WorldWideScience

Sample records for include electronic medical

  1. Implantable electronic medical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Implantable Electronic Medical Devices provides a thorough review of the application of implantable devices, illustrating the techniques currently being used together with overviews of the latest commercially available medical devices. This book provides an overview of the design of medical devices and is a reference on existing medical devices. The book groups devices with similar functionality into distinct chapters, looking at the latest design ideas and techniques in each area, including retinal implants, glucose biosensors, cochlear implants, pacemakers, electrical stimulation t

  2. Pervasive Electronic Medical Record

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nafiisah

    doctors, nurses, physician's assistants, emergency medical technicians and other caregivers. PEMR, a platform-independent solution, integrates RFID and other wireless networks to provide the required infrastructure for transmitting critical medical information anywhere and anytime using either existing network or ad hoc.

  3. Good Security Practices for Electronic Commerce, Including Electronic Data Interchange

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saltman, Roy

    1993-01-01

    Electronic commerce (EC) is the use of documents in electronic form, rather than paper, for carrying out functions of business or government that require interchange of information, obligations, or monetary value between organizations...

  4. Electronic Procedures for Medical Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Electronic procedures are replacing text-based documents for recording the steps in performing medical operations aboard the International Space Station. S&K Aerospace, LLC, has developed a content-based electronic system-based on the Extensible Markup Language (XML) standard-that separates text from formatting standards and tags items contained in procedures so they can be recognized by other electronic systems. For example, to change a standard format, electronic procedures are changed in a single batch process, and the entire body of procedures will have the new format. Procedures can be quickly searched to determine which are affected by software and hardware changes. Similarly, procedures are easily shared with other electronic systems. The system also enables real-time data capture and automatic bookmarking of current procedure steps. In Phase II of the project, S&K Aerospace developed a Procedure Representation Language (PRL) and tools to support the creation and maintenance of electronic procedures for medical operations. The goal is to develop these tools in such a way that new advances can be inserted easily, leading to an eventual medical decision support system.

  5. A Primer on Endoscopic Electronic Medical Records

    OpenAIRE

    Atreja, Ashish; Rizk, Maged; Gurland, Brooke

    2010-01-01

    Endoscopic electronic medical record systems (EEMRs) are now increasingly utilized in many endoscopy centers. Modern EEMRs not only support endoscopy report generation, but often include features such as practice management tools, image and video clip management, inventory management, e-faxes to referring physicians, and database support to measure quality and patient outcomes. There are many existing software vendors offering EEMRs, and choosing a software vendor can be time consuming and co...

  6. A primer on endoscopic electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreja, Ashish; Rizk, Maged; Gurland, Brooke

    2010-02-01

    Endoscopic electronic medical record systems (EEMRs) are now increasingly utilized in many endoscopy centers. Modern EEMRs not only support endoscopy report generation, but often include features such as practice management tools, image and video clip management, inventory management, e-faxes to referring physicians, and database support to measure quality and patient outcomes. There are many existing software vendors offering EEMRs, and choosing a software vendor can be time consuming and confusing. The goal of this article is inform the readers about current functionalities available in modern EEMR and provide them with a framework necessary to find an EEMR that is best fit for their practice.

  7. An Assessment of Hazards Caused by Electromagnetic Interaction on Humans Present near Short-Wave Physiotherapeutic Devices of Various Types Including Hazards for Users of Electronic Active Implantable Medical Devices (AIMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Karpowicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Leakage of electromagnetic fields (EMF from short-wave radiofrequency physiotherapeutic diathermies (SWDs may cause health and safety hazards affecting unintentionally exposed workers (W or general public (GP members (assisting patient exposed during treatment or presenting there for other reasons. Increasing use of electronic active implantable medical devices (AIMDs, by patients, attendants, and workers, needs attention because dysfunctions of these devices may be caused by electromagnetic interactions. EMF emitted by 12 SWDs (with capacitive or inductive applicators were assessed following international guidelines on protection against EMF exposure (International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection for GP and W, new European directive 2013/35/EU for W, European Recommendation for GP, and European Standard EN 50527-1 for AIMD users. Direct EMF hazards for humans near inductive applicators were identified at a distance not exceeding 45 cm for W or 62 cm for GP, but for AIMD users up to 90 cm (twice longer than that for W and 50% longer than that for GP because EMF is pulsed modulated. Near capacitive applicators emitting continuous wave, the corresponding distances were: 120 cm for W or 150 cm for both—GP or AIMD users. This assessment does not cover patients who undergo SWD treatment (but it is usually recommended for AIMD users to be careful with EMF treatment.

  8. Electronic Procedures for Medical Operations, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Electronic procedures are currently being used to document the steps in performing medical operations for the Space Shuttle and/or the International Space Station...

  9. Production of Medical Isotopes with Electron Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotsch, D A; Alford, K.; Bailey, J. L.; Bowers, D. L.; Brossard, T.; Brown, M. A.; Chemerisov, S. D.; Ehst, D.; Greene, J.; Gromov, R. G.; Grudzinski, J.J.; Hafenrichter, L.; Hebden, A. S.; Henning, W.; Heltemes, T. A.; Jerden, J.; Jonah, C. D.; Kalensky, M.; Krebs, J. F.; Makarashvili, V.; Micklich, B.; Nolen, J.; Quigley, K. J.; Schneider, J. F.; Smith, N. A.; Stepinski, D. C.; Sun, Z.; Tkac, P.; Vandegrift, G. F.; Virgo, M J; Wesolowski, K. A.; Youker, A. J.

    2017-06-01

    Radioisotopes play important roles in numerous areas ranging from medical treatments to national security and basic research. Radionuclide production technology for medical applications has been pursued since the early 1900s both commercially and in nuclear science centers. Many medical isotopes are now in routine production and are used in day-to-day medical procedures. Despite these advancements, research is accelerating around the world to improve the existing production methodologies as well as to develop novel radionuclides for new medical appli-cations. Electron linear accelerators (linacs) represent a unique method for the production of radioisotopes. Even though the basic technology has been around for decades, only recently have electron linacs capable of producing photons with sufficient energy and flux for radioisotope production become available. Housed in Argonne Nation-al Laboratory’s Low Energy Accelerator Facility (LEAF) is a newly upgraded 55 MeV/25-kW electron linear ac-celerator, capable of producing a wide range of radioiso-topes. This talk will focus on the work being performed for the production of the medical isotopes 99Mo (99Mo/99mTc generator), 67Cu, and 47Sc.

  10. Market factors and electronic medical record adoption in medical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menachemi, Nir; Mazurenko, Olena; Kazley, Abby Swanson; Diana, Mark L; Ford, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies identified individual or practice factors that influence practice-based physicians' electronic medical record (EMR) adoption. Less is known about the market factors that influence physicians' EMR adoption. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between environmental market characteristics and physicians' EMR adoption. The Health Tracking Physician Survey 2008 and Area Resource File (2008) were combined and analyzed. Binary logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between three dimensions of the market environment (munificence, dynamism, and complexity) and EMR adoption controlling for several physician and practice characteristics. In a nationally representative sample of 4,720 physicians, measures of market dynamism including increases in unemployment, odds ratio (OR) = 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) [0.91, 0.99], or poverty rates, OR = 0.93, 95% CI [0.89, 0.96], were negatively associated with EMR adoption. Health maintenance organization penetration, OR = 3.01, 95% CI [1.49, 6.05], another measure of dynamism, was positively associated with EMR adoption. Physicians practicing in areas with a malpractice crisis, OR = 0.82, 95% CI [0.71, 0.94], representing environmental complexity, had lower EMR adoption rates. Understanding how market factors relate to practice-based physicians' EMR adoption can assist policymakers to better target limited resources as they work to realize the national goal of universal EMR adoption and meaningful use.

  11. [Nurse's coworking to electronic medical record].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, M; Gavaciuto, D; Cappelli, G

    2007-01-01

    Nephrologists need to register and look at a great number of clinical data. The use of electronic medical records may improve efficiency and reduce errors. Aim of our work is to report the experience of Villa Scassi Hospital in Genoa, where a "patient file" has been performed to improve nephrology practice management. The file contains all clinical records, laboratory and radiology data, therapy, dialysis clinics, in addition to reports of out-patients department. This system allowed a better efficiency in diagnosis and treatment of the patient. Moreover experience of nurses in employing electronic medical records is reported. A reduced number of errors was found in therapy administering, because of a only one data source for physicians and nurses.

  12. Electronic Medical Record Tobacco Use Vital Sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norris John W

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Determination of the prevalence of tobacco use and impact of tobacco prevention/treatment efforts in an electronic medical record enabled practice utilizing a defined tobacco vital sign variable. Design and Measurements Retrospective cohort study utilizing patient data recorded in an electronic medical record database between July 15, 2001, and May 31, 2003. Patient-reported tobacco use status was obtained for each of 6,771 patients during the pre-provider period of their 24,824 visits during the study period with the recorder blinded to past tobacco use status entries. Results An overall current tobacco use prevalence of 27.1% was found during the study period. Tobacco use status was recorded in 96% of visits. Comparison of initial to final visit tobacco use status demonstrates a consistency rate of 75.0% declaring no change in tobacco status in the 4,522 patients with two or more visits. An 8.6% net tobacco use decline was seen for the practice (p value Conclusion Self reported tobacco use status as a vital sign embedded within the workflow of an electronic medical record enabled practice was a quantitative tool for determination of tobacco use prevalence and a measuring stick of risk prevention/intervention impact.

  13. Copying and pasting of examinations within the electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielke, Stephen; Hammond, Kenric; Helbig, Susan

    2007-06-01

    Electronic patient records often include text that has been copied and pasted from other records. A type of copying that involves the highest risk for confusion, medical error, and medico-legal harm is the copying of the clinical examination. We studied this phenomenon using an automated text categorization algorithm to detect copied exams in a set of 167,076 VA records. Exam copying occurred frequently, in about 3% of all exams, or in 25% of patient charts. Thirteen percent of all authors had copied at least one exam, and 3% of authors had copied an exam from another author. There were significant differences between service types and levels of training of the authors. We speculate that copying and pasting of exams degrades the quality of the medical record, and that studying this behavior is integral to our understanding of phenomenology of the electronic medical record.

  14. Value of pharmacist medication interviews on optimizing the electronic medication reconciliation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Audrey; Varma, Arjun; Boro, Maureen; Korman, Nancy

    2014-06-01

    Few studies have explored the impact of using different methods for obtaining accurate medication histories on medication safety. This study was conducted to compare the accuracy and clinical impact of pharmacist medication histories obtained by electronic medical record review (EMRR) alone with those obtained by direct interviews combined with EMRR. This 18-week prospective study included patients who were admitted to the Inpatient Medicine Service at the study institution and who had a pharmacist-conducted medication reconciliation EMRR within 48 hours of hospital admission. A chart review was performed to collect data to determine whether differences existed in the number of discrepancies, recommendations, and medication errors between the EMRR alone group compared to the EMRR combined with the patient interview group. Five hundred thirteen discrepancies were identified with the EMRR group compared to 986 from the combined EMRR and patient interview group (P < .001). Significantly more recommendations were made in the combination interview group compared to the EMRR alone group (260 vs 97; P < .001). Fewer medication errors were identified for the EMRR alone group compared to the combination interview group (55 vs 134; P < .001). The most common errors were omitted medications followed by extra dose/failure to discontinue therapy and wrong dose/frequency errors. Pharmacist-conducted admission medication interviews combined with EMRR can potentially identify harmful medication discrepancies and prevent medication errors.

  15. Electronic medical records and the gastroenterologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosinski, Lawrence R

    2012-01-01

    This is an age of disruptive innovation in health care in which the business model is changing. Fee-for-service, volume-based systems are being replaced by fixed-fee, value-based systems. One of the major facilitating forces behind this change has been the development of the electronic health record, which is providing the medical community with the ability to have real-time quality metrics that will drive the development of web-based clinical decision support tools that will transform the current peer-review-based rules of practice with an eclectic fluid environment of continuous quality measurement and improvement. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Secure scalable disaster electronic medical record and tracking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Gerard; Kahn, Christopher; Johansson, Per; Buono, Colleen; Chipara, Octav; Griswold, William; Chan, Theodore

    2013-10-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are considered superior in documentation of care for medical practice. Current disaster medical response involves paper tracking systems and radio communication for mass-casualty incidents (MCIs). These systems are prone to errors, may be compromised by local conditions, and are labor intensive. Communication infrastructure may be impacted, overwhelmed by call volume, or destroyed by the disaster, making self-contained and secure EMR response a critical capability. Report As the prehospital disaster EMR allows for more robust content including protected health information (PHI), security measures must be instituted to safeguard these data. The Wireless Internet Information System for medicAl Response in Disasters (WIISARD) Research Group developed a handheld, linked, wireless EMR system utilizing current technology platforms. Smart phones connected to radio frequency identification (RFID) readers may be utilized to efficiently track casualties resulting from the incident. Medical information may be transmitted on an encrypted network to fellow prehospital team members, medical dispatch, and receiving medical centers. This system has been field tested in a number of exercises with excellent results, and future iterations will incorporate robust security measures. A secure prehospital triage EMR improves documentation quality during disaster drills.

  17. Elements including metals in the atomizer and aerosol of disposable electronic cigarettes and electronic hookahs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Williams

    Full Text Available Our purpose was to quantify 36 inorganic chemical elements in aerosols from disposable electronic cigarettes (ECs and electronic hookahs (EHs, examine the effect of puffing topography on elements in aerosols, and identify the source of the elements.Thirty-six inorganic chemical elements and their concentrations in EC/EH aerosols were determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, and their source was identified by analyzing disassembled atomizers using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.Of 36 elements screened, 35 were detected in EC/EH aerosols, while only 15 were detected in conventional tobacco smoke. Some elements/metals were present in significantly higher concentrations in EC/EH aerosol than in cigarette smoke. Concentrations of particular elements/metals within EC/EH brands were sometimes variable. Aerosols generated at low and high air-flow rates produced the same pattern of elements, although the total element concentration decreased at the higher air flow rate. The relative amount of elements in the first and last 60 puffs was generally different. Silicon was the dominant element in aerosols from all EC/EH brands and in cigarette smoke. The elements appeared to come from the filament (nickel, chromium, thick wire (copper coated with silver, brass clamp (copper, zinc, solder joints (tin, lead, and wick and sheath (silicon, oxygen, calcium, magnesium, aluminum. Lead was identified in the solder and aerosol of two brands of EHs (up to 0.165 μg/10 puffs.These data show that EC/EH aerosols contain a mixture of elements, including heavy metals, with concentrations often significantly higher than in conventional cigarette smoke. While the health effects of inhaling mixtures of heated metals is currently not known, these data will be valuable in future risk assessments involving EC/EH elements/metals.

  18. Elements including metals in the atomizer and aerosol of disposable electronic cigarettes and electronic hookahs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Monique; Bozhilov, Krassimir; Ghai, Sanjay; Talbot, Prue

    2017-01-01

    Our purpose was to quantify 36 inorganic chemical elements in aerosols from disposable electronic cigarettes (ECs) and electronic hookahs (EHs), examine the effect of puffing topography on elements in aerosols, and identify the source of the elements. Thirty-six inorganic chemical elements and their concentrations in EC/EH aerosols were determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, and their source was identified by analyzing disassembled atomizers using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Of 36 elements screened, 35 were detected in EC/EH aerosols, while only 15 were detected in conventional tobacco smoke. Some elements/metals were present in significantly higher concentrations in EC/EH aerosol than in cigarette smoke. Concentrations of particular elements/metals within EC/EH brands were sometimes variable. Aerosols generated at low and high air-flow rates produced the same pattern of elements, although the total element concentration decreased at the higher air flow rate. The relative amount of elements in the first and last 60 puffs was generally different. Silicon was the dominant element in aerosols from all EC/EH brands and in cigarette smoke. The elements appeared to come from the filament (nickel, chromium), thick wire (copper coated with silver), brass clamp (copper, zinc), solder joints (tin, lead), and wick and sheath (silicon, oxygen, calcium, magnesium, aluminum). Lead was identified in the solder and aerosol of two brands of EHs (up to 0.165 μg/10 puffs). These data show that EC/EH aerosols contain a mixture of elements, including heavy metals, with concentrations often significantly higher than in conventional cigarette smoke. While the health effects of inhaling mixtures of heated metals is currently not known, these data will be valuable in future risk assessments involving EC/EH elements/metals.

  19. 78 FR 34132 - Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Docket No 2958] Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof; Correction to Notice of Receipt of Complaint; Solicitation... of complaint entitled Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and...

  20. 78 FR 16865 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-19

    ..., Including Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, and Tablet Computers... Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. of Seoul, Republic of Korea, and Samsung Telecommunications America, LLC of... certain electronic devices, including wireless communication devices, portable music and data processing...

  1. Electronic business in the home medical equipment industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, June; Graham, Michael J; Liu, Lai C

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims at developing electronic business solutions to increase value for the home medical equipment industry. First, an electronic strategic value chain model was developed for the home medical equipment industry. Second, electronic business solutions were mapped from this model. Third, the top 20 dominant companies in the home medical equipment industry were investigated to see the current adoption patterns of these electronic business solutions. The solutions will be beneficial to decision-makers in the information technology adoptions in the home medical equipment industry to increase the business values.

  2. Perspectives on electronic medical records adoption: electronic medical records (EMR in outcomes research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Belletti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Dan Belletti1, Christopher Zacker1, C Daniel Mullins21Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA; 2University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Health information technology (HIT is engineered to promote improved quality and efficiency of care, and reduce medical errors. Healthcare organizations have made significant investments in HIT tools and the electronic medical record (EMR is a major technological advance. The Department of Veterans Affairs was one of the first large healthcare systems to fully implement EMR. The Veterans Health Information System and Technology Architecture (VistA began by providing an interface to review and update a patient’s medical record with its computerized patient record system. However, since the implementation of the VistA system there has not been an overall substantial adoption of EMR in the ambulatory or inpatient setting. In fact, only 23.9% of physicians were using EMRs in their office-based practices in 2005. A sample from the American Medical Association revealed that EMRs were available in an office setting to 17% of physicians in late 2007 and early 2008. Of these, 17% of physicians with EMR, only 4% were considered to be fully functional EMR systems. With the exception of some large aggregate EMR databases the slow adoption of EMR has limited its use in outcomes research. This paper reviews the literature and presents the current status of and forces influencing the adoption of EMR in the office-based practice, and identifies the benefits, limitations, and overall value of EMR in the conduct of outcomes research in the US.Keywords: electronic medical records, health information technology, medical errors

  3. Medical free-electron laser: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James P.; Ponikvar, Donald R.

    1994-07-01

    The free electron laser (FEL) has long been proposed as a flexible tool for a variety of medical applications, and yet the FEL has not seen widespread acceptance in the medical community. The issues have been the laser's size, cost, and complexity. Unfortunately, research on applications of FELs has outpaced the device development efforts. This paper describes the characteristics of the FEL, as they have been demonstrated in the U.S. Army's FEL technology development program, and identifies specific medical applications where demonstrated performance levels would suffice. This includes new photodynamic therapies for cancer and HIV treatment, orthopedic applications, tissue welding applications, and multiwavelength surgical techniques. A new tunable kilowatt class FEL device is described, which utilizes existing hardware from the U.S. Army program. An assessment of the future potential, based on realistic technology scaling is provided.

  4. Implantable medical electronics prosthetics, drug delivery, and health monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Khanna, Vinod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive, interdisciplinary resource for the latest information on implantable medical devices, and is intended for graduate students studying electrical engineering, electronic instrumentation, and biomedical engineering. It is also appropriate for academic researchers, professional engineers, practicing doctors, and paramedical staff. Divided into two sections on Basic Concepts and Principles, and Applications, the first section provides an all-embracing perspective of the electronics background necessary for this work. The second section deals with pacing techniques used for the heart, brain, spinal cord, and the network of nerves that interlink the brain and spinal cord with the major organs, including ear and eye prostheses. The four main offshoots of implantable electronics, which this book discusses, are: The insertion of an implantable neural amplifier for accurate recording of neural signals for neuroengineering studies The use of implantable pulse generators for pacing the activi...

  5. Health care consumer's perception of the Electronic Medical Record ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Worldwide Electronic Medical Records (EMR) when compared to a paper-based system has been proven to improve service delivering numerous health care facilities. However, no research has been described in the literature regarding the user's perception of the clinical electronic medical record (EMR) ...

  6. Technology Acceptance of Electronic Medical Records by Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Technology Acceptance Model's (TAM) relevance of the intention of nurses to use electronic medical records in acute health care settings. The basic technology acceptance research of Davis (1989) was applied to the specific technology tool of electronic medical records (EMR) in a specific setting…

  7. Integration of Medical Imaging Including Ultrasound into a New Clinical Anatomy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscova, Michelle; Bryce, Deborah A.; Sindhusake, Doungkamol; Young, Noel

    2015-01-01

    In 2008 a new clinical anatomy curriculum with integrated medical imaging component was introduced into the University of Sydney Medical Program. Medical imaging used for teaching the new curriculum included normal radiography, MRI, CT scans, and ultrasound imaging. These techniques were incorporated into teaching over the first two years of the…

  8. 78 FR 48468 - Delphi Corporation, Electronics and Safety Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ..., Electronics and Safety Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Securitas, Bartech, Flint Janitorial... Adjustment Assistance on May 20, 2013, applicable to workers of Delphi Corporation, Electronics and Safety... on- site at the Flint, Michigan location of Delphi Corporation, Electronics and Safety Division. The...

  9. Electronic Procedures for Medical Operations, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose an alternative to using Microsoft Word for representing medical procedures that will make the procedures easier to construct and maintain, particularly...

  10. The social act of electronic medication prescribing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E.C.M. Aarts (Jos)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Prescribing medication is embedded in social norms and cultures. In modern Western health care professionals and policy makers have attempted to rationalize medicine by addressing cost-effectiveness of diagnostic and therapeutic treatments and the development of

  11. Effects and Satisfaction of Medical Device Safety Information Reporting System Using Electronic Medical Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hye Jung; Choi, Young Deuk; Kim, Nam Hyun

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes an evaluation study on the effectiveness of developing an in-hospital medical device safety information reporting system for managing safety information, including adverse incident data related to medical devices, following the enactment of the Medical Device Act in Korea. Medical device safety information reports were analyzed for 190 cases that took place prior to the application of a medical device safety information reporting system and during a period when the reporting system was used. Also, questionnaires were used to measure the effectiveness of the medical device safety information reporting system. The analysis was based on the questionnaire responses of 15 reporters who submitted reports in both the pre- and post-reporting system periods. Sixty-two reports were submitted in paper form, but after the system was set up, this number more than doubled to 128 reports in electronic form. In terms of itemized reporting, a total of 45 items were reported. Before the system was used, 23 items had been reported, but this increased to 32 items after the system was put to use. All survey variables of satisfaction received a mean of over 3 points, while positive attitude , potential benefits , and positive benefits all exceeded 4 points, each receiving 4.20, 4.20, and 4.13, respectively. Among the variables, time-consuming and decision-making had the lowest mean values, each receiving 3.53. Satisfaction was found to be high for system quality and user satisfaction , but relatively low for time-consuming and decision-making . We were able to verify that effective reporting and monitoring of adverse incidents and the safety of medical devices can be implemented through the establishment of an in-hospital medical device safety information reporting system that can enhance patient safety and medical device risk management.

  12. 78 FR 25304 - Siemens Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology), Including On...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ..., USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology), Including On-Site Leased Workers From Source... Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology), including on- site leased... of February 2013, Siemens Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology...

  13. The potential of electronic medical records for health service management.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, J. van der; Fleming, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    The medical record held in primary care provides the most comprehensive summary of all medical events. Diagnostic, laboratory, and prescribing data are all linked in individual patient records. Networks of GPs in some European countries are routinely recording data electronically in a way which

  14. Nursing Satisfaction with Medication Care by Using Neonatal Electronic Medication Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh Namnabati

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Electronic medication management system has more practical advantages than other similar systems. This system helps the nurses to identify and prevent many medication errors and save time in drug care documentation. Therefore, this system is a big step towards satisfaction with nursing medication care.

  15. Improving the medical student experience using electronic timetabling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivekanantham S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sayinthen Vivekanantham, Rahul Prashanth Ravindran Imperial College School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UKTechnology within health care delivery is improving at an unprecedented rate.1 Medical students demonstrate a preference towards mobile learning2 and familiarity with technology is essential to medical practice.1 We believe electronic timetables are an underutilized technology that can be embraced by institutions delivering medical education.

  16. Electronic medical records and efficiency and productivity during office visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Michael F

    2011-04-01

    To estimate the relationship between electronic medical record (EMR) use and efficiency of utilization and provider productivity during visits to US office-based physicians. Cross-sectional analysis of the 2006-2007 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. The sample included 62,710 patient visits to 2625 physicians. EMR systems included demographics, clinical notes, prescription orders, and laboratory and imaging results. Efficiency was measured as utilization of examinations, laboratory tests, radiology procedures, health education, nonmedication treatments, and medications. Productivity was measured as total services provided per 20-minute period. Survey-weighted regressions estimated association of EMR use with services provided, visit intensity/duration, and productivity. Marginal effects were estimated by averaging across all visits and by major reason for visit. EMR use was associated with higher probability of any examination (7.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.4%, 13.1%); any laboratory test (5.7%, 95% CI = 2.6%, 8.8%); any health education (4.9%, 95% CI = 0.2%, 9.6%); and fewer laboratory tests (-7.1%, 95% CI = -14.2%, -0.1%). During pre/post surgery visits, EMR use was associated with 7.3% (95% CI= -12.9%, -1.8%) fewer radiology procedures. EMR use was not associated with utilization of nonmedication treatments and medications, or visit duration. During routine visits for a chronic problem, EMR use was associated with 11.2% (95% CI = 5.7%, 16.8%) more diagnostic/screening services provided per 20-minute period. EMR use had a mixed association with efficiency and productivity during office visits. EMRs may improve provider productivity, especially during visits for a new problem and routine chronic care.

  17. From documents on paper to electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrajo, Lino; Penas, Angel; Melcón, Rubén; González, Fco Javier; Couto, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the creation process of an electronic medical records (EMR) application in the Juan Canalejo University Hospital Complex (CHUJC). From the knowledge acquired through the observation of the traditional processes of managing the Patients medical records on paper a tool was developed which in principle was thought of to classify electronic documents associated to a patient and to which different functions of medical work have been subsequently added: visualizing clinical documents of patients, creation of new documents and following the development of patients.

  18. 78 FR 56737 - Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-885] Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof; Commission Determination Not To Review an Initial Determination Granting Complainant's Motion To Amend the Complaint and Notice of Investigation...

  19. 78 FR 34669 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ..., Including Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, and Tablet Computers... importing wireless communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, and tablet computers... filed by Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. of Korea and Samsung Telecommunications America, LLC of...

  20. 77 FR 60720 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Commmunication Devices, Portable Music and Data...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-794] Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Commmunication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, and Tablet Computers... communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, and tablet computers, imported by Apple Inc...

  1. Implementing electronic medical record systems in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamish Fraser

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The developing world faces a series of health crises including HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis that threaten the lives of millions of people. Lack of infrastructure and trained, experienced staff are considered important barriers to scaling up treatment for these diseases. In this paper we explain why information systems are important in many healthcare projects in the developing world. We discuss pilot projects demonstrating that such systems are possible and can expand to manage hundreds of thousands of patients. We also pass on the most important practical lessons in design and implementation from our experience in doing this work. Finally, we discuss the importance of collaboration between projects in the development of electronic medical record systems rather than reinventing systems in isolation, and the use of open standards and open source software.

  2. Global Health Education for Medical Students: When Learning Objectives Include Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Alison M; Oddo, Anthony R; Dennis, David J; Siska, Robert C; VanderWal, Echo; VanderWal, Harry; Dlamini, Nompumelelo; Markert, Ronald J; McCarthy, Mary C

    2017-10-05

    The Luke Commission, a provider of comprehensive mobile health outreach in rural Swaziland, focuses on human immunodeficiency virus testing and prevention, including the performance of over 100 circumcisions weekly. Educational objectives for medical student global health electives are essential. Learning research methodology while engaging in clinical activities reinforces curriculum goals. Medical care databases can produce clinically significant findings affecting international health policy. Engaging in academic research exponentially increased the educational value of student experiences during an international medical elective. Staff of the Luke Commission, a nongovernmental organization, collected and deidentified information from 1500 Swazi male patients undergoing circumcision from January through June of 2014. Medical students designed studies and analyzed these data to produce research projects on adverse event rates, pain perception, and penile malformations. Institutional review board approval was obtained from the home institution and accompanying senior surgical faculty provided mentorship. First-year medical students enrolled in an international medical elective to explore resource availability, cultural awareness, health care provision, and developing world endemic diseases. While in country, students learned research methodology, collected data, and engaged in research projects. Following the trip, students presented posters at over 10 regional and national meetings. All 4 articles are accepted or under consideration for publication by major journals. During international medical electives the combination of clinical experiences and access to databases from health aid organizations provides the foundation for productive medical student research. All participants benefit from the relationships formed by aid organizations, medical students, and patient populations. Global health research has many complexities, but through careful planning and

  3. Use of Electronic Medical Record–Enhanced Checklist and Electronic Dashboard to Decrease CLABSIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, Christopher A.; Wood, Matthew; Cornfield, David N.; Suermondt, Jaap; Sharek, Paul J.; Franzon, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that a checklist enhanced by the electronic medical record and a unit-wide dashboard would improve compliance with an evidence-based, pediatric-specific catheter care bundle and decrease central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI). METHODS: We performed a cohort study with historical controls that included all patients with a central venous catheter in a 24-bed PICU in an academic children’s hospital. Postintervention CLABSI rates, compliance with bundle elements, and staff perceptions of communication were evaluated and compared with preintervention data. RESULTS: CLABSI rates decreased from 2.6 CLABSIs per 1000 line-days before intervention to 0.7 CLABSIs per 1000 line-days after intervention. Analysis of specific bundle elements demonstrated increased daily documentation of line necessity from 30% to 73% (P < .001), increased compliance with dressing changes from 87% to 90% (P = .003), increased compliance with cap changes from 87% to 93% (P < .001), increased compliance with port needle changes from 69% to 95% (P < .001), but decreased compliance with insertion bundle documentation from 67% to 62% (P = .001). Changes in the care plan were made during review of the electronic medical record checklist on 39% of patient rounds episodes. CONCLUSIONS: Use of an electronic medical record–enhanced CLABSI prevention checklist coupled with a unit-wide real-time display of adherence was associated with increased compliance with evidence-based catheter care and sustained decrease in CLABSI rates. These data underscore the potential for computerized interventions to promote compliance with proven best practices and prevent patient harm. PMID:24567021

  4. Use of electronic medical record-enhanced checklist and electronic dashboard to decrease CLABSIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pageler, Natalie M; Longhurst, Christopher A; Wood, Matthew; Cornfield, David N; Suermondt, Jaap; Sharek, Paul J; Franzon, Deborah

    2014-03-01

    We hypothesized that a checklist enhanced by the electronic medical record and a unit-wide dashboard would improve compliance with an evidence-based, pediatric-specific catheter care bundle and decrease central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI). We performed a cohort study with historical controls that included all patients with a central venous catheter in a 24-bed PICU in an academic children's hospital. Postintervention CLABSI rates, compliance with bundle elements, and staff perceptions of communication were evaluated and compared with preintervention data. CLABSI rates decreased from 2.6 CLABSIs per 1000 line-days before intervention to 0.7 CLABSIs per 1000 line-days after intervention. Analysis of specific bundle elements demonstrated increased daily documentation of line necessity from 30% to 73% (P < .001), increased compliance with dressing changes from 87% to 90% (P = .003), increased compliance with cap changes from 87% to 93% (P < .001), increased compliance with port needle changes from 69% to 95% (P < .001), but decreased compliance with insertion bundle documentation from 67% to 62% (P = .001). Changes in the care plan were made during review of the electronic medical record checklist on 39% of patient rounds episodes. Use of an electronic medical record-enhanced CLABSI prevention checklist coupled with a unit-wide real-time display of adherence was associated with increased compliance with evidence-based catheter care and sustained decrease in CLABSI rates. These data underscore the potential for computerized interventions to promote compliance with proven best practices and prevent patient harm.

  5. Medical education in an electronic health record-mediated world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Graves, Lisa; Greene, Peter S

    2013-04-01

    This paper reflects on the extent to which we are preparing learners for practice in an electronic health record (EHR)-mediated world. We are currently training the last generation to remember a world without the Internet and the first who will practice in a largely EHR-mediated practice environment. We undertook a thematic review of the literature connecting medical education with e-health using the concepts of 'electronic health record' or 'electronic medical record' as a proxy for the broader notion of e-health. Our findings are more equivocal and cautious than earlier commentators might have expected and while there are examples of good practice and successful integration, the majority of articles we reviewed raised issues and problems with the current links between EHRs and medical education. Medical professionals in particular are quite ambivalent about many of the changes brought about by EHRs, and in the absence of changes in perception and practice it is likely that the connections between medical education and e-health will continue to be problematic. We hope that this paper will lead to an improved understanding of these problems and will serve to advance the discourse on how medical education should engage with the world of e-health and the world of e-health with medical education.

  6. Detecting unapproved abbreviations in the electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capraro, Andrew; Stack, Anne; Harper, Marvin B; Kimia, Amir

    2012-04-01

    At an emergency department (ED) in a tertiary care children's hospital with a level 1 pediatric trauma designation, unapproved abbreviations (UAAs) within electronic medical records (EMRs) were identified, and feedback was provided to providers regarding their types and use rates. Existing EMRs, including the ED physicians' patient notes were used as templates to develop a UAA list and an abbreviation detector. The detector was validated against human-screened samples of electronic ED notes from 2003 and then applied to all existing data to generate baseline rates of UAA, before intervention/implementation. Next, the validated abbreviation detector was applied prospectively in screening all EMRs monthly during a six-month period. In validation, the abbreviation detector had a sensitivity of 89%, a specificity of 99.9%, and a positive predictive value of 89%. Some 475,613 EMRs were screened, with UAAs identified at a rate of 26.4 +/- 4 per 1,000 EMRs. The most common nonmedication UAA was "qd" [11.8/1,000 EMRs], and the most common medication UAA was "PCN" [4.2/1,000 EMRs]. A total of 27,282 patient notes from 74 physicians were screened between January 1, 2007, and June 30, 2007, and 392 monthly reports were generated. Aggregate UAA use decreased by 8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 6%-14%) per month-from 19.3 to > 12.1/100 charts, for a 37.3% decrease in UAA use in the six-month period. The estimated monthly decrease per physician was 0.9/100 (95% CI: 0.86-0.94, p abbreviation detector for surveillance of newly created EMRs, followed by consistent education and feedback, led to a significant decrease in UAA use in the study period.

  7. Clinicians’ Evaluation of Computer-Assisted Medication Summarization of Electronic Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinxin; Cimin, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Each year thousands of patients die of avoidable medication errors. When a patient is admitted to, transferred within, or discharged from a clinical facility, clinicians should review previous medication orders, current orders and future plans for care, and reconcile differences if there are any. If medication reconciliation is not accurate and systematic, medication errors such as omissions, duplications, dosing errors, or drug interactions may occur and cause harm. Computer-assisted medication applications showed promise as an intervention to reduce medication summarization inaccuracies and thus avoidable medication errors. In this study, a computer-assisted medication summarization application, designed to abstract and represent multi-source time-oriented medication data, was introduced to assist clinicians with their medication reconciliation processes. An evaluation study was carried out to assess clinical usefulness and analyze potential impact of such application. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were applied to measure clinicians' performance efficiency and inaccuracy in medication summarization process with and without the intervention of computer-assisted medication application. Clinicians' feedback indicated the feasibility of integrating such a medication summarization tool into clinical practice workflow as a complementary addition to existing electronic health record systems. The result of the study showed potential to improve efficiency and reduce inaccuracy in clinician performance of medication summarization, which could in turn improve care efficiency, quality of care, and patient safety. PMID:24393492

  8. Clinicians' evaluation of computer-assisted medication summarization of electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinxin; Cimino, James J

    2015-04-01

    Each year thousands of patients die of avoidable medication errors. When a patient is admitted to, transferred within, or discharged from a clinical facility, clinicians should review previous medication orders, current orders and future plans for care, and reconcile differences if there are any. If medication reconciliation is not accurate and systematic, medication errors such as omissions, duplications, dosing errors, or drug interactions may occur and cause harm. Computer-assisted medication applications showed promise as an intervention to reduce medication summarization inaccuracies and thus avoidable medication errors. In this study, a computer-assisted medication summarization application, designed to abstract and represent multi-source time-oriented medication data, was introduced to assist clinicians with their medication reconciliation processes. An evaluation study was carried out to assess clinical usefulness and analyze potential impact of such application. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were applied to measure clinicians' performance efficiency and inaccuracy in medication summarization process with and without the intervention of computer-assisted medication application. Clinicians' feedback indicated the feasibility of integrating such a medication summarization tool into clinical practice workflow as a complementary addition to existing electronic health record systems. The result of the study showed potential to improve efficiency and reduce inaccuracy in clinician performance of medication summarization, which could in turn improve care efficiency, quality of care, and patient safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Towards Semantic Search and Inference in Electronic Medical Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bevan Koopman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background This paper presents a novel approach to searching electronic medical records that is based on concept matching rather than keyword matching. Aims The concept-based approach is intended to overcome specific challenges we identified in searching medical records. Method Queries and documents were transformed from their term-based originals into medical concepts as defined by the SNOMED-CT ontology. Results Evaluation on a real-world collection of medical records showed our concept-based approach outperformed a keyword baseline by 25% in Mean Average Precision. Conclusion The concept-based approach provides a framework for further development of inference based search systems for dealing with medical data.

  10. Anonymization of Electronic Medical Records to Support Clinical Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gkoulalas-Divanis, Aris

    2013-01-01

    Anonymization of Electronic Medical Records to Support Clinical Analysis closely examines the privacy threats that may arise from medical data sharing, and surveys the state-of-the-art methods developed to safeguard data against these threats. To motivate the need for computational methods, the book first explores the main challenges facing the privacy-protection of medical data using the existing policies, practices and regulations. Then, it takes an in-depth look at the popular computational privacy-preserving methods that have been developed for demographic, clinical and genomic data sharing, and closely analyzes the privacy principles behind these methods, as well as the optimization and algorithmic strategies that they employ. Finally, through a series of in-depth case studies that highlight data from the US Census as well as the Vanderbilt University Medical Center, the book outlines a new, innovative class of privacy-preserving methods designed to ensure the integrity of transferred medical data for su...

  11. Electronic medical records: a developing and developed country analysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sikhondze, NC

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available on the accuracy and availability of the data and since most of the data is on paper format; this limits access to the data by healthcare providers and acts as a hindrance to healthcare delivery. The implementation of Electronic Medical Records (EMR), which...

  12. Health Care Consumer's Perception of the Electronic Medical Record

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: A structured questionnaire was developed, validated and utilized in this quantitative research project. Quantitative data were collected ... Electronic Medical Records (EMR), as a health information technology innovation, has ... EMR will provide a highly effective, reliable, secure, and innovative information system.

  13. Adoption and use of electronic information resources by medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the adoption and use of electronic information resources by medical science students of the University of Benin. The descriptive survey research design was adopted for the study and 390 students provided the data. Data collected were analysed with descriptive Statistics(Simple percentage and ...

  14. Medical Guidelines Presentation and Comparing with Electronic Health Record

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselý, Arnošt; Zvárová, Jana; Peleška, Jan; Buchtela, David; Anger, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 3-4 (2006), s. 240-245 ISSN 1386-5056 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : medical guidelines * electronic health record * GLIF model * reminder facility Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 1.726, year: 2006

  15. Factors affecting the utilisation of electronic medical records system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    knowledge and skills needed for electronic record-keeping. Paper-based record systems can ... In Malawi, paper-based medical record-keeping has been observed to exacerbate challenges related to accessing patient records and ..... Med. 2010;7(8). 7. WHO. Management of Patient Information Trends and Challenges in.

  16. Progress in electronic medical record adoption in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    To determine the rate of adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs) by physicians across Canada, provincial incentives, and perceived benefits of and barriers to EMR adoption. Data on EMR adoption in Canada were collected from CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Health Council of Canada, Canada Health Infoway, government websites, regional EMR associations, and health professional association websites. After removal of duplicate articles, 236 documents were found matching the original search. After using the filter Canada, 12 documents remained. Additional documents were obtained from each province's EMR website and from the Canada Health Infoway website. Since 2006, Canadian EMR adoption rates have increased from about 20% of practitioners to an estimated 62% of practitioners in 2013, with substantial regional disparities ranging from roughly 40% of physicians in New Brunswick and Quebec to more than 75% of physicians in Alberta. Provincial incentives vary widely but appear to have only a weak relationship with the rate of adoption. Many adopters use only a fraction of their software's available functions. User-cited benefits to adoption include time savings, improved record keeping, heightened patient safety, and confidence in retrieved data when EMRs are used efficiently. Barriers to adoption include financial and time constraints, lack of knowledgeable support personnel, and lack of interoperability with hospital and pharmacy systems. Canadian physicians remain at the stage of EMR adoption. Progression in EMR use requires experienced, knowledgeable technical support during implementation, and financial support for the transcription of patient data from paper to electronic media. The interoperability of EMR offerings for hospitals, pharmacies, and clinics is the rate-limiting factor in achieving a unified EMR solution for Canada.

  17. Extending FDA guidance to include consumer medication information (CMI) delivery on mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Adam; Blalock, Susan J; Carpenter, Delesha

    This paper describes the current state of consumer-focused mobile health application use and the current U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidance on the distribution of consumer medication information (CMI), and discusses recommendations and considerations for the FDA to expand CMI guidance to include CMI in mobile applications. Smartphone-based health interventions have been linked to increased medication adherence and improved health outcomes. Trends in smartphone ownership present opportunities to more effectively communicate and disseminate medication information; however, current FDA guidance for CMI does not outline how to effectively communicate CMI on a mobile platform, particularly in regards to user-centered design and information sourcing. As evidence supporting the potential effectiveness of mobile communication in health care continues to increase, CMI developers, regulating entities, and researchers should take note. Although mobile-based CMI offers an innovative mechanism to deliver medication information, caution should be exercised. Specifically, considerations for developing mobile CMI include consumers' digital literacy, user experience (e.g., usability), and the quality and accuracy of new widely used sources of information (e.g., crowd-sourced reviews and ratings). Recommended changes to FDA guidance for CMI include altering the language about scientific accuracy to address more novel methods of information gathering (e.g., anecdotal experiences and Google Consumer Surveys) and including guidance for usability testing of mobile health applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 78 FR 49764 - Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-885] Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof; Commission Determination Not To Review n Initial Determination Granting Google, Inc.'s Unopposed Motion To Intervene AGENCY: U.S. International...

  19. 78 FR 72712 - Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-885] Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof; Commission Determination Not To Review an Initial Determination Granting Google, Inc.'s Motion To Intervene AGENCY: U.S. International Trade...

  20. 77 FR 70464 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ..., Including Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, and Tablet Computers... Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. of Korea and Samsung Telecommunications America, LLC of Richardson, Texas... wireless communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, and tablet computers, by reason...

  1. 77 FR 34063 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Inv. No. 337-TA-847] Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile.... International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that a complaint was filed with the U.S. International Trade Commission on May 2, 2012, under section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930...

  2. 75 FR 10502 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices, Including Handheld Wireless Communications Devices...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-667; Investigation No. 337-TA-673] In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices, Including Handheld Wireless Communications Devices; Notice of... Entirety AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that...

  3. 75 FR 448 - In the Matter of: Certain Authentication Systems, Including Software and Handheld Electronic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Inv. No. 337-TA-697] In the Matter of: Certain Authentication Systems, Including Software and Handheld Electronic Devices; Notice of Investigation AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of investigation pursuant to 19 U.S.C. 1337. SUMMARY: Notice...

  4. 77 FR 27078 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Docket No. 2896] Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile... Comments Relating to the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the U.S. International Trade Commission has received a complaint...

  5. 78 FR 1247 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Wireless Communication Devices, Tablet Computers, Media...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-08

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Inv. No. 337-TA-862] Certain Electronic Devices, Including...; Institution of Investigation Pursuant to United States Code AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission... Trade Commission on November 30, 2012, under section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, 19 U.S.C...

  6. 78 FR 63492 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-847] Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof; Notice of Request for Statements on the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is...

  7. Trials and tribulations with electronic medication adherence monitoring in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allison; Low, Jac Kee; Manias, Elizabeth; Dooley, Michael; Crawford, Kimberley

    2016-01-01

    Medication adherence in kidney transplantation is critical to prevent graft rejection. Testing interventions designed to support patients to take their prescribed medications following a kidney transplant require an accurate measure of medication adherence. In research, the available methods for measuring medication adherence include self-report, pill counts, prescription refill records, surrogate measures of medication adherence and medication bottles with a microchip-embedded cap to record bottle openings. Medication bottles with a microchip-embedded cap are currently regarded as the gold standard measure. This commentary outlines the challenges in measuring medication adherence using electronic medication monitoring of kidney transplant patients recruited from five sites. The challenges included obtaining unanimous stakeholder support for using this method, agreement on an index medication to measure, adequate preparation of the patient and training of pharmacy staff, and how to analyze data when periods of time were not recorded using the electronic adherence measure. Provision of this information will enable hospital and community pharmacists to implement approaches that promote the effective use of this adherence measure for optimal patient outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Electron beam irradiation processing for industrial and medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Zehra Nur

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, electron beam processing has been widely used for medical and industrial applications. Electron beam accelerators are reliable and durable equipments that can produce ionizing radiation when it is needed for a particular commercial use. On the industrial scale, accelerators are used to generate electrons in between 0.1-100 MeV energy range. These accelerators are used mainly in plastics, automotive, wire and electric cables, semiconductors, health care, aerospace and environmental industries, as well as numerous researches. This study presents the current applications of electron beam processing in medicine and industry. Also planned study of a design for such a system in the energy range of 200-300 keV is introduced.

  9. Vibrationally resolved electronic spectra including vibrational pre-excitation: Theory and application to VIPER spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Cosel, Jan; Cerezo, Javier; Kern-Michler, Daniela; Neumann, Carsten; van Wilderen, Luuk J. G. W.; Bredenbeck, Jens; Santoro, Fabrizio; Burghardt, Irene

    2017-10-01

    Vibrationally resolved electronic absorption spectra including the effect of vibrational pre-excitation are computed in order to interpret and predict vibronic transitions that are probed in the Vibrationally Promoted Electronic Resonance (VIPER) experiment [L. J. G. W. van Wilderen et al., Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 53, 2667 (2014)]. To this end, we employ time-independent and time-dependent methods based on the evaluation of Franck-Condon overlap integrals and Fourier transformation of time-domain wavepacket autocorrelation functions, respectively. The time-independent approach uses a generalized version of the FCclasses method [F. Santoro et al., J. Chem. Phys. 126, 084509 (2007)]. In the time-dependent approach, autocorrelation functions are obtained by wavepacket propagation and by the evaluation of analytic expressions, within the harmonic approximation including Duschinsky rotation effects. For several medium-sized polyatomic systems, it is shown that selective pre-excitation of particular vibrational modes leads to a redshift of the low-frequency edge of the electronic absorption spectrum, which is a prerequisite for the VIPER experiment. This effect is typically most pronounced upon excitation of modes that are significantly displaced during the electronic transition, such as ring distortion modes within an aromatic π-system. Theoretical predictions as to which modes show the strongest VIPER effect are found to be in excellent agreement with experiment.

  10. National electronic medical records integration on cloud computing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Hebah; El-Masri, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Few Healthcare providers have an advanced level of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) adoption. Others have a low level and most have no EMR at all. Cloud computing technology is a new emerging technology that has been used in other industry and showed a great success. Despite the great features of Cloud computing, they haven't been utilized fairly yet in healthcare industry. This study presents an innovative Healthcare Cloud Computing system for Integrating Electronic Health Record (EHR). The proposed Cloud system applies the Cloud Computing technology on EHR system, to present a comprehensive EHR integrated environment.

  11. Preparing for Electronic Medical Record Implementation: Carolina Care Communication in an Electronic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Tracy; Tonges, Mary; Ray, Joel

    2017-11-01

    This article describes 1 organization's successful approach to mitigating the potential negative effects of a new electronic medical record on patient experience. The Carolina Care model, developed at the University of North Carolina Hospitals to actualize caring theory in practice, helped to structure and greatly facilitate this work. Seven focus areas were integrated to create the "Communication in an Electronic Environment" program with a strong emphasis on nurse-patient communication.

  12. 76 FR 31983 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones, Portable Music Players, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-701] In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones, Portable Music Players, and Computers; Notice of Commission... States after importation of certain electronic devices, including mobile phones, portable music players...

  13. 1st International Conference on Advancements of Medical Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Bag, Sandip; Ganguly, Karabi; Sarkar, Indranath; Biswas, Papun

    2015-01-01

    The book is a collection of peer-reviewed scientific papers submitted by active researchers in the 1st International Conference on Advancements of Medical Electronics (ICAME2015). The conference is organized jointly by the Department of Biomedical Engineering and Electronics and Communication Engineering, JIS College of Engineering, West Bengal, India. The primary objective of the conference is to strengthen interdisciplinary research and its applications for the welfare of humanity. A galaxy of academicians, professionals, scientists, statesman and researchers from different parts of the country and abroad got together and shared their knowledge. The book presents research articles of medical image processing & analysis, biomedical instrumentation & measurements, DSP & clinical applications, embedded systems & its applications in healthcare. The book can be referred as a tool for further research.

  14. Integration of medical imaging including ultrasound into a new clinical anatomy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscova, Michelle; Bryce, Deborah A; Sindhusake, Doungkamol; Young, Noel

    2015-01-01

    In 2008 a new clinical anatomy curriculum with integrated medical imaging component was introduced into the University of Sydney Medical Program. Medical imaging used for teaching the new curriculum included normal radiography, MRI, CT scans, and ultrasound imaging. These techniques were incorporated into teaching over the first two years of the program as a part of anatomy practical sessions, in addition to dedicated lectures and tutorials given by imaging specialists. Surveys were conducted between 2009 and 2012 to evaluate the student acceptance of the integration. Students were asked to rate individual activities as well as provide open-ended comments. The number of students who responded to the surveys varied from 40% to 98%. Over 90% of the respondents were satisfied with the overall quality of teaching in the anatomy units. In summary, 48% to 63% of the responding students thought that the specialist imaging lectures helped them learn effectively; 72% to 77% of students thought that the cross-sectional practical sessions helped them to better understand the imaging modalities of CT, MRI, and ultrasound; 76% to 80% of students considered hands-on ultrasound session to be useful in understanding the application of ultrasound in abdominal imaging. The results also revealed key similarities and differences in student perceptions of the new integrated curriculum for students with both a high and low prior exposure to anatomy. Further evaluation will aid in refining the integrated medical imaging program and providing its future direction. © 2014 American Association of Anatomists.

  15. Formalized Medical Guidelines and a Structured Electronic Health Record.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peleška, Jan; Anger, Z.; Buchtela, David; Šebesta, K.; Tomečková, Marie; Veselý, Arnošt; Zvára, K.; Zvárová, Jana

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2005), s. 4652-4656 ISSN 1727-1983. [EMBEC'05. European Medical and Biomedical Conference /3./. Prague, 20.11.2005-25.11.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : formalization of guidelines in cardilogy * GLIF model * structure electronic health record * algorithm in cardiovascular diagnostics and treatment Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information

  16. The Dependence of Machine Learning on Electronic Medical Record Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Long; Ledbetter, David; Aczon, Melissa; Wetzel, Randall

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in applying machine learning methods to Electronic Medical Records (EMR). Across different institutions, however, EMR quality can vary widely. This work investigated the impact of this disparity on the performance of three advanced machine learning algorithms: logistic regression, multilayer perceptron, and recurrent neural network. The EMR disparity was emulated using different permutations of the EMR collected at Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) Pediatric Int...

  17. Mass-Gathering Medical Care in Electronic Dance Music Festivals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGibbon, Kathleen M; Nable, Jose V; Ayd, Benjamin; Lawner, Benjamin J; Comer, Angela C; Lichenstein, Richard; Levy, Matthew J; Seaman, Kevin G; Bussey, Ian

    2017-10-01

    Introduction Electronic dance music (EDM) festivals represent a unique subset of mass-gathering events with limited guidance through literature or legislation to guide mass-gathering medical care at these events. Hypothesis/Problem Electronic dance music festivals pose unique challenges with increased patient encounters and heightened patient acuity under-estimated by current validated casualty predication models. This was a retrospective review of three separate EDM festivals with analysis of patient encounters and patient transport rates. Data obtained were inserted into the predictive Arbon and Hartman models to determine estimated patient presentation rate and patient transport rates. The Arbon model under-predicted the number of patient encounters and the number of patient transports for all three festivals, while the Hartman model under-predicted the number of patient encounters at one festival and over-predicted the number of encounters at the other two festivals. The Hartman model over-predicted patient transport rates for two of the three festivals. Electronic dance music festivals often involve distinct challenges and current predictive models are inaccurate for planning these events. The formation of a cohesive incident action plan will assist in addressing these challenges and lead to the collection of more uniform data metrics. FitzGibbon KM , Nable JV , Ayd B , Lawner BJ , Comer AC , Lichenstein R , Levy MJ , Seaman KG , Bussey I . Mass-gathering medical care in electronic dance music festivals. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(5):563-567.

  18. Hybrid (Vlasov-Fluid) simulation of ion-acoustic solitons chain formation including trapped electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behjat, E.; Aminmansoor, F.; Abbasi, H. [Faculty of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P. O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Disintegration of a Gaussian profile into ion-acoustic solitons in the presence of trapped electrons [H. Hakimi Pajouh and H. Abbasi, Phys. Plasmas 15, 082105 (2008)] is revisited. Through a hybrid (Vlasov-Fluid) model, the restrictions associated with the simple modified Korteweg de-Vries (mKdV) model are studied. For instance, the lack of vital information in the phase space associated with the evolution of electron velocity distribution, the perturbative nature of mKdV model which limits it to the weak nonlinear cases, and the special spatio-temporal scaling based on which the mKdV is derived. Remarkable differences between the results of the two models lead us to conclude that the mKdV model can only monitor the general aspects of the dynamics, and the precise picture including the correct spatio-temporal scales and the properties of solitons should be studied within the framework of hybrid model.

  19. Proposed Electronic Medical Record with Emphasis on Hepatitis Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Skapetis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Medical domain is characterized, like many other domains, by an exponential evolution of the knowledge. There are a lot of tools which try to reduce the risk of error apparition in medical life. Medical decision becomes a very hard activity because the human experts, who have to make decisions, can hardly process the huge amounts of data. Diagnosis has a very important role here. It is the first step from a set of therapeutic actions, an error at this level can have dramatic consequences.The aim of this paper is to present a new electronic medical system for using it on patients with hepatitis virusinfection.Results: Hepatitis is a very complicated disease with numerous different types many of them can lead to serious diseases like cirrhosis and liver cancer. An early correct diagnosis and an adequate treatment could reduce the risks of liver cancer apparition or other severe diseases. The main goal of the system is to use artificial intelligence in order to offer predictions about patients infected with hepatitis virus and also to follow the healthcondition of the patient reevaluating at every time the initial diagnosis and suggesting tests and treatment. Our effort is to present a new electronic medical record that will “borrow” data from the standard health record of the patient and other resources where information is saved and will process it and give suggestions for the diagnosis and treatment of the patient and at the same time will use a simple operating environment, such as the internet, thus making it easy to use.Conclusions The medical record is a big step in improving health services in public hospitals. The proposed EMR with the use of artificial intelligence is the next logical step that will help in the diagnosis and early treatment of disease.

  20. The development of an electronic educational portfolio: an outline for medical education professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kadriye O; Baker, Raymond C

    2007-01-01

    A growing body of literature shows that many universities and colleges are making educational portfolios part of their faculty assessment and student's learning plan for both undergraduate and graduate programs. We provide an outline for the development of a medical educator's portfolio, including an electronic version. Guidelines for the development of an educational portfolio focusing on medical education are provided, including design, format, and content. An electronic version of the portfolio, which combines flexibility and ease of revision, is also described, including formats for publication and distribution. Student reflections on the e-portfolio are presented, and potential applications of the e-portfolio in medical education are described. We believe that portfolio development is a valuable application that provides rich documentation of participants' educational history, accomplishments, and intellectual property as related to their professional learning and growth.

  1. The Study of Analytical Model of Library Electronic Resources Usage-A Case of Medical Electronic Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yen Yu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With the advents of internet, the importance of electronic resources is growing. Due to the increasing expensiveness of electronic resources, university libraries normally received budgets from parent institutions annually. They necessarily applied effective and systematic methods for decision making in electronic resources purchase or re-subscription. However, there are some difficulties in practices: First of all, libraries are unable to receive user records; second, the COUNTER statistics does not include details about users and their affiliation. As a result, one cannot conduct advanced user analysis based on the usage of users, institutions, and departments. To overcome the difficulties, this study presents a feasible model to analyze electronic resource usage effectively and flexibly. We set up a proxy server to collect actual usage raw data. By analyzing items in internet browsing records, associated with original library automatic system, this study aims at exploring how to use effective ways to analyze big data of website log data. We also propose the process of how original data to be transformed, cleared, integrated, and demonstrated. This study adopted a medical university library and its subscription of medical electronic resources as a case. Our data analysis includes (1 year of subscription,(2 title of journal, (3 affiliation, (4 subjects, and (5 specific journal requirements, etc. The findings of the study are contributed to obtain further understanding in policy making and user behavior analysis. The integrated data provides multiple applications in informatics research, information behavior, bibliomining, presenting diverse views and extended issues for further discussion.

  2. [Development of an electronic device to organize medications and promote treatment adherence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Liliana Batista; Ramos, Celso de Ávila; Castello, Matheus de Barros; Nascimento, Lorenzo Couto do

    2016-04-01

    This article describes the development of an electronic prototype to organize medications - the Electronic System for Personal and Controlled Use of Medications (Sistema Eletrônico de Uso Personalizado e Controlado de Medicamentos, SUPERMED). The prototype includes a drawer containing 1 month's supply of medicines, sound and visual medication timers, and a memory card for recording the times when the box was opened/closed (scheduled and unscheduled). This information is later transferred to a computer. Evolutionary prototyping was used to develop SUPERMED with the Arduino platform and C programming. To read alarm and box opening/closing data, software was developed in Java. Once the alarms are programmed (ideally by a health care professional), no additional adjustments are required by the patient. The prototype was tested during 31 days by the developers, with satisfactory functioning. The system seems adequate to organize medications and facilitate adherence to treatment. New studies will be carried out to validate and improve the prototype.

  3. [Significance of Multi-center Obstetrics Perioperative Team Training Including Various Medical Staffs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Fujita, Daisuke; Nakayama, Mai; Fujiwara, Shunsuke; Mihara, Ryosuke; Okada, Daisuke; Omoto, Haruka; Tanaka, Motoshige; Nishihara, Isao; Minami, Toshiaki

    2016-02-01

    We report the development of a multi-center/multispecialist obstetrics perioperative team training program. Participants were members of the team, including anesthesiologists, obstetricians, and operation nurses. A questionnaire survey was conducted prior to course participation to clarify any questions team members had. The courses included a lecture and simulation training with scenario-based discussions or the use of a simulator. Scenarios included massive bleeding during cesarean section, massive bleeding after vaginal delivery, and emergency cesarean section for premature placental abruption. After each course, participants discussed problems associated with obstetrics medical safety in the context of each theme. Simulation-based perioperative team training with anesthesiologists, obstetricians, and operation nurses may serve as a vehicle to promote perioperative obstetrics patient safety.

  4. Microwave technology for waste management applications including disposition of electronic circuitry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.; Clark, D.E.; Schulz, R.L.; Folz, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave technology is being developed nationally and internationally for a variety of environmental remediation purposes. These efforts include treatment and destruction of a vast array of gaseous, liquid and solid hazardous wastes as well as subsequent immobilization of selected components. Microwave technology provides an important contribution to an arsenal of existing remediation methods that are designed to protect the public and environment from undesirable consequences of hazardous materials. Applications of microwave energy for environmental remediation will be discussed. Emphasized will be a newly developed microwave process designed to treat discarded electronic circuitry and reclaim the precious metals within for reuse

  5. Microwave Technology for Waste Management Applications Including Disposition of Electronic Circuitry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.; Clark, D.E.; Schulz, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced microwave technology is being developed nationally and internationally for a variety of waste management and environmental remediation purposes. These efforts include treatment and destruction of a vast array of gaseous, liquid and solid hazardous wastes as well as subsequent immobilization of hazardous components into leach resistant forms. Microwave technology provides an important contribution to an arsenal of existing remediation methods that are designed to protect the public and environment from the undesirable consequences of hazardous materials. One application of special interest is the treatment of discarded electronic circuitry using a new hybrid microwave treatment process and subsequent reclamation of the precious metals within

  6. Data-Driven Information Extraction from Chinese Electronic Medical Records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Xu

    Full Text Available This study aims to propose a data-driven framework that takes unstructured free text narratives in Chinese Electronic Medical Records (EMRs as input and converts them into structured time-event-description triples, where the description is either an elaboration or an outcome of the medical event.Our framework uses a hybrid approach. It consists of constructing cross-domain core medical lexica, an unsupervised, iterative algorithm to accrue more accurate terms into the lexica, rules to address Chinese writing conventions and temporal descriptors, and a Support Vector Machine (SVM algorithm that innovatively utilizes Normalized Google Distance (NGD to estimate the correlation between medical events and their descriptions.The effectiveness of the framework was demonstrated with a dataset of 24,817 de-identified Chinese EMRs. The cross-domain medical lexica were capable of recognizing terms with an F1-score of 0.896. 98.5% of recorded medical events were linked to temporal descriptors. The NGD SVM description-event matching achieved an F1-score of 0.874. The end-to-end time-event-description extraction of our framework achieved an F1-score of 0.846.In terms of named entity recognition, the proposed framework outperforms state-of-the-art supervised learning algorithms (F1-score: 0.896 vs. 0.886. In event-description association, the NGD SVM is superior to SVM using only local context and semantic features (F1-score: 0.874 vs. 0.838.The framework is data-driven, weakly supervised, and robust against the variations and noises that tend to occur in a large corpus. It addresses Chinese medical writing conventions and variations in writing styles through patterns used for discovering new terms and rules for updating the lexica.

  7. Perspectives of healthcare practitioners: An exploration of interprofessional communication using electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardach, Shoshana H; Real, Kevin; Bardach, David R

    2017-05-01

    Contemporary state-of-the-art healthcare facilities are incorporating technology into their building design to improve communication and patient care. However, technological innovations may also have unintended consequences. This study seeks to better understand how technology influences interprofessional communication within a hospital setting based in the United States. Nine focus groups were conducted including a range of healthcare professions. The focus groups explored practitioners' experiences working on two floors of a newly designed hospital and included questions about the ways in which technology shaped communication with other healthcare professionals. All focus groups were recorded, transcribed, and coded to identify themes. Participant responses focused on the electronic medical record, and while some benefits of the electronic medical record were discussed, participants indicated use of the electronic medical record has resulted in a reduction of in-person communication. Different charting approaches resulted in barriers to communication between specialties and reduced confidence that other practitioners had received one's notes. Limitations in technology-including limited computer availability, documentation complexity, and sluggish sign-in processes-also were identified as barriers to effective and timely communication between practitioners. Given the ways in which technology shapes interprofessional communication, future research should explore how to create standardised electronic medical record use across professions at the optimal level to support communication and patient care.

  8. Improving admission medication reconciliation compliance using the electronic tool in admitted medical patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Haytham; abdulhay, dana; Luqman, Neama; Ellahham, Samer

    2016-01-01

    Sheikh Khalifa Medical City (SKMC) in Abu Dhabi is the main tertiary care referral hospital in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) with 560 bed capacity that is fully occupied most of the time. SKMC senior management has made a commitment to make quality and patient safety a top priority. Our governing body Abu Dhabi Health Services Company has identified medication reconciliation as a critical patient safety measure and key performance indicator (KPI). The medication reconciliation electronic form a computerized decision support tool was introduced to improve medication reconciliation compliance on transition of care at admission, transfer and discharge of patients both in the inpatient and outpatient settings. In order to improve medication reconciliation compliance a multidisciplinary task force team was formed and led this quality improvement project. The purpose of this publication is to indicate the quality improvement interventions implemented to enhance compliance with admission medication reconciliation and the outcomes of those interventions. We chose to conduct the pilot study in general medicine as it is the busiest department in the hospital, with an average of 390 patients admitted per month during the study period. The study period was from April 2014 till October 2015 and a total of 8576 patients were evaluated. The lessons learned were disseminated throughout the hospital. Our aim was to improve admission medication reconciliation compliance using the electronic form in order to ensure patient safety and reduce preventable harm in terms of medication errors. Admission medication reconciliation compliance improved in general medicine from 40% to above 85%, and this improvement was sustained for the last four months of the study period. PMID:27822371

  9. 77 FR 3499 - Sony Electronics, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Selectremedy Park Ridge, NJ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-71,501M] Sony Electronics, Inc... Electronics, Inc., SEL Headquarters, including on-site leased workers of SelectRemedy, StaffMark, and Payrolling.com , San Diego, California (TA-W-71,501); Sony Electronics, Inc., including on-site leased...

  10. Electronic Medical Records, Medical Students, and Ambulatory Family Physicians: A Multi-Institution Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jordan; Anthony, David; WinklerPrins, Vince; Roskos, Steven

    2017-10-01

    Medical students commonly encounter electronic medical records (EMRs) in their ambulatory family medicine clerkships, but how students interact with this technology varies tremendously and presents challenges to students and preceptors. Little research to date has evaluated the impact of EMRs on medical student education in the ambulatory setting; this three-institution study aimed to identify behaviors of ambulatory family medicine preceptors as they relate to EMRs and medical students. In 2015, the authors sent e-mails to ambulatory preceptors who in the preceding year had hosted medical students during family medicine clerkships, inviting them to participate in the survey, which asked questions about each preceptor's methods of using the EMR with medical students. Of 801 ambulatory preceptors, 265 (33%) responded. The vast majority of respondents used an EMR and provided students with access to it in some way, but only 62.2% (147/236) allowed students to write electronic notes. Of those who allowed students electronic access, one-third did so by logging students in under their own (the preceptor's) credentials, either by telling the students their log-in information (22/202; 10.9%) or by logging in the student without revealing their passwords (43/202; 21.3%). Ambulatory medical student training in the use of EMRs not only varies but also requires many preceptors to break rules for students to learn important documentation skills. Without changes to the policies surrounding student access to and use of EMRs, future physicians will enter residency without the training they need to appropriately document patient care.

  11. Does electronic medication reconciliation at hospital discharge decrease prescription medication errors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Geneve M; Weigel, Bernard; Holcroft, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Medication errors are an important patient safety issue. Electronic medication reconciliation is a system designed to correct medication discrepancies at transitions in healthcare. The purpose of this paper is to measure types and prevalence of intravenous antibiotic errors at hospital discharge before and after the addition of an electronic discharge medication reconciliation tool (EDMRT). A retrospective study was conducted at a tertiary hospital where house officers order discharge medications. In total, 100 pre-EDMRT and 100 post-EDMRT subjects were randomly recruited from the study center's clinical Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy (OPAT) program. Using infectious disease consultant recommendations as gold standard, each antibiotic listed in these consultant notes was compared to the hospital discharge orders to ascertain the primary outcome: presence of an intravenous antibiotic error in the discharge orders. The primary covariate of interest was pre- vs post-EDMRT group. After generating the crude prevalence of antibiotic errors, logistic regression accounted for potential confounding: discharge day (weekend vs weekday), average years of practice by prescribing physician, inpatient service (medicine vs surgery) and number of discharge mediations per patient. Prevalence of medication errors decreased from 30 percent (30/100) among pre-EDMRT subjects to 15 percent (15/100) errors among post-EDMRT subjects. Dosage errors were the most common type of medication error. The adjusted odds ratio of discharge with intravenous antibiotic error in the post-EDMRT era was 0.39 (0.18, 0.87) compared to the pre-EDMRT era. In the adjusted model, the total number of discharge medications was associated with increased OR of discharge error. To the authors' knowledge, no other study has examined the impact of reconciliation on types and prevalence of medication errors at hospital discharge. The focus on intravenous antibiotics as a class of high-stakes medications

  12. The University of Washington electronic medical record experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Nanette J

    2010-07-01

    The Health Sciences Library at the University of Washington initiated and continues to develop a role in the electronic medical record, starting with the development of the first integrated web-based interface, called MINDscape. An Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) grant in 1992 began the process, which also led to the development of a clinical medical librarian position. Over the years, the librarian's role in the clinical environment became more established, and with the advent of clinical online resources, it offered further opportunities for librarians to provide the expertise needed to incorporate the appropriate resources. The collaborative journey continues as librarians, now able to directly access the EMRs, provide information about what resources to use and where best to place them and design how best to provide notes or feedback to clinicians.

  13. Electronic photography: a new age of medical imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tübergen, D; Manegold, B C

    1993-07-01

    This is a critical overview of present conceptions of the introduction of electronic photography in medicine. It is not a complete list of products, rather it is a description of how the requirements of the physician have influenced medical illustration in the past and will continue to do so in the future. Video systems are widely used in medicine. Besides the learning and teaching of effects of television, minimal invasive surgery (MIS) has become reality through endoscopy, rapidly accepted worldwide. Documentation of endoscopic procedures and their effects is becoming routine. Therefore, the conversion of complex optical information into binary units is a logical development to save space for storage. The reproduction, storage and transfer of detailed images is already realized by digital camera systems, photo CD, scanners and picture archiving and communicating system (PACS). Now electronic imaging in medicine has to be regarded as a matter of routine. The real impact of accelerated editing will be shown in the future.

  14. Electronic Documentation Support Tools and Text Duplication in the Electronic Medical Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrenn, Jesse

    2010-01-01

    In order to ease the burden of electronic note entry on physicians, electronic documentation support tools have been developed to assist in note authoring. There is little evidence of the effects of these tools on attributes of clinical documentation, including document quality. Furthermore, the resultant abundance of duplicated text and…

  15. Development of an algorithm for analysing the electronic measurement of medication adherence in routine HIV care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotzinger, Aurélie; Cavassini, Matthias; Bugnon, Olivier; Schneider, Marie Paule

    2016-10-01

    Background Medication adherence is crucial for successful treatment. Various methods exist for measuring adherence, including electronic drug monitoring, pharmacy refills, pill count, and interviews. These methods are not equivalent, and no method can be considered as the gold standard. A combination of methods is therefore recommended. Objective To develop an algorithm for the management of routinely collected adherence data and to compare persistence and implementation curves using post-algorithm data (reconciled data) versus raw electronic drug monitoring data. Setting A community pharmacy located within a university medical outpatient clinic in Lausanne, Switzerland. Methods The algorithm was developed to take advantage of the strengths of each available adherence measurement method, with electronic drug monitoring as a cornerstone to capture the dynamics of patient behaviour, pill count as a complementary objective method to detect any discrepancy between the number of openings measured by electronic monitoring and the number of pills ingested per opening, and annotated interviews to interpret the discrepancy. The algorithm was tested using data from patients taking lopinavir/r and having participated in an adherence-enhancing programme for more than 3 months. Main outcome measure Adherence was calculated as the percentage of persistent patients (persistence) and the proportion of days with correct dosing over time (implementation) from inclusion to the end of the median follow-up period. Results A 10-step algorithm was established. Among 2041 analysed inter-visit periods, 496 (24 %) were classified as inaccurate, among which 372 (75 %) could be reconciled. The average implementation values were 85 % (raw data) and 91 % (reconciled data) (p electronic drug monitoring, pill count and patient interviews is possible within the setting of a medication adherence clinic. Electronic drug monitoring underestimates medication adherence, affecting subsequent

  16. Three-dimensional free electron laser dispersion relation including betatron oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Y.H.; Kim, K.J.; Xie, M.

    1991-08-01

    We have developed a 3-D FEL theory based upon the Maxwell-Vlasov equations including the effects of the energy spread and emittance of the electron beam, and of betatron oscillations. The radiation field is expressed in terms of the Green's function of the inhomogeneous wave equation and the distribution function of the electron beam. The distribution function is expanded in terms of a set of orthogonal functions determined by the unperturbed particle distribution. The coupled Maxwell-Vlasov equations are then reduced to a matrix equation, from which a dispersion relation for the eigenvalues is derived. In the limit of small betatron oscillation frequency, the present dispersion relation reduces to the well-known cubic equation of the one-dimensional theory in the limit of large beam size, and it gives the correct gain in the limit of small beam size. Comparisons of our numerical results with other approaches show good agreement. We present a handy empirical formula for the FEL gain of a 3-D Gaussian beam, as a function of the scaled parameters, that can be used for a quick estimate of the grain. 5 refs., 2 figs

  17. Generation of complete electronic nuclear medicine reports including static, dynamic and gated images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beretta, M.; Pilon, R.; Mut, F.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To develop a procedure for the creation of nuclear medicine reports containing static and dynamic images. The reason for implementing this technique is the lack of adequate solutions for an electronic format of nuclear medicine results allowing for rapid transmission via e-mail, specially in the case of dynamic and gated SPECT studies, since functional data is best presented in dynamic mode. Material and Methods: Clinical images were acquired in static, whole body, dynamic and gated mode, corresponding to bone studies, diuretic renogram, radionuclide cystography and gated perfusion SPECT, as well as respective time-activity curves. Image files were imported from a dedicated nuclear medicine computer system (Elscint XPert) to a Windows-based PC through a standard ethernet network with TCP-IP communications protocol, using a software developed by us which permits the conversion from the manufacturer's original format into a bitmap format (.bmp) compatible with commercially available PC software. For cardiac perfusion studies, background was subtracted prior to transferring to reduce the amount of information in the file; this was not done for other type of studies because useful data could be eliminated. Dynamic images were then processed using commercial software to create animated files and stored in .gif format. Static images were re-sized and stored in .jpg format. Original color or gray scale was always preserved. All the graphic material was then merged with a previously prepared report text using HTML format. The report also contained reference diagrams to facilitate interpretation. The whole report was then compressed into a self-extractable file, ready to be sent by electronic mail. Reception of the material was visually checked for data integrity including image quality by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. Results: The report presented allows for simultaneous visualization of the text, diagrams and images either static, dynamic, gated or

  18. A review of electronic medical record keeping on mobile medical service trips in austere settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainton, Christopher; Chu, Charlene H

    2017-02-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) may address the need for decision and language support for Western clinicians on mobile medical service trips (MSTs) in low resource settings abroad, while providing improved access to records and data management. However, there has yet to be a review of this emerging technology used by MSTs in low-resource settings. The aim of this study is to describe EMR systems designed specifically for use by mobile MSTs in remote settings, and accordingly, determine new opportunities for this technology to improve quality of healthcare provided by MSTs. A MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Scopus/IEEE search and supplementary Google search were performed for EMR systems specific to mobile MSTs. Information was extracted regarding EMR name, organization, scope of use, platform, open source coding, commercial availability, data integration, and capacity for linguistic and decision support. Missing information was requested by email. After screening of 122 abstracts, two articles remained that discussed deployment of EMR systems in MST settings (iChart, SmartList To Go), and thirteen additional EMR systems were found through the Google search. Of these, three systems (Project Buendia, TEBOW, and University of Central Florida's internally developed EMR) are based on modified versions of Open MRS software, while three are smartphone apps (QuickChart EMR, iChart, NotesFirst). Most of the systems use a local network to manage data, while the remaining systems use opportunistic cloud synchronization. Three (TimmyCare, Basil, and Backpack EMR) contain multilingual user interfaces, and only one (QuickChart EMR) contained MST-specific clinical decision support. There have been limited attempts to tailor EMRs to mobile MSTs. Only Open MRS has a broad user base, and other EMR systems should consider interoperability and data sharing with larger systems as a priority. Several systems include tablet compatibility, or are specifically designed for smartphone, which may be

  19. Analysis of electronic models for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glitzky, Annegret

    2010-07-01

    We introduce an electronic model for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities. The resulting drift-diffusion model corresponds to a generalized van Roosbroeck system with additional source terms coupled with ODEs containing space and energy as parameters for all defect densities. The system has to be considered in heterostructures and with mixed boundary conditions from device simulation. We give a weak formulation of the problem. If the boundary data and the sources are compatible with thermodynamic equilibrium the free energy along solutions decays monotonously. In other cases it may be increasing, but we estimate its growth. We establish boundedness and uniqueness results and prove the existence of a weak solution. This is done by considering a regularized problem, showing its solvability and the boundedness of its solutions independent of the regularization level. (orig.)

  20. Flexible barrier film, method of forming same, and organic electronic device including same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blizzard, John; Tonge, James Steven; Weidner, William Kenneth

    2013-03-26

    A flexible barrier film has a thickness of from greater than zero to less than 5,000 nanometers and a water vapor transmission rate of no more than 1.times.10.sup.-2 g/m.sup.2/day at 22.degree. C. and 47% relative humidity. The flexible barrier film is formed from a composition, which comprises a multi-functional acrylate. The composition further comprises the reaction product of an alkoxy-functional organometallic compound and an alkoxy-functional organosilicon compound. A method of forming the flexible barrier film includes the steps of disposing the composition on a substrate and curing the composition to form the flexible barrier film. The flexible barrier film may be utilized in organic electronic devices.

  1. Improving Patients\\\\\\' Care through Electronic Medical Error Reporting System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Rangraz Jeddi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Medical errors are unintentional acts that take place due to the negligence or lead to undesirable consequences in medical practice. The purpose of this study was to design a conceptual model for medical error reporting system. This applied descriptive cross-sectional research employed Delphi method carried out from 2012 to 2013. The study population was medical and paramedical personnel of health workers and paramedical personnel of hospitals, deputy of treatment, faculty members of Kashan University of Medical Sciences in addition to the internet and library resources. Sample size included 30 expert individuals in the field of medical errors. The one-stage stratified sampling procedure was used. The items with opposition ranging 0 to 25 were confirmed and those exceeding 50 were rejected whereas the items with the opposition 25 to 50 were reevaluated in the second session. This process continued for three times and the items that failed to be approved were eliminated in the model. Based on the results of this research, repeated informing about and reporting operation at on-line bases that have access to the incidence of error detected on time, identifying cause and damage due to the incidence reported confidential and anonymously immediately after the occurrence is necessary. Analysis of data quantitatively and qualitatively by using computer software is needed. Classifying the errors reports based on feedback provision according to the cause of error is needed. In addition, confidential report and possible manual retrieval were suggested It is essential to determine the means of reporting and items in the reporting form including time, cause and damage of medical error, media of reporting and method of recording and analysis.

  2. 77 FR 18860 - Certain Consumer Electronics, Including Mobile Phones and Tablets; Notice of Receipt of Complaint...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    ...; Research In Motion Corp. of TX; Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. of South Korea; Samsung Electronics America, Inc. of NJ; and Samsung Telecommunications America, LLC of TX. Proposed respondents, other interested...

  3. 77 FR 24514 - Certain Consumer Electronics, Including Mobile Phones and Tablets; Institution of Investigation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ..., Taiwan; HTC America, Inc., 13920 SE Eastgate Way, Suite 400, Bellevue, WA 98005; LG Electronics, Inc., LG Twin Towers, 20, Yoido-dong, Youngdungpo-gu, Seoul, 157-721, Republic of Korea; LG Electronics U.S.A., Inc., 1000 Sylvan Ave., Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632; LG Electronics MobileComm U.S.A., Inc., 10101 Old...

  4. Evaluation of Electronic Medical Record Administrative data Linked Database (EMRALD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Karen; Mitiku, Tezeta F; Ivers, Noah M; Guo, Helen; Lu, Hong; Jaakkimainen, Liisa; Kavanagh, Doug G; Lee, Douglas S; Tu, Jack V

    2014-01-01

    Primary care electronic medical records (EMRs) represent a potentially rich source of information for research and evaluation. To assess the completeness of primary care EMR data compared with administrative data. Retrospective comparison of provincial health-related administrative databases and patient records for more than 50,000 patients of 54 physicians in 15 geographically distinct clinics in Ontario, Canada, contained in the Electronic Medical Record Administrative data Linked Database (EMRALD). Physician billings, laboratory tests, medications, specialist consultation letters, and hospital discharges captured in EMRALD were compared with health-related administrative data in a universal access healthcare system. The mean (standard deviation [SD]) percentage of clinic primary care outpatient visits captured in EMRALD compared with administrative data was 94.4% (4.88%). Consultation letters from specialists for first consultations and for hospital discharges were captured at a mean (SD) rate of 72.7% (7.98%) and 58.5% (15.24%), respectively, within 30 days of the occurrence. The mean (SD) capture within EMRALD of the most common laboratory tests billed and the most common drugs dispensed was 67.3% (21.46%) and 68.2% (8.32%), respectively, for all clinics. We found reasonable capture of information within the EMR compared with administrative data, with the advantage in the EMR of having actual laboratory results, prescriptions for patients of all ages, and detailed clinical information. However, the combination of complete EMR records and administrative data is needed to provide a full comprehensive picture of patient health histories and processes, and outcomes of care.

  5. Identifying collaborative care teams through electronic medical record utilization patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, You; Lorenzi, Nancy M; Sandberg, Warren S; Wolgast, Kelly; Malin, Bradley A

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this investigation was to determine whether automated approaches can learn patient-oriented care teams via utilization of an electronic medical record (EMR) system. To perform this investigation, we designed a data-mining framework that relies on a combination of latent topic modeling and network analysis to infer patterns of collaborative teams. We applied the framework to the EMR utilization records of over 10 000 employees and 17 000 inpatients at a large academic medical center during a 4-month window in 2010. Next, we conducted an extrinsic evaluation of the patterns to determine the plausibility of the inferred care teams via surveys with knowledgeable experts. Finally, we conducted an intrinsic evaluation to contextualize each team in terms of collaboration strength (via a cluster coefficient) and clinical credibility (via associations between teams and patient comorbidities). The framework discovered 34 collaborative care teams, 27 (79.4%) of which were confirmed as administratively plausible. Of those, 26 teams depicted strong collaborations, with a cluster coefficient > 0.5. There were 119 diagnostic conditions associated with 34 care teams. Additionally, to provide clarity on how the survey respondents arrived at their determinations, we worked with several oncologists to develop an illustrative example of how a certain team functions in cancer care. Inferred collaborative teams are plausible; translating such patterns into optimized collaborative care will require administrative review and integration with management practices. EMR utilization records can be mined for collaborative care patterns in large complex medical centers.

  6. Using the Electronic Medical Record to Enhance Physician-Nurse Communication Regarding Patients' Discharge Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Molly; Gurka, David

    2015-01-01

    The fast-paced environment of hospitals contributes to communication failures between health care providers while impacting patient care and patient flow. An effective mechanism for sharing patients' discharge information with health care team members is required to improve patient throughput. The communication of a patient's discharge plan was identified as crucial in alleviating patient flow delays at a tertiary care, academic medical center. By identifying the patients who were expected to be discharged the following day, the health care team could initiate discharge preparations in advance to improve patient care and patient flow. The patients' electronic medical record served to convey dynamic information regarding the patients' discharge status to the health care team via conditional discharge orders. Two neurosciences units piloted a conditional discharge order initiative. Conditional discharge orders were designed in the electronic medical record so that the conditions for discharge were listed in a dropdown menu. The health care team was trained on the conditional discharge order protocol, including when to write them, how to find them in the patients' electronic medical record, and what actions should be prompted by these orders. On average, 24% of the patients discharged had conditional discharge orders written the day before discharge. The average discharge time for patients with conditional discharge orders decreased by 83 minutes (0.06 day) from baseline. Qualitatively, the health care team reported improved workflows with conditional orders. The conditional discharge orders allowed physicians to communicate pending discharges electronically to the multidisciplinary team. The initiative positively impacted patient discharge times and workflows.

  7. Monitoring system including an electronic sensor platform and an interrogation transceiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzel, Robert L.; Sheets, Larry R.

    2003-09-23

    A wireless monitoring system suitable for a wide range of remote data collection applications. The system includes at least one Electronic Sensor Platform (ESP), an Interrogator Transceiver (IT) and a general purpose host computer. The ESP functions as a remote data collector from a number of digital and analog sensors located therein. The host computer provides for data logging, testing, demonstration, installation checkout, and troubleshooting of the system. The IT transmits signals from one or more ESP's to the host computer to the ESP's. The IT host computer may be powered by a common power supply, and each ESP is individually powered by a battery. This monitoring system has an extremely low power consumption which allows remote operation of the ESP for long periods; provides authenticated message traffic over a wireless network; utilizes state-of-health and tamper sensors to ensure that the ESP is secure and undamaged; has robust housing of the ESP suitable for use in radiation environments; and is low in cost. With one base station (host computer and interrogator transceiver), multiple ESP's may be controlled at a single monitoring site.

  8. Investigation of electronic transport through a ladder-like graphene nanoribbon including random distributed impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaili, Esmat; Mardaani, Mohammad; Rabani, Hassan

    2018-01-01

    The electronic transport of a ladder-like graphene nanoribbon which the on-site or hopping energies of a small part of it can be random is modeled by using the Green's function technique within the nearest neighbor tight-binding approach. We employ a unitary transformation in order to convert the Hamiltonian of the nanoribbon to the Hamiltonian of a tight-binding ladder-like network. In this case, the disturbed part of the system includes the second neighbor hopping interactions. While, the converted Hamiltonian of each ideal part is equivalent to the Hamiltonian of two periodic on-site chains. Therefore, we can insert the self-energies of the alternative on-site tight-binding chains to the inverse of the Green's function matrix of the ladder-like part. In this viewpoint, the conductance is constructed from two trans and cis contributions. The results show that increasing the disorder strength causes the increase and decrease of the conductance of the trans and cis contributions, respectively.

  9. Perspectives for medical informatics. Reusing the electronic medical record for clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokosch, H U; Ganslandt, T

    2009-01-01

    Even though today most university hospitals have already implemented commercial hospital information systems and started to build up comprehensive electronic medical records, reuse of such data for data warehousing and research purposes is still very rare. Given this situation, the focus of this paper is to present an overview on exemplary projects, which have already tackled this challenge, reflect on current initiatives within the United States of America and the European Union to establish IT infrastructures for clinical and translational research, and draw attention to new challenges in this area. This paper does not intend to provide a fully comprehensive review on all the issues of clinical routine data reuse. It is based, however, on a presentation of a large variety of historical, but also most recent activities in data warehousing, data retrieval and linking medical informatics with translational research. The article presents an overview of the various international approaches to this issue and illustrates concepts and solutions which have been published, thus giving an impression of activities pursued in this field of medical informatics. Further, problems and open questions, which have also been named in the literature, are presented and three challenges (to establish comprehensive clinical data warehouses, to establish professional IT infrastructure applications supporting clinical trial data capture and to integrate medical record systems and clinical trial databases) related to this area of medical informatics are identified and presented. Translational biomedical research with the aim "to integrate bedside and biology" and to bridge the gap between clinical care and medical research today and in the years to come, provides a large and interesting field for medical informatics researchers. Especially the need for integrating clinical research projects with data repositories built up during documentation of routine clinical care, today still leaves

  10. [An integrated approach including paediatric and forensic medical expertise on suspicion of child abuse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, M C M; Karst, W A; van der Stel, H F; Teeuw, A H; van de Putte, E M

    2016-01-01

    A false accusation of child abuse has a major impact on child and family. Conversely, a missed diagnosis of child abuse may have significant and lifelong consequences for the child. For health professionals the assessment of the nature of the injury and differentiating between accidental and inflicted injury, disease manifestation or a physiological phenomenon can be challenging. For adequate determination of the cause of injury, an integrated approach including paediatric knowledge and forensic medical expertise is essential. Therefore, a national expertise centre for child abuse (LECK) was established in the Netherlands in 2014. The first results of this integrated approach are described and illustrated with three case reports. Case A, a 7-month-old boy with an accidental humerus fracture. Case B, an 8-year-old boy with a false positive suspicion of child abuse who was eventually diagnosed with Henoch-Schönlein syndrome. Case C, boy of 3 months with bruises and a metaphyseal fracture of the femur, both highly suspected of being inflicted injury.

  11. Surveillance of selected post-caesarean infections based on electronic registries: validation study including post-discharge infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, R A; Nørgaard, M; Uldbjerg, N

    2010-01-01

    ) within 30 days after caesarean section. We assessed the use of data from various electronic registries to identify patients with post-caesarean UTI and PWI classified according to a reference standard. The standard was based on information from medical records and self-reported data (questionnaire) using...

  12. Combined modality therapy including intraoperative electron irradiation for locally recurrent colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Michael G; Miller, Robert C; Nelson, Heidi; Pemberton, John H; Dozois, Eric J; Alberts, Steven R; Gunderson, Leonard L

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate survival, relapse patterns, and prognostic factors in patients with colorectal cancer relapse treated with curative-intent therapy, including intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT). From April 1981 through January 2008, 607 patients with recurrent colorectal cancer received IOERT as a component of treatment. IOERT was preceded or followed by external radiation (median dose, 45.5 Gy) in 583 patients (96%). Resection was classified as R0 in 227 (37%), R1 in 224 (37%), and R2 in 156 (26%). The median IOERT dose was 15 Gy (range, 7.5-30 Gy). Median overall survival was 36 months. Five- and 10-year survival rates were 30% and 16%, respectively. Survival estimates at 5 years were 46%, 27%, and 16% for R0, R1, and R2 resection, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that R0 resection, no prior chemotherapy, and more recent treatment (in the second half of the series) were associated with improved survival. The 3-year cumulative incidence of central, local, and distant relapse was 12%, 23%, and 49%, respectively. Central and local relapse were more common in previously irradiated patients and in those with subtotal resection. Toxicity Grade 3 or higher partially attributable to IOERT was observed in 66 patients (11%). Neuropathy was observed in 94 patients (15%) and was more common with IOERT doses exceeding 12.5 Gy. Long-term survival and disease control was achievable in patients with locally recurrent colorectal cancer. Continued evaluation of curative-intent, combined-modality therapy that includes IOERT is warranted in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 78 FR 13895 - Certain Consumer Electronics, Including Mobile Phones and Tablets; Commission Determination Not...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ... Motion Ltd. of Ontario, Canada and Research In Motion Corp. of Irving, Texas; Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd of Seoul, Republic of Korea, Samsung Electronics America, Inc. of Ridgefield Park, New Jersey, and Samsung Telecommunications America, L.L.C. of Richardson, Texas as respondents. Id. The Commission's...

  14. Electron Beam Adjustment in PLATO RTS 2 Including the Effect of Air Gaps

    CERN Document Server

    Lopes, M C; Trindade, A; Rodrigues, P; Peralta, L

    2002-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Beam characterization for electron dose calculations in PLATO RTS 2 treatment planning system requires the tuning of two adjustment parameters: sqx (the initial angular spread) and FMCS (a "fudge" multiple Coulomb scattering parameter). This work provides a set of suggestions to optimise electron dose calculations with PLATO, taking into account the effect of air gaps between the electron applicator and the patient skin. Material and Methods: Two adjustment criteria have been followed: one which uses just one input data set corresponding to the standard (null) air gap and another one that takes into account the whole range of clinically used distances between the electron applicator and the patient surface. The adjusted values of sqx were compared with experimental data and GEANT3 Monte Carlo code results. A systematic study has been carried out of the effect of both adjustment parameters on electron dose calculations in water. Comparisons of dose distributions and point dose values ha...

  15. The Role of the Electronic Medical Record in the Intensive Care Unit Nurse's Detection of Patient Deterioration: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despins, Laurel A; Wakefield, Bonnie J

    2018-03-30

    Failure to detect patient deterioration signals leads to longer stays in the hospital, worse functional outcomes, and higher hospital mortality rates. Surveillance, including ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of patient data by the nurse, is essential for early risk detection. Electronic medical records promote accessibility and retrievability of patient data and can support patient surveillance. A secondary analysis was performed on interview data from 24 intensive care unit nurses, collected in a study that examined factors influencing nurse responses to alarms. Six themes describing nurses' use of electronic medical record information to understand the patients' norm and seven themes describing electronic medical record design issues were identified. Further work is needed on electronic medical record design to integrate documentation and information presentation with the nursing workflow. Organizations should involve bedside nurses in the design of handoff formats that provide key information common to all intensive care unit patient populations, as well as population-specific information.

  16. Minimal impact of an electronic medical records system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tall, Jill M; Hurd, Marie; Gifford, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) implementation in hospitals and emergency departments (EDs) is becoming increasingly more common. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of an EMR system on patient-related factors that correlate to ED workflow efficiency. A retrospective chart review assessed monthly census reports of all patients who registered and were treated to disposition during conversion from paper charts to an EMR system. The primary outcome measurement was an analysis of the time of registration to discharge or total ED length of stay as well as rate of those who left without being seen, eloped, or left against medical advice. These data were recorded from 3 periods, for 18 months: before installation of the EMR system (pre-EMR), during acclimation to the EMR, and post acclimation (post-EMR). A total of 61626 individual patient records were collected and analyzed. The total ED length of stay across all patient subtypes was not significantly affected by the installation of the hospital-wide EMR system (P = .481); however, a significant decrease was found for patients who were admitted to the hospital from the ED (P .25). Installation of a hospital-wide EMR system had minimal impact on workflow efficiency parameters in an ED. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Identifying phenotypic signatures of neuropsychiatric disorders from electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyalina, Svetlana; Percha, Bethany; LePendu, Paea; Iyer, Srinivasan V; Altman, Russ B; Shah, Nigam H

    2013-12-01

    Mental illness is the leading cause of disability in the USA, but boundaries between different mental illnesses are notoriously difficult to define. Electronic medical records (EMRs) have recently emerged as a powerful new source of information for defining the phenotypic signatures of specific diseases. We investigated how EMR-based text mining and statistical analysis could elucidate the phenotypic boundaries of three important neuropsychiatric illnesses-autism, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. We analyzed the medical records of over 7000 patients at two facilities using an automated text-processing pipeline to annotate the clinical notes with Unified Medical Language System codes and then searching for enriched codes, and associations among codes, that were representative of the three disorders. We used dimensionality-reduction techniques on individual patient records to understand individual-level phenotypic variation within each disorder, as well as the degree of overlap among disorders. We demonstrate that automated EMR mining can be used to extract relevant drugs and phenotypes associated with neuropsychiatric disorders and characteristic patterns of associations among them. Patient-level analyses suggest a clear separation between autism and the other disorders, while revealing significant overlap between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. They also enable localization of individual patients within the phenotypic 'landscape' of each disorder. Because EMRs reflect the realities of patient care rather than idealized conceptualizations of disease states, we argue that automated EMR mining can help define the boundaries between different mental illnesses, facilitate cohort building for clinical and genomic studies, and reveal how clear expert-defined disease boundaries are in practice.

  18. IL 2 Laser Accelerated Protons and Electrons in Medical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceccotti, T.; Martin, Ph.; Giulietti, A.

    2010-01-01

    Charged particle acceleration through laser-matter interaction is a well-known phenomenon since long-time. T 3 (Table Top Terawatt) lasers reaching, and sometimes, getting over intensities around 10 20 W/cm 2 , allows producing particle beams in the so-called 'relativistic' regime (as accelerated electrons velocity is close to c) showing outstanding features in terms of energy, brightness and short burst duration. As a consequence they are interesting for a large spread of applications. Undoubtedly, the research in this field is stimulated to a large extent by the hope of using laser produced high energy particles for medical purposes. In particular, laser driven sources appear as a promising alternative to classical accelerator sources for two kinds of cancer treatments: the proton beam therapy (PBT) and the intra-operative radiation therapy (IORT). In this talk, we will focus on the main physical acceleration mechanisms for protons and electrons and we will review the main features and the application domain of PBT and IORT. We will present the potential advantages offered by laser-based sources as well as the progress requested to possibly substitute traditional by laser-based sources. More than 50.000 patients have been already treated with PBT since the work of Wilson about 60 years ago, which suggested using fast proton for radiotherapy. Due to the typical energy loss of protons traversing matter, the very biggest part of proton energy is actually delivered in a confined volume at a depth proportional to their energy. It is therefore possible to precisely aim at the tumor location without damaging the tissues situated just after the Bragg peak, on the contrary of standard x-ray radiation treatment. This results in fewer and milder side effects for the patient and in a quite lower relapsing rate making PBT the therapy of choice for pediatric cancer diseases and for those tumors whose location is close to vital organs. The usual required energy of

  19. Enhanced identification of eligibility for depression research using an electronic medical record search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Lisa; Hanauer, David A; Nease, Donald; Albeiruti, Rashad; Kavanagh, Janet; Kales, Helen C

    2009-12-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) have become part of daily practice for many physicians. Attempts have been made to apply electronic search engine technology to speed EMR review. This was a prospective, observational study to compare the speed and clinical accuracy of a medical record search engine vs. manual review of the EMR. Three raters reviewed 49 cases in the EMR to screen for eligibility in a depression study using the electronic medical record search engine (EMERSE). One week later raters received a scrambled set of the same patients including 9 distractor cases, and used manual EMR review to determine eligibility. For both methods, accuracy was assessed for the original 49 cases by comparison with a gold standard rater. Use of EMERSE resulted in considerable time savings; chart reviews using EMERSE were significantly faster than traditional manual review (p=0.03). The percent agreement of raters with the gold standard (e.g. concurrent validity) using either EMERSE or manual review was not significantly different. Using a search engine optimized for finding clinical information in the free-text sections of the EMR can provide significant time savings while preserving clinical accuracy. The major power of this search engine is not from a more advanced and sophisticated search algorithm, but rather from a user interface designed explicitly to help users search the entire medical record in a way that protects health information.

  20. Altruism: Should it be Included as an Attribute of Medical Professionalism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Harris

    2018-03-01

    Next steps: For many, the future of the medical profession lies in abandoning altruism as part of its defining qualities and adopting a new ethical definition of professionalism that fits with the complexities of modern society

  1. Electronic monitoring of patient adherence to oral antihypertensive medical treatment: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Arne; Osterberg, Lars G; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2009-08-01

    Poor patient adherence is often the reason for suboptimal blood pressure control. Electronic monitoring is one method of assessing adherence. The aim was to systematically review the literature on electronic monitoring of patient adherence to self-administered oral antihypertensive medications. We searched the Pubmed, Embase, Cinahl and Psychinfo databases and websites of suppliers of electronic monitoring devices. The quality of the studies was assessed according to the quality criteria proposed by Haynes et al. Sixty-two articles were included; three met the criteria proposed by Haynes et al. and nine reported the use of electronic adherence monitoring for feedback interventions. Adherence rates were generally high, whereas average study quality was low with a recent tendency towards improved quality. One study detected investigator fraud based on electronic monitoring data. Use of electronic monitoring of patient adherence according to the quality criteria proposed by Haynes et al. has been rather limited during the past two decades. Electronic monitoring has mainly been used as a measurement tool, but it seems to have the potential to significantly improve blood pressure control as well and should be used more widely.

  2. A multislice theory of electron scattering in crystals including backscattering and inelastic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelberg, Jakob; Rusz, Ján

    2015-12-01

    In the framework of the slice transition operator technique, a general multislice theory for electron scattering in crystals is developed. To achieve this generalization, we combine the approaches for inelastic scattering derived by Yoshioka [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 12, 6 (1957)] and backscattering based on the formalism of Chen and Van Dyck [Ultramicroscopy 70, 29-44 (1997)]. A computational realization of the obtained equations is suggested. The proposed computational scheme is tested on elastic backscattering of electrons, where we consider single backscattering in analogy to the computational scheme proposed by Chen and Van Dyck. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Feasibility Study for Electronic Fitness for Duty Medical Examination Reporting and Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This report examines the institutional and high-level technology aspects associated with potential mandated : electronic reporting of every commercial driver license (CDL) driver fitness-for-duty medical examination : performed by a medical examiner ...

  4. Automatic prediction of rheumatoid arthritis disease activity from the electronic medical records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Lin

    Full Text Available We aimed to mine the data in the Electronic Medical Record to automatically discover patients' Rheumatoid Arthritis disease activity at discrete rheumatology clinic visits. We cast the problem as a document classification task where the feature space includes concepts from the clinical narrative and lab values as stored in the Electronic Medical Record.The Training Set consisted of 2792 clinical notes and associated lab values. Test Set 1 included 1749 clinical notes and associated lab values. Test Set 2 included 344 clinical notes for which there were no associated lab values. The Apache clinical Text Analysis and Knowledge Extraction System was used to analyze the text and transform it into informative features to be combined with relevant lab values.Experiments over a range of machine learning algorithms and features were conducted. The best performing combination was linear kernel Support Vector Machines with Unified Medical Language System Concept Unique Identifier features with feature selection and lab values. The Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUC is 0.831 (σ = 0.0317, statistically significant as compared to two baselines (AUC = 0.758, σ = 0.0291. Algorithms demonstrated superior performance on cases clinically defined as extreme categories of disease activity (Remission and High compared to those defined as intermediate categories (Moderate and Low and included laboratory data on inflammatory markers.Automatic Rheumatoid Arthritis disease activity discovery from Electronic Medical Record data is a learnable task approximating human performance. As a result, this approach might have several research applications, such as the identification of patients for genome-wide pharmacogenetic studies that require large sample sizes with precise definitions of disease activity and response to therapies.

  5. Security of electronic medical information and patient privacy: what you need to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriole, Katherine P

    2014-12-01

    The responsibility that physicians have to protect their patients from harm extends to protecting the privacy and confidentiality of patient health information including that contained within radiological images. The intent of HIPAA and subsequent HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules is to keep patients' private information confidential while allowing providers access to and maintaining the integrity of relevant information needed to provide care. Failure to comply with electronic protected health information (ePHI) regulations could result in financial or criminal penalties or both. Protected health information refers to anything that can reasonably be used to identify a patient (eg, name, age, date of birth, social security number, radiology examination accession number). The basic tools and techniques used to maintain medical information security and patient privacy described in this article include physical safeguards such as computer device isolation and data backup, technical safeguards such as firewalls and secure transmission modes, and administrative safeguards including documentation of security policies, training of staff, and audit tracking through system logs. Other important concepts related to privacy and security are explained, including user authentication, authorization, availability, confidentiality, data integrity, and nonrepudiation. Patient privacy and security of medical information are critical elements in today's electronic health care environment. Radiology has led the way in adopting digital systems to make possible the availability of medical information anywhere anytime, and in identifying and working to eliminate any risks to patients. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 76 FR 24051 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones, Mobile Tablets, Portable...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Inv. No. 337-TA-771] In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices...; Notice of Institution of Investigation AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that a complaint was filed with the U.S. International Trade Commission on...

  7. 78 FR 32689 - Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Docket No 2958] Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices... Relating to the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the U.S. International Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled...

  8. 75 FR 4583 - In the Matter of: Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones, Portable Music Players...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-28

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Inv. No. 337-TA-701] In the Matter of: Certain Electronic Devices.... International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of investigation pursuant to 19 U.S.C. 1337. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that a complaint was filed with the U.S. International Trade Commission on December...

  9. 78 FR 38361 - Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Inv. No. 337-TA-885] Certain Portable Electronic Communications... States Code AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that a complaint was filed with the U.S. International Trade Commission on May 23, 2013, under section...

  10. Electron density in reasonably real metallic surfaces, including interchange and correlation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraga, L.A.; Martinez, G.

    1981-01-01

    By means of a new method, the electron density in a jellium surface is calculated taking in account interchange and correlation effects; reproducing, in this way, the Lang and Kohn results. The new method is self-consistent but not iterative and hence is possible extend it to the solution of the same problem in more reasonably real metallic surfaces. (L.C.) [pt

  11. An instrument for broadened risk assessment in antenatal health care including non-medical issues.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A. Vos (Amber); M.J. van Veen (Mieke); E. Birnie (Erwin); S. Denktaş (Semiha); E.A.P. Steegers (Eric); G.J. Bonsel (Gouke)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractGrowing evidence on the risk contributing role of non-medical factors on pregnancy outcomes urged for a new approach in early antenatal risk selection. The evidence invites to more integration, in particular between the clinical working area and the public health domain. We developed

  12. Report of the 2013 AMCP Partnership Forum on electronic solutions to medication reconciliation and improving transitions of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is driving the evolution of reimbursement from a fee-for-service model to an outcomes-based system. Accountable care organizations (ACOs) are 1 component of this evolution, and 1 of their charges is to reduce hospital readmission rates for key diagnoses such as congestive heart failure (CHF) and other cardiovascular comorbidities. Lack of patient follow-up and adherence are 2 major causes of readmission. Providing strong medication management is 1 of the common factors in successful readmission programs. We discuss here how electronic solutions might strengthen these medication management programs. To explore the key issues and strategies that affect the use of electronic medication reconciliation processes and to identify the role the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy (AMCP) can play in spearheading the adoption of electronic solutions. This was a descriptive analysis of the medication reconciliation process and the factors that promote or limit the application of electronic solutions to medication reconciliation and transitions of care processes. AMCP convened a panel of managed care, hospital, community, ACO, and medication therapy management pharmacists; technology vendors; and other health care stakeholders with an expertise or interest in transitions of care. In the last few years, there has been considerable uptake of electronic solutions to the admission medication reconciliation process, largely due to increasing penetration of vendors using sophisticated medication history tools. The current electronic solutions to the admission medication reconciliation record are remarkably similar in content. Some pilots for electronic solutions to discharge medication reconciliation are emerging. The focus group recommended specific programs AMCP can pursue to increase the adoption of electronic solutions for medication reconciliation. One important aspect to address is developing a business case that documents the return on investment

  13. Prospective evaluation of dermatologic surgery complications including patients on multiple antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeaux, Jeremy S; Martires, Kathryn J; Goldberg, Dori; Pattee, Sean F; Fu, Pingfu; Maloney, Mary E

    2011-09-01

    Few prospective studies have evaluated the safety of dermatologic surgery. We sought to determine rates of bleeding, infection, flap and graft necrosis, and dehiscence in outpatient dermatologic surgery, and to examine their relationship to type of repair, anatomic location of repair, antibiotic use, antiplatelet use, or anticoagulant use. Patients presenting to University of Massachusetts Medical School Dermatology Clinic for surgery during a 15-month period were prospectively entered. Medications, procedures, and complications were recorded. Of the 1911 patients, 38% were on one anticoagulant or antiplatelet medication, and 8.0% were on two or more. Risk of hemorrhage was 0.89%. Complex repair (odds ratio [OR] = 5.80), graft repair (OR = 7.58), flap repair (OR = 11.93), and partial repair (OR = 43.13) were more likely to result in bleeding than intermediate repair. Patients on both clopidogrel and warfarin were 40 times more likely to have bleeding complications than all others (P = .03). Risk of infection was 1.3%, but was greater than 3% on the genitalia, scalp, back, and leg. Partial flap necrosis occurred in 1.7% of flaps, and partial graft necrosis occurred in 8.6% of grafts. Partial graft necrosis occurred in 20% of grafts on the scalp and 10% of grafts on the nose. All complications resolved without sequelae. The study was limited to one academic dermatology practice. The rate of complications in dermatologic surgery is low, even when multiple oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet medications are continued, and prophylactic antibiotics are not used. Closure type and use of warfarin or clopidogrel increase bleeding risk. However, these medications should be continued to avoid adverse thrombotic events. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 75 FR 11919 - Qimonda 200 MM Facility, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Tokyo Electron America, Nikon...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... Employment and Training Administration Qimonda 200 MM Facility, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Tokyo... 17, 2009 and December 31, 2009 to include on-site leased workers of Tokyo Electron America, Nikon... as follows: All workers of Qimonda 200MM Facility, including on-site leased workers from Tokyo...

  15. Do we have to Include HCI Issues in Clinical Trials of Medical Devices?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene; Christensen, Lars Rune; Sabers, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Digital devices play an important role in medical treatment and will in the future play a larger role in connection to cures of health-related issues. Traditionally medicine has been tested by clinical double blind, randomized trials to document the efficacy and safety profile. When it comes...... to the use of digital devices in treatments the protocols from the field of medicine is adopted. The question is whether or not this evidence based approach is useful when dealing with digital devices and whether the understanding of the efficiency of a treatment can be obtained without also looking...... at usability and lifestyle issues. Based on a case study of epilepsy, a literature study of protocols for investigating treatments using digital medical devices, the set-up of studies, the design of a current protocol for clinical trials, and finally preliminary results, we discuss if clinical trials have...

  16. An instrument for broadened risk assessment in antenatal health care including non-medical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Amanda Vos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Growing evidence on the risk contributing role of non-medical factors on pregnancy outcomes urged for a new approach in early antenatal risk selection. The evidence invites to more integration, in particular between the clinical working area and the public health domain. We developed a non-invasive, standardized instrument for comprehensive antenatal risk assessment. The current study presents the application-oriented development of a risk screening instrument for early antenatal detection of risk factors and tailored prevention in an integrated care setting.Methods: A review of published instruments complemented with evidence from cohort studies. Selection and standardization of risk factors associated with small for gestational age, preterm birth, congenital anomalies and perinatal mortality. Risk factors were weighted to obtain a cumulative risk score. Responses were then connected to corresponding care pathways. A cumulative risk threshold was defined, which can be adapted to the population and the availability of preventive facilities. A score above the threshold implies multidisciplinary consultation between caregivers.Results: The resulting digital score card consisted of 70 items, subdivided into four non-medical and two medical domains. Weighing of risk factors was based on existing evidence. Pilot-evidence from a cohort of 218 pregnancies in a multi-practice urban setting showed a cut-off of 16 points would imply 20% of all pregnant women to be assessed in a multidisciplinary setting. A total of 28 care pathways were defined.Conclusion: The resulting score card is a universal risk screening instrument which incorporates recent evidence on non-medical risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes and enables systematic risk management in an integrated antenatal health care setting.

  17. An instrument for broadened risk assessment in antenatal health care including non-medical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Amanda Vos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Growing evidence on the risk contributing role of non-medical factors on pregnancy outcomes urged for a new approach in early antenatal risk selection. The evidence invites to more integration, in particular between the clinical working area and the public health domain. We developed a non-invasive, standardized instrument for comprehensive antenatal risk assessment. The current study presents the application-oriented development of a risk screening instrument for early antenatal detection of risk factors and tailored prevention in an integrated care setting. Methods: A review of published instruments complemented with evidence from cohort studies. Selection and standardization of risk factors associated with small for gestational age, preterm birth, congenital anomalies and perinatal mortality. Risk factors were weighted to obtain a cumulative risk score. Responses were then connected to corresponding care pathways. A cumulative risk threshold was defined, which can be adapted to the population and the availability of preventive facilities. A score above the threshold implies multidisciplinary consultation between caregivers. Results: The resulting digital score card consisted of 70 items, subdivided into four non-medical and two medical domains. Weighing of risk factors was based on existing evidence. Pilot-evidence from a cohort of 218 pregnancies in a multi-practice urban setting showed a cut-off of 16 points would imply 20% of all pregnant women to be assessed in a multidisciplinary setting. A total of 28 care pathways were defined. Conclusion: The resulting score card is a universal risk screening instrument which incorporates recent evidence on non-medical risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes and enables systematic risk management in an integrated antenatal health care setting.

  18. A Prospective Analysis of Patients Presenting for Medical Attention at a Large Electronic Dance Music Festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Matt S; Plocki, Alex; Likourezos, Antonios; Pushkar, Illya; Bazos, Andrew N; Fromm, Christian; Friedman, Benjamin W

    2017-02-01

    Mass-Gathering Medicine studies have identified variables that predict greater patient presentation rates (PPRs) and transport to hospital rates (TTHRs). This is a descriptive report of patients who presented for medical attention at an annual electronic dance music festival (EDMF). At this large, single EDMF in New York City (NYC; New York, USA), the frequency of patient presentation, the range of presentations, and interventions performed were identified. This descriptive report examined consecutive patients who presented to the medical tent of a summertime EDMF held at an outdoor venue with an active, mobile, bounded crowd. Alcohol was available for sale. Entry was restricted to persons 18 years and older. The festival occurred on three consecutive days with a total cumulative attendance of 58,000. Medical staffing included two Emergency Medicine physicians, four registered nurses, and 86 Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers. Data collected included demographics, past medical history, vital signs, physical exam, drug and alcohol use, interventions performed, and transport decisions. Eighty-four patients were enrolled over 2.5 days. Six were transported and zero died. The ages of the subjects ranged from 17 to 61 years. Forty-three (51%) were male. Thirty-eight (45%) initially presented with abnormal vital signs; four (5%) were hyperthermic. Of these latter patients, 34 (90%) reported ingestions with 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or other drugs. Eleven (65%) patients were diaphoretic or mydriatic. The most common prehospital interventions were intravenous normal saline (8/84; 10%), ondansetron (6/84; 7%), and midazolam (3/84; 4%). Electronic dance music festivals are a growing trend and a new challenge for Mass-Gathering Medicine as new strategies must be employed to decrease TTHR and mortality. Addressing common and expected medical emergencies at mass-gathering events through awareness, preparation, and early, focused medical interventions may

  19. Adhesive flexible barrier film, method of forming same, and organic electronic device including same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blizzard, John Donald; Weidner, William Kenneth

    2013-02-05

    An adhesive flexible barrier film comprises a substrate and a barrier layer disposed on the substrate. The barrier layer is formed from a barrier composition comprising an organosilicon compound. The adhesive flexible barrier film also comprises an adhesive layer disposed on the barrier layer and formed from an adhesive composition. A method of forming the adhesive flexible barrier film comprises the steps of disposing the barrier composition on the substrate to form the barrier layer, disposing the adhesive composition on the barrier layer to form the adhesive layer, and curing the barrier layer and the adhesive layer. The adhesive flexible barrier film may be utilized in organic electronic devices.

  20. Association of arrhythmia-related genetic variants with phenotypes documented in electronic medical records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Driest, Sara L.; Wells, Quinn S.; Stallings, Sarah; Bush, William S.; Gordon, Adam; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Kim, Jerry H.; Crosslin, David R.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Carrell, David S.; Ralston, James; Larson, Eric B.; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Olson, Janet E.; Ye, Zi; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Abul-Husn, Noura S.; Scott, Stuart A.; Bottinger, Erwin; Almoguera, Berta; Connolly, John; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Hakonarson, Hakon; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Pan, Vivian; Persell, Stephen D.; Smith, Maureen; Chisholm, Rex L.; Kitchner, Terrie E.; He, Max M.; Brilliant, Murray H.; Wallace, John R.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Shoemaker, M. Benjamin; Li, Rongling; Manolio, Teri A.; Callis, Thomas E.; Macaya, Daniela; Williams, Marc S.; Carey, David; Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Ackerman, Michael J.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Denny, Joshua C.; Roden, Dan M.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Large-scale DNA sequencing identifies incidental rare variants in established Mendelian disease genes, but the frequency of related clinical phenotypes in unselected patient populations is not well established. Phenotype data from electronic medical records may provide a resource to assess the clinical relevance of rare variants. Objective To determine the clinical phenotypes from electronic medical records in individuals with variants designated as pathogenic by expert review in arrhythmia susceptibility genes. Design, Setting and Participants This prospective cohort study included 2022 individuals recruited for non-antiarrhythmic drug exposure phenotypes from 10/5/2012 to 9/30/2013 for the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network Pharmacogenomics project from seven US academic medical centers. Variants in SCN5A and KCNH2, disease genes for long QT and Brugada Syndromes, were assessed for potential pathogenicity by three laboratories with ion channel expertise and the ClinVar database. Relevant phenotypes were determined from electronic medical records, with data available through 9/10/2014. Exposure One or more variants designated as pathogenic in SCN5A or KCNH2. Main Outcome Measures Arrhythmia or electrocardiographic (ECG) phenotypes defined by ICD9 codes, ECG data, and manual electronic medical record review. Results Among 2022 study participants (median age, 61 years [interquartile range, 56–65 years]; 1118 [55%] female; 1491 [74%] white), a total of 122 rare (minor allele frequency <0.5%) nonsynonymous and splice-site variants in 2 arrhythmia susceptibility genes were identified in 223 individuals (11% of the study cohort). Forty-two variants in 63 participants were designated potentially pathogenic by at least 1 laboratory or ClinVar, with low concordance across laboratories (Cohen κ = 0.26). An ICD-9 code for arrhythmia was found in 11 of 63 (17%) variant carriers vs 264 of 1959 (13%) of those without variants (difference, +4%; 95% CI

  1. Ethical precepts for medical volunteerism: including local voices and values to guide RHD surgery in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coors, Marilyn E; Matthew, Thomas L; Matthew, Dayna B

    2015-10-01

    At the invitation of the Rwandan Government, Team Heart, a team of American healthcare professionals, performs volunteer rheumatic heart disease (RHD) surgery in Rwanda every year, and confronts ethical concerns that call for cultural sensitivity. This article describes how five standard bioethical precepts are applied in practice in medical volunteerism related to RHD surgery in Rwanda. The content for the applied precepts stems from semiscripted, transcribed conversations with the authors, two Rwandan cardiologists, a Rwandan nurse and a Rwandan premedical student. The conversations revealed that the criteria for RHD surgical selection in Rwanda are analogous to the patient-selection process involving material scarcity in the USA. Rwandan notions of benefit and harm focus more attention on structural issues, such as shared benefit, national reputation and expansion of expertise, than traditional Western notions. Harm caused by inadequate patient follow-up remains a critical concern. Gender disparities regarding biological and social implications of surgical valve choices impact considerations of justice. Individual agency remains important, but not central to Rwandan concepts of justice, transparency and respect, particularly regarding women. The Rwandan understanding of standard bioethical precepts is substantively similar to the traditionally recognised interpretation with important contextual differences. The communal importance of improving the health of a small number of individuals may be underestimated in previous literature. Moreover, openness and the incorporation of Rwandan stakeholders in difficult ethical choices and long-term contributions to indigenous medical capacity appear to be valued by Rwandans. These descriptions of applied precepts are applicable to different medical missions in other emerging nations following a similar process of inclusion. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted

  2. Impact of an electronic medical record system on emergency department discharge instructions for patients with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cienki, John J; Guerrera, Angela D; Rose Steed, Nell; Kubo, Elizabeth N; Baumann, Brigitte M

    2013-09-01

    Uncontrolled hypertension is associated with significant patient morbidity and health care costs. Many patients evaluated in the emergency department (ED) do not regularly consult health care providers and have socioeconomic barriers to receiving primary care. Hypertension screening and counseling has been advocated as a routine part of ED care. Previous work has shown poor referral rates and education for ED patients presenting with elevated blood pressure (BP). We sought to determine whether implementation of an electronic medical record (EMR) would improve these rates. We performed a retrospective study conducted in 2 urban academic EDs, comparing pre-EMR (handwritten discharge) to post-EMR discharge instructions for patient referral for BP management and education on lifestyle modification. Medical records of patients aged ≥ 18 years with a systolic BP rate ≥ 140 or diastolic BP rate ≥ 90 mm Hg were included. Patient data included demographics, BP rate, presenting symptoms, and administration of antihypertensive medication while in the ED. Discharge instructions were reviewed for a directed referral for outpatient BP management, prescriptions for antihypertensive medication, and lifestyle modifications. Of the 1000 medical records reviewed, 500 were pre- and 500 were post-EMR, including a total of 389 patients who had persistently elevated BP on reassessment. At discharge, acknowledgment of elevated BP occurred in 45% of patients in the pre-EMR phase and only 26% in the post-EMR phase (P patients and in 15% of the post-EMR patients (P patient included increasing BP rate, pharmacologic treatment of hypertension in the ED, or provision of a prescription for an antihypertensive medication at discharge. The post-EMR phase was negatively associated with a directed referral for outpatient BP management. Overall, the initiation of EMR led to a decrease in outpatient referrals and acknowledgment of elevated BP rates in discharge instructions. The provision of

  3. Use of an electronic medical record reminder improves HIV screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Colleen; Taylor, Jessica L; Horowitz, Gary; Brockmeyer, Diane; Libman, Howard; Kriegel, Gila; Ngo, Long

    2018-01-10

    More than 1 in 7 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the United States are unaware of their serostatus despite recommendations of US agencies that all adults through age 65 be screened for HIV at least once. To facilitate universal screening, an electronic medical record (EMR) reminder was created for our primary care practice. Screening rates before and after implementation were assessed to determine the impact of the reminder on screening rates. A retrospective cohort analysis was performed for patients age 18-65 with visits between January 1, 2012-October 30, 2014. EMR databases were examined for HIV testing and selected patient characteristics. We evaluated the probability of HIV screening in unscreened patients before and after the reminder and used a multivariable generalized linear model to test the association between likelihood of HIV testing and specific patient characteristics. Prior to the reminder, the probability of receiving an HIV test for previously unscreened patients was 15.3%. This increased to 30.7% after the reminder (RR 2.02, CI 1.95-2.09, p < 0.0001). The impact was most significant in patients age 45-65. White race, English as primary language, and higher median household income were associated with lower likelihoods of screening both before and after implementation (RR 0.68, CI 0.65-0.72; RR 0.74, CI 0.67-0.82; RR 0.84, CI 0.80-0.88, respectively). The EMR reminder increased rates of HIV screening twofold in our practice. It was most effective in increasing screening rates in older patients. Patients who were white, English-speaking, and had higher incomes were less likely to be screened for HIV both before and after the reminder.

  4. Electronic Health Record-Related Events in Medical Malpractice Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Mark L; Siegal, Dana; Riah, Heather; Johnston, Doug; Kenyon, Kathy

    2015-11-06

    There is widespread agreement that the full potential of health information technology (health IT) has not yet been realized and of particular concern are the examples of unintended consequences of health IT that detract from the safety of health care or from the use of health IT itself. The goal of this project was to obtain additional information on these health IT-related problems, using a mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative) analysis of electronic health record-related harm in cases submitted to a large database of malpractice suits and claims. Cases submitted to the CRICO claims database and coded during 2012 and 2013 were analyzed. A total of 248 cases (<1%) involving health IT were identified and coded using a proprietary taxonomy that identifies user- and system-related sociotechnical factors. Ambulatory care accounted for most of the cases (146 cases). Cases were most typically filed as a result of an error involving medications (31%), diagnosis (28%), or a complication of treatment (31%). More than 80% of cases involved moderate or severe harm, although lethal cases were less likely in cases from ambulatory settings. Etiologic factors spanned all of the sociotechnical dimensions, and many recurring patterns of error were identified. Adverse events associated with health IT vulnerabilities can cause extensive harm and are encountered across the continuum of health care settings and sociotechnical factors. The recurring patterns provide valuable lessons that both practicing clinicians and health IT developers could use to reduce the risk of harm in the future. The likelihood of harm seems to relate more to a patient's particular situation than to any one class of error.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share thework provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used

  5. Photonuclear and Radiation Effects Testing with a Refurbished 20 MeV Medical Electron Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Timothy; Beezhold, Wendland; De Veaux, Linda C; Harmon, Frank; Petrisko, Jill E; Spaulding, Randy

    2005-01-01

    An S-band 20 MeV electron linear accelerator formerly used for medical applications has been recommissioned to provide a wide range of photonuclear activation studies as well as various radiation effects on biological and microelectronic systems. Four radiation effect applications involving the electron/photon beams are described. Photonuclear activation of a stable isotope of oxygen provides an active means of characterizing polymer degradation. Biological irradiations of microorganisms including bacteria were used to study total dose and dose rate effects on survivability and the adaptation of these organisms to repeated exposures. Microelectronic devices including bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and diodes were irradiated to study photocurrent from these devices as a function of peak dose rate with comparisons to computer modeling results. In addition, the 20 MeV linac may easily be converted to a medium energy neutron source which has been used to study neutron damage effects on transistors.

  6. Design and implementation of an affordable, public sector electronic medical record in rural Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anant Raut

    2017-06-01

    Over the course of 18 months, we were able to develop, deploy and iterate upon the electronic medical record, and then deploy the refined product at an additional facility within only four weeks. Our experience suggests the feasibility of an integrated electronic medical record for public sector care delivery even in settings of rural poverty.

  7. Medication errors with electronic prescribing (eP): Two views of the same picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Quantitative prospective methods are widely used to evaluate the impact of new technologies such as electronic prescribing (eP) on medication errors. However, they are labour-intensive and it is not always feasible to obtain pre-intervention data. Our objective was to compare the eP medication error picture obtained with retrospective quantitative and qualitative methods. Methods The study was carried out at one English district general hospital approximately two years after implementation of an integrated electronic prescribing, administration and records system. Quantitative: A structured retrospective analysis was carried out of clinical records and medication orders for 75 randomly selected patients admitted to three wards (medicine, surgery and paediatrics) six months after eP implementation. Qualitative: Eight doctors, 6 nurses, 8 pharmacy staff and 4 other staff at senior, middle and junior grades, and 19 adult patients on acute surgical and medical wards were interviewed. Staff interviews explored experiences of developing and working with the system; patient interviews focused on experiences of medicine prescribing and administration on the ward. Interview transcripts were searched systematically for accounts of medication incidents. A classification scheme was developed and applied to the errors identified in the records review. Results The two approaches produced similar pictures of the drug use process. Interviews identified types of error identified in the retrospective notes review plus two eP-specific errors which were not detected by record review. Interview data took less time to collect than record review, and provided rich data on the prescribing process, and reasons for delays or non-administration of medicines, including "once only" orders and "as required" medicines. Conclusions The qualitative approach provided more understanding of processes, and some insights into why medication errors can happen. The method is cost-effective and

  8. Medication errors with electronic prescribing (eP): Two views of the same picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Imogen; Cornford, Tony; Klecun, Ela; Barber, Nick; Clifford, Sarah; Franklin, Bryony Dean

    2010-05-24

    Quantitative prospective methods are widely used to evaluate the impact of new technologies such as electronic prescribing (eP) on medication errors. However, they are labour-intensive and it is not always feasible to obtain pre-intervention data. Our objective was to compare the eP medication error picture obtained with retrospective quantitative and qualitative methods. The study was carried out at one English district general hospital approximately two years after implementation of an integrated electronic prescribing, administration and records system. QUANTITATIVE: A structured retrospective analysis was carried out of clinical records and medication orders for 75 randomly selected patients admitted to three wards (medicine, surgery and paediatrics) six months after eP implementation. QUALITATIVE: Eight doctors, 6 nurses, 8 pharmacy staff and 4 other staff at senior, middle and junior grades, and 19 adult patients on acute surgical and medical wards were interviewed. Staff interviews explored experiences of developing and working with the system; patient interviews focused on experiences of medicine prescribing and administration on the ward. Interview transcripts were searched systematically for accounts of medication incidents. A classification scheme was developed and applied to the errors identified in the records review. The two approaches produced similar pictures of the drug use process. Interviews identified types of error identified in the retrospective notes review plus two eP-specific errors which were not detected by record review. Interview data took less time to collect than record review, and provided rich data on the prescribing process, and reasons for delays or non-administration of medicines, including "once only" orders and "as required" medicines. The qualitative approach provided more understanding of processes, and some insights into why medication errors can happen. The method is cost-effective and could be used to supplement

  9. Production of medical radioactive isotopes using KIPT electron driven subcritical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry

    2008-01-01

    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has a plan to construct an electron accelerator driven subcritical assembly. One of the facility objectives is the production of medical radioactive isotopes. This paper presents the ANL collaborative work performed for characterizing the facility performance for producing medical radioactive isotopes. First, a preliminary assessment was performed without including the self-shielding effect of the irradiated samples. Then, more detailed investigation was carried out including the self-shielding effect, which defined the sample size and location for producing each medical isotope. In the first part, the reaction rates were calculated as the multiplication of the cross section with the unperturbed neutron flux of the facility. Over fifty isotopes have been considered and all transmutation channels are used including (n, γ), (n, 2n), (n, p), and (γ, n). In the second part, the parent isotopes with high reaction rate were explicitly modeled in the calculations. Four irradiation locations were considered in the analyses to study the medical isotope production rate. The results show the self-shielding effect not only reduces the specific activity but it also changes the irradiation location that maximizes the specific activity. The axial and radial distributions of the parent capture rates have been examined to define the irradiation sample size of each parent isotope

  10. Metal and silicate particles including nanoparticles are present in electronic cigarette cartomizer fluid and aerosol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Williams

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (EC deliver aerosol by heating fluid containing nicotine. Cartomizer EC combine the fluid chamber and heating element in a single unit. Because EC do not burn tobacco, they may be safer than conventional cigarettes. Their use is rapidly increasing worldwide with little prior testing of their aerosol.We tested the hypothesis that EC aerosol contains metals derived from various components in EC.Cartomizer contents and aerosols were analyzed using light and electron microscopy, cytotoxicity testing, x-ray microanalysis, particle counting, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.The filament, a nickel-chromium wire, was coupled to a thicker copper wire coated with silver. The silver coating was sometimes missing. Four tin solder joints attached the wires to each other and coupled the copper/silver wire to the air tube and mouthpiece. All cartomizers had evidence of use before packaging (burn spots on the fibers and electrophoretic movement of fluid in the fibers. Fibers in two cartomizers had green deposits that contained copper. Centrifugation of the fibers produced large pellets containing tin. Tin particles and tin whiskers were identified in cartridge fluid and outer fibers. Cartomizer fluid with tin particles was cytotoxic in assays using human pulmonary fibroblasts. The aerosol contained particles >1 µm comprised of tin, silver, iron, nickel, aluminum, and silicate and nanoparticles (<100 nm of tin, chromium and nickel. The concentrations of nine of eleven elements in EC aerosol were higher than or equal to the corresponding concentrations in conventional cigarette smoke. Many of the elements identified in EC aerosol are known to cause respiratory distress and disease.The presence of metal and silicate particles in cartomizer aerosol demonstrates the need for improved quality control in EC design and manufacture and studies on how EC aerosol impacts the health of users and bystanders.

  11. Assessing accuracy of an electronic provincial medication repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price Morgan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Jurisdictional drug information systems are being implemented in many regions around the world. British Columbia, Canada has had a provincial medication dispensing record, PharmaNet, system since 1995. Little is known about how accurately PharmaNet reflects actual medication usage. Methods This prospective, multi-centre study compared pharmacist collected Best Possible Medication Histories (BPMH to PharmaNet profiles to assess accuracy of the PharmaNet profiles for patients receiving a BPMH as part of clinical care. A review panel examined the anonymized BPMHs and discrepancies to estimate clinical significance of discrepancies. Results 16% of medication profiles were accurate, with 48% of the discrepant profiles considered potentially clinically significant by the clinical review panel. Cardiac medications tended to be more accurate (e.g. ramipril was accurate >90% of the time, while insulin, warfarin, salbutamol and pain relief medications were often inaccurate (80–85% of the time. 1215 sequential BPMHs were collected and reviewed for this study. Conclusions The PharmaNet medication repository has a low accuracy and should be used in conjunction with other sources for medication histories for clinical or research purposes. This finding is consistent with other, smaller medication repository accuracy studies in other jurisdictions. Our study highlights specific medications that tend to be lower in accuracy.

  12. Quality assessment of Isfahan Medical Faculty web site electronic services and prioritizing solutions using analytic hierarchy process approach

    OpenAIRE

    Hajrahimi, Nafiseh; Dehaghani, Sayed Mehdi Hejazi; Hajrahimi, Nargess; Sarmadi, Sima

    2014-01-01

    Context: Implementing information technology in the best possible way can bring many advantages such as applying electronic services and facilitating tasks. Therefore, assessment of service providing systems is a way to improve the quality and elevate these systems including e-commerce, e-government, e-banking, and e-learning. Aims: This study was aimed to evaluate the electronic services in the website of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in order to propose solutions to improve them. F...

  13. The realization of the storage of XML and middleware-based data of electronic medical records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuzhen; Gu Peidi; Luo Yanlin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, using the technology of XML and middleware to design and implement a unified electronic medical records storage archive management system and giving a common storage management model. Using XML to describe the structure of electronic medical records, transform the medical data from traditional 'business-centered' medical information into a unified 'patient-centered' XML document and using middleware technology to shield the types of the databases at different departments of the hospital and to complete the information integration of the medical data which scattered in different databases, conducive to information sharing between different hospitals. (authors)

  14. 78 FR 18457 - Definition of Form I-94 To Include Electronic Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... alien to turn in the departure portion of the Form I-94 at the time of departure, the definition..., and 286 [USCBP-2013-0011; CBP Dec. No. 13-06] RIN 1651-AA96 Definition of Form I-94 To Include... departure. DHS generally issues the Form I-94 to aliens at the time they lawfully enter the United States...

  15. Ballistic electron channels including weakly protected topological states in delaminated bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, T. L. M.; Andelković, M.; Wallbank, J. R.; Covaci, L.; Peeters, F. M.; Fal'ko, V. I.

    2018-01-01

    We show that delaminations in bilayer graphene (BLG) with electrostatically induced interlayer symmetry can provide one with ballistic channels for electrons with energies inside the electrostatically induced BLG gap. These channels are formed by a combination of valley-polarized evanescent states propagating along the delamination edges (which persist in the presence of a strong magnetic field) and standing waves bouncing between them inside the delaminated region (in a strong magnetic field, these transform into Landau levels in the monolayers). For inverted stackings in BLGs on the left and right of the delamination (AB-2ML-BA or BA-2ML-AB, where 2ML indicates two decoupled monolayers of graphene), the lowest-energy ballistic channels are gapless, have linear dispersion, and appear to be weakly topologically protected. When BLG stackings on both sides of the delamination are the same (AB-2ML-AB or BA-2ML-BA), the lowest-energy ballistic channels are gapped, with a gap ɛg scaling as ɛg∝W-1 with delamination width and ɛg∝δ-1 with the on-layer energy difference in the delaminated part of the structure. Depending on the width, delaminations may also support several "higher-energy" waveguide modes. Our results are based on both the analytical study of the wave matching of Dirac states and tight-binding model calculations, and we analyze in detail the dependence of the delamination spectrum on the electrostatic conditions in the structure, such as the vertical displacement field.

  16. Electronic security systems and active implantable medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irnich, Werner

    2002-08-01

    How do active implantable medical devices react in the presence of strong magnetic fields in the frequency range between extremely low frequency (ELF) to radiofrequency (RF) as they are emitted by electronic security systems (ESS)? There are three different sorts of ESSs: electronic article surveillance (EAS) devices, metal detector (MDS) devices, and radiofrequency identification (RFID) systems. Common to all is the production of magnetic fields. There is an abundance of literature concerning interference by ESS gates with respect to if there is an influence possible and if such an influence can bear a risk for the AIMD wearers. However, there has been no attempt to study the physical mechanism nor to develop a model of how and under which conditions magnetic fields can influence pacemakers and defibrillators and how they could be disarmed by technological means. It is too often assumed that interference of AIMD with ESS is inevitable. Exogenous signals of similar intensity and rhythm to heart signals can be misinterpreted and, thus, confuse the implant. Important for the interference coupling mechanism is the differentiation between a "unipolar" and a "bipolar" system. With respect to magnetic fields, the left side implanted pacemaker is the most unfavorable case as the lead forms approximately a semicircular area of maximum 225 cm2 into which a voltage can be induced. This assumption yields an interference coupling model that can be expressed by simple mathematics. The worst-case conditions for induced interference voltages are a coupling area of 225 cm2 that is representative for a large human, a homogeneous magnetic field perpendicular to the area formed by the lead, and a unipolar ventricular pacemaker system that is implanted on the left side of the thorax and has the highest interference sensitivity. In bipolar systems the fields must be 17 times larger when compared to a unipolar system to have the same effect. The magnetic field for interfering with ICDs

  17. Qualitative study of the impact of an authentic electronic portfolio in undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, Rosie; Jones, Anna; Smith, Laura-Jane; Vincent, Tim; Naidu, Sindhu Bhaarrati; Montgomery, Julia; Haq, Inam; Gill, Deborah

    2014-12-17

    Portfolios are increasingly used in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education. Four medical schools have collaborated with an established NHS electronic portfolio provider to develop and implement an authentic professional electronic portfolio for undergraduate students. We hypothesized that using an authentic portfolio would have significant advantages for students, particularly in familiarizing them with the tool many will continue to use for years after graduation. This paper describes the early evaluation of this undergraduate portfolio at two participating medical schools. To gather data, a questionnaire survey with extensive free text comments was used at School 1, and three focus groups were held at School 2. This paper reports thematic analysis of students' opinions expressed in the free text comments and focus groups. Five main themes, common across both schools were identified. These concerned the purpose, use and acceptability of the portfolio, advantages of and barriers to the use of the portfolio, and the impacts on both learning and professional identity. An authentic portfolio mitigated some of the negative aspects of using a portfolio, and had a positive effect on students' perception of themselves as becoming past of the profession. However, significant barriers to portfolio use remained, including a lack of understanding of the purpose of a portfolio and a perceived damaging effect on feedback.

  18. Electronic prescribing in pediatrics: toward safer and more effective medication management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kevin B; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2013-04-01

    This technical report discusses recent advances in electronic prescribing (e-prescribing) systems, including the evidence base supporting their limitations and potential benefits. Specifically, this report acknowledges that there are limited but positive pediatric data supporting the role of e-prescribing in mitigating medication errors, improving communication with dispensing pharmacists, and improving medication adherence. On the basis of these data and on the basis of federal statutes that provide incentives for the use of e-prescribing systems, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the adoption of e-prescribing systems with pediatric functionality. This report supports the accompanying policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics recommending the adoption of e-prescribing by pediatric health care providers.

  19. Prevalence of Sharing Access Credentials in Electronic Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korach, Tzfania; Shreberk-Hassidim, Rony; Thomaidou, Elena; Uzefovsky, Florina; Ayal, Shahar; Ariely, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Confidentiality of health information is an important aspect of the physician patient relationship. The use of digital medical records has made data much more accessible. To prevent data leakage, many countries have created regulations regarding medical data accessibility. These regulations require a unique user ID for each medical staff member, and this must be protected by a password, which should be kept undisclosed by all means. Methods We performed a four-question Google Forms-based survey of medical staff. In the survey, each participant was asked if he/she ever obtained the password of another medical staff member. Then, we asked how many times such an episode occurred and the reason for it. Results A total of 299 surveys were gathered. The responses showed that 220 (73.6%) participants reported that they had obtained the password of another medical staff member. Only 171 (57.2%) estimated how many time it happened, with an average estimation of 4.75 episodes. All the residents that took part in the study (45, 15%) had obtained the password of another medical staff member, while only 57.5% (38/66) of the nurses reported this. Conclusions The use of unique user IDs and passwords to defend the privacy of medical data is a common requirement in medical organizations. Unfortunately, the use of passwords is doomed because medical staff members share their passwords with one another. Strict regulations requiring each staff member to have it's a unique user ID might lead to password sharing and to a decrease in data safety. PMID:28875052

  20. Migration path for structured documentation systems including standardized medical device data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Ann-Kristin; Ingenerf, Josef; Halkaliev, Stoyan; Handels, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    A standardized end-to-end solution has been implemented with the aim of supporting the semantic integration of clinical content in institution spanning applications. The approach outlined is a proof-of-concept design. It has shown that the standards chosen are suitable to integrate device data into forms, to document the results consistently and finally enable semantic interoperability. In detail the implementation includes a standardized device interface, a standardized representation of data entry forms and enables the communication of structured data via HL7 CDA. Because the proposed method applies a combination of standards semantic interoperability and the possibility of a contextual interpretation at each stage can be ensured.

  1. 76 FR 40930 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones, Portable Music Players, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-12

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-701] In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones, Portable Music Players, and Computers; Notice of Commission... music players, and computers by reason of infringement of various claims of United States Patent Nos. 6...

  2. Medical students are afraid to include abortion in their future practices: in-depth interviews in Maharastra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöström, Susanne; Essén, Birgitta; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Klingberg-Allvin, Marie

    2016-01-12

    Unsafe abortions are estimated to cause eight per-cent of maternal mortality in India. Lack of providers, especially in rural areas, is one reason unsafe abortions take place despite decades of legal abortion. Education and training in reproductive health services has been shown to influence attitudes and increase chances that medical students will provide abortion care services in their future practice. To further explore previous findings about poor attitudes toward abortion among medical students in Maharastra, India, we conducted in-depth interviews with medical students in their final year of education. We used a qualitative design conducting in-depth interviews with twenty-three medical students in Maharastra applying a topic guide. Data was organized using thematic analysis with an inductive approach. The participants described a fear to provide abortion in their future practice. They lacked understanding of the law and confused the legal regulation of abortion with the law governing gender biased sex selection, and concluded that abortion is illegal in Maharastra. The interviewed medical students' attitudes were supported by their experiences and perceptions from the clinical setting as well as traditions and norms in society. Medical abortion using mifepristone and misoprostol was believed to be unsafe and prohibited in Maharastra. The students perceived that nurse-midwives were knowledgeable in Sexual and Reproductive Health and many found that they could be trained to perform abortions in the future. To increase chances that medical students in Maharastra will perform abortion care services in their future practice, it is important to strengthen their confidence and knowledge through improved medical education including value clarification and clinical training.

  3. Technology and Health Care: Efficiency, Frustration, and Disconnect in the Transition to Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Checton, Maria

    2014-02-01

    This study investigates one medical facility's transition to electronic medical records (becoming "paperless"). We utilized face-to-face interviews to investigate the transition process with one implementer (the vice president of the medical facility) and three stakeholders from one of the four offices (an assistant office manager, a nurse, and a medical technician). We discuss the dominant themes of efficiency, frustration, and disconnect as well as conclusions and implications.

  4. Model of spur processes in aqueous radiation chemistry including spur overlap and a novel initial hydrated electron distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented from computer calculations based upon an improved diffusion-kinetic model of the spur which includes a novel initial distribution for the hydrated electron and an approximate mathematical treatment of the overlap of spurs in three dimensions. Experimental data for the decay of the hydrated electron and hydroxyl radical before one in electron-pulse-irradated, solute-free and air-free water are fit wihtin experimental uncertainty by adjustment of the initial spatial distributions of spur intermediates and the average energy deposited in the spur. Using the same values of these parameters, the hydrated electron decay is computed for times from 1 ps 10 μs after the radiatio pulse. The results of such calcuations for various conditions of pulse dose and concentrations of scavengers of individual primary chemical species in the spur are compared with corresponding experimental data obtained predominantly from water and aqueous solutions irradiated with 10 to 15 MeV electron pulses. Very good agreement between calculated and experimental hydrated electron decay in pure water is observed for the entire time range studied when a pulse dose of approximately 7900 rads is modeled, but the calcuated and experimental curves are observed to deviate for times greater than 10 ns nanoseconds when low pulse doses and low scavenger concentrations are considered. It is shown that this deviation is experimental and calculated hydrated electron decay cannot be explained by assuming the presence of a hydrated electron scavenging impurity nor by employing a distribution of nearest neighbor interspur distances to refine the overlap approximation

  5. Pharmacological Interventions Including Medical Injections for Neck Pain: An Overview as Part of the ICON§ Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peloso, Paul M; Khan, Mahweesh; Gross, Anita R; Carlesso, Lisa; Santaguida, Lina; Lowcock, Janet; MacDermid, Joy C; Walton, Dave; Goldsmith, Charlie H; Langevin, Pierre; Shi, Qiyun

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To conduct an overview (review-of-reviews) on pharmacological interventions for neck pain. Search Strategy: Computerized databases and grey literature were searched from 2006 to 2012. Selection Criteria: Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCT) in adults with acute to chronic neck pain reporting effects of pharmacological interventions including injections on pain, function/disability, global perceived effect, quality of life and patient satisfaction. Data Collection & Analysis: Two independent authors selected articles, assessed risk of bias and extracted data The GRADE tool was used to evaluate the body of evidence and an external panel provided critical review. Main Results: We found 26 reviews reporting on 47 RCTs. Most pharmacological interventions had low to very low quality methodologic evidence with three exceptions. For chronic neck pain, there was evidence of: a small immediate benefit for eperison hydrochloride (moderate GRADE, 1 trial, 157 participants);no short-term pain relieving benefit for botulinum toxin-A compared to saline (strong GRADE; 5 trial meta-analysis, 258 participants) nor for subacute/chronic whiplash (moderate GRADE; 4 trial meta-analysis, 183 participants) including reduced pain, disability or global perceived effect; andno long-term benefit for medial branch block of facet joints with steroids (moderate GRADE; 1 trial, 120 participants) over placebo to reduce pain or disability; Reviewers' Conclusions: While in general there is a lack of evidence for most pharmacological interventions, current evidence is against botulinum toxin-A for chronic neck pain or subacute/chronic whiplash; against medial branch block with steroids for chronic facet joint pain; but in favour of the muscle relaxant eperison hydrochloride for chronic neck pain. PMID:24155805

  6. The effect of electronic monitoring feedback on medication adherence and clinical outcomes: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heuckelum, Milou; van den Ende, Cornelia H M; Houterman, Anne E J; Heemskerk, Charlotte P M; van Dulmen, Sandra; van den Bemt, Bart J F

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to assess the efficacy of Electronic Monitoring Feedback (EMF) as an intervention to improve medication adherence (i.e. dose- or full adherence) and clinical outcomes in adult patients. A systematic search was performed in Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO and Web of Science and reported according to the PRISMA guidelines. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing EMF with usual care were identified to systematically summarise the evidence for use of EMF in improving medication adherence and clinical outcomes. The GRADE approach was used to assess the quality of the body of evidence. Of 9,993 initially-identified studies, ten studies (four of high-quality and six of low-quality) were included. The sample size of the studies included varied from 18 to 205 patients. Four of the six studies (66.7%) reported a significant positive effect of EMF on mean dose adherence levels, whereas a significant positive effect of EMF on mean full adherence levels was found in all of the included studies (100%, five out of five of the studies included). A significant positive effect of EMF on clinical outcomes was reported in one of the seven studies included. The overall effect of EMF on mean dose- and full adherence was positive and the overall effect of EMF on clinical outcomes was inconclusive. Considering the positive effect of EMF on medication adherence, EMF might be a promising intervention to enhance medication adherence. However, the effect of EMF on clinical outcomes was inconclusive. Prior to implementing EMF in clinical practice, future research with high-quality studies (e.g. adequate sample sizes, follow-up periods and no interfering co-interventions) is required to examine the (long-term) efficacy of EMF.

  7. Mitochondrial Iron Accumulation in Parietal and Chief Cells in Iron Pill Gastritis Following Billroth II Gastrectomy: Case Report Including Electron Microscopic Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafique, Khurram; Araujo, James L; Veluvolu, Rajesh; Cassai, Nicholas; Desoto-Lapaix, Fidelina; Pincus, Matthew R; Wieczorek, Rosemary L

    2017-05-01

    Iron pill gastritis has been shown to be associated with superficial gastric erosion and deposition of iron in lamina propria and gastric antral glands. However, iron absorption in gastric parietal and chief cells is rare. We present a case of a 62-year-old man with iron deficiency anemia. His past medical history is significant for Billroth II surgery. His medications include ferrous sulphate 325mg. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed diffuse circumferential abnormal mucosa at the gastro-jejunal anastomosis. The mucosa was erythematous and violaceous. Biopsy showed reactive gastropathy with iron deposits predominantly in macrophages, parietal cells, and chief cells. These findings were confirmed by iron stain and later by electron micrography of the gastric mucosa that showed iron deposits in mitochondria and cytoplasm of the parietal and chief cells. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  8. Extracting Surveillance Data from Templated Sections of an Electronic Medical Note: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlapalli, Adi; Divita, Guy; Carter, Marjorie; Shen, Shuying; Palmer, Miland; Forbush, Tyler; South, Brett; Redd, Andrew; Sauer, Brian; Samore, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    documents as determined by human review. The NLP algorithm successfully extracted concepts from these documents. The H set had an average of 8 concepts related to homelessness per document (median 8, range 1 to 34). The NH set had an average 2 concepts (median 1, range 1 to 13)”. Thirteen template patterns were identified in this set of documents. The three most common were check boxes with square brackets, Yes/No and free text answer after a question. Several positively and negatively asserted concepts were noted to be in the responses to templated questions such as “Are you currently homeless: Yes or No”; “How many times have you been homeless in the past 3 years: (free text response)”; “Have you ever been in jail? [Y] or [N]”; Are you in need of substance abuse services? Yes or No”. Human review of a random sample of documents at the concept level indicated that the NLP algorithm generated 28% false positives in extracting concepts related to homelessness when templates were ignored among the H documents. When the algorithm was refined to include templates, the false positive rate declined to 22%. For the NH documents, the corresponding false positive rates were 56% and 21%. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is one of the first attempts to address the problem of information extraction from templates or templated sections of the EMR. A key challenge of templates is that they will most likely lead to poor performance of NLP algorithms and cause bottlenecks in processing if they are not considered. Acknowledging the presence of templates and refining NLP algorithms to handle them improves information extraction from free text medical notes, thus creating an opportunity for improved surveillance using the EMR. Algorithms will likely need to be customized to the electronic medical record and the surveillance domain of interest. A more detailed analysis of the templated sections is underway.

  9. Determining Multiple Sclerosis Phenotype from Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Richard E; Butler, Jorie; LaFleur, Joanne; Knippenberg, Kristin; C Kamauu, Aaron W; DuVall, Scott L

    2016-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS), a central nervous system disease in which nerve signals are disrupted by scarring and demyelination, is classified into phenotypes depending on the patterns of cognitive or physical impairment progression: relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), primary-progressive MS (PPMS), secondary-progressive MS (SPMS), or progressive-relapsing MS (PRMS). The phenotype is important in managing the disease and determining appropriate treatment. The ICD-9-CM code 340.0 is uninformative about MS phenotype, which increases the difficulty of studying the effects of phenotype on disease. To identify MS phenotype using natural language processing (NLP) techniques on progress notes and other clinical text in the electronic medical record (EMR). Patients with at least 2 ICD-9-CM codes for MS (340.0) from 1999 through 2010 were identified from nationwide EMR data in the Department of Veterans Affairs. Clinical experts were interviewed for possible keywords and phrases denoting MS phenotype in order to develop a data dictionary for NLP. For each patient, NLP was used to search EMR clinical notes, since the first MS diagnosis date for these keywords and phrases. Presence of phenotype-related keywords and phrases were analyzed in context to remove mentions that were negated (e.g., "not relapsing-remitting") or unrelated to MS (e.g., "RR" meaning "respiratory rate"). One thousand mentions of MS phenotype were validated, and all records of 150 patients were reviewed for missed mentions. There were 7,756 MS patients identified by ICD-9-CM code 340.0. MS phenotype was identified for 2,854 (36.8%) patients, with 1,836 (64.3%) of those having just 1 phenotype mentioned in their EMR clinical notes: 1,118 (39.2%) RRMS, 325 (11.4%) PPMS, 374 (13.1%) SPMS, and 19 (0.7%) PRMS. A total of 747 patients (26.2%) had 2 phenotypes, the most common being 459 patients (16.1%) with RRMS and SPMS. A total of 213 patients (7.5%) had 3 phenotypes, and 58 patients (2.0%) had 4 phenotypes mentioned

  10. [Information extraction methodology used in electronic medical records].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingying; Ye, Feng

    2011-01-01

    We try to use information extraction technology in some parts of the medical records and extract disease information to accumulate experience for extracting complete information from medical records. This paper attempts to use dictionary and rules to achieve the named entity recognition. Information extraction is based on shallow parsing and use pattern sentence matching method with the help of a 3 levels finite state automaton.

  11. Developing an electronic system to manage and track emergency medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Mark W; Calabrese, Samuel V; Knoer, Scott J; Duty, Ashley M

    2018-03-01

    The development of a Web-based program to track and manage emergency medications with radio frequency identification (RFID) is described. At the Cleveland Clinic, medication kit restocking records and dispense locations were historically documented using a paper record-keeping system. The Cleveland Clinic investigated options to replace the paper-based tracking logs with a Web-based program that could track the real-time location and inventory of emergency medication kits. Vendor collaboration with a board of pharmacy (BOP) compliance inspector and pharmacy personnel resulted in the creation of a dual barcoding system using medication and pocket labels. The Web-based program was integrated with a Cleveland Clinic-developed asset tracking system using active RFID tags to give the real-time location of the medication kit. The Web-based program and the asset tracking system allowed identification of kits nearing expiration or containing recalled medications. Conversion from a paper-based system to a Web-based program began in October 2013. After 119 days, data were evaluated to assess the success of the conversion. Pharmacists spent an average of 27 minutes per day approving medication kits during the postimplementation period versus 102 minutes daily using the paper-based system, representing a 74% decrease in pharmacist time spent on this task. Prospective reports are generated monthly to allow the manager to assess the expected workload and adjust staffing for the next month. Implementation of a BOP-approved Web-based system for managing and tracking emergency medications with RFID integration decreased pharmacist review time, minimized compliance risk, and increased access to real-time data. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An Electronic Pillbox for Continuous Monitoring of Medication Adherence

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes, Tamara. L.; Hunt, John M.; Adami, Andre; Kaye, Jeffrey A.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed an instrumented pillbox, called a MedTracker, which allows monitoring of medication adherence on a continuous basis. This device improves on existing systems by providing mobility, frequent and automatic data collection, more detailed information about nonadherence and medication errors, and the familiar interface of a 7-day drug store pillbox. We report on the design of the MedTracker, and on the results of a field trial in 39 homes to evaluate the device.

  13. An electronic pillbox for continuous monitoring of medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Tamara L; Hunt, John M; Adami, Andre; Kaye, Jeffrey A

    2006-01-01

    We have developed an instrumented pillbox, called a MedTracker, which allows monitoring of medication adherence on a continuous basis. This device improves on existing systems by providing mobility, frequent and automatic data collection, more detailed information about non-adherence and medication errors, and the familiar interface of a 7-day drug store pillbox. We report on the design of the MedTracker, and on the results of a field trial in 39 homes to evaluate the device.

  14. A Study on FIDO Authentication System for Reinforcing the Security of Electronic Medical Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sujin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The target of compulsory certification in Information Security Management System has extended to medical institutions. This caused us to recognize the importance of information security in modern hospital information system that has changed from the medical record management that was recorded and managed largely in paper chart in the past to the Electronic Medical Record that medical personnel enter patient information into a computer directly for building a database. As medical institutions manage sensitive information like personal information basically, personal medical data infringement accident, if occurred can become a big social issue. Currently, the medical information in medical institutions are stored in electronic medical records and to access, user authentication is required by means of accredited certificate as security measure. Accredited certification has technical problems such as certificate storage method and security level of password and managerial problems such as certificate copy/leak/share. In this respect, this study proposes and presents how to build the FIDO-based authentication system that applies UAF or U2F authentication mechanism depending on the authority and work scope of medical personnel and medical support assistant like staffs, officers, licensed practical nurse and so on, within large medical institutions that use medical information system. The aim is to solve problems in accredited certificate authentication method in the existing medical institutions with the FIDO-based authentication system proposed in this study.

  15. Automated extraction of clinical traits of multiple sclerosis in electronic medical records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mary F; Sriram, Subramaniam; Bush, William S; Denny, Joshua C; Haines, Jonathan L

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The clinical course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is highly variable, and research data collection is costly and time consuming. We evaluated natural language processing techniques applied to electronic medical records (EMR) to identify MS patients and the key clinical traits of their disease course. Materials and methods We used four algorithms based on ICD-9 codes, text keywords, and medications to identify individuals with MS from a de-identified, research version of the EMR at Vanderbilt University. Using a training dataset of the records of 899 individuals, algorithms were constructed to identify and extract detailed information regarding the clinical course of MS from the text of the medical records, including clinical subtype, presence of oligoclonal bands, year of diagnosis, year and origin of first symptom, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores, timed 25-foot walk scores, and MS medications. Algorithms were evaluated on a test set validated by two independent reviewers. Results We identified 5789 individuals with MS. For all clinical traits extracted, precision was at least 87% and specificity was greater than 80%. Recall values for clinical subtype, EDSS scores, and timed 25-foot walk scores were greater than 80%. Discussion and conclusion This collection of clinical data represents one of the largest databases of detailed, clinical traits available for research on MS. This work demonstrates that detailed clinical information is recorded in the EMR and can be extracted for research purposes with high reliability. PMID:24148554

  16. Usability Evaluation of An Electronic Medication Administration Record (eMAR) Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J.; Iribarren, S.; Kapsandoy, S.; Perri, S.; Staggers, N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Electronic medication administration records (eMARs) have been widely used in recent years. However, formal usability evaluations are not yet available for these vendor applications, especially from the perspective of nurses, the largest group of eMAR users. Objective To conduct a formal usability evaluation of an implemented eMAR. Methods Four evaluators examined a commercial vendor eMAR using heuristic evaluation techniques. The evaluators defined seven tasks typical of eMAR use and independently evaluated the application. Consensus techniques were used to obtain 100% agreement of identified usability problems and severity ratings. Findings were reviewed with 5 clinical staff nurses and the Director of Clinical Informatics who verified findings with a small group of clinical nurses. Results Evaluators found 60 usability problems categorized into 233 heuristic violations. Match, Error, and Visibility heuristics were the most frequently violated. Administer Medication and Order and Modify Medications tasks had the highest number of heuristic violations and usability problems rated as major or catastrophic. Conclusion The high number of usability problems could impact the effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction of nurses’ medication administration activities and may include concerns about patient safety. Usability is a joint responsibility between sites and vendors. We offer a call to action for usability evaluations at all sites and eMAR application redesign as necessary to improve the user experience and promote patient safety. PMID:23616871

  17. Electronic Medical Record Keeping: Eleven Years Experience at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To rep ort the su ccess of a p ap erless med ical record system in a small clinic in a d evelop ing economy and to highlight the ad vantages and challenges of electronic med ical record keep ing, even with a small bu d get. Method: The concept of electronic med ical record (EMR) as a record keep ing method at Life Sup ...

  18. Polypharmacy including falls risk-increasing medications and subsequent falls in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Kathryn; Bennett, Kathleen; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2015-01-01

    polypharmacy is an important risk factor for falls, but recent studies suggest only when including medications associated with increasing the risk of falls. a prospective, population-based cohort study. 6,666 adults aged ≥50 years from The Irish Longitudinal study on Ageing. participants reported regular medication use at baseline. Any subsequent falls, any injurious falls and the number of falls were reported 2 years later. The association between polypharmacy (>4 medications) or fall risk-increasing medications and subsequent falls or injurious falls was assessed using modified Poisson regression. The association with the number of falls was assessed using negative binomial regression. during follow-up, 231 falls per 1,000 person-years were reported. Polypharmacy including antidepressants was associated with a greater risk of any fall (adjusted relative risk (aRR) 1.28, 95% CI 1.06-1.54), of injurious falls (aRR 1.51, 95% CI 1.10-2.07) and a greater number of falls (adjusted incident rate ratio (aIRR) 1.60, 95% CI 1.19-2.15), but antidepressant use without polypharmacy and polypharmacy without antidepressants were not. The use of benzodiazepines was associated with injurious falls when coupled with polypharmacy (aRR 1.40, 95% CI 1.04-1.87), but was associated with a greater number of falls (aIRR 1.32, 95% CI 1.05-1.65), independent of polypharmacy. Other medications assessed, including antihypertensives, diuretics and antipsychotics, were not associated with outcomes. in middle-aged and older adults, polypharmacy, including antidepressant or benzodiazepine use, was associated with injurious falls and a greater number of falls. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Barriers to the acceptance of electronic medical records by physicians from systematic review to taxonomy and interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broekhuis Manda

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main objective of this research is to identify, categorize, and analyze barriers perceived by physicians to the adoption of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs in order to provide implementers with beneficial intervention options. Methods A systematic literature review, based on research papers from 1998 to 2009, concerning barriers to the acceptance of EMRs by physicians was conducted. Four databases, "Science", "EBSCO", "PubMed" and "The Cochrane Library", were used in the literature search. Studies were included in the analysis if they reported on physicians' perceived barriers to implementing and using electronic medical records. Electronic medical records are defined as computerized medical information systems that collect, store and display patient information. Results The study includes twenty-two articles that have considered barriers to EMR as perceived by physicians. Eight main categories of barriers, including a total of 31 sub-categories, were identified. These eight categories are: A Financial, B Technical, C Time, D Psychological, E Social, F Legal, G Organizational, and H Change Process. All these categories are interrelated with each other. In particular, Categories G (Organizational and H (Change Process seem to be mediating factors on other barriers. By adopting a change management perspective, we develop some barrier-related interventions that could overcome the identified barriers. Conclusions Despite the positive effects of EMR usage in medical practices, the adoption rate of such systems is still low and meets resistance from physicians. This systematic review reveals that physicians may face a range of barriers when they approach EMR implementation. We conclude that the process of EMR implementation should be treated as a change project, and led by implementers or change managers, in medical practices. The quality of change management plays an important role in the success of EMR implementation. The

  20. An object-oriented approach for structuring the electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banhart, F; Lohmann, R

    2000-01-01

    We implemented a framework for modelling the electronic medical record on top of an object-oriented model. Clinical patient data are structured in a uniform way through the use of a comprehensive data model. The meaning of the information elements is explicitly determined by a medical data dictionary. The data structures of both, medical record and data dictionary are implemented, using a semantically rich, object-oriented data model. We examined several possibilities for the graphical preparation of the inherently recursive data structures. Again, we use object-oriented frameworks for the implementation of flexible user interfaces to the electronic medical record with a consistent look-and-feel.

  1. Calculation of Ground State Rotational Populations for Kinetic Gas Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules including Electron-Impact Excitation and Wall Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farley, David R.

    2010-01-01

    A model has been developed to calculate the ground-state rotational populations of homonuclear diatomic molecules in kinetic gases, including the effects of electron-impact excitation, wall collisions, and gas feed rate. The equations are exact within the accuracy of the cross sections used and of the assumed equilibrating effect of wall collisions. It is found that the inflow of feed gas and equilibrating wall collisions can significantly affect the rotational distribution in competition with non-equilibrating electron-impact effects. The resulting steady-state rotational distributions are generally Boltzmann for N (ge) 3, with a rotational temperature between the wall and feed gas temperatures. The N = 0,1,2 rotational level populations depend sensitively on the relative rates of electron-impact excitation versus wall collision and gas feed rates.

  2. Pilot Trial of an Electronic Family Medical History in US Faith-Based Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Patricia; Canclini, Sharon; Cauble, Denise; Raudonis, Barbara; Golden, Paulette

    2014-07-01

    In spite of the acknowledged importance of collecting family health information, methods of collecting, organizing, and storage of pedigree data are not uniformly utilized in practice, though several electronic tools have been developed for the purpose. Using electronic tools to gather health information may empower individuals to take responsibility in managing their family health history. The purpose of this study was to describe the feasibility and outcomes of introducing small groups to the My Family Health Portrait tool in faith-based communities using faith community nurses (FCNs). This pilot project adopted a mixed methods approach to assess the potential of an educational intervention delivered by FCNs for increasing the use of electronic technologies for organizing and storing family health histories among the general public. Treatment and control groups were recruited from four faith-based communities in north Texas using a parallel-groups quasi-experimental design. Qualitative data were gleaned from field notes made by investigators interacting with FCNs and observing their teaching. A majority of respondents believed that knowing one's health history and passing it on to family and medical personnel is important. Those receiving face-to-face instruction on the electronic tool were significantly more likely to have written down family health information than the control group who received only an informational handout (χ(2) = 5.96, P = .015). Barriers to teaching about and using the electronic tool included FCNs' lack of facility with computers in the educational context and FCN and respondent mistrust of electronic storage for family health information. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Paper versus computer: Feasibility of an electronic medical record in general pediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Roukema (Jolt); R.K. Los (Renske); S.E. Bleeker (Sacha); A.M. van Ginneken (Astrid); J. van der Lei (Johan); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND. Implementation of electronic medical record systems promises significant advances in patient care, because such systems enhance readability, availability, and data quality. Structured data entry (SDE) applications can prompt for completeness, provide greater accuracy and

  4. Using Electronic Health Record Data to Measure Care Quality for Individuals with Multiple Chronic Medical Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Elizabeth A; McQuillan, Deanna B; Ellis, Jennifer L; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Zeng, Chan; Barton, Mary B; Boyd, Cynthia M; Fortin, Martin; Ling, Shari M; Tai-Seale, Ming; Ralston, James D; Ritchie, Christine S; Zulman, Donna M

    2016-09-01

    To inform the development of a data-driven measure of quality care for individuals with multiple chronic conditions (MCCs) derived from an electronic health record (EHR). Qualitative study using focus groups, interactive webinars, and a modified Delphi process. Research department within an integrated delivery system. The webinars and Delphi process included 17 experts in clinical geriatrics and primary care, health policy, quality assessment, health technology, and health system operations. The focus group included 10 individuals aged 70-87 with three to six chronic conditions selected from a random sample of individuals aged 65 and older with three or more chronic medical conditions. Through webinars and the focus group, input was solicited on constructs representing high-quality care for individuals with MCCs. A working list was created of potential measures representing these constructs. Using a modified Delphi process, experts rated the importance of each possible measure and the feasibility of implementing each measure using EHR data. High-priority constructs reflected processes rather than outcomes of care. High-priority constructs that were potentially feasible to measure included assessing physical function, depression screening, medication reconciliation, annual influenza vaccination, outreach after hospital admission, and documented advance directives. High-priority constructs that were less feasible to measure included goal setting and shared decision-making, identifying drug-drug interactions, assessing social support, timely communication with patients, and other aspects of good customer service. Lower-priority domains included pain assessment, continuity of care, and overuse of screening or laboratory testing. High-quality MCC care should be measured using meaningful process measures rather than outcomes. Although some care processes are currently extractable from electronic data, capturing others will require adapting and applying technology to

  5. An analytical approach to characterize morbidity profile dissimilarity between distinct cohorts using electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildcrout, Jonathan S; Basford, Melissa A; Pulley, Jill M; Masys, Daniel R; Roden, Dan M; Wang, Deede; Chute, Christopher G; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Carrell, David; Peissig, Peggy; Kho, Abel; Denny, Joshua C

    2010-12-01

    We describe a two-stage analytical approach for characterizing morbidity profile dissimilarity among patient cohorts using electronic medical records. We capture morbidities using the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-9) codes. In the first stage of the approach separate logistic regression analyses for ICD-9 sections (e.g., "hypertensive disease" or "appendicitis") are conducted, and the odds ratios that describe adjusted differences in prevalence between two cohorts are displayed graphically. In the second stage, the results from ICD-9 section analyses are combined into a general morbidity dissimilarity index (MDI). For illustration, we examine nine cohorts of patients representing six phenotypes (or controls) derived from five institutions, each a participant in the electronic MEdical REcords and GEnomics (eMERGE) network. The phenotypes studied include type II diabetes and type II diabetes controls, peripheral arterial disease and peripheral arterial disease controls, normal cardiac conduction as measured by electrocardiography, and senile cataracts. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of educational and electronic medical record interventions on food allergy management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelig, Ari; Harwayne-Gidansky, Ilana; Gault, Allison; Wang, Julie

    2016-09-01

    The growing prevalence of food allergies indicates a responsibility among primary care providers to ensure that their patients receive accurate diagnosis and management. To improve physician knowledge and management of food allergies by implementing educational and electronic medical record interventions. Pre- and posttest scores of pediatric residents and faculty were analyzed to assess the effectiveness of an educational session designed to improve knowledge of food allergy management. One year later, a best practice advisory was implemented in the electronic medical record to alert providers to consider allergy referral whenever a diagnosis code for food allergy or epinephrine autoinjector prescription was entered. A review of charts 6 months before and 6 months after each intervention was completed to determine the impact of both interventions. Outcome measurements included referrals to an allergy clinic, prescription of self-injectable epinephrine, and documentation that written emergency action plans were provided. There was a significant increase in test scores immediately after the educational intervention (mean, 56.2 versus 84.3%; p management of children with food allergies at our pediatrics clinic. Further studies are needed to identify effective strategies to improve management of food allergies by primary care physicians.

  7. Interconnection of electronic medical record with clinical data management system by CDISC ODM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Yasushi; Hattori, Atsushi; Manabe, Shiro; Takeda, Toshihiro; Takahashi, Daiyo; Yamamoto, Yuichiro; Murata, Taizo; Mihara, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    EDC system has been used in the field of clinical research. The current EDC system does not connect with electronic medical record system (EMR), thus a medical staff has to transcribe the data in EMR to EDC system manually. This redundant process causes not only inefficiency but also human error. We developed an EDC system cooperating with EMR, in which the data required for a clinical research form (CRF) is transcribed automatically from EMR to electronic CRF (eCRF) and is sent via network. We call this system as "eCRF reporter". The interface module of eCRF reporter can retrieves the data in EMR database including patient biography data, laboratory test data, prescription data and data entered by template in progress notes. The eCRF reporter also enables users to enter data directly to eCRF. The eCRF reporter generates CDISC ODM file and PDF which is a translated form of Clinical data in ODM. After storing eCRF in EMR, it is transferred via VPN to a clinical data management system (CDMS) which can receive the eCRF files and parse ODM. We started some clinical research by using this system. This system is expected to promote clinical research efficiency and strictness.

  8. Towards improvement of the accuracy and completeness of medication registration with the use of an electronic medical record (EMR)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiddema-van de Wal, A; Smith, RJA; van der Werf, GT; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    Background. Approximately 80% of GPs use a GP information system (GIS) and an electronic medical record (EMR) in their daily practice. To reap the full benefits of an EMR for patient care, post-graduate education and research, the data input must be well structured and accurately coded. Objectives.

  9. Implementing and Integrating a Clinically-Driven Electronic Medical Record (EMR for Radiation Oncology in a Large Medical Enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Paxton Kirkpatrick

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose/Objective: While our department is heavily invested in computer-based treatment planning, we historically relied on paper-based charts for management of Radiation Oncology patients. In early 2009, we initiated the process of conversion to an electronic medical record (EMR eliminating the need for paper charts. Key goals included the ability to readily access information wherever and whenever needed, without compromising safety, treatment quality, confidentiality or productivity.Methodology: In February, 2009, we formed a multi-disciplinary team of Radiation Oncology physicians, nurses, therapists, administrators, physicists/dosimetrists, and information technology (IT specialists, along with staff from the Duke Health System IT department. The team identified all existing processes and associated information/reports, established the framework for the EMR system and generated, tested and implemented specific EMR processes.Results: Two broad classes of information were identified: information which must be readily accessed by anyone in the health system versus that used solely within the Radiation Oncology department. Examples of the former are consultation reports, weekly treatment check notes and treatment summaries; the latter includes treatment plans, daily therapy records and quality assurance reports. To manage the former, we utilized the enterprise-wide system , which required an intensive effort to design and implement procedures to export information from Radiation Oncology into that system. To manage "Radiation Oncology" data, we used our existing system (ARIA, Varian Medical Systems. The ability to access both systems simultaneously from a single workstation (WS was essential, requiring new WS and modified software. As of January, 2010, all new treatments were managed solely with an EMR. We find that an EMR makes information more widely accessible and does not compromise patient safety, treatment quality or confidentiality

  10. Audit on the Use of Dangerous Abbreviations, Symbols, and Dose Designations in Paper Compared to Electronic Medication Orders: A Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Stephanie; Hoi, Sannifer; Fernandes, Olavo; Huh, Jin; Kynicos, Sara; Murphy, Laura; Lowe, Donna

    2018-04-01

    Dangerous abbreviations on the Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada's "Do Not Use" list have resulted in medication errors leading to harm. Data comparing rates of use of dangerous abbreviations in paper and electronic medication orders are limited. To compare rates of use of dangerous abbreviations from the "Do Not Use" list, in paper and electronic medication orders. Secondary objectives include determining the proportion of patients at risk for medication errors due to dangerous abbreviations and the most commonly used dangerous abbreviations. One-day cross-sectional audits of medication orders were conducted at a 6-site hospital network in Toronto, Canada, between December 2013 and January 2014. Proportions of paper and electronic medication orders containing dangerous abbreviation(s) were compared using a χ 2 test. The proportion of patients with at least 1 medication order containing dangerous abbreviation(s) and the top 5 dangerous abbreviations used were described. Overall, 255 patient charts were reviewed. The proportions of paper and electronic medication orders containing dangerous abbreviation(s) were 172/714 (24.1%) and 9/2207 (0.4%), respectively ( P abbreviation(s). The proportions of patients with at least 1 medication order during the audit period containing dangerous abbreviation(s) for patients with paper only, electronic only, or a hybrid of paper and electronic medication orders were 50.5%, 5%, and 47.2%, respectively. Those most commonly used were "D/C", drug name abbreviations, "OD," "cc," and "U." Electronic medication orders have significantly lower rates of dangerous abbreviation use compared to paper medication orders.

  11. Urban Alabama Physicians and the Electronic Medical Record: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiggle, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The electronic medical record (EMR) is an information technology tool supporting the examination, treatment, and care of a patient. The EMR allows physicians to view a patient's record showing current medications, a history of visits from health care providers with notes from those visits, a problem list, a functional status assessment, a schedule…

  12. Brief review: dangers of the electronic medical record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available EMRs represent a potential boon to patient care and providers, but to date that potential has been unfulfilled. Data suggest that in some instances EMRs may even produce adverse outcomes. This result probably has occurred because lack of provider input and familiarity with EMRs resulting in the medical records becoming less a tool for patient care and more of a tool for documentation and reimbursement.

  13. Achieving automated narrative text interpretation using phrases in the electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, S. N.; Barnett, G. O.

    1996-01-01

    Stereotypic phrases are used by clinicians throughout the medical record, as seen in an analysis of our COSTAR medical record database. These phrases are often associated with an underling semantic concept; for example the phrase CLEAR LUNGS may be linked with the concept "normal lung exam" for a particular physician. Formalizing these associations with concepts from the UMLS using the MEDPhrase application allowed us to automate interpretation of narrative text within our electronic medical record. PMID:8947723

  14. Does electronic clinical microbiology results reporting influence medical decision making: a pre- and post-interview study of medical specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloembergen Peter

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinicians view the accuracy of test results and the turnaround time as the two most important service aspects of the clinical microbiology laboratory. Because of the time needed for the culturing of infectious agents, final hardcopy culture results will often be available too late to have a significant impact on early antimicrobial therapy decisions, vital in infectious disease management. The clinical microbiologist therefore reports to the clinician clinically relevant preliminary results at any moment during the diagnostic process, mostly by telephone. Telephone reporting is error prone, however. Electronic reporting of culture results instead of reporting on paper may shorten the turnaround time and may ensure correct communication of results. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the implementation of electronic reporting of final microbiology results on medical decision making. Methods In a pre- and post-interview study using a semi-structured design we asked medical specialists in our hospital about their use and appreciation of clinical microbiology results reporting before and after the implementation of an electronic reporting system. Results Electronic reporting was highly appreciated by all interviewed clinicians. Major advantages were reduction of hardcopy handling and the possibility to review results in relation to other patient data. Use and meaning of microbiology reports differ significantly between medical specialties. Most clinicians need preliminary results for therapy decisions quickly. Therefore, after the implementation of electronic reporting, telephone consultation between clinician and microbiologist remained the key means of communication. Conclusions Overall, electronic reporting increased the workflow efficiency of the medical specialists, but did not have an impact on their decision-making.

  15. Does electronic clinical microbiology results reporting influence medical decision making: a pre- and post-interview study of medical specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruins, Marjan J; Ruijs, Gijs J H M; Wolfhagen, Maurice J H M; Bloembergen, Peter; Aarts, Jos E C M

    2011-03-30

    Clinicians view the accuracy of test results and the turnaround time as the two most important service aspects of the clinical microbiology laboratory. Because of the time needed for the culturing of infectious agents, final hardcopy culture results will often be available too late to have a significant impact on early antimicrobial therapy decisions, vital in infectious disease management. The clinical microbiologist therefore reports to the clinician clinically relevant preliminary results at any moment during the diagnostic process, mostly by telephone. Telephone reporting is error prone, however. Electronic reporting of culture results instead of reporting on paper may shorten the turnaround time and may ensure correct communication of results. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the implementation of electronic reporting of final microbiology results on medical decision making. In a pre- and post-interview study using a semi-structured design we asked medical specialists in our hospital about their use and appreciation of clinical microbiology results reporting before and after the implementation of an electronic reporting system. Electronic reporting was highly appreciated by all interviewed clinicians. Major advantages were reduction of hardcopy handling and the possibility to review results in relation to other patient data. Use and meaning of microbiology reports differ significantly between medical specialties. Most clinicians need preliminary results for therapy decisions quickly. Therefore, after the implementation of electronic reporting, telephone consultation between clinician and microbiologist remained the key means of communication. Overall, electronic reporting increased the workflow efficiency of the medical specialists, but did not have an impact on their decision-making. © 2011 Bruins et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  16. National All Schedules Prescription Electronic Reporting Act (NASPER): balancing substance abuse and medical necessity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Brown, Keith R; Singh, Vijay

    2002-07-01

    The National All Schedules Prescription Electronic Reporting Act, or NASPER, is a bill proposed by the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians to provide and improve patient access with quality care, and protect patients and physicians from deleterious effects of controlled substance misuse, abuse and trafficking. Controlled prescription drugs, including narcotic analgesics, anxiolytics, anti-depressants, stimulants, and sedative-hypnotics play a significant and legitimate role in interventional pain management practices in managing chronic pain and related disorders. Based on the 1997 household survey on drug abuse it is estimated that 76.9 million Americans had used an illicit drug at least once in their life. In 1997, 4.2 million people used analgesics, 2.1 million used tranquillizers, and an additional 2.3 million people used various other drugs, including sedatives, tranquillizers, etc. The non-medical use of prescription drugs exceeds that of all illicit substances except for marijuana and hashish. The report on epidemiology trends in drug abuse, based on community epidemiology work group analysis showed continued increase of abuse of prescription drugs in urban, suburban, and rural areas. The most commonly abused drugs include oxycodone, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, morphine, codeine, clonazepam, alprazolam, lorazepam, diazepam and carisoprodol. The diversion of prescription controlled substances to illicit channels is a public health and safety issue. This review describes the role of controlled substances in chronic pain management, prevalence and economic impact of controlled substance abuse, prescription accountability, effectiveness of prescription monitoring programs, and rationale for national controlled substance electronic reporting system.

  17. Family Registration Card as electronic medical carrier in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo, Ahmed; Masic, Izet; Toromanovic, Selim; Loncarevic, Nedim; Junuzovic, Dzelaludin; Dizdarevic, Jadranka

    2004-01-01

    Medical documentation is a very important part of the medical documentalistics and is occupies a large part of daily work of medical staff working in Primary Health Care. Paper documentation is going to be replaced by electronic cards in Bosnia and Herzegovina and a new Health Care System is under development, based on an Electronic Family Registration Card. Developed countries proceeded from the manual and semiautomatic method of medical data processing to the new method of entering, storage, transferring, searching and protecting data, using electronic equipment. Currently, many European countries have developed a Medical Card Based Electronic Information System. Three types of electronic card are currently in use: a Hybrid Card, a Smart Card and a Laser Card. The dilemma is which card should be used as a data carrier. The Electronic Family Registration Cared is a question of strategic interest for B&H, but also a great investment. We should avoid the errors of other countries that have been developing card-based system. In this article we present all mentioned cards and compare advantages and disadvantages of different technologies.

  18. Design and implementation of an affordable, public sector electronic medical record in rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Anant; Yarbrough, Chase; Singh, Vivek; Gauchan, Bikash; Citrin, David; Verma, Varun; Hawley, Jessica; Schwarz, Dan; Harsha Bangura, Alex; Shrestha, Biplav; Schwarz, Ryan; Adhikari, Mukesh; Maru, Duncan

    2017-06-23

    Globally, electronic medical records are central to the infrastructure of modern healthcare systems. Yet the vast majority of electronic medical records have been designed for resource-rich environments and are not feasible in settings of poverty. Here we describe the design and implementation of an electronic medical record at a public sector district hospital in rural Nepal, and its subsequent expansion to an additional public sector facility.DevelopmentThe electronic medical record was designed to solve for the following elements of public sector healthcare delivery: 1) integration of the systems across inpatient, surgical, outpatient, emergency, laboratory, radiology, and pharmacy sites of care; 2) effective data extraction for impact evaluation and government regulation; 3) optimization for longitudinal care provision and patient tracking; and 4) effectiveness for quality improvement initiatives. For these purposes, we adapted Bahmni, a product built with open-source components for patient tracking, clinical protocols, pharmacy, laboratory, imaging, financial management, and supply logistics. In close partnership with government officials, we deployed the system in February of 2015, added on additional functionality, and iteratively improved the system over the following year. This experience enabled us then to deploy the system at an additional district-level hospital in a different part of the country in under four weeks. We discuss the implementation challenges and the strategies we pursued to build an electronic medical record for the public sector in rural Nepal.DiscussionOver the course of 18 months, we were able to develop, deploy and iterate upon the electronic medical record, and then deploy the refined product at an additional facility within only four weeks. Our experience suggests the feasibility of an integrated electronic medical record for public sector care delivery even in settings of rural poverty.

  19. Electron spin resonance studies of radiation effects. Final report, 1964-1979 (including annual progress reports for 1978 and 1979)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, M.T.

    1979-07-01

    The discovery of new free radicals, largely in irradiated single crystals of nonmetallic solids, and the determination of the molecular and electronic structures of these paramagnetic species by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, have been carried out using a wide variety of organic and inorganic materials. The mechanisms of production of radicals in solids, their motions, and their reactions have been investigated and some applicable general principles deduced. Emphasis has been on aliphatic free radicals from irradiated carboxylic acids and amides and their halogen-substituted derivatives, organometallic radicals and substituted cyclic hydrocarbon radicals; inorganic radicals studied include V centers, hypervalent radicals and electron adducts. Extensive investigations of paramagnetic transition metal complexes, particularly cyanides and fluorides, have been made. In all cases quantum mechanical calculations have been employed as far as possible in interpreting the data. An improved method for analyzing experimental ESR spectra of single crystals has been developed and a number of crystal structures have been determined to supplement the ESR studies. Applications of nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy to the study of structure and bonding in inorganic solids have been made and a method for using nuclear magnetic relaxation data for estimating quadrupole coupling constants in liquids has been developed.

  20. Cost-benefit analysis of electronic medical record system at a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Soo; Lee, Woo Baik; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2013-09-01

    Although Electronic Medical Record (EMR) systems provide various benefits, there are both advantages and disadvantages regarding its cost-effectiveness. This study analyzed the economic effects of EMR systems using a cost-benefit analysis based on the differential costs of managerial accounting. Samsung Medical Center (SMC) is a general hospital in Korea that developed an EMR system for outpatients from 2006 to 2008. This study measured the total costs and benefits during an 8-year period after EMR adoption. The costs include the system costs of building the EMR and the costs incurred in smoothing its adoption. The benefits included cost reductions after its adoption and additional revenues from both remodeling of paper-chart storage areas and medical transcriptionists' contribution. The measured amounts were discounted by SMC's expected interest rate to calculate the net present value (NPV), benefit-cost ratio (BCR), and discounted payback period (DPP). During the analysis period, the cumulative NPV and the BCR were US$3,617 thousand and 1.23, respectively. The DPP was about 6.18 years. Although the adoption of an EMR resulted in overall growth in administrative costs, it is cost-effective since the cumulative NPV was positive. The positive NPV was attributed to both cost reductions and additional revenues. EMR adoption is not so attractive to management in that the DPP is longer than 5 years at 6.18 and the BCR is near 1 at 1.23. However, an EMR is a worthwhile investment, seeing that this study did not include any qualitative benefits and that the paper-chart system was cost-centric.

  1. Electronic Medical Records (EMRs), Epidemiology, and Epistemology: Reflections on EMRs and Future Pediatric Clinical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are increasingly common in pediatric patient care. EMR data represent a relatively novel and rich resource for clinical research. The fact, however, that pediatric EMR data are collected for the purposes of clinical documentation and billing rather than research creates obstacles to their use in scientific investigation. Particular issues include accuracy, completeness, comparability between settings, ease of extraction, and context of recording. Although these problems can be addressed through standard strategies for dealing with partially accurate and incomplete data, a longer term solution will involve work with pediatric clinicians to improve data quality. As research becomes one of the explicit purposes for which pediatricians collect EMR data, the pediatric clinician will play a central role in future pediatric clinical research. PMID:21622040

  2. Electronic medical records (EMRs), epidemiology, and epistemology: reflections on EMRs and future pediatric clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Richard C

    2011-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are increasingly common in pediatric patient care. EMR data represent a relatively novel and rich resource for clinical research. The fact, however, that pediatric EMR data are collected for the purposes of clinical documentation and billing rather than research creates obstacles to their use in scientific investigation. Particular issues include accuracy, completeness, comparability between settings, ease of extraction, and context of recording. Although these problems can be addressed through standard strategies for dealing with partially accurate and incomplete data, a longer-term solution will involve work with pediatric clinicians to improve data quality. As research becomes one of the explicit purposes for which pediatricians collect EMR data, the pediatric clinician will play a central role in future pediatric clinical research. Copyright © 2011 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Medical device integration: CIOs must bridge the digital divide between devices and electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raths, David

    2009-02-01

    To get funding approved for medical device integration, ClOs suggest focusing on specific patient safety or staff efficiency pain points. Organizations that make clinical engineering part of their IT team report fewer chain-of-command issues. It also helps IT people understand the clinical goals because the engineering people have been working closely with clinicians for years. A new organization has formed to work on collaboration between clinical engineers and IT professionals. For more information, go to www.ceitcollaboration.org. ECRI Institute has written a guide to handling the convergence of medical technology and hospital networks. Its "Medical Technology for the IT Professional: An Essential Guide for Working in Today's Healthcare Setting" also details how IT professionals can assist hospital technology planning and acquisition, and provide ongoing support for IT-based medical technologies. For more information, visit www.ecri.org/ITresource.

  4. Die elektronischen Angebote der Virtuellen Medizinbibliothek Freiburg / The electronic choices of the Virtual Medical Library Freiburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reimers, Frank

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The Virtual Medical Library Freiburg is an important contribution to the medical information supply at the University of Freiburg since more than eight years. It is the common website of the libraries of the Medical Faculty, the University Medical Center and the University Library Freiburg. It serves as an information platform on electronic medical library services available in Freiburg. The Virtual Medical Library offers links to the relevant catalogs for print and online media available in medical libraries and direct access to medical databases, e-journals, e-books and internet resources. The Virtual Medical Library was created because of the lack of a real central medical library. The main points of information supply are the literature search and the direct access to medical full text resources (e-journals and e-books. A further important service of the information platform is document delivery. By now, feedback and access counts verify that the information platform is well known to the medical students and scientists in Freiburg.

  5. Correlation of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and electronic medical record alerts with incidence among surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Lee, Nathaniel; Duane, Therese M; Gu, Zirui; Nguyen, Natalie; Potter, Teresa; Rensing, Edna; Sampson, Renata; Burrows, Mandy; Banas, Colin; Hartigan, Sarah; Grover, Amelia

    2016-11-01

    Venous thromboembolism events are potentially preventable adverse events. We investigated the effect of interruptions and delays in pharmacologic prophylaxis on venous thromboembolism incidence. Additionally, we evaluated the utility of electronic medical record alerts for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis. Venous thromboembolisms were identified in surgical patients retrospectively through Core Measure Venous ThromboEmbolism-6-6 and Patient Safety Indicator 12 between November 2013 and March 2015. Venous thromboembolism pharmacologic prophylaxis and prescriber response to electronic medical record alerts were recorded prospectively. Prophylaxis was categorized as continuous, delayed, interrupted, other, and none. Among 10,318 surgical admissions, there were 131 venous thromboembolisms; 23.7% of the venous thromboembolisms occurred with optimal continuous prophylaxis. Prophylaxis, length of stay, age, and transfer from another hospital were associated with increased venous thromboembolism incidence. Compared with continuous prophylaxis, interruptions were associated with 3 times greater odds of venous thromboembolism. Delays were associated with 2 times greater odds of venous thromboembolism. Electronic medical record alerts occurred in 45.7% of the encounters and were associated with a 2-fold increased venous thromboembolism incidence. Focus groups revealed procedures as the main contributor to interruptions, and workflow disruption as the main limitation of the electronic medical record alerts. Multidisciplinary strategies to decrease delays and interruptions in venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and optimization of electronic medical record tools for prophylaxis may help decrease rates of preventable venous thromboembolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Perception of electronic medical records (EMRs by nursing staff in a teaching hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar Pera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Currently, in India, many healthcare organizations and their managements appreciate the advantages of electronic medical records, but they often use them. The current push for universal health coverage in India with National Rural Health Mission (NRHM and National Urban Health Mission (NUHM helping toward healthcare reforms highlights the importance of implementing information technology as a means of cutting costs and improving efficiency in healthcare field. The quality of documentation of patient care rendered at healthcare destinations is very important to showcase the growing stature of healthcare in India. Aims: As maintaining the medical records is very important, storage and retrieval of the information is also important for future patient care. In this regard, implementation of electronic medical records in hospitals is essential. Through this study, we wanted to highlight the perceptions of healthcare personnel, who are in the core team of delivering healthcare, toward implementation of electronic medical records. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out among doctors (post-graduates and staff nurses. The sample size for post-graduate students and nurses was 164 and 296, respectively, in this study. The study was carried out during the period from January to June 2013, and a survey was conducted with the help of a validated, pre-tested questionnaire in a tertiary care medical college hospital in India. Results: The results showed that 75% of the study population are comfortable working with electronic medical records. They mentioned that display of diagnosis, medications, and allergies of patients on the records was most important. Their perception was that electronic medical records improve timely decision-making and patient care due to immediate access to the patient′s disease history. Conclusion: The major problems faced by nurses, as per our study, are delay in services due to dispersion of records

  7. Dispatch from the non-HITECH-incented Health IT world: electronic medication history adoption and utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Meghan Hufstader; Smith, Jaime Y; Sow, Max; Charles, Dustin; Joseph, Seth; Wilkins, Tricia Lee

    2016-05-01

    To document national trends of electronic medication history use in the ambulatory setting and describe the characteristics and predicting factors of providers who regularly use medication history transaction capabilities through their e-prescribing systems. The study used provider-initiated medication history data requests, electronically sent over an e-prescribing network from all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Data from 138,000 prescribers were evaluated using multivariate analyses from 2007 to 2013. Medication history use showed significant growth, increasing from 8 to 850 million history requests during the study period. Prescribers on the network for histories more often than those in large and small cities, these findings were not significant in multivariate analyses. Providers in orthopedic surgery and internal medicine had a higher likelihood of more requests than family practice prescribers, with 12% and 7% higher likelihood, respectively. Early adopters of e-prescribing have remained medication history users and have continually increased their volume of requests for medication histories. Despite the fact that the use of medication histories through e-prescribing networks in the ambulatory care setting has not been encouraged through federal incentive programs, there has been substantial growth in the use of medication histories offered through e-prescribing networks. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Library usage patterns in the electronic information environment. Electronic journals, Use studies, Libraries, Medical libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Franklin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the methodology and results from Web-based surveys of more than 15,000 networked electronic services users in the United States between July 1998 and June 2003 at four academic health sciences libraries and two large main campus libraries serving a variety of disciplines. A statistically valid methodology for administering simultaneous Web-based and print-based surveys using the random moments sampling technique is discussed and implemented. Results from the Web-based surveys showed that at the four academic health sciences libraries, there were approximately four remote networked electronic services users for each in-house user. This ratio was even higher for faculty, staff, and research fellows at the academic health sciences libraries, where more than five remote users for each in-house user were recorded. At the two main libraries, there were approximately 1.3 remote users for each in-house user of electronic information. Sponsored research (grant funded research accounted for approximately 32% of the networked electronic services activity at the health sciences libraries and 16% at the main campus libraries. Sponsored researchers at the health sciences libraries appeared to use networked electronic services most intensively from on-campus, but not from in the library. The purpose of use for networked electronic resources by patrons within the library is different from the purpose of use of those resources by patrons using the resources remotely. The implications of these results on how librarians reach decisions about networked electronic resources and services are discussed.

  9. Computation of adherence to medication and visualization of medication histories in R with AdhereR: Towards transparent and reproducible use of electronic healthcare data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Lelia Dima

    Full Text Available Adherence to medications is an important indicator of the quality of medication management and impacts on health outcomes and cost-effectiveness of healthcare delivery. Electronic healthcare data (EHD are increasingly used to estimate adherence in research and clinical practice, yet standardization and transparency of data processing are still a concern. Comprehensive and flexible open-source algorithms can facilitate the development of high-quality, consistent, and reproducible evidence in this field. Some EHD-based clinical decision support systems (CDSS include visualization of medication histories, but this is rarely integrated in adherence analyses and not easily accessible for data exploration or implementation in new clinical settings. We introduce AdhereR, a package for the widely used open-source statistical environment R, designed to support researchers in computing EHD-based adherence estimates and in visualizing individual medication histories and adherence patterns. AdhereR implements a set of functions that are consistent with current adherence guidelines, definitions and operationalizations. We illustrate the use of AdhereR with an example dataset of 2-year records of 100 patients and describe the various analysis choices possible and how they can be adapted to different health conditions and types of medications. The package is freely available for use and its implementation facilitates the integration of medication history visualizations in open-source CDSS platforms.

  10. The role of frontline RNs in the selection of an electronic medical record business partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhoit, Kathryn; Mustain, Jane; King, Marjorie

    2006-01-01

    Frontline RNs knowledgeable in the strategic objectives of their organization made a difference in the selection of an electronic medical record business partner for a large, complex healthcare system. Their impact was significant because of the chief nurse executive's personal articulation of the organization's strategic goals and of her investment in their education. These factors provided the frontline RNs with a foundational base of knowledge about a variety of electronic medical record systems. The preparation and exposure enabled the frontline RNs to make a valuable contribution to the selection of an electronic medical record business partner. The RNs were a major force in affecting philosophical change from the organization's original pursuit of "best-of-breed" interfaced systems to a fully integrated, "best-of-class" vendor business partner. The learning experiences of the frontline RNs are explored to answer the following question: Why must frontline RNs play a key role in this process?

  11. Photon and electron interaction databases and their use in medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, D.E.

    1994-05-01

    This paper discusses the All Particle-Method photon and electron interaction, and atomic relaxation data bases, that were initially developed for use in medical applications. Currently these data bases are being used in both medical and industrial applications. The All Particle Method data bases are designed to allow modelling of individual collisions in as much detail as possible. Elastic scattering can be modelled as single, as opposed to multiple, scattering events. Ionization can be modelled at the atomic subshell level, to define which subshell was ionized, spectrum of the initially emitted electron, as well as the spectra of electron and photons emitted as the atom relaxes back to neutrality. These data bases are currently being used in applications involving rather small spatial regions, where detailed calculations of individual events are required. While initially designed for use in medical applications, these data bases are now being used in a variety of industrial applications, e.g., transport in microelectronics

  12. Evaluation of medication errors with implementation of electronic health record technology in the medical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao TV

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available T Vivian Liao,1 Marina Rabinovich,2 Prasad Abraham,2 Sebastian Perez,3 Christiana DiPlotti,4 Jenny E Han,5 Greg S Martin,5 Eric Honig5 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, Mercer Health Sciences Center, 2Department of Pharmacy and Clinical Nutrition, Grady Health System, 3Department of Surgery, Emory University, 4Pharmacy, Ingles Markets, 5Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA Purpose: Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU are at an increased risk for medication errors (MEs and adverse drug events from multifactorial causes. ME rate ranges from 1.2 to 947 per 1,000 patient days in the medical ICU (MICU. Studies with the implementation of electronic health records (EHR have concluded that it significantly reduced overall prescribing errors and the number of errors that caused patient harm decreased. However, other types of errors, such as wrong dose and omission of required medications increased after EHR implementation. We sought to compare the number of MEs before and after EHR implementation in the MICU, with additional evaluation of error severity.Patients and methods: Prospective, observational, quality improvement study of all patients admitted to a single MICU service at an academic medical center. Patients were evaluated during four periods over 2 years: August–September 2010 (preimplementation; period I, January–February 2011 (2 months postimplementation; period II, August–September 2012 (21 months postimplementation; period III, and January–February 2013 (25 months postimplementation; period IV. All medication orders and administration records were reviewed by an ICU clinical pharmacist and ME was defined as a deviation from established standards for prescribing, dispensing, administering, or documenting medication. The frequency and classification of MEs were compared between groups by chi square; p<0.05 was considered significant.Results: There was a statistically significant increase

  13. Building a national electronic medical record exchange system - experiences in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Chuan Jack; Yen, Ju-Chuan; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Jian, Wen-Shan; Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Hsu, Min-Huei

    2015-08-01

    There are currently 501 hospitals and about 20,000 clinics in Taiwan. The National Health Insurance (NHI) system, which is operated by the NHI Administration, uses a single-payer system and covers 99.9% of the nation's total population of 23,000,000. Taiwan's NHI provides people with a high degree of freedom in choosing their medical care options. However, there is the potential concern that the available medical resources will be overused. The number of doctor consultations per person per year is about 15. Duplication of laboratory tests and prescriptions are not rare either. Building an electronic medical record exchange system is a good method of solving these problems and of improving continuity in health care. In November 2009, Taiwan's Executive Yuan passed the 'Plan for accelerating the implementation of electronic medical record systems in medical institutions' (2010-2012; a 3-year plan). According to this plan, a patient can, at any hospital in Taiwan, by using his/her health insurance IC card and physician's medical professional IC card, upon signing a written agreement, retrieve all important medical records for the past 6 months from other participating hospitals. The focus of this plan is to establish the National Electronic Medical Record Exchange Centre (EEC). A hospital's information system will be connected to the EEC through an electronic medical record (EMR) gateway. The hospital will convert the medical records for the past 6 months in its EMR system into standardized files and save them on the EMR gateway. The most important functions of the EEC are to generate an index of all the XML files on the EMR gateways of all hospitals, and to provide search and retrieval services for hospitals and clinics. The EEC provides four standard inter-institution EMR retrieval services covering medical imaging reports, laboratory test reports, discharge summaries, and outpatient records. In this system, we adopted the Health Level 7 (HL7) Clinical Document

  14. Electronic health records and online medical records: an asset or a liability under current conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Graham, Judith; Mitchell, Lauren; Heriot, Natalie; Armani, Roksana; Langton, David; Levinson, Michele; Young, Alan; Smith, Julian A; Kotsimbos, Tom; Wilson, John W

    2018-02-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to audit the current use of medical records to determine completeness and concordance with other sources of medical information. Methods Medical records for 40 patients from each of five Melbourne major metropolitan hospitals were randomly selected (n=200). A quantitative audit was performed for detailed patient information and medical record keeping, as well as data collection, storage and utilisation. Using each hospital's current online clinical database, scanned files and paperwork available for each patient audited, the reviewers sourced as much relevant information as possible within a 30-min time allocation from both the record and the discharge summary. Results Of all medical records audited, 82% contained medical and surgical history, allergy information and patient demographics. All audited discharge summaries lacked at least one of the following: demographics, medication allergies, medical and surgical history, medications and adverse drug event information. Only 49% of records audited showed evidence the discharge summary was sent outside the institution. Conclusions The quality of medical data captured and information management is variable across hospitals. It is recommended that medical history documentation guidelines and standardised discharge summaries be implemented in Australian healthcare services. What is known about this topic? Australia has a complex health system, the government has approved funding to develop a universal online electronic medical record system and is currently trialling this in an opt-out style in the Napean Blue Mountains (NSW) and in Northern Queensland. The system was originally named the personally controlled electronic health record but has since been changed to MyHealth Record (2016). In Victoria, there exists a wide range of electronic health records used to varying degrees, with some hospitals still relying on paper-based records and many using scanned medical records

  15. [An experience with implementation of electronic medical records in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revoredo Iparraguirre, José Francisco; Cavalcanti Oscátegui, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Analyze the process for implementation of health provider information systems in Peru. A qualitative study was conducted on implementation of a health provider information system in coastal, mountain, and jungle regions of Peru. Factors were identified that hinder and that facilitate the implementation process. Critical success factors included planning of implementation, executive commitment, commitment of the implementation leader, organizational culture, and human resources capacity. Implementation processes for provider information systems demonstrate various difficulties associated primarily with human barriers.

  16. Beyond information retrieval and electronic health record use: competencies in clinical informatics for medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hersh WR

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available William R Hersh,1 Paul N Gorman,1 Frances E Biagioli,2 Vishnu Mohan,1 Jeffrey A Gold,3 George C Mejicano4 1Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, 2Department of Family Medicine, 3Department of Medicine, 4School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA Abstract: Physicians in the 21st century will increasingly interact in diverse ways with information systems, requiring competence in many aspects of clinical informatics. In recent years, many medical school curricula have added content in information retrieval (search and basic use of the electronic health record. However, this omits the growing number of other ways that physicians are interacting with information that includes activities such as clinical decision support, quality measurement and improvement, personal health records, telemedicine, and personalized medicine. We describe a process whereby six faculty members representing different perspectives came together to define competencies in clinical informatics for a curriculum transformation process occurring at Oregon Health & Science University. From the broad competencies, we also developed specific learning objectives and milestones, an implementation schedule, and mapping to general competency domains. We present our work to encourage debate and refinement as well as facilitate evaluation in this area. Keywords: curriculum transformation, clinical decision support, patient safety, health care quality, patient engagement

  17. The journey from precontemplation to action: Transitioning between electronic medical record systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Thomas; Rizer, Milisa; McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Mekhjian, Hagop; Siedler, Monica; Sharp, Karen; Teater, Phyllis; Huerta, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Health care organizations, in response to federal programs, have sought to identify electronic medical record (EMR) strategies that align well with their visions for success. Little exists in the literature discussing the transition from one EMR strategy to another. The analysis and planning process used by a major academic medical center in its journey to adopt a new strategy was described in this study. We use the transtheoretical model of change to frame the five phases through which the organization transitioned from a best-of-breed system to an enterprise system. We explore the five phases of change from the perspective of a maturing approach to new technology adoption. Data collection included archival retrieval and review as well as interviews with key stakeholders. Although there was always a focus on some enterprise capabilities such as computerized physician order entry, the emphasis on EMR selection tended to be driven by specialty requirements. Focusing on the patient across the continuum of care, as opposed to focusing on excessive requirements by clinical specialties, was essential in forming and deploying a vision for the new EMR. This research outlines a successful pathway used by an organization that had invested heavily in EMR technology and was faced with evaluating whether to continue that investment or start with a new platform. Rather than focusing on the technology alone, efforts to reframe the discussion to one that focused on the patient resulted in less resistance to change.

  18. Wound emergencies: the importance of assessment, documentation, and early treatment using a wound electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golinko, Michael S; Clark, Sunday; Rennert, Robert; Flattau, Anna; Boulton, Andrew J M; Brem, Harold

    2009-05-01

    Chronic wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, venous ulcers, and pressure ulcers are a major source of morbidity and mortality. To describe wound characteristics associated with a wound emergency, the Wound Electronic Medical Records (WEMR) of 200 consecutive admissions (139 patients, average number of admissions 1.4) to a dedicated inpatient wound healing unit over a period of 5 months were retrospectively reviewed. Patient mean age was 62 +/- 16 years, 59% were men, 27% had a foot ulcer and diabetes mellitus, and 29% had venous ulcers. Presenting signs and symptoms included wound pain, cellulitis, nonpurulent drainage, and undermining, but few presented with classic local clinical signs of infection. Treatment consisted of sharp debridement with deep tissue culture and pathology from the wound base and/or systemic antibiotics. Twenty-percent (20%) of patients had pathology-confirmed and 38% had pathology- or radiology-confirmed osteomyelitis on admission, supporting that new or increasing wound pain, cellulitis, and/or nonpurulent drainage or presence of significant undermining may be indicative of an invasive infection and that patients presenting with these signs and symptoms require an immediate treatment plan and consideration of hospital admission. Use of an objective documentation system such as the WEMR may help alert clinicians to subtle wound changes that require aggressive treatment; thereby, avoiding emergency room visits and hospital admissions. Future research is needed utilizing the WEMR across multiple medical centers to further define criteria for a chronic wound emergency.

  19. Health information technology: medical record documentation issues in the electronic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacey, Bill; Bholat, Michelle Anne

    2012-12-01

    This article outlines the regulatory movement propelling physicians into the electronic health record environment and the subsequent emergence of quality issues in the medical record. There are benefits and downside risks for implementing electronic health records as part of the desire of a practice or institution to build patient-centered medical homes. The intersection of how a practice or institution collects and reports quality metrics using health information technology and subsequently submits claims for services rendered has created unforeseen challenges for which leadership must be aware and address proactively. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Identification of a potential fibromyalgia diagnosis using random forest modeling applied to electronic medical records

    OpenAIRE

    Masters, Elizabeth T.; Emir,Birol; Mardekian,Jack; Clair,Andrew; Kuhn,Max; Silverman,Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Birol Emir,1 Elizabeth T Masters,1 Jack Mardekian,1 Andrew Clair,1 Max Kuhn,2 Stuart L Silverman,3 1Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, 2Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT, 3Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA Background: Diagnosis of fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic musculoskeletal condition characterized by widespread pain and a constellation of symptoms, remains challenging and is often delayed. Methods: Random forest modeling of electronic medical records was used to identify variables that may fa...

  1. Including limitations in news coverage of cancer research: effects of news hedging on fatalism, medical skepticism, patient trust, and backlash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jakob D; Carcioppolo, Nick; King, Andy J; Bernat, Jennifer K; Davis, LaShara; Yale, Robert; Smith, Jessica

    2011-05-01

    Past research has demonstrated that news coverage of cancer research, and scientific research generally, rarely contains discourse-based hedging, including caveats, limitations, and uncertainties. In a multiple message experiment (k = 4 news stories, N = 1082), the authors examined whether hedging shaped the perceptions of news consumers. The results revealed that participants were significantly less fatalistic about cancer (p = .039) and marginally less prone to nutritional backlash (p = .056) after exposure to hedged articles. Participants exposed to articles mentioning a second researcher (unaffiliated with the present study) exhibited greater trust in medical professions (p = .001). The findings provide additional support for the inclusion of discourse-based hedging in cancer news coverage and suggest that news consumers will use scientific uncertainty in illness representations.

  2. Loop-driven graphical unitary group approach to the electron correlation problem, including configuration interaction energy gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.R.

    1979-09-01

    The Graphical Unitary Group Approach (GUGA) was cast into an extraordinarily powerful form by restructuring the Hamiltonian in terms of loop types. This restructuring allows the adoption of the loop-driven formulation which illuminates vast numbers of previously unappreciated relationships between otherwise distinct Hamiltonian matrix elements. The theoretical/methodological contributions made here include the development of the loop-driven formula generation algorithm, a solution of the upper walk problem used to develop a loop breakdown algorithm, the restriction of configuration space employed to the multireference interacting space, and the restructuring of the Hamiltonian in terms of loop types. Several other developments are presented and discussed. Among these developments are the use of new segment coefficients, improvements in the loop-driven algorithm, implicit generation of loops wholly within the external space adapted within the framework of the loop-driven methodology, and comparisons of the diagonalization tape method to the direct method. It is also shown how it is possible to implement the GUGA method without the time-consuming full (m 5 ) four-index transformation. A particularly promising new direction presented here involves the use of the GUGA methodology to obtain one-electron and two-electron density matrices. Once these are known, analytical gradients (first derivatives) of the CI potential energy are easily obtained. Several test calculations are examined in detail to illustrate the unique features of the method. Also included is a calculation on the asymmetric 2 1 A' state of SO 2 with 23,613 configurations to demonstrate methods for the diagonalization of very large matrices on a minicomputer. 6 figures, 6 tables

  3. A SWOT Analysis of the Various Backup Scenarios Used in Electronic Medical Record Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hwa Jeong; Kim, Hye Hyeon; Kim, Ju Han

    2011-09-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) are increasingly being used by health care services. Currently, if an EMR shutdown occurs, even for a moment, patient safety and care can be seriously impacted. Our goal was to determine the methodology needed to develop an effective and reliable EMR backup system. Our "independent backup system by medical organizations" paradigm implies that individual medical organizations develop their own EMR backup systems within their organizations. A "personal independent backup system" is defined as an individual privately managing his/her own medical records, whereas in a "central backup system by the government" the government controls all the data. A "central backup system by private enterprises" implies that individual companies retain control over their own data. A "cooperative backup system among medical organizations" refers to a networked system established through mutual agreement. The "backup system based on mutual trust between an individual and an organization" means that the medical information backup system at the organizational level is established through mutual trust. Through the use of SWOT analysis it can be shown that cooperative backup among medical organizations is possible to be established through a network composed of various medical agencies and that it can be managed systematically. An owner of medical information only grants data access to the specific person who gave the authorization for backup based on the mutual trust between an individual and an organization. By employing SWOT analysis, we concluded that a linkage among medical organizations or between an individual and an organization can provide an efficient backup system.

  4. Personal medical electronic devices and walk-through metal detector security systems: assessing electromagnetic interference effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guag, Joshua; Addissie, Bisrat; Witters, Donald

    2017-03-20

    There have been concerns that Electromagnetic security systems such as walk-through metal detectors (WTMDs) can potentially cause electromagnetic interference (EMI) in certain active medical devices including implantable cardiac pacemakers and implantable neurostimulators. Incidents of EMI between WTMDs and active medical devices also known as personal medical electronic devices (PMED) continue to be reported. This paper reports on emission measurements of sample WTMDs and testing of 20 PMEDs in a WTMD simulation system. Magnetic fields from sample WTMD systems were characterized for emissions and exposure of certain PMEDs. A WTMD simulator system designed and evaluated by FDA in previous studies was used to mimic the PMED exposures to the waveform from sample WTMDs. The simulation system allows for controlled PMED exposure enabling careful study with adjustable magnetic field strengths and exposure duration, and provides flexibility for PMED exposure at elevated levels in order to study EMI effects on the PMED. The PMED samples consisted of six implantable cardiac pacemakers, six implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), five implantable neurostimulators, and three insulin pumps. Each PMED was exposed in the simulator to the sample WTMD waveforms using methods based on appropriate consensus test standards for each of the device type. Testing the sample PMEDs using the WTMD simulator revealed EMI effects on two implantable pacemakers and one implantable neurostimulator for exposure field strength comparable to actual WTMD field strength. The observed effects were transient and the PMEDs returned to pre-exposure operation within a few seconds after removal from the simulated WTMD exposure fields. No EMI was observed for the sample ICDs or insulin pumps. The findings are consistent with earlier studies where certain sample PMEDs exhibited EMI effects. Clinical implications were not addressed in this study. Additional studies are needed to evaluate potential PMED

  5. Gastrointestinal disease outbreak detection using multiple data streams from electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Sharon K; Huang, Jie; Abrams, Allyson M; Gilliss, Debra; Reed, Mary; Platt, Richard; Huang, Susan S; Kulldorff, Martin

    2012-05-01

    Passive reporting and laboratory testing delays may limit gastrointestinal (GI) disease outbreak detection. Healthcare systems routinely collect clinical data in electronic medical records (EMRs) that could be used for surveillance. This study's primary objective was to identify data streams from EMRs that may perform well for GI outbreak detection. Zip code-specific daily episode counts in 2009 were generated for 22 syndromic and laboratory-based data streams from Kaiser Permanente Northern California EMRs, covering 3.3 million members. Data streams included outpatient and inpatient diagnosis codes, antidiarrheal medication dispensings, stool culture orders, and positive microbiology tests for six GI pathogens. Prospective daily surveillance was mimicked using the space-time permutation scan statistic in single and multi-stream analyses, and space-time clusters were identified. Serotype relatedness was assessed for isolates in two Salmonella clusters. Potential outbreaks included a cluster of 18 stool cultures ordered over 5 days in one zip code and a Salmonella cluster in three zip codes over 9 days, in which at least five of six cases had the same rare serotype. In all, 28 potential outbreaks were identified using single stream analyses, with signals in outpatient diagnosis codes most common. Multi-stream analyses identified additional potential outbreaks and in one example, improved the timeliness of detection. GI disease-related data streams can be used to identify potential outbreaks when generated from EMRs with extensive regional coverage. This process can supplement traditional GI outbreak reports to health departments, which frequently consist of outbreaks in well-defined settings (e.g., day care centers and restaurants) with no laboratory-confirmed pathogen. Data streams most promising for surveillance included microbiology test results, stool culture orders, and outpatient diagnoses. In particular, clusters of microbiology tests positive for specific

  6. A systematic review of electronic multi-compartment medication devices with reminder systems for improving adherence to self-administered medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Mary; Kinnear, Moira; Bond, Christine; McKinstry, Brian

    2017-06-01

    Many patients experience difficulties adhering to medication regimes. For people who forget or get confused about medication, there are products to help them such as multi-compartment medication devices (MMDs). Some of these, known as electronic MMDs (eMMDs), use audible and/or visual signals to prompt the patient when to take medication, dispense medications, give instructions to the patient, and contact a caregiver (mobile Internet or text to a carer) as needed. To systematically review the literature on the use of eMMDs, to determine what evidence for their effectiveness is available. A comprehensive literature search of 10 databases, plus an Internet search and hand searching was conducted, using the MeSH terms reminder systems/patient compliance/medication adherence. There were no date restrictions. Inclusion criteria were patients in any community setting, in any country and with no restrictions of age, gender, ethnicity or medical condition, using an eMMD. Peer-reviewed quantitative or qualitative studies of any design were included. Of 805 abstracts identified and 99 full text papers retrieved, six met the inclusion criteria. Five of the studies reported adherence to medication regimes; one reported design factors to improve adherence. Adherence varied by the context of the reminders, the target group and usability of the devices. The studies were small scale and only one was a well conducted randomised controlled trial. Overall methodological quality of the studies was poor. Although positive effects on adherence were reported further, rigorously conducted, studies are needed to inform the use of eMMDs. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  7. A New Electronic Monitoring Device to Measure Medication Adherence: Usability of the Helping Hand™

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina De Geest

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test the user performance, satisfaction and acceptability of the Helping Hand™ (B&O Medicom electronic medication adherence monitor. Using a mixed-method design, we studied 11 kidney transplant patients and 10 healthy volunteers during three weeks. Although testing showed positive usability aspects, several areas requiring technical improvement were identified: the most important obstacles to usability and acceptability were the weak sound signal, problems loading the medication, and the fact that only one medication could be used at a time.

  8. Architecture of portable electronic medical records system integrated with streaming media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Shih, Chien-Chou

    2012-02-01

    Due to increasing occurrence of accidents and illness during business trips, travel, or overseas studies, the requirement for portable EMR (Electronic Medical Records) has increased. This study proposes integrating streaming media technology into the EMR system to facilitate referrals, contracted laboratories, and disease notification among hospitals. The current study encoded static and dynamic medical images of patients into a streaming video format and stored them in a Flash Media Server (FMS). Based on the Taiwan Electronic Medical Record Template (TMT) standard, EMR records can be converted into XML documents and used to integrate description fields with embedded streaming videos. This investigation implemented a web-based portable EMR interchanging system using streaming media techniques to expedite exchanging medical image information among hospitals. The proposed architecture of the portable EMR retrieval system not only provides local hospital users the ability to acquire EMR text files from a previous hospital, but also helps access static and dynamic medical images as reference for clinical diagnosis and treatment. The proposed method protects property rights of medical images through information security mechanisms of the Medical Record Interchange Service Center and Health Certificate Authorization to facilitate proper, efficient, and continuous treatment of patients.

  9. African-American and Latina Women Seeking Public Health Services: Cultural Beliefs regarding Pregnancy, including Medication-taking Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Dalia Sanchez, MD, MCP, MHA, PhD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe cultural beliefs and medication-taking-behavior about pregnancy in African-American and Latina women. Design: qualitative study using phenomenological methodology; face-to-face, semi structured interviews and focus group. Thematic analysis was done to obtain themes consistent with the research objective. Setting: Maricopa County, Arizona, Department of Public-health Programs, November 2008 through April 2009.Participants: women seeking public-health services in the greater Phoenix, Arizona.Results: fifteen adult women representing two ethnic groups (seven African-Americans and eight Latinas participated. Themes derived from the interview data included: “The Dilemma: To Become or Not to Become Pregnant;” “The Ideal Stress-free World: Support System;” “Changing Worlds: Wanting Dependency;” and “The Health care System: Disconnection from Pregnancy to Postpartum.”Conclusions: based on the cultural themes: 1. pregnancies were not planned; 2. healthy life-style changes were not likely to occur during pregnancy; 3. basic facts about the biology of sexual intercourse and pregnancy were not understood, and there was no usage of any preconceptional or prenatal medications; and 4. professional health care was not desired or considered necessary (except during delivery. These cultural beliefs can contribute to negative birth outcomes, and need to be considered by pharmacists and other health-care providers. The information gained from this study can guide the implementation of educational programs developed by pharmacists that are more sensitive to the cultural beliefs and points of view of these particular women. Such programs would thus be more likely to be favorably received and utilized.

  10. Association of Arrhythmia-Related Genetic Variants With Phenotypes Documented in Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Driest, Sara L; Wells, Quinn S; Stallings, Sarah; Bush, William S; Gordon, Adam; Nickerson, Deborah A; Kim, Jerry H; Crosslin, David R; Jarvik, Gail P; Carrell, David S; Ralston, James D; Larson, Eric B; Bielinski, Suzette J; Olson, Janet E; Ye, Zi; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Abul-Husn, Noura S; Scott, Stuart A; Bottinger, Erwin; Almoguera, Berta; Connolly, John; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Hakonarson, Hakon; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Pan, Vivian; Persell, Stephen D; Smith, Maureen; Chisholm, Rex L; Kitchner, Terrie E; He, Max M; Brilliant, Murray H; Wallace, John R; Doheny, Kimberly F; Shoemaker, M Benjamin; Li, Rongling; Manolio, Teri A; Callis, Thomas E; Macaya, Daniela; Williams, Marc S; Carey, David; Kapplinger, Jamie D; Ackerman, Michael J; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Denny, Joshua C; Roden, Dan M

    2016-01-05

    Large-scale DNA sequencing identifies incidental rare variants in established Mendelian disease genes, but the frequency of related clinical phenotypes in unselected patient populations is not well established. Phenotype data from electronic medical records (EMRs) may provide a resource to assess the clinical relevance of rare variants. To determine the clinical phenotypes from EMRs for individuals with variants designated as pathogenic by expert review in arrhythmia susceptibility genes. This prospective cohort study included 2022 individuals recruited for nonantiarrhythmic drug exposure phenotypes from October 5, 2012, to September 30, 2013, for the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network Pharmacogenomics project from 7 US academic medical centers. Variants in SCN5A and KCNH2, disease genes for long QT and Brugada syndromes, were assessed for potential pathogenicity by 3 laboratories with ion channel expertise and by comparison with the ClinVar database. Relevant phenotypes were determined from EMRs, with data available from 2002 (or earlier for some sites) through September 10, 2014. One or more variants designated as pathogenic in SCN5A or KCNH2. Arrhythmia or electrocardiographic (ECG) phenotypes defined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes, ECG data, and manual EMR review. Among 2022 study participants (median age, 61 years [interquartile range, 56-65 years]; 1118 [55%] female; 1491 [74%] white), a total of 122 rare (minor allele frequency <0.5%) nonsynonymous and splice-site variants in 2 arrhythmia susceptibility genes were identified in 223 individuals (11% of the study cohort). Forty-two variants in 63 participants were designated potentially pathogenic by at least 1 laboratory or ClinVar, with low concordance across laboratories (Cohen κ = 0.26). An ICD-9 code for arrhythmia was found in 11 of 63 (17%) variant carriers vs 264 of 1959 (13%) of those without variants (difference, +4%; 95% CI, -5% to +13

  11. Retrospective cohort study shows that the risks for retinopathy of prematurity included birth age and weight, medical conditions and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aliaa A; Gomaa, Nancy A S; Awadein, Ahmed R; Al-Hayouti, Huda H; Hegazy, Ahmed I

    2017-12-01

    This study described the characteristics and risk factors of neonates who developed retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and severe treatable ROP in two Egyptian neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). This retrospective cohort study comprised 108 preterm neonates who were screened for ROP after being admitted to the two NICUs run by Cairo University Hospital from June 2014 to May 2015. Patients were examined using digital fundus photography and indirect ophthalmoscopy was performed if ROP was detected. Retinopathy of prematurity occurred in 75 patients. Late-onset sepsis, ventilation and hypercapnia were independently associated with ROP. Patients who developed severe treatable ROP had a younger gestational age (GA) than patients who did not develop ROP or developed mild or moderate ROP (29 weeks, range 27-33 weeks versus 32 weeks, range 28-36 weeks, p = 0.002) and a lower birthweight (1200 g, range 980-1590 g versus 1460 g, range 770-2475 g, p = 0.029). The risk factors associated with severe treatable ROP included the duration of admission, the duration of incubator oxygen, late-onset sepsis, intraventricular haemorrhage, total parenteral nutrition and the duration of caffeine citrate therapy. This study showed that the risks for ROP were wide-ranging and included GA and weight, medical conditions and treatment. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Potential application of item-response theory to interpretation of medical codes in electronic patient records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dregan Alex

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electronic patient records are generally coded using extensive sets of codes but the significance of the utilisation of individual codes may be unclear. Item response theory (IRT models are used to characterise the psychometric properties of items included in tests and questionnaires. This study asked whether the properties of medical codes in electronic patient records may be characterised through the application of item response theory models. Methods Data were provided by a cohort of 47,845 participants from 414 family practices in the UK General Practice Research Database (GPRD with a first stroke between 1997 and 2006. Each eligible stroke code, out of a set of 202 OXMIS and Read codes, was coded as either recorded or not recorded for each participant. A two parameter IRT model was fitted using marginal maximum likelihood estimation. Estimated parameters from the model were considered to characterise each code with respect to the latent trait of stroke diagnosis. The location parameter is referred to as a calibration parameter, while the slope parameter is referred to as a discrimination parameter. Results There were 79,874 stroke code occurrences available for analysis. Utilisation of codes varied between family practices with intraclass correlation coefficients of up to 0.25 for the most frequently used codes. IRT analyses were restricted to 110 Read codes. Calibration and discrimination parameters were estimated for 77 (70% codes that were endorsed for 1,942 stroke patients. Parameters were not estimated for the remaining more frequently used codes. Discrimination parameter values ranged from 0.67 to 2.78, while calibration parameters values ranged from 4.47 to 11.58. The two parameter model gave a better fit to the data than either the one- or three-parameter models. However, high chi-square values for about a fifth of the stroke codes were suggestive of poor item fit. Conclusion The application of item response

  13. CONFERENCE SUMMARY: Summary and comment on superconducting analogue electronics research, including materials and fabrication, as presented at ISEC 07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, C. P.

    2007-11-01

    The main theme at ISEC 2007 for superconducting materials, fabrication and analogue electronics was the description of incremental developments, including a few new directions that indicate breakthroughs in this area of research. The work on applications focused on their cost-benefit analysis (in order to improve their appeal), the development of simpler systems, making more of the data collected, improving packaging and being responsive to the power handling requirements for commercial systems. All papers presenting this level of research highlighted the importance of obtaining all the necessary details in order to investigate analogue devices and the effectiveness and commercial viability of their systems. This stage of development is important if we are to achieve the transition of superconducting electronics from the laboratory to commercial use. There were some exciting disruptive breakthroughs reported. These were in the areas of nano-SQUIDs, rotating gradiometers, superconducting scanning tunnelling microscopy (Hayashi et al) and the potential of superconducting photonics using optical interfaces with superconducting vortex flow transistors, for example. The materials research in low (LTS), high (HTS) and medium (MTS) critical temperature superconductors was reported. In LTS, nitrides emerged as important materials for use as new tunnel barriers, either insulating or semiconducting. Papers on BaN, NbN, TaN, GaN and Nb-Si superconducting materials were also presented. The MTS material of MgB2 is still under development (Zhao et al). There were also new research groups from South Africa and Turkey attending the conference. The fabrication research presented covered the areas of critical current Ic spread, which is still an issue in reducing the reproducibility of Josephson junctions, a 150 mm process for Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb and methods to improve barrier layers using both new materials and smooth surfaces at thin film interfaces (Du et al). New methods to make sub

  14. Developing a Systematic Architecture Approach for Designing an Enhanced Electronic Medical Record (EEMR) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldukheil, Maher A.

    2013-01-01

    The Healthcare industry is characterized by its complexity in delivering care to the patients. Accordingly, healthcare organizations adopt and implement Information Technology (IT) solutions to manage complexity, improve quality of care, and transform to a fully integrated and digitized environment. Electronic Medical Records (EMR), which is…

  15. Health Care Professionals' Perceptions of the Use of Electronic Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyeye, Adebisi

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) use has improved significantly in health care organizations. However, many barriers and factors influence the success of EMR implementation and adoption. The purpose of the descriptive qualitative single-case study was to explore health care professionals' perceptions of the use of EMRs at a hospital division of a…

  16. Possible electromagnetic interference with electronic medical equipment by radio waves coming from outside the hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, E; Kodama, K; Takano, K; Watanabe, Y; Nose, Y

    2001-08-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) with electronic medical equipment by radio waves from mobile telephone handsets has been reported and is currently receiving wide attention. The possibility of EMI with electronic medical equipment by radio waves coming into the hospital has also been pointed out. But so far, there are no reports measuring the frequency distribution of electric field intensity induced by incoming radio waves. Therefore, we measured electric field intensity induced by radio waves coming into our 11-floor hospital, which was under construction. The maximum intensity observed was about 200 V/m at 2.79 GHz, from airport surveillance radar waves. The maximum intensity induced by radio waves from cellular phone base stations was 1.78 V/m. These data show that various frequencies of radio waves are common in this urban area, and that they induce strong electricfield intensity. This strong electric field intensity might cause EMI with electronic medical equipment. Measurement of the electromagnetic environment should be done by each hospital in urban areas to prevent EMI with electronic medical equipment.

  17. Pre-Post Evaluation of Physicians' Satisfaction with a Redesigned Electronic Medical Record System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, Monique W. M.; Peute, Linda W. P.; Lauteslager, Arnaud; Bakker, Piet J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Physicians' acceptance of Electronic Medical Record Systems (EMRs) is closely related to their usability. Knowledge about end-users' opinions on usability of an EMR system may contribute to planning for the next phase of the usability cycle of the system. A demand for integration of new

  18. The use of open source electronic medical records in an urban ED in Kumasi-Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Forson*

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: Open source medical records may be the most appropriate and cost-effective software to adapt for keeping patient records electronically in a low resource setting. Further studies need to be conducted to demonstrate how EMR may affect the pace of work in the ED.

  19. Evolution of Medication Administration Workflow in Implementing Electronic Health Record System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuan-Han

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on the clinical workflow evolutions when implementing the health information technology (HIT). The study especially emphasized on administrating medication when the electronic health record (EHR) systems were adopted at rural healthcare facilities. Mixed-mode research methods, such as survey, observation, and focus group, were…

  20. Estimating morbidity rates from electronic medical records in general practice. Evaluation of a grouping system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biermans, M.C.J.; Verheij, R.A.; Bakker, D.H. de; Zielhuis, G.A.; Robbe, P.F.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In this study, we evaluated the internal validity of EPICON, an application for grouping ICPC-coded diagnoses from electronic medical records into episodes of care. These episodes are used to estimate morbidity rates in general practice. METHODS: Morbidity rates based on EPICON were

  1. The EMR-scan: assessing the quality of Electronic Medical Records in general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, R.; Jabaaij, L.; Njoo, K.; Hoogen, H. van den; Bakker, D. de

    2008-01-01

    Background: The use of electronic medical records (EMR) in general practice has spread rapidly in the last decade (more than 90% today). Traditionally, these records are primarily used for direct patient care and for administrative purposes by the practice involved. In recent years, further

  2. A Real Application of a Concept-based Electronic Medical Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purin, Barbara; Eccher, Claudio; Forti, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    We present a real implementation of a concept-based Electronic Medical Record for the management of heart failure disease. Our approach is based on GEHR archetypes represented in XML format for modelling clinical information. By using this technique it could be possible to build a interoperable future-proof clinical information system. PMID:14728481

  3. Utilizing uncoded consultation notes from electronic medical records for predictive modeling of colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, Mark; Szolovits, Peter; Moons, Leon M G; Numans, ME

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Machine learning techniques can be used to extract predictive models for diseases from electronic medical records (EMRs). However, the nature of EMRs makes it difficult to apply off-the-shelf machine learning techniques while still exploiting the rich content of the EMRs. In this paper,

  4. Facility to disinfect medical wastes by 10 MeV electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerluke, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    As regulations related to the disposal of infectious hospital and other medical waste are become increasingly stringent, hospitals and governments worldwide are looking to develop more effective and economical means to disinfect such waste materials prior to them being ultimately landfilled, incinerated or recycled. With the advent of reliable high-energy, high-power industrial electron accelerators, the prospect now exists to centralize collection of much of the infectious medical waste for major metropolitan areas at a single facility, and render it harmless using irradiation. Using much of the same or similar methodologies already developed for single-use medical device sterilization and for bioburden reduction in other goods, high energy electron beam treatment offers unique process advantages which become increasingly attractive with the economies of scale available at higher power. This paper will explore some of the key issues related to the safe disposition of infectious hospital and other medical waste, related irradiation research projects, and the design and economic factors related to an electron beam facility dedicated to this application. This will be presented in the context of the Rhodotron family of electron beam accelerators manufactured by Ion Beam Applications s.a. (author)

  5. The use of GP electronic medical records for international comparisons on prescription.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, R.; Dijk, L. van; Pringle, M.; Elliott, C.; Fleming, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: Much international research on prescription does not take into account the associated diagnoses. Subsequently, large scale international comparisons on what is prescribed for which disease are relatively rare. Routinely collected GP electronic medical records, whose use is well established in

  6. Developing a cardiovascular disease risk factor annotated corpus of Chinese electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jia; He, Bin; Guan, Yi; Jiang, Jingchi; Yang, Jinfeng

    2017-08-08

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become the leading cause of death in China, and most of the cases can be prevented by controlling risk factors. The goal of this study was to build a corpus of CVD risk factor annotations based on Chinese electronic medical records (CEMRs). This corpus is intended to be used to develop a risk factor information extraction system that, in turn, can be applied as a foundation for the further study of the progress of risk factors and CVD. We designed a light annotation task to capture CVD risk factors with indicators, temporal attributes and assertions that were explicitly or implicitly displayed in the records. The task included: 1) preparing data; 2) creating guidelines for capturing annotations (these were created with the help of clinicians); 3) proposing an annotation method including building the guidelines draft, training the annotators and updating the guidelines, and corpus construction. Meanwhile, we proposed some creative annotation guidelines: (1) the under-threshold medical examination values were annotated for our purpose of studying the progress of risk factors and CVD; (2) possible and negative risk factors were concerned for the same reason, and we created assertions for annotations; (3) we added four temporal attributes to CVD risk factors in CEMRs for constructing long term variations. Then, a risk factor annotated corpus based on de-identified discharge summaries and progress notes from 600 patients was developed. Built with the help of clinicians, this corpus has an inter-annotator agreement (IAA) F 1 -measure of 0.968, indicating a high reliability. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first annotated corpus concerning CVD risk factors in CEMRs and the guidelines for capturing CVD risk factor annotations from CEMRs were proposed. The obtained document-level annotations can be applied in future studies to monitor risk factors and CVD over the long term.

  7. Analysis of quantum ballistic electron transport in ultrasmall silicon devices including space-charge and geometric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, S. E.; Kumar, A.; Fischetti, M. V.

    2004-05-01

    A two-dimensional device simulation program which self consistently solves the Schrödinger and Poisson equations with current flow is described in detail. Significant approximations adopted in this work are the absence of scattering and a simple six-valley, parabolic band structure for silicon. A modified version of the quantum transmitting boundary method is used to describe open boundary conditions permitting current flow in device solutions far from equilibrium. The continuous energy spectrum of the system is discretized by temporarily imposing two different forms of closed boundary conditions, resulting in energies which sample the density-of-states and establish the wave function normalization conditions. These standing wave solutions ("normal modes") are decomposed into their traveling wave constituents, each of which represents injection from only one of the open boundary contacts ("traveling eigencomponents"). These current-carrying states are occupied by a drifted Fermi distribution associated with their injecting contact and summed to form the electron density in the device. Holes are neglected in this calculation. The Poisson equation is solved on the same finite element computational mesh as the Schrödinger equation; devices of arbitrary geometry can be modeled. Computational performance of the program including characterization of a "Broyden+Newton" algorithm employed in the iteration for self consistency is described. Device results are presented for a narrow silicon resonant tunneling diode (RTD) and many variants of idealized silicon double-gate field effect transistors (DGFETs). The RTD results show two resonant conduction peaks, each of which demonstrates hysteresis. Three 7.5 nm channel length DGFET structures with identical intrinsic device configurations but differing access geometries (straight, taper and "dog bone") are studied and found to have differing current flows owing to quantum-mechanical reflection in their access regions

  8. A Survey Aimed at General Citizens of the US and Japan about Their Attitudes toward Electronic Medical Data Handling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michio Kimura

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To clarify the views of the general population of two countries (US and Japan, concerning the handling of their medical records electronically. Methods: We contacted people nationwide in the United States at random via Random Digit Dialing (RDD to obtain 200 eligible responders. The questionnaire was for obtaining the information on their attitudes towards handling of their medical records, disclosure of the name of disease, secondary usage of information, compiling their records into a lifelong medical record, and access to their medical records on the Internet. We had also surveyed people of Shizuoka prefecture in Japan using same questionnaires sent by mail, for which we obtained 457 valid answers. Results: Even in an unidentifiable manner, US people feel profit-oriented usage of medical data without specific consent is not acceptable. There is a significant difference between usage of unidentifiable medical data for profit (about 50% feel negatively and for official/research purposes (about 30% feel negatively. About 60% of the US responders have a negative view on the proposal that unidentifiable medical information be utilized for profit by private companies to attain healthcare cost savings. As regards compiling a lifelong medical record, positive answers and negative answers are almost equally divided in the US (46% vs. 38% while more positive attitudes are seen in Japan (74% vs. 12%. However, any incentive measures aimed at changing attitudes to such a compiling including the discount of healthcare costs or insurance fees are unwelcomed by people regardless of their age or health condition in both surveys. Regarding the access to their own medical record via the Internet, 38% of the US responders feel this is unacceptable while 50.5% were willing to accept it. Conclusions: Participants from the US think that the extent of the sharing their identifiable medical records should be limited to the doctors-in-charge and specified

  9. Using clinician text notes in electronic medical record data to validate transgender-related diagnosis codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosnich, John R; Cashy, John; Gordon, Adam J; Shipherd, Jillian C; Kauth, Michael R; Brown, George R; Fine, Michael J

    2018-04-04

    Transgender individuals are vulnerable to negative health risks and outcomes, but research remains limited because data sources, such as electronic medical records (EMRs), lack standardized collection of gender identity information. Most EMR do not include the gold standard of self-identified gender identity, but International Classification of Diseases (ICDs) includes diagnostic codes indicating transgender-related clinical services. However, it is unclear if these codes can indicate transgender status. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which patients' clinician notes in EMR contained transgender-related terms that could corroborate ICD-coded transgender identity. Data are from the US Department of Veterans Affairs Corporate Data Warehouse. Transgender patients were defined by the presence of ICD9 and ICD10 codes associated with transgender-related clinical services, and a 3:1 comparison group of nontransgender patients was drawn. Patients' clinician text notes were extracted and searched for transgender-related words and phrases. Among 7560 patients defined as transgender based on ICD codes, the search algorithm identified 6753 (89.3%) with transgender-related terms. Among 22 072 patients defined as nontransgender without ICD codes, 246 (1.1%) had transgender-related terms; after review, 11 patients were identified as transgender, suggesting a 0.05% false negative rate. Using ICD-defined transgender status can facilitate health services research when self-identified gender identity data are not available in EMR.

  10. An exploratory study of the electronic medical record and outpatient vascular neurology consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgeon, Larissa; Gorelick, Philip B; Raykov, Tenko; Farooq, Muhammad U; Min, Jiangyong; Goshgarian, Christopher; Haveman-Gould, Bradley; Groenhout, Amy; McCarthy, Molly

    2017-12-01

    We carried out a quality improvement project utilizing the electronic medical record (EMR) to determine (1) the quality of vascular neurologists' recommendations for recurrent stroke prevention and (2) primary care provider (PCP) acknowledgement of the vascular neurologists' recurrent stroke prevention recommendations and their frequency of meeting the recommended metrics for risk factor control and lifestyle modification. We conducted a retrospective EMR chart review on a convenience sample of ischemic stroke patients during two epochs. Data collected included risk factors, stroke subtype, and process and outcome guidance metrics for recurrent ischemic stroke prevention according to American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA) recommendations. Overall, vascular neurologists commonly recommended appropriate AHA/ASA risk factor management standards, but were less likely to do so for lifestyle management. Improvements in the EMR system over time, including the establishment of guideline-driven importable recurrent stroke prevention templates, led to a high frequency of proper risk factor and lifestyle recommendations made by vascular neurologists. Statistical analysis provided further evidence that the EMR positively influenced the delivery of proper recurrent stroke prevention guidance. Although PCPs infrequently acknowledged receipt of vascular neurology consultations, there was a relatively high frequency of achieved risk factor control. The latter may be attributed at least in part to pre-existent quality improvement programs implemented at primary care offices. Our exploratory findings suggest that proper use of the EMR may heighten efforts to provide appropriate and consistent recurrent stroke prevention recommendations in a primary care setting.

  11. On-the-job training of health professionals for electronic health record and electronic medical record use: A scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina L. Younge

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of electronic health records (EHRs or electronic medical records (EMRs is well documented in health informatics literature yet, very few studies focus primarily on how health professionals in direct clinical care are trained for EHR or EMR use. Purpose: To investigate how health professionals in direct clinical care are trained to prepare them for EHR or EMR use. Methods: Systematic searches were conducted in CINAHL, EMBASE, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed and ISI WoS and, the Arksey and O’Malley scoping methodological framework was used to collect the data and analyze the results. Results: Training was done at implementation, orientation and post-implementation. Implementation and orientation training had a broader scope while post-implementation training focused on proficiency, efficiency and improvement. The multiplicity of training methods, types and levels of training identified appear to suggest that training is more effective when a combination of training methods are used.

  12. Distribution of Problems, Medications and Lab Results in Electronic Health Records: The Pareto Principle at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Bates, David W

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many natural phenomena demonstrate power-law distributions, where very common items predominate. Problems, medications and lab results represent some of the most important data elements in medicine, but their overall distribution has not been reported. OBJECTIVE: Our objective is to determine whether problems, medications and lab results demonstrate a power law distribution. METHODS: Retrospective review of electronic medical record data for 100,000 randomly selected patients seen at least twice in 2006 and 2007 at the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and its affiliated medical practices. RESULTS: All three data types exhibited a power law distribution. The 12.5% most frequently used problems account for 80% of all patient problems, the top 11.8% of medications account for 80% of all medication orders and the top 4.5% of lab result types account for all lab results. CONCLUSION: These three data elements exhibited power law distributions with a small number of common items representing a substantial proportion of all orders and observations, which has implications for electronic health record design.

  13. Computerized Physician Order Entry - effectiveness and efficiency of electronic medication ordering with decision support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stürzlinger, Heidi; Hiebinger, Cora; Pertl, Daniela; Traurig, Peter

    2009-05-19

    Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems are software to electronically enter medication orders. They can be equipped with tools for decision support (CDS). In Germany, various vendors offer such systems for hospitals and physicians' offices. These systems have mostly been developed during the last five to ten years. CPOE-systems exist since the 1970's. Usually, clinical decision support is integrated into the CPOE to avoid errors. This HTA-report aims to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of CPOE-/CDS-systems and their ethical, social and legal aspects. The systematic literature search (27 international data bases) yielded 791 abstracts. Following a two-part selection process, twelve publications were included in the assessment. All reviews and studies included in the present report show that the use of CPOE-/CDS-systems can lead to a reduction of medication errors. Minor errors can be eliminated almost completely. The effect of CPOE-/CDS-systems on the rate of adverse drug events (ADE) is evaluated in only two primary studies with conflicting results. It is difficult to compare the results of economical studies because they evaluate different settings, interventions and time frames. In addition, the documentation often is not fully transparent. All four studies included measure costs and effects from the perspective of a hospital or hospital affiliation. Concerning social aspects, the literature points at changes regard competing interests of technology and humans that result from the implementation of CPOE-systems. The experience of institutions in which the implementation of CPOE-systems leads to problems showed that the importance of considering the socio-organisational context had partly been underestimated. CPOE-/CDS-systems are able to reduce the rate of medication errors when ordering medications. The adherence to guidelines, communication, patient care and personnel satisfaction can also be affected positively. However, the literature also

  14. Computerized Physician Order Entry - effectiveness and efficiency of electronic medication ordering with decision support systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traurig, Peter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Health political background: Computerized physician order entry (CPOE systems are software to electronically enter medication orders. They can be equipped with tools for decision support (CDS. In Germany, various vendors offer such systems for hospitals and physicians’ offices. These systems have mostly been developed during the last five to ten years. Scientific background: CPOE-systems exist since the 1970’s. Usually, clinical decision support is integrated into the CPOE to avoid errors. Research questions: This HTA-report aims to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of CPOE-/CDS-systems and their ethical, social and legal aspects. Methods: The systematic literature search (27 international data bases yielded 791 abstracts. Following a two-part selection process, twelve publications were included in the assessment. Results: All reviews and studies included in the present report show that the use of CPOE-/CDS-systems can lead to a reduction of medication errors. Minor errors can be eliminated almost completely. The effect of CPOE-/CDS-systems on the rate of adverse drug events (ADE is evaluated in only two primary studies with conflicting results. It is difficult to compare the results of economical studies because they evaluate different settings, interventions and time frames. In addition, the documentation often is not fully transparent. All four studies included measure costs and effects from the perspective of a hospital or hospital affiliation. Concerning social aspects, the literature points at changes regard competing interests of technology and humans that result from the implementation of CPOE-systems. The experience of institutions in which the implementation of CPOE-systems leads to problems showed that the importance of considering the socio-organisational context had partly been underestimated. Discussion: CPOE-/CDS-systems are able to reduce the rate of medication errors when ordering medications. The adherence to

  15. Assessment of the impact on time to complete medical record using an electronic medical record versus a paper record on emergency department patients: a study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jeffrey J; Sutherland, Jane; Symington, Cheryl; Dorland, Katie; Mansour, Marlene; Stiell, Ian G

    2014-12-01

    Electronic medical records are becoming an integral part of healthcare delivery. The goal of this study was to compare paper documentation versus electronic medical record for non-traumatic chest pain to determine differences in time for physicians to complete medical records using paper versus electronic mediums. We also assessed physician satisfaction with the electronic format. We conducted this before-after study in a single large tertiary care academic emergency department. In the 'Before Period', stopwatches determined the time for paper medical recording. In the 'After Period', a template-based electronic medical record was introduced and the time for electronic recording was measured. The time to record in the before and after periods were compared using a two-sided t test. We surveyed physicians to assess satisfaction. We enrolled 100 non-traumatic patients with chest pain in the before period and 73 in the after period. The documentation time was longer using electronic charting, (9.6±5.9 min vs 6.1±2.5 min; pelectronic patient recording for non-traumatic chest pain. This is the first study that we are aware of which compared paper versus electronic medical records in the emergency department. Electronic recording took longer than paper records. Physicians were not satisfied using this electronic record. Given the time pressures on emergency physicians, a solution to minimise the charting time using electronic medical records must be found before widespread uptake of electronic charting will be possible. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Highly Conductive Transparent and Flexible Electrodes Including Double-Stacked Thin Metal Films for Transparent Flexible Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jun Hee; Kim, Do-Hong; Jeong, Eun Gyo; Lee, Tae-Woo; Lee, Myung Keun; Park, Jeong Woo; Lee, Hoseung; Choi, Kyung Cheol

    2017-05-17

    To keep pace with the era of transparent and deformable electronics, electrode functions should be improved. In this paper, an innovative structure is suggested to overcome the trade-off between optical and electrical properties that commonly arises with transparent electrodes. The structure of double-stacked metal films showed high conductivity (electronics are expected.

  17. Update on medical and regulatory issues pertaining to compounded and FDA-approved drugs, including hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V; Pickar, James H

    2016-02-01

    We review the historical regulation of drug compounding, concerns about widespread use of non-Food and Drug Admiistration (FDA)-approved compounded bioidentical hormone therapies (CBHTs), which do not have proper labeling and warnings, and anticipated impact of the 2013 Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA) on compounding. US government websites were searched for documents concerning drug compounding regulation and oversight from 1938 (passage of Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act [FDCA]) through 2014, including chronologies, Congressional testimony, FDA guidelines and enforcements, and reports. The FDCA and DQSA were reviewed. PubMed and Google were searched for articles on compounded drugs, including CBHT. Congress explicitly granted the FDA limited oversight of compounded drugs in a 1997 amendment to the FDCA, but the FDA has encountered obstacles in exercising that authority. After 64 patient deaths and 750 adversely affected patients from the 2012 meningitis outbreak due to contaminated compounded steroid injections, Congress passed the DQSA, authorizing the FDA to create a voluntary registration for facilities that manufacture and distribute sterile compounded drugs in bulk and reinforcing FDCA regulations for traditional compounding. Given history and current environment, concerns remain about CBHT product regulation and their lack of safety and efficacy data. The DQSA and its reinforcement of §503A of the FDCA solidifies FDA authority to enforce FDCA provisions against compounders of CBHT. The new law may improve compliance and accreditation by the compounding industry; support state and FDA oversight; and prevent the distribution of misbranded, adulterated, or inconsistently compounded medications, and false and misleading claims, thus reducing public health risk.

  18. Reorganizing Care With the Implementation of Electronic Medical Records: A Time-Motion Study in the PICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumeliotis, Nadia; Parisien, Geneviève; Charette, Sylvie; Arpin, Elizabeth; Brunet, Fabrice; Jouvet, Philippe

    2018-04-01

    To assess caregivers' patient care time before and after the implementation of a reorganization of care plan with electronic medical records. A prospective, observational, time-motion study. A level 3 PICU. Nurses and orderlies caring for intubated patients during an 8-hour work shift before (2008-2009) and after (2016) implementation of reorganization of care in 2013. The reorganization plan included improved telecommunication for healthcare workers, increased tasks delegated to orderlies, and an ICU-specific electronic medical record (Intellispace Critical Care and Anesthesia information system, Philips Healthcare). Time spent completing various work tasks was recorded by direct observation, and proportion of time in tasks was compared for each study period. A total of 153.7 hours was observed from 22 nurses and 14 orderlies. There was no significant difference in the proportion of nursing patient care time before (68.8% [interquartile range, 48-72%]) and after (55% [interquartile range, 51-57%]) (p = 0.11) the reorganization with electronic medical record. Direct patient care task time for nurses was increased from 27.0% (interquartile range, 30-37%) before to 34.7% (interquartile range, 33-75%) (p = 0.336) after, and indirect patient care tasks decreased from 33.6% (interquartile range, 23-41%) to 18.6% (interquartile range, 16-22%) (p = 0.036). Documentation time significantly increased from 14.5% (interquartile range, 12-22%) to 26.2% (interquartile range, 23-28%) (p = 0.032). Nursing productivity ratio improved from 28.3 to 26.0. A survey revealed that nursing staff was satisfied with the electronic medical record, although there was a concern for the maintenance of oral communication in the unit. The reorganization of care with the implementation of an ICU-specific electronic medical record in the PICU did not change total patient care provided but improved nursing productivity, resulting in improved efficiency. Documentation time was significantly

  19. [Design and Implementation of a Mobile Operating Room Information Management System Based on Electronic Medical Record].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baozhen; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Xianwen

    2015-06-01

    A mobile operating room information management system with electronic medical record (EMR) is designed to improve work efficiency and to enhance the patient information sharing. In the operating room, this system acquires the information from various medical devices through the Client/Server (C/S) pattern, and automatically generates XML-based EMR. Outside the operating room, this system provides information access service by using the Browser/Server (B/S) pattern. Software test shows that this system can correctly collect medical information from equipment and clearly display the real-time waveform. By achieving surgery records with higher quality and sharing the information among mobile medical units, this system can effectively reduce doctors' workload and promote the information construction of the field hospital.

  20. Knowledge and attitudes of nurses in community health centres about electronic medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don O'Mahony

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses in primary healthcare record data for the monitoring and evaluation of diseases and services. Information and communications technology (ICT can improve quality in healthcare by providing quality medical records. However, worldwide, the majority of health ICT projects have failed. Individual user acceptance is a crucial factor in successful ICT implementation. Objectives: The aim of this study is to explore nurses’ knowledge, attitudes and perceptions regarding ICT so as to inform the future implementation of electronic medical record (EMR systems. Methods: A qualitative design was used. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with nurses at three community health centres (CHCs in the King Sabata Dalyindyebo Local Municipality. The interview guide was informed by the literature on user acceptance of ICT. Interviews were recorded and analysed using content analysis. Results: Many nurses knew about health ICT and articulated clearly the potential benefits of an EMR such as fewer errors, more complete records, easier reporting and access to information. They thought that an EMR system would solve the challenges they identified with the current paper-based record system, including duplication of data, misfiling, lack of a chronological patient record, excessive time in recording and reduced time for patient care. For personal ICT needs, approximately half used cellphone Internet-based services and computers. Conclusions: In this study, nurses identified many challenges with the current recording methods. They thought that an EMR should be installed at CHCs. Their knowledge about EMR, positive attitudes to ICT and personal use of ICT devices increase the likelihood of successful EMR implementation at CHCs.

  1. Modulators of normal electrocardiographic intervals identified in a large electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Andrea H; Schildcrout, Jonathan S; Blakemore, Dana L; Masys, Dan R; Pulley, Jill M; Basford, Melissa A; Roden, Dan M; Denny, Joshua C

    2011-02-01

    Traditional electrocardiographic (ECG) reference ranges were derived from studies in communities or clinical trial populations. The distribution of ECG parameters in a large population presenting to a healthcare system has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to define the contribution of age, race, gender, height, body mass index, and type 2 diabetes mellitus to normal ECG parameters in a population presenting to a healthcare system. Study subjects were obtained from the Vanderbilt Synthetic Derivative, a de-identified image of the electronic medical record (EMR), containing more than 20 years of records on 1.7 million subjects. We identified 63,177 unique subjects with an ECG that was read as "normal" by the reviewing cardiologist. Using combinations of natural language processing and laboratory and billing code queries, we identified a subset of 32,949 subjects without cardiovascular disease, interfering medications, or abnormal electrolytes. The ethnic makeup was 77% Caucasian, 13% African American, 1% Hispanic, 1% Asian, and 8% unknown. The range that included 95% of normal PR intervals was 125-196 ms, QRS 69-103 ms, QT interval corrected with Bazett formula 365-458 ms, and heart rate 54-96 bpm. Linear regression modeling of patient characteristic effects reproduced known age and gender effects and identified novel associations with race, body mass index, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. A web-based application for patient-specific normal ranges is available online at http://biostat.mc.vanderbilt.edu/ECGPredictionInterval. Analysis of a large set of EMR-derived normal ECGs reproduced known associations, found new relationships, and established patient-specific normal ranges. Such knowledge informs clinical and genetic research and may improve understanding of normal cardiac physiology. Copyright © 2011 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Modulators of normal ECG intervals identified in a large electronic medical record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Andrea H; Schildcrout, Jonathan S; Blakemore, Dana L; Masys, Dan R; Pulley, Jill M; Basford, Melissa A; Roden, Dan M; Denny, Joshua C

    2010-01-01

    Background Traditional electrocardiographic reference ranges were derived from studies in communities or clinical trial populations. The distribution of ECG parameters in a large population presenting to a healthcare system has not been studied. Objective The objective of this study is to define the contribution of age, race, gender, height, body mass index (BMI), and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) to normal electrocardiographic parameters in a population presenting to a healthcare system. Methods Study subjects were obtained from the Vanderbilt Synthetic Derivative, a de-identified image of the electronic medical record (EMR), containing more than 20 years of records on 1.7 million subjects. We identified 63,177 unique subjects with an ECG read as ‘normal’ by the reviewing cardiologist. Using combinations of natural language processing, laboratory and billing code queries, we identified a subset of 32,949 subjects without cardiovascular disease, interfering medications, or abnormal electrolytes. The ethnic makeup was 77% Caucasian, 13% African American, 1% Hispanic, 1% Asian, and 8% unknown. Results The range that included 95% of normal PR intervals was 125–196 msec; QRS 69–103 msec; QTcB 365–458 msec; and HR 54–96 bpm. Linear regression modeling of patient characteristic effects reproduced known age and gender effects and identified novel associations with race, BMI, and T2D. A web-based application for patient-specific normal ranges has been made available online at http://biostat.mc.vanderbilt.edu/ECGPredictionInterval. Conclusion Analysis of a large set of EMR-derived normal ECGs reproduced known associations, found new relationships, and established patient-specific normal ranges. Such knowledge informs clinical and genetic research and may improve understanding of normal cardiac physiology. PMID:21044898

  3. Use of an Electronic Medical Record to Assess Patient-Reported Morbidity Following Ureteroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Monica S C; Antonelli, Jodi A; Lotan, Yair; Shakir, Nabeel; Kavoussi, Nicholas; Cohen, Adam; Pearle, Margaret S

    2016-05-01

    With the extensive documentation afforded by our electronic medical record (EMR), we observed an unusually high number of patient-initiated encounters following ureteroscopy (URS). We sought to quantify and categorize patient encounters following URS to determine if we could identify avoidable common problems. Following IRB approval, we reviewed the records of 298 consecutive patients with stones who underwent 314 URS procedures between July 2013 and November 2014. Patient demographics, stone characteristics and operative details, as well as telephone encounters, secure online patient-initiated (MyChart) messages, and emergency department (ED) visits following URS were extracted from our EMR (Epic, Verona, WI). We performed univariate (UVA) and multivariate (MVA) analysis to identify factors predictive of postoperative patient encounters and compared URS patients to a group of 56 patients undergoing transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) for number and type of encounters. We identified 443 encounters generated by 201 URS patients, including 334 telephone calls, 71 MyChart messages, and 38 ED visits. Among these encounters, 352 (79%) were medically related (pain comprised 45%) and the remainder involved scheduling issues. By UVA age, bilateral versus unilateral URS, stone location (both kidney and ureter), ureteral access sheath size, and total number of stones predicted a postoperative encounter. By MVA, only younger age and larger UAS size were independent predictors. When compared with TURBT patients, URS patients had a 2.5-fold higher risk of having a pain-related postoperative encounter (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.08-7.04, P=0.03). Among patients undergoing URS for stones, two-thirds made unprompted contact with a healthcare provider and 80% of contacts involved postoperative pain, a finding that is distinct from another endoscopic procedure that does not involve upper tract manipulation. Patients do not perceive URS as the benign procedure doctors do.

  4. On standardization of basic datasets of electronic medical records in traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Ni, Wandong; Li, Jing; Jiang, Youlin; Liu, Kunjing; Ma, Zhaohui

    2017-12-24

    Standardization of electronic medical record, so as to enable resource-sharing and information exchange among medical institutions has become inevitable in view of the ever increasing medical information. The current research is an effort towards the standardization of basic dataset of electronic medical records in traditional Chinese medicine. In this work, an outpatient clinical information model and an inpatient clinical information model are created to adequately depict the diagnosis processes and treatment procedures of traditional Chinese medicine. To be backward compatible with the existing dataset standard created for western medicine, the new standard shall be a superset of the existing standard. Thus, the two models are checked against the existing standard in conjunction with 170,000 medical record cases. If a case cannot be covered by the existing standard due to the particularity of Chinese medicine, then either an existing data element is expanded with some Chinese medicine contents or a new data element is created. Some dataset subsets are also created to group and record Chinese medicine special diagnoses and treatments such as acupuncture. The outcome of this research is a proposal of standardized traditional Chinese medicine medical records datasets. The proposal has been verified successfully in three medical institutions with hundreds of thousands of medical records. A new dataset standard for traditional Chinese medicine is proposed in this paper. The proposed standard, covering traditional Chinese medicine as well as western medicine, is expected to be soon approved by the authority. A widespread adoption of this proposal will enable traditional Chinese medicine hospitals and institutions to easily exchange information and share resources. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. A study of general practitioners' perspectives on electronic medical records systems in NHSScotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; Mair, Frances S

    2013-05-21

    Primary care doctors in NHSScotland have been using electronic medical records within their practices routinely for many years. The Scottish Health Executive eHealth strategy (2008-2011) has recently brought radical changes to the primary care computing landscape in Scotland: an information system (GPASS) which was provided free-of-charge by NHSScotland to a majority of GP practices has now been replaced by systems provided by two approved commercial providers. The transition to new electronic medical records had to be completed nationally across all health-boards by March 2012. We carried out 25 in-depth semi-structured interviews with primary care doctors to elucidate GPs' perspectives on their practice information systems and collect more general information on management processes in the patient surgical pathway in NHSScotland. We undertook a thematic analysis of interviewees' responses, using Normalisation Process Theory as the underpinning conceptual framework. The majority of GPs' interviewed considered that electronic medical records are an integral and essential element of their work during the consultation, playing a key role in facilitating integrated and continuity of care for patients and making clinical information more accessible. However, GPs expressed a number of reservations about various system functionalities - for example: in relation to usability, system navigation and information visualisation. Our study highlights that while electronic information systems are perceived as having important benefits, there remains substantial scope to improve GPs' interaction and overall satisfaction with these systems. Iterative user-centred improvements combined with additional training in the use of technology would promote an increased understanding, familiarity and command of the range of functionalities of electronic medical records among primary care doctors.

  6. Detecting inpatient falls by using natural language processing of electronic medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyabe Shin-ichi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Incident reporting is the most common method for detecting adverse events in a hospital. However, under-reporting or non-reporting and delay in submission of reports are problems that prevent early detection of serious adverse events. The aim of this study was to determine whether it is possible to promptly detect serious injuries after inpatient falls by using a natural language processing method and to determine which data source is the most suitable for this purpose. Methods We tried to detect adverse events from narrative text data of electronic medical records by using a natural language processing method. We made syntactic category decision rules to detect inpatient falls from text data in electronic medical records. We compared how often the true fall events were recorded in various sources of data including progress notes, discharge summaries, image order entries and incident reports. We applied the rules to these data sources and compared F-measures to detect falls between these data sources with reference to the results of a manual chart review. The lag time between event occurrence and data submission and the degree of injury were compared. Results We made 170 syntactic rules to detect inpatient falls by using a natural language processing method. Information on true fall events was most frequently recorded in progress notes (100%, incident reports (65.0% and image order entries (12.5%. However, F-measure to detect falls using the rules was poor when using progress notes (0.12 and discharge summaries (0.24 compared with that when using incident reports (1.00 and image order entries (0.91. Since the results suggested that incident reports and image order entries were possible data sources for prompt detection of serious falls, we focused on a comparison of falls found by incident reports and image order entries. Injury caused by falls found by image order entries was significantly more severe than falls detected by

  7. A SWOT Analysis of the Various Backup Scenarios Used in Electronic Medical Record Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hwa Jeong; Kim, Hye Hyeon

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Electronic medical records (EMRs) are increasingly being used by health care services. Currently, if an EMR shutdown occurs, even for a moment, patient safety and care can be seriously impacted. Our goal was to determine the methodology needed to develop an effective and reliable EMR backup system. Methods Our "independent backup system by medical organizations" paradigm implies that individual medical organizations develop their own EMR backup systems within their organizations. A "personal independent backup system" is defined as an individual privately managing his/her own medical records, whereas in a "central backup system by the government" the government controls all the data. A "central backup system by private enterprises" implies that individual companies retain control over their own data. A "cooperative backup system among medical organizations" refers to a networked system established through mutual agreement. The "backup system based on mutual trust between an individual and an organization" means that the medical information backup system at the organizational level is established through mutual trust. Results Through the use of SWOT analysis it can be shown that cooperative backup among medical organizations is possible to be established through a network composed of various medical agencies and that it can be managed systematically. An owner of medical information only grants data access to the specific person who gave the authorization for backup based on the mutual trust between an individual and an organization. Conclusions By employing SWOT analysis, we concluded that a linkage among medical organizations or between an individual and an organization can provide an efficient backup system. PMID:22084811

  8. Ab initio effective core potentials including relativistic effects and their application to the electronic structure calculations of heavy atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.S.

    1977-11-01

    The effects of the 4f shell of electrons and the relativity of valence electrons are compared. The effect of 4f shell (lanthanide contraction) is estimated from the numerical Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations of pseudo-atoms corresponding to Hf, Re, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb and Bi without 4f electrons and with atomic numbers reduced by 14. The relativistic effect estimated from the numerical Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) calculations of those atoms is comparable in the magnitude with that of the 4f shell of electrons. Both are larger for 6s than for 5d or 6p electrons. The various relativistic effects on valence electrons are discussed in detail to determine the proper level of the approximation for the valence electron calculations of systems with heavy elements. An effective core potential system has been developed for heavy atoms in which relativistic effects are included in the effective potentials.

  9. Factors affecting electronic medical record system adoption in small korean hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Taek; Lee, Jinhyung

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the factors affecting adoption of an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system in small Korean hospitals. This study used survey data on adoption of EMR systems; data included that from various hospital organizational structures. The survey was conducted from April 10 to August 3, 2009. The response rate was 33.5% and the total number of small general hospitals was 144. Data were analyzed using the generalized estimating equation method to adjust for environmental clustering effects. The adoption rate of EMR systems was 40.2% for all responding small hospitals. The study results indicate that IT infrastructure (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.23 to 1.80) and organic hospital structure (OR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.07 to 3.23) rather than mechanistic hospital structure or the number of hospitals within a county (OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.17) were critical factors for EMR adoption after controlling for various hospital covariates. This study found that several managerial features of hospitals and one environmental factor were related to the adoption of EMR systems in small Korean hospitals. Considering that health information technology produces many positive health outcomes and that an 'adoption gap' regarding information technology exists in small clinical settings, healthcare policy makers should understand which organizational and environmental factors affect adoption of EMR systems and take action to financially support small hospitals during this transition.

  10. Methods of defining hypertension in electronic medical records: validation against national survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Mingkai; Chen, Guanmin; Kaplan, Gilaad G; Lix, Lisa M; Drummond, Neil; Lucyk, Kelsey; Garies, Stephanie; Lowerison, Mark; Weibe, Samuel; Quan, Hude

    2016-09-01

    Electronic medical records (EMR) can be a cost-effective source for hypertension surveillance. However, diagnosis of hypertension in EMR is commonly under-coded and warrants the needs to review blood pressure and antihypertensive drugs for hypertension case identification. We included all the patients actively registered in The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database, UK, on 31 December 2011. Three case definitions using diagnosis code, antihypertensive drug prescriptions and abnormal blood pressure, respectively, were used to identify hypertension patients. We compared the prevalence and treatment rate of hypertension in THIN with results from Health Survey for England (HSE) in 2011. Compared with prevalence reported by HSE (29.7%), the use of diagnosis code alone (14.0%) underestimated hypertension prevalence. The use of any of the definitions (38.4%) or combination of antihypertensive drug prescriptions and abnormal blood pressure (38.4%) had higher prevalence than HSE. The use of diagnosis code or two abnormal blood pressure records with a 2-year period (31.1%) had similar prevalence and treatment rate of hypertension with HSE. Different definitions should be used for different study purposes. The definition of 'diagnosis code or two abnormal blood pressure records with a 2-year period' could be used for hypertension surveillance in THIN. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Spin electronic magnetic sensor based on functional oxides for medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solignac, A.; Kurij, G.; Guerrero, R.; Agnus, G.; Maroutian, T.; Fermon, C.; Pannetier-Lecoeur, M.; Lecoeur, Ph.

    2015-09-01

    To detect magnetic signals coming from the body, in particular those produced by the electrical activity of the heart or of the brain, the development of ultrasensitive sensors is required. In this regard, magnetoresistive sensors, stemming from spin electronics, are very promising devices. For example, tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) junctions based on MgO tunnel barrier have a high sensitivity. Nevertheless, TMR also often have high level of noise. Full spin polarized materials like manganite La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) are attractive alternative candidates to develop such sensors because LSMO exhibits a very low 1/f noise when grown on single crystals, and a TMR response has been observed with values up to 2000%. This kind of tunnel junctions, when combined with a high Tc superconductor loop, opens up possibilities to develop full oxide structures working at liquid nitrogen temperature and suitable for medical imaging. In this work, we investigated on LSMO-based tunnel junctions the parameters controlling the overall system performances, including not only the TMR ratio, but also the pinning of the reference layer and the noise floor. We especially focused on studying the effects of the quality of the barrier, the interface and the electrode, by playing with materials and growth conditions.

  12. Electronic medical record systems in critical access hospitals: leadership perspectives on anticipated and realized benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Troy R; Vavroch, Jared; Bahensky, James A; Ward, Marcia M

    2010-04-01

    The growth of electronic medical records (EMRs) is driven by the belief that EMRs will significantly improve healthcare providers' performance and reduce healthcare costs. Evidence supporting these beliefs is limited, especially for small rural hospitals. A survey that focused on health information technology (HIT) capacity was administered to all hospitals in Iowa. Structured interviews were conducted with the leadership at 15 critical access hospitals (CAHs) that had implemented EMRs in order to assess the perceived benefits of operational EMRs. The results indicate that most of the hospitals implemented EMRs to improve efficiency, timely access, and quality. Many CAH leaders also viewed EMR implementation as a necessary business strategy to remain viable and improve financial performance. While some reasons reflect external influences, such as perceived future federal mandates, other reasons suggest that the decision was driven by internal forces, including the hospital's culture and the desires of key leaders to embrace HIT. Anticipated benefits were consistent with goals; however, realized benefits were rarely obvious in terms of quantifiable results. These findings expand the limited research on the rationale for implementing EMRs in critical access hospitals.

  13. Population prevalence and control of cardiovascular risk factors: what electronic medical records tell us.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán-Ramos, Arantxa; Verdú, Jose M; Grau, María; Iglesias-Rodal, Manuel; del Val García, José L; Consola, Alicia; Comin, Eva

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the prevalence, control, and management of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). Cross-sectional analysis of all individuals attended in the Catalan primary care centers between 2006 and 2009. History of cardiovascular diseases, diagnosis and treatment of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, DM2, lipid profile, glycemia and blood pressure data were extracted from electronic medical records. Age-standardized prevalence and levels of management and control were estimated. Individuals aged 35-74 years using primary care databases. A total of 2,174,515 individuals were included (mean age 52 years [SD 11], 47% men). Hypertension was the most prevalent cardiovascular risk factor (39% in women, 41% in men) followed by hypercholesterolemia (38% and 40%) and DM2 (12% and 16%), respectively. Diuretics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were most often prescribed for hypertension control (women treated). Hypercholesterolemia was controlled (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol women with no history of cardiovascular disease, despite lipid-lowering treatment, primarily (90%) with statins. The percentage of women and men with DM2 and with glycated hemoglobin DM2 were adequately controlled; hypercholesterolemia control was particularly low. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. A social network of hospital acquired infection built from electronic medical record data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusumano-Towner, Marco; Li, Daniel Y; Tuo, Shanshan; Krishnan, Gomathi; Maslove, David M

    2013-05-01

    Social networks have been used in the study of outbreaks of infectious diseases, including in small group settings such as individual hospitals. Collecting the data needed to create such networks, however, can be time consuming, costly, and error prone. We sought to create a social network of hospital inpatients using electronic medical record (EMR) data already collected for other purposes, for use in simulating outbreaks of nosocomial infections. We used the EMR data warehouse of a tertiary academic hospital to model contact among inpatients. Patient-to-patient contact due to shared rooms was inferred from admission-discharge-transfer data, and contact with healthcare workers was inferred from clinical documents. Contacts were used to generate a social network, which was then used to conduct probabilistic simulations of nosocomial outbreaks of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and influenza. Simulations of infection transmission across the network reflected the staffing and patient flow practices of the hospital. Simulations modeling patient isolation, increased hand hygiene, and staff vaccination showed a decrease in the spread of infection. We developed a method of generating a social network of hospital inpatients from EMR data. This method allows the derivation of networks that reflect the local hospital environment, obviate the need for simulated or manually collected data, and can be updated in near real time. Inpatient social networks represent a novel secondary use of EMR data, and can be used to simulate nosocomial infections. Future work should focus on prospective validation of the simulations, and adapting such networks to other tasks.

  15. NLP based congestive heart failure case finding: A prospective analysis on statewide electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Luo, Jin; Hao, Shiying; Xu, Haihua; Shin, Andrew Young; Jin, Bo; Liu, Rui; Deng, Xiaohong; Wang, Lijuan; Zheng, Le; Zhao, Yifan; Zhu, Chunqing; Hu, Zhongkai; Fu, Changlin; Hao, Yanpeng; Zhao, Yingzhen; Jiang, Yunliang; Dai, Dorothy; Culver, Devore S; Alfreds, Shaun T; Todd, Rogow; Stearns, Frank; Sylvester, Karl G; Widen, Eric; Ling, Xuefeng B

    2015-12-01

    In order to proactively manage congestive heart failure (CHF) patients, an effective CHF case finding algorithm is required to process both structured and unstructured electronic medical records (EMR) to allow complementary and cost-efficient identification of CHF patients. We set to identify CHF cases from both EMR codified and natural language processing (NLP) found cases. Using narrative clinical notes from all Maine Health Information Exchange (HIE) patients, the NLP case finding algorithm was retrospectively (July 1, 2012-June 30, 2013) developed with a random subset of HIE associated facilities, and blind-tested with the remaining facilities. The NLP based method was integrated into a live HIE population exploration system and validated prospectively (July 1, 2013-June 30, 2014). Total of 18,295 codified CHF patients were included in Maine HIE. Among the 253,803 subjects without CHF codings, our case finding algorithm prospectively identified 2411 uncodified CHF cases. The positive predictive value (PPV) is 0.914, and 70.1% of these 2411 cases were found to be with CHF histories in the clinical notes. A CHF case finding algorithm was developed, tested and prospectively validated. The successful integration of the CHF case findings algorithm into the Maine HIE live system is expected to improve the Maine CHF care. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Method and apparatus for enhanced sensitivity filmless medical x-ray imaging, including three-dimensional imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Sherwood

    1995-01-01

    A filmless X-ray imaging system includes at least one X-ray source, upper and lower collimators, and a solid-state detector array, and can provide three-dimensional imaging capability. The X-ray source plane is distance z.sub.1 above upper collimator plane, distance z.sub.2 above the lower collimator plane, and distance z.sub.3 above the plane of the detector array. The object to be X-rayed is located between the upper and lower collimator planes. The upper and lower collimators and the detector array are moved horizontally with scanning velocities v.sub.1, v.sub.2, v.sub.3 proportional to z.sub.1, z.sub.2 and z.sub.3, respectively. The pattern and size of openings in the collimators, and between detector positions is proportional such that similar triangles are always defined relative to the location of the X-ray source. X-rays that pass through openings in the upper collimator will always pass through corresponding and similar openings in the lower collimator, and thence to a corresponding detector in the underlying detector array. Substantially 100% of the X-rays irradiating the object (and neither absorbed nor scattered) pass through the lower collimator openings and are detected, which promotes enhanced sensitivity. A computer system coordinates repositioning of the collimators and detector array, and X-ray source locations. The computer system can store detector array output, and can associate a known X-ray source location with detector array output data, to provide three-dimensional imaging. Detector output may be viewed instantly, stored digitally, and/or transmitted electronically for image viewing at a remote site.

  17. Object-oriented framework for high-performance electronic medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Douglas C.; Harrison, Timothy H.; Pyarali, Irfan

    1996-02-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of an object-oriented communication framework we developed to meet the demands of next-generation distributed electronic medical imaging systems. Our framework combines the flexibility of high-level distributed object computing middleware (like CORBA) with the performance of low-level network programming mechanisms (like sockets). In the paper, we outline the design goals and software architecture of our framework, illustrate the performance of the framework over ATM, and describe how we resolved design challenges we faced when developing an object- oriented communication framework for distributed medical imaging.

  18. [The design and implementation of video processing system for medical electronic endoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jun-jie; Yan, Zhuang-zhi; Wang, Mu-yun

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents a medical electronic endoscopy real-time image acquisition and control system which consists of video codec chip, flash memory and FPGA. The hardware scheme and circuit design of the system is figured out, and the principle of ping-pong operation and the implementation of FPGA program is introduced. Experimental tests show that the designed system performs steadily, is easy to maintain, and reduces the cost greatly. The higher performance price ratio makes it have good application prospect in medical endoscopy.

  19. Electronic signature for medical documents--integration and evaluation of a public key infrastructure in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandner, R; van der Haak, M; Hartmann, M; Haux, R; Schmücker, P

    2002-01-01

    Our objectives were to determine the user-oriented and legal requirements for a Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) for electronic signatures for medical documents, and to translate these requirements into a general model for a signature system. A prototype of this model was then implemented and evaluated in clinical routine use. Analyses of documents, processes, interviews, observations, and of the available literature supplied the foundations for the development of the signature system model. Eight participants of the Department of Dermatology of the Heidelberg University Medical Center evaluated the implemented prototype from December 2000 to January 2001, during the course of an intervention study. By means of questionnaires, interviews, observations and database analyses, the usefulness and user acceptance of the electronic signature and its integration into electronic discharge letters were established. Since the major part of medical documents generated in a hospital are signature-relevant, they will require electronic signatures in the future. A PKI must meet the multitude of responsibilities and security needs required in a hospital. Also, the signature functionality must be integrated directly into the workflow surrounding document creation. A developed signature model, fulfilling user-oriented and legal requirements, was implemented using hard and software components that conform to the German Signature Law. It was integrated into the existing hospital information system of the Heidelberg University Medical Center. At the end of the intervention study, the average acceptance scores achieved were mean = 3.90; SD = 0.42 on a scale of 1 (very negative attitude) to 5 (very positive attitude) for the electronic signature procedure. Acceptance of the integration into computer-supported discharge letter writing reached mean = 3.91; SD = 0.47. On average, the discharge letters were completed 7.18 days earlier. The electronic signature is indispensable for the

  20. VERB-4D simulations of Earths inner magnetosphere: Ring-current-to-radiation-belt electrons including adiabatic effects in a realistic magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerman, Adam; Shprits, Yuri; Drozdov, Alexander; Aseeve, Nikita

    2016-04-01

    The Versatile Electron Radiation Belt 4D (VERB-4D) code models the dynamics of ring-current to radiation-belt electrons in Earth's magnetosphere. The code has been developed further to include a realistic magnetic field model, which allows one to model MLT-dependent adiabatic effects, in addition to other processes. Initial results are presented for storm- and non-storm time periods, demonstrating the role which adiabatic variations play on the observed electron dynamics.

  1. The Impact of the Acquisition of Electronic Medical Texts on the Usage of Equivalent Print Books in an Academic Medical Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela S. Morgan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives – This study examines whether acquiring a text in electronic format effects the usage of the print version of the text, focusing specifically on medical texts. Studies in the literature dealt specifically with general collections and it was not clear if they were applicable to medical collections. It was also not clear if these studies should play a role in determining whether a medical library should purchase electronic texts or whether reserve collections are still needed for print texts.Methods – Four usage studies were conducted using data from the circulation system and the electronic vendor systems. These were 1 trends of print usage; 2 trends of electronic usage; 3 a comparison of electronic usage with print usage of the same title in the reserve collection; 4 a comparison of electronic usage with print usage of the same title in the general collection.Results – In comparison to print, substantial usage is being made of electronic books. Print is maintaining a level pattern of usage while electronic usage is increasing steadily. There was a noticeable difference in the usage levels of the electronic texts as regards to the package in which they are contained. Usage of print texts both on reserve and in the general collection has decreased over time, however the acquisition of the electronic version of a medical title had little impact on the usage of the equivalent print version. Conclusion – There is a demand for medical texts in medical libraries. Electronic versions can replace print versions of texts in reserve. Further investigation is needed of current patterns of print collection usage, with particular emphasis on trends in reserve collection usage.

  2. Development of a clinical information tool for the electronic medical record: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Barbara A; Tannery, Nancy H; Wessel, Charles B; Yarger, Frances; LaDue, John; Fiorillo, Anthony B

    2010-07-01

    What is the process of developing a clinical information tool to be embedded in the electronic health record of a very large and diverse academic medical center? The development took place at the University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System. The clinical information tool developed is a search box with subject tabs to provide quick access to designated full-text information resources. Each subject tab offers a federated search of a different pool of resources. Search results are organized "on the fly" into meaningful categories using clustering technology and are directly accessible from the results page. After more than a year of discussion and planning, a clinical information tool was embedded in the academic medical center's electronic health record. The library successfully developed a clinical information tool, called Clinical-e, for use at the point of care. Future development will refine the tool and evaluate its impact and effectiveness.

  3. A Solid Trap and Thermal Desorption System with Application to a Medical Electronic Nose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuntao Xu

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a solid trap/thermal desorption-based odorant gas condensation system has been designed and implemented for measuring low concentration odorant gas. The technique was successfully applied to a medical electronic nose system. The developed system consists of a flow control unit, a temperature control unit and a sorbent tube. The theoretical analysis and experimental results indicate that gas condensation, together with the medical electronic nose system can significantly reduce the detection limit of the nose system and increase the system’s ability to distinguish low concentration gas samples. In addition, the integrated system can remove the influence of background components and fluctuation of operational environment. Even with strong disturbances such as water vapour and ethanol gas, the developed system can classify the test samples accurately.

  4. Outpatient Pain Medication Use: An Electronic Daily Diary Study in Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Ellen; DeLongis, Anita; Bruel, Brian; Badr, Hoda

    2018-04-01

    Understanding cancer patients' everyday pain experiences and their concomitant use of pain medication may help identify ways to improve pain management among outpatients. This study examined the between-person and within-person associations between pain intensity and analgesic use in metastatic breast cancer patients. Fifty-three women who were initiating treatment for metastatic breast cancer completed electronic diary assessments six times per day for 14 days. The likelihood of taking medication was found to depend on patients' average pain levels and on whether their pain was better or worse than usual at the time. Patients who typically experienced moderate-to-high pain were more likely to be prescribed and to take analgesics than were patients who typically experienced low pain. However, these patients tended not to vary their medication use based on within-person fluctuations in pain. In contrast, patients who typically experienced low pain tended to increase their medication use at times when their pain was higher than usual but were less likely to use medication than were patients who typically experienced higher levels of pain. Our findings provide some evidence that patients with advanced cancer tend to use their pain medications appropriately. Patients with lower pain appear to be taking medications in response to increases in pain, whereas patients whose pain is typically more intense may be relying on other cues to prompt them to take analgesic medication. Clinicians may need to be sensitive to individual differences in the factors associated with pain medication use in daily life. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. An analytical approach to characterize morbidity profile dissimilarity between distinct cohorts using electronic medical records

    OpenAIRE

    Schildcrout, Jonathan S.; Basford, Melissa A.; Pulley, Jill M.; Masys, Daniel R.; Roden, Dan M.; Wang, Deede; Chute, Christopher G.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Carrell, David; Peissig, Peggy; Kho, Abel; Denny, Joshua C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a two-stage analytical approach for characterizing morbidity profile dissimilarity among patient cohorts using electronic medical records. We capture morbidities using the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-9) codes. In the first stage of the approach separate logistic regression analyses for ICD-9 sections (e.g., “hypertensive disease” or “appendicitis”) are conducted, and the odds ratios that describe adjusted differences in pre...

  6. The Adoption of Electronic Medical Records and Decision Support Systems in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Chae, Young Moon; Yoo, Ki Bong; Kim, Eun Sook; Chae, Hogene

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To examine the current status of hospital information systems (HIS), analyze the effects of Electronic Medical Records (EMR) and Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) have upon hospital performance, and examine how management issues change over time according to various growth stages. Methods Data taken from the 2010 survey on the HIS status and management issues for 44 tertiary hospitals and 2009 survey on hospital performance appraisal were used. A chi-square test was used to ...

  7. Electronic Medical Records Optimize Clinical Data Management in the Outpatient Cardiological Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Dalmiani, Stefano; Morales, Maria Aurora; Carpeggiani, Clara; Macerata, Alberto; Marcheschi, Paolo

    2003-01-01

    A system based on a relational database with administrative and clinical information and integrated with an Information System, where the system covers the role of a Functional Island, is routinely used in our Institution. To analyze how Electronic Medical Records (EMR) may help physicians in organizing and reducing time waste in a busy outpatient clinic, a sample of 1000 reports were evaluated for system performance. The time needed for building new clinical histories or modifying the alread...

  8. Development of a 2-h suicide prevention program for medical staff including nurses and medical residents: A two-center pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagami, Yukako; Kubo, Hiroaki; Katsuki, Ryoko; Sakai, Tomomichi; Sugihara, Genichi; Naito, Chisako; Oda, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Kohei; Suzuki, Yuriko; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Naoki; Kobara, Keiji; Cho, Tetsuji; Kuga, Hironori; Takao, Kiyoshi; Kawahara, Yoko; Matsumura, Yumi; Murai, Toshiya; Akashi, Koichi; Kanba, Shigenobu; Otsuka, Kotaro; Kato, Takahiro A

    2018-01-01

    Suicide is a crucial global health concern and effective suicide prevention has long been warranted. Mental illness, especially depression is the highest risk factor of suicide. Suicidal risk is increased in people not only with mental illness but also with physical illnesses, thus medical staff caring for physically-ill patients are also required to manage people with suicidal risk. In the present study, we evaluated our newly developed suicide intervention program among medical staff. We developed a 2-h suicide intervention program for medical staff, based on the Mental Health First Aid (MHFA), which had originally been developed for the general population. We conducted this program for 74 medical staff members from 2 hospitals. Changes in knowledge, perceived skills, and confidence in early intervention of depression and suicide-prevention were evaluated using self-reported questionnaires at 3 points; pre-program, immediately after the program, and 1 month after program. This suicide prevention program had significant effects on improving perceived skills and confidence especially among nurses and medical residents. These significant effects lasted even 1 month after the program. Design was a single-arm study with relatively small sample size and short-term follow up. The present study suggests that the major target of this effective program is nurses and medical residents. Future research is required to validate the effects of the program with control groups, and also to assess long-term effectiveness and actual reduction in suicide rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Excitation and charge transfer in He+ + H collisions. A molecular approach including two-electron translation factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1983-01-01

    In a previous paper we have pointed out that the common-translation-factor (CTF) method is the only one which, at present, and within the framework of the molecular model of atomic collisions, can be shown to be both convergent and computationally fast, even for many-electron systems. In this Communication we check that this second statement is correct, presenting, for the first time, a molecular calculation involving two-electron translation factors, for He + + H collisions. A careful study of the sensitivity of the calculated cross sections to the choice of the CTF is performed, and conclusions on that sensitivity are drawn, for several types of processes

  10. Excitation and charge transfer in He/sup +/ + H collisions. A molecular approach including two-electron translation factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1983-06-01

    In a previous paper we have pointed out that the common-translation-factor (CTF) method is the only one which, at present, and within the framework of the molecular model of atomic collisions, can be shown to be both convergent and computationally fast, even for many-electron systems. In this Communication we check that this second statement is correct, presenting, for the first time, a molecular calculation involving two-electron translation factors, for He/sup +/ + H collisions. A careful study of the sensitivity of the calculated cross sections to the choice of the CTF is performed, and conclusions on that sensitivity are drawn, for several types of processes.

  11. Towards improvement of the accuracy and completeness of medication registration with the use of an electronic medical record (EMR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiddema-van de Wal, A; Smith, R J; van der Werf, G T; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    2001-06-01

    Approximately 80% of GPs use a GP information system (GIS) and an electronic medical record (EMR) in their daily practice. To reap the full benefits of an EMR for patient care, post-graduate education and research, the data input must be well structured and accurately coded. The quality and user-friendliness of the software positively influence the completeness and reliability of the data recorded in the GIS. To assess this in actual practice, this study examined whether or not an increase occurred in the accuracy and completeness of indication-related medication registration after the GIS's software package was upgraded. GPs recorded data for the Registration Network Groningen (RNG) concerning four medication groups: insulin, trimethoprim, the contraceptive pill and beta-blocking agents. The completeness and accuracy of the registered data were assessed both before and after the change to the new software package. The completeness is evaluated on the basis of the indications missing for the prescribed medications. To assess accuracy, a check was made to determine whether the indications corresponded to those deemed relevant for that particular medication according to National Pharmaceutical Guidelines. The percentage of missing indications decreased notably, especially in the chronically prescribed medication groups. For insulin, the percentage decreased from 40.5 to 3% and for the contraceptive pill from 34.5 to 1%. For trimethoprim, the percentage decreased from 10 to 1%, and for beta-blocking agents from 22 to 1.5%. Of the indications present, the percentage of relevant indications showed a slight increase, with the largest increase observed for the contraceptive pill where the percentage rose from 86 to 96%. The completeness of recorded indications improved considerably after the change of software. This is due mostly to the efforts of the GPs, their practice assistants and the support of the RNG organization involved in the conversion procedure. Accuracy

  12. Evaluation of Electromagnetic Fields in a Hospital for Safe Use of Electronic Medical Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Kai; Fujioka, Tomomi; Endo, Tetsuo; Hosokawa, Ren; Fujisaki, Tetsushi; Yoshino, Ryoji; Hirose, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Establishment of electromagnetic compatibility is important in use of electronic medical equipment in hospitals. To evaluate the electromagnetic environment, the electric field intensity induced by electromagnetic radiation in broadcasting spectra coming from outside the hospital was measured in a new hospital building before any patients visited the hospital and 6 months after the opening of the hospital. Various incoming radio waves were detected on the upper floors, with no significant difference in measured levels before and after opening of the hospital. There were no cellphone terminal signals before the hospital opened, but these signals were strongly detected at 6 months thereafter. Cellphone base stations signals were strongly detected on the upper floors, but there were no signals at most locations in the basement and in the center of the building on the lower floors. A maximum electrical intensity of 0.28 V/m from cellphone base stations (2.1 GHz) was detected at the south end of the 2nd floor before the hospital opened. This value is lower than the EMC marginal value for general electronic medical equipment specified in IEC 60601-1-2 (3 V/m). Therefore, electromagnetic interference with electronic medical equipment is unlikely in this situation. However, cellphone terminal signals were frequently detected in non-base station signal areas. This is a concern, and understanding signal strength from cellphone base stations at a hospital is important for promotion of greater safety.

  13. Design of Electronic Medical Record User Interfaces: A Matrix-Based Method for Improving Usability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushtrim Kuqi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines a new approach of using the Design Structure Matrix (DSM modeling technique to improve the design of Electronic Medical Record (EMR user interfaces. The usability of an EMR medication dosage calculator used for placing orders in an academic hospital setting was investigated. The proposed method captures and analyzes the interactions between user interface elements of the EMR system and groups elements based on information exchange, spatial adjacency, and similarity to improve screen density and time-on-task. Medication dose adjustment task time was recorded for the existing and new designs using a cognitive simulation model that predicts user performance. We estimate that the design improvement could reduce time-on-task by saving an average of 21 hours of hospital physicians’ time over the course of a month. The study suggests that the application of DSM can improve the usability of an EMR user interface.

  14. Natural language processing to extract medical problems from electronic clinical documents: performance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meystre, Stéphane; Haug, Peter J

    2006-12-01

    In this study, we evaluate the performance of a Natural Language Processing (NLP) application designed to extract medical problems from narrative text clinical documents. The documents come from a patient's electronic medical record and medical problems are proposed for inclusion in the patient's electronic problem list. This application has been developed to help maintain the problem list and make it more accurate, complete, and up-to-date. The NLP part of this system-analyzed in this study-uses the UMLS MetaMap Transfer (MMTx) application and a negation detection algorithm called NegEx to extract 80 different medical problems selected for their frequency of use in our institution. When using MMTx with its default data set, we measured a recall of 0.74 and a precision of 0.756. A custom data subset for MMTx was created, making it faster and significantly improving the recall to 0.896 with a non-significant reduction in precision.

  15. Tables or bar graphs? Presenting test results in electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Noel T; Gilkey, Melissa B; Lillie, Sarah E; Hesse, Bradford W; Sheridan, Stacey L

    2012-01-01

    Electronic personal health records offer a promising way to communicate medical test results to patients. We compared the usability of tables and horizontal bar graphs for presenting medical test results electronically. We conducted experiments with a convenience sample of 106 community-dwelling adults. In the first experiment, participants viewed either table or bar graph formats (between subjects) that presented medical test results with normal and abnormal findings. In a second experiment, participants viewed table and bar graph formats (within subjects) that presented test results with normal, borderline, and abnormal findings. Participants required less viewing time when using bar graphs rather than tables. This overall difference was due to superior performance of bar graphs in vignettes with many test results. Bar graphs and tables performed equally well with regard to recall accuracy and understanding. In terms of ease of use, participants did not prefer bar graphs to tables when they viewed only one format. When participants viewed both formats, those with experience with bar graphs preferred bar graphs, and those with experience with tables found bar graphs equally easy to use. Preference for bar graphs was strongest when viewing tests with borderline results. Compared to horizontal bar graphs, tables required more time and experience to achieve the same results, suggesting that tables can be a more burdensome format to use. The current practice of presenting medical test results in a tabular format merits reconsideration.

  16. Measuring effectiveness of electronic medical records systems: towards building a composite index for benchmarking hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otieno, George Ochieng; Hinako, Toyama; Motohiro, Asonuma; Daisuke, Koide; Keiko, Naitoh

    2008-10-01

    Many hospitals are currently in the process of developing and implementing electronic medical records (EMR) systems. This is a critical time for developing a framework that can measure and allow for comparison the effectiveness of EMR systems across hospitals that have implemented these systems. The motivation for this study comes from the realization that there is limited research on the understanding of the effectiveness of EMR systems, and a lack of appropriate reference theoretical framework for measuring the effectiveness of EMR systems. In this paper, we propose a conceptual framework for generating a composite index (CI) for measuring the effectiveness of EMR systems in hospitals. Data used to test the framework and associated research objectives were derived from a cross-sectional survey of five stakeholders of EMR systems including chief medical officers, chief nursing officers, chief information officers, doctors and nurses in 20 Japanese hospitals. Using statistical means of standardization and principal component analysis (PCA) procedure, CI was developed by summing up the scores of four dimensions-system quality, information quality, use and user satisfaction. The process included formulating items for each dimension, condensing the data into factors relevant to the dimension and calculating the CI by summing up the product of each dimension with its respective principal component score coefficient. The Cronbach's alpha for the four dimensions used in developing CI was .843. Validation of CI revealed that it was correlated to internal dimensions (system quality, R=.828; information quality, R=.909; use, R=.969; and user satisfaction, R=.679) and to external factors (JAHIS level, R=.832 and patient safety culture, R=.585). These results suggest that CI could be a reliable and valid measure of the effectiveness of EMR systems in the responding hospitals. On benchmarking of hospitals, 30.0% (6/20) of the responding hospitals performed less than

  17. An observational study of the relationship between meaningful use-based electronic health information exchange, interoperability, and medication reconciliation capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elysee, Gerald; Herrin, Jeph; Horwitz, Leora I

    2017-10-01

    Stagnation in hospitals' adoption of data integration functionalities coupled with reduction in the number of operational health information exchanges could become a significant impediment to hospitals' adoption of 3 critical capabilities: electronic health information exchange, interoperability, and medication reconciliation, in which electronic systems are used to assist with resolving medication discrepancies and improving patient safety. Against this backdrop, we assessed the relationships between the 3 capabilities.We conducted an observational study applying partial least squares-structural equation modeling technique to 27 variables obtained from the 2013 American Hospital Association annual survey Information Technology (IT) supplement, which describes health IT capabilities.We included 1330 hospitals. In confirmatory factor analysis, out of the 27 variables, 15 achieved loading values greater than 0.548 at P building blocks of the 3 capabilities. Subsequent path analysis showed a significant, positive, and cyclic relationship between the capabilities, in that decreases in the hospitals' adoption of one would lead to decreases in the adoption of the others.These results show that capability for high quality medication reconciliation may be impeded by lagging adoption of interoperability and health information exchange capabilities. Policies focused on improving one or more of these capabilities may have ancillary benefits.

  18. Laser-driven electron beam and radiation sources for basic, medical and industrial sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAKAJIMA, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    To date active research on laser-driven plasma-based accelerators have achieved great progress on production of high-energy, high-quality electron and photon beams in a compact scale. Such laser plasma accelerators have been envisaged bringing a wide range of applications in basic, medical and industrial sciences. Here inheriting the groundbreaker’s review article on “Laser Acceleration and its future” [Toshiki Tajima, (2010)],1) we would like to review recent progress of producing such electron beams due to relativistic laser-plasma interactions followed by laser wakefield acceleration and lead to the scaling formulas that are useful to design laser plasma accelerators with controllability of beam energy and charge. Lastly specific examples of such laser-driven electron/photon beam sources are illustrated. PMID:26062737

  19. Laser-driven electron beam and radiation sources for basic, medical and industrial sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    To date active research on laser-driven plasma-based accelerators have achieved great progress on production of high-energy, high-quality electron and photon beams in a compact scale. Such laser plasma accelerators have been envisaged bringing a wide range of applications in basic, medical and industrial sciences. Here inheriting the groundbreaker's review article on "Laser Acceleration and its future" [Toshiki Tajima, (2010)],(1)) we would like to review recent progress of producing such electron beams due to relativistic laser-plasma interactions followed by laser wakefield acceleration and lead to the scaling formulas that are useful to design laser plasma accelerators with controllability of beam energy and charge. Lastly specific examples of such laser-driven electron/photon beam sources are illustrated.

  20. Cognitive performance-altering effects of electronic medical records: An application of the human factors paradigm for patient safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    According to the human factors paradigm for patient safety, health care work systems and innovations such as electronic medical records do not have direct effects on patient safety. Instead, their effects are contingent on how the clinical work system, whether computerized or not, shapes health care providers' performance of cognitive work processes. An application of the human factors paradigm to interview data from two hospitals in the Midwest United States yielded numerous examples of the performance-altering effects of electronic medical records, electronic clinical documentation, and computerized provider order entry. Findings describe both improvements and decrements in the ease and quality of cognitive performance, both for interviewed clinicians and for their colleagues and patients. Changes in cognitive performance appear to have desirable and undesirable implications for patient safety as well as for quality of care and other important outcomes. Cognitive performance can also be traced to interactions between work system elements, including new technology, allowing for the discovery of problems with “fit” to be addressed through design interventions. PMID:21479125

  1. [Electronic medical records in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The electronic card--the medical record of the future in Boznia-Herzegovina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masić, I; Pandza, H; Ridanović, Z; Dover, M

    1997-01-01

    The biggest problem in organisation of the effective and rational health care of good quality in Bosnia quality and Herzegovina is a functional and updated Health Information System. In this system, important role play Health Statistic System in which documentation and evidence are very important segment. Developed countries proceeded from the manual and semiautomatic method of medical data processing and system management to the new methods of entering, storage, transfer, searching and protection of data using electronic equipment. Recently, the competition between manufacturers of the Smart Card and Laser Card is reality. Also scientific and professional debate exists about the standard card for storage of medical information in Health Care System. First option is supported by West European countries that developing Smart Card called Eurocard and second by USA and Far East countries. Because the Health Care System and other segments of Society of Bosnia and Herzegovina innovate intensively similar systems, the authors of this article intend to open discussion, and to show advantages and failures of each technological medium.

  2. Studies of the Response of the Prototype CMS Hadron Calorimeter, Including Magnetic Field Effects, to Pion, Electron, and Muon Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Abramov, V.V.; Akchurin, N.; Atanasov, I.; Baiatian, G.; Ball, A.; Banerjee, S.; de Barbaro, P.; Barnes, V.; Bencze, G.; Bodek, A.; Booke, M.; Budd, H.; Cremaldi, L.; Cushman, P.; Dugad, S.R.; Dimitrov, L.; Dyshkant, A.; Elias, J.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Fong, D.; Freeman, J.; Genchev, V.; Goncharov, P.I.; Green, D.; Gurtu, A.; Hagopian, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Korneev, Yu.; Krinitsyn, A.; Krishnaswami, G.; Krishnaswamy, M.R.; Kryshkin, V.; Kunori, S.; Laasanen, A.; Lazic, D.; Levchuk, L.; Litov, L.; Mondal, N.K.; Moulik, T.; Narasimham, V.S.; Nemashkalo, A.; Onel, Y.; Petrov, P.; Petukhov, Yu.; Piperov, S.; Popov, V.; Reidy, J.; Ronzhin, A.; Ruchti, R.; Singh, J.B.; Shen, Q.; Sirunyan, A.; Skuja, A.; Skup, E.; Sorokin, P.; Sudhakar, K.; Summers, D.; Szoncso, F.; Tereshenko, S.I.; Timmermans, C.; Tonwar, S.C.; Turchanovich, L.; Tyukov, V.; Volodko, A.; Yukaev, A.; Zaitchenko, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Korneev, Yu.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the response of a prototype CMS hadron calorimeter module to charged particle beams of pions, muons, and electrons with momenta up to 375 GeV/c. The data were taken at the H2 and H4 beamlines at CERN in 1995 and 1996. The prototype sampling calorimeter used copper absorber plates and scintillator tiles with wavelength shifting fibers for readout. The effects of a magnetic field of up to 3 Tesla on the response of the calorimeter to muons, electrons, and pions are presented, and the effects of an upstream lead tungstate crystal electromagnetic calorimeter on the linearity and energy resolution of the combined calorimetric system to hadrons are evaluated. The results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations and are used to optimize the choice of total absorber depth, sampling frequency, and longitudinal readout segmentation.

  3. R-matrix calculations for electron-impact excitation of C(+), N(2+), and O(3+) including fine structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, D.; Pradhan, A. K.

    1990-01-01

    The new R-matrix package for comprehensive close-coupling calculations for electron scattering with the first three ions in the boron isoelectronic sequence, the astrophysically significant C(+), N(2+), and O(3+), is presented. The collision strengths are calculated in the LS coupling approximation, as well as in pair-coupling scheme, for the transitions among the fine-structure sublevels. Calculations are carried out at a large number of energies in order to study the detailed effects of autoionizing resonances.

  4. Use of web services for computerized medical decision support, including infection control and antibiotic management, in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steurbaut, Kristof; Van Hoecke, Sofie; Colpaert, Kirsten; Lamont, Kristof; Taveirne, Kristof; Depuydt, Pieter; Benoit, Dominique; Decruyenaere, Johan; De Turck, Filip

    2010-01-01

    The increasing complexity of procedures in the intensive care unit (ICU) requires complex software services, to reduce improper use of antibiotics and inappropriate therapies, and to offer earlier and more accurate detection of infections and antibiotic resistance. We investigated whether web-based software can facilitate the computerization of complex medical processes in the ICU. The COSARA application contains the following modules: Infection overview, Thorax, Microbiology, Antibiotic therapy overview, Admission cause with comorbidity and admission diagnosis, Infection linking and registration, and Feedback. After the implementation and test phase, the COSARA software was installed on a physician's office PC and then on the bedside PCs of the patients. Initial evaluation indicated that the services had been integrated easily into the daily clinical workflow of the medical staff. The use of a service oriented architecture with web service technology for the development of advanced decision support in the ICU offers several advantages over classical software design approaches.

  5. Electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of CdI: MRCI+Q study including spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Shutao; Liu, Yadong; Yan, Bing

    2018-01-01

    Cadmium iodide (CdI), which is a candidate for laser material in chemical lasing, has attracted considerable scientific interest. While the complete picture for electronic structure of CdI is still unclear, particularly for the interactions of excited states. In this paper, high-level configuration interaction method is applied to compute the low-lying electronic states of the lowest two dissociation limits (Cd(1S) + I(2P) and Cd(3P) + I(2P)). To ensure the accuracy, the Davidson correction, core-valence electronic correlations and spin-orbit coupling effects are also taken into account. The potential energy curves of the 14 Λ-S states and 30 Ω states obtained from those Λ-S states are calculated. On the basis of the computed potential energy curves, the spectroscopic constants of bound and quasibound states are determined, most of which have not been reported in existing studies. The calculated values of spin-orbit coupling matrix elements demonstrate that the B2Σ+1/2 state imposes a strong perturbation on ν‧> 0 vibrational level of C2Π1/2, which can explain the weak spectral intensity of C2Π1/2-X2Σ+1/2 observed in previous experiment. The transition dipole moments as well as the lifetimes are evaluated to predict the transition properties of B2Σ+1/2, C2Π1/2 and 22Π3/2 states.

  6. Medical students are afraid to include abortion in their future practices : in-depth interviews in Maharastra, India

    OpenAIRE

    Sjöström, Susanne; Essen, Birgitta; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Klingberg-Allvin, Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Unsafe abortions are estimated to cause eight per-cent of maternal mortality in India. Lack of providers, especially in rural areas, is one reason unsafe abortions take place despite decades of legal abortion. Education and training in reproductive health services has been shown to influence attitudes and increase chances that medical students will provide abortion care services in their future practice. To further explore previous findings about poor attitudes toward abortion amo...

  7. Developing a point-of-care electronic medical record system for TB/HIV co-infected patients: experiences from Lighthouse Trust, Lilongwe, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweya, Hannock; Feldacker, Caryl; Gadabu, Oliver Jintha; Ng'ambi, Wingston; Mumba, Soyapi L; Phiri, Dave; Kamvazina, Luke; Mwakilama, Shawo; Kanyerere, Henry; Keiser, Olivia; Mwafilaso, Johnbosco; Kamba, Chancy; Egger, Matthias; Jahn, Andreas; Simwaka, Bertha; Phiri, Sam

    2016-03-05

    Implementation of user-friendly, real-time, electronic medical records for patient management may lead to improved adherence to clinical guidelines and improved quality of patient care. We detail the systematic, iterative process that implementation partners, Lighthouse clinic and Baobab Health Trust, employed to develop and implement a point-of-care electronic medical records system in an integrated, public clinic in Malawi that serves HIV-infected and tuberculosis (TB) patients. Baobab Health Trust, the system developers, conducted a series of technical and clinical meetings with Lighthouse and Ministry of Health to determine specifications. Multiple pre-testing sessions assessed patient flow, question clarity, information sequencing, and verified compliance to national guidelines. Final components of the TB/HIV electronic medical records system include: patient demographics; anthropometric measurements; laboratory samples and results; HIV testing; WHO clinical staging; TB diagnosis; family planning; clinical review; and drug dispensing. Our experience suggests that an electronic medical records system can improve patient management, enhance integration of TB/HIV services, and improve provider decision-making. However, despite sufficient funding and motivation, several challenges delayed system launch including: expansion of system components to include of HIV testing and counseling services; changes in the national antiretroviral treatment guidelines that required system revision; and low confidence to use the system among new healthcare workers. To ensure a more robust and agile system that met all stakeholder and user needs, our electronic medical records launch was delayed more than a year. Open communication with stakeholders, careful consideration of ongoing provider input, and a well-functioning, backup, paper-based TB registry helped ensure successful implementation and sustainability of the system. Additional, on-site, technical support provided

  8. An electronic health record driven algorithm to identify incident antidepressant medication users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, William V; Pathak, Jyotishman; Kremers, Hilal Maradit; Yawn, Barbara P; Brue, Scott M; Stoppel, Cynthia J; Croarkin, Paul E; St Sauver, Jennifer; Frye, Mark A; Rocca, Walter A

    2014-01-01

    We validated an algorithm designed to identify new or prevalent users of antidepressant medications via population-based drug prescription records. We obtained population-based drug prescription records for the entire Olmsted County, Minnesota, population from 2011 to 2012 (N=149,629) using the existing electronic medical records linkage infrastructure of the Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP). We selected electronically a random sample of 200 new antidepressant users stratified by age and sex. The algorithm required the exclusion of antidepressant use in the 6 months preceding the date of the first qualifying antidepressant prescription (index date). Medical records were manually reviewed and adjudicated to calculate the positive predictive value (PPV). We also manually reviewed the records of a random sample of 200 antihistamine users who did not meet the case definition of new antidepressant user to estimate the negative predictive value (NPV). 161 of the 198 subjects electronically identified as new antidepressant users were confirmed by manual record review (PPV 81.3%). Restricting the definition of new users to subjects who were prescribed typical starting doses of each agent for treating major depression in non-geriatric adults resulted in an increase in the PPV (90.9%). Extending the time windows with no antidepressant use preceding the index date resulted in only modest increases in PPV. The manual abstraction of medical records of 200 antihistamine users yielded an NPV of 98.5%. Our study confirms that REP prescription records can be used to identify prevalent and incident users of antidepressants in the Olmsted County, Minnesota, population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Barriers and facilitators to Electronic Medical Record (EMR) use in an urban slum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawhari, Badeia; Keenan, Louanne; Zakus, David; Ludwick, Dave; Isaac, Abraam; Saleh, Abdullah; Hayward, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Rapid urbanization has led to the growth of urban slums and increased healthcare burdens for vulnerable populations. Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) have the potential to improve continuity of care for slum residents, but their implementation is complicated by technical and non-technical limitations. This study sought practical insights about facilitators and barriers to EMR implementation in urban slum environments. Descriptive qualitative method was used to explore staff perceptions about a recent open-source EMR deployment in two primary care clinics in Kibera, Nairobi. Participants were interviewed using open-ended, semi-structured questions. Content analysis was used when exploring transcribed data. Three major themes - systems, software, and social considerations - emerged from content analysis, with sustainability concerns prevailing. Although participants reported many systems (e.g., power, network, Internet, hardware, interoperability) and software (e.g., data integrity, confidentiality, function) challenges, social factors (e.g., identity management, training, use incentives) appeared the most important impediments to sustainability. These findings are consistent with what others have reported, especially the importance of practical barriers to EMR deployments in resource-constrained settings. Other findings contribute unique insights about social determinants of EMR impact in slum settings, including the challenge of multiple-identity management and development of meaningful incentives to staff compliance. This study exposes front-line experiences with opportunities and shortcomings of EMR implementations in urban slum primary care clinics. Although the promise is great, there are a number of unique system, software and social challenges that EMR advocates should address before expecting sustainable EMR use in resource-constrained settings. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. A Strategy for Reusing the Data of Electronic Medical Record Systems for Clinical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Yasushi; Hattori, Atsushi; Manabe, Shiro; Tsuda, Tsutomu; Takeda, Toshihiro; Okada, Katsuki; Murata, Taizo; Mihara, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    There is a great need to reuse data stored in electronic medical records (EMR) databases for clinical research. We previously reported the development of a system in which progress notes and case report forms (CRFs) were simultaneously recorded using a template in the EMR in order to exclude redundant data entry. To make the data collection process more efficient, we are developing a system in which the data originally stored in the EMR database can be populated within a frame in a template. We developed interface plugin modules that retrieve data from the databases of other EMR applications. A universal keyword written in a template master is converted to a local code using a data conversion table, then the objective data is retrieved from the corresponding database. The template element data, which are entered by a template, are stored in the template element database. To retrieve the data entered by other templates, the objective data is designated by the template element code with the template code, or by the concept code if it is written for the element. When the application systems in the EMR generate documents, they also generate a PDF file and a corresponding document profile XML, which includes important data, and send them to the document archive server and the data sharing saver, respectively. In the data sharing server, the data are represented by an item with an item code with a document class code and its value. By linking a concept code to an item identifier, an objective data can be retrieved by designating a concept code. We employed a flexible strategy in which a unique identifier for a hospital is initially attached to all of the data that the hospital generates. The identifier is secondarily linked with concept codes. The data that are not linked with a concept code can also be retrieved using the unique identifier of the hospital. This strategy makes it possible to reuse any of a hospital's data.

  11. Validation of fragility fractures in primary care electronic medical records: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Laguna, Daniel; Soria-Castro, Alberto; Carbonell-Abella, Cristina; Orozco-López, Pilar; Estrada-Laza, Pilar; Nogues, Xavier; Díez-Perez, Adolfo; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel

    2017-11-28

    Electronic medical records databases use pre-specified lists of diagnostic codes to identify fractures. These codes, however, are not specific enough to disentangle traumatic from fragility-related fractures. We report on the proportion of fragility fractures identified in a random sample of coded fractures in SIDIAP. Patients≥50 years old with any fracture recorded in 2012 (as per pre-specified ICD-10 codes) and alive at the time of recruitment were eligible for this retrospective observational study in 6 primary care centres contributing to the SIDIAP database (www.sidiap.org). Those with previous fracture/s, non-responders, and those with dementia or a serious psychiatric disease were excluded. Data on fracture type (traumatic vs fragility), skeletal site, and basic patient characteristics were collected. Of 491/616 (79.7%) patients with a registered fracture in 2012 who were contacted, 331 (349 fractures) were included. The most common fractures were forearm (82), ribs (38), and humerus (32), and 225/349 (64.5%) were fragility fractures, with higher proportions for classic osteoporotic sites: hip, 91.7%; spine, 87.7%; and major fractures, 80.5%. This proportion was higher in women, the elderly, and patients with a previously coded diagnosis of osteoporosis. More than 4 in 5 major fractures recorded in SIDIAP are due to fragility (non-traumatic), with higher proportions for hip (92%) and vertebral (88%) fracture, and a lower proportion for fractures other than major ones. Our data support the validity of SIDIAP for the study of the epidemiology of osteoporotic fractures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  12. Using the electronic medical record to identify community-acquired pneumonia: toward a replicable automated strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain DeLisle

    Full Text Available Timely information about disease severity can be central to the detection and management of outbreaks of acute respiratory infections (ARI, including influenza. We asked if two resources: 1 free text, and 2 structured data from an electronic medical record (EMR could complement each other to identify patients with pneumonia, an ARI severity landmark.A manual EMR review of 2747 outpatient ARI visits with associated chest imaging identified x-ray reports that could support the diagnosis of pneumonia (kappa score  = 0.88 (95% CI 0.82∶0.93, along with attendant cases with Possible Pneumonia (adds either cough, sputum, fever/chills/night sweats, dyspnea or pleuritic chest pain or with Pneumonia-in-Plan (adds pneumonia stated as a likely diagnosis by the provider. The x-ray reports served as a reference to develop a text classifier using machine-learning software that did not require custom coding. To identify pneumonia cases, the classifier was combined with EMR-based structured data and with text analyses aimed at ARI symptoms in clinical notes.370 reference cases with Possible Pneumonia and 250 with Pneumonia-in-Plan were identified. The x-ray report text classifier increased the positive predictive value of otherwise identical EMR-based case-detection algorithms by 20-70%, while retaining sensitivities of 58-75%. These performance gains were independent of the case definitions and of whether patients were admitted to the hospital or sent home. Text analyses seeking ARI symptoms in clinical notes did not add further value.Specialized software development is not required for automated text analyses to help identify pneumonia patients. These results begin to map an efficient, replicable strategy through which EMR data can be used to stratify ARI severity.

  13. Contribution of Electronic Medical Records to the Management of Rare Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Bremond-Gignac

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Electronic health record systems provide great opportunity to study most diseases. Objective of this study was to determine whether electronic medical records (EMR in ophthalmology contribute to management of rare eye diseases, isolated or in syndromes. Study was designed to identify and collect patients’ data with ophthalmology-specific EMR. Methods. Ophthalmology-specific EMR software (Softalmo software Corilus was used to acquire ophthalmological ocular consultation data from patients with five rare eye diseases. The rare eye diseases and data were selected and collected regarding expertise of eye center. Results. A total of 135,206 outpatient consultations were performed between 2011 and 2014 in our medical center specialized in rare eye diseases. The search software identified 29 congenital aniridia, 6 Axenfeld/Rieger syndrome, 11 BEPS, 3 Nanophthalmos, and 3 Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. Discussion. EMR provides advantages for medical care. The use of ophthalmology-specific EMR is reliable and can contribute to a comprehensive ocular visual phenotype useful for clinical research. Conclusion. Routinely EMR acquired with specific software dedicated to ophthalmology provides sufficient detail for rare diseases. These software-collected data appear useful for creating patient cohorts and recording ocular examination, avoiding the time-consuming analysis of paper records and investigation, in a University Hospital linked to a National Reference Rare Center Disease.

  14. Contribution of Electronic Medical Records to the Management of Rare Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremond-Gignac, Dominique; Lewandowski, Elisabeth; Copin, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Electronic health record systems provide great opportunity to study most diseases. Objective of this study was to determine whether electronic medical records (EMR) in ophthalmology contribute to management of rare eye diseases, isolated or in syndromes. Study was designed to identify and collect patients' data with ophthalmology-specific EMR. Ophthalmology-specific EMR software (Softalmo software Corilus) was used to acquire ophthalmological ocular consultation data from patients with five rare eye diseases. The rare eye diseases and data were selected and collected regarding expertise of eye center. A total of 135,206 outpatient consultations were performed between 2011 and 2014 in our medical center specialized in rare eye diseases. The search software identified 29 congenital aniridia, 6 Axenfeld/Rieger syndrome, 11 BEPS, 3 Nanophthalmos, and 3 Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. EMR provides advantages for medical care. The use of ophthalmology-specific EMR is reliable and can contribute to a comprehensive ocular visual phenotype useful for clinical research. Routinely EMR acquired with specific software dedicated to ophthalmology provides sufficient detail for rare diseases. These software-collected data appear useful for creating patient cohorts and recording ocular examination, avoiding the time-consuming analysis of paper records and investigation, in a University Hospital linked to a National Reference Rare Center Disease.

  15. Evaluation of Medical Problem Extraction from Electronic Clinical Documents Using MetaMap Transfer (MMTx).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meystre, Stéphane; Haug, Peter J

    2005-01-01

    To improve the use and quality of the electronic Problem List, which is at the heart of the problem-oriented medical record in development in our institution (Intermountain Health Care, Utah, U.S.), we developed an Automated Problem List system using Natural Language Processing (NLP) technologies. A key part of this system is a module that automatically extracts potential medical problems from free-text clinical documents. The NLP module uses MMTx, developed at the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Negation detection was added to this application by adapting a negation detection algorithm called NegEx. To evaluate the adequacy of the performance of the NLP module for our Automated Problem List system, we evaluated it with 160 electronic clinical documents of different types. Two different data sets for MMTx were used: the default full UMLS data set and a customised subset adapted to detect the set of 80 medical problems we are interested in. With the default data set, we measured a recall of 0.74 (95% CI 0.68-0.8) and a precision of 0.76 (0.69-0.82). The customised subset had a significantly better recall of 0.9 (0.85-0.94), and a non-significantly different precision of 0.69 (0.63-0.75).

  16. Theoretical study of the low-lying electronic states of magnesium sulfide cation including spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Wang, Ning; Li, Song; Chen, Shan-Jun

    2017-11-01

    Highly correlated ab initio calculations have been performed for an accurate determination of electronic structures and spectroscopic features for the low-lying electronic states of the MgS+ cation. The potential energy curves for the four Λ-S states correlating to the lowest dissociation asymptote are studied for the first time. Four Λ-S states split into nine Ω states through the spin-orbit coupling effect. Accurate spectroscopic constants are deduced for all bound states. The spin-orbit couplings and the transition dipole moments, as well as the PECs, are utilized to calculate Franck-Condon factors and radiative lifetimes of the vibrational levels. To verify our computational accuracy, analogous calculations for the ground state of MgS are also carried out, and our derived results are in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. In addition, photoelectron spectrum of MgS has been simulated. The predictive results are anticipated to serve as guidelines for further researches such as assisting laboratorial detections and analyzing observed spectrum.

  17. Effect of the Implementation of Barcode Technology and an Electronic Medication Administration Record on Adverse Drug Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truitt, Erin; Thompson, Ross; Blazey-Martin, Deborah; NiSai, Danna; Salem, Deeb

    2016-06-01

    Hospitals have attempted to reduce adverse drug events (ADEs) by investing in new technologies, but data regarding their efficacy are lacking. This study evaluates the effects of the implementation of barcode medication administration (BCMA) and electronic medication administration record (eMAR) technology on the profile of ADEs in a hospital setting. We conducted a before-and-after study examining the effects of the implementation of BCMA and eMAR technology on the profile of ADEs at a 400-bed academic medical center by using incident reports. We compared reported ADEs in pre- and post-implementation periods of 5 months to determine whether there was a reduction in the rate of ADEs within medication use phases. We further examined the severity of errors and described changes in the distribution of types of errors. A total of 775 electronic error-reporting system reports were included in this study: 397 (51%) in the pre-implementation period and 378 (49%) in the post-implementation period. The rate of ADEs significantly decreased from 0.26% to 0.20% after implementation of the technology (relative risk [RR], 0.78; 95% CI, 0.67-0.89). The rate of transcription errors decreased from 0.089% to 0.036% (RR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.30-0.54), which was largely attributed to reduction of "wrong time" errors. The rate of administration errors was identical in both groups at 0.017% (RR, 0.98; 95% CI 0.58-1.66). The mean severity level of administration errors significantly decreased from 4.44 to 3.23 (p = .005). The implementation of eMAR and BCMA technology improved patient safety by decreasing the overall rate of ADEs and the rate of transcription errors. These technologies also reduced the harmful impact to patients caused by administration errors.

  18. A Way to Understand Inpatients Based on the Electronic Medical Records in the Big Data Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyi Mao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, information technology in healthcare, such as Electronic Medical Record (EMR system, is potential to improve service quality and cost efficiency of the hospital. The continuous use of EMR systems has generated a great amount of data. However, hospitals tend to use these data to report their operational efficiency rather than to understand their patients. Base on a dataset of inpatients’ medical records from a Chinese general public hospital, this study applies a configuration analysis from a managerial perspective and explains inpatients management in a different way. Four inpatient configurations (valued patients, managed patients, normal patients, and potential patients are identified by the measure of the length of stay and the total hospital cost. The implications of the finding are discussed.

  19. A Way to Understand Inpatients Based on the Electronic Medical Records in the Big Data Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In recent decades, information technology in healthcare, such as Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system, is potential to improve service quality and cost efficiency of the hospital. The continuous use of EMR systems has generated a great amount of data. However, hospitals tend to use these data to report their operational efficiency rather than to understand their patients. Base on a dataset of inpatients' medical records from a Chinese general public hospital, this study applies a configuration analysis from a managerial perspective and explains inpatients management in a different way. Four inpatient configurations (valued patients, managed patients, normal patients, and potential patients) are identified by the measure of the length of stay and the total hospital cost. The implications of the finding are discussed. PMID:28280506

  20. Reduction of incorrect record accessing and charting patient electronic medical records in the perioperative environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, Elizabeth; Kee, Spencer; Kowalski, Alicia; Harun, Nusrat; Guindani, Michele; Goravanchi, Farzin

    2016-12-01

    Opening and charting in the incorrect patient electronic record presents a patient safety issue. The authors investigated the prevalence of reported errors and whether efforts utilizing the anesthesia time-out and barcoding have decreased the incidence of errors in opening and charting in the patient electronic medical record in the perioperative environment. The authors queried the database for all surgeries and procedures requiring anesthesia from January 2009 to September 2012. Of the 115,760 records of anesthesia procedures identified, there were 57 instances of incorrect record opening and charting during the study period. A decreasing trend was observed for all sites combined (p patient record opening in the perioperative environment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Task and error analysis balancing benefits over business of electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Deborah Sater; Rodriguez, Walter; Wood, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    Task and error analysis research was performed to identify: a) the process for healthcare organisations in managing healthcare for patients with mental illness or substance abuse; b) how the process can be enhanced and; c) if electronic medical records (EMRs) have a role in this process from a business and safety perspective. The research question is if EMRs have a role in enhancing the healthcare for patients with mental illness or substance abuse. A discussion on the business of EMRs is addressed to understand the balancing act between the safety and business aspects of an EMR.

  2. Barriers to the Adoption and Use of an Electronic Medication Record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granlien, Maren Sander; Hertzum, Morten

    2012-01-01

    obtained. Eleven categories of barrier are identified with uncertainty about what the barriers concretely are as the prime barrier. This prime barrier is particularly noteworthy because the respondents are formally responsible for the adoption of the EMR. It is apparent that time alone has not led......Clinicians’ adoption of the information systems deployed at hospitals is crucial to achieving the intended effects of the systems, yet many systems face substantial adoption barriers. In this study we analyse the adoption and use of an electronic medication record (EMR) 2-4 years after its...

  3. Stepwise approach to establishing multiple outreach laboratory information system-electronic medical record interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Labranche, Wayne; Lareau, William

    2010-05-26

    Clinical laboratory outreach business is changing as more physician practices adopt an electronic medical record (EMR). Physician connectivity with the laboratory information system (LIS) is consequently becoming more important. However, there are no reports available to assist the informatician with establishing and maintaining outreach LIS-EMR connectivity. A four-stage scheme is presented that was successfully employed to establish unidirectional and bidirectional interfaces with multiple physician EMRs. This approach involves planning (step 1), followed by interface building (step 2) with subsequent testing (step 3), and finally ongoing maintenance (step 4). The role of organized project management, software as a service (SAAS), and alternate solutions for outreach connectivity are discussed.

  4. The Gap between Actual and Mandated Use of an Electronic Medication Record Three Years after Deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granlien, Maren Fich; Hertzum, Morten; Gudmundsen, Jette

    2008-01-01

    Three years after the hospitals in one of Denmark's five healthcare regions deployed an electronic medication record (EMR) four of eight main system facilities are used consistently by only 3%-37% of the hospital wards. Furthermore, four of eight mandated work procedures involving the EMR......, such as lack of knowledge, information, and training among clinicians. However, the prime barrier appears to be uncertainty about what the barriers concretely are and about the extent to which system facilities and work procedures are actually adopted. Three years after deployment it is apparent that time...

  5. Using the NASA Task Load Index to Assess Workload in Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Darren; Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) has been expected to decrease health professional workload. The NASA Task Load Index has become an important tool for assessing workload in many domains. However, its application in assessing the impact of an EMR on nurse's workload has remained to be explored. In this paper we report the results of a study of workload and we explore the utility of applying the NASA Task Load Index to assess impact of an EMR at the end of its lifecycle on nurses' workload. It was found that mental and temporal demands were the most responsible for the workload. Further work along these lines is recommended.

  6. Medical Emergencies Related to Ethanol and Illicit Drugs at an Annual, Nocturnal, Indoor, Electronic Dance Music Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Paul; Sundahl, Nora; Maudens, Kristof; Wille, Sarah Mr; Van Sassenbroeck, Diederik; De Graeve, Koen; Gogaert, Stefan; De Paepe, Peter; Devriese, Dieter; Arno, Geert; Blanckaert, Peter

    2018-02-01

    Introduction Medical problems are frequently encountered during electronic dance music (EDM) events. Problem There are uncertainties about the frequencies and severity of intoxications with different types of recreational drugs: ethanol, "classical" illicit party drugs, and new psychoactive substances (NPS). Statistical data on the medical problems encountered during two editions of an indoor electronic dance event with around 30,000 attendants were retrieved from the Belgian Red Cross (Mechelen, Belgium) database. Data on drug use were prospectively collected from the patient (or a bystander), the clinical presentation, and/or toxicological screening. In the on-site medical station, 487 patients were treated (265 in 2013 and 222 in 2014). The most frequent reasons were trauma (n=171), headache (n=36), gastro-intestinal problems (n=44), and intoxication (n=160). Sixty-nine patients were transferred to a hospital, including 53 with severe drug-related symptoms. Analysis of blood samples from 106 intoxicated patients detected ethanol in 91.5%, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) in 34.0%, cannabis in 30.2%, cocaine in 7.5%, amphetamine in 2.8%, and gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) in 0.9% of patients (alone or in combination). In only six of the MDMA-positive cases, MDMA was the sole substance found. In 2014, the neuroleptic drug clozapine was found in three cases and ketamine in one. Additional analyses for NPS were performed in 20 cases. Only in one agitated patient, the psychedelic phenethylamines 25B-NBOMe and 25C-NBOMe were found. At this particular event, recreational drug abuse necessitated on-site medical treatment in one out of 350 attendants and a hospital transfer in one out of 1,000. Ethanol remains the most frequently abused (legal) drug, yet classical illicit recreational drugs are also frequently (co-) ingested. The most worrying observation was high-risk poly-drug use, especially among MDMA users. Regarding NPS, the number of cases was low and the

  7. SU-F-T-656: Monte Carlo Study On Air Activation Around a Medical Electron Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horst, F [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences, Giessen (Germany); GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt (Germany); Fehrenbacher, G [GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt (Germany); Zink, K [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences, Giessen (Germany); University Hospital Giessen-Marburg, Marburg (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In high energy photon therapy, several radiation protection issues result from photonuclear reactions. The activation of air - directly by photonuclear reactions as well as indirectly by capture of photoneutrons generated inside the linac head - is a major point of concern for the medical staff. The purpose of this study was to estimate the annual effective dose to medical workers due to activated air around a medical high energy electron linac by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: The treatment head of a Varian Clinac in 18 MV-X mode as well as the surrounding concrete bunker were modeled and the radiation transport was simulated using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA, starting from the primary electron striking the bremsstrahlung target. The activation yields in air from photo-disintegration of O-16 and N-14 nuclei as well as from neutron capture on Ar-40 nuclei were obtained from the simulations. The activation build-up, radioactive decay and air ventilation were studied using a mathematical model. The annual effective dose to workers was estimated by using published isotope specific conversion factors. Results: The oxygen and nitrogen activation yields were in contrast to the argon activation yield found to be field size dependent. The impact of the treatment room ventilation on the different air activation products was investigated and quantified. An estimate with very conservative assumptions gave an annual effective dose to workers of < 1 mSv/a. Conclusion: From the results of this study it can be concluded that the contribution of air activation to the radiation exposure to medical workers should be negligible in modern photon therapy, especially when it is compared to the dose due to prompt neutrons and the activation of heavy solid materials such as the jaws and the collimators inside the linac head.

  8. Overview of laboratory data tools available in a single electronic medical record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil R Kudler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laboratory data account for the bulk of data stored in any given electronic medical record (EMR. To best serve the user, electronic laboratory data needs to be flexible and customizable. Our aim was to determine the various ways in which laboratory data get utilized by clinicians in our health system′s EMR. Method: All electronic menus, tabs, flowsheets, notes and subsections within the EMR (Millennium v2007.13, Cerner Corporation, Kansas City, MO, US were explored to determine how clinicians utilize discrete laboratory data. Results: Laboratory data in the EMR were utilized by clinicians in five distinct ways: within flowsheets, their personal inbox (EMR messaging, with decision support tools, in the health maintenance tool, and when incorporating laboratory data into their clinical notes and letters. Conclusions : Flexible electronic laboratory data in the EMR hava many advantages. Users can view, sort, pool, and appropriately route laboratory information to better support trend analyses, clinical decision making, and clinical charting. Laboratory data in the EMR can also be utilized to develop clinical decision support tools. Pathologists need to participate in the creation of these EMR tools in order to better support the appropriate utilization of laboratory information in the EMR.

  9. Electronic patient record use during ward rounds: a qualitative study of interaction between medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Cecily; Jones, Matthew; Blackwell, Alan; Vuylsteke, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Electronic patient records are becoming more common in critical care. As their design and implementation are optimized for single users rather than for groups, we aimed to understand the differences in interaction between members of a multidisciplinary team during ward rounds using an electronic, as opposed to paper, patient medical record. A qualitative study of morning ward rounds of an intensive care unit that triangulates data from video-based interaction analysis, observation, and interviews. Our analysis demonstrates several difficulties the ward round team faced when interacting with each other using the electronic record compared with the paper one. The physical setup of the technology may impede the consultant's ability to lead the ward round and may prevent other clinical staff from contributing to discussions. We discuss technical and social solutions for minimizing the impact of introducing an electronic patient record, emphasizing the need to balance both. We note that awareness of the effects of technology can enable ward-round teams to adapt their formations and information sources to facilitate multidisciplinary communication during the ward round.

  10. Solid-state pulse modulator using Marx generator for a medical linac electron-gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Heuijin; Hyeok Jeong, Dong; Lee, Manwoo; Lee, Mujin; Yi, Jungyu; Yang, Kwangmo; Ro, Sung Chae

    2016-04-01

    A medical linac is used for the cancer treatment and consists of an accelerating column, waveguide components, a magnetron, an electron-gun, a pulse modulator, and an irradiation system. The pulse modulator based on hydrogen thyratron-switched pulse-forming network is commonly used in linac. As the improvement of the high power semiconductors in switching speed, voltage rating, and current rating, an insulated gate bipolar transistor has become the more popular device used for pulsed power systems. We propose a solid-state pulse modulator to generator high voltage by multi-stacked storage-switch stages based on the Marx generator. The advantage of our modulator comes from the use of two semiconductors to control charging and discharging of the storage capacitor at each stage and it allows to generate the pulse with various amplitudes, widths, and shapes. In addition, a gate driver for two semiconductors is designed to reduce the control channels and to protect the circuits. It is developed for providing the pulsed power to a medical linac electron-gun that requires 25 kV and 1 A as the first application. In order to improve the power efficiency and achieve the compactness modulator, a capacitor charging power supply, a Marx pulse generator, and an electron-gun heater isolated transformer are constructed and integrated. This technology is also being developed to extend the high power pulsed system with > 1 MW and also other applications such as a plasma immersed ion implantation and a micro pulse electrostatic precipitator which especially require variable pulse shape and high repetition rate > 1 kHz. The paper describes the design features and the construction of this solid-state pulse modulator. Also shown are the performance results into the linac electron-gun.

  11. Solid-state pulse modulator using Marx generator for a medical linac electron-gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Heuijin; Jeong, Dong Hyeok; Lee, Manwoo; Lee, Mujin; Yi, Jungyu; Yang, Kwangmo; Ro, Sung Chae

    2016-01-01

    A medical linac is used for the cancer treatment and consists of an accelerating column, waveguide components, a magnetron, an electron-gun, a pulse modulator, and an irradiation system. The pulse modulator based on hydrogen thyratron-switched pulse-forming network is commonly used in linac. As the improvement of the high power semiconductors in switching speed, voltage rating, and current rating, an insulated gate bipolar transistor has become the more popular device used for pulsed power systems. We propose a solid-state pulse modulator to generator high voltage by multi-stacked storage-switch stages based on the Marx generator. The advantage of our modulator comes from the use of two semiconductors to control charging and discharging of the storage capacitor at each stage and it allows to generate the pulse with various amplitudes, widths, and shapes. In addition, a gate driver for two semiconductors is designed to reduce the control channels and to protect the circuits. It is developed for providing the pulsed power to a medical linac electron-gun that requires 25 kV and 1 A as the first application. In order to improve the power efficiency and achieve the compactness modulator, a capacitor charging power supply, a Marx pulse generator, and an electron-gun heater isolated transformer are constructed and integrated. This technology is also being developed to extend the high power pulsed system with > 1 MW and also other applications such as a plasma immersed ion implantation and a micro pulse electrostatic precipitator which especially require variable pulse shape and high repetition rate > 1 kHz. The paper describes the design features and the construction of this solid-state pulse modulator. Also shown are the performance results into the linac electron-gun

  12. 76 FR 16446 - Delphi Corporation Electronics And Safety Division Including On-Site Leased Workers From Acro...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... firm. The workers are engaged in the production of various types of automobile components, including... Solutions, working on-site at the Kokomo, Indiana location of the subject firm. The intent of the Department...

  13. What Clinical Information Is Valuable to Doctors Using Mobile Electronic Medical Records and When?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junetae; Lee, Yura; Lim, Sanghee; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Byungtae; Lee, Jae-Ho

    2017-10-18

    There has been a lack of understanding on what types of specific clinical information are most valuable for doctors to access through mobile-based electronic medical records (m-EMRs) and when they access such information. Furthermore, it has not been clearly discussed why the value of such information is high. The goal of this study was to investigate the types of clinical information that are most valuable to doctors to access through an m-EMR and when such information is accessed. Since 2010, an m-EMR has been used in a tertiary hospital in Seoul, South Korea. The usage logs of the m-EMR by doctors were gathered from March to December 2015. Descriptive analyses were conducted to explore the overall usage patterns of the m-EMR. To assess the value of the clinical information provided, the usage patterns of both the m-EMR and a hospital information system (HIS) were compared on an hourly basis. The peak usage times of the m-EMR were defined as continuous intervals having normalized usage values that are greater than 0.5. The usage logs were processed as an indicator representing specific clinical information using factor analysis. Random intercept logistic regression was used to explore the type of clinical information that is frequently accessed during the peak usage times. A total of 524,929 usage logs from 653 doctors (229 professors, 161 fellows, and 263 residents; mean age: 37.55 years; males: 415 [63.6%]) were analyzed. The highest average number of m-EMR usage logs (897) was by medical residents, whereas the lowest (292) was by surgical residents. The usage amount for three menus, namely inpatient list (47,096), lab results (38,508), and investigation list (25,336), accounted for 60.1% of the peak time usage. The HIS was used most frequently during regular hours (9:00 AM to 5:00 PM). The peak usage time of the m-EMR was early in the morning (6:00 AM to 10:00 AM), and the use of the m-EMR from early evening (5:00 PM) to midnight was higher than during regular

  14. Validation of an Improved Computer-Assisted Technique for Mining Free-Text Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duz, Marco; Marshall, John F; Parkin, Tim

    2017-06-29

    The use of electronic medical records (EMRs) offers opportunity for clinical epidemiological research. With large EMR databases, automated analysis processes are necessary but require thorough validation before they can be routinely used. The aim of this study was to validate a computer-assisted technique using commercially available content analysis software (SimStat-WordStat v.6 (SS/WS), Provalis Research) for mining free-text EMRs. The dataset used for the validation process included life-long EMRs from 335 patients (17,563 rows of data), selected at random from a larger dataset (141,543 patients, ~2.6 million rows of data) and obtained from 10 equine veterinary practices in the United Kingdom. The ability of the computer-assisted technique to detect rows of data (cases) of colic, renal failure, right dorsal colitis, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use in the population was compared with manual classification. The first step of the computer-assisted analysis process was the definition of inclusion dictionaries to identify cases, including terms identifying a condition of interest. Words in inclusion dictionaries were selected from the list of all words in the dataset obtained in SS/WS. The second step consisted of defining an exclusion dictionary, including combinations of words to remove cases erroneously classified by the inclusion dictionary alone. The third step was the definition of a reinclusion dictionary to reinclude cases that had been erroneously classified by the exclusion dictionary. Finally, cases obtained by the exclusion dictionary were removed from cases obtained by the inclusion dictionary, and cases from the reinclusion dictionary were subsequently reincluded using Rv3.0.2 (R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria). Manual analysis was performed as a separate process by a single experienced clinician reading through the dataset once and classifying each row of data based on the interpretation of the free

  15. Comparison of documentation of patient reported adverse drug reactions on both paper-based medication charts and electronic medication charts at a New Zealand hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wilson; Wong, Bernice; Chin, Jessica Yi Ping; Lee, Michael; Coulter, Carolyn; Braund, Rhiannon

    2016-10-28

    Known adverse drug reactions (ADRs) can have profound effects on disease states, as well as prescribing practice. Therefore, the correct and complete documentation of each individual patient's ADR history, upon hospital admission, is important in optimising that individual patient's pharmacotherapy. This study investigated the documentation of ADRs at a tertiary New Zealand hospital, on both paper-based medication charts and electronic medication charts to quantify both the number of ADRs patients self-report, as well as the differences between recording of that information in electronic and paper-based charting systems. Following ethical approval, inpatient medication charts on the general medical ward (electronic prescribing), or the general surgical ward (paper-based medication charts) were viewed for documented ADRs-as reported by each patient on admission. Consecutive patient charts (and electronic clinical management system) were viewed until 50 patients from each ward, each with at least one documented ADR, (in any of the information sources) were obtained. Patient demographic information, ADR history and discrepancies between information sources were determined. In both wards 114 patients were reviewed in order to find 50 patients with documented ADRs. In the medical ward (electronic) 44 (90%) patients had discrepancies in ADR information between different information sources and in the surgical ward (paper) this occurred in 49 (98%) patients. A large number of patients self-report ADRs. Full documentation of patient reported ADRs is required to adequately inform future prescribing decisions. Discrepancies between ADR information recorded in different information systems exist, but information sharing between electronic and non-electronic sources could be prioritised in order to allow full and complete information to be collected, stored and utilised; and reduce the current inadequacies.

  16. Electronic tongue-based discrimination of Korean rice wines (makgeolli) including prediction of sensory evaluation and instrumental measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bo-Sik; Lee, Jang-Eun; Park, Hyun-Jin

    2014-05-15

    A commercial electronic tongue was used to discriminate Korean rice wines (makgeolli) brewed from nine cultivars of rice with different amino acid and fatty acid compositions. The E-tongue was applied to establish prediction models with sensory evaluation or LC-MS/MS by partial least squares regression (PLSR). All makgeollis were classified into three groups by principal components analysis, and the separation pattern was affected by rice qualities and yeast fermentation. Makgeolli taste changed from the complicated comprising sweetness, saltiness, and umami to the uncomplicated, such as bitterness and then, sourness, with a decrease of amino acids and fatty acids in the rice. The quantitative correlation between E-tongue and sensory scores or LC-MS/MS by PLSR demonstrated that E-tongue could well predict most of the sensory attributes with relatively acceptable r(2), except for bitterness, but could not predict most of the chemical compounds responsible for taste attributes, except for ribose, lactate, succinate, and tryptophan. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of a potential fibromyalgia diagnosis using random forest modeling applied to electronic medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emir B

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Birol Emir,1 Elizabeth T Masters,1 Jack Mardekian,1 Andrew Clair,1 Max Kuhn,2 Stuart L Silverman,3 1Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, 2Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT, 3Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA Background: Diagnosis of fibromyalgia (FM, a chronic musculoskeletal condition characterized by widespread pain and a constellation of symptoms, remains challenging and is often delayed. Methods: Random forest modeling of electronic medical records was used to identify variables that may facilitate earlier FM identification and diagnosis. Subjects aged ≥18 years with two or more listings of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, (ICD-9 code for FM (ICD-9 729.1 ≥30 days apart during the 2012 calendar year were defined as cases among subjects associated with an integrated delivery network and who had one or more health care provider encounter in the Humedica database in calendar years 2011 and 2012. Controls were without the FM ICD-9 codes. Seventy-two demographic, clinical, and health care resource utilization variables were entered into a random forest model with downsampling to account for cohort imbalances (<1% subjects had FM. Importance of the top ten variables was ranked based on normalization to 100% for the variable with the largest loss in predicting performance by its omission from the model. Since random forest is a complex prediction method, a set of simple rules was derived to help understand what factors drive individual predictions. Results: The ten variables identified by the model were: number of visits where laboratory/non-imaging diagnostic tests were ordered; number of outpatient visits excluding office visits; age; number of office visits; number of opioid prescriptions; number of medications prescribed; number of pain medications excluding opioids; number of medications administered/ordered; number of emergency room visits; and number of musculoskeletal conditions. A receiver operating

  18. Effects of electronic communication between the GP and the pharmacist. The quality of medication data on admission and after discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kam, WJ; Meyboom-de Jong, B; Tromp, T; Moorman, PW; van der Lei, J

    2001-01-01

    Background. When a patient is admitted to a hospital, the need for information about the medications prescribed is an important issue. Objectives. Our aim was to assess whether electronic communication between the GP and the pharmacist provides better information regarding current medication when a

  19. Predictive modeling of colorectal cancer using a dedicated pre-processing pipeline on routine electronic medical records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kop, Reinier; Hoogendoorn, Mark; Teije, Annette Ten; Büchner, Frederike L; Slottje, Pauline; Moons, Leon M G; Numans, Mattijs E

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, research utilizing routine care data extracted from Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) has increased tremendously. Yet there are no straightforward, standardized strategies for pre-processing these data. We propose a dedicated medical pre-processing pipeline aimed at taking on

  20. Letter to Editor: Electronic Medical Record, Step toward Improving the Quality of Healthcare Services and Treatment Provided to Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Gozali

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Information technology can increase the quality of medical care and is a target for many of the pioneers in the development of clinical or medical information. Electronic medical record (EMR, one of such technologies, is a well-known and valuable system to access patient information in hospitals. Electronic medical records which are used for the purpose of providing basic health care are available through a network of computers. All units of the hospital such as examination room, conference room, emergency, patient care units, nursing stations, operating rooms, recovery units, laboratory, radiology, pharmacy and medical records should have access to it. Among its advantages are improved quality of care provided to patients, better organized information, improvement in the timeliness of the process, accuracy and completeness of documentation, patient access to electronic copies of records, prevention of medication errors and allergies, reduced medical errors, immediate access to information in different places, decision support technology and improvement in the process of doing . S urely the use of electronic medical records has created a new dimension to patient care and clinical practice and will provide a comprehensive system to support people in the community and enhance the quality of services provided to them.

  1. Enhancing Student Empathetic Engagement, History-Taking, and Communication Skills During Electronic Medical Record Use in Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoSasso, Alisa Alfonsi; Lamberton, Courtney E; Sammon, Mary; Berg, Katherine T; Caruso, John W; Cass, Jonathan; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    2017-07-01

    To examine whether an intervention on proper use of electronic medical records (EMRs) in patient care could help improve medical students' empathic engagement, and to test the hypothesis that the training would reduce communication hurdles in clinical encounters. Seventy third-year medical students from the Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University were randomly divided into intervention and control groups during their six-week pediatric clerkship in 2012-2013. The intervention group received a one-hour training session on EMR-specific communication skills, including discussion of EMR use, the SALTED mnemonic and technique (Set-up, Ask, Listen, Type, Exceptions, Documentation), and role-plays. Both groups completed the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) at the clerkship's start and end. At clerkship's end, faculty and standardized patients (SPs) rated students' empathic engagement in SP encounters, using the Jefferson Scale of Patient Perceptions of Physician Empathy (JSPPPE), and their history-taking and communication skills. Faculty mean ratings on the JSPPPE, history-taking skills, and communication skills were significantly higher for the intervention group than the control group. SP mean ratings on history-taking skills were significantly higher for the intervention group than the control group. Both groups' JSE mean scores increased pretest to posttest, but the changes were not significant. The intervention group's posttest JSE mean score was higher than the control group's, but the difference was not significant. The findings suggest that a simple intervention providing specialized training in EMR-specific communication can improve medical students' empathic engagement in patient care, history-taking skills, and communication skills.

  2. Prevalence of pain medication prescriptions in France, Germany, and the UK - a cross-sectional study including 4,270,142 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Louis; Kostev, Karel

    2018-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to analyze the prevalence of pain medication prescriptions in general practices in France, Germany, and the UK. This study included all patients aged ≥18 years followed in 2016 in general practitioner practices in France, Germany and the UK. The primary outcome was the prevalence of patients receiving prescriptions for pain medications in France, Germany, and the UK in 2016. The following drugs were included in the analysis: anti-inflammatory and antirheumatic products, non-steroids and analgesics including opioids, antimigraine preparations, and other analgesics and antipyretics. Demographic variables included age and gender. This study included 4,270,142 patients. The prevalences of pain medication prescriptions were 57.3% in France, 29.6% in Germany, and 21.7% in the UK. Although this prevalence generally remained consistent between age groups in France (54.3%-60.3%), it increased with age in Germany (18-30 years: 23.8%; >70 years: 35.8%) and in the UK (18-30 years: 9.3%; >70 years: 43.8%). Finally, the prevalence of pain medication prescriptions was higher in women than in men in all three countries. Paracetamol was prescribed to 82.3% and 60.1% of patients receiving pain medication in France and the UK, respectively, whereas ibuprofen was prescribed to 46.5% of individuals in Germany. The prevalence of pain medication prescriptions was higher in France than in Germany and the UK. Further research is needed to gain a better understanding of the differences in the prescription patterns between these three European countries.

  3. Business process improvement: an electronic system to monitor compliance with medical resident work hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landesman, Linda Young; Markowitz, Forest; Conde, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    The limitation of medical intern and resident work hours, known as the Bell 405 regulations, was initiated in New York State in 1989 with a modification to the state hospital code. The Bell 405 regulations were strengthened in 2000, and facilities would now be fined for noncompliance. Monitoring systems in place at that time were insufficient to provide an adequate level of review for the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) with more than 7,000 medical residents whose training is based at or who rotate through these public hospitals. A "simple to use," yet comprehensive, method of monitoring compliance needed to be developed to ensure that residents and interns complied with laws regulating working hours. The subsequent development of national accreditation standards increased the stakes for reliable scrutiny. HHC developed and implemented a Web-based Structured Query Language (SQL) application that facilitated easy access to work hour surveys captured through electronic time sheets. The time sheet data automatically entered a database that provided instant analysis of conformance to state law. The development of an electronic on-line application accessible from anywhere allowed HHC to efficiently identify nonconformance and pinpoint corrective action. Since the inception of the application and its expansion allowing access through the intranet, 26,000 individual time sheets have been submitted for evaluation. With the national movement regulating work hours, other hospitals still at the pencil and manual computation stage would greatly benefit by developing a similar application.

  4. Efficient Queries of Stand-off Annotations for Natural Language Processing on Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuan; Szolovits, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In natural language processing, stand-off annotation uses the starting and ending positions of an annotation to anchor it to the text and stores the annotation content separately from the text. We address the fundamental problem of efficiently storing stand-off annotations when applying natural language processing on narrative clinical notes in electronic medical records (EMRs) and efficiently retrieving such annotations that satisfy position constraints. Efficient storage and retrieval of stand-off annotations can facilitate tasks such as mapping unstructured text to electronic medical record ontologies. We first formulate this problem into the interval query problem, for which optimal query/update time is in general logarithm. We next perform a tight time complexity analysis on the basic interval tree query algorithm and show its nonoptimality when being applied to a collection of 13 query types from Allen's interval algebra. We then study two closely related state-of-the-art interval query algorithms, proposed query reformulations, and augmentations to the second algorithm. Our proposed algorithm achieves logarithmic time stabbing-max query time complexity and solves the stabbing-interval query tasks on all of Allen's relations in logarithmic time, attaining the theoretic lower bound. Updating time is kept logarithmic and the space requirement is kept linear at the same time. We also discuss interval management in external memory models and higher dimensions.

  5. Discovering disease associations by integrating electronic clinical data and medical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Antony B; Hawson, Alexander; Liu, Feng; Friedman, Carol; Khiabanian, Hossein; Rabadan, Raul

    2011-01-01

    Electronic health record (EHR) systems offer an exceptional opportunity for studying many diseases and their associated medical conditions within a population. The increasing number of clinical record entries that have become available electronically provides access to rich, large sets of patients' longitudinal medical information. By integrating and comparing relations found in the EHRs with those already reported in the literature, we are able to verify existing and to identify rare or novel associations. Of particular interest is the identification of rare disease co-morbidities, where the small numbers of diagnosed patients make robust statistical analysis difficult. Here, we introduce ADAMS, an Application for Discovering Disease Associations using Multiple Sources, which contains various statistical and language processing operations. We apply ADAMS to the New York-Presbyterian Hospital's EHR to combine the information from the relational diagnosis tables and textual discharge summaries with those from PubMed and Wikipedia in order to investigate the co-morbidities of the rare diseases Kaposi sarcoma, toxoplasmosis, and Kawasaki disease. In addition to finding well-known characteristics of diseases, ADAMS can identify rare or previously unreported associations. In particular, we report a statistically significant association between Kawasaki disease and diagnosis of autistic disorder.

  6. Discovering disease associations by integrating electronic clinical data and medical literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony B Holmes

    Full Text Available Electronic health record (EHR systems offer an exceptional opportunity for studying many diseases and their associated medical conditions within a population. The increasing number of clinical record entries that have become available electronically provides access to rich, large sets of patients' longitudinal medical information. By integrating and comparing relations found in the EHRs with those already reported in the literature, we are able to verify existing and to identify rare or novel associations. Of particular interest is the identification of rare disease co-morbidities, where the small numbers of diagnosed patients make robust statistical analysis difficult. Here, we introduce ADAMS, an Application for Discovering Disease Associations using Multiple Sources, which contains various statistical and language processing operations. We apply ADAMS to the New York-Presbyterian Hospital's EHR to combine the information from the relational diagnosis tables and textual discharge summaries with those from PubMed and Wikipedia in order to investigate the co-morbidities of the rare diseases Kaposi sarcoma, toxoplasmosis, and Kawasaki disease. In addition to finding well-known characteristics of diseases, ADAMS can identify rare or previously unreported associations. In particular, we report a statistically significant association between Kawasaki disease and diagnosis of autistic disorder.

  7. Brief review: Adoption of electronic medical records to enhance acute pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, David H; Phelan, Rachel; Wilson, Rosemary; Ross-White, Amanda; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth G; Penning, John P; Jaeger, Melanie

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine physician barriers to adopting electronic medical records (EMRs) as well as anesthesiologists' experiences with the EMRs used by the acute pain management service at two tertiary care centres in Canada. We first review the recent literature to determine if physician barriers to adoption are changing given the exponential growth of information technology and the evolving healthcare environment. We next report on institutional experience from two academic health sciences centres regarding the challenges they encountered over the past ten years in developing and implementing an electronic medical record system for acute pain management. The key identified barriers to adoption of EMRs are financial, technological, and time constraints. These barriers are identical to those reported in a systematic review performed prior to 2009 and remain significant factors challenging implementation. These challenges were encountered during our institution's process of adopting EMRs specific to acute pain management. In addition, our findings emphasize the importance of physician participation in the development and implementation stages of EMRs in order to incorporate their feedback and ensure the EMR system is in keeping with their workflow. Use of EMRs will inevitably become the standard of care; however, many barriers persist to impede their implementation and adoption. These challenges to implementation can be facilitated by a corporate strategy for change that acknowledges the barriers and provides the resources for implementation. Adoption will facilitate benefits in communication, patient management, research, and improved patient safety.

  8. The use of electronic patient records for medical research: conflicts and contradictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Fiona

    2015-03-29

    The use of electronic patient records for medical research is extremely topical. The Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CRPD), the English NHS observational data and interventional research service, was launched in April 2012. The CPRD has access to, and facilities to link, many healthcare related datasets. The CPRD is partially based on learning from the Health Research Support Service (HRSS), which was used to test the technical and practical aspects of downloading and linking electronic patient records for research. Questions around the feasibility and acceptability of implementing and integrating the processes necessary to enable electronic patient records to be used for the purposes of research remain. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with a total of 50 patients and 7 staff from the two English GP practices involved in piloting the HRSS, supplemented with 11 interviews with key stakeholders. Emergent themes were mapped on to the constructs of normalization process theory (NPT) to consider the ways in which sense was made of the work of implementing and integrating the HRSS. The NPT analysis demonstrated a lack of commitment to, and engagement with, the HRSS on the part of patients, whilst the commitment of doctors and practice staff was to some extent mitigated by concerns about issues of governance and consent, particularly in relation to downloading electronic patient records with associated identifiers. Although the CPRD is presented as a benign, bureaucratic process, perceptions by patients and staff of inherent contradictions with centrally held values of information governance and consent in downloading and linking electronic patient records for research remains a barrier to implementation. It is likely that conclusions reached about the problems of balancing the contradictions inherent in sharing what can be perceived as a private resource for the public good are globally transferrable.

  9. Scalable decision support at the point of care: a substitutable electronic health record app for monitoring medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosl, William; Mandel, Joshua; Jonikas, Magdalena; Ramoni, Rachel Badovinac; Kohane, Isaac S; Mandl, Kenneth D

    2013-07-22

    Non-adherence to prescribed medications is a serious health problem in the United States, costing an estimated $100 billion per year. While poor adherence should be addressable with point of care health information technology, integrating new solutions with existing electronic health records (EHR) systems require customization within each organization, which is difficult because of the monolithic software design of most EHR products. The objective of this study was to create a published algorithm for predicting medication adherence problems easily accessible at the point of care through a Web application that runs on the Substitutable Medical Apps, Reusuable Technologies (SMART) platform. The SMART platform is an emerging framework that enables EHR systems to behave as "iPhone like platforms" by exhibiting an application programming interface for easy addition and deletion of third party apps. The app is presented as a point of care solution to monitoring medication adherence as well as a sufficiently general, modular application that may serve as an example and template for other SMART apps. The widely used, open source Django framework was used together with the SMART platform to create the interoperable components of this app. Django uses Python as its core programming language. This allows statistical and mathematical modules to be created from a large array of Python numerical libraries and assembled together with the core app to create flexible and sophisticated EHR functionality. Algorithms that predict individual adherence are derived from a retrospective study of dispensed medication claims from a large private insurance plan. Patients' prescription fill information is accessed through the SMART framework and the embedded algorithms compute adherence information, including predicted adherence one year after the first prescription fill. Open source graphing software is used to display patient medication information and the results of statistical prediction

  10. Implementing change in primary care practices using electronic medical records: a conceptual framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Gail W

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Implementing change in primary care is difficult, and little practical guidance is available to assist small primary care practices. Methods to structure care and develop new roles are often needed to implement an evidence-based practice that improves care. This study explored the process of change used to implement clinical guidelines for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in primary care practices that used a common electronic medical record (EMR. Methods Multiple conceptual frameworks informed the design of this study designed to explain the complex phenomena of implementing change in primary care practice. Qualitative methods were used to examine the processes of change that practice members used to implement the guidelines. Purposive sampling in eight primary care practices within the Practice Partner Research Network-Translating Researching into Practice (PPRNet-TRIP II clinical trial yielded 28 staff members and clinicians who were interviewed regarding how change in practice occurred while implementing clinical guidelines for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and strokes. Results A conceptual framework for implementing clinical guidelines into primary care practice was developed through this research. Seven concepts and their relationships were modelled within this framework: leaders setting a vision with clear goals for staff to embrace; involving the team to enable the goals and vision for the practice to be achieved; enhancing communication systems to reinforce goals for patient care; developing the team to enable the staff to contribute toward practice improvement; taking small steps, encouraging practices' tests of small changes in practice; assimilating the electronic medical record to maximize clinical effectiveness, enhancing practices' use of the electronic tool they have invested in for patient care improvement; and providing feedback within a culture of

  11. Microwave system of the 7-10 MeV electron linear accelerator ALIN for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.; Iliescu, E.; Stirbet, M.; Oproiu, C.; Vintan, I.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed description of the Central Institute of Physics 10 MeV linear microwave system and its associated subsystems are presented. Methods of impedance matching to obtain maximum power transfer are described along with broadband design methods for transmission-line impedance transformers. Experimental results for such microwave devices are included. With respect to microwave device performances, simultaneous high efficiency and high power capability with reliability and long life at relatively low unit cost have only recently been achieved as typical device characteristics. Industrial, medical and scientific application of microwave electron accelerators have markedly influenced microwave research progress. Radiographic linear accelerators have grown substantially mainly during the past few years. Following this, the improvements of microwave device performances solicit our attention. The first electron therapy Linear Accelerator ALIN 10 marks a new stage in the development of such instrumentation. Its subsequent ALIN 15 is designed to produce a maximum energy of 18 MeV to widen its applicability in radiotherapy. In addition, a new electron linear accelerator of 8 MeV for nondestructive testing has been started. (author)

  12. Graphene and Graphene Analogs toward Optical, Electronic, Spintronic, Green-Chemical, Energy-Material, Sensing, and Medical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezapour, M Reza; Myung, Chang Woo; Yun, Jeonghun; Ghassami, Amirreza; Li, Nannan; Yu, Seong Uk; Hajibabaei, Amir; Park, Youngsin; Kim, Kwang S

    2017-07-26

    This spotlight discusses intriguing properties and diverse applications of graphene (Gr) and Gr analogs. Gr has brought us two-dimensional (2D) chemistry with its exotic 2D features of density of states. Yet, some of the 2D or 2D-like features can be seen on surfaces and at interfaces of bulk materials. The substrate on Gr and functionalization of Gr (including metal decoration, intercalation, doping, and hybridization) modify the unique 2D features of Gr. Despite abundant literature on physical properties and well-known applications of Gr, spotlight works based on the conceptual understanding of the 2D physical and chemical nature of Gr toward vast-ranging applications are hardly found. Here we focus on applications of Gr, based on conceptual understanding of 2D phenomena toward 2D chemistry. Thus, 2D features, defects, edges, and substrate effects of Gr are discussed first. Then, to pattern Gr electronic circuits, insight into differentiating conducting and nonconducting regions is introduced. By utilizing the unique ballistic electron transport properties and edge spin states of Gr, Gr nanoribbons (GNRs) are exploited for the design of ultrasensitive molecular sensing electronic devices (including molecular fingerprinting) and spintronic devices. The highly stable nature of Gr can be utilized for protection of corrosive metals, moisture-sensitive perovskite solar cells, and highly environment-susceptible topological insulators (TIs). Gr analogs have become new types of 2D materials having novel features such as half-metals, TIs, and nonlinear optical properties. The key insights into the functionalized Gr hybrid materials lead to the applications for not only energy storage and electrochemical catalysis, green chemistry, and electronic/spintronic devices but also biosensing and medical applications. All these topics are discussed here with the focus on conceptual understanding. Further possible applications of Gr, GNRs, and Gr analogs are also addressed in a

  13. Copy Number Variation Analysis in the Context of Electronic Medical Records & Large-Scale Genomics Consortium Efforts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Connolly

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to review recent research on copy number variations (CNVs and their association with complex and rare diseases. In the latter part of this paper, we focus on how large biorepositories such as the electronic medical record and genomics (eMERGE consortium may be best leveraged to systematically mine for potentially pathogenic CNVs, and we end with a discussion of how such variants might be reported back for inclusion in electronic medical records as part of medical history.

  14. Working with an Electronic Medical Record in Ambulatory Care: A Study of Patient Perceptions of Intrusiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizer, Milisa K; Sieck, Cynthia; Lehman, Jennifer S; Hefner, Jennifer L; Huerta, Timothy R; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2017-01-01

    To assess patient perceptions of electronic medical record (EMR) intrusiveness during ambulatory visits to clinics associated with a large academic medical center. We conducted a survey of patients seen at any of 98 academic medical center clinics. The survey assessed demographics, visit satisfaction, computer use, and perceived intrusiveness of the computer. Of 7,058 patients, slightly more than 80 percent reported that the physician had used the computer while in the room, but only 24 percent were shown results in the EMR. Most patients were very satisfied or satisfied with their visit and did not find the computer intrusive (83 percent). Younger respondents, those shown results, and those who reported that the physician used the computer were more likely to perceive the computer as intrusive. Qualitative comments suggest different perceptions related to computer intrusiveness than to EMR use more generally. Patients were generally accepting of EMRs and therefore use of computers in the exam room. However, subgroups of patients may require greater study to better understand patient perceptions related to EMR use and intrusiveness. Results suggest the need for greater focus on how physicians use computers in the exam room in a manner that facilitates maintaining good rapport with patients.

  15. Implementation of a Cloud-Based Electronic Medical Record to Reduce Gaps in the HIV Treatment Continuum in Rural Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Haskew

    Full Text Available Electronic medical record (EMR systems are increasingly being adopted to support the delivery of health care in developing countries and their implementation can help to strengthen pathways of care and close gaps in the HIV treatment cascade by improving access to and use of data to inform clinical and public health decision-making.This study implemented a novel cloud-based electronic medical record system in an HIV outpatient setting in Western Kenya and evaluated its impact on reducing gaps in the HIV treatment continuum including missing data and patient eligibility for ART. The impact of the system was assessed using a two-sample test of proportions pre- and post-implementation of EMR-based data verification and clinical decision support.Significant improvements in data quality and provision of clinical care were recorded through implementation of the EMR system, helping to ensure patients who are eligible for HIV treatment receive it early. A total of 2,169 and 764 patient records had missing data pre-implementation and post-implementation of EMR-based data verification and clinical decision support respectively. A total of 1,346 patients were eligible for ART, but not yet started on ART, pre-implementation compared to 270 patients pre-implementation.EMR-based data verification and clinical decision support can reduce gaps in HIV care, including missing data and eligibility for ART. A cloud-based model of EMR implementation removes the need for local clinic infrastructure and has the potential to enhance data sharing at different levels of health care to inform clinical and public health decision-making. A number of issues, including data management and patient confidentiality, must be considered but significant improvements in data quality and provision of clinical care are recorded through implementation of this EMR model.

  16. Realization of a universal patient identifier for electronic medical records through biometric technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, D C; Pons, Alexander P; Asfour, Shihab S

    2009-07-01

    The technology exists for the migration of healthcare data from its archaic paper-based system to an electronic one, and, once in digital form, to be transported anywhere in the world in a matter of seconds. The advent of universally accessible healthcare data has benefited all participants, but one of the outstanding problems that must be addressed is how the creation of a standardized nationwide electronic healthcare record system in the United States would uniquely identify and match a composite of an individual's recorded healthcare information to an identified individual patients out of approximately 300 million people to a 1:1 match. To date, a few solutions to this problem have been proposed that are limited in their effectiveness. We propose the use of biometric technology within our fingerprint, iris, retina scan, and DNA (FIRD) framework, which is a multiphase system whose primary phase is a multilayer consisting of these four types of biometric identifiers: 1) fingerprint; 2) iris; 3) retina scan; and 4) DNA. In addition, it also consists of additional phases of integration, consolidation, and data discrepancy functions to solve the unique association of a patient to their medical data distinctively. This would allow a patient to have real-time access to all of their recorded healthcare information electronically whenever it is necessary, securely with minimal effort, greater effectiveness, and ease.

  17. The Internet School of Medicine: use of electronic resources by medical trainees and the reliability of those resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egle, Jonathan P; Smeenge, David M; Kassem, Kamal M; Mittal, Vijay K

    2015-01-01

    Electronic sources of medical information are plentiful, and numerous studies have demonstrated the use of the Internet by patients and the variable reliability of these sources. Studies have investigated neither the use of web-based resources by residents, nor the reliability of the information available on these websites. A web-based survey was distributed to surgical residents in Michigan and third- and fourth-year medical students at an American allopathic and osteopathic medical school and a Caribbean allopathic school regarding their preferred sources of medical information in various situations. A set of 254 queries simulating those faced by medical trainees on rounds, on a written examination, or during patient care was developed. The top 5 electronic resources cited by the trainees were evaluated for their ability to answer these questions accurately, using standard textbooks as the point of reference. The respondents reported a wide variety of overall preferred resources. Most of the 73 responding medical trainees favored textbooks or board review books for prolonged studying, but electronic resources are frequently used for quick studying, clinical decision-making questions, and medication queries. The most commonly used electronic resources were UpToDate, Google, Medscape, Wikipedia, and Epocrates. UpToDate and Epocrates had the highest percentage of correct answers (47%) and Wikipedia had the lowest (26%). Epocrates also had the highest percentage of wrong answers (30%), whereas Google had the lowest percentage (18%). All resources had a significant number of questions that they were unable to answer. Though hardcopy books have not been completely replaced by electronic resources, more than half of medical students and nearly half of residents prefer web-based sources of information. For quick questions and studying, both groups prefer Internet sources. However, the most commonly used electronic resources fail to answer clinical queries more than half

  18. Radioactive isotope production for medical applications using Kharkov electron driven subcritical assembly facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine has a plan to construct an accelerator driven subcritical assembly. The main functions of the subcritical assembly are the medical isotope production, neutron thereby, and the support of the Ukraine nuclear industry. Reactor physics experiments and material research will be carried out using the capabilities of this facility. The United States of America and Ukraine have started collaboration activity for developing a conceptual design for this facility with low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. Different conceptual designs are being developed based on the facility mission and the engineering requirements including nuclear physics, neutronics, heat transfer, thermal hydraulics, structure, and material issues. Different fuel designs with LEU and reflector materials are considered in the design process. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. The facility is configured to accommodate future design improvements and upgrades. This report is a part of the Argonne National Laboratory Activity within this collaboration for developing and characterizing the subcritical assembly conceptual design. In this study, the medical isotope production function of the Kharkov facility is defined. First, a review was carried out to identify the medical isotopes and its medical use. Then a preliminary assessment was performed without including the self-shielding effect of the irradiated samples. Finally, more detailed investigation was carried out including the self-shielding effect, which defined the sample size and irradiation location for producing each medical isotope. In the first part, the reaction rates were calculated as the multiplication of the cross section with the unperturbed neutron flux of the facility. Over fifty isotopes were considered and all transmutation channels are used including (n,γ), (n,2n), (n,p), and (γ,n). In the second part, the parent

  19. Radioactive isotope production for medical applications using Kharkov electron driven subcritical assembly facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-05-15

    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine has a plan to construct an accelerator driven subcritical assembly. The main functions of the subcritical assembly are the medical isotope production, neutron thereby, and the support of the Ukraine nuclear industry. Reactor physics experiments and material research will be carried out using the capabilities of this facility. The United States of America and Ukraine have started collaboration activity for developing a conceptual design for this facility with low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. Different conceptual designs are being developed based on the facility mission and the engineering requirements including nuclear physics, neutronics, heat transfer, thermal hydraulics, structure, and material issues. Different fuel designs with LEU and reflector materials are considered in the design process. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. The facility is configured to accommodate future design improvements and upgrades. This report is a part of the Argonne National Laboratory Activity within this collaboration for developing and characterizing the subcritical assembly conceptual design. In this study, the medical isotope production function of the Kharkov facility is defined. First, a review was carried out to identify the medical isotopes and its medical use. Then a preliminary assessment was performed without including the self-shielding effect of the irradiated samples. Finally, more detailed investigation was carried out including the self-shielding effect, which defined the sample size and irradiation location for producing each medical isotope. In the first part, the reaction rates were calculated as the multiplication of the cross section with the unperturbed neutron flux of the facility. Over fifty isotopes were considered and all transmutation channels are used including (n,{gamma}), (n,2n), (n,p), and ({gamma},n). In the second part

  20. Long-term pain relief with optimized medical treatment including antioxidants and step-up interventional therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalimar; Midha, Shallu; Hasan, Ajmal; Dhingra, Rajan; Garg, Pramod Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal pain is difficult to treat in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). Medical therapy including antioxidants has been shown to relieve pain of CP in the short-term. Our aim was to study the long-term results of optimized medical and interventional therapy for pain relief in patients with CP with a step-up approach. All consecutive patients with CP were included prospectively in the study. They were treated medically with a well-balanced diet, pancreatic enzymes, and antioxidants (9000 IU beta-carotene, 0.54 g vitamin C, 270 IU vitamin E, 600 µg organic selenium, and 2 g methionine). Endoscopic therapy and/or surgery were offered if medical therapy failed. Pain relief was the primary outcome measure. A total of 313 patients (mean age 26.16 ± 12.17; 244 males) with CP were included; 288 (92%) patients had abdominal pain. The etiology of CP was idiopathic in 224 (71.6%) and alcohol in 82 (26.2%). At 1-year follow-up, significant pain relief was achieved in 84.7% of patients: 52.1% with medical therapy, 16.7% with endoscopic therapy, 7.6% with surgery, and 8.3% spontaneously. The mean pain score decreased from 6.36 ± 1.92 to 1.62 ± 2.10 (P pain free at those follow-up periods. Significant pain relief is achieved in the majority of patients with optimized medical and interventional treatment. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Importance to include the term superficial musculoaponeurotic system in medical subject headings and in the international anatomical nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Lydia Massako; Locali, Rafael Fagionato; Lapin, Guilherme Abbud Franco; Hochman, Bernardo

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the relevance of the term superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) and demonstrate that this term is important enough to be added to the MeSH database and listed in International Anatomical Nomenclature. Terms related to SMAS were selected from original articles retrieved from the ISI Web of Science and MEDLINE (PubMed) databases. Groups of terms were created to define a search strategy with high-sensitivity and restricted to scientific periodicals devoted to plastic surgery. This study included articles between January 1996 and May 2009, whose titles, abstracts, and keywords were searched for SMAS-related terms and all occurrences were recorded. A total of 126 original articles were retrieved from the main periodicals related to plastic surgery in the referred databases. Of these articles, 51.6% had SMAS-related terms in the abstract only, and 25.4% had SMAS-related terms in both the title and abstract. The term 'superficial musculoaponeurotic system' was present as a keyword in 19.8% of the articles. The most frequent terms were 'SMAS' (71.4%) and superficial musculoaponeurotic system (62.7%). The term SMAS refers to a structure relevant enough to start a discussion about indexing it as a keyword and as an official term in Terminologia Anatomica: International Anatomical Terminology.

  2. Actions improving the image of a nurse in electronic media. Opinion of students at medical courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowska Klaudia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of study was to define actions improving the image of nurses in electronic media. Material and method. 219 women and 44 men took part in a survey. They were the students of the following courses: nursing, medical rescue, obstetrics, medicine, dentistry, pharmaceutics, physiotherapy, public health. The studies were undertaken with use of own questionnaire in 2015. Results. Majority of respondents 64,6% (n=169 stated that improvement of image of their own profession belongs to the nurses, and only 35,4% (n=93 respondents indicated that the professional organizations of nurses and midwives have their impact on it. According to the students, the most crucial action that should be undertaken by professional organizations in order to improve the image of profession in electronic media was the improvement of wages and working conditions (72,2%, n=189 and better promotion of the profession in electronic media (73,8%, n=193. The nurses can influence the improvement of their image in media by taking care of the good opinion about the profession by setting good example (32%, n=84, and also by creating blogs, social forum, online information services, etc. (26,2%, n=69. Conclusions. According to the respondents, the image of a nurse in electronic media is shaped by the television and radio. The mentioned media tend to present nursing environment in a negative light. The data analysis shows that according to the respondents, the professional organizations of nurses and midwives and nurses themselves should be responsible for improvement of the situation. In order to improve the image, the nurses should promote professional achievements, change the stereotype used in shows and movies, and familiarize the public with the profession. The following branches of mass media should be used: internet websites, television and radio.

  3. Quality assessment of Isfahan Medical Faculty web site electronic services and prioritizing solutions using analytic hierarchy process approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajrahimi, Nafiseh; Dehaghani, Sayed Mehdi Hejazi; Hajrahimi, Nargess; Sarmadi, Sima

    2014-01-01

    Implementing information technology in the best possible way can bring many advantages such as applying electronic services and facilitating tasks. Therefore, assessment of service providing systems is a way to improve the quality and elevate these systems including e-commerce, e-government, e-banking, and e-learning. This study was aimed to evaluate the electronic services in the website of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in order to propose solutions to improve them. Furthermore, we aim to rank the solutions based on the factors that enhance the quality of electronic services by using analytic hierarchy process (AHP) method. Non-parametric test was used to assess the quality of electronic services. The assessment of propositions was based on Aqual model and they were prioritized using AHP approach. The AHP approach was used because it directly applies experts' deductions in the model, and lead to more objective results in the analysis and prioritizing the risks. After evaluating the quality of the electronic services, a multi-criteria decision making frame-work was used to prioritize the proposed solutions. Non-parametric tests and AHP approach using Expert Choice software. The results showed that students were satisfied in most of the indicators. Only a few indicators received low satisfaction from students including, design attractiveness, the amount of explanation and details of information, honesty and responsiveness of authorities, and the role of e-services in the user's relationship with university. After interviewing with Information and Communications Technology (ICT) experts at the university, measurement criteria, and solutions to improve the quality were collected. The best solutions were selected by EC software. According to the results, the solution "controlling and improving the process in handling users complaints" is of the utmost importance and authorities have to have it on the website and place great importance on updating this process

  4. Development of prostate cancer research database with the clinical data warehouse technology for direct linkage with electronic medical record system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, In Young; Park, Seungho; Park, Bumjoon; Chung, Byung Ha; Kim, Choung-Soo; Lee, Hyun Moo; Byun, Seok-Soo; Lee, Ji Youl

    2013-01-01

    In spite of increased prostate cancer patients, little is known about the impact of treatments for prostate cancer patients and outcome of different treatments based on nationwide data. In order to obtain more comprehensive information for Korean prostate cancer patients, many professionals urged to have national system to monitor the quality of prostate cancer care. To gain its objective, the prostate cancer database system was planned and cautiously accommodated different views from various professions. This prostate cancer research database system incorporates information about a prostate cancer research including demographics, medical history, operation information, laboratory, and quality of life surveys. And, this system includes three different ways of clinical data collection to produce a comprehensive data base; direct data extraction from electronic medical record (EMR) system, manual data entry after linking EMR documents like magnetic resonance imaging findings and paper-based data collection for survey from patients. We implemented clinical data warehouse technology to test direct EMR link method with St. Mary's Hospital system. Using this method, total number of eligible patients were 2,300 from 1997 until 2012. Among them, 538 patients conducted surgery and others have different treatments. Our database system could provide the infrastructure for collecting error free data to support various retrospective and prospective studies.

  5. Attitudes toward inter-hospital electronic patient record exchange: discrepancies among physicians, medical record staff, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jong-Yi; Ho, Hsiao-Yun; Chen, Jen-De; Chai, Sinkuo; Tai, Chih-Jaan; Chen, Yung-Fu

    2015-07-12

    In this era of ubiquitous information, patient record exchange among hospitals still has technological and individual barriers including resistance to information sharing. Most research on user attitudes has been limited to one type of user or aspect. Because few analyses of attitudes toward electronic patient records (EPRs) have been conducted, understanding the attitudes among different users in multiple aspects is crucial to user acceptance. This proof-of-concept study investigated the attitudes of users toward the inter-hospital EPR exchange system implemented nationwide and focused on discrepant behavioral intentions among three user groups. The system was designed by combining a Health Level 7-based protocol, object-relational mapping, and other medical informatics techniques to ensure interoperability in realizing patient-centered practices. After implementation, three user-specific questionnaires for physicians, medical record staff, and patients were administered, with a 70 % response rate. The instrument showed favorable convergent construct validity and internal consistency reliability. Two dependent variables were applied: the attitudes toward privacy and support. Independent variables comprised personal characteristics, work characteristics, human aspects, and technology aspects. Major statistical methods included exploratory factor analysis and general linear model. The results from 379 respondents indicated that the patients highly agreed with privacy protection by their consent and support for EPRs, whereas the physicians remained conservative toward both. Medical record staff was ranked in the middle among the three groups. The three user groups demonstrated discrepant intentions toward privacy protection and support. Experience of computer use, level of concerns, usefulness of functions, and specifically, reason to use electronic medical records and number of outpatient visits were significantly associated with the perceptions. Overall, four

  6. An automatic female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery registry and complications manager developed in an electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Roger P; Gafni-Kane, Adam; Jirschele, Kelly; Silver, Richard; Maurer, Darryck; Solomonides, Tony; Simmons, Alan; Silverstein, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to incorporate a structured clinical documentation system (SCDS) into the electronic medical record (EMR), allowing for automatic flow of clinical data into an enterprise data warehouse (EDW) and clinical registry. The SCDS programming was developed within inpatient and ambulatory EMR domains, allowing routine documentation in these settings to trigger data flow into an EDW. An extensive set of clinical outcomes was included, focusing on data points likely to exist in the forthcoming American Urogynecologic Society Pelvic Floor Disorders Registry. An electronic complications manager was developed to link immediate and/or delayed complications to the index surgery, allowing for accurate morbidity tracking. All aspects of EMR documentation were successfully reconfigured for charting in both inpatient and office settings. Clinicians transitioned to clinical documentation such that no additional data entry beyond routine charting was required, and this resulted in data flow into the EDW. Physician feedback led to the refinement of SCDS entry fields. This SCDS system allows for automatic flow of a comprehensive data set from our EMR into an EDW and registry. It also provides the ability to systematically track complications and longitudinal clinical outcomes. Integrated systems may eliminate barriers associated with free-standing registries including those relating to cost, maintenance, data integrity, and consistent clinician participation. In addition, it should improve ascertainment of a complete patient population in comparison to voluntary registries.

  7. Effect of Access to an Electronic Medical Resource on Performance Characteristics of a Certification Examination: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipner, Rebecca S; Brossman, Bradley G; Samonte, Kelli M; Durning, Steven J

    2017-09-05

    Electronic resources are increasingly used in medical practice. Their use during high-stakes certification examinations has been advocated by many experts, but whether doing so would affect the capacity to differentiate between high and low abilities is unknown. To determine the effect of electronic resources on examination performance characteristics. Randomized controlled trial. Medical certification program. 825 physicians initially certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) who passed the Internal Medicine Certification examination or sat for the Internal Medicine Maintenance of Certification (IM-MOC) examination in 2012 to 2015. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 conditions: closed book using typical or additional time, or open book (that is, UpToDate [Wolters Kluwer]) using typical or additional time. All participants took the same modified version of the IM-MOC examination. Primary outcomes included item difficulty (how easy or difficult the question was), item discrimination (how well the question differentiated between high and low abilities), and average question response time. Secondary outcomes included examination dimensionality (that is, the number of factors measured) and test-taking strategy. Item response theory was used to calculate question characteristics. Analysis of variance compared differences among conditions. Closed-book conditions took significantly less time than open-book conditions (mean, 79.2 seconds [95% CI, 78.5 to 79.9 seconds] vs. 110.3 seconds [CI, 109.2 to 111.4 seconds] per question). Mean discrimination was statistically significantly higher for open-book conditions (0.34 [CI, 0.32 to 0.35] vs. 0.39 [CI, 0.37 to 0.41] per question). A strong single dimension showed that the examination measured the same factor with or without the resource. Only 1 electronic resource was evaluated. Inclusion of an electronic resource with time constraints did not adversely affect test performance and did not change

  8. CLAIM (CLinical Accounting InforMation)--an XML-based data exchange standard for connecting electronic medical record systems to patient accounting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinqiu; Takada, Akira; Tanaka, Koji; Sato, Junzo; Suzuki, Muneou; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Daimon, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Nakashima, Yusei; Araki, Kenji; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2005-08-01

    With the evolving and diverse electronic medical record (EMR) systems, there appears to be an ever greater need to link EMR systems and patient accounting systems with a standardized data exchange format. To this end, the CLinical Accounting InforMation (CLAIM) data exchange standard was developed. CLAIM is subordinate to the Medical Markup Language (MML) standard, which allows the exchange of medical data among different medical institutions. CLAIM uses eXtensible Markup Language (XML) as a meta-language. The current version, 2.1, inherited the basic structure of MML 2.x and contains two modules including information related to registration, appointment, procedure and charging. CLAIM 2.1 was implemented successfully in Japan in 2001. Consequently, it was confirmed that CLAIM could be used as an effective data exchange format between EMR systems and patient accounting systems.

  9. The Electronic Medication Complete Communication (EMC2) Study: Rationale and Methods for a Randomized Controlled Trial of a Strategy to Promote Medication Safety in Ambulatory Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Stacy Cooper; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K.; Adams, William G.; Brokenshire, Samantha A.; Hickson, Ryan P.; Oramasionwu, Christine U.; Curtis, Laura M.; Kwasny, Mary J.; Wolf, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adverse drug events (ADEs) affect millions of patients annually and place a significant burden on the healthcare system. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has developed patient safety information for high-risk medications that pose serious public health concerns. However, there are currently few assurances that patients receive this information or are able to identify or respond correctly to ADEs. Objective To compare the effectiveness of the Electronic Medication Complete Communication (EMC2) Strategy to promote safe medication use and reporting of ADEs in comparison to usual care. Methods The automated EMC2 Strategy consists of: 1) provider alerts to counsel patients on medication risks, 2) the delivery of patient-friendly medication information via the electronic health record, and 3) an automated telephone assessment to identify potential medication concerns or ADEs. The study will take place in two community health centers in Chicago, IL. Adult, English or Spanish-speaking patients (N=1,200) who have been prescribed a high-risk medication will be enrolled and randomized to the intervention arm or usual care based upon practice location. The primary outcomes of the study are medication knowledge, proper medication use, and reporting of ADEs; these will be measured at baseline, 4 weeks, and three months. Intervention fidelity as well as barriers and costs of implementation will be evaluated. Conclusions The EMC2 Strategy automates a patient-friendly risk communication and surveillance process to promote safe medication use while minimizing clinic burden. This trial seeks to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of this strategy in comparison to usual care. PMID:27777127

  10. Development of control system for critical parameters of medical device sterilization at an electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomatsalyuk, R.I.; Shevchenko, V.A.; Shlyakhov, I.N.; Tenishev, A.Eh.; Uvarov, V.L.

    2015-01-01

    The hard- and software interfaces that provide on-line control and archiving of the basic parameters of the medical device sterilization (electron energy, beam current, width and shape of the beam scan, the conveyor speed and the absorbed dose in the treated products) have been developed at a radiation-industrial installation LU-10 of NSC KIPT. The main primary sensor of the control system is a stack-type monitor-absorber of the beam located behind the line of movement of the processed objects. Continuous monitoring of the processing parameters is performed by measuring and analyzing the currents from the plates of the monitor in a mode of ''radiation shadow'' created by irradiated objects. The structure of the control system, how it works and the calibration procedures for measuring channels are described.

  11. Stepwise approach to establishing multiple outreach laboratory information system-electronic medical record interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Pantanowitz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical laboratory outreach business is changing as more physician practices adopt an electronic medical record (EMR. Physician connectivity with the laboratory information system (LIS is consequently becoming more important. However, there are no reports available to assist the informatician with establishing and maintaining outreach LIS-EMR connectivity. A four-stage scheme is presented that was successfully employed to establish unidirectional and bidirectional interfaces with multiple physician EMRs. This approach involves planning (step 1, followed by interface building (step 2 with subsequent testing (step 3, and finally ongoing maintenance (step 4. The role of organized project management, software as a service (SAAS, and alternate solutions for outreach connectivity are discussed.

  12. A genome-wide association study of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia using an electronic medical record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karnes, Jason H; Cronin, Robert M; Rollin, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    . Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and candidate gene study using HIT cases and controls identified using electronic medical records (EMRs) coupled to a DNA biobank and attempted to replicate GWAS associations in an independent cohort. We subsequently investigated influences......-heparin treated patients (OR 3.09; 1.14-8.13; p=0.02). In the candidate gene study, SNPs at HLA-DRA were nominally associated with HIT (OR 0.25; 0.15-0.44; p=2.06×10(-6)). Further study of TDAG8 and HLA-DRA SNPs is warranted to assess their influence on the risk of developing HIT....

  13. A model for improving medical records by creating electronic health records: review article

    OpenAIRE

    Hamidreza Salmani Mojaveri; Mahboubeh Kordmostfapour; Kokab Mansour Kiaiy; Fatemeh Amouzad Khalili; Negin Qavi Kutenai

    2017-01-01

    Today, the use of information and communication technology (ICT) is an important and key factor in the progress of all organizations, including health-centered and health systems. Given the importance of the subject matter above, these organizations have created a particular transformation and change in order to upgrade their systems in use, one of which is the creation of Electronic Health Records (EHR). This evolving system, by increasing productivity, both by increasing staffing efficiency...

  14. Determining rates of overweight and obese status in children using electronic medical records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birken, Catherine S.; Tu, Karen; Oud, William; Carsley, Sarah; Hanna, Miranda; Lebovic, Gerald; Guttmann, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the prevalence of overweight and obese status in children by age, sex, and visit type, using data from EMRALD® (Electronic Medical Record Administrative data Linked Database). Design Heights and weights were abstracted for children 0 to 19 years of age who had at least one well-child visit from January 2010 to December 2011. Using the most recent visit, the proportions and 95% CIs of patients defined as overweight and obese were compared by age group, sex, and visit type using the World Health Organization growth reference standards. Setting Ontario. Participants Children 0 to 19 years of age who were rostered to a primary care physician participating in EMRALD and had at least one well-child visit from January 2010 to December 2011. Main outcome measures Proportion and 95% CI of children with overweight and obese status by age group; proportion of children with overweight and obese status by sex (with male sex as the referent) within each age group; and proportion of children with overweight and obese status at the most recent well-child visit type compared with other visit types by age group. Results There were 28 083 well-child visits during this period. For children who attended well-child visits, 84.7% of visits had both a height and weight documented. Obesity rates were significantly higher in 1- to 4-year-olds compared with children younger than 1 (6.1% vs 2.3%; P overweight and obese status were lower using data from well-child visits compared with other visits. Conclusion Electronic medical records might be useful to conduct population-based surveillance of overweight or obese status in children. Methodologic standards, however, should be developed. PMID:28209703

  15. A novel method for estimating transgender status using electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roblin, Douglas; Barzilay, Joshua; Tolsma, Dennis; Robinson, Brandi; Schild, Laura; Cromwell, Lee; Braun, Hayley; Nash, Rebecca; Gerth, Joseph; Hunkeler, Enid; Quinn, Virginia P; Tangpricha, Vin; Goodman, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We describe a novel algorithm for identifying transgender people and determining their male-to-female (MTF) or female-to-male (FTM) identity in electronic medical records of an integrated health system. A computer program scanned Kaiser Permanente Georgia electronic medical records from January 2006 through December 2014 for relevant diagnostic codes, and presence of specific keywords (e.g., "transgender" or "transsexual") in clinical notes. Eligibility was verified by review of de-identified text strings containing targeted keywords, and if needed, by an additional in-depth review of records. Once transgender status was confirmed, FTM or MTF identity was assessed using a second program and another round of text string reviews. Of 813,737 members, 271 were identified as possibly transgender: 137 through keywords only, 25 through diagnostic codes only, and 109 through both codes and keywords. Of these individuals, 185 (68%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 62%-74%) were confirmed as definitely transgender. The proportions (95% CIs) of definite transgender status among persons identified via keywords, diagnostic codes, and both were 45% (37%-54%), 56% (35%-75%), and 100% (96%-100%). Of the 185 definitely transgender people, 99 (54%, 95% CI: 46%-61%) were MTF, 84 (45%, 95% CI: 38%-53%) were FTM. For two persons, gender identity remained unknown. Prevalence of transgender people (per 100,000 members) was 4.4 (95% CI: 2.6-7.4) in 2006 and 38.7 (95% CI: 32.4-46.2) in 2014. The proposed method of identifying candidates for transgender health studies is low cost and relatively efficient. It can be applied in other similar health care systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Prescription errors before and after introduction of electronic medication alert system in a pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethuraman, Usha; Kannikeswaran, Nirupama; Murray, Kyle P; Zidan, Marwan A; Chamberlain, James M

    2015-06-01

    Prescription errors occur frequently in pediatric emergency departments (PEDs).The effect of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) with electronic medication alert system (EMAS) on these is unknown. The objective was to compare prescription errors rates before and after introduction of CPOE with EMAS in a PED. The hypothesis was that CPOE with EMAS would significantly reduce the rate and severity of prescription errors in the PED. A prospective comparison of a sample of outpatient, medication prescriptions 5 months before and after CPOE with EMAS implementation (7,268 before and 7,292 after) was performed. Error types and rates, alert types and significance, and physician response were noted. Medication errors were deemed significant if there was a potential to cause life-threatening injury, failure of therapy, or an adverse drug effect. There was a significant reduction in the errors per 100 prescriptions (10.4 before vs. 7.3 after; absolute risk reduction = 3.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.2 to 4.0). Drug dosing error rates decreased from 8 to 5.4 per 100 (absolute risk reduction = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.8 to 3.4). Alerts were generated for 29.6% of prescriptions, with 45% involving drug dose range checking. The sensitivity of CPOE with EMAS in identifying errors in prescriptions was 45.1% (95% CI = 40.8% to 49.6%), and the specificity was 57% (95% CI = 55.6% to 58.5%). Prescribers modified 20% of the dosing alerts, resulting in the error not reaching the patient. Conversely, 11% of true dosing alerts for medication errors were overridden by the prescribers: 88 (11.3%) resulted in medication errors, and 684 (88.6%) were false-positive alerts. A CPOE with EMAS was associated with a decrease in overall prescription errors in our PED. Further system refinements are required to reduce the high false-positive alert rates. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  17. Design and implementation of a seamless and comprehensive integrated medical device interface system for outpatient electronic medical records in a general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Soo; Lee, Jean Hyoung; Park, Jong Hwan; Nam, Han Seung; Kwon, Hyuknam; Kim, Dongsoo; Park, Seung Woo

    2011-04-01

    Implementing an efficient Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system is regarded as one of the key strategies for improving the quality of healthcare services. However, the system's interoperability between medical devices and the EMR is a big barrier to deploying the EMR system in an outpatient clinical setting. The purpose of this study is to design a framework for a seamless and comprehensively integrated medical device interface system, and to develop and implement a system for accelerating the deployment of the EMR system. We designed and developed a framework that could transform data from medical devices into the relevant standards and then store them in the EMR. The framework is composed of 5 interfacing methods according to the types of medical devices utilized at an outpatient clinical setting, registered in Samsung Medical Center (SMC) database. The medical devices used for this study were devices that have microchips embedded or that came packaged with personal computers. The devices are completely integrated with the EMR based on SMC's long term IT strategies. First deployment of integrating 352 medical devices into the EMR took place in April, 2006, and it took about 48 months. By March, 2010, every medical device was interfaced with the EMR. About 66,000 medical examinations per month were performed taking up an average of 50GB of storage space. We surveyed users, mainly the technicians. Out of 73 that responded, 76% of the respondents replied that they were strongly satisfied or satisfied, 20% replied as being neutral and only 4% complained about the speed of the system, which was attributed to the slow speed of the old-fashioned medical devices and computers. The current implementation of the medical device interface system based on the SMC framework significantly streamlines the clinical workflow in a satisfactory manner. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A pilot study of a heuristic algorithm for novel template identification from VA electronic medical record text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redd, Andrew M; Gundlapalli, Adi V; Divita, Guy; Carter, Marjorie E; Tran, Le-Thuy; Samore, Matthew H

    2017-07-01

    Templates in text notes pose challenges for automated information extraction algorithms. We propose a method that identifies novel templates in plain text medical notes. The identification can then be used to either include or exclude templates when processing notes for information extraction. The two-module method is based on the framework of information foraging and addresses the hypothesis that documents containing templates and the templates within those documents can be identified by common features. The first module takes documents from the corpus and groups those with common templates. This is accomplished through a binned word count hierarchical clustering algorithm. The second module extracts the templates. It uses the groupings and performs a longest common subsequence (LCS) algorithm to obtain the constituent parts of the templates. The method was developed and tested on a random document corpus of 750 notes derived from a large database of US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) electronic medical notes. The grouping module, using hierarchical clustering, identified 23 groups with 3 documents or more, consisting of 120 documents from the 750 documents in our test corpus. Of these, 18 groups had at least one common template that was present in all documents in the group for a positive predictive value of 78%. The LCS extraction module performed with 100% positive predictive value, 94% sensitivity, and 83% negative predictive value. The human review determined that in 4 groups the template covered the entire document, with the remaining 14 groups containing a common section template. Among documents with templates, the number of templates per document ranged from 1 to 14. The mean and median number of templates per group was 5.9 and 5, respectively. The grouping method was successful in finding like documents containing templates. Of the groups of documents containing templates, the LCS module was successful in deciphering text belonging to the template

  19. Increased adolescent overweight and obesity documentation through a simple electronic medical record intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, David V; Roberts, Timothy A; Johnson, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to improve provider documentation of adolescent overweight and obesity through body mass index percentile (BMI%) documentation in the military's electronic medical record (EMR). Using the FOCUS-PDCA (Find-Organize-Clarify-Understand-Select-Plan-Do-Check-Act) model, we developed an intervention to improve rates of diagnosis of overweight/obesity in our adolescent medicine clinic. Medical technicians documented the patient's BMI% and growth chart in the EMR. Pre- and postintervention chart reviews of approximately 300 consecutive patient encounters compared the rates of overweight/obesity with provider-documented diagnosis. A total of 333 pre- and 328 postintervention clinic encounters were reviewed. The rate of overweight and obesity calculated was similar between pre- and postintervention groups (30% vs. 31%). Correct diagnosis increased from 40% to 64% after the intervention. Females and patients seen by resident physicians were less likely to receive a correct diagnosis at baseline, but these differences were mitigated in the postintervention group. In multivariate analyses, only the intervention and provider type were predictive of an improvement in correct diagnosis. BMI% documentation in our EMR was an effective way to improve documentation of overweight/obese adolescent patients and may be particularly helpful for resident physicians.

  20. A Technology Acceptance Model for Inter-Organisational Electronic Medical Records Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn Handy

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the findings of the first stage of an ongoing, longitudinal study into the implementation of an interorganisational electronic medical records (EMR system. The study adapted and expanded Davis' (1993 technology acceptance model (TAM to investigate the attitudes of primary care practitioners towards a proposed system for maternity patients. All doctors and midwives holding maternity care contracts with a large urban hospital in New Zealand were sent a questionnaire soliciting their views on a planned EMR system linking the hospital and the primary care sectors. The results showed that whilst Davis' two key factors of perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness were important to medical professionals, another key factor, perceived system acceptability, which concerns control and management of information is vitally important to the acceptance of the system. The study also showed that the two groups of professionals had differing requirements due to different levels of experience and practice computerisation. Finally, the research highlights a number of wider organisational issues particularly relevant to the use of inter organisational systems in general and healthcare systems in particular.

  1. Medical Application of Free Electron Laser Trasmittance using Hollow Optical Fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Sachiko; Ishii, Katsonuri

    2004-01-01

    Mid-infrared Free Electron Laser (FEL) is expected as new application for biomedical surgery. However, delivery of MIR-FEL into the body is difficult because the common glass optical fibers have strong absorption at MIR region. A good operational and flexible line for FEL is required at medical field. A Hollow optical fiber is developed for IR laser and high-power laser delivery. We evaluated the fiber for FEL transmission line. This fiber is coated with cyclic olefin polymer (COP) and silver thin film on the inside of glass capillary tube. It is 700 μm-bore and 1m in lengths. The fiber transmission loss of the measured wavelength region of 5.5 μm to 12 μm is less than 1dB/m when the fiber is straight and 1.2 dB/m when bent to radius of 20 cm. Additionally, the output beam profile and the pulse structure is not so different form incidence beam. In conclusion, the fiber is suitable for delivery of the FEL energy for applications in medical and laser surgery.

  2. The effect of electronic medical record adoption on outcomes in US hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jinhyung

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The electronic medical record (EMR is one of the most promising components of health information technology. However, the overall impact of EMR adoption on outcomes at US hospitals remains unknown. This study examined the relationship between basic EMR adoption and 30-day rehospitalization, 30-day mortality, inpatient mortality and length of stay. Methods Our overall approach was to compare outcomes for the two years before and two years after the year of EMR adoption, at 708 acute-care hospitals in the US from 2000 to 2007. We looked at the effect of EMR on outcomes using two methods. First, we compared the outcomes by quarter for the period before and after EMR adoption among hospitals that adopted EMR. Second, we compared hospitals that adopted EMR to those that did not, before and after EMR adoption, using a generalized linear model. Results Hospitals adopting EMR experienced 0.11 (95% CI: -0.218 to −0.002 days’ shorter length of stay and 0.182 percent lower 30-day mortality, but a 0.19 (95% CI: 0.0006 to 0.0033 percent increase in 30-day rehospitalization in the two years after EMR adoption. The association of EMR adoption with outcomes also varied by type of admission (medical vs. surgical. Conclusions Previous studies using observational data from large samples of hospitals have produced conflicting results. However, using different methods, we found a small but statistically significant association of EMR adoption with outcomes of hospitalization.

  3. Electronic medical records and communication with patients and other clinicians: are we talking less?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Ann S; Cohen, Genna R; Grossman, Joy M

    2010-04-01

    Commercial electronic medical records (EMRs) both help and hinder physician interpersonal communication--real-time, face-to-face or phone conversations--with patients and other clinicians, according to a new Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) study based on in-depth interviews with clinicians in 26 physician practices. EMRs assist real-time communication with patients during office visits, primarily through immediate access to patient information, allowing clinicians to talk with patients rather than search for information from paper records. For some clinicians, however, aspects of EMRs pose a distraction during visits. Moreover, some indicated that clinicians may rely on EMRs for information gathering and transfer at the expense of real-time communication with patients and other clinicians. Given time pressures already present in many physician practices, EMR and office-work flow modifications could help ensure that EMRs advance care without compromising interpersonal communication. In particular, policies promoting EMR adoption should consider incorporating communication-skills training for medical trainees and clinicians using EMRs.

  4. Suitability of a thermoelectric power generator for implantable medical electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Wei, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Jing

    2007-09-01

    Embedding a thermoelectric generator (TEG) in a biological body is a promising way to supply electronic power in the long term for an implantable medical device (IMD). The unique merit of this method lies in its direct utilization of the temperature difference intrinsically existing throughout the whole biological body. However, little is known about the practicability of such a power generation strategy up to now. This paper attempts to evaluate the energy generation capacity of an implanted TEG subject to various physiological or environmental thermal conditions. Through theoretical analysis, it was found that the highest temperature gradient occurs near the skin surface of the human body, which suggested a candidate site for implanting and positioning the TEG. In addition, numerical simulations were performed on three-dimensional bioheat transfer problems in human bodies embedded with TEGs at different implantation depths and configurations. To further enhance energy generation of an implanted TEG, several external technical approaches by intentionally cooling or heating the skin surface were proposed and evaluated. Conceptual experiments either in vitro or in vivo were implemented to preliminarily test the theoretical predictions. Given the fact that an IMD generally require very little working energy, the TEG could serve well as a potential long-term energy supplier for such medical practices.

  5. [Electronic medical records: Evolution of physician-patient relationship in the Primary Care clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Santonja, T; Gómez-Paredes, L; Álvarez-Montero, S; Cabello-Ballesteros, L; Mombiela-Muruzabal, M T

    2017-04-01

    The introduction of electronic medical records and computer media in clinics, has influenced the physician-patient relationship. These modifications have many advantages, but there is concern that the computer has become too important, going from a working tool to the centre of our attention during the clinical interview, decreasing doctor interaction with the patient. The objective of the study was to estimate the percentage of time that family physicians spend on computer media compared to interpersonal communication with the patient, and whether this time is modified depending on different variables such as, doctor's age or reason for the consultation. An observational and descriptive study was conducted for 10 weeks, with 2 healthcare centres involved. The researchers attended all doctor- patient interviews, recording the patient time in and out of the consultation. Each time the doctor fixed his gaze on computer media the time was clocked. A total of 436 consultations were collected. The doctors looked at the computer support a median 38.33% of the total duration of an interview. Doctors of 45 years and older spent more time fixing their eyes on computer media (P<.05). Family physicians used almost 40% of the consultation time looking at computer media, and depends on age of physician, number of queries, and number of medical appointments. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of implementing alerts about medication black-box warnings in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Donghui Tony; Seger, Diane L; Lasser, Karen E; Karson, Andrew S; Fiskio, Julie M; Seger, Andrew C; Bates, David W

    2011-02-01

    The Food and Drug Administration issues black-box warnings (BBWs) regarding medications with serious risks, yet physician adherence to the warnings is low. We evaluated the impact of delivering BBW-based alerts about drug-drug, drug-disease, and drug-laboratory interactions for prescription medications in outpatients in an electronic health record with clinical decision support. We compared the frequency of non-adherence to all BBWs about drug-drug, drug-disease, and drug-laboratory interactions for 30 drugs/drug classes, and by individual drugs/drug groups with BBWs between the pre- and post-intervention periods. We used multivariate analysis to identify independent risk factors for non-adherence to BBWs. There was a slightly higher frequency of non-adherence to BBWs after the intervention (4.8% vs. 5.1%, p=0.045). In multivariate analyses, after adjustment for patient and provider characteristics and site of care, medications prescribed during the pre-intervention period were less likely to violate BBWs compared to those prescribed during the post-intervention period (OR 0.67, 95% CI, 0.47-0.96). However, black-box warning violations did decrease after the intervention for BBWs about drug-drug interactions (6.1% vs. 1.8%, p<0.0001) and drug-pregnancy interactions (5.1% vs. 3.6%, p=0.01). Ambulatory care computerized order entry with prescribing alerts about BBWs did not improve clinicians' overall adherence to BBWs, though it did improve adherence for specific clinically important subcategories. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Examining the symptom of fatigue in primary care: a comparative study using electronic medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Nicholson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The symptom of fatigue is one of the top five most frequently presented health complaints in primary care, yet it remains underexplored in the Canadian primary care context.Objective The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence and impact of patients presenting with fatigue in primary care, using the only known electronic database in Canada to capture patient-reported symptoms.Methods Data were extracted from the Deliver Primary Healthcare Information (DELPHI database, an electronic medical record database located in Ontario, Canada. Patients were identified using the International Classification of Primary Care, Revised Second Edition coding system. Two groups of patients (fatigue or non-fatigue symptom were followed for one year and compared. Both descriptive and multivariable analyses were conducted.Results A total of 103 fatigue symptom patients, and 103 non-fatigue symptom patients, were identified in the DELPHI database. The period prevalence of fatigue presentation was 8.2%, with the majority of patients being female and over 60 years of age. These patients experienced numerous co-occurring morbidities, in addition to the fatigue itself. During the one year follow-up period, fatigue symptom patients had significantly higher rates of subsequent visits (IRR = 1.19, p = 0.038 and investigations (IRR = 1.68, p < 0.001, and markedly high levels of referrals following their index visit.Conclusions This research used an electronic database to examine the symptom, fatigue. Using these data, fatigue symptom patients were found to have higher rates of health care utilisation, compared to non-fatigue symptom patients.

  8. Three-Dimensional Visual Patient Based on Electronic Medical Diagnostic Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liehang; Sun, Jianyong; Yang, Yuanyuan; Ling, Tonghui; Wang, Mingqing; Gu, Yiping; Yang, Zhiming; Hua, Yanqing; Zhang, Jianguo

    2018-01-01

    an innovative concept and method is introduced to use a 3-D anatomical graphic pattern called visual patient (VP) visually to index, represent, and render the medical diagnostic records (MDRs) of a patient, so that a doctor can quickly learn the current and historical medical status of the patient by manipulating VP. The MDRs can be imaging diagnostic reports and DICOM images, laboratory reports and clinical summaries which can have clinical information relating to medical status of human organs or body parts. the concept and method included three steps. First, a VP data model called visual index object (VIO) and a VP graphic model called visual anatomic object (VAO) were introduced. Second, a series of processing methods of parsing and extracting key information from MDRs were used to fill the attributes of the VIO model of a patient. Third, a VP system (VPS) was designed to map VIO to VAO, to create a VP instance for each patient. a prototype VPS has been implemented in a simulated hospital PACS/RIS integrated environment. Two evaluation results showed that more than 70% participating radiologists would like to use the VPS in their radiological imaging tasks, and the efficiency of using VPS to review the tested patients' MDRs was 2.24 times higher than that of using PACS/RIS, while the average accuracy by using PACS/RIS was better than that by using VPS; however, this difference was only about 4%. the developed VPS can show the medical status of patient organs/sub-organs with 3-D anatomical graphic pattern and will be welcomed by radiologists with better efficiency in reviewing the patients' MDRs and with acceptable accuracy. the VP introduces a new way for medical professionals to access and interact with a huge amount of patient records with better efficiency in the big data era.

  9. BION microstimulators: a case study in the engineering of an electronic implantable medical device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Michael J; Breen, Paul P; Quondamatteo, Fabio; ÓLaighin, Gearóid

    2011-01-01

    The BION (Bionic Neuron) is a single channel implantable neurostimulator of unique design that can be delivered by injection. The development of the BION injectable neurostimulators exemplifies a challenging, but well posed medical design problem addressed with a successful strategy for prioritizing and resolving the biomedical and technological challenges. Though some performance requirements required post-evaluation revision, all fundamental goals were realized. A small number of significant design corrections occurred because the device requirements did not include the full scope of environmental demands. The design has spawned a number of variants optimized for diverse biomedical applications, and its clinical applications continue to evolve. The BION development history demonstrates design successes worth emulating and design pitfalls that may be avoidable for future medical device development teams. This paper serves as an introduction to the BION microstimulator technology and as an analysis of the design process used to develop the early clinical devices. Copyright © 2010 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. OrderRex: clinical order decision support and outcome predictions by data-mining electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan H; Podchiyska, Tanya; Altman, Russ B

    2016-03-01

    To answer a "grand challenge" in clinical decision support, the authors produced a recommender system that automatically data-mines inpatient decision support from electronic medical records (EMR), analogous to Netflix or Amazon.com's product recommender. EMR data were extracted from 1 year of hospitalizations (>18K patients with >5.4M structured items including clinical orders, lab results, and diagnosis codes). Association statistics were counted for the ∼1.5K most common items to drive an order recommender. The authors assessed the recommender's ability to predict hospital admission orders and outcomes based on initial encounter data from separate validation patients. Compared to a reference benchmark of using the overall most common orders, the recommender using temporal relationships improves precision at 10 recommendations from 33% to 38% (P Recommender results quantitatively improve on reference benchmarks and qualitatively appear clinically reasonable. The method assumes that aggregate decision making converges appropriately, but ongoing evaluation is necessary to discern common behaviors from "correct" ones. Collaborative filtering recommender algorithms generate clinical decision support that is predictive of real practice patterns and clinical outcomes. Incorporating temporal relationships improves accuracy. Different evaluation metrics satisfy different goals (predicting likely events vs. "interesting" suggestions). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. How we developed eForms: an electronic form and data capture tool to support assessment in mobile medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Jane S; Cappelli, Tim; Byrne-Davis, Lucie; Lumsden, Colin J

    2014-12-01

    Mobile learning technologies are being introduced and adopted by an increasing number of medical schools. Following the implementation of these devices, institutions are tasked with the challenge of their integration into curriculum delivery and presented with the opportunity to facilitate data collection from large student cohorts. Since 2011, Manchester Medical School (MMS) has undertaken the largest deployment of iPads within UK Higher Education. Working towards the more efficient collation of students' compulsory workplace-based assessment data led us to evaluate how existing information management software could replace previously paper-based systems. Following an evaluation of six, and a trial of one, commercially available packages, the existing software solutions were found to be inflexible and unfit for purpose. This resulted in the development of a new digital solution that addressed the limitations of the previous system. "University of Manchester (UoM) eForms" consists of an app and a web-based administration system that respectively permit high volume data collection and management. UoM eForms has now replaced the preceding paper-based and electronic systems within MMS for workplace-based assessment administration, due to the improved usability and dynamicity built into its interface and infrastructure. This new system has found many further useful applications, including research data collection, feedback, placement evaluations, quality assurance and interview marking.

  12. Structured clinical documentation in the electronic medical record to improve quality and to support practice-based research in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Jaishree; Dobrin, Sofia; Choi, Janet; Rubin, Susan; Pham, Anna; Patel, Vimal; Frigerio, Roberta; Maurer, Darryck; Gupta, Payal; Link, Lourdes; Walters, Shaun; Wang, Chi; Ji, Yuan; Maraganore, Demetrius M

    2017-01-01

    Using the electronic medical record (EMR) to capture structured clinical data at the point of care would be a practical way to support quality improvement and practice-based research in epilepsy. We describe our stepwise process for building structured clinical documentation support tools in the EMR that define best practices in epilepsy, and we describe how we incorporated these toolkits into our clinical workflow. These tools write notes and capture hundreds of fields of data including several score tests: Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 items, Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Quality of Life in Epilepsy-10 items, Montreal Cognitive Assessment/Short Test of Mental Status, and Medical Research Council Prognostic Index. The tools summarize brain imaging, blood laboratory, and electroencephalography results, and document neuromodulation treatments. The tools provide Best Practices Advisories and other clinical decision support when appropriate. The tools prompt enrollment in a DNA biobanking study. We have thus far enrolled 231 patients for initial visits and are starting our first annual follow-up visits and provide a brief description of our cohort. We are sharing these EMR tools and captured data with other epilepsy clinics as part of a Neurology Practice Based Research Network, and are using the tools to conduct pragmatic trials using subgroup-based adaptive designs. © 2016 The Authors. Epilepsia published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International League Against Epilepsy.

  13. Probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of the radiotherapy treatment process with an Electron Linear Accelerator (LINAC) for medical uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilaragut Llanes, J.J.; Ferro Fernandez, R.; Rodriguez Marti, M.; Ramirez, M.L.; Perez Mulas, A.; Barrientos Montero, M.; Ortiz Lopez, P.; Somoano, F.; Delgado Rodriguez, J.M.; Papadopulos, S.B.; Pereira, P.P. Jr.; Lopez Morones, R.; Larrinaga Cortinai, E.; Rivero Oliva, J.J.; Alemany, J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) to the radiotherapy treatment process with an Electron Linear Accelerator (LINAC) for Medical Uses, which was conducted in the framework of the Extra budgetary Programme on Nuclear and Radiological Safety in Iberian-America. The PSA tools were used to evaluate occupational, public and medical exposures during treatment. The study focused on the radiological protection of patients. Equipment Failure Modes and Human Errors were evaluated for each system and treatment phase by FMEA. It was aimed at obtaining an exhaustive list of deviations with a reasonable probability of occurrence and which might produce significant adverse outcomes. Separate events trees were constructed for each initiating event group. Each event tree had a different structure since the initiating events were grouped according to mitigation requirements. Fault tree models were constructed for each top event. The fault trees were developed up to the level of components. In addition to hardware faults, the fault trees included human errors associated with the response to accidents, and human errors associated with the treatment. Each accident sequence was quantified. The combination of the initiating event and top events through one fault tree was the method used to analyse the accident sequences. After combining the appropriate models, a Boolean reduction was conducted by computer software to produce sequence cut sets. Several findings were analysed concerning the treatment process and the study proposed safety recommendations to avoid them. (author)

  14. "How To" Videos Improve Residents Performance of Essential Perioperative Electronic Medical Records and Clinical Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghbi, Veronica; Caskey, Robert C; Dumon, Kristoffel R; Soegaard Ballester, Jacqueline M; Brooks, Ari D; Morris, Jon B; Dempsey, Daniel T

    The ability to use electronic medical records (EMR) is an essential skill for surgical residents. However, frustration and anxiety surrounding EMR tasks may detract from clinical performance. We created a series of brief, 1-3 minutes "how to" videos demonstrating 7 key perioperative EMR tasks: booking OR cases, placing preprocedure orders, ordering negative-pressure wound dressing supplies, updating day-of-surgery history and physical notes, writing brief operative notes, discharging patients from the postanesthesia care unit, and checking vital signs. Additionally, we used "Cutting Insights"-a locally developed responsive mobile application for surgical trainee education-as a platform for providing interns with easy access to these videos. We hypothesized that exposure to these videos would lead to increased resident efficiency and confidence in performing essential perioperative tasks, ultimately leading to improved clinical performance. Eleven surgery interns participated in this initiative. Before watching the "how to" videos, each intern was timed performing the aforementioned 7 key perioperative EMR tasks. They also underwent a simulated perioperative emergency requiring the performance of 3 of these EMR tasks in conjunction with 5 other required interventions (including notifying the chief resident, the anesthesia team, and the OR coordinator; and ordering fluid boluses, appropriate laboratories, and blood products). These simulations were scored on a scale from 0 to 8. The interns were then directed to watch the videos. Two days later, their times for performing the 7 tasks and their scores for a similar perioperative emergency simulation were once again recorded. Before and after watching the videos, participants were surveyed to assess their confidence in performing each EMR task using a 5-point Likert scale. We also elicited their opinions of the videos and web-based mobile application using a 5-point scale. Statistical analyses to assess for

  15. Development and validation of a continuous measure of patient condition using the Electronic Medical Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Michael J; Rothman, Steven I; Beals, Joseph

    2013-10-01

    Patient condition is a key element in communication between clinicians. However, there is no generally accepted definition of patient condition that is independent of diagnosis and that spans acuity levels. We report the development and validation of a continuous measure of general patient condition that is independent of diagnosis, and that can be used for medical-surgical as well as critical care patients. A survey of Electronic Medical Record data identified common, frequently collected non-static candidate variables as the basis for a general, continuously updated patient condition score. We used a new methodology to estimate in-hospital risk associated with each of these variables. A risk function for each candidate input was computed by comparing the final pre-discharge measurements with 1-year post-discharge mortality. Step-wise logistic regression of the variables against 1-year mortality was used to determine the importance of each variable. The final set of selected variables consisted of 26 clinical measurements from four categories: nursing assessments, vital signs, laboratory results and cardiac rhythms. We then constructed a heuristic model quantifying patient condition (overall risk) by summing the single-variable risks. The model's validity was assessed against outcomes from 170,000 medical-surgical and critical care patients, using data from three US hospitals. Outcome validation across hospitals yields an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve(AUC) of ≥0.92 when separating hospice/deceased from all other discharge categories, an AUC of ≥0.93 when predicting 24-h mortality and an AUC of 0.62 when predicting 30-day readmissions. Correspondence with outcomes reflective of patient condition across the acuity spectrum indicates utility in both medical-surgical units and critical care units. The model output, which we call the Rothman Index, may provide clinicians with a longitudinal view of patient condition to help address known

  16. The electronic residency application service application can predict accreditation council for graduate medical education competency-based surgical resident performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolan, Amy M; Kaji, Amy H; Quach, Chi; Hines, O Joe; de Virgilio, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Program directors often struggle to determine which factors in the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) application are important in the residency selection process. With the establishment of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies, it would be important to know whether information available in the ERAS application can predict subsequent competency-based performance of general surgery residents. This study is a retrospective correlation of data points found in the ERAS application with core competency-based clinical rotation evaluations. ACGME competency-based evaluations as well as technical skills assessment from all rotations during residency were collected. The overall competency score was defined as an average of all 6 competencies and technical skills. A total of77 residents from two (one university and one community based university-affiliate) general surgery residency programs were included in the analysis. Receiving honors for many of the third year clerkships and AOA membership were associated with a number of the individual competencies. USMLE scores were predictive only of Medical Knowledge (p = 0.004). Factors associated with higher overall competency were female gender (p = 0.02), AOA (p = 0.06), overall number of honors received (p = 0.04), and honors in Ob/Gyn (p = 0.03) and Pediatrics (p = 0.05). Multivariable analysis showed honors in Ob/Gyn, female gender, older age, and total number of honors to be predictive of a number of individual core competencies. USMLE scores were only predictive of Medical Knowledge. The ERAS application is useful for predicting subsequent competency based performance in surgical residents. Receiving honors in the surgery clerkship, which has traditionally carried weight when evaluating a potential surgery resident, may not be as strong a predictor of future success. Copyright © 2010 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Improving adherence to safe prescription guidelines for Dapsone: harnessing an enhanced electronic medical records system and a team approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neoh, Ching Yin; Tian, Elizabeth A L; Choi, Cindy; Leong, Hui Hui; Tan, Audrey W H; Chan, Roy K W

    2012-03-01

    Dapsone is a commonly prescribed medication in dermatological practice. Its use is associated with a broad spectrum of adverse effects. Careful selection and monitoring of patients on dapsone are paramount in the prevention and early recognition of adverse effects. We designed a risk-management program for dapsone at National Skin Centre, Singapore, enhancing an existing electronic medical records system and harnessing a team approach involving the nurses. This includes the performance of key laboratory tests before and after starting dapsone, ensuring adequate counseling before starting dapsone and screening for adverse effects using a questionnaire every visit. This system of dapsone prescription efficiently improved the adherence to safe prescription and monitoring guidelines. Average adherence rates for key safety parameters improved from 61.4% pre-implementation to 95.3% at six months and were sustained at 12 months at 91.3%. Percentage of follow-up cases in which all three key monitoring parameters were fulfilled increased from 9.5% to 79.6% (p=0.0001) after 12months. The percentage of new patients in which all four key monitoring parameters were met increased from 50% to 80%. It was not statistically significant possibly because of small patient numbers. This project has also translated into enhanced patient safety with dapsone dosages adjusted in 17 patients who experienced mild adverse effects. No severe adverse effects to dapsone were observed in the 12-month period. This example of risk management for dapsone may serve as a model for institutions looking at harnessing information technology and a team approach for safer prescription of high-alert medications. © 2012 The International Society of Dermatology.

  18. Preferred names, preferred pronouns, and gender identity in the electronic medical record and laboratory information system: Is pathology ready?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine L Imborek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electronic medical records (EMRs and laboratory information systems (LISs commonly utilize patient identifiers such as legal name, sex, medical record number, and date of birth. There have been recommendations from some EMR working groups (e.g., the World Professional Association for Transgender Health to include preferred name, pronoun preference, assigned sex at birth, and gender identity in the EMR. These practices are currently uncommon in the United States. There has been little published on the potential impact of these changes on pathology and LISs. Methods: We review the available literature and guidelines on the use of preferred name and gender identity on pathology, including data on changes in laboratory testing following gender transition treatments. We also describe pathology and clinical laboratory challenges in the implementation of preferred name at our institution. Results: Preferred name, pronoun preference, and gender identity have the most immediate impact on the areas of pathology with direct patient contact such as phlebotomy and transfusion medicine, both in terms of interaction with patients and policies for patient identification. Gender identity affects the regulation and policies within transfusion medicine including blood donor risk assessment and eligibility. There are limited studies on the impact of gender transition treatments on laboratory tests, but multiple studies have demonstrated complex changes in chemistry and hematology tests. A broader challenge is that, even as EMRs add functionality, pathology computer systems (e.g., LIS, middleware, reference laboratory, and outreach interfaces may not have functionality to store or display preferred name and gender identity. Conclusions: Implementation of preferred name, pronoun preference, and gender identity presents multiple challenges and opportunities for pathology.

  19. Preferred Names, Preferred Pronouns, and Gender Identity in the Electronic Medical Record and Laboratory Information System: Is Pathology Ready?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imborek, Katherine L; Nisly, Nicole L; Hesseltine, Michael J; Grienke, Jana; Zikmund, Todd A; Dreyer, Nicholas R; Blau, John L; Hightower, Maia; Humble, Robert M; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2017-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) and laboratory information systems (LISs) commonly utilize patient identifiers such as legal name, sex, medical record number, and date of birth. There have been recommendations from some EMR working groups (e.g., the World Professional Association for Transgender Health) to include preferred name, pronoun preference, assigned sex at birth, and gender identity in the EMR. These practices are currently uncommon in the United States. There has been little published on the potential impact of these changes on pathology and LISs. We review the available literature and guidelines on the use of preferred name and gender identity on pathology, including data on changes in laboratory testing following gender transition treatments. We also describe pathology and clinical laboratory challenges in the implementation of preferred name at our institution. Preferred name, pronoun preference, and gender identity have the most immediate impact on the areas of pathology with direct patient contact such as phlebotomy and transfusion medicine, both in terms of interaction with patients and policies for patient identification. Gender identity affects the regulation and policies within transfusion medicine including blood donor risk assessment and eligibility. There are limited studies on the impact of gender transition treatments on laboratory tests, but multiple studies have demonstrated complex changes in chemistry and hematology tests. A broader challenge is that, even as EMRs add functionality, pathology computer systems (e.g., LIS, middleware, reference laboratory, and outreach interfaces) may not have functionality to store or display preferred name and gender identity. Implementation of preferred name, pronoun preference, and gender identity presents multiple challenges and opportunities for pathology.

  20. Design and implementation of a web-based patient portal linked to an electronic health record designed to improve medication safety: the Patient Gateway medications module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Schnipper

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article we describe the background, design, and preliminary results of a medications module within Patient Gateway (PG, a patient portal linked to an electronic health record (EHR. The medications module is designed to improve the accuracy of medication lists within the EHR, reduce adverse drug events and improve patient_provider communication regarding medications and allergies in several primary care practices within a large integrated healthcare delivery network. This module allows patients to view and modify the list of medications and allergies from the EHR, report nonadherence, side effects and other medication-related problems and easily communicate this information to providers, who can verify the information and update the EHR as needed. Usage and satisfaction data indicate that patients found the module easy to use, felt that it led to their providers having more accurate information about them and enabled them to feel more prepared for their forthcoming visits. Further analyses will determine the effects of this module on important medication-related outcomes and identify further enhancements needed to improve on this approach.

  1. An electronic portfolio for quantitative assessment of surgical skills in undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Gómez, Serafín; Ostos, Elisa María Cabot; Solano, Juan Manuel Maza; Salado, Tomás Francisco Herrero

    2013-05-06

    We evaluated a newly designed electronic portfolio (e-Portfolio) that provided quantitative evaluation of surgical skills. Medical students at the University of Seville used the e-Portfolio on a voluntary basis for evaluation of their performance in undergraduate surgical subjects. Our new web-based e-Portfolio was designed to evaluate surgical practical knowledge and skills targets. Students recorded each activity on a form, attached evidence, and added their reflections. Students self-assessed their practical knowledge using qualitative criteria (yes/no), and graded their skills according to complexity (basic/advanced) and participation (observer/assistant/independent). A numerical value was assigned to each activity, and the values of all activities were summated to obtain the total score. The application automatically displayed quantitative feedback. We performed qualitative evaluation of the perceived usefulness of the e-Portfolio and quantitative evaluation of the targets achieved. Thirty-seven of 112 students (33%) used the e-Portfolio, of which 87% reported that they understood the methodology of the portfolio. All students reported an improved understanding of their learning objectives resulting from the numerical visualization of progress, all students reported that the quantitative feedback encouraged their learning, and 79% of students felt that their teachers were more available because they were using the e-Portfolio. Only 51.3% of students reported that the reflective aspects of learning were useful. Individual students achieved a maximum of 65% of the total targets and 87% of the skills targets. The mean total score was 345 ± 38 points. For basic skills, 92% of students achieved the maximum score for participation as an independent operator, and all achieved the maximum scores for participation as an observer and assistant. For complex skills, 62% of students achieved the maximum score for participation as an independent operator, and 98% achieved

  2. Risk factors for medication errors in the electronic and manual prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Cris Renata Grou; Melo, Eveline Maria Magalhães de; Aguiar, Lucas Barbosa de; Pinho, Diana Lúcia Moura; Stival, Marina Morato

    2016-08-08

    to compare electronic and manual prescriptions of a public hospital of Brasilia, identifying risk factors for the occurrence of medication errors. descriptive-exploratory, comparative and retrospective study. Data collection occurred from July 2012 to January 2013, using an instrument for the review of the information contained in medical records related to the medication process. A total of 190 manual and 199 electronic records composed the sample, with 2027 prescriptions each. compared to the manual prescription, a significant reduction was observed in the risk factors after implantation of the electronic prescription, in items such as "lack of the form of dilution" (71.1% to 22.3%) and "prescription with brand name" (99.5% to 31.5%). Conversely, the risk factors "no check" and "lack of CRM of the prescriber" increased. The lack of the allergy registration and the occurrences related to medication were the same for both groups. generally, the use of the electronic prescription system was associated with a significant reduction in risk factors for medication errors, concerning the following aspects: illegibility, prescription with brand name and presence of essential items that provide a safe and effective prescription. comparar as prescrições eletrônicas e manuais de um hospital público do Distrito Federal, identificando os fatores de risco para ocorrência de erros de medicação. Estudo descritivo-exploratório, comparativo e retrospectivo. A coleta de dados ocorreu no período de julho de 2012 a janeiro de 2013, através de instrumento para revisão das informações referentes ao processo de medicação contidas em prontuários. Integraram a amostra 190 prontuários manuais e 199 eletrônicos, com 2027 prescrições cada. na comparação com a prescrição manual, observou-se redução significativa dos fatores de risco após implantação da eletrônica, em itens como "falta da forma de diluição" (71,1% e 22,3%) e "prescrição com nome comercial" (99

  3. Development and implementation of a 'Mental Health Finder' software tool within an electronic medical record system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, D; Hannigan, A; Higgins, S; McDonnell, R; Meagher, D; Cullen, W

    2017-02-01

    In Ireland, as in many other healthcare systems, mental health service provision is being reconfigured with a move toward more care in the community, and particularly primary care. Recording and surveillance systems for mental health information and activities in primary care are needed for service planning and quality improvement. We describe the development and initial implementation of a software tool ('mental health finder') within a widely used primary care electronic medical record system (EMR) in Ireland to enable large-scale data collection on the epidemiology and management of mental health and substance use problems among patients attending general practice. In collaboration with the Irish Primary Care Research Network (IPCRN), we developed the 'Mental Health Finder' as a software plug-in to a commonly used primary care EMR system to facilitate data collection on mental health diagnoses and pharmacological treatments among patients. The finder searches for and identifies patients based on diagnostic coding and/or prescribed medicines. It was initially implemented among a convenience sample of six GP practices. Prevalence of mental health and substance use problems across the six practices, as identified by the finder, was 9.4% (range 6.9-12.7%). 61.9% of identified patients were female; 25.8% were private patients. One-third (33.4%) of identified patients were prescribed more than one class of psychotropic medication. Of the patients identified by the finder, 89.9% were identifiable via prescribing data, 23.7% via diagnostic coding. The finder is a feasible and promising methodology for large-scale data collection on mental health problems in primary care.

  4. Combining free text and structured electronic medical record entries to detect acute respiratory infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain DeLisle

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The electronic medical record (EMR contains a rich source of information that could be harnessed for epidemic surveillance. We asked if structured EMR data could be coupled with computerized processing of free-text clinical entries to enhance detection of acute respiratory infections (ARI.A manual review of EMR records related to 15,377 outpatient visits uncovered 280 reference cases of ARI. We used logistic regression with backward elimination to determine which among candidate structured EMR parameters (diagnostic codes, vital signs and orders for tests, imaging and medications contributed to the detection of those reference cases. We also developed a computerized free-text search to identify clinical notes documenting at least two non-negated ARI symptoms. We then used heuristics to build case-detection algorithms that best combined the retained structured EMR parameters with the results of the text analysis.An adjusted grouping of diagnostic codes identified reference ARI patients with a sensitivity of 79%, a specificity of 96% and a positive predictive value (PPV of 32%. Of the 21 additional structured clinical parameters considered, two contributed significantly to ARI detection: new prescriptions for cough remedies and elevations in body temperature to at least 38°C. Together with the diagnostic codes, these parameters increased detection sensitivity to 87%, but specificity and PPV declined to 95% and 25%, respectively. Adding text analysis increased sensitivity to 99%, but PPV dropped further to 14%. Algorithms that required satisfying both a query of structured EMR parameters as well as text analysis disclosed PPVs of 52-68% and retained sensitivities of 69-73%.Structured EMR parameters and free-text analyses can be combined into algorithms that can detect ARI cases with new levels of sensitivity or precision. These results highlight potential paths by which repurposed EMR information could facilitate the discovery of epidemics before

  5. Personalized mortality prediction driven by electronic medical data and a patient similarity metric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joon; Maslove, David M; Dubin, Joel A

    2015-01-01

    Clinical outcome prediction normally employs static, one-size-fits-all models that perform well for the average patient but are sub-optimal for individual patients with unique characteristics. In the era of digital healthcare, it is feasible to dynamically personalize decision support by identifying and analyzing similar past patients, in a way that is analogous to personalized product recommendation in e-commerce. Our objectives were: 1) to prove that analyzing only similar patients leads to better outcome prediction performance than analyzing all available patients, and 2) to characterize the trade-off between training data size and the degree of similarity between the training data and the index patient for whom prediction is to be made. We deployed a cosine-similarity-based patient similarity metric (PSM) to an intensive care unit (ICU) database to identify patients that are most similar to each patient and subsequently to custom-build 30-day mortality prediction models. Rich clinical and administrative data from the first day in the ICU from 17,152 adult ICU admissions were analyzed. The results confirmed that using data from only a small subset of most similar patients for training improves predictive performance in comparison with using data from all available patients. The results also showed that when too few similar patients are used for training, predictive performance degrades due to the effects of small sample sizes. Our PSM-based approach outperformed well-known ICU severity of illness scores. Although the improved prediction performance is achieved at the cost of increased computational burden, Big Data technologies can help realize personalized data-driven decision support at the point of care. The present study provides crucial empirical evidence for the promising potential of personalized data-driven decision support systems. With the increasing adoption of electronic medical record (EMR) systems, our novel medical data analytics contributes to

  6. Personalized Mortality Prediction Driven by Electronic Medical Data and a Patient Similarity Metric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joon; Maslove, David M.; Dubin, Joel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical outcome prediction normally employs static, one-size-fits-all models that perform well for the average patient but are sub-optimal for individual patients with unique characteristics. In the era of digital healthcare, it is feasible to dynamically personalize decision support by identifying and analyzing similar past patients, in a way that is analogous to personalized product recommendation in e-commerce. Our objectives were: 1) to prove that analyzing only similar patients leads to better outcome prediction performance than analyzing all available patients, and 2) to characterize the trade-off between training data size and the degree of similarity between the training data and the index patient for whom prediction is to be made. Methods and Findings We deployed a cosine-similarity-based patient similarity metric (PSM) to an intensive care unit (ICU) database to identify patients that are most similar to each patient and subsequently to custom-build 30-day mortality prediction models. Rich clinical and administrative data from the first day in the ICU from 17,152 adult ICU admissions were analyzed. The results confirmed that using data from only a small subset of most similar patients for training improves predictive performance in comparison with using data from all available patients. The results also showed that when too few similar patients are used for training, predictive performance degrades due to the effects of small sample sizes. Our PSM-based approach outperformed well-known ICU severity of illness scores. Although the improved prediction performance is achieved at the cost of increased computational burden, Big Data technologies can help realize personalized data-driven decision support at the point of care. Conclusions The present study provides crucial empirical evidence for the promising potential of personalized data-driven decision support systems. With the increasing adoption of electronic medical record (EMR) systems, our

  7. Evaluation of Electronic Medical Record (EMR at large urban primary care sexual health centre.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher K Fairley

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Despite substantial investment in Electronic Medical Record (EMR systems there has been little research to evaluate them. Our aim was to evaluate changes in efficiency and quality of services after the introduction of a purpose built EMR system, and to assess its acceptability by the doctors, nurses and patients using it. METHODS: We compared a nine month period before and after the introduction of an EMR system in a large sexual health service, audited a sample of records in both periods and undertook anonymous surveys of both staff and patients. RESULTS: There were 9,752 doctor consultations (in 5,512 consulting hours in the Paper Medical Record (PMR period and 9,145 doctor consultations (in 5,176 consulting hours in the EMR period eligible for inclusion in the analysis. There were 5% more consultations per hour seen by doctors in the EMR period compared to the PMR period (rate ratio = 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.02, 1.08 after adjusting for type of consultation. The qualitative evaluation of 300 records for each period showed no difference in quality (P>0.17. A survey of clinicians demonstrated that doctors and nurses preferred the EMR system (P<0.01 and a patient survey in each period showed no difference in satisfaction of their care (97% for PMR, 95% for EMR, P = 0.61. CONCLUSION: The introduction of an integrated EMR improved efficiency while maintaining the quality of the patient record. The EMR was popular with staff and was not associated with a decline in patient satisfaction in the clinical care provided.

  8. Personalized mortality prediction driven by electronic medical data and a patient similarity metric.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Lee

    Full Text Available Clinical outcome prediction normally employs static, one-size-fits-all models that perform well for the average patient but are sub-optimal for individual patients with unique characteristics. In the era of digital healthcare, it is feasible to dynamically personalize decision support by identifying and analyzing similar past patients, in a way that is analogous to personalized product recommendation in e-commerce. Our objectives were: 1 to prove that analyzing only similar patients leads to better outcome prediction performance than analyzing all available patients, and 2 to characterize the trade-off between training data size and the degree of similarity between the training data and the index patient for whom prediction is to be made.We deployed a cosine-similarity-based patient similarity metric (PSM to an intensive care unit (ICU database to identify patients that are most similar to each patient and subsequently to custom-build 30-day mortality prediction models. Rich clinical and administrative data from the first day in the ICU from 17,152 adult ICU admissions were analyzed. The results confirmed that using data from only a small subset of most similar patients for training improves predictive performance in comparison with using data from all available patients. The results also showed that when too few similar patients are used for training, predictive performance degrades due to the effects of small sample sizes. Our PSM-based approach outperformed well-known ICU severity of illness scores. Although the improved prediction performance is achieved at the cost of increased computational burden, Big Data technologies can help realize personalized data-driven decision support at the point of care.The present study provides crucial empirical evidence for the promising potential of personalized data-driven decision support systems. With the increasing adoption of electronic medical record (EMR systems, our novel medical data analytics

  9. Electronic medical record data to identify variables associated with a fibromyalgia diagnosis: importance of health care resource utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masters ET

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth T Masters,1 Jack Mardekian,1 Birol Emir,1 Andrew Clair,1 Max Kuhn,2 Stuart L Silverman,31Pfizer, Inc., New York, NY, 2Pfizer, Inc., Groton, CT, 3Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USABackground: Diagnosis of fibromyalgia (FM is often challenging. Identifying factors associated with an FM diagnosis may guide health care providers in implementing appropriate diagnostic and management strategies.Methods: This retrospective study used the de-identified Humedica electronic medical record (EMR database to identify variables associated with an FM diagnosis. Cases (n=4,296 were subjects ≥18 years old with ≥2 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9 codes for FM (729.1 ≥30 days apart during 2012, associated with an integrated delivery network, with ≥1 encounter with a health care provider in 2011 and 2012. Controls without FM (no-FM; n=583,665 did not have the ICD-9 codes for FM. Demographic, clinical, and health care resource utilization variables were extracted from structured EMR data. Univariate analysis identified variables showing significant differences between the cohorts based on odds ratios (ORs.Results: Consistent with FM epidemiology, FM subjects were predominantly female (78.7% vs 64.5%; P<0.0001 and slightly older (mean age 53.3 vs 52.7 years; P=0.0318. Relative to the no-FM cohort, the FM cohort was characterized by a higher prevalence of nearly all evaluated comorbidities; the ORs suggested a higher likelihood of an FM diagnosis (P<0.0001, especially for musculoskeletal and neuropathic pain conditions (OR 3.1 for each condition. Variables potentially associated with an FM diagnosis included higher levels of use of specific health care resources including emergency-room visits, outpatient visits, hospitalizations, and medications. Units used per subject for emergency-room visits, outpatient visits, hospitalizations, and medications were also significantly higher in the FM cohort (P<0

  10. Is there any legal and scientific basis for classifying electronic cigarettes as medications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsalinos, Konstantinos E; Stimson, Gerry V

    2014-05-01

    The rapid growth in the use of electronic cigarettes has been accompanied by substantial discussions by governments, international organisations, consumers and public health experts about how they might be regulated. In the European Union they are currently regulated under consumer legislation but new legislation will regulate them under the Tobacco Products Directive. However, several countries have sought to regulate them under medicines regulations. These claims have been successfully challenged in 6 court cases in European states. Under European legislation a product may be deemed to be a medicine by function if it is used in or administered to human beings either with a view to restoring, correcting or modifying physiological functions by exerting a pharmacological, immunological or metabolic action, or to making a medical diagnosis. It is a medicine by presentation if it is presented (e.g. by a manufacturer or distributor) as having properties for treating or preventing disease in human beings. We assess the legal and scientific basis for the claim that electronic cigarettes should be regulated as medicines. We conclude that they are neither medicine by function nor necessarily by presentation The main reason for their existence is as a harm reduction product in which the liking for and/or dependence on nicotine is maintained, and adoption of use is as a substitute for smoking and not as a smoking cessation product. In reality, they are used as consumer products providing pleasure to the user. They are not used to treat nicotine addiction or other disease, but to enable continued use of nicotine. Their use is adjusted individually by each consumer according to his or her perceived pleasure and satisfaction. Gaps in current regulation regarding safety and quality can be met by tailored regulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The eMERGE Network: A consortium of biorepositories linked to electronic medical records data for conducting genomic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarty Catherine A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The eMERGE (electronic MEdical Records and GEnomics Network is an NHGRI-supported consortium of five institutions to explore the utility of DNA repositories coupled to Electronic Medical Record (EMR systems for advancing discovery in genome science. eMERGE also includes a special emphasis on the ethical, legal and social issues related to these endeavors. Organization The five sites are supported by an Administrative Coordinating Center. Setting of network goals is initiated by working groups: (1 Genomics, (2 Informatics, and (3 Consent & Community Consultation, which also includes active participation by investigators outside the eMERGE funded sites, and (4 Return of Results Oversight Committee. The Steering Committee, comprised of site PIs and representatives and NHGRI staff, meet three times per year, once per year with the External Scientific Panel. Current progress The primary site-specific phenotypes for which samples have undergone genome-wide association study (GWAS genotyping are cataract and HDL, dementia, electrocardiographic QRS duration, peripheral arterial disease, and type 2 diabetes. A GWAS is also being undertaken for resistant hypertension in ≈2,000 additional samples identified across the network sites, to be added to data available for samples already genotyped. Funded by ARRA supplements, secondary phenotypes have been added at all sites to leverage the genotyping data, and hypothyroidism is being analyzed as a cross-network phenotype. Results are being posted in dbGaP. Other key eMERGE activities include evaluation of the issues associated with cross-site deployment of common algorithms to identify cases and controls in EMRs, data privacy of genomic and clinically-derived data, developing approaches for large-scale meta-analysis of GWAS data across five sites, and a community consultation and consent initiative at each site. Future activities Plans are underway to expand the network in diversity of

  12. Application of Electron Accelerators in Conjunction with Microwave Sources in Medical Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.; Craciun, G.; Manaila, E.; Ighigeanu, D.; Margaritescu, I.; Chirita, D.; Neagu, M.

    2009-01-01

    Electron beams (EB) are presently used, in addition to the routine conventional radiotherapy techniques, for cancer specialized therapies (intensity modulated radiation therapy [1] and total body electron irradiation [2]), the irradiation of blood and blood components, vaccine preparation, and other. Microwaves (MW) are presently used for therapeutic applications in cardiology, urology, surgery, ophthalmology, cancer therapy, and others, and for diagnostic applications such as cancer detection, organ imaging, and more [3]. The reported data show that low dose-all body irradiation with ionizing as well as with nonionizing irradiation may enhance the tumoricidal effects of radiation or chemotherapy, overcome acquired drug resistance and can stimulate certain components of the immune system that may aid in destroying cancer cells. These data suggested that application of low-dose total body EB + MW irradiation in conjunction with chemotherapy could contribute by novel effects to the cancer therapies. In view of this argument two specifically designed radiation exposure devices (REDs) were carried out for separate, successive and simultaneous irradiation with EB of 6.23 MeV and MW of 2.45 GHz in vivo (RED-vivo) and in vitro (RED-vitro) for the following medical studies: 1) The effects of low-dose EB + MW total body irradiation without/with drugs administration on the C57 BL/6 mice bearing malignant melanoma (MM); 2) The effects of separate and simultaneous MW and EB irradiation on MM cells culture without/with drugs incubation and on human blood components (proteins and cells) irradiated in samples of integral blood from healthy donors and from donors with MM. Both REDs consist of the following units: 1) An accelerated EB source: ALIN-10 electron linear accelerator of 6.23 MeV and adjustable absorbed dose rate from 0.002 Gy s-1 up to 70 Gy s-1 (built in the NILPRP, Bucharest, Romania); 2) A special designed exposure chamber that permits inside separate, successive or

  13. Organizational Change and How It Affects Healthcare Employees: A Study on Employee Resistance to Change in Electronic Medical Record Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, Oluwakemi A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the exploratory qualitative study was to explore the strategies for reducing employee resistance to Electronic Medical Record (EMR) technology changes in a healthcare organization during implementation. The study focused on EPIC as the EMR application. Ten healthcare participants who had experienced a change to EMR were selected in…

  14. Improving sensitivity of machine learning methods for automated case identification from free-text electronic medical records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Afzal (Zubair); M.J. Schuemie (Martijn); J.C. van Blijderveen (Nico); E.F. Sen (Fatma); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam); J.A. Kors (Jan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Distinguishing cases from non-cases in free-text electronic medical records is an important initial step in observational epidemiological studies, but manual record validation is time-consuming and cumbersome. We compared different approaches to develop an automatic case

  15. Barriers to the acceptance of electronic medical records by physicians from systematic review to taxonomy and interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, Albert; Broekhuis, Manda

    2010-01-01

    Background: The main objective of this research is to identify, categorize, and analyze barriers perceived by physicians to the adoption of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) in order to provide implementers with beneficial intervention options. Methods: A systematic literature review, based on

  16. Reusability of coded data in the primary care electronic medical record : A dynamic cohort study concerning cancer diagnoses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sollie, Annet; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Helsper, Charles; Numans, Mattijs E.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess quality and reusability of coded cancer diagnoses in routine primary care data. To identify factors that influence data quality and areas for improvement. Methods A dynamic cohort study in a Dutch network database containing 250,000 anonymized electronic medical records (EMRs)

  17. Giving rheumatology patients online home access to their electronic medical record (EMR): advantages, drawbacks and preconditions according to care providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, R.; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2013-01-01

    Technology enables patients home access to their electronic medical record (EMR), via a patient portal. This study aims to analyse (dis)advantages, preconditions and suitable content for this service, according to rheumatology health professionals. A two-phase policy Delphi study was conducted.

  18. Effects of electronic communication between the GP and the pharmacist. The quality of medication data on admission and after discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. van der Kam (Wouter); B. Meyboom de Jong; T.F. Tromp; P.W. Moorman (Peter); J. van der Lei (Johan)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: When a patient is admitted to a hospital, the need for information about the medications prescribed is an important issue. OBJECTIVES: Our aim was to assess whether electronic communication between the GP and the pharmacist provides better information

  19. Epidemic surveillance using an electronic medical record: an empiric approach to performance improvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhang Zheng

    Full Text Available Electronic medical records (EMR form a rich repository of information that could benefit public health. We asked how structured and free-text narrative EMR data should be combined to improve epidemic surveillance for acute respiratory infections (ARI.Eight previously characterized ARI case detection algorithms (CDA were applied to historical EMR entries to create authentic time series of daily ARI case counts (background. An epidemic model simulated influenza cases (injection. From the time of the injection, cluster-detection statistics were applied daily on paired background+injection (combined and background-only time series. This cycle was then repeated with the injection shifted to each week of the evaluation year. We computed: a the time from injection to the first statistical alarm uniquely found in the combined dataset (Detection Delay; b how often alarms originated in the background-only dataset (false-alarm rate, or FAR; and c the number of cases found within these false alarms (Caseload. For each CDA, we plotted the Detection Delay as a function of FAR or Caseload, over a broad range of alarm thresholds.CDAs that combined text analyses seeking ARI symptoms in clinical notes with provider-assigned diagnostic codes in order to maximize the precision rather than the sensitivity of case-detection lowered Detection Delay at any given FAR or Caseload.An empiric approach can guide the integration of EMR data into case-detection methods that improve both the timeliness and efficiency of epidemic detection.

  20. Meeting the security requirements of electronic medical records in the ERA of high-speed computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazi, H O; Zaidan, A A; Zaidan, B B; Kiah, M L Mat; Al-Bakri, S H

    2015-01-01

    This study has two objectives. First, it aims to develop a system with a highly secured approach to transmitting electronic medical records (EMRs), and second, it aims to identify entities that transmit private patient information without permission. The NTRU and the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) cryptosystems are secured encryption methods. The AES is a tested technology that has already been utilized in several systems to secure sensitive data. The United States government has been using AES since June 2003 to protect sensitive and essential information. Meanwhile, NTRU protects sensitive data against attacks through the use of quantum computers, which can break the RSA cryptosystem and elliptic curve cryptography algorithms. A hybrid of AES and NTRU is developed in this work to improve EMR security. The proposed hybrid cryptography technique is implemented to secure the data transmission process of EMRs. The proposed security solution can provide protection for over 40 years and is resistant to quantum computers. Moreover, the technique provides the necessary evidence required by law to identify disclosure or misuse of patient records. The proposed solution can effectively secure EMR transmission and protect patient rights. It also identifies the source responsible for disclosing confidential patient records. The proposed hybrid technique for securing data managed by institutional websites must be improved in the future.

  1. The differing privacy concerns regarding exchanging electronic medical records of internet users in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hsin-Ginn; Han, Hwai-En; Kuo, Kuang-Ming; Liu, Chung-Feng

    2012-12-01

    This study explores whether Internet users have different privacy concerns regarding the information contained in electronic medical records (EMRs) according to gender, age, occupation, education, and EMR awareness. Based on the Concern for Information Privacy (CFIP) scale developed by Smith and colleagues in 1996, we conducted an online survey using 15 items in four dimensions, namely, collection, unauthorized access, secondary use, and errors, to investigate Internet users' concerns regarding the privacy of EMRs under health information exchanges (HIE). We retrieved 213 valid questionnaires. The results indicate that the respondents had substantial privacy concerns regarding EMRs and their educational level and EMR awareness significantly influenced their privacy concerns regarding unauthorized access and secondary use of EMRs. This study recommends that the Taiwanese government organizes a comprehensive EMR awareness campaign, emphasizing unauthorized access and secondary use of EMRs. Additionally, to cultivate the public's understanding of EMRs, the government should employ various media, especially Internet channels, to promote EMR awareness, thereby enabling the public to accept the concept and use of EMRs. People who are highly educated and have superior EMR awareness should be given a comprehensive explanation of how hospitals protect patients' EMRs from unauthorized access and secondary use to address their concerns. Thus, the public can comprehend, trust, and accept the use of EMRs, reducing their privacy concerns, which should facilitate the future implementation of HIE.

  2. Electronic medical records in a sub-specialty practice: one asthma center's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolomeo, Concettina; Shiffman, Richard; Bazzy-Asaad, Alia

    2008-11-01

    There are numerous known benefits associated with the use of an electronic medical record (EMR). In October of 2004, a pediatric respiratory medicine practice at a major academic institution began the process of implementing an EMR system. Through this process, another benefit was realized, improved coordination between out-patient and in-patient care in relation to asthma education. The process began with the formation of an implementation team. The team consisted of technical as well as clinical experts from various disciplines. Together the team developed templates, decision support tools and standardized patient care letters. The team also determined workflow and provided training on the EMR system. A major benefit associated with EMR implementation was the increase in the number of children who were hospitalized with an asthma exacerbation and received an asthma action plan upon discharge. Prior to the EMR system, 4% received an asthma action plan upon discharge. After implementation of the EMR system, 58% received an asthma action plan upon discharge.

  3. Jaundice in primary care: a cohort study of adults aged >45 years using electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Anna; Stapley, Sally; Hamilton, William

    2012-08-01

    Jaundice is a rare but important symptom of malignant and benign conditions. When patients present in primary care, understanding the relative likelihood of different disease processes can help GPs to investigate and refer patients appropriately. To identify and quantify the various causes of jaundice in adults presenting in primary care. Historical cohort study using electronic primary care records. UK General Practice Research Database. Participants (186 814 men and women) aged >45 years with clinical events recorded in primary care records between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2007. Data were searched for episodes of jaundice and explanatory diagnoses identified within the subsequent 12 months. If no diagnosis was found, the patient's preceding medical record was searched for relevant chronic diseases. From the full cohort, 277 patients had at least one record of jaundice between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2006. Ninety-two (33%) were found to have bile duct stones; 74 (27%) had an explanatory cancer [pancreatic cancer 34 (12%), cholangiocarcinoma 13 (5%) and other diagnosed primary malignancy 27 (10%)]. Liver disease attributed to excess alcohol explained 26 (9%) and other diagnoses were identified in 24 (9%). Sixty-one (22%) had no diagnosis related to jaundice recorded. Although the most common cause of jaundice is bile duct stones, cancers are present in over a quarter of patients with jaundice in this study, demonstrating the importance of urgent investigation into the underlying cause.

  4. Knowledge retrieval from PubMed abstracts and electronic medical records with the Multiple Sclerosis Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Ashutosh; Gündel, Michaela; Rajput, Abdul Mateen; Mevissen, Heinz-Theodor; Saiz, Albert; Pastor, Xavier; Lozano-Rubi, Raimundo; Martinez-Lapiscina, Elena H; Martinez-Lapsicina, Elena H; Zubizarreta, Irati; Mueller, Bernd; Kotelnikova, Ekaterina; Toldo, Luca; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Villoslada, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    In order to retrieve useful information from scientific literature and electronic medical records (EMR) we developed an ontology specific for Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The MS Ontology was created using scientific literature and expert review under the Protégé OWL environment. We developed a dictionary with semantic synonyms and translations to different languages for mining EMR. The MS Ontology was integrated with other ontologies and dictionaries (diseases/comorbidities, gene/protein, pathways, drug) into the text-mining tool SCAIView. We analyzed the EMRs from 624 patients with MS using the MS ontology dictionary in order to identify drug usage and comorbidities in MS. Testing competency questions and functional evaluation using F statistics further validated the usefulness of MS ontology. Validation of the lexicalized ontology by means of named entity recognition-based methods showed an adequate performance (F score = 0.73). The MS Ontology retrieved 80% of the genes associated with MS from scientific abstracts and identified additional pathways targeted by approved disease-modifying drugs (e.g. apoptosis pathways associated with mitoxantrone, rituximab and fingolimod). The analysis of the EMR from patients with MS identified current usage of disease modifying drugs and symptomatic therapy as well as comorbidities, which are in agreement with recent reports. The MS Ontology provides a semantic framework that is able to automatically extract information from both scientific literature and EMR from patients with MS, revealing new pathogenesis insights as well as new clinical information.

  5. Impact of immediate access to the electronic medical record on anatomic pathology performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Andrew A; Gould, Edwin W

    2013-07-01

    To assess the overall impact of access to the electronic medical record (EMR) on anatomic pathology performance. We reviewed the results of all use of the EMR by 1 pathologist over an 18-month period. Of the 10,107 cases (913 cytology and 9,194 surgical pathology) reviewed, the EMR (excluding anatomic pathology records) was accessed in 222 (2.2% of all cases, 6.5% of all cytology cases, and 1.8% of all surgical pathology cases). The EMR was used to evaluate a critical value in 20 (9.0%) cases and make a more specific diagnosis in 77 (34.7%) cases, a less specific diagnosis in 4 (1.8%) cases, and a systemic rather than localized diagnosis in 4 (1.8%) cases. The percentage of cases in which the physician was contacted decreased from 7.3% for the prior 18 months to 6.7%, but this change was not significant (P = .13). Twelve cases were subsequently sent for interinstitutional consultation, and no disagreements were identified. The EMR was accessed in 2.2% of all surgical pathology and cytology cases and affected the diagnosis in 48% of these cases.

  6. Knowledge retrieval from PubMed abstracts and electronic medical records with the Multiple Sclerosis Ontology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Malhotra

    Full Text Available In order to retrieve useful information from scientific literature and electronic medical records (EMR we developed an ontology specific for Multiple Sclerosis (MS.The MS Ontology was created using scientific literature and expert review under the Protégé OWL environment. We developed a dictionary with semantic synonyms and translations to different languages for mining EMR. The MS Ontology was integrated with other ontologies and dictionaries (diseases/comorbidities, gene/protein, pathways, drug into the text-mining tool SCAIView. We analyzed the EMRs from 624 patients with MS using the MS ontology dictionary in order to identify drug usage and comorbidities in MS. Testing competency questions and functional evaluation using F statistics further validated the usefulness of MS ontology.Validation of the lexicalized ontology by means of named entity recognition-based methods showed an adequate performance (F score = 0.73. The MS Ontology retrieved 80% of the genes associated with MS from scientific abstracts and identified additional pathways targeted by approved disease-modifying drugs (e.g. apoptosis pathways associated with mitoxantrone, rituximab and fingolimod. The analysis of the EMR from patients with MS identified current usage of disease modifying drugs and symptomatic therapy as well as comorbidities, which are in agreement with recent reports.The MS Ontology provides a semantic framework that is able to automatically extract information from both scientific literature and EMR from patients with MS, revealing new pathogenesis insights as well as new clinical information.

  7. Tissue Banking, Bioinformatics, and Electronic Medical Records: The Front-End Requirements for Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, K. Stephen; Sarojini, Sreeja; Youssif, Maher; Nalley, Kip; Milinovikj, Natasha; Elloumi, Fathi; Russell, Steven; Pecora, Andrew; Schecter, Elyssa; Goy, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine promises patient-tailored treatments that enhance patient care and decrease overall treatment costs by focusing on genetics and “-omics” data obtained from patient biospecimens and records to guide therapy choices that generate good clinical outcomes. The approach relies on diagnostic and prognostic use of novel biomarkers discovered through combinations of tissue banking, bioinformatics, and electronic medical records (EMRs). The analytical power of bioinformatic platforms combined with patient clinical data from EMRs can reveal potential biomarkers and clinical phenotypes that allow researchers to develop experimental strategies using selected patient biospecimens stored in tissue banks. For cancer, high-quality biospecimens collected at diagnosis, first relapse, and various treatment stages provide crucial resources for study designs. To enlarge biospecimen collections, patient education regarding the value of specimen donation is vital. One approach for increasing consent is to offer publically available illustrations and game-like engagements demonstrating how wider sample availability facilitates development of novel therapies. The critical value of tissue bank samples, bioinformatics, and EMR in the early stages of the biomarker discovery process for personalized medicine is often overlooked. The data obtained also require cross-disciplinary collaborations to translate experimental results into clinical practice and diagnostic and prognostic use in personalized medicine. PMID:23818899

  8. Inadequate recording of alcohol-drinking, tobacco-smoking and discharge diagnosis in medical in-patients: failure to recognize risks including drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairstow, B M; Burke, V; Beilin, L J; Deutscher, C

    1993-11-01

    The records of 62 men and 43 women, 14-88 years old, admitted to general medical wards in a public teaching hospital during 1991 were examined for discharge medications and for the recording of alcohol-drinking, tobacco-smoking and discharge diagnosis. Drinking and smoking status was unrecorded in 22.9% and 21.9% of patients respectively. Twenty-four patients had 31 potential drug interactions which were related to the number of drugs prescribed and to drinking alcohol; 10.5% of the patients had interactions involving alcohol and 2.9% tobacco. Six patients received relatively or absolutely contraindicated drugs, including one asthmatic given two beta-blockers. The drugs prescribed indicated that some patients had conditions such as gastro-oesophageal disorders, diabetes and obstructive airways disease which had not been recorded. Inadequate recording of diagnoses, alcohol and smoking status creates risks to patients and may cause opportunities for preventive care to be missed. This study provides the basis for the development of undergraduate and postgraduate education programmes to address these issues and so decrease risks to patients which arise from inadequate recording practices. Incomplete diagnoses also adversely affect hospital funding where this depends on case-mix diagnostic groups. Quality assurance programmes and other strategies are being implemented to improve medical recording and prescribing habits.

  9. Supporting information retrieval from electronic health records: A report of University of Michigan's nine-year experience in developing and using the Electronic Medical Record Search Engine (EMERSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David A; Mei, Qiaozhu; Law, James; Khanna, Ritu; Zheng, Kai

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the University of Michigan's nine-year experience in developing and using a full-text search engine designed to facilitate information retrieval (IR) from narrative documents stored in electronic health records (EHRs). The system, called the Electronic Medical Record Search Engine (EMERSE), functions similar to Google but is equipped with special functionalities for handling challenges unique to retrieving information from medical text. Key features that distinguish EMERSE from general-purpose search engines are discussed, with an emphasis on functions crucial to (1) improving medical IR performance and (2) assuring search quality and results consistency regardless of users' medical background, stage of training, or level of technical expertise. Since its initial deployment, EMERSE has been enthusiastically embraced by clinicians, administrators, and clinical and translational researchers. To date, the system has been used in supporting more than 750 research projects yielding 80 peer-reviewed publications. In several evaluation studies, EMERSE demonstrated very high levels of sensitivity and specificity in addition to greatly improved chart review efficiency. Increased availability of electronic data in healthcare does not automatically warrant increased availability of information. The success of EMERSE at our institution illustrates that free-text EHR search engines can be a valuable tool to help practitioners and researchers retrieve information from EHRs more effectively and efficiently, enabling critical tasks such as patient case synthesis and research data abstraction. EMERSE, available free of charge for academic use, represents a state-of-the-art medical IR tool with proven effectiveness and user acceptance. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Full scale electron beam systems for treatment of water, wastewater and medical waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, T.D.; Kurucz, C.N.; Cooper, W.J.; Brown, D.

    1998-01-01

    High energy electron accelerators have been used in numerous applications for several decades. In the early 1980's several attempts to use electron accelerators for the disinfection of sludge proved that the technology could be used for that application. One such facility was designed, built and tested for one year at the Miami-Dade Virginia Key Wastewater Treatment Plant. The process successfully disinfected anaerobically digested sludge. However, due to changing local regulations the process was never implemented. Now this process may provide a viable alternative for the ultimate destruction of toxic and hazardous organic chemicals from water and sludges. When high energy electrons impact an aqueous solution, with or without particulate matter present, reactive transient species are formed. The three transient species of most interest are the aqueous electron, e - aq, hydrogen radical, H·, and the hydroxyl radical, ·OH. The relative concentration of these radicals in an irradiated solution of pure water is 44, 10 and 46%, respectively. The absolute concentration of the radicals is dose and water quality dependent, but is in excess of mM levels in potable, raw and secondary wastewater effluent at our facility. This paper describes the facilities at the Electron Beam Research Facility (EBRF) in Miami, FL. The accelerator is a 1.5 MeV, 50 mA insulated core transformer type. Several areas of research have been the focus of the studies with an interdisciplinary team of faculty and students in engineering and science. The areas included are, inactivation of bacteria in raw and chlorinated and unchlorinated secondary wastewater and the changes in biochemical oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand in the raw and unchlorinated secondary wastewater. The removal of toxic chemicals has also been studied in some detail. These studies have been conducted both at the EBRF and using 60 Co gamma irradiation. To examine the effect of water quality on the destruction of the

  11. Investigating concordance in diabetes diagnosis between primary care charts (electronic medical records and health administrative data: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chevendra Vijaya

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electronic medical records contain valuable clinical information not readily available elsewhere. Accordingly, they hold important potential for contributing to and enhancing chronic disease registries with the goal of improving chronic disease management; however a standard for diagnoses of conditions such as diabetes remains to be developed. The purpose of this study was to establish a validated electronic medical record definition for diabetes. Methods We constructed a retrospective cohort using health administrative data from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences Ontario Diabetes Database linked with electronic medical records from the Deliver Primary Healthcare Information Project using data from 1 April 2006 - 31 March 2008 (N = 19,443. We systematically examined eight definitions for diabetes diagnosis, both established and proposed. Results The definition that identified the highest number of patients with diabetes (N = 2,180 while limiting to those with the highest probability of having diabetes was: individuals with ≥2 abnormal plasma glucose tests, or diabetes on the problem list, or insulin prescription, or ≥2 oral anti-diabetic agents, or HbA1c ≥6.5%. Compared to the Ontario Diabetes Database, this definition identified 13% more patients while maintaining good sensitivity (75% and specificity (98%. Conclusions This study establishes the feasibility of developing an electronic medical record standard definition of diabetes and validates an algorithm for use in this context. While the algorithm may need to be tailored to fit available data in different electronic medical records, it contributes to the establishment of validated disease registries with the goal of enhancing research, and enabling quality improvement in clinical care and patient self-management.

  12. Impact of a reengineered electronic error-reporting system on medication event reporting and care process improvements at an urban medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKaig, Donald; Collins, Christine; Elsaid, Khaled A

    2014-09-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the impact of a reengineered approach to electronic error reporting at a 719-bed multidisciplinary urban medical center. The main outcome of interest was the monthly reported medication errors during the preimplementation (20 months) and postimplementation (26 months) phases. An interrupted time series analysis was used to describe baseline errors, immediate change following implementation of the current electronic error-reporting system (e-ERS), and trend of error reporting during postimplementation. Errors were categorized according to severity using the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention (NCC MERP) Medication Error Index classifications. Reported errors were further analyzed by reporter and error site. During preimplementation, the monthly reported errors mean was 40.0 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 36.3-43.7). Immediately following e-ERS implementation, monthly reported errors significantly increased by 19.4 errors (95% CI: 8.4-30.5). The change in slope of reported errors trend was estimated at 0.76 (95% CI: 0.07-1.22). Near misses and no-patient-harm errors accounted for 90% of all errors, while errors that caused increased patient monitoring or temporary harm accounted for 9% and 1%, respectively. Nurses were the most frequent reporters, while physicians were more likely to report high-severity errors. Medical care units accounted for approximately half of all reported errors. Following the intervention, there was a significant increase in reporting of prevented errors and errors that reached the patient with no resultant harm. This improvement in reporting was sustained for 26 months and has contributed to designing and implementing quality improvement initiatives to enhance the safety of the medication use process.

  13. Do general practitioners record alcohol abuse in the electronic medical records? : A comparison of survey and medical record data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abidi, L.; Oenema, A.; van den Akker, M.; van de Mheen, D.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Primary care professionals are encouraged to screen patients for alcohol abuse. However, patients with alcohol abuse are often under-diagnosed as well as under-registered in medical records in general practices. This study aims to report on the registration rates of alcohol abuse

  14. Establishment of Electronic Chart-based Stroke Registry System in a Medical System in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsong-Hai Lee

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available To establish a prospective, real-time, self-sustainable stroke registry system, we incorporated a registry with an electronic chart to create an electronic chart-based stroke registry system in November 2006. The International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision code (430–437 was used to auto-enroll stroke patients admitted to neurology departments. Clinical information was written by doctors, nursing information was recorded by nurses, and basic patient information was entered by administrative departments. Numerical data and the date and time of any studies were auto-downloaded from the hospital computer. In total, 212 items were auto-downloaded, including basic patient information, laboratory blood test and examination results, and the date and time of imaging and special intervention. The stroke scales (121 items, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, Barthel index, and modified Rankin scale were designed to be auto-adjusted to reduce incompatibility. The 95 items with pull-down options were used to specify the contents. This registry system can be time-, labor- and money-saving with secured data accuracy.

  15. Integration of SNOMED CT into the OpenMRS electronic medical record system framework

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gerber, A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Integrating a mechanism to store, retrieve and use clinical data with a system to manage medical records enables better utilisation of medical data and improved healthcare. This poster introduces a research project that aims to extend Open...

  16. Automatic identification of methotrexate-induced liver toxicity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis from the electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chen; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Dligach, Dmitriy; Ramirez, Monica P; Miller, Timothy A; Mo, Huan; Braggs, Natalie S; Cagan, Andrew; Gainer, Vivian; Denny, Joshua C; Savova, Guergana K

    2015-04-01

    To improve the accuracy of mining structured and unstructured components of the electronic medical record (EMR) by adding temporal features to automatically identify patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with methotrexate-induced liver transaminase abnormalities. Codified information and a string-matching algorithm were applied to a RA cohort of 5903 patients from Partners HealthCare to select 1130 patients with potential liver toxicity. Supervised machine learning was applied as our key method. For features, Apache clinical Text Analysis and Knowledge Extraction System (cTAKES) was used to extract standard vocabulary from relevant sections of the unstructured clinical narrative. Temporal features were further extracted to assess the temporal relevance of event mentions with regard to the date of transaminase abnormality. All features were encapsulated in a 3-month-long episode for classification. Results were summarized at patient level in a training set (N=480 patients) and evaluated against a test set (N=120 patients). The system achieved positive predictive value (PPV) 0.756, sensitivity 0.919, F1 score 0.829 on the test set, which was significantly better than the best baseline system (PPV 0.590, sensitivity 0.703, F1 score 0.642). Our innovations, which included framing the phenotype problem as an episode-level classification task, and adding temporal information, all proved highly effective. Automated methotrexate-induced liver toxicity phenotype discovery for patients with RA based on structured and unstructured information in the EMR shows accurate results. Our work demonstrates that adding temporal features significantly improved classification results. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Preliminary development of a diabetic foot ulcer database from a wound electronic medical record: a tool to decrease limb amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golinko, Michael S; Margolis, David J; Tal, Adit; Hoffstad, Ole; Boulton, Andrew J M; Brem, Harold

    2009-01-01

    Our objective was to create a practical standardized database of clinically relevant variables in the care of patients with diabetes and foot ulcers. Numerical clinical variables such as age, baseline laboratory values, and wound area were extracted from the wound electronic medical record (WEMR). A coding system was developed to translate narrative data, culture, and pathology reports into discrete, quantifiable variables. Using data extracted from the WEMR, a diabetic foot ulcer-specific database incorporated the following tables: (1) demographics, medical history, and baseline laboratory values; (2) vascular testing data; (3) radiology data; (4) wound characteristics; and (5) wound debridement data including pathology, culture results, and amputation data. The database contains variables that can be easily exported for analysis. Amputation was studied in 146 patients who had at least two visits (e.g., two entries in the database). Analysis revealed that 19 (13%) patients underwent 32 amputations (nine major and 23 minor) in 23 limbs. There was a decreased risk of amputation, 0.87 (0.78, 1.00), using a proportional hazards model, associated with an increased number of visits and entries in the WEMR. Further analysis revealed no significant difference in age, gender, HbA1c%, cholesterol, white blood cell count, or prealbumin at baseline, whereas hemoglobin and albumin were significantly lower in the amputee group (psafety and quality of care, allowing clinicians to more easily identify a nonhealing wound and intervene. This report describes a method of capturing data relevant to clinical care of a patient with a diabetic foot ulcer, and may enable clinicians to adapt such a system to their own patient population.

  18. Impact of patient-accessible electronic medical records in rheumatology: use, satisfaction and effects on empowerment among patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vaart, Rosalie; Drossaert, Constance H C; Taal, Erik; Drossaers-Bakker, K Wiepke; Vonkeman, Harald E; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2014-03-26

    To measure the use, satisfaction and impact of a web portal which provides patients with rheumatoid arthritis home access to their electronic medical records (EMR). A pretest-posttest study was conducted among 360 patients. Questionnaires assessed socio-demographics, health literacy, Internet use, disease characteristics, patient-provider relationship and empowerment before and after launching a hospital-based patient web portal. To measure the impact of the portal, patients' satisfaction with care, trust in their rheumatologist, self-efficacy in patient-provider communication, illness perceptions, and medication adherence were assessed. The post-test included questions on portal use, satisfaction, and self-perceived impact due to portal use. 54% of respondents with Internet access had viewed their EMR. Respondents were positive about the ease of use and usefulness of the portal and reported very few problems. Age (P = .03), amount of Internet use (P = .01) and self-perceived Internet skills (P = .03) significantly predicted portal use. Of the respondents who had logged in, 44% reported feeling more involved in their treatment and 37% felt they had more knowledge about their treatment. Significant differences over time were not found on the empowerment-related instruments. The current portal succeeded in offering patients access to their EMR in a usable and understandable way. While its true impact is difficult to grasp, a relevant portion of the patients felt more involved in their treatment due to the web portal. Offering patients home EMR access, therefore, appears to be a valuable addition to the care process.

  19. Electronic Support for Public Health: Validated Case Finding and Reporting for Notifiable Diseases Using Electronic Medical Data

    OpenAIRE

    Lazarus, Ross; Klompas, Michael; Campion, Francis X.; McNabb, Scott J.N.; Hou, Xuanlin; Daniel, James; Haney, Gillian; DeMaria, Alfred; Lenert, Leslie; Platt, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Health care providers are legally obliged to report cases of specified diseases to public health authorities, but existing manual, provider-initiated reporting systems generally result in incomplete, error-prone, and tardy information flow. Automated laboratory-based reports are more likely accurate and timely, but lack clinical information and treatment details. Here, we describe the Electronic Support for Public Health (ESP) application, a robust, automated, secure, portable public health d...

  20. Quality assurance as an integrated part of the electronic medical record - a prototype applied for colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Geir; Ottestad, Per Marcus; Skafløtten, Stein Roger; Bretthauer, Michael; Moritz, Volker

    2009-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) have not developed much beyond the days of typewritten journals when it comes to facilitating extraction of data for quality assurance (QA) and improvement of health-care performance. Based on 5 years' experience from the Norwegian Gastronet QA programme, we have developed a highly QA-profiled EMR for colonoscopy. We used a three-tier solution (client, server and database) written in the Java programming language using a number of open-source libraries. QA principles from the Norwegian paper-based Gastronet QA programme formed the basis for development of the ColoReg software. ColoReg is developed primarily for colonoscopy reporting in a screening trial, but may be used in routine clinical work. The QA module in ColoReg is well suited for intervention towards suboptimal performance in both settings. We have developed user-friendly software dominated by clickable boxes and curtain menus reducing free text to a minimum. The software gives warnings when illogical registrations are entered and reasons have to be given for divergence from software recommendations for work-up and surveillance. At any time, defined performance quality parameters are readily accessible in tabular form with the named, logged-in endoscopist being compared with all other anonymized endoscopists in the database. The ColoReg software is developed for use in an international, multicentre trial on colonoscopy screening. It is user-friendly and secures continuous QA of the endoscopist's performance. The principles used are applicable to development of EMRs in general.

  1. Modeling return on investment for an electronic medical record system in Lilongwe, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Julia; Cioffi, Marco; Alide, Noor; Landis-Lewis, Zach; Gamadzi, Gervase; Gadabu, Oliver Jintha; Douglas, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    To model the financial effects of implementing a hospital-wide electronic medical record (EMR) system in a tertiary facility in Malawi. We evaluated three areas of impact: length of stay, transcription time, and laboratory use. We collected data on expenditures in these categories under the paper-based (pre-EMR) system, and then estimated reductions in each category based on findings from EMR systems in the USA and backed by ambulatory data from low-income settings. We compared these potential savings accrued over a period of 5 years with the costs of implementing the touchscreen point-of-care EMR system at that site. Estimated cost savings in length of stay, transcription time, and laboratory use totaled US$284 395 annually. When compared with the costs of installing and sustaining the EMR system, there is a net financial gain by the third year of operation. Over 5 years the estimated net benefit was US$613 681. Despite considering only three categories of savings, this analysis demonstrates the potential financial benefits of EMR systems in low-income settings. The results are robust to higher discount rates, and a net benefit is realized even under more conservative assumptions. This model demonstrates that financial benefits could be realized with an EMR system in a low-income setting. Further studies will examine these and other categories in greater detail, study the financial effects at different levels of organization, and benefit from post-implementation data. This model will be further improved by substituting its assumptions for evidence as we conduct more detailed studies.

  2. Understanding key factors affecting electronic medical record implementation: a sociotechnical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucciniello, Maria; Lapsley, Irvine; Nasi, Greta; Pagliari, Claudia

    2015-07-17

    Recent health care policies have supported the adoption of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) but examples of failed ICT projects in this sector have highlighted the need for a greater understanding of the processes used to implement such innovations in complex organizations. This study examined the interaction of sociological and technological factors in the implementation of an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system by a major national hospital. It aimed to obtain insights for managers planning such projects in the future and to examine the usefulness of Actor Network Theory (ANT) as a research tool in this context. Case study using documentary analysis, interviews and observations. Qualitative thematic analysis drawing on ANT. Qualitative analyses revealed a complex network of interactions between organizational stakeholders and technology that helped to shape the system and influence its acceptance and adoption. The EMR clearly emerged as a central 'actor' within this network. The results illustrate how important it is to plan innovative and complex information systems with reference to (i) the expressed needs and involvement of different actors, starting from the initial introductory phase; (ii) promoting commitment to the system and adopting a participative approach; (iii) defining and resourcing new roles within the organization capable of supporting and sustaining the change and (iv) assessing system impacts in order to mobilize the network around a common goal. The paper highlights the organizational, cultural, technological, and financial considerations that should be taken into account when planning strategies for the implementation of EMR systems in hospital settings. It also demonstrates how ANT may be usefully deployed in evaluating such projects.

  3. Options for diabetes management in sub-Saharan Africa with an electronic medical record system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouematchoua Tchuitcheu, G; Rienhoff, O

    2011-01-01

    An increase of diabetes prevalence of up to 80% is predicted in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) by 2025 exceeding the worldwide 55%. Mortality rates of diabetes and HIV/AIDS are similar. Diabetes shares several common factors with HIV/AIDS and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The latter two health problems have been efficiently managed by an open source electronic medical record system (EMRS) in Latin America. Therefore a similar solution for diabetes in SSA could be extremely helpful. The aim was to design and validate a conceptual model for an EMRS to improve diabetes management in SSA making use of the HIV and TB experience. A review of the literature addressed diabetes care and management in SSA as well as existing examples of information and communication technology (ICT) use in SSA. Based on a need assessment conducted in SSA a conceptual model based on the traditionally structured healthcare system in SSA was mapped into a three-layer structure. Application modules were derived and a demonstrator programmed based on an open source EMRS. Then the approach was validated by SSA experts. A conceptual model could be specified and validated which enhances a problem-oriented approach to diabetes management processes. The prototyp EMRS demonstrates options for a patient portal and simulation tools for education of health professional and patients in SSA. It is possible to find IT solutions for diabetes care in SSA which follow the same efficiency concepts as HIV or TB modules in Latin America. The local efficiency and sustainability of the solution will, however, depend on training and changes in work behavior.

  4. Electronic medical record interventions and recurrent perioperative antibiotic administration: a before-and-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincker, Alexander; Ben Abdallah, Arbi; Avidan, Michael; Candelario, Penka; Helsten, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Perioperative antibiotics decrease rates of surgical-site infections. Numerous interventions have improved administration of the first antibiotic dose; however, failures in the administration of subsequent doses frequently occur. We hypothesized that modifications to the electronic medical record (EMR) would improve the administration of the second antibiotic dose and that such improvements would be sustained over time. This historical cohort before-and-after study of multipronged alerts in the EMR analyzed 1,348 operations on adult patients. The operations lasted ≥ 240 min, utilized cefazolin as the perioperative antibiotic-constituting 1,348 second and 182 third intraoperative antibiotic doses-and did not involve cardiopulmonary bypass. A decision support intervention provided dosing recommendations when clinicians documented antibiotics. The reminder intervention displayed a continuous bar in the EMR, starting at the time the antibiotics were dosed and ending 15 min before subsequent doses were indicated. The primary endpoints of the study were the change in the proportion of correctly administered second dose of cefazolin, given in accordance with hospital guidelines in the month after implementing the intervention, and whether any improvements declined by three to seven months after implementation. Pre-intervention, 51.4% of second doses of cefazolin were correctly administered. In the immediate post-intervention period, 68.5% were correctly administered, representing a significant absolute improvement of 17.1% (95% confidence interval, 8.1 to 26.1; P pre-intervention). These inexpensive nonintrusive interventions to the EMR provided modest lasting improvements in proper administration of repeated doses of cefazolin. The fact that only approximately 70% compliance was reached highlights the difficulty in addressing this deficiency.

  5. Beyond the focus group: understanding physicians' barriers to electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Helen; Gardner, Rebekah; Baier, Rosa

    2012-04-01

    Although electronic medical records (EMRs) have potential to improve quality of care, physician adoption remains low. Rhode Island physicians' perceptions of barriers to EMRs and the association between these barriers and physician characteristics were examined. It was hypothesized that physicians with and without EMRs would differ in the types and magnitude of barriers identified. Data were drawn from the Rhode Island Department of Health's mandatory 2009 Physician Health Information Technology (HIT) survey of physicians licensed and in active practice in Rhode Island or an adjacent state. Some 1,888 (58.1% of the target population of 3,248 physicians) responded. Respondents, who were invited to provide open-ended comments, were asked to consider 11 issues as barriers to EMR use: Access to technical support, lack of computer skills, availability of a computer in the appropriate location, impact of a computer on doctor-patient interaction, lack of interoperability, privacy or security concerns, start-up financial costs, ongoing financial costs, technic limitations of systems, training and productivity impact, and lack of uniform industry standards. Respondents with EMRs consistently perceived significantly fewer barriers than those without them (p < .0001). For example, 78.9% of physicians without EMRs viewed start-up financial costs as a major barrier versus only 45.8% of physicians with EMRs. An understanding of physicians' reluctance to use EMRs is critical for developing adoption strategies. Policies to increase EMR adoption should be tailored to different physician groups to achieve maximum effectiveness. Further research into the differences between current EMR users' and nonusers' perceptions of barriers may help elucidate how to facilitate subsequent adoption.

  6. Expanded HIV Testing Strategy Leveraging the Electronic Medical Record Uncovers Undiagnosed Infection Among Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felsen, Uriel R; Cunningham, Chinazo O; Heo, Moonseong; Futterman, Donna C; Weiss, Jeffrey M; Zingman, Barry S

    2017-05-01

    Routine HIV testing of hospitalized patients is recommended, but few strategies to expand testing in the hospital setting have been described. We assessed the impact of an electronic medical record (EMR) prompt on HIV testing for hospitalized patients. We performed a pre-post study at 3 hospitals in the Bronx, NY. We compared the proportion of admissions of patients 21-64 years old with an HIV test performed, characteristics of patients tested, and rate of new HIV diagnoses made by screening while an EMR prompt recommending HIV testing was inactive vs. active. The prompt appeared for patients with no previous HIV test or a high-risk diagnosis after their last HIV test. Among 36,610 admissions while the prompt was inactive, 9.5% had an HIV test performed. Among 18,943 admissions while the prompt was active, 21.8% had an HIV test performed. Admission while the prompt was active was associated with increased HIV testing among total admissions [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 2.78, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.62 to 2.96], those without a previous HIV test (aOR 4.03, 95% CI: 3.70 to 4.40), and those with a previous negative test (aOR 1.52, 95% CI: 1.37 to 1.68) (P patient characteristics. New HIV diagnoses made by screening increased from 8.2/100,000 admissions to 37.0/100,000 admissions while the prompt was inactive and active, respectively (OR 4.51 95% CI: 1.17 to 17.45, P = 0.03). An EMR prompt for hospitalized patients was associated with a large increase in HIV testing, a diversification of patients tested, and an increase in diagnoses made by screening.

  7. A continuous usability evaluation of an electronic medication administration record application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente Oliveros, Noelia; Gramage Caro, Teresa; Pérez Menéndez-Conde, Covadonga; Álvarez-Diaz, Ana María; Martín-Aragón Álvarez, Sagrario; Bermejo Vicedo, Teresa; Delgado Silveira, Eva

    2017-12-01

    The complexity of an electronic medication administration record (eMAR) has been underestimated by most designers in the past. Usability issues, such as poorly designed user application flow in eMAR, are therefore of vital importance, since they can have a negative impact on nursing activities and result in poor outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usability of an eMAR application during its development. A usability evaluation was conducted during the development of the eMAR application. Two usability methods were used: a heuristic evaluation complemented by usability testing. Each eMAR application version provided by the vendor was evaluated by 2 hospital pharmacists, who applied the heuristic method. They reviewed the eMAR tasks, detected usability problems and their heuristic violations, and rated the severity of the usability problems. Usability testing was used to assess the final application version by observing how 3 nurses interacted with the application. Thirty-four versions were assessed before the eMAR application was considered usable. During the heuristic evaluation, the usability problems decreased from 46 unique usability problems in version 1 (V1) to 9 in version 34 (V34). In V1, usability problems were categorized into 154 heuristic violations, which decreased to 27 in V34. The average severity rating also decreased from major usability problem (2.96) to no problem (0.23). During usability testing, the 3 nurses did not encounter new usability problems. A thorough heuristic evaluation is a good method for obtaining a usable eMAR application. This evaluation points key areas for improvement and decreases usability problems and their severity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The Impact of the Transition to an Electronic Medical Record on Patient Perceptions in a Pediatric Ophthalmology Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavuoto, Kara M; Monsalve, Pedro; Chang, Ta C

    2016-05-01

    To assess the impact of the transition from traditional paper-based medical records to electronic medical records in a pediatric ophthalmology practice at a tertiary care center. A prospective, cross-sectional survey was completed at three time points: 2 weeks prior to (phase 1), 2 weeks after (phase 2), and 3 months after (phase 3) the electronic medical record transition. The survey consisted of 10 Likert-type scaled questions assessing patient satisfaction and two free response questions estimating the wait time, which was completed by patients or parents/guardians whose child/children (younger than 18 years) had an appointment in the pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus clinic. Satisfaction scores and waiting times were compared within each phase and across phases and between different appointment types. A total of 382 surveys were collected: 158 from phase 1, 68 from phase 2, and 156 from phase 3. Overall, patient satisfaction was high at all three time points. Patients' estimates of waiting time compared to actual waiting time were not significantly different at any phase; however, patients' estimates of time spent with the physician were significantly underestimated in phase 1 (20 vs 25 minutes, P = .04) and were correct or overestimated in phase 3. Patients were satisfied with the service regardless of the use of paper charts or electronic medical records. The electronic medical record system does not seem to improve patients' waiting time, but has a significant impact on the perception of time spent with the physician. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2016;53(3):173-178.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Analysis of scientific papers in the field of radiology and medical imaging included in Science Citation Index expanded and published by Turkish authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Erhan; Karçaaltincaba, Muşturay

    2010-09-01

    We aimed to analyze scientific papers published by Turkish authors in "radiology, nuclear medicine and medical imaging" journals included in the Science Citation Index Expanded and compared the number of published scientific papers from Turkey and other countries. We retrospectively searched all papers published by Turkish authors between 1945 and 2008 by using Web of Science software. We performed the analysis by typing "Turkey" in the address section and all radiology and medical imaging journals in the source title section using the general search function of the software. We further analyzed these results by using "analyze" function of the software according to the number of publications per year, journals, institution and type of papers. We also calculated total number of citations to published scientific papers using citation report function. We analyzed the rank of Turkey among other countries in terms of the number of published papers. Overall, 4,532 papers were published between 1945 and 2008. The first paper was published in 1976. Number of publications increased dramatically from 1976 (n = 1) to 2008 (n = 383). The top 5 journals publishing papers from Turkish authors were European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (n = 328), Clinical Nuclear Medicine (n = 296), European Journal of Radiology (n = 289), European Radiology (n = 207) and Journal of Clinical Ultrasound (n = 186). All published papers received 18,419 citations and citation to paper ratio was 4.06. The rank of Turkey among other countries in terms of published papers improved during the last 25 years. Number of papers from Turkey published in radiology and medical imaging journals has increased at the start of the new millennium. Currently, Turkey is among the top 12 countries when the number of scientific papers published in radiology journals is taken into consideration.

  10. Observed Benefits to On-site Medical Services during an Annual 5-day Electronic Dance Music Event with Harm Reduction Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Matthew Brendan; Lund, Adam; Golby, Riley; Turris, Sheila A

    2016-04-01

    With increasing attendance and media attention, large-scale electronic dance music events (EDMEs) are a subset of mass gatherings that have a unique risk profile for attendees and promoters. Shambhala Music Festival (Canada) is a multi-day event in a rural setting with a recognized history of providing harm reduction (HR) services alongside medical care. Study/Objective This manuscript describes the medical response at a multi-day electronic music festival where on-site HR interventions and dedicated medical care are delivered as parallel public health measures. This study was a descriptive case report. Medical encounters and event-related data were documented prospectively using an established event registry database. In 2014, Shambhala Music Festival had 67,120 cumulative attendees over a 7-day period, with a peak daily attendance of 15,380 people. There were 1,393 patient encounters and the patient presentation rate (PPR) was 20.8 per one thousand. The majority of these (90.9%) were for non-urgent complaints. The ambulance transfer rate (ATR) was 0.194 per one thousand and 0.93% of patient encounters were transferred by ambulance. No patients required intubation and there were no fatalities. Harm reduction services included mobile outreach teams, distribution of educational materials, pill checking facilities, a dedicated women's space, and a "Sanctuary" area that provided non-medical peer support for overwhelmed guests. More than 10,000 encounters were recorded by mobile and booth-based preventive and educational services, and 2,786 pills were checked on-site with a seven percent discard rate. Dedicated medical and HR services represent two complementary public health strategies to minimize risk at a multi-day electronic music festival. The specific extent to which HR strategies reduce the need for medical care is not well understood. Incorporation of HR practices when planning on-site medical care has the potential to inform patient management, reduce

  11. "Smart Forms" in an Electronic Medical Record: documentation-based clinical decision support to improve disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnipper, Jeffrey L; Linder, Jeffrey A; Palchuk, Matvey B; Einbinder, Jonathan S; Li, Qi; Postilnik, Anatoly; Middleton, Blackford

    2008-01-01

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) integrated within Electronic Medical Records (EMR) hold the promise of improving healthcare quality. To date the effectiveness of CDSS has been less than expected, especially concerning the ambulatory management of chronic diseases. This is due, in part, to the fact that clinicians do not use CDSS fully. Barriers to clinicians' use of CDSS have included lack of integration into workflow, software usability issues, and relevance of the content to the patient at hand. At Partners HealthCare, we are developing "Smart Forms" to facilitate documentation-based clinical decision support. Rather than being interruptive in nature, the Smart Form enables writing a multi-problem visit note while capturing coded information and providing sophisticated decision support in the form of tailored recommendations for care. The current version of the Smart Form is designed around two chronic diseases: coronary artery disease and diabetes mellitus. The Smart Form has potential to improve the care of patients with both acute and chronic conditions.

  12. Accuracy of administratively-assigned ancestry for diverse populations in an electronic medical record-linked biobank.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob B Hall

    Full Text Available Recently, the development of biobanks linked to electronic medical records has presented new opportunities for genetic and epidemiological research. Studies based on these resources, however, present unique challenges, including the accurate assignment of individual-level population ancestry. In this work we examine the accuracy of administratively-assigned race in diverse populations by comparing assigned races to genetically-defined ancestry estimates. Using 220 ancestry informative markers, we generated principal components for patients in our dataset, which were used to cluster patients into groups based on genetic ancestry. Consistent with other studies, we find a strong overall agreement (Kappa  = 0.872 between genetic ancestry and assigned race, with higher rates of agreement for African-descent and European-descent assignments, and reduced agreement for Hispanic, East Asian-descent, and South Asian-descent assignments. These results suggest caution when selecting study samples of non-African and non-European backgrounds when administratively-assigned race from biobanks is used.

  13.  Satisfaction and Perceived Quality of an Electronic Medical Record System in a Tertiary Hospital in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Ganesh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  Objective: To evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP of physicians towards the Electronic Medical Record (EMR system.Methods: A cross-sectional survey including physicians from various clinical specialties was conducted. An existing questionnaire was adapted to assess the KAP of physicians towards the EMR system. Information was analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS software.Results: Out of 200 distributed questionnaires, 141 (70.5�20responses were received. Overall, only 22 physicians (15.6�20rated the current EMR system as an effective tool. A substantial proportion (29.4�20of respondents considered EMR not worth the time and effort required to use it. The majority (67.4�20reported increasing difficulty with the performance of work after applying the EMR system. The overall quality of work was perceived not to have changed (41.2�0of the respondents or declined (27.4�0of the respondents. The low satisfaction and underperformance was found to be associated with younger age (p=0.032, junior designation (p=0.041, and low familiarity with computers (p=0.047.Conclusion: We report low satisfaction and perceived quality of work among physicians in our institution with the current EMR system. Inappropriate and inadequate usage of the system was found to be the main cause of the underlying poor satisfaction.

  14. Electronic Medical Record in Central Polyclinic of Isfahan Oil Industry: A Case Study Based on Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Nahid; Jahanbakhsh, Maryam; Shahin, Arash; Mokhtari, Habibollah; Rafiei, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Today, health information technologies are base of health services and Electronic Medical Record is one of them. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) on EMR at Central Polyclinic Oil Industry that is a pioneer in implementation of EMR in Isfahan. Methods This study was an applied and analytical survey that it was done at the Central Polyclinic Oil Industry. Because statistical population were limited, sampling bas been done by conducting the census and the sample was according to the population. The data was collected by a researcher-made questionnaire that it was validated by experts and its reliability was confirmed by test retest. The questionnaire was developed in 5 scopes including external factors (data quality and user interface), perceived usefulness, perceived ease of usefulness, attitude toward using, and behavioral intention to use. The Results analyzed by SPSS. Results There was a significant relationship between data quality with PU(r=/295, p/005). Discussion The survey of the scopes in the polyclinic showed that there is relationship among user interface, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of usefulness, attitude toward using, and behavioral intention to use, but data quality has no relationship with attitude. It seems the system designers didn’t consider to data quality characteristics. It is proposed that they consult with health information management professionals for improvement the existing system. PMID:23572857

  15. Clinical Correlates of Autosomal Chromosomal Abnormalities in an Electronic Medical Record–Linked Genome-Wide Association Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayan Jouni M.D.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although mosaic autosomal chromosomal abnormalities are being increasingly detected as part of high-density genotyping studies, the clinical correlates are unclear. From an electronic medical record (EMR–based genome-wide association study (GWAS of peripheral arterial disease, log-R-ratio and B-allele-frequency data were used to identify mosaic autosomal chromosomal abnormalities including copy number variation and loss of heterozygosity. The EMRs of patients with chromosomal abnormalities and those without chromosomal abnormalities were reviewed to compare clinical characteristics. Among 3336 study participants, 0.75% (n = 25, mean age = 74.8 ± 10.7 years, 64% men had abnormal intensity plots indicative of autosomal chromosomal abnormalities. A hematologic malignancy was present in 8 patients (32%, of whom 4 also had a solid organ malignancy while 2 patients had a solid organ malignancy only. In 50 age- and sex-matched participants without chromosomal abnormalities, there was a lower rate of hematologic malignancies (2% vs 32%, P < .001 but not solid organ malignancies (20% vs 24%, P = .69. We also report the clinical characteristics of each patient with the observed chromosomal abnormalities. Interestingly, among 5 patients with 20q deletions, 4 had a myeloproliferative disorder while all 3 men in this group had prostate cancer. In summary, in a GWAS of 3336 adults, 0.75% had autosomal chromosomal abnormalities and nearly a third of them had hematologic malignancies. A potential novel association between 20q deletions, myeloproliferative disorders, and prostate cancer was also noted.

  16. Distance-including rigorous upper bounds and tight estimates for two-electron integrals over long- and short-range operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Travis H.; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2017-10-01

    We introduce both rigorous and non-rigorous distance-dependent integral estimates for four-center two-electron integrals derived from a distance-including Schwarz-type inequality. The estimates are even easier to implement than our so far most efficient distance-dependent estimates [S. A. Maurer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 144107 (2012)] and, in addition, do not require well-separated charge-distributions. They are also applicable to a wide range of two-electron operators such as those found in explicitly correlated theories and in short-range hybrid density functionals. For two such operators with exponential distance decay [e-r12 and erfc (0.11 ṡr12 ) /r12], the rigorous bound is shown to be much tighter than the standard Schwarz estimate with virtually no error penalty. The non-rigorous estimate gives results very close to an exact screening for these operators and for the long-range 1/r12 operator, with errors that are completely controllable through the integral screening threshold. In addition, we present an alternative form of our non-rigorous bound that is particularly well-suited for improving the PreLinK method [J. Kussmann and C. Ochsenfeld, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134114 (2013)] in the context of short-range exchange calculations.

  17. Distance-including rigorous upper bounds and tight estimates for two-electron integrals over long- and short-range operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Travis H; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2017-10-14

    We introduce both rigorous and non-rigorous distance-dependent integral estimates for four-center two-electron integrals derived from a distance-including Schwarz-type inequality. The estimates are even easier to implement than our so far most efficient distance-dependent estimates [S. A. Maurer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 144107 (2012)] and, in addition, do not require well-separated charge-distributions. They are also applicable to a wide range of two-electron operators such as those found in explicitly correlated theories and in short-range hybrid density functionals. For two such operators with exponential distance decay [e -r 12 and erfc(0.11⋅r 12 )/r 12 ], the rigorous bound is shown to be much tighter than the standard Schwarz estimate with virtually no error penalty. The non-rigorous estimate gives results very close to an exact screening for these operators and for the long-range 1/r 12 operator, with errors that are completely controllable through the integral screening threshold. In addition, we present an alternative form of our non-rigorous bound that is particularly well-suited for improving the PreLinK method [J. Kussmann and C. Ochsenfeld, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134114 (2013)] in the context of short-range exchange calculations.

  18. Critical Gaps in the World’s Largest Electronic Medical Record: Ad Hoc Nursing Narratives and Invisible Adverse Drug Events

    OpenAIRE

    Hurdle, John F.; Weir, Charlene R.; Roth, Beverly; Hoffman, Jennifer; Nebeker, Jonathan R.

    2003-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA), of the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, operates one of the largest healthcare networks in the world. Its electronic medical record (EMR) is fully integrated into clinical practice, having evolved over several decades of design, testing, trial, and error. It is unarguably the world’s largest EMR, and as such it makes an important case study for a host of timely informatics issues. The VHA consistently has been at the vanguard of patient safety, esp...

  19. Usage Pattern Differences and Similarities of Mobile Electronic Medical Records Among Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yura; Park, Yu Rang; Kim, Junetae; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Woo Sung; Lee, Jae-Ho

    2017-12-13

    Recently, many hospitals have introduced mobile electronic medical records (mEMRs). Although numerous studies have been published on the usability or usage patterns of mEMRs through user surveys, investigations based on the real data usage are lacking. Asan Medical Center, a tertiary hospital in Seoul, Korea, implemented an mEMR program in 2010. On the basis of the mEMR usage log data collected over a period of 4.5 years, we aimed to identify a usage pattern and trends in accordance with user occupation and to disseminate the factors that make the mEMR more effective and efficient. The mEMR log data were collected from March 2012 to August 2016. Descriptive analyses were completed according to user occupation, access time, services, and wireless network type. Specifically, analyses targeted were as follows: (1) the status of the mEMR usage and distribution of users, (2) trends in the number of users and usage amount, (3) 24-hour usage patterns, and (4) trends in service usage based on user occupations. Linear regressions were performed to model the relationship between the time, access frequency, and the number of users. The differences between the user occupations were examined using Student t tests for categorical variables. Approximately two-thirds of the doctors and nurses used the mEMR. The number of logs studied was 7,144,459. Among 3859 users, 2333 (60.46%) users were nurses and 1102 (28.56%) users were doctors. On average, the mEMR was used 1044 times by 438 users per day. The number of users and amount of access logs have significantly increased since 2012 (Pusage periods were observed during 08:00 to 09:00 and 17:00 to 18:00, which were coincident with the beginning of ward rounds. Conversely, the peak usage periods for the nurses were observed during 05:00 to 06:00, 12:00 to 13:00, and 20:00 to 21:00, which effectively occurred 1 or 2 hours before handover. In more than 80% of all cases, the mEMR was accessed via a nonhospital wireless network. The usage

  20. Maternity patients' access to their electronic medical records: use and perspectives of a patient portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megan Forster, Megan; Dennison, Kerrie; Callen, Joanne; Andrew, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna I

    Patients have been able to access clinical information from their paper-based health records for a number of years. With the advent of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) access to this information can now be achieved online using a secure electronic patient portal. The purpose of this study was to investigate maternity patients' use and perceptions of a patient portal developed at the Mater Mothers' Hospital in Brisbane, Australia. A web-based patient portal, one of the first developed and deployed in Australia, was introduced on 26 June 2012. The portal was designed for maternity patients booked at Mater Mothers' Hospital, as an alternative to the paper-based Pregnancy Health Record. Through the portal, maternity patients are able to complete their hospital registration form online and obtain current health information about their pregnancy (via their EMR), as well as access a variety of support tools to use during their pregnancy such as tailored public health advice. A retrospective cross-sectional study design was employed. Usage statistics were extracted from the system for a one year period (1 July 2012 to 30 June 2013). Patients' perceptions of the portal were obtained using an online survey, accessible by maternity patients for two weeks in February 2013 (n=80). Descriptive statistics were employed to analyse the data. Between July 2012 and June 2013, 10,892 maternity patients were offered a patient portal account and access to their EMR. Of those 6,518 created one (60%; 6,518/10,892) and 3,104 went on to request access to their EMR (48%; 3,104/6,518). Of these, 1,751 had their access application granted by 30 June 2013. The majority of maternity patients submitted registration forms online via the patient portal (56.7%). Patients could view their EMR multiple times: there were 671 views of the EMR, 2,781 views of appointment schedules and 135 birth preferences submitted via the EMR. Eighty survey responses were received from EMR account holders, (response

  1. Do general practitioners record alcohol abuse in the electronic medical records? A comparison of survey and medical record data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, L; Oenema, A; van den Akker, M; van de Mheen, D

    2018-03-01

    Primary care professionals are encouraged to screen patients for alcohol abuse. However, patients with alcohol abuse are often under-diagnosed as well as under-registered in medical records in general practices. This study aims to report on the registration rates of alcohol abuse diagnoses in general practices in comparison to patients' self-reported rates of alcohol use disorder. Data of a total number of 2,349 patients were analyzed from the SMILE study, a large prospective cohort study conducted in The Netherlands. Two data collection strategies were combined: (1) Patient self-report data on alcohol consumption as well as other sociodemographic characteristics; (2) Medical record (ICPC codes) data of diagnoses of chronic and acute alcohol abuse of the same patients. GPs' registrations of diagnoses were compared with the self-report data using descriptive statistics. Based on the results of the patient reported data, 179 (14.8%) male participants had an alcohol use disorder. Of the total number of female patients, 82 (7.2%) had an alcohol use disorder. One of the male and none of the female patients with an alcohol use disorder were registered as such by the GP. This study found that 11.1% of the total patient sample reported an alcohol use disorder, of which a strikingly low number of patients were recorded as such by their GP. It is likely that low recognition due to barriers related to alcohol screening as well as registration avoidance due to the stigma around alcohol abuse play a role in low registration.

  2. Electron linac for medical isotope production with improved energy efficiency and isotope recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, John; Walters, Dean; Virgo, Matt; Lewellen, John

    2015-09-08

    A method and isotope linac system are provided for producing radio-isotopes and for recovering isotopes. The isotope linac is an energy recovery linac (ERL) with an electron beam being transmitted through an isotope-producing target. The electron beam energy is recollected and re-injected into an accelerating structure. The ERL provides improved efficiency with reduced power requirements and provides improved thermal management of an isotope target and an electron-to-x-ray converter.

  3. Patient Perceptions of Electronic Medical Record Use by Faculty and Resident Physicians: A Mixed Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei Wei; Alkureishi, Maria A; Ukabiala, Obioma; Venable, Laura Ruth; Ngooi, Samantha S; Staisiunas, Daina D; Wroblewski, Kristen E; Arora, Vineet M

    2016-11-01

    While concerns remain regarding Electronic Medical Records (EMR) use impeding doctor-patient communication, resident and faculty patient perspectives post-widespread EMR adoption remain largely unexplored. We aimed to describe patient perspectives of outpatient resident and faculty EMR use and identify positive and negative EMR use examples to promote optimal utilization. This was a prospective mixed-methods study. Internal medicine faculty and resident patients at the University of Chicago's primary care clinic participated in the study. In 2013, one year after EMR implementation, telephone interviews were conducted with patients using open-ended and Likert style questions to elicit positive and negative perceptions of EMR use by physicians. Interview transcripts were analyzed qualitatively to develop a coding classification. Satisfaction with physician EMR use was examined using bivariate statistics. In total, 108 interviews were completed and analyzed. Two major themes were noted: (1) Clinical Functions of EMR and (2) Communication Functions of EMR; as well as six subthemes: (1a) Clinical Care (i.e., clinical efficiency), (1b) Documentation (i.e., proper record keeping and access), (1c) Information Access, (1d) Educational Resource, (2a) Patient Engagement and (2b) Physical Focus (i.e., body positioning). Overall, 85 % (979/1154) of patient perceptions of EMR use were positive, with the majority within the "Clinical Care" subtheme (n = 218). Of negative perceptions, 66 % (115/175) related to the "Communication Functions" theme, and the majority of those related to the "Physical Focus" subtheme (n = 71). The majority of patients (90 %, 95/106) were satisfied with physician EMR use: 59 % (63/107) reported the computer had a positive effect on their relationship and only 7 % (8/108) reported the EMR made it harder to talk with their doctors. Despite concerns regarding EMRs impeding doctor-patient communication, patients reported largely positive

  4. Adherence to hydroxyurea medication by children with sickle cell disease (SCD) using an electronic device: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Susumu; Kodjebacheva, Gergana; Scherrer, Tammy; Rice, Gary; Grigorian, Matthew; Blankenship, Jeremy; Onwuzurike, Nkechi

    2016-08-01

    Adherence to hydroxyurea (HU) is a significant modifying factor in sickle cell vaso-occlusive pain. We conducted a study using an electronic medication container-monitor-reminder device (GlowCap™) to track adherence and determine whether use of this device affected rates of HU adherence. Subjects were regular attendees to our clinic. They were given a 37-item questionnaire and were asked to use a GlowCap containing HU. When the device cap is opened, it makes a remote "medication taken" record. The device also provides usage reminder in the form of lights and alarm sounds if the cap opening is delayed. Nineteen subjects participated in the survey, and 17 in the intervention phase. Of the 17, 12 had reliable adherence data. Seventeen caregivers of patients and two patients completed the survey. Two most common barriers to adherence identified were lack of reminders and absence of medicine home delivery. The intervention component of this study, which used both the electronic (GlowCap) method and medication possession ratio showed that the median adherence rate for the 12 patients evaluated was 85 %. The GlowCap device accurately kept a record of adherence rates. This device may be an effective tool for increasing HU medication adherence.

  5. A standard operating protocol (SOP) and minimum data set (MDS) for nursing and medical handover: considerations for flexible standardization in developing electronic tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Paul; Wong, Ming Chao; Yee, Kwang Chien

    2009-01-01

    As part of Australia's participation in the World Health Organization, the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care (ACSQHC) is the leading federal government technical agency involved in the area of clinical handover improvement. The ACSQHC has funded a range of handover improvement projects in Australia including one at the Royal Hobart Hospital (RHH), Tasmania. The RHH project aims to investigate the potential for generalizable and transferable clinical handover solutions throughout the medical and nursing disciplines. More specifically, this project produced an over-arching minimum data set (MDS) and over-arching standardized operating protocol (SOP) based on research work on nursing and medical shift-to-shift clinical handover in general medicine, general surgery and emergency medicine. The over-arching MDS consists of five headings: situational awareness, patient identification, history and information, responsibility and tasks and accountability. The over-arching SOP has five phases: preparation; design; implementation; evaluation; and maintenance. This paper provides an overview of the project and the approach taken. It considers the implications of these standardized operating protocols and minimum data sets for developing electronic clinical handover support tools. Significantly, the paper highlights a human-centred design approach that actively involves medical and nursing staff in data collection, analysis, interpretation, and systems design. This approach reveals the dangers of info-centrism when considering electronic tools, as information emerges as the only factor amongst many others that influence the efficiency and effectiveness of clinical handover.

  6. Development and evaluation of an interactive electronic laboratory manual for cooperative learning of medical histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohammed K; Kirkley, Debbie L; Kibble, Jonathan D

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the development of an interactive computer-based laboratory manual, created to facilitate the teaching and learning of medical histology. The overarching goal of developing the manual is to facilitate self-directed group interactivities that actively engage students during laboratory sessions. The design of the manual includes guided instruction for students to navigate virtual slides, exercises for students to monitor learning, and cases to provide clinical relevance. At the end of the laboratory activities, student groups can generate a laboratory report that may be used to provide formative feedback. The instructional value of the manual was evaluated by a questionnaire containing both closed-ended and open-ended items. Closed-ended items using a five-point Likert-scale assessed the format and navigation, instructional contents, group process, and learning process. Open-ended items assessed student's perception on the effectiveness of the manual in facilitating their learning. After implementation for two consecutive years, student evaluation of the manual was highly positive and indicated that it facilitated their learning by reinforcing and clarifying classroom sessions, improved their understanding, facilitated active and cooperative learning, and supported self-monitoring of their learning. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

  7. The work practice of medical secretaries and the implementation of electronic health records in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Pernille; Nøhr, Christian

    2005-01-01

    that medical secretaries have a great variety of duties, and often act as the organisational ‘glue’ or connecting thread between other professional groups at the hospital. The aim of this study is to obtain a detailed understanding of the pluralism of work tasks the medical secretaries perform. It is concluded...

  8. Quality of medication information in discharge summaries from hospitals: an audit of electronic patient records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Beate Hennie; Djønne, Berit Svendsen; Skjold, Frode; Mellingen, Ellen Marie; Aag, Trine Iversen

    2017-12-01

    Background Low quality of medication information in discharge summaries from hospitals may jeopardize optimal therapy and put the patient at risk for medication errors and adverse drug events. Objective To audit the quality of medication information in discharge summaries and explore factors associated with the quality. Setting Helgelandssykehuset Mo i Rana, a rural hospital in central Norway. Method For each month in 2013, we randomly selected 60 discharge summaries from the Department of Medicine and Surgery (totally 720) and evaluated the medication information using eight Norwegian quality criteria. Main outcome measure Mean score per discharge summary ranging from 0 (lowest quality) to 16 (highest quality). Results Mean score per discharge summary was 7.4 (SD 2.8; range 0-14), significantly higher when evaluating medications used regularly compared to mediations used as needed (7.80 vs. 6.52; p < 0.001). Lowest score was achieved for quality criteria concerning generic names, indications for medication use, reasons why changes had been made and information about the source for information. Factors associated with increased quality scores are increasing numbers of medications and male patients. Increasing age seemed to be associated with a reduced score, while type of department was not associated with the quality. Conclusion In discharge summaries from 2013, we identified a low quality of medication information in accordance with the Norwegian quality criteria. Actions for improvement are necessary and follow-up studies to monitor quality are needed.

  9. Structured assessment for prospective identification of safety signals in electronic medical records: evaluation in the health improvement network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederholm, S; Hill, G; Asiimwe, A; Bate, A; Bhayat, F; Persson Brobert, G; Bergvall, T; Ansell, D; Star, K; Norén, G N

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacovigilance signal detection largely relies on individual case reports, but longitudinal health data are being explored as complementary information sources. Research to date has focused on the ability of epidemiological methods to distinguish established adverse drug reactions (ADRs) from unrelated adverse events. The aim of this study was to evaluate a process for structured clinical and epidemiological assessment of temporally associated drugs and medical events in electronic medical records. Pairs of drugs and medical events were selected for review on the basis of their temporal association according to a calibrated self-controlled cohort analysis in The Health Improvement Network. Six assessors trained in pharmacovigilance and/or epidemiology evaluated seven drugs each, with up to 20 medical events per drug. A pre-specified questionnaire considered aspects related to the nature of the temporal pattern, demographic features of the cohort, concomitant medicines, earlier signs and symptoms, and possible confounding by underlying disease. This informed a classification of drug-event pairs as known ADRs, meriting further evaluation, or dismissed. The number of temporally associated medical events per drug ranged from 11 to 307 (median 50) for the 42 selected drugs. Out of the 509 relevant drug-event combinations subjected to the assessment, 127 (25 %) were classified as known ADRs. Ninety-one (24 %) of the remaining pairs were classified as potential signals meriting further evaluation and 291 (76 %) were dismissed. Suggestive temporal patterns and lack of clear alternative explanations were the most common reasons that drug-event pairs were classified as meriting further evaluation. Earlier signs and symptoms and confounding by the underlying disease were the most common reasons that drug-event pairs were dismissed. Exploratory analysis of electronic medical records can detect important potential safety signals. However, effective signal detection requires

  10. Development of electronic medical record charting for hospital-based transfusion and apheresis medicine services: Early adoption perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Levy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electronic medical records (EMRs provide universal access to health care information across multidisciplinary lines. In pathology departments, transfusion and apheresis medicine services (TAMS involved in direct patient care activities produce data and documentation that typically do not enter the EMR. Taking advantage of our institution′s initiative for implementation of a paperless medical record, our TAMS division set out to develop an electronic charting (e-charting strategy within the EMR. Methods: A focus group of our hospital′s transfusion committee consisting of transfusion medicine specialists, pathologists, residents, nurses, hemapheresis specialists, and information technologists was constituted and charged with the project. The group met periodically to implement e-charting TAMS workflow and produced electronic documents within the EMR (Cerner Millenium for various service line functions. Results: The interdisciplinary working group developed and implemented electronic versions of various paper-based clinical documentation used by these services. All electronic notes collectively gather and reside within a unique Transfusion Medicine Folder tab in the EMR, available to staff with access to patient charts. E-charting eliminated illegible handwritten notes, resulted in more consistent clinical documentation among staff, and provided greater real-time review/access of hemotherapy practices. No major impediments to workflow or inefficiencies have been encountered. However, minor updates and corrections to documents as well as select work re-designs were required for optimal use of e-charting by these services. Conclusion: Documentation of pathology subspecialty activities such as TAMS can be successfully incorporated into the EMR. E-charting by staff enhances communication and helps promote standardized documentation of patient care within and across service lines. Well-constructed electronic documents in the EMR may also

  11. Examining rare and low-frequency genetic variants previously associated with lone or familial forms of atrial fibrillation in an electronic medical record system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, Peter; Denny, Joshua C; Basterache, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    of European or African ancestry with electronic medical records and exome chip data to compare the frequency of AF among carriers and noncarriers of these rare variants. METHODS AND RESULTS: The exome chip included 19 of 115 rare variants, in 9 genes, previously associated with lone or familial AF. Using......BACKGROUND: Studies in individuals or small kindreds have implicated rare variants in 25 different genes in lone and familial atrial fibrillation (AF) using linkage and segregation analysis, functional characterization, and rarity in public databases. Here, we used a cohort of 20 204 patients...... validated algorithms querying a combination of clinical notes, structured billing codes, ECG reports, and procedure codes, we identified 1056 AF cases (>18 years) and 19 148 non-AF controls (>50 years) with available genotype data on the Illumina HumanExome BeadChip v.1.0 in the Vanderbilt electronic...

  12. Rapid application design of an electronic clinical skills portfolio for undergraduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornan, Tim; Lee, Catherine; Stopford, Adam; Hosie, Liam; Maredia, Neil; Rector, Alan

    2005-04-01

    The aim was to find how to use information and communication technology to present the clinical skills content of an undergraduate medical curriculum. Rapid application design was used to develop the product, and technical action research was used to evaluate the development process. A clinician-educator, two medical students, two computing science masters students, two other project workers, and a hospital education informatics lead, formed a design team. A sample of stakeholders took part in requirements planning workshops and continued to advise the team throughout the project. A university hospital had many features that favoured fast, inexpensive, and successful system development: a clearly defined and readily accessible user group; location of the development process close to end-users; fast, informal communication; leadership by highly motivated and senior end-users; devolved authority and lack of any rigidly imposed management structure; cooperation of clinicians because the project drew on their clinical expertise to achieve scholastic goals; a culture of learning and involvement of highly motivated students. A detailed specification was developed through storyboarding, use case diagramming, and evolutionary prototyping. A very usable working product was developed within weeks. "SkillsBase" is a database web application using Microsoft Active Server Pages, served from a Microsoft Windows 2000 Server operating system running Internet Information Server 5.0. Graphing functionality is provided by the KavaChart applet. It presents the skills curriculum, provides a password-protected portfolio function, and offers training materials. The curriculum can be presented in several different ways to help students reflect on their objectives and progress towards achieving them. The reflective portfolio function is entirely private to each student user and allows them to document their progress in attaining skills, as judged by self, peer and tutor assessment, and

  13. The impact of a multifaceted intervention including sepsis electronic alert system and sepsis response team on the outcomes of patients with sepsis and septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabi, Yaseen M; Al-Dorzi, Hasan M; Alamry, Ahmed; Hijazi, Ra'ed; Alsolamy, Sami; Al Salamah, Majid; Tamim, Hani M; Al-Qahtani, Saad; Al-Dawood, Abdulaziz; Marini, Abdellatif M; Al Ehnidi, Fatimah H; Mundekkadan, Shihab; Matroud, Amal; Mohamed, Mohamed S; Taher, Saadi

    2017-12-01

    Compliance with the clinical practice guidelines of sepsis management has been low. The objective of our study was to describe the results of implementing a multifaceted intervention including an electronic alert (e-alert) with a sepsis response team (SRT) on the outcome of patients with sepsis and septic shock presenting to the emergency department. This was a pre-post two-phased implementation study that consisted of a pre-intervention phase (January 01, 2011-September 24, 2012), intervention phase I (multifaceted intervention including e-alert, from September 25, 2012-March 03, 2013) and intervention phase II when SRT was added (March 04, 2013-October 30, 2013) in a 900-bed tertiary-care academic hospital. We recorded baseline characteristics and processes of care in adult patients presenting with sepsis or septic shock. The primary outcome measures were hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes were the need for mechanical ventilation and length of stay in the intensive unit and in the hospital. After implementing the multifaceted intervention including e-alert and SRT, cases were identified with less severe clinical and laboratory abnormalities and the processes of care improved. When adjusted to propensity score, the interventions were associated with reduction in hospital mortality [for intervention phase II compared to pre-intervention: adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.71, 95% CI 0.58-0.85, p = 0.003], reduction in the need for mechanical ventilation (aOR 0.45, 95% CI 0.37-0.55, p mechanical ventilation and reduction in hospital mortality and LOS.

  14. SU-F-T-234: Quality Improvements in the Electronic Medical Record of Patients Treated with High Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diener, T; Wilkinson, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To improve workflow efficiency and patient safety by assessing the quality control documentation for HDR brachytherapy within our Electronic Medical Record System (Mosaiq). Methods: A list of parameters based on NRC regulations, our quality management program (QMP), recommendations of the ACR and the American Brachyther