WorldWideScience

Sample records for include fungi bacteria

  1. Plants, mycorrhizal fungi, and bacteria: a network of interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfante, Paola; Anca, Iulia-Andra

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on interactions among plants, mycorrhizal fungi, and bacteria, testing the hypothesis whether mycorrhizas can be defined as tripartite associations. After summarizing the main biological features of mycorrhizas, we illustrate the different types of interaction occurring between mycorrhizal fungi and bacteria, from loosely associated microbes to endobacteria. We then discuss, in the context of nutritional strategies, the mechanisms that operate among members of the consortium and that often promote plant growth. Release of active molecules, including volatiles, and physical contact among the partners seem important for the establishment of the bacteria/mycorrhizal fungus/plant network. The potential involvement of quorum sensing and Type III secretion systems is discussed, even if the exact nature of the complex interspecies/interphylum interactions remains unclear.

  2. Metabolic Interactions between Bacteria and Fungi in Commensal Oral Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Lof, Marloes; Janus, Marleen M.; Krom, Bastiaan P.

    2017-01-01

    Oral health is more than just the absence of disease. The key to oral health is a diverse microbiome in an ecological balance. The oral microbiota is one of the most complex and diverse microbial communities in the human body. To maintain oral health, balance between the human host and the intrinsic microorganisms is essential. The healthy oral cavity is represented by a great microbial diversity, including both bacteria and fungi. The bacterial microbiome is very well studied. In contrast, f...

  3. Biofilms from a Brazilian water distribution system include filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, V M; Oliveira, H M B; Santos, C; Paterson, R R M; Gusmão, N B; Lima, N

    2013-03-01

    Filamentous fungi in drinking water can block water pipes, can cause organoleptic biodeterioration, and are a source of pathogens. There are increasing reports of the involvement of the organisms in biofilms. This present study describes a sampling device that can be inserted directly into pipes within water distribution systems, allowing biofilm formation in situ. Calcofluor White M2R staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization with morphological analyses using epifluorescent microscopy were used to analyse biofilms for filamentous fungi, permitting direct observation of the fungi. DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) was applied to detect bacteria. Filamentous fungi were detected in biofilms after 6 months on coupons exposed to raw water, decanted water and at the entrance of the water distribution system. Algae, yeast, and bacteria were also observed. The role of filamentous fungi requires further investigations.

  4. Antifungal Activity of Selected Lactic Acid Bacteria and Propionic Acid Bacteria against Dairy-Associated Spoilage Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aunsbjerg, Stina Dissing

    Bacterial cultures of lactic and propionic acid bacteria are widely used in fermented products including dairy products. Spoilage fungi may constitute a quality and safety issue in these products. The antifungal properties of some lactic and propionic acid bacteria make them potential candidates...... diacetyl and lactic acid, 6 antifungal hydroxy acids were identified. Of these, 3 have previously been reported from antifungal lactic acid bacteria, whereas the other 3 hydroxy acids have not previously been reported produced by antifungal lactic acid bacteria....

  5. Enumeration, isolation and identification of bacteria and fungi from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enumeration, isolation and identification of bacteria and fungi from soil contaminated with petroleum products using layer chicken droppings as an amendment The media used were nutrient agar for total heterotrophic bacterial count, potato dextrose agar for fungi count, serial dilution was carried out and the pour plate ...

  6. ETV Tech Brief: Rapid Fungi and Bacteria Detection Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical brief that summarizes the results for Mycometer, Inc. Mycometer®-test and Bactiquant®-test, which are rapid detection technologies for fungi and bacteria. The brief summarizes the results of the verification report and statement.

  7. Relative Effectiveness of Water Hyacinth, Bacteria and Fungi in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    phytoremedian), bacteria and fungi (bioremedians) used for the purification of domestic sewage was carried out using Completely Randomised Design (CRD) replicated three times. Physical, bacteriological and chemical properties of domestic sewage ...

  8. The effect of ectomycorrhizal fungi and bacteria on pine seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Dahm

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ecomycorrhizal fungi (Hebelon crustuliniforme(Bull.: Fr. Quél. 5392 and Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers. Coker et Couch 5335 and bacteria (Bacillus polymyxa and Azospirillum brasilense. associated with mycorrhizas on the growth of pine seedligs was investigated. In addition the influence of bacteria on fungal biomass production and the relationship between ectomycorrhizal fungi and fungi pathogenic to root of pine seedlings were determined. In general, the shoot/root ratio was higher in plants inoculated with Hebeloma crustuliniforme and bacteria than in the control seedlings (grown only under sterile conditions. In non-sterile substrate the root/shoot ratio of the mycorrhizal seedlings was lower as compared to the control. Similar phenomenon was noted in plants inoculated with the mycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinetorius. The bacteria used as well as the time of introduction of these organisms into the cultures of mycorrhiza fungi affected the production of fungal biomass. Hebeloma crustuliniforme and Pisolithus tinctorius inhibited the growth of Rizoctonia solani and Fusarium oxysporum fungi pathogenic to pine seedlings.

  9. Bioactive potential of symbiotic bacteria and fungi from marine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marine sponges are rich in microbial biota. In this study, totally four sponges namely Callyspongia diffusa, Hyattella Cribriformis, Sigmadocia carnosa, Spongia officininalis Var ceylonensis were collected and their associated bacteria and fungi were isolated. Among the microbes isolated, Pseudomonas fluorescens and ...

  10. In vitro screening of soil bacteria for inhibiting phytopathogenic fungi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At present, the greatest interest resides with the development and application of specific biocontrol agent for the control of diseases on plant and this form the focus of this work. Several soil bacteria were evaluated in vitro for their effectiveness on the basis of their ability to suppress fungi in plate inhibition assays. 51 strains ...

  11. The interactions of bacteria with fungi in soil : Emerging concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haq, Irshad; Zhang, Miaozhi; Yang, Pu; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Gadd, GM; Sariaslani, S

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we review the existing literature on bacterial fungal interactions in soil, exploring the role fungi may play for soil bacteria as providers of hospitable niches. A focus is placed on the mycosphere, i.e., the narrow zone of influence of fungal hyphae on the external soil milieu, in

  12. Impact of Collimonas bacteria on community composition of soil fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Höppener-Ogawa, S.; Leveau, J.H.J.; Hundscheid, M.P.J.; Van Veen, J.A.; De Boer, W.

    2009-01-01

    The genus Collimonas consists of soil bacteria that have the potential to grow at the expense of living fungal hyphae. However, the consequences of this mycophagous ability for soil fungi are unknown. Here we report on the development of fungal communities after introduction of collimonads in a soil

  13. Visualization of interaction between inorganic nanoparticles and bacteria or fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chwalibog, André; Sawosz, Ewa; Hotowy, Anna Malgorzata

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate the morphologic characteristics of self-assemblies of diamond (nano-D), silver (nano-Ag), gold (nano-Au), and platinum (nano-Pt) nanoparticles with Staphylococus aureus (bacteria) and Candida albicans (fungi), to determine the po...

  14. Fungi outcompete bacteria under increased uranium concentration in culture media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumtaz, Saqib; Streten-Joyce, Claire; Parry, David L.; McGuinness, Keith A.; Lu, Ping; Gibb, Karen S.

    2013-01-01

    As a key part of water management at the Ranger Uranium Mine (Northern Territory, Australia), stockpile (ore and waste) runoff water was applied to natural woodland on the mine lease in accordance with regulatory requirements. Consequently, the soil in these Land Application Areas (LAAs) presents a range of uranium concentrations. Soil samples were collected from LAAs with different concentrations of uranium and extracts were plated onto LB media containing no (0 ppm), low (3 ppm), medium (250 ppm), high (600 ppm) and very high (1500 ppm) uranium concentrations. These concentrations were similar to the range of measured uranium concentrations in the LAAs soils. Bacteria grew on all plates except for the very high uranium concentrations, where only fungi were recovered. Identifications based on bacterial 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that the dominant cultivable bacteria belonged to the genus Bacillus. Members of the genera Paenibacillus, Lysinibacillus, Klebsiella, Microbacterium and Chryseobacterium were also isolated from the LAAs soil samples. Fungi were identified by sequence analysis of the intergenic spacer region, and members of the genera Aspergillus, Cryptococcus, Penicillium and Curvularia were dominant on plates with very high uranium concentrations. Members of the Paecilomyces and Alternaria were also present but in lower numbers. These findings indicate that fungi can tolerate very high concentrations of uranium and are more resistant than bacteria. Bacteria and fungi isolated at the Ranger LAAs from soils with high concentrations of uranium may have uranium binding capability and hence the potential for uranium bioremediation. -- Highlights: ► Fungi outcompete bacteria under increased uranium concentration in culture media. ► Soil microorganisms isolated from the Ranger Land Application Areas (LAAs) were resistant to uranium. ► Bacillus was the most abundant cultivable genus retrieved from the Ranger LAAs soils. ► Uranium in LAAs soils is

  15. Impact of Collimonas bacteria on community composition of soil fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höppener-Ogawa, Sachie; Leveau, Johan H J; Hundscheid, Maria P J; van Veen, Johannes A; de Boer, Wietse

    2009-06-01

    The genus Collimonas consists of soil bacteria that have the potential to grow at the expense of living fungal hyphae. However, the consequences of this mycophagous ability for soil fungi are unknown. Here we report on the development of fungal communities after introduction of collimonads in a soil that had a low abundance of indigenous collimonads. Development of fungal communities was stimulated by addition of cellulose or by introducing plants (Plantago lanceolata). Community composition of total fungi in soil and rhizosphere and of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in roots was examined by PCR-DGGE. The introduction of collimonads altered the composition of all fungal communities studied but had no effects on fungal biomass increase, cellulose degrading activity or plant performance. The most likely explanation for these results is that differences in sensitivity of fungal species to the presence of collimonads result in competitive replacement of species. The lab and greenhouse experiments were complemented with a field experiment. Mesh bags containing sterile sand with or without collimonads were buried in an ex-arable field and a forest. The presence of collimonads had an effect on the composition of fungi invading these bags in the ex-arable site but not in the forest site.

  16. Interactions among endophytic bacteria and fungi: effects and potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, W M M S; Seneviratne, Gamini; Kulasooriya, S A

    2006-12-01

    Plants benefit extensively by harbouring endophytic microbes. They promote plant growth and confer enhanced resistance to various pathogens. However, the way the interactions among endophytes influence the plant productivity has not been explained. Present study experimentally showed that endophytes isolated from rice (Oryza sativa) used as the test plant produced two types of interactions; biofilms (bacteria attached to mycelia) and mixed cultures with no such attachments. Acidity, as measured by pH in cultures with biofilms was higher than that of fungi alone, bacteria alone or the mixed cultures. Production of indoleacetic acid like substances (IAAS) of biofilms was higher than that of mixed cultures, fungi or bacteria. Bacteria and fungi produced higher quantities of IAAS than mixed cultures. In mixed cultures, the potential of IAAS production of resident microbes was reduced considerably. There was a negative relationship between IAAS and pH of the biofilms, indicating that IAAS was the main contributor to the acidity. However, such a relationship was not observed in mixed cultures. Microbial acid production is important for suppressing plant pathogens. Thus the biofilm formation in endophytic environment seems to be very important for healthy and improved plant growth. However, it is unlikely that an interaction among endophytes takes place naturally in the endophytic environment, due to physical barriers of plant tissues. Further, critical cell density dependant quorum sensing that leads to biofilm formation may not occur in the endophytic environment as there is a limited space. As such in vitro production and application of beneficial biofilmed inocula of endophytes are important for improved plant production in any agro-ecosystem. The conventional practice of plant inoculation with monocultures or mixed cultures of effective microbes may not give the highest microbial effect, which may only be achieved by biofilm formation.

  17. Uniform categorization of biocommunication in bacteria, fungi and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzany, Günther

    2010-05-26

    This article describes a coherent biocommunication categorization for the kingdoms of bacteria, fungi and plants. The investigation further shows that, besides biotic sign use in trans-, inter- and intraorganismic communication processes, a common trait is interpretation of abiotic influences as indicators to generate an appropriate adaptive behaviour. Far from being mechanistic interactions, communication processes within organisms and between organisms are sign-mediated interactions. Sign-mediated interactions are the precondition for every cooperation and coordination between at least two biological agents such as cells, tissues, organs and organisms. Signs of biocommunicative processes are chemical molecules in most cases. The signs that are used in a great variety of signaling processes follow syntactic (combinatorial), pragmatic (context-dependent) and semantic (content-specific) rules. These three levels of semiotic rules are helpful tools to investigate communication processes throughout all organismic kingdoms. It is not the aim to present the latest empirical data concerning communication in these three kingdoms but to present a unifying perspective that is able to interconnect transdisciplinary research on bacteria, fungi and plants.

  18. Biodegradation of lignin by fungi, bacteria and laccases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asina, Fnu; Brzonova, Ivana; Voeller, Keith; Kozliak, Evguenii; Kubátová, Alena; Yao, Bin; Ji, Yun

    2016-11-01

    Indulin AT biodegradation by basidiomycetous fungi, actinobacteria and commercial laccases was evaluated using a suite of chemical analysis methods. The extent of microbial degradation was confirmed by novel thermal carbon analysis (TCA), as the treatments altered the carbon desorption and pyrolysis temperature profiles in supernatants. Laccase treatments caused only minor changes, though with increases occurring in the 850°C and char precursor fractions. After fungal treatments, lignin showed a similar change in the TCA profile, along with a gradual decrease of the total carbon, signifying lignin mineralization (combined with polymerization). By contrast, bacteria produced phenolic monomers without their further catabolism. After 54days of cultivation, a 20wt% weight loss was observed only for fungi, Coriolus versicolor, corroborating the near-80% carbon mass balance closure obtained by TCA. Compositional changes in lignin as a result of biodegradation were confirmed by thermal desorption (TD)-pyrolysis-GC-MS validating the carbon fractionation obtained by TCA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 9 CFR 113.25 - Culture media for detection of bacteria and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Culture media for detection of bacteria and fungi. 113.25 Section 113.25 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.25 Culture media for detection of bacteria and fungi. (a...

  20. Soft rot decay capabilities and interactions of fungi and bacteria from fumigated utility poles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.J.K.; Worrall, J.J. (State Univ. of New York, Syracuse, NY (United States). Coll. of Environmental Science and Forestry)

    1992-11-01

    The objectives were to (1) identify microfungi and bacterial associates isolated from fumigated southern pine poles from EPRI project RP 1471-72, (2) study the soft-rot capabilities of predominant fungi, and (3) study interactions among microorganisms in relation to wood decay. Methods for identification followed standard techniques using morphological and physiological criteria. Soft-rot by microfungi alone and with bacteria was determined as weight loss and anatomical examination of wood blocks using light microscopy and limited electron microscopy. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus was the predominant bacterium. Twenty-one species of microfungi were identified including four new species. A book entitled IDENTIFICATION MANUAL FOR FUNGI FROM UTILITY POLES IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES was published. An improved soft-rot test was devised. Fifty-one of 84 species (60%) of microfungi from poles tested were soft-rot positive; that is much greater than previously reported. Three types of anatomical damage of wood of pine or birch caused by soft-rot fungi were described. Interaction tests showed that, in some cases, there was a strong synergism between bacteria and fungi in causing weight loss, but results were inconsistent. Although soft rot is often most apparent under conditions of very high moisture, intermediate moisture levels appear to be optimal, as with basidiomycete decayers.

  1. Soft rot decay capabilities and interactions of fungi and bacteria from fumigated utility poles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.J.K.; Worrall, J.J.

    1992-11-01

    The objectives were to (1) identify microfungi and bacterial associates isolated from fumigated southern pine poles from EPRI project RP 1471-72, (2) study the soft-rot capabilities of predominant fungi, and (3) study interactions among microorganisms in relation to wood decay. Methods for identification followed standard techniques using morphological and physiological criteria. Soft-rot by microfungi alone and with bacteria was determined as weight loss and anatomical examination of wood blocks using light microscopy and limited electron microscopy. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus was the predominant bacterium. Twenty-one species of microfungi were identified including four new species. A book entitled IDENTIFICATION MANUAL FOR FUNGI FROM UTILITY POLES IN THE EASTERN UNITED STATES was published. An improved soft-rot test was devised. Fifty-one of 84 species (60%) of microfungi from poles tested were soft-rot positive; that is much greater than previously reported. Three types of anatomical damage of wood of pine or birch caused by soft-rot fungi were described. Interaction tests showed that, in some cases, there was a strong synergism between bacteria and fungi in causing weight loss, but results were inconsistent. Although soft rot is often most apparent under conditions of very high moisture, intermediate moisture levels appear to be optimal, as with basidiomycete decayers

  2. Revisiting the life cycle of dung fungi, Including Sordaria fimicola

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Newcombe; Jason Campbell; David Griffith; Melissa Baynes; Karen Launchbaugh; Rosemary Pendleton

    2016-01-01

    Dung fungi, such as Sordaria fimicola, generally reproduce sexually with ascospores discharged from mammalian dung after passage through herbivores. Their life cycle is thought to be obligate to dung, and thus their ascospores in Quaternary sediments have been interpreted as evidence of past mammalian herbivore activity. Reports of dung fungi as endophytes would seem...

  3. Proposal to consistently apply the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP) to names of the oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (cyanobacteria), including those validly published under the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN)/International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants (ICN), and proposal to change Principle 2 of the ICNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinevich, Alexander V

    2015-03-01

    This taxonomic note was motivated by the recent proposal [Oren & Garrity (2014) Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 64, 309-310] to exclude the oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (cyanobacteria) from the wording of General Consideration 5 of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP), which entails unilateral coverage of these prokaryotes by the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICN; formerly the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, ICBN). On the basis of key viewpoints, approaches and rules in the systematics, taxonomy and nomenclature of prokaryotes it is reciprocally proposed to apply the ICNP to names of cyanobacteria including those validly published under the ICBN/ICN. For this purpose, a change to Principle 2 of the ICNP is proposed to enable validation of cyanobacterial names published under the ICBN/ICN rules. © 2015 IUMS.

  4. Bacteria in decomposing wood and their interactions with wood-decay fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Sarah R; Boddy, Lynne; Weightman, Andrew J

    2016-11-01

    The fungal community within dead wood has received considerable study, but far less attention has been paid to bacteria in the same habitat. Bacteria have long been known to inhabit decomposing wood, but much remains underexplored about their identity and ecology. Bacteria within the dead wood environment must interact with wood-decay fungi, but again, very little is known about the form this takes; there are indications of both antagonistic and beneficial interactions within this fungal microbiome. Fungi are hypothesised to play an important role in shaping bacterial communities in wood, and conversely, bacteria may affect wood-decay fungi in a variety of ways. This minireview considers what is currently known about bacteria in wood and their interactions with fungi, and proposes possible associations based on examples from other habitats. It aims to identify key knowledge gaps and pressing questions for future research. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Biotransformation of chlorpyrifos and endosulfan by bacteria and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supreeth, M; Raju, N S

    2017-08-01

    Large quantities of pesticides are applied on crops to protect them from pests in modern agricultural practices around the globe. The two insecticides, chlorpyrifos, belonging to the organophosphorous group and endosulfan, belonging to the organochlorine group, are vastly used insecticides on agricultural crops in the last three decades. Hence, both these insecticides are ubiquitous in the environment. Once applied, these two insecticides undergo transformation in the environment either biologically or non-biologically. Microbial degradation has been considered a safe and cost-effective method for removing contaminants from the environment. Both the insecticides have been subjected to biodegradation studies using various bacteria and fungi by the researchers. Here, in this review, we report on biotransformed products formed during the course of biodegradation of these two insecticides and also discuss about the aftereffects of their transformed metabolites. This is important, because the primary biotransformed metabolites 3,5,6, trichloro-2-pyridinol of chlorpyrifos and endosulfan sulfate of endosulfan are toxic as their parent compounds and are noxious to variety of organisms. In conclusion, it is recommended to obtain microbial cultures capable of mineralizing pesticides completely without formation of any such toxic by-product before adopting bioremediation or bioaugmentation technology.

  6. The sapro-rhizosphere: Carbon flow from saprotrophic fungi into fungus-feeding bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballhausen, M-B.; De Boer, W.

    2016-01-01

    Root-derived, labile organic compounds are thought to enter the rhizosphere food web mainly via consumption by mycorrhizal fungi and bacteria. Studies tracking the fate of root derived carbon via stable isotope probing (SIP), however, indicate an important role for saprotrophic fungi as consumers of

  7. Diversity of bacteria and fungi associated with tarballs: Recent developments and future prospects

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shinde, V.L.; Suneel, V.; Shenoy, B.D.

    are known to be associated with tarballs. They presumably play an important role in tarball degradation and some are potential human and animal pathogens. This paper highlights the recent studies on tarball-associated bacteria and fungi. Future perspectives...

  8. Anaerobic consortia of fungi and sulfate reducing bacteria in deep granite fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Henrik; Ivarsson, Magnus; Bengtson, Stefan; Heim, Christine; Siljeström, Sandra; Whitehouse, Martin J; Broman, Curt; Belivanova, Veneta; Åström, Mats E

    2017-07-04

    The deep biosphere is one of the least understood ecosystems on Earth. Although most microbiological studies in this system have focused on prokaryotes and neglected microeukaryotes, recent discoveries have revealed existence of fossil and active fungi in marine sediments and sub-seafloor basalts, with proposed importance for the subsurface energy cycle. However, studies of fungi in deep continental crystalline rocks are surprisingly few. Consequently, the characteristics and processes of fungi and fungus-prokaryote interactions in this vast environment remain enigmatic. Here we report the first findings of partly organically preserved and partly mineralized fungi at great depth in fractured crystalline rock (-740 m). Based on environmental parameters and mineralogy the fungi are interpreted as anaerobic. Synchrotron-based techniques and stable isotope microanalysis confirm a coupling between the fungi and sulfate reducing bacteria. The cryptoendolithic fungi have significantly weathered neighboring zeolite crystals and thus have implications for storage of toxic wastes using zeolite barriers.Deep subsurface microorganisms play an important role in nutrient cycling, yet little is known about deep continental fungal communities. Here, the authors show organically preserved and partly mineralized fungi at 740 m depth, and find evidence of an anaerobic fungi and sulfate reducing bacteria consortium.

  9. Insights into the Synergistic Effect of Fungi and Bacteria for Reactive Red Decolorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial contamination is a prevalent problem in fungal dye wastewater decolorization that prevents the development of this technology in practical engineering. New insight into the relationship between fungi and bacteria is given in terms of settleability, bioadsorption, and biodegradation, which all confirm their synergistic effect. Sterilization is implied to be not the only mechanism for fungi decolorization. When the fungi and bacteria isolated from the activated sludge were cocultured, fungi removed more than 70% of the reactive red through sole bioadsorption in 5 min and enhanced the settleability of the bacteria group from 7.7 to 18.4 in the aggregation index. Subsequently, the bacteria played a more significant role in dye biodegradation according to the ultraviolet-visible spectrum analysis. They further enhanced the decolorization efficiency to over 80% when cocultured with fungi. Therefore, the advanced bioadsorption and settleability of fungi, combined with the good dye biodegradation ability of bacteria, results in the synergistic effect of the coculture microorganisms.

  10. Rainforest Conversion to Rubber Plantation May Not Result in Lower Soil Diversity of Bacteria, Fungi, and Nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfahi, Dorsaf; Tripathi, Binu M; Dong, Ke; Go, Rusea; Adams, Jonathan M

    2016-08-01

    Large areas of rainforest in Asia have been converted to plantations, with uncertain effects on soil biodiversity. Using standard metagenetic methods, we compared the soil biota of bacteria, fungi, and nematodes at three rainforest sites in Malaysia with two rubber plantation sites with similar soils and geology. We predicted the following: (1) that the rubber sites would have a lower α- and β-diversity than the rainforest sites, due to the monospecific canopy cover and intensive management with herbicides, pesticides, and fertilizers, and (2) that due to differences in the physical and biotic environment associated with cultivation, there would be distinct communities of bacteria, fungi, and nematodes. However, regarding (1), the results showed no consistent difference in α- and β-diversity of bacteria, fungi, or nematodes between rainforest and rubber plantation sites. It appears that conversion of rainforest to rubber plantations does not necessarily result in a decrease in diversity of soil biota. It may be that heterogeneity associated with the cultivation regimen compensates for loss of biotically imposed heterogeneity of the original rainforest. Regarding (2), as predicted there were statistically significant differences in community composition between rainforest and rubber plantation for bacteria, fungi, and nematodes. These differences could be related to a range of factors including light level, litter fall composition, pH, C and N, selecting a distinct set of soil taxa, and it is possible that this in itself would affect long-term soil function.

  11. Bacteria and fungi in day-old turkeys vary among companies, collection periods, and breeder flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A H; Rehberger, T G

    2018-04-01

    Microbial colonization of the intestinal tract of commercial poultry is highly variable, likely due to the fact that poults and chicks are hatched and raised without exposure to adult birds and their microbiota. In industrial poultry production, it is hypothesized that most of the microbiota is obtained through horizontal transmission from the environment and very little by maternal transmission. The initial gut microbiota will therefore differ between flocks and companies based on environmental conditions at the hatchery. Day-old poults were collected from the hatchery of 2 companies at 3 different time points to monitor the initial colonizing microbiota by sequencing amplicons of marker genes for bacteria, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), fungi, and archaea. Bacterial colonizers were distinct by company (pseudo-F 38.7, P ≤ 0.05) with the predominant bacteria at Company A being clostridia, specifically Clostridium celatum group, C. paraputrificum, and C. tertium. Predominant bacteria at Company B were Enterobacteriaceae, belonging to 2 different groups, one that included Escherichia; Shigella and Salmonella and the other Klebsiella; Enterobacter; and others. The predominant LAB at both companies were Enterococcus faecalis and E. gallinarum, confirmed by sequencing the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of colonies picked from lactobacilli agar plate counts. The predominant fungi were Aspergillus niger and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with Candida sake or Alterneria sp. in some samples of Company A. Archaeal sequences were detected only in a single poult from Company B. The initial gastrointestinal colonizers of poults vary across company and time, signifying a strong environmental effect on microbiota acquisition. There was an indication of maternal effects in certain breeder flocks from Company B. Further work is necessary to determine how this variability affects microbiota succession and impacts growth and production of the birds.

  12. Antibiotic management of lung infections in cystic fibrosis. II. Nontuberculous mycobacteria, anaerobic bacteria, and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, James F; Aksamit, Timothy R; Chotirmall, Sanjay H; Dasenbrook, Elliott C; Elborn, J Stuart; LiPuma, John J; Ranganathan, Sarath C; Waters, Valerie J; Ratjen, Felix A

    2014-10-01

    Airway infections are a key component of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Whereas the approach to common pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa is guided by a significant body of evidence, other infections often pose a considerable challenge to treating physicians. In Part I of this series on the antibiotic management of difficult lung infections, we discussed bacterial organisms including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, gram-negative bacterial infections, and treatment of multiple bacterial pathogens. Here, we summarize the approach to infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria, anaerobic bacteria, and fungi. Nontuberculous mycobacteria can significantly impact the course of lung disease in patients with CF, but differentiation between colonization and infection is difficult clinically as coinfection with other micro-organisms is common. Treatment consists of different classes of antibiotics, varies in intensity, and is best guided by a team of specialized clinicians and microbiologists. The ability of anaerobic bacteria to contribute to CF lung disease is less clear, even though clinical relevance has been reported in individual patients. Anaerobes detected in CF sputum are often resistant to multiple drugs, and treatment has not yet been shown to positively affect patient outcome. Fungi have gained significant interest as potential CF pathogens. Although the role of Candida is largely unclear, there is mounting evidence that Scedosporium species and Aspergillus fumigatus, beyond the classical presentation of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, can be relevant in patients with CF and treatment should be considered. At present, however there remains limited information on how best to select patients who could benefit from antifungal therapy.

  13. About the use of antagonistic bacteria and fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Tilcher, R.; Schmidt, C.; Lorenz, D.; Wolf, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    Microorganisms isolated from the phylloplane of vine and cereal plants inhibiting different phytopathogenic fungi were tested as biological control agents against Plasmopara viticola (downy mildew of grapevine). Based on screening in vitro against Phytophthora infestans, P. parasitica, Pythium ultimum, Botrytis cinerea 62 bacterial isolates were selected for tests with Plasmopara viticola.. Antifungal bacterial strains were assayed for antagonistic activity towards the grapevine dieback fungu...

  14. Endophytic Fungi Associated With Turmeric (Curcuma longa L. Can Inhibit Histamine-Forming Bacteria in Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eris Septiana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Turmeric (Curcuma longa L. is a medicinal plant that is commonly used as spice and preservative. Many types of endophytic fungi have been reported as being associated with medicinal plants and able to synthesize secondary metabolites. In this study, endophytic fungi were isolated from all plant parts of turmeric plants. Identification of the endophytic fungi was done using morphological characteristics and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS region of ribosomal DNA. The dual culture method was used for screening antibacterial activity of the endophytic fungi against Morganella morganii, a common histamine-producing bacteria. The disc diffusion method was used to test the ability of water fractions of selected endophytic fungi to inhibit M. morganii growth. Two-dimensional thin layer chromatography was used to determine the fungal extract inhibition activity on histamine formation. In total, 11 endophytic fungi were successfully isolated and identified as Arthrobotrys foliicola, Cochliobolus kusanoi, Daldinia eschscholzii, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium proliferatum, Fusarium solani, Fusarium verticillioides, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and Phaeosphaeria ammophilae. Five isolates showed inhibition activity against M. morganii in the dual culture tests. Based on the disc diffusion assay, A. foliicola and F. verticillioides inhibited the growth of M. morganii as a histamine-producing bacteria, and inhibiting histamine formation in fish. The best effects in inhibiting growth of the histamine-producing bacteria and histamine formation inhibition in fish were produced with F. verticillioides water fraction at 0°C incubation.

  15. Continental-scale distributions of dust-associated bacteria and fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barberán, Albert; Ladau, Joshua; Leff, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    It has been known for centuries that microorganisms are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, where they are capable of long-distance dispersal. Likewise, it is well-established that these airborne bacteria and fungi can have myriad effects on human health, as well as the health of plants and livestock...... across the United States to understand the continental-scale distributions of bacteria and fungi in the near-surface atmosphere. The microbial communities were highly variable in composition across the United States, but the geographic patterns could be explained by climatic and soil variables...

  16. Plant expansins in bacteria and fungi: evolution by horizontal gene transfer and independent domain fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Doran, Nicole; Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2014-02-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has been described as a common mechanism of transferring genetic material between prokaryotes, whereas genetic transfers from eukaryotes to prokaryotes have been rarely documented. Here we report a rare case of HGT in which plant expansin genes that code for plant cell-wall loosening proteins were transferred from plants to bacteria, fungi, and amoebozoa. In several cases, the species in which the expansin gene was found is either in intimate association with plants or is a known plant pathogen. Our analyses suggest that at least two independent genetic transfers occurred from plants to bacteria and fungi. These events were followed by multiple HGT events within bacteria and fungi. We have also observed that in bacteria expansin genes have been independently fused to DNA fragments that code for an endoglucanase domain or for a carbohydrate binding module, pointing to functional convergence at the molecular level. Furthermore, the functional similarities between microbial expansins and their plant xenologs suggest that these proteins mediate microbial-plant interactions by altering the plant cell wall and therefore may provide adaptive advantages to these species. The evolution of these nonplant expansins represents a unique case in which bacteria and fungi have found innovative and adaptive ways to interact with and infect plants by acquiring genes from their host. This evolutionary paradigm suggests that despite their low frequency such HGT events may have significantly contributed to the evolution of prokaryotic and eukaryotic species.

  17. Fungi, beta-Glucan, and Bacteria in Nasal Lavage of Greenhouse Workers and Their Relation to Occupational Exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, A. M.; Tendal, K.; Thilsing, T.

    2013-01-01

    occupational exposure to fungi, -glucan, and bacteria and contents of fungi, -glucan, and bacteria in nasal lavage (NAL) of greenhouse workers. We also studied whether contents of microorganisms in NAL were related to gender, time of the work week, and runny nose. NAL samples (n 135) were taken Monday morning....... The ratios of fungi in NAL between Thursday at noon and Monday morning were 14 (median value) for men and 3.5 for women. Gender had no effect on the exposure level but had a significant effect on the content of fungi, -glucan, and bacteria in NAL, with the highest contents in NAL of men. On Thursdays...

  18. Action of Antimicrobial Copper on Bacteria and Fungi Isolated from Commercial Poultry Hatcheries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RFR Depner

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Since 2008, when the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA registered copper and its alloys as an antimicrobial agent for contact surfaces, research has demonstrated their antimicrobial activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of antimicrobial copper against bacteria and fungi isolated from commercial poultry hatcheries in order to develop a microbiological control alternative in these environments. Samples were collected from the surfaces of hatcher baskets from two hatcheries. Mesophilic microorganisms and fungi/yeasts were isolated and standardized in concentration of 105 cells/mL. Four copper plates and four stainless steel plates were completely immersed for one minute in bacteria and fungi/yeasts solutions and left to dry for a day at room temperature. Subsequently, samples were collected from the metal plates with the aid of sterile swab and delimiter. These samples were planted onto Plate Count Agar (for mesophilic culture and Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (for fungi and yeast culture and incubated at 36°C for 48 hours and at 25°C for 5-7 days, respectively. After incubation, the colonies recovered from the plates were counted according to IN 62 of the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture. Almost all contamination was eliminated from the surface of copper plates in a single day, while the stainless steel plates proved to be innocuous to the screened microorganisms. Copper, as a contact surface, proved to have important antimicrobial action on bacteria, fungi and yeasts common to hatcheries.

  19. Differences in activity and N demand between bacteria and fungi in a microcosm incubation experiment with selective inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, A.M.; Bloem, J.; Dalen, van B.R.; Kalbitz, K.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria and fungi are important micro-organisms in the soil, but may differ in their impact on net N-mineralization. The hypothesis was tested that fungi are characterized by low microbial activity, but also low immobilization, and bacteria by high activity and high immobilization. A one-month

  20. Molecular Detecting of fungi and Bacteria in the ‎Blood of Patients With Genital System ‎Inflammatory Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ibrahim Khalil

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A PCR technique was used to detect fungi and bacteria in the blood of patients with inflammatory infection of genital system, three primer sets were used to detect E. Coli , Candida spp. and existence of other fungi  The results showed infection by both microorganisms. All patients had bacteria in the blood stream while 30 % of them had a Candida spp. and the same percentage of other fungi species in blood

  1. 9 CFR 113.26 - Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine. 113.26 Section 113.26 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... in live vaccine. Each serial and subserial of biological product except live vaccines shall be tested...

  2. Bacteria, fungi and arthropod pests collected on modern human mummies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Palla

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A survey of opportunistic biocenosis (macro and micro organisms associated with a rest of human mummy samples was carried out to characterise the biocenosis and to detect the potential of biodeteriogens. The rests of the human modern mummies come from a hypogeic site. Since mummies are relevant from a historic-artistic-scientific point of view, an aspect of this study was the identification and characterization of the biological systems related with biodeterioration of organic matter. In a first step, different sampling methods, according to the taxa, were applied. Technological procedures were combined in order to have an interdisciplinary approach to the conservation actions for testing future restoration protocols. Specimens were collected, identified and characterized by Microscopy (light, SEM, CLSM and molecular analyses (DNA extraction, in vitro target sequence amplification, sequencing, sequence analysis. The results highlight a rather complex biocenonsis consisting of fungi, cyanobacteria, several insects and other arthropods.

  3. The ecological role of type three secretion systems in the interaction of bacteria with fungi in soil and related habitats is diverse and context-dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nazir, Rashid; Mazurier, Sylvie; Yang, Pu; Lemanceau, Philippe; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria and fungi constitute important organisms in many ecosystems, in particular terrestrial ones. Both organismal groups contribute significantly to biogeochemical cycling processes. Ecological theory postulates that bacteria capable of receiving benefits from host fungi are likely to evolve

  4. Bacteria and fungi inactivation by photocatalysis under UVA irradiation: liquid and gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Silva, Caio; Miranda, Sandra M; Lopes, Filipe V S; Silva, Mário; Dezotti, Márcia; Silva, Adrián M T; Faria, Joaquim L; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P; Pinto, Eugénia

    2017-03-01

    In the last decade, environmental risks associated with wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have become a concern in the scientific community due to the absence of specific legislation governing the occupational exposure limits (OEL) for microorganisms present in indoor air. Thus, it is necessary to develop techniques to effectively inactivate microorganisms present in the air of WWTPs facilities. In the present work, ultraviolet light A radiation was used as inactivation tool. The microbial population was not visibly reduced in the bioaerosol by ultraviolet light A (UVA) photolysis. The UVA photocatalytic process for the inactivation of microorganisms (bacteria and fungi, ATCC strains and isolates from indoor air samples of a WWTP) using titanium dioxide (TiO 2 P25) and zinc oxide (ZnO) was tested in both liquid-phase and airborne conditions. In the slurry conditions at liquid phase, P25 showed a better performance in inactivation. For this reason, gas-phase assays were performed in a tubular photoreactor packed with cellulose acetate monolithic structures coated with P25. The survival rate of microorganisms under study decreased with the catalyst load and the UVA exposure time. Inactivation of fungi was slower than resistant bacteria, followed by Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria. Graphical abstract Inactivation of fungi and bacteria in gas phase by photocatalitic process performed in a tubular photoreactor packed with cellulose acetate monolith structures coated with TiO 2 .

  5. Spoilage of vegetable crops by bacteria and fungi and related health hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournas, V H

    2005-01-01

    After harvest, vegetables are often spoiled by a wide variety of microorganisms including many bacterial and fungal species. The most common bacterial agents are Erwinia carotovora, Pseudomonas spp., Corynebacterium, Xanthomonas campestris, and lactic acid bacteria with E. carotovora being the most common, attacking virtually every vegetable type. Fungi commonly causing spoilage of fresh vegetables are Botrytis cinerea, various species of the genera Alternaria, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Colletotrichum, Phomopsis, Fusarium, Penicillium, Phoma, Phytophthora, Pythium and Rhizopus spp., Botrytis cinerea, Ceratocystis fimbriata, Rhizoctonia solani, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and some mildews. A few of these organisms show a substrate preference whereas others such as Botrytis cinerea, Colletotrichum, Alternaria, Cladosporium, Phytophthora, and Rhizopus spp., affect a wide variety of vegetables causing devastating losses. Many of these agents enter the plant tissue through mechanical or chilling injuries, or after the skin barrier has been broken down by other organisms. Besides causing huge economic losses, some fungal species could produce toxic metabolites in the affected sites, constituting a potential health hazard for humans. Additionally, vegetables have often served as vehicles for pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and parasites and were implicated in many food borne illness outbreaks. In order to slow down vegetable spoilage and minimize the associated adverse health effects, great caution should be taken to follow strict hygiene, good agricultural practices (GAPs) and good manufacturing practices (GMPs) during cultivation, harvest, storage, transport, and marketing.

  6. Phytate Degradation by Fungi and Bacteria that Inhabit Sawdust and Coffee Residue Composts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eida, Mohamed Fathallh; Nagaoka, Toshinori; Wasaki, Jun; Kouno, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Phytate is the primary source of organic phosphorus, but it cannot be directly utilized by plants and is strongly adsorbed by the soil, reducing bioavailability. Composting is a process used to improve the bioavailability of phytate in organic wastes through degradation by microorganisms. In this study, we aimed to investigate the phytate-degrading ability of fungi and bacteria that inhabit sawdust compost and coffee residue compost, and their contribution to the composting process. In the plate assay, the fungi that formed clear zones around their colonies belonged to the genera Mucor, Penicillium, Galactomyces, Coniochaeta, Aspergillus, and Fusarium, while the bacteria belonged to the genera Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Chitinophaga, and Rahnella. Eight fungal isolates (genera Mucor, Penicillium, Galactomyces, and Coniochaeta) and four bacterial isolates (genera Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, and Rahnella) were selected to evaluate phytase activity in their liquid culture and their ability to degrade phytate in organic materials composed of mushroom media residue and rice bran. The selected fungi degraded phytate in organic materials to varying degrees. Penicillium isolates showed the highest degradation ability and Coniochaeta isolate exhibited relatively high degradation ability. The clear zone diameters of these fungal isolates displayed significantly positive and negative correlations with inorganic and phytate phosphorus contents in the organic materials after incubation, respectively; however, none of the selected bacteria reduced phytate phosphorus in organic materials. It is therefore possible that fungi are major contributors to phytate degradation during composting. PMID:23100024

  7. Identification of Contaminated Cells with Viruses, Bacteria, or Fungi by Fourier Transform Infrared Microspectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Erukhimovitch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR-M can detect small molecular changes in cells and therefore was previously applied for the identification of different biological samples. In the present study, FTIR spectroscopy was used for the identification and discrimination of Vero cells infected with herpes viruses or contaminated with bacteria or fungi in cell culture. Vero cells in culture were infected herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 or contaminated with E. coli bacteria or Candida albicans fungi and analyzed by FTIR microscopy at 24 h postinfection/contamination. Specific different spectral changes were observed according to the infecting or contaminating agent. For instance, both pure fungi and cell culture contaminated with this fungi showed specific peaks at 1030 cm−1 and at 1373 cm−1 regions, while pure E. coli and cell culture contaminated with this bacteria showed a specific and unique peak at 1657 cm−1. These results support the potential of developing FTIR microspectroscopy as a simple, reagent free method for identification and discrimination between different tissue infection or contamination with various pathogens.

  8. Human pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and viruses in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayidou, Stavria; Ioannidou, Eleni; Apidianakis, Yiorgos

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila has been the invertebrate model organism of choice for the study of innate immune responses during the past few decades. Many Drosophila–microbe interaction studies have helped to define innate immunity pathways, and significant effort has been made lately to decipher mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis. Here we catalog 68 bacterial, fungal, and viral species studied in flies, 43 of which are relevant to human health. We discuss studies of human pathogens in flies revealing not only the elicitation and avoidance of immune response but also mechanisms of tolerance, host tissue homeostasis, regeneration, and predisposition to cancer. Prominent among those is the emerging pattern of intestinal regeneration as a defense response induced by pathogenic and innocuous bacteria. Immunopathology mechanisms and many microbial virulence factors have been elucidated, but their relevance to human health conventionally necessitates validation in mammalian models of infection. PMID:24398387

  9. [Infections of finger and toe nails due to fungi and bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenoff, P; Paasch, U; Handrick, W

    2014-04-01

    Infections of the finger and the toe nails are most frequently caused by fungi, primarily dermatophytes. Causative agents of tinea unguium are mostly anthropophilic dermatophytes. Both in Germany, and worldwide, Trichophyton rubrum represents the main important causative agent of onychomycoses. Yeasts are isolated from fungal nail infections, both paronychia and onychomycosis far more often than generally expected. This can represent either saprophytic colonization as well as acute or chronic infection of the nail organ. The main yeasts causing nail infections are Candida parapsilosis, and Candida guilliermondii; Candida albicans is only in third place. Onychomycosis due to molds, or so called non-dermatophyte molds (NDM), are being increasingly detected. Molds as cause of an onychomycosis are considered as emerging pathogens. Fusarium species are the most common cause of NDM onychomycosis; however, rare molds like Onychocola canadensis may be found. Bacterial infections of the nails are caused by gram negative bacteria, usually Pseudomonas aeruginosa (recognizable because of green or black coloration of the nails) but also Klebsiella spp. and gram positive bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus. Treatment of onychomycosis includes application of topical antifungal agents (amorolfine, ciclopirox). If more than 50 % of the nail plate is affected or if more than three out of ten nails are affected by the fungal infection, oral treatment using terbinafine (in case of dermatophyte infection), fluconazole (for yeast infections), or alternatively itraconazole are recommended. Bacterial infections are treated topically with antiseptic agents (octenidine), and in some cases with topical antibiotics (nadifloxacin, gentamicin). Pseudomonas infections of the nail organ are treated by ciprofloxacin; other bacteria are treated according to the results of culture and sensitivity testing.

  10. Bacteria and fungi isolated from housefly ( Musca domestica L.) larvae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A variety of microorganisms, which includes the pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aerruginosa, Aspergillus tamarii and Bacullus cereus were found. Also, nonpathogenic microbes werer recovered including Bacillus subtilis and Stroplococcus faecalis. Keywords: Microorganism, isolation, housefly larvae.

  11. Biological and structure-activity evaluation of chalcone derivatives against bacteria and fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Wender A.; Andrade, Carlos Kleber Z.; Napolitano, Hamilton B., E-mail: wender@unb.br, E-mail: ckleber@unb.br [Universidade de Brasilia (LaQMOS/UnB), DF (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Vencato, Ivo; Castro, Miriam R.C. de; Camargo, Ademir J. [Universidade Estadual de Goias (UEG), Anapolis, GO (Brazil). Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Lariucci, Carlito [Universidade Estadual de Goias (UEG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2013-01-15

    The present work describes the antibacterial and antifungal activities of several chalcones obtained by a straight Claisen-Schmidt aldol condensation determined by the minimal inhibitory concentration against different microorganisms (Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi). Solid state crystal structures of seven chalcones were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Chemometric studies were carried out in order to identify a potential structure activity relationship. (author)

  12. Archaea and bacteria mediate the effects of native species root loss on fungi during plant invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamet, Steven D; Lamb, Eric G; Piper, Candace L; Winsley, Tristrom; Siciliano, Steven D

    2017-05-01

    Although invasive plants can drive ecosystem change, little is known about the directional nature of belowground interactions between invasive plants, native roots, bacteria, archaea and fungi. We used detailed bioinformatics and a recently developed root assay on soils collected in fescue grassland along a gradient of smooth brome (Bromus inermis Leyss) invasion to examine the links between smooth brome shoot litter and root, archaea, bacteria and fungal communities. We examined (1) aboveground versus belowground influences of smooth brome on soil microbial communities, (2) the importance of direct versus microbe-mediated impacts of plants on soil fungal communities, and (3) the web of roots, shoots, archaea, bacteria and fungi interactions across the A and B soil horizons in invaded and non-invaded sites. Archaea and bacteria influenced fungal composition, but not vice versa, as indicated by redundancy analyses. Co-inertia analyses suggested that bacterial-fungal variance was driven primarily by 12 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Brome increased bacterial diversity via smooth brome litter in the A horizon and roots in the B horizon, which then reduced fungal diversity. Archaea increased abundance of several bacterial OTUs, and the key bacterial OTUs mediated changes in the fungi's response to invasion. Overall, native root diversity loss and bacterial mediation were more important drivers of fungal composition than were the direct effects of increases in smooth brome. Critically, native plant species displacement and root loss appeared to be the most important driver of fungal composition during invasion. This causal web likely gives rise to the plant-fungi feedbacks, which are an essential factor determining plant diversity in invaded grassland ecosystems.

  13. Antifungal Rhizosphere Bacteria Can increase as Response to the Presence of Saprotrophic Fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wietse de Boer

    Full Text Available Knowledge on the factors that determine the composition of bacterial communities in the vicinity of roots (rhizosphere is essential to understand plant-soil interactions. Plant species identity, plant growth stage and soil properties have been indicated as major determinants of rhizosphere bacterial community composition. Here we show that the presence of saprotrophic fungi can be an additional factor steering rhizosphere bacterial community composition and functioning. We studied the impact of presence of two common fungal rhizosphere inhabitants (Mucor hiemalis and Trichoderma harzianum on the composition of cultivable bacterial communities developing in the rhizosphere of Carex arenaria (sand sedge in sand microcosms. Identification and phenotypic characterization of bacterial isolates revealed clear shifts in the rhizosphere bacterial community composition by the presence of two fungal strains (M. hiemalis BHB1 and T. harzianum PvdG2, whereas another M. hiemalis strain did not show this effect. Presence of both M. hiemalis BHB1 and T. harzianum PvdG2 resulted in a significant increase of chitinolytic and (in vitro antifungal bacteria. The latter was most pronounced for M. hiemalis BHB1, an isolate from Carex roots, which stimulated the development of the bacterial genera Achromobacter and Stenotrophomonas. In vitro tests showed that these genera were strongly antagonistic against M. hiemalis but also against the plant-pathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani. The most likely explanation for fungal-induced shifts in the composition of rhizosphere bacteria is that bacteria are being selected which are successful in competing with fungi for root exudates. Based on the results we propose that measures increasing saprotrophic fungi in agricultural soils should be explored as an alternative approach to enhance natural biocontrol against soil-borne plant-pathogenic fungi, namely by stimulating indigenous antifungal rhizosphere bacteria.

  14. Biological and structure-activity evaluation of chalcone derivatives against bacteria and fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Wender A.; Andrade, Carlos Kleber Z.; Napolitano, Hamilton B.; Vencato, Ivo; Lariucci, Carlito; Castro, Miriam. R. C. de; Camargo, Ademir J.

    2013-01-01

    The present work describes the antibacterial and antifungal activities of several chalcones obtained by a straight Claisen-Schmidt aldol condensation determined by the minimal inhibitory concentration against different microorganisms (Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi). Solid state crystal structures of seven chalcones were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Chemometric studies were carried out in order to identify a potential structure-activity relationship. ...

  15. Antifungal Rhizosphere Bacteria Can increase as Response to the Presence of Saprotrophic Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Wietse; Hundscheid, Maria P. J.; Klein Gunnewiek, Paulien J. A.; de Ridder-Duine, Annelies S.; Thion, Cecile; van Veen, Johannes A.; van der Wal, Annemieke

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge on the factors that determine the composition of bacterial communities in the vicinity of roots (rhizosphere) is essential to understand plant-soil interactions. Plant species identity, plant growth stage and soil properties have been indicated as major determinants of rhizosphere bacterial community composition. Here we show that the presence of saprotrophic fungi can be an additional factor steering rhizosphere bacterial community composition and functioning. We studied the impact of presence of two common fungal rhizosphere inhabitants (Mucor hiemalis and Trichoderma harzianum) on the composition of cultivable bacterial communities developing in the rhizosphere of Carex arenaria (sand sedge) in sand microcosms. Identification and phenotypic characterization of bacterial isolates revealed clear shifts in the rhizosphere bacterial community composition by the presence of two fungal strains (M. hiemalis BHB1 and T. harzianum PvdG2), whereas another M. hiemalis strain did not show this effect. Presence of both M. hiemalis BHB1 and T. harzianum PvdG2 resulted in a significant increase of chitinolytic and (in vitro) antifungal bacteria. The latter was most pronounced for M. hiemalis BHB1, an isolate from Carex roots, which stimulated the development of the bacterial genera Achromobacter and Stenotrophomonas. In vitro tests showed that these genera were strongly antagonistic against M. hiemalis but also against the plant-pathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani. The most likely explanation for fungal-induced shifts in the composition of rhizosphere bacteria is that bacteria are being selected which are successful in competing with fungi for root exudates. Based on the results we propose that measures increasing saprotrophic fungi in agricultural soils should be explored as an alternative approach to enhance natural biocontrol against soil-borne plant-pathogenic fungi, namely by stimulating indigenous antifungal rhizosphere bacteria. PMID:26393509

  16. Aerobic bacteria and fungi from skin lesions of fish in Khartoum state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaa Hassan Ibrahim

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Fishes with skin lesions are harboring many pathogenic bacteria and fungi and may act as a source of zoonotic infections and can transmit several pathogens to workers in fish industry and consumers. Therefore, thorough and strict routine inspection of fish is recommended to ensure safety and that there are no serious risks to consumers. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2016; 3(4.000: 375-385

  17. Fungi and bacteria inventory on soybean (Glycine max (L.) merill) planting media applied by local microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhsan, Ni'matuljannah; Vionita

    2017-02-01

    An experiment aimed to determine the effect of application of several types of local microorganisms (MOL) and the number of doses to the development of fungi and bacteria on soybean planting media, have been conducted in Samarinda for 3 (three) months. Factorial experiment arranged in a completely randomized design and repeated three times, was used in this experiment. The first factor was the type of MOL consisted of cow dung (m1), snails (m2), banana peel (m3) and bamboo roots (m4), and the second factor was the dose MOL zero mL (d0), 100 mL (d1), 200 mL (d2), 300 mL (d3), 400 mL (d4) analyzed with Anova and Least Significance Difference (LSD) at 5%. Fungi and bacteria contained in the local microorganisms (cow dung, snails, banana peel and bamboo root) are: fungus Aspergillus sp, Penicillium sp., Trichoderma sp., cellulotic and lignolitic bacteria. An increase in the type and amount of fungus is happened for some genus. The dominant bacteria in the planting medium is a gram-negative bacteria. Cow dung seemed the best source at the dosages level of 400 ml.

  18. Antimicrobial compounds from seaweeds-associated bacteria and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravindra Pal; Kumari, Puja; Reddy, C R K

    2015-02-01

    In recent decade, seaweeds-associated microbial communities have been significantly evaluated for functional and chemical analyses. Such analyses let to conclude that seaweeds-associated microbial communities are highly diverse and rich sources of bioactive compounds of exceptional molecular structure. Extracting bioactive compounds from seaweed-associated microbial communities have been recently increased due to their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities including antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-settlement, antiprotozoan, antiparasitic, and antitumor. These allelochemicals not only provide protection to host from other surrounding pelagic microorganisms, but also ensure their association with the host. Antimicrobial compounds from marine sources are promising and priority targets of biotechnological and pharmaceutical applications. This review describes the bioactive metabolites reported from seaweed-associated bacterial and fungal communities and illustrates their bioactivities. Biotechnological application of metagenomic approach for identifying novel bioactive metabolites is also dealt, in view of their future development as a strong tool to discover novel drug targets from seaweed-associated microbial communities.

  19. Mechanisms of action of fungi and bacteria used as biofertilizers in agricultural soils : a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Paulina Restrepo-Correa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus, nitrogen, iron and potassium are some compounds necessary for plant growth and development; chemical fertilizers used to increase concentration significantly affect the environment and soil ecosystems. According to the scientific literature, microorganisms with biofertilizer potential have demonstrated various mechanisms of action to solubilize these compounds and thus meet the requirements of plants. This systematic review collects scientific information that describes the mechanisms of action of microbial fertilizers in agricultural soils, published between 2004 and 2014, in three different databases; ScienceDirect, SpringerLink and Scopus,using the search path (biofertilizer AND (bacteria OR fungi AND (effect OR action OR mechanism. After using different inclusion and exclusion criteria, the search displayed a total of 63 original articles, including six unindexed documents. As a result of the systematic review, it indicates that the production of various organic acids allows soil acidification, facilitating absorption of elements. It was also observed that solubilization of P is the most described mechanism, by obtaining a solubilizing of 726.5 mg/L of P due to P. pseudoalcaligenes

  20. Ancient horizontal gene transfer from bacteria enhances biosynthetic capabilities of fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imke Schmitt

    Full Text Available Polyketides are natural products with a wide range of biological functions and pharmaceutical applications. Discovery and utilization of polyketides can be facilitated by understanding the evolutionary processes that gave rise to the biosynthetic machinery and the natural product potential of extant organisms. Gene duplication and subfunctionalization, as well as horizontal gene transfer are proposed mechanisms in the evolution of biosynthetic gene clusters. To explain the amount of homology in some polyketide synthases in unrelated organisms such as bacteria and fungi, interkingdom horizontal gene transfer has been evoked as the most likely evolutionary scenario. However, the origin of the genes and the direction of the transfer remained elusive.We used comparative phylogenetics to infer the ancestor of a group of polyketide synthase genes involved in antibiotic and mycotoxin production. We aligned keto synthase domain sequences of all available fungal 6-methylsalicylic acid (6-MSA-type PKSs and their closest bacterial relatives. To assess the role of symbiotic fungi in the evolution of this gene we generated 24 6-MSA synthase sequence tags from lichen-forming fungi. Our results support an ancient horizontal gene transfer event from an actinobacterial source into ascomycete fungi, followed by gene duplication.Given that actinobacteria are unrivaled producers of biologically active compounds, such as antibiotics, it appears particularly promising to study biosynthetic genes of actinobacterial origin in fungi. The large number of 6-MSA-type PKS sequences found in lichen-forming fungi leads us hypothesize that the evolution of typical lichen compounds, such as orsellinic acid derivatives, was facilitated by the gain of this bacterial polyketide synthase.

  1. Bacteria and fungi associated with isoprene consumption in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Gray

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Isoprene is a reactive volatile organic compound released from the biosphere that can be abundant in the planetary boundary layer, where it can have a myriad of effects on atmospheric chemistry and secondary aerosol formation. There is currently a high degree of uncertainty in forecasts of how atmospheric isoprene concentrations will shift in response to anthropogenic land-use change and climate change. One source of this uncertainty is that studies of terrestrial isoprene fluxes have almost entirely focused on plant sources of isoprene, largely ignoring the role of soils as a sink of isoprene and the corresponding microbial consumption of isoprene. We quantified isoprene consumption rates by the microbial communities found in two distinct soils under laboratory conditions and used high-throughput sequencing to identify the bacterial and fungal taxa that increased in relative abundance with changes in isoprene mixing ratios. On average, soil microbes were capable of consuming 68% (ranging 55% to 80% of the gaseous isoprene provided to the soils (2–200 ppbv in a flow-through experiment. Consumption rates increased with increasing levels of isoprene with rates reaching 770 pmol g-1 h-1 in one of the soils exposed to the highest mixing ratio of isoprene (200 ppbv. Increases in isoprene levels were associated with significant shifts in the composition of both soil bacterial and fungal communities. A wide range of taxa were associated with isoprene consumption including members of the Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, and Zygomycota phyla with many of the taxa being closely related to known hydrocarbon degraders. Soils likely represent a significant sink of atmospheric isoprene and our results suggest that a wide range of bacterial and fungal taxa are capable of isoprene degradation.

  2. Biodegradation of naphthalenesulphonate polymers: the potential of a combined application of fungi and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullotto, Antonella; Lubello, Claudio; Mannucci, Alberto; Gori, Riccardo; Munz, Giulio; Briganti, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    The potential of several fungi and their synergy with bacterial biomasses were evaluated as a solution for the removal of 2-naphthalensulphonic acid polymers (2-NSAPs) from petrochemical wastewater, characterized by a chemical oxygen demand (COD) greater than 9000 mg/L. The ability of fungi to grow on 2-NSAP mixtures was preliminarily investigated using a solid medium, and then the action of the selected strains, both in suspended and immobilized form, was evaluated in terms of degradation, depolymerization, sorption and an increase in biodegradability of 2-NSAP. Among the 25 fungi evaluated two, in particular, Bjerkandera adusta and Pleurotus ostreatus, have been found to significantly depolymerize 2-NSAP yielding to the corresponding monomer (2-naphthalenesulphonic acid, 2-NSA), which has been further degraded by a bacterial consortia selected in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The fungal treatment alone was able to reduce the COD value up to 44%, while activated sludge removed only 9% of the initial COD. In addition, the combined treatment (fungi and bacteria) allowed an increase in the COD removal up to 62%.

  3. Soil bacteria and fungi respond on different spatial scales to invasion by the legume Lespedeza cuneata

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    Anthony C Yannarell

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The spatial scale on which microbial communities respond to plant invasions may provide important clues as to the nature of potential invader-microbe interactions. Lespedeza cuneata (Dum. Cours. G. Don is an invasive legume that may benefit from associations with mycorrhizal fungi; however, it has also been suggested that the plant is allelopathetic and may alter the soil chemistry of invaded sites through secondary metabolites in its root exudates or litter. Thus, L. cuneata invasion may interact with soil microorganisms on a variety of scales. We investigated L. cuneata-related changes to soil bacterial and fungal communities at two spatial scales using multiple sites from across its invaded N. American range. Using whole community DNA fingerprinting, we characterized microbial community variation at the scale of entire invaded sites and at the scale of individual plants. Based on permutational multivariate analysis of variance, soil bacterial communities in heavily invaded sites were significantly different from those of uninvaded sites, but bacteria did not show any evidence of responding at very local scales around individual plants. In contrast, soil fungi did not change significantly at the scale of entire sites, but there were significant differences between fungal communities of native versus exotic plants within particular sites. The differential scaling of bacterial and fungal responses indicates that L. cuneata interacts differently with soil bacteria and soil fungi, and these microorganisms may play very different roles in the invasion process of this plant.

  4. Detection of airborne psychrotrophic bacteria and fungi in food storage refrigerators

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    Sema Sandikci Altunatmaz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the microbiological air quality (psychrotrophic bacteria and airborne fungi and distribution of fungi in different types of ready-to-eat (RTE food-storage refrigerators (n=48 at selected retail stores in the city of Edirne, Turkey. Refrigerators were categorized according to the type of RTE food-storage: meat products, vegetables, desserts, or a mix of food types. Microbiological quality of air samples was evaluated by using a Mas-100 Eco Air Sampler. Four refrigerators (all containing meat products, 8.3% produced air samples with undetectable microorganisms. The highest detected mean value of airborne psychrotrophic bacteria and fungi was 82.3 CFU/m³ and 54.6 CFU/m³, respectively and were found in mixed-food refrigerators. The dominant airborne fungal genera found were Penicillium (29.0%, Aspergillus (12.0%, Mucor (9%, Cladosporium (8%, Botyrtis (7%, and Acremonium (6%. By definition, RTE food does not undergo a final treatment to ensure its safety prior to consumption. Therefore, ensuring a clean storage environment for these foods is important to prevent food-borne disease and other health risks.

  5. Variations of bacteria and fungi in PM2.5 in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Pengrui; Du, Rui; Ren, Weishan; Lu, Zedong; Zhang, Yang; Fu, Pingqing

    2018-01-01

    Bacteria and fungi present in the airborne fine particulate matter (PM2.5) play important roles in the atmosphere and provide significant impacts on human health. However, variations in the species composition and community structure have not been well understood. In this study, we sampled PM2.5 in suburban Beijing and analyzed the bacterial and fungal composition during different seasons and at different air pollution levels using gene sequencing methods. The results showed that the species richness and diversity of bacterial communities displayed a downtrend with the aggravation of air pollution. Additionally, the bacterial communities in spring samples showed the highest species richness, with average richness estimators, ACE and Chao 1, up to 14,649 and 7608, respectively, followed by winter samples (7690 and 5031, respectively) and autumn samples (4368 and 3438, respectively), whereas summer samples exhibited the lowest average ACE and Chao 1 indexes (2916 and 1900, respectively). The species richness of fungal communities followed the same seasonal pattern. The community structure of bacteria and the species composition of fungi in PM2.5 showed significant seasonal variations. The dominant bacteria were Actinobacteria (33.89%), Proteobacteria (25.72%), Firmicutes (19.87%), Cyanobacteria/Chloroplast (15.34%), and Bacteroidetes (3.19%), and Ascomycota, with an average abundance of 74.68% of all sequences, were the most abundant fungi. At the genus level, as many as 791 bacterial genera and 517 fungal genera were identified in PM2.5. The results advance our understanding of the distribution and variation of airborne microorganisms in the metropolitan surrounding areas.

  6. Effects of polluting soil with cassava mill effluent on the bacteria and fungi populations of a soil cultivated with maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogboghodo, I A; Oluwafemi, A P; Ekeh, S M

    2006-05-01

    The study was carried out to investigate the effects of application of cassava mill effluent on bacteria and fungi types and population in a soil grown to maize (Zea Mays L.) Microbial populations were determined before pollution of soil with cassava mill effluent, six weeks after pollution with effluent and at the end of the experiment. Results obtained showed that bacteria and fungi populations increased with time as rates of pollution increased. It was also observed that some bacteria present in the soil at the beginning of the experiment and up to the sixth week after pollution with effluent became extinct at the end of the experiment.

  7. Biotechnological Applications of Marine Enzymes From Algae, Bacteria, Fungi, and Sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parte, S; Sirisha, V L; D'Souza, J S

    Diversity is the hallmark of all life forms that inhabit the soil, air, water, and land. All these habitats pose their unique inherent challenges so as to breed the "fittest" creatures. Similarly, the biodiversity from the marine ecosystem has evolved unique properties due to challenging environment. These challenges include permafrost regions to hydrothermal vents, oceanic trenches to abyssal plains, fluctuating saline conditions, pH, temperature, light, atmospheric pressure, and the availability of nutrients. Oceans occupy 75% of the earth's surface and harbor most ancient and diverse forms of organisms (algae, bacteria, fungi, sponges, etc.), serving as an excellent source of natural bioactive molecules, novel therapeutic compounds, and enzymes. In this chapter, we introduce enzyme technology, its current state of the art, unique enzyme properties, and the biocatalytic potential of marine algal, bacterial, fungal, and sponge enzymes that have indeed boosted the Marine Biotechnology Industry. Researchers began exploring marine enzymes, and today they are preferred over the chemical catalysts for biotechnological applications and functions, encompassing various sectors, namely, domestic, industrial, commercial, and healthcare. Next, we summarize the plausible pros and cons: the challenges encountered in the process of discovery of the potent compounds and bioactive metabolites such as biocatalysts/enzymes of biomedical, therapeutic, biotechnological, and industrial significance. The field of Marine Enzyme Technology has recently assumed importance, and if it receives further boost, it could successfully substitute other chemical sources of enzymes useful for industrial and commercial purposes and may prove as a beneficial and ecofriendly option. With appropriate directions and encouragement, marine enzyme technology can sustain the rising demand for enzyme production while maintaining the ecological balance, provided any undesired exploitation of the marine

  8. Rapid Monitoring of Bacteria and Fungi aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, D.; Flores, G.; Effinger, M.; Maule, J.; Wainwright, N.; Steele, A.; Damon, M.; Wells, M.; Williams, S.; Morris, H.; hide

    2009-01-01

    Microorganisms within spacecraft have traditionally been monitored with culture-based techniques. These techniques involve growth of environmental samples (cabin water, air or surfaces) on agar-type media for several days, followed by visualization of resulting colonies or return of samples to Earth for ground-based analysis. Data obtained over the past 4 decades have enhanced our understanding of the microbial ecology within space stations. However, the approach has been limited by the following factors: i) Many microorganisms (estimated > 95%) in the environment cannot grow on conventional growth media; ii) Significant time lags (3-5 days for incubation and up to several months to return samples to ground); iii) Condensation in contact slides hinders colony counting by crew; and iv) Growth of potentially harmful microorganisms, which must then be disposed of safely. This report describes the operation of a new culture-independent technique onboard the ISS for rapid analysis (within minutes) of endotoxin and beta-1, 3-glucan, found in the cell walls of gramnegative bacteria and fungi, respectively. The technique involves analysis of environmental samples with the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) assay in a handheld device, known as the Lab-On-a-Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS). LOCADPTS was launched to the ISS in December 2006, and here we present data obtained from Mach 2007 until the present day. These data include a comparative study between LOCADPTS analysis and existing culture-based methods; and an exploratory survey of surface endotoxin and beta-1, 3-glucan throughout the ISS. While a general correlation between LOCAD-PTS and traditional culture-based methods should not be expected, we will suggest new requirements for microbial monitoring based upon culture-independent parameters measured by LOCAD-PTS.

  9. Effect of root exudates of various plants on composition of bacteria and fungi communities with special regard to pathogenic soil-borne fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Piętka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the studies conducted in the years 1996 - 1998 was to determine the composition of bacteria and fungi populations in the rhizosphere of winter wheat, spring wheat, soybean and potato, and in non-rhizosphere soil. Besides, the effect of root exudates of these plants on the formation of pathogenic fungi communities was established. The microbiological analysis showed that the greatest tolal number of bacteria was found in the rhizospheres of potato and soybean, and the lowest number in non-rhizosphere soil. The smallest total number of fungi was found in the rhizosphere of winter wheat, and the largest in the rhizosphere of soybean. Pathogenic fungi dominated in the rhizospheres of soybean and potato, while non-rhizosphere soil was the poorest in these microorganisms. Among the pathogenic fungi, Fusarium oxysporum, F.culmorum and F.solani were most frequently isolated. Soybean roots exudated the greatest amount of aminoacids, and acidic aminoacids, which have a positive effect on the development of phytopathogens, dominated in their content. On the other hand, the best quantitative and qualitative composition of aminoacids was found out in the root exudates of winter wheat, since they conlained big amounts of alkaline and aromatic aminoacids.

  10. Study of antimicrobial effect of novel Quaternary Ammonium Compounds on bacteria and fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Sadrnia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quarterly Ammonium Compounds (QuAC are the more effective antimicrobial agents in medicine and industry. It needs to produce the new compounds with the wider spectrum and less toxicity, because of microbial resistance. Aim of this study was microbiological Evaluation of the new Quarterly Ammonium Compounds produced by Structural modifications on some bacteria, yeast and fungi. Material and Methods: 16 Quat salts were designed and made in Ethanol or Aceto Nitril. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC was determined by standard method on Nutrient Broth and Minimal agar culture media for bacteria , Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA for fungi and Nutrient Agar and Saboro Dextrose Agar (SDA for yeasts . Results: Compounds 2,7,8,9,12,13 has the more antimicrobial effect ( minimum of MIC. Furthermore, it was shown that MIC was unrelated to culture compounds. In yeast culture it must to increases the concentration in enriched media. Compounds 9,12 and 13 has the more antibacterial effect as well as antifungal effect. Conclusion: In comparison of structure of produced compounds and results of the study, it was revealed that radical R3 has the most important role in antimicrobial properties of Quats and it could to be substitute any suitable group related to increasing anti microbial effects.

  11. Bacteria and fungi can contribute to nutrients bioavailability and aggregate formation in degraded soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Muhammad Imtiaz; Mujawar, Liyakat Hamid; Shahzad, Tanvir; Almeelbi, Talal; Ismail, Iqbal M I; Oves, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Intensive agricultural practices and cultivation of exhaustive crops has deteriorated soil fertility and its quality in agroecosystems. According to an estimate, such practices will convert 30% of the total world cultivated soil into degraded land by 2020. Soil structure and fertility loss are one of the main causes of soil degradation. They are also considered as a major threat to crop production and food security for future generations. Implementing safe and environmental friendly technology would be viable solution for achieving sustainable restoration of degraded soils. Bacterial and fungal inocula have a potential to reinstate the fertility of degraded land through various processes. These microorganisms increase the nutrient bioavailability through nitrogen fixation and mobilization of key nutrients (phosphorus, potassium and iron) to the crop plants while remediate soil structure by improving its aggregation and stability. Success rate of such inocula under field conditions depends on their antagonistic or synergistic interaction with indigenous microbes or their inoculation with organic fertilizers. Co-inoculation of bacteria and fungi with or without organic fertilizer are more beneficial for reinstating the soil fertility and organic matter content than single inoculum. Such factors are of great importance when considering bacteria and fungi inocula for restoration of degraded soils. The overview of presented mechanisms and interactions will help agriculturists in planning sustainable management strategy for reinstating the fertility of degraded soil and assist them in reducing the negative impact of artificial fertilizers on our environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Novel diesel-oil-degrading bacteria and fungi from the Ecuadorian Amazon rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddela, N R; Masabanda, M; Leiva-Mora, M

    2015-01-01

    Isolating new diesel-oil-degrading microorganisms from crude-oil contaminated sites and evaluating their degradation capacities are vitally important in the remediation of oil-polluted environments and crude-oil exploitation. In this research, new hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria and fungi were isolated from the crude-oil contaminated soil of the oil-fields in the Amazon rainforest of north-east Ecuador by using a soil enrichment technique. Degradation analysis was tracked by gas chromatography and a flame ionization detector. Under laboratory conditions, maximum degradability of the total n-alkanes reached up to 77.34 and 62.62 removal ratios after 30 days of incubation for the evaporated diesel oil by fungi (isolate-1) and bacteria (isolate-1), respectively. The 16S/18S rDNA sequence analysis indicated that the microorganisms were most closely (99-100%) related to Bacillus cereus (isolate-1), Bacillus thuringiensis (isolate-2), Geomyces pannorum (isolate-1), and Geomyces sp. (isolate-2). Therefore, these strains enable the degradation of hydrocarbons as the sole carbon source, and these findings will benefit these strains in the remediation of oil-polluted environments and oil exploitation.

  13. Ecotoxic heavy metals transformation by bacteria and fungi in aquatic ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Amiy Dutt; Pal, Dharm; Penta, Santhosh; Kumar, Awanish

    2015-10-01

    Water is the most important and vital molecule of our planet and covers 75% of earth surface. But it is getting polluted due to high industrial growth. The heavy metals produced by industrial activities are recurrently added to it and considered as dangerous pollutants. Increasing concentration of toxic heavy metals (Pb(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+), Ni(2+)) in water is a severe threat for human. Heavy metal contaminated water is highly carcinogenic and poisonous at even relatively low concentrations. When they discharged in water bodies, they dissolve in the water and are distributed in the food chain. Bacteria and fungi are efficient microbes that frequently transform heavy metals and remove toxicity. The application of bacteria and fungi may offer cost benefit in water treatment plants for heavy metal transformation and directly related to public health and environmental safety issues. The heavy metals transformation rate in water is also dependent on the enzymatic capability of microorganisms. By transforming toxic heavy metals microbes sustain aquatic and terrestrial life. Therefore the application of microbiological biomass for heavy metal transformation and removal from aquatic ecosystem is highly significant and striking. This paper reviews the microbial transformation of heavy metal, microbe metal interaction and different approaches for microbial heavy metal remediation from water bodies.

  14. Communities of P-solubilizing bacteria, fungi and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in grass pasture and secondary forest of Paraty, RJ - Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Souchie, Edson L.; Saggin-Júnior, Orivaldo J.; Silva, Eliane M.R.; Campello, Eduardo F.C.; Azcón, Rosario; Barea, Jose M.

    2006-01-01

    Communities of P-solubilizing bacteria, fungi and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, were evaluated in two different ecosystems. Samplings taken from two areas of Atlantic forest, in Paraty - RJ, Brazil, one with a secondary forest and the other with a grass pasture were studied. Four growth media: GL (glucose and yeast extract), GES (glucose, soil extract, KNO3, CaCl2, MgSO4, NaCl, FeEDTA and micronutrients solution), GAGES (glucose, soil extract, arabinose, glycerol, CaCl2, MgSO4 and NaCl) and G...

  15. A Rapid and Reproducible Genomic DNA Extraction Protocol for Sequence-Based Identification of Archaea, Bacteria, Cyanobacteria, Diatoms, Fungi, and Green Algae

    OpenAIRE

    Farkhondeh Saba; Moslem Papizadeh; Javad Khansha; Mahshid Sedghi; Mehrnoosh Rasooli; Mohammad Ali Amoozegar; Mohammad Reza Soudi; Seyed Abolhassan Shahzadeh Fazeli

    2016-01-01

    Background:  Sequence-based identification of various microorganisms including Archaea, Bacteria, Cyanobacteria, Diatoms, Fungi, and green algae necessitates an efficient and reproducible genome extraction procedure though which a pure template DNA is yielded and it can be used in polymerase chain reactions (PCR). Considering the fact that DNA extraction from these microorganisms is time consuming and laborious, we developed and standardized a safe, rapid and inexpensive miniprep protocol. Me...

  16. Isolation of marine fungi Aspergillus sp. and its in vitro antifouling activity against marine bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiyagarajan, Santhananmari; Bavya, Manoharan; Jamal, Alruwaili

    2016-09-01

    Biofouling is considered as a main issue of concern in aquatic environment causing severe economic loss and pollution. The aim of the present study was to isolate marine fungus antagonistic to biofouling bacteria and to define antifouling compounds present in it. Using standard plate method five predominant biofouling bacteria viz., Methylococcus sp., Flavobacterium sp., Marinococcus sp., Serratia sp. and Pseudomonas sp. were isolated from marine solid substances on Zobell's agar. Tolerance range of these bacteria to NaCl was 2-10%. Isolation of fungi from mangrove and estuarine sediments and their screening identified Aspergillus sp. EF4 as a potential isolate. This isolate caused inhibition of all the five test bacterial cultures measuring zone diameters respectively of 11, 16, 12, 13 and 11mm.? Subsequent to submerged fermentation using shaking flask method this fungus produced bioactive compounds within 5 days. The culture parameters optimized were raffinose as carbon source, yeast extract as lone nitrogen source, pH up to 9.0 and temperature up to 40?C. Antifouling compounds of culture filtrate were separated and detected by a three-step procedure involving thin layer chromatography, bioautography and preparative TLC. The in vitro assay involving glass slide-wooden stick-biofilm method revealed that these compounds could cause inhibition and destruction of bacteria to an extent of 2.16 x 104 CFU ml-1 and 2.46 x 104 CFU ml-1 respectively while growth of bacteria in control beaker was enumerated to be 4.41 x 104 CFU ml-1. High performance liquid chromatography of culture filtrate indicated probable principal antifouling compound as Fumonisin B2. Isolation of antagonistic marine fungus from Indian coast and detection of its antifouling compound would help in planning effective strategies for controlling biofouling in marine environment.

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Pigments Extracted from Rhodotorula glutinis Against Some Bacteria and Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Yolmeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Nowadays hazards of synthetic additives and preservatives have been identified, so researchers are looking to a natural and safe alternative for them. The aim of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial effect of carotenoids of Rhodotorula glutinis on the some pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Methods This experimental study was done in Gorgan University of Agriculture and Natural Resources. After cultivating R. glutinis in 50 mL YPG broth at 30°C for overnight, cells were harvested by centrifugation at 10,000 rpm for 10 minutes and were washed three times with distilled water. Cells were ruptured 3 times with 12 mL of acetone and broken using homogenizer. Then the suspension was centrifuged and the supernatant collected. The supernatant (contain pigments was powdered using freeze-dryer. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated by disc diffusion method and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC was determined by using the agar dilution method. Results Giving the results, carotenoids of R. glutinis was effective on the growth of all the tested bacteria, so that Bacillus cereus and Salmonella enteritidis were the lowest and highest sensitivity to this pigment, respectively. The highest MIC and MBC among the tested bacteria were observed for S. enteritidis and Escherichia coli, respectively; whereas MBC was not observed for S. enteritidis at concentrations of the tested pigment. Conclusions Gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive than Gram-negative bacteria against the antimicrobial activity of pigments of R. glutinis. According to the results, pigments of R. glutinis can be used as an inhibitor of bacterial growth.

  18. Inhibition of in vitro growth of soil-borne pathogens by compost-inhabiting indigenous bacteria and fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramzan, N.; Noreen, N.; Shahzad, S.

    2014-01-01

    During the present studies, compost-inhabiting microorganisms including 44 fungi and 15 bacteria isolated from different compost samples were evaluated for their in vitro efficacy against soil-borne pathogens viz., Fusarium solani, Macrophomina phaseolina, Pythium aphanidermatum, Rhizoctonia solani, and Sclerotium rolfsii. Compost inhabiting microbes like Trichoderma harzianum, T. virens, Bacillus cereus, B. pumilus, B. subtilis, Micrococcus varians and Pseudomonas fluorescens were found to inhibit all the test pathogens. Acrophialophora fusispora and Penicillium citrinum reduced the mycelial growth of all the test pathogens except Sclerotium rolfsii. Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus megaterium showed biocontrol activity against all the pathogens except Rhizoctonia solani. Trichoderma harzianum parasitized mycelia of all the tested pathogens and produced coiling around the mycelium. (author)

  19. [REGULATING EFFECT OF ASSOCIATIVE MICROBIOTA ON THE RHYTHMS OF BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF FUNGI AND BACTERIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timokhina, T Kh; Bukharin, O V; Nikolenko, M V; Paromova, Ya I; Perunova, N B

    2015-01-01

    Study the effect of exometabolites of associative microbiota on circadian dynamics of functional parameters, that reflect pathogenic and persistence properties of fungi and bacteria. Clinical isolates of Candida albicans, isolated-from intestine of healthy individuals and patients with candidosis, as well as clinical isolates and museum ATCC strains Staphylococcus. aureus 25923, Escherichia coli 35218 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 27853 were taken for study of proliferative, adhesive, catalase, protease, phospholipase, hemolytic, anti-lysozyme, biofilm-forming activity. The results were treated statistically. C. albicans isolates, isolated from healthy individuals were revealed to be indifferent to the effect of bacterial metabolites. Chrono-infrastructure of biological properties of fungi altered under the effect of microbiota metabolites. Hospital isolates of S. aureus, E. coli and P. aeruginosa displayed a relative stability of physiological properties against the effect of bacterial-fungal metabolites as opposed to museum strains. The alterations of chrono-infrastructure of biological rhythms of microorganisms by bacterial-fungal metabolites of associants reflect the intensity of the biological system, that is inevitable during the process of formation of inter-microbial interactions.

  20. A survey of fungi and some indicator bacteria in chlorinated water of indoor public swimming pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, R.; Hirn, J.

    1981-01-01

    Fifty-four water samples, of volume 500 ml, originating from six public indoor fresh water swimming pools were examined for the presence of fungi and some indicator bacteria by a membrane-filter method. Sabouraud-dextrose agar and selective Candida albicans-medium were used for isolation and identification of fungi. In all but one of the samples the free chlorine content was above 0.40 mg/l. No Candida albicans were detected. Molds and unidentified yeasts were isolated from 29 of the samples. The following species were recorded: Acremonium spp., ALternaria sp., Aspergillus spp., Candida guilliermondii, Chaetomium sp., Cladosporium spp., Clasterosporium sp., Fusarium spp., Geotrichium sp., Penicillium spp., Petriellidium boydii and Phoma spp. Their occurrence was sporadic, each species mostly appearing as single colonies only, with a maximum of 5 colonies. Bacterial growth was noticed in 15 samples, but only in the sample of low free chlorine content did this reach significant proportions. The study indicates that the standard of chlorination is, at least in general, an adequate measure against fungal contamination of swimming pool water. However, the spectrum of mold species encountered encourages a further search for possible indicator species among these organisms.

  1. Life in leaf litter: novel insights into community dynamics of bacteria and fungi during litter decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purahong, Witoon; Wubet, Tesfaye; Lentendu, Guillaume; Schloter, Michael; Pecyna, Marek J; Kapturska, Danuta; Hofrichter, Martin; Krüger, Dirk; Buscot, François

    2016-08-01

    Microorganisms play a crucial role in the biological decomposition of plant litter in terrestrial ecosystems. Due to the permanently changing litter quality during decomposition, studies of both fungi and bacteria at a fine taxonomic resolution are required during the whole process. Here we investigated microbial community succession in decomposing leaf litter of temperate beech forest using pyrotag sequencing of the bacterial 16S and the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rRNA genes. Our results reveal that both communities underwent rapid changes. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes dominated over the entire study period, but their taxonomic composition and abundances changed markedly among sampling dates. The fungal community also changed dynamically as decomposition progressed, with ascomycete fungi being increasingly replaced by basidiomycetes. We found a consistent and highly significant correlation between bacterial richness and fungal richness (R = 0.76, P kingdom co-occurrence pattern of their communities from the early to the later stages of decomposition. During this process, macronutrients, micronutrients, C:N ratio and pH were significantly correlated with the fungal and bacterial communities, while bacterial richness positively correlated with three hydrolytic enzymes important for C, N and P acquisition. Overall, we provide evidence that the complex litter decay is the result of a dynamic cross-kingdom functional succession. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Metabolic response induced by endophytic fungi and bacteria in H. marrubioides Epling in vitro microplants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Cristina Vitorino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyptis marrubioides Epling is a native plant from Brazilian Cerrado. In this paper, the response of in vitro microplants of this species to inoculation with bacterial and fungal endophytic isolates is evaluated. HPLC-DAD analysis showed the presence of 3,4-O-(Z-dicaffeoylquinic acid and quercetin-7-O-glucoside as the main components. GC/MS analysis demonstrated that the sesquiterpenes τ-cadinol and caryophyllene oxide were only produced in microplants inoculated with endophytic bacteria, while methyl hexadecanoate, methyl heptadecanoate and methyl (Z,Z,Z 9,12,15-octadecatrienoate and the triterpene methyl 3β-hydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oate were overexpressed only when the microplant was treated with endophytic fungi.

  3. Aqueous Extracts of Wild Mushrooms Show Antimicrobial and Antiadhesion Activities against Bacteria and Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klančnik, Anja; Megušar, Polona; Sterniša, Meta; Jeršek, Barbara; Bucar, Franz; Smole Možina, Sonja; Kos, Janko; Sabotič, Jerica

    2017-12-01

    Mushrooms represent promising sources of novel bioactive compounds and can be applied as innovative strategies to control microbial contamination and infection via the food chain. We characterized aqueous extracts from 21 wild basidiomycete mushrooms and the cultivated oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus, as putative sources of antimicrobial and antiadhesive compounds. Broth microdilutions and adhesion to a polystyrene surface were evaluated on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and on fungi. The aqueous extracts tested showed antimicrobial and antiadhesive activities against these microorganisms. Biochemical analyses of the P. ostreatus extract indicated the involvement of several compounds with different molecular masses. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Metabolic response induced by endophytic fungi and bacteria in H. marrubioides Epling in vitro micro plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitorino, Luciana Cristina; Silva, Fabiano Guimaraes, E-mail: fabianocefetrv@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia Goiano, Rio Verde, GO (Brazil); Lima, William Cardoso; Soares, Marcos Antonio [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiaba, MT (Brazil). Dept. de Botanica e Ecologia; Pedroso, Rita Cassia Nascimento; Silva, Maroli Rodrigues; Dias, Herbert Junior; Crotti, Antonio Eduardo Miller; Silva, Marcio Luis Andrade e; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; Pauletti, Patricia Mendonca; Januario, Ana Helena [Universidade de Franca, SP (Brazil). Nucleo de Pesquisa em Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas

    2013-10-01

    Hyptis marrubioides Epling is a native plant from Brazilian Cerrado. In this paper, the response of in vitro micro plants of this species to inoculation with bacterial and fungal endophytic isolates is evaluated. HPLC-DAD analysis showed the presence of 3,4-O-(Z)-dicaffeoylquinic acid and quercetin-7-O-glucoside as the main components. GC/MS analysis demonstrated that the sesquiterpenes Greek-Small-Letter-Tau -cadinol and caryophyllene oxide were only produced in micro plants inoculated with endophytic bacteria, while methyl hexadecanoate, methyl heptadecanoate and methyl (Z,Z,Z) 9,12,15-octadecatrienoate and the triterpene methyl 3{beta}-hydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oate were over expressed only when the micro plant was treated with endophytic fungi. (author)

  5. Genus Distribution of Bacteria and Fungi Associated with Keratitis in a Large Eye Center Located in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lixia; Lan, Weizhong; Lou, Bingsheng; Ke, Hongmin; Yang, Yuanzhe; Lin, Xiaofeng; Liang, Lingyi

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the genus distribution of bacteria and fungi associated with keratitis in a large eye center located in Southern China and to compare the results with existing data from other areas in China. All results of corneal microbiological examinations from 2009 to 2013 of patients who had been clinically diagnosed with bacterial or fungal keratitis were obtained chronologically and anonymously from the microbiology database at Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center. Smear/culture data were reviewed and analyzed. Antibiotic resistance of the harvested bacteria was also evaluated. Of 2973 samples, the microbial detection rate was 46.05%; in which 759 eyes (25.5%) were positive for bacteria, 796 eyes (26.8%) were positive for fungi, and 186 eyes (6.3%) were co-infected with both fungi and bacteria. The most common type of bacteria isolated was Staphylococcus epidermidis (31.9%), followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (12.4%). The most common type of fungus was Fusarium species (29.3%), followed by Aspergillus species (24.1%). For the bacteria harvested, mean antibiotic resistance was chloromycetin (34.6%), cephalosporins (20.0%), fluoroquinolones (18.6%), and aminoglycosides (10.5%). The genus distribution of organisms detected in keratitis cases in the largest eye center located in Southern China differs from those in other areas in China. In Southern China during the time period studied, S. epidermidis and Fusarium sp. were the most common pathogens of infectious keratitis. Monitoring the changing trend of pathogens as well as antibiotic resistance are warranted.

  6. The effectiveness of post-culture liquids of antagonistic bacteria in the protection of soybean from soil-borne fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Patkowska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper was to determine the effectiveness of post-culture liquids of Bacillus sp. Bsch 19 and Pseudomonas sp. Psch 16 in the protection of soybean from soil-borne fungi. The use of post-culture liquids of those bacteria in seed dressing positively affected the number, healthiness and yielding of soybean plants. The plants were mainly infected by Fusarium spp., Phoma exigua var. exigua, Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Those fungi were isolated much more rarely from the plants in combinations with the use of post-culture liquids of antagonistic bacteria as compared with the plants from the control combination, i.e. without seed dressing. A reverse relation was found for the occurrence of saprophytic fungi from the genera of Gliocladium, Penicillium and Trichoderma

  7. Differences in fungal and bacterial physiology alter soil carbon and nitrogen cycling: synthesizing effects of microbial community structure using the Fungi and Bacteria (FAB) model. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averill, C.; Hawkes, C. V.; Waring, B. G.

    2013-12-01

    Most biogeochemical models of soil carbon and nitrogen cycling include a simplified representation of the soil microbial community as a single pool, despite good evidence that shifts in the composition or relative abundance of microbial taxa can affect process rates. Incorporating a more realistic depiction of the microbial community in these models may increase their predictive accuracy, but this must be balanced against the feasibility of modeling the enormous diversity present in soil. We propose that explicitly including two major microbial functional groups with distinct physiologies, fungi and bacteria, will improve model predictions. To this end, we created the fungi and bacteria (FAB) model, building off previous enzyme-driven biogeochemical models that explicitly represent microbial physiology. We compared this model to a complementary biogeochemical model that does not include microbial community structure (';single-pool'). We also performed a cross-ecosystem meta-analysis of fungi-to-bacteria ratios to determine if model predictions of community structure matched empirical data. There were large differences in process rates and pool sizes between the single-pool and FAB models. In the FAB model, inorganic N pools were reduced by 5-95% depending on the soil C:N ratio due to bacterial immobilization of fungal mineralization products. This nitrogen subsidy also increased microbial biomass at some C:N ratios. Although there were changes in some components of respiration, particularly overflow respiration, there was no net effect of community structure on total respiration fluxes. The FAB model predicted a breakpoint in the relationship between the ratio of fungi to bacteria and soil C:N, after which the fungi-to-bacteria ratio should begin to increase. Break-point analysis of the meta-analysis data set revealed a consistent pattern and matched the slope of the change in F:B with soil C:N, but not the precise breakpoint. We argue that including microbial

  8. On the reaction of some bacteria and fungi on coal tar creosote. Zur Verhalten einiger Bakterien und Pilze gegenueber Steinkohlenteeroel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, O.; Dittberner, D.; Faix, O. (Universitaet Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany). Ordinariat fuer Holzbiologie)

    1991-01-01

    To contribute to the waste management of wood preservatives, the biodegradability of coal tar creosote by bacteria and fungi has been investigated. Microorganisms comprised 24 bacterial strains and 31 fungi from different systematic and ecological groups as well as isolates from contaminated soils. Based on countings of viable cells, the experiments with various nutrient media, methods of cultivation, preservative concentrations, and organic solvents yielded some bacteria which could grow in the presence of creosote: {ital Aeromonas hydrophila}, {ital Flavobacterium} sp., {ital Pseudomonas arvilla}, {ital P. fluorescens}, and {ital P. putida}. The white-rot fungi {ital Bjerkandera adusta}, {ital Heterobasidion annosum}, {ital Hirschioporus abietinus}, {ital Lentinula edodes}, {ital Peniophora gigantea}, {ital Pleurotus ostreatus}, {ital Schizophyllum commune}, and {ital Trametes versicolor}, the brown-rot fungus {ital Lentinus lepideus}, the staining fungi {ital Ceratocystis piceae} and {ital Stereum sanguinolentum}, and the moulds {ital Paecilomyces variotii} and {ital Trichoderma viride} also grew with creosote. To prepare samples for IR-measurements, continuous extraction of creosote from the nutrient liquid by percolation with methylene chloride was suitable. However, the IR-spectra of creosote did not show any measurable changes after incubation with 16 bacterial strains and 6 fungi. 42 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. The life cycle of iron Fe(III) oxide: impact of fungi and bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, Steeve

    2014-05-01

    Iron oxides are ubiquitous reactive constituents of soils, sediments and aquifers. They exhibit vast surface areas which bind a large array of trace metals, nutrients and organic molecules hence controlling their mobility/reactivity in the subsurface. In this context, understanding the "life cycle" of iron oxide in soils is paramount to many biogeochemical processes. Soils environments are notorious for their extreme heterogeneity and variability of chemical, physical conditions and biological agents at play. Here, we present studies investigating the role of two biological agents driving iron oxide dynamics in soils, root-associated fungi (mycorrhiza) and bacteria. Mycorrhiza filaments (hypha) grow preferentially around, and on the surface of nutrient-rich minerals, making mineral-fungi contact zones, hot-spots of chemical alteration in soils. However, because of the microscopic nature of hyphae (only ~ 5 µm wide for up to 1 mm long) and their tendency to strongly adhere to mineral surface, in situ observations of this interfacial micro-environment are scarce. In a microcosm, ectomycorrhiza (Paxillus involutus) was grown symbiotically with a pine tree (Pinus sylvestris) in the presence of freshly-cleaved biotite under humid, yet undersaturated, conditions typical of soils. Using spatially-resolved ion milling technique (FIB), transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy (TEM/STEM-EDS), synchrotron based X-ray microscopy (STXM), we were able to quantify the speciation of Fe at the biotite-hypha interface. The results shows that substantial oxidation of biotite structural-Fe(II) into Fe(III) subdomains occurs at the contact zone between mycorrhiza and biotite. Once formed, iron(III) oxides can reductively dissolve under suboxic conditions via several abiotic and microbial pathways. In particular, they serve as terminal electron acceptors for the oxidation of organic matter by iron reducing bacteria. We aimed here to understand the role of Fe(III) mineral

  10. Dust, endotoxin, fungi, and bacteria exposure as determined by work task, season, and type of plant in a flower greenhouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilsing, Trine; Madsen, Anne Mette; Basinas, Ioannis; Schlünssen, Vivi; Tendal, Kira; Bælum, Jesper

    2015-03-01

    Greenhouse workers are exposed to dust, endotoxin, fungi, and bacteria potentially causing airway inflammation as well as systemic symptoms. Knowledge about determinants of exposure is a prerequisite for efficient prevention through knowledge-based reduction in exposure. The objective of this study was to assess the occupational exposure in a flower greenhouse and to investigate the impact of work tasks on the intensity and variability in exposure. Seventy-six personal full-shift exposure measurements were performed on 38 employees in a Danish flower greenhouse producing Campanula, Lavandula, Rhipsalideae, and Helleborus. The samples were gravimetrically analysed for inhalable dust. Endotoxin was assessed by the Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate test and culture-based quantification of bacteria and fungi was performed. Information on the performed tasks during sampling was extracted from the greenhouse electronic task logging system. Associations between log-transformed exposure outcomes, season, and work tasks were examined in linear mixed-effects regression with worker identity as random effect. Measured concentrations ranged between 0.04 and 2.41mg m(-3) for inhalable dust and between 0.84 and 1097 EU m(-3) for endotoxin exposure, with the highest mean levels measured during Lavandula and Campanula handling, respectively. Personal exposure to fungi ranged between 1.8×10(2) and 3.4×10(6) colony-forming units (CFU) m(-3) and to bacteria between 1.6×10(1) and 4.2×10(5) CFU m(-3). Exposure to dust, endotoxin, fungi, and bacteria differed between seasons. Packing Lavandula, sticking, potting, and grading Rhipsalideae, and all examined tasks related to Campanula production except sticking increased dust exposure. Endotoxin exposure was increased during sticking Campanula and pinching or packing Rhipsalideae, and fungi exposure was elevated by subtasks performed in the research and development area for Campanula, and by potting, packing/dumping Campanula. Sticking and

  11. Biodesulphurized subbituminous coal by different fungi and bacteria studied by reductive pyrolysis. Part 1: Initial coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Gonsalvesh; S.P. Marinov; M. Stefanova; Y. Yurum; A.G. Dumanli; G. Dinler-Doganay; N. Kolankaya; M. Sam; R. Carleer; G. Reggers; E. Thijssen; J. Yperman [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Institute of Organic Chemistry

    2008-09-15

    One of the perspective methods for clean solid fuels production is biodesulphurization. In order to increase the effect of this approach it is necessary to apply the advantages of more informative analytical techniques. Atmospheric pressure temperature programming reduction (AP-TPR) coupled with different detection systems gave us ground to attain more satisfactory explanation of the effects of biodesulphurization on the treated solid products. Subbituminous high sulphur coal from 'Pirin' basin (Bulgaria) was selected as a high sulphur containing sample. Different types of microorganisms were chosen and maximal desulphurization of 26% was registered. Biodesulphurization treatments were performed with three types of fungi: 'Trametes Versicolor' - ATCC No. 200801, 'Phanerochaeta Chrysosporium' - ME446, Pleurotus Sajor-Caju and one Mixed Culture of bacteria - ATCC No. 39327. A high degree of inorganic sulphur removal (79%) with Mixed Culture of bacteria and consecutive reduction by 13% for organic sulphur (Sorg) decrease with 'Phanerochaeta Chrysosporium' and 'Trametes Versicolor' were achieved. To follow the Sorg changes a set of different detection systems i.e. AP-TPR coupled 'on-line' with mass spectrometry (AP-TPR/MS), on-line with potentiometry (AP-TPR/pot) and by the 'off-line' AP-TPR/GC/MS analysis was used. The need of applying different atmospheres in pyrolysis experiments was proved and their effects were discussed. In order to reach more precise total sulphur balance, oxygen bomb combustion followed by ion chromatography was used. 28 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Isolation of Bacteria with Antifungal Activity against the Phytopathogenic Fungi Stenocarpella maydis and Stenocarpella macrospora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuridia Mercado-Flores

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Stenocarpella maydis and Stenocarpella macrospora are the causal agents of ear rot in corn, which is one of the most destructive diseases in this crop worldwide. These fungi are important mycotoxin producers that cause different pathologies in farmed animals and represent an important risk for humans. In this work, 160 strains were isolated from soil of corn crops of which 10 showed antifungal activity against these phytopathogens, which, were identified as: Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas spp., Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pantoea agglomerans by sequencing of 16S rRNA gene and the phylogenetic analysis. From cultures of each strain, extracellular filtrates were obtained and assayed to determine antifungal activity. The best filtrates were obtained in the stationary phase of B. subtilis cultures that were stable to the temperature and extreme pH values; in addition they did not show a cytotoxicity effect against brine shrimp and inhibited germination of conidia. The bacteria described in this work have the potential to be used in the control of white ear rot disease.

  13. Bioremediation mechanisms of combined pollution of PAHs and heavy metals by bacteria and fungi: A mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shao-Heng; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Niu, Qiu-Ya; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Lu; Jiang, Lu-Hua; Tan, Xiao-Fei; Xu, Piao; Zhang, Chen; Cheng, Min

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, knowledge in regard to bioremediation of combined pollution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals by bacteria and fungi has been widely developed. This paper reviews the species of bacteria and fungi which can tackle with various types of PAHs and heavy metals entering into environment simultaneously or successively. Microbial activity, pollutants bioavailability and environmental factors (e.g. pH, temperature, low molecular weight organic acids and humic acids) can all affect the bioremediation of PAHs and heavy metals. Moreover, this paper summarizes the remediation mechanisms of PAHs and heavy metals by microbes via elucidating the interaction mechanisms of heavy metals with heavy metals, PAHs/PAHs metabolites with PAHs and PAHs with heavy metals. Based on the above reviews, this paper also discusses the potential research needs for this field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) cultivar Avenger against pathogenic bacteria, phytopathogenic filamentous fungi and yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Cano, R D; Salcedo-Hernández, R; López-Meza, J E; Bideshi, D K; Barboza-Corona, J E

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to show whether the edible part of broccoli has antibacterial and antifungal activity against micro-organism of importance in human health and vegetable spoilage, and to test if this effect was partially due to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Crude extracts were obtained from florets and stems of broccoli cultivar Avenger and the inhibitory effect was demonstrated against pathogenic bacteria (Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus xylosus, Staphylococcus aureus, Shigella flexneri, Shigella sonnei, Proteus vulgaris), phytopathogenic fungi (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Asperigillus niger) and yeasts (Candida albicans and Rhodotorula sp.). It was shown that samples treated with proteolytic enzymes had a reduction of approximately 60% in antibacterial activity against Staph. xylosus, suggesting that proteinaceous compounds might play a role in the inhibitory effect. Antimicrobial components in crude extracts were thermoresistant and the highest activity was observed under acidic conditions. It was shown that antifungal activity of broccoli's crude extracts might not be attributed to chitinases. Organic broccoli cultivar Avenger has antimicrobial activity against pathogenic bacteria, yeast and phytophatogenic fungi. Data suggest that this effect is partially due to AMPs. Broccoli's crude extracts have activity not only against pathogenic bacteria but also against phytophatogenic fungi of importance in agriculture. We suggest for first time that the inhibitory effect is probably due to AMPs. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Specific interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and plant growth-promoting bacteria--as revealed by different combinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaderlund, Lotta; Arthurson, Veronica; Granhall, Ulf; Jansson, Janet K.

    2008-05-15

    The interactions between two plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and Paenibacillus brasilensis PB177, two arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (Glomus mosseae and G. intraradices) and one pathogenic fungus (Microdochium nivale) were investigated on winter wheat (Triticum aestivum cultivar Tarso) in a greenhouse trial. PB177, but not SBW25, had strong inhibitory effects on M. nivale in dual culture plate assays. The results from the greenhouse experiment show very specific interactions; e.g. the two AM fungi react differently when interacting with the same bacteria on plants. G. intraradices (single inoculation or together with SBW25) increased plant dry weight on M. nivale infested plants, suggesting that the pathogenic fungus is counteracted by G. intraradices, but PB177 inhibited this positive effect. This is an example of two completely different reactions between the same AM fungus and two species of bacteria, previously known to enhance plant growth and inhibit pathogens. When searching for plant growth promoting microorganisms it is therefore important to test for the most suitable combination of plant, bacteria and fungi in order to get satisfactory plant growth benefits.

  16. Comparison of phenanthrene removal by Aspergillus niger ATC 16404 (filamentous fungi) and Pseudomonas putida KT2442 (bacteria) in enriched nutrient-liquid medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, N.; Kamil, N. A. F. M.; Singhal, N.; Padhye, L.; Swift, S.

    2018-04-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) is one of the persistent and carcinogenic pollutants that needs to be eliminated from the environment. The study on degradation of PAHs by bacteria is thoroughly discussed in literature. Many strains of bacteria were chosen in order to eliminate the PAHs compound in the environment. However, there are less study on the filamentous fungi although fungi appears to be an abundant population and as dominant group in PAHs contaminated soil habitats [1], [2]. This study was conducted to determine and compare the Phenanthrene (PHE) removal by fungi and bacteria in excessive nutrient-liquid culture. Then, the survival for both strains was investigated in the presence of PHE and finally, the analysis on the fungi-PHE interaction was carried out. In condition of excessive nutrient, the removal of PHE was evaluated for fungi and bacteria in batch experiment for 5 days. PHE removal for A.niger and P.putida were found to be 97% and 20% respectively after 5 days. The presence of PHE was negatively inhibits the grow of the bacteria and the fungus. The PHE uptake mechanism for A.niger was observed to be a passive transport mechanism with 45 μg per g fungus dry weight within 24 hr of incubation. As a conclusion, filamentous fungi have the potent role in the removal of PHE as well as bacteria but depending on the strains and the condition of the environment. Fungi is known to co-metabolize the PHE meanwhile, PHE can be used as sole carbon for bacteria. This preliminary result is significant in understanding the bacteria-fungi-PHE interaction to enhance the degradation of PAHs for co-culture study in the future.

  17. Isolation of Fungi and Bacteria Associated with the Guts of Tropical Wood-Feeding Coleoptera and Determination of Their Lignocellulolytic Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas-Jiménez, Keilor; Hernández, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    The guts of beetle larvae constitute a complex system where relationships among fungi, bacteria, and the insect host occur. In this study, we collected larvae of five families of wood-feeding Coleoptera in tropical forests of Costa Rica, isolated fungi and bacteria from their intestinal tracts, and determined the presence of five different pathways for lignocellulolytic activity. The fungal isolates were assigned to three phyla, 16 orders, 24 families, and 40 genera; Trichoderma was the most ...

  18. Effect of Various Organic Matter stimulates Bacteria and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Plantations on Eroded Slopes in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha Vaidya, G.; Shrestha, K.; Wallander, H.

    2009-04-01

    Erosion resulting from landslides is a serious problem in mountainous countries such as Nepal. To restore such sites it is essential to establish plant cover that protects the soil and reduces erosion. Trees and shrubs on the lower hillsides in Nepal form symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and these fungi are important for the uptake of mineral nutrients from the soil. In addition, the mycelia formed by these fungi have an important function in stabilizing the soil. The success of plantations of these eroded slopes is therefore highly dependent on the extent of mycorrhizal colonization of the plants. Mycorrhizal fungi growing in symbiosis with plants are essential in this respect because they improve both plant and nutrient uptake and soil structure. We investigated the influence of organic matter and P amendment on recently produced biomass of bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in eroded slopes in Nepal. Eroded soil mixed with different types of organic matter was placed in mesh bags which were buried around the trees of Bauhinia purpurea and Leucaena diversifolia .This experiment were done in two seasons ( (the wet and the dry season). Signature fatty acids were used to determine bacterial and AM fungal biomass after the six month intervals. The amount and composition of AM fungal spores were analyzed in the mesh bags from the wet and dry seasons. More microbial biomass was produced during wet season than during dry season. Further more, organic matter addition enhanced the production of AM fungal and bacterial biomass during both seasons. The positive influence of organic matter addition on AM fungi could be an important contribution to plant survival, growth and nutrient composition in the soil in plantations on eroded slopes. Different AM spore communities and bacterial profiles were obtained with different organic amendments and this suggests a possible way of selecting for specific microbial communities in the management of eroded

  19. Bioremediation of organophosphates by fungi and bacteria in agricultural soils. A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina María Hernández-Ruiz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphates are a type of pesticides widely used in agriculture for pest control. Since these are highly toxic compounds, their excessive use has caused great deterioration of arable soils, as well as serious damage to ecosystems and human health. Bioremediation is used as an alternative way to transform pesticides into simple, less polluting compounds, using the metabolic potential of microorganisms. Therefore, the objective of this study was to summarize the fungi and bacteria involved in bioremediation of the main organophos-phorus pesticides used in agricultural soils through a systematic review of the scientific literature, in order to provide useful information for conducting further studies. Scientific information was obtained ResumoOs organofosforados são um tipo de praguicidas amplamente utilizados no setor agrícola para o controle de pragas. Dado que estes são compostos químicos altamente tóxicos, o uso excessivo destes há causado grande deterioro nos solos cultiváveis, assim como graves danos contra os ecossistemas e na saúde humana. A biorremediação surge como uma alternativa para transformar os praguicidas em compostos mais simples e pouco contaminantes mediante o uso do potencial metabólico dos micro-rganismos. Pelo anterior, o objetivo desta pesquisa foi descrever os fungos e bactérias envolvidos na biorremediação dos principais praguicidas organo-fosforados empregados em solos agrícolas por meio de uma revisão sistemática da literatura científica, com o fim de aportar informação útil para a through the use of databases such as ScienceDirect and Springer Link and unindexed information was also gathered from Google Scholar, as a result of this study, it was found that the most studied organophosphate pesticide is chlorpyrifos (Toxicity category III and microorganisms most commonly used in the bioremediation of organophosphate pesticides belongs to the genera Serratia, Bacillus and Pseudomonas. It is

  20. Strigolactones cross the kingdoms: plants, fungi, and bacteria in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranco, Luisa; Fiorilli, Valentina; Venice, Francesco; Bonfante, Paola

    2017-12-22

    Strigolactones (SLs) first evolved as regulators of simple developmental processes in very ancient plant lineages, and then assumed new roles to sustain the increasing biological complexity of land plants. Their versatility is also shown by the fact that during evolution they have been exploited, once released in the rhizosphere, as a communication system towards plant-interacting organisms even belonging to different kingdoms. Here, we reviewed the impact of SLs on soil microbes, paying particular attention to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). SLs induce several responses in AMF, including spore germination, hyphal branching, mitochondrial metabolism, transcriptional reprogramming, and production of chitin oligosaccharides which, in turn, stimulate early symbiotic responses in the host plant. In the specific case study of the AMF Gigaspora margarita, SLs are also perceived, directly or indirectly, by the well-characterized population of endobacteria, with an increase of bacterial divisions and the activation of specific transcriptional responses. The dynamics of SLs during AM root colonization were also surveyed. Although not essential for the establishment of this mutualistic association, SLs act as positive regulators as they are relevant to achieve the full extent of colonization. This possibly occurs through a complex crosstalk with other hormones such as auxin, abscisic acid, and gibberellins. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Dust, endotoxin, fungi, and bacteria exposure as determined by work task, season, and type of plant in a flower greenhouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilsing, T.; Madsen, A. M.; Basinas, I.

    2015-01-01

    ). Exposure to dust, endotoxin, fungi, and bacteria differed between seasons. Packing Lavandula, sticking, potting, and grading Rhipsalideae, and all examined tasks related to Campanula production except sticking increased dust exposure. Endotoxin exposure was increased during sticking Campanula and pinching...... exposure limit of 90 EU m(-3) was exceeded in 30% of the samples, which may have health implications for the employees. Exposure levels were found to vary depending on the tasks performed, and thereby results can be used to direct task-based initiatives to reduce workplace exposures....

  2. Direct quantitation of fatty acids present in bacteria and fungi: stability of the cyclopropane ring to chlorotrimethylsilane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eras, Jordi; Oró, Robert; Torres, Mercè; Canela, Ramon

    2008-07-09

    The stability of the cyclopropane ring and the fatty acid composition of microbial cells were determined using chlorotrimethylsilane as reagent with three different conditions 80 degrees C for 1 h, 60 degrees C for 1 h, and 60 degrees C for 2 h. Chlorotrimethylsilane permits a simultaneous extraction and derivatization of fatty acids. A basic method was used as reference. The bacteria, Escherichia coli, Burkholderia cepacia, and Lactobacillus brevis, and fungi Aspergillus niger and Gibberella fujikuroi were used. The stability of the cyclopropane ring on acidic conditions was tested using the cyclopropanecarboxylic acid and a commercial mixture of bacteria fatty acid methyl esters (BAME). Fisher's least significant difference test showed significant differences among the methods. The method using chlorotrimethylsilane and 1-pentanol for 1 h at 80 degrees C gave the best results in cyclopropane, hydroxyl, and total fatty acid recoveries. This procedure allows the fast and easy one-step direct extraction derivatization.

  3. Contribution of Ruminal Fungi, Archaea, Protozoa, and Bacteria to the Methane Suppression Caused by Oilseed Supplemented Diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaopu; Giller, Katrin; Kreuzer, Michael; Ulbrich, Susanne E; Braun, Ueli; Schwarm, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Dietary lipids can suppress methane emission from ruminants, but effects are variable. Especially the role of bacteria, archaea, fungi and protozoa in mediating the lipid effects is unclear. In the present in vitro study, archaea, fungi and protozoa were selectively inhibited by specific agents. This was fully or almost fully successful for fungi and protozoa as well as archaeal activity as determined by the methyl-coenzyme M reductase alpha subunit gene. Five different microbial treatments were generated: rumen fluid being intact (I), without archaea (-A), without fungi (-F), without protozoa (-P) and with bacteria only (-AFP). A forage-concentrate diet given alone or supplemented with crushed full-fat oilseeds of either safflower ( Carthamus tinctorius ) or poppy ( Papaver somniferum ) or camelina ( Camelina sativa ) at 70 g oil kg -1 diet dry matter was incubated. This added up to 20 treatments with six incubation runs per treatment. All oilseeds suppressed methane emission compared to the non-supplemented control. Compared to the non-supplemented control, -F decreased organic matter (OM) degradation, and short-chain fatty acid concentration was greater with camelina and safflower seeds. Methane suppression per OM digested in -F was greater with camelina seeds (-12 vs.-7% with I, P = 0.06), but smaller with poppy seeds (-4 vs. -8% with I, P = 0.03), and not affected with safflower seeds. With -P, camelina seeds decreased the acetate-to-propionate ratio and enhanced the methane suppression per gram dry matter (18 vs. 10% with I, P = 0.08). Hydrogen recovery was improved with -P in any oilseeds compared to non-supplemented control. No methane emission was detected with the -A and -AFP treatments. In conclusion, concerning methanogenesis, camelina seeds seem to exert effects only on archaea and bacteria. By contrast, with safflower and poppy seeds methane was obviously reduced mainly through the interaction with protozoa or archaea associated with protozoa. This

  4. Profile Of Bacteria And Fungi On Money Coins | Kuria | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the quantity and quality of bacterial and fungi on money coins and to identify those that could pose a public health risk. Design: Random sampling of coins from subjects within predetermined categories. Setting: Westlands division of Nairobi Metropolitan province. Subjects: Twenty-shilling coin ...

  5. Differential activation of the NF-kappaB-like factors Relish and Dif in Drosophila melanogaster by fungi and Gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedengren-Olcott, Marika; Olcott, Michael C; Mooney, Duane T; Ekengren, Sophia; Geller, Bruce L; Taylor, Barbara J

    2004-05-14

    The current model of immune activation in Drosophila melanogaster suggests that fungi and Gram-positive (G(+)) bacteria activate the Toll/Dif pathway and that Gram-negative (G(-)) bacteria activate the Imd/Relish pathway. To test this model, we examined the response of Relish and Dif (Dorsal-related immunity factor) mutants to challenge by various fungi and G(+) and G(-) bacteria. In Relish mutants, the Cecropin A gene was induced by the G(+) bacteria Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus, but not by other G(+) or G(-) bacteria. This Relish-independent Cecropin A induction was blocked in Dif/Relish double mutant flies. Induction of the Cecropin A1 gene by M. luteus required Relish, whereas induction of the Cecropin A2 gene required Dif. Intact peptidoglycan (PG) was necessary for this differential induction of Cecropin A. PG extracted from M. luteus induced Cecropin A in Relish mutants, whereas PGs from the G(+) bacteria Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus subtilis did not, suggesting that the Drosophila immune system can distinguish PGs from various G(+) bacteria. Various fungi stimulated antimicrobial peptides through at least two different pathways requiring Relish and/or Dif. Induction of Attacin A by Geotrichum candidum required Relish, whereas activation by Beauvaria bassiana required Dif, suggesting that the Drosophila immune system can distinguish between at least these two fungi. We conclude that the Drosophila immune system is more complex than the current model. We propose a new model to account for this immune system complexity, incorporating distinct pattern recognition receptors of the Drosophila immune system, which can distinguish between various fungi and G(+) bacteria, thereby leading to selective induction of antimicrobial peptides via differential activation of Relish and Dif.

  6. Comparative study of the fungicide Benomyl toxicity on some plant growth promoting bacteria and some fungi in pure cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elslahi Randa H.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Six laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of the fungicide Benomyl on pure cultures of some plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB and some fungi. The highest LD50 was recorded for Bacillus circulans and proved to be the most resistant to the fungicide, followed by Azospirillum braziliense, while Penicillium sp. was the most affected microorganism. LD50 values for the affected microorganisms were in 21-240 orders of magnitude lower in comparison with the LD50 value for Azospirillum braziliense. The results indicate a strong selectivity for Benomyl against Rhizobium meliloti and Penicillium sp. when compared to other microorganisms tested. The highest safety coefficient was recorded for Bacillus circulans followed by Azospirillum braziliense, while Rhizobium meliloti, showed the lowest safety coefficient value compared to other bacteria. The lowest toxicity index was recorded for Bacillus circulans and Azospirillum braziliense. The slope of the curves for Bacillus sp. and Rhizobium meliloti was steeper than that of the other curves, suggesting that even a slight increase of the dose of the fungicide can cause a very strong negative effect. In conclusion, Benomyl could be applied without restriction when using inocula based on growth promoting bacteria such as symbiotic nitrogen fixers (Rhizobium meliloti, non-symbiotic nitrogen fixers (Azospirillum braziliense or potassium solibilizers (Bacillus circulans, given that the fungicide is applied within the range of the recommended field dose.

  7. Identification of non-pseudomonad bacteria from fruit bodies of wild agaricales fungi that detoxify tolaasin produced by Pseudomonas tolaasii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Takanori; Murata, Hitoshi; Shirata, Akira

    2002-10-01

    Bacterial isolates from wild Agaricales fungi detoxified tolaasin, the inducer of brown blotch disease of cultivated mushrooms produced by Pseudomonas tolaasii. Mycetocola tolaasinivorans and Mycetocola lacteus were associated with fruit bodies of wild Pleurotus ostreatus and wild Lepista nuda, respectively. Tolaasin-detoxifying bacteria belonging to other genera were found in various wild mushrooms. An Acinetobacter sp. was isolated from fruit bodies of Tricholoma matsutake, Bacillus pumilus was isolated from Coprinus disseminatus, and Sphingobacterium multivorum was isolated from Clitocybe clavipes. A Pedobacter sp., which seemed not be identifiable as any known bacterial species, was isolated from a Clitocybe sp. Tolaasin-detoxifying bacteria identified thus far were attached to the surface of mycelia rather than residing within the fungal cells. M. tolaasinivorans, M. lacteus, B. pumilus, the Pedobacter sp., and S. multivorum efficiently detoxified tolaasin and strongly suppressed brown blotch development in cultivated P. ostreatus and Agaricus bisporus in vitro, but the Acinetobacter sp. did so less efficiently. These bacteria may be useful for the elucidation of mechanisms involved in tolaasin-detoxification, and may become biological control agents of mushroom disease.

  8. Speculations on niches occupied by fungi in the sea with relation to bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, S.

    living tissues of the seagrass Zostera and causes the wasting disease (Short et al 1987). Unicellular bacteria are not capable of substantially penetrating solid substrata and growing inside. Even the burrowing bacteria in wood (Mouzouras et al 1988... in the sea as parasites of living organisms and on dead organic matter (Jones 1976; Kohlmeyer and Kohlmeyer 1979; Moss 1986a), their importance inth~processes in the sea has still not been sufficiently ev.aluated. Authors of standard works on marine...

  9. Assessment of bioaerosol contamination (bacteria and fungi) in the largest urban wastewater treatment plant in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Sadegh; Hassanvand, Mohammad Sadegh; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Alimohammadi, Mahmood; Nabavi, Samira; Faridi, Sasan; Dehghani, Asghar; Hoseini, Mohammad; Moradi-Joo, Mohammad; Mokamel, Adel; Kashani, Homa; Yarali, Navid; Yunesian, Masud

    2015-10-01

    Bioaerosol concentration was measured in wastewater treatment units in south of Tehran, the largest wastewater treatment plant in the Middle East. Active sampling was carried out around four operational units and a point as background. The results showed that the aeration tank with an average of 1016 CFU/m(3) in winter and 1973 CFU/m(3) in summer had the greatest effect on emission of bacterial bioaerosols. In addition, primary treatment had the highest impact on fungal emission. Among the bacteria, Micrococcus spp. showed the widest emission in the winter, and Bacillus spp. was dominant in summer. Furthermore, fungi such as Penicillium spp. and Cladosporium spp. were the dominant types in the seasons. Overall, significant relationship was observed between meteorological parameters and the concentration of bacterial and fungal aerosols.

  10. Acidotolerant Bacteria and Fungi as a Sink of Methanol-Derived Carbon in a Deciduous Forest Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawe, Mareen; Hoeke, Henrike; Wissenbach, Dirk K; Lentendu, Guillaume; Wubet, Tesfaye; Kröber, Eileen; Kolb, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Methanol is an abundant atmospheric volatile organic compound that is released from both living and decaying plant material. In forest and other aerated soils, methanol can be consumed by methanol-utilizing microorganisms that constitute a known terrestrial sink. However, the environmental factors that drive the biodiversity of such methanol-utilizers have been hardly resolved. Soil-derived isolates of methanol-utilizers can also often assimilate multicarbon compounds as alternative substrates. Here, we conducted a comparative DNA stable isotope probing experiment under methylotrophic (only [ 13 C 1 ]-methanol was supplemented) and combined substrate conditions ([ 12 C 1 ]-methanol and alternative multi-carbon [ 13 C u ]-substrates were simultaneously supplemented) to (i) identify methanol-utilizing microorganisms of a deciduous forest soil (European beech dominated temperate forest in Germany), (ii) assess their substrate range in the soil environment, and (iii) evaluate their trophic links to other soil microorganisms. The applied multi-carbon substrates represented typical intermediates of organic matter degradation, such as acetate, plant-derived sugars (xylose and glucose), and a lignin-derived aromatic compound (vanillic acid). An experimentally induced pH shift was associated with substantial changes of the diversity of active methanol-utilizers suggesting that soil pH was a niche-defining factor of these microorganisms. The main bacterial methanol-utilizers were members of the Beijerinckiaceae ( Bacteria ) that played a central role in a detected methanol-based food web. A clear preference for methanol or multi-carbon substrates as carbon source of different Beijerinckiaceae -affiliated phylotypes was observed suggesting a restricted substrate range of the methylotrophic representatives. Apart from Bacteria , we also identified the yeasts Cryptococcus and Trichosporon as methanol-derived carbon-utilizing fungi suggesting that further research is needed to

  11. Differences in composition of honey samples and their impact on the antimicrobial activities against drug multiresistant bacteria and pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Waili, Noori; Al Ghamdi, Ahmad; Ansari, Mohammad Javed; Al-Attal, Yehya; Al-Mubarak, Aarif; Salom, Khelod

    2013-05-01

    Antibiotic multiresistant microbes represent a challenging problem. Because honey has a potent antibacterial property, the antimicrobial effects of different honey samples against multiresistant pathogens and their compositions were investigated. Five honey samples were used: Talah, Dhahian, Sumra-1, Sidr, and Sumra-2. Samples were analyzed to determine chemical composition such as fructose, glucose, sucrose, pH, total flavonoids, total phenolics, hydrogen peroxide concentration, minerals and trace elements. Antimicrobial activities of the samples against 17 (16 were multiresistant) human pathogenic bacteria and three types of fungi were studied. Specimens of the isolates were cultured into 10 mL of 10-100% (volume/volume) honey diluted in broth. Microbial growth was assessed on a solid plate media after 24 h and 72 h incubation. The composition of honey samples varied considerably. Sumra 1 and 2 contained the highest level of flavonoids and phenolics and the lowest level of hydrogen peroxide, whereas Dhahian honey contained the highest level of hydrogen peroxide. Sixteen pathogens were antibiotic multiresistant. A single dose of each honey sample inhibited all the pathogens tested after 24 h and 72 h incubation. The most sensitive pathogens were Aspergillus nidulans, Salmonella typhimurum and Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis). Although there was no statistically significant difference in the effectiveness of honey samples, the most effective honey against bacteria was Talah and against fungi were Dhahian and Sumra-2. Various honey samples collected from different geographical areas and plant origins showed almost similar antimicrobial activities against multiresistant pathogens despite considerable variation in their composition. Honey may represent an alternative candidate to be tested as part of management of drug multiresistant pathogens. Copyright © 2013 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Acidotolerant Bacteria and Fungi as a Sink of Methanol-Derived Carbon in a Deciduous Forest Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareen Morawe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Methanol is an abundant atmospheric volatile organic compound that is released from both living and decaying plant material. In forest and other aerated soils, methanol can be consumed by methanol-utilizing microorganisms that constitute a known terrestrial sink. However, the environmental factors that drive the biodiversity of such methanol-utilizers have been hardly resolved. Soil-derived isolates of methanol-utilizers can also often assimilate multicarbon compounds as alternative substrates. Here, we conducted a comparative DNA stable isotope probing experiment under methylotrophic (only [13C1]-methanol was supplemented and combined substrate conditions ([12C1]-methanol and alternative multi-carbon [13Cu]-substrates were simultaneously supplemented to (i identify methanol-utilizing microorganisms of a deciduous forest soil (European beech dominated temperate forest in Germany, (ii assess their substrate range in the soil environment, and (iii evaluate their trophic links to other soil microorganisms. The applied multi-carbon substrates represented typical intermediates of organic matter degradation, such as acetate, plant-derived sugars (xylose and glucose, and a lignin-derived aromatic compound (vanillic acid. An experimentally induced pH shift was associated with substantial changes of the diversity of active methanol-utilizers suggesting that soil pH was a niche-defining factor of these microorganisms. The main bacterial methanol-utilizers were members of the Beijerinckiaceae (Bacteria that played a central role in a detected methanol-based food web. A clear preference for methanol or multi-carbon substrates as carbon source of different Beijerinckiaceae-affiliated phylotypes was observed suggesting a restricted substrate range of the methylotrophic representatives. Apart from Bacteria, we also identified the yeasts Cryptococcus and Trichosporon as methanol-derived carbon-utilizing fungi suggesting that further research is needed to

  13. Soil bacteria respond to presence of roots but not to mycelium of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, P.A.; Bååth, E.; Jakobsen, I.

    1996-01-01

    and Gerdemann, were used. Bacterial numbers (direct and viable count) and activities (thymidine incorporation) were highest in the root compartment, but were not affected by the AM mycelium after 30 days of plant growth. The soil was stored after harvest for 16 d at 13°C to study the effect of disconnected......) pattern. The bacteria specific PLFAs cy17:0 and cy19:0 increased in both experiments in the root compartments. The PLFAs 15:0 and 17:0, which are usually considered to be bacteria specific, also increased due to the presence of roots, but it was shown that these fatty acids were present in aseptically...... grown cucumber roots, and thus not bacteria specific. No bacterial PLFAs were affected by the presence of mycorrhiza....

  14. Baiting of bacteria with hyphae of common soil fungi revealed a diverse group of potentially mycophagous secondary consumers in the rhizosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudnick, M.B.; van Veen, J.A.; de Boer, W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fungi and bacteria are primary consumers of plant-derived organic compounds and therefore considered as basal members of soil food webs. Trophic interactions among these microorganisms could, however, induce shifts in food web energy flows. Given increasing evidence for a prominent role of

  15. The Ecological Role of Type Three Secretion Systems in the Interaction of Bacteria with Fungi in Soil and Related Habitats Is Diverse and Context-Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Rashid; Mazurier, Sylvie; Yang, Pu; Lemanceau, Philippe; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria and fungi constitute important organisms in many ecosystems, in particular terrestrial ones. Both organismal groups contribute significantly to biogeochemical cycling processes. Ecological theory postulates that bacteria capable of receiving benefits from host fungi are likely to evolve efficient association strategies. The purpose of this review is to examine the mechanisms that underpin the bacterial interactions with fungi in soil and other systems, with special focus on the type III secretion system (T3SS). Starting with a brief description of the versatility of the T3SS as an interaction system with diverse eukaryotic hosts, we subsequently examine the recent advances made in our understanding of its contribution to interactions with soil fungi. The analysis used data sets ranging from circumstantial evidence to gene-knockout-based experimental data. The initial finding that the abundance of T3SSs in microbiomes is often enhanced in fungal-affected habitats like the mycosphere and the mycorrhizosphere is now substantiated with in-depth knowledge of the specific systems involved. Different fungal–interactive bacteria, in positive or negative associations with partner fungi, harbor and express T3SSs, with different ecological outcomes. In some particular cases, bacterial T3SSs have been shown to modulate the physiology of its fungal partner, affecting its ecological characteristics and consequently shaping its own habitat. Overall, the analyses of the collective data set revealed that diverse T3SSs have assumed diverse roles in the interactions of bacteria with host fungi, as driven by ecological and evolutionary niche requirements. PMID:28197129

  16. The interaction between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and endophytic bacteria enhances plant growth of Acacia gerrardii under salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Hashem

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbes living symbiotically in plant tissues mutually cooperate with each other by providing nutrients for proliferation of the partner organism and have a beneficial effect on plant growth. However, few studies thus far have examined the interactive effect of endophytic bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF in hostile conditions and their potential to improve plant stress tolerance. In this study, we investigated how the synergistic interactions of endophytic bacteria and AMF affect plant growth, nodulation, nutrient acquisition and stress tolerance of Acacia gerrardii under salt stress. Plant growth varied between the treatments with both single inoculants and was higher in plants inoculated with the endophytic B. subtilis strain than with AMF. Co-inoculated A. gerrardii had a significantly greater shoot and root dry weight, nodule number, and leghemoglobin content than those inoculated with AMF or B. subtilis alone under salt stress. The endophytic B. subtilis could alleviate the adverse effect of salt on AMF colonization. The differences in nitrate and nitrite reductase and nitrogenase activities between uninoculated plants and those inoculated with AMF and B. subtilis together under stress were significant. Both inoculation treatments, either B. subtilis alone or combined with AMF, enhanced the N, P, K, Mg and Ca contents and phosphatase activities in salt-stressed A. gerrardii tissues and reduced Na and Cl concentration, thereby protecting salt-stressed plants from ionic and osmotic stress-induced changes. In conclusion, our results indicate that endophytic bacteria and AMF contribute to a tripartite mutualistic symbiosis in A. gerrardii and are coordinately involved in the plant adaptation to salt stress tolerance.Key words: AMF, endophyte, Acacia gerrardii, salinity, nutrition

  17. Nematode-trapping fungi and fungus-associated bacteria interactions: the role of bacterial diketopiperazines and biofilms on Arthrobotrys oligospora surface in hyphal morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Yang, Min; Luo, Jun; Qu, Qing; Chen, Ying; Liang, Lianming; Zhang, Keqin

    2016-11-01

    In soil, nematode-trapping fungi and bacteria often share microhabitats and interact with each other, but effects of fungus-associated bacteria on its trap formation are underestimated. We have ascertained the presence of Stenotrophomonas and Rhizobium genera associated with A. oligospora GJ-1. After A. oligospora GJ-1 without associated bacteria (cured Arthrobotrys) was co-cultivated with Stenotrophomonas and its supernatant extract, microscopic study of hyphae from co-cultivation indicated that bacterial biofilm formation on hyphae was related to trap formation in fungi and Stenotrophomonas supernatant extract. Four diketopiperazines (DKPs) were purified from Stenotrophomonas supernatant extract that could not induce traps in the cured Arthrobotrys. When cured Arthrobotrys was cultured with Stenotrophomonas and one of DKPs, polar attachment, bacterial biofilms on hyphae and trap formation in fungi were observed. After cured Arthrobotrys with bacterial biofilms was consecutively transferred several times on nutrient poor medium, trap formation disappeared with the disappearance of bacterial biofilms on hyphae. DKPs could facilitate chemotaxis of Stenotrophomonas towards fungal extract which was suggested to contribute to bacterial biofilms on hyphae. Furthermore, when cured Arthrobotrys was cultured with Stenotrophomonas and DKPs in soil, trap formation in fungi and bacterial biofilms on hyphae were also observed, and the fungal activity against nematode was enhanced. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Urediospores of rust fungi are ice nucleation active at > -10 °C and harbor ice nucleation active bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, C. E.; Sands, D. C.; Glaux, C.; Samsatly, J.; Asaad, S.; Moukahel, A. R.; Gonçalves, F. L. T.; Bigg, E. K.

    2013-04-01

    Various features of the biology of the rust fungi and of the epidemiology of the plant diseases they cause illustrate the important role of rainfall in their life history. Based on this insight we have characterized the ice nucleation activity (INA) of the aerially disseminated spores (urediospores) of this group of fungi. Urediospores of this obligate plant parasite were collected from natural infections of 7 species of weeds in France, from coffee in Brazil and from field and greenhouse-grown wheat in France, the USA, Turkey and Syria. Immersion freezing was used to determine freezing onset temperatures and the abundance of ice nuclei in suspensions of washed spores. Microbiological analyses of spores from France, the USA and Brazil, and subsequent tests of the ice nucleation activity of the bacteria associated with spores were deployed to quantify the contribution of bacteria to the ice nucleation activity of the spores. All samples of spores were ice nucleation active, having freezing onset temperatures as high as -4 °C. Spores in most of the samples carried cells of ice nucleation-active strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae (at rates of less than 1 bacterial cell per 100 urediospores), but bacterial INA accounted for only a small fraction of the INA observed in spore suspensions. Changes in the INA of spore suspensions after treatment with lysozyme suggest that the INA of urediospores involves a polysaccharide. Based on data from the literature, we have estimated the concentrations of urediospores in air at cloud height and in rainfall. These quantities are very similar to those reported for other biological ice nucleators in these same substrates. However, at cloud level convective activity leads to widely varying concentrations of particles of surface origin, so that mean concentrations can underestimate their possible effects on clouds. We propose that spatial and temporal concentrations of biological ice nucleators active at temperatures > -10

  19. Toxicity of tetracyclines and tetracycline degradation products to environmentally relevant bacteria, including selected tetracycline-resistant bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling-Sørensen, B.; Sengeløv, G.; Tjørnelund, J.

    2002-01-01

    solution were theoretically identified at various environmental conditions, such as pH, presence of chelating, metals, and fight. Their potency was assessed on sludge bacteria, tetracycline-sensitive soil bacteria, and tetracycline-resistant strains. Several of the degradation products had potency...

  20. Evaluation of some fungi and bacteria for biocontrol of anthracnose disease of cowpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebanjo, A; Bankole, S A

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy of some fungal and bacterial isolates obtained from cowpea phylloplane in inhibiting the in vitro and in vivo growth of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, causal agent of anthracnose of cowpea was investigated. Inhibition of growth of the pathogen with production of zones of inhibition was observed for Aspergillus flavus, A. ochraceus, Penicillium aurantiogriseum, Bacillus subtilis-BS21, B. subtilis-BS22 and B. subtilis-BS23. Inhibition of growth on contact was recorded for A. niger while Trichoderma viride-TH14 and T. viride-TH31hyperparasitized the pathogen. The two isolates of T. viride and all tested bacteria significantly reduced seedling infection from anthracnose infested seeds in pot experiments. Spray application of T. viride-TH31 on inoculated cowpea plants in the field effectively suppressed the incidence and severity of anthracnose disease, and significantly increased yield over the control. The antagonist was more effective when applied twice weekly than once in a week.

  1. A Rapid and Reproducible Genomic DNA Extraction Protocol for Sequence-Based Identification of Archaea, Bacteria, Cyanobacteria, Diatoms, Fungi, and Green Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkhondeh Saba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Sequence-based identification of various microorganisms including Archaea, Bacteria, Cyanobacteria, Diatoms, Fungi, and green algae necessitates an efficient and reproducible genome extraction procedure though which a pure template DNA is yielded and it can be used in polymerase chain reactions (PCR. Considering the fact that DNA extraction from these microorganisms is time consuming and laborious, we developed and standardized a safe, rapid and inexpensive miniprep protocol. Methods:  According to our results, amplification of various genomic regions including SSU, LSU, ITS, β-tubulin, actin, RPB2, and EF-1 resulted in a reproducible and efficient DNA extraction from a wide range of microorganisms yielding adequate pure genomic material for reproducible PCR-amplifications. Results:   This method relies on a temporary shock of increased concentrations of detergent which can be applied concomitant with multiple freeze-thaws to yield sufficient amount of DNA for PCR amplification of multiple or single fragments(s of the genome. As an advantage, the recipe seems very flexible, thus, various optional steps can be included depending on the samples used.Conclusion:   Having the needed flexibility in each step, this protocol is applicable on a very wide range of samples. Hence, various steps can be included depending on the desired quantity and quality.

  2. A Rapid and Reproducible Genomic DNA Extraction Protocol for Sequence-Based Identification of Archaea, Bacteria, Cyanobacteria, Diatoms, Fungi, and Green Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkhondeh Saba

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Sequence-based identification of various microorganisms including Archaea, Bacteria, Cyanobacteria, Diatoms, Fungi, and green algae necessitates an efficient and reproducible genome extraction procedure though which a pure template DNA is yielded and it can be used in polymerase chain reactions (PCR. Considering the fact that DNA extraction from these microorganisms is time consuming and laborious, we developed and standardized a safe, rapid and inexpensive miniprep protocol. Methods:  According to our results, amplification of various genomic regions including SSU, LSU, ITS, β-tubulin, actin, RPB2, and EF-1 resulted in a reproducible and efficient DNA extraction from a wide range of microorganisms yielding adequate pure genomic material for reproducible PCR-amplifications. Results:   This method relies on a temporary shock of increased concentrations of detergent which can be applied concomitant with multiple freeze-thaws to yield sufficient amount of DNA for PCR amplification of multiple or single fragments(s of the genome. As an advantage, the recipe seems very flexible, thus, various optional steps can be included depending on the samples used.Conclusion:   Having the needed flexibility in each step, this protocol is applicable on a very wide range of samples. Hence, various steps can be included depending on the desired quantity and quality.

  3. Gold nanoparticles synthesized by Brassica oleracea (Broccoli) acting as antimicrobial agents against human pathogenic bacteria and fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piruthiviraj, Prakash; Margret, Anita; Krishnamurthy, Poornima Priyadharsani

    2016-04-01

    Production of antimicrobial agents through the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using green technology has been extensively made consistent by various researchers; yet, this study uses the flower bud's aqueous extracts of Brassica oleracea (Broccoli) as a reducing agent for chloroauric acid (1 mM). After 30 min of incubation, synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNps) was observed by a change in extract color from pale yellow to purple color. Synthesis of AuNps was confirmed in UV-visible spectroscopy at the range of approximately 560 nm. The SEM analysis showed the average nanoparticles size of 12-22 nm. The antimicrobial activity of AuNps was analyzed by subjecting it to human pathogenic bacteria (Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Klebsiella pneumonia) and fungi (Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans) using disc diffusion method. The broccoli-synthesized AuNps showed the efficient antibacterial and antifungal activity of above-mentioned microbes. It was confirmed that AuNps have the best antimicrobial agent compared to the standard antibiotics (Gentamicin and Fluconazole). When the concentrations of AuNps were increased (10, 25, and 50 µg/ml), the sensitivity zone also increased for all the tested microbes. The synthesized AuNps are capable of rendering high antimicrobial efficacy and, hence, have a great potential in the preparation of drugs used against major bacterial and fungal diseases in humans.

  4. Comparative evaluation of three impactor samplers for measuring airborne bacteria and fungi concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méheust, Delphine; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre; Cann, Pierre Le

    2013-01-01

    Portable microbial samplers are useful for detecting microorganisms in the air. However, limited data are available on their performance when sampling airborne biological agents in a routine practice. We compared bacterial and fungal concentrations obtained in field conditions using three impactor samplers with different designs (AES Chemunex Sampl'Air, bioMérieux Air Ideal, and Sartorius AirPort MD8/BACTair). The linearity of mold collection was tested in the range of 100 L to 1000 L, and all the devices had a correlation coefficient higher than 0.95. For optimal comparison of the samplers, we performed experiments in different hospital rooms with varying levels of air biocontamination. Each sampling procedure was repeated to assess reproducibility. No significant difference between the samplers was observed for the mold concentrations on Sabouraud agar, whereas Sampl'Air collected significantly more bacteria on tryptic soy agar than Air Ideal or BACTair at one of the sites. Impactor location in the room was nevertheless associated with the variability observed with the three samplers at the highest microbial concentration levels. On the basis of their performance, autonomy and simplicity of use, these three impactors are suitable for routine indoor evaluation of microbial air contamination.

  5. Isolation of Corynebacterium Xerosis from Jordanian Soil and a Study on its Antimicrobial Activity against a Range of Bacteria and Fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Banna, Nasser

    2004-01-01

    A bacterial strain which has been identified as Corneybacterium Xerosis NB-2 was isolated from a soil sample from Jerash Private University, Jerash, Jordan. This isolate was found to produce an antimicrobial substance active only against filamentous fungi and yeasts (Aspergillus niger SQ 40, Fusarium oxysporium SQ11, Verticillium dahliae SQ 42, Saccharomyces SQ 46 and Candida albicans SQ 47). However, all tested gram-positive bacteria and gram negative bacteria (Bacillus megaterium SQ5, Bacillus cereus SQ6, Staphylococcus aureus SQ9, Streptococcus pyogens SQ10, Eschericshia coli SQ 22, Klepsiella spp SQ33 and SQ33 and Pseudonomas mallei SQ 34) were found to be resistant. In batch culture, the isolated NB-2 produced the antimicrobial substance late in the growth phase and antimicrobial activity of Corynebacterium Xerosis against filamentous fungi and yeasts which was not previously described. (author)

  6. Increased protein content of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and nitrogen-fixing bacteria under water deficit conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rui S; Carvalho, Patrícia; Marques, Guilhermina; Ferreira, Luís; Nunes, Mafalda; Rocha, Inês; Ma, Ying; Carvalho, Maria F; Vosátka, Miroslav; Freitas, Helena

    2017-10-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is a widely cropped pulse and an important source of proteins for humans. In Mediterranean regions it is predicted that drought will reduce soil moisture and become a major issue in agricultural practice. Nitrogen (N)-fixing bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have the potential to improve plant growth and drought tolerance. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of N-fixing bacteria and AM fungi on the growth, grain yield and protein content of chickpea under water deficit. Plants inoculated with Mesorhizobium mediterraneum or Rhizophagus irregularis without water deficit and inoculated with M. mediterraneum under moderate water deficit had significant increases in biomass. Inoculation with microbial symbionts brought no benefits to chickpea under severe water deficit. However, under moderate water deficit grain crude protein was increased by 13%, 17% and 22% in plants inoculated with M. mediterraneum, R. irregularis and M. mediterraneum + R. irregularis, respectively. Inoculation with N-fixing bacteria and AM fungi has the potential to benefit agricultural production of chickpea under water deficit conditions and to contribute to increased grain protein content. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Characterization of free amino acids, bacteria and fungi in size-segregated atmospheric aerosols in boreal forest: seasonal patterns, abundances and size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Helin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and constitute ∼ 30 % of atmospheric aerosol particle mass in sizes  > 1 µm. PBAP components, such as bacteria, fungi and pollen, may affect the climate by acting as cloud-active particles, thus having an effect on cloud and precipitation formation processes. In this study, size-segregated aerosol samples (< 1.0, 1–2.5, 2.5–10 and  > 10 µm were collected in boreal forest (Hyytiälä, Finland during a 9-month period covering all seasons and analysed for free amino acids (FAAs, DNA concentration and microorganism (bacteria, Pseudomonas and fungi. Measurements were performed using tandem mass spectrometry, spectrophotometry and qPCR, respectively. Meteorological parameters and statistical analysis were used to study their atmospheric implication for results. Distinct annual patterns of PBAP components were observed, late spring and autumn being seasons of dominant occurrence. Elevated abundances of FAAs and bacteria were observed during the local pollen season, whereas fungi were observed at the highest level during autumn. Meteorological parameters such as air and soil temperature, radiation and rainfall were observed to possess a close relationship with PBAP abundances on an annual scale.

  8. Characterization of free amino acids, bacteria and fungi in size-segregated atmospheric aerosols in boreal forest: seasonal patterns, abundances and size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helin, Aku; Sietiö, Outi-Maaria; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Bäck, Jaana; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa; Parshintsev, Jevgeni

    2017-11-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs) are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and constitute ˜ 30 % of atmospheric aerosol particle mass in sizes > 1 µm. PBAP components, such as bacteria, fungi and pollen, may affect the climate by acting as cloud-active particles, thus having an effect on cloud and precipitation formation processes. In this study, size-segregated aerosol samples ( 10 µm) were collected in boreal forest (Hyytiälä, Finland) during a 9-month period covering all seasons and analysed for free amino acids (FAAs), DNA concentration and microorganism (bacteria, Pseudomonas and fungi). Measurements were performed using tandem mass spectrometry, spectrophotometry and qPCR, respectively. Meteorological parameters and statistical analysis were used to study their atmospheric implication for results. Distinct annual patterns of PBAP components were observed, late spring and autumn being seasons of dominant occurrence. Elevated abundances of FAAs and bacteria were observed during the local pollen season, whereas fungi were observed at the highest level during autumn. Meteorological parameters such as air and soil temperature, radiation and rainfall were observed to possess a close relationship with PBAP abundances on an annual scale.

  9. Examination of equine glandular stomach lesions for bacteria, including Helicobacter spp by fluorescence in situ hybridisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen Susanne N

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The equine glandular stomach is commonly affected by erosion and ulceration. The aim of this study was to assess whether bacteria, including Helicobacter, could be involved in the aetiology of gastric glandular lesions seen in horses. Results Stomach lesions, as well as normal appearing mucosa were obtained from horses slaughtered for human consumption. All samples were tested for urease activity using the Pyloritek® assay, while mucosal bacterial content was evaluated using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridisation. In selected sub samples, bacteria characterisation was pursued further by cloning and sequencing. Mucosal lesions were found in 36/63 stomachs and included hyperplastic rugae, polypoid structures and focal erosions. None of the samples were tested positive for urease activity or for FISH using the Helicobacter genus specific probe. In samples of lesions, as well as normal samples, clones with 99% similarities to Lactobacillus salivarius and Sarcina ventriculi were found. Escherichia like bacterium clones and Enterococcus clones were demonstrated in one focal erosion. Based on a phylogenetic tree these clones had 100% similarity to Escherichia fergusonii and Enterococcus faecium. The Enterococcus were found colonising the mucosal surface, while E. fergusonii organisms were also demonstrated intraepithelial. Conclusion Gastric Helicobacter spp. could not be verified as being involved in lesions of the glandular stomach of the horse. Since E. fergusonii has been described as an emerging pathogen in both humans and animals, the finding of this bacterium in gastric erosion warrants further clarification to whether gastric infection with this type bacterium is important for horses.

  10. Examination of equine glandular stomach lesions for bacteria, including Helicobacter spp by fluorescence in situ hybridisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    husted, Louise; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Olsen, Susanne N.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The equine glandular stomach is commonly affected by erosion and ulceration. The aim of this study was to assess whether bacteria, including Helicobacter, could be involved in the aetiology of gastric glandular lesions seen in horses. Results: Stomach lesions, as well as normal...... by cloning and sequencing. Mucosal lesions were found in 36/63 stomachs and included hyperplastic rugae, polypoid structures and focal erosions. None of the samples were tested positive for urease activity or for FISH using the Helicobacter genus specific probe. In samples of lesions, as well as normal...... faecium. The Enterococcus were found colonising the mucosal surface, while E. fergusonii organisms were also demonstrated intraepithelial. Conclusion: Gastric Helicobacter spp. could not be verified as being involved in lesions of the glandular stomach of the horse. Since E. fergusonii has been described...

  11. Oligo-DNA custom macroarray for monitoring major pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi and bacteria in the phyllosphere of apple trees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hong He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To monitor the richness in microbial inhabitants in the phyllosphere of apple trees cultivated under various cultural and environmental conditions, we developed an oligo-DNA macroarray for major pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi and bacteria inhabiting the phyllosphere of apple trees. METHODS AND FINDINGS: First, we isolated culturable fungi and bacteria from apple orchards by an agar-plate culture method, and detected 32 fungal and 34 bacterial species. Alternaria, Aureobasidium, Cladosporium, Rhodotorula, Cystofilobasidium, and Epicoccum genera were predominant among the fungi, and Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, Methylobacterium, and Pantoea genera were predominant among the bacteria. Based on the data, we selected 29 major non-pathogenic and 12 phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria as the targets of macroarray. Forty-one species-specific 40-base pair long oligo-DNA sequences were selected from the nucleotide sequences of rDNA-internal transcribed spacer region for fungi and 16S rDNA for bacteria. The oligo-DNAs were fixed on nylon membrane and hybridized with digoxigenin-labeled cRNA probes prepared for each species. All arrays except those for Alternaria, Bacillus, and their related species, were specifically hybridized. The array was sensitive enough to detect 10(3 CFU for Aureobasidium pullulans and Bacillus cereus. Nucleotide sequencing of 100 each of independent fungal rDNA-ITS and bacterial 16S-rDNA sequences from apple tree was in agreement with the macroarray data obtained using the same sample. Finally, we analyzed the richness in the microbial inhabitants in the samples collected from apple trees in four orchards. Major apple pathogens that cause scab, Alternaria blotch, and Marssonina blotch were detected along with several non-phytopathogenic fungal and bacterial inhabitants. CONCLUSIONS: The macroarray technique presented here is a strong tool to monitor the major microbial species and the community structures in

  12. Nitrogen removal from synthetic wastewater using single and mixed culture systems of denitrifying fungi, bacteria, and actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenfeng; Cao, Lixiang; Tan, Hongming; Zhang, Renduo

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of single and mixed culture of denitrifying fungi, bacteria, and actinobacteria on nitrogen removal and N 2 O emission in treatment of wastewater. Denitrifying endophytes of Pseudomonas sp. B2, Streptomyces sp. A9, and Fusarium sp. F3 isolated from rice plants were utilized for treatment of synthetic wastewater containing nitrate and nitrite. Experiments were conducted under shaking and static conditions. Results showed that under the static condition, more than 97 % of nitrate removal efficiencies were reached in all the treatments containing B2. The nitrate removal rates within the first 12 h in the treatments of B2, B2+A9, B2+F3, and B2+A9+F3 were 7.3, 9.8, 11, and 11 mg L -1  h -1 , respectively. Under the shaking condition, 100 % of nitrite was removed in all the treatments containing B2. The presence of A9 and F3 with B2 increased the nitrite removal rates under both the shaking and static conditions. Compared to the B2 system, the mixed systems of B2+A9, B2+F3, and B2+A9+F3 reduced N 2 O emission (78.4 vs. 19.4, 1.80, and 0.03 μM in 4 weeks, respectively). Our results suggested that B2 is an important strain that enhances nitrogen removal from wastewater. Mixed cultures of B2 with A9 and F3 can remove more nitrate and nitrite from wastewater and reduce nitrite accumulation and N 2 O emission in the denitrification process.

  13. The community distribution of bacteria and fungi on ancient wall paintings of the Mogao Grottoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yantian; Zhang, He; Du, Ye; Tian, Tian; Xiang, Ting; Liu, Xiande; Wu, Fasi; An, Lizhe; Wang, Wanfu; Gu, Ji-Dong; Feng, Huyuan

    2015-01-13

    In this study, we compared the microbial communities colonising ancient cave wall paintings of the Mogao Grottoes exhibiting signs of biodeterioration. Ten samples were collected from five different caves built during different time periods and analysed using culture-independent and culture-dependent methods. The clone library results revealed high microbial diversity, including the bacterial groups Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Gemmatimonadetes, Planctomycetes, and Chloroflexi and the fungal groups Euascomycetes, Dothideomycetes, Eurotiomycetes, Sordariomycetes, Saccharomycetes, Plectomycetes, Pezizomycetes, Zygomycota, and Basidiomycota. The bacterial community structures differed among the samples, with no consistent temporal or spatial trends. However, the fungal community diversity index correlated with the building time of the caves independent of environmental factors (e.g., temperature or relative humidity). The enrichment cultures revealed that many culturable strains were highly resistant to various stresses and thus may be responsible for the damage to cave paintings in the Mogao Grottoes.

  14. X-ray microanalytical studies of mineral elements in the tripartite symbiosis between lima bean, N2-fixing bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, Bruna Wurr; Freitas, Douglas Siqueira; Bamberg, Soraya Marx; Carneiro, Marco Aurélio Carbone; Guilherme, Luiz Roberto Guimarães

    2017-01-01

    The symbiosis between legumes, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, and N 2 -fixing bacteria (NFB) provides mutual nutritional gains. However, assessing the nutritional status of the microorganisms is a difficult task. A methodology that could assess this status, in situ, could assist managing these organisms in agriculture. This study used X-ray microanalyses to quantify and locate mineral elements in structures formed in a tripartite symbiosis. Lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus L. Walp) was cultivated in pots under greenhouse conditions, to which we have added AM fungal isolates (Glomus macrocarpum and Acaulospora colombiana) and NFB (Bradyrhizobium japonicum) inocula. Uninoculated control plants were also included. Symbionts were evaluated at the onset of flowering. Quantification of the mineral elements in the symbiotic components was performed using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to identify structures. EDX analysis detected 13 elements with the most abundant being N, Ca, and Se, occurring in all tissues, Fe in roots, Ni and Al in epidermis and P and Mo in nodules. Elemental quantification in fungal structures was not possible. The distribution of elements was related to their symbiotic function. X-ray microanalysis can be efficiently applied for nutritional diagnosis in tripartite symbiosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Beverages obtained from soda fountain machines in the U.S. contain microorganisms, including coliform bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Amy S; Godard, Renee D; Belling, Carolyn; Kasza, Victoria; Beach, Rebecca L

    2010-01-31

    Ninety beverages of three types (sugar sodas, diet sodas and water) were obtained from 20 self-service and 10 personnel-dispensed soda fountains, analyzed for microbial contamination, and evaluated with respect to U.S. drinking water regulations. A follow-up study compared the concentration and composition of microbial populations in 27 beverages collected from 9 soda fountain machines in the morning as well as in the afternoon. Ice dispensed from these machines was also examined for microbial contamination. While none of the ice samples exceeded U.S. drinking water standards, coliform bacteria was detected in 48% of the beverages and 20% had a heterotrophic plate count greater than 500cfu/ml. Statistical analyses revealed no difference in levels of microbial contamination between beverage types or between those dispensed from self-service and personnel-dispensed soda fountains. More than 11% of the beverages analyzed contained Escherichia coli and over 17% contained Chryseobacterium meningosepticum. Other opportunistic pathogenic microorganisms isolated from the beverages included species of Klebsiella, Staphylococcus, Stenotrophomonas, Candida, and Serratia. Most of the identified bacteria showed resistance to one or more of the 11 antibiotics tested. These findings suggest that soda fountain machines may harbor persistent communities of potentially pathogenic microorganisms which may contribute to episodic gastric distress in the general population and could pose a more significant health risk to immunocompromised individuals. These findings have important public health implications and signal the need for regulations enforcing hygienic practices associated with these beverage dispensers. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Growth, Survival, and Death of Bacteria and Fungi Following Wet-up of Seasonally Dried Soil Revealed by Heavy Water Stable Isotope Probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazewicz, S.; Nuccio, E. E.; Lim, H.; Schwartz, E.; Brodie, E.; Firestone, M.

    2013-12-01

    The rapid increase in microbial activity that occurs when a dry soil is rewetted has been well documented and is of great interest due to implications of changing precipitation patterns on soil C dynamics. Several studies have shown minor net changes in microbial population diversity or abundance following wet-up, but the gross population dynamics of bacteria and fungi resulting from soil wet-up are virtually unknown due to the technical difficulties associated with such measurements. Here we applied DNA stable isotope probing with H218O coupled with quantitative PCR and high throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes to characterize taxonomic composition of bacteria and to describe new growth, survival, and mortality of bacteria and fungi following the rewetting of a seasonally dried California annual grassland soil. Total microbial abundance revealed little change throughout the 7-day post-wet incubation, but there was substantial turnover of both bacterial and fungal populations (49 and 52% respectively). New growth was linear between 24 and 168 hours for both bacteria and fungi with average growth rates of 2.3 x 108 bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies gdw-1 h-1 and 4.3 x 107 fungal ITS copies gdw-1 h-1. While bacteria and fungi differed in their mortality and survival characteristics during the 7-day incubation, mortality that occurred within the first 3 hours was similar with 25 and 27% of bacterial and fungal gene copies disappearing from the pre-wet community, respectively. The rapid disappearance of gene copies indicates that cell death, occurring either during the extreme dry down period (preceding 5 months) or during the rapid change in water-potential due to wet-up, generates a significant pool of available C that likely contributes to the large pulse in CO2 associated with wet-up. Sequential bacterial growth patterns observed at the phylum and order levels suggest that an ecologically coherent response was observable at coarse taxonomic levels with

  17. Variation of airborne bacteria and fungi at Emperor Qin's Terra-Cotta Museum, Xi'an, China, during the "Oct. 1" gold week period of 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ping; Cui, Ying; Dong, Jun-Gang

    2010-02-01

    To stimulate the national economy, a so-called "gold week" comprising May Day and National Day has been put in force by the government, and the first golden-week holiday began on October 1, 1999. Statistical data show that about 15,000 visitors were received each day by Emperor Qin's Terra-Cotta Museum during just such a gold week period. To evaluate the effects of tourism on indoor air, airborne samples were collected by the sedimentation plate method for 5 min during the "Oct. 1" gold week period of 2006, and both composition and changes of airborne bacteria and fungi in indoor/outdoor air in the museums were investigated. Airborne microbes were simultaneously collected by means of gravitational sedimentation on open Petri dishes. Three parallel samples were collected at the same time each day, and samples were subsequently incubated in the lab. Microbiology media were prepared before each experiment by a professional laboratory. Concentrations were calculated and presented as average data of colony-forming units per cubic meter of air (CFU/m(3)). The results show that (1) 13 bacterial genera and eight genera of fungi were identified from indoor and outdoor air at Emperor Qin's Terra-Cotta Museum during "Oct. 1" gold week in 2006. The bacterial groups occupied 61%, the fungi groups occupied 36%, and others occupied 3% of the total number of isolated microorganism genera. (2) As for the comparison of indoor and outdoor samples, the average concentrations of fungi were higher during the afternoon (13:00) than for the morning (09:00). The average concentrations of bacteria in indoor air were higher during the afternoon (13:00) than for the morning (9:00), and in outdoor air, they were lower during the afternoon (13:00) than for the morning (9:00). (3) The average concentrations of five dominant groups of bacteria and three dominant groups of fungi were higher during the afternoon (13:00) than for the morning (9:00) in the indoor air, but the average concentrations

  18. Combined Field Inoculations ofPseudomonasBacteria, Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi, and Entomopathogenic Nematodes and their Effects on Wheat Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperiali, Nicola; Chiriboga, Xavier; Schlaeppi, Klaus; Fesselet, Marie; Villacrés, Daniela; Jaffuel, Geoffrey; Bender, S Franz; Dennert, Francesca; Blanco-Pérez, Ruben; van der Heijden, Marcel G A; Maurhofer, Monika; Mascher, Fabio; Turlings, Ted C J; Keel, Christoph J; Campos-Herrera, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    In agricultural ecosystems, pest insects, pathogens, and reduced soil fertility pose major challenges to crop productivity and are responsible for significant yield losses worldwide. Management of belowground pests and diseases remains particularly challenging due to the complex nature of the soil and the limited reach of conventional agrochemicals. Boosting the presence of beneficial rhizosphere organisms is a potentially sustainable alternative and may help to optimize crop health and productivity. Field application of single beneficial soil organisms has shown satisfactory results under optimal conditions. This might be further enhanced by combining multiple beneficial soil organisms, but this remains poorly investigated. Here, we inoculated wheat plots with combinations of three beneficial soil organisms that have different rhizosphere functions and studied their effects on crop performance. Plant beneficial Pseudomonas bacteria, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), and entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN), were inoculated individually or in combinations at seeding, and their effects on plant performance were evaluated throughout the season. We used traditional and molecular identification tools to monitor their persistence over the cropping season in augmented and control treatments, and to estimate the possible displacement of native populations. In three separate trials, beneficial soil organisms were successfully introduced into the native populations and readily survived the field conditions. Various Pseudomonas , mycorrhiza, and nematode treatments improved plant health and productivity, while their combinations provided no significant additive or synergistic benefits compared to when applied alone. EPN application temporarily displaced some of the native EPN, but had no significant long-term effect on the associated food web. The strongest positive effect on wheat survival was observed for Pseudomonas and AMF during a season with heavy natural infestation by

  19. Combined Field Inoculations of Pseudomonas Bacteria, Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi, and Entomopathogenic Nematodes and their Effects on Wheat Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Imperiali

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In agricultural ecosystems, pest insects, pathogens, and reduced soil fertility pose major challenges to crop productivity and are responsible for significant yield losses worldwide. Management of belowground pests and diseases remains particularly challenging due to the complex nature of the soil and the limited reach of conventional agrochemicals. Boosting the presence of beneficial rhizosphere organisms is a potentially sustainable alternative and may help to optimize crop health and productivity. Field application of single beneficial soil organisms has shown satisfactory results under optimal conditions. This might be further enhanced by combining multiple beneficial soil organisms, but this remains poorly investigated. Here, we inoculated wheat plots with combinations of three beneficial soil organisms that have different rhizosphere functions and studied their effects on crop performance. Plant beneficial Pseudomonas bacteria, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, and entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN, were inoculated individually or in combinations at seeding, and their effects on plant performance were evaluated throughout the season. We used traditional and molecular identification tools to monitor their persistence over the cropping season in augmented and control treatments, and to estimate the possible displacement of native populations. In three separate trials, beneficial soil organisms were successfully introduced into the native populations and readily survived the field conditions. Various Pseudomonas, mycorrhiza, and nematode treatments improved plant health and productivity, while their combinations provided no significant additive or synergistic benefits compared to when applied alone. EPN application temporarily displaced some of the native EPN, but had no significant long-term effect on the associated food web. The strongest positive effect on wheat survival was observed for Pseudomonas and AMF during a season with heavy

  20. Combined Field Inoculations of Pseudomonas Bacteria, Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi, and Entomopathogenic Nematodes and their Effects on Wheat Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperiali, Nicola; Chiriboga, Xavier; Schlaeppi, Klaus; Fesselet, Marie; Villacrés, Daniela; Jaffuel, Geoffrey; Bender, S. Franz; Dennert, Francesca; Blanco-Pérez, Ruben; van der Heijden, Marcel G. A.; Maurhofer, Monika; Mascher, Fabio; Turlings, Ted C. J.; Keel, Christoph J.; Campos-Herrera, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    In agricultural ecosystems, pest insects, pathogens, and reduced soil fertility pose major challenges to crop productivity and are responsible for significant yield losses worldwide. Management of belowground pests and diseases remains particularly challenging due to the complex nature of the soil and the limited reach of conventional agrochemicals. Boosting the presence of beneficial rhizosphere organisms is a potentially sustainable alternative and may help to optimize crop health and productivity. Field application of single beneficial soil organisms has shown satisfactory results under optimal conditions. This might be further enhanced by combining multiple beneficial soil organisms, but this remains poorly investigated. Here, we inoculated wheat plots with combinations of three beneficial soil organisms that have different rhizosphere functions and studied their effects on crop performance. Plant beneficial Pseudomonas bacteria, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), and entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN), were inoculated individually or in combinations at seeding, and their effects on plant performance were evaluated throughout the season. We used traditional and molecular identification tools to monitor their persistence over the cropping season in augmented and control treatments, and to estimate the possible displacement of native populations. In three separate trials, beneficial soil organisms were successfully introduced into the native populations and readily survived the field conditions. Various Pseudomonas, mycorrhiza, and nematode treatments improved plant health and productivity, while their combinations provided no significant additive or synergistic benefits compared to when applied alone. EPN application temporarily displaced some of the native EPN, but had no significant long-term effect on the associated food web. The strongest positive effect on wheat survival was observed for Pseudomonas and AMF during a season with heavy natural infestation by

  1. Contribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and/or bacteria to enhancing plant drought tolerance under natural soil conditions: effectiveness of autochthonous or allochthonous strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, N; Armada, E; Duque, E; Roldán, A; Azcón, R

    2015-02-01

    Autochthonous microorganisms [a consortium of arbuscular-mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)] were assayed and compared to Rhizophagus intraradices (Ri), Bacillus megaterium (Bm) or Pseudomonas putida (Psp) and non-inoculation on Trifolium repens in a natural arid soil under drought conditions. The autochthonous bacteria Bt and the allochthonous bacteria Psp increased nutrients and the relative water content and decreased stomatal conductance, electrolyte leakage, proline and APX activity, indicating their abilities to alleviate the drought stress. Mycorrhizal inoculation significantly enhanced plant growth, nutrient uptake and the relative water content, particularly when associated with specific bacteria minimizing drought stress-imposed effects. Specific combinations of autochthonous or allochthonous inoculants also contributed to plant drought tolerance by changing proline and antioxidative activities. However, non-inoculated plants had low relative water and nutrients contents, shoot proline accumulation and glutathione reductase activity, but the highest superoxide dismutase activity, stomatal conductance and electrolyte leakage. Microbial activities irrespective of the microbial origin seem to be coordinately functioning in the plant as an adaptive response to modulated water stress tolerance and minimizing the stress damage. The autochthonous AM fungi with Bt or Psp and those allochthonous Ri with Bm or Psp inoculants increased water stress alleviation. The autochthonous Bt showed the greatest ability to survive under high osmotic stress compared to the allochthonous strains, but when single inoculated or associated with Ri or AM fungi were similarly efficient in terms of physiological and nutritional status and in increasing plant drought tolerance, attenuating and compensating for the detrimental effect of water limitation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Plants used in Guatemala for the treatment of protozoal infections. I. Screening of activity to bacteria, fungi and American trypanosomes of 13 native plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, A; López, B; González, S; Berger, I; Tada, I; Maki, J

    1998-10-01

    Extracts were prepared from 13 native plants used for the treatment of protozoal infections. Activity against bacteria and fungi was demonstrated by dilution procedures; Trypanosoma cruzi was evaluated in vitro against epimastigote and trypomastigotes and in vivo against trypomastigotes. In active extracts, toxicity was evaluated by Artemia salina nauplii, oral acute toxicity (1-5 g/kg) and oral and intraperitoneal subacute toxicity in mice (500 mg/kg). From the plants screened, six showed activity (Petiveria alliacea and Tridax procumbens. Toxicity studies showed that extracts from S. americanum are toxic to A. salina (aqueous, 160 ppm). None showed acute or oral toxicity to mice; S. americanum showed intraperitoneal subacute toxicity.

  3. Metagenomic analysis of medicinal Cannabis samples; pathogenic bacteria, toxigenic fungi, and beneficial microbes grow in culture-based yeast and mold tests [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin McKernan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The presence of bacteria and fungi in medicinal or recreational Cannabis poses a potential threat to consumers if those microbes include pathogenic or toxigenic species. This study evaluated two widely used culture-based platforms for total yeast and mold (TYM testing marketed by 3M Corporation and Biomérieux, in comparison with a quantitative PCR (qPCR approach marketed by Medicinal Genomics Corporation. Methods: A set of 15 medicinal Cannabis samples were analyzed using 3M and Biomérieux culture-based platforms and by qPCR to quantify microbial DNA. All samples were then subjected to next-generation sequencing and metagenomics analysis to enumerate the bacteria and fungi present before and after growth on culture-based media. Results: Several pathogenic or toxigenic bacterial and fungal species were identified in proportions of >5% of classified reads on the samples, including Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Ralstonia pickettii, Salmonella enterica, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Aspergillus ostianus, Aspergillus sydowii, Penicillium citrinum and Penicillium steckii. Samples subjected to culture showed substantial shifts in the number and diversity of species present, including the failure of Aspergillus species to grow well on either platform. Substantial growth of Clostridium botulinum and other bacteria were frequently observed on one or both of the culture-based TYM platforms. The presence of plant growth promoting (beneficial fungal species further influenced the differential growth of species in the microbiome of each sample. Conclusions: These findings have important implications for the Cannabis and food safety testing industries.

  4. Isolation of Fungi and Bacteria Associated with the Guts of Tropical Wood-Feeding Coleoptera and Determination of Their Lignocellulolytic Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Jiménez, Keilor; Hernández, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    The guts of beetle larvae constitute a complex system where relationships among fungi, bacteria, and the insect host occur. In this study, we collected larvae of five families of wood-feeding Coleoptera in tropical forests of Costa Rica, isolated fungi and bacteria from their intestinal tracts, and determined the presence of five different pathways for lignocellulolytic activity. The fungal isolates were assigned to three phyla, 16 orders, 24 families, and 40 genera; Trichoderma was the most abundant genus, detected in all insect families and at all sites. The bacterial isolates were assigned to five phyla, 13 orders, 22 families, and 35 genera; Bacillus, Serratia, and Pseudomonas were the dominant genera, present in all the Coleopteran families. Positive results for activities related to degradation of wood components were determined in 65% and 48% of the fungal and bacterial genera, respectively. Our results showed that both the fungal and bacterial populations were highly diverse in terms of number of species and their phylogenetic composition, although the structure of the microbial communities varied with insect host family and the surrounding environment. The recurrent identification of some lignocellulolytic-positive inhabitants suggests that particular microbial groups play important roles in providing nutritional needs for the Coleopteran host.

  5. Isolation of Fungi and Bacteria Associated with the Guts of Tropical Wood-Feeding Coleoptera and Determination of Their Lignocellulolytic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keilor Rojas-Jiménez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The guts of beetle larvae constitute a complex system where relationships among fungi, bacteria, and the insect host occur. In this study, we collected larvae of five families of wood-feeding Coleoptera in tropical forests of Costa Rica, isolated fungi and bacteria from their intestinal tracts, and determined the presence of five different pathways for lignocellulolytic activity. The fungal isolates were assigned to three phyla, 16 orders, 24 families, and 40 genera; Trichoderma was the most abundant genus, detected in all insect families and at all sites. The bacterial isolates were assigned to five phyla, 13 orders, 22 families, and 35 genera; Bacillus, Serratia, and Pseudomonas were the dominant genera, present in all the Coleopteran families. Positive results for activities related to degradation of wood components were determined in 65% and 48% of the fungal and bacterial genera, respectively. Our results showed that both the fungal and bacterial populations were highly diverse in terms of number of species and their phylogenetic composition, although the structure of the microbial communities varied with insect host family and the surrounding environment. The recurrent identification of some lignocellulolytic-positive inhabitants suggests that particular microbial groups play important roles in providing nutritional needs for the Coleopteran host.

  6. Cohort Study of Airway Mycobiome in Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patients: Differences in Community Structure between Fungi and Bacteria Reveal Predominance of Transient Fungal Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer-Heilborn, Annette; Welte, Tobias; Guzman, Carlos A.; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Höfle, Manfred G.

    2015-01-01

    The respiratory mycobiome is an important but understudied component of the human microbiota. Like bacteria, fungi can cause severe lung diseases, but their infection rates are much lower. This study compared the bacterial and fungal communities of sputum samples from a large cohort of 56 adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) during nonexacerbation periods and under continuous antibiotic treatment. Molecular fingerprinting based on single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis revealed fundamental differences between bacterial and fungal communities. Both groups of microorganisms were taxonomically classified by identification of gene sequences (16S rRNA and internal transcript spacer), and prevalences of single taxa were determined for the entire cohort. Major bacterial pathogens were frequently observed, whereas fungi of known pathogenicity in CF were detected only in low numbers. Fungal species richness increased without reaching a constant level (saturation), whereas bacterial richness showed saturation after 50 patients were analyzed. In contrast to bacteria, a large number of fungal species were observed together with high fluctuations over time and among patients. These findings demonstrated that the mycobiome was dominated by transient species, which strongly suggested that the main driving force was their presence in inhaled air rather than colonization. Considering the high exposure of human airways to fungal spores, we concluded that fungi have low colonization abilities in CF, and colonization by pathogenic fungal species may be considered a rare event. A comprehensive understanding of the conditions promoting fungal colonization may offer the opportunity to prevent colonization and substantially reduce or even eliminate fungus-related disease progression in CF. PMID:26135861

  7. Distribution and Diversity of Bacteria and Fungi Colonization in Stone Monuments Analyzed by High-Throughput Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Zhang, Bingjian; He, Zhang; Yang, Xiaoru

    The historical and cultural heritage of Qingxing palace and Lingyin and Kaihua temple, located in Hangzhou of China, include a large number of exquisite Buddhist statues and ancient stone sculptures which date back to the Northern Song (960-1219 A.D.) and Qing dynasties (1636-1912 A.D.) and are considered to be some of the best examples of ancient stone sculpting techniques. They were added to the World Heritage List in 2011 because of their unique craftsmanship and importance to the study of ancient Chinese Buddhist culture. However, biodeterioration of the surface of the ancient Buddhist statues and white marble pillars not only severely impairs their aesthetic value but also alters their material structure and thermo-hygric properties. In this study, high-throughput sequencing was utilized to identify the microbial communities colonizing the stone monuments. The diversity and distribution of the microbial communities in six samples collected from three different environmental conditions with signs of deterioration were analyzed by means of bioinformatics software and diversity indices. In addition, the impact of environmental factors, including temperature, light intensity, air humidity, and the concentration of NO2 and SO2, on the microbial communities' diversity and distribution was evaluated. The results indicate that the presence of predominantly phototrophic microorganisms was correlated with light and humidity, while nitrifying bacteria and Thiobacillus were associated with NO2 and SO2 from air pollution.

  8. Distribution and Diversity of Bacteria and Fungi Colonization in Stone Monuments Analyzed by High-Throughput Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Li

    Full Text Available The historical and cultural heritage of Qingxing palace and Lingyin and Kaihua temple, located in Hangzhou of China, include a large number of exquisite Buddhist statues and ancient stone sculptures which date back to the Northern Song (960-1219 A.D. and Qing dynasties (1636-1912 A.D. and are considered to be some of the best examples of ancient stone sculpting techniques. They were added to the World Heritage List in 2011 because of their unique craftsmanship and importance to the study of ancient Chinese Buddhist culture. However, biodeterioration of the surface of the ancient Buddhist statues and white marble pillars not only severely impairs their aesthetic value but also alters their material structure and thermo-hygric properties. In this study, high-throughput sequencing was utilized to identify the microbial communities colonizing the stone monuments. The diversity and distribution of the microbial communities in six samples collected from three different environmental conditions with signs of deterioration were analyzed by means of bioinformatics software and diversity indices. In addition, the impact of environmental factors, including temperature, light intensity, air humidity, and the concentration of NO2 and SO2, on the microbial communities' diversity and distribution was evaluated. The results indicate that the presence of predominantly phototrophic microorganisms was correlated with light and humidity, while nitrifying bacteria and Thiobacillus were associated with NO2 and SO2 from air pollution.

  9. Site properties have a stronger influence than fire severity on ectomycorrhizal fungi and associated N-cycling bacteria in regenerating post-beetle-killed lodgepole pine forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Nabla M; Robertson, Susan J; Green, D Scott; Scholefield, Scott R; Arocena, Joselito M; Tackaberry, Linda E; Massicotte, Hugues B; Egger, Keith N

    2015-09-01

    Following a pine beetle epidemic in British Columbia, Canada, we investigated the effect of fire severity on rhizosphere soil chemistry and ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECM) and associated denitrifying and nitrogen (N)-fixing bacteria in the root systems of regenerating lodgepole pine seedlings at two site types (wet and dry) and three fire severities (low, moderate, and high). The site type was found to have a much larger impact on all measurements than fire severity. Wet and dry sites differed significantly for almost all soil properties measured, with higher values identified from wet types, except for pH and percent sand that were greater on dry sites. Fire severity caused few changes in soil chemical status. Generally, bacterial communities differed little, whereas ECM morphotype analysis revealed ectomycorrhizal diversity was lower on dry sites, with a corresponding division in community structure between wet and dry sites. Molecular profiling of the fungal ITS region confirmed these results, with a clear difference in community structure seen between wet and dry sites. The ability of ECM fungi to colonize seedlings growing in both wet and dry soils may positively contribute to subsequent regeneration. We conclude that despite consecutive landscape disturbances (mountain pine beetle infestation followed by wildfire), the "signature" of moisture on chemistry and ECM community structure remained pronounced.

  10. Atrazine, chlorpyrifos, and iprodione effect on the biodiversity of bacteria, actinomycetes, and fungi in a pilot biopurification system with a green cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgueta, Sebastian; Correa, Arturo; Campo, Marco; Gallardo, Felipe; Karpouzas, Dimitrios; Diez, Maria Cristina

    2017-09-02

    The use of biopurification systems can mitigate the effects of pesticide contamination on farms. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pesticide dissipation on microbial communities in a pilot biopurification system. The pesticide dissipation of atrazine, chlorpyrifos and iprodione (35 mg kg -1 active ingredient [a.i.]) and biological activity were determined for 40 days. The microbial communities (bacteria, actinomycetes and fungi) were analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). In general, pesticide dissipation was the highest by day 5 and reached 95%. The pesticides did not affect biological activity during the experiment. The structure of the actinomycete and bacterial communities in the rhizosphere was more stable during the evaluation than that in the communities in the control without pesticides. The rhizosphere fungal communities, detected using DGGE, showed small and transitory shifts with time. To conclude, rhizosphere microbial communities were not affected during pesticide dissipation in a pilot biopurification system.

  11. Bacteria and fungi respond differently to multifactorial climate change in a temperate heathland, traced with 13C-Glycine and FACE CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Louise C.; Dungait, Jennifer A.J.; Bol, Roland

    2014-01-01

    t is vital to understand responses of soil microorganisms to predicted climate changes, as these directly control soil carbon (C) dynamics. The rate of turnover of soil organic carbon is mediated by soil microorganisms whose activity may be affected by climate change. After one year of multifacto......t is vital to understand responses of soil microorganisms to predicted climate changes, as these directly control soil carbon (C) dynamics. The rate of turnover of soil organic carbon is mediated by soil microorganisms whose activity may be affected by climate change. After one year.......e. incorporated 13 Cin all treatments, whereas fungi had minor or no glycine derived 13 C-enrichment, hence slowly reacting to a new substrate. The effects of elevated CO 2 did suggest increased direct incorporation of glycine in microbial biomass, in particular in G + bacteria, in an ecosystem subjected...

  12. Ascorbate oxidase: the unexpected involvement of a 'wasteful enzyme' in the symbioses with nitrogen-fixing bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Ott, Thomas; Güther, Mike; Bonfante, Paola; Udvardi, Michael K; De Tullio, Mario C

    2012-10-01

    Ascorbate oxidase (AO, EC 1.10.3.3) catalyzes the oxidation of ascorbate (AsA) to yield water. AO over-expressing plants are prone to ozone and salt stresses, whereas lower expression apparently confers resistance to unfavorable environmental conditions. Previous studies have suggested a role for AO as a regulator of oxygen content in photosynthetic tissues. For the first time we show here that the expression of a Lotus japonicus AO gene is induced in the symbiotic interaction with both nitrogen-fixing bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. In this framework, high AO expression is viewed as a possible strategy to down-regulate oxygen diffusion in root nodules, and a component of AM symbiosis. A general model of AO function in plants is discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. The effects of various land reclamation scenarios on the succession of soil Bacteria, Archaea, and fungi over the short and long term

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjian eLi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ecological restoration of mining areas has mainly focused on the succession dynamics of vegetation and the fate of microbial communities remains poorly understood. We examined changes in soil characteristics and plant and microbial communities with increasing reclamation period in an open coal mine. Bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities were assessed by tag-encoded 454 pyrosequencing. At the phylum level, Proteobacteria, Crenarchaeota, and Ascomycota had the highest detected relative abundance within bacteria, archaea, and fungi, respectively. Partial regressions and canonical correspondence analysis demonstrated that vegetation played a major role in bacterial and archaeal diversity and assemblies, and soil characteristics, especially nitrogen, were important for fungal diversity and assemblies. Spearman rank correlation indicated that bacterial and archaeal communities showed synergistic succession with plants; whereas, fungal communities showed no such pattern. Overall, our data suggest that there are different drivers of bacterial, archaeal and fungal succession during secondary succession in a reclaimed open mine.

  14. Chemical constituents of Helichrysum italicum (Roth G. Don essential oil and their antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, filamentous fungi and Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouzid Djihane

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aerial parts of Helichrysum italicum (Roth G. Don were subjected to hydrodistillation to obtain essential oils which had been analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry and tested for antimicrobial activity against 12 bacteria, two yeasts and four fungi by agar diffusion method. The essential oil yielded 0.44% (v/w and 67 compounds accounting for 99.24% of the oil were identified with a high content of oxygenated sesquiterpenes (61.42%. The most oxygenated sesquiterpene compounds were α-Cedrene (13.61%, α-Curcumene (11.41%, Geranyl acetate (10.05%, Limonene (6.07%, Nerol (5.04%, Neryl acetate (4.91% and α-Pinene (3.78%. The antimicrobial activity of the essential oil was assayed by using the disk diffusion method on Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Micrococcus luteus ATCC 4698, Klebsiella pneumonia ATCC 4352, Enterococcus cereus ATCC 2035, Bacillus cereus ATCC 10876, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 9372, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 49452, Proteus mirabilis ATCC 35659, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 15313 and yeasts Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 9763 and fungi, Fusarium solani var. coeruleum, Aspergillus niger, Alternaria alternata, Ascochyta rabiei. H. italicum inhibited the growth of all the tested microorganisms except three bacteria, E. coli ATCC 25922, K. pneumonia ATCC 4352 and L. monocytogenes ATCC 15313. The most sensitive bacterium was E. cereus ATCC 2035 with minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations of 0.79 μg ml−1. A minimum fungistatic and fungicide concentration of 6.325 μg ml−1 and 12.65 μg ml−1 respectively was obtained with C. albicans ATCC 10231 and S. cerevisiae ATCC 9763. However the four fungi were more resistant with fungistatic minimum concentration ranging from 6.325 μg ml−1 to 50.6 μg ml−1 and a fungicide minimum

  15. Effect of dual inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and bacteria on growth and mineral nutrition of strawberry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gryndler, Milan; Vosátka, Miroslav; Hršelová, Hana; Čatská, Vlasta; Chvátalová, Irena; Jansa, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 6 (2002), s. 1341-1358 ISSN 0190-4167 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA502/94/0834; GA MŠk 926125 Keywords : dual * inoculation * bacteria Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.593, year: 2002

  16. Examination of equine glandular stomach lesions for bacteria, including Helicobacter spp by fluorescence in situ hybridisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    husted, Louise; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Olsen, Susanne N.

    2010-01-01

    by cloning and sequencing. Mucosal lesions were found in 36/63 stomachs and included hyperplastic rugae, polypoid structures and focal erosions. None of the samples were tested positive for urease activity or for FISH using the Helicobacter genus specific probe. In samples of lesions, as well as normal...

  17. Fight Fungi with Fungi: Antifungal Properties of the Amphibian Mycobiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Patrick J; Fischer, Sarah; Fernández-Beaskoetxea, Saioa; Gabor, Caitlin R; Bosch, Jaime; Bowen, Jennifer L; Tlusty, Michael F; Woodhams, Douglas C

    2017-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases caused by fungal taxa are increasing and are placing a substantial burden on economies and ecosystems worldwide. Of the emerging fungal diseases, chytridomycosis caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (hereafter Bd ) is linked to global amphibian declines. Amphibians have innate immunity, as well as additional resistance through cutaneous microbial communities. Despite the targeting of bacteria as potential probiotics, the role of fungi in the protection against Bd infection in unknown. We used a four-part approach, including high-throughput sequencing of bacterial and fungal communities, cultivation of fungi, Bd challenge assays, and experimental additions of probiotic to Midwife Toads ( Altyes obstetricans ), to examine the overlapping roles of bacterial and fungal microbiota in pathogen defense in captive bred poison arrow frogs ( Dendrobates sp.). Our results revealed that cutaneous fungal taxa differed from environmental microbiota across three species and a subspecies of Dendrobates spp. frogs. Cultivation of host-associated and environmental fungi realved numerous taxa with the ability to inhibit or facilitate the growth of Bd . The abundance of cutaneous fungi contributed more to Bd defense (~45% of the fungal community), than did bacteria (~10%) and frog species harbored distinct inhibitory communities that were distinct from the environment. Further, we demonstrated that a fungal probiotic therapy did not induce an endocrine-immune reaction, in contrast to bacterial probiotics that stressed amphibian hosts and suppressed antimicrobial peptide responses, limiting their long-term colonization potential. Our results suggest that probiotic strategies against amphibian fungal pathogens should, in addition to bacterial probiotics, focus on host-associated and environmental fungi such as Penicillium and members of the families Chaetomiaceae and Lasiosphaeriaceae.

  18. Fight Fungi with Fungi: Antifungal Properties of the Amphibian Mycobiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. Kearns

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Emerging infectious diseases caused by fungal taxa are increasing and are placing a substantial burden on economies and ecosystems worldwide. Of the emerging fungal diseases, chytridomycosis caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (hereafter Bd is linked to global amphibian declines. Amphibians have innate immunity, as well as additional resistance through cutaneous microbial communities. Despite the targeting of bacteria as potential probiotics, the role of fungi in the protection against Bd infection in unknown. We used a four-part approach, including high-throughput sequencing of bacterial and fungal communities, cultivation of fungi, Bd challenge assays, and experimental additions of probiotic to Midwife Toads (Altyes obstetricans, to examine the overlapping roles of bacterial and fungal microbiota in pathogen defense in captive bred poison arrow frogs (Dendrobates sp.. Our results revealed that cutaneous fungal taxa differed from environmental microbiota across three species and a subspecies of Dendrobates spp. frogs. Cultivation of host-associated and environmental fungi realved numerous taxa with the ability to inhibit or facilitate the growth of Bd. The abundance of cutaneous fungi contributed more to Bd defense (~45% of the fungal community, than did bacteria (~10% and frog species harbored distinct inhibitory communities that were distinct from the environment. Further, we demonstrated that a fungal probiotic therapy did not induce an endocrine-immune reaction, in contrast to bacterial probiotics that stressed amphibian hosts and suppressed antimicrobial peptide responses, limiting their long-term colonization potential. Our results suggest that probiotic strategies against amphibian fungal pathogens should, in addition to bacterial probiotics, focus on host-associated and environmental fungi such as Penicillium and members of the families Chaetomiaceae and Lasiosphaeriaceae.

  19. Hopanoid-producing bacteria in the Red Sea include the major marine nitrite-oxidizers

    KAUST Repository

    Kharbush, Jenan J

    2018-04-10

    Hopanoids, including the extended side chain-containing bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs), are bacterial lipids found abundantly in the geological record and across Earth\\'s surface environments. However, the physiological roles of this biomarker remain uncertain, limiting interpretation of their presence in current and past environments. Recent work investigating the diversity and distribution of hopanoid producers in the marine environment implicated low-oxygen regions as important loci of hopanoid production, and data from marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) suggested that the dominant hopanoid producers in these environments are nitrite-utilizing organisms, revealing a potential connection between hopanoid production and the marine nitrogen cycle. Here we use metagenomic data from the Red Sea to investigate the ecology of hopanoid producers in an environmental setting that is biogeochemically distinct from those investigated previously. The distributions of hopanoid production and nitrite oxidation genes in the Red Sea are closely correlated, and the majority of hopanoid producers are taxonomically affiliated with the major marine nitrite oxidizers, Nitrospinae and Nitrospirae. These results suggest that the relationship between hopanoid production and nitrite oxidation is conserved across varying biogeochemical conditions in dark ocean microbial ecosystems.

  20. Novel microbial route to synthesize ZnO nanoparticles using Aeromonas hydrophila and their activity against pathogenic bacteria and fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaseelan, C.; Rahuman, A. Abdul; Kirthi, A. Vishnu; Marimuthu, S.; Santhoshkumar, T.; Bagavan, A.; Gaurav, K.; Karthik, L.; Rao, K. V. Bhaskara

    2012-05-01

    In the present work, we describe a low-cost, unreported and simple procedure for biosynthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) using reproducible bacteria, Aeromonas hydrophila as eco-friendly reducing and capping agent. UV-vis spectroscopy, XRD, FTIR, AFM, NC-AFM and FESEM with EDX analyses were performed to ascertain the formation and characterization of ZnO NPs. The synthesized ZnO NPs were characterized by a peak at 374 nm in the UV-vis spectrum. XRD confirmed the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles and AFM showed the morphology of the nanoparticle to be spherical, oval with an average size of 57.72 nm. Synthesized ZnO NPs showed the XRD peaks at 31.75°, 34.37°, 47.60°, 56.52°, 66.02° and 75.16° were identified as (1 0 0), (0 0 2), (1 0 1), (1 0 2), (1 1 0), (1 1 2) and (2 02 ) reflections, respectively. Rietveld analysis to the X-ray data indicated that ZnO NPs have hexagonal unit cell at crystalline level. The size and topological structure of the ZnO NPs was measured by NC-AFM. The morphological characterization of synthesized nanoparticles was analyzed by FESEM and chemical composition by EDX. The antibacterial and antifungal activity was ended with corresponding well diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration. The maximum zone of inhibition was observed in the ZnO NPs (25 μg/mL) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (22 ± 1.8 mm) and Aspergillus flavus (19 ± 1.0 mm). Bacteria-mediated ZnO NPs were synthesized and proved to be a good novel antimicrobial material for the first time in this study.

  1. Synthesis, spectroscopic studies and inhibitory activity against bacteria and fungi of acyclic and macrocyclic transition metal complexes containing a triamine coumarine Schiff base ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Hussein, A A; Linert, Wolfgang

    2015-04-15

    Two series of new mono and binuclear complexes with a Schiff base ligand derived from the condensation of 3-acetylcoumarine and diethylenetriamine, in the molar ratio 2:1 have been prepared. The ligand was characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-visible, (1)H-NMR and mass spectra. The reaction of the Schiff base ligand with cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II) and oxovanadium(IV) lead to mono or binuclear species of cyclic or macrocyclic complexes, depending on the mole ratio of metal to ligand and as well as on the method of preparation. The Schiff base ligand behaves as a cyclic bidentate, tetradendate or pentaentadentae ligand. The formation of macrocyclic complexes depends significantly on the dimension of the internal cavity, the rigidity of the macrocycles, the nature of its donor atoms and on the complexing properties of the anion involved in the coordination. Electronic spectra and magnetic moments of the complexes indicate that the geometries of the metal centers are either square pyramidal or octahedral for acyclic or macro-cyclic complexes. The structures are consistent with the IR, UV-visible, ESR, (1)H-NMR, mass spectra as well as conductivity and magnetic moment measurements. The Schiff base ligand and its metal complexes were tested against two pathogenic bacteria as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as one kind of fungi. Most of the complexes exhibit mild antibacterial and antifungal activities against these organisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Simultaneous profiling of seed-associated bacteria and fungi reveals antagonistic interactions between microorganisms within a shared epiphytic microbiome on Triticum and Brassica seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Links, Matthew G; Demeke, Tigst; Gräfenhan, Tom; Hill, Janet E; Hemmingsen, Sean M; Dumonceaux, Tim J

    2014-01-01

    In order to address the hypothesis that seeds from ecologically and geographically diverse plants harbor characteristic epiphytic microbiota, we characterized the bacterial and fungal microbiota associated with Triticum and Brassica seed surfaces. The total microbial complement was determined by amplification and sequencing of a fragment of chaperonin 60 (cpn60). Specific microorganisms were quantified by qPCR. Bacteria and fungi corresponding to operational taxonomic units (OTU) that were identified in the sequencing study were isolated and their interactions examined. A total of 5477 OTU were observed from seed washes. Neither total epiphytic bacterial load nor community richness/evenness was significantly different between the seed types; 578 OTU were shared among all samples at a variety of abundances. Hierarchical clustering revealed that 203 were significantly different in abundance on Triticum seeds compared with Brassica. Microorganisms isolated from seeds showed 99–100% identity between the cpn60 sequences of the isolates and the OTU sequences from this shared microbiome. Bacterial strains identified as Pantoea agglomerans had antagonistic properties toward one of the fungal isolates (Alternaria sp.), providing a possible explanation for their reciprocal abundances on both Triticum and Brassica seeds. cpn60 enabled the simultaneous profiling of bacterial and fungal microbiota and revealed a core seed-associated microbiota shared between diverse plant genera. PMID:24444052

  3. Simultaneous profiling of seed-associated bacteria and fungi reveals antagonistic interactions between microorganisms within a shared epiphytic microbiome on Triticum and Brassica seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Links, Matthew G; Demeke, Tigst; Gräfenhan, Tom; Hill, Janet E; Hemmingsen, Sean M; Dumonceaux, Tim J

    2014-04-01

    In order to address the hypothesis that seeds from ecologically and geographically diverse plants harbor characteristic epiphytic microbiota, we characterized the bacterial and fungal microbiota associated with Triticum and Brassica seed surfaces. The total microbial complement was determined by amplification and sequencing of a fragment of chaperonin 60 (cpn60). Specific microorganisms were quantified by qPCR. Bacteria and fungi corresponding to operational taxonomic units (OTU) that were identified in the sequencing study were isolated and their interactions examined. A total of 5477 OTU were observed from seed washes. Neither total epiphytic bacterial load nor community richness/evenness was significantly different between the seed types; 578 OTU were shared among all samples at a variety of abundances. Hierarchical clustering revealed that 203 were significantly different in abundance on Triticum seeds compared with Brassica. Microorganisms isolated from seeds showed 99-100% identity between the cpn60 sequences of the isolates and the OTU sequences from this shared microbiome. Bacterial strains identified as Pantoea agglomerans had antagonistic properties toward one of the fungal isolates (Alternaria sp.), providing a possible explanation for their reciprocal abundances on both Triticum and Brassica seeds. cpn60 enabled the simultaneous profiling of bacterial and fungal microbiota and revealed a core seed-associated microbiota shared between diverse plant genera. © 2014 AAFC. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Rapidly evolving genes in pathogens: methods for detecting positive selection and examples among fungi, bacteria, viruses and protists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguileta, Gabriela; Refrégier, Guislaine; Yockteng, Roxana; Fournier, Elisabeth; Giraud, Tatiana

    2009-07-01

    The ongoing coevolutionary struggle between hosts and pathogens, with hosts evolving to escape pathogen infection and pathogens evolving to escape host defences, can generate an 'arms race', i.e., the occurrence of recurrent selective sweeps that each favours a novel resistance or virulence allele that goes to fixation. Host-pathogen coevolution can alternatively lead to a 'trench warfare', i.e., balancing selection, maintaining certain alleles at loci involved in host-pathogen recognition over long time scales. Recently, technological and methodological progress has enabled detection of footprints of selection directly on genes, which can provide useful insights into the processes of coevolution. This knowledge can also have practical applications, for instance development of vaccines or drugs. Here we review the methods for detecting genes under positive selection using divergence data (i.e., the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates, d(N)/d(S)). We also review methods for detecting selection using polymorphisms, such as methods based on F(ST) measures, frequency spectrum, linkage disequilibrium and haplotype structure. In the second part, we review examples where targets of selection have been identified in pathogens using these tests. Genes under positive selection in pathogens have mostly been sought among viruses, bacteria and protists, because of their paramount importance for human health. Another focus is on fungal pathogens owing to their agronomic importance. We finally discuss promising directions in pathogen studies, such as detecting selection in non-coding regions.

  5. Influence of PGPR Bacteria and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on Growth and some Physiological Parameters of Onopordon acanthium in a Cd-Contaminated Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MirHassan Rasouli-Sadaghiani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Heavy metals (HMs are serious threat for environment due to their dangerous effects. These metals as contaminants that can be accumulated in soil and after absorption by plants, finally will be found in food chains. Cadmium (Cd is one of the dangerous HMs that threats the health of plants, living organisms and human. Physicochemical remediation methods may cause large changes in different characteristics of soils . Recently environmental-friendly strategies including phytoremediation have been emphasized by researchers. Phytoremediation that refers to the use of plants and their assistance with microorganisms for remediation of contaminated soils is an effective and low cost method for reclamation of heavy metals polluted soils. The most important limitation of phytoremediation is low availability of heavy metals and sensitivity of plants to contamination. There are evidences that soil microbes can help to overcome these limitations through several ways. Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are known to enhance plant growth and survival in heavy metal contaminated soils through different mechanisms including producing promoting metabolites, auxin, siderophore and antibiotics. In this study the role of some strains of PGPR (a mixture of Pseudomonas species including P. putida, P. fluorescens, and P. aeruginosa and AMF (a mixture of Glomus species including G. intraradices, G. mosseae and G. fasciculatum, on uptake and accumulation of Cd, Fe, Zn and Cu as well as some physiological properties of Onopordon (Onopordon acanthium L were evaluated. Materials and Methods:This study was carried out under greenhouse condition as a factorial experiment based on a randomized complete block design with two factors including Cd concentration (four levels and microbial treatment (three levels in three replications. Consequently, a soil was selected and spiked uniformly with different concentrations of

  6. MicroRNA844-Guided Downregulation of Cytidinephosphate Diacylglycerol Synthase3 (CDS3) mRNA Affects the Response of Arabidopsis thaliana to Bacteria and Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa Jung; Park, Young Ju; Kwak, Kyung Jin; Kim, Donghyun; Park, June Hyun; Lim, Jae Yun; Shin, Chanseok; Yang, Kwang-Yeol; Kang, Hunseung

    2015-08-01

    Despite the fact that a large number of miRNA sequences have been determined in diverse plant species, reports demonstrating the functional roles of miRNAs in the plant response to pathogens are severely limited. Here, Arabidopsis thaliana miRNA844 (miR844) was investigated for its functional role in the defense response to diverse pathogens. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing miR844 (35S::miR844) displayed much more severe disease symptoms than the wild-type plants when challenged with the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 or the fungus Botrytis cinerea. By contrast, a loss-of-function mir844 mutant showed an enhanced resistance against the pathogens. Although no cleavage was observed at the predicted cleavage site of the putative target mRNA, cytidinephosphate diacylglycerol synthase3 (CDS3), cleavage was observed at 6, 12, 21, or 52 bases upstream of the predicted cleavage site of CDS3 mRNA, and the level of CDS3 mRNA was downregulated by the overexpression of miR844, implying that miR844 influences CDS3 transcript level. To further confirm that the miR844-mediated defense response was due to the decrease in CDS3 mRNA level, the disease response of a CDS3 loss-of-function mutant was analyzed upon pathogen challenge. Increased susceptibility of both cds3 mutant and 35S::miR844 plants to pathogens confirmed that miR844 affected the defense response by downregulating CDS3 mRNA. The expression of miR844 was decreased, and the CDS3 transcript level increased upon pathogen challenge. Taken together, these results provide evidence that downregulation of miR844 and a concomitant increase in CDS3 expression is a defensive response of Arabidopsis to bacteria and fungi.

  7. Distribution and Diversity of Bacteria and Fungi Colonization in Stone Monuments Analyzed by High-Throughput Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Qiang; Zhang, Bingjian; He, Zhang; Yang, Xiaoru

    2016-01-01

    The historical and cultural heritage of Qingxing palace and Lingyin and Kaihua temple, located in Hangzhou of China, include a large number of exquisite Buddhist statues and ancient stone sculptures which date back to the Northern Song (960-1219 A.D.) and Qing dynasties (1636-1912 A.D.) and are considered to be some of the best examples of ancient stone sculpting techniques. They were added to the World Heritage List in 2011 because of their unique craftsmanship and importance to the study of...

  8. The elicitation step of nickel allergy is promoted in mice by microbe-related substances, including some from oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling; Kinbara, Masayuki; Funayama, Hiromi; Takada, Haruhiko; Sugawara, Shunji; Endo, Yasuo

    2011-11-01

    Microbial components activate the host's innate immunity via interactions with molecules including TLRs and NODs. We previously reported that in mice (i) Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS; TLR4 agonist) promotes Ni-allergy even in T-cell-deficient mice, (ii) E. coli LPS reduces the minimum allergy-inducing concentrations of Ni at both the sensitization and elicitation steps, and (iii) various microbe-related substances promote sensitization to Ni. Here, we examined the effects of microbe-related substances at the elicitation step. Mice (except for TLR4-mutated C3H/HeJ mice) were sensitized to Ni by intraperitoneal injection of NiCl(2) + E. coli LPS. Ten days later their ear-pinnas were challenged with 1 μM NiCl(2) with or without a test substance. Although NiCl(2) alone at this concentration does not induce Ni-allergy, its combination with the following substances induced Ni-allergy in BALB/c mice: LPS preparations from oral gram-negative bacteria (Prevotella intermedia and Porphyromonas gingivalis), a mannan preparation from a fungus (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), and synthetic NOD2 and TLR2 agonists. The effect of the mannan preparation was small in C3H/HeJ mice (sensitized with NiCl(2) + the P. intermedia preparation). The P. intermedia preparation promoted Ni-allergy in C3H/HeJ and nude mice, but not in mice deficient in either TLR2 or histidine decarboxylase. Intragingival injection of the P. intermedia preparation and later challenge with NiCl(2) alone to ear-pinnas also promoted Ni-allergy. These results indicate that (i) in Ni-allergy, a microbial milieu or innate immunity is important at the elicitation step, too, and (ii) some oral bacteria may promote Ni-allergy via TLR2-stimulant(s) production. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mysterious Mycorrhizae? A Field Trip & Classroom Experiment to Demystify the Symbioses Formed between Plants & Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nancy C.; Chaudhary, V. Bala; Hoeksema, Jason D.; Moore, John C.; Pringle, Anne; Umbanhowar, James A.; Wilson, Gail W. T.

    2009-01-01

    Biology curricula cover fungi in units on bacteria, protists, and primitive plants, but fungi are more closely related to animals than to bacteria or plants. Like animals, fungi are heterotrophs and cannot create their own food; but, like plants, fungi have cell walls, and are for the most part immobile. Most species of fungi have a filamentous…

  10. Isolation, structural elucidation and in vitro activity of 2-acetyl-2-decarboxamido-oxytetracycline against environmental relevant bacteria, including tetracycline-resistant bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkeberg, Anne Kruse; Sengeløv, Gitte; Cornett, Claus

    2004-01-01

    i.d., 5 microm), and the mobile phase contained methanol-water (27:73 (v/v)) with 0.08 M formic acid added. The flow rate was 9.0 ml/min. It was possible to isolate few milligram ADOTC in a day. The compound was unambiguously identified using NMR and MS-MS. The anti-microbial activity against...... activated sludge bacteria was determined giving a potency of only 3% of that of OTC. With tetracycline-resistant bacteria, no anti-microbial activity was observed, indicating a mode of action similar to that of OTC....

  11. Diallylthiosulfinate (Allicin, a Volatile Antimicrobial from Garlic (Allium sativum, Kills Human Lung Pathogenic Bacteria, Including MDR Strains, as a Vapor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Reiter

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Garlic (Allium sativum has potent antimicrobial activity due to allicin (diallylthiosulfinate synthesized by enzyme catalysis in damaged garlic tissues. Allicin gives crushed garlic its characteristic odor and its volatility makes it potentially useful for combating lung infections. Allicin was synthesized (>98% pure by oxidation of diallyl disulfide by H2O2 using formic acid as a catalyst and the growth inhibitory effect of allicin vapor and allicin in solution to clinical isolates of lung pathogenic bacteria from the genera Pseudomonas, Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus, including multi-drug resistant (MDR strains, was demonstrated. Minimal inhibitory (MIC and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC were determined and compared to clinical antibiotics using standard European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST procedures. The cytotoxicity of allicin to human lung and colon epithelial and murine fibroblast cells was tested in vitro and shown to be ameliorated by glutathione (GSH. Similarly, the sensitivity of rat precision-cut lung slices (PCLS to allicin was decreased by raising the [GSH] to the approximate blood plasma level of 1 mM. Because allicin inhibited bacterial growth as a vapor, it could be used to combat bacterial lung infections via direct inhalation. Since there are no volatile antibiotics available to treat pulmonary infections, allicin, particularly at sublethal doses in combination with oral antibiotics, could make a valuable addition to currently available treatments.

  12. Diallylthiosulfinate (Allicin), a Volatile Antimicrobial from Garlic (Allium sativum), Kills Human Lung Pathogenic Bacteria, Including MDR Strains, as a Vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Jana; Levina, Natalja; van der Linden, Mark; Gruhlke, Martin; Martin, Christian; Slusarenko, Alan J

    2017-10-12

    Garlic ( Allium sativum ) has potent antimicrobial activity due to allicin (diallylthiosulfinate) synthesized by enzyme catalysis in damaged garlic tissues. Allicin gives crushed garlic its characteristic odor and its volatility makes it potentially useful for combating lung infections. Allicin was synthesized (>98% pure) by oxidation of diallyl disulfide by H₂O₂ using formic acid as a catalyst and the growth inhibitory effect of allicin vapor and allicin in solution to clinical isolates of lung pathogenic bacteria from the genera Pseudomonas , Streptococcus , and Staphylococcus , including multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains, was demonstrated. Minimal inhibitory (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were determined and compared to clinical antibiotics using standard European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) procedures. The cytotoxicity of allicin to human lung and colon epithelial and murine fibroblast cells was tested in vitro and shown to be ameliorated by glutathione (GSH). Similarly, the sensitivity of rat precision-cut lung slices (PCLS) to allicin was decreased by raising the [GSH] to the approximate blood plasma level of 1 mM. Because allicin inhibited bacterial growth as a vapor, it could be used to combat bacterial lung infections via direct inhalation. Since there are no volatile antibiotics available to treat pulmonary infections, allicin, particularly at sublethal doses in combination with oral antibiotics, could make a valuable addition to currently available treatments.

  13. An Antimicrobial Metabolite from Bacillus sp.: Significant activity against pathogenic bacteria including multidrug-resistant clinical strains

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    AJAY GHOSH CHALASANI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the cell free modified trypticase soya broth (pH 7.4+0.2 of Bacillus subtilis URID 12.1 showed significant antimicrobial activity against multidrug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Streptococcus pyogenes and Enterococcus faecalis. The partially purified antimicrobial molecule was found to be resistant to extremes of pH and temperatures and also to higher concentrations of trypsin and proteinase K. The antimicrobial molecule was purified by a three-step method that included reverse-phased high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values were determined for 11 species of bacteria using a microbroth dilution technique. The HPLC-purified fraction showed the MICs ranging from 0.5 to 1 µg/ml for methicillin and vancomycin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MVRSA and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE strains. The molecular mass of the antimicrobial compound was determined to be 842.37 Da. The same antimicrobial fraction showed negligible haemolytic activity against human red blood cells even at a concentration as high as 100µg/ml. Because of its significant antimicrobial activity at low MIC values coupled with its non-haemolytic property, it may prove to be a novel antimicrobial lead molecule.

  14. Isolation, structural elucidation and in vitro activity of 2-acetyl-2-decarboxamido-oxytetracycline against environmental relevant bacteria, including tetracycline-resistant bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkeberg, Anne Kruse; Sengeløv, Gitte; Cornett, Claus

    2004-01-01

    2-Acetyl-2-decarboxamido-oxytetracycline (ADOTC) is a major impurity of oxytetracycline (OTC) produced as a side product during fermentation. ADOTC was isolated from OTC and other impurities using preparative HPLC. The preparative column was an Xterra MS. C-18 chromatographic column (100 mm x 19...... turn W., 5 mum), and the mobile phase contained methanol-water (27:73 (v/v)) with 0.08 M formic acid added. The flow rate was 9.0 ml/min. It was possible to isolate few milligram ADOTC in a day. The compound was unambiguously identified using NMR and MS-MS. The anti-microbial activity against activated...... sludge bacteria was deter-mined giving a potency of only 3% of that of OTC. With tetracycline-resistant bacteria, no anti-microbial activity was observed, indicating a mode of action similar to that of OTC....

  15. Comparative Genomics Including the Early-Diverging Smut Fungus Ceraceosorus bombacis Reveals Signatures of Parallel Evolution within Plant and Animal Pathogens of Fungi and Oomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rahul; Xia, Xiaojuan; Riess, Kai; Bauer, Robert; Thines, Marco

    2015-08-27

    Ceraceosorus bombacis is an early-diverging lineage of smut fungi and a pathogen of cotton trees (Bombax ceiba). To study the evolutionary genomics of smut fungi in comparison with other fungal and oomycete pathogens, the genome of C. bombacis was sequenced and comparative genomic analyses were performed. The genome of 26.09 Mb encodes for 8,024 proteins, of which 576 are putative-secreted effector proteins (PSEPs). Orthology analysis revealed 30 ortholog PSEPs among six Ustilaginomycotina genomes, the largest groups of which are lytic enzymes, such as aspartic peptidase and glycoside hydrolase. Positive selection analyses revealed the highest percentage of positively selected PSEPs in C. bombacis compared with other Ustilaginomycotina genomes. Metabolic pathway analyses revealed the absence of genes encoding for nitrite and nitrate reductase in the genome of the human skin pathogen Malassezia globosa, but these enzymes are present in the sequenced plant pathogens in smut fungi. Interestingly, these genes are also absent in cultivable oomycete animal pathogens, while nitrate reductase has been lost in cultivable oomycete plant pathogens. Similar patterns were also observed for obligate biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic fungal and oomycete pathogens. Furthermore, it was found that both fungal and oomycete animal pathogen genomes are lacking cutinases and pectinesterases. Overall, these findings highlight the parallel evolution of certain genomic traits, revealing potential common evolutionary trajectories among fungal and oomycete pathogens, shaping the pathogen genomes according to their lifestyle. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF PHYTOPATHOGENIC FUNGI, BACTERIA, NEMATODES AND VIRUSES IN FOUR COMMERCIAL VARIETIES OF HELICONIA (Heliconia sp. CARACTERIZACIÓN DE HONGOS, BACTERIAS, NEMÁTODOS Y VIRUS FITOPATÓGENOS EN CUATRO VARIEDADES COMERCIALES DE HELICONIA (Heliconia sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathali López Cardona

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Analysis of 914 samples of roots, rhizomes, pseudostems, inflorescences and leaves of four commercial varieties of heliconia, cultivated at the municipality of Chinchiná-Caldas (Colombia, allowed to identify five genera of plant pathogenic fungi (Rhizoctonia, Fusarium, Colletotrichum, Helminthosporium and Curvularia, three genera of plant pathogenic bacteria (Ralstonia, Pseudomonas and Erwinia, two species of viruses (Banana streak virus (BSV, Badnavirus, and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, Cucumovirus,, and seven genera of plant parasitic nematodes (Helicotylenchus, Tylenchus, Meloidogyne, Ditylenchus, Aphelenchoides, Pratylenchus, and Radopholus. Of these, Fusarium sp., affecting pseudostems, Pseudomonas sp., affecting leaves and inflorescences, and the plant parasitic nematodes Ditylenchus sp., Aphelenchoides sp., Pratylenchus sp. and Radopholus sp., are new records in the heliconia production in Colombia . The most limiting diseases corresponded to leaf blight, caused by Helminthosporium sp.; the bacterioses, caused by Pseudomonas sp.; the spotted stems, caused by Fusarium sp.; and soft rot of the pseudostems, caused by Erwinia sp. The pathogenicity tests demonstrated that Colletotrichum sp. and Phoma sp. are not pathogenic in leaves; while Fusarium sp., inoculated in pseudostems, Helminthosporium sp. and Pseudomonas sp., inoculated in leaves, and Colletotrichum sp. and Pseudomonas sp., inoculated in inflorescences, had incidence values of 83.3, 86.6, 93.3, 100.0 and 100.0%, respectively.Resumen. El análisis de 914 muestras de raíces, rizomas, pseudotallos, inflorescencias y hojas de cuatro variedades comerciales de heliconia, cultivadas en el municipio de Chinchiná-Caldas (Colombia, permitieron identificar cinco géneros de hongos fitopatógenos (Rhizoctonia, Fusarium, Colletotrichum, Helminthosporium y Curvularia, tres géneros de bacterias fitopatógenas (Ralstonia, Pseudomonas y Erwinia, dos especies de virus (Banana streak

  17. Interação entre fungos micorrízicos arbusculares e bactérias diazotróficas em trigo Interaction between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and diazotrophic bacteria in wheat plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Marino Rodrigues Sala

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito da inoculação de dois novos isolados de bactérias diazotróficas endofíticas e da interação destas bactérias com fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMAs, na cultura do trigo. Foi realizado um experimento em casa de vegetação, com dois isolados de bactérias diazotróficas endofíticas, IAC11HT (Achromobacter insolitus e IAC12HT (Zoogloea ramigera, e dois FMAs (Glomus sp. e Acaulospora sp.. Houve efeito sinérgico da co-inoculação na colonização das raízes por bactérias diazotróficas, com o emprego do FMA do gênero Acaulospora. As plantas associadas a Glomus, na presença dos isolados bacterianos, apresentaram maior crescimento, acúmulo e aproveitamento dos nutrientes do que as plantas colonizadas por Acaulospora sp., entretanto, não superaram os tratamentos em que as bactérias e os fungos foram inoculados isoladamente. Apesar de não ter havido efeito benéfico da co-inoculação FMA-bactéria diazotrófica sobre a maioria dos parâmetros avaliados, essas novas bactérias propiciaram o dobro de crescimento, acúmulo e aproveitamento do N e P em plantas de trigo.The aim of this work was to evaluate the inoculation effect of two new endophytic diazotrophic bacteria and the interaction between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF and these bacteria on wheat plants. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse with the two strains of diazotrophic bacteria, IAC11HT (Achromobacter insolitus and IAC12HT (Zoogloea ramigera, and two AMF (Glomus sp. and Acaulospora sp.. There was synergistic effect of the co-inoculation on root colonization by diazotrophic bacteria with the AMF of the genus Acaulospora. The plants colonized by Glomus associated to bacterial strains showed higher growth, accumulation and exploitation of the nutrients than plants colonized by Acaulospora sp., however, this effect did not surpass the treatments in which bacteria and fungi were inoculated separately. Although

  18. [Microbial resistance to formaldehyde. I. Comparative quantitative studies in some selected species of vegetative bacteria, bacterial spores, fungi, bacteriophages and viruses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicher, G; Peters, J

    1976-12-01

    The resistence of different microorganisms to formaldehyde was determined. As test objects served gram-negative and gram-positive vegetative germs (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella paratyphi-B, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus faecalis), bacterial spores (Bacillus cereus, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus stearothermophilus, Bacillus subtilis), fungi (Aspergillus niger, Candida albicans), bacteriophages (Escherichia coli phages, T1, T2, T3), and viruses (adenovirus, poliomyelitis virus, vaccinia virus). For the studies, suspensions of germs were exposed at identical temperature (20 degrees C) and pH (7.0). The microbicidal effect of formaldehyde was measured by the decrease of the proportion of germs capable of multiplication in the suspension (lg (N/N0); where: N0 equals initial number of germs capable of multiplication; N equals number of germs capable of multiplication after exposure to formaldehyde). For all germs the dependence of the microbicidal effect on the concentration of formaldehyde was determined. In all experiments, the duration of exposure was two hours. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Salmonella paratyphi-B were found to be more susceptible than Staphylococcus aureus (vf. Fig. 1 A). The strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa used were widely varying as to their susceptibility. To obtain equal microbicidal effects, concentrations of formaldehyde almost three times as high had to be used for the most resistant strain than were necessary for the most susceptible strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae examined were found to have an identical resistence to formaldehyde. Streptococcus faecalis was even more resistant to formaldehyde than Staphylococcus aureus. In the case of Streptococcus faecalis, a concentration of formaldehyde about three times as high had to be used to obtain microbicidal effects of identical magnitude. For the killing of Candida albicans cells concentrations of

  19. Heterologous gene expression in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaoyun; Schmitz, George; Zhang, Meiling; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac K O

    2012-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are critical to production of many commercial enzymes and organic compounds. Fungal-based systems have several advantages over bacterial-based systems for protein production because high-level secretion of enzymes is a common trait of their decomposer lifestyle. Furthermore, in the large-scale production of recombinant proteins of eukaryotic origin, the filamentous fungi become the vehicle of choice due to critical processes shared in gene expression with other eukaryotic organisms. The complexity and relative dearth of understanding of the physiology of filamentous fungi, compared to bacteria, have hindered rapid development of these organisms as highly efficient factories for the production of heterologous proteins. In this review, we highlight several of the known benefits and challenges in using filamentous fungi (particularly Aspergillus spp., Trichoderma reesei, and Neurospora crassa) for the production of proteins, especially heterologous, nonfungal enzymes. We review various techniques commonly employed in recombinant protein production in the filamentous fungi, including transformation methods, selection of gene regulatory elements such as promoters, protein secretion factors such as the signal peptide, and optimization of coding sequence. We provide insights into current models of host genomic defenses such as repeat-induced point mutation and quelling. Furthermore, we examine the regulatory effects of transcript sequences, including introns and untranslated regions, pre-mRNA (messenger RNA) processing, transcript transport, and mRNA stability. We anticipate that this review will become a resource for researchers who aim at advancing the use of these fascinating organisms as protein production factories, for both academic and industrial purposes, and also for scientists with general interest in the biology of the filamentous fungi. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Individual Patterns of Complexity in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Microbiota, Including Predator Bacteria, over a 1-Year Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan de Dios Caballero

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF lung microbiota composition has recently been redefined by the application of next-generation sequencing (NGS tools, identifying, among others, previously undescribed anaerobic and uncultivable bacteria. In the present study, we monitored the fluctuations of this ecosystem in 15 CF patients during a 1-year follow-up period, describing for the first time, as far as we know, the presence of predator bacteria in the CF lung microbiome. In addition, a new computational model was developed to ascertain the hypothetical ecological repercussions of a prey-predator interaction in CF lung microbial communities. Fifteen adult CF patients, stratified according to their pulmonary function into mild (n = 5, moderate (n = 9, and severe (n = 1 disease, were recruited at the CF unit of the Ramááóíóóóñóíéíóíúááóón y Cajal University Hospital (Madrid, Spain. Each patient contributed three or four induced sputum samples during a 1-year follow-up period. Lung microbiota composition was determined by both cultivation and NGS techniques and was compared with the patients’ clinical variables. Results revealed a particular microbiota composition for each patient that was maintained during the study period, although some fluctuations were detected without any clinical correlation. For the first time, Bdellovibrio and Vampirovibrio predator bacteria were shown in CF lung microbiota and reduced-genome bacterial parasites of the phylum Parcubacteria were also consistently detected. The newly designed computational model allows us to hypothesize that inoculation of predators into the pulmonary microbiome might contribute to the control of chronic colonization by CF pathogens in early colonization stages.

  1. Individual Patterns of Complexity in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Microbiota, Including Predator Bacteria, over a 1-Year Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dios Caballero, Juan; Vida, Rafael; Cobo, Marta; Máiz, Luis; Suárez, Lucrecia; Galeano, Javier; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael; Del Campo, Rosa

    2017-09-26

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung microbiota composition has recently been redefined by the application of next-generation sequencing (NGS) tools, identifying, among others, previously undescribed anaerobic and uncultivable bacteria. In the present study, we monitored the fluctuations of this ecosystem in 15 CF patients during a 1-year follow-up period, describing for the first time, as far as we know, the presence of predator bacteria in the CF lung microbiome. In addition, a new computational model was developed to ascertain the hypothetical ecological repercussions of a prey-predator interaction in CF lung microbial communities. Fifteen adult CF patients, stratified according to their pulmonary function into mild ( n = 5), moderate ( n = 9), and severe ( n = 1) disease, were recruited at the CF unit of the Ramón y Cajal University Hospital (Madrid, Spain). Each patient contributed three or four induced sputum samples during a 1-year follow-up period. Lung microbiota composition was determined by both cultivation and NGS techniques and was compared with the patients' clinical variables. Results revealed a particular microbiota composition for each patient that was maintained during the study period, although some fluctuations were detected without any clinical correlation. For the first time, Bdellovibrio and Vampirovibrio predator bacteria were shown in CF lung microbiota and reduced-genome bacterial parasites of the phylum Parcubacteria were also consistently detected. The newly designed computational model allows us to hypothesize that inoculation of predators into the pulmonary microbiome might contribute to the control of chronic colonization by CF pathogens in early colonization stages. IMPORTANCE The application of NGS to sequential samples of CF patients demonstrated the complexity of the organisms present in the lung (156 species) and the constancy of basic individual colonization patterns, although some differences between samples from the same patient were

  2. Taxonomy of Allergenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levetin, Estelle; Horner, W Elliott; Scott, James A

    2016-01-01

    The Kingdom Fungi contains diverse eukaryotic organisms including yeasts, molds, mushrooms, bracket fungi, plant rusts, smuts, and puffballs. Fungi have a complex metabolism that differs from animals and plants. They secrete enzymes into their surroundings and absorb the breakdown products of enzyme action. Some of these enzymes are well-known allergens. The phylogenetic relationships among fungi were unclear until recently because classification was based on the sexual state morphology. Fungi lacking an obvious sexual stage were assigned to the artificial, now-obsolete category, "Deuteromycetes" or "Fungi Imperfecti." During the last 20 years, DNA sequencing has resolved 8 fungal phyla, 3 of which contain most genera associated with important aeroallergens: Zygomycota, Ascomycota, and Basidiomycota. Advances in fungal classification have required name changes for some familiar taxa. Because of regulatory constraints, many fungal allergen extracts retain obsolete names. A major benefit from this reorganization is that specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels in individuals sensitized to fungi appear to closely match fungal phylogenetic relationships. This close relationship between molecular fungal systematics and IgE sensitization provides an opportunity to systematically look at cross-reactivity and permits representatives from each taxon to serve as a proxy for IgE to the group. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Role of Fungi in the Etiology of Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Benito-León

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system. Infectious triggers of MS are being actively investigated. Substantial evidence supports the involvement of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, though other viruses, bacteria, protists, and fungi are also being considered. Many links between fungi and diseases involving chronic inflammation have been found recently. Evidence linking MS and fungi is reviewed here. The HLA-DRB1*15 allele group is the most important genetic risk factor of MS, and is a risk factor in several other conditions linked to fungal infections. Many biomarkers of MS are consistent with fungal infections, such as IL-17, chitotriosidase, and antibodies against fungi. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF, first used as an industrial fungicide, was recently repurposed to reduce MS symptoms. Its mechanisms of action in MS have not been firmly established. The low risk of MS during childhood and its moderate association with herpes simplex virus type 2 suggest genital exposure to microbes (including fungi should be investigated as a possible trigger. Molecular and epidemiological evidence support a role for infections such as EBV in MS. Though fungal infections have not been widely studied in MS, many lines of evidence are consistent with a fungal etiology. Future microbiome and serological studies should consider fungi as a possible risk factor for MS, and future clinical studies should consider the effect of fungicides other than DMF on MS symptoms.

  4. In vitro antibacterial and chemical properties of essential oils including native plants from Brazil against pathogenic and resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Lidiane Nunes; Probst, Isabella da Silva; Andrade, Bruna Fernanda Murbach Teles; Alves, Fernanda Cristina Bérgamo; Albano, Mariana; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza; Doyama, Julio Toshimi; Rall, Vera Lúcia Mores; Fernandes Júnior, Ary

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobials products from plants have increased in importance due to the therapeutic potential in the treatment of infectious diseases. Therefore, we aimed to examine the chemical characterisation (GC-MS) of essential oils (EO) from seven plants and measure antibacterial activities against bacterial strains isolated from clinical human specimens (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and sensitive (MSSA), Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella Typhimurium) and foods (Salmonella Enteritidis). Assays were performed using the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and MIC90%) (mg/mL) by agar dilution and time kill curve methods (log CFU/mL) to aiming synergism between EO. EO chemical analysis showed a predominance of terpenes and its derivatives. The highest antibacterial activities were with Cinnamomun zeylanicum (0.25 mg/mL on almost bacteria tested) and Caryophyllus aromaticus EO (2.40 mg/mL on Salmonella Enteritidis), and the lowest activity was with Eugenia uniflora (from 50.80 mg/mL against MSSA to 92.40 mg/mL against both Salmonella sources and P. aeruginosa) EO. The time kill curve assays revealed the occurrence of bactericide synergism in combinations of C. aromaticus and C. zeylanicum with Rosmarinus. officinalis. Thus, the antibacterial activities of the EO were large and this can also be explained by complex chemical composition of the oils tested in this study and the synergistic effect of these EO, yet requires further investigation because these interactions between the various chemical compounds can increase or reduce (antagonism effect) the inhibitory effect of essential oils against bacterial strains.

  5. Mass production of entomopathogenic fungi using agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-06-17

    Jun 17, 2008 ... Similarly carrot, jack seeds and ladies finger also supported good growth and sporulation of all the three tested fungi. Coconut water supported maximum growth and sporulation. Key words: Entomopathogenic fungi, mass production, agricultural products. INTRODUCTION. Biopesticides based on bacteria, ...

  6. IncP-1 and PromA group plasmids are major providers of horizontal gene transfer capacities across bacteria in the mycosphere of different soil fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Miaozhi; Visser, Sander; Pereira e Silva, Michele C.; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    Plasmids of the IncP-1 beta group have been found to be important carriers of accessory genes that enhance the ecological fitness of bacteria, whereas plasmids of the PromA group are key agents of horizontal gene transfer in particular soil settings. However, there is still a paucity of knowledge

  7. Solubilization of Australian lignites by fungi and other microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catcheside, D.E.A.; Mallett, K.J. (Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA (Australia). School of Biological Sciences)

    Lignites (brown coals) from the Latrobe Valley in Victoria are solubilized by {ital Coriolus versicolor}, {ital Phanerochaete chrysosporium}, and five other species known to be active on Leonardite and various acid-treated North America lignites. Run-of-mine coal from Morwell and Loy Yang is refractory but is soluble after pretreatment with acid. A weathered deposit at Loy Yang, like Leonardite, is susceptible to biosolubilization without pretreatment. The white rot fungi {ital Ganoderma applanatum}, {ital Perenniporia tephropora} ({ital Fomes lividus}), {ital Pleurotus ostreatus}, {ital Pycnoporus cinnabarinus}, {ital Rigidoporus ulmarius}, and {ital Xylaria hypoxylon} were found to be capable of solubilizing lignite. In contrast, brown rot fungi were weakly active or inactive under the same test conditions. Lignite-degrading fungi, actinomycetes, and other bacteria, including some active on untreated run-of-mine coal, were isolated from natural lignite exposures and mining sites. 15 refs., 5 tabs.

  8. Importance of saprotrophic freshwater fungi for pollen degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Wurzbacher

    Full Text Available Fungi and bacteria are the major organic matter (OM decomposers in aquatic ecosystems. While bacteria are regarded as primary mineralizers in the pelagic zone of lakes and oceans, fungi dominate OM decomposition in streams and wetlands. Recent findings indicate that fungal communities are also active in lakes, but little is known about their diversity and interactions with bacteria. Therefore, the decomposer niche overlap of saprotrophic fungi and bacteria was studied on pollen (as a seasonally recurring source of fine particulate OM by performing microcosm experiments with three different lake types. Special emphasis was placed on analysis of fungal community composition and diversity. We hypothesized that (I pollen select for small saprotrophic fungi and at the same time for typical particle-associated bacteria; (II fungal communities form specific free-living and attached sub-communities in each lake type; (III the ratio between fungi or bacteria on pollen is controlled by the lake's chemistry. Bacteria-to-fungi ratios were determined by quantitative PCR (qPCR, and bacterial and fungal diversity were studied by clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE fingerprints. A protease assay was used to identify functional differences between treatments. For generalization, systematic differences in bacteria-to-fungi ratios were analyzed with a dataset from the nearby Baltic Sea rivers. High abundances of Chytridiomycota as well as occurrences of Cryptomycota and yeast-like fungi confirm the decomposer niche overlap of saprotrophic fungi and bacteria on pollen. As hypothesized, microbial communities consistently differed between the lake types and exhibited functional differences. Bacteria-to-fungi ratios correlated well with parameters such as organic carbon and pH. The importance of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen for bacteria-to-fungi ratios was supported by the Baltic Sea river dataset. Our findings highlight the fact

  9. Fungi in the cystic fibrosis lung: bystanders or pathogens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotirmall, Sanjay H; McElvaney, Noel G

    2014-07-01

    Improvement to the life expectancy of people with cystic fibrosis (PWCF) brings about novel challenges including the need for evaluation of the role of fungi in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. To determine if such organisms represent bystanders or pathogens affecting clinical outcomes we review the existing knowledge from a clinical, biochemical, inflammatory and immunological perspective. The prevalence and importance of fungi in the CF airway has likely been underestimated with the most frequently isolated filamentous fungi being Aspergillus fumigatus and Scedosporium apiospermum and the major yeast Candida albicans. Developing non-culture based microbiological methods for fungal detection has improved both our classification and understanding of their clinical consequences including localized, allergic and systemic infections. Cross-kingdom interaction between bacteria and fungi are discussed as is the role of biofilms further affecting clinical outcome. A combination of host and pathogen-derived factors determines if a particular fungus represents a commensal, colonizer or pathogen in the setting of CF. The underlying immune state, disease severity and treatment burden represent key host variables whilst fungal type, form, chronicity and virulence including the ability to evade immune recognition determines the pathogenic potential of a specific fungus at a particular point in time. Further research in this emerging field is warranted to fully elucidate the spectrum of disease conferred by the presence of fungi in the CF airway and the indications for therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. and fungi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2012-05-15

    May 15, 2012 ... protein extracts from wild mushroom fungi and native plant species against hospital pathogens. J. Pharma. Phytotherap. 2: 103-107. Hu M, McClements D, Decker E (2003). Lipid oxidation in corn oil-in- water emulsions stabilized by casein, whey protein isolate, and soy protein isolate, J. Agric. Food Chem.

  11. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of anamorphic fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Madrid Lorca, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Anamorphic fungi (those reproducing asexually) are a big part of kingdom Fungi. Most of them occur as saprobes in nature, but numerous species are pathogenic to plants and animals including man. With the aim of contributing to the knowledge of the diversity and distribution of anamorphic fungi, we performed a phenotypic and molecular characterization of environmental and clinical isolates of these fungi. Based on a polyphasic taxonomy approach which included morphology, physiology and DNA seq...

  12. Mechanisms of humic substances degradation by fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Hadar, Y.; Grinhut, T.

    2012-04-01

    Humic substances (HS) are formed by secondary synthesis reactions (humification) during the decay process and transformation of biomolecules originating from plants and other dead organisms. In nature, HS are extremely resistant to biological degradation. Thus, these substances are major components in the C cycle and in the biosphere and therefore, the understanding of the process leading to their formation and transformation and degradation is vital. Fungi active in the decomposition process of HS include mainly ascomycetes and basidiomycetes that are common in the upper layer of forest and grassland soils. Many basidiomycetes belong to the white-rot fungi (WRF) and litter-decomposing fungi (LDF). These fungi are considered to be the most efficient lignin degraders due to their nonspecific oxidizing enzymes: manganese peroxidase (MnP), lignin peroxidase (LiP) and laccase. Although bacteria dominate compost and participate in the turnover of HS, their ability to degrade stable macromolecules such as lignin and HS is limited. The overall objectives of this research were to corroborate biodegradation processes of HS by WRF. The specific objectives were: (i) To isolate, identify and characterize HS degrading WRF from biosolids (BS) compost; (ii) To study the biodegradation process of three types of HS, which differ in their structure, by WRF isolated from BS compost; and (iii) To investigate the mechanisms of HA degradation by WRF using two main approaches: (a) Study the physical and chemical analyses of the organic compounds obtained from direct fungal degradation of HA as well as elucidation of the relevant enzymatic reactions; and (b) Study the enzymatic and biochemical mechanisms involved during HA degradation. In order to study the capability of fungi to degrade HS, seventy fungal strains were isolated from biosolids (BS) compost. Two of the most active fungal species were identified based on rDNA sequences and designated Trametes sp. M23 and Phanerochaetesp., Y6

  13. The diversity and distribution of fungi on residential surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel I Adams

    Full Text Available The predominant hypothesis regarding the composition of microbial assemblages in indoor environments is that fungal assemblages are structured by outdoor air with a moderate contribution by surface growth, whereas indoor bacterial assemblages represent a mixture of bacteria entered from outdoor air, shed by building inhabitants, and grown on surfaces. To test the fungal aspect of this hypothesis, we sampled fungi from three surface types likely to support growth and therefore possible contributors of fungi to indoor air: drains in kitchens and bathrooms, sills beneath condensation-prone windows, and skin of human inhabitants. Sampling was done in replicated units of a university-housing complex without reported mold problems, and sequences were analyzed using both QIIME and the new UPARSE approach to OTU-binning, to the same result. Surfaces demonstrated a mycological profile similar to that of outdoor air from the same locality, and assemblages clustered by surface type. "Weedy" genera typical of indoor air, such as Cladosporium and Cryptococcus, were abundant on sills, as were a diverse set of fungi of likely outdoor origin. Drains supported more depauperate assemblages than the other surfaces and contained thermotolerant genera such as Exophiala, Candida, and Fusarium. Most surprising was the composition detected on residents' foreheads. In addition to harboring Malassezia, a known human commensal, skin also possessed a surprising richness of non-resident fungi, including plant pathogens such as ergot (Claviceps purperea. Overall, fungal richness across indoor surfaces was high, but based on known autecologies, most of these fungi were unlikely to be growing on surfaces. We conclude that while some endogenous fungal growth on typical household surfaces does occur, particularly on drains and skin, all residential surfaces appear - to varying degrees - to be passive collectors of airborne fungi of putative outdoor origin, a view of the origins

  14. Imaging mass spectrometry and MS/MS molecular networking reveals chemical interactions among cuticular bacteria and pathogenic fungi associated with fungus-growing ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boya P, Cristopher A; Fernández-Marín, Hermógenes; Mejía, Luis C; Spadafora, Carmenza; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Gutiérrez, Marcelino

    2017-07-17

    The fungus-growing ant-microbe symbiosis is an ideal system to study chemistry-based microbial interactions due to the wealth of microbial interactions described, and the lack of information on the molecules involved therein. In this study, we employed a combination of MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) and MS/MS molecular networking to study chemistry-based microbial interactions in this system. MALDI IMS was used to visualize the distribution of antimicrobials at the inhibition zone between bacteria associated to the ant Acromyrmex echinatior and the fungal pathogen Escovopsis sp. MS/MS molecular networking was used for the dereplication of compounds found at the inhibition zones. We identified the antibiotics actinomycins D, X2 and X 0β , produced by the bacterium Streptomyces CBR38; and the macrolides elaiophylin, efomycin A and efomycin G, produced by the bacterium Streptomyces CBR53.These metabolites were found at the inhibition zones using MALDI IMS and were identified using MS/MS molecular networking. Additionally, three shearinines D, F, and J produced by the fungal pathogen Escovopsis TZ49 were detected. This is the first report of elaiophylins, actinomycin X 0β and shearinines in the fungus-growing ant symbiotic system. These results suggest a secondary prophylactic use of these antibiotics by A. echinatior because of their permanent production by the bacteria.

  15. Bioactive Terpenes from Marine-Derived Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Elissawy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine-derived fungi continue to be a prolific source of secondary metabolites showing diverse bioactivities. Terpenoids from marine-derived fungi exhibit wide structural diversity including numerous compounds with pronounced biological activities. In this review, we survey the last five years’ reports on terpenoidal metabolites from marine-derived fungi with particular attention on those showing marked biological activities.

  16. Fungi that Infect Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Julia R; Hube, Bernhard; Puccia, Rosana; Casadevall, Arturo; Perfect, John R

    2017-06-01

    Fungi must meet four criteria to infect humans: growth at human body temperatures, circumvention or penetration of surface barriers, lysis and absorption of tissue, and resistance to immune defenses, including elevated body temperatures. Morphogenesis between small round, detachable cells and long, connected cells is the mechanism by which fungi solve problems of locomotion around or through host barriers. Secretion of lytic enzymes, and uptake systems for the released nutrients, are necessary if a fungus is to nutritionally utilize human tissue. Last, the potent human immune system evolved in the interaction with potential fungal pathogens, so few fungi meet all four conditions for a healthy human host. Paradoxically, the advances of modern medicine have made millions of people newly susceptible to fungal infections by disrupting immune defenses. This article explores how different members of four fungal phyla use different strategies to fulfill the four criteria to infect humans: the Entomophthorales, the Mucorales, the Ascomycota, and the Basidiomycota. Unique traits confer human pathogenic potential on various important members of these phyla: pathogenic Onygenales comprising thermal dimorphs such as Histoplasma and Coccidioides ; the Cryptococcus spp. that infect immunocompromised as well as healthy humans; and important pathogens of immunocompromised patients- Candida , Pneumocystis , and Aspergillus spp. Also discussed are agents of neglected tropical diseases important in global health such as mycetoma and paracoccidiomycosis and common pathogens rarely implicated in serious illness such as dermatophytes. Commensalism is considered, as well as parasitism, in shaping genomes and physiological systems of hosts and fungi during evolution.

  17. [Antibacterial actin of vinegar against food-borne pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli O157:H7 (Part 2). Effect of sodium chloride and temperature on bactericidal activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entani, E; Asai, M; Tsujihata, S; Tsukamoto, Y; Ohta, M

    1997-05-01

    Bactericidal effects of various kinds of AWASEZU (processed vinegar, 2.5% acidity) on food-borne pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other bacteria were examined. the order of bactericidal activities was NIHAIZU (3.5% NaCl was added) > SANBA-IZU (3.5% NaCl and 10% sucrose were added) > plain vinegar (spirit vinegar) > AMAZU (10% sucrose was added). This indicates that their activities were enhanced by the addition of sodium chloride and suppressed by the addition of sugar. On the other hand, when soy sauce was used instead of sodium chloride, the order of bactericidal activities was plain vinegar > AMAZU > NIHAIZU > SANBAIZU. This is mainly because their activities were suppressed by the increase in the pH value. The effect of sodium chloride (0.01-15%) and temperature (10-50 degrees C) on bactericidal activities against E. coli O157:H7 in spirit vinegar (0.5-2.5% acidity) was further examined. When vinegar was used in combination with sodium chloride, predominant synergism on the bactericidal activity was observed. Their activities were markedly enhanced by the addition of sodium chloride in proportion to the concentration. In addition to this, at higher temperatures spirit vinegar killed bacteria much more rapidly. It should be noted that the bactericidal activity of spirit vinegar was extremely enhanced by the combined use of the addition of sodium chloride and the rise of temperature. For example, in 2.5% acidity vinegar, the time required for 3 log decrease in viable cell numbers at 20 degrees C was shortened to 1/140-fold by the addition of 5% sodium chloride, shortened to 1/51-fold by the rise of the reaction temperature at 40 degrees C, and shortened to 1/830-fold; 0.89 minutes by both the addition of 5% sodium chloride and the rise of temperature at 40 degrees C. In order to propose the methods to prevent food poisoning by bacterial infection, bactericidal activities of vinegar solution containing sodium chloride on cooking tools and

  18. Recovery of fermented inulin fiber by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from inulin hydrolysate using fungi inulinase enzymes of Scopulariopsis sp.-CBS1 and class of Deuteromycetes-CBS4 as cholesterol binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilowati, Agustine; Melanie, Hakiki; Maryati, Yati; Aspiyanto

    2017-01-01

    Fermentation of Lactobacillus Acid Bacteria (LAB) which are mixtures of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacteriumbifidum, Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophillus on hydrolysate as a result of inulin hydrolysis using inulinase enzymes obtained from endophytic fungi ofScopulariopsis sp.-CBS1 (inulin hydrolysate of S) and Class of Deuteromycetes-CBS4 (inulin hydrolysate of D) generate potential fermented inulin fiber as cholesterol binder. Fermentation process was conducted under concentrations of inulin hydrolysate 50% (w/v), LAB 15% (v/v) and skim milk 12.5% (w/v) at room temperature and 40°C for 0, 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours, respectively. Result of experimental work showed that longer time of LAB fermentation increased total acids, TPC and CBC at pH 2, but decreased total sugar, reducing, IDF, SDF, CBC pH 2 and CBC pH 7. Based on Cholesterol Binding Capacity (CBC), optimization of fermentation process on inulin hydrolysate of S was achieved by combining treatment at 40°C for 24 hours resulted in CBC pH 2 of 19.11 mg/g TDF and inulin hydrolysate of D was achieved by fermentation at 40 °C for 48 hours resulted in CBC pH 2 of 24.28 mg/g TDF. Inulin hydrolysate of class of Deutrymecetes CBS4 fermented by LAB had better functional property as cholesterol binder than that inulin hydrolysate of S fermented by LAB. This is due to cholesterol binder and cholesterol derivatives as a result of degradation of LAB on digestive system (stomach) when compared to higher colon under optimal process condition.

  19. Solubilização de fosfatos em meios sólido e líquido por bactérias e fungos do solo Phosphate solubilization in solid and liquid media by soil bacteria and fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Luiz Souchie

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a capacidade e a eficiência de solubilização de CaHPO4, AlPO4 e apatita de Araxá em meio sólido, e de AlPO4 e apatita de Araxá em meio líquido, por fungos (Aspergillus e bactérias (Enterobacteriaceae do solo. Em meio sólido, todos solubilizaram CaHPO4, nenhum solubilizou apatita de Araxá e apenas o isolado de fungo FSF 7 solubilizou AlPO4. Em meio líquido, todos solubilizaram AlPO4 e apatita de Araxá. A seleção de solubilizadores deve ser feita com a quantificação do potencial de solubilização em meio líquido.The objective of this work was to evaluate the ability and efficiency of solubilization of CaHPO4, AlPO4 and Araxá apatite in solid medium, and AlPO4 and Araxá apatite in liquid medium. Soil P-solubilizing fungi (Aspergillus and P-solubilizing bacteria (Enterobacteriaceae were tested. In solid medium, all isolates solubilized CaHPO4, not any isolate solubilized Araxá apatite, and one fungus isolate (PSF 7 solubilized AlPO4. In liquid medium, all isolates solubilized AlPO4 and Araxá apatite. Screening of P-solubilizing microorganisms must be done by quantifying their potential of phosphate solubilization in liquid growth medium.

  20. Methyl Halide Production by Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, G. D.; Varner, R. K.; Blanchard, R. O.; Sive, B. C.; Crill, P. M.

    2005-12-01

    Methyl chloride (CH3Cl), methyl bromide (CH3Br) and methyl iodide (CH3I) are methyl halide gases that contribute significant amounts of halogen radicals to the atmosphere. In an effort to better understand the global budget of methyl halides and their impact on the atmosphere, we need to identify the natural sources in addition to the known anthropogenic sources of these compounds. We are investigating the role of fungi in the production of methyl halides in the soils and wetlands in southern New Hampshire, USA. Previous research has shown that wood decay fungi and ectomycorrhizal fungi, which are within a group of fungi called basidiomycetes, emit methyl halides. In our study, measurements of headspace gas extracted from flasks containing fungi grown in culture demonstrate that a variety of fungi, including basidiomycetes and non-basidiomycetes, emit methyl halides. Our research sites include four ecosystems: an agricultural field, a temperate forest, a fresh water wetland, and coastal salt marshes. We have collected and isolated fungi at each site by culturing tissue samples of fruiting bodies and plant material, by using wood baits, and from the direct culture of soil. We compared the rates of methyl halide emissions from the fungi in the four ecosystems. In addition, we measured emissions from previously assayed fungal isolates after reintroducing them to sterilized soils that were collected from their original environments. Fungal biomass was determined by substrate-induced respiration (SIR). The emission rate by the fungus was determined by a linear regression of the concentration of methyl halide in the sample headspace over time divided by the fungal biomass.

  1. Ocorrência de bactérias diazotróficas e fungos micorrízicos arbusculares na cultura da mandioca Occurrence of diazotrophic bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on the cassava crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcio Liborio Balota

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar a ocorrência, isolar e identificar fungos micorrízicos arbusculares associados à cultura da mandioca (Manihot esculenta. Amostras de solo rizosférico e de várias partes da planta (raízes, tubérculos, manivas e folhas de locais nos Estados do Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo e Paraná, foram inoculadas nos meios LGI-P, NFb-malato e NFb-GOC, avaliando-se o número mais provável de células e a atividade de redução de acetileno. Bactérias diazotróficas foram isoladas de todas as partes da planta, com exceção das folhas, sendo identificadas como Klebsiella sp., Azospirillum lipoferum e uma bactéria denominada "E", provavelmente pertencente ao gênero Burkholderia. A Bactéria E acumulou de 7,63 mg a 14,84 mg de N/g de C em meio semi-sólido, isento de N, e conseguiu manter a capacidade de fixação biológica de N, mesmo após uma dezena de repicagens consecutivas. A colonização micorrízica variou de 31% a 69%, e a densidade de esporos de 10 a 384 esporos/100 mL de solo, predominando as espécies Entrophospora colombiana e Acaulospora scrobiculata no Rio de Janeiro, A. scrobiculata e Scutellospora heterogama no Paraná e em Piracicaba (São Paulo e A. appendicula e S. pellucida em Campinas (São Paulo.This study was performed to evaluate the occurrence and to isolate and identify diazotrophic bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated with the cassava (Manihot esculenta crop. Samples from rhizospherical soil, roots, tubers, stems and leaves from several localities of the States of Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo and Paraná, in Brazil, were inoculated in three media specific for diazotrophic associative bacteria, LGI-P, NFb-malate and NFb-GOC, evaluating the most probable number of cells and the acetylene-reducing activity. Diazotrophic bacteria were detected in all plant parts except for the leaves, and were identified as Klebsiella sp., Azospirillum lipoferum and a bacterium called "E

  2. Antimicrobial activity of Calendula officinalis petal extracts against fungi, as well as Gram-negative and Gram-positive clinical pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstratiou, Efstratios; Hussain, Abdullah I; Nigam, Poonam S; Moore, John E; Ayub, Muhammad A; Rao, Juluri R

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the antimicrobial activity of methanol and ethanol extracts of pot marigold (Calendula officinalis) petals against clinical pathogens. The antimicrobial potential of C. officinalis extracts was evaluated against a panel of microorganisms isolated from patients at the Belfast City Hospital (BCH), including bacteria and fungi, using disc diffusion assay. Methanol extract of C. officinalis exhibited better antibacterial activity against most of the bacteria tested, than ethanol extract. Both methanol and ethanol extracts showed excellent antifungal activity against tested strains of fungi, while comparing with Fluconazole. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nuclear movement in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xin

    2017-12-11

    Nuclear movement within a cell occurs in a variety of eukaryotic organisms including yeasts and filamentous fungi. Fungal molecular genetic studies identified the minus-end-directed microtubule motor cytoplasmic dynein as a critical protein for nuclear movement or orientation of the mitotic spindle contained in the nucleus. Studies in the budding yeast first indicated that dynein anchored at the cortex via its anchoring protein Num1 exerts pulling force on an astral microtubule to orient the anaphase spindle across the mother-daughter axis before nuclear division. Prior to anaphase, myosin V interacts with the plus end of an astral microtubule via Kar9-Bim1/EB1 and pulls the plus end along the actin cables to move the nucleus/spindle close to the bud neck. In addition, pushing or pulling forces generated from cortex-linked polymerization or depolymerization of microtubules drive nuclear movements in yeasts and possibly also in filamentous fungi. In filamentous fungi, multiple nuclei within a hyphal segment undergo dynein-dependent back-and-forth movements and their positioning is also influenced by cytoplasmic streaming toward the hyphal tip. In addition, nuclear movement occurs at various stages of fungal development and fungal infection of plant tissues. This review discusses our current understanding on the mechanisms of nuclear movement in fungal organisms, the importance of nuclear positioning and the regulatory strategies that ensure the proper positioning of nucleus/spindle. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. What we know about arbuscular mycorhizal fungi and associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mycorrhizal fungi are common soil microorganisms and are well known for their symbiotic association with the roots of host plants. The soil is a complex environment harbouring a wide diversity of microorganisms. The interaction between soil bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi has been shown in several studies to ...

  5. A comparative study on the disintegration of filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubert, J; Krings, U; Berger, R G

    2000-11-01

    Different methods for cell disintegration were tested for their efficacy on filamentous fungi, including percussion grinding, homogenization using an Ultra-Turrax, chemical treatment and lyophylization. The release of protein from Ganoderma applanatum and Pycnoporus cinnabarinus and the activity of cytoplasmatic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the crude extracts were monitored to determine the efficiency of each disintegration technique used. Fungal cells proved to be particularly resistant towards some disintegration methods commonly used for yeasts and bacteria. Best results were obtained using a percussion grinder, if necessary, in combination with an Ultra-Turrax pretreatment.

  6. Communication in Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Cottier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We will discuss fungal communication in the context of fundamental biological functions including mating, growth, morphogenesis, and the regulation of fungal virulence determinants. We will address intraspecies but also interkingdom signaling by systematically discussing the sender of the message, the molecular message, and receiver. Analyzing communication shows the close coevolution of fungi with organisms present in their environment giving insights into multispecies communication. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying microbial communication will promote our understanding of the “fungal communicome.”

  7. Melanized fungi in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revankar, Sanjay G; Sutton, Deanna A

    2010-10-01

    Melanized or dematiaceous fungi are associated with a wide variety of infectious syndromes, including chromoblastomycosis, mycetoma, and phaeohyphomycosis. [corrected]. Many are soil organisms and are generally distributed worldwide, though certain species appear to have restricted geographic ranges. Though they are uncommon causes of disease, melanized fungi have been increasingly recognized as important pathogens, with most reports occurring in the past 20 years. The spectrum of diseases with which they are associated has also broadened and includes allergic disease, superficial and deep local infections, pneumonia, brain abscess, and disseminated infection. For some infections in immunocompetent individuals, such as allergic fungal sinusitis and brain abscess, they are among the most common etiologic fungi. Melanin is a likely virulence factor for these fungi. Diagnosis relies on careful microscopic and pathological examination, as well as clinical assessment of the patient, as these fungi are often considered contaminants. Therapy varies depending upon the clinical syndrome. Local infection may be cured with excision alone, while systemic disease is often refractory to therapy. Triazoles such as voriconazole, posaconazole, and itraconazole have the most consistent in vitro activity. Further studies are needed to better understand the pathogenesis and optimal treatment of these uncommon infections.

  8. What Defines the "Kingdom" Fungi?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Thomas A; Leonard, Guy; Wideman, Jeremy G

    2017-06-01

    The application of environmental DNA techniques and increased genome sequencing of microbial diversity, combined with detailed study of cellular characters, has consistently led to the reexamination of our understanding of the tree of life. This has challenged many of the definitions of taxonomic groups, especially higher taxonomic ranks such as eukaryotic kingdoms. The Fungi is an example of a kingdom which, together with the features that define it and the taxa that are grouped within it, has been in a continual state of flux. In this article we aim to summarize multiple lines of data pertinent to understanding the early evolution and definition of the Fungi. These include ongoing cellular and genomic comparisons that, we will argue, have generally undermined all attempts to identify a synapomorphic trait that defines the Fungi. This article will also summarize ongoing work focusing on taxon discovery, combined with phylogenomic analysis, which has identified novel groups that lie proximate/adjacent to the fungal clade-wherever the boundary that defines the Fungi may be. Our hope is that, by summarizing these data in the form of a discussion, we can illustrate the ongoing efforts to understand what drove the evolutionary diversification of fungi.

  9. High diversity of airborne fungi in the hospital environment as revealed by meta-sequencing-based microbiome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xunliang; Xu, Hongtao; Zou, Lihui; Cai, Meng; Xu, Xuefeng; Zhao, Zuotao; Xiao, Fei; Li, Yanming

    2017-01-03

    Invasive fungal infections acquired in the hospital have progressively emerged as an important cause of life-threatening infection. In particular, airborne fungi in hospitals are considered critical pathogens of hospital-associated infections. To identify the causative airborne microorganisms, high-volume air samplers were utilized for collection, and species identification was performed using a culture-based method and DNA sequencing analysis with the Illumina MiSeq and HiSeq 2000 sequencing systems. Few bacteria were grown after cultivation in blood agar. However, using microbiome sequencing, the relative abundance of fungi, Archaea species, bacteria and viruses was determined. The distribution characteristics of fungi were investigated using heat map analysis of four departments, including the Respiratory Intensive Care Unit, Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Room and Outpatient Department. The prevalence of Aspergillus among fungi was the highest at the species level, approximately 17% to 61%, and the prevalence of Aspergillus fumigatus among Aspergillus species was from 34% to 50% in the four departments. Draft genomes of microorganisms isolated from the hospital environment were obtained by sequence analysis, indicating that investigation into the diversity of airborne fungi may provide reliable results for hospital infection control and surveillance.

  10. USE OF BACTERIA AND MICROALGAE IN SYNTHESIS OF NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Zinicovscaia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A critical need in the field of nanotechnology is the development of a reliable and eco-friendly process for synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. A number of different organisms, including bacteria, microalgae, yeast and fungi, have shown their ability to produce metal nanoparticles. But they have some drawbacks in providing better control over size distribution, shape and crystallinity. This review article presents an overview of microorganisms (bacteria and microalga capable of producing silver and gold nanoparticles. This article is an extended abstract of a communication presented at the Conference Ecological Chemistry 2012

  11. Systemic resistance induced by rhizosphere bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.C. van; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Nonpathogenic rhizobacteria can induce a systemic resistance in plants that is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR) has been demonstrated against fungi, bacteria, and viruses in Arabidopsis, bean,

  12. Fungi and mycotoxins: Food contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocić-Tanackov Sunčica D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth of fungi on food causes physical and chemical changes which, further affect negatively the sensory and nutritive quality of food. Species from genera: Aspergillus, Penicillium, Fusarium, Alternariа, Cladosporium, Mucor, Rhizopus, Eurotium and Emericella are usually found. Some of them are potentially dangerous for humans and animals, due to possible synthesis and excretion of toxic secondary metabolites - mycotoxins into the food. Their toxic syndroms in animals and humans are known as mycotoxicoses. The pathologic changes can be observed in parenhimatic organs, and in bones and central nervous system also. Specific conditions are necessary for mycotoxin producing fungi to synthetize sufficient quantities of these compounds for demonstration of biologic effects. The main biochemical paths in the formation of mycotoxins include the polyketide (aflatoxins, sterigmatocystin, zearalenone, citrinine, patulin, terpenic (trichothecenes, aminoacid (glicotoxins, ergotamines, sporidesmin, malformin C, and carbonic acids path (rubratoxins. Aflatoxins are the most toxigenic metabolites of fungi, produced mostly by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus species. Aflatoxins appear more frequently in food in the tropic and subtropic regions, while the food in Europe is more exposed to also very toxic ochratoxin A producing fungi (A. ochraceus and some Penicillium species. The agricultural products can be contaminated by fungi both before and after the harvest. The primary mycotoxicoses in humans are the result of direct intake of vegetable products contaminated by mycotoxins, while the secondary mycotoxicoses are caused by products of animal origin. The risk of the presence of fungi and mycotoxin in food is increasing, having in mind that some of them are highly thermoresistent, and the temperatures of usual food sterilization is not sufficient for their termination. The paper presents the review of most important mycotoxins, their biologic effects

  13. Removal of crude petroleum hydrocarbons by heterotrophic bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitrogenous fertilizer (NPK) plant effluents from NAFCON were used in amending plots of land experimentally polluted with crude oil. Counts of heterotrophic bacteria (THBC) and fungi (TF), and of petroleum utilizing bacteria (PUB) and fungi (PUF) were monitored during an 8 weeks period. Counts obtained showed that ...

  14. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria......, Thiomargarita namibiensis, with a diameter of 750 mum. All bacteria, including those that swim around in the environment, obtain their food molecules by molecular diffusion. Only the fastest and largest swimmers known, Thiovulum majus, are able to significantly increase their food supply by motility...... and by actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria...

  15. [Interactions between invasive plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yan-fang; Guo, Shao-xia; Li, Min

    2011-09-01

    The invasion of invasive plants changes the biological community structure in their invaded lands, leading to the biodiversity loss. As an important component of soil microorganisms in terrestrial ecosystem, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can affect the growth performance of invasive plants. This kind of specific relations between AM fungi and invasive plants also implies that AM fungi can affect plant invasion. On the other hand, the invasion of invasive plants can affect the community structure and function of AM fungi. This paper summarized the species and harms of invasive plants in China, and discussed the relationships between AM fungi and invasive plants invasion, including the roles of AM fungi in the processes of invasive plants invasion, the effects of the invasion on AM fungi, and the interactive mechanisms between the invasion and AM fungi.

  16. Metabolites from Alternaria Fungi and Their Bioactivities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligang Zhou

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Alternaria is a cosmopolitan fungal genus widely distributing in soil and organic matter. It includes saprophytic, endophytic and pathogenic species. At least 268 metabolites from Alternaria fungi have been reported in the past few decades. They mainly include nitrogen-containing metabolites, steroids, terpenoids, pyranones, quinones, and phenolics. This review aims to briefly summarize the structurally different metabolites produced by Alternaria fungi, as well as their occurrences, biological activities and functions. Some considerations related to synthesis, biosynthesis, production and applications of the metabolites from Alternaria fungi are also discussed.

  17. Filamentous Fungi Fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Anders; Stocks, Stuart; Woodley, John

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous fungi (including microorganisms such as Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oryzae) represent an enormously important platform for industrial fermentation. Two particularly valuable features are the high yield coefficients and the ability to secrete products. However, the filamentous...... morphology, together with non-Newtonian rheological properties (shear thinning), result in poor oxygen transfer unless sufficient energy is provided to the fermentation. While genomic research may improve the organisms, there is no doubt that to enable further application in future it will be necessary...... to match such research with studies of oxygen transfer and energy supply to high viscosity fluids. Hence, the implementation of innovative solutions (some of which in principle are already possible) will be essential to ensure the further development of such fermentations....

  18. Proteomics of Filamentous Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passel, van M.W.J.; Schaap, P.J.; Graaff, de L.H.

    2013-01-01

    Filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae traditionally have had an important role in providing enzymes and enzyme cocktails that are used in food industry. In recent years the genome sequences of many filamentous fungi have become available. This combined with

  19. Marine fungi: A critique

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, S.; Raghukumar, C.

    in the sea have been ignored to a large extent. However, several instances of terrestrial species of fungi, active in marine environment have been reported. The arguments to support the view that terrestrial species of fungi by virtue of their physiological...

  20. Terpenoids from Endophytic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jucimar Jorgeane de Souza

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This work reviews the production of terpenoids by endophytic fungi and their biological activities, in period of 2006 to 2010. Sixty five sesquiterpenes, 45 diterpenes, five meroterpenes and 12 other terpenes, amounting to 127 terpenoids were isolated from endophytic fungi.

  1. Isolation, identification and antimicrobial activity of propolis-associated fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Giovanni Gontijo; Pfenning, Ludwig Heinrich; de Moura, Fabiana; Salgado, Mírian; Takahashi, Jacqueline Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is a natural product widely known for its medicinal properties. In this work, fungi present on propolis samples were isolated, identified and tested for the production of antimicrobial metabolites. Twenty-two fungal isolates were obtained, some of which were identified as Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus flavus, Bipolaris hawaiiensis, Fusarium merismoides, Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Penicillium citrinum, Penicillium crustosum, Penicillium janthinellum, Penicillium purpurogenum, Pestalotiopsis palustris, Tetracoccosporium paxianum and Trichoderma koningii. These fungi were grown in liquid media to obtain crude extracts that were evaluated for their antibiotic activity against pathogenic bacteria, yeast and Cladosporium cladosporioides and A. flavus. The most active extract was obtained from L. theobromae (minimum inhibitory concentration = 64 μg/mL against Listeria monocitogenes). Some extracts showed to be more active than the positive control in the inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus and L. monocitogenes. Therefore, propolis is a promising source of fungi, which produces active agents against relevant food poisoning bacteria and crop-associated fungi.

  2. Biotechnological potential of Clostridium butyricum bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Szymanowska-Powałowska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In response to demand from industry for microorganisms with auspicious biotechnological potential, a worldwide interest has developed in bacteria and fungi isolation. Microorganisms of interesting metabolic properties include non-pathogenic bacteria of the genus Clostridium, particularly C. acetobutylicum, C. butyricum and C. pasteurianum. A well-known property of C. butyricum is their ability to produce butyric acid, as well as effectively convert glycerol to 1,3-propanediol (38.2 g/L. A conversion rate of 0.66 mol 1,3-propanediol/mol of glycerol has been obtained. Results of the studies described in the present paper broaden our knowledge of characteristic features of C. butyricum specific isolates in terms of their phylogenetic affiliation, fermentation capacity and antibacterial properties.

  3. Mucoralean fungi for sustainable production of bioethanol and biologically active molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satari, Behzad; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2018-02-01

    Mucoralean fungi are suitable microorganisms for the sustainable production of food, fodder, and fuels from inexpensive natural resources. Ethanol-producing Mucorales are particularly advantageous for second-generation ethanol production in comparison to the conventional ethanolic yeasts and bacteria. They are able to ferment a wide range of sugars to a range of valuable products, while they are typically resistance against the inhibitors available in different substrates, including untreated lignocellulosic hydrolysates. In addition to a high ethanol yield, the fungi produce several commercially valuable by-products, including chitosan, microbial oil (mainly polyunsaturated fatty acids), and protein. Moreover, the fungal extracts can replace the expensive nutrients required in fermentation. Besides, their morphologies can be altered from filamentous to yeast like and are adjustable based on the process requirement. The focus of this review is on applying Mucorales in producing ethanol and the biomass by-products thereof.

  4. Advances in Genomics of Entomopathogenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J B; St Leger, R J; Wang, C

    2016-01-01

    Fungi are the commonest pathogens of insects and crucial regulators of insect populations. The rapid advance of genome technologies has revolutionized our understanding of entomopathogenic fungi with multiple Metarhizium spp. sequenced, as well as Beauveria bassiana, Cordyceps militaris, and Ophiocordyceps sinensis among others. Phylogenomic analysis suggests that the ancestors of many of these fungi were plant endophytes or pathogens, with entomopathogenicity being an acquired characteristic. These fungi now occupy a wide range of habitats and hosts, and their genomes have provided a wealth of information on the evolution of virulence-related characteristics, as well as the protein families and genomic structure associated with ecological and econutritional heterogeneity, genome evolution, and host range diversification. In particular, their evolutionary transition from plant pathogens or endophytes to insect pathogens provides a novel perspective on how new functional mechanisms important for host switching and virulence are acquired. Importantly, genomic resources have helped make entomopathogenic fungi ideal model systems for answering basic questions in parasitology, entomology, and speciation. At the same time, identifying the selective forces that act upon entomopathogen fitness traits could underpin both the development of new mycoinsecticides and further our understanding of the natural roles of these fungi in nature. These roles frequently include mutualistic relationships with plants. Genomics has also facilitated the rapid identification of genes encoding biologically useful molecules, with implications for the development of pharmaceuticals and the use of these fungi as bioreactors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Microscopic fungi as significant sesquiterpene emission sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    HorváTh, Eszter; Hoffer, AndráS.; SebőK, Flóra; Dobolyi, Csaba; Szoboszlay, SáNdor; Kriszt, BaláZs; GelencséR, AndráS.

    2011-08-01

    Among the volatile organic compounds emitted by vegetation, isoprene, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and their derivatives are thought to contribute to secondary organic aerosol formation. Although it is well known that microscopic fungi globally turn over vast amount of carbon by decomposing the organic matter in the soil, vegetation is considered as the exclusive source of biogenic secondary organic aerosol precursors in various atmospheric models. Secondary fungal metabolites including sesquiterpenes have been recognized as characteristic volatile organic compounds emitted by fungi. In the present study, we investigated the rates of sesquiterpene emission of microscopic fungi to establish their potential significance compared to those from vegetation. To sample the headspace of the pure culture of some common fungi, we used an aseptic flow-through apparatus designed for solid phase microextraction in our laboratory. The identified sesquiterpenes in the headspace extracts were quantified for eight strains of microscopic fungi belonging to four different genera. Our results showed that microscopic fungi emit a considerable amount of sesquiterpenes. Based on our first estimations microscopic fungi may be considered as potentially significant sesquiterpene emission sources whose contribution to secondary organic aerosol formation may be comparable to that of vegetation.

  6. Patents on Endophytic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, M; Gupta, D; Gupta, U; Faraz, R; Sandhu, S S

    2017-01-01

    Endophytic fungi are taxonomically and ecologically heterogeneous group of organisms, mainly belonging to the Ascomycotina and Deuteromycotina. Endophytes usually produce the enzymes necessary for the colonization of plant tissues. Endophytes are able to utilize components of plant cells without disturbing host metabolism, which is confirmed by isozyme analysis and studies on substrate utilization. The patents related to enzymes and metabolites produced by endophytic fungi are associated with their ecological significance. Application of metabolites and growth promoting factors produced from endophytic fungi, in the pharmaceutical and agricultural industries, is now well established. The patents on secretion of extracellular enzymes in vitro by endophytic fungi needed for cell wall degradation, support the hypothesis that fungal endophytes represent a group of organisms specialized to live within plant tissue. This review presents the patents granted on different aspects of endophytic fungi for the last 11 years. This expresses the scenario and impact of these patents regarding significance in human society. In the last few years, research and inventions regarding the different aspects of endophytic fungi beneficial for host plant as well as for human beings have been carried out, which is supported by the increasing number of patents granted on endophytic fungi. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Linking plants, fungi and soil mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Anil; Graf, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Plants provide important functions in respect soil strength and are increasingly considered for slope stabilisation within eco-engineering methods, particularly to prevent superficial soil failure. The protective functions include hydrological regulation through interception and evapo-transpiration as well as mechanical stabilisation through root reinforcement and, to a certain extent, chemical stabilisation through sticky metabolites. The ever-growing application of plants in slope stabilisation demanded more precise information of the vegetation effects and, concomitant, led the models for quantifying the reinforcement shoot up like mushrooms. However, so far, the framework and interrelationships for both the role of plants and the quantification concepts have not been thoroughly analysed and comprehensively considered, respectively, often resulting in unsatisfactory results. Although it seems obvious and is implicitly presupposed that the plant specific functions related to slope stability require growth and development, this is anything but given, particularly under the often hostile conditions dominating on bare and steep slopes. There, the superficial soil layer is often characterised by a lack of fines and missing medium-sized and fine pores due to an unstable soil matrix, predominantly formed by coarse grains. Low water retention capacity and substantial leaching of nutrients are the adverse consequences. Given this general set-up, sustainable plant growth and, particularly, root development is virtually unachievable. At exactly this point mycorrhizal fungi, the symbiotic partners of almost all plants used in eco-engineering, come into play. Though, they are probably well-known within the eco-engineering community, mycorrhizal fungi lead a humble existence. This is in spite of the fact that they supply their hosts with water and nutrients, improving the plant's ability to master otherwise unbridgeable environmental conditions. However, in order to support

  8. Phylogenomic evolutionary surveys of subtilase superfamily genes in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Gu, Fei; Wu, Runian; Yang, JinKui; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2017-03-30

    Subtilases belong to a superfamily of serine proteases which are ubiquitous in fungi and are suspected to have developed distinct functional properties to help fungi adapt to different ecological niches. In this study, we conducted a large-scale phylogenomic survey of subtilase protease genes in 83 whole genome sequenced fungal species in order to identify the evolutionary patterns and subsequent functional divergences of different subtilase families among the main lineages of the fungal kingdom. Our comparative genomic analyses of the subtilase superfamily indicated that extensive gene duplications, losses and functional diversifications have occurred in fungi, and that the four families of subtilase enzymes in fungi, including proteinase K-like, Pyrolisin, kexin and S53, have distinct evolutionary histories which may have facilitated the adaptation of fungi to a broad array of life strategies. Our study provides new insights into the evolution of the subtilase superfamily in fungi and expands our understanding of the evolution of fungi with different lifestyles.

  9. Consequences of introducing requirements for tanks prepared for solar heating in the building regulations including examinations of bacteria risks; Konsekvenser ved solvarmeforberedte beholdere i bygningsreglementet herunder undersoegelse af risici for bakteriegener

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellehauge, K.; Kaersgaard, K. [Teknologisk Inst., SolEnergiCentret, Taastrup (Denmark); Bagh, L. [Teknologisk Inst., Miljoedivisionen (Denmark)

    2000-07-01

    A larger dissemination of solar heating units must be expected, if requirements for tanks prepared for solar heating are introduced in the building regulations. However, this may have effects, which have to be discussed beforehand, just as it has to be decided how the regulations can be put into practice. 1) The aim is to examine and discuss the consequences of introducing requirements for tanks prepared for solar heating in the building regulations including connections with other legislation, potential, consequences for the building services sector and proposals for rules in the building regulations (exceptions etc.) 2) Furthermore, the aim is to explain the risk of bacteria in tanks prepared for solar heating according to existing or new additional studies. It must be explained whether tanks prepared for solar heating will result in an increased number of bacteria in the water compared to traditional hot water tanks and - if possible - whether the change is caused by the increased volume of the tank (the water stays in the tank for a longer period) or changed temperature conditions which favours growth of bacteria at a certain incubation temperature. (EHS)

  10. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds Posted April 2, 2014 Your ... hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health ...

  11. Interkingdom gene transfer of a hybrid NPS/PKS from bacteria to filamentous Ascomycota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Lawrence

    Full Text Available Nonribosomal peptides (NRPs and polyketides (PKs are ecologically important secondary metabolites produced by bacteria and fungi using multidomain enzymes called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs and polyketide synthases (PKSs, respectively. Previous phylogenetic analyses of fungal NRPSs and PKSs have suggested that a few of these genes were acquired by fungi via horizontal gene transfer (HGT from bacteria, including a hybrid NPS/PKS found in Cochliobolus heterostrophus (Dothideomycetes, Ascomycota. Here, we identify this hybrid gene in fungi representing two additional classes of Ascomycota (Aspergillus spp., Microsporum canis, Arthroderma spp., and Trichophyton spp., Eurotiomycetes; Chaetomium spp. and Metarhizium spp., Sordariomycetes and use phylogenetic analyses of the most highly conserved domains from NRPSs (adenylation (A domain and PKSs (ketoacyl synthase (KS domain to examine the hypothesis that the hybrid NPS7/PKS24 was acquired by fungi from bacteria via HGT relatively early in the evolution of the Pezizomycotina. Our results reveal a unique ancestry of the A domain and KS domain in the hybrid gene relative to known fungal NRPSs and PKSs, provide strong evidence for HGT of the hybrid gene from a putative bacterial donor in the Burkholderiales, and suggest the HGT event occurred early in the evolution of the filamentous Ascomycota.

  12. Fungi from industrial tannins: potential application in biotransformation and bioremediation of tannery wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigione, Valeria; Trocini, Bruno; Spina, Federica; Poli, Anna; Romanisio, Davide; Giovando, Samuele; Varese, Giovanna Cristina

    2018-03-18

    Tannins are a complex family of polyphenolic compounds, widely distributed in the plant kingdom where they act as growth inhibitors towards many microorganisms including bacteria, yeasts, and fungi. Tannins are one of the major components of tannery wastewaters and may cause serious environmental pollution. In the present study, four different tannins (the hydrolysable chestnut ellagitannin and tara gallotannin and the condensed quebracho and wattle tannins) were characterized from a mycological point of view with the aim of selecting fungal strains capable of growing in the presence of high tannin concentration and thus potentially useful in industrial biotransformations of these compounds or in the bioremediation of tannery wastewaters. A total of 125 isolates of filamentous fungi belonging to 10 species and four genera (Aspergillus, Paecilomyces, Penicillium, and Talaromyces) were isolated from the tannin industrial preparations. Miniaturized biotransformation tests were set up with 10 fungal strains and the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis pointed out a strong activity of all the tested fungi on both chestnut and tara tannins. Two strains (Aspergillus tubingensis MUT 990 and Paecilomyces variotii MUT 1125), tested against a real tannery wastewater, were particularly efficient in chemical oxygen demand (COD) and tannin removal (> 60%), with a detoxification above 74%. These results indicate that these fungi are potentially exploitable in the treatment of tannery wastewaters.

  13. Genomic Encyclopedia of Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-08-10

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 150 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  14. Pigments in Thermophilic fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Somasundaram, T; Rao, Sanjay SR; Maheshwari, R

    1986-01-01

    UV and visible absorption spectra of thermophilic fungi were obtained by photoacoustic spectroscopy. Based on these data as well as on the chem. properties and IR spectra, it is suggested that the pigments may be hydroxylated polycyclic quinones.

  15. Adaptive Immunity to Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, Marcel; Deepe, George S.; Klein, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Only a handful of the more than 100,000 fungal species on our planet cause disease in humans, yet the number of life-threatening fungal infections in patients has recently skyrocketed as a result of advances in medical care that often suppress immunity intensely. This emerging crisis has created pressing needs to clarify immune defense mechanisms against fungi, with the ultimate goal of therapeutic applications. Herein, we describe recent insights in understanding the mammalian immune defenses deployed against pathogenic fungi. The review focuses on adaptive immune responses to the major medically important fungi and emphasizes how dendritic cells and subsets in various anatomic compartments respond to fungi, recognize their molecular patterns, and signal responses that nurture and shape the differentiation of T cell subsets and B cells. Also emphasized is how the latter deploy effector and regulatory mechanisms that eliminate these nasty invaders while also constraining collateral damage to vital tissue. PMID:22224780

  16. Maarja Unduski 'Fungi'

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    24. nov.-st Linnagaleriis Tallinnas Maarja Unduski kolmas isiknäitus 'Fungi'. Eksponeeritud hiigelseened ja rida värviliste lehtedega ramatuid, mille kaante valmistamisel on autor esmakordselt kasutanud ka lõuendit ja paberreljeefi.

  17. Manglicolous fungi from India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chinnaraj, S.; Untawale, A.G.

    This paper deals with nine Ascomycetous fungi viz. Rhizophila marina Hyde et Jones, Trematosphaeria striatispora Hyde, Lineolata rhizophorae (Kohlm. et. Kohlm.) Kohlm. et. Volkm.-Kohlm., Caryosporella rhizophorae Kohlm., Passeriniella savoryellopsis...

  18. Mycorrhiza helper bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deveau, Aurelie [French National Insitute for Agricultural Research (INRA); Labbe, Jessy [ORNL

    2016-10-01

    This chapter focuses on the Mycorrhiza Helper Bacteria (MHB), a generic name given to bacteria which stimulate the formation of mycorrhizal symbiosis. By extension, some bacterial strains that positively impact the functioning of mycorrhizal symbiosis are also called MHB. These bacteria have applicative interests, as they indirectly improve the health and growth of tree seedlings. MHB are not restricted to a specific type of ecosystem, but are rather generalist in the way that they associate with both herbaceous and woody mycorrhizal plants from boreal, temperate, arid and tropical ecosystems. However, understanding the molecular mechanisms and their specificities will help us to know more about the ecology of the MHB. The process of acquisition varies between fungal species; while ectomycorrhizal fungi most probably recurrently acquire them from the environment, the association between bacterial endosymbionts and Glomeromycota probably dates back to very ancient times, and has since been vertically transmitted.

  19. Entomopathogenic bacteria use multiple mechanisms for bioactive peptide library design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiaofeng; Nowak, Sarah; Wesche, Frank; Bischoff, Iris; Kaiser, Marcel; Fürst, Robert; Bode, Helge. B.

    2017-04-01

    The production of natural product compound libraries has been observed in nature for different organisms such as bacteria, fungi and plants; however, little is known about the mechanisms generating such chemically diverse libraries. Here we report mechanisms leading to the biosynthesis of the chemically diverse rhabdopeptide/xenortide peptides (RXPs). They are exclusively present in entomopathogenic bacteria of the genera Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus that live in symbiosis with nematodes delivering them to insect prey, which is killed and utilized for nutrition by both nematodes and bacteria. Chemical diversity of the biologically active RXPs results from a combination of iterative and flexible use of monomodular nonribosomal peptide synthetases including substrate promiscuity, enzyme cross-talk and enzyme stoichiometry as shown by in vivo and in vitro experiments. Together, this highlights several of nature's methods for diversification, or evolution, of natural products and sheds light on the biosynthesis of the bioactive RXPs.

  20. Important mycotoxins and the fungi which produce them

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Thrane, Ulf; Samson, R.A

    2006-01-01

    The assessment of the relationship between species and mycotoxins production has proven to be very difficult. The modern literature is cluttered with examples of species purported to make particular mycotoxins, but where the association is incorrect. In some cases, mycotoxins have even been named......, are ever present problems in the food industry around the world. In defining mycotoxins, we exclude fungal metabolites which are active against bacteria, protozoa, and lower animals including insects....... in acceptance, that determining true associations has become very difficult. It does not need to be emphasised how important it is that these associations be known accurately. The possible presence of mycotoxigenic fungi in foods, and rational decisions on the status of foods suspected to contain mycotoxins...

  1. Effector proteins of rust fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petre, Benjamin; Joly, David L; Duplessis, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Rust fungi include many species that are devastating crop pathogens. To develop resistant plants, a better understanding of rust virulence factors, or effector proteins, is needed. Thus far, only six rust effector proteins have been described: AvrP123, AvrP4, AvrL567, AvrM, RTP1, and PGTAUSPE-10-1. Although some are well established model proteins used to investigate mechanisms of immune receptor activation (avirulence activities) or entry into plant cells, how they work inside host tissues to promote fungal growth remains unknown. The genome sequences of four rust fungi (two Melampsoraceae and two Pucciniaceae) have been analyzed so far. Genome-wide analyses of these species, as well as transcriptomics performed on a broader range of rust fungi, revealed hundreds of small secreted proteins considered as rust candidate secreted effector proteins (CSEPs). The rust community now needs high-throughput approaches (effectoromics) to accelerate effector discovery/characterization and to better understand how they function in planta. However, this task is challenging due to the non-amenability of rust pathosystems (obligate biotrophs infecting crop plants) to traditional molecular genetic approaches mainly due to difficulties in culturing these species in vitro. The use of heterologous approaches should be promoted in the future.

  2. Ecology of fungi in the denitrification zones of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Manohar, C.S.

    The microbial process, denitrification was considered to be an inherent character of a few specialized groups of bacteria. But recently, the involvement of micro-eukaryotes such as fungi and foraminiferans are reported (Takaya et al., 2002; Risgaard...

  3. Fungi producing significant mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of microfungi that are known to cause sickness or death in humans or animals. Although many such toxic metabolites are known, it is generally agreed that only a few are significant in causing disease: aflatoxins, fumonisins, ochratoxin A, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, and ergot alkaloids. These toxins are produced by just a few species from the common genera Aspergillus, Penicillium, Fusarium, and Claviceps. All Aspergillus and Penicillium species either are commensals, growing in crops without obvious signs of pathogenicity, or invade crops after harvest and produce toxins during drying and storage. In contrast, the important Fusarium and Claviceps species infect crops before harvest. The most important Aspergillus species, occurring in warmer climates, are A. flavus and A. parasiticus, which produce aflatoxins in maize, groundnuts, tree nuts, and, less frequently, other commodities. The main ochratoxin A producers, A. ochraceus and A. carbonarius, commonly occur in grapes, dried vine fruits, wine, and coffee. Penicillium verrucosum also produces ochratoxin A but occurs only in cool temperate climates, where it infects small grains. F. verticillioides is ubiquitous in maize, with an endophytic nature, and produces fumonisins, which are generally more prevalent when crops are under drought stress or suffer excessive insect damage. It has recently been shown that Aspergillus niger also produces fumonisins, and several commodities may be affected. F. graminearum, which is the major producer of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone, is pathogenic on maize, wheat, and barley and produces these toxins whenever it infects these grains before harvest. Also included is a short section on Claviceps purpurea, which produces sclerotia among the seeds in grasses, including wheat, barley, and triticale. The main thrust of the chapter contains information on the identification of these fungi and their morphological characteristics, as well as factors

  4. Diversity and antimicrobial activity of culturable endophytic fungi isolated from moso bamboo seeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ye Shen

    Full Text Available Bamboos, regarded as therapeutic agents in ethnomedicine, have been used to inhibit inflammation and enhance natural immunity for a long time in Asia, and there are many bamboo associated fungi with medical and edible value. In the present study, a total of 350 fungal strains were isolated from the uncommon moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis seeds for the first time. The molecular diversity of these endophytic fungi was investigated and bioactive compound producers were screened for the first time. All the fungal endophytes were categorized into 69 morphotypes according to culturable characteristics and their internal transcriber spacer (ITS regions were analyzed by BLAST search with the NCBI database. The fungal isolates showed high diversity and were divided in Ascomycota (98.0% and Basidiomycota (2.0%, including at least 19 genera in nine orders. Four particular genera were considered to be newly recorded bambusicolous fungi, including Leptosphaerulina, Simplicillium, Sebacina and an unknown genus in Basidiomycetes. Furthermore, inhibitory effects against clinical pathogens and phytopathogens were screened preliminarily and strains B09 (Cladosporium sp., B34 (Curvularia sp., B35 (undefined genus 1, B38 (Penicillium sp. and zzz816 (Shiraia sp. displayed broad-spectrum activity against clinical bacteria and yeasts by the agar diffusion method. The crude extracts of isolates B09, B34, B35, B38 and zzz816 under submerged fermentation, also demonstrated various levels of bioactivities against bambusicolous pathogenic fungi. This study is the first report on the antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi associated with moso bamboo seeds, and the results show that they could be exploited as a potential source of bioactive compounds and plant defense activators. In addition, it is the first time that strains of Shiraia sp. have been isolated and cultured from moso bamboo seeds, and one of them (zzz816 could produce hypocrellin A at high yield, which

  5. Diversity and antimicrobial activity of culturable endophytic fungi isolated from moso bamboo seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao-Ye; Cheng, Yan-Lin; Cai, Chun-Ju; Fan, Li; Gao, Jian; Hou, Cheng-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Bamboos, regarded as therapeutic agents in ethnomedicine, have been used to inhibit inflammation and enhance natural immunity for a long time in Asia, and there are many bamboo associated fungi with medical and edible value. In the present study, a total of 350 fungal strains were isolated from the uncommon moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) seeds for the first time. The molecular diversity of these endophytic fungi was investigated and bioactive compound producers were screened for the first time. All the fungal endophytes were categorized into 69 morphotypes according to culturable characteristics and their internal transcriber spacer (ITS) regions were analyzed by BLAST search with the NCBI database. The fungal isolates showed high diversity and were divided in Ascomycota (98.0%) and Basidiomycota (2.0%), including at least 19 genera in nine orders. Four particular genera were considered to be newly recorded bambusicolous fungi, including Leptosphaerulina, Simplicillium, Sebacina and an unknown genus in Basidiomycetes. Furthermore, inhibitory effects against clinical pathogens and phytopathogens were screened preliminarily and strains B09 (Cladosporium sp.), B34 (Curvularia sp.), B35 (undefined genus 1), B38 (Penicillium sp.) and zzz816 (Shiraia sp.) displayed broad-spectrum activity against clinical bacteria and yeasts by the agar diffusion method. The crude extracts of isolates B09, B34, B35, B38 and zzz816 under submerged fermentation, also demonstrated various levels of bioactivities against bambusicolous pathogenic fungi. This study is the first report on the antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi associated with moso bamboo seeds, and the results show that they could be exploited as a potential source of bioactive compounds and plant defense activators. In addition, it is the first time that strains of Shiraia sp. have been isolated and cultured from moso bamboo seeds, and one of them (zzz816) could produce hypocrellin A at high yield, which is

  6. Genetically Engineering Entomopathogenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H; Lovett, B; Fang, W

    2016-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi have been developed as environmentally friendly alternatives to chemical insecticides in biocontrol programs for agricultural pests and vectors of disease. However, mycoinsecticides currently have a small market share due to low virulence and inconsistencies in their performance. Genetic engineering has made it possible to significantly improve the virulence of fungi and their tolerance to adverse conditions. Virulence enhancement has been achieved by engineering fungi to express insect proteins and insecticidal proteins/peptides from insect predators and other insect pathogens, or by overexpressing the pathogen's own genes. Importantly, protein engineering can be used to mix and match functional domains from diverse genes sourced from entomopathogenic fungi and other organisms, producing insecticidal proteins with novel characteristics. Fungal tolerance to abiotic stresses, especially UV radiation, has been greatly improved by introducing into entomopathogens a photoreactivation system from an archaean and pigment synthesis pathways from nonentomopathogenic fungi. Conversely, gene knockout strategies have produced strains with reduced ecological fitness as recipients for genetic engineering to improve virulence; the resulting strains are hypervirulent, but will not persist in the environment. Coupled with their natural insect specificity, safety concerns can also be mitigated by using safe effector proteins with selection marker genes removed after transformation. With the increasing public concern over the continued use of synthetic chemical insecticides and growing public acceptance of genetically modified organisms, new types of biological insecticides produced by genetic engineering offer a range of environmentally friendly options for cost-effective control of insect pests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nematode-Trapping Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Meichun; Liu, Xingzhong

    2017-01-01

    Nematode-trapping fungi are a unique and intriguing group of carnivorous microorganisms that can trap and digest nematodes by means of specialized trapping structures. They can develop diverse trapping devices, such as adhesive hyphae, adhesive knobs, adhesive networks, constricting rings, and nonconstricting rings. Nematode-trapping fungi have been found in all regions of the world, from the tropics to Antarctica, from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems. They play an important ecological role in regulating nematode dynamics in soil. Molecular phylogenetic studies have shown that the majority of nematode-trapping fungi belong to a monophyletic group in the order Orbiliales (Ascomycota). Nematode-trapping fungi serve as an excellent model system for understanding fungal evolution and interaction between fungi and nematodes. With the development of molecular techniques and genome sequencing, their evolutionary origins and divergence, and the mechanisms underlying fungus-nematode interactions have been well studied. In recent decades, an increasing concern about the environmental hazards of using chemical nematicides has led to the application of these biological control agents as a rapidly developing component of crop protection.

  8. ANTIMALARIAL COMPOUNDS FROM ENDOPHYTIC FUNGI OF BROTOWALI (Tinaspora crispa L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elfita Elfita

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The term endophytic refers to a bacteria or a fungi microorganism that colonizes interior organs of plants, but does not have pathogenic effects on its host. In their symbiotic association, the host plant protects and feeds the endophytic, which ";in return"; produces bioactive metabolites to enhance the growth and compotitiveness of the host and to protect it from herbivores and plant pathogens. Plants with ethnobotanical history, for example brotowali (Tinaspora crispa L, are likely candidates to find bioactive compounds. Two alkaloids have been isolated from endophytic fungi of brotowali. The molecular structures of the isolated compounds were determined based on spectroscopic data, including UV, IR, NMR 1D and 2D spectrum. The compounds were determined as: 7- hydroxy-3,4,5-trimethyl-6-on-2,3,4,6-tetrahydroisoquinoline-8-carboxylic acid (1 and 2,5-dihydroxy-1-(hydroxymethylpyridin-4-on (2. The compound has antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum 3D7, with IC50 values 0,129 µM and 0,127 µM.

  9. Immunity against fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionakis, Michail S.; Iliev, Iliyan D.; Hohl, Tobias M.

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi cause a wide range of syndromes in immune-competent and immune-compromised individuals, with life-threatening disease primarily seen in humans with HIV/AIDS and in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapies for cancer, autoimmunity, and end-organ failure. The discovery that specific primary immune deficiencies manifest with fungal infections and the development of animal models of mucosal and invasive mycoses have facilitated insight into fungus-specific recognition, signaling, effector pathways, and adaptive immune responses. Progress in deciphering the molecular and cellular basis of immunity against fungi is guiding preclinical studies into vaccine and immune reconstitution strategies for vulnerable patient groups. Furthermore, recent work has begun to address the role of endogenous fungal communities in human health and disease. In this review, we summarize a contemporary understanding of protective immunity against fungi. PMID:28570272

  10. Chapter 4: Genetic Identification of Fungi Involved in Wood Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant Kirker

    2014-01-01

    Wood decay is a complex process that involves contributions from molds, bacteria, decay fungi, and often insects. The first step in the accurate diagnosis of decay is identification of the causal agents, but wood decay in the strictest sense (white and brown rot) is caused by cryptic fungal species that are very difficult to identify using traditional methods. Genetic...

  11. Genome Studies on Nematophagous and Entomogenous Fungi in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Cheng, Xiaoli; Liu, Xingzhong; Xiang, Meichun

    2016-01-01

    The nematophagous and entomogenous fungi are natural enemies of nematodes and insects and have been utilized by humans to control agricultural and forestry pests. Some of these fungi have been or are being developed as biological control agents in China and worldwide. Several important nematophagous and entomogenous fungi, including nematode-trapping fungi (Arthrobotrys oligospora and Drechslerella stenobrocha), nematode endoparasite (Hirsutella minnesotensis), insect pathogens (Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium spp.) and Chinese medicinal fungi (Ophiocordyceps sinensis and Cordyceps militaris), have been genome sequenced and extensively analyzed in China. The biology, evolution, and pharmaceutical application of these fungi and their interacting with host nematodes and insects revealed by genomes, comparing genomes coupled with transcriptomes are summarized and reviewed in this paper. PMID:29376926

  12. Genome Studies on Nematophagous and Entomogenous Fungi in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The nematophagous and entomogenous fungi are natural enemies of nematodes and insects and have been utilized by humans to control agricultural and forestry pests. Some of these fungi have been or are being developed as biological control agents in China and worldwide. Several important nematophagous and entomogenous fungi, including nematode-trapping fungi (Arthrobotrys oligospora and Drechslerella stenobrocha, nematode endoparasite (Hirsutella minnesotensis, insect pathogens (Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium spp. and Chinese medicinal fungi (Ophiocordyceps sinensis and Cordyceps militaris, have been genome sequenced and extensively analyzed in China. The biology, evolution, and pharmaceutical application of these fungi and their interacting with host nematodes and insects revealed by genomes, comparing genomes coupled with transcriptomes are summarized and reviewed in this paper.

  13. Comparative genome analysis of Basidiomycete fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Henrissat, Bernard; Nagy, Laszlo; Brown, Daren; Held, Benjamin; Baker, Scott; Blanchette, Robert; Boussau, Bastien; Doty, Sharon L.; Fagnan, Kirsten; Floudas, Dimitris; Levasseur, Anthony; Manning, Gerard; Martin, Francis; Morin, Emmanuelle; Otillar, Robert; Pisabarro, Antonio; Walton, Jonathan; Wolfe, Ken; Hibbett, David; Grigoriev, Igor

    2013-08-07

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes symbionts, pathogens, and saprotrophs including the majority of wood decaying and ectomycorrhizal species. To better understand the genetic diversity of this phylum we compared the genomes of 35 basidiomycetes including 6 newly sequenced genomes. These genomes span extremes of genome size, gene number, and repeat content. Analysis of core genes reveals that some 48percent of basidiomycete proteins are unique to the phylum with nearly half of those (22percent) found in only one organism. Correlations between lifestyle and certain gene families are evident. Phylogenetic patterns of plant biomass-degrading genes in Agaricomycotina suggest a continuum rather than a dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. Based on phylogenetically-informed PCA analysis of wood decay genes, we predict that that Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea have properties similar to white rot species, although neither has typical ligninolytic class II fungal peroxidases (PODs). This prediction is supported by growth assays in which both fungi exhibit wood decay with white rot-like characteristics. Based on this, we suggest that the white/brown rot dichotomy may be inadequate to describe the full range of wood decaying fungi. Analysis of the rate of discovery of proteins with no or few homologs suggests the value of continued sequencing of basidiomycete fungi.

  14. Diversity of Mn oxides produced by Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santelli, Cara M.; Webb, Samuel M.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2011-05-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are environmentally abundant, highly reactive mineral phases that mediate the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, contaminants, carbon, and numerous other elements. Despite the belief that microorganisms (specifically bacteria and fungi) are responsible for the majority of Mn oxide formation in the environment, the impact of microbial species, physiology, and growth stage on Mn oxide formation is largely unresolved. Here, we couple microscopic and spectroscopic techniques to characterize the Mn oxides produced by four different species of Mn(II)-oxidizing Ascomycete fungi ( Plectosphaerella cucumerina strain DS2psM2a2 , Pyrenochaeta sp. DS3sAY3a, Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a, and Acremonium strictum strain DS1bioAY4a) isolated from acid mine drainage treatment systems in central Pennsylvania. The site of Mn oxide formation varies greatly among the fungi, including deposition on hyphal surfaces, at the base of reproductive structures (e.g., fruiting bodies), and on envisaged extracellular polymers adjacent to the cell. The primary product of Mn(II) oxidation for all species growing under the same chemical and physical conditions is a nanoparticulate, poorly-crystalline hexagonal birnessite-like phase resembling synthetic δ-MnO 2. The phylogeny and growth conditions (planktonic versus surface-attached) of the fungi, however, impact the conversion of the initial phyllomanganate to more ordered phases, such as todorokite ( A. strictum strain DS1bioAY4a) and triclinic birnessite ( Stagonospora sp. SRC1lsM3a). Our findings reveal that the species of Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi impacts the size, morphology, and structure of Mn biooxides, which will likely translate to large differences in the reactivity of the Mn oxide phases.

  15. LTR retrotransposons in fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Muszewska

    Full Text Available Transposable elements with long terminal direct repeats (LTR TEs are one of the best studied groups of mobile elements. They are ubiquitous elements present in almost all eukaryotic genomes. Their number and state of conservation can be a highlight of genome dynamics. We searched all published fungal genomes for LTR-containing retrotransposons, including both complete, functional elements and remnant copies. We identified a total of over 66,000 elements, all of which belong to the Ty1/Copia or Ty3/Gypsy superfamilies. Most of the detected Gypsy elements represent Chromoviridae, i.e. they carry a chromodomain in the pol ORF. We analyzed our data from a genome-ecology perspective, looking at the abundance of various types of LTR TEs in individual genomes and at the highest-copy element from each genome. The TE content is very variable among the analyzed genomes. Some genomes are very scarce in LTR TEs (8000 elements. The data shows that transposon expansions in fungi usually involve an increase both in the copy number of individual elements and in the number of element types. The majority of the highest-copy TEs from all genomes are Ty3/Gypsy transposons. Phylogenetic analysis of these elements suggests that TE expansions have appeared independently of each other, in distant genomes and at different taxonomical levels. We also analyzed the evolutionary relationships between protein domains encoded by the transposon pol ORF and we found that the protease is the fastest evolving domain whereas reverse transcriptase and RNase H evolve much slower and in correlation with each other.

  16. Communities of fungi in decomposed wood of oak and pine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwaśna Hanna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The abundance and diversity of wood decomposing fungi were investigated by isolating and cultivating filamentous fungi from wood and by detection of fruit bodies of ascomycetous and basidiomycetous fungi. The objective was to study the impact of forest management on fungi in 100-year-old oak and 87-year-old Scots pine forests in Northern Poland. Fungi were found on coarse woody debris of decayed stumps and fallen logs, boughs and branches in each of the three (managed and unmanaged examined stands. In total, 226 species of Oomycota and fungi were recorded. Oak wood was colonized by one species of Oomycota and 141 species of fungi including Zygomycota (19 species, Ascomycota (103 species and Basidiomycota (19 species. Scots pine wood was also colonized by one species of Oomycota and 138 species of fungi including Zygomycota (19 species, Ascomycota (90 species and Basidiomycota (29 species. In the first, second and third stages of decomposition, the oak wood was colonized by 101, 89 and 56 species of fungi respectively and pine wood was colonized by 82, 103 and 47 species respectively. Eighty three of the observed species (37% occurred on both types of wood, while the other species displayed nutritional preferences. A decrease in the number of species with advancing decay indicates the necessity for a continuous supply of dead wood to the forest ecosystem.

  17. Fun with Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLure, John W.

    1993-01-01

    Describes hands-on activities with fungi that may provoke the curiosity of early adolescents and increase their enjoyment and understanding of a vast, important portion of botany. Some of the activities may be conducted during the winter months when most fieldwork ceases. (PR)

  18. Senescence in Fungi

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 3. Senescence in Fungi. Anthony Deepak D'souza Ramesh Maheshwari. General Article Volume 7 Issue 3 March 2002 pp 51-55. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/007/03/0051-0055 ...

  19. Senescence in Fungi

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fungi are non-photosynthetic, filamentous organisms (Box 1). The filaments or the hyphae are branched and divided into segments by transverse walls or septa. The growth of the hypha is restricted to its tip, which grows linearly by the apical addi- tion of new cell wall material. The hyphal tip perpetuates itself.

  20. Philatelic Mycology: Families of Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marasas, W.F.O.; Marasas, H.M.; Wingfield, M.J.; Crous, P.W.

    2014-01-01

    Philately, the study of postage stamps, and mycology, the study of fungi, are seldom connected by those that practice these very different activities. When associated, philatelic mycology would be considered as the study of fungi on stamps. The Fungi touch every aspect of our daily lives, most

  1. Sexual selection in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuis, B P S; Aanen, D K

    2012-12-01

    The significance of sexual selection, the component of natural selection associated with variation in mating success, is well established for the evolution of animals and plants, but not for the evolution of fungi. Even though fungi do not have separate sexes, most filamentous fungi mate in a hermaphroditic fashion, with distinct sex roles, that is, investment in large gametes (female role) and fertilization by other small gametes (male role). Fungi compete to fertilize, analogous to 'male-male' competition, whereas they can be selective when being fertilized, analogous to female choice. Mating types, which determine genetic compatibility among fungal gametes, are important for sexual selection in two respects. First, genes at the mating-type loci regulate different aspects of mating and thus can be subject to sexual selection. Second, for sexual selection, not only the two sexes (or sex roles) but also the mating types can form the classes, the members of which compete for access to members of the other class. This is significant if mating-type gene products are costly, thus signalling genetic quality according to Zahavi's handicap principle. We propose that sexual selection explains various fungal characteristics such as the observed high redundancy of pheromones at the B mating-type locus of Agaricomycotina, the occurrence of multiple types of spores in Ascomycotina or the strong pheromone signalling in yeasts. Furthermore, we argue that fungi are good model systems to experimentally study fundamental aspects of sexual selection, due to their fast generation times and high diversity of life cycles and mating systems. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2012 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  2. The fungi: 1, 2, 3 ... 5.1 million species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Meredith

    2011-03-01

    Fungi are major decomposers in certain ecosystems and essential associates of many organisms. They provide enzymes and drugs and serve as experimental organisms. In 1991, a landmark paper estimated that there are 1.5 million fungi on the Earth. Because only 70000 fungi had been described at that time, the estimate has been the impetus to search for previously unknown fungi. Fungal habitats include soil, water, and organisms that may harbor large numbers of understudied fungi, estimated to outnumber plants by at least 6 to 1. More recent estimates based on high-throughput sequencing methods suggest that as many as 5.1 million fungal species exist. Technological advances make it possible to apply molecular methods to develop a stable classification and to discover and identify fungal taxa. Molecular methods have dramatically increased our knowledge of Fungi in less than 20 years, revealing a monophyletic kingdom and increased diversity among early-diverging lineages. Mycologists are making significant advances in species discovery, but many fungi remain to be discovered. Fungi are essential to the survival of many groups of organisms with which they form associations. They also attract attention as predators of invertebrate animals, pathogens of potatoes and rice and humans and bats, killers of frogs and crayfish, producers of secondary metabolites to lower cholesterol, and subjects of prize-winning research. Molecular tools in use and under development can be used to discover the world's unknown fungi in less than 1000 years predicted at current new species acquisition rates.

  3. Screening and assessment of laccase producing fungi isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laccase is a copper-containing polyphenol oxidase that acts on a wide range of substrates. This enzyme is found in many plant species and is widely distributed in fungi including wood-rotting fungi where it is often associated with lignin peroxidase, manganese dependent peroxidase, or both. Because of its importance in ...

  4. Dermatophytes and other pathogenic fungi from hospital staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hospital staff apparel from protective gown, face- shields and hand gloves were tested for the presence of fungi. Examined samples were collected using the swab culture method. Results: Of a total of 110 swab samples of hospital staff apparel, 56 (51 %) showed fungi contamination including 31 (66 %) of 47 samples from ...

  5. Isolasi dan Karakterisasi Fungi Endofit Tanaman Tapak Dara (Catharanthus Roseus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Arifuddin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the diversity of endophytic fungi Tread Dara (Catharanthus roseus as one of the potential plants that can produce medicinal efficacious compounds. This study includes the isolation and identification of endophytic fungi on Tapak Dara plant using PDA medium. Based on the results obtained 6 endophytic fungal isolates originating from roots and leaves Tread Dara.

  6. Documentation of inherited knowledge on wild edible fungi from Malyasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdullah, F.; Rusea, G.

    2009-01-01

    The gradual loss in traditional knowledge on wild edible fungi is a common phenomenon the world over, including Malaysia. A documentation of known edible fungi in Malaysia was executed, with the objective of salvaging traditional knowledge on the identification and edibility of these mushrooms,

  7. Using Fungi (the Almost-Forgotten Organisms) in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrazo, Gerry M., Jr.; Hounshell, Paul B.

    1979-01-01

    Ideas are given for including fungi in classroom activities for high school biology students. A discussion on the science of taxonomy leads into a discussion on the position of fungi in the five kingdom classification scheme of organisms. Suggestions are given for observing their growth and development. (SA)

  8. Culturable fungi in potting soils and compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Doris; Lesch, Susanne; Buzina, Walter; Galler, Herbert; Gutschi, Anna Maria; Habib, Juliana; Pfeifer, Bettina; Luxner, Josefa; Reinthaler, Franz F

    2016-11-01

    In the present study the spectrum and the incidence of fungi in potting soils and compost was investigated. Since soil is one of the most important biotopes for fungi, relatively high concentrations of fungal propagules are to be expected. For detection of fungi, samples of commercial soils, compost and soils from potted plants (both surface and sub-surface) were suspended and plated onto several mycological media. The resulting colonies were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. The results from the different sampling series vary, but concentrations on the surface of potted plants and in commercial soils are increased tenfold compared to compost and sub-surface soils. Median values range from 9.5 × 10(4) colony forming units (CFU)/g to 5.5 × 10(5) CFU/g. The spectrum of fungi also varies in the soils. However, all sampling series show high proportion of Aspergillus and Penicillium species, including potentially pathogenic species such as Aspergillus fumigatus. Cladosporium, a genus dominant in the ambient air, was found preferably in samples which were in contact with the air. The results show that potentially pathogenic fungi are present in soils. Immunocompromised individuals should avoid handling soils or potted plants in their immediate vicinity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Fungal inhibitory lactic acid bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Ström, Katrin

    2005-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are microorganisms that have been used for centuries to prepare and improve storage of food and for ensiling of different crops for animal feed. This thesis explores the possibility of using LAB to inhibit growth of spoilage fungi in food and feed products. LAB isolates, collected from plant material or dairy products, were screened for antifungal activity in a dual culture assay. Strains with antifungal activity were identified and the fungal inhibitory activity wa...

  10. Endophytic Fungi: A Reservoir of Antibacterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Deshmukh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug drug resistant bacteria are becoming increasingly problematic particularly in the undeveloped countries of the world. The most important microorganisms that have seen a geometric rise in are Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium, Penicillin resistant Streptococcus pneumonia and multiple drug resistant tubercule bacteria to name a just few. New drug scaffolds are essential to tackle this every increasing problem. These scaffolds can be sourced from nature itself. Endophytic fungi are an important reservoir of therapeutically active compounds. This review attempts to present some data relavent to the problem. New, very specific and effective antibiotics are needed but also at the affordable price!!!. Herculean task for researcher all over the world. In the Asian subcontinent indigenous therapeutics that has been practiced over the centuries such as Ayurveda that has been effective as ‘handed down data’ in family generations. May need a second, third and more in-depth investigations?

  11. Endophytic fungi: a reservoir of antibacterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Sunil K.; Verekar, Shilpa A.; Bhave, Sarita V.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug drug resistant bacteria are becoming increasingly problematic particularly in the under developed countries of the world. The most important microorganisms that have seen a geometric rise in numbers are Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium, Penicillin resistant Streptococcus pneumonia and multiple drug resistant tubercule bacteria to name a just few. New drug scaffolds are essential to tackle this every increasing problem. These scaffolds can be sourced from nature itself. Endophytic fungi are an important reservoir of therapeutically active compounds. This review attempts to present some data relevant to the problem. New, very specific and effective antibiotics are needed but also at an affordable price! A Herculean task for researchers all over the world! In the Asian subcontinent indigenous therapeutics that has been practiced over the centuries such as Ayurveda have been effective as “handed down data” in family generations. May need a second, third and more “in-depth investigations?” PMID:25620957

  12. Comparative Genome Analysis of Basidiomycete Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Morin, Emmanuelle; Nagy, Laszlo; Manning, Gerard; Baker, Scott; Brown, Daren; Henrissat, Bernard; Levasseur, Anthony; Hibbett, David; Martin, Francis; Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-19

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes), make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes the mushrooms, wood rots, symbionts, and plant and animal pathogens. To better understand the diversity of phenotypes in basidiomycetes, we performed a comparative analysis of 35 basidiomycete fungi spanning the diversity of the phylum. Phylogenetic patterns of lignocellulose degrading genes suggest a continuum rather than a sharp dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. Patterns of secondary metabolic enzymes give additional insight into the broad array of phenotypes found in the basidiomycetes. We suggest that the profile of an organism in lignocellulose-targeting genes can be used to predict its nutritional mode, and predict Dacryopinax sp. as a brown rot; Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea as white rots.

  13. Genera of phytopathogenic fungi: GOPHY 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Marin-Felix

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Genera of Phytopathogenic Fungi (GOPHY is introduced as a new series of publications in order to provide a stable platform for the taxonomy of phytopathogenic fungi. This first paper focuses on 21 genera of phytopathogenic fungi: Bipolaris, Boeremia, Calonectria, Ceratocystis, Cladosporium, Colletotrichum, Coniella, Curvularia, Monilinia, Neofabraea, Neofusicoccum, Pilidium, Pleiochaeta, Plenodomus, Protostegia, Pseudopyricularia, Puccinia, Saccharata, Thyrostroma, Venturia and Wilsonomyces. For each genus, a morphological description and information about its pathology, distribution, hosts and disease symptoms are provided. In addition, this information is linked to primary and secondary DNA barcodes of the presently accepted species, and relevant literature. Moreover, several novelties are introduced, i.e. new genera, species and combinations, and neo-, lecto- and epitypes designated to provide a stable taxonomy. This first paper includes one new genus, 26 new species, ten new combinations, and four typifications of older names.

  14. Recent records of hypogeous fungi in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanos Diamandis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainty among Greek farmers who are in search of new and profitable crops has increased interest in truffle cultivation. Recent research has come up with 23 taxa of hypogeous fungi new for Greece including gastronomically valuable species. Natural ecosystems of Quercus pubescens, Q. frainetto, Q. ilex and Q. coccifera seem to be rich in hypogeous species. Ecosystems with Corylus avellana, Carpinus betulus, Mediterranean pines and even poplar plantations were found to also host hypogeous fungi. These records, supported by historical information about the existence of truffles in Greece, seem to be encouraging hints for systematic truffle cultivation.

  15. Impedimetric method for physiologically characterisation of fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Væggemose; Petersen, Karina

    1998-01-01

    Fungi are playing an important role in the food and pharmaceutical industry today, both as starter cultures, fermentation organisms, and as contaminants. Characterisation of fungal growth is normally time consuming as it includes measurements and study on a wide range of media at different...... time) on the Bactometer and agar plates were obtained. The two methods present two phases of the growth of fungi; exponential growth observed after growth on the Bactometer (first 2-3 days) and a linear growth observed after growth on agar plates (after 2-3 days). It was also found that growth depends...

  16. Diversity, Bacterial Symbionts and Antibacterial Potential of Gut-Associated Fungi Isolated from the Pantala flavescens Larvae in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wei Shao

    Full Text Available The diversity of fungi associated with the gut of Pantala flavescens larvae was investigated using a culture-dependent method and molecular identification based on an analysis of the internally transcribed spacer sequence. In total, 48 fungal isolates were obtained from P. flavescens larvae. Based on phylogenetic analyses, the fungal isolates were grouped in 5 classes and 12 different genera. Fourteen bacterial 16S rDNA sequences derived from total genomic DNA extractions of fungal mycelia were obtained. The majority of the sequences were associated with Proteobacteria (13/14, and one Bacillaceae (1/14 was included. Leclercia sp., Oceanobacillus oncorhynchi and Methylobacterium extorquens, were reported for the first time as bacterial endosymbionts in fungi. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis indicated that bacterial symbionts produced specific metabolites and also exerted an inhibitory effect on fungal metabolites. The biological activity of the fungal culture extracts against the pathogenic bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538, Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633 and Escherichia coli (ATCC 8739 was investigated, and 20 extracts (42% exhibited antibacterial activity against at least one of the tested bacterial strains. This study is the first report on the diversity and antibacterial activity of symbiotic fungi residing in the gut of P. flavescens larvae, and the results show that these fungi are highly diverse and could be exploited as a potential source of bioactive compounds.

  17. Endophytic fungi in elms

    OpenAIRE

    Blumenstein, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Integrated pest management calls for new biocontrol solutions in management of forest diseases. Endophytic fungi that are commonly found in tree tissue may have potential in biocontrol. However, the links between endophyte status and disease tolerance are still unclear, and we know little about the mechanisms by which the endophytes can influence tree pathogens. The first goal of the thesis was to compare the endophyte status in elm (Ulmus spp.) trees with low vs. high susceptibility t...

  18. Deep-sea fungi

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, C.; Damare, S.

    > and can reach fresh habitats. It has been recently reported that spores of Aspergillus sydowii are croTied from the Saharan deserts across the Atlantic Ocean during dust storm!) to the Carihhean islands and cause aspergillosis disease in seafan~(87). Fungi... hand, heat shock pre treatment increased barotolerance in S. cerevisiae (strain IFO-0224) cells, indicating that hydrostatic pressure and high temperature may have the same physiological effects on this yeast (31). Heat shock treatment also prevented...

  19. Deep Subseafloor Fungi as an Untapped Reservoir of Amphipathic Antimicrobial Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarri, Marion; Jégou, Camille; Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Brillet, Benjamin; Barbier, Georges; Burgaud, Gaëtan; Fleury, Yannick

    2016-03-10

    The evolving global threat of antimicrobial resistance requires a deep renewal of the antibiotic arsenal including the isolation and characterization of new drugs. Underexplored marine ecosystems may represent an untapped reservoir of novel bioactive molecules. Deep-sea fungi isolated from a record-depth sediment core of almost 2000 m below the seafloor were investigated for antimicrobial activities. This antimicrobial screening, using 16 microbial targets, revealed 33% of filamentous fungi synthesizing bioactive compounds with activities against pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Interestingly, occurrence of antimicrobial producing isolates was well correlated with the complexity of the habitat (in term of microbial richness), as higher antimicrobial activities were obtained at specific layers of the sediment core. It clearly highlights complex deep-sea habitats as chemical battlefields where synthesis of numerous bioactive compounds appears critical for microbial competition. The six most promising deep subseafloor fungal isolates were selected for the production and extraction of bioactive compounds. Depending on the fungal isolates, antimicrobial compounds were only biosynthesized in semi-liquid or solid-state conditions as no antimicrobial activities were ever detected using liquid fermentation. An exception was made for one fungal isolate, and the extraction procedure designed to extract amphipathic compounds was successful and highlighted the amphiphilic profile of the bioactive metabolites.

  20. Deep Subseafloor Fungi as an Untapped Reservoir of Amphipathic Antimicrobial Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Navarri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The evolving global threat of antimicrobial resistance requires a deep renewal of the antibiotic arsenal including the isolation and characterization of new drugs. Underexplored marine ecosystems may represent an untapped reservoir of novel bioactive molecules. Deep-sea fungi isolated from a record-depth sediment core of almost 2000 m below the seafloor were investigated for antimicrobial activities. This antimicrobial screening, using 16 microbial targets, revealed 33% of filamentous fungi synthesizing bioactive compounds with activities against pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Interestingly, occurrence of antimicrobial producing isolates was well correlated with the complexity of the habitat (in term of microbial richness, as higher antimicrobial activities were obtained at specific layers of the sediment core. It clearly highlights complex deep-sea habitats as chemical battlefields where synthesis of numerous bioactive compounds appears critical for microbial competition. The six most promising deep subseafloor fungal isolates were selected for the production and extraction of bioactive compounds. Depending on the fungal isolates, antimicrobial compounds were only biosynthesized in semi-liquid or solid-state conditions as no antimicrobial activities were ever detected using liquid fermentation. An exception was made for one fungal isolate, and the extraction procedure designed to extract amphipathic compounds was successful and highlighted the amphiphilic profile of the bioactive metabolites.

  1. A study on biological activity of marine fungi from different habitats in coastal regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Songlin; Wang, Min; Feng, Qi; Lin, Yingying; Zhao, Huange

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, marine fungi have become an important source of active marine natural products. Former researches are limited in habitats selection of fungi with bioactive compounds. In this paper were to measure antibacterial and antitumor cell activity for secondary metabolites of marine fungi, which were isolated from different habitats in coastal regions. 195 strains of marine fungi were isolated and purified from three different habitats. They biologically active experiment results showed that fungi isolation from the mangrove habitats had stronger antibacterial activity than others, and the stains isolated from the estuarial habitats had the least antibacterial activity. However, the strains separated from beach habitats strongly inhibited tumor cell proliferation in vitro, and fungi of mangrove forest habitats had the weakest activity of inhibiting tumor. Meanwhile, 195 fungal strains belonged to 46 families, 84 genera, 142 species and also showed 137 different types of activity combinations by analyzing the inhibitory activity of the metabolites fungi for 4 strains of pathogenic bacteria and B-16 cells. The study investigated the biological activity of marine fungi isolated from different habitats in Haikou coastal regions. The results help us to understand bioactive metabolites of marine fungi from different habitats, and how to selected biological activity fungi from various marine habitats effectively.

  2. Effects of fungicides on endophytic fungi and photosynthesis in seedlings of a tropical tree, guarea guidonia (meliaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamboa Gaitan, Miguel A; Wen, Shiyun; Fetcher, Ned; Bayman, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Endophytes are microorganisms that live within healthy plant tissues, and include fungi and bacteria. They can be mutualists, comensals or even latent pathogens. Presence of these endosymbionts may affect host physiology, for example by consuming products of photosynthesis (endophytes are heterotrophs) or producing toxic metabolites. In this work two fungicides were used to eliminate fungal endophytes from seedlings of guarea guidonia. light saturated photosynthesis (Amax) was measured in endophytefree plants and compared with control plants. Each fungicide killed different fungal endosymbionts. phomopsis was more susceptible to benomyl while colletotrichum was more susceptible to propiconazole. Although suggestive, values of Amax were not significantly different for each treatment compared with control plants. No prediction can be made at this point about the final outcome of a given plantendophytic fungi interaction

  3. Casuarina in Africa: distribution, role and importance of arbuscular mycorrhizal, ectomycorrhizal fungi and Frankia on plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diagne, Nathalie; Diouf, Diegane; Svistoonoff, Sergio; Kane, Aboubacry; Noba, Kandioura; Franche, Claudine; Bogusz, Didier; Duponnois, Robin

    2013-10-15

    Exotic trees were introduced in Africa to rehabilitate degraded ecosystems. Introduced species included several Australian species belonging to the Casuarinaceae family. Casuarinas trees grow very fast and are resistant to drought and high salinity. They are particularly well adapted to poor and disturbed soils thanks to their capacity to establish symbiotic associations with mycorrhizal fungi -both arbuscular and ectomycorrhizal- and with the nitrogen-fixing bacteria Frankia. These trees are now widely distributed in more than 20 African countries. Casuarina are mainly used in forestation programs to rehabilitate degraded or polluted sites, to stabilise sand dunes and to provide fuelwood and charcoal and thus contribute considerably to improving livelihoods and local economies. In this paper, we describe the geographical distribution of Casuarina in Africa, their economic and ecological value and the role of the symbiotic interactions between Casuarina, mycorrhizal fungi and Frankia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular genetics of lignin-degrading fungi and their applications in organopollutant degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel Cullen

    2002-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the physiology and associated molecular genetics of wood- decaying fungi as they relate to organopollutant degradation. White-rot fungi are characterized by an ability to fragment all major structural polymers of wood including lignin. More poorly understood are the brown-rot fungi, which rapidly depolymerize cellulosic materials...

  5. In vitro effectiveness of Castellani solution including various ingredients against different microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şükran Çopur

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: As the external auditory canal is a moisturearea, it facilitates the growth of bacteria and fungi. Infectionsand inflammation due to Staphylococcus aureus,Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aspergillus spp. and Candidaalbicans can develop in this area. Classical Castellanisolution including boric acid, fenol, fucsin, resorcinol, acetone,and alcohol is used for external ear tract infectionsdue to fungi and bacteria, and also for the superficial dermatophytoses,and eczematous dermatitis of the externalear tract infections.The purpose of this study is to investigate of the in vitroeffectiveness of classical Castellani solution and its differentformulations with different dilutions against the standardyeast and bacteria strains.Methods: C. albicans ATCC 10231, C. krusei ATCC6258, C. dubliniensis CD 36, C. guilliermondii ATCC6260, C. parapsilosis ATCC22019, E. coli ATCC 25922,P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853, MRSA ATCC 43300, Staphylococcusaureus ATCC 25923, and S. epidermidis ATCC12228 strains were included in the study. Broth microdilutionmethod was used for each microorganism and Castellaniformulation. The tests are repeated at least twice.Results: The inhibitory concentration of classical Castellanisolution against bacteria and fungi is 1/64-1/256,1/32-1/64 for fuchsin free solution, 1/32-1/128 for boricacid-free solution and, 1/64-1/128 for resorcinol-free solution.Conclusions: As a conclusion we think that the classicalCastellani solution and its different formulations at variousdilutions may be effective antimicrobial agents for differentpatient populations. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (3:302-305Key words: Castellani solution, antimicrobial activity, in vitro

  6. Identification of Endophytic Fungi of Medicinal Herbs of Lauraceae and Rutaceae with Antimicrobial Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Yuan Ho

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine taxonomical features and antimicrobial activities of 156 isolates of endophytic fungi collected from twigs of medicinal plants of Lauraceae (67 isolates and Rutaceae (89 isolates in central and northern Taiwan. The 156 isolates of fungi were classified into 35 genera in 19 families based on morphological characteristics of mycelia and asexual/sexual spores, as well as molecular phylogenetic analysis of rDNA LSU D1/D2 and ITS regions. The most common endophytes were in the taxa of Colletotrichum, Guignardia, Hypoxylon, Nigrospora, Phomopsis and Xylaria, and the most common hosts were Citrus and Zanthoxylum of Rutaceae and Cinnamomum of Lauraceae. Molecular phylogenetic analysis showed that xylariaceous isolates could be separated into Xylaria and Hypoxylon groups based on rDNA of LSU D1/D2 and ITS regions. Four isolates of endophytic fungi including Lasmenia sp. isolate CB10, Ophioceras tenuisporum isolate CI02, Xylaria cubensis isolate LA04 and Cyanodermella sp. isolate TR09 were tested for antimicrobial activities using a dual culture method and Lasmenia sp. isolate CB10 and Cyanodermella sp. isolate TR09 showed better antimicrobial activity against 12 plant pathogens including 9 fungi and 3 bacteria. Spraying Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa plants with culture filtrates of the endophytic fungus Lasmenia sp. isolate CB10 significantly reduced severity of anthracnose of Chinese cabbage caused by Colletotrichum higginsianum under greenhouse conditions. This study suggests that the Lasmenia sp. isolate CB10 may be of potential for management of anthracnose of Chinese cabbage.

  7. Systemic resistance induced by rhizosphere bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Loon, L.C. van; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Nonpathogenic rhizobacteria can induce a systemic resistance in plants that is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR) has been demonstrated against fungi, bacteria, and viruses in Arabidopsis, bean, carnation, cucumber, radish, tobacco, and tomato under conditions in which the inducing bacteria and the challenging pathogen remained spatially separated. Bacterial strains differ in their ability to ...

  8. Ecology of Pathogen Groups: Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajek, Ann E.; Meyling, Nicolai Vitt

    2018-01-01

    Summary This chapter investigates the recent results of studies of the ecology of fungal pathogens, including ecological insights obtained by implementation of molecular tools. It spans a spectrum of invertebrates as hosts, although emphasis will be on pathogens of terrestrial insects, which have...... been the focus of most ecological research. Some taxa of invertebrate pathogenic fungi have evolved adaptations for utilizing living plants as substrates, and these lifestyles have recently received increased attention from researchers following the initial documentations of such plant associations...... by Beauveria and Metarhizium. This topic has recently been reviewed; the chapter mainly focuses on aspects of ecological relevance, including trophic interactions. Fungal pathogens are used to provide biological control in numerous ways. The primary type of biological control emphasized for fungal pathogens...

  9. Autophagy in plant pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Hong; Xu, Fei; Snyder, John Hugh; Shi, Huan-Bin; Lu, Jian-Ping; Lin, Fu-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Autophagy is a conserved cellular process that degrades cytoplasmic constituents in vacuoles. Plant pathogenic fungi develop special infection structures and/or secrete a range of enzymes to invade their plant hosts. It has been demonstrated that monitoring autophagy processes can be extremely useful in visualizing the sequence of events leading to pathogenicity of plant pathogenic fungi. In this review, we introduce the molecular mechanisms involved in autophagy. In addition, we explore the relationship between autophagy and pathogenicity in plant pathogenic fungi. Finally, we discuss the various experimental strategies available for use in the study of autophagy in plant pathogenic fungi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Natural substrata for corticioid fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene O. Yurchenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the types of substrata inhabited by non-poroid resupinate Homobasidiomycetes in situ in global scale with both examples from literature sources and from observations on Belarus corticioid fungi biota. The groups of organic world colonized by corticioid basidiomata and vegetative mycelium are arboreous, semi-arboreous, and herbaceous vascular plants, Bryophyta, epiphytic coccoid algae, lichenized and non-lichenized fungi, and occasionally myxomycetes and invertebrates. The fungi occur on living, dying, and dead on all decay stages parts of organisms. Besides, the fungi are known on soil, humus, stones, artificial inorganic and synthetic materials and dung.

  11. Biochemiluminescence of certain fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Sławiński

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Twelve species of fungi growing on the Sabouraud medium in darkness and illumination in an incubator, were tested to find out their ability to emit the ultra-weak biochemiluminescence. Using a sensitive photon-counling device, it was possible to measure biochemiluminescence intensity during ten days of cultures growth. Boletus edulis, Pestalotia funerea and Microsporum gypseum displayed biochemiluminescence, while Aspergillus nidulans, A. quadrilineatus, Beauveria bassiana, Macrophoma candollei, Mucor lausanensis, Paecilomyces farinosus, Penicillium sp., Trichoderma lignorum and Tricholoma equestre failed to do it. Illumination put down biochemiluminescence and stimulated colour formation in both mycelia and in the medium.

  12. Fungi isolated from Stewartia pseudocamellia Max. seeds and their pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Kurzawińska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of studies was to determine typical composition of fungi occurring on seeds of Stewartia pseudocamellia.The studies conducted on 100 disinfected and 100 nondisinfected seeds of these plants.Isolates of Alternaria alternata, Fusarium oxysporum, Cylindrocarpon radicicola and Rhizoctonia solani were characterized by pathogenicity towards the investigated Stewartia pseudocamellia. In the laboratory experiment, 204 isolations of microorganisms were obtained that belonged to 20 species and form of fungi and bacteria. Among fungi there were both of parasite (Alternaria alternata, Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium spp., Rhizoctonia solani and typical saprophytic (Cladosporium spp., Penicillium spp., Aspergillus spp., Epicoccum spp., Mucor spp.. The dominant fungus on seeds was Alternaria alternata. Among the investigated isolates only one isolate (R4 Rhizoctonia solani, was strongly pathogenic, isolates (A1 Alternaria alternata were weakly pathogenic to seedlings of Stewartia pseudocamellia.

  13. Bioactive alkaloids produced by fungi. I. Updates on alkaloids from the species of the genera Boletus, Fusarium and psilocybe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Zafar Alam; Ahmed, Syed Waseemuddin; Azhar, Iqbal; Sualeh, Mohammad; Baig, Mirza Tasawer; Zoha, Sms

    2010-07-01

    Fungi, in particular, are able in common with the higher plants and bacteria, to produce metabolites, including alkaloids. Alkaloids, along with other metabolites are the most important fungal metabolites from pharmaceutical and industrial point of view. Based on this observation, the authors of this review article have tried to provide an information on the alkaloids produced by the species of genera: Boletus, Fusarium and Psilocybef from 1981-2009. Thus the review would be helpful and provides valuable information for the researchers of the same field.

  14. Forest Soil Bacteria: Diversity, Involvement in Ecosystem Processes, and Response to Global Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lladó, Salvador; López-Mondéjar, Rubén; Baldrian, Petr

    2017-06-01

    The ecology of forest soils is an important field of research due to the role of forests as carbon sinks. Consequently, a significant amount of information has been accumulated concerning their ecology, especially for temperate and boreal forests. Although most studies have focused on fungi, forest soil bacteria also play important roles in this environment. In forest soils, bacteria inhabit multiple habitats with specific properties, including bulk soil, rhizosphere, litter, and deadwood habitats, where their communities are shaped by nutrient availability and biotic interactions. Bacteria contribute to a range of essential soil processes involved in the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus. They take part in the decomposition of dead plant biomass and are highly important for the decomposition of dead fungal mycelia. In rhizospheres of forest trees, bacteria interact with plant roots and mycorrhizal fungi as commensalists or mycorrhiza helpers. Bacteria also mediate multiple critical steps in the nitrogen cycle, including N fixation. Bacterial communities in forest soils respond to the effects of global change, such as climate warming, increased levels of carbon dioxide, or anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. This response, however, often reflects the specificities of each studied forest ecosystem, and it is still impossible to fully incorporate bacteria into predictive models. The understanding of bacterial ecology in forest soils has advanced dramatically in recent years, but it is still incomplete. The exact extent of the contribution of bacteria to forest ecosystem processes will be recognized only in the future, when the activities of all soil community members are studied simultaneously. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Reclassification of rhizosphere bacteria including strains causing corky root of lettuce and proposal of Rhizorhapis suberifaciens gen. nov., comb. nov., Sphingobium mellinum sp. nov., Sphingobium xanthum sp. nov. and Rhizorhabdus argentea gen. nov., sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Isolde M; Jochimsen, Kenneth N; De Vos, Paul; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    2014-04-01

    The genus Rhizorhapis gen. nov. (to replace the illegitimate genus name Rhizomonas) is proposed for strains of Gram-negative bacteria causing corky root of lettuce, a widespread and important lettuce disease worldwide. Only one species of the genus Rhizomonas was described, Rhizomonas suberifaciens, which was subsequently reclassified as Sphingomonas suberifaciens based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and the presence of sphingoglycolipid in the cell envelope. However, the genus Sphingomonas is so diverse that further reclassification was deemed necessary. Twenty new Rhizorhapis gen. nov.- and Sphingomonas-like isolates were obtained from lettuce or sow thistle roots, or from soil using lettuce seedlings as bait. These and previously reported isolates were characterized in a polyphasic study including 16S rRNA gene sequencing, DNA-DNA hybridization, DNA G+C content, whole-cell fatty acid composition, morphology, substrate oxidation, temperature and pH sensitivity, and pathogenicity to lettuce. The isolates causing lettuce corky root belonged to the genera Rhizorhapis gen. nov., Sphingobium, Sphingopyxis and Rhizorhabdus gen. nov. More specifically, we propose to reclassify Rhizomonas suberifaciens as Rhizorhapis suberifaciens gen. nov., comb. nov. (type strain, CA1(T) = LMG 17323(T) = ATCC 49355(T)), and also propose the novel species Sphingobium xanthum sp. nov., Sphingobium mellinum sp. nov. and Rhizorhabdus argentea gen. nov., sp. nov. with the type strains NL9(T) ( = LMG 12560(T) = ATCC 51296(T)), WI4(T) ( = LMG 11032(T) = ATCC 51292(T)) and SP1(T) ( = LMG 12581(T) = ATCC 51289(T)), respectively. Several strains isolated from lettuce roots belonged to the genus Sphingomonas, but none of them were pathogenic.

  16. Anti-fungal properties of chitinolytic dune soil bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, W.; Klein Gunnewiek, P.J.A.; Lafeber, P.; Janse, J.H.; Spit, B.E.; Woldendorp, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    Anti-fungal properties of chitinolytic soil bacteria may enable them to compete successfully for chitin with fungi. Additionally, the production of chitinase may be part of a lytic system that enables the bacteria to use living hyphae rather than chitin as the actual growth substrate, since chitin

  17. Entomopathogenic fungi on Hemiberlesia pitysophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengqun Lv

    Full Text Available Hemiberlesia pitysophila Takagi is an extremely harmful exotic insect in forest to Pinus species, including Pinus massoniana. Using both morphological taxonomy and molecular phylogenetics, we identified 15 strains of entomogenous fungi, which belong to 9 genera with high diversities. Surprisingly, we found that five strains that were classified as species of Pestalotiopsis, which has been considered plant pathogens and endophytes, were the dominant entomopathogenic fungus of H. pitysophila. Molecular phylogenetic tree established by analyzing sequences of ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer showed that entomopathogenic Pestalotiopsis spp. were similar to plant Pestalotiopsis, but not to other pathogens and endophytes of its host plant P. massoniana. We were the first to isolate entomopathogenic Pestalotiopsis spp. from H. pitysophila. Our findings suggest a potential and promising method of H. pitysophila bio-control.

  18. Entomopathogenic fungi on Hemiberlesia pitysophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chengqun; Huang, Baoling; Qiao, Mengji; Wei, Jiguang; Ding, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Hemiberlesia pitysophila Takagi is an extremely harmful exotic insect in forest to Pinus species, including Pinus massoniana. Using both morphological taxonomy and molecular phylogenetics, we identified 15 strains of entomogenous fungi, which belong to 9 genera with high diversities. Surprisingly, we found that five strains that were classified as species of Pestalotiopsis, which has been considered plant pathogens and endophytes, were the dominant entomopathogenic fungus of H. pitysophila. Molecular phylogenetic tree established by analyzing sequences of ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer showed that entomopathogenic Pestalotiopsis spp. were similar to plant Pestalotiopsis, but not to other pathogens and endophytes of its host plant P. massoniana. We were the first to isolate entomopathogenic Pestalotiopsis spp. from H. pitysophila. Our findings suggest a potential and promising method of H. pitysophila bio-control.

  19. Isolation of Ascomycetous Fungi from a Tertiary Institution Campus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The predominant Ascomycetous fungi isolated include among others; Aspergillus niger, Fusarium solani, Fusarium oxysporum, Penicillium italicum, Fusarium acuminatum, Fusarium culmorum, Candida albicans, Botrytis cinerea, Geotrichum candidum, Trichoderma viride, Verticillium lateritum, Curvularia palescens ...

  20. Biodegradation of Crude-oil by Fungi Isolated from Cow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... fungi identified from the contaminated soils include; Bdellospora helicoides, Aspergillus fumigatus, Gonadobotricum apiculata, Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma viridae, Pleurothecium recurvatum, Streptothrix atra, Thysarophora longispora, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, Helminthosporium velutinum, Botrytis cinerea, ...

  1. Pestalotioid fungi from Restionaceae in the Cape Floral Kingdom.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, S.; Crous, P.W.; Wingfield, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Eight pestalotioid fungi were isolated from the Restionaceae growing in the Cape Floral Kingdom of South Africa. Sarcostroma restionis, Truncatella megaspora, T. restionacearum and T. spadicea are newly described. New records include Pestalotiopsis matildae, Sarcostroma lomatiae, Truncatella betulae

  2. Pestalotioid fungi from Restionaceae in the Cape Floral Kingdom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, M.J.; Crous, P.W.; Wingfield, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Eight pestalotioid fungi were isolated from the Restionaceae growing in the Cape Floral Kingdom of South Africa. Sarcostroma restionis, Truncatella megaspora, T. restionacearum and T. spadicea are newly described. New records include Pestalotiopsis matildae, Sarcostroma lomatiae, Truncatella betulae

  3. Phylogeny of rock-inhabiting fungi related to Dothideomycetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruibal, C.; Gueidan, C.; Selbmann, L.; Gorbushina, A.A.; Crous, P.W.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Muggia, L.; Grube, M.; Isola, D.; Schoch, C.L.; Staley, J.T.; Lutzoni, F.; Hoog, de G.S.

    2009-01-01

    The class Dothideomycetes (along with Eurotiomycetes) includes numerous rock-inhabiting fungi (RIF), a group of ascomycetes that tolerates surprisingly well harsh conditions prevailing on rock surfaces. Despite their convergent morphology and physiology, RIF are phylogenetically highly diverse in

  4. The ITS-based phylogeny of fungi associated with tarballs

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sanyal, O.; Shinde, V.L.; Meena, R.M.; Damare, S.R.; Shenoy, B.D.

    Tarballs, the remnants of crude oil which change into semi-solid phase due to various weathering processes in the sea, are rich in hydrocarbons, including toxic and almost non-degradable hydrocarbons. Certain microorganisms such as fungi are known...

  5. Filamentous fungi: the indeterminate lifestyle and microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, D A; Paschke, M W

    2004-04-01

    The filamentous fungi have dynamic and variable hyphal structures within which cytoplasm can be moved, synthesized, and degraded, in response to changes in environmental conditions, resource availability, and resource distribution. Their study has gone through several phases. In the first phase, direct observation was emphasized without undue concern for interior structures or in the presence of cytoplasm. By the mid-1970s, single biochemical proxies (ergosterol, marker fatty acids, chitin derivatives, etc.) were being used increasingly. The use of these surrogate single measurements continues, in spite of their inability to provide information on the physical structure of the filamentous fungi. Molecular approaches also are being used, primarily through the use of bulk nucleic acid extraction and cloning. Because the sources of the nucleic acids used in such studies usually are not known, taxonomic and phylogenetic information derived by this approach cannot be linked to specific fungal structures. Recently, a greater emphasis has been placed on assessing physical aspects of indeterminate fungal growth, involving the assessment of cytoplasm-filled and evacuated (empty) hyphae. Both of these parameters are important for describing filamentous fungal growth and function. The use of phase contrast microscopy and varied general stains, as well as fluorogenic substrates with observation by epifluorescence microscopy, has made it possible to provide estimates of cytoplasm-filled hyphal lengths. Using this approach, it has been possible to evaluate the responses of the indeterminate fungal community to changes in environmental conditions, including soil management. It is now possible to obtain molecular information from individual bacteria and fungal structures (hyphae, spores, fruiting bodies) recovered from environments, making it possible to link individual fungal structures with their taxonomic and phylogenetic information. In addition, this information can be

  6. METHODS FOR DETECTING BACTERIA USING POLYMER MATERIALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Grinsven Bart Robert, Nicolaas; Cleij, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    A method for characterizing bacteria includes passing a liquid containing an analyte comprising a first bacteria and a second bacteria over and in contact with a polymer material on a substrate. The polymer material is formulated to bind to the first bacteria, and the first bacteria binds to the

  7. Plant biomass degradation by fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mäkelä, Miia R; Donofrio, Nicole; de Vries, Ronald P; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass degradation by fungi has implications for several fields of science. The enzyme systems employed by fungi for this are broadly used in various industrial sectors such as food & feed, pulp & paper, detergents, textile, wine, and more recently biofuels and biochemicals. In addition, the

  8. Molecular Systematics of Entomopathogenic Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insect parasitism has multiple and diverse origins within the Kingdom Fungi, with shifts to trophic specialization on insects having evolved one or more times in each of the four traditionally recognized phyla of fungi, the Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and Zygomycota. The rich legacy ...

  9. Beer spoilage bacteria and hop resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakamoto, K; Konings, WN

    2003-01-01

    For brewing industry, beer spoilage bacteria have been problematic for centuries. They include some lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus lindneri and Pediococcus damnosus, and some Gram-negative bacteria such as Pectinatus cerevisiiphilus, Pectinatus frisingensis and

  10. Bacteria and fungi associated with isoprene consumption in soil

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Christopher M.; Helmig, Detlev; Fierer, Noah

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Isoprene is a reactive volatile organic compound released from the biosphere that can be abundant in the planetary boundary layer, where it can have a myriad of effects on atmospheric chemistry and secondary aerosol formation. There is currently a high degree of uncertainty in forecasts of how atmospheric isoprene concentrations will shift in response to anthropogenic land-use change and climate change. One source of this uncertainty is that studies of terrestrial isoprene fluxes hav...

  11. Moringa, marinade, bacteria, fungi, catfish, smoke-dried

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    2013-01-16

    Jan 16, 2013 ... the fishes were soaked in the treatments for 2 hours and later hot smoked for 12hours. After smoking, the fishes were stored in netted ... suitable for complementing high carbohydrate diets (Abdullahi et al., 2001). Fish is ... salting, canning, drying and smoking (Kumolu et al., 2010). However, smoking is the ...

  12. Bacteria, fungi, and viruses outnumber human cells 10:1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Karen Nelson

    Institute of Biodiversity and Sustainable Development (IBSD), Imphal. ‡ Institute for Advances Science and Technology (IASST), Guwahati. ‡ National Institute for Biomedical Genomics (NIBMG), Kalyani. ‡ Foundation for Revitalization of Local Health Traditions (FLHRT), Bengaluru. ‡ Tata Consultancy Services (TCS), Pune.

  13. enumeration, isolation and identification of bacteria and fungi from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    Key words: Bioremediation, Chicken droppings, Petroleum, contaminated soil. INTRODUCTION. Microbial degradation is the major mechanism for the elimination of used petroleum products from the environment (Ibe, 1984; Atlas and. Bartha, 1992). Barka and Atlas (1977) also reported that the ability to actively decompose.

  14. Small azobenzene derivatives active against bacteria and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotto, Stefano; Concilio, Simona; Sessa, Lucia; Porta, Amalia; Calabrese, Elena Concetta; Zanfardino, Anna; Varcamonti, Mario; Iannelli, Pio

    2013-10-01

    ATP synthase and protein kinase (PKs) are prime targets for drug discovery in a variety of diseases. It is well known that numerous stilbenes are capable to interact and inhibit ATP synthase and PKs. This work focuses on a series of azobenzene based molecules having high structural similarity with antimicrobial stilbenes. An investigation was carried out analyzing the potential toxicity of a large set of molecules by means of computational analysis. A small selection of potential low toxic molecules have been therefore synthesized, characterized and finally microbiologically tested. The synthesized compounds show potent bactericidal activity against Gram+ and a fungus, and are capable of inhibiting biofilm formation. Finally, the compounds demonstrated a thermal stability that makes them potential candidates for incorporation in polymer matrix for application as biomedical devices and food packaging. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Interactions among endophytic bacteria and fungi: effects and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    The colonization of plants by putative endophytes has been visualized by using laser scanning confocal microscope (Coombs and Franco 2003). Endophytes promote the growth of plants in various ways, for example through secretion of plant growth regulators;. e.g. indole-acetic acid (Lee et al 2004), via phosphate-.

  16. Interactions among endophytic bacteria and fungi: effects and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    sensing that leads to biofilm formation may not occur in the endophytic environment as there is a limited space. As such in vitro ... of effective microbes may not give the highest microbial effect, which may only be achieved by biofilm formation. [Bandara W M M S ... inoculants (Barraquio et al 2000). The colonization of plants.

  17. enumeration, isolation and identification of bacteria and fungi from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    bioremediation of soil contaminated with petroleum products and possibly other oil polluted sites. Key words: Bioremediation .... bacterial isolates obtained from soil contaminated and layers chicken droppings. S/No Isolates identification. Grams. Reaction. Citrate Indole TSIA. Gas production. Urease Isolate identification. 1.

  18. Biotransformation of limonene by bacteria, fungi, yeasts, and plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duetz, W.A.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Beilen, J.B.; Witholt, B.

    2003-01-01

    The past 5 years have seen significant progress in the field of limonene biotransformation, especially with regard to the regiospecificity of microbial biocatalysts. Whereas earlier only regiospecific biocatalysts for the 1,2 position (limonene-1,2-diol) and the 8-position (¿±-terpineol) were

  19. Bacteria, fungi, and viruses outnumber human cells 10:1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Karen Nelson

    Microbiome has been associated with large number of diseases. ‡ Type 2 diabetes. ‡ Cardiovascular disease. ‡ Inflammatory bowel disorder. ‡ NAFLD. ‡ Obesity. ‡ Autoimmune disorders. ‡ Metabolic syndrome. ‡ Cancer. ‡ Autism. ‡ … Source: Nature 2012, Special Issue on Microbiome ...

  20. Interactions among endophytic bacteria and fungi: effects and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Plants benefit extensively by harbouring endophytic microbes. They promote plant growth and confer enhanced resistance to various pathogens. However, the way the interactions among endophytes influence the plant productivity has not been explained. Present study experimentally showed that endophytes isolated from ...

  1. Biodegradation of carbamazepine using fungi and bacteria | Nasir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carbamazepine is an anti-epileptic pharmaceuticalcompound which is frequently detected in wastewater. However, this compound is hardly degraded naturally due to its persistency. Thus, carbamazepine presents in water stream and household water supply as well as wastewater treatment plant. This paper focuses on ...

  2. Cercosporoid fungi (Mycosphaerellaceae) 1. Species on other fungi, Pteridophyta and Gymnospermae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braun, Uwe; Nakashima, C.; Crous, Pedro W.

    2013-01-01

    Cercosporoid fungi (former Cercospora s. lat.) represent one of the largest groups of hyphomycetes belonging to the Mycosphaerellaceae (Ascomycota). They include asexual morphs, asexual holomorphs or species with mycosphaerella-like sexual morphs. Most of them are leaf-spotting plant pathogens with

  3. Diagnostic utility of melanin production by fungi: Study on tissue sections and culture smears with Masson-Fontana stain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Challa Sundaram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dematiaceous fungi appear brown in tissue section due to melanin in their cell walls. When the brown color is not seen on routine H and E and culture is not available, differentiation of dematiaceous fungi from other fungi is difficult on morphology alone. Aims and Objective: To study if melanin production by dematiaceous fungi can help differentiate them from other types of fungi. Materials and Methods: Fifty tissue sections of various fungal infections and 13 smears from cultures of different species of fungi were stained with Masson Fontana stain to assess melanin production. The tissue sections included biopsies from 26 culture-proven fungi and 24 biopsies of filamentous fungi diagnosed on morphology alone with no culture confirmation. Results: All culture-proven dematiaceous fungi and Zygomycetes showed strong positivity in sections and culture smears. Aspergillus sp showed variable positivity and intensity. Cryptococcus neoformans showed strong positivity in tissue sections and culture smears. Tissue sections of septate filamentous fungi (9/15, Zygomycetes (4/5, and fungi with both hyphal and yeast morphology (4/4 showed positivity for melanin. The septate filamentous fungi negative for melanin were from biopsy samples of fungal sinusitis including both allergic and invasive fungal sinusitis and colonizing fungal balls. Conclusion: Melanin is produced by both dematiaceous and non-dematiaceous fungi. Masson-Fontana stain cannot reliably differentiate dematiaceous fungi from other filamentous fungi like Aspergillus sp; however, absence of melanin in the hyphae may be used to rule out dematiaceous fungi from other filamentous fungi. In the differential diagnosis of yeast fungi, Cryptococcus sp can be differentiated from Candida sp by Masson-Fontana stain in tissue sections.

  4. Hybrid histidine kinases in pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defosse, Tatiana A; Sharma, Anupam; Mondal, Alok K; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Calderone, Richard; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Courdavault, Vincent; Clastre, Marc; Papon, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    Histidine kinases (HK) sense and transduce via phosphorylation events many intra- and extracellular signals in bacteria, archaea, slime moulds and plants. HK are also widespread in the fungal kingdom, but their precise roles in the regulation of physiological processes remain largely obscure. Expanding genomic resources have recently given the opportunity to identify uncharacterised HK family members in yeasts and moulds and now allow proposing a complex classification of Basidiomycota, Ascomycota and lower fungi HK. A growing number of genetic approaches have progressively provided new insight into the role of several groups of HK in prominent fungal pathogens. In particular, a series of studies have revealed that members of group III HK, which occur in the highest number of fungal species and contain a unique N-terminus region consisting of multiple HAMP domain repeats, regulate morphogenesis and virulence in various human, plant and insect pathogenic fungi. This research field is further supported by recent shape-function studies providing clear correlation between structural properties and signalling states in group III HK. Since HK are absent in mammals, these represent interesting fungal target for the discovery of new antifungal drugs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Some mycogenous fungi from Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Chlebicki

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper the results of earlier studies on mycogenous fungi which were gathered occasionally are summarized. Fifieen specres. previously Pyrenomycetes s.l., have been found growing on other fungi Immothia hypoxylon and Lophiostoma polyporicola are new species to the Polish mycoflora. Sphaeronaemella Kulczyńskiana described by K. R o u p p e r t (1912 is considered to be Eleuteromyces subultus. Relatively high number of fungi inhabiting stromata of Diatrypella favacea is probably connected with its early colonization of the Polish area.

  6. Magnetic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  7. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria...... and by actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria......, the 80 x 600 mum large Epulopiscium sp. from the gut of tropical fish, are presumably living in a very nutrient-rich medium. Many large bacteria contain numerous inclusions in the cells that reduce the volume of active cytoplasm. The most striking examples of competitive advantage from large cell size...

  8. Marine fungi: Degraders of poly-3-hydroxyalkanoate based plastic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matavulj Milan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for new biosynthetic and biodegradable materials to save nonrenewable resources and reduce global pollution problems is an urgent task. Recently, materials like thermoplastic poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates (PHA, have been found synthesized by bacteria as storage materials. The major PHAs synthesized are poly-b-hydroxybutyrate (PHB, poly-b-hydroxyvalerate (PHV and their copolymers. They are already commercially produced and used as BIOPOLTM (ICI, England. Their complete degradability by bacteria has already been shown. Today, oceans and estuaries serve as major landfills, and since fungi are an important part of the degrading microbiota, in order to prove their participation in the degradation process, a simple degradation test suitable for fungi and marine conditions had to be developed. Several solid media based on artificial sea water, differing in the content of non-alkanoate organics and supplemented with 0.1% PHA (or BIOPOLTM as a main source of carbon have been tested. The testing principle consists of clearing the turbid medium in test tube or plates caused by suspended granules of PHA. All media tested supported the growth of fungi. For the discrete and transparent clearing of zones, a mineral medium with 0.01% peptone, 0.01% yeast extract, and 0.1% PHB or BIOPOLTM was finally chosen where the fine and evenly distributed turbidity is accomplished by a specific procedure. This method allows the investigation of degradability of PHA-based plastic materials as well as screening for fungal ability to depolymerise pure PHA homopolymers. Using this medium, 32 strains of marine yeasts and 102 strains of marine mycelial fungi belonging to different systematic and ecological groups were tested for their ability to degrade PHAs. Only about 4% of the strains were able to degrade BIOPOLTM and about 6% depolymerised pure PHB homopolymer. This is in sharp contrast to the results of our previous experiments with 143 strains of terrestrial fungi

  9. Role of Fungi in the Biomineralization of Calcite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Bindschedler

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the field of microbial biomineralization, much of the scientific attention is focused on processes carried out by prokaryotes, in particular bacteria, even though fungi are also known to be involved in biogeochemical cycles in numerous ways. They are traditionally recognized as key players in organic matter recycling, as nutrient suppliers via mineral weathering, as well as large producers of organic acids such as oxalic acid for instance, an activity leading to the genesis of various metal complexes such as metal-oxalate. Their implications in the transformation of various mineral and metallic compounds has been widely acknowledged during the last decade, however, currently, their contribution to the genesis of a common biomineral, calcite, needs to be more thoroughly documented. Calcite is observed in many ecosystems and plays an essential role in the biogeochemical cycles of both carbon (C and calcium (Ca. It may be physicochemical or biogenic in origin and numerous organisms have been recognized to control or induce its biomineralization. While fungi have often been suspected of being involved in this process in terrestrial environments, only scarce information supports this hypothesis in natural settings. As a result, calcite biomineralization by microbes is still largely attributed to bacteria at present. However, in some terrestrial environments there are particular calcitic habits that have been described as being fungal in origin. In addition to this, several studies dealing with axenic cultures of fungi have demonstrated the ability of fungi to produce calcite. Examples of fungal biomineralization range from induced to organomineralization processes. More examples of calcite biomineralization related to direct fungal activity, or at least to their presence, have been described within the last decade. However, the peculiar mechanisms leading to calcite biomineralization by fungi remain incompletely understood and more research is

  10. Secondary Metabolites from Higher Fungi: Discovery, Bioactivity, and Bioproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian-Jiang; Xiao, Jian-Hui

    Medicinal higher fungi such as Cordyceps sinensis and Ganoderma lucidum have been used as an alternative medicine remedy to promote health and longevity for people in China and other regions of the world since ancient times. Nowadays there is an increasing public interest in the secondary metabolites of those higher fungi for discovering new drugs or lead compounds. Current research in drug discovery from medicinal higher fungi involves a multifaceted approach combining mycological, biochemical, pharmacological, metabolic, biosynthetic and molecular techniques. In recent years, many new secondary metabolites from higher fungi have been isolated and are more likely to provide lead compounds for new drug discovery, which may include chemopreventive agents possessing the bioactivity of immunomodulatory, anticancer, etc. However, numerous challenges of secondary metabolites from higher fungi are encountered including bioseparation, identification, biosynthetic metabolism, and screening model issues, etc. Commercial production of secondary metabolites from medicinal mushrooms is still limited mainly due to less information about secondary metabolism and its regulation. Strategies for enhancing secondary metabolite production by medicinal mushroom fermentation include two-stage cultivation combining liquid fermentation and static culture, two-stage dissolved oxygen control, etc. Purification of bioactive secondary metabolites, such as ganoderic acids from G. lucidum, is also very important to pharmacological study and future pharmaceutical application. This review outlines typical examples of the discovery, bioactivity, and bioproduction of secondary metabolites of higher fungi origin.

  11. Studies on foliicolous fungi VI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosagoudar, V.B.

    2002-01-01

    An account is given of three foliicolous fungi from India. Two new species, viz. Clasterosporium cyperacearum and Questieriella grewiae are described. Dysrhynchis uncinata forms a new generic and specific record to India and is reported on an endemic host.

  12. Methods for genetic transformation of filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dandan; Tang, Yu; Lin, Jun; Cai, Weiwen

    2017-10-03

    Filamentous fungi have been of great interest because of their excellent ability as cell factories to manufacture useful products for human beings. The development of genetic transformation techniques is a precondition that enables scientists to target and modify genes efficiently and may reveal the function of target genes. The method to deliver foreign nucleic acid into cells is the sticking point for fungal genome modification. Up to date, there are some general methods of genetic transformation for fungi, including protoplast-mediated transformation, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, electroporation, biolistic method and shock-wave-mediated transformation. This article reviews basic protocols and principles of these transformation methods, as well as their advantages and disadvantages.

  13. [Chitinolytic activity of filamentous fungi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubakov, A A; Kucheriavykh, P S

    2004-01-01

    The chitinolytic activity of nine species of filamentous fungi, classified with seven genera (specifically, Aspergillus, Penicillium, Trichoderma, Paecilomyces, Sporotrichum, Beaueria, and Mucor), was studied. When cultured in liquid medium containing 1% crystalline chitin, all fungi produced extracellular chitosans with activity varying from 0.2 U/mg protein (Sporotrichum olivaceum, Mucor sp., etc.) to 4.0-4.2 U/mg protein (Trichoderma lignorum, Aspergillus niger).

  14. Experimental Evidence that Fungi are Dominant Microbes in Carbon Content and Growth Response to Added Soluble Organic Carbon in Moss-rich Tundra Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, O Roger; Lee, Jee Min; McGuire, Krista

    2016-05-01

    Global warming significantly affects Arctic tundra, including permafrost thaw and soluble C release that may differentially affect tundra microbial growth. Using laboratory experiments, we report some of the first evidence for the effects of soluble glucose-C enrichment on tundra soil prokaryotes (bacteria and archaea) and fungi, with comparisons to microbial eukaryotes. Fungal increase in C-biomass was equivalent to 10% (w/w) of the added glucose-C, and for prokaryote biomass 2% (w/w), the latter comparable to prior published results. The C-gain after 14 d was 1.3 mg/g soil for fungi, and ~200 μg/g for prokaryotes. © 2015 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2015 International Society of Protistologists.

  15. Do foliar endophytic bacteria fix nitrogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueppers, L. M.; Moyes, A. B.; Frank, C.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Carper, D.; Vandehey, N.; O'Neil, J.; Dekas, A.

    2015-12-01

    Endophytic microorganisms - bacteria and fungi that live inside healthy plant tissue - are a relatively unexplored source of functional diversity in natural ecosystems. Prior to modern sequencing technology, detecting uncultured endophytic bacteria and assessing their putative functions was challenging. However, recent work has revealed a remarkable diversity of as yet non-culturable endophytic taxa and is beginning to identify functional roles within plant microbiomes. We recently examined bacterial communities in the foliage of a long-lived, high-elevation conifer species, limber pine (Pinus flexilis), and discovered a community strongly dominated by acetic acid bacteria (Acetobacteraceae), with several taxa closely related to known nitrogen fixers. Given limber pine's status as a pioneer species that is able to grow in low fertility soils, we hypothesized that this bacterial community has a potential functional role in fixing atmospheric nitrogen, providing a source of this limiting nutrient to the host tree. We used the radioisotope 13N2 to confirm that N2 rapidly diffuses into pine needles, where it could potentially be fixed. With an acetylene reduction assay we confirmed nitrogenase enzyme activity inside excised twigs 4 times over a growing season, and estimate potential rates of N2 fixation at 0.1 nmol N2 g needle-1 hr-1. Scaled to the stand level, this N input could be on the order of ~20 mg N m-2 d-1 over a growing season. While these rates are low, the long lifespan of individual trees (~1000 years) makes them biologically meaningful. Still, measured rates of acetylene reduction and bulk 15N2 incorporation are quite variable in space and time. Much work remains to better characterize the plant-microbial interactions in this system, including the rates of nitrogen fixation and their variability over the growing season, across edaphic conditions, among host species, and through plant development; and to determine which community members are responsible

  16. Mycorrhizal fungi of Vanilla: diversity, specificity and effects on seed germination and plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras-Alfaro, Andrea; Bayman, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are essential for the germination of orchid seeds. However, the specificity of orchids for their mycorrhizal fungi and the effects of the fungi on orchid growth are controversial. Mycorrhizal fungi have been studied in some temperate and tropical, epiphytic orchids, but the symbionts of tropical, terrestrial orchids are still unknown. Here we study diversity, specificity and function of mycorrhizal fungi in Vanilla, a pantropical genus that is both terrestrial and epiphytic. Mycorrhizal roots were collected from four Vanilla species in Puerto Rico, Costa Rica and Cuba. Cultured and uncultured mycorrhizal fungi were identified by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer region of nuclear rDNA (nrITS) and part of the mitochondrial ribosomal large subunit (mtLSU), and by counting number of nuclei in hyphae. Vanilla spp. were associated with a wide range of mycorrhizal fungi: Ceratobasidium, Thanatephorus and Tulasnella. Related fungi were found in different species of Vanilla, although at different relative frequencies. Ceratobasidium was more common in roots in soil and Tulasnella was more common in roots on tree bark, but several clades of fungi included strains from both substrates. Relative frequencies of genera of mycorrhizal fungi differed significantly between cultured fungi and those detected by direct amplification. Ceratobasidium and Tulasnella were tested for effects on seed germination of Vanilla and effects on growth of Vanilla and Dendrobium plants. We found significant differences among fungi in effects on seed germination and plant growth. Effects of mycorrhizal fungi on Vanilla and Dendrobium were similar: a clade of Ceratobasidium had a consistently positive effect on plant growth and seed germination. This clade has potential use in germination and propagation of orchids. Results confirmed that a single orchid species can be associated with several mycorrhizal fungi with different functional consequences for the plant.

  17. Cercosporoid fungi (Mycosphaerellaceae) 1. Species on other fungi, Pteridophyta and Gymnospermae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Uwe; Nakashima, Chiharu; Crous, Pedro W

    2013-12-01

    Cercosporoid fungi (former Cercospora s. lat.) represent one of the largest groups of hyphomycetes belonging to the Mycosphaerellaceae (Ascomycota). They include asexual morphs, asexual holomorphs or species with mycosphaerella-like sexual morphs. Most of them are leaf-spotting plant pathogens with special phytopathological relevance. The only monograph of Cercospora s. lat., published by Chupp (1954), is badly in need of revision. However, the treatment of this huge group of fungi can only be accomplished stepwise on the basis of treatments of cercosporoid fungi on particular host plant families. The present first part of this series comprises an introduction, a survey on currently recognised cercosporoid genera, a key to the genera concerned, a discussion of taxonomically relevant characters, and descriptions and illustrations of cercosporoid species on other fungi (mycophylic taxa), Pteridophyta and Gymnospermae, arranged in alphabetical order under the particular cercosporoid genera, which are supplemented by keys to the species concerned. The following taxonomic novelties are introduced: Passalora austroplenckiae comb. nov., P. backmanii comb. nov., P. condensata comb. nov., P. gymnocladi comb. nov., P. thalictri comb. nov., Pseudocercospora davalliicola sp. nov., P. chamaecyparidis comb. nov., P. cratevicola nom. nov., P. gleicheniae comb. nov., P. lygodiicola sp. nov., P. lygodiigena nom. nov., P. nephrolepidigena sp. nov., P. paraexosporioides sp. nov., P. pini-densiflorae var. montantiana comb. et stat. nov., P. pteridigena sp. nov., P. ptisanae sp. nov., P. sciadopityos sp. nov., P. subramanianii nom. nov., P. thujina comb. nov., and Zasmidium australiense comb. nov.

  18. Fungi with multifunctional lifestyles: endophytic insect pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barelli, Larissa; Moonjely, Soumya; Behie, Scott W; Bidochka, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    This review examines the symbiotic, evolutionary, proteomic and genetic basis for a group of fungi that occupy a specialized niche as insect pathogens as well as endophytes. We focus primarily on species in the genera Metarhizium and Beauveria, traditionally recognized as insect pathogenic fungi but are also found as plant symbionts. Phylogenetic evidence suggests that these fungi are more closely related to grass endophytes and diverged from that lineage ca. 100 MYA. We explore how the dual life cycles of these fungi as insect pathogens and endophytes are coupled. We discuss the evolution of insect pathogenesis while maintaining an endophytic lifestyle and provide examples of genes that may be involved in the transition toward insect pathogenicity. That is, some genes for insect pathogenesis may have been co-opted from genes involved in endophytic colonization. Other genes may be multifunctional and serve in both lifestyle capacities. We suggest that their evolution as insect pathogens allowed them to effectively barter a specialized nitrogen source (i.e. insects) with host plants for photosynthate. These ubiquitous fungi may play an important role as plant growth promoters and have a potential reservoir of secondary metabolites.

  19. Sex and the Imperfect Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Paul S; Kück, Ulrich

    2017-06-01

    Approximately 20% of species in the fungal kingdom are only known to reproduce by asexual means despite the many supposed advantages of sexual reproduction. However, in recent years, sexual cycles have been induced in a series of emblematic "asexual" species. We describe how these discoveries were made, building on observations of evidence for sexual potential or "cryptic sexuality" from population genetic analyses; the presence, distribution, and functionality of mating-type genes; genome analyses revealing the presence of genes linked to sexuality; the functionality of sex-related genes; and formation of sex-related developmental structures. We then describe specific studies that led to the discovery of mating and sex in certain Candida , Aspergillus , Penicillium , and Trichoderma species and discuss the implications of sex including the beneficial exploitation of the sexual cycle. We next consider whether there might be any truly asexual fungal species. We suggest that, although rare, imperfect fungi may genuinely be present in nature and that certain human activities, combined with the genetic flexibility that is a hallmark of the fungal kingdom, might favor the evolution of asexuality under certain conditions. Finally, we argue that fungal species should not be thought of as simply asexual or sexual, but rather as being composed of isolates on a continuum of sexual fertility.

  20. Massive gene swamping among cheese-making Penicillium fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Ropars

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfers (HGT, i.e., the transmission of genetic material between species not directly attributable to meiotic gene exchange, have long been acknowledged as a major driver of prokaryotic evolution and is increasingly recognized as an important source of adaptation in eukaryotes. In fungi in particular, many convincing examples of HGT have been reported to confer selective advantages on the recipient fungal host, either promoting fungal pathogenicity on plants or increasing their toxicity by the acquisition of secondary metabolic clusters, resulting in adaptation to new niches and in some cases eventually even in speciation. These horizontal gene transfers involve single genes, complete metabolic pathways or even entire chromosomes. A recent study has uncovered multiple recent horizontal transfers of a 575 kb genomic island in cheese Penicillium fungi, representing ca. 2% of the Penicillium roqueforti’s genome, that may confer selective advantage in the competing cheese environment where bacteria and fungi occur. Novel phylogenomic methods are being developed, revealing massive HGT among fungi. Altogether, these recent studies indicate that HGT is a crucial mechanism of rapid adaptation, even among eukaryotes.

  1. RNA Interference in Fungi: Retention and Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolás, Francisco E; Garre, Victoriano

    2016-12-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism conserved in eukaryotes, including fungi, that represses gene expression by means of small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) of about 20 to 30 nucleotides. Its discovery is one of the most important scientific breakthroughs of the past 20 years, and it has revolutionized our perception of the functioning of the cell. Initially described and characterized in Neurospora crassa, the RNAi is widespread in fungi, suggesting that it plays important functions in the fungal kingdom. Several RNAi-related mechanisms for maintenance of genome integrity, particularly protection against exogenous nucleic acids such as mobile elements, have been described in several fungi, suggesting that this is the main function of RNAi in the fungal kingdom. However, an increasing number of fungal sRNAs with regulatory functions generated by specific RNAi pathways have been identified. Several mechanistic aspects of the biogenesis of these sRNAs are known, but their function in fungal development and physiology is scarce, except for remarkable examples such as Mucor circinelloides, in which specific sRNAs clearly regulate responses to environmental and endogenous signals. Despite the retention of RNAi in most species, some fungal groups and species lack an active RNAi mechanism, suggesting that its loss may provide some selective advantage. This article summarizes the current understanding of RNAi functions in the fungal kingdom.

  2. Growth of indoor fungi on gypsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segers, F J J; van Laarhoven, K A; Wösten, H A B; Dijksterhuis, J

    2017-08-01

    To have a better understanding of fungal growth on gypsum building materials to prevent indoor fungal growth. Gypsum is acquired by mining or as a by-product of flue-gas desulphurization or treatment of phosphate ore for the production of fertilizer. Natural gypsum, flue-gas gypsum and phosphogypsum therefore have different mineral compositions. Here, growth of fungi on these types of gypsum was assessed. Conidia of the indoor fungi Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium halotolerans and Penicillium rubens were inoculated and observed using microscopic techniques including low-temperature scanning electron microscopy. Elemental analysis of gypsum was done using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and segmented flow analysis. Moisture content of the gypsum was determined using a dynamic vapour sorption apparatus. Aspergillus niger, C. halotolerans and P. rubens hardly germinated on natural gypsum and flue-gas gypsum. The latter two fungi did show germination, outgrowth, and conidiation on phosphogypsum, while A. niger hardly germinated on this substrate. Other experiments show that C. halotolerans and P. rubens can develop in pure water, but A. niger does not. The observations show that the lack of germination of three indoor fungi is explained by the low amount of phosphor in natural, flue-gas and laboratory-grade gypsum. Additionally, C. halotolerans and P. rubens can develop in pure water, while conidia of A. niger do not show any germination, which is explained by the need for organic molecules of this species to induce germination. Indoor fungal growth is a potential threat to human health and causes damage to building materials. This study possibly helps in the application of the right type of gypsum in buildings. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Entomopathogenic Fungi in Flies Associated with Pastured Cattle in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenberg, Tove; Jespersen, Jørgen B.; Jensen, Karl-Martin Vagn

    2001-01-01

    Cattle flies, including Musca autumnalis, Haematobia irritans, and Hydrotaea irritans, are pests of pastured cattle. A 2-year study of the natural occurrence of entomopathogenic fungi in adult cattle flies and other flies associated with pastures showed that the four species included in the Entom......Cattle flies, including Musca autumnalis, Haematobia irritans, and Hydrotaea irritans, are pests of pastured cattle. A 2-year study of the natural occurrence of entomopathogenic fungi in adult cattle flies and other flies associated with pastures showed that the four species included...

  4. Sea salts as a potential source of food spoilage fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biango-Daniels, Megan N; Hodge, Kathie T

    2018-02-01

    Production of sea salt begins with evaporation of sea water in shallow pools called salterns, and ends with the harvest and packing of salts. This process provides many opportunities for fungal contamination. This study aimed to determine whether finished salts contain viable fungi that have the potential to cause spoilage when sea salt is used as a food ingredient by isolating fungi on a medium that simulated salted food with a lowered water activity (0.95 a w ). The viable filamentous fungi from seven commercial salts were quantified and identified by DNA sequencing, and the fungal communities in different salts were compared. Every sea salt tested contained viable fungi, in concentrations ranging from 0.07 to 1.71 colony-forming units per gram of salt. In total, 85 fungi were isolated representing seven genera. One or more species of the most abundant genera, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, and Penicillium was found in every salt. Many species found in this study have been previously isolated from low water activity environments, including salterns and foods. We conclude that sea salts contain many fungi that have potential to cause food spoilage as well as some that may be mycotoxigenic. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. [Isolation of endophytic fungi from medicinal plant Brucea javanica and their microbial inhibition activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zi-Ning; Zhu, Hua; Lai, Kai-Ping; Chen, Long

    2014-04-01

    To isolate and identify endophytic fungi from Brucea javanica, and to detect the antimicrobial activity of these strains. Endophytic fungi were isolated by tissue inoculation culture and identified by conventional morphological characteristic method. Seven kinds of pathogenic fungi and three kinds of bacteria were used as targeting microbes to test microbial inhibition activities by agar plate antagonistic action and modified agar gel diffusion methods, respectively. A total of 83 endophytic fungi strains were isolated from the root, stem, leaf and fruit of Brucea javanica. 34 strains were obtained from the stem, 32 strains were obtained from the leaf, 15 strains were isolated from the root and 2 strains came from the fruit. These 73 strains which had been identified attribute to 5 orders, 6 families and 12 genera. For the isolated strains, 14 strains had antifungal activities against at least one pathogenic fungi, 9 strains showed antibacterial activities against one or more bacteria. Especially, the strain YJ-17 which belonged to Phomopsis genus showed the best inhibitory effect on the targeting microbes. The endophytic fungi from Brucea javanica show diversity and microbial inhibition activity, and are worthy for further study on plant disease controlling.

  6. Fungi of the murine gut: episodic variation and proliferation during antibiotic treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Dollive

    Full Text Available Antibiotic use in humans has been associated with outgrowth of fungi. Here we used a murine model to investigate the gut microbiome over 76 days of treatment with vancomycin, ampicillin, neomycin, and metronidazole and subsequent recovery. Mouse stool was studied as a surrogate for the microbiota of the lower gastrointestinal tract. The abundance of fungi and bacteria was measured using quantitative PCR, and the proportional composition of the communities quantified using 454/Roche pyrosequencing of rRNA gene tags. Prior to treatment, bacteria outnumbered fungi by >3 orders of magnitude. Upon antibiotic treatment, bacteria dropped in abundance >3 orders of magnitude, so that the predominant 16S sequences detected became transients derived from food. Upon cessation of treatment, bacterial communities mostly returned to their previous numbers and types after 8 weeks, though communities remained detectably different from untreated controls. Fungal communities varied substantially over time, even in the untreated controls. Separate cages within the same treatment group showed radical differences, but mice within a cage generally behaved similarly. Fungi increased ∼40-fold in abundance upon antibiotic treatment but declined back to their original abundance after cessation of treatment. At the last time point, Candida remained more abundant than prior to treatment. These data show that 1 gut fungal populations change radically during normal mouse husbandry, 2 fungi grow out in the gut upon suppression of bacterial communities with antibiotics, and 3 perturbations due to antibiotics persist long term in both the fungal and bacterial microbiota.

  7. ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZA FUNGI AS AN INDICATOR OF SOIL FERTILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Akhid Syibli

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are ubiquitous organism that forms association with the root of most terrestrial plants. AMF association also influence soil fertility through the enhancement of chemical, biological and physical content. In this study, we enumerated AMF spores from rhizosphere of Tithonia difersivolia as an indicator of soil fertility. The results showed that the most fertile soil had the highest AMF spores density. This research has confirmed that AMF has high interaction with organic carbon, organic matter, total phosphorus, cation exchange capacity, water level, soil fungi and soil bacteria. Partial regression analysis revealed the mathematic equation for their interaction. This equation used the abundant of AMF spores as an indicator for chemical, biological and physical fertility of the soil.

  8. Comparative analysis of programmed cell death pathways in filamentous fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wortman Jennifer R

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fungi can undergo autophagic- or apoptotic-type programmed cell death (PCD on exposure to antifungal agents, developmental signals, and stress factors. Filamentous fungi can also exhibit a form of cell death called heterokaryon incompatibility (HI triggered by fusion between two genetically incompatible individuals. With the availability of recently sequenced genomes of Aspergillus fumigatus and several related species, we were able to define putative components of fungi-specific death pathways and the ancestral core apoptotic machinery shared by all fungi and metazoa. Results Phylogenetic profiling of HI-associated proteins from four Aspergilli and seven other fungal species revealed lineage-specific protein families, orphan genes, and core genes conserved across all fungi and metazoa. The Aspergilli-specific domain architectures include NACHT family NTPases, which may function as key integrators of stress and nutrient availability signals. They are often found fused to putative effector domains such as Pfs, SesB/LipA, and a newly identified domain, HET-s/LopB. Many putative HI inducers and mediators are specific to filamentous fungi and not found in unicellular yeasts. In addition to their role in HI, several of them appear to be involved in regulation of cell cycle, development and sexual differentiation. Finally, the Aspergilli possess many putative downstream components of the mammalian apoptotic machinery including several proteins not found in the model yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusion Our analysis identified more than 100 putative PCD associated genes in the Aspergilli, which may help expand the range of currently available treatments for aspergillosis and other invasive fungal diseases. The list includes species-specific protein families as well as conserved core components of the ancestral PCD machinery shared by fungi and metazoa.

  9. THE OCCURRENCE OF ENTOMOPATHOGENIC FUNGI IN SOILS FROM CULTIVATED PERENNIAL RYEGRASS (LOLIUM PERENNE L.

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    Roman Kolczarek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An important role in the agricultural agrocenosis is attributed to entomopathogenic fungi. They limit the occurrence of certain populations of soil pests and insects overwintering in the soil environment, or held in the pupation. Fungi are the only pathogens of arthropods witch have the ability to infect plant pests directly by body. However, bacteria are the largest group of microorganisms inhabiting the soil. The aim of this study was to compare the species composition and the severity of the occurrence of entomopathogenic fungi in soils of monoculture crops perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.. The material consisted of soil samples taken from the experimental research conducted in two experimental stations of the Central Research Centre for Cultivar. The fungi isolated from soil insecticides using a method developed by the selective medium.

  10. Isolation and 16s rdna sequence analysis of bacteria from dieback affected mango orchards in southern pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.A.; Khan, A.; Asif, H.; Azim, M.K.; Muhlbach, H.P.

    2014-01-01

    A broad range of microorganisms are involved in various mango plant diseases such as fungi, algae and bacteria. In order to study the role of bacteria in mango dieback, a survey of infected mango plants in southern Pakistan was carried out. A number of bacterial isolates were obtained from healthy looking and infected mango trees, and their characterization was undertaken by colony PCR and subsequent sequence analysis of 16S rDNA. These analyses revealed the presence of various genera including Acinetobacter, Bacillus, Burkholderia, Cronobacter, Curtobacterium, Enterobacter, Erwinia, Exiguobacterium, Halotelea, Lysinibacillus, Micrococcus, Microbacterium, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Salmonella and Staphylococcus. It is noteworthy that several members of these genera have been reported as plant pathogens. The present study provided baseline information regarding the phytopathogenic bacteria associated with mango trees in southern Pakistan. (author)

  11. Fungi isolated in school buildings

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    Elżbieta Ejdys

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the species composition of fungi occurring on wall surfaces and in the air in school buildings. Fungi isolated from the air using the sedimentation method and from the walls using the surface swab technique constituted the study material. Types of finish materials on wall surfaces were identified and used in the analysis. Samples were collected in selected areas in two schools: classrooms, corridors, men's toilets and women's toilets, cloakrooms, sports changing rooms and shower. Examinations were conducted in May 2005 after the heating season was over. Fungi were incubated on Czapek-Dox medium at three parallel temperatures: 25, 37 and 40°C, for at least three weeks. A total of 379 isolates of fungi belonging to 32 genera of moulds, yeasts and yeast-like fungi were obtained from 321 samples in the school environment. The following genera were isolated most frequently: Aspergillus, Penicillium and Cladosporium. Of the 72 determined species, Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium chrysogenum occurred most frequently in the school buildings. Wall surfaces were characterised by an increased prevalence of mycobiota in comparison with the air in the buildings, with a slightly greater species diversity. A certain species specificity for rough and smooth wall surfaces was demonstrated. Fungi of the genera Cladosporium and Emericella with large spores adhered better to smooth surfaces while those of the genus Aspergillus with smaller conidia adhered better to rough surfaces. The application of three incubation temperatures helped provide a fuller picture of the mycobiota in the school environment.

  12. Molecular battles between plant and pathogenic bacteria in the phyllosphere

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    C.M. Baker

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The phyllosphere, i.e., the aerial parts of the plant, provides one of the most important niches for microbial colonization. This niche supports the survival and, often, proliferation of microbes such as fungi and bacteria with diverse lifestyles including epiphytes, saprophytes, and pathogens. Although most microbes may complete the life cycle on the leaf surface, pathogens must enter the leaf and multiply aggressively in the leaf interior. Natural surface openings, such as stomata, are important entry sites for bacteria. Stomata are known for their vital role in water transpiration and gas exchange between the plant and the environment that is essential for plant growth. Recent studies have shown that stomata can also play an active role in limiting bacterial invasion of both human and plant pathogenic bacteria as part of the plant innate immune system. As counter-defense, plant pathogens such as Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst DC3000 use the virulence factor coronatine to suppress stomate-based defense. A novel and crucial early battleground in host-pathogen interaction in the phyllosphere has been discovered with broad implications in the study of bacterial pathogenesis, host immunity, and molecular ecology of bacterial diseases.

  13. Airborne bacterial communities in residences: similarities and differences with fungi.

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    Rachel I Adams

    Full Text Available Genetic analysis of indoor air has uncovered a rich microbial presence, but rarely have both the bacterial and fungal components been examined in the same samples. Here we present a study that examined the bacterial component of passively settled microbes from both indoor and outdoor air over a discrete time period and for which the fungal component has already been reported. Dust was allowed to passively settle in five common locations around a home - living room, bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, and balcony - at different dwellings within a university-housing complex for a one-month period at two time points, once in summer and again in winter. We amplified the bacterial 16S rRNA gene in these samples and analyzed them with high-throughput sequencing. Like fungal OTU-richness, bacterial OTU-richness was higher outdoors then indoors and was invariant across different indoor room types. While fungal composition was structured largely by season and residential unit, bacterial composition varied by residential unit and room type. Bacteria from putative outdoor sources, such as Sphingomonas and Deinococcus, comprised a large percentage of the balcony samples, while human-associated taxa comprised a large percentage of the indoor samples. Abundant outdoor bacterial taxa were also observed indoors, but the reverse was not true; this is unlike fungi, in which the taxa abundant indoors were also well-represented outdoors. Moreover, there was a partial association of bacterial composition and geographic distance, such that samples separated by even a few hundred meters tended have greater compositional differences than samples closer together in space, a pattern also observed for fungi. These data show that while the outdoor source for indoor bacteria and fungi varies in both space and time, humans provide a strong and homogenizing effect on indoor bacterial bioaerosols, a pattern not observed in fungi.

  14. Diversity and antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi isolated from Cephalotaxus hainanensis Li, a well-known medicinal plant in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H R; Hu, X P; Jiang, C J; Qi, J; Wu, Y C; Li, W; Zeng, Y J; Li, C F; Liu, S X

    2015-11-01

    About 1051 endophytic fungi were isolated from leaves, branches, barks and stems of Cephalotaxus hainanensis Li from four sites in Hainan, China. The fungi were identified as 21 genera by morphology and ITS sequences. One dominant species was Phomopsis quercella in Hainan Tropical Botanical Garden and Bawangling Nature Reserve, with relative frequency of 42·06 and 34·88% respectively. Another dominant species was Colletotrichum boninense in Wuzhishan and Jianfengling Nature Reserves, with relative frequency of 36·84 and 46·97% respectively. Among the selected 21 endophytic fungi, 17 strains (80·95%) had activity against at least one pathogenic bacteria, and 14 strains (66·67%) exhibited activity against at least one fungal pathogens. Neonectria macroconidialis showed strong inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus (inhibition zone being 20 mm), Bacillus subtilis (14 mm) and Streptococcus agalactiae (28 mm). Xylaria sp. showed strong inhibition against Escherichia coli (20 mm), Rhizoctonia solani (20 mm) and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (17 mm). Verticillium bulbillosum showed great activity against Strep. agalactiae (32 mm) and Fusarium oxysporum (22 mm). These endophytic fungi showed potentials in medicine development. Endophytic fungi from medicinal plants are an important source of novel and viable drugs. Cephalotaxus hainanensis Li is well known for leukaemia treatment and its endophytic fungi were isolated to investigate the diversity and antimicrobial activity. It was found that Ce. hainanensis Li had rich endophytic fungi, and some fungi showed strong antimicrobial activity against certain pathogens. These fungi can be used in medicine development. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Bacteria and archaea paleomicrobiology of the dental calculus: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, H T T; Verneau, J; Levasseur, A; Drancourt, M; Aboudharam, G

    2016-06-01

    Dental calculus, a material observed in the majority of adults worldwide, emerged as a source for correlating paleomicrobiology with human health and diet. This mini review of 48 articles on the paleomicrobiology of dental calculus over 7550 years discloses a secular core microbiota comprising nine bacterial phyla - Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, TM7, Synergistetes, Chloroflexi, Fusobacteria, Spirochetes - and one archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota; and some accessory microbiota that appear and disappear according to time frame. The diet residues and oral microbes, including bacteria, archaea, viruses and fungi, consisting of harmless organisms and pathogens associated with local and systemic infections have been found trapped in ancient dental calculus by morphological approaches, immunolabeling techniques, isotope analyses, fluorescent in situ hybridization, DNA-based approaches, and protein-based approaches. These observations led to correlation of paleomicrobiology, particularly Streptococcus mutans and archaea, with past human health and diet. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. [Research advances in endophytic fungi of mangrove].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ai-Rong; Wu, Xiao-Peng; Xu, Tong

    2007-04-01

    Mangrove, a kind of special host plants, is a resource of abundant endophytic fungi. More than 200 species of endophytic fungi are isolated and identified from mangrove, being the second largest community of marine fungi. The reported endophytic fungi of mangrove are mainly Alternaria, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Colletotrichum, Fusarium, Paecilomyces, Penicillium, Pestalotiopsis, Phoma, Phomopsis, Phyllosticta and Trichoderma. Most endophytic fungi have wide range of hosts, and a few only have single host. However, the composition and dominant species on each mangrove plant are different. The colonization of endophytic fungi always varies with different parts (leaves, twigs, stems) and age of host plants and with seasons. The endophytic fungi of mangrove can produce many kinds of metabolites with great potential for anti-microbial and anti-tumor medicinal use. In this paper, the research advances in biodiversity of endophytic fungi in mangrove, their distribution, biological and ecological function, and secondary metabolites were reviewed.

  17. Commensal Fungi in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limon, Jose J; Skalski, Joseph H; Underhill, David M

    2017-08-09

    Fungi are increasingly being recognized as common members of the microbiomes found on nearly all mucosal surfaces, and interest is growing in understanding how these organisms may contribute to health and disease. In this review, we investigate recent developments in our understanding of the fungal microbiota or "mycobiota" including challenges faced in characterizing it, where these organisms are found, their diversity, and how they interact with host immunity. Growing evidence indicates that, like the bacterial microbiota, the fungal microbiota is often altered in disease states, and increasingly studies are being designed to probe the functional consequences of such fungal dysbiosis on health and disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Secreted proteases from pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monod, Michel; Capoccia, Sabrina; Léchenne, Barbara; Zaugg, Christophe; Holdom, Mary; Jousson, Olivier

    2002-10-01

    Many species of human pathogenic fungi secrete proteases in vitro or during the infection process. Secreted endoproteases belong to the aspartic proteases of the pepsin family, serine proteases of the subtilisin family, and metalloproteases of two different families. To these proteases has to be added the non-pepsin-type aspartic protease from Aspergillus niger and a unique chymotrypsin-like protease from Coccidioides immitis. Pathogenic fungi also secrete aminopeptidases, carboxypeptidases and dipeptidyl-peptidases. The function of fungal secreted proteases and their importance in infections vary. It is evident that secreted proteases are important for the virulence of dermatophytes since these fungi grow exclusively in the stratum corneum, nails or hair, which constitutes their sole nitrogen and carbon sources. The aspartic proteases secreted by Candida albicans are involved in the adherence process and penetration of tissues, and in interactions with the immune system of the infected host. For Aspergillus fumigatus, the role of proteolytic activity has not yet been proved. Although the secreted proteases have been intensively investigated as potential virulence factors, knowledge on protease substrate specificities is rather poor and few studies have focused on the research of inhibitors. Knowledge of substrate specificities will increase our understanding about the action of each protease secreted by pathogenic fungi and will help to determine their contribution to virulence.

  19. Transmission of Airborne Bacteria across Built Environments and Its Measurement Standards: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Fujiyoshi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Human health is influenced by various factors including microorganisms present in built environments where people spend most of their lives (approximately 90%. It is therefore necessary to monitor and control indoor airborne microbes for occupational safety and public health. Most studies concerning airborne microorganisms have focused on fungi, with scant data available concerning bacteria. The present review considers papers published from 2010 to 2017 approximately and factors affecting properties of indoor airborne bacteria (communities and concentration with respect to temporal perspective and to multiscale interaction viewpoint. From a temporal perspective, bacterial concentrations in built environments change depending on numbers of human occupancy, while properties of bacterial communities tend to remain stable. Similarly, the bacteria found in social and community spaces such as offices, classrooms and hospitals are mainly associated with human occupancy. Other major sources of indoor airborne bacteria are (i outdoor environments, and (ii the building materials themselves. Indoor bacterial communities and concentrations are varied with varying interferences by outdoor environment. Airborne bacteria from the outdoor environment enter an indoor space through open doors and windows, while indoor bacteria are simultaneously released to the outer environment. Outdoor bacterial communities and their concentrations are also affected by geographical factors such as types of land use and their spatial distribution. The bacteria found in built environments therefore originate from any of the natural and man-made surroundings around humans. Therefore, to better understand the factors influencing bacterial concentrations and communities in built environments, we should study all the environments that humans contact as a single ecosystem. In this review, we propose the establishment of a standard procedure for assessing properties of indoor airborne

  20. Analysis of bile bacteria culture and their antibiotic sensitivity in patients with varying degrees of acute cholangitis

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    LIU Huifang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo profile the types of bacteria in bile culture and study their antibiotic sensitivity pattern in patients with varying degrees of acute cholangitis and to provide data guidance for the prevention and treatment of bacterial infection. MethodsThe clinical data of 230 patients with acute cholangitis who were admitted to our hospital from April 2010 to April 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Classification of pathogenic bacteria and the antibiotic sensitivity test in bile cultures were performed using VITEK 2 Compact Biomerieux microbiological system. ResultsWithin the 230 patients, 172 tested positive for biliary bacteria, and the positive rate was 74.78% (172/230. There were 237 strains of pathogenic bacteria, including 135 strains of Gram-positive bacteria (56.96%, comprised mainly of Enterococcus and Staphylococcus aureus, 96 strains of Gram-negative bacteria (40.51%, comprised mainly of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumonia, and 6 strains of fungi (2.53%, comprised mainly of yeast. Significant difference in the positive rate of bacteria was detected between patients with mild and severe cholangitis (χ2 = 4.58, P = 0.028. Gram-negative bacteria were the predominant isolates in patients with mild and moderate acute cholangitis, while multiple bacterial infection was more common in patients with severe cholangitis. Biliary bacteria had a higher rate of susceptibility to vancomycin, imipenem, and amikacin compared with other antibiotics. ConclusionGram-positive bacteria are the predominant pathogens in acute cholangitis. Early detection, immediate intervention, and accurate drug susceptibility test should be implemented at regular intervals to direct effective clinical therapy.

  1. Bioactive Metabolites from Pathogenic and Endophytic Fungi of Forest Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Marco; Maddau, Lucia; Linaldeddu, Benedetto Teodoro; Scanu, Bruno; Evidente, Antonio; Cimmino, Alessio

    2018-01-01

    Fungi play an important role in terrestrial ecosystems interacting positively or negatively with plants. These interactions are complex and the outcomes are different depending on the fungal lifestyles, saprotrophic, mutualistic or pathogenic. Furthermore, fungi are well known for producing secondary metabolites, originating from different biosynthetic pathways, which possess biological properties of considerable biotechnological interest. Among the terrestrial ecosystems, temperate forests represent an enormous reservoir of fungal diversity. This review will highlight the goldmine of secondary metabolites produced by pathogenic and endophytic fungi of forest trees with focus on their biological activities. A structured search of bibliographic databases for peer-reviewed research literature was undertaken using a research discovery application providing access to a large and authoritative source of references. The papers selected were examined and the main results were reported and discussed. Two hundred forthy-one papers were included in the review, outlined a large number of secondary metabolites produced by pathogenic and endophiltic fungi and their biological activities, including phytotoxic, antifungal, antioomycetes, antibacterial, brine shrimp lethality, mosquito biting deterrence and larvicidal, cytotoxic, antiproliferative and many other bioactivities. The findings of this review confirm the importance of secondary metabolites produced by pathogenic and endophytic fungi from forest plants growing in temperate regions as an excellent prospects to discover compounds with new bioactivities and mode of actions. In addition, the potential of some metabolites as a source of new drugs and biopesticides is underlined. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Diversity of fungi colonizing leaves of Rhododendron (Rhododendron L. cuttings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Kierpiec-Baran

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rhododendrons (Rhododendron L. are shrubs whose attractiveness is determined by their multi-coloured flowers and evergreen leaves. Necroses visible on the leaves of rhododendron cuttings diminish the suitability of nursery material for marketing. These symptoms are most frequently caused by fungi. The investigations were conducted in 2010–2011 in an ornamental shrub nursery to identify fungi colonizing the phyllosphere of rhododendron cuttings and causing leaf necroses. The material for analysis consisted of leaves of 11 rhododendron cultivars. 550 leaves were collected from 110 half-year-old cuttings for mycological analysis. Over 350 fungal colonies belonging to 15 species were isolated from the leaves of rhododendron cuttings. The dominants included: Pestalotiopsis sydowiana, Trichoderma koningii and Alternaria alternata. The influents included: Aspergillus brasiliensis, Mucor hiemalis f. hiemalis, Epicoccum nigrum, Sordaria fimicola and Umbelopsis isabellina. A large majority of the fungi preferred the phyllosphere environment of Yakushima rhododendron (R. yakushimanum cultivars ‘Sneezy’ and ‘Golden Torch’ as well as of the large-flowered cultivars ‘Flautando’, ‘Dominik’, and ‘Simona’. The phyllosphere of the large-flowered cultivars ‘Bernstein’, ‘Nova Zembla’, and ‘Goldbuckett’ was a reservoir for many fungal colonies and fungi species. The cultivars less susceptible to colonization by fungi and the most promising for planting in green areas and home gardens are the large-flowered cultivars ‘Bernstein’, ‘Nova Zembla’, ‘Goldbuckett’, ‘Rasputin’, and ‘Roseum Elegans’.

  3. Endophytic fungi with antitumor activities: Their occurrence and anticancer compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Zhang, Qiao-Yan; Jia, Min; Ming, Qian-Liang; Yue, Wei; Rahman, Khalid; Qin, Lu-Ping; Han, Ting

    2016-05-01

    Plant endophytic fungi have been recognized as an important and novel resource of natural bioactive products, especially in anticancer application. This review mainly deals with the research progress on the production of anticancer compounds by endophytic fungi between 1990 and 2013. Anticancer activity is generally associated with the cytotoxicity of the compounds present in the endophytic fungi. All strains of endophytes producing antitumor chemicals were classified taxonomically and the genera of Pestalotiopsis and Aspergillus as well as the taxol producing endophytes were focused on. Classification of endophytic fungi producing antitumor compounds has received more attention from mycologists, and it can also lead to the discovery of novel compounds with antitumor activity due to phylogenetic relationships. In this review, the structures of the anticancer compounds isolated from the newly reported endophytes between 2010 and 2013 are discussed including strategies for the efficient production of the desired compounds. The purpose of this review is to provide new directions in endophytic fungi research including integrated information relating to its anticancer compounds.

  4. Fungi as a Source of Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Joëlle; Dequin, Sylvie; Giraud, Tatiana; Le Tacon, François; Marsit, Souhir; Ropars, Jeanne; Richard, Franck; Selosse, Marc-André

    2017-06-01

    In this article, we review some of the best-studied fungi used as food sources, in particular, the cheese fungi, the truffles, and the fungi used for drink fermentation such as beer, wine, and sake. We discuss their history of consumption by humans and the genomic mechanisms of adaptation during artificial selection.

  5. The role of bacteria and mycorrhiza in plant sulfur supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinta Mariea Gahan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth is highly dependent on bacteria, saprophytic and mycorrhizal fungi which facilitate the cycling and mobilization of nutrients. Over 95% of the sulfur (S in soil is present in an organic form. Sulfate-esters and sulfonates, the major forms of organo-S in soils, arise through deposition of biological material and are transformed through subsequent humification. Fungi and bacteria release S from sulfate-esters using sulfatases, however, release of S from sulfonates is catalyzed by a bacterial multi-component mono-oxygenase system. The asfA gene is used as a key marker in this desulfonation process to study sulfonatase activity in soil bacteria identified as Variovorax, Polaromonas, Acidovorax and Rhodococcus. The rhizosphere is regarded as a hot spot for microbial activity and recent studies indicate that this is also the case for the mycorrhizosphere where bacteria may attach to the fungal hyphae capable of mobilizing organo-S. While current evidence is not showing sulfatase and sulfonatase activity in arbuscular mycorrhiza, their effect on the expression of plant host sulfate transporters is documented. A revision of the role of bacteria, fungi and the interactions between soil bacteria and mycorrhiza in plant S supply was conducted.

  6. Nests of Marsh harrier (Circus aeruginosus L.) as refuges of potentially phytopathogenic and zoopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornillowicz-Kowalska, Teresa; Kitowski, Ignacy

    2018-01-01

    Birds' nests may be refuges for various species of fungi including that which are potentially phytopathogenic and zoopathogenic. Among the 2449 isolates of fungi obtained from nests of Marsh harriers 96.8% belonged to filamentous fungi. In total, 37 genera were identified from 63 fungi species. Within the mycobiotas of the examined nests populations of fungi which are potentially pathogenic for humans, homoiothermous animals and plants dominated. Among 63 species, 46 (72%) were potentially pathogenic fungi of which 18 species were potentially phytopathogenic and 32 species were pathogenic for homoiothermous animals. Inter alia species of fungi were found in the Marsh harriers nests: Aspergillus fumigatus , Aspergillus flavus , Scopulariopsis brevicaulis , Chrysosporium keratinophilum and Fusarium poae , Fusarium sporotrichioides . In terms of numbers, dominant in Marsh harrier nests were fungi pathogenic to birds, other homoiothermous animals and humans. On that basis it was concluded that Marsh harrier nests are both a source of fungal infections for that species and one of the links in the epidemiological cycle of opportunistic fungi for humans.

  7. Native ectomycorrhizal fungi of limber and whitebark pine: Necessary for forest sustainability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathy L. Cripps; Robert K. Antibus

    2011-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi are an important component of northern coniferous forests, including those of Pinus flexilis (limber pine) and P. albicaulis (whitebark pine) which are being decimated by white pine blister rust and mountain pine beetles. Ectomycorrhizal fungi are known to promote seedling establishment, tree health, and may play a role in forest sustainability....

  8. Role of mycorrhizal fungi and salicylic acid in salinity tolerance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salinity is one of the common agricultural and biological problems. Most researchers showed that inoculation of plants with mycorrhizal fungi and using salicylic acid increase tolerance of plants due to salinity. In this study, the effect of mycorrhizal fungi, including Glomus mosseae, Glomus intraradices, and salicylic acid (0.2 ...

  9. Oxidation of gaseous hydrocarbons by alkene-utilizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van C.G.

    1987-01-01

    Gaseous alkenes are widespread in the environment due to the emission of these hydrocarbons by industry and due to their production from natural sources as for instance ethene by plants, fungi and bacteria. Micro-organisms have developed the potential to oxidize these hydrocarbons. Alkenes

  10. Facilitation of phosphorus uptake in maize plants by mycorrhizosphere bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battini, Fabio; Grønlund, Mette; Agnolucci, Monica

    2017-01-01

    availability of soil P. This study investigated whether biofertilizers and bioenhancers, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and their associated bacteria could enhance growth and P uptake in maize. Plants were grown with or without mycorrhizas in compartmented pots with radioactive P tracers and were...

  11. Money and transmission of bacteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gedik, H.; Voss, T.A.; Voss, A.

    2013-01-01

    Money is one of the most frequently passed items in the world. The aim of this study was to ascertain the survival status of bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Vancomycin- Resistant Enterococci (VRE) on banknotes from different countries and the transmission of bacteria

  12. The threatened plant intermediate wintergreen (Pyrola media) associates with a wide range of biotrophic fungi in native Scottish pine woods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftegaard, Tenna; Iason, Glenn R.; Alexander, Ian J.

    2010-01-01

    in a Scots pine forest was determined by morphotyping, polymerase chain reaction, cloning and sequencing. Molecular identification found 49 taxa representing ecto- and ericoid mycorrhizal fungi, dark septate endophytes, saprotrophs, and fungi of unknown trophic status. The majority of the taxa (67.4%) were...... that they associate with a restricted range of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi. Here, we examined the hypothesis that specialisation by P. media for fungi usually associated with Scots pine is a factor in promoting its occurrence in this habitat. The fungal community associated with the roots of P. media growing...... Basidiomycota, with 24.4% known to be ECM fungi specific to Pinus sp. or conifers. However, a wide range of other mycorrhizal fungi with varying degrees of host specificity were also found, including taxa usually associated with deciduous hosts. In conclusion, the broad range of mycorrhizal fungi recovered from...

  13. [Non-coding RNA in fungi--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liping; Luo, Yuping; Li, Siguang

    2013-08-04

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) existing widely in many living organisms are functional RNA molecules, function directly as structural or regulatory RNAs in organisms. Although large and diverse populations of ncRNAs have been extensively studied and well understood in animals and plants, few reports could be found about ncRNAs in fungi. Recently, with the development of modern biological techniques, a number of ncRNAs have been identified in fungi, including snoRNA-derived RNAs, long non-coding RNAs, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), dsRNA Killer viruses, and novel classes of ncRNAs discovered in filamentous fungi. These ncRNAs play important roles in gene transcription and translation, RNA processing and modifying, chromatin structure, and even fungal pathogenicity. Therefore, studies on ncRNAs in fungi may shed light on the regulatory system of gene expression and the characteristics of fungal growth, and even provide some clues towards understanding pathogenic mechanisms of pathogenic fungi, which will contribute to the treatment of fungal diseases. Here, we reviewed the discovery of fungal ncRNAs, their origins and processing, classification, and biological functions, aiming to establish a theoretical foundation and basis for deep understanding of fungal ncRNAs in future.

  14. Isolation of keratinophilic fungi from soil in Isfahan province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachuei, R; Emami, M; Naeimi, B; Diba, K

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the epidemiology of keratophilic fungi in Isfahan province, Iran. The present research has been conducted on soil samples collected from 16 townships of Isfahan province. For isolate geophilic dermatophytes and keratinophilic fungi, the keratin baiting technique has been applied. Of 800 soil samples examined, 588 (73.5%) keratinophilic fungi were isolated. The present studied recognized 727 isolates including 16 species of 11 genus, as follows: Chrysosporium keratinophilum (31.4%), C. pannicola (16.9%), C. tropicum (15.4%), Microsporum gypseum (12.4%), Chrysosporium spp. (9.9%), C. indicum (7%), Sepedonium spp. (3.3%), Malbranchia spp. (1%), Trichophyton terrestre (0.8%), T. ajelloi and Paecilomyces lilacinus (0.4%), Engyodontium album and Acremonium spp. (0.3%), Curvularia spp., Fusarium spp. and Ulocladium spp. (0.1%). In this study, E. album was isolated for the first time in this country (Iran). The frequency these keratinophilic fungi are discussed in relation to different agents such as soil pH. This study contributes to the knowledge of keratophilic fungi in Iran. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. [Diverse double-stranded RNA viruses infecting fungi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Sotaro; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Most of reported fungal viruses (mycoviruses) have double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genomes. This may reflect the simple, easy method for mycovirus hunting that entails detection of dsRNAs as a sign of viral infections. There are an increasing number of screens of various fungi, particularly phytopathogenic fungi for viruses pathogenic to host fungi or able to confer hypovirulence to them. This bases on an attractive research field of biological control of fungal plant diseases using viruses (virocontrol), mainly targeting important phytopathogenic fungi. While isolated viruses usually induce asymptomatic symptoms, they show a considerably high level of diversity. As of 2014, fungal dsRNA viruses are classified into six families: Reoviridae, Totiviridae, Chrysoviridae, Partitiviridae, Megabirnaviridae and Quadriviridae. These exclude unassigned mycoviruses which will definitely be placed into distinct families and/or genera. In this review article, dsRNA viruses isolated from the kingdom Fungi including as-yet-unclassified taxa are overviewed. Some recent achievements in the related field are briefly introduced as well.

  16. Impact of matric potential and pore size distribution on growth dynamics of filamentous and non-filamentous soil bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, A.B.; Vos, M.; De Boer, W.; Kowalchuk, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous growth form is an important strategy for soil microbes to bridge air-filled pores in unsaturated soils. In particular, fungi perform better than bacteria in soils during drought, a property that has been ascribed to the hyphal growth form of fungi. However, it is unknown if, and to

  17. Impact of Matric Potential and Pore Size Distribution on Growth Dynamics of Filamentous and Non-Filamentous Soil Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, A.B.; Vos, de M.; Boer, de W.; Kowalchuk, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous growth form is an important strategy for soil microbes to bridge air-filled pores in unsaturated soils. In particular, fungi perform better than bacteria in soils during drought, a property that has been ascribed to the hyphal growth form of fungi. However, it is unknown if, and to

  18. Specificity of the mutualistic association between actinomycete bacteria and two sympatric species of Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, M; Cafaro, M; Boomsma, J J

    2005-01-01

    Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants maintain two highly specialized, vertically transmitted mutualistic ectosymbionts: basidiomycete fungi that are cultivated for food in underground gardens and actinomycete Pseudonocardia bacteria that are reared on the cuticle to produce antibiotics that suppress the ...

  19. Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Coliform Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Mesner, Nancy; Daniels, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This fact sheet provides information about coliform bacteria. Including sections about what coliform bacteria is, how it enters drinking water, health concerns from exposure, drinking water standards, and how to treat drinking water that contains coliforms.

  20. Phylogeny and comparative genome analysis of a Basidiomycete fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert W.; Salamov, Asaf; Grigoriev, Igor; Hibbett, David

    2011-03-14

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota, make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important from the perspectives of forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes the mushrooms, wood rots, plant pathogenic rusts and smuts, and some human pathogens. To better understand these important fungi, we have undertaken a comparative genomic analysis of the Basidiomycetes with available sequenced genomes. We report a phylogeny that sheds light on previously unclear evolutionary relationships among the Basidiomycetes. We also define a `core proteome? based on protein families conserved in all Basidiomycetes. We identify key expansions and contractions in protein families that may be responsible for the degradation of plant biomass such as cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Finally, we speculate as to the genomic changes that drove such expansions and contractions.

  1. Impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on uranium accumulation by plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boulois, H Dupré; Joner, E J; Leyval, C; Jakobsen, I; Chen, B D; Roos, P; Thiry, Y; Rufyikiri, G; Delvaux, B; Declerck, S

    2008-05-01

    Contamination by uranium (U) occurs principally at U mining and processing sites. Uranium can have tremendous environmental consequences, as it is highly toxic to a broad range of organisms and can be dispersed in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. Remediation strategies of U-contaminated soils have included physical and chemical procedures, which may be beneficial, but are costly and can lead to further environmental damage. Phytoremediation has been proposed as a promising alternative, which relies on the capacity of plants and their associated microorganisms to stabilize or extract contaminants from soils. In this paper, we review the role of a group of plant symbiotic fungi, i.e. arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, which constitute an essential link between the soil and the roots. These fungi participate in U immobilization in soils and within plant roots and they can reduce root-to-shoot translocation of U. However, there is a need to evaluate these observations in terms of their importance for phytostabilization strategies.

  2. Cell wall integrity signalling in human pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichtl, Karl; Samantaray, Sweta; Wagener, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Fungi are surrounded by a rigid structure, the fungal cell wall. Its plasticity and composition depend on active regulation of the underlying biosynthesis and restructuring processes. This involves specialised signalling pathways that control gene expression and activities of biosynthetic enzymes. The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway is the central signalling cascade required for the adaptation to a wide spectrum of cell wall perturbing conditions, including heat, oxidative stress and antifungals. In the recent years, great efforts were made to analyse the CWI pathway of diverse fungi. It turned out that the CWI signalling cascade is mostly conserved in the fungal kingdom. In this review, we summarise as well as compare the current knowledge on the canonical CWI pathway in the human pathogenic fungi Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Aspergillus fumigatus and Cryptococcus neoformans. Understanding the differences and similarities in the stress responses of these organisms could become a key to improving existing or developing new antifungal therapies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Liposome-mediated mycelial transformation of filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Ran; Zhang, Guang; Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Mingyue; Zhao, Shuaiju; Qiu, Liyou

    2013-09-01

    Liposome-mediated transformation is common for cells with no cell wall, but has very limited usage in cells with walls, such as bacteria, fungi, and plants. In this study, we developed a procedure to introduce DNA into mycelium of filamentous fungi, Rhizopus nigricans LH 21 and Pleurotus ostreatus TD 300, by liposome-mediation but with no protoplast preparation. The DNA was transformed into R. nigricans via plasmid pEGFP-C1 and into P. ostreatus via 7.2 kb linear DNA. The mycelia were ground in 0.6 M mannitol without any grinding aids or glass powder for 15 min to make mycelial fragments suspension; the suspension was mixed with a mixture of the DNA and Lipofectamine 2000, and placed on ice for 30 min; 100 μL of the transformation solution was plated on potato dextrose agar (PDA) plate and cultivated at 28 °C for transformant screening. The plasmid and the linear DNA were confirmed to be integrated into the host chromosome, proving the success of transformation. The transformation efficiencies were similar to those of electroporation-mediated protoplast transformation (EMPT) of R. nigricans or PEG/CaCl2-mediated protoplast transformation (PMT) of P. ostreatus, respectively. The results showed that our procedure was effective, fast, and simple transformation method for filamentous fungi. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Parasitism of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: reviewing the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purin, Sonia; Rillig, Matthias C

    2008-02-01

    In order to understand the functioning of mycorrhizal fungi in ecosystems it is necessary to consider the full suite of possible biotic interactions in the soil. While a number of such interactions have recently been shown to be crucially important, parasitism is a highly neglected feature in the ecology of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). A number of studies have classified some interactions between populations of bacteria and fungi with AMF as parasitism, generating discussion about its consequences at both 'parasite' and host population levels. This paper reviews these various publications, and based on a set of criteria that are necessary to demonstrate parasitism, it was concluded that parasitism has not been conclusively shown to exist in AMF, even though some data are highly suggestive of such a relationship. The difficulties in gathering data supportive of parasitism were discussed, and hypotheses for defense were offered. This paper concludes by presenting potential consequences of AMF parasitism at the population/community levels and by discussing applied aspects.

  5. Filamentous Growth in Eremothecium Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Therese

    , this thesis deals with some of the aspects of hyphal growth, which is an important virulence factor for pathogenic fungi infecting both humans and plants. Hyphal establishment through continuous polar growth is a complex process, requiring the careful coordination of a large subset of proteins involved...... in polarity establishment and maintenance, cytoskeleton dynamics and intracellular transport. The first part of this thesis addresses the A. gossypii Arf3 small GTPase and its GEF- and GAP regulators; Yel1 and Gts1, which has been implicated in polar growth in a wide range of organisms. We could demonstrate......-regulatory activity of AgGts1, the protein could have additional actin organizing properties. In the second and third part, this thesis addresses the use of A. gossypii and its relative E. cymbalariae as model organisms for filamentous growth. A series of assays analyzed the capability of Eremothecium genus fungi...

  6. Molecular Characterization and Analysis of Antimicrobial Activity of Endophytic Fungi From Medicinal Plants in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gashgari, Rukaia; Gherbawy, Youssuf; Ameen, Fuad; Alsharari, Salam

    2016-01-01

    Endophytic fungi, which have been reported in numerous plant species, are important components of the forest community and contribute significantly to the diversity of natural ecosystems. The current study aimed to evaluate and characterize, at the molecular level, the diversity and antimicrobial activities of endophytic fungi from medicinal plants in Saudi Arabia. Fungi growing on plant segments were isolated and identified based on morphological and molecular characteristics. The isolates were grouped into 35 distinct operational taxonomic units, based on the sequence of the internal transcribed spacer regions in the rRNA gene. The colonization frequency and the dominant fungi percentage of these endophytic fungi were calculated. A dual culture technique was adopted to investigate the antifungal activity of these endophytes. Tamarix nilotica showed the highest endophytic diversity with a relative frequency of 27.27%, followed by Cressa cretica with a relative frequency of 19.27%. The most frequently isolated species was Penicillium chrysogenum with an overall colonization rate of 98.57%. Seven out of 35 endophytic fungi exhibited strong antifungal activity to all plant fungal pathogens tested. P. chrysogenum, Fusarium oxysporum, and F. nygamai exhibited the highest inhibition against the human pathogenic bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Aspergillus sydowii, P. chrysogenum, and Eupenicillium crustaceum showed strong antimicrobial activity against Enterococcus faecalis. The antimicrobial activity of these endophytic microorganisms could be exploited in biotechnology, medicine, and agriculture.

  7. Screening of micro-organisms for decolorization of melanins produced by bluestain fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rättö, M; Chatani, M; Ritschkoff, A C; Viikari, L

    2001-03-01

    A total of 17 fungi and four bacteria were screened for their ability to decolorize melanin, using isolated extracellular melanin of the bluestain fungus Aureobasidium pullulans as substrate. On agar media, decolorization was observed by four fungal strains: Bjerkandera adusta VTT-D-99746, Galactomyces geotrichum VTT-D-84228, Trametes hirsuta VTT-D-95443 and Trametes versicolor VTT-D-99747. The four fungi were more efficient on nitrogen-limited medium than on complete medium. The melanin-decolorizing activity of G. geotrichum appeared to be located on the mycelium and could be liberated into the medium enzymatically.

  8. Lipids from yeasts and fungi: Tomorrow's source of Biodiesel?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuwse, P.; Sanders, J.P.M.; Tramper, J.; Rinzema, A.

    2013-01-01

    In the search for new transport fuels from renewable resources, biodiesel from microbial lipids comes into view. We have evaluated the lipid yield and energy use of a process for production of biodiesel from agricultural waste using lipid-accumulating yeast and fungi. We included different

  9. Decay fungi of oaks and associated hardwoods for western arborists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessie A. Glaeser; Kevin T. Smith

    2010-01-01

    Examination of trees for the presence and extent of decay should be part of any hazard tree assessment. Identification of the fungi responsible for the decay improves prediction of tree performance and the quality of management decisions, including tree pruning or removal. Scouting for Sudden Oak Death (SOD) in the West has drawn attention to hardwood tree species,...

  10. Surveillance of potential pathogenic fungi associated with water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... by the International Mycoherbicide Programme for Eichhornia crassipes Control in Africa (IMPECCA) for development into a mycoherbicide. Other fungal pathogens isolated included Rhizoctonia solani, Acremonium zonatum and Cercospora piaropi. Key words: Bio-control, pathogenic fungi, Kainji Lake, water hyacinth, ...

  11. A higher-level phylogenetic classification of the Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hibbett, David S; Binder, Manfred; Bischoff, Joseph F; Blackwell, Meredith; Cannon, Paul F; Eriksson, Ove E; Huhndorf, Sabine; James, Timothy; Kirk, Paul M; Lücking, Robert; Thorsten Lumbsch, H; Lutzoni, François; Matheny, P Brandon; McLaughlin, David J; Powell, Martha J; Redhead, Scott; Schoch, Conrad L; Spatafora, Joseph W; Stalpers, Joost A; Vilgalys, Rytas; Aime, M Catherine; Aptroot, André; Bauer, Robert; Begerow, Dominik; Benny, Gerald L; Castlebury, Lisa A; Crous, Pedro W; Dai, Yu-Cheng; Gams, Walter; Geiser, David M; Griffith, Gareth W; Gueidan, Cécile; Hawksworth, David L; Hestmark, Geir; Hosaka, Kentaro; Humber, Richard A; Hyde, Kevin D; Ironside, Joseph E; Kõljalg, Urmas; Kurtzman, Cletus P; Larsson, Karl-Henrik; Lichtwardt, Robert; Longcore, Joyce; Miadlikowska, Jolanta; Miller, Andrew; Moncalvo, Jean-Marc; Mozley-Standridge, Sharon; Oberwinkler, Franz; Parmasto, Erast; Reeb, Valérie; Rogers, Jack D; Roux, Claude; Ryvarden, Leif; Sampaio, José Paulo; Schüssler, Arthur; Sugiyama, Junta; Thorn, R Greg; Tibell, Leif; Untereiner, Wendy A; Walker, Christopher; Wang, Zheng; Weir, Alex; Weiss, Michael; White, Merlin M; Winka, Katarina; Yao, Yi-Jian; Zhang, Ning

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive phylogenetic classification of the kingdom Fungi is proposed, with reference to recent molecular phylogenetic analyses, and with input from diverse members of the fungal taxonomic community. The classification includes 195 taxa, down to the level of order, of which 16 are described

  12. Effect of supplementing fungi degraded cowpea seedhull in broiler ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of inclusion of fungi degraded cowpea seedhull was investigated in a broiler study that lasted for eight weeks. The degraded seedhull was included at 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% levels in a Completely Randomized Design experiment. The performance characteristics and heamatological parameters were evaluated.

  13. Secondary metabolites inhibiting ABC transporters and reversing resistance of cancer cells and fungi to cytotoxic and antimicrobial agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eWink

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Fungal, bacterial and cancer cells can develop resistance against antifungal, antibacterial or anticancer agents. Mechanisms of resistance are complex and often multifactorial. Mechanisms include: 1. Activation of ABC transporters, such as P-gp, which pump out lipophilic compounds that have entered a cell, 2. Activation of cytochrome p450 oxidases which can oxidise lipophilic agents to make them more hydrophilic and accessible for conjugation reaction with glucuronic acid, sulphate or amino acids, and 3. Activation of glutathione transferase, which can conjugate xenobiotics. This review summarises the evidence that secondary metabolites of plants, such as alkaloids, phenolics and terpenoids can interfere with ABC transporters in cancer cells, parasites, bacteria and fungi. Among the active natural products several lipophilic terpenoids ( monoterpenes, diterpenes, triterpenes (including saponins, steroids (including cardiac glycosides and tetraterpenes but also some alkaloids (isoquinoline, protoberberine, quinoline, indole, monoterpene indole, and steroidal alkaloids function probably as competitive inhibitors of P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP in cancer cells, or efflux pumps in bacteria (NorA and fungi. More polar phenolics (phenolic acids, flavonoids, catechins, chalcones, xanthones, stilbenes, anthocyanins, tannins, anthraquinones, and naphthoquinones directly inhibit proteins forming several hydrogen and ionic bonds and thus disturbing the 3D structure of the transporters. The natural products may be interesting in medicine or agriculture as they can enhance the activity of active chemotherapeutics or pesticides or even reverse MDR, at least partially, of adapted and resistant cells. If these secondary metabolites are applied in combination with a cytotoxic or antimicrobial agent, they may reverse resistance in a synergistic fashion.

  14. Succession of root-associated fungi in Pisum sativum during a plant growth cycle as examined by 454 pyrosequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, L.; Nicolaisen, M.; Larsen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Roots are inhabited by a broad range of fungi, including pathogens and mycorrhizal fungi, with functional traits related to plant health and nutrition. Management of these fungi in agroecosystems requires profound knowledge about their ecology. The main objective of this study was to exam...

  15. Microbiological diversity and prevalence of spoilage and pathogenic bacteria in commercial fermented alcoholic beverages (beer, fruit wine, refined rice wine, and yakju).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Se Hui; Kim, Nam Hee; Shim, Moon Bo; Jeon, Young Wook; Ahn, Ji Hye; Lee, Soon Ho; Hwang, In Gyun; Rhee, Min Suk

    2015-04-01

    The present study examined 469 commercially available fermented alcoholic beverages (FABs), including beer (draft, microbrewed, and pasteurized), fruit wine (grape and others), refined rice wine, and yakju (raw and pasteurized). Samples were screened for Escherichia coli and eight foodborne pathogens (Bacillus cereus, Campylobacter jejuni, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and Yersinia enterocolitica), and the aerobic plate count, lactic acid bacteria, acetic acid bacteria, fungi, and total coliforms were also enumerated. Microbrewed beer contained the highest number of microorganisms (average aerobic plate count, 3.5; lactic acid bacteria, 2.1; acetic acid bacteria, 2.0; and fungi, 3.6 log CFU/ml), followed by draft beer and yakju (P coliforms (detected in 23.8% of microbrewed beer samples) and B. cereus (detected in all FABs) were present in some products. B. cereus was detected most frequently in microbrewed beer (54.8% of samples) and nonpasteurized yakju (50.0%), followed by pasteurized yakju (28.8%), refined rice wine (25.0%), other fruit wines (12.3%), grape wine (8.6%), draft beer (5.6%), and pasteurized beer (2.2%) (P coliform bacteria can survive the harsh conditions present in alcoholic beverages should be taken into account (alongside traditional quality indicators such as the presence of lactic acid-producing bacteria, acetic acid-producing bacteria, or both) when developing manufacturing systems and methods to prolong the shelf life of high-quality FAB products. New strategic quality management plans for various FABs are needed.

  16. Diversity and antimicrobial activity of culturable fungi from fishscale bamboo (Phyllostachys heteroclada) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying-Ke; Shen, Xiao-Ye; Hou, Cheng-Lin

    2017-06-01

    An important and useful bamboo species, fishscale bamboo (Phyllostachys heteroclada Oliver), is broadly distributed in Southeast China and has multiple purposes, including uses in cuisine, weaving, Chinese medicine and ecological protection. However, no previous studies have focused on the endophytes of this plant. In our article, a total of 127 fungal strains were first isolated from the healthy branches and leaves of common P. heteroclada. These endophytic fungi could be directly categorized into 50 morphotypes according to their culture characteristics, and their internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions were analyzed for molecular identification. Using the BLAST search tool of the NCBI database and phylogenetic tree analysis, these isolates were divided into two phyla, Ascomycota (95.28%) and Basidiomycota (4.72%), including at least six orders (Xylariales, Capnodiales, Pleosporales, Hypocreales, Chaetothyriales and Polyporales) and fourteen genera (Arthrinium, Pestalotiopsis, Epicoccum, Cladosporium, Nigrospora, Setophoma, Didymella, Calcarisporium, Preussia, Nemania, Creosphaeria, Ophiobolus, Phialophora and Perenniporia). It is fascinating that four genera, Calcarisporium, Preussia, Creosphaeria and Phialophora were isolated from bamboos for the first time. The inhibitory effects against clinical pathogens were also preliminarily screened, and four isolates FB43 (Calcarisporium arbuscula), FB06 (Preussia minima), FB16 (Setophoma sp.) and FB21 (Perenniporia medulla-pains) among the candidate strains displayed broad-spectrum activities according to the agar diffusion method and the disk diffusion assay. Strain FB16 (Setophoma sp.) especially indicated high bioactivity against both clinical bacteria and yeast. This study is the first report on the diversity and antimicrobial activity of the endophytic fungi associated with P. heteroclada, which could be regarded as a potential source of drug precursors and could be used in biocontrol development.

  17. Biological control strategies of mycotoxigenic fungi and associated mycotoxins in Mediterranean basin crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios I. TSITSIGIANNIS

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Fungi that belong to the genera Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Penicillium pose serious phytopathological and mycotoxicological risks at pre-harvest and post-harvest stages, as well as in processed food products because they can produce several mycotoxins. Mycotoxins pose a serious problem for animal and human health and have a significant economic impact worldwide. The Mediterranean basin is a large geographical region with a temperate climate supporting the cultivation of a wealth of field and greenhouse crops with a high risk of mycotoxin contamination. The most important mycotoxins that occur in the Mediterranean basin are aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1 and G2 in dried fruits and nuts, ochratoxin A in grapes and raisins as well as trichothecenes and fumonisins in cereals. A variety of chemical, biological and physical strategies have been developed to control the mycotoxigenic pathogens; to minimize mycotoxin production at pre- or post-harvest level; to contribute to decontamination and/or detoxification of mycotoxins from contaminated foods and feeds; or to inhibit mycotoxin absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. Biological control using microbial antagonists either alone or as part of an integrated control strategy to reduce pesticide inputs, has emerged as a promising approach for control of mycotoxins in crops, both pre- and post-harvest. Several organisms including atoxigenic Aspergilli, yeasts, bacteria and fungi have been tested for their ability to reduce both fungal infection and mycotoxin contamination. For instance, atoxigenic fungal strains are being used widely to prevent pre-harvest aflatoxin contamination of crops such as peanuts, pistachios, maize, and cottonseed in several parts of the world including the Mediterranean area. Recent advancements in the use of biocontrol strategies have led to registration of commercial products with increased practical applications for the benefit of growers in several countries.

  18. Diversity and screening for antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi from Alstonia scholaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, S; Banerjee, D

    2010-09-01

    Endophytic fungi of three tissues (petiole, bark and leaf) of Alstonia scholaris were assessed. A total number of 1,152 endophytic fungi were isolated from 1,002 different plant segments of seven different localities of Paschim Medinipur, West Bengal, India. The isolated fungi belong to nineteen genera, including four unidentified fungi and yeast. Colletotrichum sp. (20.39%) and Sordaria sp. (29.68%) were most commonly isolated from this plant. Hyalopus sp., Fusarium sp. and Curvularia sp. were also isolated. The colonization frequency of endophytic fungi is much higher in leaves (44.66%) in comparison to petioles (32.16%) and barks (23.17%). The study provided evidence for tissue specificity of endophytic fungi. The endophytic fungal species diversity was higher in plant segments collected from Gopegarh and Khoirullahchak, while diversity was the lowest in Rice mill area. Screenings of antimicrobial activity of these isolated endophytic fungi were done. Eight endophytic fungi showed antimicrobial activity. Among them Curvularia sp., Aspergillus sp. and one unidentified fungus showed maximum activity against test pathogens.

  19. Foliar fungi of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris)

    OpenAIRE

    Millberg, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is an ecologically and economically important tree species in Fennoscandia. Scots pine needles host a variety of fungi, some with the potential to profoundly influence their host. These fungi can have beneficial or detrimental effects with important implications for both forest health and primary production. In this thesis, the foliar fungi of Scots pine needles were investigated with the aim of exploring spatial and temporal patterns, and development with needle...

  20. A guide to binary vectors and strategies for targeted genome modification in fungi using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rasmus John Normand

    2011-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) of fungi has become a common technique for the study of a wide variety of different fungal species over the past 12years. The discovery that the host range of A. tumefaciens could be extended to include fungi provided an efficient transform......Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) of fungi has become a common technique for the study of a wide variety of different fungal species over the past 12years. The discovery that the host range of A. tumefaciens could be extended to include fungi provided an efficient...

  1. Biochemical adaptation of phytopathogenic fungi, Sclerotium rolfsii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biochemical adaptation of phytopathogenic fungi, Sclerotium rolfsii, in response to temperature stress. Natthiya Buensanteai, Kanjana Thumanu, Khanistha Kooboran, Dusit Athinuwat, Sutruedee Prathuangwong ...

  2. Entomopathogenic fungi associated with Ixodes ricinus ticks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalsbeek, Vibeke; Frandsen, F.; Steenberg, Tove

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the occurrence of entomopathogenic fungi on Ixodes ricinus ticks in relation to the tick stage, engorgement and season. Ticks were collected from the vegetation, from small rodents and from deer. All entomopathogenic fungi found belonged to the Hypho......The objective of this study was to demonstrate the occurrence of entomopathogenic fungi on Ixodes ricinus ticks in relation to the tick stage, engorgement and season. Ticks were collected from the vegetation, from small rodents and from deer. All entomopathogenic fungi found belonged....... ricinus population, since females were the most frequently infected stage....

  3. Carotenoids biosynthesis and cleavage related genes from bacteria to plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ming-Hua; Zhu, Jianhua; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2017-06-13

    Carotenoids are essential for photosynthesis and photoprotection in photosynthetic organisms and beneficial for human health. Apocarotenoids derived from carotenoid degradation can serve critical functions including hormones, volatiles, and signals. They have been used commercially as food colorants, animal feed supplements, and nutraceuticals for cosmetic and pharmaceutical purposes. This review focuses on the molecular evolution of carotenogenic enzymes and carotenoid cleavage oxygenases (CCOs) from bacteria, fungi, cyanobacteria, algae, and plants. The diversity of carotenoids and apocarotenoids as well as their complicated biosynthetic pathway in different species can shed light on the history of early molecular evolution. Some carotenogenic genes (such as phytoene synthases) have high protein sequence similarity from bacteria to land plants, but some (such as phytoene desaturases, lycopene cyclases, carotenoid hydroxylases, and CCOs) have low similarity. The broad diversity of apocarotenoid volatile compounds can be attributed to large numbers of carotenoid precursors and the various cleavage sites catalyzed by CCOs enzymes. A variety of carotenogenic enzymes and CCOs indicate the functional diversification of carotenoids and apocrotenoids in different species. New carotenoids, new apocarotenoids, new carotenogenic enzymes, new CCOs, and new pathways still need to be explored.

  4. Oligotrophic bacteria isolated from clinical materials.

    OpenAIRE

    Tada, Y; Ihmori, M; Yamaguchi, J

    1995-01-01

    Oligotrophic bacteria (oligotrophs) are microorganisms that grow in extremely nutritionally deficient conditions in which the concentrations of organic substances are low. Many oligotrophic bacteria were isolated from clinical materials including urine, sputum, swabbings of the throat, vaginal discharges, and others. Seventy-seven strains of oligotrophic bacteria from 871 samples of clinical material were isolated. A relatively higher frequency of isolation of oligotrophic bacteria was shown ...

  5. Enumeration of fungi in barley

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rabie

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info rabie_1997.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 26510 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name rabie_1997.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 hmatiod Journal of...FoodMiaubiology ELSEVIER International Journal of Food Microbiology 35 (1997) Il7- 127 Enumeration of fungi in barley C.J. Rabie*, A. Liibben, G.J. Marais, H. Jansen van Vuuren CSIR Food Scienw and Technology, P.0 Bos 395. Prrroria 0001...

  6. The vaginal mycobiome: A contemporary perspective on fungi in women's health and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, L Latéy; Ravel, Jacques

    2017-04-03

    Most of what is known about fungi in the human vagina has come from culture-based studies and phenotypic characterization of single organisms. Though valuable, these approaches have masked the complexity of fungal communities within the vagina. The vaginal mycobiome has become an emerging field of study as genomics tools are increasingly employed and we begin to appreciate the role these fungal communities play in human health and disease. Though vastly outnumbered by its bacterial counterparts, fungi are important constituents of the vaginal ecosystem in many healthy women. Candida albicans, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, colonizes 20% of women without causing any overt symptoms, yet it is one of the leading causes of infectious vaginitis. Understanding its mechanisms of commensalism and patho-genesis are both essential to developing more effective therapies. Describing the interactions between Candida, bacteria (such as Lactobacillus spp.) and other fungi in the vagina is funda-mental to our characterization of the vaginal mycobiome.

  7. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi from Camptotheca acuminata (Nyssaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, T; Jiang, T; Zhou, J; Xu, L; Gao, Z M

    2010-10-26

    Agricultural research of plant-derived endophytic fungi has grown in recent decades. We isolated 26 endophytic fungi from the leaves, stems and fruits of "the tree of life", Camptotheca acuminata, and tested them for antimicrobial activities based on growth inhibition measurements in a modified agar diffusion method. Fermentation broths from most of the isolates exhibited antifungal activity and 50% exhibited antibacterial activity; some of them also exhibited strong broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. The strongest antimicrobial activity was exhibited by strains XSY10 and XSY15 against Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum, with 75% and 67% inhibition, respectively. Strain XSJ01 gave strong activity against pathogenic bacteria, with inhibition zones more than 20 mm in diameter. The isolates were identified by molecular methods as belonging to nine taxa: Nigrospora, Diaporthe, Alternaria, Colletotrichum, Pestalotiopsis, Sordariomycete, Guignardiai, Penicillium, and Zythia. Based on these results, we conclude that the endophytic fungi of C. acuminata are promising sources of novel bioactive compounds.

  8. The Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on Nitrogen Concentration of Berseem Clover in Contaminated Soil with Cadmium

    OpenAIRE

    H. Aram; A. Golchin

    2013-01-01

    The effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal fungi on nitrogen concentration of berseem clover were examined in contaminated soil with cadmium. Examined factors included: levels of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation (Glomus mosseae) (With and without inoculation), and different levels of soil contamination by cadmium (0, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 mg.kg-1). The results showed that the effects of cadmium levels and mycorrhiza fungi were significant on nitrogen concentration (P≤ 0.01).  Arbuscular myc...

  9. Spiral and Rotor Patterns Produced by Fairy Ring Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karst, N.; Dralle, D.; Thompson, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Soil fungi fill many essential ecological and biogeochemical roles, e.g. decomposing litter, redistributing nutrients, and promoting biodiversity. Fairy ring fungi offer a rare glimpse into the otherwise opaque spatiotemporal dynamics of soil fungal growth, because subsurface mycelial patterns can be inferred from observations at the soil's surface. These observations can be made directly when the fungi send up fruiting bodies (e.g., mushrooms and toadstools), or indirectly via the effect the fungi have on neighboring organisms. Grasses in particular often temporarily thrive on the nutrients liberated by the fungus, creating bands of rich, dark green turf at the edge of the fungal mat. To date, only annular (the "ring" in fairy ring) and arc patterns have been described in the literature. We report observations of novel spiral and rotor pattern formation in fairy ring fungi, as seen in publically available high-resolution aerial imagery of 22 sites across the continental United States. To explain these new behaviors, we first demonstrate that a well-known model describing fairy ring formation is equivalent to the Gray-Scott reaction-diffusion model, which is known to support a wide range of dynamical behaviors, including annular traveling waves, rotors, spirals, and stable spatial patterns including spots and stripes. Bifurcation analysis and numerical simulation are then used to define the region of parameter space that supports spiral and rotor formation. We find that this region is adjacent to one within which typical fairy rings develop. Model results suggest simple experimental procedures that could potentially induce traditional ring structures to exhibit rotor or spiral dynamics. Intriguingly, the Gray-Scott model predicts that these same procedures could be used to solicit even richer patterns, including spots and stripes, which have not yet been identified in the field.

  10. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white-rot/brown-rot paradigm for wood decay fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up some 37% of the described fungi and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes symbionts, pathogens, and saprotrophs including the majority of wood decaying and ectomycorrhizal species. To b...

  11. Viruses of plant pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghabrial, Said A; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2009-01-01

    Mycoviruses are widespread in all major groups of plant pathogenic fungi. They are transmitted intracellularly during cell division, sporogenesis, and cell fusion, but apparently lack an extracellular route for infection. Their natural host ranges are limited to individuals within the same or closely related vegetative compatibility groups. Recent advances, however, allowed the establishment of experimental host ranges for a few mycoviruses. Although the majority of known mycoviruses have dsRNA genomes that are packaged in isometric particles, an increasing number of usually unencapsidated mycoviruses with positive-strand RNA genomes have been reported. We discuss selected mycoviruses that cause debilitating diseases and/or reduce the virulence of their phytopathogenic fungal hosts. Such fungal-virus systems are valuable for the development of novel biocontol strategies and for gaining an insight into the molecular basis of fungal virulence. The availability of viral and host genome sequences and of transformation and transfection protocols for some plant pathogenic fungi will contribute to progress in fungal virology.

  12. Rhizospheric fungi of Panax notoginseng: diversity and antagonism to host phytopathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui-Ping Miao

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Our results suggest that diverse fungi including potential pathogenic ones exist in the rhizosphere soil of 2-yr-old P. notoginseng and that antagonistic isolates may be useful for biological control of pathogens.

  13. Isolation, Identification And Screening Antibacterial Activity from Marine Sponge-Associated Fungi Against Multidrug-Resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triandala Sibero, Mada; Sabdaningsih, Aninditia; Cristianawati, Olvi; Nuryadi, Handung; Karna Radjasa, Ocky; Sabdono, Agus; Trianto, Agus

    2017-02-01

    Irrational used of antibiotic in several decades ago causing resistant in bacteria and decreasing the cure rate of infectious diseases. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli is known to cause various of infectious diseases such as urinary tract infection, nosocomial bloodstream infection, meningitis, bacteraemia, and gastrointestinal disease. Marine sponge-associated fungi have potential as source of new compound to combat MDR E. coli. The aims of this research were to isolate marine sponge-assosiated fungi, to screen potential fungi against MDR E. coli, to identify the potential fungi and its host sponge. There were 29 marine sponge-associated fungi successfully isolated from 9 sponges. Among 29 sponge-associated fungi screened, there were 7 isolates showed antibacterial activity against MDR E. coli. The best inhibition zone produced by MPS 14.1/MT 02 and MPS 14.3/MT 04 from sponge PP.SP.16.14. According to fungi identification result fungus MPS 14.1/MT 02 was identified as Trichoderma asperellum while MPS 14.3/MT 04 was identified as Trichoderma reesei. Sponge identification leaded the PP.SP.16.14 as Cinachyrella sp.

  14. Review on SERS of Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela A. Mosier-Boss

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS has been widely used for chemical detection. Moreover, the inherent richness of the spectral data has made SERS attractive for use in detecting biological materials, including bacteria. This review discusses methods that have been used to obtain SERS spectra of bacteria. The kinds of SERS substrates employed to obtain SERS spectra are discussed as well as how bacteria interact with silver and gold nanoparticles. The roll of capping agents on Ag/Au NPs in obtaining SERS spectra is examined as well as the interpretation of the spectral data.

  15. Comparison of techniques to examine the diversity of fungi in adult patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Yuriko; Elborn, J Stuart; Millar, B Cherie; Walker, James M; Goldsmith, Colin E; Rendall, Jackie; Moore, John E

    2010-02-01

    This study compares conventional and molecular techniques for the detection of fungi in 77 adult cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Three different methods were investigated, i.e., (1) conventional microbiological culture (including yeasts and filamentous fungi), (2) mycological culture with CF-derived fungal specific culture media, and (3) Non-culture and direct DNA extraction from patient sputa. Fungi isolated from environmental air samples of the CF unit were compared to fungi in sputa from CF patients. Fungi (n = 107) were detected in 14/77(18%) of patients by method 1, in 60/77 (78%) of patients by method 2 and with method 3, in 77/77(100%) of the patients. The majority of yeasts isolated were Candida albicans and C. dubliniensis. Exophiala (Wangiella) dermatitidis, Scedosporium apiospermum, Penicillium spp., Aspergillus fumigatus, and Aspergillus versicolor were also identified by sequence analysis of the rDNA short internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) region. Conventional laboratory analysis failed to detect fungi in 63 patients mainly due to overgrowth by Gram-negative organisms. Mycological culture with antibiotics dramatically increased the number of fungi that could be detected. Molecular techniques detected fungi such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Malassezia spp., Fuscoporia ferrea, Fusarium culmorum, Acremonium strictum, Thanatephorus cucumeris and Cladosporium spp. which were not found with other methods. This study demonstrates that several potentially important fungi may not be detected if mycological culture methods alone are used. A polyphasic approach employing both enhanced mycological culture with molecular detection will help determine the presence of fungi in the sputa of patients with CF and their healthcare environment.

  16. Uptake of elements by fungi in the Forsmark area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johanson, Karl J.; Nikolova, Ivanka; Taylor, Andy F.S.; Vinichuk, Mykhaylo M.

    2004-10-01

    between CR and pH. Seventeen elements, including P, Ca, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Cd, I, Hg, Pb, Ra, Th and U were divided into four groups, based on the concentration in bulk soil: very high concentration (>100 mg/kg dw, high concentration (10-100 mg/kg); moderate concentration (1-10 mg/kg) and low concentration (<1 mg/kg). Fungal mycelium accumulated the following elements, listed in decreasing order: P, Cd, Cu, Ca, Zn, Sr, Co, As and Hg. Fruit bodies of fungi accumulate: P, Cd, Cu, Zn, As and Hg. Phosphorus was accumulated by fungal mycelium very efficiently. Concentration ratio for mycelium (mg/kg dw in mycelium divided by mg/kg dw in soil) was found to be 7.4. Even higher accumulation was observed for fruit bodies of fungi, giving CR 8.5. Fungi did not accumulate Ca and this element seemed to be excluded from fungi particularly from the fruit bodies rather efficiently. Concentration ratio for Ca in mycelium was found to be 1.8. In fruit bodies of the studied species CR was about 0.03. Chromium was also excluded from fungi as indicated by low CRs 0.5 for mycelium and 0.02 for fruit bodies. Manganese might also be excluded from fungi, particularly from the fruit bodies. Concentration ratio for Mn in mycelium was 0.9 and in fruit bodies 0.17. Cobalt was only moderately accumulated by fungal mycelium (CR=1.4) and efficiently excluded from fruit bodies, giving CR 0.06. Our data did not show any accumulation of Ni by fungi. Concentration ratios for mycelium and fruit bodies were 0.9 and 0.4 respectively. Concentration ratios of Cu for mycelium were found to be 3.0, and for fruit bodies 5.9, indicating that copper concentration increase in the order soil-mycelium-fruit bodies. Fungi also accumulated zinc. Concentration ratios for zinc were found to be 1.6 in mycelium and 2.3 in fruit bodies. Arsenic was only moderately accumulated by mycelium (CR=1.4) as well as by fruit bodies (CR=1.3). Sr seemed to behave similar as Ca. Concentration ratios of Sr were found to be 1

  17. Uptake of elements by fungi in the Forsmark area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johanson, Karl J.; Nikolova, Ivanka; Taylor, Andy F.S. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Mycology and Pathology; Vinichuk, Mykhaylo M. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Soil Sciences

    2004-10-01

    between CR and pH. Seventeen elements, including P, Ca, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Cd, I, Hg, Pb, Ra, Th and U were divided into four groups, based on the concentration in bulk soil: very high concentration (>100 mg/kg dw, high concentration (10-100 mg/kg); moderate concentration (1-10 mg/kg) and low concentration (<1 mg/kg). Fungal mycelium accumulated the following elements, listed in decreasing order: P, Cd, Cu, Ca, Zn, Sr, Co, As and Hg. Fruit bodies of fungi accumulate: P, Cd, Cu, Zn, As and Hg. Phosphorus was accumulated by fungal mycelium very efficiently. Concentration ratio for mycelium (mg/kg dw in mycelium divided by mg/kg dw in soil) was found to be 7.4. Even higher accumulation was observed for fruit bodies of fungi, giving CR 8.5. Fungi did not accumulate Ca and this element seemed to be excluded from fungi particularly from the fruit bodies rather efficiently. Concentration ratio for Ca in mycelium was found to be 1.8. In fruit bodies of the studied species CR was about 0.03. Chromium was also excluded from fungi as indicated by low CRs 0.5 for mycelium and 0.02 for fruit bodies. Manganese might also be excluded from fungi, particularly from the fruit bodies. Concentration ratio for Mn in mycelium was 0.9 and in fruit bodies 0.17. Cobalt was only moderately accumulated by fungal mycelium (CR=1.4) and efficiently excluded from fruit bodies, giving CR 0.06. Our data did not show any accumulation of Ni by fungi. Concentration ratios for mycelium and fruit bodies were 0.9 and 0.4 respectively. Concentration ratios of Cu for mycelium were found to be 3.0, and for fruit bodies 5.9, indicating that copper concentration increase in the order soil-mycelium-fruit bodies. Fungi also accumulated zinc. Concentration ratios for zinc were found to be 1.6 in mycelium and 2.3 in fruit bodies. Arsenic was only moderately accumulated by mycelium (CR=1.4) as well as by fruit bodies (CR=1.3). Sr seemed to behave similar as Ca. Concentration ratios of Sr were found to be 1

  18. Controlled rate cooling of fungi using a stirling cycle freezer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Matthew J; Kasulyte-Creasey, Daiva; Kermode, Anthony; San, Shwe Phue; Buddie, Alan G

    2014-01-01

    The use of a Stirling cycle freezer for cryopreservation is considered to have significant advantages over traditional methodologies including N2 free operation, application of low cooling rates, reduction of sample contamination risks and control of ice nucleation. The study assesses the suitability of an 'N2-free' Stirling Cycle controlled rate freezer for fungi cryopreservation. In total, 77 fungi representing a broad taxonomic coverage were cooled using the N2 free cooler following a cooling rate of -1 degrees C min(-1). Of these, 15 strains were also cryopreserved using a traditional 'N2 gas chamber' controlled rate cooler and a comparison of culture morphology and genomic stability against non-cryopreserved starter cultures was undertaken. In total of 75 fungi survived cryopreservation, only a recalcitrant Basidiomycete and filamentous Chromist failed to survive. No changes were detected in genomic profile after preservation, suggesting that genomic function is not adversely compromised as a result of using 'N2 free' cooling. The results demonstrate the potential of 'N2-free' cooling for the routine cryopreservation of fungi in Biological Resource Centres.

  19. Interaction of entomopathogenic fungi with the host immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shuang; Wang, Sibao

    2018-02-02

    Entomopathogenic fungi can invade wide range of insect hosts in the natural world and have been used as environmentally friendly alternatives to chemical insecticides for pest control. Studies of host-pathogen interactions provide valuable insights into the coevolutionay arms race between fungal pathogens and their hosts. Entomopathogenic fungi have evolved a series of sophisticated strategies to counter insect immune defenses. In response to fungal infection, insect hosts rely on behavior avoidance, physical barrier and innate immune defenses in the fight against invading pathogens. The insect cuticle acts as the first physical barrier against pathogens. It is an inhospitable physiological environment that contains chemicals (e.g., antimicrobial peptides and reactive oxygen species), which inhibit fungal growth. In addition, innate immune responses, including cellular immunity and humoral immunity, play critical roles in preventing fungal infection. In this review, we outline the current state of our knowledge of insect defenses to fungal infection and discuss the strategies by which entomopathogenic fungi counter the host immune system. Increased knowledge regarding the molecular interactions between entomopathogenic fungi and the insect host could provide new strategies for pest management. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of filamentous fungi isolated from highly antibiotic-contaminated river sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svahn, K. Stefan; Göransson, Ulf; El-Seedi, Hesham; Bohlin, Lars; Larsson, D.G. Joakim; Olsen, Björn; Chryssanthou, Erja

    2012-01-01

    Background Filamentous fungi are well known for their production of substances with antimicrobial activities, several of which have formed the basis for the development of new clinically important antimicrobial agents. Recently, environments polluted with extraordinarily high levels of antibiotics have been documented, leading to strong selection pressure on local sentinel bacterial communities. In such microbial ecosystems, where multidrug-resistant bacteria are likely to thrive, it is possible that certain fungal antibiotics have become less efficient, thus encouraging alternative strategies for fungi to compete with bacteria. Methods In this study, sediment of a highly antibiotic-contaminated Indian river was sampled in order to investigate the presence of cultivable filamentous fungi and their ability to produce substances with antimicrobial activity. Results Sixty one strains of filamentous fungi, predominantly various Aspergillus spp. were identified. The majority of the Aspergillus strains displayed antimicrobial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans. Bioassay-guided isolation of the secondary metabolites of A. fumigatus led to the identification of gliotoxin. Conclusion This study demonstrated proof of principle of using bioassay-guided isolation for finding bioactive molecules. PMID:22957125

  1. Antagonism of entomopathogenic fungi by Bacillus spp. associated with the integument of cicadellids and delphacids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Andrea; López, Silvina; Aulicino, Mónica; de Remes-Lenicov, Ana María; Balatti, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi are potential tools to biocontrol cicadellids and delphacids, two groups of insects that cause extensive damage to agricultural crops. However, bacteria living on the host cuticle may inhibit fungal growth. In the present work, following the molecular characterization of 10 strains of Bacillus isolated from the integument of cicadellids and delphacids, we selected isolates of the fungi Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae that are resistant to the antimicrobials secreted by these bacterial strains. The antagonistic activity of the 10 bacterial isolates belonging to the genus Bacillus (i.e., B. amyloliquefaciens, B. pumilus, and B. subtilis) against 41 isolates of Bea. bassiana and 20 isolates of M. anisopliae was investigated in vitro on tryptic soy agar using the central disk test. With this approach, isolates of Bea. bassiana and M. anisopliae resistant to antagonistic bacteria were identified that can be further developed as biological control agents. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  2. Bacteria on housefly eggs, Musca domestica, suppress fungal growth in chicken manure through nutrient depletion or antifungal metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Kevin; Thu, Kelsie; Tsang, Michelle; Moore, Margo; Gries, Gerhard

    2009-09-01

    Female houseflies, Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae), lay their eggs in ephemeral resources such as animal manure. Hatching larvae compete for essential nutrients with fungi that also colonize such resources. Both the well-known antagonistic relationship between bacteria and fungi and the consistent presence of the bacterium Klebsiella oxytoca on housefly eggs led us to hypothesize (1) that K. oxytoca, and possibly other bacteria on housefly eggs, help curtail the growth of fungal resource competitors and (2) that such fungi indeed adversely affect the development of housefly larvae. Bacteria washed from housefly eggs significantly reduced the growth of fungi in chicken manure. Nineteen bacterial strains and ten fungal strains were isolated from housefly eggs or chicken manure, respectively. Co-culturing each of all the possible bacterium-fungus pairs revealed that the bacteria as a group, but no single bacterium, significantly suppressed the growth of all fungal strains tested. The bacteria's adverse effect on fungi is due to resource nutrient depletion and/or the release of antifungal chemicals. Well-established fungi in resources significantly reduced the number of larval offspring that completed development to adult flies.

  3. Effect of seed pelleting with biocontrol agents on growth and colonisation of roots of mungbean by root-infecting fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzan, Nadia; Noreen, Nayara; Perveen, Zahida; Shahzad, Saleem

    2016-08-01

    Mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) is a leguminous pulse crop that is a major source of proteins, vitamins and minerals. Root-infecting fungi produce severe plant diseases like root rot, charcoal rot, damping-off and stem rot. The soil-borne pathogens can be controlled by chemicals, but these chemicals have several negative effects. Use of microbial antagonist such as fungi and bacteria is a safe, effective and eco-friendly method for the control of many soil-borne pathogens. Biological control agents promote plant growth and develop disease resistance. Application of bacteria and fungi as seed dressing suppressed the root-infecting fungi on leguminous crops. Seeds of mungbean were pelleted with different biocontrol agents to determine their effect on plant growth and colonisation of roots by root-infecting fungi, viz. Fusarium solani, Macrophomina phaseolina, Pythium aphanidermatum, Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotium rolfsii. Treatment of mungbean seeds with fungal antagonists showed more shoot and root length as compared to bacterial antagonists, whereas seed treated with bacterial antagonists showed maximum shoot and root weight. Trichoderma harzianum and Bacillus subtilis were the best among all the biocontrol agents since they provided the highest plant growth and greater reduction in root colonisation by all root-infecting fungi. Bacillus cereus, Trichoderma virens, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Micrococcus varians were also effective against root-infecting fungi but to a lesser extent. T. harzianum, T. virens, B. subtilis and P. fluorescens were found to be best among all biocontrol agents. The root-infecting fungi can be controlled by pelleting seeds with biocontrol agents as it is safe and effective method. Additionally, plant growth was promoted more by this method. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Bioremediation of treated wood with fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara L. Illman; Vina W. Yang

    2006-01-01

    The authors have developed technologies for fungal bioremediation of waste wood treated with oilborne or metal-based preservatives. The technologies are based on specially formulated inoculum of wood-decay fungi, obtained through strain selection to obtain preservative-tolerant fungi. This waste management approach provides a product with reduced wood volume and the...

  5. Different interactions of fungi with toxic metals

    OpenAIRE

    Fanelli, Corrado; Fabbri, Anna Adele; Pilo, Giuseppina; Luongo, Laura; Corazza, Luciana; Melis, Pietro

    1994-01-01

    Many papers have reported the uptake and translocation of toxic metals and radionuclides to fruit bodies of edible fungi and also to mycelia biomass. Our aim is to study how to reduce the metal phytotoxicity by mychorrizal fungi pointing at land reclamation and at the detoxification of metal/radionuclides-containing industrial effluents.

  6. Fossil evidence of the zygomycetous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krings, M.; Taylor, T.N.; Dotzler, N.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular clock data indicate that the first zygomycetous fungi occurred on Earth during the Precambrian, however, fossil evidence of these organisms has been slow to accumulate. In this paper, the fossil record of the zygomycetous fungi is compiled, with a focus on structurally preserved

  7. Antibacterial activity of marine-derived fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Carsten; Crescente, Oscar; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    1998-01-01

    A total of 227 marine isolates of ubiqituous fungi were cultivated on different media and the secondary metabolite content of the extracts (ethyl acetate/chlorofonn/methanol 3 : 2 : 1) characterized by HPLC. The fungi were secured from animals, plants and sediments of Venezuelan waters (0-10 m...

  8. Deep-sea fungi: Occurrence and adaptations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Damare, S.

    . In spite of this, fungi have remained largely neglected in the vast environment of deep sea, with some sporadic reports appearing once in a while. With this study, it is tried to reduce this void by describing the occurrence and diversity of fungi from...

  9. Ancestral state reconstruction infers phytopathogenic origins of sooty blotch and flyspeck fungi on apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Siti Izera; Batzer, Jean Carlson; Harrington, Thomas C; Crous, Pedro W; Lavrov, Dennis V; Li, Huanyu; Gleason, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    Members of the sooty blotch and flyspeck (SBFS) complex are epiphytic fungi in the Ascomycota that cause economically damaging blemishes of apples worldwide. SBFS fungi are polyphyletic, but approx. 96% of SBFS species are in the Capnodiales. Evolutionary origins of SBFS fungi remain unclear, so we attempted to infer their origins by means of ancestral state reconstruction on a phylogenetic tree built utilizing genes for the nuc 28S rDNA (approx. 830 bp from near the 59 end) and the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RPB2). The analyzed taxa included the well-known genera of SBFS as well as non-SBFS fungi from seven families within the Capnodiales. The non-SBFS taxa were selected based on their distinct ecological niches, including plant-parasitic and saprophytic species. The phylogenetic analyses revealed that most SBFS species in the Capnodiales are closely related to plant-parasitic fungi. Ancestral state reconstruction provided strong evidence that plant-parasitic fungi were the ancestors of the major SBFS lineages. Knowledge gained from this study may help to better understand the ecology and evolution of epiphytic fungi. © 2016 by The Mycological Society of America.

  10. Cnidarian-derived filamentous fungi from Brazil: isolation, characterisation and RBBR decolourisation screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, M; Passarini, M R Z; Bonugli, R C; Sette, L D

    2008-12-01

    Marine-derived fungi represent a valuable source of structurally novel and biologically active metabolites of industrial interest. They also have drawn attention for their capacity to degrade several pollutants, including textile dyes, organochlorides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), among others. The fungal tolerance to higher concentrations of salt might be considered an advantage for bioremediation processes in the marine environment. Therefore, filamentous fungi were isolated from cnidarians (scleractinian coral and zoanthids) collected from the north coast of São Paulo State, Brazil. A total of 144 filamentous fungi were morphologically and molecularly characterised. Among them there were several species of Penicillium and Aspergillus, in addition to Cladosporium spp., Eutypella sp., Fusarium spp., Khuskia sp., Mucor sp., Peacilomyces sp., Phoma sp. and Trichoderma spp. These fungi were tested regarding their decolourisation activity for Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR), a textile dye used as an initial screening for PAH-degrading fungi. The most efficient fungi for RBBR decolourisation after 12 days were Penicillium citrinum CBMAI 853 (100%), Aspergillus sulphureus CBMAI 849 (95%), Cladosporium cladosporioides CBMAI 857 (93%) and Trichoderma sp. CBMAI 852 (89%). Besides its efficiency for dye decolourisation within liquid media, C. cladosporioides CBMAI 857 also decolourised dye on solid media, forming a decolourisation halo. Further research on the biotechnological potential, including studies on PAH metabolism, of these selected fungi are in progress.

  11. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: PROBIOTIC APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    NEENA GARG

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a heterotrophic Gram-positive bacteria which under goes lactic acid fermentations and leads to production of lactic acid as an end product. LAB includes Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus which are grouped together in the family lactobacillaceae. LAB shows numerous antimicrobial activities due to production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds such as organic acids, bacteriocins, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide and reutrin. LA...

  12. Myco-heterotrophy: when fungi host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merckx, Vincent; Bidartondo, Martin I; Hynson, Nicole A

    2009-12-01

    Myco-heterotrophic plants are partly or entirely non-photosynthetic plants that obtain energy and nutrients from fungi. These plants form a symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal, ectomycorrhizal or saprotrophic fungi to meet their nutrient demands. This Botanical Briefing summarizes current knowledge about myco-heterotrophy, discusses its controversial aspects and highlights future directions for research. Considerable recent progress has been made in terms of understanding the evolutionary history, germination and nutrition of myco-heterotrophic plants. Myco-heterotrophic plants: (1) are diverse and often ancient lineages that have coevolved with fungi, (2) often demonstrate unusually high specificity towards fungi during germination and maturity, and (3) can either cheat common mycorrhizal networks supported by neighbouring photosynthetic plants to satisfy all or part of their energetic and nutritional needs, or recruit free-living saprotrophic fungi into novel mycorrhizal symbioses. However, several fundamental aspects of myco-heterotrophy remain controversial or unknown, such as symbiotic costs and physiology.

  13. Molecular transformation, gene cloning, and gene expression systems for filamentous fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Scott E.; Duick, John W.; Redman, Regina S.; Rodriguez, Rusty J.

    2001-01-01

    This chapter discusses the molecular transformation, gene cloning, and gene expression systems for filamentous fungi. Molecular transformation involves the movement of discrete amounts of DNA into cells, the expression of genes on the transported DNA, and the sustainable replication of the transforming DNA. The ability to transform fungi is dependent on the stable replication and expression of genes located on the transforming DNA. Three phenomena observed in bacteria, that is, competence, plasmids, and restriction enzymes to facilitate cloning, were responsible for the development of molecular transformation in fungi. Initial transformation success with filamentous fungi, involving the complementation of auxotrophic mutants by exposure to sheared genomic DNA or RNA from wt isolates, occurred with low transformation efficiencies. In addition, it was difficult to retrieve complementing DNA fragments and isolate genes of interest. This prompted the development of transformation vectors and methods to increase efficiencies. The physiological studies performed with fungi indicated that the cell wall could be removed to generate protoplasts. It was evident that protoplasts could be transformed with significantly greater efficiencies than walled cells.

  14. Effects of two AM fungi on phytoplasma infection in the model plant Chrysanthemum carinatum

    OpenAIRE

    Simonetta Sampò; Nadia Massa; Umberto D’Agostino; Domenico Bosco; Cristina Marzachì; Graziella Berta

    2012-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are plant pathogenic bacteria, naturally transmitted by insects and confined in the phloem of the host plant, where they take up nutrients and eventually cause plant death. Their control is mainly based on insecticide treatments. The aim of this work was to study the effect of two AM fungi in modifying plant response to chrysanthemum yellows phytoplasma (CY) infection in chrysanthemum plants. Inoculation of Glomus intraradices BB-E and G. mosseae BEG12 reduced the damage caused ...

  15. Chemical Investigations of Marine Filamentous and Zoosporic Fungi and Studies in Marine Microbial Chemical Ecology

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, Kelly M.

    1998-01-01

    The natural products chemistry of marine microorganisms is an emerging area of organic chemistry with the aim of discovering novel secondary metabolites exhibiting both biomedical and ecological activities. While marine bacteria have proven to be a productive source of new natural products, there are many groups of marine microorganisms which have not been fully investigated. In particular, marine fungi represent an untapped and potentially novel source of bioactive secondary metabolites. Whi...

  16. Potential of marine-derived fungi and their enzymes in bioremediation of industrial pollutants

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Verma, A.K.

    flotation, membrane-filtration, ion exchange, irradiation, precipitation, ozonation, and adsorption using activated carbon or biological adsorption using bacteria, fungi, algae, or plant biomass (Robinson et al. 2001b; Husain, 2006; Whiteley and Lee, 2006..., Eastern Europe, China, South Korea and Taiwan consume approximately 600 thousand tons (kt) of dyes per annum (Ishikawa et al., 2000). The distribution of global dyestuff market has changed during the last decade, with Asia being the largest dyestuff...

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of morphologic identification of filamentous fungi in paraffin embedded tissue sections: Correlation of histological and culture diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundaram Challa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The aim was to investigate the correlation between histological and culture diagnosis of filamentous fungi. Materials and Methods: Tissue sections from biopsy samples stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin and special stains from samples of chronic invasive/noninvasive sinusitis and intracranial space occupying lesions during 2005-2011 diagnosed to have infection due to filamentous fungi were reviewed. The histopathology and culture diagnoses were analyzed for correlation and discrepancy. Results: There were 125 samples positive for filamentous fungi on biopsy. Of these 76 (60.8% were submitted for culture and fungi grew in 30 (39.97% samples. There was a positive correlation between histological and culture diagnosis in 25 (83.33% samples that included Aspergillus species (16/19, Zygomycetes species (8/10 and dematiaceous fungi (1/1. The negative yield of fungi was more in Zygomycetes species (20/30 when compared to Aspergillus species (25/44. There was a discrepancy in diagnosis in 5/30 (16.67% samples which included probable dual infection in two, and dematiaceous fungi being interpreted as Aspergillus species in three samples. Conclusion: Histopathology plays a major role in the diagnosis of infection due to filamentous fungi, especially when cultures are not submitted or negative. The discrepancy between histological and culture diagnosis was either due to dematiaceous fungi being interpreted as Aspergillus species or probable dual infection.

  18. Soil fungi colony growth and community dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, Ruth E.; Kravchenko, Alexandra; Otten, Wilfred

    2010-05-01

    Fungi are a major player in soil functioning, they contribute to soil structure formation and shaping of plant communities through their role in nutrient cycling, pathogenesis and symbiosis. Theoretical approaches which have emerged over the years and improved considerably our understanding of above ground plant communities are still lacking below ground. A theoretical framework is needed, such that links soil physics, fungal biology and mathematical biology in order to understand fungal community dynamics and diversity in undisturbed soils. Such a framework is essential if we are to understand how environmental change or soil manipulation impacts biodiversity. Different land use and management practices significantly affect soil environmental characteristics crucial for fungal communities by contributing different quantities and qualities of biomass inputs, generating different levels of soil disturbance, influencing soil temperature and moisture regimes, and affecting structure and geometry of soil pore space. Differences in pore structures generated by long-term differences in land use and management are reflected in notable changes in soil physical and hydraulic properties, including soil porosity, hydraulic conductivity and water retention (Brye and Pirani, 2005). Changes in numbers, shapes, and distributions of soil macropores have been often observed (e.g., Pachepsky et al., 1996; Giménez et al., 1997; Udawatta et al., 2008). However, specific implications of these differences in pore structure and geometries for ability of pathogenic as well as non-pathogenic fungi to colonize soil have not yet been addressed. Recent advances in computed tomography and microscopy facilitate detailed examination of the inner pore structures of undisturbed soil samples as well as visualization of fungal mycelia. Such tools together with modelling generate a new level of understanding of the mechanisms governing fungal behaviour at microscopic scales, and for the first time

  19. Phytopathogenic Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, van der J.M.; Boer, de S.H.

    2015-01-01

    A few hundred bacterial species, belonging to the Proteobacteria, Mollecutes and Actinomycetes cause a large number of different plant diseases, some of which are devastating for agricultural crops. Symptoms of bacterial plant diseases are diverse and include necrosis, tissue maceration, wilting,

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF SOIL FUNGI ISOLATED FROM ALFALFA (Medicago sativa L) TO FIND SPECIFIC FUNGI WHICH IMPROVED THE GROWTH OF ALFALFA

    OpenAIRE

    T. Yudiarti; S. Sumarsono; D.W. Widjayanto

    2014-01-01

    Objective of the study was to identify all kinds of fungi which can life in the alfalfa plantation inBaturaden Purwokerto-Central Java. Fungi used in this study was 38 isolates. All fungi have been takenfrom the isolation of soil and root of diseased plant. Macroscopic and microscopic methods were usedfor identification. Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA) medium was used to grow the fungi. All fungi wereidentified using book identification of fungi. The results showed that from 38 isolates, six speci...

  1. Insect Immunity to Entomopathogenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H-L; St Leger, R J

    2016-01-01

    The study of infection and immunity in insects has achieved considerable prominence with the appreciation that their host defense mechanisms share many fundamental characteristics with the innate immune system of vertebrates. Studies on the highly tractable model organism Drosophila in particular have led to a detailed understanding of conserved innate immunity networks, such as Toll. However, most of these studies have used opportunistic human pathogens and may not have revealed specialized immune strategies that have arisen through evolutionary arms races with natural insect pathogens. Fungi are the commonest natural insect pathogens, and in this review, we focus on studies using Metarhizium and Beauveria spp. that have addressed immune system function and pathogen virulence via behavioral avoidance, the use of physical barriers, and the activation of local and systemic immune responses. In particular, we highlight studies on the evolutionary genetics of insect immunity and discuss insect-pathogen coevolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular mechanisms underlying the close association between soil Burkholderia and fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopnisek, Nejc; Zühlke, Daniela; Carlier, Aurélien; Barberán, Albert; Fierer, Noah; Becher, Dörte; Riedel, Katharina; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial species belonging to the genus Burkholderia have been repeatedly reported to be associated with fungi but the extent and specificity of these associations in soils remain undetermined. To assess whether associations between Burkholderia and fungi are widespread in soils, we performed a co-occurrence analysis in an intercontinental soil sample collection. This revealed that Burkholderia significantly co-occurred with a wide range of fungi. To analyse the molecular basis of the interaction, we selected two model fungi frequently co-occurring with Burkholderia, Alternaria alternata and Fusarium solani, and analysed the proteome changes caused by cultivation with either fungus in the widespread soil inhabitant B. glathei, whose genome we sequenced. Co-cultivation with both fungi led to very similar changes in the B. glathei proteome. Our results indicate that B. glathei significantly benefits from the interaction, which is exemplified by a lower abundance of several starvation factors that were highly expressed in pure culture. However, co-cultivation also gave rise to stress factors, as indicated by the increased expression of multidrug efflux pumps and proteins involved in oxidative stress response. Our data suggest that the ability of Burkholderia to establish a close association with fungi mainly lies in the capacities to utilize fungal-secreted metabolites and to overcome fungal defense mechanisms. This work indicates that beneficial interactions with fungi might contribute to the survival strategy of Burkholderia species in environments with sub-optimal conditions, including acidic soils. PMID:25989372

  3. Molecular Characterisation of Endophytic Fungi from Roots of Wild Banana (Musa acuminata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Latiffah; Jamil, Muhamad Izham Muhamad; Anuar, Intan Sakinah Mohd

    2016-02-01

    Endophytic fungi inhabit apparently healthy plant tissues and are prevalent in terrestrial plants, especially root tissues, which harbour a wide assemblage of fungal endophytes. Therefore, this study focused on the isolation and characterisation of endophytic fungi from the roots of wild banana (Musa acuminata). A total of 31 isolates of endophytic fungi were isolated from 80 root fragments. The endophytic fungi were initially sorted according to morphological characteristics and identified using the sequences of the translation elongation factor-1α (TEF-1α) gene of Fusarium spp. and the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions of other fungi. The most common fungal isolates were species of the genus Fusarium, which were identified as F. proliferatum, Fusarium sp., F. solani species complex, and F. oxysporum. Other isolated endophytic fungi included Curvularia lunata, Trichoderma atroviride, Calonectria gracilis, Rhizoctonia solani, Bionectria ochroleuca, and Stromatoneurospora phoenix (Xylariceae). Several of the fungal genera, such as Fusarium, Trichoderma, Rhizoctonia, and Xylariceae, are among the common fungal endophytes reported in plants. This study showed that the roots of wild banana harbour a diverse group of endophytic fungi.

  4. In situ hybridization for the detection of rust fungi in paraffin embedded plant tissue sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Mitchell A; McMahon, Michael B; Bonde, Morris R; Palmer, Cristi L; Luster, Douglas G

    2016-01-01

    Rust fungi are obligate pathogens with multiple life stages often including different spore types and multiple plant hosts. While individual rust pathogens are often associated with specific plants, a wide range of plant species are infected with rust fungi. To study the interactions between these important pathogenic fungi and their host plants, one must be able to differentiate fungal tissue from plant tissue. This can be accomplished using the In situ hybridization (ISH) protocol described here. To validate reproducibility using the ISH protocol, samples of Chrysanthemum × morifolium infected with Puccinia horiana, Gladiolus × hortulanus infected with Uromyces transversalis and Glycine max infected with Phakopsora pachyrhizi were tested alongside uninfected leaf tissue samples. The results of these tests show that this technique clearly distinguishes between rust pathogens and their respective host plant tissues. This ISH protocol is applicable to rust fungi and potentially other plant pathogenic fungi as well. It has been shown here that this protocol can be applied to pathogens from different genera of rust fungi with no background staining of plant tissue. We encourage the use of this protocol for the study of plant pathogenic fungi in paraffin embedded sections of host plant tissue.

  5. Isolation and characterization of novel chitinolytic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürkök, Sümeyra; Görmez, Arzu

    2016-04-01

    Chitin, a linear polymer of β-1,4-N-acetylglucosamine units, is one of the most abundant biopolymers widely distributed in the marine and terrestrial environments. It is found as a structural component of insects, crustaceans and the cell walls of fungi. Chitinases, the enzymes degrading chitin by cleaving the β-(1-4) bond, have gained increased attention due to their wide range of biotechnological applications, especially for biocontrol of harmful insects and phytopathogenic fungi in agriculture. In the present study, 200 bacterial isolates from Western Anatolia Region of Turkey were screened for chitinolytic activity on agar media amended with colloidal chitin. Based on the chitin hydrolysis zone, 13 isolates were selected for further study. Bacterial isolates with the highest chitinase activity were identified as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Arthrobacter oxydans, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, Brevibacillus reuszeri, Kocuria erythromyxa, Kocuria rosea, Novosphingobium capsulatum, Rhodococcus bratislaviensis, Rhodococcus fascians and Staphylococcus cohnii by MIS and BIOLOG systems. The next aims of the study are to compare the productivity of these bacteria quantitatively, to purify the enzyme from the most potent producer and to apply the pure enzyme for the fight against the phytopathogenic fungi and harmful insects.

  6. Genetics of Cordyceps and related fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peng; Xia, Yongliang; Zhang, Siwei; Wang, Chengshu

    2013-04-01

    Ascomycete Cordyceps sensu lato consists of hundreds of species of fungi capable of infecting different insects. Species of these fungi are either valued traditional Chinese medicines or used for biocontrol of insect pests. Phylogenomic analysis indicated that fungal entomopathogenicity has evolved for multiple times, and the species of Cordyceps were diverged from the mycoparasite or plant endophyte. Relative to plant pathogens and saprophytes, Cordyceps species demonstrate characteristic genome expansions of proteases and chitinases that are used by the fungi to target insect cuticles. Only a single mating-type gene identified in the sequenced species of Cordyceps sensu lato indicates that these fungi are sexually heterothallic, but the gene structure of the mating-type loci and frequency in performing sexual cycle are considerably different between different species. Similar to the model fungus Neurospora crassa, Cordyceps and related fungi contain the full components for RNA interference pathways. However, the mechanism of repeat-induced point mutation varies between different fungi. Epigenetic rather than genetic alterations are majorly responsible for the frequent occurrence of culture degeneration in Cordyceps-related species. Future genetic and epigenetic studies of fungal sexuality controls and culture degeneration mechanisms will benefit the cost-effective applications of Cordyceps and related fungi in pharmaceuticals and agriculture.

  7. Antimicrobial activities of endophytic fungi isolated from Ophiopogon japonicus (Liliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hanqiao; Xing, Yongmei; Chen, Juan; Zhang, Dawei; Guo, Shunxing; Wang, Chunlan

    2012-11-28

    Drug resistance in bacteria has become a global concern and the search for new antibacterial agents is urgent and ongoing. Endophytes provide an abundant reservoir of bioactive metabolites for medicinal exploitation, and an increasing number of novel compounds are being isolated from endophytic fungi. Ophiopogon japonicus, containing compounds with antibacterial activity, is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant used for eliminating phlegm, relieving coughs, latent heat in the lungs, and alleviating diabetes mellitus. We investigated the antimicrobial activities of 30 strains of O. japonicus. Fungal endophytes were isolated from roots and stems of O. japonicus collected from Chongqing City, southwestern China. Mycelial extracts (MC) and fermentation broth (FB) were tested for antimicrobial activity using peptide deformylase (PDF) inhibition fluorescence assays and MTT cell proliferation assays. A total of 30 endophytic strains were isolated from O. japonicus; 22 from roots and eight from stems. 53.33% of the mycelial extracts (MC) and 33.33% of the fermentation broths (FB) displayed potent inhibition of PDF. 80% of MC and 33.33% of FB significantly inhibited Staphylococcus aureus. 70% of MC and 36.67% of FB showed strong activities against Cryptococcus neoformans. None showed influence on Escherichia coli. The secondary metabolites of endophytic fungi from O. japonicus are potential antimicrobial agents.

  8. Antimicrobial activities of endophytic fungi isolated from Ophiopogon japonicus (Liliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Hanqiao

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug resistance in bacteria has become a global concern and the search for new antibacterial agents is urgent and ongoing. Endophytes provide an abundant reservoir of bioactive metabolites for medicinal exploitation, and an increasing number of novel compounds are being isolated from endophytic fungi. Ophiopogon japonicus, containing compounds with antibacterial activity, is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant used for eliminating phlegm, relieving coughs, latent heat in the lungs, and alleviating diabetes mellitus. We investigated the antimicrobial activities of 30 strains of O. japonicus. Methods Fungal endophytes were isolated from roots and stems of O. japonicus collected from Chongqing City, southwestern China. Mycelial extracts (MC and fermentation broth (FB were tested for antimicrobial activity using peptide deformylase (PDF inhibition fluorescence assays and MTT cell proliferation assays. Results A total of 30 endophytic strains were isolated from O. japonicus; 22 from roots and eight from stems. 53.33% of the mycelial extracts (MC and 33.33% of the fermentation broths (FB displayed potent inhibition of PDF. 80% of MC and 33.33% of FB significantly inhibited Staphylococcus aureus. 70% of MC and 36.67% of FB showed strong activities against Cryptococcus neoformans. None showed influence on Escherichia coli. Conclusion The secondary metabolites of endophytic fungi from O. japonicus are potential antimicrobial agents.

  9. Fungi and mycotoxins in cocoa: from farm to chocolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copetti, Marina V; Iamanaka, Beatriz T; Pitt, John I; Taniwaki, Marta H

    2014-05-16

    Cocoa is an important crop, as it is the raw material from which chocolate is manufactured. It is grown mainly in West Africa although significant quantities also come from Asia and Central and South America. Primary processing is carried out on the farm, and the flavour of chocolate starts to develop at that time. Freshly harvested pods are opened, the beans, piled in heaps or wooden boxes, are fermented naturally by yeasts and bacteria, then dried in the sun on wooden platforms or sometimes on cement or on the ground, where a gradual reduction in moisture content inhibits microbial growth. Beans are then bagged and marketed. In processing plants, the dried fermented beans are roasted, shelled and ground, then two distinct processes are used, to produce powdered cocoa or chocolate. Filamentous fungi may contaminate many stages in cocoa processing, and poor practices may have a strong influence on the quality of the beans. Apart from causing spoilage, filamentous fungi may also produce aflatoxins and ochratoxin A. This review deals with the growth of fungal species and formation of mycotoxins during the various steps in cocoa processing, as well as reduction of these contaminants by good processing practices. Methodologies for fungal and mycotoxin detection and quantification are discussed while current data about dietary exposure and regulation are also presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi from olive tree leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhadas, Cynthia; Malheiro, Ricardo; Pereira, José Alberto; de Pinho, Paula Guedes; Baptista, Paula

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the antimicrobial potential of three fungal endophytes from leaves of Olea europaea L. was evaluated and the host plant extract effect in the antimicrobial activity was examined. The volatile compounds produced by endophytes were identified by GC/MS and further correlated with the antimicrobial activity. In potato dextrose agar, both Penicillium commune and Penicillium canescens were the most effective inhibiting Gram-positive and -negative bacteria (up to 2.7-fold compared to 30 µg/mL chloramphenicol), whereas Alternaria alternata was most effective inhibiting yeasts (up to 8.0-fold compared to 25 μg/mL fluconazole). The presence of aqueous leaf extract in culture medium showed to induce or repress the antimicrobial activity, depending on the endophytic species. In the next step, various organic extracts from both A. alternata mycelium and cultured broth were prepared; being ethyl acetate extracts displayed the widest spectrum of anti-microorganisms at a minimum inhibitory concentration ≤0.095 mg/mL. The volatile composition of the fungi that displayed the highest (A. alternata) and the lowest (P. canescens) antimicrobial activity against yeasts revealed the presence of six volatiles, being the most abundant components (3-methyl-1-butanol and phenylethyl alcohol) ascribed with antimicrobial potentialities. Overall the results highlighted for the first time the antimicrobial potential of endophytic fungi from O. europaea and the possibility to be exploited for their antimicrobial agents.

  11. DNA-based characterization of wood-, butt- and root-rot fungi from the western Pacific Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara M. Ashiglar; Phil G. Cannon; Robert L. Schlub; Mee-Sook Kim; Yuko Ota; Norio Sahashi; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2015-01-01

    Although the islands of the western Pacific comprise a hotspot of species, including fungi, a large number of these species have not been catalogued or documented in the scientific literature on an island to island basis. Butt- and root-rot fungi were collected from infected wood and fruiting bodies of diverse tropical trees from forest, agricultural, and...

  12. Employing 454 amplicon pyrosequencing to reveal intragenomic divergence in the internal transcribed spacer rDNA region in fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel L. Lindner; Tor Carlsen; Henrik Nilsson; Marie Davey; Trond Schumacher; Havard. Kauserud

    2013-01-01

    The rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has been accepted as a DNA barcoding marker for fungi and is widely used in phylogenetic studies; however, intragenomic ITS variability has been observed in a broad range of taxa, including prokaryotes, plants, animals, and fungi, and this variability has the potential to inflate species richness estimates in molecular...

  13. Transformation of gram positive bacteria by sonoporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunfeng; Li, Yongchao

    2014-03-11

    The present invention provides a sonoporation-based method that can be universally applied for delivery of compounds into Gram positive bacteria. Gram positive bacteria which can be transformed by sonoporation include, for example, Bacillus, Streptococcus, Acetobacterium, and Clostridium. Compounds which can be delivered into Gram positive bacteria via sonoporation include nucleic acids (DNA or RNA), proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, viruses, small organic and inorganic molecules, and nano-particles.

  14. Phylogenomic Analyses Indicate that Early Fungi Evolved Digesting Cell Walls of Algal Ancestors of Land Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying; Wang, Sishuo; Sekimoto, Satoshi; Aerts, Andrea L.; Choi, Cindy; Clum, Alicia; LaButti, Kurt M.; Lindquist, Erika A.; Yee Ngan, Chew; Ohm, Robin A.; Salamov, Asaf A.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Berbee, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    As decomposers, fungi are key players in recycling plant material in global carbon cycles. We hypothesized that genomes of early diverging fungi may have inherited pectinases from an ancestral species that had been able to extract nutrients from pectin-containing land plants and their algal allies (Streptophytes). We aimed to infer, based on pectinase gene expansions and on the organismal phylogeny, the geological timing of the plant–fungus association. We analyzed 40 fungal genomes, three of which, including Gonapodya prolifera, were sequenced for this study. In the organismal phylogeny from 136 housekeeping loci, Rozella diverged first from all other fungi. Gonapodya prolifera was included among the flagellated, predominantly aquatic fungal species in Chytridiomycota. Sister to Chytridiomycota were the predominantly terrestrial fungi including zygomycota I and zygomycota II, along with the ascomycetes and basidiomycetes that comprise Dikarya. The Gonapodya genome has 27 genes representing five of the seven classes of pectin-specific enzymes known from fungi. Most of these share a common ancestry with pectinases from Dikarya. Indicating functional and sequence similarity, Gonapodya, like many Dikarya, can use pectin as a carbon source for growth in pure culture. Shared pectinases of Dikarya and Gonapodya provide evidence that even ancient aquatic fungi had adapted to extract nutrients from the plants in the green lineage. This implies that 750 million years, the estimated maximum age of origin of the pectin-containing streptophytes represents a maximum age for the divergence of Chytridiomycota from the lineage including Dikarya. PMID:25977457

  15. Pestalotioid fungi from Restionaceae in the Cape Floral Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seonju; Crous, Pedro W.; Wingfield, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Eight pestalotioid fungi were isolated from the Restionaceae growing in the Cape Floral Kingdom of South Africa. Sarcostroma restionis, Truncatella megaspora, T. restionacearum and T. spadicea are newly described. New records include Pestalotiopsis matildae, Sarcostroma lomatiae, Truncatella betulae and T. hartigii. To resolve generic affiliations, phylogenetic analyses were performed on ITS (ITS1, 5.8S, ITS2) and part of 28S rDNA. DNA data support the original generic concept of Truncatella,...

  16. Long-Distance Dispersal of Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Jacob J; Pringle, Anne

    2017-07-01

    Dispersal is a fundamental biological process, operating at multiple temporal and spatial scales. Despite an increasing understanding of fungal biodiversity, most research on fungal dispersal focuses on only a small fraction of species. Thus, any discussion of the dispersal dynamics of fungi as a whole is problematic. While abundant morphological and biogeographic data are available for hundreds of species, researchers have yet to integrate this information into a unifying paradigm of fungal dispersal, especially in the context of long-distance dispersal (LDD). Fungal LDD is mediated by multiple vectors, including meteorological phenomena (e.g., wind and precipitation), plants (e.g., seeds and senesced leaves), animals (e.g., fur, feathers, and gut microbiomes), and in many cases humans. In addition, fungal LDD is shaped by both physical constraints on travel and the ability of spores to survive harsh environments. Finally, fungal LDD is commonly measured in different ways, including by direct capture of spores, genetic comparisons of disconnected populations, and statistical modeling and simulations of dispersal data. To unify perspectives on fungal LDD, we propose a synthetic three-part definition that includes (i) an identification of the source population and a measure of the concentration of source inoculum and (ii) a measured and/or modeled dispersal kernel. With this information, LDD is defined as (iii) the distance found within the dispersal kernel beyond which only 1% of spores travel.

  17. Detection of Fungi in Hair-brushes in Beauty Salons at Jatinangor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Mitchelle Edward

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various beauty tools are used in beauty salons, among those is the hair-brush. The hair-brush can conceal various human skin pathogens although under harsh environmental conditions, most pathogens are killed; nevertheless, few microorganisms, such as the fungi can adapt and survive. Moreover, the moist conditions of the hair-brush predisposes the growth of fungi however the ability of these fungi to instigate disease in an individual is dependent on the portal of entry and the host immunological status. This study was conducted to determine the fungus that is present in the beauty salon’s hair-brushes. Methods: This study was conducted in beauty salons located in Jatinangor area during September–October 2013 using the descriptive laboratory method. Fifteen beauty salons were included in this study based on sample size calculation for dichotomous variable. The specimens from all the hair-brushes were collected after the owner’s informed consent, then cultured onto 30 sabouraud agar, two for each beauty salon (dermatophyte and non-dermatophyte agar. The fungi were detected macroscopically and microscopically. Results: Overall, 93% revealed to be culture positive, with 90% of them were found to be non-dermatophytes, most of which are saprophytic fungi. The remaining 3% were dermatophytes. Conclusions: Beauty salon’s hair-brushes contain a wide range of fungi distribution which may be a source of fungal colonization. However, most of the fungi found in the beauty salons are saprophytic fungi, therefore it is unnecessary to be anxious about a small amount of pathogenic fungi are found in humans.

  18. A Foray into Fungal Ecology: Understanding Fungi and Their Functions Across Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, N.; Dunkirk, N. C.; Peay, K.

    2015-12-01

    Despite their incredible diversity and importance to terrestrial ecosystems, fungi are not included in a standard high school science curriculum. This past summer, however, my work for the Stanford EARTH High School Internship program introduced me to fungal ecology through experiments involving culturing, genomics and root dissections. The two fungal experiments I worked on had very different foci, both searching for answers to broad ecological questions of fungal function and physiology. The first, a symbiosis experiment, sought to determine if the partners of the nutrient exchange between pine trees and their fungal symbionts could choose one another. The second experiment, a dung fungal succession project, compared the genetic sequencing results of fungal extractions from dung versus fungal cultures from dung. My part in the symbiosis experiment involved dissection, weighing and encapsulation of root tissue samples characterized based on the root thickness and presence of ectomycorrhizal fungi. The dung fungi succession project required that I not only learn how to culture various genera of dung fungi but also learn how to extract DNA and RNA for sequencing from the fungal tissue. Although I primarily worked with dung fungi cultures and thereby learned about their unique physiologies, I also learned about the different types of genetic sequencing since the project compared sequences of cultured fungi versus Next Generation sequencing of all fungi present within a dung pellet. Through working on distinct fungal projects that reassess how information about fungi is known within the field of fungal ecology, I learned not only about the two experiments I worked on but also many past related experiments and inquiries through reading scientific papers. Thanks to my foray into fungal research, I now know not only the broader significance of fungi in ecological research but also how to design and conduct ecological experiments.

  19. USER MANUAL: A Practical Guide to Inoculation with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Ecological Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-05

    Beyond benefitting the growth of a plant host, AM fungi confer other ecosystem services . For instance, AM fungi can reduce soil erosion by...restorations will depend upon the context in which they are being used , including the land - use history of the site, the plant species planted, and the...altered physically, chemically and biologically. The particular land use history of a restoration site may determine where mycorrhizal inoculations are

  20. Fungi associated with three common bark beetle species in Norwegian scots pine forest

    OpenAIRE

    Waalberg, Max Emil

    2015-01-01

    Pityogenes bidentatus, P. quadridens and Ips acuminatus are known to be associated with fungi. However, little is known about the associations between the three beetle species and fungi in Norwegian Scots pine forest. This study reports species associated with the three beetle species in Norway. In total, 60 specimens P. bidentatus, 66 of P. quadridens, and 30 of I. acuminatus were collected and dissected. A total number of 560 fungal isolates including 46 species were obtained. In this study...

  1. Bioremediation of Heavy Metals in Liquid Media Through Fungi Isolated from Contaminated Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, P. K.; Swarup, Anand; Maheshwari, Sonu; Kumar, Raman; Singh, Namita

    2011-01-01

    Wastewater particularly from electroplating, paint, leather, metal and tanning industries contain enormous amount of heavy metals. Microorganisms including fungi have been reported to exclude heavy metals from wastewater through bioaccumulation and biosorption at low cost and in eco-friendly way. An attempt was, therefore, made to isolate fungi from sites contaminated with heavy metals for higher tolerance and removal of heavy metals from wastewater. Seventy-six fungal isolates tolerant to he...

  2. Amateur mycologists can assist to conserve fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van der Heul TM

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The conservation of all members belonged to the forgotten kingdom (FUNGI is overlooked all the time worldwide. Mycologists carry the responsibility to discuss these issues and communicate with public and politicians but what about amateur mycologists? This is a very heavy burden, as even the majority of scientists deny the true importance of fungi and their essential role in the conservation, recycling and protection of biomes. A hard mission for the amateur mycologists is to get the attention of decision makers and is even more difficult as national legislation is strongly focused on protecting of plants and animal and ignoring fungi. The amateur's role in the history of mycology in Australia dated back to the mid nineteenth century. For more than 24 years as amateur mycologist, I studied fungi close to Dalmeny, New South Wales, Australia and this work will shed the light on twelve species and their conservation status.

  3. Heterologous expression of cellobiohydrolases in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoglowek, Marta; Lübeck, Peter S.; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    2015-01-01

    Cellobiohydrolases are among the most important enzymes functioning in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose, significantly contributing to the efficient biorefining of recalcitrant lignocellulosic biomass into biofuels and bio-based products. Filamentous fungi are recognized as both well...... into valuable products. However, due to low cellobiohydrolase activities, certain fungi might be deficient with regard to enzymes of value for cellulose conversion, and improving cellobiohydrolase expression in filamentous fungi has proven to be challenging. In this review, we examine the effects of altering...... promoters, signal peptides, culture conditions and host post-translational modifications. For heterologous cellobiohydrolase production in filamentous fungi to become an industrially feasible process, the construction of site-integrating plasmids, development of protease-deficient strains and glycosylation...

  4. Characterization of hydrocarbon utilizing fungi from hydrocarbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    Bonny, Rivers State. Nigeria and water samples from effluent discharge points of four different flow stations in Delta State were sampled. They were analyzed for presence of indigenous fungi. This was to establish possible fungal involvement in ...

  5. Recovery of Endophytic Fungi from Myriophyllum Spicatum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shearer, Judy

    2001-01-01

    ..., often in an attempt to explain sudden population declines. As a result of assaying the plant material for pathogens, lists of fungi associated with milfoil at each collecting site were compiled...

  6. Rhizosphere Fungi of Red Pepper ( Capsicum frutescens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fungi isolated were Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus stolonifer, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus candidus, Penicillium expansum, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium poae, Penicillium citrinum, Mucor racemosus, Mucor mucedo, Verticillium lateritium, Fusarium avenaceum, Trichophyton mentagrophyte, Fusarium verticilliodes, ...

  7. Temperature requirements of four entomopathogenic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Miętkiewski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Infection potential of Beauvaria bassiana, Metarhizium anisopliae, Paecilomyces farinosus and P. fumosoroseus to G. mellonella larvae in pine litter was established. The growth of these fungi on the Czapek's Dox medium exposed to different temperature was determined.

  8. Thraustochytrid fungi associated with marine algae

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, C.

    Many of the diatoms collected from Arabian Sea were found to harbour thraustochytrid fungi on them. The fungus was identified as Ulkenia visurgensis and it could be grown on pine pollen in seawater. The fungus never infected healthy growing cultures...

  9. Antimicrobial activities of novel cultivable bacteria isolated from marine sponge Tedania anhelans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhen; Zhao, Jing; Ke, Caihuan; Wang, Dexiang

    2013-05-01

    Marine sponge Tedania anhelans distributes throughout the intertidal zone of Fujian, southeastern China, and is a potential source of natural bioactive products. The sponge harbors a large number of bacterial groups that have been identified using various techniques, including fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Fractionation of dissociated sponge allowed isolation of 25 bacterial species. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, phylogenetic analysis attributed most of these eubacteria to α- Proteobacteria, γ- Proteobacteria, Cytophaga / Flavobacterium / Bacteroidetes (CFB group), and the family Bacillaceae of Gram-positive bacteria. In sequence similarity, five putatively novel species were identified with less than 98% similarity to other strains in the NCBI database. Tests for antimicrobial activities were performed against Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, fungi, antitumor indicators Escherichia coli 343/591 (with DNA repair deficiency), regular E. coli 343/636 (with different DNA repair capacity), and 10 bacterial isolates exhibited inhibitory bioactivities. Among these strains, three isolates were detected involving function gene NRPS-A domains, which were most closely related to the amino acid sequences of linear gramicidin synthetase and pyoverdine synthetase. These results contribute to our knowledge of the microbes associated with marine sponges and further reveal novel bacterial resources for the screening of bioactive marine natural products.

  10. Antibacterial activity of Achillea tenuifolia Lam. extract against standard bacteria and isolated strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Omidpanah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have been trying to develop new broad-spectrum antibiotics against the infectious diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites for many decades. Prolonged usage of the antibiotics has led to the emergence of drug resistance among bacteria; therefore, there is a tremendous need for novel antimicrobial agents from different sources such as plants which are used in traditional medicine. The aim of this study was to evaluate antibacterial effect of Achillea tenuifolia. The plant material was extracted by maceration method using methanol three times at room temperature. The extract was concentrated after removing the solvent by rotary evaporator and then lyophilized using freeze dryer. Inhibitory effect of the extract was examined against four standard bacteria strains and two isolated strains from diseased hen using disk diffusion method and microdilution method to evaluate their inhibition zone diameter (IZD and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, respectively. The results showed that the extract of the plant was active against standard strains including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis with IZDs of 10.3±0.5, 14±0.0, 12±0.0 and 11.6±0.5, respectively. However, growths of isolated strains were not inhibited in the presence of the extract. Although, the growths of isolated strains were not inhibited by the plant extract, the standard strains were moderately susceptible to the extract; among those P. aeroginosa was more sensible than other tested strains

  11. Biological activities and health effects of terpenoids from marine fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Li, Yong-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been developed by the consumers toward natural bioactive compounds as functional ingredients in the nutraceutical, cosmeceutical, and pharmaceutical products due to their various health beneficial effects. Hence, it can be suggested that bioactive functional ingredients from marine bioresources and their by-products are alternative sources for synthetic ingredients that can contribute to consumer's well-being, as a part of nutraceuticals and functional foods. Marine-derived fungi produce a vast array of secondary metabolites including terpenes, steroids, polyketides, peptides, alkaloids, and polysaccharides. These secondary metabolites serve many biopharmaceutical purposes. This chapter discusses about marine fungi-derived terpenoids and presents an overview of their beneficial health effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Aflatoxigenic Fungi and Aflatoxins in Portuguese Almonds

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, P.; Venâncio, A.; Lima, N.

    2012-01-01

    Aflatoxin contamination of nuts is an increasing concern to the consumer’s health. Portugal is a big producer of almonds, but there is no scientific knowledge on the safety of those nuts, in terms of mycotoxins. The aim of this paper was to study the incidence of aflatoxigenic fungi and aflatoxin contamination of 21 samples of Portuguese almonds, and its evolution throughout the various stages of production. All fungi belonging to Aspergillus section Flavi were identified and tested ...

  13. Inhibitory activity spectrum of reuterin produced by Lactobacillus reuteri against intestinal bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duboux Marc

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reuterin produced from glycerol by Lactobacillus reuteri, a normal inhabitant of the human intestine, is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent. It has been postulated that reuterin could play a role in the probiotic effects of Lb. reuteri. Reuterin is active toward enteropathogens, yeasts, fungi, protozoa and viruses, but its effect on commensal intestinal bacteria is unknown. Moreover reuterin's mode of action has not yet been elucidated. Glutathione, a powerful antioxidant, which also plays a key role in detoxifying reactive aldehydes, protects certain bacteria from oxidative stress, and could also be implicated in resistance to reuterin. The aim of this work was to test the activity of reuterin against a representative panel of intestinal bacteria and to study a possible correlation between intracellular low molecular weight thiols (LMW-SH such as glutathione, hydrogen peroxide and/or reuterin sensitivity. Reuterin was produced by Lb. reuteri SD2112 in pure glycerol solution, purified and used to test the minimal inhibitory (MIC and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBC. Hydrogen peroxide sensitivity and intracellular LMW-SH concentration were also analysed. Results Our data showed that most tested intestinal bacteria showed MIC below that for a sensitive indicator Escherichia coli (7.5–15 mM. Lactobacilli and Clostridium clostridioforme were more resistant with MIC ranging from 15 to 50 mM. No correlation between bacterial intracellular concentrations of LMW-SH, including glutathione, and reuterin or hydrogen peroxide sensitivities were found. Conclusion Our data showed that intestinal bacteria were very sensitive to reuterin and that their intracellular concentration of LMW-SH was not directly linked to their capacity to resist reuterin or hydrogen peroxide. This suggests that detoxification by LMW-SH such as glutathione is not a general mechanism and that other mechanisms are probably involved in bacterial tolerance

  14. Polygalacturonase from Sitophilus oryzae: Possible horizontal transfer of a pectinase gene from fungi to weevils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhicheng Shen

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Endo-polygalacturonase, one of the group of enzymes known collectively as pectinases, is widely distributed in bacteria, plants and fungi. The enzyme has also been found in several weevil species and a few other insects, such as aphids, but not in Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae, or Caenorhabditis elegans or, as far as is known, in any more primitive animal species. What, then, is the genetic origin of the polygalacturonases in weevils? Since some weevil species harbor symbiotic microorganisms, it has been suggested, reasonably, that the symbionts' genomes of both aphids and weevils, rather than the insects' genomes, could encode polygalacturonase. We report here the cloning of a cDNA that encodes endo-polygalacturonase in the rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L., and investigations based on the cloned cDNA. Our results, which include analysis of genes in antibiotic-treated rice weevils, indicate that the enzyme is, in fact, encoded by the insect genome. Given the apparent absence of the gene in much of the rest of the animal kingdom, it is therefore likely that the rice weevil polygalacturonase gene was incorporated into the weevil's genome by horizontal transfer, possibly from a fungus.

  15. What influences the composition of fungi in wheat grains?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biruta Bankina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Wheat grains are inhabited by different fungi, including plant pathogens and fungi – mycotoxin producers. The composition of seed mycobiota can be influenced by different factors, including agronomic practices, but the results are still contradictory. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mycobiota of wheat grains depending on agroecological conditions. Wheat grains were obtained from a two-factorial field trial: A – tillage system (A1 – ploughing at a depth of 22–24 cm; A2 – harrowing at a depth of up to 10 cm; B – crop rotation (B1 – continuous wheat; B2 – oilseed rape and wheat; B3 – crop rotation. The mycobiota of grain were determined by mycological and molecular methods. The most abundant and widespread of the mycobiota were Pyrenophora tritici-repentis, Alternaria spp., Arthrinium spp., and Fusarium avenaceum. Higher amounts of precipitation increased the infection of grains with Fusarium fungi. Seven species of Fusarium were identified in the grain samples: F. avenaceum, F. poae, F. graminearum, F. culmorum, F. acuminatum, F. sporotrichioides, and F. tricinctum. The soil tillage method and crop rotation did not influence the total incidence of Fusarium spp., but the abundance of a particular species differed depending on agronomic practice. The research suggests that continuous wheat sowing under conditions of reduced soil tillage can increase the level of risk of grain infection with F. graminearum and, consequently, the accumulation of mycotoxins.

  16. The GSTome Reflects the Chemical Environment of White-Rot Fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Deroy

    Full Text Available White-rot fungi possess the unique ability to degrade and mineralize all the different components of wood. In other respects, wood durability, among other factors, is due to the presence of extractives that are potential antimicrobial molecules. To cope with these molecules, wood decay fungi have developed a complex detoxification network including glutathione transferases (GST. The interactions between GSTs from two white-rot fungi, Trametes versicolor and Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and an environmental library of wood extracts have been studied. The results demonstrate that the specificity of these interactions is closely related to the chemical composition of the extracts in accordance with the tree species and their localization inside the wood (sapwood vs heartwood vs knotwood. These data suggest that the fungal GSTome could reflect the chemical environment encountered by these fungi during wood degradation and could be a way to study their adaptation to their way of life.

  17. The GSTome Reflects the Chemical Environment of White-Rot Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroy, Aurélie; Saiag, Fanny; Kebbi-Benkeder, Zineb; Touahri, Nassim; Hecker, Arnaud; Morel-Rouhier, Mélanie; Colin, Francis; Dumarcay, Stephane; Gérardin, Philippe; Gelhaye, Eric

    2015-01-01

    White-rot fungi possess the unique ability to degrade and mineralize all the different components of wood. In other respects, wood durability, among other factors, is due to the presence of extractives that are potential antimicrobial molecules. To cope with these molecules, wood decay fungi have developed a complex detoxification network including glutathione transferases (GST). The interactions between GSTs from two white-rot fungi, Trametes versicolor and Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and an environmental library of wood extracts have been studied. The results demonstrate that the specificity of these interactions is closely related to the chemical composition of the extracts in accordance with the tree species and their localization inside the wood (sapwood vs heartwood vs knotwood). These data suggest that the fungal GSTome could reflect the chemical environment encountered by these fungi during wood degradation and could be a way to study their adaptation to their way of life. PMID:26426695

  18. THE ROLE FUNGI AND YEAST IN MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.; Abe, M.; Johnson, B.; Simpson, W.; Mckinsey, P.

    2010-01-26

    Fungi and yeast have been characterized as important components in the bioremediation of organic contaminants in soil and water including polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); however, research into their ability to metabolize these compounds in extreme environments has been limited. In this work forty-three fungi and yeasts were isolated from a PAH-contaminated sludge waste lagoon in Poland. The lagoon was part of a monitored natural attenuation (MNA) study where natural reduction of PAHs and associated toxicity over time in non-disturbed areas of the sludge lagoon indicated MNA activity. The microorganisms were initially isolated on minimal medium containing naphthalene as the sole carbon and energy source. Fungal isolates were then maintained on MEA and identified based on microscopic examination and BIOLOG{reg_sign}. The analysis identified several of the fungal isolates as belonging to the genera Penicillium, Paecilomyces, Aspergillus, and Eupenicillium. Yeasts included Candida parapsilosis and C. fluvialitis. Further microbial characterization revealed that several isolates were capable of rowing on acidified media of pH 4, 3, and 2.5. Over twenty percent of the fungi demonstrated growth as low as pH 2.5. Of the 43 isolates examined, 24 isolates exhibited growth at 5 C. Nine of the fungal isolates exhibiting growth at 5 C were then examined for metabolic activity using a respirometer testing metabolic activity at pH 3. Microcosm studies confirmed the growth of the fungi on PAH contaminated sediment as the sole carbon and energy source with elevated metabolic rates indicating evidence of MNA. Our findings suggest that many of the Poland fungal isolates may be of value in the bioremediation processes in acidic waste sites in northern climates typical of Northern Europe.

  19. Studies on drug metabolism by fungi colonizing decomposing human cadavers. Part I: DNA sequence-based identification of fungi isolated from postmortem material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ramírez, Jorge A; Strien, Juliane; Sanft, Juliane; Mall, Gita; Walther, Grit; Peters, Frank T

    2013-10-01

    Cadavers can be colonized by a wide variety of bacteria and fungi. Some of these microbes could change the concentration or the metabolic pattern of drugs present in postmortem samples. The purpose of this study was to identify fungi from human postmortem material and to further assess their potential role in the metabolism of drugs. Aliquots of 252 postmortem samples (heart blood, liver, kidney, and lung) taken from 105 moderately to severely decomposed bodies were streaked on Sabouraud agar for isolation of fungal species. One part of the samples was worked up immediately after autopsy (group I). The second part had previously been stored at -20 °C for at least 1 year (group II). Identification of the isolates was achieved morphologically by microscopy and molecularly by polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of markers allowing species identification of the respective genera. Depending on the genus, different gene fragments were used: calmodulin for Aspergillus, β-tubulin for Penicillium, translation elongation factor 1α for Fusarium, and the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal DNA for all remaining genera. A total of 156 fungal strains were isolated from 62% of the postmortem materials. By using these primers, 98% of the isolates could be identified to the species level. The most common genera were Candida (60.0%-six species), Penicillium (10.3%-two species), Rhodotorula (7.1%-one species), Mucor (6.4%-four species), Aspergillus (3.2%-four species), Trichosporon (3.2%-one species), and Geotrichum (3.2%-one species). Group I samples contained 53% more fungal species than stored samples suggesting some fungi did not survive the freezing process. The isolated fungi might be characteristic for decomposed bodies. The proposed methodology proved to be appropriate for the identification of fungi in this type of material.

  20. Comparative Genome Analysis of Filamentous Fungi Reveals Gene Family Expansions Associated with Fungal Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soanes, Darren M.; Alam, Intikhab; Cornell, Mike; Wong, Han Min; Hedeler, Cornelia; Paton, Norman W.; Rattray, Magnus; Hubbard, Simon J.; Oliver, Stephen G.; Talbot, Nicholas J.

    2008-01-01

    Fungi and oomycetes are the causal agents of many of the most serious diseases of plants. Here we report a detailed comparative analysis of the genome sequences of thirty-six species of fungi and oomycetes, including seven plant pathogenic species, that aims to explore the common genetic features associated with plant disease-causing species. The predicted translational products of each genome have been clustered into groups of potential orthologues using Markov Chain Clustering and the data integrated into the e-Fungi object-oriented data warehouse (http://www.e-fungi.org.uk/). Analysis of the species distribution of members of these clusters has identified proteins that are specific to filamentous fungal species and a group of proteins found only in plant pathogens. By comparing the gene inventories of filamentous, ascomycetous phytopathogenic and free-living species of fungi, we have identified a set of gene families that appear to have expanded during the evolution of phytopathogens and may therefore serve important roles in plant disease. We have also characterised the predicted set of secreted proteins encoded by each genome and identified a set of protein families which are significantly over-represented in the secretomes of plant pathogenic fungi, including putative effector proteins that might perturb host cell biology during plant infection. The results demonstrate the potential of comparative genome analysis for exploring the evolution of eukaryotic microbial pathogenesis. PMID:18523684

  1. Methylotrophic bacteria in sustainable agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Tomar, Rajesh Singh; Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby

    2016-07-01

    Excessive use of chemical fertilizers to increase production from available land has resulted in deterioration of soil quality. To prevent further soil deterioration, the use of methylotrophic bacteria that have the ability to colonize different habitats, including soil, sediment, water, and both epiphytes and endophytes as host plants, has been suggested for sustainable agriculture. Methylotrophic bacteria are known to play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycle in soil ecosystems, ultimately fortifying plants and sustaining agriculture. Methylotrophs also improve air quality by using volatile organic compounds such as dichloromethane, formaldehyde, methanol, and formic acid. Additionally, methylotrophs are involved in phosphorous, nitrogen, and carbon cycling and can help reduce global warming. In this review, different aspects of the interaction between methylotrophs and host plants are discussed, including the role of methylotrophs in phosphorus acquisition, nitrogen fixation, phytohormone production, iron chelation, and plant growth promotion, and co-inoculation of these bacteria as biofertilizers for viable agriculture practices.

  2. STUDY OF THE ANTIMICROBIAL PROPERTIES OF CERTAIN SAPROPHYTIC OBLIGATE MARINE FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyuzhnaya O.S.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Today promising area of the development and introduction of new antimicrobial agents is to search for new antibiotics from natural sources, namely among marine organisms - microscopic fungi. Such saprophytic fungi as Ascomycota (families Arenariomyces, Ceriosporopsis, Corollospora, Halosphaeria and Basidiomycota (family Nia, which are widely spreaded in Ukraine (salty estuaries and the coast of the Black Sea, are the objects of the study of this work. These types of marine organisms have been provided by the Odessa Branch of the Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas after collecting samples of water, sediment, cellulose substrates and subsequent isolation and obtain pure cultures by accumulation in the form fruiting bodies of Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes - ascocarps and basidiocarps that can be stored 3-5 months in sterile seawater. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of antimicrobial properties of saprophytic fungi obligate marine, which are characteristic for residents in Ukraine, namely the Black Sea. Materials and methods. At this stage the study of antimicrobial activity was performed by agar diffusion method and method of cocultivation of marine fungi with test strains in liquid culture medium. We have used reference strains of microorganisms: Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Proteus vulgaris ATCC 6896, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and opportunistic fungus Candida albicans ATCC 885-653. Results and Discussion. Determination of antimicrobial activity by agar diffusion method showed that all samples had antimicrobial activity against the Gram-positive test strains (S. aureus and B. subtilis, effect for the Gramnegative bacteria (E. coli, P. vulgaris, P. aeruginosa was much smaller or non-existent, and it isn’t observed against C. albicans (exclusion Nia vibrissa with zone of growth inhibition – 6.2 mm. The results of the counting of cells test strains

  3. Population level of main microbiota and yeast-like Candida fungi in women with vulvovaginal candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Yakovychuk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim - to determine population levels of main microbiota and yeast-like fungi of the genus Candida in healthy women and in women with vulvovaginal candidiasis. Materials and methods. For 10 years we have been surveyed 270 women in reproductive age from 19 to 34 years old with vulvovaginal candidiasis and 73 healthy women. In all patients population level of main microflora and yeast-like fungi of the genus Candida in vulvovaginal content has been determined. The isolation of yeast-like fungi of the genus Candida has been performed by seeding of vulvovaginal content on a solid Saboaraud nutrient medium and on Saboaraud medium with the addition of cycloheximide, relatively with pure culture. "Seedlings test" and identification by species with establishment of population level had been performed in each individual case. Results. Coexistence of representatives of the ecosystem "microorganism - microbiota" and compared the changes of microecology of vulvovaginal content in healthy women and women with vulvovaginal candidiasis were defined. In the study of population level of yeast-like fungi of the genus Candida in vulvovaginal content in women with vulvovaginal candidiasis it was found that the dominant species was C. albicans, of population level of which were different from other species, such as C. guillіermondii by 1.77 %, C. krusei - by 4.82 %, C. glabrata - by 5.78 %, C. kefyr – by 8.19 %, C. tropicalis – by 8,35 %, C. inconspicua and C. zeylanoides by 15.08 %. Thus, in the vulvovaginal content of women with vulvovaginal candidiasis yeast-like fungi of the genus Candida of 8 different taxons were at the population level over 5,00 lg CFU/ml, which can not only persist but they were suspected to be agents of inflammation. The results of the study of population levels of autochtonous obligate and facultative bacteria of vulvovaginal content of women with vulvovaginal candidiasis indicated that the level of Lactobacteria decreased by 67

  4. Vita activa in biotechnology: what we do with fungi and what fungi do with us.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinhold, Martin; Mast-Gerlach, Edeltraud; Meyer, Vera

    2017-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are fascinating microorganisms. One of the reasons why it is so worthwhile to take a closer look at them is their capacity to produce secondary metabolites. Some of these substances have the potential to be of great use for mankind, such as it was the case with penicillin and its discovery in 1928. Almost a century later, the situation in healthcare could possibly turn back to the state before the development of the first antibiotics. Due to an overuse of antibiotics we are facing a surge of multiresistant bacteria that are not inhibited by any of the currently known drugs. That was part of the background why a European research project was launched in October 2013, titled "Quantitative Biology for Fungal Secondary Metabolite Producers", or "QuantFung". Fifteen young scientists embarked on a new phase in their career, moving to new work environments within Europe and dedicating their work lives intensively to the quest for useful secondary metabolites. After 4 years, the QuantFung project concluded in October this year. In this commentary, we aim to convey what it means to work in this field of fungal biotechnology and how important it is to improve the efficiency of the research therein. We introduce five out of the fifteen fellows at length and let them have their say about the adventure of science, euphoric moments, prospects and doubts. We also raise questions about the current state of research in academia, something the QuantFung fellows experienced first-hand. Being a scientist often goes beyond earning money to make one's living. This is why we also reflect on aspects of the meaning of work in our western society, where production for profit's sake is a main driver. For that we refer to one of the most distinguished thinkers of the twentieth century, to Hannah Arendt.

  5. Antibacterial activity of endophytic fungi from leaves of Indigofera suffruticosa Miller (Fabaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Irailton Prazeres; da Silva, Luís Cláudio Nascimento; da Silva, Márcia Vanusa; de Araújo, Janete Magali; Cavalcanti, Marilene da Silva; Lima, Vera Lucia de Menezes

    2015-01-01

    Endophytic fungi were isolated from healthy leaves of Indigofera suffruticosa Miller, a medicinal plant found in Brazil which is used in folk medicine to treat various diseases. Among 65 endophytic fungi isolated, 18 fungi showed activity against at least one tested microorganism in preliminary screening, and the best results were obtained with Nigrospora sphaerica (URM-6060) and Pestalotiopsis maculans (URM-6061). After fermentation in liquid media and in semisolid media, only N. sphaerica demonstrated antibacterial activity (in Potato Dextrose Broth-PDB and in semisolid rice culture medium). In the next step, a methanolic extract from rice culture medium (NsME) and an ethyl acetate extract (NsEAE) from the supernatant of PDB were prepared and both exhibited antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The best result was observed against Staphylococcus aureus, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values of 1.56 mg/mL and 6.25 mg/mL, respectively, for NsME and MIC and MBC values of 0.39 mg/mL and 3.12 mg/mL, respectively, for NsEAE. This study is the first report about the antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi residing in I. suffruticosa leaves, in which the fungus N. sphaerica demonstrated the ability to produce bioactive agents with pharmaceutical potential, and may provide a new lead in the pursuit of new biological sources of drug candidates. PMID:25999918

  6. Stimulation of nitrogen fixation in soddy-podzolic soils with fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurakov, A. V.; Prokhorov, I. S.; Kostina, N. V.; Makhova, E. G.; Sadykova, V. S.

    2006-09-01

    Stimulation of nitrogen fixation in soddy-podzolic soils is related to the hydrolytic activity of fungi decomposing plant polymers. It was found that the rate of nitrogen fixation upon the simultaneous inoculation of the strains of nitrogen-fixing bacteria Bacillus cereus var. mycoides and the cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma asperellum into a sterile soil enriched with cellulose or Jerusalem artichoke residues is two to four times higher than upon the inoculation of the strains of Bacillus cereus var. mycoides L1 only. The increase in the nitrogen fixation depended on the resistance of the substrates added into the soil to fungal hydrolysis. The biomass of the fungi decomposing plant polymers increased by two-four times. The nitrogen-fixing activity of the soil decreased when the growth of the fungi was inhibited with cycloheximide, which attested to a close correlation between the intensity of the nitrogen fixation and the decomposition of the plant polymers by fungi. The introduction of an antifungal antibiotic, together with starch or with plant residues, significantly (by 60-90%) decreased the rate of nitrogen fixation in the soll.

  7. Thermophilic Fungi to Dominate Aflatoxigenic/Mycotoxigenic Fungi on Food under Global Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Robert Russell M; Lima, Nelson

    2017-02-17

    Certain filamentous fungi produce mycotoxins that contaminate food. Mycotoxin contamination of crops is highly influenced by environmental conditions and is already affected by global warming, where there is a succession of mycotoxigenic fungi towards those that have higher optimal growth temperatures. Aflatoxigenic fungi are at the highest limit of temperature although predicted increases in temperature are beyond that constraint. The present paper discusses what will succeed these fungi and represents the first such consideration. Aflatoxins are the most important mycotoxins and are common in tropical produce, much of which is exported to temperate regions. Hot countries may produce safer food under climate change because aflatoxigenic fungi will be inhibited. The same situation will occur in previously temperate regions where these fungi have recently appeared, although decades later. Existing thermotolerant and thermophilic fungi (TTF) will dominate, in contrast to the conventional mycotoxigenic fungi adapting or mutating, as it will be quicker. TTF produce a range of secondary metabolites, or potential mycotoxins and patulin which may become a new threat. In addition, Aspergillus fumigatus will appear more frequently, a serious human pathogen, because it is (a) thermotolerant and (b) present on crops: hence this is an even greater problem. An incubation temperature of 41 °C needs employing forthwith to detect TTF. Finally, TTF in crops requires study because of the potential for diseases in humans and animals under climate change.

  8. Phylogenomics of zygomycete fungi: impacts on a phylogenetic classification of Kingdom Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    The zygomycetous fungi (”zygomycetes”) mark the major transition from zoosporic life histories of the common ancestor of Fungi and the earliest diverging chytrid lineages (Chytridiomycota and Blastocladiomycota). Their ecological and economic importance range from the earliest documented symbionts o...

  9. Thermophilic Fungi to Dominate Aflatoxigenic/Mycotoxigenic Fungi on Food under Global Warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Russell M. Paterson

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Certain filamentous fungi produce mycotoxins that contaminate food. Mycotoxin contamination of crops is highly influenced by environmental conditions and is already affected by global warming, where there is a succession of mycotoxigenic fungi towards those that have higher optimal growth temperatures. Aflatoxigenic fungi are at the highest limit of temperature although predicted increases in temperature are beyond that constraint. The present paper discusses what will succeed these fungi and represents the first such consideration. Aflatoxins are the most important mycotoxins and are common in tropical produce, much of which is exported to temperate regions. Hot countries may produce safer food under climate change because aflatoxigenic fungi will be inhibited. The same situation will occur in previously temperate regions where these fungi have recently appeared, although decades later. Existing thermotolerant and thermophilic fungi (TTF will dominate, in contrast to the conventional mycotoxigenic fungi adapting or mutating, as it will be quicker. TTF produce a range of secondary metabolites, or potential mycotoxins and patulin which may become a new threat. In addition, Aspergillus fumigatus will appear more frequently, a serious human pathogen, because it is (a thermotolerant and (b present on crops: hence this is an even greater problem. An incubation temperature of 41 °C needs employing forthwith to detect TTF. Finally, TTF in crops requires study because of the potential for diseases in humans and animals under climate change.

  10. Parasitic fungi of the genera Betula and Salix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Adamska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the years 2001-2004, the occurrence of parasitic fungi of plants of the genera Betula and Salix growing in the Słowiński National Park was investigated. The plant species examined included B. pubescens, B. pendula, S. aurita, S. caprea, S. cinerea, S. fragilis, and S. repens. Plants of the genus Betula were affected by 9 species of parasiting fungi. In Poland, three of them (Microsphaera ornata var. europaea, Phyllactinia guttata, Melampsoridium betulinum occur commonly, five (Asteroma leptothyrioides, Discula betulina, Fusicladium betulae, Phyllosticta betulina, Septoria betulina are rare, and Septoria betulae-odoratae has not been recorded to date. Three species, Asteroma leptothyrioides, Fusicladium betulae, Phyllosticta betulina, were found on new plant hosts. Plants of the genus Salix were attacked by 8 species of parasiting fungi. Four of them (Melampsora allii-fragilis, M. caprearum, M. epitea, Uncinula adunca var. adunca are common in Poland, four (Marssonina salicicola, Phyllosticta salicicola, Septoria salicicola, Trimmatostroma betulinum rarely occur here. Uncinula adunca var. adunca, Marssonina salicicola, Phyllosticta salicicola, Septoria salicicola and Trimmatostroma betulinum were associated with the plant species not reported earlier to be their hosts.

  11. Transposable element dynamics among asymbiotic and ectomycorrhizal Amanita fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Jaqueline; Skrede, Inger; Wolfe, Benjamin E; LaButti, Kurt; Ohm, Robin A; Grigoriev, Igor V; Pringle, Anne

    2014-06-12

    Transposable elements (TEs) are ubiquitous inhabitants of eukaryotic genomes and their proliferation and dispersal shape genome architectures and diversity. Nevertheless, TE dynamics are often explored for one species at a time and are rarely considered in ecological contexts. Recent work with plant pathogens suggests a link between symbiosis and TE abundance. The genomes of pathogenic fungi appear to house an increased abundance of TEs, and TEs are frequently associated with the genes involved in symbiosis. To investigate whether this pattern is general, and relevant to mutualistic plant-fungal symbioses, we sequenced the genomes of related asymbiotic (AS) and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) Amanita fungi. Using methods developed to interrogate both assembled and unassembled sequences, we characterized and quantified TEs across three AS and three ECM species, including the AS outgroup Volvariella volvacea. The ECM genomes are characterized by abundant numbers of TEs, an especially prominent feature of unassembled sequencing libraries. Increased TE activity in ECM species is also supported by phylogenetic analysis of the three most abundant TE superfamilies; phylogenies revealed many radiations within contemporary ECM species. However, the AS species Amanita thiersii also houses extensive amplifications of elements, highlighting the influence of additional evolutionary parameters on TE abundance. Our analyses provide further evidence for a link between symbiotic associations among plants and fungi, and increased TE activity, while highlighting the importance individual species' natural histories may have in shaping genome architecture. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  12. Phylogenomic relationships between amylolytic enzymes from 85 strains of fungi.

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    Wanping Chen

    Full Text Available Fungal amylolytic enzymes, including α-amylase, gluocoamylase and α-glucosidase, have been extensively exploited in diverse industrial applications such as high fructose syrup production, paper making, food processing and ethanol production. In this paper, amylolytic genes of 85 strains of fungi from the phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota and Zygomycota were annotated on the genomic scale according to the classification of glycoside hydrolase (GH from the Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZy Database. Comparisons of gene abundance in the fungi suggested that the repertoire of amylolytic genes adapted to their respective lifestyles. Amylolytic enzymes in family GH13 were divided into four distinct clades identified as heterologous α-amylases, eukaryotic α-amylases, bacterial and fungal α-amylases and GH13 α-glucosidases. Family GH15 had two branches, one for gluocoamylases, and the other with currently unknown function. GH31 α-glucosidases showed diverse branches consisting of neutral α-glucosidases, lysosomal acid α-glucosidases and a new clade phylogenetically related to the bacterial counterparts. Distribution of starch-binding domains in above fungal amylolytic enzymes was related to the enzyme source and phylogeny. Finally, likely scenarios for the evolution of amylolytic enzymes in fungi based on phylogenetic analyses were proposed. Our results provide new insights into evolutionary relationships among subgroups of fungal amylolytic enzymes and fungal evolutionary adaptation to ecological conditions.

  13. Class of cyclic ribosomal peptide synthetic genes in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Nozomi; Umemura, Myco; Izumikawa, Miho; Kawano, Jin; Ishii, Tomoko; Kikuchi, Moto; Tomii, Kentaro; Kumagai, Toshitaka; Yoshimi, Akira; Machida, Masayuki; Abe, Keietsu; Shin-Ya, Kazuo; Asai, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Ustiloxins were found recently to be the first example of cyclic peptidyl secondary metabolites that are ribosomally synthesized in filamentous fungi. In this work, two function-unknown genes (ustYa/ustYb) in the gene cluster for ustiloxins from Aspergillus flavus were found experimentally to be involved in cyclization of the peptide. Their homologous genes are observed mainly in filamentous fungi and mushrooms. They have two "HXXHC" motifs that might form active sites. Computational genome analyses showed that these genes are frequently located near candidate genes for ribosomal peptide precursors, which have signal peptides at the N-termini and repeated sequences with core peptides for the cyclic portions, in the genomes of filamentous fungi, particularly Aspergilli, as observed in the ustiloxin gene cluster. Based on the combination of the ustYa/ustYb homologous genes and the nearby ribosomal peptide precursor candidate genes, 94 ribosomal peptide precursor candidates that were identified computationally from Aspergilli genome sequences were classified into more than 40 types including a wide variety of core peptide sequences. A set of the predicted ribosomal peptide biosynthetic genes was experimentally verified to synthesize a new cyclic peptide compound, designated as asperipin-2a, which comprises the amino acid sequence in the corresponding precursor gene, distinct from the ustiloxin precursors. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Diversity of endophytic fungi in Glycine max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Elio Gomes; Pereira, Olinto Liparini; da Silva, Cynthia Cânedo; Bento, Claudia Braga Pereira; de Queiroz, Marisa Vieira

    2015-12-01

    Endophytic fungi are microorganisms that live within plant tissues without causing disease during part of their life cycle. With the isolation and identification of these fungi, new species are being discovered, and ecological relationships with their hosts have also been studied. In Glycine max, limited studies have investigated the isolation and distribution of endophytic fungi throughout leaves and roots. The distribution of these fungi in various plant organs differs in diversity and abundance, even when analyzed using molecular techniques that can evaluate fungal communities in different parts of the plants, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Our results show there is greater species richness of culturable endophytic filamentous fungi in the leaves G. max as compared to roots. Additionally, the leaves had high values for diversity indices, i.e. Simpsons, Shannon and Equitability. Conversely, dominance index was higher in roots as compared to leaves. The fungi Ampelomyces sp., Cladosporium cladosporioides, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Diaporthe helianthi, Guignardia mangiferae and Phoma sp. were more frequently isolated from the leaves, whereas the fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani and Fusarium sp. were prevalent in the roots. However, by evaluating the two communities by DGGE, we concluded that the species richness was higher in the roots than in the leaves. UPGMA analysis showed consistent clustering of isolates; however, the fungus Leptospora rubella, which belongs to the order Dothideales, was grouped among species of the order Pleosporales. The presence of endophytic Fusarium species in G. max roots is unsurprising, since Fusarium spp. isolates have been previously described as endophyte in other reports. However, it remains to be determined whether the G. max Fusarium endophytes are latent pathogens or non-pathogenic forms that benefit the plant. This study provides a broader knowledge of the distribution of the fungal

  15. Human-associated fungi in deep subseafloor sediment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulfer, V. M.; Kirkpatrick, J. B.; D'Hondt, S.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have reported fungi in marine sediment samples from depths as great as 1740 meters below seafloor (mbsf) (Rédou et al., 2014). Such studies have utilized a variety of techniques to identify fungi, including cultivation of isolates, amplicon sequencing, and metagenomics. Six recent studies of marine sediment collectively identify nearly 100 fungal taxa at the genus and species levels (Damare et al., 2006; Lai et al., 2007; Edgcomb et al., 2010; Singh et al., 2010; Orsi et al., 2013; Rédou et al., 2014). Known marine taxa are rarely identified by these studies. For individual studies with more than two taxa, between 16% and 57% of the fungal taxa are human microflora or associated with human environments (e.g., human skin or indoor air). For example, three of the six studies identified Malassezia species that are common skin inhabitants of humans and dogs. Although human-associated taxa have been identified in both shallow and deep sediment, they pose a particularly acute problem for deep subseafloor samples, where claims of a eukaryotic deep biosphere are most striking; depending on the study, 25% to 38% of species identified in sediment taken at depths greater than 40 meters are human-associated. Only one to three species have been reported from each of the four samples taken at depths greater than one km (eight species total; Rédou et al., 2014). Of these eight species, three are human-associated. This ubiquity of human-associated microflora is very problematic for interpretations of an indigenous deep subseafloor fungal community; either human-associated taxa comprise a large fraction of marine sedimentary fungi, or sample and analytical contamination is so widespread that the extent and ubiquity of a deep subseafloor fungal community remains uncertain. This highlights the need for stringent quality control measures throughout coring, sampling, and recovery of marine sediment, and when cultivating, extracting, and/or sequencing fungi from

  16. Cereal fungal infection, mycotoxins, and lactic acid bacteria mediated bioprotection: from crop farming to cereal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Pedro M; Zannini, Emanuele; Arendt, Elke K

    2014-02-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) metabolites are a reliable alternative for reducing fungal infections pre-/post-harvest with additional advantages for cereal-base products which convene the food market's trend. Grain industrial use is in expansion owing to its applicability in generating functional food. The food market is directed towards functional natural food with clear health benefits for the consumer in detriment to chemical additives. The food market chain is becoming broader and more complex, which presents an ever-growing fungal threat. Toxigenic and spoilage fungi are responsible for numerous diseases and economic losses. Cereal infections may occur in the field or post-processing, along the food chain. Consequently, the investigation of LAB metabolites with antifungal activity has gained prominence in the scientific research community. LAB bioprotection retards the development of fungal diseases in the field and inhibit pathogens and spoilage fungi in food products. In addition to the health safety improvement, LAB metabolites also enhance shelf-life, organoleptic and texture qualities of cereal-base foods. This review presents an overview of the fungal impact through the cereal food chain leading to investigation on LAB antifungal compounds. Applicability of LAB in plant protection and cereal industry is discussed. Specific case studies include Fusarium head blight, malting and baking. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bacteria, some permanent tenants Space Station; Bacteria, unos inquilinos permanentes de la estacion espacial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, B.

    2015-07-01

    Vacuum cleaners to operate the vacuum or rags with ethanol they are the products of cleaning of the astronauts. Is there tight spaces fully sterilized? It seems not, even in the Space Station International (ISS). When it comes to bacteria, they are able to travel more than 400 kilometers housed in costumes, bodies and interior of the astronauts themselves and settle in a enclosed space where-unlike in a {sup c}leanroom 'terrestre- the air is not recycled. A NASA study has found an abundance of bacteria 'opportunists' which, although harmless on Earth, they might derivasen cause infections in inflammations or skin irritations. Not forgetting those fungi that could damage or affect the infrastructure equipment space. (Author)

  18. Endophytic fungi from mangrove inhibit lung cancer cell growth and angiogenesis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Wu, Xin; Ma, Yuefan; Zhang, Wenzhang; Hu, Liang; Feng, Xiaowei; Li, Xiangyong; Tang, Xudong

    2017-03-01

    The secondary metabolites of mangrove-derived endophytic fungi contain multiple substances with novel structures and biological activities. In the present study, three types of mangrove plants, namely Kandelia candel, Rhizophora stylosa and Rhizophoraceae from Zhanjiang region including the leaves, roots and stems were collected, and endophytic fungi were isolated, purified and identified from these mangrove plants. MTT assay was used to observe the effects of the isolated endophytic fungi on the growth of A549 and NCI-H460 lung cancer cells. The effect of the endophytic fungi on lung cancer angiogenesis in vitro induced by the HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein was observed. Our results showed that 28 strains of endophytic fungi were isolated, purified and identified from the three types of mangrove plants. Ten strains of endophytic fungi significantly suppressed the growth of A549 and NCI-H460 cells. The average inhibitory rates in the A549 cells were 64.4, 59.5, 81.9, 43.9, 58.3, 56.2, 48.3, 42.4, 93.0 and 49.7%, respectively. The average inhibitory rates in the NCI-H460 cells were 41.2, 49.3, 82.7, 40.7, 53.9, 52.6, 56.8, 64.3, 91.0 and 45.6%, respectively. Particularly, three strains of endophytic fungi markedly inhibited HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein‑induced lung cancer angiogenesis in vitro. These findings contribute to the further screening of potential chemotherapeutic agents from mangrove-derived endophytic fungi.

  19. [Separation and identification of endophytic fungi from desert plant Cynanchum komarovii].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hai-Jing; Han, Ting; Wu, Xiu-Li; Li, Na; Chen, Jing; Qin, Lu-Ping

    2013-02-01

    The research aimed to investigate the entophytic fungal community of Cynanchum Komarrovii, including the biodiversity in different organs and the correlations with ecological environment. Endophytic fungi with patent bioactivity were also rapidly screened. PDA medium was used to isolate and purify the endophytic fungi from C. komarovii living in Shaanxi and Ningxia district, respectively. The strains were identified based on the morphological characteristics of the fungi and similarity of 5.8S gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence. Pyriculaia oryzae model was applied to preliminarily screen the active fungi. Ninety-four strains of endophytic fungi were isolated and identified to 9 species, 13 genera, 9 families and 6 orders, among them, 47 strains were from the plants living in Ningxia. And then, 5 of them were isolated from roots, 14 from branches, and 28 from leaves. They were identified belonging to 8 species, 9 genera, 5 families and 4 orders. Additionally, 47 strains were from the plants living in Shaanxi. 16 were isolated from the roots, 18 from branches, 13 from leaves. They were identified belonging to 5 species, 8 genera, 6 families and 4 orders. By preliminary screening, 18 strains of endophytes completely inhibited the germination of conidium, which showed a potential bioactivity for these fungi. Both N4 and S17 strains had stronger growth inhibition effect. Endophytic fungi from desert plant C. komarovii have the feature of diversity. Different geographical environment and type of organizations lead to the significant difference on the quantity and the species composition. Most of fungi in Ningxia C. komarovii distribute in leaves. However, most of those in Shaanxi C. komarovii distribute in stems and leaves. It also indicated that endophytes from C. komarovii had a strong antifungal activity.

  20. Litter decomposing fungi in sal (Shorea robusta forests of central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAM KEERTI VERMA

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Soni KK, Pyasi A, Verma RK. 2011. Litter decomposing fungi in sal (Shorea robusta forests of central India. Nusantara Bioscience 3: 136-144. The present study aim on isolation and identification of fungi associated with decomposition of litter of sal forest in central India. Season wise successional changes in litter mycoflora were determined for four main seasons of the year namely, March-May, June-August, September-November and December-February. Fungi like Aspergillus flavus, A. niger and Rhizopus stolonifer were associated with litter decomposition throughout the year, while Aspergillus fumigatus, Cladosporium cladosporioides, C. oxysporum, Curvularia indica, and C. lunata were recorded in three seasons. Some fungi including ectomycorrhiza forming occur only in the rainy season (June-August these are Astraeus hygrometricus, Boletus fallax, Calvatia elata, Colletotrichum dematium, Corticium rolfsii, Mycena roseus, Periconia minutissima, Russula emetica, Scleroderma bovista, S. geaster, S. verrucosum, Scopulariopsis alba and four sterile fungi. Fungi like Alternaria citri, Gleocladium virens, Helicosporium phragmitis and Pithomyces cortarum were rarely recorded only in one season.