each individual by adding the body mass index (BMI)-increasing alleles across the 12 SNPs. Physical activity was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Linear and logistic regression models were used to examine main effects of the genetic predisposition score and its interaction with physical activity on BMI/obesity risk and BMI change over time, assuming an additive effect for each additional BMI-increasing allele carried. Each additional BMI-increasing allele was associated with 0.154 (standard error [SE] 0.012) kg/m(2) (p = 6.73 x 10(-37)) increase in BMI (equivalent to 445 g in body weight for a person 1.70 m tall). This association was significantly (p(interaction) = 0.005) more pronounced in inactive people (0.205 [SE 0.024] kg/m(2) [p = 3.62 x 10(-18); 592 g in weight]) than in active people (0.131 [SE 0.014] kg/m(2) [p = 7.97 x 10(-21); 379 g in weight]). Similarly, each additional BMI-increasing allele increased the risk of obesity 1.116-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.093-1.139, p = 3.37 x 10(-26)) in the whole population, but significantly (p(interaction) = 0.015) more in inactive individuals (odds ratio [OR] = 1.158 [95% CI 1.118-1.199; p = 1.93 x 10(-16)]) than in active individuals (OR = 1.095 (95% CI 1.068-1.123; p = 1

  9. Contribution of KIR genes, HLA class I ligands, and KIR/HLA class I ligand combinations on the genetic predisposition to celiac disease and coexisting celiac disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, H Haluk; Patiroglu, Turkan; Sevinc, Eylem; Aslan, Duran; Okdemir, Deniz; Kurtoglu, Selim

    2015-09-01

    There are some common genetic features between celiac disease (CD) and diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM). However, the genetic risk factors have not been fully clarified for CD and the co-occurrence of CD and DM. KIR (killer immunoglobulin-like receptor) genes regulate the cytolitic activity of NK-cells and T lymphocytes. The aim of this study is to evaluate the contribution of KIR genes, KIR ligands, and combinations of KIR/ KIR ligands on the genetic predisposition to CD and co-occurrence of CD and DM. Forty six patients with CD (n = 46), 20 patients with CD+DM (n = 20), and 60 healthy controls (n = 60) were included in this study. KIR genes and KIR ligands were investigated with PCR-SSOP and PCR-SSP in all subjects, respectively. This study showed that while the telomeric KIR genes (2DS5 and 3DS1), and combinations of 3DS1+HLA-BBw4-Thrand 3DS1+HLA-BBw4-Iso- (p KIR genes, C1 ligand, and combinations of 3DS1+HLA-BBw4-Thr- and 3DS1+HLA-BBw4-Iso- (p = 0.002, p = 0.004, p = 0.036, p KIR genes, KIR ligands, and KIR/KIR ligand interactions may be responsible for a predisposition to CD and the coexistence of CD and DM. For development of coexisting CD and DM, the 2DS5 and 3DS1 genes, C1 ligand, and combinations of 3DS1+HLA-BBw4-Thr- and 3DS1+HLA-BBw4-Iso- were found to be risk factors.

  10. The altruism of Dona Benigna in Benito Perez Galdós’s Misericordia Religious Morality, Cultural Predisposition or Genetic Inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Fartakh,

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the novel Misericordia (2004 by Benito Perez Galdós there is a character, Doña Benigna, who has developed an altruistic behavior in favor of other characters. What is certain is that the origin of this cooperative behavior is unclear. We would think that it emanates either from an acquired moral religious education, or from a cultural predisposition or a genetic inheritance. The moral development of the individual is one of the foundations for the birth of man as free individual during this period of Spanish history. Benito Perez Galdós’s narrative raises a debate about the issue of morality as solidarity action in this critical period of Spain’s evolution.

  11. Association among genetic predisposition, gut microbiota, and host immune response in the etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, P J; Fonseca, M T C; Bonfá, G; Alves, V B F; Sales-Campos, H; Nardini, V; Cardoso, C R B

    2014-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), is a chronic disorder that affects thousands of people around the world. These diseases are characterized by exacerbated uncontrolled intestinal inflammation that leads to poor quality of life in affected patients. Although the exact cause of IBD still remains unknown, compelling evidence suggests that the interplay among immune deregulation, environmental factors, and genetic polymorphisms contributes to the multifactorial nature of the disease. Therefore, in this review we present classical and novel findings regarding IBD etiopathogenesis. Considering the genetic causes of the diseases, alterations in about 100 genes or allelic variants, most of them in components of the immune system, have been related to IBD susceptibility. Dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota also plays a role in the initiation or perpetuation of gut inflammation, which develops under altered or impaired immune responses. In this context, unbalanced innate and especially adaptive immunity has been considered one of the major contributing factors to IBD development, with the involvement of the Th1, Th2, and Th17 effector population in addition to impaired regulatory responses in CD or UC. Finally, an understanding of the interplay among pathogenic triggers of IBD will improve knowledge about the immunological mechanisms of gut inflammation, thus providing novel tools for IBD control.

  12. Genetic Predisposition to Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, Postpartum Weight Reduction, and Glycemic Changes: A Longitudinal Study in Women With Prior Gestational Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiange; Leng, Junhong; Li, Nan; Martins de Carvalho, Aline; Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yan; Li, Weiqin; Liu, Huikun; Wang, Leishen; Hu, Gang; Qi, Lu

    2015-12-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common condition in reproductive-aged women and a major female-specific risk factor of obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, and diabetes. We examined whether the genetic variation predisposing to PCOS affected glycemic changes in women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and whether such an effect was modified by changes in body adiposity, especially during and after pregnancy. This is a longitudinal study in Tianjin, China. We genotyped 7 genome-wide association study-identified PCOS single nucleotide polymorphisms and assessed gestational weight gain and changes in glycemic traits and weight at 1 to 5 years postpartum in 1133 women with prior GDM. The main outcome measure was postpartum glycemic changes. The PCOS genetic risk score significantly interacted with postpartum weight reduction on changes in fasting glucose and 2-h glucose (P for interaction = .032 and .007; respectively) after multivariable adjustment. In women with postpartum weight reduction of ≥ 5 kg/y, the genetic risk score was associated with decreased fasting and 2-h glucose, whereas an opposite genetic effect was found in women who lost less weight. The association between postpartum weight reduction and glycemic improvement was more significant among women with a higher genetic risk score. In a large cohort of Chinese women with a history of GDM, our data for the first time indicate that the genetic predisposition to PCOS may interact with postpartum weight reduction on long-term glycemic changes, emphasizing the importance of postpartum weight management in prevention of diabetes in this subgroup of women.

  13. Radiation sensitivity and genetic predisposition seen from a clinical viewpoint; Strahlenempfindlichkeit und genetische Praedisposition aus klinischer Sicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budach, W. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik, Abt. Strahlentherapie

    2001-07-01

    This contribution gives a short overview of the current state of knowledge concerning genetically related changes in radiation sensitivity. [German] In den Ausfuehrungen wird ein kurzer Ueberblick ueber derzeit bekannte genetisch bedingte Veraenderungen der Strahlenempfindlichkeit gegeben. (orig.)

  14. HLA-C, DRB1 and DQB1 alleles involved in genetic predisposition to psoriasis vulgaris in the Slovak population

    OpenAIRE

    Shawkatov?, Ivana; Javor, Juraj; P?rnick?, Zuzana; Kozub, Peter; ?il?nkov?, M?ria; Frey, Peter; Feren??k, Stanislav; Buc, Milan

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a complex chronic skin disease with immunological and genetic background. The most important predisposing genetic factors in psoriasis are genes of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. Accumulative evidence has shown that several HLA alleles are closely associated with psoriasis; however, they tend to vary in different racial and ethnic backgrounds. One hundred forty-seven unrelated Slovak patients with psoriasis vulgaris (average age at onset 28???14?years) were ge...

  15. The Genetic Predisposition Score of Seven Obesity-Related Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Is Associated with Better Metabolic Outcomes after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Carolina Ferreira; Pinhel, Marcela A Souza; de Oliveira, Bruno Affonso Parenti; Marchini, Julio Sergio; Salgado Junior, Wilson; Silva Junior, Wilson Araujo; Nonino, Carla Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variants associated with obesity have cumulative effects on obesity risk and related phenotypes. This study aimed to estimate the contribution of a genetic predisposition score (GPS) calculated from 7 obesity-related polymorphisms to the improvement of biochemical parameters 1 year after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Obese patients (n = 150; aged 47.2 ± 10.5 years) were enrolled and weight, body mass index (BMI), and biochemical parameters (glycemia and lipid profile) were evaluated preoperatively and 1 year after RYGB. A GPS was calculated with the polymorphisms rs1801282 of PPARG2, rs4994 of ADRB3, rs1800592 of UCP1, rs659366 and rs669339 of UCP2, rs7121 of GNAS1, and rs5443 of GNB3. We observed that 66.3% of the patients has a GPS >5. During the preoperative period, the GPS showed a significant association with weight (β = -0.163; p = 0.020), BMI (β = -0.169; p = 0.038), and glucose concentrations (β = -0.177; p = 0.036). After sex and age adjustment, a higher GPS was associated with a greater reduction in glycemia (β = -0.158; p = 0.048), triglycerides (β = -0.256; p = 0.002), and total cholesterol (β = -0.172; p = 0.038) concentrations 1 year after surgery. Our data elucidated that a higher GPS provides a greater metabolic benefit of RYGB. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. A pedigree-based proxy measure of genetic predisposition of drinking and alcohol use among female sex workers in China: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Li, Xiaoming; Liu, Yu; Qiao, Shan; Su, Shaobing; Zhang, Liying; Zhou, Yuejiao

    2017-02-01

    Scientific evidence has suggested that genetic factors accounted for more than half of the vulnerability of developing alcohol use problems. However, collecting genetic data poses a significant challenge for most population-based behavioral studies. The aim of this study was to assess the utilities of a pedigree-based proxy measure of genetic predisposition of drinking (GPD) and its effect on alcohol use behaviors as well as its interactions with personal and environmental factors. In the current study, cross-sectional data were collected from 700 female sex workers (FSW) in Guangxi, China. Participants provided information on a pedigree-based proxy measure of GPD and their alcohol use behaviors. Chi-square and independent t-test was applied for examining the bivariate associations between GPD and alcohol use behaviors; multivariate and ordinal regression models were used to examine the effect of GPD on alcohol use. This study found that women with a higher composite score of GPD tended to have a higher risk of alcohol use problem compared to their counterparts (p < .05). GPD was a significant predictor of alcohol use problems (p < .05), especially among women who had mental health issues or lack of health cares. The pedigree-based measure provided a useful proxy of GPD among participants. Both FSW's mental health and health care access interact with GPD and affect their drinking patterns. By understanding the genetic basis of alcohol use, we can develop scalable and efficacious interventions that will take into consideration the individual risk profile and environmental influences.

  17. The association of genetic predisposition to depressive symptoms with non-suicidal and suicidal self-injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maciejewski, D.F.; Renteria, M.E.; Abdellaoui, A.; Medland, S.E.; Few, L.R.; Gordon, S.D.; Madden, P.A.F.; Montgomery, G.W.; Trull, T.J.; Heath, A.C.; Statham, D.J.; Martin, N.G.; Zietsch, B.P.; Verweij, K.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    Non-suicidal and suicidal self-injury are very destructive, yet surprisingly common behaviours. Depressed mood is a major risk factor for non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. We conducted a genetic risk prediction study to examine the polygenic overlap of

  18. The Association of Genetic Predisposition to Depressive Symptoms with Non-suicidal and Suicidal Self-Injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maciejewski, Dominique F; Renteria, Miguel E; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Medland, Sarah E; Few, Lauren R; Gordon, Scott D; Madden, Pamela A F; Montgomery, Grant W; Trull, Timothy J; Heath, Andrew C; Statham, Dixie J; Martin, Nicholas G; Zietsch, Brendan P; Verweij, Karin J. H.

    Non-suicidal and suicidal self-injury are very destructive, yet surprisingly common behaviours. Depressed mood is a major risk factor for non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. We conducted a genetic risk prediction study to examine the polygenic overlap of

  19. Improved prediction of genetic predisposition to psychiatric disorders using genomic feature best linear unbiased prediction models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Palle Duun; Demontis, Ditte; Børglum, Anders

    variance into components capturing the variance by a genomic feature (e.g. GO term) and the remaining genomic variance by differential weighting of the genetic variants within the two groups. Previously we have demonstrated (on pigs and fruit flies) increased predictive ability when the genomic feature...

  20. Genetic predisposition of six well-defined polymorphisms in HMGB1/RAGE pathway to breast cancer in a large Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Liling; Zhang, Qibing; He, Lan; Zhang, Minglong; Dong, Jing; Zhao, Dalong; Ma, Hongxing; Pan, Hongming; Zheng, Lihong

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer constitutes an enormous burden in China. A strong familial clustering of breast cancer suggests a genetic component in its carcinogenesis. To examine the genetic predisposition of high mobility group box-1/receptor for advanced glycation end products (HMGB1/RAGE) pathway to breast cancer, we genotyped six well-defined polymorphisms in this pathway among 524 breast cancer patients and 518 cancer-free controls from Heilongjiang province, China. There were no deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for all polymorphisms. In single-locus analysis, the frequency of rs1800624 polymorphism mutant A allele in RAGE gene was significantly higher in patients than in controls (24.52% versus 19.50%, P = 0.006), with the carriers of rs1800624-A allele being 1.51 times more likely to develop breast cancer relative to those with rs1800624-GG genotype after adjustment (95% confidence interval or CI: 1.17-1.94, P = 0.001). In HMGB1 gene, haplotype analysis did not reveal any significance, while in RAGE gene, haplotypes C-T-A and C-A-G (alleles in order of rs1800625, rs18006024, rs2070600) were significantly associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (adjusted OR = 2.72 and 10.35; 95% CI: 1.20-6.18 and 1.58-67.80; P = 0.017 and 0.015 respectively). In further genetic score analysis, per unit and quartile increments of unfavourable alleles were significantly associated with an increased risk of breast cancer after adjustment (odds ratio or OR = 1.20 and 1.26; 95% CI: 1.09-1.32 and 1.12-1.42; P breast cancer risk, and more importantly a cumulative impact of multiple risk associated polymorphisms in HMGB1/RAGE pathway on breast carcinogenesis. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  1. Heritable major histocompatibility complex class II-associated differences in production of tumor necrosis factor. alpha. : Relevance to genetic predisposition to systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, C.O.; Fronek, Z.; Koo, M.; McDevitt, H.O. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (USA)); Lewis, G.C. (Genentech Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Hansen, J.A. (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (USA))

    1990-02-01

    The authors report on the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and TNF-{beta} by mitogen-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes or enriched monocyte subpopulations from human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typed healthy subjects. The results indicate that HLA-DR2- and DQw1-positive donors frequently exhibit low production of TNF-{alpha}, whereas DR3- and DR4-positive subjects show high levels of TNF-{alpha} production. No correlation between TNF-{alpha} levels and HLA-A, -B, and -C genotype was found. The relevance of this quantitative polymorphism to the genetic predisposition to lupus nephritis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients was investigated. DR2, DQw1-positive SLE patients show low levels of TNF-{alpha} inducibility; this genotype is also associated with an increased incidence of lupus nephritis. DR3-positive SLE patients, on the other hand, are not predisposed to nephritis, and these patients have high TNF-{alpha} production. DR4 haplotype is associated with high TNF-{alpha} inducibility and is negatively correlated with lupus nephritis. These data may help explain the strong association between HLA-DR2, DQw1 in SLE patients and their susceptibility to nephritis.

  2. Human Leukocyte Antigen-B27: The Genetic Predisposition Leading to Reactive Arthritis during Induction Phase Chemotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartakke, Sandip P; Sampagar, Abhilasha Ashok; Bafna, Vibha Sanjay; Patel, Putun

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of reactive arthritis (ReA) during induction phase chemotherapy of a 15-year-old male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) M4 with inv(16), most probably due to a genetic predisposition of being human leukocyte antigen b27 (HLA-B27) positive. The episode of ReA recurred during consolidation therapy; however, the patient was asymptomatic after the completion of treatment. The link between HLA-B27 and a large family of inflammatory rheumatic diseases is a well-established fact, but interestingly, there is also a molecular link between HLA-B27 and hematological malignancies. This case brings to our notice, the common immunological, molecular, and microbiological link between AML, HLA-B27, and ReA. It also emphasizes the fact that clinicians should have a high index of suspicion of HLA-B27 positivity, if a case of AML develops arthritis during chemotherapy, since early introduction of immunosuppressive medications for arthritis may reduce morbidity and prevent delay in the administration of further chemotherapy cycles. PMID:29200696

  3. Hereditary Predispositions to Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Bannon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS are heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, bone marrow dysplasia, and peripheral cytopenias. Familial forms of MDS have traditionally been considered rare, especially in adults; however, the increasing availability of somatic and germline genetic analyses has identified multiple susceptibility loci. Bone marrow failure syndromes have been well-described in the pediatric setting, e.g., Fanconi anemia (FA, dyskeratosis congenita (DC, Diamond–Blackfan anemia (DBA, and Shwachman–Diamond syndrome (SBS, hallmarked by clinically-recognizable phenotypes (e.g., radial ray anomalies in FA and significantly increased risks for MDS and/or acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the setting of bone marrow failure. However, additional families with multiple cases of MDS or AML have long been reported in the medical literature with little known regarding potential hereditary etiologies. Over the last decade, genomic investigation of such families has revealed multiple genes conferring inherited risks for MDS and/or AML as the primary malignancy, including RUNX1, ANKRD26, DDX41, ETV6, GATA2, and SRP72. As these syndromes are increasingly appreciated in even apparently de novo presentations of MDS, it is important for hematologists/oncologists to become familiar with these newly-described syndromes. Herein, we provide a review of familial MDS syndromes and practical aspects of management in patients with predisposition syndromes.

  4. Plasma Taurine, Diabetes Genetic Predisposition, and Changes of Insulin Sensitivity in Response to Weight-Loss Diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan; Ceglarek, Uta; Huang, Tao; Wang, Tiange; Heianza, Yoriko; Ma, Wenjie; Bray, George A; Thiery, Joachim; Sacks, Frank M; Qi, Lu

    2016-10-01

    Taurine metabolism disturbance is closely linked to obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. Previous evidence suggested that the preventative effects of taurine on diabetes might be through regulating the expression levels of diabetes-related genes. We estimated whether blood taurine levels modified the overall genetic susceptibility to diabetes on improvement of insulin sensitivity in a randomized dietary trial. We genotyped 31 diabetes-associated variants to calculate a genetic risk score (GRS) and measured plasma taurine levels and glycemic traits among participants from the Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS Lost) trial. Seven-hundred eleven overweight or obese participants (age 30-70 y; 60% females) had genetic variants genotyped and blood taurine levels measured. Participants went on 2-year weight-loss diets, which were different in macronutrient composition. Improvements in glycemic traits were measured. We found that baseline taurine levels significantly modified the effects of diabetes GRS on changes in fasting glucose, insulin, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) during the 2-year diet intervention (P-interaction = .04, .01, .002, respectively), regardless of weight loss. High baseline taurine levels were associated with a less reduction in both glucose and HOMA-IR among the participants with the lowest tertile of diabetes GRS (both P = .02), and with a greater reduction in both insulin and HOMA-IR among those with the highest tertile of diabetes GRS (both P = .04). Our data suggest that blood taurine levels might differentially modulate the effects of diabetes-related genes on improvement of insulin sensitivity among overweight/obese patients on weight-loss diets.

  5. Plasma Taurine, Diabetes Genetic Predisposition, and Changes of Insulin Sensitivity in Response to Weight-Loss Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan; Ceglarek, Uta; Huang, Tao; Wang, Tiange; Heianza, Yoriko; Ma, Wenjie; Bray, George A.; Thiery, Joachim; Sacks, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Taurine metabolism disturbance is closely linked to obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. Previous evidence suggested that the preventative effects of taurine on diabetes might be through regulating the expression levels of diabetes-related genes. Objective: We estimated whether blood taurine levels modified the overall genetic susceptibility to diabetes on improvement of insulin sensitivity in a randomized dietary trial. Design and Setting: We genotyped 31 diabetes-associated variants to calculate a genetic risk score (GRS) and measured plasma taurine levels and glycemic traits among participants from the Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS Lost) trial. Participants: Seven-hundred eleven overweight or obese participants (age 30–70 y; 60% females) had genetic variants genotyped and blood taurine levels measured. Intervention: Participants went on 2-year weight-loss diets, which were different in macronutrient composition. Main Outcome Measure: Improvements in glycemic traits were measured. Results: We found that baseline taurine levels significantly modified the effects of diabetes GRS on changes in fasting glucose, insulin, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) during the 2-year diet intervention (P-interaction = .04, .01, .002, respectively), regardless of weight loss. High baseline taurine levels were associated with a less reduction in both glucose and HOMA-IR among the participants with the lowest tertile of diabetes GRS (both P = .02), and with a greater reduction in both insulin and HOMA-IR among those with the highest tertile of diabetes GRS (both P = .04). Conclusions: Our data suggest that blood taurine levels might differentially modulate the effects of diabetes-related genes on improvement of insulin sensitivity among overweight/obese patients on weight-loss diets. PMID:27466884

  6. The Association of Genetic Predisposition to Depressive Symptoms with Non-suicidal and Suicidal Self-Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Dominique F; Renteria, Miguel E; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Medland, Sarah E; Few, Lauren R; Gordon, Scott D; Madden, Pamela A F; Montgomery, Grant; Trull, Timothy J; Heath, Andrew C; Statham, Dixie J; Martin, Nicholas G; Zietsch, Brendan P; Verweij, Karin J H

    2017-01-01

    Non-suicidal and suicidal self-injury are very destructive, yet surprisingly common behaviours. Depressed mood is a major risk factor for non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. We conducted a genetic risk prediction study to examine the polygenic overlap of depressive symptoms with lifetime NSSI, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts in a sample of 6237 Australian adult twins and their family members (3740 females, mean age = 42.4 years). Polygenic risk scores for depressive symptoms significantly predicted suicidal ideation, and some predictive ability was found for suicide attempts; the polygenic risk scores explained a significant amount of variance in suicidal ideation (lowest p = 0.008, explained variance ranging from 0.10 to 0.16 %) and, less consistently, in suicide attempts (lowest p = 0.04, explained variance ranging from 0.12 to 0.23 %). Polygenic risk scores did not significantly predict NSSI. Results highlight that individuals genetically predisposed to depression are also more likely to experience suicidal ideation/behaviour, whereas we found no evidence that this is also the case for NSSI.

  7. The interaction of genetic predisposition and socioeconomic position with type 2 diabetes mellitus: cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses from the Lifelines Cohort and Biobank Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zon, Sander K R; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; van der Most, Peter J; Swertz, Morris A; Bültmann, Ute; Snieder, Harold

    2018-01-29

    A strong genetic predisposition for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) may aggravate the negative effects of low socioeconomic position (SEP) in the etiology of the disorder. This study aimed to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations and interactions of a genetic risk score (GRS) and SEP with T2DM, and to investigate whether clinical and behavioral risk factors can explain these associations and interactions. We used data from 13,027 genotyped participants from the Lifelines study. The GRS was based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genome-wide associated with T2DM and was categorized into tertiles. SEP was measured as educational level. T2DM was based on biological markers, recorded medication use, and self-reports. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations, and interactions, between the GRS and SEP on T2DM were examined. The combination of a high GRS and low SEP had the strongest association with T2DM in cross-sectional (OR: 3.84; 95% CI: 2.28, 6.46) and longitudinal analyses (HR: 2.71; 1.39, 5.27), compared to a low GRS and high SEP. Interaction between a high GRS and a low SEP was observed in cross-sectional (relative excess risk due to interaction: 1.85; 0.65, 3.05) but not in longitudinal analyses. Clinical and behavioral risk factors mostly explained the observed associations and interactions. A high GRS combined with a low SEP provides the highest risk for T2DM. These factors also exacerbated each other's impact cross-sectionally but not longitudinally. Preventive measures should target individual and contextual factors of this high-risk group to reduce the risk of T2DM.

  8. The journey from genetic predisposition to medication overuse headache to its acquisition as sequela of chronic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelletti, Paolo

    2018-01-10

    Migraine remains one of the biggest clinical case to be solved among the non-communicable diseases, second to low back pain for disability caused as reported by the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. Despite this, its genetics roots are still unknown. Its evolution in chronic forms hits 2-4% of the population and causes a form so far defined Medication Overuse Headache (MOH), whose pathophysiological basis have not been explained by many dedicated studies. The Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 has not recognized MOH as independent entity, but as a sequela of Chronic Migraine. This concept, already reported in previous studies, has been confirmed by the efficacy of OnabotulinumtoxinA in Chronic Migraine independently from the presence of MOH. The consistency of the current definitions of both Medication Overuse Headache and Chronic Migraine itself might be re-read on the basis of new evidences.

  9. Protective effect of compression socks in a marathon runner with a genetic predisposition to thrombophilia due to Factor V Leiden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Amanda L; Pescatello, Linda S; Thompson, Paul D; Taylor, Beth A

    2015-07-01

    The present case study is an analysis of the effect of compression socks on hemostatic activation following a marathon in a female endurance athlete found to be heterozygous for the coagulation factor V (F5 1691 G>A [Arg>Gln rs6025/560]) risk allele that predisposes one to a genetically inherited disorder of blood clotting, Factor V Leiden. Markers for coagulation and fibrinolysis were obtained 24 h prior to (PRE), immediately after (FINISH) and 24 h after (POST) completion of two marathons: the first in which the runner was not wearing compression socks, and the second in which the runner wore compression socks throughout the race. Compression socks worn during a marathon appeared to lower the overall impact on hemostasis as well as clot formation in this particular athlete as evidenced by lower t-PA (-56%), TAT (-63%) and D-dimer (-30%). Hemostatic activation may be lower with the use of compression socks, and thus may be effective for preserving hemostasis in endurance athletes at risk.

  10. Genetic predisposition to low bone mass is paralleled by an enhanced sensitivity to signals anabolic to the skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judex, Stefan; Donahue, Leah-Rae; Rubin, Clinton

    2002-01-01

    The structure of the adult skeleton is determined, in large part, by its genome. Whether genetic variations may influence the effectiveness of interventions to combat skeletal diseases remains unknown. The differential response of trabecular bone to an anabolic (low-level mechanical vibration) and a catabolic (disuse) mechanical stimulus were evaluated in three strains of adult mice. In low bone-mineral-density C57BL/6J mice, the low-level mechanical signal caused significantly larger bone formation rates (BFR) in the proximal tibia, but the removal of functional weight bearing did not significantly alter BFR. In mid-density BALB/cByJ mice, mechanical stimulation also increased BFR, whereas disuse significantly decreased BFR. In contrast, neither anabolic nor catabolic mechanical signals influenced any index of bone formation in high-density C3H/HeJ mice. Together, data from this study indicate that the sensitivity of trabecular tissue to both anabolic and catabolic stimuli is influenced by the genome. Extrapolated to humans, these results may explain in part why prophylaxes for low bone mass are not universally effective, yet also indicate that there may be a genotypic indication of people who are at reduced risk of suffering from bone loss.

  11. Comparative expression profiling of E. coli and S. aureus inoculated primary mammary gland cells sampled from cows with different genetic predispositions for somatic cell score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponsuksili Siriluck

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the past ten years many quantitative trait loci (QTL affecting mastitis incidence and mastitis related traits like somatic cell score (SCS were identified in cattle. However, little is known about the molecular architecture of QTL affecting mastitis susceptibility and the underlying physiological mechanisms and genes causing mastitis susceptibility. Here, a genome-wide expression analysis was conducted to analyze molecular mechanisms of mastitis susceptibility that are affected by a specific QTL for SCS on Bos taurus autosome 18 (BTA18. Thereby, some first insights were sought into the genetically determined mechanisms of mammary gland epithelial cells influencing the course of infection. Methods Primary bovine mammary gland epithelial cells (pbMEC were sampled from the udder parenchyma of cows selected for high and low mastitis susceptibility by applying a marker-assisted selection strategy considering QTL and molecular marker information of a confirmed QTL for SCS in the telomeric region of BTA18. The cells were cultured and subsequently inoculated with heat-inactivated mastitis pathogens Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. After 1, 6 and 24 h, the cells were harvested and analyzed using the microarray expression chip technology to identify differences in mRNA expression profiles attributed to genetic predisposition, inoculation and cell culture. Results Comparative analysis of co-expression profiles clearly showed a faster and stronger response after pathogen challenge in pbMEC from less susceptible animals that inherited the favorable QTL allele 'Q' than in pbMEC from more susceptible animals that inherited the unfavorable QTL allele 'q'. Furthermore, the results highlighted RELB as a functional and positional candidate gene and related non-canonical Nf-kappaB signaling as a functional mechanism affected by the QTL. However, in both groups, inoculation resulted in up-regulation of genes

  12. Limited potential of genetic predisposition scores to predict muscle mass and strength performance in Flemish Caucasians between 19 and 73 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Ruben; Caspers, Maarten; Knaeps, Sara; Mertens, Evelien; Lambrechts, Diether; Lefevre, Johan; Thomis, Martine

    2017-03-01

    Since both muscle mass and strength performance are polygenic in nature, the current study compared four genetic predisposition scores (GPS) in their ability to predict these phenotypes. Data were gathered within the framework of the first-generation Flemish Policy Research Centre "Sport, Physical Activity and Health" (2002-2004). Results are based on muscle characteristics data of 565 Flemish Caucasians (19-73 yr, 365 men). Skeletal muscle mass was determined from bioelectrical impedance. The Biodex dynamometer was used to measure isometric (PT static120° ) and isokinetic strength (PT dynamic60° and PT dynamic240° ), ballistic movement speed (S 20% ), and muscular endurance (Work) of the knee extensors. Genotyping was done for 153 gene variants, selected on the basis of a literature search and the expression quantitative trait loci of selected genes. Four GPS were designed: a total GPS (based on the sum of all 153 variants, each favorable allele = score 1), a data-driven and weighted GPS [respectively, the sum of favorable alleles of those variants with significant b-coefficients in stepwise regression (GPS dd ), and the sum of these variants weighted with their respective partial r 2 (GPS w )], and an elastic net GPS (based on the variants that were selected by an elastic net regularization; GPS en ). It was found that four different models for a GPS were able to significantly predict up to ~7% of the variance in strength performance. GPS en made the best prediction of SMM and Work. However, this was not the case for the remaining strength performance parameters, where best predictions were made by GPS dd and GPS w . Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Dietary management and genetic predisposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Holbæk; Larsen, Lesli Hingstrup

    2013-01-01

    Today, dietary recommendations are based on recommended daily intake for the general population, and only a few subgroups are considered for additional dietary advice. Nutrigenetics aim to optimize health and prevent disease. Particularly for lifestyle disease, such as obesity, which has increase...

  14. Genetic predisposition to testicular cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutke Holzik, Martijn Frederik

    2007-01-01

    Alhoewel zaadbalkanker een zeldzame ziekte is, is het toch de meest voorkomende vorm van kanker bij mannen tussen de 15 en 40 jaar. De ziekte is tegenwoordig goed te behandelen en de 10 jaars overleving is ongeveer 90%. Het hebben van een familielid met zaadbalkanker is de sterkste risicofactor voor

  15. Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk factor for the development of celiac disease, genetic predisposition. Without this factor, it is impossible that the ... with antibody testing in the future. When the genetic predisposition for celiac disease was detected (on Chromosome 6) ...

  16. Genetic predisposition to coronary heart disease and stroke using an additive genetic risk score: a population-based study in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: To determine the extent to which the risk for incident coronary heart disease (CHD) increases in relation to a genetic risk score (GRS) that additively integrates the influence of high-risk alleles in nine documented single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for CHD, and to examine whether t...

  17. Chronic pain, depression and cardiovascular disease linked through a shared genetic predisposition: Analysis of a family-based cohort and twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hecke, Oliver; Hocking, Lynne J; Torrance, Nicola; Campbell, Archie; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Porteous, David J; McIntosh, Andrew M; Burri, Andrea V; Tanaka, Haruka; Williams, Frances M K; Smith, Blair H

    2017-01-01

    were obtained when the outcomes and predictors were reversed and similar effects seen among sibling pairs; depression in one sibling predicted chronic pain in the other (OR 1·34 [1·05-1·71]), angina predicted chronic pain in the other (OR 2·19 [1·63-2·95]), and depression, angina (OR 1·98 [1·49-2·65]). Individuals with chronic pain and angina showed almost four-fold greater odds of depression compared with those manifesting neither trait (OR 3·78 [2·99-4·78]); angina showed seven-fold increased odds in the presence of chronic pain and depression (OR 7·76 [6·05-9·95]) and chronic pain nine-fold in the presence of depression and angina (OR 9·43 [6·85-12·98]). In TwinsUK, the relationship between CWP and depression has been published (R = 0.34, pgenetic predisposition, shared between the two traits (2·2% [95% CI 0·06-0·23]). We found an increased co-occurrence of chronic pain, depression and cardiovascular disease in two independent cohorts (general population-based cohort, twins cohort) suggesting a shared genetic contribution. Adjustment for known environmental influences, particularly those relating to socio-economic status (Generation Scotland: age, gender, deprivation, smoking, education; Twins UK: age,BMI) did not explain the relationship observed between chronic pain, depression and cardiovascular disease. Our findings from two independent cohorts challenge the concept of traditional disease boundaries and warrant further investigation of shared biological mechanisms.

  18. Existe-t-il une predisposition genetique aux addictions ?

    OpenAIRE

    CASTERMANS, Emilie; GAILLEZ, Stephanie; BOURS, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Is free will the rule in front of drugs, alcohol or gambling? Would interindividual genetic variations influence our behaviour to such a point that addiction susceptibility would be enhanced or decreased? Addiction predisposition is a complex trait, involving numerous predisposition genes and also environment. Heritability of this trait is 50%, meaning a similar contribution of genes and environment in the setting of this trait. Some genes of the dopaminergic system and some others specific f...

  19. Identification of Prostate Cancer Predisposition Genes on the Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH -15 -1-0638 TITLE: Identification of Prostate Cancer Predisposition Genes on the Y Chromosome PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Identification of Prostate Cancer Predisposition Genes on the Y Chromosome 5b. GRANT NUMBER Chromosome 5c. PROGRAM...difficult. We hypothesize the existence of Y chromosome genes/variants related to increased risk, and propose multiple genetic analyses to efficiently

  20. Radiation-induced breast cancer: Influence of age at exposure, latency period, age, and genetic predisposition; Strahleninduziertes Mammakarzinom: Einfluss von Alter bei Exposition, Latenzzeit, erreichtem Lebensalter und genetischer Praedisposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuni, H. [Klinische Nuklearmedizin, Marburg Univ. (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Radiation induced breast cancer: Influence of age at exposure, time since exposure, attained age and genetic predisposition. The amount of undesirable effects of screening with mammography was estimated from mortality studies after radiation exposure. Newer incidence studies demonstrate, however, an underestimation of the health detriment by mortality studies, in particular with increasing age at exposure, which amounts about five- to sixfold after an exposure in an age of 45-50y. The multidimensional analysis of the discrete values of incidence after radiation exposure respecting age at exposure, time since exposure and attained age instead of calculating a steady function simply depending from age at exposure results in an increasing relative and absolute risk of cancer incidence (and mortality) with growing age after an exposure at an age above 40y. Some genes seems to be correlated with an predisposition of breast cancer. In women carrying BRCA-1 the radiosensitivity for induction of breast cancer may exceed the risk in the normal population by about two orders of magnitude. The resulting doubling dose amounts in the order of the natural and medical radiation exposure. At least in part the genetic predisposition is associated with an early onset of the cancer after an additional radiation exposure. This kind of health detriment was not considered in the former discussion of radiation hazards. (orig.) [German] Das Ausmass unerwuenschter Folgen eines Mammographie-Screenings war bisher aus Mortalitaetsstatistiken nach einer Strahlenbelastung abgeleitet worden. Neuere Inzidenzstatistiken zeigen, dass besonders mit zunehmendem Lebensalter die Mortalitaetsstatistiken die Gefaehrdung durch ein strahleninduziertes Mammakarzinom erheblich unterschaetzen, nach einer Strahlenbelastung im Alter um 45-50 Jahre um etwa das Fuenf- bis Siebenfache. Werden zur Beschreibung der strahleninduzierten Inzidinz aus den Statistiken keine kontinuierlichen mathematischen Funktionen

  1. Predisposition to Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nanna Julie; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2012-01-01

    predisposed to future obesity. The purpose of this paper is to review interventions on obesity prevention published during the past year, and to examine if interventions targeting predisposed groups or individuals seem more efficient in preventing obesity than studies targeting general populations. Among 15......Obesity prevention should remain a priority, even if there is some suggestion that the epidemic may presently have reached a stable level. However, previous interventions have not been effective in preventing overweight and obesity, and at the same time studies suggest that some subgroups are more...... identified studies, 7 targeted predisposed children or adolescents. More of the studies targeting predisposed individuals were able to show significant effects than the studies targeting general populations. Most studies targeting predisposed defined the predisposition based on ethnicity or socioeconomic...

  2. Genetic polymorphisms of NOS2 and predisposition to fracture non-union: A case control study based on Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Kun; Zhu, Yangjun; Wang, Zhan; Li, Zijun; Zhang, Jun

    2018-01-01

    A non-union, especially atrophic non-unions, is a permanent failure of healing following a fracture and can be difficult to treat. Approximately 5-10% of fractures will result in a non-union during the healing process. non-unions can be classified into two types: atrophic non-union which is often due to impaired bone healing with a potential biological mechanism, and hypertrophic non-union which is due to inadequate fixation after fracture. Genetic variations also play an important role in the fracture healing response. Previous studies based on animal models have indicated that NOS2 might be greatly involved in the bone fracture healing process. In this case-control study, 346 nonunion patients were compared to 883 patients with normal fracture healing to investigate the potential genetic association between NOS2 and the fracture healing process using study subjects of Chinese Han ancestry. Twenty-seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering NOS2 were genotyped in our study subjects and analyzed. In addition to the single marker-based analysis, we performed a gene-by-environment analysis to examine the potential interactions between genetic polymorphisms and some environmental factors. SNP rs2297514 showed significant association with the fracture healing process after adjusting for age and gender (OR = 1.38, P = 0.0005). Our results indicated that the T allele of rs2297514 significantly increased the risk of a non-union during the fracture healing process by 38% compared to the C allele. Further stratification analyses conducted for this SNP using data from subgroups classified by different sites of fracture indicated that significance could only be observed in the tibial diaphysis subgroup (N = 428, OR = 1.77, P = 0.0007) but not other groups including femur diaphysis, humeral shaft, ulnar shaft, and femur neck. Gene-by-environment interaction analyses of the three environmental factors showed no significant results. In this study, rs2297514 was

  3. International Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research: basic and translational research recognition : Mary-Claire King received the 2016 Prize for her pioneering research that demonstrated the first evidence of genetic predisposition to breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Hali; Zhao, Jie; Ba, Sujuan

    2017-11-21

    The Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research is a prestigious scientific award sponsored by the National Foundation for Cancer Research (NFCR)-a leading cancer research charitable organization in the United States that supports innovative cancer research globally with the ultimate goal to cure cancer. The coveted Szent-Györgyi Prize annually honors a scientist whose seminal discovery or body of work has resulted in, or led toward, notable contributions to cancer prevention, diagnosis, or treatment; and the discovery has had a high direct impact of saving people's lives. In addition, the prize promotes public awareness of the importance of basic cancer research and encourages the sustained investment needed to accelerate the translation of these research discoveries into new cancer treatments. In 2016, NFCR's Szent-Györgyi Prize Selection Committee was unanimous in its decision to recognize an icon in human disease genetics, Dr. Mary-Claire King, for her pioneering research that demonstrated the first evidence of genetic predisposition to breast cancer. Her proof of existence of BRCA1 gene and its location has made genetic screening for breast and ovarian cancers possible, saving lives of many people who are at high risk with inherited BRCA1 mutations.

  4. Associations Between Cancer Predisposition Testing Panel Genes and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Fergus J; Shimelis, Hermela; Hu, Chunling; Hart, Steven N; Polley, Eric C; Na, Jie; Hallberg, Emily; Moore, Raymond; Thomas, Abigail; Lilyquist, Jenna; Feng, Bingjian; McFarland, Rachel; Pesaran, Tina; Huether, Robert; LaDuca, Holly; Chao, Elizabeth C; Goldgar, David E; Dolinsky, Jill S

    2017-09-01

    Germline pathogenic variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to an increased lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, the relevance of germline variants in other genes from multigene hereditary cancer testing panels is not well defined. To determine the risks of breast cancer associated with germline variants in cancer predisposition genes. A study population of 65 057 patients with breast cancer receiving germline genetic testing of cancer predisposition genes with hereditary cancer multigene panels. Associations between pathogenic variants in non-BRCA1 and non-BRCA2 predisposition genes and breast cancer risk were estimated in a case-control analysis of patients with breast cancer and Exome Aggregation Consortium reference controls. The women underwent testing between March 15, 2012, and June 30, 2016. Breast cancer risk conferred by pathogenic variants in non-BRCA1 and non-BRCA2 predisposition genes. The mean (SD) age at diagnosis for the 65 057 women included in the analysis was 48.5 (11.1) years. The frequency of pathogenic variants in 21 panel genes identified in 41 611 consecutively tested white women with breast cancer was estimated at 10.2%. After exclusion of BRCA1, BRCA2, and syndromic breast cancer genes (CDH1, PTEN, and TP53), observed pathogenic variants in 5 of 16 genes were associated with high or moderately increased risks of breast cancer: ATM (OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 2.22-3.62), BARD1 (OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.31-3.63), CHEK2 (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.31-1.67), PALB2 (OR, 7.46; 95% CI, 5.12-11.19), and RAD51D (OR, 3.07; 95% CI, 1.21-7.88). Conversely, variants in the BRIP1 and RAD51C ovarian cancer risk genes; the MRE11A, RAD50, and NBN MRN complex genes; the MLH1 and PMS2 mismatch repair genes; and NF1 were not associated with increased risks of breast cancer. This study establishes several panel genes as high- and moderate-risk breast cancer genes and provides estimates of breast cancer risk associated with pathogenic variants in these genes among

  5. Childhood cancer predisposition syndromes-A concise review and recommendations by the Cancer Predisposition Working Group of the Society for Pediatric Oncology and Hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripperger, Tim; Bielack, Stefan S; Borkhardt, Arndt; Brecht, Ines B; Burkhardt, Birgit; Calaminus, Gabriele; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Deubzer, Hedwig; Dirksen, Uta; Eckert, Cornelia; Eggert, Angelika; Erlacher, Miriam; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Frühwald, Michael C; Gnekow, Astrid; Goehring, Gudrun; Graf, Norbert; Hanenberg, Helmut; Hauer, Julia; Hero, Barbara; Hettmer, Simone; von Hoff, Katja; Horstmann, Martin; Hoyer, Juliane; Illig, Thomas; Kaatsch, Peter; Kappler, Roland; Kerl, Kornelius; Klingebiel, Thomas; Kontny, Udo; Kordes, Uwe; Körholz, Dieter; Koscielniak, Ewa; Kramm, Christof M; Kuhlen, Michaela; Kulozik, Andreas E; Lamottke, Britta; Leuschner, Ivo; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Meinhardt, Andrea; Metzler, Markus; Meyer, Lüder H; Moser, Olga; Nathrath, Michaela; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Nustede, Rainer; Pajtler, Kristian W; Paret, Claudia; Rasche, Mareike; Reinhardt, Dirk; Rieß, Olaf; Russo, Alexandra; Rutkowski, Stefan; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Schneider, Dominik; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Schrappe, Martin; Schroeder, Christopher; von Schweinitz, Dietrich; Simon, Thorsten; Sparber-Sauer, Monika; Spix, Claudia; Stanulla, Martin; Steinemann, Doris; Strahm, Brigitte; Temming, Petra; Thomay, Kathrin; von Bueren, Andre O; Vorwerk, Peter; Witt, Olaf; Wlodarski, Marcin; Wössmann, Willy; Zenker, Martin; Zimmermann, Stefanie; Pfister, Stefan M; Kratz, Christian P

    2017-04-01

    Heritable predisposition is an important cause of cancer in children and adolescents. Although a large number of cancer predisposition genes and their associated syndromes and malignancies have already been described, it appears likely that there are more pediatric cancer patients in whom heritable cancer predisposition syndromes have yet to be recognized. In a consensus meeting in the beginning of 2016, we convened experts in Human Genetics and Pediatric Hematology/Oncology to review the available data, to categorize the large amount of information, and to develop recommendations regarding when a cancer predisposition syndrome should be suspected in a young oncology patient. This review summarizes the current knowledge of cancer predisposition syndromes in pediatric oncology and provides essential information on clinical situations in which a childhood cancer predisposition syndrome should be suspected. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Significance of genetic predisposition and genomic instability for individual sensitivity to radiation. Implications for radiation protection; Bedeutung der genetischen Praedisposition und der genomischen Instabilitaet fuer die individuelle Strahlenempfindlichkeit. Konsequenzen fuer den Strahlenschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, H. (ed.)

    2001-07-01

    At its closed-door meeting on 20/21 January 2000 the Radiation Protection Committee dedicated much of its attention to the significance of genetic predisposition and genetic instability for individual radiation sensitivity and to the implication of this for radiation protection. The statements and contributions to the closing plenary discussion touched on many aspects of ethics, personal rights, occupational medicine and insurance issues relating to this subject, all of which extend far beyond the purely technical issues of radiation protection. The present volume contains the lecture manuscripts of the meeting as well as a summarising assessment by the Radiation Protection Committee. [German] Der Strahlenschutzkommission war es ein besonderes Anliegen, sich im Rahmen ihrer Klausurtagung am 20./21. Januar 2000 mit der Bedeutung der genetischen Praedisposition und der genetischen Instabilitaet fuer die individuelle Strahlenempfindlichkeit sowie mit den damit moeglicherweise verbundenen Auswirkungen auf den Strahlenschutz intensiv auseinanderzusetzen. Die vielfaeltigen ethischen, persoenlichkeitsrechtlichen, arbeitsmedizinischen und versicherungsrelevanten Aspekte dieser Thematik, die weit ueber rein fachliche Fragen des Strahlenschutzes hinausgehen, kamen waehrend des abschliessenden Podiumsgespraeches in Stellungnahmen und Diskussionsbeitraegen zur Sprache. Der vorliegende Band beinhaltet die Vortragsmanuskripte dieser Veranstaltung sowie eine zusammenfassende Bewertung durch die Strahlenschutzkommission. (orig.)

  7. Interactions between genetic variants associated with adiposity traits and soft drinks in relation to longitudinal changes in body weight and waist circumference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nanna J; Ängquist, Lars; Larsen, Sofus C

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with obesity, and this association may be modified by a genetic predisposition to obesity. Objective: We examined the interactions between a molecular genetic predisposition to various aspects of obesity and the consumption of soft...... drinks, which are a major part of sugar-sweetened beverages, in relation to changes in adiposity measures. Design: A total of 4765 individuals were included in the study. On the basis of 50 obesity- Associated single nucleotide polymorphisms that are associated with body mass index (BMI), waist...... circumference (WC), or the waist- To-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRBMI), the following 4 genetic predisposition scores (GRSs) were constructed: A complete genetic predisposition score including all 50 single nucleotide polymorphisms (GRSComplete), a genetic predisposition score including BMI- Associated single...

  8. Exposure to low-dose radiation and the risk of breast cancer among women with a familial or genetic predisposition : a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen-van der Weide, Marijke C.; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; Jansen, Liesbeth; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; de Bock, Geertruida H.

    2010-01-01

    Women with familial or genetic aggregation of breast cancer are offered screening outside the population screening programme. However, the possible benefit of mammography screening could be reduced due to the risk of radiation-induced tumours. A systematic search was conducted addressing the

  9. Additive influence of genetic predisposition and conventional risk factors in the incidence of coronary heart disease: a population-based study in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    An additive genetic risk score (GRS) for coronary heart disease (CHD) has previously been associated with incident CHD in the population-based Greek European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort. In this study, we explore GRS-‘environment’ joint actions on CHD for severa...

  10. Bone Strength Estimated by Micro-Finite Element Analysis (µFEA) Is Heritable and Shares Genetic Predisposition With Areal BMD: The Framingham Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, David; Demissie, Serkalem; Lu, Darlene; Broe, Kerry E; Boyd, Steven K; Liu, Ching-Ti; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Bouxsein, Mary L; Kiel, Douglas P

    2017-11-01

    Genetic factors contribute to the risk of bone fractures, partly because of effects on bone strength. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) estimates bone strength using micro-finite element analysis (µFEA). The goal of this study was to investigate if the bone failure load estimated by HR-pQCT-based µFEA is heritable and to what extent it shares genetic regulation with areal bone mineral density (aBMD). Bone microarchitecture was measured by HR-pQCT at the ultradistal tibia and ultradistal radius in adults from the Framingham Heart Study (n = 1087, mean age 72 years; 57% women). Radial and tibial failure load in compression were estimated by µFEA. Femoral neck (FN) and ultradistal forearm (UD) aBMD were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Heritability (h 2 ) of failure load and aBMD and genetic correlations between them was estimated adjusting for covariates (age and sex). Failure load values at the non-weight-bearing ultradistal radius and at the weight-bearing ultradistal tibia were highly correlated (r = 0.906; p analysis, there was a high phenotypic and genetic correlation between covariate-adjusted failure load at the radius and UD aBMD (ρ P  = 0.826, ρ G  = 0.954, respectively), whereas environmental correlations were lower (ρ E  = 0.696), all highly significant (p micro-finite element analysis is heritable and shares some genetic composition with areal BMD, regardless of the skeletal site. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  11. Genetic Predisposition to an Impaired Metabolism of the Branched-Chain Amino Acids and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: A Mendelian Randomisation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotta, Luca A; Scott, Robert A; Sharp, Stephen J; Burgess, Stephen; Luan, Jian'an; Tillin, Therese; Schmidt, Amand F; Imamura, Fumiaki; Stewart, Isobel D; Perry, John R B; Marney, Luke; Koulman, Albert; Karoly, Edward D; Forouhi, Nita G; Sjögren, Rasmus J O; Näslund, Erik; Zierath, Juleen R; Krook, Anna; Savage, David B; Griffin, Julian L; Chaturvedi, Nishi; Hingorani, Aroon D; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Barroso, Inês; McCarthy, Mark I; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Wareham, Nicholas J; Langenberg, Claudia

    2016-11-01

    Higher circulating levels of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs; i.e., isoleucine, leucine, and valine) are strongly associated with higher type 2 diabetes risk, but it is not known whether this association is causal. We undertook large-scale human genetic analyses to address this question. Genome-wide studies of BCAA levels in 16,596 individuals revealed five genomic regions associated at genome-wide levels of significance (p genetically predicted difference of 1 SD in amino acid level was associated with an odds ratio for type 2 diabetes of 1.44 (95% CI 1.26-1.65, p = 9.5 × 10-8) for isoleucine, 1.85 (95% CI 1.41-2.42, p = 7.3 × 10-6) for leucine, and 1.54 (95% CI 1.28-1.84, p = 4.2 × 10-6) for valine. Estimates were highly consistent with those from prospective observational studies of the association between BCAA levels and incident type 2 diabetes in a meta-analysis of 1,992 cases and 4,319 non-cases. Metabolome-wide association analyses of BCAA-raising alleles revealed high specificity to the BCAA pathway and an accumulation of metabolites upstream of branched-chain alpha-ketoacid oxidation, consistent with reduced BCKD activity. Limitations of this study are that, while the association of genetic variants appeared highly specific, the possibility of pleiotropic associations cannot be entirely excluded. Similar to other complex phenotypes, genetic scores used in the study captured a limited proportion of the heritability in BCAA levels. Therefore, it is possible that only some of the mechanisms that increase BCAA levels or affect BCAA metabolism are implicated in type 2 diabetes. Evidence from this large-scale human genetic and metabolomic study is consistent with a causal role of BCAA metabolism in the aetiology of type 2 diabetes.

  12. Genetic Predisposition to an Impaired Metabolism of the Branched-Chain Amino Acids and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: A Mendelian Randomisation Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca A Lotta

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Higher circulating levels of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs; i.e., isoleucine, leucine, and valine are strongly associated with higher type 2 diabetes risk, but it is not known whether this association is causal. We undertook large-scale human genetic analyses to address this question.Genome-wide studies of BCAA levels in 16,596 individuals revealed five genomic regions associated at genome-wide levels of significance (p < 5 × 10-8. The strongest signal was 21 kb upstream of the PPM1K gene (beta in standard deviations [SDs] of leucine per allele = 0.08, p = 3.9 × 10-25, encoding an activator of the mitochondrial branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD responsible for the rate-limiting step in BCAA catabolism. In another analysis, in up to 47,877 cases of type 2 diabetes and 267,694 controls, a genetically predicted difference of 1 SD in amino acid level was associated with an odds ratio for type 2 diabetes of 1.44 (95% CI 1.26-1.65, p = 9.5 × 10-8 for isoleucine, 1.85 (95% CI 1.41-2.42, p = 7.3 × 10-6 for leucine, and 1.54 (95% CI 1.28-1.84, p = 4.2 × 10-6 for valine. Estimates were highly consistent with those from prospective observational studies of the association between BCAA levels and incident type 2 diabetes in a meta-analysis of 1,992 cases and 4,319 non-cases. Metabolome-wide association analyses of BCAA-raising alleles revealed high specificity to the BCAA pathway and an accumulation of metabolites upstream of branched-chain alpha-ketoacid oxidation, consistent with reduced BCKD activity. Limitations of this study are that, while the association of genetic variants appeared highly specific, the possibility of pleiotropic associations cannot be entirely excluded. Similar to other complex phenotypes, genetic scores used in the study captured a limited proportion of the heritability in BCAA levels. Therefore, it is possible that only some of the mechanisms that increase BCAA levels or affect BCAA metabolism are

  13. Computer simulation of heterogeneous single nucleotide polymorphisms in the catalase gene indicates structural changes in the enzyme active site, NADPH-binding and tetramerization domains: a genetic predisposition for an altered catalase in patients with vitiligo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, John M; Gibbons, Nicholas C J; Chavan, Bhaven; Schallreuter, Karin U

    2008-04-01

    Patients with vitiligo have low levels/activities of catalase in their lesional and non-lesional epidermis as well as in their epidermal melanocytes under in vitro conditions while the levels of catalase mRNA are unaltered. This defect leads to a build-up of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in the 10(-3) m range in the epidermis of these patients. In this context, it was realized that 10(-3) m H(2)O(2) deactivates catalase. Along this line, it was also suspected that catalase in patients with vitiligo possesses a special sensitivity to this reactive oxygen species (ROS), and indeed several heterozygous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been documented in the cat gene of these patients. Based on the 3D structure of human catalase monomer, we have modelled the influence of three selected SNPs on the enzyme active site, on the NADPH- as well as the tetramerization-binding domains. Our results show that these SNPs severely alter catalase structurally, which in turn should make the enzyme more susceptible to ROS compared with wild-type enzyme. Taken together, the work presented herein together with the earlier results on SNPs in the cat gene suggests a genetic predisposition for an altered catalase in patients with vitiligo.

  14. Breast cancer predisposition syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemel, Deborah; Domchek, Susan M

    2010-10-01

    A small, but important, percentage of breast cancer cases is caused by the inheritance of a single copy of a mutated gene. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the genes most commonly associated with inherited breast cancer; however, mutations in TP53 and PTEN cause Li-Fraumeni syndrome and Cowden syndrome, respectively, both of which are associated with high lifetime risks of breast cancer. Advances in the field of breast cancer genetics have led to an improved understanding of detection and prevention strategies. More recently, strategies to target the underlying genetic defects in BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated breast and ovarian cancers are emerging and may have implications for certain types of sporadic breast cancer. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Estimation of BDNF gene polymorphism and predisposition to dependence development for selected psychoactive compounds: genetic aspects of addiction with the selected drugs, amphetamine, tetrahydrocannabinol and opiates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biskupska, J; Borowiak, K S; Karlin-Grazewicz, K; Janus, T; Waloszczyk, P; Potocka-Banas, B; Machoy-Mokrzynska, A; Ossowski, A; Ciechanowicz, A

    2013-03-01

    The etiology of drug addiction, a central nervous system (CNS) disease, is not fully known. This complex problem is believed to be connected with concurrently affecting genetic, psychological and environmental factors. The development of addiction is connected with CNS reinforcement system and dopaminergic neurotransmission. Molecular processes are postulated to be of universal character and allow to presume a similar mechanism of dependence for both ethanol and other substances. Therefore, elements of dopaminergic transmission become excellent candidates for the examination of genetic influence on the development of addiction. A relationship between alcoholic disease and the presence of TaqIA1 and DRD2 alleles permits to initiate another investigation of gene-coding DRD2 dopamine receptor. The latest results indicate the importance of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the regulation of dopaminergic route. The purpose of this research was to reveal the relationship between the Val66Met BDNF gene polymorphism and dependence of psychoactive agent. The examinations were performed with the Local Research Ethics Committee approval and patient's consent. The study group consisted of 100 patients (88 men and 12 women) aged 18-52 years, qualified for research program according to the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) requirements, medical examination and detailed questionnaire.

  16. Prospects for genetically modified non-human primate models, including the common marmoset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Erika

    2015-04-01

    Genetically modified mice have contributed much to studies in the life sciences. In some research fields, however, mouse models are insufficient for analyzing the molecular mechanisms of pathology or as disease models. Often, genetically modified non-human primate (NHP) models are desired, as they are more similar to human physiology, morphology, and anatomy. Recent progress in studies of the reproductive biology in NHPs has enabled the introduction of exogenous genes into NHP genomes or the alteration of endogenous NHP genes. This review summarizes recent progress in the production of genetically modified NHPs, including the common marmoset, and future perspectives for realizing genetically modified NHP models for use in life sciences research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Exposure to low-dose radiation and the risk of breast cancer among women with a familial or genetic predisposition: a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen-van der Weide, Marijke C. [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, Hanzeplein 1, PO Box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Epidemiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Greuter, Marcel J.W.; Pijnappel, Ruud M. [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, Hanzeplein 1, PO Box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); Jansen, Liesbeth [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Surgery, Groningen (Netherlands); Oosterwijk, Jan C. [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Clinical Genetics, Groningen (Netherlands); Bock, Geertruida H. de [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Epidemiology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2010-11-15

    Women with familial or genetic aggregation of breast cancer are offered screening outside the population screening programme. However, the possible benefit of mammography screening could be reduced due to the risk of radiation-induced tumours. A systematic search was conducted addressing the question of how low-dose radiation exposure affects breast cancer risk among high-risk women. A systematic search was conducted for articles addressing breast cancer, mammography screening, radiation and high-risk women. Effects of low-dose radiation on breast cancer risk were presented in terms of pooled odds ratios (OR). Of 127 articles found, 7 were selected for the meta-analysis. Pooled OR revealed an increased risk of breast cancer among high-risk women due to low-dose radiation exposure (OR = 1.3, 95% CI: 0.9- 1.8). Exposure before age 20 (OR = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.3-3.1) or a mean of {>=}5 exposures (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.1-3.0) was significantly associated with a higher radiation-induced breast cancer risk. Low-dose radiation increases breast cancer risk among high-risk women. When using low-dose radiation among high-risk women, a careful approach is needed, by means of reducing repeated exposure, avoidance of exposure at a younger age and using non-ionising screening techniques. (orig.)

  18. Exposure to low-dose radiation and the risk of breast cancer among women with a familial or genetic predisposition: a meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen-van der Weide, Marijke C.; Greuter, Marcel J.W.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; Jansen, Liesbeth; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Bock, Geertruida H. de

    2010-01-01

    Women with familial or genetic aggregation of breast cancer are offered screening outside the population screening programme. However, the possible benefit of mammography screening could be reduced due to the risk of radiation-induced tumours. A systematic search was conducted addressing the question of how low-dose radiation exposure affects breast cancer risk among high-risk women. A systematic search was conducted for articles addressing breast cancer, mammography screening, radiation and high-risk women. Effects of low-dose radiation on breast cancer risk were presented in terms of pooled odds ratios (OR). Of 127 articles found, 7 were selected for the meta-analysis. Pooled OR revealed an increased risk of breast cancer among high-risk women due to low-dose radiation exposure (OR = 1.3, 95% CI: 0.9- 1.8). Exposure before age 20 (OR = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.3-3.1) or a mean of ≥5 exposures (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.1-3.0) was significantly associated with a higher radiation-induced breast cancer risk. Low-dose radiation increases breast cancer risk among high-risk women. When using low-dose radiation among high-risk women, a careful approach is needed, by means of reducing repeated exposure, avoidance of exposure at a younger age and using non-ionising screening techniques. (orig.)

  19. Predictors associated with MRI surveillance screening in women with a personal history of unilateral breast cancer but without a genetic predisposition for future contralateral breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, John V; Wang, Xiaoyan; Attai, Deanna J; DiNome, Maggie L; Kusske, Amy; Hoyt, Anne C; Hurvitz, Sara A; Weidhaas, Joanne B; Steinberg, Michael L; McCloskey, Susan A

    2017-11-01

    For women with a personal history of breast cancer (PHBC), no validated mechanisms exist to calculate future contralateral breast cancer (CBC) risk. The Manchester risk stratification guidelines were developed to evaluate CBC risk in women with a PHBC, primarily for surgical decision making. This tool may be informative for the use of MRI screening, as CBC risk is an assumed consideration for high-risk surveillance. Three hundred twenty-two women with a PHBC were treated with unilateral surgery within our multidisciplinary breast clinic. We calculated lifetime CBC risk using the Manchester tool, which incorporates age at diagnosis, family history, genetic mutation status, estrogen receptor positivity, and endocrine therapy use. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses (UVA/MVA) were performed, evaluating whether CBC risk predicted MRI surveillance. For women with invasive disease undergoing MRI surveillance, 66% had low, 23% above-average, and 11% moderate/high risk for CBC. On MVA, previous mammography-occult breast cancer [odds ratio (OR) 18.95, p breast tissue (OR 3.69, p = 0.0007), mastectomy versus lumpectomy (OR 3.12, p = 0.0041), and CBC risk (OR 3.17 for every 10% increase, p = 0.0002) were associated with MRI surveillance. No pathologic factors increasing ipsilateral breast cancer recurrence were significant on MVA. Although CBC risk predicted MRI surveillance, 89% with invasive disease undergoing MRI had breast cancer detectability (dense breasts and/or previous mammography-occult disease) predominate decision making. Pathologic factors important for determining ipsilateral recurrence risk, aside from age, were not associated with MRI surveillance.

  20. Genetic Predisposition to Poor Opioid Response in Preterm Infants: Impact of KCNJ6 and COMT Polymorphisms on Pain Relief After Endotracheal Intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elens, Laure; Norman, Elisabeth; Matic, Maja; Rane, Anders; Fellman, Vineta; van Schaik, Ron H N

    2016-08-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes involved in pain control might predispose to exaggerated sensitivity or difference in opioid analgesic effect. The relevance of the KCNJ6 -1250G>A (rs6517442, c.-1787G>A) and the catecholamine-O-methyltransferase (COMT) c.472G>A (rs4680, ValMet) single-nucleotide polymorphisms were studied in preterm infants needing intubation and randomized to a premedication strategy including remifentanil (n = 17) or morphine (n = 17). Pain was scored with Astrid Lindgren and Lund Children's Hospital Pain Assessment Scale every 30 minutes for 6 hours. The pain relief provided by the opioids was compared between the different KCNJ6 and COMT genotypes. Infants homozygous for the KCNJ6 -1250A allele had an increased duration after intubation to achieve a score indicating no pain compared with infants with the A/G or G/G genotypes (182 ± 30, 109 ± 29, and 60 ± 21 minutes, respectively; Logrank = 7.5, P = 0.006). Similarly, the duration was increased in individuals with the COMT Val/Val alleles compared with Val/Met and Met/Met (285 ± 37, 137 ± 25, and 63 ± 15 minutes, respectively; Logrank = 14.4, P = 0.0021). Cox proportional hazards analysis confirmed that the variation in both genes was independently associated with susceptibility to respond to therapy. We conclude that the KCNJ6 -1250A and COMT Val alleles are predisposing preterm newborns to diminished opioid-induced pain relief.

  1. Evidence of an Inherited Predisposition for Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Alpesh A.; Spiker, William Ryan; Daubs, Michael; Brodke, Darrel S.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective population based study cross referencing a genealogic database of over 2 million Utah residents with 10 years of clinical diagnosis data from a large tertiary hospital. Objective The objective of this study is to determine the presence or absence of an inherited predisposition to the development of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Summary of Background Data A genetic predisposition for the development of cervical spondylosis has been discussed in the literature with low quality evidence. Families with a high incidence of disease or early onset disease in monozygotic twins have both been reported. However, these suggestions of an inherited predisposition for disease have never been rigorously studied. The purpose of this study is to determine a genetic predisposition among patients diagnosed with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Methods The Utah Population Database (UPDB) combines health and genealogic data on over 2 million Utah residents. ICD-9 codes were used to identify 486 patients in the database with a diagnosis of cervical spondylosis with myelopathy (ICD9 code 721.1). The hypothesis of excessive familial clustering was tested using the Genealogical Index of Familiality (GIF) and Relative risks (RR) in relatives were estimated by comparing rates of disease in relatives with rates estimated in the relatives of 5 matched controls for each case. This methodology has been previously reported and validated for other disease conditions but not for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Results The GIF analysis for patients with CSM showed significant excess relatedness for disease (pspondylosis with myelopathy. Level of Evidence III PMID:21252820

  2. Myeloid Neoplasms with Germline Predisposition: A New Provisional Entity Within the World Health Organization Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuchlewski, David R; Peterson, LoAnn C

    2016-03-01

    The forthcoming update of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of hematopoietic neoplasms will feature "Myeloid Neoplasms with Germline Predisposition" as a new provisional diagnostic entity. This designation will be applied to some cases of acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome arising in the setting of constitutional mutations that render patients susceptible to the development of myeloid malignancies. For the diagnostic pathologist, recognizing these cases and confirming the diagnosis will demand a sophisticated grasp of clinical genetics and molecular techniques. This article presents a concise review of this new provisional WHO entity, including strategies for clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Postirradiation sarcoma in retinoblastoma. Induction or predisposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, M.B.; Burgess, L.P.; Fee, W.E. Jr.; Donaldson, S.S.

    1988-01-01

    An alarmingly high rate of postirradiation sarcomas following treatment for retinoblastoma has been described in the literature. We present four new cases and report 57 others from the English literature. Osteogenic sarcoma was the predominant histologic type (58%), followed by fibrosarcoma (21%) and various other sarcomas (21%). The average latency period between irradiation and development of the second primary (sarcoma) was 12.4 years. Irrespective of irradiation, a genetic linkage between retinoblastoma and osteogenic sarcoma on the 13q14 chromosome is recognized. Through a pleiotropic effect of this same chromosome, a predisposition for other sarcomas may exist as well. Finally, a strong role for radiation induction is proposed for all of these postirradiation sarcomas. This is based on the increased number of sarcomas arising in the field of prior irradiation (sites uncharacteristic of spontaneously occurring primary sarcomas) and the prolonged latency periods.13 references

  4. Fragile X Syndrome: Genetic Predisposition to Psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, Joel D.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Psychiatric evaluation of 14 males (ages 3-27 years) with the fragile X syndrome found pervasive hyperactivity, impulsivity, and attentional deficits, and a significant degree of anxiety. However, diagnostic criteria for persistent pervasive developmental disorder and autism were not met. (Author/DB)

  5. Familial predisposition to anterior cruciate ligament injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Goshima

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although several risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injury have been evaluated in the literature, there are few reports on familial predisposition. This study investigated the familial predisposition to ACL injury. The study included 350 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction between January 2005 and September 2008. All patients were surveyed by telephone or a written questionnaire about family history (FH of ACL injury, sports played by family members, and mechanisms of injury. We also compared age, sex, height, weight, body mass index, Tegner activity score, general joint laxity, and tibial slope between an FH group (with FH and a control group (without FH. In addition, we compared the incidence of ACL graft rupture and contralateral ACL rupture 2 years after primary surgery. Complete information was obtained from 316 patients, 38 (12.0% of whom had FH of ACL injury. Two families had three members with ACL injuries. Of the 40 family members with ACL injuries, 38 (95% had noncontact injuries and 34 (85% shared a similar mechanism of injury with the related patient. No significant differences were identified between the two groups, except that tibial slope was significantly greater in the FH group than in the control group. Although the incidence of repeat ACL injury was greater in the FH group (23.7% than in the control group (16.4%, there was no significant difference. Our results indicated a high probability of familial predisposition to many of the identified risk factors for ACL injury. In addition, patients with FH of ACL injury might be at high risk for initial and repeat ACL injuries. Therefore, prevention programs should be implemented for patients with FH of ACL injury in order to decrease the risk of these injuries.

  6. Host microsatellite alleles in malaria predisposition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trivedi Rajni

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a serious, sometimes fatal, disease caused by Plasmodium infection of human red blood cells. The host-parasite co-evolutionary processes are well understood by the association of coding variations such as G6PD, Duffy blood group receptor, HLA, and beta-globin gene variants with malaria resistance. The profound genetic diversity in host is attributed to polymorphic microsatellites loci. The microsatellite alleles in bacterial species are known to have aided their survival in fatal environmental conditions. The fascinating question is whether microsatellites are genomic cushion in the human genome to combat disease stress and has cause-effect relationships with infections. Presentation of the hypothesis It is hypothesized that repeat units or alleles of microsatellites TH01 and D5S818, located in close proximity to beta-globin gene and immune regulatory region in human play a role in malaria predisposition. Association of alleles at aforesaid microsatellites with malaria infection was analysed. To overrule the false association in unrecognized population stratification, structure analysis and AMOVA were performed among the sampled groups. Testing of hypothesis Associations of microsatellite alleles with malaria infection were verified using recombination rate, Chi-square, and powerful likelihood tests. Further investigation of population genetic structure, and AMOVA was done to rule out the confounding effects of population stratification in interpretation of association studies. Implication of the hypothesis Lower recombination rate (θ between microsatellites and genes implicated in host fitness; positive association between alleles -13 (D5S818, 9 (TH01 and strong susceptibility to Plasmodium falciparum; and alleles-12 (D5S818 and 6 (TH01 rendering resistance to human host were evident. The interesting fact emerging from the study was that while predisposition to malaria was a prehistoric attribute, among TH01

  7. Breed predisposition to canine gastric carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seim-Wikse, Tonje; Jörundsson, Einar; Nødtvedt, Ane

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has indicated a breed predisposition to gastric carcinoma in dogs. However, results to date are inconsistent since several studies have failed to prove such a predisposition. Better knowledge of breeds at risk could facilitate early detection of gastric carcinoma in dogs. The aim...

  8. The Impact of Familial Predisposition to Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease on Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Louise Aas; Nielsen, Tenna Ruest Haarmark; Holm, Jens-Christian

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity has reached alarming rates world-wide. The aetiology seems to be an interplay between genetic and environmental factors, and a surrogate measure of this complex interaction is suggested as familial predisposition. Familial predisposition to obesity and related cardiovascular disease (CVD) complications constitute the presence of obesity and/or obesity-related complications in primarily blood-related family members. The approaches of its measurement and applicability vary, and the evidence especially of its influence on obesity and obesity treatment in childhood is limited. Studies have linked a familial predisposition of obesity, CVD (hypertension, dyslipidaemia and thromboembolic events), and type 2 diabetes mellitus to BMI as well as other adiposity measures in children, suggesting degrees of familial aggregation of metabolic derangements. A pattern of predispositions arising from mothers, parents or grandparents as being most influential have been found, but further comprehensive studies are needed in order to specify the exact implications of familial predisposition. In the scope of childhood obesity this article reviews the current literature regarding familial predisposition to obesity and obesity-related complications, and how these familial predispositions may impact obesity in the offspring. PMID:26465142

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction in DDR-related cancer predisposition syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakhovich, Alex; Graifer, Dmitry; Stefanovie, Barbora; Krejci, Lumir

    2016-04-01

    Given the key role of mitochondria in various cellular events, it is not surprising that mitochondrial dysfunction (MDF) is seen in many pathological conditions, in particular cancer. The mechanisms defining MDF are not clearly understood and may involve genetic defects, misbalance of reactive oxygen species (ROS), impaired autophagy (mitophagy), acquired mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA and inability of cells to cope with the consequences. The importance of MDF arises from its detection in the syndromes with defective DNA damage response (DDR) and cancer predisposition. Here, we will focus on the dual role of these syndromes in cancer predisposition and MDF with specific emphasis on impaired autophagy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Can unknown predisposition in familial breast cancer be family-specific?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Henry; Wen, Hongxiu; Kim, Yeong C; Snyder, Carrie; Kinarsky, Yulia; Chen, Pei Xian; Xiao, Fengxia; Goldgar, David; Cowan, Kenneth H; Wang, San Ming

    2013-01-01

    Genetic predisposition plays a key role in the development of familial breast cancer. In spite of strong familial clustering of the disease and extensive efforts made during the past decade; however, progress has been slow in identifying genetic predisposition for the majority of familial breast cancer families. The question arises therefore as to whether current approaches are adequate in identifying the unknown genetic predisposition. We analyzed eight members of a BRCA1-, BRCA2-, p53-, and PTEN-negative breast cancer family, of which five had breast cancer, one is an obligate gene carrier, and two were unaffected. We sequenced the entire coding region of the genome for each member using exome sequencing to identify nonsynonymous variants. We identified 55 nonsynonymous germline variants affecting 49 genes in multiple members of the family, of which 22 are predicted to have damaging effects. We validated 20 of the 22 selected variants in the family by Sanger sequencing. Two variants in KAT6B, an acetal transferase gene, were identified in six family members of which five were affected with breast cancer and one is the unaffected obligate carrier. We further examined the presence of the identified variants in a cohort of 40 additional breast cancer cases from 22 familial breast cancer families, but none of the 22 variants was detected in these cases. Sequencing the entire coding exons in KAT6B detects no variants in these cases. Our results show that genetic predisposition for familial breast cancer can be rich in an affected family, but the predisposition can be family-specific. As such, it will be difficult to detect them by applying population-based approach. Our study supports the concept that focusing on each affected family will be required to determine the genetic predisposition for many familial breast cancer families whose genetic dispositions remain unknown. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Microsatellite DNA reveals population genetic differentiation among sprat (Sprattus sprattus) sampled throughout the Northeast Atlantic, including Norwegian fjords

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glover, Kevin A.; Skaala, Øystein; Limborg, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Glover, K. A., Skaala, Ø., Limborg, M., Kvamme, C., and Torstensen, E. Microsatellite DNA reveals population genetic differentiation among sprat (Sprattus sprattus) sampled throughout the Northeast Atlantic, including Norwegian fjords. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 68: 2145–2151. Sprat (Sprat...... display population genetic differentiation throughout the Northeast Atlantic, and there may be limited connectivity between Norwegian fjord and sea-going populations.......Glover, K. A., Skaala, Ø., Limborg, M., Kvamme, C., and Torstensen, E. Microsatellite DNA reveals population genetic differentiation among sprat (Sprattus sprattus) sampled throughout the Northeast Atlantic, including Norwegian fjords. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 68: 2145–2151. Sprat...

  12. Human cancer predisposition and the implications for radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, R.

    1994-01-01

    It is well established from clinical, epidemiological and laboratory studies that specific human germ line mutation can predispose to spontaneously arising cancer. Some of the responsible genes have been characterized at the molecular level and evidence is rapidly accumulating on mechanistic aspects of the problem. A major outstanding issue is the extent to which genetically determined cancer predisposition in man interacts with exposures to environmental genotoxic agents such as ionizing radiation. This brief review considers the current position regarding the different forms and frequencies of cancer-predisposing mutations in the human population and provides an interim view of the possible implications for protection of man from ionizing radiation. (author)

  13. Effect of deregulation of Sonic Hedgehog pathway on responses to DNA damage and cancer predisposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charazac, Aurelie

    2015-01-01

    The Gorlin syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by several developmental abnormalities. Due to mutations in PTCH1, a key player of the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway, clinical manifestations also includes hyper-radiosensitivity and an increased predisposition to the development of basal cell carcinomas. Given the implication of DNA repair system defects in hyper-radiosensitivity pathologies, we decided to study the effect of PTCH1 mutations on the DNA damage response in order to better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to Gorlin's phenotype.This study demonstrate a global failure of the DNA damage repair systems in Gorlin fibroblasts with respect to controls. It highlights in particular the collapse of the base excision repair pathway (BER) responsible for the repair of oxidative DNA damage. (author) [fr

  14. Stochastic dynamic simulation modeling including multitrait genetics to estimate genetic, technical, and financial consequences of dairy farm reproduction and selection strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaniyamattam, K; Elzo, M A; Cole, J B; De Vries, A

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a daily stochastic dynamic dairy simulation model that included multitrait genetics and to evaluate the effects of reduced genetic models and various reproduction and selection strategies on the genetic, technical, and financial performance of a dairy herd. The 12 correlated genetic traits included in the 2014 lifetime net merit (NM$) index were modeled for each animal. For each animal, a true breeding value (TBV) for each trait was calculated as the average of the sire's and dam's TBV, plus a fraction of the inbreeding and Mendelian sampling variability. Similarly, an environmental component for each trait was calculated and was partitioned into a permanent and a daily (temporary) effect. The combined TBV and environmental effects were converted into the phenotypic performance of each animal. Hence, genetics and phenotypic performances were associated. Estimated breeding values (EBV) were also simulated. Genetic trends for each trait for the service sire were based on expected trends in US Holsteins. Surplus heifers were culled based on various ranking criteria to maintain a herd size of 1,000 milking cows. In the first 8 scenarios, culling of surplus heifers was either random or based on the EBV of NM$. Four different genetic models, depending on the presence or absence of genetic trends or genetic and environmental correlations, or both, were evaluated to measure the effect of excluding multitrait genetics on animal performance. In the last 5 scenarios, the full genetic model was used and culling of surplus heifers was either random or based on the EBV of NM$ or the EBV of milk. Sexed semen use and reliability of the EBV were also varied. Each scenario was simulated for 15yr into the future. Results showed that genetic models without all 12 genetic trends and genetic and environmental correlations provided biased estimates of the genetic, technical, and financial performance of the dairy herd. Average TBV of NM$ of all

  15. Interactions between genetic variants associated with adiposity traits and soft drinks in relation to longitudinal changes in body weight and waist circumference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Nanna J; Ängquist, Lars; Larsen, Sofus C; Linneberg, Allan; Skaaby, Tea; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Toft, Ulla; Tjønneland, Anne; Halkjær, Jytte; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Overvad, Kim; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Sørensen, Thorkild Ia; Heitmann, Berit L

    2016-09-01

    Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with obesity, and this association may be modified by a genetic predisposition to obesity. We examined the interactions between a molecular genetic predisposition to various aspects of obesity and the consumption of soft drinks, which are a major part of sugar-sweetened beverages, in relation to changes in adiposity measures. A total of 4765 individuals were included in the study. On the basis of 50 obesity-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms that are associated with body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), or the waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (WHRBMI), the following 4 genetic predisposition scores (GRSs) were constructed: a complete genetic predisposition score including all 50 single nucleotide polymorphisms (GRSComplete), a genetic predisposition score including BMI-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (GRSBMI), a genetic predisposition score including waist circumference-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (GRSWC), and a genetic predisposition score including the waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (GRSWHR). Associations between soft drink intake and the annual change (Δ) in body weight (BW), WC, or waist circumference adjusted for BMI (WCBMI) and possible interactions with the GRSs were examined with the use of linear regression analyses and meta-analyses. For each soft drink serving per day, soft drink consumption was significantly associated with a higher ΔBW of 0.07 kg/y (95% CI: 0.01, 0.13 kg/y; P = 0.020) but not with the ΔWC or ΔWCBMI In analyses of the ΔBW, we showed an interaction only with the GRSWC (per risk allele for each soft drink serving per day: -0.06 kg/y; 95% CI: -0.10, -0.02 kg/y; P = 0.006). In analyses of the ΔWC, we showed interactions only with the GRSBMI and GRSComplete [per risk allele for each soft drink serving per day: 0.05 cm/y (95% CI: 0.02, 0.09 cm/y; P = 0.001) and 0.05 cm/y (95% CI: 0.02, 0.07 cm

  16. Genetic variants associated with drugs-induced immediate hypersensitivity reactions: a PRISMA-compliant systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oussalah, A.; Mayorga, C.; Blanca, M.; Barbaud, A.; Nakonechna, A.; Cernadas, J.; Gotua, M.; Brockow, K.; Caubet, J.-C.; Bircher, A.; Atanaskovic, M.; Demoly, P.; K Tanno, L.; Terreehorst, I.; Laguna, J. J.; Romano, A.; Guéant, J.-L.

    2016-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity includes allergic (AR) and nonallergic reactions (NARs) influenced by genetic predisposition. We performed a systematic review of genetic predictors of IgE-mediated AR and NAR with MEDLINE and PubMed search engine between January 1966 and December 2014. Among 3110 citations,

  17. J. Genet. classic 227 NOTE: The pagination in the original included ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    , December 2005. 227. NOTE: The pagination in the original included the reverse of plate 1 on p. 445, which was a blank. The blank is not included here, but the original page numbers have been retained.

  18. The Influence of Familial Predisposition to Cardiovascular Complications upon Childhood Obesity Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Louise A; Bøjsøe, Christine; Kloppenborg, Julie T

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim was to investigate whether a familial predisposition to obesity related cardiovascular complications was associated with the degree of obesity at baseline and/or changes in the degree of obesity during a multidisciplinary childhood obesity treatment program. METHODS: The study......) calculated, and self-reported information on familial predisposition to obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), thromboembolic events, and dyslipidaemia were obtained. A familial predisposition included events in biological parents, siblings, grandparents, uncles, and aunts. The treatment...... outcomes were categorically analysed according to the prevalence of familial predispositions. RESULTS: The median BMI SDS at enrollment was 3.2 in boys and 2.8 in girls. One-thousand-and-forty-one children had obesity in their family, 773 had hypertension, 551 had T2DM, 568 had thromboembolic events...

  19. THE ROLES OF INDUSTRY AND SCIENCE, INCLUDING GENETIC SELECTION, IN IMPROVING ANIMAL WELFARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.M. BROOM

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Animal producers have to predict future situations and be aware of changing public views. At present, those in the animal industry are often trying to fight off change rather than preparing for and pre-empting it. As a consequence, many animal producers have bad public images. It is better to be proactive than reactive. Producer groups should be aware of new developments in knowledge and in public attitudes to animal-related activities. They should inform their members about how to manage animals in such a way that the welfare of the animals is good and the people involved in animal care are well-respected in society. This is especially important also for those who design and manufacture housing and equipment and those who breed animals for they can have substantial effects on animal welfare. It is important for animal welfare scientists to provide objective information about the welfare of animals, so that decisions can be taken about how animals should be bred, housed and treated. Animals use a wide range of coping mechanisms and these involve high-level brain function, with associated good and bad feelings. Where welfare is poor, the best overall assessment of welfare is a function of how bad is the effect on the individual and the duration of that effect. Conventional breeding, cloning and transgenesis can all have effects on the welfare of the animals produced. Selection for fast growth and high feed conversion efficiency in broiler chickens and other meat producing animals leads to too high an incidence of leg and other disorders. Selection for high milk yield in dairy cows leads to poor welfare associated with leg disorders, mastitis and reproductive disorders. These effects should be evaluated using a range of animal welfare measures and if there are adverse effects of genetic engineering, the usage of the animals should not be permitted except for research. In the case of genetically modified or cloned animals, any effects on function

  20. Genetic or Psychogenic? A Case Study of “Folie à Quatre” Including Twins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Ohnuma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shared psychotic disorder, characterized by shared delusion among two or more subjects (termed “Folie à deux,” “trois,” etc., is often associated with strong religious beliefs or social isolation, factors creating strong psychological sympathy. Recently, we treated a rare familial case of “Folie à quatre” in central Tokyo without such influences. The proband was a schizophrenia patient and younger brother within monozygotic twins. Positive symptoms were “transmitted” to remaining family members, his elder brother, mother, and father father, in a relatively short period of three months. Although the pathophysiology of these positive symptoms (delusions and hallucinations remains unclear, the transmission pattern suggests the primacy of social and environmental factors (and/or their interaction, while genetics appeared less influential in this “Folie à famille.” Although undiagnosed psychoses in the whole family cannot be excluded, they did not share the other negative schizophrenia symptoms of the proband. A strong familial connection appeared to be the most important factor for the common delusion and hallucination.

  1. Genetic testing including targeted gene panel in a diverse clinical population of children with autism spectrum disorder: Findings and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsner, Louisa; Twachtman-Bassett, Jennifer; Tokarski, Kristin; Stanley, Christine; Dumont-Mathieu, Thyde; Cotney, Justin; Chamberlain, Stormy

    2017-12-21

    Genetic testing of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is now standard in the clinical setting, with American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMGG) guidelines recommending microarray for all children, fragile X testing for boys and additional gene sequencing, including PTEN and MECP2, in appropriate patients. Increasingly, testing utilizing high throughput sequencing, including gene panels and whole exome sequencing, are offered as well. We performed genetic testing including microarray, fragile X testing and targeted gene panel, consistently sequencing 161 genes associated with ASD risk, in a clinical population of 100 well characterized children with ASD. Frequency of rare variants identified in individual genes was compared with that reported in the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) database. We did not diagnose any conditions with complete penetrance for ASD; however, copy number variants believed to contribute to ASD risk were identified in 12%. Eleven children were found to have likely pathogenic variants on gene panel, yet, after careful analysis, none was considered likely causative of disease. KIRREL3 variants were identified in 6.7% of children compared to 2% in ExAC, suggesting a potential role for KIRREL3 variants in ASD risk. Children with KIRREL3 variants more often had minor facial dysmorphism and intellectual disability. We also observed an increase in rare variants in TSC2. However, analysis of variant data from the Simons Simplex Collection indicated that rare variants in TSC2 occur more commonly in specific racial/ethnic groups, which are more prevalent in our population than in the ExAC database. The yield of genetic testing including microarray, fragile X (boys) and targeted gene panel was 12%. Gene panel did not increase diagnostic yield; however, we found an increase in rare variants in KIRREL3. Our findings reinforce the need for racial/ethnic diversity in large-scale genomic databases used to identify variants that

  2. Verification of the model of predisposition in triathlon – structural model of confirmative factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Kovářová

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The triathlon is a combination of three different types of sport – swimming, cycling, and running. Each of these requires different top level predispositions and complex approach to talent selection is a rather difficult process. Attempts to identify assumptions in the triathlon have so far been specific and focused only on some groups of predispositions (physiology, motor tests, and psychology. The latest studies missed the structural approach and were based on determinants of sport performance, theory of sports training and expert assessment. OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study was to verify the model of predisposition in the short triathlon for talent assessment of young male athletes age 17–20 years. METHODS: The research sample consisted of 55 top level triathletes – men, who were included in the Government supported sports talent programme in the Czech Republic at the age of 17–20 years. We used a confirmative factor analysis (FA and Path diagram to verify the model, which allow us to explain mutual relationships among observed variables. For statistical data processing we used a structure equating modeling (SEM by software Lisrel L88. RESULTS: The study confirms best structural model for talent selection in triathlon at the age of 17–20 years old men, which composed seventeen indicators (tests and explained 91% of all cross-correlations (Goodness of Fit Index /GFI/ 0.91, Root Mean Square Residual /RMSR/ 0.13. Tests for predispositions in triathlons were grouped into five items, three motor predispositions (swimming, cycling and running skills, aerobic and psychological predispositions. Aerobic predispositions showed the highest importance to the assumptions to the general factor (1.00; 0. Running predispositions were measured as a very significant factor (–0.85; 0.28 which confirms importance of this critical stage of the race. Lower factor weight showed clusters of swimming (–0.61; 0.63 and cycling (0.53; 0

  3. Familial Predisposition for Salivary Gland Cancer in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katri Aro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Salivary gland cancer (SGC accounts for 3–5% of head and neck malignancies, and register-based studies estimate the familial proportion to be 0.15%. Objective We studied familial predisposition for SGC in the genetically distinct Finnish population. Patients and Methods We sent a patient questionnaire to 161 Finnish SGC patients, 86 of whom responded. Results A total of 76% of the patients reported having one or more relatives with cancer, 30% two or more, and 9% three or more but only one patient reported having a relative with SGC. Tracing the birthplaces of the SGC patients’ grandparents showed no regional clustering suggestive of a founder effect. Conclusions Lack of familial SGC patients and the absence of a founder effect strongly suggest that familial predisposition for SGC is insignificant in the Finnish population. Various histological subtypes and the rarity of these neoplasms make it impossible to draw conclusions about site-specific association between SGC and other malignancies.

  4. Validation of a clinical screening instrument for tumour predisposition syndromes in patients with childhood cancer (TuPS) : Protocol for a prospective, observational, multicentre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Floor A M; Hopman, Saskia M J; De Borgie, Corianne A J M; Hammond, Peter; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Merks, Johannes H M; Aalfs, Cora M.; Anninga, Jakob K.; Berger, Lieke P V; Bleeker, Fonnet E.; De Bont, Eveline S J M; Dommering, Charlotte J.; Van Eijkelenburg, Natasha K A; Van Den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Jongmans, Marjolijn C J; Kors, Wijnanda A.; Letteboer, Tom G W; Loeffen, Jan L C M; Olderode-Berends, Maran J W; Wagner, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Recognising a tumour predisposition syndrome (TPS) in patients with childhood cancer is of significant clinical relevance, as it affects treatment, prognosis and facilitates genetic counselling. Previous studies revealed that only half of the known TPSs are recognised during standard

  5. Ovine Reference Materials and Assays for Prion Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Genetic predisposition to scrapie in sheep is associated with variation in the peptide sequence of the ovine prion protein encoded by Prnp. Codon variants implicated in scrapie susceptibility or disease progression include those at amino acid positions 112, 136, 141, 154, and 171. Nin...

  6. Objectively Measured Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and Genetic Predisposition to Obesity in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jee-Young; Wang, Tao; Sofer, Tamar; North, Kari E; Isasi, Carmen R; Cai, Jianwen; Gellman, Marc D; Moncrieft, Ashley E; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Argos, Maria; Kaplan, Robert C; Qi, Qibin

    2017-12-01

    Studies using self-reported data suggest a gene-physical activity interaction on obesity, yet the influence of sedentary behavior, distinct from a lack of physical activity, on genetic associations with obesity remains unclear. We analyzed interactions of accelerometer-measured moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and time spent sedentary with genetic variants on obesity among 9,645 U.S. Hispanics/Latinos. An overall genetic risk score (GRS), a central nervous system (CNS)-related GRS, and a non-CNS-related GRS were calculated based on 97 BMI-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Genetic association with BMI was stronger in individuals with lower MVPA (first tertile) versus higher MVPA (third tertile) (β = 0.78 kg/m 2 [SE, 0.10 kg/m 2 ] vs. 0.39 kg/m 2 [0.09 kg/m 2 ] per SD increment of GRS; P interaction = 0.005), and in those with more time spent sedentary (third tertile) versus less time spent sedentary (first tertile) (β = 0.73 kg/m 2 [SE, 0.10 kg/m 2 ] vs. 0.44 kg/m 2 [0.09 kg/m 2 ]; P interaction = 0.006). Similar significant interaction patterns were observed for obesity risk, body fat mass, fat percentage, fat mass index, and waist circumference, but not for fat-free mass. The CNS-related GRS, but not the non-CNS-related GRS, showed significant interactions with MVPA and sedentary behavior, with effects on BMI and other adiposity traits. Our data suggest that both increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary behavior may attenuate genetic associations with obesity, although the independence of these interaction effects needs to be investigated further. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  7. Methylation of Breast Cancer Predisposition Genes in Early-Onset Breast Cancer: Australian Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron M Scott

    Full Text Available DNA methylation can mimic the effects of both germline and somatic mutations for cancer predisposition genes such as BRCA1 and p16INK4a. Constitutional DNA methylation of the BRCA1 promoter has been well described and is associated with an increased risk of early-onset breast cancers that have BRCA1-mutation associated histological features. The role of methylation in the context of other breast cancer predisposition genes has been less well studied and often with conflicting or ambiguous outcomes. We examined the role of methylation in known breast cancer susceptibility genes in breast cancer predisposition and tumor development. We applied the Infinium HumanMethylation450 Beadchip (HM450K array to blood and tumor-derived DNA from 43 women diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 40 years and measured the methylation profiles across promoter regions of BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, PALB2, CDH1, TP53, FANCM, CHEK2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Prior genetic testing had demonstrated that these women did not carry a germline mutation in BRCA1, ATM, CHEK2, PALB2, TP53, BRCA2, CDH1 or FANCM. In addition to the BRCA1 promoter region, this work identified regions with variable methylation at multiple breast cancer susceptibility genes including PALB2 and MLH1. Methylation at the region of MLH1 in these breast cancers was not associated with microsatellite instability. This work informs future studies of the role of methylation in breast cancer susceptibility gene silencing.

  8. Contribution of germline mutations in cancer predisposition genes to tumor etiology in young women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Seth K; Lovejoy, Leann; Shriver, Craig D; Ellsworth, Rachel E

    2017-08-01

    Although breast cancer in young women accounts for cancer predisposition genes is needed to improve the understanding of breast cancer etiology in young women. All female patients enrolled in the Clinical Breast Cancer Project between 2001 and 2015 and diagnosed with invasive breast cancer before age 40 were included in this study. Family history was classified using the NCCN Familial Risk Assessment guidelines. Targeted sequencing of 94 cancer predisposition genes was performed using peripheral blood DNA. Variants were detected using VariantStudio and classified using ClinVar. Seven percent (141/1980) of patients were young women and 44 had a significant family history. Sequencing was completed for 118 women with genomic DNA. Pathogenic mutations were present in 27 patients: BRCA1 (n = 10), BRCA2 (n = 12), TP53 (n = 1), and CHEK2 (n = 4). Mutations classified as pathogenic were also detected in APC (n = 1) and MUTYH (n = 2). Variants of uncertain significance (VUS) were detected in an additional 17 patients in ten genes. Pathogenic mutations in high- and moderate-risk breast cancer genes were detected in 23% of young women with an additional 3% having pathogenic mutations in colon cancer predisposition genes. VUS were observed in 14% of women in genes such as ATM, BRCA2, CDH1, CHEK2, and PALB2. Identification of those non-genetic factors is critical to reduce the burden of breast cancer in this population.

  9. Methylation of Breast Cancer Predisposition Genes in Early-Onset Breast Cancer: Australian Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Cameron M; Joo, JiHoon Eric; O'Callaghan, Neil; Buchanan, Daniel D; Clendenning, Mark; Giles, Graham G; Hopper, John L; Wong, Ee Ming; Southey, Melissa C

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation can mimic the effects of both germline and somatic mutations for cancer predisposition genes such as BRCA1 and p16INK4a. Constitutional DNA methylation of the BRCA1 promoter has been well described and is associated with an increased risk of early-onset breast cancers that have BRCA1-mutation associated histological features. The role of methylation in the context of other breast cancer predisposition genes has been less well studied and often with conflicting or ambiguous outcomes. We examined the role of methylation in known breast cancer susceptibility genes in breast cancer predisposition and tumor development. We applied the Infinium HumanMethylation450 Beadchip (HM450K) array to blood and tumor-derived DNA from 43 women diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 40 years and measured the methylation profiles across promoter regions of BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, PALB2, CDH1, TP53, FANCM, CHEK2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Prior genetic testing had demonstrated that these women did not carry a germline mutation in BRCA1, ATM, CHEK2, PALB2, TP53, BRCA2, CDH1 or FANCM. In addition to the BRCA1 promoter region, this work identified regions with variable methylation at multiple breast cancer susceptibility genes including PALB2 and MLH1. Methylation at the region of MLH1 in these breast cancers was not associated with microsatellite instability. This work informs future studies of the role of methylation in breast cancer susceptibility gene silencing.

  10. Effect of including genetic Progress in milk yield on evaluating the use of sexed semen and other reproduction strategies in a dairy herd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettema, Jehan F.; Østergaard, Søren; Sørensen, Morten Kargo

    2011-01-01

    of a dairy herd including young stock. A daily increasing trend describing genetic milk yield potential of the sire population was included in the model. The inaccuracy of assuming that replacement heifers have the same (milk yield) potential as the cows present in the herd was hereby dealt with. Improving...... on the superior half of all heifers reduced GM by €8 per cow-year when genetic progress was not included and increased the GM by €16 per cow-year when genetic progress was included in the model. Including genetic progress reduced the losses caused by lower conception and estrus detection rates and had a minimal...

  11. Improvement in genetic evaluation of female fertility in dairy cattle using multiple-trait models including milk production traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, C; Madsen, P; Lund, M S

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the improvement in genetic evaluation of fertility traits by using production traits as secondary traits (MILK = 305-d milk yield, FAT = 305-d fat yield, and PROT = 305-d protein yield). Data including 471,742 records from first lactations of Denmark Holstein cows, covering...... (DATAC1, which only contained the first crop daughters) for proven bulls. In addition, the superiority of the models was evaluated by expected reliability of EBV, calculated from the prediction error variance of EBV. Based on these criteria, the models combining milk production traits showed better model...... stability and predictive ability than single-trait models for all the fertility traits, except for nonreturn rate within 56 d after first service. The stability and predictive ability for the model including MILK or PROT were similar to the model including all 3 milk production traits and better than...

  12. Predisposición genética para el cáncer de mama: genes BRCA1 y BRCA2 Genetic predisposition for breast cancer: BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A Narod

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available El descubrimiento de los genes BRCA1 y BRCA2 ha llevado a la introducción de pruebas genéticas cada vez más sofisticadas para medir el riesgo de cáncer de mama de origen hereditario, entre otras cosas. En el presente artículo exploramos los criterios a seguir para realizar pruebas para estos genes, así como las implicaciones en el tratamiento para los pacientes en caso de identificarlos.The discovery of genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 has led to the introduction of genetic tests more complex every time for the evaluation ofthehereditarycancerrisk,amongothers.In the present paper we explore the criteria to decide when to run the testing for the genes, as well as the implications for the treatment of patients who are identified with them.

  13. Le diabete de type 1: de la predisposition genetique a un contexte environnemental hypothetique.

    OpenAIRE

    Phlips, J.-C.; Radermecker, Régis

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results in a progressive (complete in most cases) destruction of insulin-secreting beta cells from Langerhans islets. Even if the autoimmune process becomes to be well known, no one is yet sure what specifically prompts the autoimmune response that destroys the body's ability to produce insulin. Etiology of this complex disease combines a genetic predisposition and still (almost) unknown environmental factors that trigger autoimmuninty specificall...

  14. Xq28 duplication including MECP2 in six unreported affected females: what can we learn for diagnosis and genetic counselling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Chehadeh, S; Touraine, R; Prieur, F; Reardon, W; Bienvenu, T; Chantot-Bastaraud, S; Doco-Fenzy, M; Landais, E; Philippe, C; Marle, N; Callier, P; Mosca-Boidron, A-L; Mugneret, F; Le Meur, N; Goldenberg, A; Guerrot, A-M; Chambon, P; Satre, V; Coutton, C; Jouk, P-S; Devillard, F; Dieterich, K; Afenjar, A; Burglen, L; Moutard, M-L; Addor, M-C; Lebon, S; Martinet, D; Alessandri, J-L; Doray, B; Miguet, M; Devys, D; Saugier-Veber, P; Drunat, S; Aral, B; Kremer, V; Rondeau, S; Tabet, A-C; Thevenon, J; Thauvin-Robinet, C; Perreton, N; Des Portes, V; Faivre, L

    2017-04-01

    Duplication of the Xq28 region, involving MECP2 (dupMECP2), has been primarily described in males with severe developmental delay, spasticity, epilepsy, stereotyped movements and recurrent infections. Carrier mothers are usually asymptomatic with an extremely skewed X chromosome inactivation (XCI) pattern. We report a series of six novel symptomatic females carrying a de novo interstitial dupMECP2, and review the 14 symptomatic females reported to date, with the aim to further delineate their phenotype and give clues for genetic counselling. One patient was adopted and among the other 19 patients, seven (37%) had inherited their duplication from their mother, including three mildly (XCI: 70/30, 63/37, 100/0 in blood and random in saliva), one moderately (XCI: random) and three severely (XCI: uninformative and 88/12) affected patients. After combining our data with data from the literature, we could not show a correlation between XCI in the blood or duplication size and the severity of the phenotype, or explain the presence of a phenotype in these females. These findings confirm that an abnormal phenotype, even severe, can be a rare event in females born to asymptomatic carrier mothers, making genetic counselling difficult in couples at risk in terms of prognosis, in particular in prenatal cases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Chromosomal radiosensitivity, cancer predisposition and response to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, D.

    2000-01-01

    Aim: This paper briefly summarizes the research on this topic, undertaken in the Department of Cancer Genetics, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester, England, over the previous 6 years. We have investigated the possible role of radiosensitivity as a marker of cancer predisposition and response to radiotherapy in the general population. Results: We found that 42% (57/135) of breast cancer patients exhibit chromosomal radiosensitivity when lymphocytes are irradiated in the G 2 phase of the cell cycle, compared with 6% (6/105) of healthy controls. These figures are much higher than the estimated frequencies of carriers of the ataxia-telangiectasia gene (heterozygotes) amongst breast cancer patients ( 2 sensitivity by studying relatives of breast cancer cases. The pattern of inheritance is relatively simple and attributable to 1 or 2 genes segregating in each family. In a prospective study of 123 breast cancer patients, 9 (7%) had severe acute reactions to radiotherapy and their mean G 2 sensitivity was significantly greater (p=0.001) than that of the remaining patients. In 16 patients with adverse acute reactions we found no mutations of the ataxia-telangiectasia gene (ATM). Using another chromosomal assay (micronucleus induction in G 0 lymphocytes) we found that the mean radiosensitivity of patients with severe late reactions was higher than that of normal reactors. For example, 8 patients with severe fibrosis were more sensitive (p=0.055) than 39 patients with a normal response. However, the discriminatory power of these chromosomal assays is too low for them to be used alone in a clinical setting. Conclusion: Our results provide good evidence that genes other than ATM, that confer chromosomal radiosensitivity, are involved in low penetrance predisposition to breast cancer in a high proportion of cases and contribute to adverse reactions after radiotherapy. (orig.) [de

  16. Age-dependent Mendelian predisposition to herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Laurent; Plancoulaine, Sabine; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Mahfoufi, Nora; Nicolas, Nathalie; Sancho-Shimizu, Vanessa; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Guo, Yiqi; Cardon, Annabelle; Boucherit, Soraya; Obach, Dorothée; Clozel, Thomas; Lorenzo, Lazaro; Amsallem, Daniel; Berquin, Patrick; Blanc, Thierry; Bost-Bru, Cécile; Chabrier, Stéphane; Chabrol, Brigitte; Cheuret, Emmanuel; Dulac, Olivier; Evrard, Philippe; Héron, Bénédicte; Lazaro, Leila; Mancini, Josette; Pedespan, Jean-Michel; Rivier, François; Vallée, Louis; Lebon, Pierre; Rozenberg, Flore; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Tardieu, Marc

    2010-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that predisposition to childhood herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 encephalitis (HSE) may be determined in part by human genetic factors. A genetic epidemiologic survey of childhood HSE (onset at age 3 months to 15 years) over a 20-year period (1985-2004) was conducted throughout France (comprising 29 university hospital neuropediatric centers). A total of 85 children fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for inclusion. Family and personal histories were obtained by face-to-face interview for 51 patients. No familial cases of HSE were identified in our survey; however, a high proportion (20%) of the children interviewed had a relevant family history: parental consanguinity (12% of patients), early-onset herpetic keratitis in a first-degree relative (6%), or both (2%). The narrow window of high susceptibility to HSE before age 3 years (62% of patients) further indicates that predisposition to HSE is tightly age-dependent. This survey suggests that childhood HSE, although sporadic, may result from Mendelian predisposition (from autosomal recessive susceptibility in particular), at least in some children. There likely is incomplete penetrance, however, which may reflect, at least in part, the impact of age at the time of HSV-1 infection. Copyright (c) 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic Susceptibility to Prostate Cancer in the Netherlands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ostrer, Harry

    2004-01-01

    Studies of the genetics of populations that were historically endogamous for reasons of geography, religion, or language have contributed substantially to our understanding about hereditary predisposition to cancer...

  18. Genetic Susceptibility to Prostate Cancer in the Netherlands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ostrer, Harry

    2001-01-01

    Studies of the genetics of populations that were historically endogamous for reasons of geography, religion, or language have contributed substantially to our understanding about hereditary predisposition to cancer...

  19. Genetic Susceptibility to Prostate Cancer in the Netherlands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ostrer, Harry

    2002-01-01

    Studies of the genetics of populations that were historically endogamous for reasons of geography, religion, or language have contributed substantially to our understanding about hereditary predisposition to cancer...

  20. Genetic Susceptibility to Prostate Cancer in the Netherlands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ostrer, Harry

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the genetics of populations that were historically endogamous for reasons of geography, religion, or language have contributed substantially to our understanding about hereditary predisposition to cancer...

  1. Study of some genetic predisposition in pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehan Elassal

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: Gene mutation especially factor V Leiden mutation is very important to be considered in young patients presented with venous thrombo-embolism, patients with thrombosis in unusual sites or patients with recurrent thrombo-embolic manifestations.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: BAP1 tumor predisposition syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center: Uveal Melanoma (Eye Cancer) Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (4 links) American Cancer Society Melanoma Research Foundation Ocular Melanoma Foundation Skin Cancer Foundation ...

  3. Genetic predisposition to schizophrenia associated with increased use of cannabis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Power, R.A.; Verweij, K.J.H.; Zuhair, M.; Montgomery, G.W.; Henders, A.K.; Heath, A.C.; Madden, P.A.F.; Medland, S.E.; Wray, N.R.; Martin, N.G.

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly used illicit drug worldwide. With debate surrounding the legalization and control of use, investigating its health risks has become a pressing area of research. One established association is that between cannabis use and schizophrenia, a debilitating psychiatric

  4. Genetic predisposition to schizophrenia associated with increased use of cannabis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Power, R.A.; Verweij, C.J.H.; Zuhair, M.; Montgomery, G.W.; Henders, A.K.; Heath, A.C.; Madden, P.A.F.; Medland, S.E.; Wray, N.R.; Martin, N.G.

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly used illicit drug worldwide. With debate surrounding the legalization and control of use, investigating its health risks has become a pressing area of research. One established association is that between cannabis use and schizophrenia, a debilitating psychiatric

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Denys-Drash syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Diagnosis & Management Resources Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Drash syndrome Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (2 links) GeneReview: Wilms Tumor Predisposition MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Nephrotic Syndrome General Information from MedlinePlus ( ...

  6. [Issues on business of genetic testing in near future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Fumio

    2009-06-01

    Since 1990's, a business condition that company sells genetic testing services directly to consumers without through medical facility, so called "direct-to-consumers (DTC) genetic testing", has risen. They provide genetic testing for obesity, disease susceptibility or paternity, etc. There are serious problems in this kind of business. Most of the providers do not make sales with face-to-face selling, and do through internet instead. They do not provide genetic counseling by certified genetic counselor or clinical geneticist. Most DTC genetic testing services for disease susceptibility or predispositions including obesity, lack scientific validity, clinical validity and clinical utility. And also including paternity genetic testing, they all have risks of ethical legal and social issues (ELSI) in genetic discrimination and/or eugenics. The specific problem in Japan is that the healthcare section of the government still has not paid attention and not taken seriously the requirement to deploy safety net.

  7. Single nucleotide polymorphism rs1800872 in the promoter region of the IL10 gene is associated with predisposition to chronic hepatitis C in Russian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhash, Andrey V; Kochneva, Galina V; Chub, Elena V; Romaschenko, Aida G

    2018-03-01

    Previously, we studied an association of two IL28B gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and three IL10 gene SNPs with predisposition to tick-borne encephalitis in a Russian population. In this study, a possible involvement of these SNPs in the development of predisposition to chronic hepatitis C (caused by structurally similar, related virus from the Flaviviridae family) was investigated in the same population. Only the IL10 promoter rs1800872 SNP was associated with predisposition to chronic hepatitis C. This SNP seems to be a common genetic marker of predisposition to two diseases caused by hepatitis C and tick-borne encephalitis viruses in Russian population. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Individual differences in plasma ALT, AST and GGT: contributions of genetic and environmental factors, including alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, J B; Martin, N G

    1985-01-01

    The causes of individuality of the plasma enzymes alanine aminotransferase (ALT; EC 2.6.1.2), aspartate aminotransferase (AST; EC 2.6.1.1) and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT; EC 2.3.2.2) were investigated in a study of 206 pairs of twins. Between-person variance was greater in men than women, while within-person variation was similar in both sexes. Plasma ALT and AST levels were affected by genetic factors, while GGT was affected by some environmental factor shared by co-twins. In the men, alcohol intake had a significant but small effect on all three enzyme levels, and since alcohol consumption was highly heritable, this appeared as a genetic influence on enzyme activities. The major factors involved in the observed correlations between these enzymes were a non-shared environmental factor other than alcohol affecting ALT, AST and GGT, and a genetic factor affecting only ALT and AST.

  9. Female alcoholism: Gender differences as victimogenic predispositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinović-Vilić Slobodanka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject matter of this paper is an analysis of stereotypical social reactions to women’s alcoholism in the micro and macro social and cultural environment. The social stigma and blame that female alcohol abusers are exposed to have become part of deeply rooted gender-related labels. In a broader social context, they lead to discrimination and social exclusion. In the contemporary society, female alcoholism is turning into a growing social and health problem and because of that it is essential to make the social environment more sensitive to the issue of female alcoholism in order to eliminate the causes of female alcoholism and fully support women’s medical treatment,. It would have a preventive effect in suppressing female alcoholism and it would significantly reduce victimization of women who are, in such circumstances, much more vulnerable and exposed to physical and sexual violence. The aim of this paper is to point out to the basic phenomenological and etiological feature of female alcoholism, prejudices and stereotypical attitudes they are exposed to, social and cultural implications of female alcoholism, which is perceived as a predisposition for women’s victimization and exposure to violence, so as to promote a different social approach to female alcoholism and advocate for instituting social and educational policy based on the concept of gender equality and support of social control measures.

  10. Mosaic PPM1D mutations are associated with predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruark, Elise; Snape, Katie; Humburg, Peter; Loveday, Chey; Bajrami, Ilirjana; Brough, Rachel; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Ramsay, Emma; Duarte, Silvana Del Vecchio; Rivas, Manuel A; Warren-Perry, Margaret; Zachariou, Anna; Campion-Flora, Adriana; Hanks, Sandra; Murray, Anne; Ansari Pour, Naser; Douglas, Jenny; Gregory, Lorna; Rimmer, Andrew; Walker, Neil M; Yang, Tsun-Po; Adlard, Julian W; Barwell, Julian; Berg, Jonathan; Brady, Angela F; Brewer, Carole; Brice, Glen; Chapman, Cyril; Cook, Jackie; Davidson, Rosemarie; Donaldson, Alan; Douglas, Fiona; Eccles, Diana; Evans, D Gareth; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Henderson, Alex; Izatt, Louise; Kumar, Ajith; Lalloo, Fiona; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick J; Paterson, Joan; Porteous, Mary; Rogers, Mark T; Shanley, Susan; Walker, Lisa; Gore, Martin; Houlston, Richard; Brown, Matthew A; Caufield, Mark J; Deloukas, Panagiotis; McCarthy, Mark I; Todd, John A; Turnbull, Clare; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Ashworth, Alan; Antoniou, Antonis C; Lord, Christopher J; Donnelly, Peter; Rahman, Nazneen

    2013-01-17

    Improved sequencing technologies offer unprecedented opportunities for investigating the role of rare genetic variation in common disease. However, there are considerable challenges with respect to study design, data analysis and replication. Using pooled next-generation sequencing of 507 genes implicated in the repair of DNA in 1,150 samples, an analytical strategy focused on protein-truncating variants (PTVs) and a large-scale sequencing case-control replication experiment in 13,642 individuals, here we show that rare PTVs in the p53-inducible protein phosphatase PPM1D are associated with predisposition to breast cancer and ovarian cancer. PPM1D PTV mutations were present in 25 out of 7,781 cases versus 1 out of 5,861 controls (P = 1.12 × 10(-5)), including 18 mutations in 6,912 individuals with breast cancer (P = 2.42 × 10(-4)) and 12 mutations in 1,121 individuals with ovarian cancer (P = 3.10 × 10(-9)). Notably, all of the identified PPM1D PTVs were mosaic in lymphocyte DNA and clustered within a 370-base-pair region in the final exon of the gene, carboxy-terminal to the phosphatase catalytic domain. Functional studies demonstrate that the mutations result in enhanced suppression of p53 in response to ionizing radiation exposure, suggesting that the mutant alleles encode hyperactive PPM1D isoforms. Thus, although the mutations cause premature protein truncation, they do not result in the simple loss-of-function effect typically associated with this class of variant, but instead probably have a gain-of-function effect. Our results have implications for the detection and management of breast and ovarian cancer risk. More generally, these data provide new insights into the role of rare and of mosaic genetic variants in common conditions, and the use of sequencing in their identification.

  11. Sex-stratified Genome-wide Association Studies Including 270000 Individuals Show Sexual Dimorphism in Genetic Loci for Anthropometric Traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Randall, J.C.; Winkler, T.W.; Kutalik, Z.; Berndt, S.I.; Jackson, A.U.; Monda, K.L.; Kilpeläinen, T.O.; Esko, T.; Mägi, R.; Li, S.; Workalemahu, T.; Feitosa, M.F.; Croteau-Chonka, D.C.; Day, F.R.; Fall, T.; Ferreira, T.; Gustafsson, S.; Locke, A.E.; Mathieson, I.; Scherag, A.; Vedantam, S.; Wood, A.R.; Liang, L.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Thorleifsson, G.; Dermitzakis, E.T.; Dimas, A.S.; Karpe, F.; Min, J.L.; Nicholson, G.; Clegg, D.J.; Person, T.; Krohn, J.P.; Bauer, S.; Buechler, C.; Eisinger, K.; Bonnefond, A.; Froguel, P.; Hottenga, J.J.; Prokopenko, I.; Waite, L.L.; Harris, T.B.; Smith, A.V.; Shuldiner, A.R.; McArdle, W.L.; Caulfield, M.J.; Munroe, P.B.; Grönberg, H.; Chen, Y.D.; Li, G.; Beckmann, J.S.; Johnson, T.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Teder-Laving, M.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.J.; Zhao, J.H.; Amin, N.; Oostra, B.A.; Kraja, A.T.; Province, M.A.; Cupples, L.A.; Heard-Costa, N.L.; Kaprio, J.; Ripatti, S.; Surakka, I.; Collins, F.S.; Saramies, J.; Tuomilehto, J.; Jula, A.; Salomaa, V.; Erdmann, J.; Hengstenberg, C.; Loley, C.; Schunkert, H.; Lamina, C.; Wichmann, H.E.; Albrecht, E.; Gieger, C.; Hicks, A.A.; Johansson, A.; Pramstaller, P.P.; Kathiresan, S.; Speliotes, E.K.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Hartikainen, A.L.; Järvelin, M.R.; Gyllensten, U.; Boomsma, D.I.; Campbell, H.; Wilson, J.F.; Chanock, S.J.; Farrall, M.; Goel, A.; Medina-Gomez, C.; Rivadeneira, F.; Estrada, K.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Hofman, A.; Zillikens, M.C.; den Heijer, M.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Maschio, A.; Hall, P.; Tyrer, J.; Teumer, A.; Völzke, H.; Kovacs, P.; Tönjes, A.; Mangino, M.; Spector, T.D.; Hayward, C.; Rudan, I.; Hall, A.S.; Samani, N.J.; Attwood, A.P.; Sambrook, J.G.; Hung, J.; Palmer, L.J.; Lokki, M.L.; Sinisalo, J.; Boucher, G.; Huikuri, H.V.; Lorentzon, M.; Ohlsson, C.; Eklund, N.; Eriksson, J.G.; Barlassina, C.; Rivolta, C.; Nolte, I.M.; Snieder, H.; van der Klauw, M.M.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Gejman, P.V.; Shi, J.; Jacobs, K.B.; Wang, Z.; Bakker, S.J.; Mateo Leach, I.; Navis, G.; van der Harst, P.; Martin, N.G.; Medland, S.E.; Montgomery, G.W.; Yang, J.; Chasman, D.I.; Ridker, P.M.; Rose, L.M.; Lehtimäki, T.; Raitakari, O.; Absher, D.; Iribarren, C.; Basart, H.; Hovingh, K.G.; Hyppönen, E.; Power, C.; Anderson, D.; Beilby, J.P.; Hui, J.; Jolley, J.; Sager, H.; Bornstein, S.R.; Schwarz, P.E.; Kristiansson, K.; Perola, M.; Lindström, J.; Swift, A.J.; Uusitupa, M.; Atalay, M.; Lakka, T.A.; Rauramaa, R.; Bolton, J.L.; Fowkes, G.; Fraser, R.M.; Price, J.F.; Fischer, K.; Krjuta Kov, K.; Metspalu, A.; Mihailov, E.; Langenberg, C.; Luan, J.; Ong, K.K.; Chines, P.S.; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemie, S.; Saaristo, T.E.; Edkins, S.; Franks, P.W.; Hallmans, G.; Shungin, D.; Morris, A.D.; Palmer, C.N.A.; Erbel, R.; Moebus, S.; Nöthen, M.M.; Pechlivanis, S.; Hveem, K.; Narisu, N.; Hamsten, A.; Humphries, S.E.; Strawbridge, R.J.; Tremoli, E.; Grallert, H.; Thorand, B.; Illig, T.; Koenig, W.; Müller-Nurasyid, M.; Peters, A.; Boehm, B.O.; Kleber, M.E.; März, W.; Winkelmann, B.R.; Kuusisto, J.; Laakso, M.; Arveiler, D.; Cesana, G.; Kuulasmaa, K.; Virtamo, J.; Yarnell, J.W.; Kuh, D; Wong, A.; Lind, L.; de Faire, U.; Gigante, B.; Magnusson, P.K.E.; Pedersen, N.L.; Dedoussis, G.; Dimitriou, M.; Kolovou, G.; Kanoni, S.; Stirrups, K.; Bonnycastle, L.L.; Njolstad, I.; Wilsgaard, T.; Ganna, A.; Rehnberg, E.; Hingorani, A.D.; Kivimaki, M.; Kumari, M.; Assimes, T.L.; Barroso, I.; Boehnke, M.; Borecki, I.B.; Deloukas, P.; Fox, C.S.; Frayling, T.M.; Groop, L.C.; Haritunians, T.; Hunter, D.; Ingelsson, E.; Kaplan, R.; Mohlke, K.L.; O'Connell, J.R.; Schlessinger, D.; Strachan, D.P.; Stefansson, K.; van Duijn, C.M.; Abecasis, G.R.; McCarthy, M.I.; Hirschhorn, J.N.; Qi, L.; Loos, R.J.; Lindgren, C.M.; North, K.E.; Heid, I.M.

    2013-01-01

    Given the anthropometric differences between men and women and previous evidence of sex-difference in genetic effects, we conducted a genome-wide search for sexually dimorphic associations with height, weight, body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, and waist-to-hip-ratio (133,723

  12. Effect of including genetic progress in milk yield on evaluating the use of sexed semen and other reproduction strategies in a dairy herd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettema, Jehan Frans; Østergaard, Søren; Sørensen, M K

    2010-01-01

    strategies based on the phenotypical states of the individual animals over a number of years. Typically, the genetic levels of replacement heifers in these models are not different from those of the culling candidates in the herd; continuous genetic improvement in the population is ignored. The importance...... of including genetic progress when evaluating reproductive strategies with simulation models has not been explored. Improved reproductive efficiency does allow a higher selection intensity of which cows to stay in the herd and give birth to own young stock....

  13. Evaluation of Patients and Families With Concern for Predispositions to Hematologic Malignancies Within the Hereditary Hematologic Malignancy Clinic (HHMC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNardo, Courtney D; Bannon, Sarah A; Routbort, Mark; Franklin, Anna; Mork, Maureen; Armanios, Mary; Mace, Emily M; Orange, Jordan S; Jeff-Eke, Meselle; Churpek, Jane E; Takahashi, Koichi; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Kornblau, Steve; Bertuch, Alison; Cheung, Hannah; Bhalla, Kapil; Futreal, Andrew; Godley, Lucy A; Patel, Keyur P

    2016-07-01

    Although multiple predispositions to hematologic malignancies exist, evaluations for hereditary cancer syndromes (HCS) are underperformed by most hematologist/oncologists. Criteria for initiating HCS evaluation are poorly defined, and results of genetic testing for hereditary hematologic malignancies have not been systematically reported. From April 2014 to August 2015, 67 patients were referred to the Hereditary Hematologic Malignancy Clinic (HHMC). Referral reasons included (1) bone marrow failure or myelodysplastic syndrome in patients ≤ 50 years, (2) evaluation for germ-line inheritance of identified RUNX1, GATA2, or CEBPA mutations on targeted next-generation sequencing panels, and (3) strong personal and/or family history of malignancy. Cultured skin fibroblasts were utilized for germ-line DNA in all patients with hematologic malignancy. Eight patients (12%) were clinically diagnosed with a HCS: 4 patients with RUNX1-related familial platelet disorder (FPD)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and 1 patient each with dyskeratosis congenita, Fanconi anemia, germ-line DDX41, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). Two patients with concern for FPD/AML and LFS, respectively, had RUNX1 and TP53 variants of unknown significance. Additionally, 4 patients with prior HCS diagnosis (1 LFS, 3 FPD/AML) were referred for further evaluation and surveillance. In this HHMC-referred hematologic malignancy cohort, HCS was confirmed in 12 patients (18%). HCS identification provides insight for improved and individualized treatment, as well as screening/surveillance opportunities for family members. The HHMC has facilitated HCS diagnosis; with increased clinical awareness of hematologic malignancy predisposition syndromes, more patients who may benefit from evaluation can be identified. Mutation panels intended for prognostication may provide increased clinical suspicion for germ-line testing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic diversity of the Ethiopian Grevy's zebra (Equus grevyi) populations that includes a unique population of the Alledeghi Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Fanuel; Rosenbom, Sonia; Khalatbari, Leili; Moehlman, Patricia D; Beja-Pereira, Albano; Bekele, Afework

    2016-01-01

    The endangered Grevy's Zebra (Equus grevyi) is confined to the Horn of Africa, specifically Ethiopia and Kenya. It is threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation due to human encroachment of historic range. Knowledge of population genetics is essential for the development of appropriate conservation actions and management. The focus of this study was to assess the heterogeneity and genetic distinctiveness of the two Grevy's zebra populations in Ethiopia. Non-invasive fecal samples (N = 120) were collected during 2009-2010 from Grevy's zebra populations in the Alledeghi Wildlife Reserve and the Sarite area, Ethiopia. Analyses of a 329 bp of the mtDNA control region of 47 sequences, revealed the existence of two unreported haplotypes in the northern population of Alledeghi, that were not shared with the southern population of Sarite. The Sarite population is contiguous with the Grevy's zebra population in Kenya. The nucleotide diversity levels found in both the populations are extremely low.

  15. Estimation of Genetic Variance Components Including Mutation and Epistasis using Bayesian Approach in a Selection Experiment on Body Weight in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widyas, Nuzul; Jensen, Just; Nielsen, Vivi Hunnicke

    selected downwards and three lines were kept as controls. Bayesian statistical methods are used to estimate the genetic variance components. Mixed model analysis is modified including mutation effect following the methods by Wray (1990). DIC was used to compare the model. Models including mutation effect...

  16. An overview of the role of prophylactic surgery in the management of individuals with a hereditary cancer predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oseni, Tawakalitu; Jatoi, Ismail

    2008-08-01

    Genetic testing for cancer susceptibility has been implemented widely in recent years, with the hope that it eventually will lead to a reduction in cancer-related mortality. Asymptomatic individuals who have a genetic predisposition for cancer can be identified, and many may benefit from early intervention. Not all of these individuals will develop cancer, however, and the penetrance varies among individuals with different mutations. Surveillance, chemoprevention, and prophylactic surgery are accepted options for managing individuals who have a genetic predisposition for cancer. Yet, there are no randomized prospective trials that have assessed the impact of these interventions specifically in mutation carriers. The decision to undergo prophylactic surgery therefore should be made after all other management options are considered, and the patient is informed of the potential risks and benefits of surgery. This article provides an overview of the role of prophylactic surgery for managing patients who have a genetic predisposition for cancer. It specifically discusses the potential role of surgery in preventing breast, colon, thyroid, and gastric cancers. Additionally, it discusses the types of prophylactic surgical procedures that are performed commonly, and their expanding role in cancer prevention.

  17. Localization of genes modulating the predisposition to schizophrenia: a revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Z. Lopes-Machado

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The genetics of schizophrenia or bipolar affective disorder has advanced greatly at the molecular level since the introduction of probes for the localization of specific genes. Research on gene candidates for susceptibility to schizophrenia can broadly be divided into two types, i.e., linkage studies, where a gene is found near a specific DNA marker on a specific chromosome, and association studies, when a condition is associated with a specific allele of a specific gene. This review covers a decade of publications in this area, from the 1988 works of Bassett et al. and Sherrington et al. on a gene localized on the long arm of chromosome 5 at the 5q11-13 loci, to the 1997 work of Lin et al. pointing to the 13q14.1-q32 loci of chromosome 13 and to the 1998 work of Wright et al. on an HLA DRB1 gene locus on chromosome 6 at 6p21-3. The most replicated loci were those in the long arm of chromosome 22 (22q12-q13.1 and on the short arm of chromosome 6 (6p24-22. In this critical review of the molecular genetic studies involved in the localization of genes which modulate the predisposition to schizophrenia the high variability in the results obtained by different workers suggests that multiple loci are involved in the predisposition to this illness.A genética da esquizofrenia (como também do distúrbio bipolar teve grande avanço a partir da descoberta, a nível de genética molecular, da técnica de localização de genes com uso de sondas de DNA (Botstein et al., 1980. Os estudos que procuram "genes candidatos" a exercerem algum papel na susceptibilidade à esquizofrenia são, basicamente, de dois tipos: de ligação ("linkage" e de associação. Quando, à luz da genética molecular, um gene é localizado próximo a um marcador de DNA específico no cromossomo, fala-se em estudo "de ligação". Por outro lado, quando a doença é associada a um alelo específico de um determinado gene, fala-se em estudo "de associação". Esta revisão cobriu uma d

  18. Genetic and environmental interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong, L.C.

    1977-01-01

    Cancer may result from a multistage process occurring over a long period of time. Presumably, initial and progressive stages of carcinogenesis may be modified by both genetic and environmental factors. Theoretically, genetic factors may alter susceptibility to the carcinogenic effects of an environmental agent at the initial exposure due to variation in metabolism of the carcinogen or variation in specific target cell response to the active carcinogen, or during the latent phase due to numerous factors that might increase the probability of tumor expression, including growth-promoting factors or immunodeficiency states. Observed genetic and environmental interactions in carcinogenesis include an association between genetically determined inducibility of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase and smoking-related cancers, familial susceptibility to certain environmental carcinogens, an association between hereditary disorders of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, and enhancement of tissue-specific, dominantly inherited tumor predisposition by radiation. Multiple primary tumors occur frequently in genetically predisposed individuals. Specific markers for susceptibility must be sought in order that high-risk individuals be identified and appropriate measures taken for early cancer detection or prevention. Study of the nature of the genetically determined susceptibility and interactions with environmental agents may be revealing in the understanding of carcinogenesis in general

  19. Disentangling the Importance of Psychological Predispositions and Social Constructions in the Organization of American Political Ideology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulst, Brad; Hatemi, Peter K; Eaves, Lindon J

    2012-06-01

    Ideological preferences within the American electorate are contingent on both the environmental conditions that provide the content of the contemporary political debate and internal predispositions that motivate people to hold liberal or conservative policy preferences. In this article we apply Jost, Federico, and Napier's (2009) top-down/bottom-up theory of political attitude formation to a genetically informative population sample. In doing so, we further develop the theory by operationalizing the top-down pathway to be a function of the social environment and the bottom-up pathway as a latent set of genetic factors. By merging insights from psychology, behavioral genetics, and political science, we find strong support for the top-down/bottom-up framework that segregates the two independent pathways in the formation of political attitudes and identifies a different pattern of relationships between political attitudes at each level of analysis.

  20. Evaluation criteria of the individual motor predisposition of female sport gymnastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boraczynski T.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In the paper were presented the results of research, aimed to improve criteria for assessing the motor predisposition of girls in sports gymnastics at the initial stage of training. The studies included 24 gymnasts divided into two age groups: A 6,0-7,5 years of age and B (8,3-13,0. The level of physical fitness was assessed with the use of the EUROFIT battery tests. easurements of the maximum moment of muscle strength in the bending forearm in the elbow joint in terms of isometric contraction were also performed. Assessment f the level of individual strengthspeed and coordination abilities and physical fitness structure including the pace of biological development were the basis for the development of objective criteria for assessing the sports predispositions of young gymnasts at the initial stage of training. Our results provide the basis for improving the control system and optimization of assessment criteria in women gymnastics, including age, training experience and sports level. The results presented in this paper demonstrated the usefulness of the research methodology used to assess the physical fitness and predispositions of gymnasts at the initial stage of training, what enables individualization of training process.

  1. Predisposition for Empathy, Intercultural Sensitivity, and Intentions for Using Motivational Interviewing in First Year Pharmacy Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekong, Gladys; Kavookjian, Jan; Hutchison, Amber

    2017-10-01

    Objective. To assess first-year pharmacy (P1) students' predispositions (eg, perceptions for empathy, intercultural sensitivity, and motivational interviewing (MI) as a patient-centered communication skillset) and identify potential curricula content/communication skills training needs. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was used to collect students' self-reported perceptions for empathy, intercultural sensitivity, counseling contexts, and projected future MI use. Relationships between variables were explored and logistic regression was used to evaluate intention for using MI in future patient encounters. Results. There were 134 students who participated. Higher predisposition for empathy and for intercultural sensitivity were significantly correlated. Significant predictors for applying MI in future patient encounters were sex, confidence with counseling skills, and current use of MI. Conclusion. Results suggest the need to incorporate innovative training strategies in communication skills curricula. Potential areas include empathy, intercultural sensitivity and significant predictor variables for future MI use. Further investigation in other schools is needed.

  2. Population-genetic approach to standardization of radiation and non-radiation factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telnov, I.

    2006-01-01

    Numerous studies demonstrate the importance of genetic predisposition in the development of wide range of pathologies and unfavorable effects caused by different factors. This prompts to account for genetic factors in the risk assessment of unfavorable effects. Current approaches used to solve this problem are far from perfect. On the one hand, recommendations on occupational selection bas ed on genetic signs are presently considered as human rights violation. On the other hand, to medically inform an individual with certain genetic characteristics about possible unfavorable health effects due to occupational hazard has little effect. Finally, a vast number of polymorphic genes in human genome (at least 30%) hampers accounting for all possible factors of genetic predisposition to the increasing number of environmental factors. Therefore, the current situation proves it appropriate to develop the new approach to account for genetic predisposition of individuals that would be free of flaws considered above. A possible basis for such an approach is the assessment of genotype specific relative risk (G.S.R.R.) that accounts for genetic predisposition (susceptibility) of individuals to the effects of unfavorable factors. The study used results from 65 studies. This effort was undertaken to study the association between 32 diseases and unfavorable effects and 17 genetic polymorphic systems. Data analysis included calculation of relative risk (R.R.) of specific diseases or effects development in individuals with different genotypes. Genotype-specific relative risk (G.S.R.R.) of diseases and unfavorable effects in individuals with 'sensitive' genotypes was calculated. Since about the third of genes in human genome are polymorphic, and therefore, a considerable number of genes can be involved in genetic predisposition of an individual to a specific unfavorable effect, an averaged G.S.R.R. of diseases and unfavorable effects was calculated for integral characteristics on

  3. Population-genetic approach to standardization of radiation and non-radiation factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telnov, I. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute, Ozersk (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    Numerous studies demonstrate the importance of genetic predisposition in the development of wide range of pathologies and unfavorable effects caused by different factors. This prompts to account for genetic factors in the risk assessment of unfavorable effects. Current approaches used to solve this problem are far from perfect. On the one hand, recommendations on occupational selection bas ed on genetic signs are presently considered as human rights violation. On the other hand, to medically inform an individual with certain genetic characteristics about possible unfavorable health effects due to occupational hazard has little effect. Finally, a vast number of polymorphic genes in human genome (at least 30%) hampers accounting for all possible factors of genetic predisposition to the increasing number of environmental factors. Therefore, the current situation proves it appropriate to develop the new approach to account for genetic predisposition of individuals that would be free of flaws considered above. A possible basis for such an approach is the assessment of genotype specific relative risk (G.S.R.R.) that accounts for genetic predisposition (susceptibility) of individuals to the effects of unfavorable factors. The study used results from 65 studies. This effort was undertaken to study the association between 32 diseases and unfavorable effects and 17 genetic polymorphic systems. Data analysis included calculation of relative risk (R.R.) of specific diseases or effects development in individuals with different genotypes. Genotype-specific relative risk (G.S.R.R.) of diseases and unfavorable effects in individuals with 'sensitive' genotypes was calculated. Since about the third of genes in human genome are polymorphic, and therefore, a considerable number of genes can be involved in genetic predisposition of an individual to a specific unfavorable effect, an averaged G.S.R.R. of diseases and unfavorable effects was calculated for integral

  4. Dengue viruses in Papua New Guinea: evidence of endemicity and phylogenetic variation, including the evolution of new genetic lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Peter R; van den Hurk, Andrew F; Mackenzie, John S; Pyke, Alyssa T

    2017-12-20

    Dengue is the most common cause of mosquito-borne viral disease in humans, and is endemic in more than 100 tropical and subtropical countries. Periodic outbreaks of dengue have been reported in Papua New Guinea (PNG), but there is only limited knowledge of its endemicity and disease burden. To help elucidate the status of the dengue viruses (DENVs) in PNG, we performed envelope (E) gene sequencing of DENV serotypes 1-4 (DENV 1-4) obtained from infected patients who traveled to Australia or from patients diagnosed during local DENV transmission events between 2001 and 2016. Phylogenetic analysis and comparison with globally available DENV sequences revealed new endemic PNG lineages for DENV 1-3 which have emerged within the last decade. We also identified another possible PNG lineage for DENV-4 from 2016. The DENV-1 and 3 PNG lineages were most closely related to recent lineages circulating on Pacific island nations while the DENV-2 lineage and putative DENV-4 PNG lineage were most similar to Indonesian sequences. This study has demonstrated for the first time the co-circulation of DENV 1-4 strains in PNG and provided molecular evidence of endemic DENV transmission. Our results provide an important platform for improved surveillance and monitoring of DENVs in PNG and broaden the global understanding of DENV genetic diversity.

  5. Locating critical points on multi-dimensional surfaces by genetic algorithm: test cases including normal and perturbed argon clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Pinaki; Bhattacharyya, S. P.

    1999-03-01

    It is demonstrated that Genetic Algorithm in a floating point realisation can be a viable tool for locating critical points on a multi-dimensional potential energy surface (PES). For small clusters, the standard algorithm works well. For bigger ones, the search for global minimum becomes more efficient when used in conjunction with coordinate stretching, and partitioning of the strings into a core part and an outer part which are alternately optimized The method works with equal facility for locating minima, local as well as global, and saddle points (SP) of arbitrary orders. The search for minima requires computation of the gradient vector, but not the Hessian, while that for SP's requires the information of the gradient vector and the Hessian, the latter only at some specific points on the path. The method proposed is tested on (i) a model 2-d PES (ii) argon clusters (Ar 4-Ar 30) in which argon atoms interact via Lennard-Jones potential, (iii) Ar mX, m=12 clusters where X may be a neutral atom or a cation. We also explore if the method could also be used to construct what may be called a stochastic representation of the reaction path on a given PES with reference to conformational changes in Ar n clusters.

  6. High proportion of genetic cases in patients with advanced cardiomyopathy including a novel homozygous Plakophilin 2-gene mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baerbel Klauke

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathies might lead to end-stage heart disease with the requirement of drastic treatments like bridging up to transplant or heart transplantation. A not precisely known proportion of these diseases are genetically determined. We genotyped 43 index-patients (30 DCM, 10 ARVC, 3 RCM with advanced or end stage cardiomyopathy using a gene panel which covered 46 known cardiomyopathy disease genes. Fifty-three variants with possible impact on disease in 33 patients were identified. Of these 27 (51% were classified as likely pathogenic or pathogenic in the MYH7, MYL2, MYL3, NEXN, TNNC1, TNNI3, DES, LMNA, PKP2, PLN, RBM20, TTN, and CRYAB genes. Fifty-six percent (n = 24 of index-patients carried a likely pathogenic or pathogenic mutation. Of these 75% (n = 18 were familial and 25% (n = 6 sporadic cases. However, severe cardiomyopathy seemed to be not characterized by a specific mutation profile. Remarkably, we identified a novel homozygous PKP2-missense variant in a large consanguineous family with sudden death in early childhood and several members with heart transplantation in adolescent age.

  7. Genetic gain and economic values of selection strategies including semen traits in three- and four-way crossbreeding systems for swine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Peña, D; Knox, R V; MacNeil, M D; Rodriguez-Zas, S L

    2015-03-01

    Four semen traits: volume (VOL), concentration (CON), progressive motility of spermatozoa (MOT), and abnormal spermatozoa (ABN) provide complementary information on boar fertility. Assessment of the impact of selection for semen traits is hindered by limited information on economic parameters. Objectives of this study were to estimate economic values for semen traits and to evaluate the genetic gain when these traits are incorporated into traditional selection strategies in a 3-tier system of swine production. Three-way (maternal nucleus lines A and B and paternal nucleus line C) and 4-way (additional paternal nucleus line D) crossbreeding schemes were compared. A novel population structure that accommodated selection for semen traits was developed. Three selection strategies were simulated. Selection Strategy I (baseline) encompassed selection for maternal traits: number of pigs born alive (NBA), litter birth weight (LBW), adjusted 21-d litter weight (A21), and number of pigs at 21 d (N21); and paternal traits: number of days to 113.5 kg (D113), backfat (BF), ADG, feed efficiency (FE), and carcass lean % (LEAN). Selection Strategy II included Strategy I and the number of usable semen doses per collection (DOSES), a function of the 4 semen traits. Selection Strategy III included Strategy I and the 4 semen traits individually. The estimated economic values of VOL, CON, MOT, ABN, and DOSES for 7 to 1 collections/wk ranged from $0.21 to $1.44/mL, $0.12 to $0.83/10 spermatozoa/mm, $0.61 to $12.66/%, -$0.53 to -$10.88/%, and $2.01 to $41.43/%, respectively. The decrease in the relative economic values of semen traits and DOSES with higher number of collections per wk was sharper between 1 and 2.33 collections/wk than between 2.33 and 7 collections/wk. The higher economic value of MOT and ABN relative to VOL and CON could be linked to the genetic variances and covariances of these traits. Average genetic gains for the maternal traits were comparable across strategies

  8. Genetic diversity of bovine papillomavirus types, including two putative new types, in teat warts from dairy cattle herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunardi, Michele; de Camargo Tozato, Claudia; Alfieri, Alice Fernandes; de Alcântara, Brígida Kussumoto; Vilas-Boas, Laurival Antonio; Otonel, Rodrigo Alejandro Arellano; Headley, Selwyn Arlington; Alfieri, Amauri Alcindo

    2016-06-01

    Teat papillomatosis affects dairy cows worldwide. Milking can become difficult due to teat warts, and maintaining affected cows in the herds may diminish economic profit in the dairy industry. Currently, 13 bovine papillomavirus (BPV) types have been fully characterized, and numerous putative BPV types have been identified through partial L1 gene PCR. In order to identify the viral types present in warts on the udders of dairy cows, 40 teat lesions from 24 cows from 13 cattle farms in three States of Brazil were evaluated by PV L1 gene PCR. The warts that were evaluated contained sequences from BPVs 6-10, the putative BPV types BAPV9 and BAPV4, and two unreported putative papillomavirus (PV) types, named BPV/BR-UEL6 and BPV/BR-UEL7. In addition, mixed infections and coinfections were identified, since more than one lesion was observed on the udders of 13 cows. Phylogenetic analysis showed that BPV/BR-UEL6 is closely related to BPVs belonging to the genus Xipapillomavirus, while BPV/BR-UEL7 clustered with the previously reported strains Cervus timorensis and Pudu puda PVs, which represent a putative new PV type, and it was only distantly related to xi-, epsilon-, delta- and dyoxi-PVs. These results provide information that will assist in the understanding of the association of BPVs 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10, as well as putative BPV types BAPV4 and BAPV9, with mammary papillomatosis. This is the first characterization of putative novel PV types BPV/BR-UEL6 and BPV/BR-UEL7 in teat warts of dairy cows, highlighting the high genetic diversity of BPVs associated with teat papillomatosis.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: myasthenia gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GP, Tzartos SJ, Poulas K. Recent advances in genetic predisposition of myasthenia gravis. Biomed Res Int. 2013;2013:404053. doi: 10.1155/2013/404053. Epub 2013 Nov 5. Review. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed ... from Genetics Home Reference Bulletins Genetics Home Reference Celebrates Its ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Dupuytren contracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 60 develop the disorder. Studies suggest that a genetic predisposition to develop this disorder may have been spread through northern Europe and Britain by the Vikings. Dupuytren contracture is less common in ... information about a genetic condition can statistics provide? Why are some genetic ...

  11. Interactions between Genetics and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption on Health Outcomes: A Review of Gene–Diet Interaction Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle E. Haslam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB, which includes soft drinks, fruit drinks, and other energy drinks, is associated with excess energy intake and increased risk for chronic metabolic disease among children and adults. Thus, reducing SSB consumption is an important strategy to prevent the onset of chronic diseases, and achieve and maintain a healthy body weight. The mechanisms by which excessive SSB consumption may contribute to complex chronic diseases may partially depend on an individual’s genetic predisposition. Gene–SSB interaction investigations, either limited to single genetic loci or including multiple genetic variants, aim to use genomic information to define mechanistic pathways linking added sugar consumption from SSBs to those complex diseases. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available gene-SSB interaction studies investigating the relationships between genetics, SSB consumption, and various health outcomes. Current evidence suggests there are genetic predispositions for an association between SSB intake and adiposity; evidence for a genetic predisposition between SSB and type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular disease is limited.

  12. Data from a survey of Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile shedding by dogs and cats in the Madrid region (Spain, including phenotypic and genetic characteristics of recovered isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Álvarez-Pérez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article contains information related to a recent survey of the prevalence of fecal shedding of Clostridium perfringens and C. difficile by dogs and cats attended in veterinary clinics located in the Madrid region (Spain. Specifically, we provide detailed information about the clinics that participated in the survey, the demographic and clinic characteristics of recruited animals and the genetic and phenotypic characteristics (including antimicrobial susceptibility data, of recovered bacterial isolates.

  13. Sex-stratified genome-wide association studies including 270,000 individuals show sexual dimorphism in genetic loci for anthropometric traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua C Randall

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Given the anthropometric differences between men and women and previous evidence of sex-difference in genetic effects, we conducted a genome-wide search for sexually dimorphic associations with height, weight, body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, and waist-to-hip-ratio (133,723 individuals and took forward 348 SNPs into follow-up (additional 137,052 individuals in a total of 94 studies. Seven loci displayed significant sex-difference (FDR<5%, including four previously established (near GRB14/COBLL1, LYPLAL1/SLC30A10, VEGFA, ADAMTS9 and three novel anthropometric trait loci (near MAP3K1, HSD17B4, PPARG, all of which were genome-wide significant in women (P<5×10(-8, but not in men. Sex-differences were apparent only for waist phenotypes, not for height, weight, BMI, or hip circumference. Moreover, we found no evidence for genetic effects with opposite directions in men versus women. The PPARG locus is of specific interest due to its role in diabetes genetics and therapy. Our results demonstrate the value of sex-specific GWAS to unravel the sexually dimorphic genetic underpinning of complex traits.

  14. Biomarkers and genes predictive of disease predisposition and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biomarkers and genes predictive of disease predisposition and prognosis in rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is a debilitating disease which often progresses to relentlessly severe disease. Pieter W A Meyer, NHDip Med Tech, MTech, PhD. Medical Research Council Unit for Inflammation and Immunity, Department ...

  15. Content, Structure, and Usefulness of Juvenile Predisposition Psychological Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Samantha L.; Cruise, Keith R.; Hinz, Holly; Holloway, Evan D.; Chapman, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a dearth of research regarding the content and structure of juvenile predisposition psychological evaluations. Limited research suggests that key mental health domains are insufficiently represented and judges use evaluator recommendations regarding legal outcomes more often than clinical outcomes. Studies have not addressed…

  16. Predisposition of Nigerian children with severe malaria to urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The predisposition of children with severe malaria to urinary tract infection was investigated in a group of 112 clinically diagnosed and para sitologically confirmed severe malaria patients (test) and in another subset of 114 apparently physically healthy non-malaria infected subjects (control). Standard bacteriological and ...

  17. Divorce: An Unreliable Predictor of Children's Emotional Predispositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Janine M.; Nesbitt, Sally

    1981-01-01

    Used the Children's Emotion Projection Instrument to investigate the emotional predispositions of children from divorce or disruption and children from intact families. Results indicated that children of divorce or disruption are not more hampered emotionally than children from intact families. Discusses implications for family therapists.…

  18. Family Size and Parental Education on Predisposition to Female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the influence of family size and parental education on predisposition to female trafficking in southern Nigeria. Stratified Random sampling procedure was used to select the 150 parents from various ethnic groups consisting of. Yoruba, Igbo, Bini, and Ibibio/Efik among others. A researcher-constructed ...

  19. The genetic basis of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Tappakhov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a multifactorial disease that develops in the presence of both genetic and environmental factors. In recent years, there has been sufficient information on the role of genetic predisposition in the development of not only familial cases, but also sporadic ones. A hereditary burden in PD may not be traced in cases of recessive inheritance with a low gene penetrance, as well as in a patient's death before the onset of the disease. Active introduction of molecular genetic methods, including next generation sequencing, can annually identify new gene mutations that underlie sporadic PD cases. This paper provides an overview of the current literature on the genetic aspects of PD with emphasis on the ethnic characteristics of the disease.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: DICER1 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Encyclopedia: Sertoli-Leydig Cell Tumor Health Topic: Cancer Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) DICER1-related pleuropulmonary blastoma cancer predisposition syndrome Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Cancer ...

  1. Rare genetic variants: making the connection with breast cancer susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tú Nguyen-Dumont

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The practice of clinical genetics in the context of breast cancer predisposition has reached another critical point in its evolution. For the past two decades, genetic testing offered to women attending clinics has been limited to BRCA1 and BRCA2 unless other syndromic indicators have been evident (e.g. PTEN and TP53 for Cowden and Li-Fraumeni syndrome, respectively. Women (and their families who are concerned about their personal and/or family history of breast and ovarian cancer have enthusiastically engaged with clinical genetics services, anticipating a genetic cause for their cancer predisposition will be identified and to receive clinical guidance for their risk management and treatment options. Genetic testing laboratories have demonstrated similar enthusiasm for transitioning from single gene to gene panel testing that now provide opportunities for the large number of women found not to carry mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, enabling them to undergo additional genetic testing. However, these panel tests have limited clinical utility until more is understood about the cancer risks (if any associated with the genetic variation observed in the genes included on these panels. New data is urgently needed to improve the interpretation of the genetic variation data that is already reported from these panels and to inform the selection of genes included in gene panel tests in the future. To address this issue, large internationally coordinated research studies are required to provide the evidence-base from which clinical genetics for breast cancer susceptibility can be practiced in the era of gene panel testing and oncogenetic practice.Two significant steps associated with this process include i validating the genes on these panels (and those likely to be added in the future as bona fide breast cancer predisposition genes and ii interpreting the variation, on a variant-by-variant basis in terms of their likely “pathogenicity” ― a process

  2. Identification ofKANSARLas the first cancer predisposition fusion gene specific to the population of European ancestry origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jeff Xiwu; Yang, Xiaoyan; Ning, Shunbin; Wang, Ling; Wang, Kesheng; Zhang, Yanbin; Yuan, Fenghua; Li, Fengli; Zhuo, David D; Tang, Liren; Zhuo, Degen

    2017-08-01

    Gene fusion is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Recent advances in RNA-seq of cancer transcriptomes have facilitated the discovery of fusion transcripts. In this study, we report identification of a surprisingly large number of fusion transcripts, including six KANSARL ( KANSL1 - ARL17A ) transcripts that resulted from the fusion between the KANSL1 and ARL17A genes using a RNA splicingcode model. Five of these six KANSARL fusion transcripts are novel. By systematic analysis of RNA-seq data of glioblastoma, prostate cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, and lymphoma from different regions of the World, we have found that KANSARL fusion transcripts were rarely detected in the tumors of individuals from Asia or Africa. In contrast, they exist in 30 - 52% of the tumors from North Americans cancer patients. Analysis of CEPH/Utah Pedigree 1463 has revealed that KANSARL is a familially-inherited fusion gene. Further analysis of RNA-seq datasets of the 1000 Genome Project has indicated that KANSARL fusion gene is specific to 28.9% of the population of European ancestry origin. In summary, we demonstrated that KANSARL is the first cancer predisposition fusion gene associated with genetic backgrounds of European ancestry origin.

  3. The consequences of including non-additive effects on the genetic evaluation of harvest body weight in Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neira Roberto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we used different animal models to estimate genetic and environmental variance components on harvest weight in two populations of Oncorhynchus kisutch, forming two classes i.e. odd- and even-year spawners. Methods The models used were: additive, with and without inbreeding as a covariable (A + F and A respectively; additive plus common environmental due to full-sib families and inbreeding (A + C + F; additive plus parental dominance and inbreeding (A + D + F; and a full model (A + C + D + F. Genetic parameters and breeding values obtained by different models were compared to evaluate the consequences of including non-additive effects on genetic evaluation. Results Including inbreeding as a covariable did not affect the estimation of genetic parameters, but heritability was reduced when dominance or common environmental effects were included. A high heritability for harvest weight was estimated in both populations (even = 0.46 and odd = 0.50 when simple additive models (A + F and A were used. Heritabilities decreased to 0.21 (even and 0.37 (odd when the full model was used (A + C + D + F. In this full model, the magnitude of the dominance variance was 0.19 (even and 0.06 (odd, while the magnitude of the common environmental effect was lower than 0.01 in both populations. The correlation between breeding values estimated with different models was very high in all cases (i.e. higher than 0.98. However, ranking of the 30 best males and the 100 best females per generation changed when a high dominance variance was estimated, as was the case in one of the two populations (even. Conclusions Dominance and common environmental variance may be important components of variance in harvest weight in O. kisutch, thus not including them may produce an overestimation of the predicted response; furthermore, genetic evaluation was seen to be partially affected, since the ranking of selected animals changed with the inclusion of

  4. Autism genetic database (AGD: a comprehensive database including autism susceptibility gene-CNVs integrated with known noncoding RNAs and fragile sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talebizadeh Zohreh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism is a highly heritable complex neurodevelopmental disorder, therefore identifying its genetic basis has been challenging. To date, numerous susceptibility genes and chromosomal abnormalities have been reported in association with autism, but most discoveries either fail to be replicated or account for a small effect. Thus, in most cases the underlying causative genetic mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present work, the Autism Genetic Database (AGD was developed as a literature-driven, web-based, and easy to access database designed with the aim of creating a comprehensive repository for all the currently reported genes and genomic copy number variations (CNVs associated with autism in order to further facilitate the assessment of these autism susceptibility genetic factors. Description AGD is a relational database that organizes data resulting from exhaustive literature searches for reported susceptibility genes and CNVs associated with autism. Furthermore, genomic information about human fragile sites and noncoding RNAs was also downloaded and parsed from miRBase, snoRNA-LBME-db, piRNABank, and the MIT/ICBP siRNA database. A web client genome browser enables viewing of the features while a web client query tool provides access to more specific information for the features. When applicable, links to external databases including GenBank, PubMed, miRBase, snoRNA-LBME-db, piRNABank, and the MIT siRNA database are provided. Conclusion AGD comprises a comprehensive list of susceptibility genes and copy number variations reported to-date in association with autism, as well as all known human noncoding RNA genes and fragile sites. Such a unique and inclusive autism genetic database will facilitate the evaluation of autism susceptibility factors in relation to known human noncoding RNAs and fragile sites, impacting on human diseases. As a result, this new autism database offers a valuable tool for the research

  5. Autism Genetic Database (AGD): a comprehensive database including autism susceptibility gene-CNVs integrated with known noncoding RNAs and fragile sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszek, Gregory; Talebizadeh, Zohreh

    2009-09-24

    Autism is a highly heritable complex neurodevelopmental disorder, therefore identifying its genetic basis has been challenging. To date, numerous susceptibility genes and chromosomal abnormalities have been reported in association with autism, but most discoveries either fail to be replicated or account for a small effect. Thus, in most cases the underlying causative genetic mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present work, the Autism Genetic Database (AGD) was developed as a literature-driven, web-based, and easy to access database designed with the aim of creating a comprehensive repository for all the currently reported genes and genomic copy number variations (CNVs) associated with autism in order to further facilitate the assessment of these autism susceptibility genetic factors. AGD is a relational database that organizes data resulting from exhaustive literature searches for reported susceptibility genes and CNVs associated with autism. Furthermore, genomic information about human fragile sites and noncoding RNAs was also downloaded and parsed from miRBase, snoRNA-LBME-db, piRNABank, and the MIT/ICBP siRNA database. A web client genome browser enables viewing of the features while a web client query tool provides access to more specific information for the features. When applicable, links to external databases including GenBank, PubMed, miRBase, snoRNA-LBME-db, piRNABank, and the MIT siRNA database are provided. AGD comprises a comprehensive list of susceptibility genes and copy number variations reported to-date in association with autism, as well as all known human noncoding RNA genes and fragile sites. Such a unique and inclusive autism genetic database will facilitate the evaluation of autism susceptibility factors in relation to known human noncoding RNAs and fragile sites, impacting on human diseases. As a result, this new autism database offers a valuable tool for the research community to evaluate genetic findings for this complex

  6. Role of genetic factors in the pathogenesis of aggressive periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Albandar, Jasim M

    2014-06-01

    This article critically reviews the evidence for a role of genetic factors in the pathogenesis of aggressive periodontitis and discusses the study approaches commonly used to identify genetic risk factors of this disease. Available data suggest that aggressive periodontitis is caused by mutations in multiple genes, combined with environmental effects. Syndromic periodontal diseases include certain monogenic disorders that express phenotypes showing aggressive forms of periodontitis, and the genetic triggering factors of most of these syndromes have been identified. Other periodontal disease phenotypes seem to occur through different genetic predisposition patterns. Case-control and genome-wide studies have been used to investigate the association with gene polymorphisms. Association studies and the familial aggregation of aggressive periodontitis suggest a significant genetic component in the increased predisposition to this disease. There is evidence to support the contribution of a few major genes or of multiple small-effects genes. In addition, there is evidence of gene-gene and gene-environment interaction effects. Early studies suggested an X-linked mode of transmission of aggressive periodontitis, and subsequent studies support an autosomal mode. Genetic studies have the potential to improve the screening programs of subjects at risk for developing aggressive periodontitis and may enhance treatment outcome through gene therapy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Management of women with a hereditary predisposition for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatoi, Ismail; Benson, John R

    2016-10-01

    Women with a hereditary breast cancer predisposition have three management options: screening, chemoprevention (risk-reducing medication) and risk-reducing surgery. However, no randomized trials have addressed the effect of these strategies in mutation carriers. In the general population, randomized trials failed to demonstrate a benefit for screening in premenopausal women. Moreover, although chemoprevention reduces breast cancer incidence in high-risk populations, this benefit is potentially confined to estrogen receptor-positive tumors. Finally, observational studies suggest that prophylactic mastectomy and even prophylactic salpingo-ophorectomy reduces breast cancer risk in BRCA mutation carriers, but there are systematic biases associated with such studies. Therefore, women with a hereditary predisposition for breast cancer should be informed of the three risk-reducing strategies, and that their benefits are not fully understood.

  8. A 1,681-locus consensus genetic map of cultivated cucumber including 67 NB-LRR resistance gene homolog and ten gene loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Luming; Li, Dawei; Li, Yuhong; Gu, Xingfang; Huang, Sanwen; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Weng, Yiqun

    2013-03-25

    Cucumber is an important vegetable crop that is susceptible to many pathogens, but no disease resistance (R) genes have been cloned. The availability of whole genome sequences provides an excellent opportunity for systematic identification and characterization of the nucleotide binding and leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) type R gene homolog (RGH) sequences in the genome. Cucumber has a very narrow genetic base making it difficult to construct high-density genetic maps. Development of a consensus map by synthesizing information from multiple segregating populations is a method of choice to increase marker density. As such, the objectives of the present study were to identify and characterize NB-LRR type RGHs, and to develop a high-density, integrated cucumber genetic-physical map anchored with RGH loci. From the Gy14 draft genome, 70 NB-containing RGHs were identified and characterized. Most RGHs were in clusters with uneven distribution across seven chromosomes. In silico analysis indicated that all 70 RGHs had EST support for gene expression. Phylogenetic analysis classified 58 RGHs into two clades: CNL and TNL. Comparative analysis revealed high-degree sequence homology and synteny in chromosomal locations of these RGH members between the cucumber and melon genomes. Fifty-four molecular markers were developed to delimit 67 of the 70 RGHs, which were integrated into a genetic map through linkage analysis. A 1,681-locus cucumber consensus map including 10 gene loci and spanning 730.0 cM in seven linkage groups was developed by integrating three component maps with a bin-mapping strategy. Physically, 308 scaffolds with 193.2 Mbp total DNA sequences were anchored onto this consensus map that covered 52.6% of the 367 Mbp cucumber genome. Cucumber contains relatively few NB-LRR RGHs that are clustered and unevenly distributed in the genome. All RGHs seem to be transcribed and shared significant sequence homology and synteny with the melon genome suggesting conservation of

  9. Identification of germline alterations in breast cancer predisposition genes among Malaysian breast cancer patients using panel testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, P S; Wen, W X; Fadlullah, M Z H; Yoon, S Y; Lee, S Y; Thong, M K; Yip, C H; Mohd Taib, N A; Teo, S H

    2016-10-01

    Although an association between protein-truncating variants and breast cancer risk has been established for 11 genes, only alterations in BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and PALB2 have been reported in Asian populations. Given that the age of onset of breast cancer is lower in Asians, it is estimated that inherited predisposition to breast cancer may be more significant. To determine the potential utility of panel testing, we investigated the prevalence of germline alterations in 11 established and 4 likely breast cancer genes in a cross-sectional hospital-based cohort of 108 moderate to high-risk breast cancer patients using targeted next generation sequencing. Twenty patients (19%) were identified to carry deleterious mutations, of whom 13 (12%) were in the BRCA1 or BRCA2, 6 (6%) were in five other known breast cancer predisposition genes and 1 patient had a mutation in both BRCA2 and BARD1. Our study shows that BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for the majority of genetic predisposition to breast cancer in our cohort of Asian women. Although mutations in other known breast cancer genes are found, the functional significance and breast cancer risk have not yet been determined, thus limiting the clinical utility of panel testing in Asian populations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Epidemiology and genetics of ventricular fibrillation during acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glinge, Charlotte; Sattler, Stefan; Jabbari, Reza

    2016-01-01

    of a family member is a risk factor for SCD and VF during acute myocardial infarction (MI), independent of traditional risk factors including family history of MI, suggesting a genetic component in the susceptibility to VF. To prevent SCD and VF due to MI, we need a better understanding of the genetic...... and molecular mechanisms causing VF in this apparently healthy population. Even though new insights and technologies have become available, the genetic predisposition to VF during MI remains poorly understood. Findings from a variety of different genetic studies have failed to reach reproducibility, although...... several genetic variants, both common and rare variants, have been associated to either VF or SCD. For this review, we searched PubMed for potentially relevant articles, using the following MeSH-terms: "sudden cardiac death", "ventricular fibrillation", "out-of-hospital cardiac arrest", "myocardial...

  11. Structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus: implications for predisposition to Lynch syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Kerr, Iain D.; Min, Jinrong

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus is reported at 2.30 Å resolution. The overall structure is described along with an analysis of two clinically important mutations. Mismatch repair prevents the accumulation of erroneous insertions/deletions and non-Watson–Crick base pairs in the genome. Pathogenic mutations in the MLH1 gene are associated with a predisposition to Lynch and Turcot’s syndromes. Although genetic testing for these mutations is available, robust classification of variants requires strong clinical and functional support. Here, the first structure of the N-terminus of human MLH1, determined by X-ray crystallography, is described. The structure shares a high degree of similarity with previously determined prokaryotic MLH1 homologs; however, this structure affords a more accurate platform for the classification of MLH1 variants

  12. Structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus: implications for predisposition to Lynch syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram [University of Toronto, 101 College Street, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7 (Canada); Kerr, Iain D., E-mail: ikerr@myriad.com [Myriad Genetic Laboratories Inc., 320 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States); Min, Jinrong, E-mail: ikerr@myriad.com [University of Toronto, 101 College Street, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7 (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5G 1L7 (Canada)

    2015-07-28

    The crystal structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus is reported at 2.30 Å resolution. The overall structure is described along with an analysis of two clinically important mutations. Mismatch repair prevents the accumulation of erroneous insertions/deletions and non-Watson–Crick base pairs in the genome. Pathogenic mutations in the MLH1 gene are associated with a predisposition to Lynch and Turcot’s syndromes. Although genetic testing for these mutations is available, robust classification of variants requires strong clinical and functional support. Here, the first structure of the N-terminus of human MLH1, determined by X-ray crystallography, is described. The structure shares a high degree of similarity with previously determined prokaryotic MLH1 homologs; however, this structure affords a more accurate platform for the classification of MLH1 variants.

  13. River predisposition to ice jams: a simplified geospatial model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. De Munck

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Floods resulting from river ice jams pose a great risk to many riverside municipalities in Canada. The location of an ice jam is mainly influenced by channel morphology. The goal of this work was therefore to develop a simplified geospatial model to estimate the predisposition of a river channel to ice jams. Rather than predicting the timing of river ice breakup, the main question here was to predict where the broken ice is susceptible to jam based on the river's geomorphological characteristics. Thus, six parameters referred to potential causes for ice jams in the literature were initially selected: presence of an island, narrowing of the channel, high sinuosity, presence of a bridge, confluence of rivers, and slope break. A GIS-based tool was used to generate the aforementioned factors over regular-spaced segments along the entire channel using available geospatial data. An ice jam predisposition index (IJPI was calculated by combining the weighted optimal factors. Three Canadian rivers (province of Québec were chosen as test sites. The resulting maps were assessed from historical observations and local knowledge. Results show that 77 % of the observed ice jam sites on record occurred in river sections that the model considered as having high or medium predisposition. This leaves 23 % of false negative errors (missed occurrence. Between 7 and 11 % of the highly predisposed river sections did not have an ice jam on record (false-positive cases. Results, limitations, and potential improvements are discussed.

  14. Individual predisposition, household clustering and risk factors for human infection with Ascaris lumbricoides: new epidemiological insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Martin; Hall, Andrew; Basáñez, María-Gloria

    2011-04-26

    Much of our current understanding of the epidemiology of Ascaris lumbricoides infections in humans has been acquired by analyzing worm count data. These data are collected by treating infected individuals with anthelmintics so that worms are expelled intact from the gastrointestinal tract. Analysis of such data established that individuals are predisposed to infection with few or many worms and members of the same household tend to harbor similar numbers of worms. These effects, known respectively as individual predisposition and household clustering, are considered characteristic of the epidemiology of ascariasis. The mechanisms behind these phenomena, however, remain unclear. In particular, the impact of heterogeneous individual exposures to infectious stages has not been thoroughly explored. Bayesian methods were used to fit a three-level hierarchical statistical model to A. lumbricoides worm counts derived from a three-round chemo-expulsion study carried out in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The effects of individual predisposition, household clustering and household covariates of the numbers of worms per host (worm burden) were considered simultaneously. Individual predisposition was found to be of limited epidemiological significance once household clustering had been accounted for. The degree of intra-household variability among worm burdens was found to be reduced by approximately 58% when household covariates were included in the model. Covariates relating to decreased affluence and quality of housing construction were associated with a statistically significant increase in worm burden. Heterogeneities in the exposure of individuals to infectious eggs have an important role in the epidemiology of A. lumbricoides infection. The household covariates identified as being associated with worm burden provide valuable insights into the source of these heterogeneities although above all emphasize and reiterate that infection with A. lumbricoides is inextricably associated

  15. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Likelihood of getting certain diseases Mental abilities Natural talents An abnormal trait (anomaly) that is passed down ... one of them has a genetic disorder. Information Human beings have cells with 46 chromosomes . These consist ...

  16. Change in subcutaneous adipose tissue metabolism and gene network expression during the transition period in dairy cows, including differences due to sire genetic merit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M J; Hosseini, A; Burrell, S; Rocco, S M; McNamara, J P; Loor, J J

    2013-04-01

    Adipose metabolism is an essential contributor to the efficiency of milk production, and metabolism is controlled by several mechanisms, including gene expression of critical proteins; therefore, the objective of this study was to determine how lactational state and the genetic merit of dairy cattle affects adipose tissue (AT) metabolism and mRNA expression of genes known to control metabolism. Animals of high (HGM) and low genetic merit (LGM) were fed to requirements, and weekly dry matter intake, milk production, blood glucose, and nonesterified fatty acids were measured. Subcutaneous AT biopsies were collected at -21, 7, 28 and 56 d in milk (DIM). The mRNA expression of genes coding for lipogenic enzymes [phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (soluble) (PCK1), fatty acid synthase (FASN), diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2), and stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase (SCD)], transcription regulators [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARG), thyroid hormone responsive (THRSP), wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 10B (WNT10B), sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 (SREBF1), and adiponectin (ADIPOQ)], lipolytic enzymes [hormone-sensitive lipase (LIPE), patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 2 (PNPLA2), monoglyceride lipase (MGLL), adrenoceptor β-2 (ADRB2), adipose differentiation-related protein (ADFP), and α-β-hydrolase domain containing 5 (ABHD5)], and genes controlling the sensing of intracellular energy [phosphodiesterase 3A (PDE3A); PDE3B; protein kinase, AMP-activated, α-1 catalytic subunit (PRKAA1); PRKAA2; and growth hormone receptor (GHR)] was measured. Dry matter intake, blood glucose, and nonesterified fatty acid concentrations did not differ between genetic merit groups. Milk production was greater for HGM cows from 6 to 8 wk postpartum. As expected, the rates of lipogenesis decreased in early lactation, whereas stimulated lipolysis increased. At 7 DIM, lipogenesis in HGM cows increased as a function

  17. Genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubitschek, H.E.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: genetic effects of high LET radiations; genetic regulation, alteration, and repair; chromosome replication and the division cycle of Escherichia coli; effects of radioisotope decay in the DNA of microorganisms; initiation and termination of DNA replication in Bacillus subtilis; mutagenesis in mouse myeloma cells; lethal and mutagenic effects of near-uv radiation; effect of 8-methoxypsoralen on photodynamic lethality and mutagenicity in Escherichia coli; DNA repair of the lethal effects of far-uv; and near uv irradiation of bacterial cells

  18. Autism genetic database (AGD): a comprehensive database including autism susceptibility gene-CNVs integrated with known noncoding RNAs and fragile sites

    OpenAIRE

    Talebizadeh Zohreh; Matuszek Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Autism is a highly heritable complex neurodevelopmental disorder, therefore identifying its genetic basis has been challenging. To date, numerous susceptibility genes and chromosomal abnormalities have been reported in association with autism, but most discoveries either fail to be replicated or account for a small effect. Thus, in most cases the underlying causative genetic mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present work, the Autism Genetic Database (AGD) was dev...

  19. Diverse Cone-Snail Species Harbor Closely Related Streptomyces Species with Conserved Chemical and Genetic Profiles, Including Polycyclic Tetramic Acid Macrolactams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Quezada

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces are Gram-positive bacteria that occupy diverse ecological niches including host-associations with animals and plants. Members of this genus are known for their overwhelming repertoire of natural products, which has been exploited for almost a century as a source of medicines and agrochemicals. Notwithstanding intense scientific and commercial interest in Streptomyces natural products, surprisingly little is known of the intra- and/or inter-species ecological roles played by these metabolites. In this report we describe the chemical structures, biological properties, and biosynthetic relationships between natural products produced by Streptomyces isolated from internal tissues of predatory Conus snails, collected from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Using chromatographic, spectroscopic and bioassays methodology, we demonstrate that Streptomyces isolated from five different Conus species produce identical chemical and antifungal profiles – comprising a suite of polycyclic tetramic acid macrolactams (PTMs. To investigate possible ecological (and evolutionary relationships we used genome analyses to reveal a close taxonomic relationship with other sponge-derived and free-living PTM producing Streptomyces (i.e., Streptomyces albus. In-depth phylogenomic analysis of PTM biosynthetic gene clusters indicated PTM structure diversity was governed by a small repertoire of genetic elements, including discrete gene acquisition events involving dehydrogenases. Overall, our study shows a Streptomyces-Conus ecological relationship that is concomitant with specific PTM chemical profiles. We provide an evolutionary framework to explain this relationship, driven by anti-fungal properties that protect Conus snails from fungal pathogens.

  20. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  1. [Genetics factors in pathogenesis and clinical genetics of binge eating disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibitov, А О; Мazo, G E

    2016-01-01

    Genetic studies have shown that binge eating disorder (ВЕD) aggregates in families, heritability was estimated as about 60% and additive genetic influences on BED up to 50%. Using a genetic approach has proved useful for verifying the diagnostic categories of BED using DSM-IV criteria and supporting the validity of considering this pathology as a separate nosological category. The results confirmed the genetic and pathogenic originality of BED as a separate psychopathological phenomenon, but not a subtype of obesity. It seems fruitful to considerate BED as a disease with hereditary predisposition with significant genetic influence and a complex psychopathological syndrome, including not only eating disorders, but also depressive and addictive component. A possible mechanism of pathogenesis of BED may be the interaction of the neuroendocrine and neurotransmitters systems including the active involvement of the reward system in response to a variety of chronic stress influences with the important modulatory role of specific personality traits. The high level of genetic influence on the certain clinical manifestations of BED confirms the ability to identify the subphenotypes of BED on genetic basis involving clinical criteria. It can not only contribute to further genetic studies, taking into account more homogeneous samples, but also help in finding differentiated therapeutic approaches.

  2. Predisposição genética, hereditariedade e reabsorções radiculares em Ortodontia: cuidados com interpretações precipitadas: uma análise crítica do trabalho de Al-Qawasmi et al Genetics predisposition, heredity and radicular resorption, in Orthodontics: cares with precipitated interpretations and a critical analysis of Al-Qawasmi´s work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Consolaro

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho de Al-Qawasmi et al.¹, publicado em março de 2003 pelo American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, procurou estabelecer uma predisposição genética para justificar as reabsorções dentárias em Ortodontia, mas apresentou algumas limitações metodológicas e equívocos na interpretação de seus resultados. A análise criteriosa deste artigo ressalta que, na maioria, estas limitações foram mencionadas e reconhecidas pelos autores na discussão do trabalho, mas o seu resumo e título foram muito taxativos e conclusivos. A linguagem de estudos genéticos nem sempre é familiar a todos os clínicos e isto também requer uma análise esclarecedora à luz de uma visão mais aplicada ao cotidiano ortodôntico. Referenciar ou citar este trabalho de Al-Qawasmi et al.¹, para afirmar de forma taxativa que se demonstrou a natureza hereditária das reabsorções dentárias em Ortodontia, pode denotar falta de conhecimento sobre o assunto ou uma leitura ou compreensão apenas do seu título. Ou ainda, a citação deste trabalho como prova definitiva de associação entre hereditariedade e reabsorções dentárias em Ortodontia pode traduzir também o desejo de excluir da prática clínica a responsabilidade de planejar de forma individualizada e detalhada cada tratamento com base no conhecimento das possibilidades e limitações técnicas oferecidas pela ciência ortodôntica, bem como nas suas bases biológicas, por exemplo, valorizando a morfologia radicular e da crista óssea alveolar e o papel dos cementoblastos na proteção da superfície radicular.The study published in the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics last March by Al-Qawasmi et al. tried to implicate dental resorption during orthodontic treatment to genetic predisposition. The methodology used, however, presents limitations and interpretative mistakes of the results. When analyzing the article sensibly, one is able to find that

  3. Panel 3: Genetics and Precision Medicine of Otitis Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jizhen; Hafrén, Hena; Kerschner, Joseph; Li, Jian-Dong; Brown, Steve; Zheng, Qing Y; Preciado, Diego; Nakamura, Yoshihisa; Huang, Qiuhong; Zhang, Yan

    2017-04-01

    Objective The objective is to perform a comprehensive review of the literature up to 2015 on the genetics and precision medicine relevant to otitis media. Data Sources PubMed database of the National Library of Medicine. Review Methods Two subpanels were formed comprising experts in the genetics and precision medicine of otitis media. Each of the panels reviewed the literature in their respective fields and wrote draft reviews. The reviews were shared with all panel members, and a merged draft was created. The entire panel met at the 18th International Symposium on Recent Advances in Otitis Media in June 2015 and discussed the review and refined the content. A final draft was made, circulated, and approved by the panel members. Conclusion Many genes relevant to otitis media have been identified in the last 4 years in advancing our knowledge regarding the predisposition of the middle ear mucosa to commensals and pathogens. Advances include mutant animal models and clinical studies. Many signaling pathways are involved in the predisposition of otitis media. Implications for Practice New knowledge on the genetic background relevant to otitis media forms a basis of novel potential interventions, including potential new ways to treat otitis media.

  4. Unifying diseases through common genetic mechanisms: the example of the genetic theory of infectious diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Darrason, Marie

    2013-01-01

    International audience; In the contemporary biomedical literature, every disease is considered genetic. This extension of the concept of genetic disease is usually interpreted either in a trivial or genocentrist sense, but it is never taken seriously as the expression of a genetic theory of disease. However, a group of French researchers defend the idea of a genetic theory of infectious diseases. By identifying four common genetic mechanisms (Mendelian predisposition to multiple infections, M...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: parathyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of parathyroid cancer are not caused by inherited genetic factors. These cancers are associated with somatic mutations that are acquired during a person's lifetime, and they do not cluster in families. A predisposition to parathyroid cancer caused by a germline mutation ...

  6. Molecular genetics of hemophilia A: Clinical perspectives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Azza A.G. Tantawy

    incompletely explained by genetic predisposition [71]. The observation of hemophilic monozygotic twins discor- dant for inhibitors points out the interplay of non-genetic fac- tors. Theoretically, challenges of the immune system brought about by infections, vaccinations, and tissue damage in associ- ation with FVIII exposure ...

  7. Genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskola, Pasi J; Lemmelä, Susanna; Kjaer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Low back pain is associated with lumbar disc degeneration, which is mainly due to genetic predisposition. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration as defined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in humans....

  8. X-ray diagnosis of predisposition to pulmonary nephrotic edema in patients with glomerulonephritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenetskij, M.S.; Pervak, M.B.; Tkachenko, G.D.; Vernikov, B.L.

    1995-01-01

    To develop criteria for determining predisposition to pulmonary edema in patients with glomerulonephritis, clinical, laboratory and X-ray examinations were made in 697 patients with glomerulonephritis at different stages of its development. X-ray examination included chest tele X-ray and its densitometric analysis. Twenty two patients underwent computerized tomography with gistographic analysis. In 106 patients, X-ray findings were compared with the volume of circulating blood, cardiac and stroke indices. CHanges in the lungs and pleural cavities were found in 22,7%, pulmonary edema was revealed in 15,7% of the patients. The prognostically unfavourable criteria for the development of pulmonary edema were found to be Stage 2 pulmonary venous hypertension with hypervolemia and peripheral edemas

  9. Predicting attitudes toward nanotechnology: The influence of cultural and predispositional values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsung-Jen

    Past experience in dealing with biotechnology has suggested that public opinion plays an important role in determining the prosperity of emerging technologies. A great amount of money and energy, therefore, were invested to understand nanotechnology's impact on the society and the public, in addition to the technical advancement of the technology. However, most studies examining public opinion have focused on personal level factors and have ignored the potential influence of cultural factors. This study addresses this gap by analyzing public opinion in 21 countries, including the US and 20 European countries. Specifically, this study examines the impact of predispositional and cultural values on public support for nanotechnology, with the mediating roles of moral judgment and risk perception accounted for. This study also looks into the dynamics between cultural values and predispositional values; that is, how cultural values may moderate the effects of predispositional values in affecting attitudes toward nanotechnology. The results indicate that people rely on "information shortcuts," such as confidence and religious belief, for decision making. Individual-level factors still play an important role in shaping public attitudes even after country-level factors are controlled. Furthermore, aggregate cultural values provide people with important "mental programs" to interpret nanotechnology. They explain why people in different cultures have different moral and risk perceptions. However, most of the cultural values do not affect public support directly, suggesting that public support is contingent greatly on the core characteristics of nanotechnology, such as its usefulness, risk, and moral acceptability, which, in turn, is influenced by personal beliefs and cultural givens. The results also suggest that people in different cultures respond to survey questions in different manners. People living in cultures emphasizing uncertainty avoidance and individualism are more

  10. HLA and non-HLA genes and familial predisposition to autoimmune diseases in families with a child affected by type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkkola, Anna; Laine, Antti-Pekka; Karhunen, Markku; Härkönen, Taina; Ryhänen, Samppa J; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael

    2017-01-01

    Genetic predisposition could be assumed to be causing clustering of autoimmunity in individuals and families. We tested whether HLA and non-HLA loci associate with such clustering of autoimmunity. We included 1,745 children with type 1 diabetes from the Finnish Pediatric Diabetes Register. Data on personal or family history of autoimmune diseases were collected with a structured questionnaire and, for a subset, with a detailed search for celiac disease and autoimmune thyroid disease. Children with multiple autoimmune diseases or with multiple affected first- or second-degree relatives were identified. We analysed type 1 diabetes related HLA class II haplotypes and genotyped 41 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) outside the HLA region. The HLA-DR4-DQ8 haplotype was associated with having type 1 diabetes only whereas the HLA-DR3-DQ2 haplotype was more common in children with multiple autoimmune diseases. Children with multiple autoimmune diseases showed nominal association with RGS1 (rs2816316), and children coming from an autoimmune family with rs11711054 (CCR3-CCR5). In multivariate analyses, the overall effect of non-HLA SNPs on both phenotypes was evident, associations with RGS1 and CCR3-CCR5 region were confirmed and additional associations were implicated: NRP1, FUT2, and CD69 for children with multiple autoimmune diseases. In conclusion, HLA-DR3-DQ2 haplotype and some non-HLA SNPs contribute to the clustering of autoimmune diseases in children with type 1 diabetes and in their families.

  11. Ashkenazi Jewish genetic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrow, Joel

    2004-01-01

    The frequency of several genes responsible for 'single-gene' disorders and disease predispositions is higher among Ashkenazi Jews than among Sephardi Jews and non-Jews. The disparity is most likely the result of founder effect and genetic drift, rather than heterozygote advantage. The more common Mendelian Ashkenazi Jewish genetic disorders are summarized, and examples of variable expressivity and penetrance, inconsistent genotype-phenotype correlation, and potential modifiers are presented. The importance of genetic counseling in both the pre- and post-test phases of population screening is emphasized.

  12. Sex-stratified genome-wide association studies including 270,000 individuals show sexual dimorphism in genetic loci for anthropometric traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Randall, Joshua C.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Berndt, Sonja I.; Jackson, Anne U.; Monda, Keri L.; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Li, Shengxu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Feitosa, Mary F.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Day, Felix R.; Fall, Tove; Ferreira, Teresa; Gustafsson, Stefan; Locke, Adam E.; Mathieson, Iain; Scherag, Andre; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wood, Andrew R.; Liang, Liming; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Dimas, Antigone S.; Karpe, Fredrik; Min, Josine L.; Nicholson, George; Clegg, Deborah J.; Person, Thomas; Krohn, Jon P.; Bauer, Sabrina; Buechler, Christa; Eisinger, Kristina; Bonnefond, Amélie; Froguel, Philippe; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Prokopenko, Inga; Waite, Lindsay L.; Harris, Tamara B.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Shuldiner, Alan R.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Grönberg, Henrik; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Li, Guo; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Johnson, Toby; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Teder-Laving, Maris; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Amin, Najaf; Oostra, Ben A.; Kraja, Aldi T.; Province, Michael A.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Ripatti, Samuli; Surakka, Ida; Collins, Francis S.; Saramies, Jouko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Jula, Antti; Salomaa, Veikko; Erdmann, Jeanette; Hengstenberg, Christian; Loley, Christina; Schunkert, Heribert; Lamina, Claudia; Wichmann, H. Erich; Albrecht, Eva; Gieger, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Johansson, Asa; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Penninx, Brenda; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Gyllensten, Ulf; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Campbell, Harry; Wilson, James F.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Farrall, Martin; Goel, Anuj; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Estrada, Karol; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Zillikens, M. Carola; den Heijer, Martin; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Maschio, Andrea; Hall, Per; Tyrer, Jonathan; Teumer, Alexander; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Tönjes, Anke; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D.; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Hall, Alistair S.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Attwood, Antony Paul; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Hung, Joseph; Palmer, Lyle J.; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Boucher, Gabrielle; Huikuri, Heikki; Lorentzon, Mattias; Ohlsson, Claes; Eklund, Niina; Eriksson, Johan G.; Barlassina, Cristina; Rivolta, Carlo; Nolte, Ilja M.; Snieder, Harold; van der Klauw, Melanie M.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Gejman, Pablo V.; Shi, Jianxin; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Wang, Zhaoming; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Mateo Leach, Irene; Navis, Gerjan; van der Harst, Pim; Martin, Nicholas G.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Yang, Jian; Chasman, Daniel I.; Ridker, Paul M.; Rose, Lynda M.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli; Absher, Devin; Iribarren, Carlos; Basart, Hanneke; Hovingh, Kees G.; Hyppönen, Elina; Power, Chris; Anderson, Denise; Beilby, John P.; Hui, Jennie; Jolley, Jennifer; Sager, Hendrik; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Kristiansson, Kati; Perola, Markus; Lindström, Jaana; Swift, Amy J.; Uusitupa, Matti; Atalay, Mustafa; Lakka, Timo A.; Rauramaa, Rainer; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Fowkes, Gerry; Fraser, Ross M.; Price, Jackie F.; Fischer, Krista; Krjutå Kov, Kaarel; Metspalu, Andres; Mihailov, Evelin; Langenberg, Claudia; Luan, Jian'an; Ong, Ken K.; Chines, Peter S.; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Saaristo, Timo E.; Edkins, Sarah; Franks, Paul W.; Hallmans, Göran; Shungin, Dmitry; Morris, Andrew David; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Erbel, Raimund; Moebus, Susanne; Nöthen, Markus M.; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Hveem, Kristian; Narisu, Narisu; Hamsten, Anders; Humphries, Steve E.; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Tremoli, Elena; Grallert, Harald; Thorand, Barbara; Illig, Thomas; Koenig, Wolfgang; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Peters, Annette; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Kleber, Marcus E.; März, Winfried; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Arveiler, Dominique; Cesana, Giancarlo; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Virtamo, Jarmo; Yarnell, John W. G.; Kuh, Diana; Wong, Andrew; Lind, Lars; de Faire, Ulf; Gigante, Bruna; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Dedoussis, George; Dimitriou, Maria; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kanoni, Stavroula; Stirrups, Kathleen; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Njølstad, Inger; Wilsgaard, Tom; Ganna, Andrea; Rehnberg, Emil; Hingorani, Aroon; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Frayling, Timothy; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David; Ingelsson, Erik; Kaplan, Robert; Mohlke, Karen L.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P.; Stefansson, Kari; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Qi, Lu; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; North, Kari E.; Heid, Iris M.

    2013-01-01

    Given the anthropometric differences between men and women and previous evidence of sex-difference in genetic effects, we conducted a genome-wide search for sexually dimorphic associations with height, weight, body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, and waist-to-hip-ratio (133,723

  13. Sex-stratified genome-wide association studies including 270,000 individuals show sexual dimorphism in genetic loci for anthropometric traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Randall, Joshua C; Winkler, Thomas W; Kutalik, Zoltán; Berndt, Sonja I; Jackson, Anne U; Monda, Keri L; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Li, Shengxu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Feitosa, Mary F; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Day, Felix R; Fall, Tove; Ferreira, Teresa; Gustafsson, Stefan; Locke, Adam E; Mathieson, Iain; Scherag, Andre; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wood, Andrew R; Liang, Liming; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Dimas, Antigone S; Karpe, Fredrik; Min, Josine L; Nicholson, George; Clegg, Deborah J; Person, Thomas; Krohn, Jon P; Bauer, Sabrina; Buechler, Christa; Eisinger, Kristina; Bonnefond, Amélie; Froguel, Philippe; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Prokopenko, Inga; Waite, Lindsay L; Harris, Tamara B; Smith, Albert Vernon; Shuldiner, Alan R; McArdle, Wendy L; Caulfield, Mark J; Munroe, Patricia B; Grönberg, Henrik; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Li, Guo; Beckmann, Jacques S; Johnson, Toby; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Teder-Laving, Maris; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Zhao, Jing Hua; Amin, Najaf; Oostra, Ben A; Kraja, Aldi T; Province, Michael A; Cupples, L Adrienne; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Kaprio, Jaakko; Ripatti, Samuli; Surakka, Ida; Collins, Francis S; Saramies, Jouko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Jula, Antti; Salomaa, Veikko; Erdmann, Jeanette; Hengstenberg, Christian; Loley, Christina; Schunkert, Heribert; Lamina, Claudia; Wichmann, H Erich; Albrecht, Eva; Gieger, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Johansson, Asa; Pramstaller, Peter P; Kathiresan, Sekar; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Penninx, Brenda; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Gyllensten, Ulf; Boomsma, Dorret I; Campbell, Harry; Wilson, James F; Chanock, Stephen J; Farrall, Martin; Goel, Anuj; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Estrada, Karol; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Zillikens, M Carola; den Heijer, Martin; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Maschio, Andrea; Hall, Per; Tyrer, Jonathan; Teumer, Alexander; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Tönjes, Anke; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Hall, Alistair S; Samani, Nilesh J; Attwood, Antony Paul; Sambrook, Jennifer G; Hung, Joseph; Palmer, Lyle J; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Boucher, Gabrielle; Huikuri, Heikki; Lorentzon, Mattias; Ohlsson, Claes; Eklund, Niina; Eriksson, Johan G; Barlassina, Cristina; Rivolta, Carlo; Nolte, Ilja M; Snieder, Harold; Van der Klauw, Melanie M; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Gejman, Pablo V; Shi, Jianxin; Jacobs, Kevin B; Wang, Zhaoming; Bakker, Stephan J L; Mateo Leach, Irene; Navis, Gerjan; van der Harst, Pim; Martin, Nicholas G; Medland, Sarah E; Montgomery, Grant W; Yang, Jian; Chasman, Daniel I; Ridker, Paul M; Rose, Lynda M; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli; Absher, Devin; Iribarren, Carlos; Basart, Hanneke; Hovingh, Kees G; Hyppönen, Elina; Power, Chris; Anderson, Denise; Beilby, John P; Hui, Jennie; Jolley, Jennifer; Sager, Hendrik; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Kristiansson, Kati; Perola, Markus; Lindström, Jaana; Swift, Amy J; Uusitupa, Matti; Atalay, Mustafa; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerry; Fraser, Ross M; Price, Jackie F; Fischer, Krista; Krjutå Kov, Kaarel; Metspalu, Andres; Mihailov, Evelin; Langenberg, Claudia; Luan, Jian'an; Ong, Ken K; Chines, Peter S; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Edkins, Sarah; Franks, Paul W; Hallmans, Göran; Shungin, Dmitry; Morris, Andrew David; Palmer, Colin N A; Erbel, Raimund; Moebus, Susanne; Nöthen, Markus M; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Hveem, Kristian; Narisu, Narisu; Hamsten, Anders; Humphries, Steve E; Strawbridge, Rona J; Tremoli, Elena; Grallert, Harald; Thorand, Barbara; Illig, Thomas; Koenig, Wolfgang; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Peters, Annette; Boehm, Bernhard O; Kleber, Marcus E; März, Winfried; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Arveiler, Dominique; Cesana, Giancarlo; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Virtamo, Jarmo; Yarnell, John W G; Kuh, Diana; Wong, Andrew; Lind, Lars; de Faire, Ulf; Gigante, Bruna; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Pedersen, Nancy L; Dedoussis, George; Dimitriou, Maria; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kanoni, Stavroula; Stirrups, Kathleen; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Njølstad, Inger; Wilsgaard, Tom; Ganna, Andrea; Rehnberg, Emil; Hingorani, Aroon; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Assimes, Themistocles L; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S; Frayling, Timothy; Groop, Leif C; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David; Ingelsson, Erik; Kaplan, Robert; Mohlke, Karen L; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; Stefansson, Kari; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; McCarthy, Mark I; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Qi, Lu; Loos, Ruth J F; Lindgren, Cecilia M; North, Kari E; Heid, Iris M

    Given the anthropometric differences between men and women and previous evidence of sex-difference in genetic effects, we conducted a genome-wide search for sexually dimorphic associations with height, weight, body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, and waist-to-hip-ratio (133,723

  14. Sex-stratified Genome-wide Association Studies Including 270,000 Individuals Show Sexual Dimorphism in Genetic Loci for Anthropometric Traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randall, Joshua C; Winkler, Thomas W; Kutalik, Zoltán

    2013-01-01

    Given the anthropometric differences between men and women and previous evidence of sex-difference in genetic effects, we conducted a genome-wide search for sexually dimorphic associations with height, weight, body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, and waist-to-hip-ratio (133,72...

  15. Sex-stratified Genome-wide Association Studies Including 270,000 Individuals Show Sexual Dimorphism in Genetic Loci for Anthropometric Traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Randall, J.C.; Winkler, T.W.; Kutalik, Z.; Berndt, S.I.; Jackson, A.U.; Monda, K.L.; Kilpelainen, T.O.; Esko, T.; Magi, R.; Li, S.; Workalemahu, T.; Feitosa, M.F.; Croteau-Chonka, D.C.; Day, F.R.; Fall, T.; Ferreira, T.; Gustafsson, S.; Locke, A.E.; Mathieson, I.; Scherag, A.; Vedantam, S.; Wood, A.R.; Liang, L.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Thorleifsson, G.; Dermitzakis, E.T.; Dimas, A.S.; Karpe, F.; Min, J.L.; Nicholson, G.; Clegg, D.J.; Person, T.; Krohn, J.P.; Bauer, S.; Buechler, C.; Eisinger, K.; Bonnefond, A.; Froguel, P.; Hottenga, J.J.; Prokopenko, I.; Waite, L.L.; Harris, T.B.; Smith, A.V.; Shuldiner, A.R.; McArdle, W.L.; Caulfield, M.J.; Munroe, P.B.; Gronberg, H.; Chen, Y.D.; Li, G.; Beckmann, J.S.; Johnson, T.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Teder-Laving, M.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.J.; Zhao, J.H.; Amin, N.; Oostra, B.A.; Kraja, A.T.; Province, M.A.; Cupples, L.A.; Heard-Costa, N.L.; Kaprio, J.; Ripatti, S.; Surakka, I.; Collins, F.S.; Saramies, J.; Tuomilehto, J.; Jula, A.; Salomaa, V.; Erdmann, J.; Hengstenberg, C.; Loley, C.; Schunkert, H.; Lamina, C.; Wichmann, H.E.; Albrecht, E.; Gieger, C.; Hicks, A.A.; Johansson, A; Pramstaller, P.P.; Kathiresan, S.; Speliotes, E.K.; Penninx, B.; Hartikainen, A.L.; Jarvelin, M.R.; Gyllensten, U.; Boomsma, D.I.; Campbell, H.; Wilson, J.F.; Chanock, S.J.; Farrall, M.; Goel, A.; Medina-Gomez, C.; Rivadeneira, F.; Estrada, K.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Heijer, M. den; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    Given the anthropometric differences between men and women and previous evidence of sex-difference in genetic effects, we conducted a genome-wide search for sexually dimorphic associations with height, weight, body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, and waist-to-hip-ratio (133,723

  16. Stocking the genetic supermarket: reproductive genetic technologies and collective action problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyngell, Chris; Douglas, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Reproductive genetic technologies (RGTs) allow parents to decide whether their future children will have or lack certain genetic predispositions. A popular model that has been proposed for regulating access to RGTs is the 'genetic supermarket'. In the genetic supermarket, parents are free to make decisions about which genes to select for their children with little state interference. One possible consequence of the genetic supermarket is that collective action problems will arise: if rational individuals use the genetic supermarket in isolation from one another, this may have a negative effect on society as a whole, including future generations. In this article we argue that RGTs targeting height, innate immunity, and certain cognitive traits could lead to collective action problems. We then discuss whether this risk could in principle justify state intervention in the genetic supermarket. We argue that there is a plausible prima facie case for the view that such state intervention would be justified and respond to a number of arguments that might be adduced against that view. © 2014 The Authors. Bioethics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Prepubertal Ovariectomy Exaggerates Adult Affective Behaviors and Alters the Hippocampal Transcriptome in a Genetic Rat Model of Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Neha S.; Chen, Hao; Schipma, Matthew; Luo, Wendy; Chung, Sarah; Wang, Lei; Redei, Eva E.

    2018-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a debilitating illness that affects twice as many women than men postpuberty. This female bias is thought to be caused by greater heritability of MDD in women and increased vulnerability induced by female sex hormones. We tested this hypothesis by removing the ovaries from prepubertal Wistar Kyoto (WKY) more immobile (WMI) females, a genetic animal model of depression, and its genetically close control, the WKY less immobile (WLI). In adulthood, prepubertally ovariectomized (PrePubOVX) animals and their Sham-operated controls were tested for depression- and anxiety-like behaviors, using the routinely employed forced swim and open field tests, respectively, and RNA-sequencing was performed on their hippocampal RNA. Our results confirmed that the behavioral and hippocampal expression changes that occur after prepubertal ovariectomy are the consequences of an interaction between genetic predisposition to depressive behavior and ovarian hormone-regulated processes. Lack of ovarian hormones during and after puberty in the WLIs led to increased depression-like behavior. In WMIs, both depression- and anxiety-like behaviors worsened by prepubertal ovariectomy. The unbiased exploration of the hippocampal transcriptome identified sets of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the strains and treatment groups. The relatively small number of hippocampal DEGs resulting from the genetic differences between the strains confirmed the genetic relatedness of these strains. Nevertheless, the differences in DEGs between the strains in response to prepubertal ovariectomy identified different molecular processes, including the importance of glucocorticoid receptor-mediated mechanisms, that may be causative of the increased depression-like behavior in the presence or absence of genetic predisposition. This study contributes to the understanding of hormonal maturation-induced changes in affective behaviors and the hippocampal transcriptome as it

  18. Prepubertal Ovariectomy Exaggerates Adult Affective Behaviors and Alters the Hippocampal Transcriptome in a Genetic Rat Model of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha S. Raghavan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD is a debilitating illness that affects twice as many women than men postpuberty. This female bias is thought to be caused by greater heritability of MDD in women and increased vulnerability induced by female sex hormones. We tested this hypothesis by removing the ovaries from prepubertal Wistar Kyoto (WKY more immobile (WMI females, a genetic animal model of depression, and its genetically close control, the WKY less immobile (WLI. In adulthood, prepubertally ovariectomized (PrePubOVX animals and their Sham-operated controls were tested for depression- and anxiety-like behaviors, using the routinely employed forced swim and open field tests, respectively, and RNA-sequencing was performed on their hippocampal RNA. Our results confirmed that the behavioral and hippocampal expression changes that occur after prepubertal ovariectomy are the consequences of an interaction between genetic predisposition to depressive behavior and ovarian hormone-regulated processes. Lack of ovarian hormones during and after puberty in the WLIs led to increased depression-like behavior. In WMIs, both depression- and anxiety-like behaviors worsened by prepubertal ovariectomy. The unbiased exploration of the hippocampal transcriptome identified sets of differentially expressed genes (DEGs between the strains and treatment groups. The relatively small number of hippocampal DEGs resulting from the genetic differences between the strains confirmed the genetic relatedness of these strains. Nevertheless, the differences in DEGs between the strains in response to prepubertal ovariectomy identified different molecular processes, including the importance of glucocorticoid receptor-mediated mechanisms, that may be causative of the increased depression-like behavior in the presence or absence of genetic predisposition. This study contributes to the understanding of hormonal maturation-induced changes in affective behaviors and the hippocampal

  19. Comparative analyses of genetic risk prediction methods reveal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 94; Issue 1. Comparative analyses of genetic risk prediction methods reveal extreme diversity of genetic predisposition to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) among ethnic populations of India. Ankita Chatterjee Analabha Basu Abhijit Chowdhury Kausik Das Neeta ...

  20. Prophylactic surgery in women with a hereditary predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, A; Rebbeck, T R; Wood, W C; Weber, B L

    2000-05-01

    To review the published literature on the efficacy and adverse effects of prophylactic mastectomy (PM) and prophylactic oophorectomy (PO) in women with a hereditary predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer and to provide management recommendations for these women. Using the terms "prophylactic," "preventive," "bilateral," "mastectomy," "oophorectomy," and "ovariectomy," a MEDLINE search of the English-language literature for articles related to PM and PO was performed. The bibliographies of these articles were reviewed to identify additional relevant references. There have been no prospective trials of PM or PO for the reduction of breast cancer or ovarian cancer incidence or mortality. Most of the available retrospective studies are composed of women who had surgery for a variety of indications and in whom genetic risk was not well characterized. However, some reports in women at increased risk of breast or ovarian cancer have shown that PM and PO can reduce cancer incidence. Interest in and use of PM and PO are high among physicians and high-risk women. PM and PO seem to be associated with considerable reduction in the risk of breast and ovarian cancer, albeit incomplete. The surgical morbidity of PM and PO is low, but the complications of premature menopause may be significant, and few studies address quality-of-life issues in women who have opted for PM and PO. Management recommendations for high-risk individuals are presented on the basis of the available evidence.

  1. Cliff-edge model predicts intergenerational predisposition to dystocia and Caesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitteroecker, Philipp; Windhager, Sonja; Pavlicev, Mihaela

    2017-10-31

    Recently, we presented the cliff-edge model to explain the evolutionary persistence of relatively high incidences of fetopelvic disproportion (FPD) in human childbirth. According to this model, the regular application of Caesarean sections since the mid-20th century has triggered an evolutionary increase of fetal size relative to the dimensions of the maternal birth canal, which, in turn, has inflated incidences of FPD. While this prediction is difficult to test in epidemiological data on Caesarean sections, the model also implies that women born by Caesarean because of FPD are more likely to develop FPD in their own childbirth compared with women born vaginally. Multigenerational epidemiological studies indeed evidence such an intergenerational predisposition to surgical delivery. When confined to anatomical indications, these studies report risks for Caesarean up to twice as high for women born by Caesarean compared with women born vaginally. These findings provide independent support for our model, which we show here predicts that the risk of FPD for mothers born by Caesarean because of FPD is 2.8 times the risk for mothers born vaginally. The congruence between these data and our prediction lends support to the cliff-edge model of obstetric selection and its underlying assumptions, despite the genetic and anatomical idealizations involved. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  2. The Effect of Phototherapy on Cancer Predisposition Genes of Diabetic and Normal Human Skin Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongsathorn Chotikasemsri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate whether LED light at different wavelengths affects the expression profile of 143 cancer predisposition genes in both diabetic and normal human fibroblasts. In this study, both diabetic and normal fibroblast cell lines were cultured and irradiated with red (635 nm, green (520 nm, and blue (465 nm LED light for 10 minutes at 0.67 J/cm2 each. After that, mRNA from all cell lines was extracted for microarray analysis. We found that green light activates EPHB2, KIT, ANTXR2, ESCO2, MSR1, EXT1, TSC1, KIT, NF1, BUB1B, FANCD2, EPCAM, FANCD2, NF, DIS3L2, and RET in normal fibroblast cells, while blue and red light can upregulate RUNX1, PDGFRA, EHBP1, GPC3, AXIN2, KDR, GLMN, MSMB, EPHB2, MSR1, KIT, FANCD2, BMPR1A, BUB1B, PDE11A, and RET. Therefore, genetic screening before phototherapy treatment may be required.

  3. The Effect of Phototherapy on Cancer Predisposition Genes of Diabetic and Normal Human Skin Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotikasemsri, Pongsathorn; Tangtrakulwanich, Boonsin; Sangkhathat, Surasak

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether LED light at different wavelengths affects the expression profile of 143 cancer predisposition genes in both diabetic and normal human fibroblasts. In this study, both diabetic and normal fibroblast cell lines were cultured and irradiated with red (635 nm), green (520 nm), and blue (465 nm) LED light for 10 minutes at 0.67 J/cm 2 each. After that, mRNA from all cell lines was extracted for microarray analysis. We found that green light activates EPHB2, KIT, ANTXR2, ESCO2, MSR1, EXT1, TSC1, KIT, NF1, BUB1B, FANCD2, EPCAM, FANCD2, NF, DIS3L2, and RET in normal fibroblast cells, while blue and red light can upregulate RUNX1, PDGFRA, EHBP1, GPC3, AXIN2, KDR, GLMN, MSMB, EPHB2, MSR1, KIT, FANCD2, BMPR1A, BUB1B, PDE11A, and RET. Therefore, genetic screening before phototherapy treatment may be required.

  4. Cell culture isolation and sequence analysis of genetically diverse US porcine epidemic diarrhea virus strains including a novel strain with a large deletion in the spike gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Tomoichiro; Saif, Linda J; Marthaler, Douglas; Esseili, Malak A; Meulia, Tea; Lin, Chun-Ming; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Jung, Kwonil; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Qiuhong

    2014-10-10

    The highly contagious and deadly porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) first appeared in the US in April 2013. Since then the virus has spread rapidly nationwide and to Canada and Mexico causing high mortality among nursing piglets and significant economic losses. Currently there are no efficacious preventive measures or therapeutic tools to control PEDV in the US. The isolation of PEDV in cell culture is the first step toward the development of an attenuated vaccine, to study the biology of PEDV and to develop in vitro PEDV immunoassays, inactivation assays and screen for PEDV antivirals. In this study, nine of 88 US PEDV strains were isolated successfully on Vero cells with supplemental trypsin and subjected to genomic sequence analysis. They differed genetically mainly in the N-terminal S protein region as follows: (1) strains (n=7) similar to the highly virulent US PEDV strains; (2) one similar to the reportedly US S INDEL PEDV strain; and (3) one novel strain most closely related to highly virulent US PEDV strains, but with a large (197aa) deletion in the S protein. Representative strains of these three genetic groups were passaged serially and grew to titers of ∼5-6log10 plaque forming units/mL. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation in cell culture of an S INDEL PEDV strain and a PEDV strain with a large (197aa) deletion in the S protein. We also designed primer sets to detect these genetically diverse US PEDV strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The frequency of cancer predisposition gene mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer patients in Taiwan: From BRCA1/2 to multi-gene panels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pi-Lin Sung

    Full Text Available An important role of genetic factors in the development of breast cancer (BC or ovarian cancer (OC in Taiwanese (ethnic Chinese patients has been suggested. However, other than germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, which are related to hereditary breast-ovarian cancer (HBOC, cancer-predisposition genes have not been well studied in this population. The aim of the present study was to more accurately summarize the prevalence of genetic mutations in HBOC patients using various gene panels ranging in size from BRCA1/2 alone to multi-gene panels. Among 272 HBOC patients analyzed, the prevalence of BRCA1, BRCA2 and non-BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations was 7.7% (21/272, 6.8% (16/236 and 8.2% (13/159, respectively. The total mutation rate was 18.4% (50/272. Although no founder mutations were identified in this study, two recurrent mutations, BRCA1 (c.3607C>T and BRCA2 (c.5164_5165 delAG, were found. The main pathogenic/likely pathogenic mutations in non-BRCA1/2 genes included ATM, BRIP1, FANCI, MSH2, MUYTH, RAD50, RAD51C and TP53. The prevalence rate of gene mutations in HBOC patients did not differ with respect to whether BC or OC was the first diagnosis or they presented a family history of the disease or their age at diagnosis. HBOC patients with both BC and OC exhibited a higher prevalence rate of mutations (50.0% than patients with OC (25.0% or BC (8.6% alone. In conclusion, evaluation of hereditary cancer risk in Taiwan HBOC patients, particularly individuals with double cancer, is strongly encouraged. Panel testing can yield additional genomic information, and widespread and well-designed panel testing will help in assessing more accurate mutational prevalence of risk genes.

  6. Genetic Basis of Positive and Negative Symptom Domains in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Rose Mary; Vorderstrasse, Allison

    2017-10-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder, the genetic etiology of which has been well established. Yet despite significant advances in genetics research, the pathophysiological mechanisms of this disorder largely remain unknown. This gap has been attributed to the complexity of the polygenic disorder, which has a heterogeneous clinical profile. Examining the genetic basis of schizophrenia subphenotypes, such as those based on particular symptoms, is thus a useful strategy for decoding the underlying mechanisms. This review of literature examines the recent advances (from 2011) in genetic exploration of positive and negative symptoms in schizophrenia. We searched electronic databases PubMed, Web of Science, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature using key words schizophrenia, symptoms, positive symptoms, negative symptoms, cognition, genetics, genes, genetic predisposition, and genotype in various combinations. We identified 115 articles, which are included in the review. Evidence from these studies, most of which are genetic association studies, identifies shared and unique gene associations for the symptom domains. Genes associated with neurotransmitter systems and neuronal development/maintenance primarily constitute the shared associations. Needed are studies that examine the genetic basis of specific symptoms within the broader domains in addition to functional mechanisms. Such investigations are critical to developing precision treatment and care for individuals afflicted with schizophrenia.

  7. An Evolutionary Genetic Perspective of Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Alexandra J; Pigeyre, Marie; Couturier, Jennifer; Meyre, David

    2018-01-01

    Eating disorders (ED) including anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED) affect up to 5% of the population in Western countries. Risk factors for developing an ED include personality traits, family environment, gender, age, ethnicity, and culture. Despite being moderately to highly heritable with estimates ranging from 28 to 83%, no genetic risk factors have been conclusively identified. Our objective was to explore evolutionary theories of EDs to provide a new perspective on research into novel biological mechanisms and genetic causes of EDs. We developed a framework that explains the possible interactions between genetic risk and cultural influences in the development of ED. The framework includes three genetic predisposition categories (people with mainly AN restrictive gene variants, people with mainly BED variants, and people with gene variants predisposing to both diseases) and a binary variable of either the presence or absence of pressure to be thin. We propose novel theories to explain the overlapping characteristics of the subtypes of AN (binge/purge and restrictive), BN, and BED. For instance, mutations/structural gene variants in the same gene causing opposite effects or mutations in nearby genes resulting in partial disequilibrium for the genes causing AN (restrictive) and BED may explain the overlap of phenotypes seen in AN (binge/purge). © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Prospective cohort study of cannabis use, predisposition for psychosis, and psychotic symptoms in young people.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henquet, C.J.; Krabbendam, L.; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Kaplan, C.; Lieb, R.; Wittchen, H.U.; Os, J. van

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relation between cannabis use and psychotic symptoms in individuals with above average predisposition for psychosis who first used cannabis during adolescence. DESIGN: Analysis of prospective data from a population based sample. Assessment of substance use,

  9. MAJOR MOLECULAR GENETIC DRIVERS IN SPORADIC PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is primarily due to a solitary parathyroid adenoma but multi-gland disease, parathyroid carcinoma, and ectopic parathyroid hormone production can occur. Although primary hyperparathyroidism mostly presents sporadically, strong familial predispositions also exist. Much is known about heritable genetic mutations responsible for these syndromes, including multiple endocrine neoplasia types 1 and 2A, hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome, and familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia. Acquired mutations in common sporadic hyperparathyroidism have also been discovered. Here we focus on the most common and well-established genetic drivers: 1) involvement of the oncogene cyclin D1 in human neoplasia was first established in parathyroid adenomas, followed by recognition of its importance in other tumor types including breast cancer and B-lymphoid malignancy; and 2) somatic mutation of the MEN1 gene, first identified as the source of pathogenic germline mutations in patients with familial endocrinopathies, is found in a substantial fraction of non-familial parathyroid adenomas.

  10. The Genetic Architecture of Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel T Jerram

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D is classically characterised by the clinical need for insulin, the presence of disease-associated serum autoantibodies, and an onset in childhood. The disease, as with other autoimmune diseases, is due to the interaction of genetic and non-genetic effects, which induce a destructive process damaging insulin-secreting cells. In this review, we focus on the nature of this interaction, and how our understanding of that gene–environment interaction has changed our understanding of the nature of the disease. We discuss the early onset of the disease, the development of distinct immunogenotypes, and the declining heritability with increasing age at diagnosis. Whilst Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA have a major role in causing T1D, we note that some of these HLA genes have a protective role, especially in children, whilst other non-HLA genes are also important. In adult-onset T1D, the disease is often not insulin-dependent at diagnosis, and has a dissimilar immunogenotype with reduced genetic predisposition. Finally, we discuss the putative nature of the non-genetic factors and how they might interact with genetic susceptibility, including preliminary studies of the epigenome associated with T1D.

  11. Genetics of upper and lower airway diseases in the horse.

    OpenAIRE

    Gerber V; Tessier C; Marti E

    2014-01-01

    Genetic predispositions for guttural pouch tympany recurrent laryngeal neuropathy and recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) are well documented. There is also evidence that exercise induced pulmonary haemorrhage and infectious diseases of the respiratory tract in horses have a genetic component. The clinical expression of equine respiratory diseases with a genetic basis results from complex interactions between the environment and the genetic make up of each individual horse. The genetic effects...

  12. Melanoma genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Read, Jazlyn; Wadt, Karin A W; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 10% of melanoma cases report a relative affected with melanoma, and a positive family history is associated with an increased risk of developing melanoma. Although the majority of genetic alterations associated with melanoma development are somatic, the underlying presence of herita......Approximately 10% of melanoma cases report a relative affected with melanoma, and a positive family history is associated with an increased risk of developing melanoma. Although the majority of genetic alterations associated with melanoma development are somatic, the underlying presence...... in a combined total of approximately 50% of familial melanoma cases, the underlying genetic basis is unexplained for the remainder of high-density melanoma families. Aside from the possibility of extremely rare mutations in a few additional high penetrance genes yet to be discovered, this suggests a likely...... polygenic component to susceptibility, and a unique level of personal melanoma risk influenced by multiple low-risk alleles and genetic modifiers. In addition to conferring a risk of cutaneous melanoma, some 'melanoma' predisposition genes have been linked to other cancers, with cancer clustering observed...

  13. From predisposition to psychosis: progression of symptoms in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parnas, Josef

    1999-01-01

    Schizophrenia is increasingly viewed as a neurodevelopmental process caused by an interaction between genetic factors and environmental stressors. Prospective studies and retrospective research using objective data indicate that behavioural deviations can be dated to early infancy and cut across...

  14. Genetic fixity in the human major histocompatibility complex and block size diversity in the class I region including HLA-E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Viviana; Larsen, Charles E; Duke-Cohan, Jonathan S; Fox, Edward A; Romero, Tatiana; Clavijo, Olga P; Fici, Dolores A; Husain, Zaheed; Almeciga, Ingrid; Alford, Dennis R; Awdeh, Zuheir L; Zuñiga, Joaquin; El-Dahdah, Lama; Alper, Chester A; Yunis, Edmond J

    2007-04-12

    The definition of human MHC class I haplotypes through association of HLA-A, HLA-Cw and HLA-B has been used to analyze ethnicity, population migrations and disease association. Here, we present HLA-E allele haplotype association and population linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis within the ~1.3 Mb bounded by HLA-B/Cw and HLA-A to increase the resolution of identified class I haplotypes. Through local breakdown of LD, we inferred ancestral recombination points both upstream and downstream of HLA-E contributing to alternative block structures within previously identified haplotypes. Through single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis of the MHC region, we also confirmed the essential genetic fixity, previously inferred by MHC allele analysis, of three conserved extended haplotypes (CEHs), and we demonstrated that commercially-available SNP analysis can be used in the MHC to help define CEHs and CEH fragments. We conclude that to generate high-resolution maps for relating MHC haplotypes to disease susceptibility, both SNP and MHC allele analysis must be conducted as complementary techniques.

  15. The genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Flannick, Jason; Teslovich, Tanya M

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of common traits, including the number, frequency, and effect sizes of inherited variants that contribute to individual risk, has been long debated. Genome-wide association studies have identified scores of common variants associated with type 2 diabetes, but in aggregate......,940 individuals from five ancestry groups. To increase statistical power, we expanded the sample size via genotyping and imputation in a further 111,548 subjects. Variants associated with type 2 diabetes after sequencing were overwhelmingly common and most fell within regions previously identified by genome......-wide association studies. Comprehensive enumeration of sequence variation is necessary to identify functional alleles that provide important clues to disease pathophysiology, but large-scale sequencing does not support the idea that lower-frequency variants have a major role in predisposition to type 2 diabetes....

  16. NMD and microRNA expression profiling of the HPCX1 locus reveal MAGEC1 as a candidate prostate cancer predisposition gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattila, Henna; Schindler, Martin; Isotalo, Jarkko; Ikonen, Tarja; Vihinen, Mauno; Oja, Hannu; Tammela, Teuvo LJ; Wahlfors, Tiina; Schleutker, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    Several predisposition loci for hereditary prostate cancer (HPC) have been suggested, including HPCX1 at Xq27-q28, but due to the complex structure of the region, the susceptibility gene has not yet been identified. In this study, nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) inhibition was used for the discovery of truncating mutations. Six prostate cancer (PC) patients and their healthy brothers were selected from a group of HPCX1-linked families. Expression analyses were done using Agilent 44 K oligoarrays, and selected genes were screened for mutations by direct sequencing. In addition, microRNA expression levels in the lymphoblastic cells were analyzed to trace variants that might alter miRNA expression and explain partly an inherited genetic predisposion to PC. Seventeen genes were selected for resequencing based on the NMD array, but no truncating mutations were found. The most interesting variant was MAGEC1 p.Met1?. An association was seen between the variant and unselected PC (OR = 2.35, 95% CI = 1.10-5.02) and HPC (OR = 3.38, 95% CI = 1.10-10.40). miRNA analysis revealed altogether 29 miRNAs with altered expression between the PC cases and controls. miRNA target analysis revealed that 12 of them also had possible target sites in the MAGEC1 gene. These miRNAs were selected for validation process including four miRNAs located in the X chromosome. The expressions of 14 miRNAs were validated in families that contributed to the significant signal differences in Agilent arrays. Further functional studies are needed to fully understand the possible contribution of these miRNAs and MAGEC1 start codon variant to PC

  17. Unifying diseases from a genetic point of view: the example of the genetic theory of infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrason, Marie

    2013-08-01

    In the contemporary biomedical literature, every disease is considered genetic. This extension of the concept of genetic disease is usually interpreted either in a trivial or genocentrist sense, but it is never taken seriously as the expression of a genetic theory of disease. However, a group of French researchers defend the idea of a genetic theory of infectious diseases. By identifying four common genetic mechanisms (Mendelian predisposition to multiple infections, Mendelian predisposition to one infection, and major gene and polygenic predispositions), they attempt to unify infectious diseases from a genetic point of view. In this article, I analyze this explicit example of a genetic theory, which relies on mechanisms and is applied only to a specific category of diseases, what we call "a regional genetic theory." I have three aims: to prove that a genetic theory of disease can be devoid of genocentrism, to consider the possibility of a genetic theory applied to every disease, and to introduce two hypotheses about the form that such a genetic theory could take by distinguishing between a genetic theory of diseases and a genetic theory of Disease. Finally, I suggest that network medicine could be an interesting framework for a genetic theory of Disease.

  18. BRCA1 and BRCA2: Cancer Risk and Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MR imaging in women with a familial or genetic predisposition. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 2010; 119(2):399–407. [PubMed Abstract] Evans DG, Gaarenstroom KN, Stirling D, et al. Screening for familial ovarian cancer: Poor ... Genetics 2009; 46(9):593–597. [PubMed Abstract] Domchek ...

  19. Untangling genetic networks of panic, phobia, fear and anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafuerte, Sandra; Burmeister, Margit

    2003-01-01

    As is the case for normal individual variation in anxiety levels, the conditions panic disorder, agoraphobia and other phobias have a significant genetic basis. Recent reports have started to untangle the genetic relationships between predispositions to anxiety and anxiety disorders. PMID:12914652

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Sjögren syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome in particular. The inheritance pattern of this predisposition is unknown. Related Information What does it mean if a disorder seems to run in my family? What are the different ways in which a genetic condition can be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic ...

  1. Arousal Predisposition as a Vulnerability Indicator for Psychosis: A General Population Online Stress Induction Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Clamor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Explanatory models ascribe to arousability a central role for the development of psychotic symptoms. Thus, a disposition to hyperarousal (i.e., increased arousal predisposition (AP may serve as an underlying vulnerability indicator for psychosis by interacting with stressors to cause symptoms. In this case, AP, stress-response, and psychotic symptoms should be linked before the development of a diagnosable psychotic disorder. We conducted a cross-sectional online study in a population sample (N=104; Mage=27.7 years, SD=11.2, range 18–70. Participants rated their AP and subclinical psychotic symptoms. Participants reported their stress-levels before and after two stress inductions including an arithmetic and a social stressor. The participants with an increased AP generally felt more stressed. However, AP was not associated with the specific stress-response. As expected, positive psychotic symptoms were significantly associated with AP, but this was not mediated by general stress-levels. Its association to subtle, nonclinical psychotic symptoms supports our assumption that AP could be a vulnerability indicator for psychosis. The trait is easily accessible via a short self-report and could facilitate the identification of people at risk and be a promising target for early stress-management. Further research is needed to clarify its predictive value for stress-responses.

  2. Characterization of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor Biotype Variant Clinical Isolates from Bangladesh and Haiti, Including a Molecular Genetic Analysis of Virulence Genes ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Mike S.; Megli, Christina J.; Kovacikova, Gabriela; Qadri, Firdausi; Taylor, Ronald K.

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1, the causative agent of the diarrheal disease cholera, is divided into two biotypes: classical and El Tor. Both biotypes produce the major virulence factors toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) and cholera toxin (CT). Although possessing genotypic and phenotypic differences, El Tor biotype strains displaying classical biotype traits have been reported and subsequently were dubbed El Tor variants. Of particular interest are reports of El Tor variants that produce various levels of CT, including levels typical of classical biotype strains. Here, we report the characterization of 10 clinical isolates from the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, and a representative strain from the 2010 Haiti cholera outbreak. We observed that all 11 strains produced increased CT (2- to 10-fold) compared to that of wild-type El Tor strains under in vitro inducing conditions, but they possessed various TcpA and ToxT expression profiles. Particularly, El Tor variant MQ1795, which produced the highest level of CT and very high levels of TcpA and ToxT, demonstrated hypervirulence compared to the virulence of El Tor wild-type strains in the infant mouse cholera model. Additional genotypic and phenotypic tests were conducted to characterize the variants, including an assessment of biotype-distinguishing characteristics. Notably, the sequencing of ctxB in some El Tor variants revealed two copies of classical ctxB, one per chromosome, contrary to previous reports that located ctxAB only on the large chromosome of El Tor biotype strains. PMID:21880975

  3. PKCα is genetically linked to memory capacity in healthy subjects and to risk for posttraumatic stress disorder in genocide survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana; Ackermann, Sandra; Aerni, Amanda; Boesiger, Peter; Demougin, Philippe; Elbert, Thomas; Ertl, Verena; Gschwind, Leo; Hadziselimovic, Nils; Hanser, Edveena; Heck, Angela; Hieber, Petra; Huynh, Kim-Dung; Klarhöfer, Markus; Luechinger, Roger; Rasch, Björn; Scheffler, Klaus; Spalek, Klara; Stippich, Christoph; Vogler, Christian; Vukojevic, Vanja; Stetak, Attila; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2012-05-29

    Strong memory of a traumatic event is thought to contribute to the development and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Therefore, a genetic predisposition to build strong memories could lead to increased risk for PTSD after a traumatic event. Here we show that genetic variability of the gene encoding PKCα (PRKCA) was associated with memory capacity--including aversive memory--in nontraumatized subjects of European descent. This finding was replicated in an independent sample of nontraumatized subjects, who additionally underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). fMRI analysis revealed PRKCA genotype-dependent brain activation differences during successful encoding of aversive information. Further, the identified genetic variant was also related to traumatic memory and to the risk for PTSD in heavily traumatized survivors of the Rwandan genocide. Our results indicate a role for PKCα in memory and suggest a genetic link between memory and the risk for PTSD.

  4. A recurrent germline BAP1 mutation and extension of the BAP1 tumor predisposition spectrum to include basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadt, K A W; Aoude, L G; Johansson, P

    2015-01-01

    ) and mesothelioma, as previously reported for germline BAP1 mutations. However, mutation carriers from three new families, and one previously reported family, developed basal cell carcinoma (BCC), thus suggesting inclusion of BCC in the phenotypic spectrum of the BAP1 tumor syndrome. This notion is supported...

  5. Evidence for genetic association between chromosome 1q loci and predisposition to colorectal neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, Stephanie A.; Ruano, Dina; Elsayed, Fadwa A.; Boot, Arnoud; Crobach, Stijn; Sarasqueta, Arantza Farina; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce; van der Klauw, Melanie M.; Oosting, Jan; Tops, Carli M.; van Eijk, Ronald; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Vossen, Rolf H. A. M.; Nielsen, Maartje; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Tomlinson, Ian; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Vodicka, Pavel; Wijnen, Juul T.; Hes, Frederik J.; Morreau, Hans; de Miranda, Noel F. C. C.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; van Wezel, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Background: A substantial fraction of familial colorectal cancer (CRC) and polyposis heritability remains unexplained. This study aimed to identify predisposing loci in patients with these disorders. Methods: Homozygosity mapping was performed using 222 563 SNPs in 302 index patients with various

  6. [Hormonotherapy for breast cancer prevention: What about women with genetic predisposition to breast cancer?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sénéchal, Claire; Reyal, Fabien; Callet, Nasrine; This, Pascale; Noguès, Catherine; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Fourme, Emmanuelle

    2016-03-01

    In France, women carrying BRCA1/2 mutation, at an identified high risk of breast cancer are recommended to undergo breast MRI screening. That screening does not however prevent the risk of developing a breast cancer. The only alternative to breast cancer screening available in France is surgical prevention by prophylactic mastectomy. An interesting option for women who wish to reduce their breast cancer risk, but are unready for prophylactic mastectomy is a preventive hormonal treatment by aromatase inhibitors, or selective estrogens receptor modulators (SERMs). Reliable clinical trials show the efficiency of tamoxifen, raloxifen, exemestane, and anastrozole especially, in reducing breast cancer incidence by 33%, 34%, 65% and 53% respectively. This article tries to sum up the main published trials of breast cancer prevention with hormonal treatment, and presents the latest American and English clinical guidelines concerning hormonal prevention for women at high risk of breast cancer, and starts thinking about the possibilities of hormonoprevention, especially among women carrying a BRCA1/2 mutation in France. Copyright © 2016 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects and Costs of Breast Cancer screening in women with a familial or genetic predisposition

    OpenAIRE

    Rijnsburger, Rian

    2005-01-01

    textabstract"Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, who have a considerable increased risk of developing breast cancer, now face the choice of intensive screening, prophylactic surgery or chemoprevention. The efficacy of the various medical options and the durability of its effects are of major concern to female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, and will influence their choices. Although prophylactic mastectomy reduces the rate of breast cancer risk of 90 % or more, the intervention is irreversible, ...

  8. Genetic Predisposition to In Situ and Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawyer, Elinor; Roylance, Rebecca; Petridis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC) accounts for 10-15% of all invasive breast carcinomas. It is generally ER positive (ER+) and often associated with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common polymorphisms that predispose to breast......(-4)). Of the 75 known breast cancer polymorphisms that were genotyped, 56 were associated with ILC and 15 with LCIS at P... for LCIS than ILC (rs6678914/1q32/LGR6, P-het = 0.001 and rs1752911/6q14, P-het = 0.04). In addition, seven of the 75 known loci showed significant differences between ER+ tumors with IDC and ILC histology, three of these showing stronger associations for ILC (rs11249433/1p11, rs2981579/10q26/FGFR2 and rs...

  9. Research Directions in Genetic Predispositions to Stevens-Johnson Syndrome / Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolio, Teri A; Hutter, Carolyn M; Avigan, Mark; Cibotti, Ricardo; Davis, Robert L; Denny, Joshua C; Grenade, Lois La; Wheatley, Lisa M; Carrington, Mary N; Chantratita, Wasun; Chung, Wen-Hung; Dalton, Andrea D; Hung, Shuen-Iu; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Leeder, J Steven; Lertora, Juan J L; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; McLeod, Howard L; Mockenhaupt, Maja; Pacanowski, Michael; Phillips, Elizabeth J; Pinheiro, Simone; Pirmohamed, Munir; Sung, Cynthia; Suwankesawong, Wimon; Trepanier, Lauren; Tumminia, Santa J; Veenstra, David; Yuliwulandari, Rika; Shear, Neil H

    2018-03-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) is one of the most devastating of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and was, until recently, essentially unpredictable. With the discovery of several risk alleles for drug-induced SJS/TEN and the demonstration of effectiveness of screening in reducing incidence, the stage is set for implementation of preventive strategies in populations at risk. Yet much remains to be learned about this potentially fatal complication of commonly used drugs. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  10. Genetic predisposition to ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petridis, Christos; Brook, Mark N; Shah, Vandna

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-invasive form of breast cancer. It is often associated with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), and is considered to be a non-obligate precursor of IDC. It is not clear to what extent these two forms of cancer share low-risk susceptibility loci, o...

  11. Breast Cancer Screening in Women with a Familial or Genetic Predisposition: the role of MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kriege (Mieke)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractWomen with a strong family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer combined with young ages at diagnosis of affected family members have an increased risk of these types of cancer. In 1994 and 1995 respectively, the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were identified. A germline mutation in one of

  12. Subclinical psychotic experiences in healthy young adults: associations with stress and genetic predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruenig, Dagmar; White, Melanie J; Young, Ross McD; Voisey, Joanne

    2014-10-01

    Stress has been identified as a common trigger for psychosis. Dopamine pathways are suggested to be affected by chronic and severe stress and to play an important role in psychosis. This pilot study investigates the potential relationship of stress and psychosis in subclinical psychotic experiences. It was hypothesized that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously found to be associated with psychiatric disorders would be associated with both stress and subclinical psychotic experiences. University students (N=182) were genotyped for 17 SNPs across 11 genes. Higher stress reporting was associated with rs4680 COMT, rs13211507 HLA region, and rs13107325 SLC39A8. Reports of higher subclinical psychotic experiences were associated with DRD2 SNPs rs17601612 and rs658986 and an AKT1 SNP rs2494732. Replication studies are recommended to further pursue this line of research for identification of markers of psychosis for early diagnosis and intervention.

  13. Breast Cancer Screening in Women with a Familial or Genetic Predisposition: the role of MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kriege (Mieke)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractWomen with a strong family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer combined with young ages at diagnosis of affected family members have an increased risk of these types of cancer. In 1994 and 1995 respectively, the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were identified. A germline mutation in one

  14. Women's acceptance of MRI in breast cancer surveillance because of a familial or genetic predisposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essink-Bot, M. L.; Rijnsburger, A. J.; van Dooren, S.; de Koning, H. J.; Seynaeve, C.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breasts is a promising screening modality for early detection in women at increased breast cancer risk. We investigated the subjective experiences with MRI and the preferences for MRI, mammography or clinical breast examination in 178 high-risk women adhering

  15. Environmental Exposure and Genetic Predisposition as Risk Factors for Asthma in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Wong, Gary W K; Li, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic pulmonary disease worldwide and places a considerable economic burden on society. China is the world's largest developing country and has the largest population. China has undergone dramatic changes in the past few decades. The traditional lifestyle and living environment have changed in ways that directly affect the prevalence of asthma. The prevalence of asthma is lower in Chinese children and adults than in developed countries, but the prevalence has been on the rise during the past 30 years. The prevalence significantly varies among different parts of China. Polymorphisms of multiple genes, outdoor air pollution caused by PM2.5, PM10, SO₂, NO₂, environmental tobacco smoke, and coal, indoor pollution, and inhaled allergens, such as house dust mites, pollen, and cockroach particles, are risk factors for asthma.

  16. Effects and Costs of Breast Cancer screening in women with a familial or genetic predisposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Rijnsburger (Rian)

    2005-01-01

    textabstract"Women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, who have a considerable increased risk of developing breast cancer, now face the choice of intensive screening, prophylactic surgery or chemoprevention. The efficacy of the various medical options and the durability of its effects are of major

  17. Prevalence of Hyperinsulinemia Associated with Body Mass Index, Genetic Predisposition, and Lifestyle in College Freshmen Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Mari K.; Brown, Gordon W.; Funke, Katharine A.; Pike Brown, Leslie R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: College lifestyle places an individual at greater risk for the development of insulin resistance (IR) and disease. The aim of this study was to establish a baseline measurement of insulin, and other variables influencing IR in college freshmen. Participants: Twenty-two men and women, 18 to 19 years of age, during first month of college.…

  18. Evidence for genetic association between chromosome 1q loci and predisposition to colorectal neoplasia.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schubert, S.A.; Ruano, D.; Elsayed, F.A.; Boot, A.; Crobach, S.; Sarasqueta, A.F.; Wolffenbuttel, B.; van der Klauw, M.M.; Oosting, J.; Tops, C.M.; van Eijk, R.; Vasen, H.F.; Vossen, R.H.; Nielsen, M.; Castellví-Bel, S.; Ruiz-Ponte, C.; Tomlinson, I.; Dunlop, M.G.; Vodička, Pavel; Wijnen, J.T.; Hes, F.J.; Morreau, H.; de Miranda, N.F.; Sijmons, R.H.; van Wezel, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 8 (2017), s. 1215-1223 ISSN 0007-0920 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14050 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : hereditary colorectal cancer * colorectal polyps * homozygosity mapping Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 6.176, year: 2016

  19. Genetic Predisposition and Sensory Experience in Language Development: Evidence from Cochlear-Implanted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coene, Martine; Schauwers, Karen; Gillis, Steven; Rooryck, Johan; Govaerts, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Recent neurobiological studies have advanced the hypothesis that language development is not continuously plastic but is governed by biological constraints that may be modified by experience within a particular time window. This hypothesis is tested based on spontaneous speech data from deaf cochlear-implanted (CI) children with access to…

  20. A possible association between the genetic predisposition for dizygotic twinning and schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kläning, Ulla; Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A previous study demonstrated a 40% higher rate of schizophrenia in dizygotic twins than in the general population. The aim of the present study is to evaluate whether genes influencing the rate of dizygotic twinning and genes of importance for developing schizophrenia can be associat...

  1. Cannabis use and genetic predisposition for schizophrenia : a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veling, W; Mackenbach, J P; van Os, J; Hoek, H W

    BACKGROUND: Cannabis use may be a risk factor for schizophrenia. Part of this association may be explained by genotype-environment interaction, and part of it by genotype-environment correlation. The latter issue has not been explored. We investigated whether cannabis use is associated with

  2. Response to Comments on ?High Altitude Pulmonary Edema in an Experienced Mountaineer. Possible Genetic Predisposition?

    OpenAIRE

    Whitlow, Kenneth S.

    2015-01-01

    We appreciate the letter to the editor and are pleased to respond regarding our recent case study regarding high altitude pulmonary edema in an experienced mountaineer. The letter raises some valid questions regarding our treatment decisions.

  3. Characterization of genetic predisposition and autoantibody profile in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurjar, Bahadur Singh; Sriharsha, T Manikanta; Bhasym, Angika; Prabhu, Savit; Puraswani, Mamta; Khandelwal, Priyanka; Saini, Himanshi; Saini, Savita; Verma, Anita Kamra; Chatterjee, Priyadarshini; Gucchait, Prasenjit; Bal, Vineeta; George, Anna; Rath, Satyajit; Sahu, Arvind; Sharma, Amita; Hari, Pankaj; Sinha, Aditi; Bagga, Arvind

    2018-02-27

    We previously reported that Indian pediatric patients of atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (aHUS) showed high frequencies of anti-complement factor H (FH) autoantibodies that are correlated with homozygous deletion of the genes for FH-related proteins 1 and 3 (FHR1 and FHR3) (FHR1/3-/-). We now report that Indian pediatric aHUS patients without anti-FH autoantibodies also showed modestly higher frequencies of the FHR1/3-/- genotype. Further, when we characterized epitope specificities and binding avidities of anti-FH autoantibodies in aHUS patients, most anti-FH autoantibodies were directed towards the FH cell-surface anchoring polyanionic binding site-containing C-terminal short conservative regions (SCRs) 17-20 with higher binding avidities than for native FH. FH SCR17-20-binding anti-FH autoantibodies also bound the other cell-surface anchoring polyanionic binding site-containing region FH SCR5-8, at lower binding avidities. Anti-FH autoantibody avidities correlated with antibody titres. These anti-FH autoantibody characteristics did not differ between aHUS patients with or without the FHR1/3-/- genotype. Our data suggest a complex matrix of interactions between FHR1-FHR3 deletion, immunomodulation and anti-FH autoantibodies in the etiopathogenesis of aHUS. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetics of pediatric obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manco, Melania; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2012-07-01

    Onset of obesity has been anticipated at earlier ages, and prevalence has dramatically increased worldwide over the past decades. Epidemic obesity is mainly attributable to modern lifestyle, but family studies prove the significant role of genes in the individual's predisposition to obesity. Advances in genotyping technologies have raised great hope and expectations that genetic testing will pave the way to personalized medicine and that complex traits such as obesity will be prevented even before birth. In the presence of the pressing offer of direct-to-consumer genetic testing services from private companies to estimate the individual's risk for complex phenotypes including obesity, the present review offers pediatricians an update of the state of the art on genomics obesity in childhood. Discrepancies with respect to genomics of adult obesity are discussed. After an appraisal of findings from genome-wide association studies in pediatric populations, the rare variant-common disease hypothesis, the theoretical soil for next-generation sequencing techniques, is discussed as opposite to the common disease-common variant hypothesis. Next-generation sequencing techniques are expected to fill the gap of "missing heritability" of obesity, identifying rare variants associated with the trait and clarifying the role of epigenetics in its heritability. Pediatric obesity emerges as a complex phenotype, modulated by unique gene-environment interactions that occur in periods of life and are "permissive" for the programming of adult obesity. With the advent of next-generation sequencing techniques and advances in the field of exposomics, sensitive and specific tools to predict the obesity risk as early as possible are the challenge for the next decade.

  5. Practical aspects of genetic counseling in breast cancer: lights and shadows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christinat, Alexandre; Pagani, Olivia

    2013-08-01

    In unselected populations, less than 10% of breast cancers are associated with germline mutations in predisposing genes. Breast cancer type 1 and 2 (BRCA1 and BRCA2) susceptibility genes are the most common involved genes and confer a 10-30 times higher risk of developing the disease compared to the general population. A personal or family history suggestive of inherited breast cancer syndrome may be further evaluated to assess the risk of genetic predisposition and the presence of a genetic mutation. Breast cancer genetic counseling should include a careful risk assessment with associated psychosocial evaluation and support, possible molecular testing, personalized discussion of results. Knowledge of BRCA status can influence individualized cancer risk-reduction strategies. i.e. active surveillance, prophylactic surgery and/or pharmacoprevention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic variation in IBD: progress, clues to pathogenesis and possible clinical utility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Byong Duk; McGovern, Dermot P.B.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies have suggested that the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is strongly influenced by genetic predisposition. Beyond the limitations of linkage analysis, multiple genome-wide association studies, their meta-analyses, and targeted genotyping array techniques have broadened our understanding of the genetic architecture of IBD. Currently, over 200 single nucleotide polymorphisms are known to be associated with susceptibility to IBD and through functional analysis of genes and loci, a substantial proportion of pathophysiologic mechanisms have been revealed. However, because only a modest fraction of predicted heritability can be explained by known genes/loci, additional strategies are needed including the identification of rare variants with large effect sizes to help explain the missing heritability. Considerable progress is also being made on applying outcomes of genetic research in diagnostics, classification, prognostics, and the development of new therapeutics of IBD. PMID:27156530

  7. Cancer predispostition, radiosensitivity and the risk of radiation-induced cancers. II. A mendelian single-locus model of cancer predisposition and radiosensitivity for predicting cancer risks in populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, R.; Sankaranarayanan, K.

    1995-01-01

    Individuals genetically predisposed to cancer may be more sensitive to cancers induced by ionizing radiation than those who are not so predisposed. Should this be true, under conditions of radiation exposure, a population consisting of cancer-predisposed and non-predisposed individuals will be expected to respond with a higher total frequency of induced cancers than one in which all the individuals are assumed to have the same sensitivity to radiation-induced cancers. To study this problem quantitatively, we have developed a Mendelian autosomal one-locus, two-allele model; this model assumes that one of the alleles is mutant and the genotypes carrying the mutant allele(s) are cancer-predisposed and are also more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer. Formal analytical predictions as well as numerical illustrations of this model show that: (1) when such heterogeneity with respect to cancer predisposition and radiosensitivity is present in the population, irradiation results in a greater increase in the frequency of induced cancers than when it is absent; (2) this increase is detectable only when the proportion of cancers due to genetic predisposition is large and when the degree of predisposition is considerable; and (3) even when the effect is small, most of the radiation-induced cancers will occur in predisposed individuals. These conclusions are valid for models of cancer when predisposition and radiosensitivity may be either dominant or recessive. The published data on breast cancers in Japanese A-bomb survivors show that at 1 Sv, the radiation-related excess relative risk in women irradiated before age 20 is 13 compared to about 2 for those irradiated at later ages. We examined the application of our model to the above data using two assumptions, namely, that the proportion of cancers due to genetic susceptibility at the BRCA1 locus and the frequency of the mutant allele estimated for Western populations are valid for Japanese women. 14 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Beyond Anxious Predisposition: Do Padecer de Nervios and Ataque de Nervios Add Incremental Validity to Predictions of Current Distress among Mexican Mothers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara, Carmela; Abelson, James L.; Gone, Joseph P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nervios (PNRV) and ataque de nervios (ATQ) are culture-bound syndromes with overlapping symptoms of anxiety, depression, and dissociation, shown to have inconsistent associations to psychiatric disorder. Few studies test the basic assumption that PNRV and ATQ are uniformly linked to distress outcomes across Latina/o immigrant groups. This study examined: (a) the extent to which acculturative stress, Latino/U.S. American acculturation, and anxious predisposition were associated with lifetime history of ATQ and PNRV, and (b) the extent to which ATQ and PNRV add incremental validity in explaining acculturative stress and psychological distress beyond measures of anxious predisposition. Method Participants (n = 82) included Mexican mothers who completed surveys on acculturation, trait anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, lifetime ATQ/PNRV, psychological distress, and acculturative stress. Results Lifetime PNRV, but not lifetime ATQ, was significantly predictive of psychological distress. PNRV was also linked to trait anxiety. Psychometric measures of anxious predisposition (trait anxiety, anxiety sensitivity) were more robust predictors of distress outcomes than lifetime history of ATQ/PNRV. Conclusions Inquiry into lifetime history of nervios may be a useful point of entry in talking to Mexican immigrant mothers about stress and distress. However, standard tools for assessing anxiety sensitivity and trait anxiety appear most useful in identifying and explaining presence of psychological distress. Further research is needed to determine the cross-cultural relevance of trait anxiety and anxiety sensitivity, and its implications for the development of anxiety treatments that are effective across cultures. PMID:21769996

  9. Personality Predispositions to Depression in Children of Affectively-Ill Parents: The Buffering Role of Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abela, John R. Z.; Fishman, Michael B.; Cohen, Joseph R.; Young, Jami F.

    2012-01-01

    A major theory of personality predispositions to depression posits that individuals who possess high levels of self-criticism and/or dependency are vulnerable to developing depression following negative life events. The goal of the current study was to test this theory of personality predispositions and the self-esteem buffering hypothesis in a…

  10. Bridging Home and Host Country: Educational Predispositions of Chinese and Indian Recent Immigrant Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, June A.; Liu, Xiangyan

    2015-01-01

    This research focuses on the predispositions that recent Chinese and Indian immigrant families bring with them to the United States and how these are reinforced by the communities in which they locate. The findings draw from 144 interviews in California. Three themes dominate: positioning through schooling, transnational family, and extended…

  11. Predisposition Factors of Career and Technical Education Transfer Students: A Hermeneutic Phenomenology Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hioki, Warren; Lester, Derek; Martinez, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Six college students, who were career and technical education (CTE) transfer students in the state of Nevada, were interviewed Spring Semester of 2009. The study used a hermeneutic phenomenology framework as the method to identify those predisposition variables that heavily influenced the students in their decision to transfer to a senior…

  12. The Role of Social Factors in Iranian University Students' Predispositions towards Autonomous Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeeini, Sara Kashefian; Riazi, Abdolmehdi; Salehi, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    In order to meet the demands of the changing world, students should become endowed with the ability to learn perpetually and regard learning as a life-long enterprise. This study investigated those learners belief which showed learners' predispositions toward autonomy and some social factors such as gender, academic achievement, marital status and…

  13. The influence of water table depth and the free atmospheric state on convective rainfall predisposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara Bonetti; Gabriele Manoli; Jean-Christopher Domec; Mario Putti; Marco Marani; Gabriel G. Katul

    2015-01-01

    A mechanistic model for the soil-plant system is coupled to a conventional slab representation of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) to explore the role of groundwater table (WT) variations and free atmospheric (FA) states on convective rainfall predisposition (CRP) at a Loblolly pine plantation site situated in the lower coastal plain of North Carolina....

  14. Informing family members about a hereditary predisposition to cancer: attitudes and practices among clinical geneticists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stol, Y.; Menko, F.H.; Westerman, M.J.; Janssens, M.J.P.A.

    2010-01-01

    If a hereditary predisposition to colorectal cancer or breast cancer is diagnosed, most guidelines state that clinical geneticists should request index patients to inform their at-risk relatives about the existence of this condition in their family, thus enabling them to consider presymptomatic

  15. Genetics and Genetic Testing in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, David C; Shelton, Celeste A; Brand, Randall E

    2015-10-01

    Genetic testing of germline DNA is used in patients suspected of being at risk of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) to better define the individual's risk and to determine the mechanism of risk. A high genetic risk increases the pretest probability that a biomarker of early cancer is a true positive and warrants further investigation. The highest PDAC risk is generally associated with a hereditary predisposition. However, the majority of PDAC results from complex, progressive gene-environment interactions that currently fall outside the traditional risk models. Over many years, the combination of inflammation, exposure to DNA-damaging toxins, and failed DNA repair promote the accumulation of somatic mutations in pancreatic cells; PDAC risk is further increased by already present oncogenic germline mutations. Predictive models and new technologies are needed to classify patients into more accurate and mechanistic PDAC risk categories that can be linked to improved surveillance and preventative strategies. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic Factors in Tendon Injury: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Natalie H; Stepanyan, Hayk; Gallo, Robert A; Dhawan, Aman

    2017-08-01

    Tendon injury such as tendinopathy or rupture is common and has multiple etiologies, including both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The genetic influence on susceptibility to tendon injury is not well understood. To analyze the published literature regarding genetic factors associated with tendon injury. Systematic review; Level of evidence, 3. A systematic review of published literature was performed in concordance with the Preferred Reporting Items of Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) guidelines to identify current evidence for genetic predisposition to tendon injury. PubMed, Ovid, and ScienceDirect databases were searched. Studies were included for review if they specifically addressed genetic factors and tendon injuries in humans. Reviews, animal studies, or studies evaluating the influence of posttranscription factors and modifications (eg, proteins) were excluded. Overall, 460 studies were available for initial review. After application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 11 articles were ultimately included for qualitative synthesis. Upon screening of references of these 11 articles, an additional 15 studies were included in the final review, for a total of 26 studies. The genetic factors with the strongest evidence of association with tendon injury were those involving type V collagen A1, tenascin-C, matrix metalloproteinase-3, and estrogen-related receptor beta. The published literature is limited to relatively homogenous populations, with only level 3 and level 4 data. Additional research is needed to make further conclusions about the genetic factors involved in tendon injury.

  17. Genetics of diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Tarnow, L; Rossing, P

    1996-01-01

    of diabetic nephropathy is multifactorial, with contributions from metabolic abnormalities, hemodynamic alterations, and various growth factors and genetic factors. Epidemiologic and family studies have demonstrated that only a subset of the patients develop this complication that family clustering...... of nephropathy is present, and that ethnicity plays an important role in the risk of developing this kidney disease. Short stature and low birth weight are both associated with increased risk of developing diabetic nephropathy, supporting the hypothesis that genetic predisposition or factors operating in utero...... nephropathy have yielded conflicting results. Recently, studies of genetic markers involved in the regulation of blood pressure and levels of cardiovascular risk factors have been conducted. Several studies have demonstrated that the deletion polymorphism in the angiotensin-I-converting enzyme acts as a risk...

  18. Predisposition and genome instability: studies with mouse embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streffer, C. [Essen Universitatsklinikum, (Germany). Institut fur Medizinische Strahlenbiologie

    1997-03-01

    The preimplantation mouse embryo is a useful system for radiobiological studies. Chromosomal aberrations were determined after exposure to X-rays and neutrons during the zygote (1-cell stage). New aberrations developed and were expressed during the 2. and 3. mitosis after irradiation. These later aberration developed from DNA damage which was originally not a DSB. Further chromosomal aberrations were studied in fibroblasts of fetuses 19 days post conception. A significant increase of chromosome aberrations was found in the fetuses which were irradiated in the 1-cell stage and which had developed a malformation. These data can only be explained by the induction of a genome instability through the radiation exposure which had been performed many cell generations earlier. Until recently is was generally accepted that an exposure which had been performed many cell generations earlier. Until recently it was generally accepted that an exposure to ionizing radiation during the preimplantation period of mammalian development will not induce malformations. However, recently it could be shown that certain sensitive mouse strains exist in which malformations are induced by exposure to X-rays and neutrons during the preimplantation period. It was further demonstrated that this effect can be suppressed if the sensitive mouse strain is crossbred with mice from a resistant mouse train. These data show that this radiation effect is due to a genetic phenomenon with a recessive trait. Studies on protein patterns in normal fetuses and in fetuses with the malformation showed that characteristic changes occur. There are proteins which are no longer expressed in the malformed fetuses nd new proteins may appear. Certain changes in glycoproteins and phosphoproteins were found not only in liver of malformed fetuses but also in skin and kidney of these organisms. The analysis of the genome of these malformed fetuses have given evidence that changes in two or three genes are responsible for

  19. Aortic Disease in the Young: Genetic Aneurysm Syndromes, Connective Tissue Disorders, and Familial Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many genetic syndromes associated with the aortic aneurysmal disease which include Marfan syndrome (MFS, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS, Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS, familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD, bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV, and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. In the absence of familial history and other clinical findings, the proportion of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and dissections resulting from a genetic predisposition is still unknown. In this study, we propose the review of the current genetic knowledge in the aortic disease, observing, in the results that the causative genes and molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm disease remain undiscovered and continue to be an area of intensive research.

  20. Shared activity patterns arising at genetic susceptibility loci reveal underlying genomic and cellular architecture of human disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baillie, J Kenneth; Bretherick, Andrew; Haley, Christopher S

    2018-01-01

    Genetic variants underlying complex traits, including disease susceptibility, are enriched within the transcriptional regulatory elements, promoters and enhancers. There is emerging evidence that regulatory elements associated with particular traits or diseases share similar patterns...... the regulation of the OCT1 cation transporter and genetic variants underlying circulating cholesterol levels. NDA strongly implicates particular cell types and tissues in disease pathogenesis. For example, distinct groupings of disease-associated regulatory regions implicate two distinct biological processes...... in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis; a further two separate processes are implicated in Crohn's disease. Thus, our functional analysis of genetic predisposition to disease defines new distinct disease endotypes. We predict that patients with a preponderance of susceptibility variants in each group are likely...

  1. Thermogenic side effects to migratory predisposition in shorebirds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vezina, Francois; Jalvingh, Kirsten M.; Dekinga, Anne; Piersma, Theunis

    In the calidrine sandpiper red knot (Calidris canutus), the weeks preceding takeoff for long-distance migration are characterized by a rapid increase in body mass, largely made up of fat but also including a significant proportion of lean tissue. Before takeoff, the pectoral muscles are known to

  2. Genetic Aspects of Nephrotic Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Shivani

    steroid dependence or become frequent relapsers. Repeated courses of corticosteroid treatment often cause significant associated morbidity. Familial occurrence of SSNS is rare and suggests a potential genetic origin. However, very little data on molecular genetics of familial SSNS is available...... with SSNS are rare, but do indicate a genetic predisposition. In study III we investigated a potential genetic linkage in 9 European SSNS families with at least two affected siblings. Using SNP6 whole genome linkage analysis we could establish linkage of the disease phenotype to chromosome 15 with a maximum...... immunosuppressive treatment in future patients with the same genotype. Our findings also demonstrate that inheritance of different alleles at independent genetic loci in NS may contribute to the disease phenotype. SSNS is clinically distinct from SRNS and its pathogenesis is still unclear. Our study showed linkage...

  3. Genetic studies of African populations: an overview on disease susceptibility and response to vaccines and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirugo, Giorgio; Hennig, Branwen J; Adeyemo, Adebowale A; Matimba, Alice; Newport, Melanie J; Ibrahim, Muntaser E; Ryckman, Kelli K; Tacconelli, Alessandra; Mariani-Costantini, Renato; Novelli, Giuseppe; Soodyall, Himla; Rotimi, Charles N; Ramesar, Raj S; Tishkoff, Sarah A; Williams, Scott M

    2008-07-01

    Africa is the ultimate source of modern humans and as such harbors more genetic variation than any other continent. For this reason, studies of the patterns of genetic variation in African populations are crucial to understanding how genes affect phenotypic variation, including disease predisposition. In addition, the patterns of extant genetic variation in Africa are important for understanding how genetic variation affects infectious diseases that are a major problem in Africa, such as malaria, tuberculosis, schistosomiasis, and HIV/AIDS. Therefore, elucidating the role that genetic susceptibility to infectious diseases plays is critical to improving the health of people in Africa. It is also of note that recent and ongoing social and cultural changes in sub-Saharan Africa have increased the prevalence of non-communicable diseases that will also require genetic analyses to improve disease prevention and treatment. In this review we give special attention to many of the past and ongoing studies, emphasizing those in Sub-Saharan Africans that address the role of genetic variation in human disease.

  4. Predisposition to essential hypertension and development of diabetic nephropathy in IDDM patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagerudd, J A; Tarnow, L; Jacobsen, P

    1998-01-01

    Conflicting results have been reported on the relationship between familial predisposition to hypertension and development of diabetic nephropathy in IDDM. In our case-control study, we assessed the prevalence of hypertension among parents of 73 IDDM patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN...... for hypertension than were patients with DN+ and without parental treatment for hypertension (100 vs. 61%; P = 0.034; difference 39% [21-57%]). In conclusion, familial predisposition to essential hypertension increases the risk of diabetic nephropathy and may also contribute to the development of systemic......+; persistent albuminuria > 200 microg/min or > 300 mg/24 h) and 73 IDDM patients without diabetic nephropathy (DN-; urinary albumin excretion or = 135/85 mm...

  5. Etiological theories of addiction: A comprehensive update on neurobiological, genetic and behavioural vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzir, Mounir; Errami, Mohammed

    2016-09-01

    Currently, about 246 million people around the world have used an illicit drug. The reasons for this use are multiple: e.g. to augment the sensation of pleasure or to reduce the withdrawal and other aversive effects of a given substance. This raises the problem of addiction, which remains a disease of modern society. This review offers a comprehensive update of the different theories about the etiology of addictive behaviors with emphasis on the neurobiological, environmental, psychopathological, behavioural and genetic aspects of addictions, discussed from an evolutionary perspective. The main conclusion of this review is that vulnerability to drug addiction suggests an interaction between many brain systems (including the reward, decision-making, serotonergic, oxytocin, interoceptive insula, CRF, norepinephrine, dynorphin/KOR, orexin and vasopressin systems), genetic predisposition, sociocultural context, impulsivity and drugs types. Further advances in biological and psychological science are needed to address the problems of addiction at its roots. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Biological underpinnings of trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder: focusing on genetics and epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Joanne; Chaudieu, Isabelle; Ancelin, Marie-Laure; Saffery, Richard

    2016-11-01

    Certain individuals are more susceptible to stress and trauma, as well as the physical and mental health consequences following such exposure, including risk for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This differing vulnerability is likely to be influenced by genetic predisposition and specific characteristics of the stress itself (nature, intensity and duration), as well as epigenetic mechanisms. In this review we provide an overview of research findings in this field. We highlight some of the key genetic risk factors identified for PTSD, and the evidence that epigenetic processes might play a role in the biological response to trauma, as well as being potential biomarkers of PTSD risk. We also discuss important considerations for future research in this area.

  7. Mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction during aging: Predisposition to thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, Cesar; Palomo, Iván; Fuentes, Eduardo

    2017-06-01

    One of the risk factors for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) is aging. In the elderly endothelial dysfunction occurs as altered endothelial ability to regulate hemostasis, vascular tone and cell permeability. In addition, there are changes in the expression and plasma levels of important endothelial components related to endothelial-mediated modulation in hemostasis. These include alterations in the metabolism of nitric oxide and prostanoides, endothelin-1, thrombomodulin and Von Willebrand factor. These alterations potentiate the pro-coagulant status developed with aging, highlighting the endothelial role in the development of thrombosis in aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasi J Eskola

    Full Text Available Low back pain is associated with lumbar disc degeneration, which is mainly due to genetic predisposition. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration as defined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in humans.A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, SCOPUS, ISI Web of Science, The Genetic Association Database and The Human Genome Epidemiology Network for information published between 1990-2011 addressing genes and lumbar disc degeneration. Two investigators independently identified studies to determine inclusion, after which they performed data extraction and analysis. The level of cumulative genetic association evidence was analyzed according to The HuGENet Working Group guidelines.Fifty-two studies were included for review. Forty-eight studies reported at least one positive association between a genetic marker and lumbar disc degeneration. The phenotype definition of lumbar disc degeneration was highly variable between the studies and replications were inconsistent. Most of the associations presented with a weak level of evidence. The level of evidence was moderate for ASPN (D-repeat, COL11A1 (rs1676486, GDF5 (rs143383, SKT (rs16924573, THBS2 (rs9406328 and MMP9 (rs17576.Based on this first extensive systematic review on the topic, the credibility of reported genetic associations is mostly weak. Clear definition of lumbar disc degeneration phenotypes and large population-based cohorts are needed. An international consortium is needed to standardize genetic association studies in relation to disc degeneration.

  9. Inherited predisposition to preeclampsia: Analysis of the Aberdeen intergenerational cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayorinde, Abimbola A; Bhattacharya, Sohinee

    2017-04-01

    To assess the magnitude of familial risk of preeclampsia and gestational hypertension in women born of a preeclamptic pregnancy and those born of pregnancy complicated by gestational hypertension while accounting for other risk factors. An intergenerational dataset was extracted from the Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal Databank (AMND) which records all pregnancy and delivery details occurring in Aberdeen, Scotland since 1950. The analysis included all nulliparous women whose mothers' records at their births are also recorded in the AMND. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the risk of having preeclampsia or gestational hypertension based on maternal history of preeclampsia or gestational hypertension. There were 17302 nulliparous women included, of whom 1057(6.1%) had preeclampsia while 4098(23.7%) had gestational hypertension. Furthermore, 424(2.5%) and 2940(17.0%) had maternal history of preeclampsia and gestational hypertension respectively. The risk of preeclampsia was higher in women who were born of pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia (adjusted RRR 2.55 95% CI 1.87-3.47). This was higher than the risk observed in women whose mothers had gestational hypertension (adjusted RRR 1.44 95% CI 1.23-1.69). Conversely, the risk of gestational hypertension was similar in those who were born of preeclamptic pregnancies (adjusted RRR 1.37 95% CI 1.09-1.71) and those whose mothers had gestational hypertension (adjusted RRR 1.36 95% CI 1.24-1.49). There was a dose response effect in the inheritance pattern of preeclampsia with the highest risk in women born of preeclamptic pregnancies. Gestational hypertension showed similar increased risk with maternal gestational hypertension and preeclampsia. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the Study of Hypertension in Pregnancy. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A blueprint for vocal learning: auditory predispositions from brains to genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatcroft, David; Qvarnström, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Memorizing and producing complex strings of sound are requirements for spoken human language. We share these behaviours with likely more than 4000 species of songbirds, making birds our primary model for studying the cognitive basis of vocal learning and, more generally, an important model for how memories are encoded in the brain. In songbirds, as in humans, the sounds that a juvenile learns later in life depend on auditory memories formed early in development. Experiments on a wide variety of songbird species suggest that the formation and lability of these auditory memories, in turn, depend on auditory predispositions that stimulate learning when a juvenile hears relevant, species-typical sounds. We review evidence that variation in key features of these auditory predispositions are determined by variation in genes underlying the development of the auditory system. We argue that increased investigation of the neuronal basis of auditory predispositions expressed early in life in combination with modern comparative genomic approaches may provide insights into the evolution of vocal learning. PMID:26246333

  11. Hereditariedade e suscetibilidade à reabsorção radicular em Ortodontia não se fundamentam: erros metodológicos e interpretativos repetidamente publicados podem gerar falsas verdades. Análise crítica do trabalho de Al-Qawasmi et al.² sobre a predisposição genética à reabsorção radicular de natureza ortodôntica Heredity and susceptibility to radicular resorption in Odontology do not base: methodological and interpretative repeatedly published mistakes can generate false truths. Critical analysis of Al-Qawasmi work about genetics predisposition to radicular reabsorption of orthodontic kind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Consolaro

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho de Al-Qawasmi et al.², publicado em agosto de 2003 no periódico Journal of Dental Research, procurou estabelecer um gene candidato para a hereditariedade e predisposição genética nas reabsorções dentárias em Ortodontia, mas apresentou e repetiu algumas limitações metodológicas e equívocos na interpretação de seu trabalho anterior de março de 2003¹. Nas conclusões afirmam explicitamente que os achados são preliminares e sugestivos, necessitando de confirmação por meio de estudos adicionais. Os resultados são correlacionados fundamentando-se em dados de outros autores sobre síndromes ósseas associadas a reabsorções por substituição, cervicais externas e não com as reabsorções radiculares externas apicais induzidas ortodonticamente. O gene da reabsorção radicular externa apical relacionada a tratamentos ortodônticos não foi determinado e muito menos a sua natureza hereditária. Nem tampouco, a suscetibilidade à reabsorção radicular em Ortodontia foi detectada ou provada. O trabalho analisado e os demais relacionados com o mesmo tema não conseguiram comprovar suas hipóteses porque ignoram que o primeiro passo para a reabsorção radicular externa é a destruição da camada cementoblástica e isto apenas ocorre a partir da ação de fatores locais. Analisando criticamente estes trabalhos podemos afirmar que procurar o gene da reabsorção radicular e da suscetibilidade a partir de pesquisas em mediadores e células clásticas demonstra a falta de um conhecimento completo e amplo da etiopatogenia deste importante fenômeno biológico, imprescindível para o estabelecimento da premissa dos trabalhos.The study of Al-Qawasmi et al.² published in August 2003 on Journal of Dental Research, aimed to establish a candidate gene for heritability and genetic predisposition to external root resorption in orthodontic patients. This paper, however, presents and repeated some methodological faults and equivocated

  12. Cholesterol-Induced Hepatic Inflammation Does Not Underlie the Predisposition to Insulin Resistance in Dyslipidemic Female LDL Receptor Knockout Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruben, Nanda; Funke, Anouk; Kloosterhuis, Niels J.; Schreurs, Marijke; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Havinga, Rick; Houten, Sander M.; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; van de Sluis, Bart; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Koonen, Debby P. Y.; Hofker, Marten H.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is considered a causal risk factor predisposing to insulin resistance. However, evidence is accumulating that inflammation confined to the liver may not be causal to metabolic dysfunction. To investigate this, we assessed if hepatic inflammation explains the predisposition

  13. Assessing potential predisposition of elementary school children to heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, T A; Brown, R; Hubbard, E J; Copeland, L R

    1982-12-01

    Physical well-being has been designated a top priority for the children in the Clovis (California) Unified School District. In an effort to diminish coronary risk factors and encourage a healthy life style, a health assessment battery was developed for students in grades 1 through 6. The battery included measurements in height, weight, blood pressure, sit and reach flexibility, and skin-fold test for body fat composition. More than 5000 students were administered the tests by a health assessment team consisting of two nurses, three physical education resource teachers, and two clerical staff members. A random sample of 100 males and 100 females at each grade level was utilized for the statistical analysis. The correlation between body fat and weight was .80 (p v .05) in the fifth and sixth grades. Body fat was positively correlated with both systolic and diastolic measures of blood pressure. The coefficient averaged .21 (p v .05) over the 6 grades for systolic and .22 (p .05) over the 6 grades for diastolic blood pressure. Future plans call for the development of a longitudinal profile of students, as well as establishing district norms for the test battery.

  14. Shared genetic risk factors of intracranial, abdominal, and thoracic aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, Femke N G; Ruigrok, Ynte M; Lee, Cue Hyunkyu; Ripke, Stephan; Anderson, Graig; de Andrade, Mariza; Baas, Annette F; Blankensteijn, Jan D; Böttinger, Erwin P; Bown, Matthew J; Broderick, Joseph; Bijlenga, Philippe; Carrell, David S; Crawford, Dana C; Crosslin, David R; Ebeling, Christian; Eriksson, Johan G; Fornage, Myriam; Foroud, Tatiana; von Und Zu Fraunberg, Mikael; Friedrich, Christoph M; Gaál, Emília I; Gottesman, Omri; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Harrison, Seamus C; Hernesniemi, Juha; Hofman, Albert; Inoue, Ituro; Jääskeläinen, Juha E; Jones, Gregory T; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Kivisaari, Riku; Ko, Nerissa; Koskinen, Seppo; Kubo, Michiaki; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Kurki, Mitja I; Laakso, Aki; Lai, Dongbing; Leal, Suzanne M; Lehto, Hanna; LeMaire, Scott A; Low, Siew-Kee; Malinowski, Jennifer; McCarty, Catherine A; Milewicz, Dianna M; Mosley, Thomas H; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Niemelä, Mika; Pacheco, Jennifer; Peissig, Peggy L; Pera, Joanna; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Rivadeneira, Fernando; van Rij, Andre M; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Saratzis, Athanasios; Slowik, Agnieszka; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tromp, Gerard; Uitterlinden, André G; Verma, Shefali S; Vermeulen, Sita H; Wang, Gao T; Han, Buhm; Rinkel, Gabriël J E; de Bakker, Paul I W

    2016-01-01

    Background--Intracranial aneurysms (IAs), abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), and thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) all have a familial predisposition. Given that aneurysm types are known to co-occur, we hypothesized that there may be shared genetic risk factors for IAs, AAAs, and TAAs. Methods and

  15. Shared Genetic Risk Factors of Intracranial, Abdominal, and Thoracic Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, Femke N G; Ruigrok, Ynte M; Lee, Cue Hyunkyu; Ripke, Stephan; Anderson, Graig; de Andrade, Mariza; Baas, Annette F; Blankensteijn, Jan D; Böttinger, Erwin P; Bown, Matthew J; Broderick, Joseph; Bijlenga, Philippe; Carrell, David S; Crawford, Dana C; Crosslin, David R; Ebeling, Christian; Eriksson, Johan G; Fornage, Myriam; Foroud, Tatiana; von Und Zu Fraunberg, Mikael; Friedrich, Christoph M; Gaál, Emília I; Gottesman, Omri; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Harrison, Seamus C; Hernesniemi, Juha; Hofman, Albert; Inoue, Ituro; Jääskeläinen, Juha E; Jones, Gregory T; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Kivisaari, Riku; Ko, Nerissa; Koskinen, Seppo; Kubo, Michiaki; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Kurki, Mitja I; Laakso, Aki; Lai, Dongbing; Leal, Suzanne M; Lehto, Hanna; LeMaire, Scott A; Low, Siew-Kee; Malinowski, Jennifer; McCarty, Catherine A; Milewicz, Dianna M; Mosley, Thomas H; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Niemelä, Mika; Pacheco, Jennifer; Peissig, Peggy L; Pera, Joanna; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Rivadeneira, Fernando; van Rij, Andre M; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Saratzis, Athanasios; Slowik, Agnieszka; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tromp, Gerard; Uitterlinden, André G; Verma, Shefali S; Vermeulen, Sita H; Wang, Gao T; Han, Buhm; Rinkel, Gabriël J E; de Bakker, Paul I W

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intracranial aneurysms (IAs), abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), and thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) all have a familial predisposition. Given that aneurysm types are known to co-occur, we hypothesized that there may be shared genetic risk factors for IAs, AAAs, and TAAs. METHODS AND

  16. Genetic epidemiology of coronary artery disease: an Asian Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is a matter of great interest to understand the role of genetic factors in ethnic populations that have a strong underlying predisposition to CAD such as the South Asian populations, particularly among Asian Indians living in India and abroad. Although, a number of isolated studies do implicate certain gene polymorphisms ...

  17. Molecular genetic study of hemophilia B in an Algerian population

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DELL

    2016-12-21

    Dec 21, 2016 ... genetic predisposition of developing inhibitors. The objective of this study were, to identify the mutations that produce different forms of HB disease among Algerian patients, to characterise mutations of the. FIX gene and to develop our knowledge about the molecular basis of this disease. MATERIALS AND ...

  18. Preventing organ damage by genetic testing for hereditary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haemochromatosis can be prevented by regular blood donation or phlebotomy and therefore detection of a genetic predisposition at an early age, before irreversible damage to cardiac, hepatic and endocrine tissue occurs, represents an important clinical goal. South African Family Practice Vol. 47(2) 2005: 44-45 ...

  19. Phenotype-Environment Interactions in Genetic Syndromes Associated with Severe or Profound Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliffe, Penny; Oliver, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The research literature notes both biological and operant theories of behavior disorder in individuals with intellectual disabilities. These two theories of genetic predisposition and operant reinforcement remain quite distinct; neither theory on its own is sufficient to explain challenging behavior in genetic syndromes and an integrated approach…

  20. Thermogenic side effects to migratory predisposition in shorebirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vézina, François; Jalvingh, Kirsten M; Dekinga, Anne; Piersma, Theunis

    2007-03-01

    In the calidrine sandpiper red knot (Calidris canutus), the weeks preceding takeoff for long-distance migration are characterized by a rapid increase in body mass, largely made up of fat but also including a significant proportion of lean tissue. Before takeoff, the pectoral muscles are known to hypertrophy in preparation for endurance flight without any specific training. Because birds facing cold environments counterbalance heat loss through shivering thermogenesis, and since pectoral muscles represent a large proportion of avian body mass, we asked the question whether muscle hypertrophy in preparation for long-distance endurance flight would induce improvements in thermogenic capacity. We acclimated red knots to different controlled thermal environments: 26 degrees C, 5 degrees C, and variable conditions tracking outdoor temperatures. We then studied within-individual variations in body mass, pectoral muscle size (measured by ultrasound), and metabolic parameters [basal metabolic rate (BMR) and summit metabolic rate (M(sum))] throughout a 3-mo period enclosing the migratory gain and loss of mass. The gain in body mass during the fattening period was associated with increases in pectoral muscle thickness and thermogenic capacity independent of thermal acclimation. Regardless of their thermal treatment, birds showing the largest increases in body mass also exhibited the largest increases in M(sum). We conclude that migratory fattening is accompanied by thermoregulatory side effects. The gain of body mass and muscle hypertrophy improve thermogenic capacity independent of thermal acclimation in this species. Whether this represents an ecological advantage depends on the ambient temperature at the time of fattening.

  1. Knowledge, attitudes and preferences regarding genetic testing for smoking cessation. A cross-sectional survey among Dutch smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaak, Marieke; Smerecnik, Chris; van Schooten, Frederik J; de Vries, Hein; van Schayck, Constant P

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Recent research strongly suggests that genetic variation influences smokers' ability to stop. Therefore, the use of (pharmaco) genetic testing may increase cessation rates. This study aims to assess the intention of smokers concerning undergoing genetic testing for smoking cessation and their knowledge, attitudes and preferences about this subject. Design Online cross-sectional survey. Setting Database internet research company of which every inhabitant of the Netherlands of ≥12 years with an email address and capable of understanding Dutch can become a member. Participants 587 of 711 Dutch smokers aged ≥18 years, daily smokers for ≥5 years and smoke on average ≥10 cigarettes/day (response rate=83%). Primary and secondary outcome measures Smokers' knowledge, attitudes and preferences and their intention to undergo genetic testing for smoking cessation. Results Knowledge on the influence of genetic factors in smoking addiction and cessation was found to be low. Smokers underestimated their chances of having a genetic predisposition and the influence of this on smoking cessation. Participants perceived few disadvantages, some advantages and showed moderate self-efficacy towards undergoing a genetic test and dealing with the results. Smokers were mildly interested in receiving information and participating in genetic testing, especially when offered by their general practitioner (GP). Conclusions For successful implementation of genetic testing for smoking in general practice, several issues should be addressed, such as the knowledge on smoking cessation, genetics and genetic testing (including advantages and disadvantages) and the influence of genetics on smoking addiction and cessation. Furthermore, smokers allocate their GPs a crucial role in the provision of information and the delivery of a genetic test for smoking; however, it is unclear whether GPs will be able and willing to take on this role.

  2. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis - a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkó, Júlia; Besenyei, Timea; Laki, Judit; Glant, Tibor T; Mikecz, Katalin; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2013-10-01

    The "Bermuda triangle" of genetics, environment and autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Various aspects of genetic contribution to the etiology, pathogenesis and outcome of RA are discussed in this review. The heritability of RA has been estimated to be about 60 %, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11-37 %. Apart from known shared epitope (SE) alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*01 and DRB1*04, other HLA alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*13 and DRB1*15 have been linked to RA susceptibility. A novel SE classification divides SE alleles into S1, S2, S3P and S3D groups, where primarily S2 and S3P groups have been associated with predisposition to seropositive RA. The most relevant non-HLA gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with RA include PTPN22, IL23R, TRAF1, CTLA4, IRF5, STAT4, CCR6, PADI4. Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 30 loci involved in RA pathogenesis. HLA and some non-HLA genes may differentiate between anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) seropositive and seronegative RA. Genetic susceptibility has also been associated with environmental factors, primarily smoking. Some GWAS studies carried out in rodent models of arthritis have confirmed the role of human genes. For example, in the collagen-induced (CIA) and proteoglycan-induced arthritis (PgIA) models, two important loci - Pgia26/Cia5 and Pgia2/Cia2/Cia3, corresponding the human PTPN22/CD2 and TRAF1/C5 loci, respectively - have been identified. Finally, pharmacogenomics identified SNPs or multiple genetic signatures that may be associated with responses to traditional disease-modifying drugs and biologics.

  3. Familial Myelodysplastic/Acute Leukemia Syndromes—Myeloid Neoplasms with Germline Predisposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Lyrio Rafael Baptista

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Although most cases of myeloid neoplasms are sporadic, a small subset has been associated with germline mutations. The 2016 revision of the World Health Organization classification included these cases in a myeloid neoplasm group with a predisposing germline mutational background. These patients must have a different management and their families should get genetic counseling. Cases identification and outline of the major known syndromes characteristics will be discussed in this text.

  4. Familial Myelodysplastic/Acute Leukemia Syndromes—Myeloid Neoplasms with Germline Predisposition

    OpenAIRE

    Baptista, Renata Lyrio Rafael; dos Santos, Anna Cláudia Evangelista; Gutiyama, Luciana Mayumi; Solza, Cristiana; Zalcberg, Ilana Renault

    2017-01-01

    Although most cases of myeloid neoplasms are sporadic, a small subset has been associated with germline mutations. The 2016 revision of the World Health Organization classification included these cases in a myeloid neoplasm group with a predisposing germline mutational background. These patients must have a different management and their families should get genetic counseling. Cases identification and outline of the major known syndromes characteristics will be discussed in this text.

  5. Beliefs about the Etiology of Homosexuality and about the Ramifications of Discovering Its Possible Genetic Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Jane P.; Pfeffer, Carla A.; Jayaratne, Toby Epstein; Feldbaum, Merle; Petty, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Homosexuality is viewed by many as a social problem. As such, there has been keen interest in elucidating the origins of homosexuality among many scholars, from anthropologists to zoologists, psychologists to theologians. Research has shown that those who believe sexual orientation is inborn are more likely to have tolerant attitudes toward gay men and lesbians, whereas those who believe it is a choice have less tolerant attitudes. The current qualitative study used in-depth, open-ended telephone interviews with 42 White and 44 Black Americans to gain insight into the public's beliefs about the possible genetic origins of homosexuality. Along with etiological beliefs (and the sources of information used to develop those beliefs), we asked respondents to describe the benefits and dangers of scientists discovering the possible genetic basis for homosexuality. We found that although limited understanding and biased perspectives likely led to simplistic reasoning concerning the origins and genetic basis of homosexuality, many individuals appreciated complex and interactive etiological perspectives. These interactive perspectives often included recognition of some type of inherent aspect, such as a genetic factor(s), that served as an underlying predisposition that would be manifested after being influenced by other factors such as choice or environmental exposures. We also found that beliefs in a genetic basis for homosexuality could be used to support very diverse opinions, including those in accordance with negative eugenic agendas. PMID:17594974

  6. Beliefs about the etiology of homosexuality and about the ramifications of discovering its possible genetic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Jane P; Pfeffer, Carla A; Jayaratne, Toby Epstein; Feldbaum, Merle; Petty, Elizabeth M

    2007-01-01

    Homosexuality is viewed by many as a social problem. As such, there is a keen interest in elucidating the origins of homosexuality among many scholars, from anthropologists to zoologists, from psychologists to theologians. Research has shown that those who believe sexual orientation is inborn are more likely to have tolerant attitudes toward gay men and lesbians, whereas those who believe it is a choice have less tolerant attitudes. The current qualitative study used in-depth, open-ended telephone interviews with 42 White and 44 Black Americans to gain insight into the public's beliefs about the possible genetic origins of homosexuality. Along with etiological beliefs (and the sources of information used to develop these beliefs), we asked respondents to describe the benefits and dangers of scientists discovering the possible genetic basis for homosexuality. We found that although limited understanding and biased perspectives likely led to simplistic reasoning concerning the origins and genetic basis of homosexuality, many individuals appreciated the complex and interactive etiological perspectives. These interactive perspectives often included recognition of some type of inherent aspect, such as a genetic factor(s), that served as an underlying predisposition that would be manifested after being influenced by other factors such as choice or environmental exposures. We also found that beliefs in a genetic basis for homosexuality could be used to support very diverse opinions including those in accordance with negative eugenic agendas.

  7. Redescription and first genetic characterisation of Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus) macaensis Vicente & Santos, 1972 (Nematoda: Camallanidae), including re-evaluation of the species of Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus) from marine fishes off Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardella, Carla J; Pereira, Felipe B; Luque, José L

    2017-07-01

    Newly collected specimens of Procamallanus (Spirocamallanus) macaensis Vicente & Santos, 1972 from the intestine of Paralonchurus brasiliensis (Steindachner), off Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, are redescribed and genetically characterised. Additionally, all congeners deposited in the Coleção Helmintológica do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz (CHIOC) parasitic in marine fishes of the South Atlantic, including types of P. (S.) macaensis, were re-evaluated. The following features are described for the first time in P. (S.) macaensis: morphology and arrangement of cephalic structures, shape of deirids and location of phasmids. The position of the excretory pore, the number and arrangement of caudal papillae in males, the structure of the spicules and of tail end in both males and females are rectified. Most specimens deposited in the CHIOC identified as P. (S.) pereirai Annereaux, 1946 were transferred to P. (S.) macaensis and others were designated as Procamallanus (S.) sp. Procamallanus (S.) cruzi Guimarães, Cristófaro & Rodrigues, 1976 is considered a species inquirenda due to its poor description and the lack of match of its original description with the type-material re-examined. Moreover, several taxonomic problems were noted after observations of the specimens (mostly poorly preserved), including inadequate morphological reports as well as misidentifications. Phylogenies inferred using sequences of the SSU rDNA from camallanids (Nematoda: Camallanidae) mostly generated weakly supported clades; however, Camallanus Railliet & Henry, 1915 and Procamallanus Baylis, 1923 do not seem to be monophyletic. Based on the present results and the lack of molecular data, it would be pertinent to adopt the widely-used classification for the subgenera of Procamallanus.

  8. Systematic search for enhancer elements and somatic allelic imbalance at seven low-penetrance colorectal cancer predisposition loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houlston Richard S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in ten chromosomal loci have been shown to predispose to colorectal cancer (CRC in genome-wide association studies. A plausible biological mechanism of CRC susceptibility associated with genetic variation has so far only been proposed for three loci, each pointing to variants that affect gene expression through distant regulatory elements. In this study, we aimed to gain insight into the molecular basis of seven low-penetrance CRC loci tagged by rs4779584 at 15q13, rs10795668 at 10p14, rs3802842 at 11q23, rs4444235 at 14q22, rs9929218 at 16q22, rs10411210 at 19q13, and rs961253 at 20p12. Methods Possible somatic gain of the risk allele or loss of the protective allele was studied by analyzing allelic imbalance in tumour and corresponding normal tissue samples of heterozygous patients. Functional variants were searched from in silico predicted enhancer elements locating inside the CRC-associating linkage-disequilibrium regions. Results No allelic imbalance targeting the SNPs was observed at any of the seven loci. Altogether, 12 SNPs that were predicted to disrupt potential transcription factor binding sequences were genotyped in the same population-based case-control series as the seven tagging SNPs originally. None showed association with CRC. Conclusions The results of the allelic imbalance analysis suggest that the seven CRC risk variants are not somatically selected for in the neoplastic progression. The bioinformatic approach was unable to pinpoint cancer-causing variants at any of the seven loci. While it is possible that many of the predisposition loci for CRC are involved in control of gene expression by targeting transcription factor binding sites, also other possibilities, such as regulatory RNAs, should be considered.

  9. Race and ethnicity as a victimogenic predisposition of exceeding and abuse of police authority

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesić Zoran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The unique position in society and the specific functions make the police one of the key holders of protection of the fundamental rights and freedoms of citizens. At the same time, their position and function provide police officers significant opportunities to violate the same freedoms and rights, by resorting to various forms of violation and abuse of power. This dual nature of the police authority gives us reason to question the police from a completely different angle - as a source of a specific form of victimization. The risk degree of victimization by police authority is determined by the different predispositions, and above all by the victim’s behavior. However, some individual characteristics (gender, age, sexual orientation, ethnic and social origin are also a kind of victimogenic predisposition, as they contribute to the process of victimization independently or in combination with the behavior of the victim. In this work we draw attention to the fact that race (ethnicity often makes an independent criterion which the police use when deciding how to act in the concrete case. This circumstance contributes to a distinctive form of police procedure, known as racial profiling. The fact that the race of a person is taken as a criterion for treatment suggests the conclusion that here is actually about a form of discriminatory behavior. Considered in this context, race may be treated as victimogenic predisposition of police authority, and racial profiling as a process of victimization. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179045: Razvoj institucionalnih kapaciteta, standarda i procedura za suprotstavljanje organizovanom kriminalu i terorizmu u uslovima međunarodnih integracija

  10. The Effect of Phototherapy on Cancer Predisposition Genes of Diabetic and Normal Human Skin Fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Chotikasemsri, Pongsathorn; Tangtrakulwanich, Boonsin; Sangkhathat, Surasak

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether LED light at different wavelengths affects the expression profile of 143 cancer predisposition genes in both diabetic and normal human fibroblasts. In this study, both diabetic and normal fibroblast cell lines were cultured and irradiated with red (635 nm), green (520 nm), and blue (465 nm) LED light for 10 minutes at 0.67 J/cm2 each. After that, mRNA from all cell lines was extracted for microarray analysis. We found that green light activ...

  11. Germline mutation in the RAD51B gene confers predisposition to breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golmard, Lisa; Nicolas, André; Castéra, Laurent; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Stern, Marc-Henri; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Davy, Grégoire; Al Ageeli, Essam; Poirot, Brigitte; Tirapo, Carole; Michaux, Dorothée; Barbaroux, Catherine; D'Enghien, Catherine Dubois

    2013-01-01

    Most currently known breast cancer predisposition genes play a role in DNA repair by homologous recombination. Recent studies conducted on RAD51 paralogs, involved in the same DNA repair pathway, have identified rare germline mutations conferring breast and/or ovarian cancer predisposition in the RAD51C, RAD51D and XRCC2 genes. The present study analysed the five RAD51 paralogs (RAD51B, RAD51C, RAD51D, XRCC2, XRCC3) to estimate their contribution to breast and ovarian cancer predisposition. The study was conducted on 142 unrelated patients with breast and/or ovarian cancer either with early onset or with a breast/ovarian cancer family history. Patients were referred to a French family cancer clinic and had been previously tested negative for a BRCA1/2 mutation. Coding sequences of the five genes were analysed by EMMA (Enhanced Mismatch Mutation Analysis). Detected variants were characterized by Sanger sequencing analysis. Three splicing mutations and two likely deleterious missense variants were identified: RAD51B c.452 + 3A > G, RAD51C c.706-2A > G, RAD51C c.1026 + 5-1026 + 7del, RAD51B c.475C > T/p.Arg159Cys and XRCC3 c.448C > T/p.Arg150Cys. No RAD51D and XRCC2 gene mutations were detected. These mutations and variants were detected in families with both breast and ovarian cancers, except for the RAD51B c.475C > T/p.Arg159Cys variant that occurred in a family with 3 breast cancer cases. This study identified the first RAD51B mutation in a breast and ovarian cancer family and is the first report of XRCC3 mutation analysis in breast and ovarian cancer. It confirms that RAD51 paralog mutations confer breast and ovarian cancer predisposition and are rare events. In view of the low frequency of RAD51 paralog mutations, international collaboration of family cancer clinics will be required to more accurately estimate their penetrance and establish clinical guidelines in carrier individuals

  12. Erratum : De Novo Mutations in Synaptic Transmission Genes Including DNM1 Cause Epileptic Encephalopathies (American Journal of Human Genetics 95(4) (360–370)(S0002929714003838)(10.1016/j.ajhg.2014.08.013))

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appenzeller, Silke; Balling, Rudi; Barisic, Nina; Baulac, Stéphanie; Caglayan, Hande; Craiu, Dana; De Jonghe, Peter; Depienne, Christel; Dimova, Petia; Djémié, Tania; Gormley, Padhraig; Guerrini, Renzo; Helbig, Ingo; Hjalgrim, Helle; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Jähn, Johanna A.; Klein, Karl Martin; Koeleman, Bobby; Komarek, Vladimir; Krause, Roland; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor; Leguern, Eric; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Lemke, Johannes R.; Lerche, Holger; Linnankivi, Tarja; Marini, Carla; May, Patrick; Møller, Rikke S.; Muhle, Hiltrud; Pal, Deb; Palotie, Aarno; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Robbiano, Angela; Roelens, Filip; Rosenow, Felix; Selmer, Kaja; Serratosa, Jose M.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Stephani, Ulrich; Sterbova, Katalin; Striano, Pasquale; Suls, Arvid; Talvik, Tiina; von Spiczak, Sarah; Weber, Yvonne G.; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Zara, Federico; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Alldredge, Brian K.; Andermann, Eva; Andermann, Frederick; Amrom, Dina; Bautista, Jocelyn F.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Bluvstein, Judith; Boro, Alex; Cascino, Gregory; Consalvo, Damian; Crumrine, Patricia; Devinsky, Orrin; Dlugos, Dennis; Epstein, Michael P.; Fiol, Miguel; Fountain, Nathan B.; French, Jacqueline; Friedman, Daniel; Geller, Eric B.; Glauser, Tracy; Glynn, Simon; Haas, Kevin; Haut, Sheryl R.; Hayward, Jean; Helmers, Sandra L.; Joshi, Sucheta; Kanner, Andres; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Knowlton, Robert C.; Kossoff, Eric H.; Kuperman, Rachel; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; McGuire, Shannon M.; Motika, Paul V.; Novotny, Edward J.; Ottman, Ruth; Paolicchi, Juliann M.; Parent, Jack; Park, Kristen; Poduri, Annapurna; Sadleir, Lynette G.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Shellhaas, Renée A; Sherr, Elliott; Shih, Jerry J.; Singh, Rani; Sirven, Joseph; Smith, Michael C.; Sullivan, Joe; Thio, Liu Lin; Venkat, Anu; Vining, Eileen P. G.; Von Allmen, Gretchen K.; Weisenberg, Judith L.; Widdess-Walsh, Peter; Winawer, Melodie R.; Allen, Andrew S.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Cossette, Patrick; Delanty, Norman; Dlugos, Dennis; Eichler, Evan E.; Epstein, Michael P.; Glauser, Tracy; Goldstein, David B.; Han, Yujun; Heinzen, Erin L.; Johnson, Michael R.; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; Marson, Anthony G.; Mefford, Heather C.; Nieh, Sahar Esmaeeli; O'Brien, Terence J.; Ottman, Ruth; Petrou, Stephen; Petrovski, Slavé; Poduri, Annapurna; Ruzzo, Elizabeth K.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Sherr, Elliott

    2017-01-01

    (The American Journal of Human Genetics 95, 360–370; October 2, 2014) In the list of consortium members for the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project, member Dina Amrom's name was misspelled as Amron. The authors regret the error.

  13. Exploring cancer genetics and care of the family: an evolving challenge for palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillie, Alison Kate

    2006-02-01

    There is a growing scientific understanding and increasing public awareness of the influence of genetics on the development of cancer. This article, which is based on a review of the literature, focuses on how the awareness of genetic predisposition to cancer is affecting patients and their families. It highlights the way that risk assessment for predisposition to cancer can conflict with traditional models of informed consent and can cause concern for families. It suggests that there is need for informed discussion within palliative care about how best to support families with concerns about a family history of cancer.

  14. Genetic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, John

    1973-01-01

    Presents a review of genetic engineering, in which the genotypes of plants and animals (including human genotypes) may be manipulated for the benefit of the human species. Discusses associated problems and solutions and provides an extensive bibliography of literature relating to genetic engineering. (JR)

  15. Examining the Use of Distance-Mediated Case Conferencing for Case-Based Training in Clinical Cancer Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazer, Kathleen R.

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with a cancer-predisposing genetic trait have a lifetime risk to develop cancer approaching 100 percent, and cancer often strikes early in age, before standard recommended cancer screening begins. Identifying hereditary cancer predisposition through genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA) allows for intensified measures to prevent…

  16. [Predisposition of citizens to use Internet-based channels to communicate with doctors in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Usagre, Manuel; Reyes-Alcázar, Víctor; Valverde, José A

    2014-01-01

    Analyze factors affecting the predisposition of Spanish citizens to use Internet-based communication channels (E-mail, blogs, social networks, and online recommendations). Secondary data were analyzed by applying a boosted regression tree (BRT) to the results obtained from the survey "Use and Applications of Information and Communications Technology in Health," administered to a representative sample of the Spanish population between 16 and 85 years of age who use the Internet. Model forecasts achieved different degrees of precision for each of the communication channels: for E-mail, AUC (area under the curve) = 0.79; for the physician's blog or personal website, AUC = 0.736; for social networks, AUC = 0.73; for recommendations of websites related to health problems, AUC = 0.768. Being young was the most important parameter in citizen predisposition to communicate through social networks (relative influence; RI = 21.05%), while population density was the most important parameter in likelihood that the physician would have a blog or personal health-related website (RI = 19.48%). Having a positive perception of the technology when facilitating health-related transactions was the most important characteristic in wanting to receive recommendations on health-related Internet resources (RI = 18.66%), while having a higher level of education was the best predictor of wanting to establish E-mail communication (RI = 18.98%). Many of Spanish people are open to using physician-patient interaction channels on the Internet.

  17. The Role of Social Factors in Iranian University Students' Predispositions towards Autonomous Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Kashefian Naeeini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to meet the demands of the changing world, students should become endowed with the ability to learn perpetually and regard learning as a life-long enterprise. This study investigated those learners belief which showed learners’ predispositions toward autonomy  and some social factors such as gender, academic achievement, marital status and age were taken into consideration. All BA and MA students majoring in English Literature at the department of Foreign Languages of Shiraz University of Iran were involved. The data were collected through a questionnaire the items of which were obtained from two questionnaires by Cotterall (1995 and Cotterall (1999 which were incorporated into a five-point Likert-type rating scale. Factor analysis of responses of students revealed the existence of five underlying factors for learner autonomy which were learner independence, dependence on the teacher, learner confidence, attitudes towards language learning and self-assessment. Based on t-test for independent samples and Analysis of Variance it came to light that age and gender did not have impact on students’ readiness for autonomy while martial statues influenced students’  self-assessment. Moreover, good academic achievement positively influenced their predispositions towards autonomous language learning.

  18. NAT2 polymorphism in Omani gastric cancer patients-risk predisposition and clinicopathological associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Moundhri, Mansour S; Al-Kindi, Mohamed; Al-Nabhani, Maryam; Al-Bahrani, Bassim; Burney, Ikram A; Al-Madhani, Ali; Ganguly, Shyam S; Tanira, Misbah

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study whether N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) genotypes and phenotypes are associated with increased risk factor for gastric cancer in Omani patients and to study the clinico-pathological correlations and the prognostic significance of NAT2. METHODS: Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 100 gastric cancer patients and 100 control subjects. NAT2 genotyping was performed using DNA sequencing. The prognostic significance of NAT2 and other clinicopathological features was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: We observed no significant association between NAT2 genotypes and phenotypes and gastric cancer risk. The NAT2 phenotype polymorphisms and gastric cancer risk predisposition were not modified by concomitant H pylori infection and smoking. There was no significant association between NAT2 and clinicopathological features, and NAT2 had no independent prognostic significance. CONCLUSION: In the current study, NAT2 genotypes and phenotypes are not associated with gastric cancer risk predisposition. Moreover NAT2 phenotypes had no clinicopathological associations or prognostic significance. PMID:17569138

  19. Impaired mucociliary clearance in allergic rhinitis patients is related to a predisposition to rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Ioannis; Athanasopoulos, Ioannis; Mastronikolis, Nicholas S; Panogeorgou, Theodora; Margaritis, Vassilios; Naxakis, Stefanos; Goumas, Panos D

    2009-04-01

    Although mucociliary clearance has been shown to be impaired in patients with allergic rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis, its exact role in relation to a predisposition to rhinosinusitis is unknown. To investigate this possible association, we conducted a prospective study of 125 patients with allergic rhinitis. Of this group, 23 patients were classified as being sinusitis-prone based on their history of antibiotic consumption for the treatment of rhinosinusitis; the remaining 102 patients were deemed to be not sinusitis-prone. The saccharine test was used to evaluate mucociliary clearance in all patients. Several variables-age, sex, smoking habits, rhinitis severity, and medication history-were examined. We found that the sinusitis-prone patients had a significantly greater mucociliary clearance time than did those who were not prone (median: 15 and 12 min, respectively; p = 0.02). No other statistically significant differences were seen between the 2 groups with respect to any other variables that might have affected mucociliary clearance. We conclude that impaired mucociliary clearance in allergic rhinitis patients is associated with a predisposition to rhinosinusitis.

  20. Tour de France Champions born or made: where do we take the genetics of performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Colin N; Pitsiladis, Yannis P

    2017-07-01

    Cyclists in the Tour de France are endurance specialists. Twin and family studies have shown that approximately 50% of the variance in a number of performance-related phenotypes (whether measured at baseline, i.e., natural talent, or in response to training) including those important to cycling can be explained by genetic variation. Research into the specific genetic variants that are responsible has identified over 200 genes containing common genetic variants involved in the genetic predisposition to physical performance. However, typically these explain only a small portion of the variance, perhaps 1-2% and collectively they rarely explain anything approaching the 50% of the variance identified in the twin and family studies. Thus, there is a gap in our understanding of the relationship between heritability and performance. This gap may be bridged by investigation of rare variants or epigenetic variation or by altering study designs through increased collaborations to pool existing cohorts together. Initial findings from such efforts show promising results. This mini-review will touch on the genetics and epigenetics of sporting performance, how they relate to cyclists in the Tour de France and where best future efforts may be directed as well as discuss some preliminary research findings.

  1. Assimetria cerebral e lateralização da linguagem: déficits nucleares na esquizofrenia como indicadores da predisposição genética Asimetría cerebral y lateralización del lenguaje: déficits nucleares en la esquizofrenia como indicadores de predisposición genética Cerebral asymmetry and the lateralization of language: core deficits in schizophrenia as pointers to the genetic predisposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Crow

    2004-08-01

    anatómicos, funcionales y genéticos. HALLAZGOS RECIENTES: Estudios de imagen, post mortem y anatómicos, demuestran evidencias de una reducción o reversión de aspectos de asimetría, particularmente en la corteza de asociación occipito-temporo-parietal. En algunos estudios, hay interacción con el sexo. Hay evidencias de que una alteración en el lóbulo temporal izquierdo es, a veces, progresiva. Estudios funcionales agregan credibilidad al concepto de que la lateralización del lenguaje es reducida y, en algunos casos, revertida. RESUMEN: La dimensión de la asimetría se destaca como la variable que puede dar significación a las observaciones entre campos de investigación y que proporciona una solución para la base genética de la psicosis. Estudios de gemelos monocigóticos discordantes vienen presentando fuertes indicaciones de que la variación relevante es epigenética; ello es consistente con la posibilidad de que la variación esté relacionada a alteraciones estructurales recientes (la trasposición replicativa Xq21.3/Yp de los cromosomas sexuales.PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Cerebral asymmetry (the torque from right frontal to left occipital is the defining feature of the human brain, and as Broca proposed, the putative neural correlate of language. If as has been suggested schizophrenia is the price that Homo sapiens pays for language, the torque together with its functional correlates is of central significance. Recent evidence from anatomical, functional and genetic studies is reviewed. RECENT FINDINGS: Both post-mortem and anatomical imaging studies show evidence of a reduction or reversal of aspects of asymmetry particularly in the occipito-temporo-parietal association cortex. In some studies there is an interaction with sex. There is evidence that change in the left temporal lobe is sometimes progressive. Functional studies add substance to the concept that the lateralization of language is reduced and in some aspects reversed. SUMMARY: The dimension of

  2. Arthropod Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumwalde, Sharon

    2000-01-01

    Introduces an activity on arthropod genetics that involves phenotype and genotype identification of the creature and the construction process. Includes a list of required materials and directions to build a model arthropod. (YDS)

  3. Practicability of comprehensive care in clinical genetics in the brazilian unified health system: expanding the debate

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes-Júnior, Luís Carlos; Flória-Santos, Milena; Ferraz, Victor Evangelista de Faria; Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena; Palha, Pedro Fredemir; Bomfim, Emiliana de Omena; Abrahão, Camila Aparecida; Silva, Sara da

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to highlight the discussions on the National Policy for Comprehensive Care in Clinical Genetics and reflect on its pending regulation when genomic discoveries change the model of health care. Nine of the ten causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide presents genetic/genomic predisposition. Based on strategic planning, this Policy proposes the organization of a network of referral services and specialized centers in genetics, with capacity to meet the needs of the populatio...

  4. Exploring the Role of Genetic Modifiers in DNA Repair and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    09-1-0029 TITLE: Exploring the role of genetic modifiers in DNA repair and breast cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Brian D...1 September 2009 - 31 August 2013Annual SummarySeptember 2013 Exploring the Role of Genetic Modifiers in DNA Repair and Breast Cancer Brian D...cause sensitivity to DNA damage in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in an attempt to identify genetic factors which cause predisposition to breast

  5. Investigating Ductal Carcinoma in Situ Using Noninvasive Imaging of Genetically Engineered Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    PJ, Gupta PB, Klebba I, Jones AD, et al. (2011) Genetic predisposition directs breast cancer phenotype by dictating progenitor cell fate. Cell Stem...Albertson DG, Simin K. Cooperativity of Rb, Brca1, and p53 in malignant breast cancer evolution. PLoS Genet . 2012;8(11). 16. Behbod F, Kittrell FS...Cre lines for genetic recombination, specifically WAP-Cre and K14Cre, which are widely utilized in mouse models of breast cancer (Liu et al. PNAS

  6. Effects of Pharmacologic and Genetic Inhibition of Alk on Cognitive Impairments in NF1 Mutant Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    normal development and tumor predisposition , in mice lacking exon 23a of Nf1. Nat Genet 27, 399-405 (2001). 8 Silva, A. J. et al. A mouse model for...AD______________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0117 TITL