WorldWideScience

Sample records for include dynamics condensation

  1. Dynamics of inhomogeneous chiral condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlomagno, Juan Pablo; Krein, Gastão; Kroff, Daniel; Peixoto, Thiago

    2018-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the formation of inhomogeneous chirally broken phases in the final stages of a heavy-ion collision, with particular interest on the time scales involved in the formation process. The study is conducted within the framework of a Ginzburg-Landau time evolution, driven by a free energy functional motivated by the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. Expansion of the medium is modeled by one-dimensional Bjorken flow and its effect on the formation of inhomogeneous condensates is investigated. We also use a free energy functional from a nonlocal Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model which predicts metastable phases that lead to long-lived inhomogeneous condensates before reaching an equilibrium phase with homogeneous condensates.

  2. The Dynamics of Aerosols in Condensational Scrubbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Jens Tue; Christensen, Jan A.; Simonsen, Ole

    1997-01-01

    A mathematical model for the simulation of the dynamics of aerosol change in condensational scrubbers and scrubbing condensers is proposed. The model is applicable for packed column gas/liquid contact when plug flow can be assumed. The model is compared with experimental data for particle removal...... for their estimation is proposed. The behaviour of scrubbers and condensers for some important technical applications is demonstrated by model simulations. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  3. Dynamics of capillary condensation in aerogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, R; Miyashita, W; Yoneyama, K; Okuda, Y

    2006-03-01

    Dynamics of capillary condensation of liquid 4He in various density silica aerogels was investigated systematically. Interfaces were clearly visible when bulk liquid was rapidly sucked into the aerogel. Time evolution of the interface positions was consistent with the Washburn model and their effective pore radii were obtained. Condensation was a single step in a dense aerogel and two steps in a low density aerogel. Crossover between the two types of condensation was observed in an intermediate density aerogel. Variety of the dynamics may be the manifestation of the fractal nature of aerogels which had a wide range of distribution of pore radii.

  4. Heavy quark condensates from dynamically borken flavour symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, T.; King, S.F.

    1992-01-01

    We study the dynamics of top quark condensation induced by gauge interactions resulting from a broken flavour symmetry. The gap equation in dressed ladder approximation is solved numerically to obtain directly the top quark mass. The new high energy dynamics reduces the prediction of m t somewhat, but the usual problems of m t being too large and fine tuning remain. In order to solve these problems we extend our discussion to include fourth generation quark condensates. (orig.)

  5. Dynamics of moduli and gaugino condensates in an expanding universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papineau, C.; Ramos-Sanchez, S.; Postma, M.

    2009-08-01

    We study dynamical moduli stabilization driven by gaugino condensation in supergravity. In the presence of background radiation, there exists a region of initial conditions leading to successful stabilization. We point out that most of the allowed region corresponds to initial Hubble rate H close to the scale of condensation Λ, which is the natural cutoff of the effective theory. We first show that including the condensate dynamics sets a strong bound on the initial conditions. We then find that (complete) decoupling of the condensate happens at H about two orders of magnitude below Λ. This bound implies that in the usual scenario with the condensate integrated out, only the vicinity of the minimum leads to stabilization. Finally, we discuss the effects of thermal corrections. (orig.)

  6. Temporal dynamics of Bose-condensed gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trujillo Martinez, Mauricio

    2014-03-19

    We perform a detailed quantum dynamical study of non-equilibrium trapped, interacting Bose-condensed gases. We investigate Josephson oscillations between interacting Bose-Einstein condensates confined in a finite size double-well trap and the non-trivial time evolution of a coherent state placed at the center of a two dimensional optical lattice. For the Josephson oscillations three time scales appear. We find that Josephson junction can sustain multiple undamped oscillations up to a characteristic time scale τ{sub c} without exciting atoms out of the condensates. Beyond the characteristic time scale τ{sub c} the dynamics of the junction are governed by fast, non-condensed particles assisted Josephson tunnelling as well as the collisions between non-condensed particles. In the non-condensed particles dominated regime we observe strong damping of the oscillations due to inelastic collisions, equilibrating the system leading to an effective loss of details of the initial conditions. In addition, we predict that an initially self-trapped BEC state will be destroyed by these fast dynamics. The time evolution of a coherent state released at the center of a two dimensional optical lattice shows a ballistic expansion with a decreasing expansion velocity for increasing two-body interactions strength and particle number. Additionally, we predict that if the two-body interactions strength exceeds a certain value, a forerunner splits up from the expanding coherent state. We also observe that this system, which is prepared far from equilibrium, can evolve to a quasistationary non-equilibrium state.

  7. Simulating coronal condensation dynamics in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschou, S. P.; Keppens, R.; Xia, C.; Fang, X.

    2015-12-01

    We present numerical simulations in 3D settings where coronal rain phenomena take place in a magnetic configuration of a quadrupolar arcade system. Our simulation is a magnetohydrodynamic simulation including anisotropic thermal conduction, optically thin radiative losses, and parametrised heating as main thermodynamical features to construct a realistic arcade configuration from chromospheric to coronal heights. The plasma evaporation from chromospheric and transition region heights eventually causes localised runaway condensation events and we witness the formation of plasma blobs due to thermal instability, that evolve dynamically in the heated arcade part and move gradually downwards due to interchange type dynamics. Unlike earlier 2.5D simulations, in this case there is no large scale prominence formation observed, but a continuous coronal rain develops which shows clear indications of Rayleigh-Taylor or interchange instability, that causes the denser plasma located above the transition region to fall down, as the system moves towards a more stable state. Linear stability analysis is used in the non-linear regime for gaining insight and giving a prediction of the system's evolution. After the plasma blobs descend through interchange, they follow the magnetic field topology more closely in the lower coronal regions, where they are guided by the magnetic dips.

  8. Competition between Bose-Einstein Condensation and Spin Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, B; Brewczyk, M; Gajda, M; Gorceix, O; Maréchal, E; Vernac, L; Laburthe-Tolra, B

    2016-10-28

    We study the impact of spin-exchange collisions on the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensation by rapidly cooling a chromium multicomponent Bose gas. Despite relatively strong spin-dependent interactions, the critical temperature for Bose-Einstein condensation is reached before the spin degrees of freedom fully thermalize. The increase in density due to Bose-Einstein condensation then triggers spin dynamics, hampering the formation of condensates in spin-excited states. Small metastable spinor condensates are, nevertheless, produced, and they manifest in strong spin fluctuations.

  9. Pion condensation and neutron star dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaempfer, B.

    1983-01-01

    The question of formation of pion condensate via a phase transition in nuclear matter, especially in the core of neutron stars is reviewed. The possible mechanisms and the theoretical restrictions of pion condensation are summarized. The effects of ultradense equation of state and density jumps on the possible condensation phase transition are investigated. The possibilities of observation of condensation process are described. (D.Gy.)

  10. Condensation and Wetting Dynamics on Micro/Nano-Structured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olceroglu, Emre

    Because of their adjustable wetting characteristics, micro/nanostructured surfaces are attractive for the enhancement of phase-change heat transfer where liquid-solid-vapor interactions are important. Condensation, evaporation, and boiling processes are traditionally used in a variety of applications including water harvesting, desalination, industrial power generation, HVAC, and thermal management systems. Although they have been studied by numerous researchers, there is currently a lack of understanding of the underlying mechanisms by which structured surfaces improve heat transfer during phase-change. This PhD dissertation focuses on condensation onto engineered surfaces including fabrication aspect, the physics of phase-change, and the operational limitations of engineered surfaces. While superhydrophobic condensation has been shown to produce high heat transfer rates, several critical issues remain in the field. These include surface manufacturability, heat transfer coefficient measurement limitations at low heat fluxes, failure due to surface flooding at high supersaturations, insufficient modeling of droplet growth rates, and the inherent issues associated with maintenance of non-wetted surface structures. Each of these issues is investigated in this thesis, leading to several contributions to the field of condensation on engineered surfaces. A variety of engineered surfaces have been fabricated and characterized, including nanostructured and hierarchically-structured superhydrophobic surfaces. The Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is used here as a biological template for the fabrication of nickel nanostructures, which are subsequently functionalized to achieve superhydrophobicity. This technique is simple and sustainable, and requires no applied heat or external power, thus making it easily extendable to a variety of common heat transfer materials and complex geometries. To measure heat transfer rates during superhydrophobic condensation in the presence of non-condensable

  11. Model for dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and quark condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekrasov, M.L.; Rochev, V.E.

    1986-01-01

    In the framework of the model, proposed earlier to describe nonperturbative QCD, the singularity of the type 1/k 4 in the gluon propagator is shown to result in dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and appearance of quark condensate. The value, obtained for quark condensate, is close to the phenomenological one

  12. Condensers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrieux, M.B.

    1984-01-01

    Characteristics of the condenser cooling waters of various French 900 MW nuclear power plants. Design and description of various types of condensers: condensers feeded directly with river water, condensers feeded by cooling towers, condensers feeded with sea water of brackish water. Presentation of the main problems encountered with the brass bundles (ammoniacal corrosion, erosion of the peripheral tubes, vibrations of the tubes), with the titanium bundles, with the tubular plates, the tubes-tubular plates assemblies, the coatings of the condenser water chamber (sea water), the vapor by-pass and with the air inlet. Analysis of the in service performances such as condensation pressure, oxygen content and availability [fr

  13. Amplitude-Mode Dynamics of Polariton Condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brierley, R. T.; Littlewood, P. B.; Eastham, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    We study the stability of collective amplitude excitations in nonequilibrium polariton condensates. These excitations correspond to renormalized upper polaritons and to the collective amplitude modes of atomic gases and superconductors. They would be present following a quantum quench or could be created directly by resonant excitation. We show that uniform amplitude excitations are unstable to the production of excitations at finite wave vectors, leading to the formation of density-modulated phases. The physical processes causing the instabilities can be understood by analogy to optical parametric oscillators and the atomic Bose supernova.

  14. Bose-Einstein condensate collapse and dynamical squeezing of vacuum fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calzetta, E.A.; Hu, B.L.

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the phenomena of condensate collapse, as described by Donley et al. [Nature 412, 295 (2001)] and N. Claussen [Ph. D thesis, University of Colorado, 2003 (unpublished)] by focusing on the behavior of excitations or fluctuations above the condensate, as driven by the dynamics of the condensate, rather than the dynamics of the condensate alone or the kinetics of the atoms. The dynamics of the condensate squeezes and amplifies the quantum excitations, mixing the positive and negative frequency components of their wave functions thereby creating particles that appear as bursts and jets. By analyzing the changing amplitude and particle content of these excitations, our simple physical picture explains well the overall features of the collapse phenomena and provides excellent quantitative fits with experimental data on several aspects, such as the scaling behavior of the collapse time and the number of particles in the jet. The prediction of the bursts at this level of approximation is less than satisfactory but may be improved by including the backreaction of the excitations on the condensate. The mechanism behind the dominant effect--parametric amplification of vacuum fluctuations and freezing of modes outside of horizon--is similar to that of cosmological particle creation and structure formation in a rapid quench (which is fundamentally different from Hawking radiation in black holes). This shows that Bose-Einstein condensate dynamics is a promising venue for doing 'laboratory cosmology'

  15. Classification of quench-dynamical behaviors in spinor condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daǧ, Ceren B.; Wang, Sheng-Tao; Duan, L.-M.

    2018-02-01

    Thermalization of isolated quantum systems is a long-standing fundamental problem where different mechanisms are proposed over time. We contribute to this discussion by classifying the diverse quench-dynamical behaviors of spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates, which includes well-defined quantum collapse and revivals, thermalization, and certain special cases. These special cases are either nonthermal equilibration with no revival but a collapse even though the system has finite degrees of freedom or no equilibration with no collapse and revival. Given that some integrable systems are already shown to demonstrate the weak form of eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH), we determine the regions where ETH holds and fails in this integrable isolated quantum system. The reason behind both thermalizing and nonthermalizing behaviors in the same model under different initial conditions is linked to the discussion of "rare" nonthermal states existing in the spectrum. We also propose a method to predict the collapse and revival time scales and find how they scale with the number of particles in the condensate. We use a sudden quench to drive the system to nonequilibrium and hence the theoretical predictions given in this paper can be probed in experiments.

  16. Dynamical quark and gluon condensates from a modified perturbative QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabo Montes de Oca, A.; Martinez Pedrera, D.

    2004-12-01

    As it was suggested by previous works on a modified perturbation expansion for QCD, the possibility for the generation of large quark condensates in the massless version of the theory is explored. For this purpose, it is firstly presented a way to well define the Feynman diagrams at any number of loops by just employing dimensional regularization. After that, the calculated zero and one loop corrections to the effective potential indicate a strong instability of the system under the generation of quark condensates even in the absence of the gluon one. The quark condensate dependence of particular two loop terms does not modify the instability picture arising at one loop. The results suggest a possible mechanism for a sort of Top Condensate Model to be a dynamically fixed effective action for massless QCD. The inability of lattice calculations in detecting this possibility could be related to the current limitations in treating the fermion determinants. (author)

  17. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasenzer, Thomas; McLerran, Larry; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dénes

    2014-01-01

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates

  18. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasenzer, Thomas [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); McLerran, Larry [Physics Department, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); RIKEN BNL Research Center, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Physics Department, China Central Normal University, Wuhan (China); Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dénes [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.

  19. The dynamics of Affleck-Dine condensate collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enqvist, Kari; McDonald, John

    2000-01-01

    In the MSSM, cosmological scalar field condensates formed along flat directions of the scalar potential (Affleck-Dine condensates) are typically unstable with respect to formation of Q-balls, a type of non-topological soliton. We consider the dynamical evolution of the Affleck-Dine condensate in the MSSM. We discuss the creation and linear growth, in F- and D-term inflation models, of the quantum seed perturbations which in the non-linear regime catalyse the collapse of the condensate to non-topological soliton lumps. We study numerically the evolution of the collapsing condensate lumps and show that the solitons initially formed are not in general Q-balls, but Q-axitons, a pseudo-breather which can have very different properties from Q-balls of the same charge. We calculate the energy and charge radiated from a spherically symmetric condensate lump as it evolves into a Q-axiton. We also discuss the implications for baryogenesis and dark matter

  20. Modeling non-adiabatic photoexcited reaction dynamics in condensed phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coker, D.F.

    2003-01-01

    Reactions of photoexcited molecules, ions, and radicals in condensed phase environments involve non-adiabatic dynamics over coupled electronic surfaces. We focus on how local environmental symmetries can effect non-adiabatic coupling between excited electronic states and thus influence, in a possibly controllable way, the outcome of photo-excited reactions. Semi-classical and mixed quantum-classical non-adiabatic molecular dynamics methods, together with semi-empirical excited state potentials are used to probe the dynamical mixing of electronic states in different environments from molecular clusters, to simple liquids and solids, and photo-excited reactions in complex reaction environments such as zeolites

  1. Inflation via Gravitino Condensation in Dynamically Broken Supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandre, Jean; Mavromatos, Nick E

    2015-01-01

    Gravitino-condensate-induced inflation via the super-Higgs effect is a UV-motivated scenario for both inflating the early universe and breaking local supersymmetry dynamically, entirely independent of any coupling to external matter. As an added benefit, this also removes the (as of yet unobserved) massless Goldstino associated to global supersymmetry breaking from the particle spectrum. In this review we detail the pertinent properties and outline previously hidden details of the various steps required in this context in order to make contact with current inflationary phenomenology. The class of models of SUGRA we use to exemplify our approach are minimal four-dimensional N=1 supergravity and conformal extensions thereof (with broken conformal symmetry). Therein, the gravitino condensate itself can play the role of the inflaton, however the requirement of slow-roll necessitates unnaturally large values of the wave-function renormalisation. Nevertheless, there is an alternative scenario that may provide Staro...

  2. Dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a symmetric triple-well trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viscondi, Thiago F; Furuya, K, E-mail: viscondi@ifi.unicamp.br [Instituto de Fisica ' Gleb Wataghin' , Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), 13083-859 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-04-29

    We present a complete analysis of the dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in a symmetric triple-well potential. Our classical analogue treatment, based on a time-dependent variational method using SU(3) coherent states, includes the parameter dependence analysis of the equilibrium points and their local stability, which is closely related to the condensate collective behaviour. We also consider the effects of off-site interactions, and how these 'cross-collisions' may become relevant for a large number of trapped bosons. Even in the presence of cross-collisional terms, the model still features an integrable sub-regime, known as the twin-condensate dynamics, which corresponds to invariant surfaces in the classical phase space. However, the quantum dynamics preserves the twin-condensate defining characteristics only partially, thus breaking the invariance of the associated quantum subspace. Moreover, the periodic geometry of the trapping potential allowed us to investigate the dynamics of finite angular momentum collective excitations, which can be suppressed by the emergence of chaos. Finally, using the generalized purity associated with the su(3) algebra, we were able to quantify the dynamical classicality of a quantum evolved system, as compared to the corresponding classical trajectory.

  3. International Symposium on Dynamics of Ordering Processes in Condensed Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Furukawa, H

    1988-01-01

    The International Symposium on Dynamics of Ordering Processes in Condensed Matter was held at the Kansai Seminar House, Kyoto, for four days, from 27 to 30 August 1987, under the auspices of the Physical Soci­ ety of Japan. The symposium was financially supported by the four orga­ nizations and 45 companies listed on other pages in this volume. We are very grateful to all of them and particularly to the greatest sponsor, the Commemorative Association for the Japan World Exposition 1970. A total Df 22 invited lectures and 48 poster presentations were given and 110 participants attended from seven nations. An objective of the Symposium was to review and extend our present understanding of the dynamics of ordering processes in condensed matters, (for example, alloys, polymers and fluids), that are brought to an un­ stable state by sudden change of such external parameters as temperature and pressure. A second objective, no less important, was to identify new fields of science that might be investigated by sim...

  4. Dynamics and stability of light-like tachyon condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnaby, Neil; Robinson, Patrick; Mulryne, David J.; Nunes, Nelson J.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, Hellerman and Schnabl considered the dynamics of unstable D-branes in the background of a linear dilaton. Remarkably, they were able to construct light-like tachyon solutions which interpolate smoothly between the perturbative and nonperturbative vacua, without undergoing the wild oscillations that plague time-like solutions. In their analysis, however, the full structure of the initial value problem for the nonlocal dynamical equations was not considered. In this paper, therefore, we reexamine the nonlinear dynamics of light-like tachyon condensation using a combination of numerical and analytical techniques. We find that for the p-adic string the monotonic behaviour obtained previously relied on a special choice of initial conditions near the unstable maximum. For generic initial conditions the wild oscillations come back to haunt us. Interestingly, we find an 'island of stability' in initial condition space that leads to sensible evolution at late times. For the string field theory case, on the other hand, we find that the evolution is completely stable for generic choices of initial data. This provides an explicit example of a string theoretic system that admits infinitely many initial data but is nevertheless nonperturbatively stable. Qualitatively similar dynamics are obtained in nonlocal cosmologies where the Hubble damping plays a role very analogous to the dilaton gradient.

  5. Dynamics and stability of light-like tachyon condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaby, Neil; Mulryne, David J.; Nunes, Nelson J.; Robinson, Patrick

    2009-03-01

    Recently, Hellerman and Schnabl considered the dynamics of unstable D-branes in the background of a linear dilaton. Remarkably, they were able to construct light-like tachyon solutions which interpolate smoothly between the perturbative and nonperturbative vacua, without undergoing the wild oscillations that plague time-like solutions. In their analysis, however, the full structure of the initial value problem for the nonlocal dynamical equations was not considered. In this paper, therefore, we reexamine the nonlinear dynamics of light-like tachyon condensation using a combination of numerical and analytical techniques. We find that for the p-adic string the monotonic behaviour obtained previously relied on a special choice of initial conditions near the unstable maximum. For generic initial conditions the wild oscillations come back to haunt us. Interestingly, we find an ``island of stability'' in initial condition space that leads to sensible evolution at late times. For the string field theory case, on the other hand, we find that the evolution is completely stable for generic choices of initial data. This provides an explicit example of a string theoretic system that admits infinitely many initial data but is nevertheless nonperturbatively stable. Qualitatively similar dynamics are obtained in nonlocal cosmologies where the Hubble damping plays a role very analogous to the dilaton gradient.

  6. Collapsing dynamics of attractive Bose-Einstein condensates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergé, L.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    2002-01-01

    The self-similar collapse of 3D and quasi-2D atom condensates with negative scattering length is examined. 3D condensates are shown to blow up following the scenario of weak collapse, for which 3-body recombination weakly dissipates the atoms. In contrast, 2D condensates undergo a strong collapse......, that absorbs a significant amount of particles. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  7. Dynamical pion production via parametric resonance from disoriented chiral condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiro-Oka, Hideaki; Minakata, Hisakazu

    2000-04-01

    We discuss a dynamical mechanism of pion production from disoriented chiral condensates. It leads to an explosive production of pions via the parametric resonance mechanism, which is similar to the reheating mechanism in inflationary cosmology. Classically it is related with the instability in the solutions of the Mathieu equation and we explore the quantum aspects of the mechanism. We show that nonlinearities and back reactions can be ignorable for a sufficiently long time under the small amplitude approximations of background σ oscillations, which may be appropriate for the late stage of a nonequilibrium phase transition. It allows us to obtain an explicit quantum state of the produced pions and σ, the squeezed state of BCS type. Single particle distributions and two pion correlation functions are computed within these approximations. The results obtained illuminate the characteristic features of multipion states produced through the parametric amplification mechanism. In particular, two pion correlations of various charge combinations contain back-to-back correlations which cannot be masked by the identical particle interference effect. We suggest that the parametric resonance mechanism might be a cause of the long lasting amplification of low-momentum modes in linear sigma model simulations.

  8. Dynamic Modeling of Steam Condenser and Design of PI Controller Based on Grey Wolf Optimizer

    OpenAIRE

    Shu-Xia Li; Jie-Sheng Wang

    2015-01-01

    Shell-and-tube condenser is a heat exchanger for cooling steam with high temperature and pressure, which is one of the main kinds of heat exchange equipment in thermal, nuclear, and marine power plant. Based on the lumped parameter modeling method, the dynamic mathematical model of the simplified steam condenser is established. Then, the pressure PI control system of steam condenser based on the Matlab/Simulink simulation platform is designed. In order to obtain better performance, a new meta...

  9. Coherent inflationary dynamics for Bose-Einstein condensates crossing a quantum critical point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lei; Clark, Logan W.; Gaj, Anita; Chin, Cheng

    2018-03-01

    Quantum phase transitions, transitions between many-body ground states, are of extensive interest in research ranging from condensed-matter physics to cosmology1-4. Key features of the phase transitions include a stage with rapidly growing new order, called inflation in cosmology5, followed by the formation of topological defects6-8. How inflation is initiated and evolves into topological defects remains a hot topic of debate. Ultracold atomic gas offers a pristine and tunable platform to investigate quantum critical dynamics9-21. We report the observation of coherent inflationary dynamics across a quantum critical point in driven Bose-Einstein condensates. The inflation manifests in the exponential growth of density waves and populations in well-resolved momentum states. After the inflation stage, extended coherent dynamics is evident in both real and momentum space. We present an intuitive description of the quantum critical dynamics in our system and demonstrate the essential role of phase fluctuations in the formation of topological defects.

  10. Spatial interference patterns in the dynamics of a 2D Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Jayanta; Roy, Utpal

    2018-05-01

    Bose-Einstein condensate has become a highly tunable physical system, which is proven to mimic a number of interesting physical phenomena in condensed matter physics. We study the dynamics of a two-dimensional Bose Einstein condensate (BEC) in the presence of a flat harmonic confinement and time-dependent sharp potential peak. Condensate density can be meticulously controlled with time by tuning the physically relevant parameters: frequency of the harmonic trap, width of the peaks, frequency of their oscillations, initial density etc. By engineering various trap profile, we solve the system, numerically, and explore the resulting spatial interference patters.

  11. Investigation of static and dynamic properties of condensed matter by using neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidovic, M.

    1997-01-01

    Possibilities of using neutron scattering for investigating microscopic properties of materials are analyzed. Basic neutron scattering theory is presented and its use in structure and dynamics analyses of condense systems. (author)

  12. Dynamical Evolution of the Scalar Condensate in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Csernai, Laszlo P.; Jeon, Sangyong; Kapusta, Joseph I.; Csernai, Laszlo P.; Ellis, Paul J.; Jeon, Sangyong; Kapusta, Joseph I.

    2000-01-01

    We derive the effective coarse-grained field equation for the scalar condensate of the linear sigma model in a simple and straightforward manner using linear response theory. In general, the necessary response functions cannot be obtained in perturbation theory but require a summation of ladder diagrams. We estimate these response functions using direct physical reasoning. The field equation is solved for hot matter undergoing either one or three dimensional expansion and cooling in the aftermath of a high energy nuclear collision. The results show that the time constant for returning the scalar condensate to thermal equilibrium is of order 2 fm/c.

  13. Condensation and dissociation rates for gas phase metal clusters from molecular dynamics trajectory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Goudeli, Eirini; Hogan, Christopher J.

    2018-04-01

    In gas phase synthesis systems, clusters form and grow via condensation, in which a monomer binds to an existing cluster. While a hard-sphere equation is frequently used to predict the condensation rate coefficient, this equation neglects the influences of potential interactions and cluster internal energy on the condensation process. Here, we present a collision rate theory-molecular dynamics simulation approach to calculate condensation probabilities and condensation rate coefficients. We use this approach to examine atomic condensation onto 6-56-atom Au and Mg clusters. The probability of condensation depends upon the initial relative velocity (v) between atom and cluster and the initial impact parameter (b). In all cases, there is a well-defined region of b-v space where condensation is highly probable, and outside of which the condensation probability drops to zero. For Au clusters with more than 10 atoms, we find that at gas temperatures in the 300-1200 K range, the condensation rate coefficient exceeds the hard-sphere rate coefficient by a factor of 1.5-2.0. Conversely, for Au clusters with 10 or fewer atoms and for 14- and 28-atom Mg clusters, as cluster equilibration temperature increases, the condensation rate coefficient drops to values below the hard-sphere rate coefficient. Calculations also yield the self-dissociation rate coefficient, which is found to vary considerably with gas temperature. Finally, calculations results reveal that grazing (high b) atom-cluster collisions at elevated velocity (>1000 m s-1) can result in the colliding atom rebounding (bounce) from the cluster surface or binding while another atom dissociates (replacement). The presented method can be applied in developing rate equations to predict material formation and growth rates in vapor phase systems.

  14. Disorder Induced Dynamic Equilibrium Localization and Random Phase Steps of Bose—Einstein Condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Ya-Fan; Xu Zhen; Qian Jun; Sun Jian-Fang; Jiang Bo-Nan; Hong Tao

    2011-01-01

    We numerically analyze the dynamic behavior of Bose—Einstein condensate (BEC) in a one-dimensional disordered potential before it completely loses spatial quantum coherence. We find that both the disorder statistics and the atom interactions produce remarkable effects on localization. We also find that the single phase of the initial condensate is broken into many small pieces while the system approaches localization, showing a counter-intuitive step-wise phase but not a thoroughly randomized phase. Although the condensates as a whole show less flow and expansion, the currents between adjacent phase steps retain strong time dependence. Thus we show explicitly that the localization of a finite size Bose—Einstein condensate is a dynamic equilibrium state. (general)

  15. Quantum Many-Body Dynamics with Driven Bose Condensates: Kibble-Zurek Mechanism and Bose Fireworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Logan William

    In recent years there has been an explosion of interest in the field of quantum many-body physics. Understanding the complex and often unintuitive behavior of systems containing interacting quantum constituents is not only fascinating but also crucial for developing the next generation of quantum technology, including better materials, sensors, and computers. Yet understanding such systems remains a challenge, particularly when considering the dynamics which occur when they are excited far from equilibrium. Ultracold atomic gases provide an ideal system with which to study dynamics by enabling clean, well-controlled experiments at length- and time-scales which allow us to observe the dynamics directly. This thesis describes experiments on the many-body dynamics of ultracold, bosonic cesium atoms. Our apparatus epitomizes the versatility of ultracold atoms by providing extensive control over the quantum gas. In particular, we will discuss our use of a digital micromirror device to project arbitrary, dynamic external potentials onto the gas; our development of a powerful new scheme for optically controlling Feshbach resonances to enable spatiotemporal control of the interactions between atoms; and our use of near-resonant shaking lattices to modify the kinetic energy of atoms. Taking advantage of this flexible apparatus, we have been able to test a longstanding conjecture based on the Kibble-Zurek mechanism, which says that the dynamics of a system crossing a quantum phase transition should obey a universal scaling symmetry of space and time. After accounting for this scaling symmetry, critical dynamics would be essentially independent of the rate at which a system crossed a phase transition. We tested the universal scaling of critical dynamics by using near-resonant shaking to drive Bose-Einstein condensates across an effectively ferromagnetic quantum phase transition. After crossing the phase transition, condensates divide themselves spatially into domains with

  16. Leggett-Garg tests of macrorealism for bosonic systems including double-well Bose-Einstein condensates and atom interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Zárate, L.; Opanchuk, B.; He, Q. Y.; Reid, M. D.

    2018-04-01

    We construct quantifiable generalizations of Leggett-Garg tests for macro- and mesoscopic realism and noninvasive measurability that apply when not all outcomes of measurement can be identified as arising from one of two macroscopically distinguishable states. We show how quantum mechanics predicts a negation of the Leggett-Garg premises for strategies involving ideal negative-result, weak, and minimally invasive ("nonclumsy") projective measurements on dynamical entangled systems, as might be realized with Bose-Einstein condensates in a double-well potential, path-entangled NOON states, and atom interferometers. Potential loopholes associated with each strategy are discussed.

  17. Dynamics of the Bose-Einstein condensate: quasi-one-dimension and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, Lincoln D.; Leung, Mary Ann; Mills College, Oakland, CA 94613-1301; Reinhardt, William P.; Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1700

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that the quasi-one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate is experimentally accessible and rich in intriguing phenomena. We demonstrate numerically and analytically the existence, stability and perturbation-induced dynamics of all types of stationary states of the quasi-one-dimensional nonlinear Schroedinger equation for both repulsive and attractive cases. Among our results are: the connection between stationary states and solitons; creation of vortices from such states; manipulation of such states with simple phase profiles; demonstration of the fragility of the condensate phase in response to shock; and a robust stabilization of the attractive Bose-Einstein condensate. (author)

  18. Dynamics of defect-induced dark solitons in an exciton-polariton condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opala, Andrzej; Pieczarka, Maciej; Bobrovska, Nataliya; Matuszewski, Michał

    2018-04-01

    We study theoretically the emission of dark solitons induced by a moving defect in a nonresonantly pumped exciton-polariton condensate. The number of created dark solitons per unit of time is found to be strongly dependent on the pump power. We relate the observed dynamics of this process to the oscillations of the drag force experienced by the condensate. We investigate the stability of the polariton quantum fluid and present various types of dynamics depending on the condensate and moving obstacle parameters. Furthermore, we provide analytical expressions for dark soliton dynamics using the variational method adapted to the nonequilibrium polariton system. The determined dynamical equations are found to be in excellent agreement with the results of numerical simulations.

  19. Nonlinearity from quantum mechanics: Dynamically unstable Bose-Einstein condensate in a double-well trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javanainen, Juha

    2010-01-01

    We study theoretically an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate in a double-well trap, both quantum-mechanically and classically, under conditions such that in the classical model an unstable equilibrium dissolves into large-scale oscillations of the atoms between the potential wells. Quantum mechanics alone does not exhibit such nonlinear dynamics, but measurements of the atom numbers in the potential wells may nevertheless cause the condensate to behave essentially classically.

  20. Dynamic ignition regime of condensed system by radiate heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhipov, V A; Zolotorev, N N; Korotkikh, A G; Kuznetsov, V T

    2017-01-01

    The main ignition characteristics of high-energy materials are the ignition time and critical heat flux allowing evaluation of the critical conditions for ignition, fire and explosive safety for the test solid propellants. The ignition process is typically studied in stationary conditions of heat input at constant temperature of the heating surface, environment or the radiate heat flux on the sample surface. In real conditions, ignition is usually effected at variable time-dependent values of the heat flux. In this case, the heated layer is formed on the sample surface in dynamic conditions and significantly depends on the heat flux change, i.e. increasing or decreasing falling heat flux in the reaction period of the propellant sample. This paper presents a method for measuring the ignition characteristics of a high-energy material sample in initiation of the dynamic radiant heat flux, which includes the measurement of the ignition time when exposed to a sample time varying radiant heat flux given intensity. In case of pyroxyline containing 1 wt. % of soot, it is shown that the ignition times are reduced by 20–50 % depending on the initial value of the radiant flux density in initiation by increasing or decreasing radiant heat flux compared with the stationary conditions of heat supply in the same ambient conditions. (paper)

  1. ICECON: a computer program used to calculate containment back pressure for LOCA analysis (including ice condenser plants)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-07-01

    The ICECON computer code provides a method for conservatively calculating the long term back pressure transient in the containment resulting from a hypothetical Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) for PWR plants including ice condenser containment systems. The ICECON computer code was developed from the CONTEMPT/LT-022 code. A brief discussion of the salient features of a typical ice condenser containment is presented. Details of the ice condenser models are explained. The corrections and improvements made to CONTEMPT/LT-022 are included. The organization of the code, including the calculational procedure, is outlined. The user's manual, to be used in conjunction with the CONTEMPT/LT-022 user's manual, a sample problem, a time-step study (solution convergence) and a comparison of ICECON results with the results of the NSSS vendor are presented. In general, containment pressure calculated with the ICECON code agree with those calculated by the NSSS vendor using the same mass and energy release rates to the containment

  2. Pore-scale evaporation-condensation dynamics resolved by synchrotron x-ray tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahraeeni, Ebrahim; Or, Dani

    2012-01-01

    Capillary processes greatly influence vapor mediated transport dynamics and associated changes in liquid phase content of porous media. Rapid x-ray synchrotron tomography measurements were used to resolve liquid-vapor interfacial dynamics during evaporation and condensation within submillimetric pores forming between sintered glass bead samples subjected to controlled ambient temperature and relative humidity. Evolution of gas-liquid interfacial shapes were in agreement with predictions based on our analytical model for interfacial dynamics in confined wedge-shaped pores. We also compared literature experimental data at the nanoscale to illustrate the capability of our model to describe early stages of condensation giving rise to the onset of capillary forces between rough surfaces. The study provides high resolution, synchrotron-based observations of capillary evaporation-condensation dynamics at the pore scale as the confirmation of the pore scale analytical model for capillary condensation in a pore and enables direct links with evolution of macroscopic vapor gradients within a sintered glass bead sample through their effect on configuration and evolution of the local interfaces. Rapid condensation processes play a critical role in the onset of capillary-induced friction affecting mechanical behavior of physical systems and industrial applications.

  3. Spin tunnelling dynamics for spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates in a swept magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guanfang; Fu Libin; Liu Jie

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the spin tunnelling of spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates in a linearly swept magnetic field with a mean-field treatment. We focus on the two typical alkali Bose atoms 87 Rb and 23 Na condensates and study their tunnelling dynamics according to the sweep rates of the external magnetic fields. In the adiabatic (i.e. slowly sweeping) and sudden (i.e. fast sweeping) limits, no tunnelling is observed. For the case of moderate sweep rates, the tunnelling dynamics is found to be very sensitive to the sweep rates, so the plots of tunnelling probability versus sweep rate only become resolvable at a resolution of 10 -4 G s -1 . Moreover, a conserved quantity standing for the magnetization in experiments is found to affect dramatically the dynamics of the spin tunnelling. Theoretically we have given a complete interpretation of the above findings, and our studies could stimulate the experimental study of spinor Bose-Einstein condensates

  4. Functional Wigner representation of quantum dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opanchuk, B.; Drummond, P. D. [Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2013-04-15

    We develop a method of simulating the full quantum field dynamics of multi-mode multi-component Bose-Einstein condensates in a trap. We use the truncated Wigner representation to obtain a probabilistic theory that can be sampled. This method produces c-number stochastic equations which may be solved using conventional stochastic methods. The technique is valid for large mode occupation numbers. We give a detailed derivation of methods of functional Wigner representation appropriate for quantum fields. Our approach describes spatial evolution of spinor components and properly accounts for nonlinear losses. Such techniques are applicable to calculating the leading quantum corrections, including effects such as quantum squeezing, entanglement, EPR correlations, and interactions with engineered nonlinear reservoirs. By using a consistent expansion in the inverse density, we are able to explain an inconsistency in the nonlinear loss equations found by earlier authors.

  5. Dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates in novel optical potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueber, Johannes

    2014-07-21

    Matter wave interferometry offers a novel approach for high precision measurements, such as the determination of physical constants like the local gravity constant g or the fine-structure constant. Since its early demonstration, it has become an important tool in the fields of fundamental and applied physics. The present work covers the implementation of matter wave interferometers as well as the creation of novel guiding potentials for ultra-cold ensembles of atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates for this purpose. In addition, novel techniques for the manipulation of atoms with Bragg lattices are presented, serving as elements for interferometry. The measurements in this work are performed with a Bose-Einstein condensate of 25000 {sup 87}rubidium atoms created in a crossed optical dipole trap. The crossed optical dipole trap is loaded from a magneto-optical trap and allows a measurement every 25 s. This work introduces the novel technique of double Bragg diffraction as a tool for atom optics for the first time experimentally. The creation of beamsplitters and mirrors for advanced interferometric measurements is characterized. An in depth discussion on the momentum distribution of atomic clouds and its influence on double Bragg diffraction is given. Additionally experimental results for higher-order Bragg diffraction are explained and double Bragg diffraction is used to implement a full Ramsey-type interferometer. A second central result of this work is the implementation of novel guiding structures for ultra-cold atoms. These structures are created with conical refraction, an effect that occurs when light is guided along one of the optical axis of a bi-axial crystal. The conical refraction crystal used to operate the novel trapping geometries is a KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystal that has been specifically cut orthogonal to one of the optical axis. Two regimes are discussed in detail: the creation of a toroidal matter wave guide and the implementation of a three

  6. Dynamics of a strongly driven two-component Bose-Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmond, G.L.; Holmes, C.A.; Milburn, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    We consider a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate in two spatially localized modes of a double-well potential, with periodic modulation of the tunnel coupling between the two modes. We treat the driven quantum field using a two-mode expansion and define the quantum dynamics in terms of the Floquet Operator for the time periodic Hamiltonian of the system. It has been shown that the corresponding semiclassical mean-field dynamics can exhibit regions of regular and chaotic motion. We show here that the quantum dynamics can exhibit dynamical tunneling between regions of regular motion, centered on fixed points (resonances) of the semiclassical dynamics

  7. Vortex dynamics in coherently coupled Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderaro, Luca; Fetter, Alexander L.; Massignan, Pietro; Wittek, Peter

    2017-02-01

    In classical hydrodynamics with uniform density, vortices move with the local fluid velocity. This description is rewritten in terms of forces arising from the interaction with other vortices. Two such positive straight vortices experience a repulsive interaction and precess in a positive (anticlockwise) sense around their common centroid. A similar picture applies to vortices in a two-component, two-dimensional uniform Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) coherently coupled through rf Rabi fields. Unlike the classical case, however, the rf Rabi coupling induces an attractive interaction and two such vortices with positive signs now rotate in the negative (clockwise) sense. Pairs of counter-rotating vortices are instead found to translate with uniform velocity perpendicular to the line joining their cores. This picture is extended to a single vortex in a two-component trapped BEC. Although two uniform vortex-free components experience familiar Rabi oscillations of particle-number difference, such behavior is absent for a vortex in one component because of the nonuniform vortex phase. Instead the coherent Rabi coupling induces a periodic vorticity transfer between the two components.

  8. Generalization of the quasi-geostrophic Eliassen-Palm flux to include eddy forcing of condensation heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, P. H.; Salustri, G.

    1984-01-01

    A modified Eulerian form of the Eliassen-Palm flux which includes the effect of eddy forcing on condensation heating is defined. With the two-dimensional vector flux in the meridional plane which is a function of the zonal mean eddy fluxes replaced by the modified flux, both the Eliassen-Palm theorem and a modified but more general form of the nonacceleration theorem for quasi-geostrophic motion still hold. Calculations of the divergence of the modified flux and of the eddy forcing of the moisture field are presented.

  9. Interfacial Dynamics of Condensing Vapor Bubbles in an Ultrasonic Acoustic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boziuk, Thomas; Smith, Marc; Glezer, Ari

    2016-11-01

    Enhancement of vapor condensation in quiescent subcooled liquid using ultrasonic actuation is investigated experimentally. The vapor bubbles are formed by direct injection from a pressurized steam reservoir through nozzles of varying characteristic diameters, and are advected within an acoustic field of programmable intensity. While kHz-range acoustic actuation typically couples to capillary instability of the vapor-liquid interface, ultrasonic (MHz-range) actuation leads to the formation of a liquid spout that penetrates into the vapor bubble and significantly increases its surface area and therefore condensation rate. Focusing of the ultrasonic beam along the spout leads to ejection of small-scale droplets from that are propelled towards the vapor liquid interface and result in localized acceleration of the condensation. High-speed video of Schlieren images is used to investigate the effects of the ultrasonic actuation on the thermal boundary layer on the liquid side of the vapor-liquid interface and its effect on the condensation rate, and the liquid motion during condensation is investigated using high-magnification PIV measurements. High-speed image processing is used to assess the effect of the actuation on the dynamics and temporal variation in characteristic scale (and condensation rate) of the vapor bubbles.

  10. Dark-dark-soliton dynamics in two density-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera, I.; Mateo, A. Muñoz; Polls, A.; Juliá-Díaz, B.

    2018-04-01

    We study the one-dimensional dynamics of dark-dark solitons in the miscible regime of two density-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates having repulsive interparticle interactions within each condensate (g >0 ). By using an adiabatic perturbation theory in the parameter g12/g , we show that, contrary to the case of two solitons in scalar condensates, the interactions between solitons are attractive when the interparticle interactions between condensates are repulsive g12>0 . As a result, the relative motion of dark solitons with equal chemical potential μ is well approximated by harmonic oscillations of angular frequency wr=(μ /ℏ ) √{(8 /15 ) g12/g } . We also show that, in finite systems, the resonance of this anomalous excitation mode with the spin-density mode of lowest energy gives rise to alternating dynamical instability and stability fringes as a function of the perturbative parameter. In the presence of harmonic trapping (with angular frequency Ω ) the solitons are driven by the superposition of two harmonic motions at a frequency given by w2=(Ω/√{2 }) 2+wr2 . When g12<0 , these two oscillators compete to give rise to an overall effective potential that can be either single well or double well through a pitchfork bifurcation. All our theoretical results are compared with numerical solutions of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the dynamics and the Bogoliubov equations for the linear stability. A good agreement is found between them.

  11. Dynamic Modeling of Steam Condenser and Design of PI Controller Based on Grey Wolf Optimizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Xia Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shell-and-tube condenser is a heat exchanger for cooling steam with high temperature and pressure, which is one of the main kinds of heat exchange equipment in thermal, nuclear, and marine power plant. Based on the lumped parameter modeling method, the dynamic mathematical model of the simplified steam condenser is established. Then, the pressure PI control system of steam condenser based on the Matlab/Simulink simulation platform is designed. In order to obtain better performance, a new metaheuristic intelligent algorithm, grey wolf optimizer (GWO, is used to realize the fine-tuning of PI controller parameters. On the other hand, the Z-N engineering tuning method, genetic algorithm, and particle swarm algorithm are adopted for tuning PI controller parameters and compared with GWO algorithm. Simulation results show that GWO algorithm has better control performance than other four algorithms.

  12. All-optical spinor Bose-Einstein condensation and the spinor dynamics-driven atom laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundblad, Nathan Eric

    dynamics. We drive coherent spin-mixing evolution through adiabatic compression of the initially weak trap. Such dual beams, nominally number-correlated through the angular momentum-conserving collision 2m0 ⇋ m+1 + m-1 have been proposed as tools to explore entanglement and squeezing in Bose-Einstein condensates.

  13. Third-order transfer matrices calculated for an electrostatic toroidal sector condenser including fringing-field effects

    CERN Document Server

    Mordik, S N

    2002-01-01

    The third-order transfer matrices are calculated for an electrostatic toroidal sector condenser using a rigorously conserved matrix method that implies the conservation of the beam phase volume at each step in the calculations. The transfer matrices (matrizants) obtained, include the fringing-field effect due to the stray fields. In the case of a rectangular distribution of the field components along the optical axis, the analytical expressions for all aberration coefficients, including the dispersion ones, are derived accurate to the third-order terms. In simulations of real fields with the stray field width other than zero, a smooth distribution of the field components is used for which similar aberration coefficients were calculated by means of the conserved numerical method . It has been found that for a smooth model, as the stray field width tends to zero, the aberration coefficients approach the corresponding aberration values in the rectangular model.

  14. Third-order transfer matrices calculated for an electrostatic toroidal sector condenser including fringing-field effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mordik, S.N.; Ponomarev, A.G.

    2002-01-01

    The third-order transfer matrices are calculated for an electrostatic toroidal sector condenser using a rigorously conserved matrix method that implies the conservation of the beam phase volume at each step in the calculations. The transfer matrices (matrizants) obtained, include the fringing-field effect due to the stray fields. In the case of a rectangular distribution of the field components along the optical axis, the analytical expressions for all aberration coefficients, including the dispersion ones, are derived accurate to the third-order terms. In simulations of real fields with the stray field width other than zero, a smooth distribution of the field components is used for which similar aberration coefficients were calculated by means of the conserved numerical method . It has been found that for a smooth model, as the stray field width tends to zero, the aberration coefficients approach the corresponding aberration values in the rectangular model

  15. Molecular dynamics study on condensation/evaporation coefficients of chain molecules at liquid-vapor interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Gyoko; Takematsu, Masaki; Mizuguchi, Hirotaka; Tsuruta, Takaharu

    2015-07-07

    The structure and thermodynamic properties of the liquid-vapor interface are of fundamental interest for numerous technological implications. For simple molecules, e.g., argon and water, the molecular condensation/evaporation behavior depends strongly on their translational motion and the system temperature. Existing molecular dynamics (MD) results are consistent with the theoretical predictions based on the assumption that the liquid and vapor states in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor interface are isotropic. Additionally, similar molecular condensation/evaporation characteristics have been found for long-chain molecules, e.g., dodecane. It is unclear, however, whether the isotropic assumption is valid and whether the molecular orientation or the chain length of the molecules affects the condensation/evaporation behavior at the liquid-vapor interface. In this study, MD simulations were performed to study the molecular condensation/evaporation behavior of the straight-chain alkanes, i.e., butane, octane, and dodecane, at the liquid-vapor interface, and the effects of the molecular orientation and chain length were investigated in equilibrium systems. The results showed that the condensation/evaporation behavior of chain molecules primarily depends on the molecular translational energy and the surface temperature and is independent of the molecular chain length. Furthermore, the orientation at the liquid-vapor interface was disordered when the surface temperature was sufficiently higher than the triple point and had no significant effect on the molecular condensation/evaporation behavior. The validity of the isotropic assumption was confirmed, and we conclude that the condensation/evaporation coefficients can be predicted by the liquid-to-vapor translational length ratio, even for chain molecules.

  16. The new physics of non-equilibrium condensates: insights from classical dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eastham, P R [Theory of Condensed Matter, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-25

    We discuss the dynamics of classical Dicke-type models, aiming to clarify the mechanisms by which coherent states could develop in potentially non-equilibrium systems such as semiconductor microcavities. We present simulations of an undamped model which show spontaneous coherent states with persistent oscillations in the magnitude of the order parameter. These states are generalizations of superradiant ringing to the case of inhomogeneous broadening. They correspond to the persistent gap oscillations proposed in fermionic atomic condensates, and arise from a variety of initial conditions. We show that introducing randomness into the couplings can suppress the oscillations, leading to a limiting dynamics with a time-independent order parameter. This demonstrates that non-equilibrium generalizations of polariton condensates can be created even without dissipation. We explain the dynamical origins of the coherence in terms of instabilities of the normal state, and consider how it can additionally develop through scattering and dissipation.

  17. The new physics of non-equilibrium condensates: insights from classical dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham, P R

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the dynamics of classical Dicke-type models, aiming to clarify the mechanisms by which coherent states could develop in potentially non-equilibrium systems such as semiconductor microcavities. We present simulations of an undamped model which show spontaneous coherent states with persistent oscillations in the magnitude of the order parameter. These states are generalizations of superradiant ringing to the case of inhomogeneous broadening. They correspond to the persistent gap oscillations proposed in fermionic atomic condensates, and arise from a variety of initial conditions. We show that introducing randomness into the couplings can suppress the oscillations, leading to a limiting dynamics with a time-independent order parameter. This demonstrates that non-equilibrium generalizations of polariton condensates can be created even without dissipation. We explain the dynamical origins of the coherence in terms of instabilities of the normal state, and consider how it can additionally develop through scattering and dissipation

  18. Waste heat recovery system including a mechanism for collection, detection and removal of non-condensable gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Zigan, James A.

    2017-06-20

    The disclosure describes a non-condensable gas collection, detection, and removal system for a WHR system that helps to maintain cycle efficiency of the WHR system across the life of an engine system associated with the WHR system. A storage volume is configured to collect non-condensable gas received from the working fluid circuit, and a release valve is configured to selectively release non-condensable gas contained within the storage volume.

  19. PREFACE: Topics in the application of scattering methods to investigate the structure and dynamics of soft condensed matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sow-Hsin; Baglioni, Piero

    2006-09-01

    This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter gathers together a series of contributions presented at the workshop entitled `Topics in the Application of Scattering Methods to Investigate the Structure and Dynamics of Soft Condensed Matter' held at Pensione Bencista, Fiesole, Italy, a wonderful Italian jewel tucked high in the hills above Florence. This immaculate 14th century villa is a feast for the eyes with antiques and original artwork everywhere you turn, and a stunning view of Florence, overlooking numerous villas and groves of olive trees. The meeting consisted of about 40 invited talks delivered by a selected group of prominent physicists and chemists from the USA, Mexico, Europe and Asia working in the fields of complex and glassy liquids. The topics covered by the talks included: simulations on the liquid-liquid transition phenomenon dynamic crossover in deeply supercooled confined water thermodynamics and dynamics of complex fluids dynamics of interfacial water structural arrest transitions in colloidal systems structure and dynamics in complex systems structure of supramolecular assemblies The choice of topics is obviously heavily biased toward the current interests of the two organizers of the workshop, in view of the fact that one of the incentives for organizing the meeting was to celebrate Sow-Hsin Chen’s life-long scientific activities on the occasion of his 70th birthday. The 21 articles presented in this issue are a state-of-the-art description of the different aspects reported at the workshop from all points of view---experimental, theoretical and numerical. The interdisciplinary nature of the talks should make this special issue of interest to a broad community of scientists involved in the study of the properties of complex fluids, soft condensed matter and disordered glassy systems. We are grateful to the Consorzio per lo Sviluppo dei Sistemi a Grande Interfase (CSGI), Florence, Italy and to the Materials Science Program of

  20. Gas dynamics, optics and chemistry of an aircraft condensable wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinats, E.S.; Kashevarov, A.V.; Stasenko, A.L. [Central Aerohydrodynamic Inst., Zhukovsky (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    Prediction of the properties of a jet-and-vortex wake from an individual airplane is of great interest as the first step to assessment of the possible global changes in the atmosphere due to the world civil aviation. Several mathematical models of the different regions of an aircraft wake and corresponding numerical results are presented. The axisymmetric exhaust jet was simulated on the base of the well-known k-{epsilon} model of turbulence. Jet chemistry was investigated on the base of kinetic scheme of the gas phase reactions of enriched by including chemisorption by water droplets of several species and by taking into account of the photochemical processes. In the 3D far wake model, the numerical results for distribution of species exhausted by the engines and entrapped by the velocity field of two parallel vortices are shown. (R.P.) 7 refs.

  1. Gas dynamics, optics and chemistry of an aircraft condensable wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinats, E S; Kashevarov, A V; Stasenko, A L [Central Aerohydrodynamic Inst., Zhukovsky (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    Prediction of the properties of a jet-and-vortex wake from an individual airplane is of great interest as the first step to assessment of the possible global changes in the atmosphere due to the world civil aviation. Several mathematical models of the different regions of an aircraft wake and corresponding numerical results are presented. The axisymmetric exhaust jet was simulated on the base of the well-known k-{epsilon} model of turbulence. Jet chemistry was investigated on the base of kinetic scheme of the gas phase reactions of enriched by including chemisorption by water droplets of several species and by taking into account of the photochemical processes. In the 3D far wake model, the numerical results for distribution of species exhausted by the engines and entrapped by the velocity field of two parallel vortices are shown. (R.P.) 7 refs.

  2. Dynamical creation of complex vector solitons in spinor Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Bo; Gong Jiangbin

    2010-01-01

    By numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii mean-field equations, we show that the dynamical creation of stable complex vector solitons in a homogeneous spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate can be achieved by applying a localized magnetic field for a certain duration, with the initial uniform density prepared differently for the formation of different vector solitons. In particular, it is shown that stable dark-bright-dark vector solitons, dark-bright-bright vector solitons, and other analogous solutions can be dynamically created. It is also found that the peak intensity and the group velocity of the vector solitons thus generated can be tuned by adjusting the applied magnetic field. Extensions of our approach also allow for the creation of vector-soliton chains or the pumping of many vector solitons. The results can be useful for possible vector-soliton-based applications of dilute Bose-Einstein condensates.

  3. Self-trapping mechanisms in the dynamics of three coupled Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzosi, Roberto; Penna, Vittorio

    2002-01-01

    We formulate the dynamics of three coupled Bose-Einstein condensates within a semiclassical scenario based on the standard boson coherent states. We compare such a picture with that of K. Nemoto et al. [Phys. Rev. A 63, 013604 (2001)] and show how our approach entails a simple formulation of the dimeric regime therein studied. This allows us to recognize the parameters that govern the bifurcation mechanism causing self-trapping, and paves the way to the construction of analytic solutions

  4. Air source heat pump water heater: Dynamic modeling, optimal energy management and mini-tubes condensers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Oussama; Fardoun, Farouk; Younes, Rafic; Louahlia-Gualous, Hasna

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic simulation model to predict the performance of an ASHPWH (air source heat pump water heater). The developed model is used to assess its performance in the Lebanese context. It is shown that for the four Lebanese climatic zones, the expected monthly values of the average COP (coefficient of performance) varies from 2.9 to 5, leading to high efficiencies compared with conventional electric water heaters. The energy savings and GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions reduction are investigated for each zone. Furthermore, it is recommended to use the ASHPWH during the period of highest daily ambient temperatures (noon or afternoon), assuming that the electricity tariff and hot water loads are constant. In addition, an optimal management model for the ASHPWH is developed and applied for a typical winter day of Beirut. Moreover, the developed dynamic model of ASHPWH is used to compare the performance of three similar systems that differ only with the condenser geometry, where results show that using mini-condenser geometries increase the COP (coefficient of performance) and consequently, more energy is saved as well as more GHG emissions are reduced. In addition, the condenser “surface compactness” is increased giving rise to an efficient compact heat exchanger. - Highlights: • Numerical modeling and experimental validation for ASHPWH (air source heat pump water heater). • Optimization of the ASHPWH-condenser length. • Comparison of the ASHPWH with conventional electric water heater according to energy efficiency and green gas house emissions. • Development of an energetic-economic optimal management model for ASHPWH. • Energetic and environmental assessment of ASHPWH with mini-tubes condensers

  5. Dynamics of vortex assisted metal condensation in superfluid helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Evgeny; Mammetkuliyev, Muhammet; Eloranta, Jussi

    2013-05-28

    Laser ablation of copper and silver targets immersed in bulk normal and superfluid (4)He was studied through time-resolved shadowgraph photography. In normal fluid, only a sub-millimeter cavitation bubble is created and immediate formation of metal clusters is observed within a few hundred microseconds. The metal clusters remain spatially tightly focused up to 15 ms, and it is proposed that this observation may find applications in particle image velocimetry. In superfluid helium, the cavitation bubble formation process is distinctly different from the normal fluid. Due to the high thermal conductivity and an apparent lag in the breakdown of superfluidity, about 20% of the laser pulse energy was transferred directly into the liquid and a large gas bubble, up to several millimeters depending on laser pulse energy, is created. The internal temperature of the gas bubble is estimated to exceed 9 K and the following bubble cool down period therefore includes two separate phase transitions: gas-normal liquid and normal liquid-superfluid. The last stage of the cool down process was assigned to the superfluid lambda transition where a sudden formation of large metal clusters is observed. This is attributed to high vorticity created in the volume where the gas bubble previously resided. As shown by theoretical bosonic density functional theory calculations, quantized vortices can trap atoms and dimers efficiently, exhibiting static binding energies up to 22 K. This, combined with hydrodynamic Bernoulli attraction, yields total binding energies as high as 35 K. For larger clusters, the static binding energy increases as a function of the volume occupied in the liquid to minimize the surface tension energy. For heliophobic species an energy barrier develops as a function of the cluster size, whereas heliophilics show barrierless entry into vortices. The present theoretical and experimental observations are used to rationalize the previously reported metal nanowire assembly in

  6. Dynamics of double-well Bose–Einstein condensates subject to external Gaussian white noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Hanlei; Hao Yajiang; Gu Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical properties of the Bose–Einstein condensate in a double-well potential subject to Gaussian white noise are investigated by numerically solving the time-dependent Gross–Pitaevskii equation. The Gaussian white noise is used to describe influence of the random environmental disturbance on the double-well condensate. Dynamical evolutions from three different initial states, the Josephson oscillation state, the running phase and π-mode macroscopic quantum self-trapping states, are considered. It is shown that the system is rather robust with respect to the weak noise whose strength is small and change rate is high. If the evolution time is sufficiently long, the weak noise will finally drive the system to evolve from high-energy states to low-energy states, but in a manner rather different from the energy-dissipation effect. In the presence of strong noise with either large strength or slow change rate, the double-well condensate may exhibit very irregular dynamical behaviours. (paper)

  7. Core sizes and dynamical instabilities of giant vortices in dilute Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuopanportti, Pekko; Lundh, Emil; Huhtamaeki, Jukka A. M.; Pietilae, Ville; Moettoenen, Mikko

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by a recent demonstration of cyclic addition of quantized vorticity into a Bose-Einstein condensate, the vortex pump, we study dynamical instabilities and core sizes of giant vortices. The core size is found to increase roughly as a square-root function of the quantum number of the vortex, whereas the strength of the dynamical instability either saturates to a fairly low value or increases extremely slowly for large quantum numbers. Our studies suggest that giant vortices of very high angular momenta may be achieved by gradually increasing the operation frequency of the vortex pump.

  8. Dynamic analysis of the condensate feedwater system in boiling water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanji, J.; Omori, T.

    1982-01-01

    The computer code, CONFAC, has been developed for dynamic analysis of the condensate feedwater system in boiling water reactor plants. This code simulates the hydrodynamics in the piping system, the pump dynamics, and the feedwater controller in order to clarify the system transient characteristics in such cases as pump trip incidents. Code verification was performed by comparison between analytical results and actual plant operational data. Satisfactory agreement was obtained. With the code, appropriate pump start/stop interlocks were estimated for preventing pump cavitation in pump trip incidents

  9. A Simple and Efficient Numerical Method for Computing the Dynamics of Rotating Bose--Einstein Condensates via Rotating Lagrangian Coordinates

    KAUST Repository

    Bao, Weizhu; Marahrens, Daniel; Tang, Qinglin; Zhang, Yanzhi

    2013-01-01

    We propose a simple, efficient, and accurate numerical method for simulating the dynamics of rotating Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) in a rotational frame with or without longrange dipole-dipole interaction (DDI). We begin with the three

  10. Tunnelling Dynamics of Bose—Einstein Condensates in a Five-Well Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ai-Xia, Zhang; Shi-Ling, Tian; Rong-An, Tang; Ju-Kui, Xue

    2008-01-01

    We develop a five-well model for describing the tunnelling dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) trapped in 2D optical lattices. The tunnelling dynamics of BECs in this five-well model are investigated both analytically and numerically. We focus on the self-trapped states and the difference of the tunnelling dynamics among two-well, three-well and five-well systems. The criterions for the self-trapped states and the phase diagrams of the five trapped BECs in zero-phase mode and π-phase mode are obtained. We find that the criterions and the phase diagrams are largely modified by the dimension of the system and the phase difference between wells. The five-well model is a good model and can give us an insight into the tunnelling dynamics of BECs trapped in 2D optical lattices

  11. Thermalization of the quark-gluon plasma and dynamical formation of Bose-Einstein Condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Jinfeng

    2013-01-01

    We report recent progress on understanding the thermalization of the quark-gluon plasma during the early stage in a heavy ion collision. The initially high overpopulation in the pre-equilibrium gluonic matter ( g lasma ) is shown to play a crucial role. The strongly interacting nature (and thus fast evolution) naturally arises as an emergent property of this pre-equilibrium matter where the intrinsic coupling is weak but the highly occupied gluon states coherently amplify the scattering. A possible transient Bose-Einstein Condensate is argued to form dynamically on a rather general ground. We develop the kinetic approach for describing this highly overpopulated system and find approximate scaling solutions as well as numerically study the onset of condensation. Finally we also discuss possible phenomenological implications.

  12. A single parameter representation of hygroscopic growth and cloud condensation nucleus activity – Part 2: Including solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Petters

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability of a particle to serve as a cloud condensation nucleus in the atmosphere is determined by its size, hygroscopicity and its solubility in water. Usually size and hygroscopicity alone are sufficient to predict CCN activity. Single parameter representations for hygroscopicity have been shown to successfully model complex, multicomponent particles types. Under the assumption of either complete solubility, or complete insolubility of a component, it is not necessary to explicitly include that component's solubility into the single parameter framework. This is not the case if sparingly soluble materials are present. In this work we explicitly account for solubility by modifying the single parameter equations. We demonstrate that sensitivity to the actual value of solubility emerges only in the regime of 2×10−1–5×10−4, where the solubility values are expressed as volume of solute per unit volume of water present in a saturated solution. Compounds that do not fall inside this sparingly soluble envelope can be adequately modeled assuming they are either infinitely soluble in water or completely insoluble.

  13. Communication: On the consistency of approximate quantum dynamics simulation methods for vibrational spectra in the condensed phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Mariana; Liu, Hanchao; Paesani, Francesco; Bowman, Joel; Ceriotti, Michele

    2014-11-14

    Including quantum mechanical effects on the dynamics of nuclei in the condensed phase is challenging, because the complexity of exact methods grows exponentially with the number of quantum degrees of freedom. Efforts to circumvent these limitations can be traced down to two approaches: methods that treat a small subset of the degrees of freedom with rigorous quantum mechanics, considering the rest of the system as a static or classical environment, and methods that treat the whole system quantum mechanically, but using approximate dynamics. Here, we perform a systematic comparison between these two philosophies for the description of quantum effects in vibrational spectroscopy, taking the Embedded Local Monomer model and a mixed quantum-classical model as representatives of the first family of methods, and centroid molecular dynamics and thermostatted ring polymer molecular dynamics as examples of the latter. We use as benchmarks D2O doped with HOD and pure H2O at three distinct thermodynamic state points (ice Ih at 150 K, and the liquid at 300 K and 600 K), modeled with the simple q-TIP4P/F potential energy and dipole moment surfaces. With few exceptions the different techniques yield IR absorption frequencies that are consistent with one another within a few tens of cm(-1). Comparison with classical molecular dynamics demonstrates the importance of nuclear quantum effects up to the highest temperature, and a detailed discussion of the discrepancies between the various methods let us draw some (circumstantial) conclusions about the impact of the very different approximations that underlie them. Such cross validation between radically different approaches could indicate a way forward to further improve the state of the art in simulations of condensed-phase quantum dynamics.

  14. Dynamic Analysis of Wind Turbines Including Soil-Structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harte, M.; Basu, B.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the along-wind forced vibration response of an onshore wind turbine. The study includes the dynamic interaction effects between the foundation and the underlying soil, as softer soils can influence the dynamic response of wind turbines. A Multi-Degree-of-Freedom (MDOF......) horizontal axes onshore wind turbine model is developed for dynamic analysis using an Euler–Lagrangian approach. The model is comprised of a rotor blade system, a nacelle and a flexible tower connected to a foundation system using a substructuring approach. The rotor blade system consists of three rotating...... for displacement of the turbine system are obtained and the modal frequencies of the combined turbine-foundation system are estimated. Simulations are presented for the MDOF turbine structure subjected to wind loading for different soil stiffness conditions. Steady state and turbulent wind loading, developed using...

  15. Dynamic d-symmetry Bose condensate of a planar-large-bipolaron liquid in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emin, David

    2017-11-01

    Planar-large-bipolarons can form if the ratio of the surrounding mediums' static to high-frequency dielectric constants is especially large, ε0/ε∞ >> 2. A large-bipolaron in p-doped La2CuO4 is modelled as two electrons being removed from the out-of-plane orbitals of four oxygen ions circumscribed by four copper ions of a CuO2 layer. These oxygen dianions relax inwardly as they donate electrons to the surrounding outwardly relaxing copper cations. This charge transfer generates the strong in-plane electron-lattice interaction needed to stabilise a large-bipolaron with respect to decomposing into polarons. The lowest-energy radial in-plane optic vibration of a large-bipolaron's four core oxygen ions with their associated electronic charges has d-symmetry. Electronic relaxation in response to multiple large-bipolarons' atomic vibrations lowers their frequencies to generate a phonon-mediated attraction among them which fosters their condensation into a liquid. This liquid features distinctive transport and optical properties. A large-bipolaron liquid's superconductivity can result when it undergoes a Bose condensation yielding macroscopic occupation of its ground state. The synchronised vibrations of large-bipolarons' core-oxygen ions with their electronic charges generate this Bose condensate's dynamic global d-symmetry.

  16. Nonlinear dynamics in a trapped atomic Bose-Einstein condensate induced by an oscillating Gaussian potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Kazuya; Tsubota, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    We consider a trapped atomic Bose-Einstein condensate penetrated by a repulsive Gaussian potential and theoretically investigate the dynamics induced by oscillating the Gaussian potential. Our study is based on the numerical calculation of the two-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Our calculation reveals the dependence of the characteristic behavior of the condensate on the amplitude and frequency of the oscillating potential. These dynamics are deeply related to the nucleation and dynamics of quantized vortices and solitons. When the potential oscillates with a large amplitude, it nucleates many vortex pairs that move away from the potential. When the amplitude of the oscillation is small, it nucleates solitons through an annihilation of vortex pairs. We discuss three issues concerning the nucleation of vortices. The first is the phase diagram for the nucleation of vortices and solitons near the oscillating potential. The second is the mechanism and critical velocity of the nucleation. The critical velocity of the nucleation is an important issue in quantum fluids, and we propose an expression for the velocity containing both the coherence length and the size of the potential. The third is the divergence of the nucleation time, which is the time it takes for the potential to nucleate vortices, near the critical parameters for vortex nucleation.

  17. Guiding-center dynamics of vortex dipoles in Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middelkamp, S.; Schmelcher, P.; Torres, P. J.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; Carretero-Gonzalez, R.; Freilich, D. V.; Hall, D. S.

    2011-01-01

    A quantized vortex dipole is the simplest vortex molecule, comprising two countercirculating vortex lines in a superfluid. Although vortex dipoles are endemic in two-dimensional superfluids, the precise details of their dynamics have remained largely unexplored. We present here several striking observations of vortex dipoles in dilute-gas Bose-Einstein condensates, and develop a vortex-particle model that generates vortex line trajectories that are in good agreement with the experimental data. Interestingly, these diverse trajectories exhibit essentially identical quasiperiodic behavior, in which the vortex lines undergo stable epicyclic orbits.

  18. Macroscopic self-trapping in Bose-Einstein condensates: Analysis of a dynamical quantum phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julia-Diaz, B.; Dagnino, D.; Martorell, J.; Polls, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2010-01-01

    We consider a Bose-Einstein condensate in a double-well potential undergoing a dynamical transition from the regime of Josephson oscillations to the regime of self-trapping. We analyze the statistical properties of the ground state (or the highest excited state) of the Hamiltonian in these two regimes for attractive (repulsive) interactions. We demonstrate that it is impossible to describe the transition within the mean-field theory. In contrast, the transition proceeds through a strongly correlated delocalized state, with large quantum fluctuations, and spontaneous breaking of the symmetry.

  19. Dynamic model of counter flow air to air heat exchanger for comfort ventilation with condensation and frost formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Toke Rammer; Rose, Jørgen; Kragh, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    must be calculated under conditions with condensation and freezing. This article presents a dynamic model of a counter flow air to air heat exchanger taking into account condensation and freezing and melting of ice. The model is implemented in Simulink and results are compared to measurements......In cold climates heat recovery in the ventilation system is essential to reduce heating energy demand. Condensation and freezing occur often in efficient heat exchangers used in cold climates. To develop efficient heat exchangers and defrosting strategies for cold climates, heat and mass transfer...

  20. Computation of the chiral condensate using Nf=2 and Nf=2+1+1 dynamical flavors of twisted mass fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cichy, K.; Jansen, K.; Shindler, A.; Forschungszentrum Juelich; Forschungszentrum Juelich

    2013-12-01

    We apply the spectral projector method, recently introduced by Giusti and Luescher, to compute the chiral condensate using N f =2 and N f =2+1+1 dynamical flavors of maximally twisted mass fermions. We present our results for several quark masses at three different lattice spacings which allows us to perform the chiral and continuum extrapolations. In addition we report our analysis on the O(a) improvement of the chiral condensate for twisted mass fermions. We also study the effect of the dynamical strange and charm quarks by comparing our results for N f =2 and N f =2+1+1 dynamical flavors.

  1. Damage Detection for Continuous Bridge Based on Static-Dynamic Condensation and Extended Kalman Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoxiang He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As an effective and classical method about physical parameter identification, extended Kalman filtering (EKF algorithm is widely used in structural damage identification, but the equations and solutions for the structure with bending deformation are not established based on EKF. The degrees of freedom about rotation can be eliminated by the static condensation method, and the dynamic condensation method considering Rayleigh damping is proposed in order to establish the equivalent and simplified modal based on complex finite element model such as continuous girder bridge. According to the requirement of bridge inspection and health monitoring, the online and convenient damage detection method based on EKF is presented. The impact excitation can be generated only on one location by one hammer actuator, and the signal in free vibration is analyzed. The deficiency that the complex excitation information is needed based on the traditional method is overcome. As a numerical example, a three-span continuous girder bridge is simulated, and the corresponding stiffness, the damage location and degree, and the damping parameter are identified accurately. It is verified that the method is suitable for the dynamic signal with high noise-signal ratio; the convergence speed is fast and this method is feasible for application.

  2. Water Condensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kasper Risgaard; Fojan, Peter; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2014-01-01

    The condensation of water is a phenomenon occurring in multiple situations in everyday life, e.g., when fog is formed or when dew forms on the grass or on windows. This means that this phenomenon plays an important role within the different fields of science including meteorology, building physics......, and chemistry. In this review we address condensation models and simulations with the main focus on heterogeneous condensation of water. The condensation process is, at first, described from a thermodynamic viewpoint where the nucleation step is described by the classical nucleation theory. Further, we address...

  3. Inflationary Quasiparticle Creation and Thermalization Dynamics in Coupled Bose-Einstein Condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posazhennikova, Anna; Trujillo-Martinez, Mauricio; Kroha, Johann

    2016-06-03

    A Bose gas in a double-well potential, exhibiting a true Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) amplitude and initially performing Josephson oscillations, is a prototype of an isolated, nonequilibrium many-body system. We investigate the quasiparticle (QP) creation and thermalization dynamics of this system by solving the time-dependent Keldysh-Bogoliubov equations. We find avalanchelike QP creation due to a parametric resonance between BEC and QP oscillations, followed by slow, exponential relaxation to a thermal state at an elevated temperature, controlled by the initial excitation energy of the oscillating BEC above its ground state. The crossover between the two regimes occurs because of an effective decoupling of the QP and BEC oscillations. This dynamics is analogous to elementary particle creation in models of the early universe. The thermalization in our setup occurs because the BEC acts as a grand canonical reservoir for the quasiparticle system.

  4. Spatiotemporal dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates in linear- and circular-chain optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, N.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices that have a linear-or a circular-chain configuration with the tunneling couplings between nearest-neighbor lattice sites. A discrete nonlinear Schroedinger equation has been solved for various initial conditions and for a definite range of repulsive and attractive interatomic interactions. It is shown that the diversity of the spatiotemporal dynamics of the atomic population distribution such as a macroscopic self-trapping, bright and dark solitons, and symmetry breaking is derived from the positive and negative interatomic interactions. For the circular-chain configuration, two types of rotational modes are obtained as we introduce a definite relation for the initial phase conditions

  5. Population and phase dynamics of F=1 spinor condensates in an external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, D.R.; Passos, E.J.V. de

    2004-01-01

    We show that the classical dynamics underlying the mean-field description of homogeneous mixtures of spinor F=1 Bose-Einstein condensates in an external magnetic field is integrable as a consequence of number conservation and axial symmetry in spin space. The population dynamics depends only on the quadratic term of the Zeeman energy and on the strength of the spin-dependent term of the atom-atom interaction. We determine the equilibrium populations as function of the ratio of these two quantities and the miscibility of the hyperfine components in the ground state spinors are thoroughly discussed. Outside the equilibrium, the populations are always a periodic function of time where the periodic motion can be a libration or a rotation. Our studies also indicate the absence of metastability

  6. Inflationary Quasiparticle Creation and Thermalization Dynamics in Coupled Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posazhennikova, Anna; Trujillo-Martinez, Mauricio; Kroha, Johann

    2016-06-01

    A Bose gas in a double-well potential, exhibiting a true Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) amplitude and initially performing Josephson oscillations, is a prototype of an isolated, nonequilibrium many-body system. We investigate the quasiparticle (QP) creation and thermalization dynamics of this system by solving the time-dependent Keldysh-Bogoliubov equations. We find avalanchelike QP creation due to a parametric resonance between BEC and QP oscillations, followed by slow, exponential relaxation to a thermal state at an elevated temperature, controlled by the initial excitation energy of the oscillating BEC above its ground state. The crossover between the two regimes occurs because of an effective decoupling of the QP and BEC oscillations. This dynamics is analogous to elementary particle creation in models of the early universe. The thermalization in our setup occurs because the BEC acts as a grand canonical reservoir for the quasiparticle system.

  7. Bouncing dynamics of Bose–Einstein condensates under the effects of gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekh, Golam Ali, E-mail: golamali.sekh@ba.infn.it [Department of Physics, University of Kashmir, Hazratbal, Srinagar-190006, J & K (India); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy)

    2017-03-03

    Bouncing dynamics of quasi-one dimensional Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) falling under gravity on delta-function potentials is investigated. First, we consider a single component BEC in the presence of cubic-quintic nonlinearity and study dynamical behavior of different parameters of the system using variational and numerical approaches. We see that the quintic nonlinearity plays a dominant role over cubic nonlinear interaction to extend the bouncing dynamics in the non-linear regime. We find that a matter-wave performs bouncing motion only for certain discrete values of initial position above the reflecting potential. We then consider bouncing dynamics of binary BECs. It is shown that the pair of matter-waves bounces together if inter-species interaction is attractive. However, their pairing breaks down if the inter-species interaction is made repulsive. - Highlights: • Single and coupled BECs • Effects of inter-component interaction and gravity • Periodic and quasi-periodic dynamics • Fermi-type acceleration.

  8. How to fix a broken symmetry: quantum dynamics of symmetry restoration in a ferromagnetic Bose-Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damski, Bogdan; Zurek, Wojciech H

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the dynamics of a quantum phase transition in a spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate when it is driven from the magnetized broken-symmetry phase to the unmagnetized 'symmetric' polar phase. We determine where the condensate goes out of equilibrium as it approaches the critical point, and compute the condensate magnetization at the critical point. This is done within a quantum Kibble-Zurek scheme traditionally employed in the context of symmetry-breaking quantum phase transitions. Then we study the influence of the non-equilibrium dynamics near a critical point on the condensate magnetization. In particular, when the quench stops at the critical point, nonlinear oscillations of magnetization occur. They are characterized by a period and an amplitude that are inversely proportional. If we keep driving the condensate far away from the critical point through the unmagnetized 'symmetric' polar phase, the amplitude of magnetization oscillations slowly decreases reaching a nonzero asymptotic value. That process is described by an equation that can be mapped onto the classical mechanical problem of a particle moving under the influence of harmonic and 'anti-friction' forces whose interplay leads to surprisingly simple fixed-amplitude oscillations. We obtain several scaling results relating the condensate magnetization to the quench rate, and verify numerically all analytical predictions

  9. Attractive versus repulsive interactions in the Bose-Einstein condensation dynamics of relativistic field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berges, J.; Boguslavski, K.; Chatrchyan, A.; Jaeckel, J.

    2017-10-01

    We study the impact of attractive self-interactions on the nonequilibrium dynamics of relativistic quantum fields with large occupancies at low momenta. Our primary focus is on Bose-Einstein condensation and nonthermal fixed points in such systems. For a model system, we consider O (N ) -symmetric scalar field theories. We use classical-statistical real-time simulations as well as a systematic 1 /N expansion of the quantum (two-particle-irreducible) effective action to next-to-leading order. When the mean self-interactions are repulsive, condensation occurs as a consequence of a universal inverse particle cascade to the zero-momentum mode with self-similar scaling behavior. For attractive mean self-interactions, the inverse cascade is absent, and the particle annihilation rate is enhanced compared to the repulsive case, which counteracts the formation of coherent field configurations. For N ≥2 , the presence of a nonvanishing conserved charge can suppress number-changing processes and lead to the formation of stable localized charge clumps, i.e., Q balls.

  10. Topological susceptibility and chiral condensate with Nf=2+1+1 dynamical flavors of maximally twisted mass fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cichy, K.

    2012-03-01

    We study the 'spectral projector' method for the computation of the chiral condensate and the topological susceptibility, using N f =2+1+1 dynamical flavors of maximally twisted mass Wilson fermions. In particular, we perform a study of the quark mass dependence of the chiral condensate Σ and topological susceptibility χ top in the range 270 MeV π top in the quenched approximation where we match the lattice spacing to the N f =2+1+1 dynamical simulations. Using the Kaon, η and η' meson masses computed on the N f =2+1+1 ensembles, we then perform a preliminary test of the Witten-Veneziano relation.

  11. 77 FR 41808 - General Dynamics Itronix Corporation, a Subsidiary of General Dynamics Corporation, Including...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-81,448] General Dynamics Itronix Corporation, a Subsidiary of General Dynamics Corporation, Including Remote Workers Reporting to Sunrise, FL..., 2012, a State Workforce Office requested administrative reconsideration of the negative determination...

  12. Generation of dark solitons and their instability dynamics in two-dimensional condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Gunjan; Rapol, Umakant D.; Nath, Rejish

    2017-04-01

    We analyze numerically the formation and the subsequent dynamics of two-dimensional matter wave dark solitons in a Thomas-Fermi rubidium condensate using various techniques. An initially imprinted sharp phase gradient leads to the dynamical formation of a stationary soliton as well as very shallow gray solitons, whereas a smooth gradient only creates gray solitons. The depth and hence, the velocity of the soliton is provided by the spatial width of the phase gradient, and it also strongly influences the snake-instability dynamics of the two-dimensional solitons. The vortex dipoles stemming from the unstable soliton exhibit rich dynamics. Notably, the annihilation of a vortex dipole via a transient dark lump or a vortexonium state, the exchange of vortices between either a pair of vortex dipoles or a vortex dipole and a single vortex, and so on. For sufficiently large width of the initial phase gradient, the solitons may decay directly into vortexoniums instead of vortex pairs, and also the decay rate is augmented. Later, we discuss alternative techniques to generate dark solitons, which involve a Gaussian potential barrier and time-dependent interactions, both linear and periodic. The properties of the solitons can be controlled by tuning the amplitude or the width of the potential barrier. In the linear case, the number of solitons and their depths are determined by the quench time of the interactions. For the periodic modulation, a transient soliton lattice emerges with its periodicity depending on the modulation frequency, through a wave number selection governed by the local Bogoliubov spectrum. Interestingly, for sufficiently low barrier potential, both Faraday pattern and soliton lattice coexist. The snake instability dynamics of the soliton lattice is characteristically modified if the Faraday pattern is present.

  13. Where do winds come from? A new theory on how water vapor condensation influences atmospheric pressure and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarieva, A. M.; Gorshkov, V. G.; Sheil, D.; Nobre, A. D.; Li, B.-L.

    2013-01-01

    Phase transitions of atmospheric water play a ubiquitous role in the Earth's climate system, but their direct impact on atmospheric dynamics has escaped wide attention. Here we examine and advance a theory as to how condensation influences atmospheric pressure through the mass removal of water from the gas phase with a simultaneous account of the latent heat release. Building from fundamental physical principles we show that condensation is associated with a decline in air pressure in the lower atmosphere. This decline occurs up to a certain height, which ranges from 3 to 4 km for surface temperatures from 10 to 30 °C. We then estimate the horizontal pressure differences associated with water vapor condensation and find that these are comparable in magnitude with the pressure differences driving observed circulation patterns. The water vapor delivered to the atmosphere via evaporation represents a store of potential energy available to accelerate air and thus drive winds. Our estimates suggest that the global mean power at which this potential energy is released by condensation is around one per cent of the global solar power - this is similar to the known stationary dissipative power of general atmospheric circulation. We conclude that condensation and evaporation merit attention as major, if previously overlooked, factors in driving atmospheric dynamics.

  14. Dynamics of nanoparticle self-assembly into superhydrophobic liquid marbles during water condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykaczewski, Konrad; Chinn, Jeff; Walker, Marlon L; Scott, John Henry J; Chinn, Amy; Jones, Wanda

    2011-12-27

    Nanoparticles adsorbed onto the surface of a drop can fully encapsulate the liquid, creating a robust and durable soft solid with superhydrophobic characteristics referred to as a liquid marble. Artificially created liquid marbles have been studied for about a decade but are already utilized in some hair and skin care products and have numerous other potential applications. These soft solids are usually formed in small quantity by depositing and rolling a drop of liquid on a layer of hydrophobic particles but can also be made in larger quantities in an industrial mixer. In this work, we demonstrate that microscale liquid marbles can also form through self-assembly during water condensation on a superhydrophobic surface covered with a loose layer of hydrophobic nanoparticles. Using in situ environmental scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy, we study the dynamics of liquid marble formation and evaporation as well as their interaction with condensing water droplets. We demonstrate that the self-assembly of nanoparticle films into three-dimensional liquid marbles is driven by multiple coalescence events between partially covered droplets and is aided by surface flows causing rapid nanoparticle film redistribution. We also show that droplet and liquid marble coalescence can occur due to liquid-to-liquid contact or squeezing of the two objects into each other as a result of compressive forces from surrounding droplets and marbles. Irrelevant of the mechanism, coalescence of marbles and drops can cause their rapid movement across and rolling off the edge of the surface. We also demonstrate that the liquid marbles randomly moving across the surface can be captured and immobilized by hydrophilic surface patterns.

  15. Quasi-particle excitations and dynamical structure function of trapped Bose-condensates in the WKB approximation

    OpenAIRE

    Csordás, András; Graham, Robert; Szépfalusy, Péter

    1997-01-01

    The Bogoliubov equations of the quasi-particle excitations in a weakly interacting trapped Bose-condensate are solved in the WKB approximation in an isotropic harmonic trap, determining the discrete quasi-particle energies and wave functions by torus (Bohr-Sommerfeld) quantization of the integrable classical quasi-particle dynamics. The results are used to calculate the position and strengths of the peaks in the dynamic structure function which can be observed by off-resonance inelastic light...

  16. Crossover dynamics of dispersive shocks in Bose-Einstein condensates characterized by two- and three-body interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Crosta, M.

    2012-04-10

    We show that the perturbative nonlinearity associated with three-atom interactions, competing with standard two-body repulsive interactions, can change dramatically the evolution of one-dimensional (1D) dispersive shock waves in a Bose-Einstein condensate. In particular, we prove the existence of a rich crossover dynamics, ranging from the formation of multiple shocks regularized by nonlinear oscillations culminating in coexisting dark and antidark matter waves to 1D-soliton collapse. For a given scattering length, all these different regimes can be accessed by varying the density of atoms in the condensate.

  17. Crossover dynamics of dispersive shocks in Bose-Einstein condensates characterized by two- and three-body interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Crosta, M.; Trillo, S.; Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    We show that the perturbative nonlinearity associated with three-atom interactions, competing with standard two-body repulsive interactions, can change dramatically the evolution of one-dimensional (1D) dispersive shock waves in a Bose-Einstein condensate. In particular, we prove the existence of a rich crossover dynamics, ranging from the formation of multiple shocks regularized by nonlinear oscillations culminating in coexisting dark and antidark matter waves to 1D-soliton collapse. For a given scattering length, all these different regimes can be accessed by varying the density of atoms in the condensate.

  18. Including dynamic CO2 intensity with demand response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, Pia; Brandt, Nils; Nordström, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Hourly demand response tariffs with the intention of reducing or shifting loads during peak demand hours are being intensively discussed among policy-makers, researchers and executives of future electricity systems. Demand response rates have still low customer acceptance, apparently because the consumption habits requires stronger incentive to change than any proposed financial incentive. An hourly CO 2 intensity signal could give customers an extra environmental motivation to shift or reduce loads during peak hours, as it would enable co-optimisation of electricity consumption costs and carbon emissions reductions. In this study, we calculated the hourly dynamic CO 2 signal and applied the calculation to hourly electricity market data in Great Britain, Ontario and Sweden. This provided a novel understanding of the relationships between hourly electricity generation mix composition, electricity price and electricity mix CO 2 intensity. Load shifts from high-price hours resulted in carbon emission reductions for electricity generation mixes where price and CO 2 intensity were positively correlated. The reduction can be further improved if the shift is optimised using both price and CO 2 intensity. The analysis also indicated that an hourly CO 2 intensity signal can help avoid carbon emissions increases for mixes with a negative correlation between electricity price and CO 2 intensity. - Highlights: • We present a formula for calculating hybrid dynamic CO 2 intensity of electricity generation mixes. • We apply the dynamic CO 2 Intensity on hourly electricity market prices and generation units for Great Britain, Ontario and Sweden. • We calculate the spearman correlation between hourly electricity market price and dynamic CO 2 intensity for Great Britain, Ontario and Sweden. • We calculate carbon footprint of shifting 1 kWh load daily from on-peak hours to off-peak hours using the dynamic CO 2 intensity. • We conclude that using dynamic CO 2 intensity for

  19. Dynamic model including piping acoustics of a centrifugal compression system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helvoirt, van J.; Jager, de A.G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with low frequency pulsation phenomena in full-scale centrifugal compression systems associated with compressor surge. The Greitzer lumped parameter model is applied to describe the dynamic behavior of an industrial compressor test rig and experimental evidence is provided for the

  20. Control of the dynamics of coupled atomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensates: Modified Gross-Pitaevskii approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Moumita; Dastidar, Krishna Rai

    2009-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the atomic and molecular Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) of 87 Rb in a spherically symmetric trap coupled by stimulated Raman photoassociation process. Considering the higher order nonlinearity in the atom-atom interaction we analyze the dynamics of the system using coupled modified Gross-Pitaevskii (MGP) equations and compare it with mean-field coupled Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) dynamics. Considerable differences in the dynamics are obtained in these two approaches at large scattering length, i.e., for large values of peak-gas parameter x pk ≥10 -3 . We show how the dynamics of the coupled system is affected when the atom-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions are considered together with the atom-atom interaction and also when the strengths of these three interactions are increased. The effect of detuning on the efficiency of conversion of atomic fractions into molecules is demonstrated and the feasibility of maximum molecular BEC formation by varying the Raman detuning parameter at different values of time is explored. Thus by varying the Raman detuning and the scattering length for atom-atom interaction one can control the dynamics of the coupled atomic-molecular BEC system. We have also solved coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations for atomic to molecular condensate formation through magnetic Feshbach resonance in a BEC of 85 Rb. We found similar features for oscillations between atomic and molecular condensates noted in previous theoretical study and obtained fairly good agreement with the evolution of total atomic condensate observed experimentally.

  1. Nonequilibrium chiral fluid dynamics including dissipation and noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahrgang, Marlene; Herold, Christoph; Bleicher, Marcus; Leupold, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    We present a consistent theoretical approach for the study of nonequilibrium effects in chiral fluid dynamics within the framework of the linear σ model with constituent quarks. Treating the quarks as an equilibrated heat bath, we use the influence functional formalism to obtain a Langevin equation for the σ field. This allows us to calculate the explicit form of the damping coefficient and the noise correlators. For a self-consistent derivation of both the dynamics of the σ field and the quark fluid, we have to employ the 2PI (two-particle irreducible) effective action formalism. The energy dissipation from the field to the fluid is treated in the exact formalism of the 2PI effective action where a conserved energy-momentum tensor can be constructed. We derive its form and comment on approximations generating additional terms in the energy-momentum balance of the entire system.

  2. Dynamical preparation of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement in two-well Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opanchuk, B.; He, Q. Y.; Reid, M. D.; Drummond, P. D.

    2012-08-01

    We propose to generate Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) entanglement between groups of atoms in a two-well Bose-Einstein condensate using a dynamical process similar to that employed in quantum optics. A local nonlinear S-wave scattering interaction has the effect of creating spin squeezing at each well, while a tunneling coupling, analogous to a beam splitter in optics, introduces an interference between these fields that causes interwell entanglement. We consider two internal modes at each well so that the entanglement can be detected by measuring a reduction in the variances of the sums of local Schwinger spin observables. As is typical of continuous variable (CV) entanglement, the entanglement is predicted to increase with atom number. It becomes sufficiently strong at higher numbers of atoms so that the EPR paradox and steering nonlocality can be realized. The entanglement is predicted using an analytical approach and, for larger atom numbers, using stochastic simulations based on a truncated Wigner function approximation. We find generally that strong tunneling is favorable, and that entanglement persists and is even enhanced in the presence of realistic nonlinear losses.

  3. Rabi dynamics of coupled atomic and molecular Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishkhanyan, Artur; Chernikov, G.P.; Nakamura, Hiroki

    2004-01-01

    The dynamics of coherent Rabi oscillations in coupled atomic and molecular Bose-Einstein condensates is considered taking into account the atom-atom, atom-molecule, and molecule-molecule elastic interactions. The exact solution for the molecule formation probability is derived in terms of the elliptic functions. The two-dimensional space of the involved parameters intensity and detuning is analyzed and divided into two regions where the Rabi oscillations show different characteristics. A resonance curve is found, on which the molecular formation probability monotonically increases as a function of time. The maximum value of the final transition probability on this curve is 1/2 (i.e., total transition to the molecular state) and it is achieved at high field intensities starting from a minimal threshold defined by the interspecies interaction scattering lights. The explicit form of the resonance curve is determined, and it is shown that the resonance frequency position reveals a nonlinear dependence on the Rabi frequency of the applied field. A singular point is found on the resonance curve, where a power-law time evolution of the system is observed

  4. Dynamic and energetic stabilization of persistent currents in Bose-Einstein condensates

    KAUST Repository

    Law, Kody; Neely, T. W.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Anderson, B. P.; Bradley, A. S.; Carretero-Gonzá lez, R.

    2014-01-01

    We study conditions under which vortices in a highly oblate harmonically trapped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) can be stabilized due to pinning by a blue-detuned Gaussian laser beam, with particular emphasis on the potentially destabilizing effects of laser beam positioning within the BEC. Our approach involves theoretical and numerical exploration of dynamically and energetically stable pinning of vortices with winding number up to S=6, in correspondence with experimental observations. Stable pinning is quantified theoretically via Bogoliubov-de Gennes excitation spectrum computations and confirmed via direct numerical simulations for a range of conditions similar to those of experimental observations. The theoretical and numerical results indicate that the pinned winding number, or equivalently the winding number of the superfluid current about the laser beam, decays as a laser beam of fixed intensity moves away from the BEC center. Our theoretical analysis helps explain previous experimental observations and helps define limits of stable vortex pinning for future experiments involving vortex manipulation by laser beams.

  5. Antwerp Advanced Study Institute on Electronic Structure, Dynamics and Quantum Structural Properties of Condensed Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Camp, Piet

    1985-01-01

    The 1984 Advanced Study Institute on "Electronic Structure, Dynamics and Quantum Structural Properties of Condensed Matter" took place at the Corsendonk Conference Center, close to the City of Antwerpen, from July 16 till 27, 1984. This NATO Advanced Study Institute was motivated by the research in my Institute, where, in 1971, a project was started on "ab-initio" phonon calculations in Silicon. I~ is my pleasure to thank several instances and people who made this ASI possible. First of all, the sponsor of the Institute, the NATO Scientific Committee. Next, the co-sponsors: Agfa-Gevaert, Bell Telephone Mfg. Co. N.V., C & A, Esso Belgium·, CDC Belgium, Janssens Pharmaceutica, Kredietbank and the Scientific Office of the U.S. Army. Special thanks are due to Dr. P. Van Camp and Drs. H. Nachtegaele, who, over several months, prepared the practical aspects of the ASI with the secretarial help of Mrs. R.-M. Vandekerkhof. I also like to. thank Mrs. M. Cuyvers who prepared and organized the subject and material ...

  6. Dynamic and energetic stabilization of persistent currents in Bose-Einstein condensates

    KAUST Repository

    Law, Kody

    2014-05-09

    We study conditions under which vortices in a highly oblate harmonically trapped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) can be stabilized due to pinning by a blue-detuned Gaussian laser beam, with particular emphasis on the potentially destabilizing effects of laser beam positioning within the BEC. Our approach involves theoretical and numerical exploration of dynamically and energetically stable pinning of vortices with winding number up to S=6, in correspondence with experimental observations. Stable pinning is quantified theoretically via Bogoliubov-de Gennes excitation spectrum computations and confirmed via direct numerical simulations for a range of conditions similar to those of experimental observations. The theoretical and numerical results indicate that the pinned winding number, or equivalently the winding number of the superfluid current about the laser beam, decays as a laser beam of fixed intensity moves away from the BEC center. Our theoretical analysis helps explain previous experimental observations and helps define limits of stable vortex pinning for future experiments involving vortex manipulation by laser beams.

  7. A novel modelling approach for condensing boilers based on hybrid dynamical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Satyavada, H.; Baldi, S.

    2016-01-01

    Condensing boilers use waste heat from flue gases to pre-heat cold water entering the boiler. Flue gases are condensed into liquid form, thus recovering their latent heat of vaporization, which results in as much as 10%–12% increase in efficiency. Modeling these heat transfer phenomena is crucial to

  8. Computational fluid dynamics validation study of steam condensation on the containment walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gera, B.; Sharma, P.K.; Singh, R.K.; Vaze, K.K.

    2012-01-01

    In water cooled power reactors, significant quantities of hydrogen could be produced following a severe accident (loss-of-coolant-accident along with non availability of emergency core cooling system). A sound understanding of dispersion, stratification and diffusion of released hydrogen during severe accidents is, therefore, of practical importance and use to better understand the possibility of ignition, combustion and explosion of such releases within the context of containment safety. The presence of air and steam in the containment atmosphere also affects the hydrogen distribution as steam condensation takes place at containment walls in presence of non condensable and bulk of the mixture diffuses towards wall. The application of general purpose CFD codes for the analysis of the hydrogen behaviour within NPP containments during severe accidents has been increasing over past few years. The commercial CFD codes generally do not have built-in steam condensations models. In the present work, the adaptation of a commercial multipurpose code to this kind of problem is explained, i.e. by the implementation of models for steam condensation onto walls in presence of non-condensable gases. Steam condensation was modeled using the Uchida correlation, which was originally developed to be used for 'lumped' (volume-averaged) modeling of steam condensation in the presence of non-condensable gases. The Uchida correlation is based on experiments on natural convection from relatively small vertical plates. The present methodology has been validated against experimental data from the TOSQAN and COPAIN experimental facilities. (orig.)

  9. Dynamics of capillary condensation in lattice gas models of confined fluids: a comparison of dynamic mean field theory with dynamic Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, John R; Monson, Peter A

    2013-06-21

    This article addresses the accuracy of a dynamic mean field theory (DMFT) for fluids in porous materials [P. A. Monson, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 084701 (2008)]. The theory is used to study the relaxation processes of fluids in pores driven by step changes made to a bulk reservoir in contact with the pore. We compare the results of the DMFT to those obtained by averaging over large numbers of dynamic Monte Carlo (DMC) simulation trajectories. The problem chosen for comparison is capillary condensation in slit pores, driven by step changes in the chemical potential in the bulk reservoir and involving a nucleation process via the formation of a liquid bridge. The principal difference between the DMFT results and DMC is the replacement of a distribution of nucleation times and location along the pore for the formation of liquid bridges by a single time and location. DMFT is seen to yield an otherwise qualitatively accurate description of the dynamic behavior.

  10. Aeroelastic modal dynamics of wind turbines including anisotropic effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoldan, Peter Fisker

    frequency is thus identified as the dominant frequency in the response of a pure excitation of the mode observed in the inertial frame. A modal analysis tool based directly on the complex aeroelastic wind turbine code BHawC is presented. It uses the Coleman approach in isotropic conditions......Several methods for aeroelastic modal analysis of a rotating wind turbine are developed and used to analyse the modal dynamics of two simplified models and a complex model in isotropic and anisotropic conditions. The Coleman transformation is used to enable extraction of the modal frequencies...... of Floquet analysis or Hill's method which do not provide a unique reference frame for observing the modal frequency, to which any multiple of the rotor speed can be added. This indeterminacy is resolved by requiring that the periodic mode shape be as constant as possible in the inertial frame. The modal...

  11. Study of the Dynamics of a Condensing Bubble Using Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnawaz Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann method (LBM is used to discretize the governing equations for a steam bubble inside a tube filled with water. The bubbles are kept at higher temperature compared to its boiling point while the liquid is kept subcooled. Heat transfer is allowed to take place between the two phases by virtue of which the bubble will condense. Three separate probability distribution functions are used in LBM to handle continuity, momentum and energy equations separately. The interface is considered to be diffused within a narrow zone and it has been modeled using convective Cahn-Hillard equation. Combined diffused interface-LBM framework is adapted accordingly to handle complex interface separating two phases having high density ratio. Developed model is validated with respect to established correlations for instantaneous equivalent radius of a spherical condensing bubble. Numerical snapshots of the simulation depict that the bubble volume decreases faster for higher degree of superheat. The degrees of superheat are varied over a wide range to note its effect on bubble shape and size. Effect of initial volume of the bubble on the condensation rate is also studied. It has been observed that for a fixed degree of superheat, the condensation rate is not exactly proportional to its volume. Due to the variation in interfacial configuration for different sized bubbles, condensation rate changes drastically. Influence of gravity on the rate of condensation is also studied using the developed methodology.

  12. Market diffusion, technological learning, and cost-benefit dynamics of condensing gas boilers in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Martin; Dittmar, Lars; Junginger, Martin; Patel, Martin K.; Blok, Kornelis

    2009-01-01

    High costs often prevent the market diffusion of novel and efficient energy technologies. Monitoring cost and price decline for these technologies is thus important in order to establish effective energy policy. Here, we present experience curves and cost-benefit analyses for condensing gas boilers produced and sold in the Netherlands between 1981 and 2006. For the most dominant boiler type on the Dutch market, i.e., condensing gas combi boilers, we identify learning rates of 14±1% for the average price and 16±8% for the additional price relative to non-condensing devices. Economies of scale, competitive sourcing of boiler components, and improvements in boiler assembly are among the main drivers behind the observed price decline. The net present value of condensing gas combi boilers shows an overall increasing trend. Purchasing in 2006 a gas boiler of this type instead of a non-condensing device generates a net present value of 970 EUR (Euro) and realizes CO 2 (carbon dioxide) emission savings at negative costs of -120 EUR per tonne CO 2 . We attribute two-thirds of the improvements in the cost-benefit performance of condensing gas combi boilers to technological learning and one-third to a combination of external effects and governmental policies.

  13. Aeroelastic modal dynamics of wind turbines including anisotropic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisker Skjoldan, P.

    2011-03-15

    Several methods for aeroelastic modal analysis of a rotating wind turbine are developed and used to analyse the modal dynamics of two simplified models and a complex model in isotropic and anisotropic conditions. The Coleman transformation is used to enable extraction of the modal frequencies, damping, and periodic mode shapes of a rotating wind turbine by describing the rotor degrees of freedom in the inertial frame. This approach is valid only for an isotropic system. Anisotropic systems, e.g., with an unbalanced rotor or operating in wind shear, are treated with the general approaches of Floquet analysis or Hill's method which do not provide a unique reference frame for observing the modal frequency, to which any multiple of the rotor speed can be added. This indeterminacy is resolved by requiring that the periodic mode shape be as constant as possible in the inertial frame. The modal frequency is thus identified as the dominant frequency in the response of a pure excitation of the mode observed in the inertial frame. A modal analysis tool based directly on the complex aeroelastic wind turbine code BHawC is presented. It uses the Coleman approach in isotropic conditions and the computationally efficient implicit Floquet analysis in anisotropic conditions. The tool is validated against system identifications with the partial Floquet method on the nonlinear BHawC model of a 2.3 MW wind turbine. System identification results show that nonlinear effects on the 2.3 MW turbine in most cases are small, but indicate that the controller creates nonlinear damping. In isotropic conditions the periodic mode shape contains up to three harmonic components, but in anisotropic conditions it can contain an infinite number of harmonic components with frequencies that are multiples of the rotor speed. These harmonics appear in calculated frequency responses of the turbine. Extreme wind shear changes the modal damping when the flow is separated due to an interaction between

  14. Probing the structural and dynamical properties of liquid water with models including non-local electron correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Ben, Mauro; Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-01-01

    Water is a ubiquitous liquid that displays a wide range of anomalous properties and has a delicate structure that challenges experiment and simulation alike. The various intermolecular interactions that play an important role, such as repulsion, polarization, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals interactions, are often difficult to reproduce faithfully in atomistic models. Here, electronic structure theories including all these interactions at equal footing, which requires the inclusion of non-local electron correlation, are used to describe structure and dynamics of bulk liquid water. Isobaric-isothermal (NpT) ensemble simulations based on the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) yield excellent density (0.994 g/ml) and fair radial distribution functions, while various other density functional approximations produce scattered results (0.8-1.2 g/ml). Molecular dynamics simulation in the microcanonical (NVE) ensemble based on Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) yields dynamical properties in the condensed phase, namely, the infrared spectrum and diffusion constant. At the MP2 and RPA levels of theory, ice is correctly predicted to float on water, resolving one of the anomalies as resulting from a delicate balance between van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions. For several properties, obtaining quantitative agreement with experiment requires correction for nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), highlighting their importance, for structure, dynamics, and electronic properties. A computed NQE shift of 0.6 eV for the band gap and absorption spectrum illustrates the latter. Giving access to both structure and dynamics of condensed phase systems, non-local electron correlation will increasingly be used to study systems where weak interactions are of paramount importance

  15. Conditions for order and chaos in the dynamics of a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate in coordinate and energy space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhel, Roger R.; Sakhel, Asaad R.; Ghassib, Humam B.; Balaz, Antun

    2016-03-01

    We investigate numerically conditions for order and chaos in the dynamics of an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) confined by an external trap cut off by a hard-wall box potential. The BEC is stirred by a laser to induce excitations manifesting as irregular spatial and energy oscillations of the trapped cloud. Adding laser stirring to the external trap results in an effective time-varying trapping frequency in connection with the dynamically changing combined external+laser potential trap. The resulting dynamics are analyzed by plotting their trajectories in coordinate phase space and in energy space. The Lyapunov exponents are computed to confirm the existence of chaos in the latter space. Quantum effects and trap anharmonicity are demonstrated to generate chaos in energy space, thus confirming its presence and implicating either quantum effects or trap anharmonicity as its generator. The presence of chaos in energy space does not necessarily translate into chaos in coordinate space. In general, a dynamic trapping frequency is found to promote chaos in a trapped BEC. An apparent means to suppress chaos in a trapped BEC is achieved by increasing the characteristic scale of the external trap with respect to the condensate size.

  16. A Simple and Efficient Numerical Method for Computing the Dynamics of Rotating Bose--Einstein Condensates via Rotating Lagrangian Coordinates

    KAUST Repository

    Bao, Weizhu

    2013-01-01

    We propose a simple, efficient, and accurate numerical method for simulating the dynamics of rotating Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) in a rotational frame with or without longrange dipole-dipole interaction (DDI). We begin with the three-dimensional (3D) Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) with an angular momentum rotation term and/or long-range DDI, state the twodimensional (2D) GPE obtained from the 3D GPE via dimension reduction under anisotropic external potential, and review some dynamical laws related to the 2D and 3D GPEs. By introducing a rotating Lagrangian coordinate system, the original GPEs are reformulated to GPEs without the angular momentum rotation, which is replaced by a time-dependent potential in the new coordinate system. We then cast the conserved quantities and dynamical laws in the new rotating Lagrangian coordinates. Based on the new formulation of the GPE for rotating BECs in the rotating Lagrangian coordinates, a time-splitting spectral method is presented for computing the dynamics of rotating BECs. The new numerical method is explicit, simple to implement, unconditionally stable, and very efficient in computation. It is spectral-order accurate in space and second-order accurate in time and conserves the mass on the discrete level. We compare our method with some representative methods in the literature to demonstrate its efficiency and accuracy. In addition, the numerical method is applied to test the dynamical laws of rotating BECs such as the dynamics of condensate width, angular momentum expectation, and center of mass, and to investigate numerically the dynamics and interaction of quantized vortex lattices in rotating BECs without or with the long-range DDI.Copyright © by SIAM.

  17. Market diffusion, technological learning, and cost-benefit dynamics of condensing gas boilers in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, M.; Dittmar, L.; Junginger, H.M.; Patel, M.K.; Blok, K.

    2009-01-01

    High costs often prevent the market diffusion of novel and efficient energy technologies. Monitoring cost and price decline for these technologies is thus important in order to establish effective energy policy. Here, we present experience curves and cost-benefit analyses for condensing gas boilers

  18. Decoherence dynamics in interferometry with one-dimensional bose-einstein condensates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumm, Thorsten; Hofferberth, Sebastian; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    in the interference pattern and allow a quantization of the decoherence process with time. For the uncoupled system we ultimately recover individual phase fluctuating condensates, whereas finite tunnel coupling counteracts the decoherence and leads to an equilibrium characterized by a finite coherence length...

  19. Performance of evaporative condensers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettouney, Hisham M.; El-Dessouky, Hisham T.; Bouhamra, Walid; Al-Azmi, Bader

    2001-07-01

    Experimental investigation is conducted to study the performance of evaporative condensers/coolers. The analysis includes development of correlations for the external heat transfer coefficient and the system efficiency. The evaporative condenser includes two finned-tube heat exchangers. The system is designed to allow for operation of a single condenser, two condensers in parallel, and two condensers in series. The analysis is performed as a function of the water-to-air mass flow rate ratio (L/G) and the steam temperature. Also, comparison is made between the performance of the evaporative condenser and same device as an air-cooled condenser. Analysis of the collected data shows that the system efficiency increases at lower L/G ratios and higher steam temperatures. The system efficiency for various configurations for the evaporative condenser varies between 97% and 99%. Lower efficiencies are obtained for the air-cooled condenser, with values between 88% and 92%. The highest efficiency is found for the two condensers in series, followed by two condensers in parallel and then the single condenser. The parallel condenser configuration can handle a larger amount of inlet steam and can provide the required system efficiency and degree of subcooling. The correlation for the system efficiency gives a simple tool for preliminary system design. The correlation developed for the external heat transfer coefficient is found to be consistent with the available literature data. (Author)

  20. Use of Computational Fluid Dynamics for improving freeze-dryers design and process understanding. Part 2: Condenser duct and valve modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchisio, Daniele L; Galan, Miquel; Barresi, Antonello A

    2018-05-05

    This manuscript shows how computational models, mainly based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), can be used to simulate different parts of an industrial freeze-drying equipment and to properly design them; in particular in this part the duct connecting the chamber with the condenser, with its valves, is considered, while the chamber design and its effect on drying kinetics have been investigated in Part 1. Such an approach allows a much deeper process understanding and assessment of the critical aspects of lyophilisation. This methodology will be demonstrated on freeze-drying equipment of different sizes, investigating influence of valve type (butterfly and mushroom) and shape on duct conductance and critical flow conditions. The role of the inlet and boundary conditions considered has been assessed, also by modelling the whole apparatus including chamber and condenser, and the influence of the duct diameter has been discussed; the results show a little dependence of the relationship between critical mass flux and chamber pressure on the duct size. Results concerning the fluid dynamics of a simple disk valve, a profiled butterfly valve and a mushroom valve installed in a medium size horizontal condenser are presented. Also in these cases the maximum allowable flow when sonic flow conditions are reached can be described by a correlation similar to that found valid for empty ducts; for the mushroom valve the parameters are dependent on the valve opening length. The possibility to use the equivalent length concept, and to extend the validity of the results obtained for empty ducts will be also discussed. Finally the presence of the inert gas modifies the conductance of the duct, reducing the maximum flow rate of water that can be removed through it before the flow is choked; this also requires a proper over-sizing of the duct (or duct-butterfly valve system). Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Kinetic Models for Chiral Dominance in Soft Condensed Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxvaerd, Søren

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation, models for isomerization kinetics, origin of biomolecular chirality......Molecular dynamics simulation, models for isomerization kinetics, origin of biomolecular chirality...

  2. Soliton dynamical properties of Bose—Einstein condensates trapped in a double square well potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jin-Hui; Li Zhi-Jian

    2011-01-01

    We first present an analytical solution of the single and double solitions of Bose—Einstein condensates trapped in a double square well potential using the multiple-scale method. Then, we show by numerical calculation that a dark soliton can be transmitted through the square well potential. With increasing depth of the square well potential, the amplitude of the dark soliton becomes larger, and the soliton propagates faster. In particular, we treat the collision behaviour of the condensates trapped in either equal or different depths of the double square well potential. If we regard the double square well potential as the output source of the solitons, the collision locations (position and time) between two dark solitons can be controlled by its depth. (general)

  3. Condensation-induced kinematics and dynamics of cyclones, hurricanes and tornadoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarieva, A.M.; Gorshkov, V.G.

    2009-01-01

    A universal equation is obtained for air pressure and wind velocity in cyclones, hurricanes and tornadoes as dependent on the distance from the center of the considered wind pattern driven by water vapor condensation. The obtained theoretical estimates of the horizontal profiles of air pressure and wind velocity, eye and wind wall radius in hurricanes and tornadoes and maximum values of the radial, tangential and vertical velocity components are in good agreement with empirical evidence.

  4. Images of a Bose-Einstein condensates: diagonal dynamical Bogoliubov vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziarmaga, J.; Sacha, K.; Karkuszewski, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Evolution of a Bose-Einstein condensate subject to a time-dependent external perturbation can be described by a time-dependent Bogoliubov theory: a condensate initially in its ground state evolves into a time-dependent excited state which can be formally written as a time-dependent Bogoliubov vacuum annihilated by time-dependent quasiparticle annihilation operators. We prove that any Bogoliubov vacuum can be brought to a diagonal form in a time-dependent orthonormal basis. This diagonal form is taylored for simulations of quantum measurements on excited condensates. As an example we work out a model of atomic interferometer where a trap potential is split in two parts by a potential barrier, and then atoms are released by opening the double-well trap potential. In the Gross-Pitaevskii approximation the released atoms give a high contrast interference pattern with repeatable position of interference fringes. In the two-mode tight-binding approximation the effect of phase diffusion makes the position of fringes fluctuate from experiment to experiment but every single realisation of experiment gives a high quality interference pattern. The time-dependent Bogoliubov theory is a more realistic description of the experiment which goes beyond both approximations. Using the diagonal time-dependent Bogoliubov vacuum we show that in addition to position fluctuations the interference pattern is also loosing its high quality contrast. (author)

  5. Study of the Condensed Matter Dynamics by the Deep Inelastic Neutron Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blostein, Juan Jeronimo

    2004-01-01

    In this work we describe the motivations that originated the eVS technique, and we explain why this technique is particularly useful to study the dynamics of nuclei in different systems.We expose the fundamentals of the convolution formalism usually employed for the data treatment of this technique, which is based on the assumption that the energy of the detected neutrons is fixed by the resonant filter. In this thesis it is presented for the first time the exact formalism that describes the experimentally obtained spectra for thin samples, which considers all pairs of initial and final energies compatible with the flight paths, in clear contrast with the mentioned hypothesis of fixed final energy .In the light of the exact formalism, the analysis presented in the this thesis reveals flaws in the convolution formalism employed for the experimental data treatment.This analysis shows that the deficient descriptions of the different peaks observed in the time of flight scale produce errors in the magnitudes usually informed as results of an eVS experiment, i.e.: intensity of isolated peaks, intensities of peaks not totally resolved, effective temperatures and momentum distributions.To expose the basic reason of such deficiencies, an the exact formalism is employed to analyze the final energy distributions responsible of the observed intensities in the different time channels.We conclude that for each time channel, it is not a well-defined energy, but a whole energy distribution the responsible to produce the observed spectrum.We show that such energy distributions are not determined only by the filter's resonance, but depend strongly on the time of flight due to kinematic and dynamic reasons, not taken into account in the usual data treatment.We analyze examples where the use of the convolution approximation leads to erroneous results, and we show them to have a similar behavior than claimed anomalous results published in several papers, which ascribe them to new

  6. Localized nonlinear waves and dynamical stability in spinor Bose–Einstein condensates with time–space modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yu-Qin; Han, Wei; Li, Ji; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2018-05-01

    Nonlinearity is one of the most remarkable characteristics of Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs). Much work has been done on one- and two-component BECs with time- or space-modulated nonlinearities, while there is little work on spinor BECs with space–time-modulated nonlinearities. In the present paper we investigate localized nonlinear waves and dynamical stability in spinor Bose–Einstein condensates with nonlinearities dependent on time and space. We solve the three coupled Gross–Pitaevskii equations by similarity transformation and obtain two families of exact matter wave solutions in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions and the Mathieu equation. The localized states of the spinor matter wave describe the dynamics of vector breathing solitons, moving breathing solitons, quasi-breathing solitons and resonant solitons. The results show that one-order vector breathing solitons, quasi-breathing solitons, resonant solitons and the moving breathing solitons ψ ±1 are all stable, but the moving breathing soliton ψ 0 is unstable. We also present the experimental parameters to realize these phenomena in future experiments.

  7. Integrable properties of a variable-coefficient Korteweg-de Vries model from Bose-Einstein condensates and fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunyi; Gao Yitian; Meng Xianghua; Li Juan; Xu Tao; Wei Guangmei; Zhu Hongwu

    2006-01-01

    The phenomena of the trapped Bose-Einstein condensates related to matter waves and nonlinear atom optics can be governed by a variable-coefficient Korteweg-de Vries (vc-KdV) model with additional terms contributed from the inhomogeneity in the axial direction and the strong transverse confinement of the condensate, and such a model can also be used to describe the water waves propagating in a channel with an uneven bottom and/or deformed walls. In this paper, with the help of symbolic computation, the bilinear form for the vc-KdV model is obtained and some exact solitonic solutions including the N-solitonic solution in explicit form are derived through the extended Hirota method. We also derive the auto-Baecklund transformation, nonlinear superposition formula, Lax pairs and conservation laws of this model. Finally, the integrability of the variable-coefficient model and the characteristic of the nonlinear superposition formula are discussed

  8. The dynamics of triple-well trapped Bose–Einstein condensates with atoms feeding and loss effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Aixia; Zhou Xiaoyan; Xue Jukui

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the macroscopic quantum tunnelling and self-trapping phenomena of Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) with three-body recombination losses and atoms feeding from thermal cloud in triple-well potential. Using the three-mode approximation, three coupled Gross–Pitaevskii equations (GPEs), which describe the dynamics of the system, are obtained. The corresponding numerical results reveal some interesting characteristics of BECs for different scattering lengths. The self-trapping and quantum tunnelling both are found in zero-phase and π-phase modes. Furthermore, we observe the quantum beating phenomenon and the resonance character during the self-trapping and quantum tunnelling. It is also shown that the initial phase has a significant effect on the dynamics of the system

  9. Capillary-wave dynamics and interface structure modulation in binary Bose-Einstein condensate mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indekeu, Joseph O.; Van Thu, Nguyen; Lin, Chang-You; Phat, Tran Huu

    2018-04-01

    The localized low-energy interfacial excitations, or interfacial Nambu-Goldstone modes, of phase-segregated binary mixtures of Bose-Einstein condensates are investigated analytically. To this end a double-parabola approximation (DPA) is performed on the Lagrangian density in Gross-Pitaevskii theory for a system in a uniform potential. This DPA entails a model in which analytic expressions are obtained for the excitations underlying capillary waves or ripplons for arbitrary strength K (>1 ) of the phase segregation. The dispersion relation ω (k ) ∝k3 /2 is derived directly from the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations in the limit that the wavelength 2 π /k is much larger than the interface width. The proportionality constant in the dispersion relation provides the static interfacial tension. A correction term in ω (k ) of order k5 /2 is calculated analytically within the DPA model. The combined result is tested against numerical diagonalization of the exact Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. Satisfactory agreement is obtained in the range of physically relevant wavelengths. The ripplon dispersion relation is relevant to state-of-the-art experiments using (quasi)uniform optical-box traps. Furthermore, within the DPA model explicit expressions are obtained for the structural deformation of the interface due to the passing of the capillary wave. It is found that the amplitude of the wave is enhanced by an amount that is quadratic in the ratio of the phase velocity ω /k to the sound velocity c . For generic mixtures consisting of condensates with unequal healing lengths, an additional modulation is predicted of the common value of the condensate densities at the interface.

  10. Dynamics of the formation of the condensed phase particles at detonation of high explosives

    CERN Document Server

    Evdokov, O V; Kulipanov, G N; Luckjanchikov, L A; Lyakhov, N Z; Mishnev, S I; Sharafutdinov, M R; Sheromov, M A; Ten, K A; Titov, V M; Tolochko, B P; Zubkov, P I

    2001-01-01

    The article presents the results of the experimental study SAXS on condensed carbon particles that appear at the detonation of a high explosive. It was shown that the SAXS signal rises for 1.5-4 mu s after the detonation front passing. The SAXS signal in trotyl and its alloys with hexogen starts just after the compression of the material in the detonation wave. In octogen, hexogen and PETN, the SAXS signal appears in 0.5 mu s and is much smaller than the signal at the detonation of trotyl and its alloys with hexogen.

  11. Gluon transport equation with effective mass and dynamical onset of Bose–Einstein condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul; Jiang, Yin; Liao, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    We study the transport equation describing a dense system of gluons, in the small scattering angle approximation, taking into account medium-generated effective masses of the gluons. We focus on the case of overpopulated systems that are driven to Bose–Einstein condensation on their way to thermalization. The presence of a mass modifies the dispersion relation of the gluon, as compared to the massless case, but it is shown that this does not change qualitatively the scaling behavior in the vicinity of the onset.

  12. Computational models to determine fluid dynamical transients due to condensation induced water hammer (CIWH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swidersky, H.; Schaffrath, A.; Dudlik, A.

    2011-01-01

    Condensation induced water hammer (CIWH) represent a dangerous phenomenon in pipings, which can endanger the pipe integrity. If they cannot be excluded, they have to be taken into account for the integrity proof of components and pipe structures. Up to now, there exists no substantiated model, which sufficiently determines loads due to CIWH. Within the framework of the research alliance CIWA, a tool for estimating the potential and the amount of pressure loads will be developed based on theoretical work and supported by experimental results. This first study discusses used computational models, compares their results against experimental observations and gives an outlook onto future techniques. (author)

  13. Condensation of steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prisyazhniuk, V.A.

    2002-01-01

    An equation for nucleation kinetics in steam condensation has been derived, the equation taking into account the concurrent and independent functioning of two nucleation mechanisms: the homogeneous one and the heterogeneous one. The equation is a most general-purpose one and includes all the previously known condensation models as special cases. It is shown how the equation can be used in analyzing the process of steam condensation in the condenser of an industrial steam-turbine plant, and in working out new ways of raising the efficiency of the condenser, as well as of the steam-turbine plant as a whole. (orig.)

  14. A Simple Approach to Dynamic Material Balance in Gas-Condensate Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidari Sureshjani M.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In traditional material balance calculations, shut-in well pressure data are used to determine average reservoir pressure while recent techniques do not require the well to be shut-in and use instead flowing well pressure-rate data. These methods, which are known as “dynamic” material balance, are developed for single-phase flow (oil or gas in reservoirs. However, utilization of such methods for gas-condensate reservoirs may create significant errors in prediction of average reservoir pressure due to violation of the single-phase assumption in such reservoirs. In a previous work, a method for production data analysis in gas-condensate reservoirs was developed. The method required standard gas production rate, producing gas-oil ratio, flowing well pressure, CVD data and relative permeability curves. This paper presents a new technique which does not need relative permeability curves and flowing well pressure. In this method, the producing oil-gas ratio is interpolated in the vaporized oil in gas phase (Rv versus pressure (p data in the CVD table and the corresponding pressure is located. The parameter pressure/two-phase deviation factor (p/ztp is then evaluated at the determined pressure points and is plotted versus produced moles (np which forms a straight line. The nature of this plot is such that its extrapolation to point where p/ztp = 0 will give initial moles in place. Putting initial pressure/initial two-phase deviation factor (pi/ztp,i (known parameter and estimated initial moles (ni into the material balance equation, average reservoir pressure can be determined. A main assumption behind the method is that the region where both gas and condensate phases are mobile is of negligible size compared to the reservoir. The approach is quite simple and calculations are much easier than the previous work. It provides a practical engineering tool for industry studies as it requires data which are generally available in normal production

  15. Communication: Predictive partial linearized path integral simulation of condensed phase electron transfer dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo, Pengfei; Miller, Thomas F. III; Coker, David F.

    2013-01-01

    A partial linearized path integral approach is used to calculate the condensed phase electron transfer (ET) rate by directly evaluating the flux-flux/flux-side quantum time correlation functions. We demonstrate for a simple ET model that this approach can reliably capture the transition between non-adiabatic and adiabatic regimes as the electronic coupling is varied, while other commonly used semi-classical methods are less accurate over the broad range of electronic couplings considered. Further, we show that the approach reliably recovers the Marcus turnover as a function of thermodynamic driving force, giving highly accurate rates over four orders of magnitude from the normal to the inverted regimes. We also demonstrate that the approach yields accurate rate estimates over five orders of magnitude of inverse temperature. Finally, the approach outlined here accurately captures the electronic coherence in the flux-flux correlation function that is responsible for the decreased rate in the inverted regime

  16. Dynamic behaviour of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices with two- and three-body interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yan; Chen Yong; Zhang Kezhi

    2009-01-01

    We study the dynamic behaviour of Bose-Einstein condensates with two- and three-atom interactions in optical lattices with analytical and numerical methods. It is found that the steady-state relative population displays tuning-fork bifurcation when the system parameters are changed to certain critical values. In particular, the existence of the three-body interaction not only transforms the bifurcation point of the system but also greatly affects the macroscopic quantum self-trapping behaviours associated with the critically stable steady-state solution. In addition, we investigated the influence of the initial conditions, three-body interaction, and the energy bias on the macroscopic quantum self-trapping. Finally, by applying the periodic modulation on the energy bias, we observed that the relative population oscillation exhibits a process from order to chaos, via a series of period-doubling bifurcations.

  17. Core structure and dynamics of non-Abelian vortices in a biaxial nematic spinor Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgh, Magnus O.; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate that multiple interaction-dependent defect core structures as well as dynamics of non-Abelian vortices can be realized in the biaxial nematic (BN) phase of a spin-2 atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). An experimentally simple protocol may be used to break degeneracy with the uniaxial nematic phase. We show that a discrete spin-space symmetry in the core may be reflected in a breaking of its spatial symmetry. The discrete symmetry of the BN order parameter leads to non-commuting vortex charges. We numerically simulate reconnection of non-Abelian vortices, demonstrating formation of the obligatory rung vortex. In addition to atomic BECs, non-Abelian vortices are theorized in, e.g., liquid crystals and cosmic strings. Our results suggest the BN spin-2 BEC as a prime candidate for their realization. We acknowledge financial support from the EPSRC.

  18. Modelling of condensation phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jae Jun; Chang, Won Pyo

    1996-07-01

    Condensation occurs when vapor is cooled sufficiently below the saturation temperature to induce the nucleation of droplets. Such nucleation may occur homogeneously within the vapor or heterogeneously on entrained particular matter. Heterogeneous nucleation may occur on the walls of the system, where the temperature is below the saturation temperature. There are two forms of heterogeneous condensation, drop-wise and film-wise. Another form of condensation occurs when vapor directly contacts to subcooled liquid. In nuclear power plant systems, all forms of condensation may occur during normal operation or accident conditions. In this work the modelling of condensation is surveyed, including the Nusselts' laminar film condensation theory in 1916, Rohsenow's turbulent film condensation model in 1950s, and Chen's models in 1987. Major attention is paid on the film condensation models among various research results because of its importance in engineering applications. It is found that theory, experiment, and empirical correlations for film condensation are well established, but research for drop-wise and direct-contact condensation are not sufficient yet. Condensation models in the best-estimate system codes such as RELAP5/MOD3 and CATHARE2 are also investigated. 3 tabs., 11 figs., 36 refs. (Author)

  19. Zero point energy leakage in condensed phase dynamics: An assessment of quantum simulation methods for liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habershon, Scott; Manolopoulos, David E.

    2009-12-01

    The approximate quantum mechanical ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) and linearized semiclassical initial value representation (LSC-IVR) methods are compared and contrasted in a study of the dynamics of the flexible q-TIP4P/F water model at room temperature. For this water model, a RPMD simulation gives a diffusion coefficient that is only a few percent larger than the classical diffusion coefficient, whereas a LSC-IVR simulation gives a diffusion coefficient that is three times larger. We attribute this discrepancy to the unphysical leakage of initially quantized zero point energy (ZPE) from the intramolecular to the intermolecular modes of the liquid as the LSC-IVR simulation progresses. In spite of this problem, which is avoided by construction in RPMD, the LSC-IVR may still provide a useful approximation to certain short-time dynamical properties which are not so strongly affected by the ZPE leakage. We illustrate this with an application to the liquid water dipole absorption spectrum, for which the RPMD approximation breaks down at frequencies in the O-H stretching region owing to contamination from the internal modes of the ring polymer. The LSC-IVR does not suffer from this difficulty and it appears to provide quite a promising way to calculate condensed phase vibrational spectra.

  20. Zero point energy leakage in condensed phase dynamics: an assessment of quantum simulation methods for liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habershon, Scott; Manolopoulos, David E

    2009-12-28

    The approximate quantum mechanical ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) and linearized semiclassical initial value representation (LSC-IVR) methods are compared and contrasted in a study of the dynamics of the flexible q-TIP4P/F water model at room temperature. For this water model, a RPMD simulation gives a diffusion coefficient that is only a few percent larger than the classical diffusion coefficient, whereas a LSC-IVR simulation gives a diffusion coefficient that is three times larger. We attribute this discrepancy to the unphysical leakage of initially quantized zero point energy (ZPE) from the intramolecular to the intermolecular modes of the liquid as the LSC-IVR simulation progresses. In spite of this problem, which is avoided by construction in RPMD, the LSC-IVR may still provide a useful approximation to certain short-time dynamical properties which are not so strongly affected by the ZPE leakage. We illustrate this with an application to the liquid water dipole absorption spectrum, for which the RPMD approximation breaks down at frequencies in the O-H stretching region owing to contamination from the internal modes of the ring polymer. The LSC-IVR does not suffer from this difficulty and it appears to provide quite a promising way to calculate condensed phase vibrational spectra.

  1. Quantum-phase dynamics of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates: Collapse-revival of macroscopic superposition states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Masayoshi; Kishi, Ryohei; Ohta, Suguru; Takahashi, Hideaki; Furukawa, Shin-ichi; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the long-time dynamics of two-component dilute gas Bose-Einstein condensates with relatively different two-body interactions and Josephson couplings between the two components. Although in certain parameter regimes the quantum state of the system is known to evolve into macroscopic superposition, i.e., Schroedinger cat state, of two states with relative atom number differences between the two components, the Schroedinger cat state is also found to repeat the collapse and revival behavior in the long-time region. The dynamical behavior of the Pegg-Barnett phase difference between the two components is shown to be closely connected with the dynamics of the relative atom number difference for different parameters. The variation in the relative magnitude between the Josephson coupling and intra- and inter-component two-body interaction difference turns out to significantly change not only the size of the Schroedinger cat state but also its collapse-revival period, i.e., the lifetime of the Schroedinger cat state

  2. Energetic and dynamical instability of spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate in a deep optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zi-Fa; Chai, Xu-Dan; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the energetic and dynamical instability of spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate in a deep optical lattice via a tight-binding model. The stability phase diagram is completely revealed in full parameter space, while the dependence of superfluidity on the dispersion relation is illustrated explicitly. In the absence of spin-orbit coupling, the superfluidity only exists in the center of the Brillouin zone. However, the combination of spin-orbit coupling, Zeeman field, nonlinearity and optical lattice potential can modify the dispersion relation of the system, and change the position of Brillouin zone for generating the superfluidity. Thus, the superfluidity can appear in either the center or the other position of the Brillouin zone. Namely, in the center of the Brillouin zone, the system is either superfluid or Landau unstable, which depends on the momentum of the lowest energy. Therefore, the superfluidity can occur at optional position of the Brillouin zone by elaborating spin-orbit coupling, Zeeman splitting, nonlinearity and optical lattice potential. For the linear case, the system is always dynamically stable, however, the nonlinearity can induce the dynamical instability, and also expand the superfluid region. These predicted results can provide a theoretical evidence for exploring the superfluidity of the system experimentally.

  3. Simple Simulations of DNA Condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-07-12

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a simple, bead-spring model of semiflexible polyelectrolytes such as DNA are performed. All charges are explicitly treated. Starting from extended, noncondensed conformations, condensed structures form in the simulations with tetravalent or trivalent counterions. No condensates form or are stable for divalent counterions. The mechanism by which condensates form is described. Briefly, condensation occurs because electrostatic interactions dominate entropy, and the favored Coulombic structure is a charge ordered state. Condensation is a generic phenomena and occurs for a variety of polyelectrolyte parameters. Toroids and rods are the condensate structures. Toroids form preferentially when the molecular stiffness is sufficiently strong.

  4. Temporal condensation and dynamic λ-transition within the complex network: an application to real-life market evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiliński, Mateusz; Szewczak, Bartłomiej; Gubiec, Tomasz; Kutner, Ryszard; Struzik, Zbigniew R.

    2015-02-01

    We fill a void in merging empirical and phenomenological characterisation of the dynamical phase transitions in complex networks by identifying and thoroughly characterising a triple sequence of such transitions on a real-life financial market. We extract and interpret the empirical, numerical, and analytical evidences for the existence of these dynamical phase transitions, by considering the medium size Frankfurt stock exchange (FSE), as a typical example of a financial market. By using the canonical object for the graph theory, i.e. the minimal spanning tree (MST) network, we observe: (i) the (initial) dynamical phase transition from equilibrium to non-equilibrium nucleation phase of the MST network, occurring at some critical time. Coalescence of edges on the FSE's transient leader (defined by its largest degree) is observed within the nucleation phase; (ii) subsequent acceleration of the process of nucleation and the emergence of the condensation phase (the second dynamical phase transition), forming a logarithmically diverging temporal λ-peak of the leader's degree at the second critical time; (iii) the third dynamical fragmentation phase transition (after passing the second critical time), where the λ-peak logarithmically relaxes over three quarters of the year, resulting in a few loosely connected sub-graphs. This λ-peak (comparable to that of the specific heat vs. temperature forming during the equilibrium continuous phase transition from the normal fluid I 4He to the superfluid II 4He) is considered as a prominent result of a non-equilibrium superstar-like superhub or a dragon-king's abrupt evolution over about two and a half year of market evolution. We capture and meticulously characterise a remarkable phenomenon in which a peripheral company becomes progressively promoted to become the dragon-king strongly dominating the complex network over an exceptionally long period of time containing the crash. Detailed analysis of the complete trio of the

  5. Semiclassical Hybrid Approach to Condensed Phase Molecular Dynamics: Application to the I2Kr17 Cluster

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buchholz, M.; Goletz, Ch. M.; Grossman, F.; Schmidt, B.; Heyda, J.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 46 (2012), s. 11199-11210 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : semiclassical molecular dynamics * cluster * wavepacket * coherence * spectra Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.771, year: 2012

  6. Proceedings: Condenser technology conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsou, J.L.; Mussalli, Y.G.

    1991-08-01

    Seam surface condenser and associated systems performance strongly affects availability and heat rate in nuclear and fossil power plants. Thirty-six papers presented at a 1990 conference discuss research results, industry experience, and case histories of condenser problems and solutions. This report contains papers on life extension, performance improvement, corrosion and failure analysis, fouling prevention, and recommendation for future R ampersand D. The information represents recent work on condenser problems and solutions to improve the procurement, operation, and maintenance functions of power plant personnel. Several key points follow: A nuclear and a fossil power plant report show that replacing titanium tube bundles improves condenser availability and performance. One paper reports 10 years of experience with enhanced heat transfer tubes in utility condensers. The newly developed enhanced condenser tubes could further improve condensing heat transfer. A new resistance summation method improves the accuracy of condenser performance prediction, especially for stainless steel and titanium tubed condensers. Several papers describe improved condenser fouling monitoring techniques, including a review of zebra mussel issues

  7. Dynamics of vector dark soliton induced by the Rabi coupling in one-dimensional trapped Bose–Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chao-Fei; Lu, Min; Liu, Wei-Qing

    2012-01-01

    The Rabi coupling between two components of Bose–Einstein condensates is used to controllably change ordinary dark soliton into dynamic vector dark soliton or ordinary vector dark soliton. When all inter- and intraspecies interactions are equal, the dynamic vector dark soliton is exactly constructed by two sub-dark-solitons, which oscillate with the same velocity and periodically convert with each other. When the interspecies interactions deviate from the intraspecies ones, the whole soliton can maintain its essential shape, but the sub-dark-soliton becomes inexact or is broken. This study indicates that the Rabi coupling can be used to obtain various vector dark solitons. -- Highlights: ► We consider the Rabi coupling to affect the dark soliton in BECs. ► We examine the changes of the initial dark solitons. ► The structure of the soliton depends on the inter- and intraspecies interactions strength. ► The Rabi coupling can be used to obtain various vector dark solitons.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations to examine structure, energetics, and evaporation/condensation dynamics in small charged clusters of water or methanol containing a single monatomic ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daub, Christopher D; Cann, Natalie M

    2012-11-01

    We study small clusters of water or methanol containing a single Ca(2+), Na(+), or Cl(-) ion with classical molecular dynamics simulations, using models that incorporate polarizability via the Drude oscillator framework. Evaporation and condensation of solvent from these clusters is examined in two systems, (1) for isolated clusters initially prepared at different temperatures and (2) those with a surrounding inert (Ar) gas of varying temperature. We examine these clusters over a range of sizes, from almost bare ions up to 40 solvent molecules. We report data on the evaporation and condensation of solvent from the clusters and argue that the observed temperature dependence of evaporation in the smallest clusters demonstrates that the presence of heated gas alone cannot, in most cases, solely account for bare ion production in electrospray ionization (ESI), neglecting the key contribution of the electric field. We also present our findings on the structure and energetics of the clusters as a function of size. Our data agree well with the abundant literature on hydrated ion clusters and offer some novel insight into the structure of methanol and ion clusters, especially those with a Cl(-) anion, where we observe the presence of chain-like structures of methanol molecules. Finally, we provide some data on the reparameterizations necessary to simulate ions in methanol using the separately developed Drude oscillator models for methanol and for ions in water.

  9. Computation of the chiral condensate using N{sub f}=2 and N{sub f}=2+1+1 dynamical flavors of twisted mass fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichy, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Poznan Univ. (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Garcia-Ramos, E. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany); Jansen, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Shindler, A. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). IAS; Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). IKP; Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). JCHP; Collaboration: European Twisted Mass Collaboration

    2013-12-15

    We apply the spectral projector method, recently introduced by Giusti and Luescher, to compute the chiral condensate using N{sub f}=2 and N{sub f}=2+1+1 dynamical flavors of maximally twisted mass fermions. We present our results for several quark masses at three different lattice spacings which allows us to perform the chiral and continuum extrapolations. In addition we report our analysis on the O(a) improvement of the chiral condensate for twisted mass fermions. We also study the effect of the dynamical strange and charm quarks by comparing our results for N{sub f}=2 and N{sub f}=2+1+1 dynamical flavors.

  10. Investigation of dynamic glass transitions and structure transformations in cryovacuum condensates of ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldiyarov, A.; Aryutkina, M.; Drobyshev, A.; Kaikanov, M.; Kurnosov, V.

    2009-01-01

    An IR spectrometric investigation of the dynamic glass transition of ethanol from the rotationally disordered crystal to the orientationally disordered crystal is carried out. The samples considered are thin films formed from the gas phase at a substrate temperature of T=16 K. The measurements are performed using the experimental apparatus which has been described in detail in our recent work. The sample thickness was d=2 μm, and the typical rate of annealing is approximately 10 K/min. The results are compared with the phase diagram of solid ethanol proposed by M.A. Ramos et al. We observe good agreement between the temperature intervals of existence of the amorphous and crystalline states. The low-temperature amorphous phase (12-70 K) is described by the present authors as amorphous solid ethanol by analogy with the amorphous solid water

  11. Advances in studying order and dynamics in condensed matter by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voda, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, molecular transport in liquid samples is studied in terms of susceptibility induced magnetic field inhomogeneities and spectral distortions for interdiffusion in binary mixtures. Molecular order and dynamics are topics for two different soft solids, natural rubber and polyurethane. The influence of the mixture heterogeneity on the magnetic field homogeneity was investigated in terms of a spatial and time-dependent magnetic susceptibility. The effect of the heterogeneous distribution of magnetic susceptibility in liquid mixtures on the static and rf field homogeneity was simulated together with the corresponding spectral distortions. The problem of low magnetic field homogeneity provided by the Halbach type of magnets is discussed. The design of modified Halbach magnets is studied in order to increase the field homogeneity. The work was focused on two types of Halbach magnets, consisting of 16 and 24 magnet blocks, respectively. Different modifications were applied to these magnet designs, and the field homogeneity was significantly improved. The changes induced in molecular dynamics and order in stretched elastomers was investigated using multispin moments edited by multiple-quantum NMR. The main purpose of this part is to investigate the changes in proton residual dipolar coupling and the sensitivity of multiple quantum coherences of higher order for cross-linked natural rubber under uniaxial deformation. The effect of uniaxial deformation of a natural rubber band was investigated by measurements of second van Vleck moments and fourth moments edited by double-quantum and triple-quantum coherences, respectively. A spin diffusion experiment was employed for the elucidation of the morphology and domain sizes of a series of polyurethane samples. A proton DQ dipolar filer was used to select the magnetization of the rigid phase. The most probable morphology is three-dimensional for the TPU samples with a high content in HS as was established by a

  12. Advances in studying order and dynamics in condensed matter by NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voda, M.A.

    2006-07-13

    In this thesis, molecular transport in liquid samples is studied in terms of susceptibility induced magnetic field inhomogeneities and spectral distortions for interdiffusion in binary mixtures. Molecular order and dynamics are topics for two different soft solids, natural rubber and polyurethane. The influence of the mixture heterogeneity on the magnetic field homogeneity was investigated in terms of a spatial and time-dependent magnetic susceptibility. The effect of the heterogeneous distribution of magnetic susceptibility in liquid mixtures on the static and rf field homogeneity was simulated together with the corresponding spectral distortions. The problem of low magnetic field homogeneity provided by the Halbach type of magnets is discussed. The design of modified Halbach magnets is studied in order to increase the field homogeneity. The work was focused on two types of Halbach magnets, consisting of 16 and 24 magnet blocks, respectively. Different modifications were applied to these magnet designs, and the field homogeneity was significantly improved. The changes induced in molecular dynamics and order in stretched elastomers was investigated using multispin moments edited by multiple-quantum NMR. The main purpose of this part is to investigate the changes in proton residual dipolar coupling and the sensitivity of multiple quantum coherences of higher order for cross-linked natural rubber under uniaxial deformation. The effect of uniaxial deformation of a natural rubber band was investigated by measurements of second van Vleck moments and fourth moments edited by double-quantum and triple-quantum coherences, respectively. A spin diffusion experiment was employed for the elucidation of the morphology and domain sizes of a series of polyurethane samples. A proton DQ dipolar filer was used to select the magnetization of the rigid phase. The most probable morphology is three-dimensional for the TPU samples with a high content in HS as was established by a

  13. Fixed-Charge Atomistic Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations in the Condensed Phase: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riniker, Sereina

    2018-03-26

    In molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations, the interactions between the particles (atoms) in the system are described by a so-called force field. The empirical functional form of classical fixed-charge force fields dates back to 1969 and remains essentially unchanged. In a fixed-charge force field, the polarization is not modeled explicitly, i.e. the effective partial charges do not change depending on conformation and environment. This simplification allows, however, a dramatic reduction in computational cost compared to polarizable force fields and in particular quantum-chemical modeling. The past decades have shown that simulations employing carefully parametrized fixed-charge force fields can provide useful insights into biological and chemical questions. This overview focuses on the four major force-field families, i.e. AMBER, CHARMM, GROMOS, and OPLS, which are based on the same classical functional form and are continuously improved to the present day. The overview is aimed at readers entering the field of (bio)molecular simulations. More experienced users may find the comparison and historical development of the force-field families interesting.

  14. A molecular dynamics study of nuclear quantum effect on the diffusion of hydrogen in condensed phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Hiroki; Tokumasu, Takashi; Tsuda, Shin-ichi; Tsuboi, Nobuyuki; Koshi, Mitsuo; Hayashie, A. Koichi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the quantum effect of hydrogen molecule on its diffusivity is analyzed using Molecular Dynamics (MD) method. The path integral centroid MD (CMD) method is applied for the reproduction method of time evolution of the molecules. The diffusion coefficient of liquid hydrogen is calculated using the Green-Kubo method. The simulation is performed at wide temperature region and the temperature dependence of the quantum effect of hydrogen molecule is addressed. The calculation results are compared with those of classical MD results. As a result, it is confirmed that the diffusivity of hydrogen molecule is changed depending on temperature by the quantum effect. It is clarified that this result can be explained that the dominant factor by quantum effect on the diffusivity of hydrogen changes from the swollening the potential to the shallowing the potential well around 30 K. Moreover, it is found that this tendency is related to the temperature dependency of the ratio of the quantum kinetic energy and classical kinetic energy

  15. Team Dynamics. Essays in the Sociology and Social Psychology of Sport Including Methodological and Epistemological Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenk, Hans

    This document contains nine essays on the sociology and social psychology of team dynamics, including methodological and epistemological issues involved in such study. Essay titles are: (1) Conflict and Achievement in Top Athletic Teams--Sociometric Structures of Racing Eight Oar Crews; (2) Top Performance Despite Internal Conflict--An Antithesis…

  16. Path-integral isomorphic Hamiltonian for including nuclear quantum effects in non-adiabatic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xuecheng; Shushkov, Philip; Miller, Thomas F.

    2018-03-01

    We describe a path-integral approach for including nuclear quantum effects in non-adiabatic chemical dynamics simulations. For a general physical system with multiple electronic energy levels, a corresponding isomorphic Hamiltonian is introduced such that Boltzmann sampling of the isomorphic Hamiltonian with classical nuclear degrees of freedom yields the exact quantum Boltzmann distribution for the original physical system. In the limit of a single electronic energy level, the isomorphic Hamiltonian reduces to the familiar cases of either ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) or centroid molecular dynamics Hamiltonians, depending on the implementation. An advantage of the isomorphic Hamiltonian is that it can easily be combined with existing mixed quantum-classical dynamics methods, such as surface hopping or Ehrenfest dynamics, to enable the simulation of electronically non-adiabatic processes with nuclear quantum effects. We present numerical applications of the isomorphic Hamiltonian to model two- and three-level systems, with encouraging results that include improvement upon a previously reported combination of RPMD with surface hopping in the deep-tunneling regime.

  17. BROMOCEA Code: An Improved Grand Canonical Monte Carlo/Brownian Dynamics Algorithm Including Explicit Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Carlos J F; Pothula, Karunakar R; Prajapati, Jigneshkumar D; De Biase, Pablo M; Noskov, Sergei Yu; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2016-05-10

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations have a long history of applications studying ion and substrate permeation across biological and artificial pores. While offering unprecedented insights into the underpinning transport processes, MD simulations are limited in time-scales and ability to simulate physiological membrane potentials or asymmetric salt solutions and require substantial computational power. While several approaches to circumvent all of these limitations were developed, Brownian dynamics simulations remain an attractive option to the field. The main limitation, however, is an apparent lack of protein flexibility important for the accurate description of permeation events. In the present contribution, we report an extension of the Brownian dynamics scheme which includes conformational dynamics. To achieve this goal, the dynamics of amino-acid residues was incorporated into the many-body potential of mean force and into the Langevin equations of motion. The developed software solution, called BROMOCEA, was applied to ion transport through OmpC as a test case. Compared to fully atomistic simulations, the results show a clear improvement in the ratio of permeating anions and cations. The present tests strongly indicate that pore flexibility can enhance permeation properties which will become even more important in future applications to substrate translocation.

  18. Steam condenser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Fujio

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable safe steam condensation by providing steam condensation blades at the end of a pipe. Constitution: When high temperature high pressure steam flows into a vent pipe having an opening under water in a pool or an exhaust pipe or the like for a main steam eacape safety valve, non-condensable gas filled beforehand in the steam exhaust pipe is compressed, and discharged into the water in the pool. The non-condensable gas thus discharged from the steam exhaust pipe is introduced into the interior of the hollow steam condensing blades, is then suitably expanded, and thereafter exhausted from a number of exhaust holes into the water in the pool. In this manner, the non-condensable gas thus discharged is not directly introduced into the water in the pool, but is suitable expanded in the space of the steam condensing blades to suppress extreme over-compression and over-expansion of the gas so as to prevent unstable pressure vibration. (Yoshihara, H.)

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Steam Condensation on Nuclear Containment Wall Surfaces Based on Semiempirical Generalized Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan K. Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In water-cooled nuclear power reactors, significant quantities of steam and hydrogen could be produced within the primary containment following the postulated design basis accidents (DBA or beyond design basis accidents (BDBA. For accurate calculation of the temperature/pressure rise and hydrogen transport calculation in nuclear reactor containment due to such scenarios, wall condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC is used. In the present work, the adaptation of a commercial CFD code with the implementation of models for steam condensation on wall surfaces in presence of noncondensable gases is explained. Steam condensation has been modeled using the empirical average HTC, which was originally developed to be used for “lumped-parameter” (volume-averaged modeling of steam condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases. The present paper suggests a generalized HTC based on curve fitting of most of the reported semiempirical condensation models, which are valid for specific wall conditions. The present methodology has been validated against limited reported experimental data from the COPAIN experimental facility. This is the first step towards the CFD-based generalized analysis procedure for condensation modeling applicable for containment wall surfaces that is being evolved further for specific wall surfaces within the multicompartment containment atmosphere.

  20. Relaxation dynamics of a driven two-level system coupled to a Bose-Einstein condensate: application to quantum dot-dipolar exciton gas hybrid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, Vadim M; Tse, Wang-Kong

    2017-11-22

    We develop a microscopic theory for the relaxation dynamics of an optically pumped two-level system (TLS) coupled to a bath of weakly interacting Bose gas. Using Keldysh formalism and diagrammatic perturbation theory, expressions for the relaxation times of the TLS Rabi oscillations are derived when the boson bath is in the normal state and the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) state. We apply our general theory to consider an irradiated quantum dot coupled with a boson bath consisting of a two-dimensional dipolar exciton gas. When the bath is in the BEC regime, relaxation of the Rabi oscillations is due to both condensate and non-condensate fractions of the bath bosons for weak TLS-light coupling and pre dominantly due to the non-condensate fraction for strong TLS-light coupling. Our theory also shows that a phase transition of the bath from the normal to the BEC state strongly influences the relaxation rate of the TLS Rabi oscillations. The TLS relaxation rate is approximately independent of the pump field frequency and monotonically dependent on the field strength when the bath is in the low-temperature regime of the normal phase. Phase transition of the dipolar exciton gas leads to a non-monotonic dependence of the TLS relaxation rate on both the pump field frequency and field strength, providing a characteristic signature for the detection of BEC phase transition of the coupled dipolar exciton gas.

  1. Boilers, evaporators, and condensers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakac, S.

    1991-01-01

    This book reports on the boilers, evaporators and condensers that are used in power plants including nuclear power plants. Topics included are forced convection for single-phase side heat exchangers, heat exchanger fouling, industrial heat exchanger design, fossil-fuel-fired boilers, once through boilers, thermodynamic designs of fossil fuel-first boilers, evaporators and condensers in refrigeration and air conditioning systems (with respect to reducing CFC's) and nuclear steam generators

  2. Dynamics of bright-bright solitons in Bose-Einstein condensate with Raman-induced one-dimensional spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Hu, Ai-Yuan; Zhou, Jing; Yu, Peng; Xia, Lei; Sun, Qing; Ji, An-Chun

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of bright-bright solitons in one-dimensional two-component Bose-Einstein condensates with Raman-induced spin-orbit coupling, via the variational approximation and the numerical simulation of Gross-Pitaevskii equations. For the uniform system without trapping potential, we obtain two population balanced stationary solitons. By performing the linear stability analysis, we find a Goldstone eigenmode and an oscillation eigenmode around these stationary solitons. Moreover, we derive a general dynamical solution to describe the center-of-mass motion and spin evolution of the solitons under the action of spin-orbit coupling. The effects of a harmonic trap have also been discussed.

  3. Some concepts in condensed phase chemical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelman, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    Some concepts in condensed phase chemical kinetics which have emerged from a recent rigorous statistical mechanical treatment of condensed phase chemical reaction dynamics (S.A. Adelman, Adv. Chem. Phys.53:61 (1983)) are discussed in simple physical terms

  4. First-order symmetrizable hyperbolic formulations of Einstein's equations including lapse and shift as dynamical fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvi, Kashif

    2002-01-01

    First-order hyperbolic systems are promising as a basis for numerical integration of Einstein's equations. In previous work, the lapse and shift have typically not been considered part of the hyperbolic system and have been prescribed independently. This can be expensive computationally, especially if the prescription involves solving elliptic equations. Therefore, including the lapse and shift in the hyperbolic system could be advantageous for numerical work. In this paper, two first-order symmetrizable hyperbolic systems are presented that include the lapse and shift as dynamical fields and have only physical characteristic speeds

  5. Physics of condensed matter

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, Prasanta K

    2012-01-01

    Physics of Condensed Matter is designed for a two-semester graduate course on condensed matter physics for students in physics and materials science. While the book offers fundamental ideas and topic areas of condensed matter physics, it also includes many recent topics of interest on which graduate students may choose to do further research. The text can also be used as a one-semester course for advanced undergraduate majors in physics, materials science, solid state chemistry, and electrical engineering, because it offers a breadth of topics applicable to these majors. The book be

  6. Modeling of the dynamics of wind to power conversion including high wind speed behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litong-Palima, Marisciel; Bjerge, Martin Huus; Cutululis, Nicolaos Antonio

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes and validates an efficient, generic and computationally simple dynamic model for the conversion of the wind speed at hub height into the electrical power by a wind turbine. This proposed wind turbine model was developed as a first step to simulate wind power time series...... for power system studies. This paper focuses on describing and validating the single wind turbine model, and is therefore neither describing wind speed modeling nor aggregation of contributions from a whole wind farm or a power system area. The state-of-the-art is to use static power curves for the purpose...... of power system studies, but the idea of the proposed wind turbine model is to include the main dynamic effects in order to have a better representation of the fluctuations in the output power and of the fast power ramping especially because of high wind speed shutdowns of the wind turbine. The high wind...

  7. Generation of complete electronic nuclear medicine reports including static, dynamic and gated images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beretta, M.; Pilon, R.; Mut, F.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To develop a procedure for the creation of nuclear medicine reports containing static and dynamic images. The reason for implementing this technique is the lack of adequate solutions for an electronic format of nuclear medicine results allowing for rapid transmission via e-mail, specially in the case of dynamic and gated SPECT studies, since functional data is best presented in dynamic mode. Material and Methods: Clinical images were acquired in static, whole body, dynamic and gated mode, corresponding to bone studies, diuretic renogram, radionuclide cystography and gated perfusion SPECT, as well as respective time-activity curves. Image files were imported from a dedicated nuclear medicine computer system (Elscint XPert) to a Windows-based PC through a standard ethernet network with TCP-IP communications protocol, using a software developed by us which permits the conversion from the manufacturer's original format into a bitmap format (.bmp) compatible with commercially available PC software. For cardiac perfusion studies, background was subtracted prior to transferring to reduce the amount of information in the file; this was not done for other type of studies because useful data could be eliminated. Dynamic images were then processed using commercial software to create animated files and stored in .gif format. Static images were re-sized and stored in .jpg format. Original color or gray scale was always preserved. All the graphic material was then merged with a previously prepared report text using HTML format. The report also contained reference diagrams to facilitate interpretation. The whole report was then compressed into a self-extractable file, ready to be sent by electronic mail. Reception of the material was visually checked for data integrity including image quality by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. Results: The report presented allows for simultaneous visualization of the text, diagrams and images either static, dynamic, gated or

  8. Brownian dynamics simulations of a flexible polymer chain which includes continuous resistance and multibody hydrodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jason E.; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2005-01-01

    Using methods adapted from the simulation of suspension dynamics, we have developed a Brownian dynamics algorithm with multibody hydrodynamic interactions for simulating the dynamics of polymer molecules. The polymer molecule is modeled as a chain composed of a series of inextensible, rigid rods with constraints at each joint to ensure continuity of the chain. The linear and rotational velocities of each segment of the polymer chain are described by the slender-body theory of Batchelor [J. Fluid Mech. 44, 419 (1970)]. To include hydrodynamic interactions between the segments of the chain, the line distribution of forces on each segment is approximated by making a Legendre polynomial expansion of the disturbance velocity on the segment, where the first two terms of the expansion are retained in the calculation. Thus, the resulting linear force distribution is specified by a center of mass force, couple, and stresslet on each segment. This method for calculating the hydrodynamic interactions has been successfully used to simulate the dynamics of noncolloidal suspensions of rigid fibers [O. G. Harlen, R. R. Sundararajakumar, and D. L. Koch, J. Fluid Mech. 388, 355 (1999); J. E. Butler and E. S. G. Shaqfeh, J. Fluid Mech. 468, 204 (2002)]. The longest relaxation time and center of mass diffusivity are among the quantities calculated with the simulation technique. Comparisons are made for different levels of approximation of the hydrodynamic interactions, including multibody interactions, two-body interactions, and the "freely draining" case with no interactions. For the short polymer chains studied in this paper, the results indicate a difference in the apparent scaling of diffusivity with polymer length for the multibody versus two-body level of approximation for the hydrodynamic interactions.

  9. Molecular dynamics study of kinetic boundary condition at an interface between a polyatomic vapor and its condensed phase

    OpenAIRE

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Yano, Takeru; Fujikawa, Shigeo

    2004-01-01

    The kinetic boundary condition for the Boltzmann equation at an interface between a polyatomic vapor and its liquid phase is investigated by the numerical method of molecular dynamics, with particular emphasis on the functional form of the evaporation part of the boundary condition, including the evaporation coefficient. The present study is an extension of a previous one for argon [Ishiyama, Yano, and Fujikawa, Phys. Fluids 16, 2899 (2004)] to water and methanol, typical examples of polyatom...

  10. Sedimentary condensation and authigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föllmi, Karl

    2016-04-01

    Most marine authigenic minerals form in sediments, which are subjected to condensation. Condensation processes lead to the formation of well individualized, extremely thin ( 100ky), and which experienced authigenesis and the precipitation of glaucony, verdine, phosphate, iron and manganese oxyhydroxides, iron sulfide, carbonate and/or silica. They usually show complex internal stratigraphies, which result from an interplay of sediment accumulation, halts in sedimentation, sediment winnowing, erosion, reworking and bypass. They may include amalgamated faunas of different origin and age. Hardgrounds may be part of condensed beds and may embody strongly condensed beds by themselves. Sedimentary condensation is the result of a hydrodynamically active depositional regime, in which sediment accumulation, winnowing, erosion, reworking and bypass are processes, which alternate as a function of changes in the location and intensity of currents, and/or as the result of episodic high-energy events engendered by storms and gravity flow. Sedimentary condensation has been and still is a widespread phenomenon in past and present-day oceans. The present-day distribution of glaucony and verdine-rich sediments on shelves and upper slopes, phosphate-rich sediments and phosphorite on outer shelves and upper slopes, ferromanganese crusts on slopes, seamounts and submarine plateaus, and ferromanganese nodules on abyssal seafloors is a good indication of the importance of condensation processes today. In the past, we may add the occurrence of oolitic ironstone, carbonate hardgrounds, and eventually also silica layers in banded iron formations as indicators of the importance of condensation processes. Besides their economic value, condensed sediments are useful both as a carrier of geochemical proxies of paleoceanographic and paleoenvironmental change, as well as the product of episodes of paleoceanographic and paleoenvironmental change themselves.

  11. Transient Response Dynamic Module Modifications to Include Static and Kinetic Friction Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misel, J. E.; Nenno, S. B.; Takahashi, D.

    1984-01-01

    A methodology that supports forced transient response dynamic solutions when both static and kinetic friction effects are included in a structural system model is described. Modifications that support this type of nonlinear transient response solution are summarized for the transient response dynamics (TRD) NASTRAN module. An overview of specific modifications for the NASTRAN processing subroutines, INITL, TRD1C, and TRD1D, are described with further details regarding inspection of nonlinear input definitions to define the type of nonlinear solution required, along with additional initialization requirements and specific calculation subroutines to successfully solve the transient response problem. The extension of the basic NASTRAN nonlinear methodology is presented through several stages of development to the point where constraint equations and residual flexibility effects are introduced into the finite difference Newmark-Beta recurrsion formulas. Particular emphasis is placed on cost effective solutions for large finite element models such as the Space Shuttle with friction degrees of freedom between the orbiter and payloads mounted in the cargo bay. An alteration to the dynamic finite difference equations of motion is discussed, which allows one to include friction effects at reasonable cost for large structural systems such as the Space Shuttle. Data are presented to indicate the possible impact of transient friction loads to the payload designer for the Space Shuttle. Transient response solution data are also included, which compare solutions without friction forces and those with friction forces for payloads mounted in the Space Shuttle cargo bay. These data indicate that payload components can be sensitive to friction induced loads.

  12. Physics through the 1990s: condensed-matter physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The volume presents the current status of condensed-matter physics from developments since the 1970s to opportunities in the 1990s. Topics include electronic structure, vibrational properties, critical phenomena and phase transitions, magnetism, semiconductors, defects and diffusion, surfaces and interfaces, low-temperature physics, liquid-state physics, polymers, nonlinear dynamics, instabilities, and chaos. Appendices cover the connections between condensed-matter physics and applications of national interest, new experimental techniques and materials, laser spectroscopy, and national facilities for condensed-matter physics research. The needs of the research community regarding support for individual researchers and for national facilities are presented, as are recommendations for improved government-academic-industrial relations

  13. Molecular dynamics study on evaporation and condensation characteristics of thin film liquid Argon on nanostructured surface in nano-scale confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammad Nasim; Rabbi, Kazi Fazle; Sabah, Arefiny; Ahmed, Jannat; Kuri, Subrata Kumar; Rakibuzzaman, S. M.

    2017-06-01

    Investigation of Molecular level phase change phenomena are becoming important in heat and mass transfer research at a very high rate, driven both by the need to understand certain fundamental phenomena as well as by a plethora of new and forthcoming applications in the areas of micro- and nanotechnologies. Molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out to go through the evaporation and condensation characteristics of thin liquid argon film in Nano-scale confinement. In the present study, a cuboid system is modeled for understanding the Nano-scale physics of simultaneous evaporation and condensation. The cuboid system consists of hot and cold parallel platinum plates at the bottom and top ends. The fluid comprised of liquid argon film at the bottom plate and vapor argon in between liquid argon and upper plate of the domain. Three different simulation domains have been created here: (i) Both platinum plates are considered flat, (ii) Upper plate consisting of transverse slots of low height and (iii) Upper plate consisting of transverse slots of bigger height. Considering hydrophilic nature of top and bottom plates, two different high temperatures of the hot wall was set and an observation was made on normal and explosive vaporizations and their impacts on thermal transport. For all the structures, equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) was performed to reach equilibrium state at 90 K. Then the lower wall is set to two different temperatures like 110 K and 250 K for all three models to perform non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD). For vaporization, higher temperature of the hot wall led to faster transport of the liquid argon as a cluster moving from hot wall to cold wall. But excessive temperature causes explosive boiling which seems not good for heat transportation because of less phase change. In case of condensation, an observation was made which indicates that the nanostructured transverse slots facilitate condensation. Two factors affect the rate of

  14. Conceptualizing a Dynamic Fall Risk Model Including Intrinsic Risks and Exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenk, Jochen; Becker, Clemens; Palumbo, Pierpaolo; Schwickert, Lars; Rapp, Kilan; Helbostad, Jorunn L; Todd, Chris; Lord, Stephen R; Kerse, Ngaire

    2017-11-01

    Falls are a major cause of injury and disability in older people, leading to serious health and social consequences including fractures, poor quality of life, loss of independence, and institutionalization. To design and provide adequate prevention measures, accurate understanding and identification of person's individual fall risk is important. However, to date, the performance of fall risk models is weak compared with models estimating, for example, cardiovascular risk. This deficiency may result from 2 factors. First, current models consider risk factors to be stable for each person and not change over time, an assumption that does not reflect real-life experience. Second, current models do not consider the interplay of individual exposure including type of activity (eg, walking, undertaking transfers) and environmental risks (eg, lighting, floor conditions) in which activity is performed. Therefore, we posit a dynamic fall risk model consisting of intrinsic risk factors that vary over time and exposure (activity in context). eHealth sensor technology (eg, smartphones) begins to enable the continuous measurement of both the above factors. We illustrate our model with examples of real-world falls from the FARSEEING database. This dynamic framework for fall risk adds important aspects that may improve understanding of fall mechanisms, fall risk models, and the development of fall prevention interventions. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Elements of Dynamics of a One-Dimensional Trapped Bose-Einstein Condensate Excited by a Time-Dependent Dimple: A Lagrangian Variational Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhel, Asaad R.; Sakhel, Roger R.

    2018-02-01

    We examine the dynamics of a one-dimensional harmonically trapped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), induced by the addition of a dimple trap whose depth oscillates with time. For this purpose, the Lagrangian variational method (LVM) is applied to provide the required analytical equations. The goal is to provide an analytical explanation for the quasiperiodic oscillations of the BEC size at resonance, that is additional to the one given by Adhikari (J Phys B At Mol Opt Phys 36:1109, 2003). It is shown that LVM is able to reproduce instabilities in the dynamics along the same lines outlined by Lellouch et al. (Phys Rev X 7:021015, 2017). Moreover, it is found that at resonance the energy dynamics display ordered oscillations, whereas at off-resonance they tend to be chaotic. Further, by using the Poincare-Lindstedt method to solve the LVM equation of motion, the resulting solution is able to reproduce the quasiperiodic oscillations of the BEC.

  16. On the Necessity of Including Joint Passive Dynamics in the Impedance Control of Robotic Legs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Arevalo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bioinspired quadruped robots are among the best robot designs for field missions over the complex terrain encountered in extraterrestrial landscapes and disaster scenarios caused by natural and human-made catastrophes, such as those caused by nuclear power plant accidents and radiological emergencies. For such applications, the performance characteristics of the robots should include high mobility, adaptability to the terrain, the ability to handle a large payload and good endurance. Nature can provide inspiration for quadruped designs that are well suited for traversing complex terrain. Horse legs are an example of a structure that has evolved to exhibit good performance characteristics. In this paper, a leg design exhibiting the key features of horse legs is briefly described. This leg is an underactuated mechanism because it has two actively driven degrees of freedom (DOFs and one passively driven DOF. In this work, two control laws intended to be use in the stan ce phase are described: a control law that considers passive mechanism dynamics and a second law that neglects these dynamics. The performance of the two control laws is experimentally evaluated and compared. The results indicate that the first control law better achieves the control goal; however, the use of the second is not completely unjustified.

  17. The Civil Society Dynamic of Including and Empowering Refugees in Canada’s Urban Centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Schmidtke

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the critical role that civil society at the urban level plays in integrating and empowering immigrants and minorities in Canadian society. From a place-based approach, it investigates how key agencies in the local community have been instrumental in including immigrants in general and refugees in particular into the fabric of Canadian society. Empirically the analysis focuses on Neighbourhood Houses in Greater Vancouver and the Privately-Sponsored Refugee program in Canada. With the interpretative lens on the urban context, the article shows how immigrants and refugees have gained agency and voice in the public arena through place-based communities. The insight into these two empirical cases provides the basis for conceptualizing the socio-political dynamics of immigrant settlement and integration in terms of the effects generated by urban governance structures.

  18. Multi-Objective Dynamic Economic Dispatch of Microgrid Systems Including Vehicle-to-Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Liu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Based on the characteristics of electric vehicles (EVs, this paper establishes the load models of EVs under the autonomous charging mode and the coordinated charging and discharging mode. Integrating the EVs into a microgrid system which includes wind turbines (WTs, photovoltaic arrays (PVs, diesel engines (DEs, fuel cells (FCs and a storage battery (BS, this paper establishes multi-objective economic dispatch models of a microgrid, including the lowest operating cost, the least carbon dioxide emissions, and the lowest pollutant treatment cost. After converting the multi-objective functions to a single objective function by using the judgment matrix method, we analyze the dynamic economic dispatch of the microgrid system including vehicle-to-grid (V2G with an improved particle swarm optimization algorithm under different operation control strategies. With the example system, the proposed models and strategies are verified and analyzed. Simulation results show that the microgrid system with EVs under the coordinated charging and discharging mode has better operation economics than the autonomous charging mode. Meanwhile, the greater the load fluctuation is, the higher the operating cost of the microgrid system is.

  19. Numerically exact dynamics of the interacting many-body Schroedinger equation for Bose-Einstein condensates. Comparison to Bose-Hubbard and Gross-Pitaevskii theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakmann, Kaspar

    2010-07-21

    In this thesis, the physics of trapped, interacting Bose-Einstein condensates is analyzed by solving the many-body Schroedinger equation. Particular emphasis is put on coherence, fragmentation and reduced density matrices. First, the ground state of a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate and its correlation functions are obtained. Then the dynamics of a bosonic Josephson junction is investigated by solving the time-dependent many-body Schroedinger equation numerically exactly. These are the first exact results in literature in this context. It is shown that the standard approximations of the field, Gross-Pitaevskii theory and the Bose-Hubbard model fail at weak interaction strength and within their range of expected validity. For stronger interactions the dynamics becomes strongly correlated and a new equilibration phenomenon is discovered. By comparison with exact results it is shown that a symmetry of the Bose- Hubbard model between attractive and repulsive interactions must be considered an artefact of the model. A conceptual innovation of this thesis are time-dependent Wannier functions. Equations of motion for time-dependent Wannier functions are derived from the variational principle. By comparison with exact results it is shown that lattice models can be greatly improved at little computational cost by letting the Wannier functions of a lattice model become time-dependent. (orig.)

  20. Dynamics of a bright soliton in Bose-Einstein condensates with time-dependent atomic scattering length in an expulsive parabolic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Z.X.; Zhang, Z.D.; Liu, W.M.

    2005-01-01

    We present a family of exact solutions of the one-dimensional nonlinear Schroedinger equation which describes the dynamics of a bright soliton in Bose-Einstein condensates with the time-dependent interatomic interaction in an expulsive parabolic potential. Our results show that, under a safe range of parameters, the bright soliton can be compressed into very high local matter densities by increasing the absolute value of the atomic scattering length, which can provide an experimental tool for investigating the range of validity of the one-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We also find that the number of atoms in the bright soliton keeps dynamic stability: a time-periodic atomic exchange is formed between the bright soliton and the background

  1. Polariton condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snoke, David; Littlewood, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Most students of physics know about the special properties of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) as demonstrated in the two best-known examples: superfluid helium-4, first reported in 1938, and condensates of trapped atomic gases, first observed in 1995. (See the article by Wolfgang Ketterle in PHYSICS TODAY, December 1999, page 30.) Many also know that superfluid 3 He and superconducting metals contain BECs of fermion pairs. An underlying principle of all those condensed-matter systems, known as quantum fluids, is that an even number of fermions with half-integer spin can be combined to make a composite boson with integer spin. Such composite bosons, like all bosons, have the property that below some critical temperature--roughly the temperature at which the thermal de Broglie wavelength becomes comparable to the distance between the bosons--the total free energy is minimized by having a macroscopic number of bosons enter a single quantum state and form a macroscopic, coherent matter wave. Remarkably, the effect of interparticle repulsion is to lead to quantum mechanical exchange interactions that make that state robust, since the exchange interactions add coherently.

  2. Statistical physics including applications to condensed matter

    CERN Document Server

    Hermann, Claudine

    2005-01-01

    Statistical Physics bridges the properties of a macroscopic system and the microscopic behavior of its constituting particles, otherwise impossible due to the giant magnitude of Avogadro's number. Numerous systems of today's key technologies -- as e.g. semiconductors or lasers -- are macroscopic quantum objects; only statistical physics allows for understanding their fundamentals. Therefore, this graduate text also focuses on particular applications such as the properties of electrons in solids with applications, and radiation thermodynamics and the greenhouse effect.

  3. Role of thermal two-phonon scattering for impurity dynamics in a low-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lausch, Tobias; Widera, Artur; Fleischhauer, Michael

    2018-03-01

    We numerically study the relaxation dynamics of a single, heavy impurity atom interacting with a finite one- or two-dimensional, ultracold Bose gas. While there is a clear separation of time scales between processes resulting from single- and two-phonon scattering in three spatial dimensions, the thermalization in lower dimensions is dominated by two-phonon processes. This is due to infrared divergences in the corresponding scattering rates in the thermodynamic limit, which are a manifestation of the Mermin-Wagner-Hohenberg theorem. This makes it necessary to include second-order phonon scattering above a crossover temperature T2ph . T2ph scales inversely with the system size and is much smaller than currently experimentally accessible.

  4. Condensed matter physics

    CERN Document Server

    Marder, Michael P

    2010-01-01

    This Second Edition presents an updated review of the whole field of condensed matter physics. It consolidates new and classic topics from disparate sources, teaching not only about the effective masses of electrons in semiconductor crystals and band theory, but also about quasicrystals, dynamics of phase separation, why rubber is more floppy than steel, granular materials, quantum dots, Berry phases, the quantum Hall effect, and Luttinger liquids.

  5. Off-equilibrium infrared structure of self-interacting scalar fields: Universal scaling, vortex-antivortex superfluid dynamics, and Bose-Einstein condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jian; Schlichting, Soeren; Venugopalan, Raju; Wang, Qun

    2018-05-01

    We map the infrared dynamics of a relativistic single-component (N =1 ) interacting scalar field theory to that of nonrelativistic complex scalar fields. The Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation, describing the real-time dynamics of single-component ultracold Bose gases, is obtained at first nontrivial order in an expansion proportional to the powers of λ ϕ2/m2 where λ , ϕ , and m are the coupling constant, the scalar field, and the particle mass respectively. Our analytical studies are corroborated by numerical simulations of the spatial and momentum structure of overoccupied scalar fields in (2+1)-dimensions. Universal scaling of infrared modes, vortex-antivortex superfluid dynamics, and the off-equilibrium formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate are observed. Our results for the universal scaling exponents are in agreement with those extracted in the numerical simulations of the GP equation. As in these simulations, we observe coarsening phase kinetics in the Bose superfluid with strongly anomalous scaling exponents relative to that of vertex resummed kinetic theory. Our relativistic field theory framework further allows one to study more closely the coupling between superfluid and normal fluid modes, specifically the turbulent momentum and spatial structure of the coupling between a quasiparticle cascade to the infrared and an energy cascade to the ultraviolet. We outline possible applications of the formalism to the dynamics of vortex-antivortex formation and to the off-equilibrium dynamics of the strongly interacting matter formed in heavy-ion collisions.

  6. Statistical physics and condensed matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This document is divided into 4 sections: 1) General aspects of statistical physics. The themes include: possible geometrical structures of thermodynamics, the thermodynamical foundation of quantum measurement, transport phenomena (kinetic theory, hydrodynamics and turbulence) and out of equilibrium systems (stochastic dynamics and turbulence). The techniques involved here are typical of applied analysis: stability criteria, mode decomposition, shocks and stochastic equations. 2) Disordered, glassy and granular systems: statics and dynamics. The complexity of the systems can be studied through the structure of their phase space. The geometry of this phase space is studied in several works: the overlap distribution can now be computed with a very high precision; the boundary energy between low lying states does not behave like in ordinary systems; and the Edward's hypothesis of equi-probability of low lying metastable states is invalidated. The phenomenon of aging, characteristic of glassy dynamics, is studied in several models. Dynamics of biological systems or of fracture is shown to bear some resemblance with that of disordered systems. 3) Quantum systems. The themes include: mesoscopic superconductors, supersymmetric approach to strongly correlated electrons, quantum criticality and heavy fermion compounds, optical sum rule violation in the cuprates, heat capacity of lattice spin models from high-temperature series expansion, Lieb-Schultz-Mattis theorem in dimension larger than one, quantum Hall effect, Bose-Einstein condensation and multiple-spin exchange model on the triangular lattice. 4) Soft condensed matter and biological systems. Path integral representations are invaluable to describe polymers, proteins and self-avoiding membranes. Using these methods, problems as diverse as the titration of a weak poly-acid by a strong base, the denaturation transition of DNA or bridge-hopping in conducting polymers have been addressed. The problems of RNA folding

  7. Statistical physics and condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This document is divided into 4 sections: 1) General aspects of statistical physics. The themes include: possible geometrical structures of thermodynamics, the thermodynamical foundation of quantum measurement, transport phenomena (kinetic theory, hydrodynamics and turbulence) and out of equilibrium systems (stochastic dynamics and turbulence). The techniques involved here are typical of applied analysis: stability criteria, mode decomposition, shocks and stochastic equations. 2) Disordered, glassy and granular systems: statics and dynamics. The complexity of the systems can be studied through the structure of their phase space. The geometry of this phase space is studied in several works: the overlap distribution can now be computed with a very high precision; the boundary energy between low lying states does not behave like in ordinary systems; and the Edward's hypothesis of equi-probability of low lying metastable states is invalidated. The phenomenon of aging, characteristic of glassy dynamics, is studied in several models. Dynamics of biological systems or of fracture is shown to bear some resemblance with that of disordered systems. 3) Quantum systems. The themes include: mesoscopic superconductors, supersymmetric approach to strongly correlated electrons, quantum criticality and heavy fermion compounds, optical sum rule violation in the cuprates, heat capacity of lattice spin models from high-temperature series expansion, Lieb-Schultz-Mattis theorem in dimension larger than one, quantum Hall effect, Bose-Einstein condensation and multiple-spin exchange model on the triangular lattice. 4) Soft condensed matter and biological systems. Path integral representations are invaluable to describe polymers, proteins and self-avoiding membranes. Using these methods, problems as diverse as the titration of a weak poly-acid by a strong base, the denaturation transition of DNA or bridge-hopping in conducting polymers have been addressed. The problems of RNA folding has

  8. BEAM DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF SARAF ACCELERATOR INCLUDING ERROR PROPAGATION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE EURISOL DRIVER

    CERN Document Server

    J. Rodnizki, D. Berkovits, K. Lavie, I. Mardor, A. Shor and Y. Yanay (Soreq NRC, Yavne), K. Dunkel, C. Piel (ACCEL, Bergisch Gladbach), A. Facco (INFN/LNL, Legnaro, Padova), V. Zviagintsev (TRIUMF, Vancouver)

    AbstractBeam dynamics simulations of SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting RF linear accelerator have been performed in order to establish the accelerator design. The multi-particle simulation includes 3D realistic electromagnetic field distributions, space charge forces and fabrication, misalignment and operation errors. A 4 mA proton or deuteron beam is accelerated up to 40 MeV with a moderated rms emittance growth and a high real-estate gradient of 2 MeV/m. An envelope of 40,000 macro-particles is kept under a radius of 1.1 cm, well below the beam pipe bore radius. The accelerator design of SARAF is proposed as an injector for the EURISOL driver accelerator. The Accel 176 MHZ β0=0.09 and β0=0.15 HWR lattice was extended to 90 MeV based on the LNL 352 MHZ β0=0.31 HWR. The matching between both lattices ensures smooth transition and the possibility to extend the accelerator to the required EURISOL ion energy.

  9. Thermosetting polymer for dynamic nuclear polarization: Solidification of an epoxy resin mixture including TEMPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Yohei, E-mail: noda.yohei@jaea.go.jp [Quantum Beam Science Centre, Sector of Nuclear Science Research, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kumada, Takayuki [Quantum Beam Science Centre, Sector of Nuclear Science Research, Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Shamoto, Shin-ichi [Quantum Beam Science Centre, Sector of Nuclear Science Research, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2015-03-11

    We investigated the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of typical thermosetting polymers (two-component type epoxy resins; Araldite{sup ®} Standard or Araldite{sup ®} Rapid) doped with a (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-yl)oxy (TEMPO) radical. The doping process was developed by carefully considering the decomposition of TEMPO during the solidification of the epoxy resin. The TEMPO electron spin in each two-component paste decayed slowly, which was favorable for our study. Furthermore, despite the dissolved TEMPO, the mixture of the two-component paste successfully solidified. With the resulting TEMPO-doped epoxy-resin samples, DNP experiments at 1.2 K and 3.35 T indicated a magnitude of a proton-spin polarization up to 39%. This polarization is similar to that (35%) obtained for TEMPO-doped polystyrene (PS), which is often used as a standard sample for DNP. To combine this solidification of TEMPO-including mixture with a resin-casting technique enables a creation of polymeric target materials with a precise and complex structure.

  10. Quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics: an approach for computing dynamically averaged vibrational spectra including critical nuclear quantum effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2007-10-18

    We have introduced a computational methodology to study vibrational spectroscopy in clusters inclusive of critical nuclear quantum effects. This approach is based on the recently developed quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics method that combines quantum wavepacket dynamics with ab initio molecular dynamics. The computational efficiency of the dynamical procedure is drastically improved (by several orders of magnitude) through the utilization of wavelet-based techniques combined with the previously introduced time-dependent deterministic sampling procedure measure to achieve stable, picosecond length, quantum-classical dynamics of electrons and nuclei in clusters. The dynamical information is employed to construct a novel cumulative flux/velocity correlation function, where the wavepacket flux from the quantized particle is combined with classical nuclear velocities to obtain the vibrational density of states. The approach is demonstrated by computing the vibrational density of states of [Cl-H-Cl]-, inclusive of critical quantum nuclear effects, and our results are in good agreement with experiment. A general hierarchical procedure is also provided, based on electronic structure harmonic frequencies, classical ab initio molecular dynamics, computation of nuclear quantum-mechanical eigenstates, and employing quantum wavepacket ab initio dynamics to understand vibrational spectroscopy in hydrogen-bonded clusters that display large degrees of anharmonicities.

  11. Parallel processing for nonlinear dynamics simulations of structures including rotating bladed-disk assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Shang-Hsien

    1993-01-01

    The principal objective of this research is to develop, test, and implement coarse-grained, parallel-processing strategies for nonlinear dynamic simulations of practical structural problems. There are contributions to four main areas: finite element modeling and analysis of rotational dynamics, numerical algorithms for parallel nonlinear solutions, automatic partitioning techniques to effect load-balancing among processors, and an integrated parallel analysis system.

  12. Excitations of Bose-Einstein condensates at finite temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusch, M.

    2000-01-01

    Recent experimental observations of collective excitations of Bose condensed atomic vapours have stimulated interest in the microscopic description of the dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate confined in an external potential. We present a finite temperature field theory for collective excitations of trapped Bose-Einstein condensates and use a finite-temperature linear response formalism, which goes beyond the simple mean-field approximation of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The effect of the non-condensed thermal atoms we include using perturbation theory in a quasiparticle basis. This presents a simple scheme to understand the interaction between condensate and non-condensed atoms and enables us to include the effect the condensate has on collision dynamics. At first we limit our treatment to the case of a spatially homogeneous Bose gas. We include the effect of pair and triplet anomalous averages and thus obtain a gapless theory for the excitations of a weakly interacting system, which we can link to well known results for Landau and Beliaev damping rates. A gapless theory for trapped systems with a static thermal component follows straightforwardly. We then investigate finite temperature excitations of a condensate in a spherically symmetric harmonic trap. We avoid approximations to the density of states and thus emphasise finite size aspects of the problem. We show that excitations couple strongly to a restricted number of modes, giving rise to resonance structure in their frequency spectra. Where possible we derive energy shifts and lifetimes of excitations. For one particular mode, the breathing mode, the effects of the discreteness of the system are sufficiently pronounced that the simple picture of an energy shift and width fails. Experiments in spherical traps have recently become feasible and should be able to test our detailed quantitative predictions. (author)

  13. Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron transfer in solution: Explicit and implicit solvent treatments that include multiple relaxation time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerdtfeger, Christine A.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    The development of efficient theoretical methods for describing electron transfer (ET) reactions in condensed phases is important for a variety of chemical and biological applications. Previously, dynamical dielectric continuum theory was used to derive Langevin equations for a single collective solvent coordinate describing ET in a polar solvent. In this theory, the parameters are directly related to the physical properties of the system and can be determined from experimental data or explicit molecular dynamics simulations. Herein, we combine these Langevin equations with surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics methods to calculate the rate constants for thermal ET reactions in polar solvents for a wide range of electronic couplings and reaction free energies. Comparison of explicit and implicit solvent calculations illustrates that the mapping from explicit to implicit solvent models is valid even for solvents exhibiting complex relaxation behavior with multiple relaxation time scales and a short-time inertial response. The rate constants calculated for implicit solvent models with a single solvent relaxation time scale corresponding to water, acetonitrile, and methanol agree well with analytical theories in the Golden rule and solvent-controlled regimes, as well as in the intermediate regime. The implicit solvent models with two relaxation time scales are in qualitative agreement with the analytical theories but quantitatively overestimate the rate constants compared to these theories. Analysis of these simulations elucidates the importance of multiple relaxation time scales and the inertial component of the solvent response, as well as potential shortcomings of the analytical theories based on single time scale solvent relaxation models. This implicit solvent approach will enable the simulation of a wide range of ET reactions via the stochastic dynamics of a single collective solvent coordinate with parameters that are relevant to experimentally accessible

  14. Condensed matter physics

    CERN Document Server

    Isihara, A

    2007-01-01

    More than a graduate text and advanced research guide on condensed matter physics, this volume is useful to plasma physicists and polymer chemists, and their students. It emphasizes applications of statistical mechanics to a variety of systems in condensed matter physics rather than theoretical derivations of the principles of statistical mechanics and techniques. Isihara addresses a dozen different subjects in separate chapters, each designed to be directly accessible and used independently of previous chapters. Topics include simple liquids, electron systems and correlations, two-dimensional

  15. Theoretical and computational studies of non-equilibrium and non-statistical dynamics in the gas phase, in the condensed phase and at interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spezia, Riccardo; Martínez-Nuñez, Emilio; Vazquez, Saulo; Hase, William L

    2017-04-28

    In this Introduction, we show the basic problems of non-statistical and non-equilibrium phenomena related to the papers collected in this themed issue. Over the past few years, significant advances in both computing power and development of theories have allowed the study of larger systems, increasing the time length of simulations and improving the quality of potential energy surfaces. In particular, the possibility of using quantum chemistry to calculate energies and forces 'on the fly' has paved the way to directly study chemical reactions. This has provided a valuable tool to explore molecular mechanisms at given temperatures and energies and to see whether these reactive trajectories follow statistical laws and/or minimum energy pathways. This themed issue collects different aspects of the problem and gives an overview of recent works and developments in different contexts, from the gas phase to the condensed phase to excited states.This article is part of the themed issue 'Theoretical and computational studies of non-equilibrium and non-statistical dynamics in the gas phase, in the condensed phase and at interfaces'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  16. Sloshing motion dynamics of a free surface in the draft tube cone of a Francis turbine operating in synchronous condenser mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagnoni, Elena; Andolfatto, Loïc; Favrel, Arthur; Avellan, François

    2016-11-01

    The penetration of the electrical grid by intermittent renewable energy sources induces grid fluctuations which must be compensated in order to guarantee the stability of the grid. Hydropower plants can supply reactive power to ensure the grid stabilization by operating in condenser mode. In this operating mode, the turbine operates with the tail water depressed to let the runner spin in air to reduce the power consumption. Pressurized air is injected in the draft tube cone to maintain the water level below the runner and this induces air-water interaction phenomena which cause important power losses. Flow visualization and pressure fluctuation measurements are performed in a reduced scale physical model of a Francis turbine operating in condenser mode to investigate the dynamics of the air-water interaction in the draft tube cone which causes the sloshing motion of the free surface. An image post-processing method is developed, enabling a quantitative description of the sloshing motion. The latter depends on the Froude number. By increasing the value of the Froude number, the amplitude of the sloshing motion decreases, as well as the amplitude of the pressure fluctuations. The frequency of the sloshing motion corresponds to the first natural frequency of the water volume.

  17. Structure and dynamics of molecular complex He2*(a3Σu+) in condensed phases of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kafanov, S.G.; Parshin, A.Ya.; Tadoshchenko, I.A.

    2000-01-01

    The absorption spectra of the helium triplet metastable molecules in the a 3 Σ u + states in the liquid 4 He and 3 He by various pressures and in the 3 He dense gas are studied. The analysis of the spectrum, corresponding to the a 3 Σ u + → c 3 Σ g + transition, proves the conclusion on the availability of a microscopic bubble, surrounding the molecule in the liquid helium. Simple approximation of the wave function of the molecule valent electron is proposed and the bubble parameters under various experimental conditions are determined. The coefficient conditions are determined. The coefficient of the molecular recombination in the liquid 3 He and 4 He by different pressures and in the 3 He cold gas is experimentally determined. The obtained results agree well with the mutual recombination theory. It is shown, that molecular polarization in the helium condensed phases under the magnetic field effect does not lead to their mutual recombination [ru

  18. Bose-Einstein Condensation in Complex Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2001-01-01

    The evolution of many complex systems, including the World Wide Web, business, and citation networks, is encoded in the dynamic web describing the interactions between the system's constituents. Despite their irreversible and nonequilibrium nature these networks follow Bose statistics and can undergo Bose-Einstein condensation. Addressing the dynamical properties of these nonequilibrium systems within the framework of equilibrium quantum gases predicts that the 'first-mover-advantage,' 'fit-get-rich,' and 'winner-takes-all' phenomena observed in competitive systems are thermodynamically distinct phases of the underlying evolving networks

  19. Hardware-in-the-loop vehicle system including dynamic fuel cell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemes, Z.; Lenhart, T.; Braun, M.; Maencher, H. [MAGNUM Automatisierungstechnik GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    In order to reduce costs and accelerate the development of fuel cells and systems the usage of hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) testing and dynamic modelling opens new possibilities. The dynamic model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) together with a vehicle model is used to carry out a comprehensive system investigation, which allows designing and optimising the behaviour of the components and the entire fuel cell system. The set-up of a HIL system enables real time interaction between the selected hardware and the model. (orig.)

  20. ATEFlap aerodynamic model, a dynamic stall model including the effects of trailing edge flap deflection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergami, L.; Gaunaa, M.

    2012-02-15

    The report presents the ATEFlap aerodynamic model, which computes the unsteady lift, drag and moment on a 2D airfoil section equipped with Adaptive Trailing Edge Flap. The model captures the unsteady response related to the effects of the vorticity shed into the wake, and the dynamics of flow separation a thin-airfoil potential flow model is merged with a dynamic stall model of the Beddoes-Leishmann type. The inputs required by the model are steady data for lift, drag, and moment coefficients as function of angle of attack and flap deflection. Further steady data used by the Beddoes- Leishmann dynamic stall model are computed in an external preprocessor application, which gives the user the possibility to verify, and eventually correct, the steady data passed to the aerodynamic model. The ATEFlap aerodynamic model is integrated in the aeroelastic simulation tool HAWC2, thus al- lowing to simulate the response of a wind turbine with trailing edge flaps on the rotor. The algorithms used by the preprocessor, and by aerodynamic model are presented, and modifications to previous implementations of the aerodynamic model are briefly discussed. The performance and the validity of the model are verified by comparing the dynamic response computed by the ATEFlap with solutions from CFD simulations. (Author)

  1. Situational effects of the school factors included in the dynamic model of educational effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creerners, Bert; Kyriakides, Leonidas

    We present results of a longitudinal study in which 50 schools, 113 classes and 2,542 Cypriot primary students participated. We tested the validity of the dynamic model of educational effectiveness and especially its assumption that the impact of school factors depends on the current situation of

  2. Condensation coefficient of water in a weak condensation state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Kazumichi; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Yamano, Daigo; Yano, Takeru; Fujikawa, Shigeo

    2008-01-01

    The condensation coefficient of water at a vapor-liquid interface is determined by combining shock tube experiments and numerical simulations of the Gaussian-BGK Boltzmann equation. The time evolution in thickness of a liquid film, which is formed on the shock tube endwall behind the shock wave reflected at the endwall, is measured with an optical interferometer consisting of the physical beam and the reference one. The reference beam is utilized to eliminate systematic noises from the physical beam. The growth rate of the film is evaluated from the measured time evolution and it is incorporated into the kinetic boundary condition for the Boltzmann equation. From a numerical simulation using the boundary condition, the condensation coefficient of water is uniquely deduced. The results show that, in a condition of weak condensation near a vapor-liquid equilibrium state, the condensation coefficient of water is almost equal to the evaporation coefficient estimated by molecular dynamics simulations near a vapor-liquid equilibrium state and it decreases as the system becomes a nonequilibrium state. The condensation coefficient of water is nearly identical with that of methanol [Mikami, S., Kobayashi, K., Ota, T., Fujikawa, S., Yano, T., Ichijo, M., 2006. Molecular gas dynamics approaches to interfacial phenomena accompanied with condensation. Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci. 30, 795-800].

  3. Condensation coefficient of water in a weak condensation state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazumichi; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Yamano, Daigo; Yano, Takeru; Fujikawa, Shigeo

    2008-07-01

    The condensation coefficient of water at a vapor-liquid interface is determined by combining shock tube experiments and numerical simulations of the Gaussian-BGK Boltzmann equation. The time evolution in thickness of a liquid film, which is formed on the shock tube endwall behind the shock wave reflected at the endwall, is measured with an optical interferometer consisting of the physical beam and the reference one. The reference beam is utilized to eliminate systematic noises from the physical beam. The growth rate of the film is evaluated from the measured time evolution and it is incorporated into the kinetic boundary condition for the Boltzmann equation. From a numerical simulation using the boundary condition, the condensation coefficient of water is uniquely deduced. The results show that, in a condition of weak condensation near a vapor-liquid equilibrium state, the condensation coefficient of water is almost equal to the evaporation coefficient estimated by molecular dynamics simulations near a vapor-liquid equilibrium state and it decreases as the system becomes a nonequilibrium state. The condensation coefficient of water is nearly identical with that of methanol [Mikami, S., Kobayashi, K., Ota, T., Fujikawa, S., Yano, T., Ichijo, M., 2006. Molecular gas dynamics approaches to interfacial phenomena accompanied with condensation. Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci. 30, 795-800].

  4. Axisymmetric disruption dynamics including current profile changes in the ASDEX-Upgrade tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Pautasso, G.; Gruber, O.; Jardin, S.C.

    2002-01-01

    Axisymmetric MHD simulations have revealed a new driving mechanism that governs the vertical displacement event (VDE) dynamics in tokamak disruptions. A rapid flattening of the plasma current profile during the disruption plays a substantial role in dragging a single null-diverted plasma vertically towards the divertor. As a consequence, the occurrence of downward-going VDEs predominates over the upward-going ones in bottom-diverted discharges. This dragging effect, due to an abrupt change in the current profile, is absent in up-down symmetric limiter discharges. These simulation results are consistent with experiments in ASDEX-Upgrade. Together with the attractive force that arises from passive shell currents induced by the plasma current quench, the dragging effect explains many details of the VDE dynamics over the whole period of the disruptive termination. (author)

  5. Residential building stocks and flows as dynamic systems: Chilean dwelling stock and energy modeling, including earthquakes.

    OpenAIRE

    Gallardo, Carla

    2012-01-01

    The building sector comprises a very important part of each country s economy, playing an important role in the consumption of resources and energy. In practice there is little knowledge on how the building stock develops. It is useful then to understand the dynamics and the metabolism of the built environment. Research on building stocks, predominantly on the residential sector, has been performed mainly for developed countries. There is little or none research on building stock for developi...

  6. Cracked rotors. A survey on static and dynamic behaviour including modelling and diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachschmid, Nicolo; Pennacchi, Paolo; Tanzi, Ezio [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Cracks can develop in rotating shafts and can propagate to relevant depths without affecting consistently the normal operating conditions of the shaft. In order to avoid catastrophic failures, accurate vibration analyses have to be performed for crack detection. The identification of the crack location and depth is possible by means of a model based diagnostic approach, provided that the model of the crack and the model of the cracked shaft dynamical behavior are accurate and reliable. This monograph shows the typical dynamical behavior of cracked shafts and presents tests for detecting cracks. The book describes how to model cracks, how to simulate the dynamical behavior of cracked shaft, and compares the corresponding numerical with experimental results. All effects of cracks on the vibrations of rotating shafts are analyzed, and some results of a numerical sensitivity analysis of the vibrations to the presence and severity of the crack are shown. Finally the book describes some crack identification procedures and shows some results in model based crack identification in position and depth. The book is useful for higher university courses in mechanical and energetic engineering, but also for skilled technical people employed in power generation industries. (orig.)

  7. The importance of including dynamic soil-structure interaction into wind turbine simulation codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    A rigorous numerical model, describing a wind turbine structure and subsoil, may contain thousands of degrees of freedom, making the approach computationally inefficient for fast time domain analysis. In order to meet the requirements of real-time calculations, the dynamic impedance of the founda......A rigorous numerical model, describing a wind turbine structure and subsoil, may contain thousands of degrees of freedom, making the approach computationally inefficient for fast time domain analysis. In order to meet the requirements of real-time calculations, the dynamic impedance...... of the foundation from a rigorous analysis can be formulated into a so-called lumped-parameter model consisting of a few springs, dashpots and point masses which are easily implemented into aeroelastic codes. In this paper, the quality of consistent lumped-parameter models of rigid surface footings and mono piles...... is examined. The optimal order of the models is determined and implemented into the aeroelastic code HAWC2, where the dynamic response of a 5.0 MW wind turbine is evaluated. In contrast to the fore-aft vibrations, the inclusion of soil-structure interaction is shown to be critical for the side-side vibrations...

  8. Dynamic analysis of liquid storage tank including hydrodynamic interaction by boundary element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, I.T.; Ting, K.

    1987-01-01

    Dynamic response of liquid storage tanks considering the hydrodynamic interactions due to earthquake ground motion has been extensively studied. Several finite element procedures, such as Balendra et. al. (1982) and Haroun (1983), have been devoted to investigate the dynamic interaction between the deformable wall of the tank and the liquid. Further, if the geometry of the storage tank can not be described by axi-symmetric case, the tank wall and the fluid domain must be discretized by three dimensional finite elements to investigate the fluid-structure-interactions. Thus, the need of large computer memory and expense of vast computer time usually make this analysis impractical. To demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of the solution technique developed herein, the dynamic behavior of ground-supported, deformed, cylindrical tank with incompressible fluid conducted by Haroun (1983) are analyzed. Good correlations of hydrodynamic pressure distribution between the computed results with the referenced solutions are noted. The fluid compressibility significantly affects the hydrodynamic pressures of the liquid-tank-interactions and the work which is done on this discussion is still little attention. Thus, the influences of the compressibility of the liquid on the reponse of the liquid storage due to ground motion are then drawn. By the way, the complex-valued frequency response functions for hydrodynamic forces of Haroun's problem are also displayed. (orig./GL)

  9. Evaporation and condensation at a liquid methanol surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro; Yasuoka, Kenji; Kataoka, Yosuke

    1994-07-01

    The dynamics of evaporation and condensation at a flat liquid surface of methanol were studied under the liquidvapor equilibrium condition at room temperature with molecular dynamics computer simulation techniques. Analysis of molecular trajectories shows that the condensation coefficient is 89%. It suggests that only a tenth of incident vapor molecules are reflected at the liquid surface, contrary to a prediction of a classical transition state theory. To investigate the potential barrier of the evaporation-condensation process, a particle insertion method was applied and the local chemical potential near the surface was evaluated. The calculated chemical potential is constant in the whole region including the surface layer and no potential barrier is observed in the vincinity of the surface, which casts strong doubt on the explanation of a transition state theory.

  10. The Human Bathtub: Safety and Risk Predictions Including the Dynamic Probability of Operator Errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, Romney B.; Saull, John W.

    2006-01-01

    Reactor safety and risk are dominated by the potential and major contribution for human error in the design, operation, control, management, regulation and maintenance of the plant, and hence to all accidents. Given the possibility of accidents and errors, now we need to determine the outcome (error) probability, or the chance of failure. Conventionally, reliability engineering is associated with the failure rate of components, or systems, or mechanisms, not of human beings in and interacting with a technological system. The probability of failure requires a prior knowledge of the total number of outcomes, which for any predictive purposes we do not know or have. Analysis of failure rates due to human error and the rate of learning allow a new determination of the dynamic human error rate in technological systems, consistent with and derived from the available world data. The basis for the analysis is the 'learning hypothesis' that humans learn from experience, and consequently the accumulated experience defines the failure rate. A new 'best' equation has been derived for the human error, outcome or failure rate, which allows for calculation and prediction of the probability of human error. We also provide comparisons to the empirical Weibull parameter fitting used in and by conventional reliability engineering and probabilistic safety analysis methods. These new analyses show that arbitrary Weibull fitting parameters and typical empirical hazard function techniques cannot be used to predict the dynamics of human errors and outcomes in the presence of learning. Comparisons of these new insights show agreement with human error data from the world's commercial airlines, the two shuttle failures, and from nuclear plant operator actions and transient control behavior observed in transients in both plants and simulators. The results demonstrate that the human error probability (HEP) is dynamic, and that it may be predicted using the learning hypothesis and the minimum

  11. Dynamic 2D-barcodes for multi-device Web session migration including mobile phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alapetite, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a novel Web architecture that supports session migration in multi-device Web applications, particularly the case when a user starts a Web session on a computer and wishes to continue on a mobile phone. The proposed solution for transferring the needed session identifiers...... across devices is to dynamically generate pictures of 2D-barcodes containing a Web address and a session ID in an encoded form. 2D-barcodes are a cheap, fast and robust approach to the problem. They are widely known and used in Japan, and are spreading in other countries. Variations on the topic...

  12. Spatial Correlation of PAN UWB-MIMO Channel Including User Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yu; Kovacs, Istvan Zsolt; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    . It is found the channel shows spatial correlated wideband power, and spatial uncorrelated complex channel coefficients at different frequencies and delays with respect to a correlation coefficient threshold of 0.7. The Kronecker model is proved not suitable for the investigated scenarios. The MIMO UWB channel......In this paper we present and analyze spatial correlation properties of indoor 4x2 MIMO UWB channels in personal area network (PAN) scenarios. The presented results are based on measurement of radio links between an access point like device and a hand held or belt mounted device with dynamic user...

  13. LIDT-DD: A New Self-Consistent Debris Disc Model Including Radiation Pressure and Coupling Dynamical and Collisional Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Q.; Thebault, P.; Charnoz, S.

    2014-01-01

    The first attempt at developing a fully self-consistent code coupling dynamics and collisions to study debris discs (Kral et al. 2013) is presented. So far, these two crucial mechanisms were studied separately, with N-body and statistical collisional codes respectively, because of stringent computational constraints. We present a new model named LIDT-DD which is able to follow over long timescales the coupled evolution of dynamics (including radiation forces) and collisions in a self-consistent way.

  14. HIV Model Parameter Estimates from Interruption Trial Data including Drug Efficacy and Reservoir Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Rutao; Piovoso, Michael J.; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Zurakowski, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical models based on ordinary differential equations (ODE) have had significant impact on understanding HIV disease dynamics and optimizing patient treatment. A model that characterizes the essential disease dynamics can be used for prediction only if the model parameters are identifiable from clinical data. Most previous parameter identification studies for HIV have used sparsely sampled data from the decay phase following the introduction of therapy. In this paper, model parameters are identified from frequently sampled viral-load data taken from ten patients enrolled in the previously published AutoVac HAART interruption study, providing between 69 and 114 viral load measurements from 3–5 phases of viral decay and rebound for each patient. This dataset is considerably larger than those used in previously published parameter estimation studies. Furthermore, the measurements come from two separate experimental conditions, which allows for the direct estimation of drug efficacy and reservoir contribution rates, two parameters that cannot be identified from decay-phase data alone. A Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo method is used to estimate the model parameter values, with initial estimates obtained using nonlinear least-squares methods. The posterior distributions of the parameter estimates are reported and compared for all patients. PMID:22815727

  15. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of framed structures including soil-structure interaction effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, M.N.; Ahmed, S.Y.

    2008-01-01

    The role of oil-structure interaction on seismic behavior of reinforced concrete structures is investigated in this paper. A finite element approach has been adopted to model the interaction system that consists of the reinforced concrete plane frame, soil deposit and interface which represents the frictional between foundation of the structure and subsoil. The analysis is based on the elasto-plastic behavior of the frame members (beams and columns) that is defined by the ultimate axial force-bending moment interaction curve, while the cap model is adopted to govern the elasto-plastic behavior of the soil material. Mohr-Coulomb failure law is used to determine the initiation of slippage at the interface, while the separation is assumed to determine the initiation of slippage at the interface, while the separation is assumed to occur when the stresses at the interface becomes tension stresses. New-Mark's Predictor-Corrector algorithm is adopted for nonlinear dynamic analysis. The main aim of present work is to evaluate the sensitivity of structures to different behavior of the soil and interface layer when subjected to an earthquake excitation. Predicted results of the dynamic analysis of the interaction system indicate that the soil-structure interaction problem can have beneficial effects on the structural behavior when different soil models (elastic and elasto-plastic) and interface conditions (perfect bond and permitted slip)are considered. (author)

  16. Dynamic Analysis of Thick Plates Including Deep Beams on Elastic Foundations Using Modified Vlasov Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korhan Ozgan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic analysis of foundation plate-beam systems with transverse shear deformation is presented using modified Vlasov foundation model. Finite element formulation of the problem is derived by using an 8-node (PBQ8 finite element based on Mindlin plate theory for the plate and a 2-node Hughes element based on Timoshenko beam theory for the beam. Selective reduced integration technique is used to avoid shear locking problem for the evaluation of the stiffness matrices for both the elements. The effect of beam thickness, the aspect ratio of the plate and subsoil depth on the response of plate-beam-soil system is analyzed. Numerical examples show that the displacement, bending moments and shear forces are changed significantly by adding the beams.

  17. Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluidity

    CERN Document Server

    Pitaevskii, Lev

    2016-01-01

    This volume introduces the basic concepts of Bose–Einstein condensation and superfluidity. It makes special reference to the physics of ultracold atomic gases; an area in which enormous experimental and theoretical progress has been achieved in the last twenty years. Various theoretical approaches to describing the physics of interacting bosons and of interacting Fermi gases, giving rise to bosonic pairs and hence to condensation, are discussed in detail, both in uniform and harmonically trapped configurations. Special focus is given to the comparison between theory and experiment, concerning various equilibrium, dynamic, thermodynamic, and superfluid properties of these novel systems. The volume also includes discussions of ultracold gases in dimensions, quantum mixtures, and long-range dipolar interactions.

  18. Dynamics of beam-driven Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves including electrostatic decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, B.; Willes, A.J.; Robinson, P.A.; Cairns, I.H.

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of Langmuir waves and ion-acoustic waves stimulated by a hot electron beam in an initially homogeneous plasma is investigated numerically in time, position, and wave number space. Quasilinear interactions between the beam particles and Langmuir waves, nonlinear interactions between the Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves through Langmuir decay processes, and spontaneous emission are taken into account in the kinetic theory employed. For illustrative parameters of those in the solar wind near 1 a.u., nonlinear Langmuir decays are observed to transfer the beam-driven Langmuir waves rapidly out of resonance. The scattered Langmuir waves then undergo further decays, moving sequentially toward small wave numbers, until decay is kinematically prohibited. The main features of the evolution of Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves are spatially inhomogeneous. The scattered Langmuir spectra increase and eventually reach or exceed the beam-driven Langmuir spectra at a given spatial location (except in regions where further decays proceed). The ion-acoustic waves are relatively weak and subject to damping at the later stages of their evolution. The development of fine structures in the product Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves are observed, due to depletion of their energy by decay and dominant damping effects, respectively. The propagation of the beam is essentially unaffected by the operation of the decay process. The decay process is thus slaved to the primary beam-plasma evolution, as assumed in previous studies. A variation of the ratio of electron temperature to ion temperature is found to affect not only the ion-acoustic wave levels through effects on the damping rate, but also the dynamics of decay via effects on the decay rate. The latter was not addressed in previous studies. Furthermore, spontaneous emission of ion-acoustic waves is found to affect the dynamics of decay, thus its inclusion is necessary to correctly model the Langmuir and ion-acoustic spectra

  19. Chaotic behavior, collective modes, and self-trapping in the dynamics of three coupled Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzosi, Roberto; Penna, Vittorio

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of the three coupled bosonic wells (trimer) containing N bosons is investigated within a standard (mean-field) semiclassical picture based on the coherent-state method. Various periodic solutions (configured as π-like, dimerlike, and vortex states) representing collective modes are obtained analytically when the fixed points of trimer dynamics are identified on the N=const submanifold in the phase space. Hyperbolic, maximum and minimum points are recognized in the fixed-point set by studying the Hessian signature of the trimer Hamiltonian. The system dynamics in the neighborhood of periodic orbits (associated with fixed points) is studied via numeric integration of trimer motion equations, thus revealing a diffused chaotic behavior (not excluding the presence of regular orbits), macroscopic effects of population inversion, and self-trapping. In particular, the behavior of orbits with initial conditions close to the dimerlike periodic orbits shows how the self-trapping effect of dimerlike integrable subregimes is destroyed by the presence of chaos

  20. Condensates in quantum chromodynamics and the cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Shrock, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Casher and Susskind [Casher A, Susskind L (1974) Phys Rev 9:436–460] have noted that in the light-front description, spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking is a property of hadronic wavefunctions and not of the vacuum. Here we show from several physical perspectives that, because of color confinement, quark and gluon condensates in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) are associated with the internal dynamics of hadrons. We discuss condensates using condensed matter analogues, the Anti de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence, and the Bethe–Salpeter–Dyson–Schwinger approach for bound states. Our analysis is in agreement with the Casher and Susskind model and the explicit demonstration of “in-hadron” condensates by Roberts and coworkers [Maris P, Roberts CD, Tandy PC (1998) Phys Lett B 420:267–273], using the Bethe–Salpeter–Dyson–Schwinger formalism for QCD-bound states. These results imply that QCD condensates give zero contribution to the cosmological constant, because all of the gravitational effects of the in-hadron condensates are already included in the normal contribution from hadron masses.

  1. Experimental and computational analysis of steam condensation in the presence of air and helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucci, M.

    2010-01-01

    Among the different phenomena expected to occur within nuclear reactor containments during a postulated loss of coolant accident, condensation on containment walls plays a major role, since it represents an important heat sink for evacuating the energy released by the discharge of the primary water. Nevertheless, condensation strongly affects other relevant phenomena, like containment atmosphere mixing, that influences the distribution of non-condensable gases hypothetically delivered in severe accident conditions. In this scenario, the role of condensation is not obvious, since it can locally aid the hydrogen produced by the oxidation of the core claddings to concentrate and reach flammability limits, providing a dangerous effect instead of a positive one. The understanding of condensation in the presence of air and hydrogen is therefore a fundamental task for the safety analyses of reactor containments. This research has been carried out with the aim to contribute to the understanding of these phenomena. A double strategy has been adopted, including complementary experimental and computational activities. Novel data have been made available by the CONAN facility, investigating the effects induced by light non-condensable gases in experimental configurations that were scarcely investigated in past studies. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) condensation models have been developed and validated. The suitability of helium as a substitute for hydrogen in experimental activities has been investigated by theoretical and computational analyses allowing to establish simple criteria for the scaling of condensation tests in the presence of a light non-condensable gas. (authors)

  2. Characterization of spacecraft humidity condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muckle, Susan; Schultz, John R.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    When construction of Space Station Freedom reaches the Permanent Manned Capability (PMC) stage, the Water Recovery and Management Subsystem will be fully operational such that (distilled) urine, spent hygiene water, and humidity condensate will be reclaimed to provide water of potable quality. The reclamation technologies currently baselined to process these waste waters include adsorption, ion exchange, catalytic oxidation, and disinfection. To ensure that the baseline technologies will be able to effectively remove those compounds presenting a health risk to the crew, the National Research Council has recommended that additional information be gathered on specific contaminants in waste waters representative of those to be encountered on the Space Station. With the application of new analytical methods and the analysis of waste water samples more representative of the Space Station environment, advances in the identification of the specific contaminants continue to be made. Efforts by the Water and Food Analytical Laboratory at JSC were successful in enlarging the database of contaminants in humidity condensate. These efforts have not only included the chemical characterization of condensate generated during ground-based studies, but most significantly the characterization of cabin and Spacelab condensate generated during Shuttle missions. The analytical results presented in this paper will be used to show how the composition of condensate varies amongst enclosed environments and thus the importance of collecting condensate from an environment close to that of the proposed Space Station. Although advances were made in the characterization of space condensate, complete characterization, particularly of the organics, requires further development of analytical methods.

  3. Dynamical density functional theory for arbitrary-shape colloidal fluids including inertia and hydrodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Goddard, Ben; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2015-11-01

    Over the last few decades the classical density-functional theory (DFT) and its dynamic extensions (DDFTs) have become a remarkably powerful tool in the study of colloidal fluids. Recently there has been extensive research to generalise all previous DDFTs finally yielding a general DDFT equation (for spherical particles) which takes into account both inertia and hydrodynamic interactions (HI) which strongly influence non-equilibrium properties. The present work will be devoted to a further generalisation of such a framework to systems of anisotropic particles. To this end, the kinetic equation for the Brownian particle distribution function is derived starting from the Liouville equation and making use of Zwanzig's projection-operator techniques. By averaging over all but one particle, a DDFT equation is finally obtained with some similarities to that for spherical colloids. However, there is now an inevitable translational-rotational coupling which affects the diffusivity of asymmetric particles. Lastly, in the overdamped (high friction) limit the theory is notably simplified leading to a DDFT equation which agrees with previous derivations. We acknowledge financial support from European Research Council via Advanced Grant No. 247031.

  4. Condensation model for the ESBWR passive condensers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revankar, S. T.; Zhou, W.; Wolf, B.; Oh, S.

    2012-01-01

    In the General Electric's Economic simplified boiling water reactor (GE-ESBWR) the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) plays a major role in containment pressure control in case of an loss of coolant accident. The PCCS condenser must be able to remove sufficient energy from the reactor containment to prevent containment from exceeding its design pressure following a design basis accident. There are three PCCS condensation modes depending on the containment pressurization due to coolant discharge; complete condensation, cyclic venting and flow through mode. The present work reviews the models and presents model predictive capability along with comparison with existing data from separate effects test. The condensation models in thermal hydraulics code RELAP5 are also assessed to examine its application to various flow modes of condensation. The default model in the code predicts complete condensation well, and basically is Nusselt solution. The UCB model predicts through flow well. None of condensation model in RELAP5 predict complete condensation, cyclic venting, and through flow condensation consistently. New condensation correlations are given that accurately predict all three modes of PCCS condensation. (authors)

  5. Observation of Faraday Waves in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, P.; Atherton, C.; Hoefer, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    Faraday waves in a cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate are created. It is shown that periodically modulating the transverse confinement, and thus the nonlinear interactions in the BEC, excites small amplitude longitudinal oscillations through a parametric resonance. It is also demonstrated that even without the presence of a continuous drive, an initial transverse breathing mode excitation of the condensate leads to spontaneous pattern formation in the longitudinal direction. Finally, the effects of strongly driving the transverse breathing mode with large amplitude are investigated. In this case, impact-oscillator behavior and intriguing nonlinear dynamics, including the gradual emergence of multiple longitudinal modes, are observed

  6. Critical Dynamics : The Expansion of the Master Equation Including a Critical Point

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, H.

    1980-01-01

    In this thesis it is shown how to solve the master equation for a Markov process including a critical point by means of successive approximations in terms of a small parameter. A critical point occurs if, by adjusting an externally controlled quantity, the system shows a transition from normal

  7. Enhanced UWB Radio Channel Model for Short-Range Communication Scenarios Including User Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, Istvan Zsolt; Nguyen, Tuan Hung; Eggers, Patrick Claus F.

    2005-01-01

    channel model represents an enhancement of the existing IEEE 802.15.3a/4a PAN channel model, where antenna and user-proximity effects are not included. Our investigations showed that significant variations of the received wideband power and time-delay signal clustering are possible due the human body...

  8. Condensate growth in trapped Bose gates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, M.J.; Zaremba, E.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2000-01-01

    We study the dynamics of condensate fromation in an inhomogeneous trapped Bose gas with a positive interatomic scattering length. We take into account both the nonequilibrium kinetics of the thermal cloud and the Hartree-Fock mean-field efects in the condensed and the noncondensed parts of the gas.

  9. Condensate growth in trapped Bose gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, M.J.; Zaremba, E.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2000-01-01

    We study the dynamics of condensate formation in an inhomogeneous trapped Bose gas with a positive interatomic scattering length. We take into account both the nonequilibrium kinetics of the thermal cloud and the Hartree-Fock mean-field effects in the condensed and the noncondensed parts of the gas.

  10. Wettability modified nanoporous ceramic membrane for simultaneous residual heat and condensate recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H. W.; Tang, G. H.; Niu, D.

    2016-06-01

    Recovery of both latent heat and condensate from boiler flue gas is significant for improving boiler efficiency and water conservation. The condensation experiments are carried out to investigate the simultaneous heat and mass transfer across the nanoporous ceramic membranes (NPCMs) which are treated to be hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces using the semicontinuous supercritical reactions. The effects of typical parameters including coolant flow rate, vapor/nitrogen gas mixture temperature, water vapor volume fraction and transmembrane pressure on heat and mass transfer performance are studied. The experimental results show that the hydrophilic NPCM exhibits higher performances of condensation heat transfer and condensate recovery. However, the hydrophobic modification results in remarkable degradation of heat and condensate recovery from the mixture. Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to establish a hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore/water liquid system, and the infiltration characteristics of the single hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore is revealed.

  11. Wettability modified nanoporous ceramic membrane for simultaneous residual heat and condensate recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H W; Tang, G H; Niu, D

    2016-06-07

    Recovery of both latent heat and condensate from boiler flue gas is significant for improving boiler efficiency and water conservation. The condensation experiments are carried out to investigate the simultaneous heat and mass transfer across the nanoporous ceramic membranes (NPCMs) which are treated to be hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces using the semicontinuous supercritical reactions. The effects of typical parameters including coolant flow rate, vapor/nitrogen gas mixture temperature, water vapor volume fraction and transmembrane pressure on heat and mass transfer performance are studied. The experimental results show that the hydrophilic NPCM exhibits higher performances of condensation heat transfer and condensate recovery. However, the hydrophobic modification results in remarkable degradation of heat and condensate recovery from the mixture. Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to establish a hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore/water liquid system, and the infiltration characteristics of the single hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore is revealed.

  12. Enhanced Condensation Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, John Winston

    The paper gives some personal observations on various aspects of enhanced condensation heat transfer. The topics discussed are external condensation (horizontal low-finned tubes and wire-wrapped tubes), internal condensation (microfin tubes and microchannels) and Marangoni condensation of binary mixtures.

  13. Tools for system validation. Dynamic modelling of the direct condenser at Sandvik II in Vaexjoe; Hjaelpmedel foer systemvalidering. Dynamisk modellering av direktkondensorn paa Sandvik II i Vaexjoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raaberg, Martin [Dynasim AB, Lund (Sweden); Tuszynski, Jan [Sycon Energikonsult AB, Malmoe (Sweden)

    2002-04-01

    The project reported here aimed to test the suitability of existing computer tools for modelling of energy processes. The suggested use for the models are at the early tests and validations of new, refurbished or modernised thermal plants. The technique presented in this report should be applicable for clarification of the scope of delivery and testing for both the process and tile control system. The validation process can thus be simplified, allowing risk reduction and predictability of the commissioning. The main delays and economical misfortune often occurs during commissioning. This report should prove the feasibility of the purchase routines where purchaser, vendor and quality inspection will use a common model of the process to validate system requirements and specifications. Later on it is used to validate structure and predefine testing. Thanks to agreement on the common model, early tests can be conducted on complex systems, minimizing the investment risks. The modelling reported here concerns the direct condenser at Sandvik 11, power and heating plant owned by Vaexjoe Energi AB in Sweden. We have chosen the direct condenser because it is an existing, well-documented and well-defined subsystem of high complexity in both structure and operation. Heavy transients made commissioning and test runs of similar condensers throughout Sweden costly and troublesome. The work resulted in an open, general, and physically correct model. The model can easily be re-dimensioned through physical parameters of common use. The control system modelled corresponds to the actual control system at the Sandvik II plant. Any improvement or deep validation of the controllers was not included in this work. The suitability is shown through four simulation cases. Three cases are based on a registered plant operation during a turbine trip. The first test case uses present plant data, the second an old steam valve actuator and the third uses the old actuator and an error in level

  14. LES of cavitating flow inside a Diesel injector including dynamic needle movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örley, F.; Hickel, S.; Schmidt, S. J.; Adams, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    We perform large-eddy simulations (LES) of the turbulent, cavitating flow inside a 9-hole solenoid common-rail injector including jet injection into gas during a full injection cycle. The liquid fuel, vapor, and gas phases are modelled by a homogeneous mixture approach. The cavitation model is based on a thermodynamic equilibrium assumption. The geometry of the injector is represented on a Cartesian grid by a conservative cut-element immersed boundary method. The strategy allows for the simulation of complex, moving geometries with sub-cell resolution. We evaluate the effects of needle movement on the cavitation characteristics in the needle seat and tip region during opening and closing of the injector. Moreover, we study the effect of cavitation inside the injector nozzles on primary jet break-up.

  15. Dynamic elastic-plastic behaviour of a frame including coupled bending and torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messmer, S.; Sayir, M.

    1989-01-01

    The full time response of a space frame under impact loading perpendicular to the frame plane is discussed. Theoretical solutions and experimental results are presented and compared. A space frame clamped at its two ends is loaded by a 0.22 lead bullet that hits a mass in the middle of the transversal beam of the frame. The loading time is about 40 to 60 μs and the resulting linear momentum of the impact in the experiment is 0.5 to 1 N s. The time response of this frame can be divided in four phases where different physical effects are dominant: (a) The loading phase where elastic wave motion dominates the time response. Because of the high impact forces, plastic deformation occurs in the vicinity of the mass and must be included in a theoretical model. The influence of reflections at the corners on the time response is shown in theory and experiment. (b) The evolution phase. Within this phase, a plastic collapse mechanism develops. Most of this phase is dominated by elastic deformation but local plastic deformations beside the mass are also present. Because many reflections at corners, clamps and the mass occur within this phase, a modal analysis method is used to predict time histories. (c) The plastic phase with plastic zones at the clamps. The phase sets in after the bending wave reaches the clamps. It is characterized by plastic deformation near the clamps and elastic deformation of the other parts of the frame. We used a modal analysis including plastic 'modes' to get accurate results. (d) The elastic vibration phase

  16. Three-dimensional parallel vortex rings in Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasovan, Lucian-Cornel; Perez-Garcia, Victor M.; Danaila, Ionut; Mihalache, Dumitru; Torner, Lluis

    2004-01-01

    We construct three-dimensional structures of topological defects hosted in trapped wave fields, in the form of vortex stars, vortex cages, parallel vortex lines, perpendicular vortex rings, and parallel vortex rings, and we show that the latter exist as robust stationary, collective states of nonrotating Bose-Einstein condensates. We discuss the stability properties of excited states containing several parallel vortex rings hosted by the condensate, including their dynamical and structural stability

  17. Capillary Condensation in Confined Media

    OpenAIRE

    Charlaix, Elisabeth; Ciccotti, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    28 pages - To appear in 2010 in the Handbook of Nanophysics - Vol 1 - Edited by Klaus Sattler - CRC Press; We review here the physics of capillary condensation of liquids in confined media, with a special regard to the application in nanotechnologies. The thermodynamics of capillary condensation and thin film adsorption are first exposed along with all the relevant notions. The focus is then shifted to the modelling of capillary forces, to their measurements techniques (including SFA, AFM and...

  18. Multistate electron transfer dynamics in the condensed phase: Exact calculations from the reduced hierarchy equations of motion approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Midori; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2010-01-01

    Multiple displaced oscillators coupled to an Ohmic heat bath are used to describe electron transfer (ET) in a dissipative environment. By performing a canonical transformation, the model is reduced to a multilevel system coupled to a heat bath with the Brownian spectral distribution. A reduced hierarchy equations of motion approach is introduced for numerically rigorous simulation of the dynamics of the three-level system with various oscillator configurations, for different nonadiabatic coupling strengths and damping rates, and at different temperatures. The time evolution of the reduced density matrix elements illustrates the interplay of coherences between the electronic and vibrational states. The ET reaction rates, defined as a flux-flux correlation function, are calculated using the linear response of the system to an external perturbation as a function of activation energy. The results exhibit an asymmetric inverted parabolic profile in a small activation regime due to the presence of the intermediate state between the reactant and product states and a slowly decaying profile in a large activation energy regime, which arises from the quantum coherent transitions.

  19. Laser-induced electron dynamics including photoionization: A heuristic model within time-dependent configuration interaction theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkusch, Stefan; Saalfrank, Peter; Klamroth, Tillmann

    2009-09-21

    We report simulations of laser-pulse driven many-electron dynamics by means of a simple, heuristic extension of the time-dependent configuration interaction singles (TD-CIS) approach. The extension allows for the treatment of ionizing states as nonstationary states with a finite, energy-dependent lifetime to account for above-threshold ionization losses in laser-driven many-electron dynamics. The extended TD-CIS method is applied to the following specific examples: (i) state-to-state transitions in the LiCN molecule which correspond to intramolecular charge transfer, (ii) creation of electronic wave packets in LiCN including wave packet analysis by pump-probe spectroscopy, and, finally, (iii) the effect of ionization on the dynamic polarizability of H(2) when calculated nonperturbatively by TD-CIS.

  20. Research progress of control of condensate depression for condenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Liang, Run; Li, Fengyu

    2017-08-01

    It is introduced that significance and structure of the condensate depression control system. In accordance with controller devised procedure, we analyze and elaborate how to construct the lumped parameter and dynamic mathematical model which possesses distinct physics significance. Neural network model being called black-box model is also introduced. We analyze and contrast the control technique of condensate depression as conventional PI control, fuzzy PI control and fuzzy control. It is indicated that if the controller of condensate depression were devised inappropriate, while the steam discharged of turbine varying by a large margin, would result in the rotation rate of cooling water circulating pump accelerating at a great lick even to trigger the galloping danger which is less impressive for the units operating safely.

  1. Mathematical multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system including mitral valve dynamics. Application to ischemic mitral insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moonen Marie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Valve dysfunction is a common cardiovascular pathology. Despite significant clinical research, there is little formal study of how valve dysfunction affects overall circulatory dynamics. Validated models would offer the ability to better understand these dynamics and thus optimize diagnosis, as well as surgical and other interventions. Methods A cardiovascular and circulatory system (CVS model has already been validated in silico, and in several animal model studies. It accounts for valve dynamics using Heaviside functions to simulate a physiologically accurate "open on pressure, close on flow" law. However, it does not consider real-time valve opening dynamics and therefore does not fully capture valve dysfunction, particularly where the dysfunction involves partial closure. This research describes an updated version of this previous closed-loop CVS model that includes the progressive opening of the mitral valve, and is defined over the full cardiac cycle. Results Simulations of the cardiovascular system with healthy mitral valve are performed, and, the global hemodynamic behaviour is studied compared with previously validated results. The error between resulting pressure-volume (PV loops of already validated CVS model and the new CVS model that includes the progressive opening of the mitral valve is assessed and remains within typical measurement error and variability. Simulations of ischemic mitral insufficiency are also performed. Pressure-Volume loops, transmitral flow evolution and mitral valve aperture area evolution follow reported measurements in shape, amplitude and trends. Conclusions The resulting cardiovascular system model including mitral valve dynamics provides a foundation for clinical validation and the study of valvular dysfunction in vivo. The overall models and results could readily be generalised to other cardiac valves.

  2. Recent developments in Bose-Einstein condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalman, G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper contains viewgraphs on developments on Bose-Einstein condensation. Some topics covered are: strongly coupled coulomb systems; standard response functions of the first and second kind; dynamical mean field theory; quasi localized charge approximation; and the main equations

  3. Recent developments in Bose-Einstein condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalman, G.

    1997-09-22

    This paper contains viewgraphs on developments on Bose-Einstein condensation. Some topics covered are: strongly coupled coulomb systems; standard response functions of the first and second kind; dynamical mean field theory; quasi localized charge approximation; and the main equations.

  4. Dynamic model of a micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell stack including an integrated cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Martin; Brouwer, Jacob; Winkler, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    A novel dynamic micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell (MT-SOFC) and stack model including an integrated cooling system is developed using a quasi three-dimensional, spatially resolved, transient thermodynamic, physical and electrochemical model that accounts for the complex geometrical relations between the cells and cooling-tubes. The modeling approach includes a simplified tubular geometry and stack design including an integrated cooling structure, detailed pressure drop and gas property calculations, the electrical and physical constraints of the stack design that determine the current, as well as control strategies for the temperature. Moreover, an advanced heat transfer balance with detailed radiative heat transfer between the cells and the integrated cooling-tubes, convective heat transfer between the gas flows and the surrounding structures and conductive heat transfer between the solid structures inside of the stack, is included. The detailed model can be used as a design basis for the novel MT-SOFC stack assembly including an integrated cooling system, as well as for the development of a dynamic system control strategy. The evaluated best-case design achieves very high electrical efficiency between around 75 and 55% in the entire power density range between 50 and 550 mW /cm2 due to the novel stack design comprising an integrated cooling structure.

  5. Condensate and feedwater systems, pumps, and water chemistry. Volume seven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Subject matter includes condensate and feedwater systems (general features of condensate and feedwater systems, condenser hotwell level control, condensate flow, feedwater flow), pumps (principles of fluid flow, types of pumps, centrifugal pumps, positive displacement pumps, jet pumps, pump operating characteristics) and water chemistry (water chemistry fundamentals, corrosion, scaling, radiochemistry, water chemistry control processes, water pretreatment, PWR water chemistry, BWR water chemistry, condenser circulating water chemistry

  6. Proceedings of the international symposium on atomic, molecular, and condensed matter theory and computational methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewdin, Per-Olov; Oehrn, N.Y.; Sabin, J.R.; Zerner, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    After an introduction and a personal (World War II and postwar) retrospective by C.C.J. Roothaan, 69 papers are presented in fields of quantum biology, quantum chemistry, and condensed matter physics; topics covered include advanced scientific computing, interaction of photons and matter, quantum molecular dynamics, electronic structure methods, polymeric systems, and quantum chemical methods for extended systems. An author index is included

  7. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biberian, Jean-Paul

    2006-02-01

    of analysis of Ti foil after glow discharge with deuterium / I. B. Savvatimova and D. V. Gavritenkov. Enhancement mechanisms of low-energy nuclear reactions / F. A. Gareev, I. E. Zhidkova, and Y. L. Ratis. Co-deposition of palladium with hydrogen isotopes / J. Dash and A. Ambadkar. Variation of the concentration of isotopes copper and zinc in human plasmas of patients affected by cancer / A. Triassi. Transmutation of metal at low energy in a confined plasma in water / D. Cirillo and V. Iorio. The conditions and realization of self-similar Coulomb collapse of condensed target and low-energy laboratory nucleosynthesis / S. V. Adamenko and V. I. Vysotskii. The spatial structure of water and the problem of controlled low-energy nuclear reactions in water matrix / V. I. Vysotskii and A. A. Kornilova. Experiments on controlled decontamination of water mixture of longlived active isotopes in biological cells / V. I. Vysotskii. Assessment of the biological effects of "strange" radiation / E. A. Pryakhin ... [et al.]. Possible nuclear transmutation of nitrogen in the earth's atmosphere / M. Fukuhara. Evidences on the occurrence of LENR-type processes in alchemical transmutations / J. Pérez-Pariente. History of the discovery of transmutation at Texas A&M University / J. O.-M. Bockris -- 4. Theory. Quantum electrodynamics. Concerning the modeling of systems in terms of quantum electro dynamics: the special case of "cold fusion" / M. Abyaneh ... [et al.]. Screening. Theoretical model of the probability of fusion between deuterons within deformed lattices with microcracks at room temperature / F. Fulvio. Resonant tunnelling. Effective interaction potential in the deuterium plasma and multiple resonance scattering / T. Toimela. Multiple scattering theory and condensed matter nuclear science - "super-absorption" in a crystal latice / X. Z. Li ... [et al.]. Ion band states. Framework for understanding LENR processes, using conventional condensed matter physics / S. R. Chubb. I

  8. Hydrophilic structures for condensation management in appliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehl, Steven John; Vonderhaar, John J.; Wu, Guolian; Wu, Mianxue

    2016-02-02

    An appliance that includes a cabinet having an exterior surface; a refrigeration compartment located within the cabinet; and a hydrophilic structure disposed on the exterior surface. The hydrophilic structure is configured to spread condensation. The appliance further includes a wicking structure located in proximity to the hydrophilic structure, and the wicking structure is configured to receive the condensation.

  9. Low pressure lithium condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadkins, R.P.; Oh, C.H.

    1985-01-01

    A low pressure experiment to evaluate the laminar film condensation coefficients of lithium was conducted. Some thirty-six different heat transfer tests were made at system pressures ranging from 1.3 to 26 Pa. Boiled lithium was condensed on the inside of a 7.6-cm (ID), 409 stainless-steel pipe. Condensed lithium was allowed to reflux back to the pool boiling region below the condensing section. Fourteen chromel/alumel thermocouples were attached in various regions of the condensing section. The thermocouples were initially calibrated with errors of less than one degree Celsius

  10. Development of Constraint Force Equation Methodology for Application to Multi-Body Dynamics Including Launch Vehicle Stage Seperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.; Toniolo, Matthew D.; Tartabini, Paul V.; Roithmayr, Carlos M.; Albertson, Cindy W.; Karlgaard, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this report is to develop and implement a physics based method for analysis and simulation of multi-body dynamics including launch vehicle stage separation. The constraint force equation (CFE) methodology discussed in this report provides such a framework for modeling constraint forces and moments acting at joints when the vehicles are still connected. Several stand-alone test cases involving various types of joints were developed to validate the CFE methodology. The results were compared with ADAMS(Registered Trademark) and Autolev, two different industry standard benchmark codes for multi-body dynamic analysis and simulations. However, these two codes are not designed for aerospace flight trajectory simulations. After this validation exercise, the CFE algorithm was implemented in Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2) to provide a capability to simulate end-to-end trajectories of launch vehicles including stage separation. The POST2/CFE methodology was applied to the STS-1 Space Shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB) separation and Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV) separation from the Pegasus booster as a further test and validation for its application to launch vehicle stage separation problems. Finally, to demonstrate end-to-end simulation capability, POST2/CFE was applied to the ascent, orbit insertion, and booster return of a reusable two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) vehicle concept. With these validation exercises, POST2/CFE software can be used for performing conceptual level end-to-end simulations, including launch vehicle stage separation, for problems similar to those discussed in this report.

  11. Ice condenser experimental plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannberg, L.D.; Piepel, G.F.; Owczarski, P.C.; Liebetrau, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental plan is being developed to validate the computer code ICEDF. The code was developed to estimate the extent of aerosol retention in the ice compartments of pressurized water reactor ice condenser containment systems during severe accidents. The development of the experimental plan began with review of available information on the conditions under which the code will be applied. Computer-generated estimates of thermohydraulic and aerosol conditions entering the ice condenser were evaluated and along with other information, used to generate design criteria. The design criteria have been used for preliminary test assembly design and for generation of statistical test designs. Consideration of the phenomena to be evaluated in the testing program, as well as equipment and measurement limitations, have led to changes in the design criteria and to subsequent changes in the test assembly design and statistical test design. The overall strategy in developing the experimental plan includes iterative generation and evaluation of candidate test designs using computer codes for statistical test design and ICEDF for estimation of experimental results. Estimates of experimental variability made prior to actual testing will be verified by replicate testing at preselected design points

  12. Stabilization of matter wave solitons in weakly coupled atomic condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radha, R.; Vinayagam, P.S.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a weakly coupled two component Bose–Einstein condensate and generate bright soliton solutions. We observe that when the bright solitons evolve in time, the density of the condensates shoots up suddenly by virtue of weak coupling indicating the onset of instability in the dynamical system. However, this instability can be overcome either through Feshbach resonance by tuning the temporal scattering length or by suitably changing the time dependent coupling coefficient, thereby extending the lifetime of the condensates.

  13. Vortices in a rotating dark matter condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Rotha P; Morgan, Michael J

    2002-01-01

    We examine vortices in a self-gravitating dark matter Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), consisting of ultra-low mass scalar bosons that arise during a late-time cosmological phase transition. Rotation of the dark matter BEC imprints a background phase gradient on the condensate, which establishes a harmonic trap potential for vortices. A numerical simulation of vortex dynamics shows that the vortex number density, n v ∝ r -1 , resulting in a flat velocity profile for the dark matter condensate. (letter to the editor)

  14. Soliton resonance in bose-einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Michail; Kulikov, I.

    2002-01-01

    A new phenomenon in nonlinear dispersive systems, including a Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC), has been described. It is based upon a resonance between an externally induced soliton and 'eigen-solitons' of the homogeneous cubic Schrodinger equation. There have been shown that a moving source of positive /negative potential induces bright /dark solitons in an attractive / repulsive Bose condensate.

  15. Condensate cleaning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Michiyoshi; Oosumi, Katsumi; Takashima, Yoshie; Mitani, Shinji.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the frequency for the backwash and regeneration operations due to the increase in the differential pressure resulted from claddings captured in a mixed floor type desalter, and decrease the amount of radioactive liquid wastes of claddings from the condensate systems by removing claddings with electromagnetic filters. Constitution: In an existent plant, a valves is disposed between a condensate pump and a mixed floor type desalter. A pipeway is branched from a condensate pipe between the condensate pipe and the valve, through which condensates are transferred by a pump to an electromagnetic filter such as of a high gradient type electromagntic filter to remove claddings, then returned to a condensate pipe between the valve and the mixed floor type desalter and, thereafter, are removed with ionic components in the mixed floor type desalter and fed to the reactor. (Yoshino, Y.)

  16. Purification method for condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoda, Akiyoshi.

    1996-01-01

    Condensates generated in secondary coolant circuits of a PWR type reactor are filtered using a hollow thread separation membranes comprising aromatic polyether ketone. Preferably, condensates after passing through a turbine are filtered at a place between a condensator and a steam generator at high temperature as close as a temperature of the steam generator. As the hollow thread membrane, partially crystalline membrane comprising aromatic polyether ketone is used. When it is used at high temperature, the crystallinity is preferably not less than 15wt%. Since a hollow thread membrane comprising the aromatic polyether ketone of excellent heat resistance is used, it can filter and purify the condensates at not lower than 70degC. Accordingly, impurities such as colloidal iron can be removed from the condensates, and the precipitation of cruds in the condensates to a steam generator and a turbine can be suppressed. (I.N.)

  17. Gluon condensation and modelling of quark confinement in QCD-motivated Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bel'kov, A.A.; Ebert, D.; Emel'yanenko, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    The possibility of modelling of a quark propagator without poles realizing quark confinement is considered on the basis of a nonperturbative gluon propagator including gluon condensation and a dynamical gluon mass. The property of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking is retained providing us with a reasonable pattern of low-lying meson properties. 2 figs.; 1 tab

  18. On inflation in the presence of a gaugino condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, Oleg; Papineau, Chloe

    2009-07-01

    We study the effect of inflation on gaugino condensation in supergravity. Unless the Hubble scale H is significantly below the gaugino condensation scale, the gaugino condensate is a dynamical variable which cannot be integrated out. For a sufficiently high H, the gaugino condensate evolves to zero which in turn leads to dilaton/moduli destabilization. In practice, this often occurs at the Hubble rate about an order of magnitude below the gaugino condensation scale. This effect is independent of the specifics of moduli stabilization and thus places model independent constraints on inflationary scenarios. It also applies more generally to any periods of fast expansion in the early Universe. (orig.)

  19. On inflation in the presence of a gaugino condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, Oleg; Papineau, Chloe; Postma, Marieke

    2010-01-01

    We study the effect of inflation on gaugino condensation in supergravity. Unless the Hubble scale H is significantly below the gaugino condensation scale, the gaugino condensate is a dynamical variable which cannot be integrated out. For a sufficiently high H, the gaugino condensate evolves to zero which in turn leads to dilaton/moduli destabilization. In practice, this often occurs at the Hubble rate about an order of magnitude below the gaugino condensation scale. This effect is independent of the specifics of moduli stabilization and thus places model-independent constraints on inflationary scenarios. It also applies more generally to any periods of fast expansion in the early Universe.

  20. On inflation in the presence of a gaugino condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, Oleg; Papineau, Chloe [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Postma, Marieke [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-07-15

    We study the effect of inflation on gaugino condensation in supergravity. Unless the Hubble scale H is significantly below the gaugino condensation scale, the gaugino condensate is a dynamical variable which cannot be integrated out. For a sufficiently high H, the gaugino condensate evolves to zero which in turn leads to dilaton/moduli destabilization. In practice, this often occurs at the Hubble rate about an order of magnitude below the gaugino condensation scale. This effect is independent of the specifics of moduli stabilization and thus places model independent constraints on inflationary scenarios. It also applies more generally to any periods of fast expansion in the early Universe. (orig.)

  1. On inflation in the presence of a gaugino condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, Oleg [DESY Theory Group, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Papineau, Chloe, E-mail: chloe.papineau@desy.d [DESY Theory Group, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Postma, Marieke [NIKHEF, Kruislaan 409, 1098 Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-02-08

    We study the effect of inflation on gaugino condensation in supergravity. Unless the Hubble scale H is significantly below the gaugino condensation scale, the gaugino condensate is a dynamical variable which cannot be integrated out. For a sufficiently high H, the gaugino condensate evolves to zero which in turn leads to dilaton/moduli destabilization. In practice, this often occurs at the Hubble rate about an order of magnitude below the gaugino condensation scale. This effect is independent of the specifics of moduli stabilization and thus places model-independent constraints on inflationary scenarios. It also applies more generally to any periods of fast expansion in the early Universe.

  2. Steam blowdown experiments with the condensation pool test rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purhonen, H.; Puustinen, M.; Laine, J.; Raesaenen, A.; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R.; Vihavainen, J.

    2005-01-01

    During a possible loss-of-coolant accident (Local) a large amount of non-condensable (nitrogen) and condensable (steam) gas is blown from the upper drywell of the containment to the condensation pool through the blowdown pipes at the boiling water reactors (BWRs). The wet well pool serves as the major heat sink for condensation of steam. The blowdown causes both dynamic and structural loads to the condensation pool. There might also be a risk that the gas discharging to the pool could push its way to the emergency core cooling systems (ECCS) and undermine their performance. (author)

  3. Dynamical behaviors of Rb-E2F pathway including negative feedback loops involving miR449.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fang; Liu, Haihong; Hao, Junjun; Liu, Zengrong

    2012-01-01

    MiRNAs, which are a family of small non-coding RNAs, regulate a broad array of physiological and developmental processes. However, their regulatory roles have remained largely mysterious. E2F is a positive regulator of cell cycle progression and also a potent inducer of apoptosis. Positive feedback loops in the regulation of Rb-E2F pathway are predicted and shown experimentally. Recently, it has been discovered that E2F induce a cluster of miRNAs called miR449. In turn, E2F is inhibited by miR449 through regulating different transcripts, thus forming negative feedback loops in the interaction network. Here, based on the integration of experimental evidence and quantitative data, we studied Rb-E2F pathway coupling the positive feedback loops and negative feedback loops mediated by miR449. Therefore, a mathematical model is constructed based in part on the model proposed in Yao-Lee et al. (2008) and nonlinear dynamical behaviors including the stability and bifurcations of the model are discussed. A comparison is given to reveal the implication of the fundamental differences of Rb-E2F pathway between regulation and deregulation of miR449. Coherent with the experiments it predicts that miR449 plays a critical role in regulating the cell cycle progression and provides a twofold safety mechanism to avoid excessive E2F-induced proliferation by cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Moreover, numerical simulation and bifurcation analysis shows that the mechanisms of the negative regulation of miR449 to three different transcripts are quite distinctive which needs to be verified experimentally. This study may help us to analyze the whole cell cycle process mediated by other miRNAs more easily. A better knowledge of the dynamical behaviors of miRNAs mediated networks is also of interest for bio-engineering and artificial control.

  4. Dynamical behaviors of Rb-E2F pathway including negative feedback loops involving miR449.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Yan

    Full Text Available MiRNAs, which are a family of small non-coding RNAs, regulate a broad array of physiological and developmental processes. However, their regulatory roles have remained largely mysterious. E2F is a positive regulator of cell cycle progression and also a potent inducer of apoptosis. Positive feedback loops in the regulation of Rb-E2F pathway are predicted and shown experimentally. Recently, it has been discovered that E2F induce a cluster of miRNAs called miR449. In turn, E2F is inhibited by miR449 through regulating different transcripts, thus forming negative feedback loops in the interaction network. Here, based on the integration of experimental evidence and quantitative data, we studied Rb-E2F pathway coupling the positive feedback loops and negative feedback loops mediated by miR449. Therefore, a mathematical model is constructed based in part on the model proposed in Yao-Lee et al. (2008 and nonlinear dynamical behaviors including the stability and bifurcations of the model are discussed. A comparison is given to reveal the implication of the fundamental differences of Rb-E2F pathway between regulation and deregulation of miR449. Coherent with the experiments it predicts that miR449 plays a critical role in regulating the cell cycle progression and provides a twofold safety mechanism to avoid excessive E2F-induced proliferation by cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Moreover, numerical simulation and bifurcation analysis shows that the mechanisms of the negative regulation of miR449 to three different transcripts are quite distinctive which needs to be verified experimentally. This study may help us to analyze the whole cell cycle process mediated by other miRNAs more easily. A better knowledge of the dynamical behaviors of miRNAs mediated networks is also of interest for bio-engineering and artificial control.

  5. Scrutinizing the pion condensed phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carignano, Stefano; Mammarella, Andrea; Mannarelli, Massimo [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Lepori, Luca [Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Padova (Italy); Universita dell' Aquila, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, Coppito-L' Aquila (Italy); Pagliaroli, Giulia [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    When the isospin chemical potential exceeds the pion mass, charged pions condense in the zero-momentum state forming a superfluid. Chiral perturbation theory provides a very powerful tool for studying this phase. However, the formalism that is usually employed in this context does not clarify various aspects of the condensation mechanism and makes the identification of the soft modes problematic. We re-examine the pion condensed phase using different approaches within the chiral perturbation theory framework. As a first step, we perform a low-density expansion of the chiral Lagrangian valid close to the onset of the Bose-Einstein condensation. We obtain an effective theory that can be mapped to a Gross-Pitaevskii Lagrangian in which, remarkably, all the coefficients depend on the isospin chemical potential. The low-density expansion becomes unreliable deep in the pion condensed phase. For this reason, we develop an alternative field expansion deriving a low-energy Lagrangian analog to that of quantum magnets. By integrating out the ''radial'' fluctuations we obtain a soft Lagrangian in terms of the Nambu-Goldstone bosons arising from the breaking of the pion number symmetry. Finally, we test the robustness of the second-order transition between the normal and the pion condensed phase when next-to-leading-order chiral corrections are included. We determine the range of parameters for turning the second-order phase transition into a first-order one, finding that the currently accepted values of these corrections are unlikely to change the order of the phase transition. (orig.)

  6. Supersymmetry breaking by gaugino condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    We briefly review the status and some of the recent work on supersymmetry breaking by gaugino condensation effects in the context of superstring theories. This issue is intimately related to the structure of the effective potential coming from superstrings. Minimization of this not only allows to find the scale of supersymmetry breaking, but also to determine dynamically other fundamental parameters of the theory, in particular the gauge coupling constant at the unification point and the expectation values of the moduli which give the size and shape of the compactified space. In a multiple condensate scenario these get reasonable values which may, in turn, lead to a determination of the family mass hierarchy. Some directions for future work are examined too. (author). 23 refs

  7. Condensed matter analogues of cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibble, Tom; Srivastava, Ajit

    2013-10-01

    It is always exciting when developments in one branch of physics turn out to have relevance in a quite different branch. It would be hard to find two branches farther apart in terms of energy scales than early-universe cosmology and low-temperature condensed matter physics. Nevertheless ideas about the formation of topological defects during rapid phase transitions that originated in the context of the very early universe have proved remarkably fruitful when applied to a variety of condensed matter systems. The mathematical frameworks for describing these systems can be very similar. This interconnection has led to a deeper understanding of the phenomena in condensed matter systems utilizing ideas from cosmology. At the same time, one can view these condensed matter analogues as providing, at least in a limited sense, experimental access to the phenomena of the early universe for which no direct probe is possible. As this special issue well illustrates, this remains a dynamic and exciting field. The basic idea is that when a system goes through a rapid symmetry-breaking phase transition from a symmetric phase into one with spontaneously broken symmetry, the order parameter may make different choices in different regions, creating domains that when they meet can trap defects. The scale of those domains, and hence the density of defects, is constrained by the rate at which the system goes through the transition and the speed with which order parameter information propagates. This is what has come to be known as the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The resultant scaling laws have now been tested in a considerable variety of different systems. The earliest experiments illustrating the analogy between cosmology and condensed matter were in liquid crystals, in particular on the isotropic-to-nematic transition, primarily because it is very easy to induce the phase transition (typically at room temperature) and to image precisely what is going on. This field remains one of the

  8. Systematic text condensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malterud, Kirsti

    2012-01-01

    To present background, principles, and procedures for a strategy for qualitative analysis called systematic text condensation and discuss this approach compared with related strategies.......To present background, principles, and procedures for a strategy for qualitative analysis called systematic text condensation and discuss this approach compared with related strategies....

  9. Bose-Einstein Condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaksch, D

    2003-01-01

    The Gross-Pitaevskii equation, named after one of the authors of the book, and its large number of applications for describing the properties of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in trapped weakly interacting atomic gases, is the main topic of this book. In total the monograph comprises 18 chapters and is divided into two parts. Part I introduces the notion of BEC and superfluidity in general terms. The most important properties of the ideal and the weakly interacting Bose gas are described and the effects of nonuniformity due to an external potential at zero temperature are studied. The first part is then concluded with a summary of the properties of superfluid He. In Part II the authors describe the theoretical aspects of BEC in harmonically trapped weakly interacting atomic gases. A short and rather rudimentary chapter on collisions and trapping of atomic gases which seems to be included for completeness only is followed by a detailed analysis of the ground state, collective excitations, thermodynamics, and vortices as well as mixtures of BECs and the Josephson effect in BEC. Finally, the last three chapters deal with topics of more recent interest like BEC in optical lattices, low dimensional systems, and cold Fermi gases. The book is well written and in fact it provides numerous useful and important relations between the different properties of a BEC and covers most of the aspects of ultracold weakly interacting atomic gases from the point of view of condensed matter physics. The book contains a comprehensive introduction to BEC for physicists new to the field as well as a lot of detail and insight for those already familiar with this area. I therefore recommend it to everyone who is interested in BEC. Very clearly however, the intention of the book is not to provide prospects for applications of BEC in atomic physics, quantum optics or quantum state engineering and therefore the more practically oriented reader might sometimes wonder why exactly an equation is

  10. Demonstration of Nautilus Centripetal Capillary Condenser Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, RIchard; Tang, Linh; Wambolt, Spencer; Golliher, Eric; Agui, Juan

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a proof of concept effort for development of a Nautilus Centripetal Capillary Condenser (NCCC or NC3) used for microgravity compatible water recovery from moist air with integral passive phase separation. Removal of liquid condensate from the air stream exiting a condenser is readily performed here on Earth. In order to perform this function in space however, without gravity or mechanical action, other tactics including utilization of inertial, drag and capillary forces are required. Within the NC3, liquid water forms via condensation on cold condenser surfaces as humid air passes along multiple spiral channels, each in its own plane, all together forming a stacked plate assembly. Non-mechanical inertial forces are employed to transfer condensate, as it forms, via centripetal action to the outer perimeter of each channel. A V-shaped groove, constructed on this outer edge of the spiral channel, increases local capillary forces thereby retaining the liquid. Air drag then pulls the liquid along to a collection region near the center of the device. Dry air produced by each parallel spiral channel is combined in a common orthogonal, out-of-plane conduit passing down the axial center of the stacked device. Similarly, the parallel condensate streams are combined and removed from the condenser/separator through yet another out-of-plane axial conduit. NC3 is an integration of conventional finned condenser operation, combined with static phase separation and capillary transport phenomena. A Mars' transit mission would be a logical application for this technology where gravity is absent and the use of vibrating, energy-intensive, motor-driven centrifugal separators is undesired. Here a vapor stream from either the Heat Melt Compactor or the Carbon dioxide Reduction Assembly, for example, would be dried to a dew point of 10 deg using a passive NC3 condenser/separator with the precious water condensate recycled to the water bus.

  11. Adult vaccination strategies for the control of pertussis in the United States: an economic evaluation including the dynamic population effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Coudeville

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prior economic evaluations of adult and adolescent vaccination strategies against pertussis have reached disparate conclusions. Using static approaches only, previous studies failed to analytically include the indirect benefits derived from herd immunity as well as the impact of vaccination on the evolution of disease incidence over time. METHODS: We assessed the impact of different pertussis vaccination strategies using a dynamic compartmental model able to consider pertussis transmission. We then combined the results with economic data to estimate the relative cost-effectiveness of pertussis immunization strategies for adolescents and adults in the US. The analysis compares combinations of programs targeting adolescents, parents of newborns (i.e. cocoon strategy, or adults of various ages. RESULTS: In the absence of adolescent or adult vaccination, pertussis incidence among adults is predicted to more than double in 20 years. Implementing an adult program in addition to childhood and adolescent vaccination either based on 1 a cocoon strategy and a single booster dose or 2 a decennial routine vaccination would maintain a low level of pertussis incidence in the long run for all age groups (respectively 30 and 20 cases per 100,000 person years. These strategies would also result in significant reductions of pertussis costs (between -77% and -80% including additional vaccination costs. The cocoon strategy complemented by a single booster dose is the most cost-effective one, whereas the decennial adult vaccination is slightly more effective in the long run. CONCLUSIONS: By providing a high level of disease control, the implementation of an adult vaccination program against pertussis appears to be highly cost-effective and often cost-saving.

  12. Chromosome condensation and segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viegas-Pequignot, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    Some aspects of chromosome condensation in mammalians -humans especially- were studied by means of cytogenetic techniques of chromosome banding. Two further approaches were adopted: a study of normal condensation as early as prophase, and an analysis of chromosome segmentation induced by physical (temperature and γ-rays) or chemical agents (base analogues, antibiotics, ...) in order to show out the factors liable to affect condensation. Here 'segmentation' means an abnormal chromosome condensation appearing systematically and being reproducible. The study of normal condensation was made possible by the development of a technique based on cell synchronization by thymidine and giving prophasic and prometaphasic cells. Besides, the possibility of inducing R-banding segmentations on these cells by BrdU (5-bromodeoxyuridine) allowed a much finer analysis of karyotypes. Another technique was developed using 5-ACR (5-azacytidine), it allowed to induce a segmentation similar to the one obtained using BrdU and identify heterochromatic areas rich in G-C bases pairs [fr

  13. Condensation in complex geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauro, F.

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical evaluation of the condensation exchange coefficient can only succeds for well specified cases: small upright or inclined plates, horizontal tubes, small height vertical tubes. Among the main hypotheses accounted for this mathematical development in the case of the condensate, a laminar flow and uniform surface temperature are always considered. In practice certain shapes of surfaces significantly increase the heat transfer during the vapor condensation on a surface wet by the condensate. Such surfaces are rough surfaces such as the condensate is submitted to surface tension effects, negligeable for plane or large curvature surfaces, and the nature of the material may play an important role (temperature gradients). Results from tests on tubes with special shapes, performed in France or out of France, are given [fr

  14. Holography, Gravity and Condensed Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartnoll, Sean [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2017-12-20

    Over the five years of funding from this grant, I produced 26 publications. These include a book-long monograph on "Holographic Quantum Matter" that is currently in press with MIT press. The remainder were mostly published in Physical Review Letters, the Journal of High Energy Physics, Nature Physics, Classical and Quantum Gravity and Physical Review B. Over this period, the field of holography applied to condensed matter physics developed from a promising theoretical approach to a mature conceptual and practical edifice, whose ideas were realized in experiments. My own work played a central role in this development. In particular, in the final year of this grant, I co-authored two experimental papers in which ideas that I had developed in earlier years were shown to usefully describe transport in strongly correlated materials — these papers were published in Science and in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (obviously my contribution to these papers was theoretical). My theoretical work in this period developed several new directions of research that have proven to be influential. These include (i) The construction of highly inhomogeneous black hole event horizons, realizing disordered fixed points and describing new regimes of classical gravity, (ii) The conjecture of a bound on diffusivities that could underpin transport in strongly interacting media — an idea which may be proven in the near future and has turned out to be intimately connected to studies of quantum chaos in black holes and strongly correlated media, (iii) The characterization of new forms of hydrodynamic transport, e.g. with phase-disordered order parameters. These studies pertain to key open questions in our understanding of how non-quasiparticle, intrinsically strongly interacting systems can behave. In addition to the interface between holography and strongly interacting condensed matter systems, I made several advances on understanding the role of entanglement in quantum

  15. Frustration in Condensed Matter and Protein Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Tanner, S.; Conroy, B.; Owens, F.; Tran, M. M.; Boekema, C.

    2014-03-01

    By means of computer modeling, we are studying frustration in condensed matter and protein folding, including the influence of temperature and Thomson-figure formation. Frustration is due to competing interactions in a disordered state. The key issue is how the particles interact to reach the lowest frustration. The relaxation for frustration is mostly a power function (randomly assigned pattern) or an exponential function (regular patterns like Thomson figures). For the atomic Thomson model, frustration is predicted to decrease with the formation of Thomson figures at zero kelvin. We attempt to apply our frustration modeling to protein folding and dynamics. We investigate the homogeneous protein frustration that would cause the speed of the protein folding to increase. Increase of protein frustration (where frustration and hydrophobicity interplay with protein folding) may lead to a protein mutation. Research is supported by WiSE@SJSU and AFC San Jose.

  16. Condensed matter research using pulsed neutron sources: a bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mildner, D.F.R.; Stirling, G.C.

    1976-05-01

    This report is an updated revision of RL-75-095 'Condensed Matter Research Using Pulsed Neutron Sources: A Bibliography'. As before, the survey lists published papers concerning (a) the production of high intensity neutron pulses suitable for thermal neutron scattering research, (b) moderating systems for neutron thermalization and pulse shaping, (c) techniques and instrumentation for diffraction and inelastic scattering at pulsed sources, and (d) their application to research problems concerning the structural and dynamical properties of condensed matter. Papers which deal with the white beam time-of-flight technique at steady state reactors have also been included. A number of scientists have brought to the author's attention papers which have been published since the previous edition. They are thanked and encouraged to continue the cooperation so that the bibliography may be updated periodically. (author)

  17. Including local rainfall dynamics and uncertain boundary conditions into a 2-D regional-local flood modelling cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez, María; Neal, Jeffrey C.; Bates, Paul D.; Coxon, Gemma; Freer, Jim E.; Cea, Luis; Puertas, Jerónimo

    2016-04-01

    Flood inundation models require appropriate boundary conditions to be specified at the limits of the domain, which commonly consist of upstream flow rate and downstream water level. These data are usually acquired from gauging stations on the river network where measured water levels are converted to discharge via a rating curve. Derived streamflow estimates are therefore subject to uncertainties in this rating curve, including extrapolating beyond the maximum observed ratings magnitude. In addition, the limited number of gauges in reach-scale studies often requires flow to be routed from the nearest upstream gauge to the boundary of the model domain. This introduces additional uncertainty, derived not only from the flow routing method used, but also from the additional lateral rainfall-runoff contributions downstream of the gauging point. Although generally assumed to have a minor impact on discharge in fluvial flood modeling, this local hydrological input may become important in a sparse gauge network or in events with significant local rainfall. In this study, a method to incorporate rating curve uncertainty and the local rainfall-runoff dynamics into the predictions of a reach-scale flood inundation model is proposed. Discharge uncertainty bounds are generated by applying a non-parametric local weighted regression approach to stage-discharge measurements for two gauging stations, while measured rainfall downstream from these locations is cascaded into a hydrological model to quantify additional inflows along the main channel. A regional simplified-physics hydraulic model is then applied to combine these inputs and generate an ensemble of discharge and water elevation time series at the boundaries of a local-scale high complexity hydraulic model. Finally, the effect of these rainfall dynamics and uncertain boundary conditions are evaluated on the local-scale model. Improvements in model performance when incorporating these processes are quantified using observed

  18. Atomistic modeling of dropwise condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikarwar, B. S., E-mail: bssikarwar@amity.edu; Singh, P. L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Amity University Uttar Pradesh, Noida (India); Muralidhar, K.; Khandekar, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, IIT Kanpur (India)

    2016-05-23

    The basic aim of the atomistic modeling of condensation of water is to determine the size of the stable cluster and connect phenomena occurring at atomic scale to the macroscale. In this paper, a population balance model is described in terms of the rate equations to obtain the number density distribution of the resulting clusters. The residence time is taken to be large enough so that sufficient time is available for all the adatoms existing in vapor-phase to loose their latent heat and get condensed. The simulation assumes clusters of a given size to be formed from clusters of smaller sizes, but not by the disintegration of the larger clusters. The largest stable cluster size in the number density distribution is taken to be representative of the minimum drop radius formed in a dropwise condensation process. A numerical confirmation of this result against predictions based on a thermodynamic model has been obtained. Results show that the number density distribution is sensitive to the surface diffusion coefficient and the rate of vapor flux impinging on the substrate. The minimum drop radius increases with the diffusion coefficient and the impinging vapor flux; however, the dependence is weak. The minimum drop radius predicted from thermodynamic considerations matches the prediction of the cluster model, though the former does not take into account the effect of the surface properties on the nucleation phenomena. For a chemically passive surface, the diffusion coefficient and the residence time are dependent on the surface texture via the coefficient of friction. Thus, physical texturing provides a means of changing, within limits, the minimum drop radius. The study reveals that surface texturing at the scale of the minimum drop radius does not provide controllability of the macro-scale dropwise condensation at large timescales when a dynamic steady-state is reached.

  19. Transient direct-contact condensation on liquid droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.; Nelson, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, direct-contact condensation on subcooled liquid droplets is studied in two parts. In the first part, simple design correlations for the condensation in a steady environment are developed based upon a conduction model. These correlations include the convective heat-transfer coefficient, condensation rate, total condensation, and the droplet-thermalization time. In the second part of the paper, the effect of a time-dependent saturation temperature on the condensation process is investigated. A rapid decrease in saturation temperature is typical of condensation environments in which the steam-supply rate is limited and condensation-induced depressurization becomes important. Design correlations are developed for condensation in an environment in which the saturation temperature decreases linearly with time. These correlations are graphically compared to the design correlations of the first part through a quasi-steady approach. The error associated with this approach is quantified as a function of the rate of change of the saturation temperature

  20. A two-dimensional model of the pressing section of a paper machine including dynamic capillary effects

    KAUST Repository

    Iliev, Oleg P.

    2013-05-15

    Paper production is a problem with significant importance for society; it is also a challenging topic for scientific investigation. This study is concerned with the simulation of the pressing section of a paper machine. A two-dimensional model is developed to account for the water flow within the pressing zone. A Richards-type equation is used to describe the flow in the unsaturated zone. The dynamic capillary pressure-saturation relation is adopted for the paper production process. The mathematical model accounts for the coexistence of saturated and unsaturated zones in a multilayer computational domain. The discretization is performed by the MPFA-O method. Numerical experiments are carried out for parameters that are typical of the production process. The static and dynamic capillary pressure-saturation relations are tested to evaluate the influence of the dynamic capillary effect. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  1. Condensation in Microchannels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ameel, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    .... Evaporators and condensers for meso-scale energy systems will most likely be constructed of microchannels due to the microfabrication constraints that limit most structures to two-dimensional planar geometries...

  2. Molecular equilibrium with condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, C.M.; Huebner, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    Minimization of the Gibbs energy of formation for species of chemical elements and compounds in their gas and condensed phases determines their relative abundances in a mixture in chemical equilibrium. The procedure is more general and more powerful than previous abundance determinations in multiphase astrophysical mixtures. Some results for astrophysical equations of state are presented, and the effects of condensation on opacity are briefly indicated. 18 refs

  3. SLAC synchronous condenser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corvin, C.

    1995-06-01

    A synchronous condenser is a synchronous machine that generates reactive power that leads real power by 90 degrees in phase. The leading reactive power generated by the condenser offsets or cancels the normal lagging reactive power consumed by inductive and nonlinear loads at the accelerator complex. The quality of SLAC's utility power is improved with the addition of the condenser. The inertia of the condenser's 35,000 pound rotor damps and smoothes voltage excursions on two 12 kilovolt master substation buses, improving voltage regulation site wide. The condenser absorbs high frequency transients and noise in effect ''scrubbing'' the electric system power at its primary distribution source. In addition, the condenser produces a substantial savings in power costs. Federal and investor owned utilities that supply electric power to SLAC levy a monthly penalty for lagging reactive power delivered to the site. For the 1993 fiscal year this totaled over $285,000 in added costs for the year. By generating leading reactive power on site, thereby reducing total lagging reactive power requirements, a substantial savings in electric utility bills is achieved. Actual savings of $150,000 or more a year are possible depending on experimental operations

  4. A two-dimensional model of the pressing section of a paper machine including dynamic capillary effects

    KAUST Repository

    Iliev, Oleg P.; Printsypar, Galina; Rief, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    is developed to account for the water flow within the pressing zone. A Richards-type equation is used to describe the flow in the unsaturated zone. The dynamic capillary pressure-saturation relation is adopted for the paper production process. The mathematical

  5. Theory of linear physical systems theory of physical systems from the viewpoint of classical dynamics, including Fourier methods

    CERN Document Server

    Guillemin, Ernst A

    2013-01-01

    An eminent electrical engineer and authority on linear system theory presents this advanced treatise, which approaches the subject from the viewpoint of classical dynamics and covers Fourier methods. This volume will assist upper-level undergraduates and graduate students in moving from introductory courses toward an understanding of advanced network synthesis. 1963 edition.

  6. Biomolecular condensates: organizers of cellular biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banani, Salman F; Lee, Hyun O; Hyman, Anthony A; Rosen, Michael K

    2017-05-01

    Biomolecular condensates are micron-scale compartments in eukaryotic cells that lack surrounding membranes but function to concentrate proteins and nucleic acids. These condensates are involved in diverse processes, including RNA metabolism, ribosome biogenesis, the DNA damage response and signal transduction. Recent studies have shown that liquid-liquid phase separation driven by multivalent macromolecular interactions is an important organizing principle for biomolecular condensates. With this physical framework, it is now possible to explain how the assembly, composition, physical properties and biochemical and cellular functions of these important structures are regulated.

  7. A combined multibody and finite element approach for dynamic interaction analysis of high-speed train and railway structure including post-derailment behavior during an earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, M; Wakui, H; Sogabe, M; Matsumoto, N; Tanabe, Y

    2010-01-01

    A combined multibody and finite element approach is given to solve the dynamic interaction of a Shinkansen train (high-speed train in Japan) and the railway structure including post-derailment during an earthquake effectively. The motion of the train is expressed in multibody dynamics. Efficient mechanical models to express interactions between wheel and track structure including post-derailment are given. Rail and track elements expressed in multibody dynamics and FEM are given to solve contact problems between wheel and long railway components effectively. The motion of a railway structure is modeled with various finite elements and rail and track elements. The computer program has been developed for the dynamic interaction analysis of a Shinkansen train and railway structure including post derailment during an earthquake. Numerical examples are demonstrated.

  8. Multi-shell model of ion-induced nucleic acid condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolokh, Igor S. [Department of Computer Science, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Drozdetski, Aleksander V. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Pollack, Lois [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-3501 (United States); Baker, Nathan A. [Advanced Computing, Mathematics, and Data Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Onufriev, Alexey V. [Department of Computer Science, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    We present a semi-quantitative model of condensation of short nucleic acid (NA) duplexes induced by trivalent cobalt(III) hexammine (CoHex) ions. The model is based on partitioning of bound counterion distribution around single NA duplex into “external” and “internal” ion binding shells distinguished by the proximity to duplex helical axis. In the aggregated phase the shells overlap, which leads to significantly increased attraction of CoHex ions in these overlaps with the neighboring duplexes. The duplex aggregation free energy is decomposed into attractive and repulsive components in such a way that they can be represented by simple analytical expressions with parameters derived from molecular dynamic simulations and numerical solutions of Poisson equation. The attractive term depends on the fractions of bound ions in the overlapping shells and affinity of CoHex to the “external” shell of nearly neutralized duplex. The repulsive components of the free energy are duplex configurational entropy loss upon the aggregation and the electrostatic repulsion of the duplexes that remains after neutralization by bound CoHex ions. The estimates of the aggregation free energy are consistent with the experimental range of NA duplex condensation propensities, including the unusually poor condensation of RNA structures and subtle sequence effects upon DNA condensation. The model predicts that, in contrast to DNA, RNA duplexes may condense into tighter packed aggregates with a higher degree of duplex neutralization. An appreciable CoHex mediated RNA-RNA attraction requires closer inter-duplex separation to engage CoHex ions (bound mostly in the “internal” shell of RNA) into short-range attractive interactions. The model also predicts that longer NA fragments will condense more readily than shorter ones. The ability of this model to explain experimentally observed trends in NA condensation lends support to proposed NA condensation picture based on the multivalent

  9. Capillary condensation in porous alumina observed by positronium lifetime spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Eugeniu; Vata, Ion; Toderian, Stefan; Dudu, Dorin; Rusen, Ion; Stefan, Nitisor

    2008-01-01

    The PALS method based on time distribution measurements has been used to study capillary condensation of different gases adsorbed in microporous alumina powder. The isotherms exhibit features which are associated with a shifted gas-liquid transition. The sorption and desorption processes are irreversible presenting a hysteresis effect. Suggestions on some new aspects of the capillary condensation dynamics are made

  10. A consistent analysis for the quark condensate in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zheng; Huang Tao

    1988-08-01

    The dynamical symmetry breaking in QCD is analysed based on the vacuum condensates. A self-consistent equation for the quark condensate (φ φ) is derived. A nontrivial solution for (φ φ) ≠ 0 is given in terms of the QCD scale parameter A

  11. Combined study of the gluon and ghost condensates μ2> and abccbcc> in Euclidean SU(2) Yang-Mills theory in the Landau gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capri, M.A.L.; Lemes, V.E.R.; Sobreiro, R.F.; Sorella, S.P.; Dudal, D.; Verschelde, H.; Gracey, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The ghost condensate abc c b c c > is considered together with the gluon condensate μ 2 > in SU(2) Euclidean Yang-Mills theories quantized in the Landau gauge. The vacuum polarization ceases to be transverse due to the nonvanishing condensate abc c b c c >. The gluon propagator itself remains transverse. By polarization effects, this ghost condensate induces then a splitting in the gluon mass parameter, which is dynamically generated through μ 2 >. The obtained effective masses are real when μ 2 > is included in the analysis. In the absence of μ 2 >, the already known result that the ghost condensate induces effective tachyonic masses is recovered. At the one-loop level, we find that the effective diagonal mass becomes smaller than the off-diagonal one. This might serve as an indication for some kind of Abelian dominance in the Landau gauge, similar to what happens in the maximal Abelian gauge

  12. The importance of including dynamic social networks when modeling epidemics of airborne infections: does increasing complexity increase accuracy?

    OpenAIRE

    Blower, Sally; Go, Myong-Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Mathematical models are useful tools for understanding and predicting epidemics. A recent innovative modeling study by Stehle and colleagues addressed the issue of how complex models need to be to ensure accuracy. The authors collected data on face-to-face contacts during a two-day conference. They then constructed a series of dynamic social contact networks, each of which was used to model an epidemic generated by a fast-spreading airborne pathogen. Intriguingly, Stehle and colleagu...

  13. Chiral Lagrangians and quark condensate in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delorme, J.; Chanfray, G.; Ericson, M.

    1996-03-01

    The evolution of density of quark condensate in nuclear medium with interacting nucleons, including the short range correlations is examined. Two chiral models are used, the linear sigma model and the non-linear one. It is shown that the quark condensate, as other observables, is independent on the variant selected. The application to physical pions excludes the linear sigma model as a credible one. The non-linear models restricted to pure s-wave pion-nucleon scattering are examined. (author)

  14. Water condensation on ultrahydrophobic flexible micro pillar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narhe, Ramchandra

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the growth dynamics of water drops in controlled condensation on ultrahydrophobic geometrically patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) cylindrical micro pillars. At the beginning, the condensed drops size is comparable to the pattern dimensions. The interesting phenomenon we observe is that, as the condensation progresses, water drops between the pillars become unstable and enforced to grow in the upward direction along the pillars surface. The capillary force of these drops is of the order of μ\\text{N} and acts on neighboring pillars. That results into bending of the pillars. Pillars bending enhances the condensation and favors the most energetically stable Wenzel state.

  15. Evaporation and condensation at a liquid surface. II. Methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro; Yasuoka, Kenji; Kataoka, Yosuke

    1994-11-01

    The rates of evaporation and condensation of methanol under the vapor-liquid equilibrium condition at the temperature of 300 and 350 K are investigated with a molecular dynamics computer simulation. Compared with the argon system (reported in part I), the ratio of self-reflection is similar (˜10%), but the ratio of molecule exchange is several times larger than the argon, which suggests that the conventional assumption of condensation as a unimolecular process completely fails for associating fluids. The resulting total condensation coefficient is 20%-25%, and has a quantitative agreement with a recent experiment. The temperature dependence of the evaporation-condensation behavior is not significant.

  16. A low cycle fatigue model for low carbon manganese steel including the effect of dynamic strain aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhi Yong, E-mail: huangzy@scu.edu.cn [Sichuan University, School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, No.29 Jiuyanqiao Wangjiang Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Wagner, Danièle [Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense (France); Wang, Qing Yuan; Khan, Muhammad Kashif [Sichuan University, School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, No.29 Jiuyanqiao Wangjiang Road, Chengdu 610064 (China); Chaboche, Jean–Louis [ONERA, DMSM, 29 avenue de la Division Lecerc, F-92320, Chatillon (France)

    2016-01-27

    Carbon–manganese steel A48 (French standards) is used in steam generator pipes of the nuclear power plant where it is subjected to the cyclic thermal load. The Dynamic Strain Aging (DSA) influences the mechanical behavior of the steel in low cycle fatigue (LCF) at favorable temperature and strain rate. The peak stress of A48 steel experiences hardening–softening–hardening (HSH) evolution at 200 °C and 0.4% s{sup −1} strain rate in fatigue loading. In this study, isotropic and kinematic hardening rules with DSA effect have been modified. The HSH evolution of cyclic stress associated with cumulative plastic deformation has also been estimated.

  17. Cytoskeletal Reorganization Drives Mesenchymal Condensation and Regulates Downstream Molecular Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulomi Ray

    Full Text Available Skeletal condensation occurs when specified mesenchyme cells self-organize over several days to form a distinctive cartilage template. Here, we determine how and when specified mesenchyme cells integrate mechanical and molecular information from their environment, forming cartilage condensations in the pharyngeal arches of chick embryos. By disrupting cytoskeletal reorganization, we demonstrate that dynamic cell shape changes drive condensation and modulate the response of the condensing cells to Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF, Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP and Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β signaling pathways. Rho Kinase (ROCK-driven actomyosin contractions and Myosin II-generated differential cell cortex tension regulate these cell shape changes. Disruption of the condensation process inhibits the differentiation of the mesenchyme cells into chondrocytes, demonstrating that condensation regulates the fate of the mesenchyme cells. We also find that dorsal and ventral condensations undergo distinct cell shape changes. BMP signaling is instructive for dorsal condensation-specific cell shape changes. Moreover, condensations exhibit ventral characteristics in the absence of BMP signaling, suggesting that in the pharyngeal arches ventral morphology is the ground pattern. Overall, this study characterizes the interplay between cytoskeletal dynamics and molecular signaling in a self-organizing system during tissue morphogenesis.

  18. Dynamics and Evolution of SO 2 Gas Condensation around Prometheus-like Volcanic Plumes on Io as Seen by the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douté, Sylvain; Lopes, Rosaly; Kamp, Lucas W.; Carlson, Robert; Schmitt, Bernard; Galileo NIMS Team

    2002-08-01

    We analyze a series of spectral image cubes acquired by the Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) over the Prometheus region of Io. We use SO 2 frost, a volatile compound ubiquitous on the surface, as a tracer to understand various thermodynamic and volcanic processes acting in this equatorial region. Here we develop a new method to derive, from the 12-wavelength NIMS products, the distribution and physical properties of solid SO 2. This method is based on the inversion of a bidirectional reflectance model on two observed spectral ratios sensitive to (1) the areal abundance of SO 2 and (2) its mean grain size. As a result, reliable and consistent maps of SO 2 abundance and granularity are obtained which can be correlated to distinguish four different physical units. The distribution of these SO 2 units indicates zones of condensation, metamorphism, and sublimation linked with the thermodynamic and volcanic processes of interest. Our maps depict equatorial plains undisturbed by any kind of vigorous volcanic activity over 35-40% of their surface. Elsewhere, 10-20% of the equatorial plains display abnormally low frost coverage which may imply the recent presence of positive thermal anomalies with temperatures in the range 110-200 K. Hot-spots such as Prometheus, Culann, Surya, and Tupan (to mention the most persistent) emit a great variety of gases, some of which will condense at Io's surface near their source regions. Associated fields of freshly condensed SO 2 are easily observed, and deposits of more refractory compounds with higher (e.g., S 8) or lower (e.g., NaCl) molecular weight must also be present (although their exact nature is unknown). Three different mechanisms of emission are proposed for the volatile compounds and supported by the distribution maps. These are (a) the interaction between flowing lava and preexisting volatile deposits on the surface, (b) direct degassing from the lava, an d (c) the eruption of a liquid aquifer from underground

  19. CONDENSATION OF WATER VAPOR IN A VERTICAL TUBE CONDENSER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Havlík

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of heat transfer in the process of condensation of water vapor in a vertical shell-and-tube condenser. We analyze the use of the Nusselt model for calculating the condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC inside a vertical tube and the Kern, Bell-Delaware and Stream-flow analysis methods for calculating the shell-side HTC from tubes to cooling water. These methods are experimentally verified for a specific condenser of waste process vapor containing air. The operating conditions of the condenser may be different from the assumptions adopted in the basic Nusselt theory. Modifications to the Nusselt condensation model are theoretically analyzed.

  20. The importance of including dynamic social networks when modeling epidemics of airborne infections: does increasing complexity increase accuracy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Myong-Hyun

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mathematical models are useful tools for understanding and predicting epidemics. A recent innovative modeling study by Stehle and colleagues addressed the issue of how complex models need to be to ensure accuracy. The authors collected data on face-to-face contacts during a two-day conference. They then constructed a series of dynamic social contact networks, each of which was used to model an epidemic generated by a fast-spreading airborne pathogen. Intriguingly, Stehle and colleagues found that increasing model complexity did not always increase accuracy. Specifically, the most detailed contact network and a simplified version of this network generated very similar results. These results are extremely interesting and require further exploration to determine their generalizability. Please see related article BMC Medicine, 2011, 9:87

  1. The importance of including dynamic social networks when modeling epidemics of airborne infections: does increasing complexity increase accuracy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Sally; Go, Myong-Hyun

    2011-07-19

    Mathematical models are useful tools for understanding and predicting epidemics. A recent innovative modeling study by Stehle and colleagues addressed the issue of how complex models need to be to ensure accuracy. The authors collected data on face-to-face contacts during a two-day conference. They then constructed a series of dynamic social contact networks, each of which was used to model an epidemic generated by a fast-spreading airborne pathogen. Intriguingly, Stehle and colleagues found that increasing model complexity did not always increase accuracy. Specifically, the most detailed contact network and a simplified version of this network generated very similar results. These results are extremely interesting and require further exploration to determine their generalizability.

  2. A moving boundary problem and orthogonal collocation in solving a dynamic liquid surfactant membrane model including osmosis and breakage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.C. Biscaia Junior

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic kinetic-diffusive model for the extraction of metallic ions from aqueous liquors using liquid surfactant membranes is proposed. The model incorporates undesirable intrinsic phenomena such as swelling and breakage of the emulsion globules that have to be controlled during process operation. These phenomena change the spatial location of the chemical reaction during the course of extraction, resulting in a transient moving boundary problem. The orthogonal collocation method was used to transform the partial differential equations into an ordinary differential equation set that was solved by an implicit numerical routine. The model was found to be numerically stable and reliable in predicting the behaviour of zinc extraction with acidic extractant for long residence times.

  3. Containment condensing heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gido, R.G.; Koestel, A.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents a mechanistic heat-transfer model that is valid for large scale containment heat sinks. The model development is based on the determination that the condensation is controlled by mass diffusion through the vapor-air boundary layer, and the application of the classic Reynolds' analogy to formulate expressions for the transfer of heat and mass based on hydrodynamic measurements of the momentum transfer. As a result, the analysis depends on the quantification of the shear stress (momentum transfer) at the interface between the condensate film and the vapor-air boundary layer. In addition, the currently used Tagami and Uchida test observations and their range of applicability are explained

  4. Decay of non-equilibrium polariton condensate in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beloussov, I.V.; Shvera, Y.M.

    1993-08-01

    Excitation dynamics of polariton quantum fluctuations arising in direct-gap semi-conductor as a result of parametric decay of non-equilibrium polariton condensate with non-zero wave vector is studied. The predominant mechanism of polariton scattering is supposed to be exciton-exciton interaction. Steady state which corresponds to the case of dynamic equilibrium between the polariton condensate and quantum fluctuations is obtained. Distribution functions of non-condensate polaritons are localized in the resonant regions, corresponding to two-particle excitation of polaritons from the condensate. The spectrum of elementary excitations in steady state coincides with usual polariton energy with the shift proportional to initial density of polariton condensate. (author). 25 refs

  5. Simulation of Escherichia coli Dynamics in Biofilms and Submerged Colonies with an Individual-Based Model Including Metabolic Network Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Ignace L M M; Nimmegeers, Philippe; Akkermans, Simen; Hashem, Ihab; Van Impe, Jan F M

    2017-01-01

    Clustered microbial communities are omnipresent in the food industry, e.g., as colonies of microbial pathogens in/on food media or as biofilms on food processing surfaces. These clustered communities are often characterized by metabolic differentiation among their constituting cells as a result of heterogeneous environmental conditions in the cellular surroundings. This paper focuses on the role of metabolic differentiation due to oxygen gradients in the development of Escherichia coli cell communities, whereby low local oxygen concentrations lead to cellular secretion of weak acid products. For this reason, a metabolic model has been developed for the facultative anaerobe E. coli covering the range of aerobic, microaerobic, and anaerobic environmental conditions. This metabolic model is expressed as a multiparametric programming problem, in which the influence of low extracellular pH values and the presence of undissociated acid cell products in the environment has been taken into account. Furthermore, the developed metabolic model is incorporated in MICRODIMS, an in-house developed individual-based modeling framework to simulate microbial colony and biofilm dynamics. Two case studies have been elaborated using the MICRODIMS simulator: (i) biofilm growth on a substratum surface and (ii) submerged colony growth in a semi-solid mixed food product. In the first case study, the acidification of the biofilm environment and the emergence of typical biofilm morphologies have been observed, such as the mushroom-shaped structure of mature biofilms and the formation of cellular chains at the exterior surface of the biofilm. The simulations show that these morphological phenomena are respectively dependent on the initial affinity of pioneer cells for the substratum surface and the cell detachment process at the outer surface of the biofilm. In the second case study, a no-growth zone emerges in the colony center due to a local decline of the environmental pH. As a result

  6. Simulation of Escherichia coli Dynamics in Biofilms and Submerged Colonies with an Individual-Based Model Including Metabolic Network Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignace L. M. M. Tack

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Clustered microbial communities are omnipresent in the food industry, e.g., as colonies of microbial pathogens in/on food media or as biofilms on food processing surfaces. These clustered communities are often characterized by metabolic differentiation among their constituting cells as a result of heterogeneous environmental conditions in the cellular surroundings. This paper focuses on the role of metabolic differentiation due to oxygen gradients in the development of Escherichia coli cell communities, whereby low local oxygen concentrations lead to cellular secretion of weak acid products. For this reason, a metabolic model has been developed for the facultative anaerobe E. coli covering the range of aerobic, microaerobic, and anaerobic environmental conditions. This metabolic model is expressed as a multiparametric programming problem, in which the influence of low extracellular pH values and the presence of undissociated acid cell products in the environment has been taken into account. Furthermore, the developed metabolic model is incorporated in MICRODIMS, an in-house developed individual-based modeling framework to simulate microbial colony and biofilm dynamics. Two case studies have been elaborated using the MICRODIMS simulator: (i biofilm growth on a substratum surface and (ii submerged colony growth in a semi-solid mixed food product. In the first case study, the acidification of the biofilm environment and the emergence of typical biofilm morphologies have been observed, such as the mushroom-shaped structure of mature biofilms and the formation of cellular chains at the exterior surface of the biofilm. The simulations show that these morphological phenomena are respectively dependent on the initial affinity of pioneer cells for the substratum surface and the cell detachment process at the outer surface of the biofilm. In the second case study, a no-growth zone emerges in the colony center due to a local decline of the environmental p

  7. Vortices in trapped Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, B.

    2000-09-01

    In this thesis we solve the Gross-Pitaevskii equation numerically in order to model the response of trapped Bose-Einstein condensed gases to perturbations by electromagnetic fields. First, we simulate output coupling of pulses from the condensate and compare our results to experiments. The excitation and separation of eigenmodes on flow through a constriction is also studied. We then move on to the main theme of this thesis: the important subject of quantised vortices in Bose condensates, and the relation between Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluidity. We propose methods of producing vortex pairs and rings by controlled motion of objects. Full three-dimensional simulations under realistic experimental conditions are performed in order to test the validity of these ideas. We link vortex formation to drag forces on the object, which in turn is connected with energy transfer to the condensate. We therefore argue that vortex formation by moving objects is intimately related to the onset of dissipation in superfluids. We discuss this idea in the context of a recent experiment, using simulations to provide evidence of vortex formation in the experimental scenario. Superfluidity is also manifest in the property of persistent currents, which is linked to vortex stability and dynamics. We simulate vortex line and ring motion, and find in both cases precessional motion and thermodynamic instability to dissipation. Strictly speaking, the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is valid only for temperatures far below the BEC transition. We end the thesis by describing a simple finite-temperature model to describe mean-field coupling between condensed and non-condensed components of the gas. We show that our hybrid Monte-Carlo/FFT technique can describe damping of the lowest energy excitations of the system. Extensions to this model and future research directions are discussed in the conclusion. (author)

  8. Quantum condensation from a tailored exciton population in a microcavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham, P. R.; Phillips, R. T.

    2009-01-01

    An experiment is proposed on the coherent quantum dynamics of a semiconductor microcavity containing quantum dots. Modeling the experiment using a generalized Dicke model, we show that a tailored excitation pulse can create an energy-dependent population of excitons, which subsequently evolves to a quantum condensate of excitons and photons. The population is created by a generalization of adiabatic rapid passage and then condenses due to a dynamical analog of the BCS instability.

  9. Dynamics of entanglement of a three-level atom in motion interacting with two coupled modes including parametric down conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, M. J.; Tavassoly, M. K.; Hatami, M.

    In this paper, a model by which we study the interaction between a motional three-level atom and two-mode field injected simultaneously in a bichromatic cavity is considered; the three-level atom is assumed to be in a Λ-type configuration. As a result, the atom-field and the field-field interaction (parametric down conversion) will be appeared. It is shown that, by applying a canonical transformation, the introduced model can be reduced to a well-known form of the generalized Jaynes-Cummings model. Under particular initial conditions, which may be prepared for the atom and the field, the time evolution of state vector of the entire system is analytically evaluated. Then, the dynamics of atom by considering ‘atomic population inversion’ and two different measures of entanglement, i.e., ‘von Neumann entropy’ and ‘idempotency defect’ is discussed, in detail. It is deduced from the numerical results that, the duration and the maximum amount of the considered physical quantities can be suitably tuned by selecting the proper field-mode structure parameter p and the detuning parameters.

  10. Creating nanoscale emulsions using condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Ingrid F; Anand, Sushant; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2017-11-08

    Nanoscale emulsions are essential components in numerous products, ranging from processed foods to novel drug delivery systems. Existing emulsification methods rely either on the breakup of larger droplets or solvent exchange/inversion. Here we report a simple, scalable method of creating nanoscale water-in-oil emulsions by condensing water vapor onto a subcooled oil-surfactant solution. Our technique enables a bottom-up approach to forming small-scale emulsions. Nanoscale water droplets nucleate at the oil/air interface and spontaneously disperse within the oil, due to the spreading dynamics of oil on water. Oil-soluble surfactants stabilize the resulting emulsions. We find that the oil-surfactant concentration controls the spreading behavior of oil on water, as well as the peak size, polydispersity, and stability of the resulting emulsions. Using condensation, we form emulsions with peak radii around 100 nm and polydispersities around 10%. This emulsion formation technique may open different routes to creating emulsions, colloidal systems, and emulsion-based materials.

  11. The Design, Synthesis, and Study of Solid-State Molecular Rotors: Structure/Function Relationships for Condensed-Phase Anisotropic Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsberg, Cortnie Sue

    Amphidynamic crystals are an extremely promising platform for the development of artificial molecular machines and stimuli-responsive materials. In analogy to skeletal muscle, their function will rely upon the collective operation of many densely packed molecular machines (i.e. actin-bound myosin) that are self-assembled in a highly organized anisotropic medium. By choosing lattice-forming elements and moving "parts" with specific functionalities, individual molecular machines may be synthesized and self-assembled in order to carry out desirable functions. In recent years, efforts in the design of amphidynamic materials based on molecular gyroscopes and compasses have shown that a certain amount of free volume is essential to facilitate internal rotation and reorientation within a crystal. In order to further establish structure/function relationships to advance the development of increasingly complex molecular machinery, molecular rotors and a molecular "spinning" top were synthesized and incorporated into a variety of solid-state architectures with different degrees of periodicity, dimensionality, and free volume. Specifically, lamellar molecular crystals, hierarchically ordered periodic mesoporous organosilicas, and metal-organic frameworks were targeted for the development of solid-state molecular machines. Using an array of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques, the dynamic properties of these novel molecular machine assemblies were determined and correlated with their corresponding structural features. It was found that architecture type has a profound influence on functional dynamics. The study of layered molecular crystals, composed of either molecular rotors or "spinning" tops, probed functional dynamics within dense, highly organized environments. From their study, it was discovered that: 1) crystallographically distinct sites may be utilized to differentiate machine function, 2) halogen bonding interactions are sufficiently

  12. Vapor condensation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Manabu; Hirayama, Fumio; Kurosawa, Setsumi; Yoshikawa, Jun; Hosaka, Seiichi.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention enables to separate and remove 14 C as CO 3 - ions without condensation in a vapor condensation can of a nuclear facility. That is, the vapor condensation device of the nuclear facility comprises (1) a spray pipe for spraying an acidic aqueous solution to the evaporation surface of an evaporation section, (2) a spray pump for sending the acidic aqueous solution to the spray pipe, (3) a tank for storing the acidic aqueous solution, (4) a pH sensor for detecting pH of the evaporation section, (5) a pH control section for controlling the spray pump, depending on the result of the detection of the pH sensor. With such a constitution, the pH of liquid wastes on the vaporization surface is controlled to 7 by spraying an aqueous solution of dilute sulfuric acid to the evaporation surface, thereby enabling to increase the transfer rate of 14 C to condensates to 60 to 70%. If 14 C is separated and removed as a CO 2 gas from the evaporation surface, the pH of the liquid wastes returns to the alkaline range of 9 to 10 and the liquid wastes are returned to a heating section. The amount of spraying the aqueous solution of dilute sulfuric acid can be controlled till the pH is reduced to 5. (I.S.)

  13. Condensed matter physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The condensed matter physics research in the Physics Department of Risoe National Laboratory is predominantly experimental utilising diffraction of neutrons and x-rays. The research topics range from studies of structure, excitations and phase transitions in model systems to studies of ion transport, texture and recrystallization kinetics with a more applied nature. (author)

  14. Bose-Einstein Condensation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    absolute zero. These ideas had ... Everybody is talking about Bose-Einstein condensation. This discovery ... needed if we want to find the probability distribution of the x- ... Boltzmann took two approaches to the problem, both of them deep and ...

  15. Condensed matter physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This is a summary of condensed matter physics in Brazil. It discusses as well, the perspectives and financing evolved in this research area for the next decade. It is specially concerned with semiconductors, magnetic materials, superconductivity, polymers, glasses, crystals ceramics, statistical physics, magnetic resonance and Moessbauer spectroscopy. (A.C.A.S.)

  16. Modelling of film condensation in presence of non condensable gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genevieve Geffraye; Dominique Bestion; Vladimir Kalitvianski

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: This paper presents recent developments in the modelling of the condensation due to heat removal from a wall with a possible presence of hydrogen, nitrogen, or air. This work is mainly concerned with nuclear reactor safety with particular reference to situations related to new reactor design, cold shutdown state and severe accident analysis. Film condensation of steam in presence of nitrogen and helium in a tube has been investigated in the COTURNE experiment in a rather large range of parameters, pressure (from 0.1 to 7 Mpa), heat flux (0.1 to 6 W/cm 2 ), mass fraction of noncondensable gas (0 to 1) and also in presence of superheated steam. The experiment represents a Steam Generator tube of a Pressurised Water Reactor and can simulate both co-current or countercurrent flow of steam and water.The models are implemented in the CATHARE code used for nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics. The code uses two mass balance equations for liquid and gas, two momentum balance equations for liquid and gas and two energy balance equations for liquid and gas. Additional mass transport equations can be added for each non condensable gas. Heat transfers from wall to liquid film, from liquid to interface and gas to interface are modelled. The liquid film heat transfer coefficient is first investigated in pure saturated steam conditions in the pressure range from 0.1 to 7 Mpa. The CATHARE film condensation model in pure steam conditions is derived from Chen's correlation. Chen proposes a general correlation for the film condensation, covering the wavy-laminar and the turbulent film regimes and taking into account the interfacial friction effect. A large data base of laminar film regime was used including COTURNE data other available data found in the literature. The analysis of these data base suggests an influence of the liquid Reynolds number, according to the Nusselt theory, and also of the Eoetvoes number, with surface tension effects. A

  17. Preventing freezing of condensate inside tubes of air cooled condenser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Jeong A; Hwang, In Hwan; Lee, Dong Hwan; Cho, Young Il

    2012-01-01

    An air cooled condenser is a device that is used for converting steam into condensate by using ambient air. The air cooled condenser is prone to suffer from a serious explosion when the condensate inside the tubes of a heat exchanger is frozen; in particular, tubes can break during winter. This is primarily due to the structural problem of the tube outlet of an existing conventional air cooled condenser system, which causes the backflow of residual steam and noncondensable gases. To solve the backflow problem in such condensers, such a system was simulated and a new system was designed and evaluated in this study. The experimental results using the simulated condenser showed the occurrence of freezing because of the backflow inside the tube. On the other hand, no backflow and freezing occurred in the advanced new condenser, and efficient heat exchange occurred

  18. Chemical equilibrium of ablation materials including condensed species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, C. W.; Brinkley, K. L.

    1975-01-01

    Equilibrium is determined by finding chemical composition with minimum free energy. Method of steepest descent is applied to quadratic representation of free-energy surface. Solution is initiated by selecting arbitrary set of mole fractions, from which point on free-energy surface is computed.

  19. EEGLAB: an open source toolbox for analysis of single-trial EEG dynamics including independent component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, Arnaud; Makeig, Scott

    2004-03-15

    We have developed a toolbox and graphic user interface, EEGLAB, running under the crossplatform MATLAB environment (The Mathworks, Inc.) for processing collections of single-trial and/or averaged EEG data of any number of channels. Available functions include EEG data, channel and event information importing, data visualization (scrolling, scalp map and dipole model plotting, plus multi-trial ERP-image plots), preprocessing (including artifact rejection, filtering, epoch selection, and averaging), independent component analysis (ICA) and time/frequency decompositions including channel and component cross-coherence supported by bootstrap statistical methods based on data resampling. EEGLAB functions are organized into three layers. Top-layer functions allow users to interact with the data through the graphic interface without needing to use MATLAB syntax. Menu options allow users to tune the behavior of EEGLAB to available memory. Middle-layer functions allow users to customize data processing using command history and interactive 'pop' functions. Experienced MATLAB users can use EEGLAB data structures and stand-alone signal processing functions to write custom and/or batch analysis scripts. Extensive function help and tutorial information are included. A 'plug-in' facility allows easy incorporation of new EEG modules into the main menu. EEGLAB is freely available (http://www.sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab/) under the GNU public license for noncommercial use and open source development, together with sample data, user tutorial and extensive documentation.

  20. Mean-field dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a time-dependent triple-well trap: Nonlinear eigenstates, Landau-Zener models, and stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graefe, E. M.; Korsch, H. J.; Witthaut, D.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a triple-well trap in a three-level approximation. The interatomic interactions are taken into account in a mean-field approximation (Gross-Pitaevskii equation), leading to a nonlinear three-level model. Additional eigenstates emerge due to the nonlinearity, depending on the system parameters. Adiabaticity breaks down if such a nonlinear eigenstate disappears when the parameters are varied. The dynamical implications of this loss of adiabaticity are analyzed for two important special cases: A three-level Landau-Zener model and the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) scheme. We discuss the emergence of looped levels for an equal-slope Landau-Zener model. The Zener tunneling probability does not tend to zero in the adiabatic limit and shows pronounced oscillations as a function of the velocity of the parameter variation. Furthermore we generalize the STIRAP scheme for adiabatic coherent population transfer between atomic states to the nonlinear case. It is shown that STIRAP breaks down if the nonlinearity exceeds the detuning

  1. Gluon transport equation in the small angle approximation and the onset of Bose–Einstein condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul; Liao, Jinfeng; McLerran, Larry

    2014-01-01

    To understand the evolution of a dense system of gluons, such as those produced in the early stages of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions, is an important and challenging problem. We describe the approach to thermal equilibrium using the small angle approximation for gluon scattering in a Boltzmann equation that includes the effects of Bose statistics. The role of Bose statistical factors in amplifying the rapid growth of the population of the soft modes is essential. With these factors properly taken into account, one finds that elastic scattering alone provides an efficient mechanism for populating soft modes, and in fact leads to rapid infrared local thermalization. Furthermore, recent developments suggest that high initial overpopulation plays a key role and may lead to dynamical Bose–Einstein condensation. The kinetics of condensation is an interesting problem in itself. By solving the transport equation for initial conditions with a large enough initial phase-space density the equilibrium state contains a Bose condensate, and we present numerical evidence that such over-occupied systems reach the onset of Bose–Einstein condensation in a finite time. It is also found that the approach to condensation is characterized by a scaling behavior. Finally we discuss a number of extensions of the present study

  2. Gluon transport equation in the small angle approximation and the onset of Bose–Einstein condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul [Institut de Physique Théorique, CNRS/URA 2306, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Liao, Jinfeng [Physics Dept. and CEEM, Indiana University, 2401 N Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); RIKEN BNL Research Center, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); McLerran, Larry [Physics Dept., Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); RIKEN BNL Research Center, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Physics Department, China Central Normal University, Wuhan (China)

    2014-11-15

    To understand the evolution of a dense system of gluons, such as those produced in the early stages of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions, is an important and challenging problem. We describe the approach to thermal equilibrium using the small angle approximation for gluon scattering in a Boltzmann equation that includes the effects of Bose statistics. The role of Bose statistical factors in amplifying the rapid growth of the population of the soft modes is essential. With these factors properly taken into account, one finds that elastic scattering alone provides an efficient mechanism for populating soft modes, and in fact leads to rapid infrared local thermalization. Furthermore, recent developments suggest that high initial overpopulation plays a key role and may lead to dynamical Bose–Einstein condensation. The kinetics of condensation is an interesting problem in itself. By solving the transport equation for initial conditions with a large enough initial phase-space density the equilibrium state contains a Bose condensate, and we present numerical evidence that such over-occupied systems reach the onset of Bose–Einstein condensation in a finite time. It is also found that the approach to condensation is characterized by a scaling behavior. Finally we discuss a number of extensions of the present study.

  3. Bose Condensate in He II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Condensate Saga, now halfway through its fifth decade, is reviewed. The recent neutron-scattering work which has at last convincingly established that there is indeed a Bose Condensate in He II is described

  4. Maintaining steam/condensate lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russum, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Steam and condensate systems must be maintained with the same diligence as the boiler itself. Unfortunately, they often are not. The water treatment program, critical to keeping the boiler at peak efficiency and optimizing operating life, should not stop with the boiler. The program must encompass the steam and condensate system as well. A properly maintained condensate system maximizes condensate recovery, which is a cost-free energy source. The fuel needed to turn the boiler feedwater into steam has already been provided. Returning the condensate allows a significant portion of that fuel cost to be recouped. Condensate has a high heat content. Condensate is a readily available, economical feedwater source. Properly treated, it is very pure. Condensate improves feedwater quality and reduces makeup water demand and pretreatment costs. Higher quality feedwater means more reliable boiler operation

  5. Trichoderma virens β-glucosidase I (BGLI) gene; expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae including docking and molecular dynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Gammadde Hewa Ishan Maduka; Rathnayake, Pilimathalawe Panditharathna Attanayake Mudiyanselage Samith Indika; Chandrasekharan, Naduviladath Vishvanath; Weerasinghe, Mahindagoda Siril Samantha; Wijesundera, Ravindra Lakshman Chundananda; Wijesundera, Wijepurage Sandhya Sulochana

    2017-06-21

    between the amino acid residues of BGLI and cellobiose are mainly involved in the integrity of enzyme-substrate association. The BGLI activity was remarkably higher in the genomic DNA clone compared to the cDNA clone. Cellobiose was successfully fermented into ethanol by the recombinant S.cerevisiae genomic DNA clone. It has the potential to be used in the industrial production of ethanol as it is capable of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellobiose. Homology modeling, docking studies and molecular dynamics simulation studies will provide a realistic model for further studies in the modification of active site residues which could be followed by mutation studies to improve the catalytic action of BGLI.

  6. Continuous condensation in nanogrooves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2018-05-01

    We consider condensation in a capillary groove of width L and depth D , formed by walls that are completely wet (contact angle θ =0 ), which is in a contact with a gas reservoir of the chemical potential μ . On a mesoscopic level, the condensation process can be described in terms of the midpoint height ℓ of a meniscus formed at the liquid-gas interface. For macroscopically deep grooves (D →∞ ), and in the presence of long-range (dispersion) forces, the condensation corresponds to a second-order phase transition, such that ℓ ˜(μcc-μ ) -1 /4 as μ →μcc - where μc c is the chemical potential pertinent to capillary condensation in a slit pore of width L . For finite values of D , the transition becomes rounded and the groove becomes filled with liquid at a chemical potential higher than μc c with a difference of the order of D-3. For sufficiently deep grooves, the meniscus growth initially follows the power law ℓ ˜(μcc-μ ) -1 /4 , but this behavior eventually crosses over to ℓ ˜D -(μ-μc c) -1 /3 above μc c, with a gap between the two regimes shown to be δ ¯μ ˜D-3 . Right at μ =μc c , when the groove is only partially filled with liquid, the height of the meniscus scales as ℓ*˜(D3L) 1 /4 . Moreover, the chemical potential (or pressure) at which the groove is half-filled with liquid exhibits a nonmonotonic dependence on D with a maximum at D ≈3 L /2 and coincides with μc c when L ≈D . Finally, we show that condensation in finite grooves can be mapped on the condensation in capillary slits formed by two asymmetric (competing) walls a distance D apart with potential strengths depending on L . All these predictions, based on mesoscopic arguments, are confirmed by fully microscopic Rosenfeld's density functional theory with a reasonable agreement down to surprisingly small values of both L and D .

  7. Keeping condensers clean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wicker, K.

    2006-04-15

    The humble condenser is among the biggest contributors to a steam power plant's efficiency. But although a clean condenser can provide great economic benefit, a dirty one can raise plant heat rate, resulting in large losses of generation revenue and/or unnecessarily high fuel bills. Conventional methods for cleaning fouled tubes range form chemicals to scrapers to brushes and hydro-blasters. This article compares the available options and describes how one power station, Omaha Public Power District's 600 MW North Omaha coal-fired power station, cleaned up its act. The makeup and cooling water of all its five units comes from the Missouri River. 6 figs.

  8. Deepak Condenser Model (DeCoM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Development of the DeCoM comes from the requirement of analyzing the performance of a condenser. A component of a loop heat pipe (LHP), the condenser, is interfaced with the radiator in order to reject heat. DeCoM simulates the condenser, with certain input parameters. Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (SINDA), a thermal analysis software, calculates the adjoining component temperatures, based on the DeCoM parameters and interface temperatures to the radiator. Application of DeCoM is (at the time of this reporting) restricted to small-scale analysis, without the need for in-depth LHP component integrations. To efficiently develop a model to simulate the LHP condenser, DeCoM was developed to meet this purpose with least complexity. DeCoM is a single-condenser, single-pass simulator for analyzing its behavior. The analysis is done based on the interactions between condenser fluid, the wall, and the interface between the wall and the radiator. DeCoM is based on conservation of energy, two-phase equations, and flow equations. For two-phase, the Lockhart- Martinelli correlation has been used in order to calculate the convection value between fluid and wall. Software such as SINDA (for thermal analysis analysis) and Thermal Desktop (for modeling) are required. DeCoM also includes the ability to implement a condenser into a thermal model with the capability of understanding the code process and being edited to user-specific needs. DeCoM requires no license, and is an open-source code. Advantages to DeCoM include time dependency, reliability, and the ability for the user to view the code process and edit to their needs.

  9. Condensed elementary particle matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajantie, K.

    1996-01-01

    Quark matter is a special case of condensed elementary particle matter, matter governed by the laws of particle physics. The talk discusses how far one can get in the study of particle matter by reducing the problem to computations based on the action. As an example the computation of the phase diagram of electroweak matter is presented. It is quite possible that ultimately an antireductionist attitude will prevail: experiments will reveal unpredicted phenomena not obviously reducible to the study of the action. (orig.)

  10. BWR condensate filtration studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.A.; Pasricha, A.; Rekart, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    Poor removal of particulate corrosion products (especially iron) from condensate is one of the major problems in BWR systems. The presence of activated corrosion products creates ''hot spots'' and increases piping dose rates. Also, fuel efficiency is reduced and the risk of fuel failure is increased by the deposit of corrosion products on the fuel. Because of these concerns, current EPRI guidelines call for a maximum of 2 ppb of iron in the reactor feedwater with a level of 0.5 ppb being especially desirable. It has become clear that conventional deep bed resins are incapable of meeting these levels. While installation of prefilter systems is an option, it would be more economical for plants with naked deep beds to find an improved bead resin for use in existing systems. BWR condensate filtration technologies are being tested on a condensate side stream at Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station. After two years of testing, hollow fiber filters (HFF) and fiber matrix filters (FMF), and low crosslink cation resin, all provide acceptable results. The results are presented for pressure drop, filtration efficiency, and water quality measurements. The costs are compared for backwashable non-precoat HFF and FMF. Results are also presented for full deep bed vessel tests of the low crosslink cation resin

  11. Condensation of exciton polaritons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasprzak, J.

    2006-10-01

    Because of their unique property of bringing pure quantum effects into the real world scale, phase transitions towards condensed phases - like Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), superfluidity, and superconductivity - have always fascinated scientists. The BEC, appearing upon cooling a gas of bosons below a critical temperature, has been given a striking demonstration in dilute atomic gases of rubidium atoms at temperatures below 200 nK. By confining photons in a semiconductor micro-cavity, and strongly coupling them to electronic excitations, one may create polaritons. These bosonic quasi-particles are 10 9 times lighter than rubidium atoms, thus theoretically allowing a BEC at standard cryogenic temperatures. Here we detail a comprehensive set of experiments giving compelling evidence for a BEC of polaritons. Above a critical density, we observe massive occupation of the ground state, developing from a thermalized and saturated distribution of the polariton population at (16-20) K. We demonstrate as well the existence of a critical temperature for this transition. The spontaneous onset of a coherent state is manifested by the increase of temporal coherence, the build-up of long-range spatial coherence and the reduction of the thermal noise observed in second order coherence experiments. The marked linear polarization of the emission from the condensate is also measured. All of these findings indicate the spontaneous onset of a macroscopic quantum phase. (author)

  12. Polymorphism of Lysozyme Condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Mohammad S; Byington, Michael C; Conrad, Jacinta C; Vekilov, Peter G

    2017-10-05

    Protein condensates play essential roles in physiological processes and pathological conditions. Recently discovered mesoscopic protein-rich clusters may act as crucial precursors for the nucleation of ordered protein solids, such as crystals, sickle hemoglobin polymers, and amyloid fibrils. These clusters challenge settled paradigms of protein condensation as the constituent protein molecules present features characteristic of both partially misfolded and native proteins. Here we employ the antimicrobial enzyme lysozyme and examine the similarities between mesoscopic clusters, amyloid structures, and disordered aggregates consisting of chemically modified protein. We show that the mesoscopic clusters are distinct from the other two classes of aggregates. Whereas cluster formation and amyloid oligomerization are both reversible, aggregation triggered by reduction of the intramolecular S-S bonds is permanent. In contrast to the amyloid structures, protein molecules in the clusters retain their enzymatic activity. Furthermore, an essential feature of the mesoscopic clusters is their constant radius of less than 50 nm. The amyloid and disordered aggregates are significantly larger and rapidly grow. These findings demonstrate that the clusters are a product of limited protein structural flexibility. In view of the role of the clusters in the nucleation of ordered protein solids, our results suggest that fine-tuning the degree of protein conformational stability is a powerful tool to control and direct the pathways of protein condensation.

  13. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre, Anthony; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto, E-mail: aguirre@scipp.ucsc.edu, E-mail: alberto.diez@fisica.ugto.mx [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, 95064 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate must be lighter than a few tens of eV so that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of decoupling to the scale of the QCD phase transition or above. This requires large dark matter-to-photon ratios and very weak interactions with standard model particles.

  14. Corrosion-related failures in power plant condensers. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beavers, J.A.; Agrawal, A.K.; Berry, W.E.

    1980-08-01

    A survey of the literature has been conducted for the Electric Power Research Institute on corrosion failures in surface condensers. The survey was directed toward condenser failures in pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants but includes pertinent literature related to fossil and to other nuclear power plants. It includes literature on reported service failures and on experimental studies that impact on these failures

  15. Condensate oscillations in a Penrose tiling lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdeniz, Z.; Vignolo, P.

    2017-07-01

    We study the dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate subject to a particular Penrose tiling lattice. In such a lattice, the potential energy at each site depends on the neighbour sites, accordingly to the model introduced by Sutherland [16]. The Bose-Einstein wavepacket, initially at rest at the lattice symmetry center, is released. We observe a very complex time-evolution that strongly depends on the symmetry center (two choices are possible), on the potential energy landscape dispersion, and on the interaction strength. The condensate-width oscillates at different frequencies and we can identify large-frequency reshaping oscillations and low-frequency rescaling oscillations. We discuss in which conditions these oscillations are spatially bounded, denoting a self-trapping dynamics.

  16. Condenser performance monitoring and cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walden, J.V.

    1998-01-01

    The main condenser at Ginna Station was retubed from admiralty brass to 316 stainless steel. A condenser performance monitoring spreadsheet was developed using EPRI guidelines after fouling was discovered. PEPSE computer models were used to determine the power loss and confirm the spreadsheet results. Cleaning of the condenser was performed using plastic scrubbers. Condenser performance improved dramatically following the cleaning. PEPSE, condenser spreadsheet performance, and actual observed plant data correlated well together. The fouling mechanism was determined to be a common lake bacteria and fungus growth which was combined with silt. Chlorination of the circulating water system at the allowable limits is keeping the biofouling under control

  17. Condensation of steam in horizontal pipes: model development and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szijarto, R.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis submitted to the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH in Zurich presents the development and validation of a model for the condensation of steam in horizontal pipes. Condensation models were introduced and developed particularly for the application in the emergency cooling system of a Gen-III+ boiling water reactor. Such an emergency cooling system consists of slightly inclined horizontal pipes, which are immersed in a cold water tank. The pipes are connected to the reactor pressure vessel. They are responsible for a fast depressurization of the reactor core in the case of accident. Condensation in horizontal pipes was investigated with both one-dimensional system codes (RELAP5) and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics software (ANSYS FLUENT). The performance of the RELAP5 code was not sufficient for transient condensation processes. Therefore, a mechanistic model was developed and implemented. Four models were tested on the LAOKOON facility, which analysed direct contact condensation in a horizontal duct

  18. Bouncing cosmologies from quantum gravity condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriti, Daniele; Sindoni, Lorenzo; Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2017-02-01

    We show how the large-scale cosmological dynamics can be obtained from the hydrodynamics of isotropic group field theory condensate states in the Gross-Pitaevskii approximation. The correct Friedmann equations are recovered in the classical limit for some choices of the parameters in the action for the group field theory, and quantum gravity corrections arise in the high-curvature regime causing a bounce which generically resolves the big-bang and big-crunch singularities.

  19. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Molecular Dynamics Study of Stability of Solid Solutions and Amorphous Phase in the Cu-Al System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Lai, Wen-Sheng

    2009-06-01

    The relative stability of fcc and bcc solid solutions and amorphous phase with different compositions in the Cu-Al system is studied by molecular dynamics simulations with n-body potentials. For Cu1-xAlx alloys, the calculations show that the fcc solid solution has the lowest energies in the composition region with x 0.72, while the bee solid solution has the lowest energies in the central composition range, in agreement with the ball-milling experiments that a single bcc solid solution with 0.30 < x < 0.70 is obtained. The evolution of structures in solid solutions and amorphous phase is studied by the coordination number (CN) and bond-length analysis so as to unveil the underlying physics. It is found that the energy sequence among three phases is determined by the competition in energy change originating from the bond length and CNs (or the number of bonds).

  20. Condensate bright solitons under transverse confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salasnich, L.; Reatto, L.; Parola, A.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensate bright solitons made of alkali-metal atoms with negative scattering length and under harmonic confinement in the transverse direction. Contrary to the one-dimensional (1D) case, the 3D bright soliton exists only below a critical attractive interaction that depends on the extent of confinement. Such a behavior is also found in multisoliton condensates with box boundary conditions. We obtain numerical and analytical estimates of the critical strength beyond which the solitons do not exist. By using an effective 1D nonpolynomial nonlinear Schroedinger equation, which accurately takes into account the transverse dynamics of cigarlike condensates, we numerically simulate the dynamics of the 'soliton train' reported in a recent experiment [Nature (London) 417, 150 (2002)]. Then, analyzing the macroscopic quantum tunneling of the bright soliton on a Gaussian barrier, we find that its interference in the tunneling region is strongly suppressed with respect to nonsolitonic case; moreover, the tunneling through a barrier breaks the shape invariance of the matter wave. Finally, we show that the collapse of the soliton is induced by the scattering on the barrier or by the collision with another matter wave when the density reaches a critical value, for which we derive an accurate analytical formula

  1. In-stack condensible particulate matter measurement and permitting issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corio, L.A.; Sherwell, J.

    1997-01-01

    Based on the results of recent epidemiological studies and assessments of the causes of visibility degradation, EPA is proposing to regulate PM2.5 emissions. PM can be classified as either filterable or condensible PM. Condensible PM includes sulfates, such as sulfuric acid. Sulfates typically account for at least half of the total dry fine PM mass in the atmosphere. Power plant SO x -based emissions make a significant contribution to ambient fine PM levels in the eastern US. Although much of this mass is derived from secondary chemical reactions in the atmosphere, a portion of this sulfate is emitted directly from stacks as condensible PM. The potential condensible PM fraction associated with coal-burning boiler emissions is somewhat uncertain. The characterization of PM emissions from these sources has been, until recently, based on in-stack filterable PM measurements only. To determine the relative magnitude of condensible PM emissions and better understand condensible PM measurement issues, a review and analysis of actual EPA Method 202 results and state-developed hybrid condensible PM methods were conducted. A review of available Method 202 results for several coal-burning boilers showed that the condensible PM, on average, comprises 60% of the total PM10. A review of recent results for state-developed measurement methods for condensible PM for numerous coal-burning boilers indicated that condensible PM accounted for, on average, approximately 49% of total PM. Caution should be exercised in the use of these results because of the seemingly unresolved issue of artifact formation, which may bias the Method 202 and state-developed methods results on the high side. Condensible PM10 measurement results and issues, and potential ramifications of including condensible PM10 emissions in the PSD permit review process are discussed. Selected power plants in Maryland are discussed as examples

  2. Dynamic analysis of the condensate and of the feed water in the Laguna Verde nuclear power station; Analisis dinamico del sistema de condensado y agua de alimentacion de la nucleoelectrica de Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo Muth, Javier; Sandoval Pena, Ramon [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1988-12-31

    This article shows a non-lineal mathematical model for the condensate, and feed water systems and for feed water heater drains at the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Station for its simulation in real time. The model allows the calculation of flows and pressures in all the piping system and equipment that integrate the systems. It was obtained by using the force unbalance in the fluid concept and is capable of reproducing its dynamic behavior through variations induced by the different operation modes and more common failures. The final model objective is to form part of the Laguna Verde simulator that will be used for operator training of this Nuclear Power Plant. [Espanol] En este articulo se muestra un modelo matematico no lineal de los sistemas de condensado, agua de alimentacion y drenes de calentadores de la central nuclear de Laguna Verde para su simulacion en tiempo real. El modelo permite calcular los flujos y las presiones en toda la red de tuberias y equipos que integran los sistemas. Se obtuvo utilizando el concepto de desbalance de fuerzas en el fluido, y es capaz de reproducir su comportamiento dinamico ante variaciones inducidas por los diversos modos de operacion y fallas mas comunes. El objetivo final del modelo es formar parte del simulador de Laguna Verde que se empleara para el adiestramiento de los operadores de dicha central nuclear.

  3. Steam condensation modelling in aerosol codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunbar, I.H.

    1986-01-01

    The principal subject of this study is the modelling of the condensation of steam into and evaporation of water from aerosol particles. These processes introduce a new type of term into the equation for the development of the aerosol particle size distribution. This new term faces the code developer with three major problems: the physical modelling of the condensation/evaporation process, the discretisation of the new term and the separate accounting for the masses of the water and of the other components. This study has considered four codes which model the condensation of steam into and its evaporation from aerosol particles: AEROSYM-M (UK), AEROSOLS/B1 (France), NAUA (Federal Republic of Germany) and CONTAIN (USA). The modelling in the codes has been addressed under three headings. These are the physical modelling of condensation, the mathematics of the discretisation of the equations, and the methods for modelling the separate behaviour of different chemical components of the aerosol. The codes are least advanced in area of solute effect modelling. At present only AEROSOLS/B1 includes the effect. The effect is greater for more concentrated solutions. Codes without the effect will be more in error (underestimating the total airborne mass) the less condensation they predict. Data are needed on the water vapour pressure above concentrated solutions of the substances of interest (especially CsOH and CsI) if the extent to which aerosols retain water under superheated conditions is to be modelled. 15 refs

  4. Condensation of vapor bubble in subcooled pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, K.; Koiwa, Y.; Kaneko, T.; Ueno, I.

    2017-02-01

    We focus on condensation process of vapor bubble exposed to a pooled liquid of subcooled conditions. Two different geometries are employed in the present research; one is the evaporation on the heated surface, that is, subcooled pool boiling, and the other the injection of vapor into the subcooled pool. The test fluid is water, and all series of the experiments are conducted under the atmospheric pressure condition. The degree of subcooling is ranged from 10 to 40 K. Through the boiling experiment, unique phenomenon known as microbubble emission boiling (MEB) is introduced; this phenomenon realizes heat flux about 10 times higher than the critical heat flux. Condensation of the vapor bubble is the key phenomenon to supply ambient cold liquid to the heated surface. In order to understand the condensing process in the MEB, we prepare vapor in the vapor generator instead of the evaporation on the heated surface, and inject the vapor to expose the vapor bubble to the subcooled liquid. Special attention is paid to the dynamics of the vapor bubble detected by the high-speed video camera, and on the enhancement of the heat transfer due to the variation of interface area driven by the condensation.

  5. The condensed matter physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapoval, B.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the laboratory of the Condensed Matter Physics (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The Laboratory activities are related to the physics of semiconductors and disordered phases. The electrical and optical properties of the semiconductors, mixed conductor, superionic conductors and ceramics, are studied. Moreover, the interfaces of those systems and the sol-gel inorganic polymerization phenomena, are investigated. The most important results obtained, concern the following investigations: the electrochemical field effect transistor, the cathodoluminescence, the low energy secondary electrons emission, the fluctuations of a two-dimensional diffused junction and the aerogels [fr

  6. Topology in Condensed Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Monastyrsky, M I

    2006-01-01

    This book reports new results in condensed matter physics for which topological methods and ideas are important. It considers, on the one hand, recently discovered systems such as carbon nanocrystals and, on the other hand, new topological methods used to describe more traditional systems such as the Fermi surfaces of normal metals, liquid crystals and quasicrystals. The authors of the book are renowned specialists in their fields and present the results of ongoing research, some of it obtained only very recently and not yet published in monograph form.

  7. Air condensation plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelp, F.; Pohl, H.H.

    1978-01-01

    In this plant the steam is distributed by a ventilator from the bottom to symmetrically fixed, inclined cooling elements with tubes. The upper part of the current side of the cooling elements as well as the bottom part of the outflow side can be covered by cover plates via a control circuit. This way, part of the air amount is deviated and in case of unfavourable atmospheric conditions (cold) the air is heated. This heating is enough to prevent freezing of the condensate on the cooling tubes. (DG) [de

  8. Lattice solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremidis, Nikolaos K.; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.

    2003-01-01

    We systematically study the properties of lattice solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates with either attractive or repulsive atom interactions. This is done, by exactly solving the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the presence of a periodic potential. We find new families of lattice soliton solutions that are characterized by the position of the energy eigenvalue within the associated band structure. These include lattice solitons in condensates with either attractive or repulsive atom interactions that exist in finite or semi-infinite gaps, as well as nonlinear modes that exhibit atomic population cutoffs

  9. Quark Condensate in the Strange Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Chang-Fang; LU" Xiao-Fu

    2003-01-01

    In a nonlinear chiral SU(3) framework, we investigate the quark condensate in the strange matter including N, Σ, Ξ, and Λ, making use of chiral symmetry spontaneous breaking Lagrangian and mean-field approximation. The results show that the chiral symmetry is restored partially when the strange matter density increases and that 〈π→2〉 plays a very important role in the strange matter which may approach the constituents of the neutron stars. In addition, we can find that the strange matter density where the π-condensate emerges leads to the ratio of the nucleon number to baryon number.

  10. Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anglin, J. R.; Ketterle, W.

    2003-01-01

    The early experiments on Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute atomic gases accomplished three longstanding goals. First, cooling of neutral atoms into their motional state, thus subjecting them to ultimate control, limited only by Heisenberg uncertainty relation. Second, creation of a coherent sample of atoms, in which all occupy the same quantum states, and the realization of atom lasers - devices that output coherent matter waves. And third, creation of gaseous quantum fluid, with properties that are different from the quantum liquids helium-3 and helium-4. The field of Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases has continued to progress rapidly, driven by the combination of new experimental techniques and theoretical advances. The family of quantum degenerate gases has grown, and now includes metastable and fermionic atoms. condensates have become an ultralow-temperature laboratory for atom optics, collisional physics and many-body physics, encompassing phonons, superfluidity, quantized vortices, Josephson junctions and quantum phase transitions. (author)

  11. Optimal quantum control of Bose-Einstein condensates in magnetic microtraps: Comparison of gradient-ascent-pulse-engineering and Krotov optimization schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Georg; Reich, Daniel M.; Goerz, Michael H.; Koch, Christiane P.; Hohenester, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    We study optimal quantum control of the dynamics of trapped Bose-Einstein condensates: The targets are to split a condensate, residing initially in a single well, into a double well, without inducing excitation, and to excite a condensate from the ground state to the first-excited state of a single well. The condensate is described in the mean-field approximation of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We compare two optimization approaches in terms of their performance and ease of use; namely, gradient-ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) and Krotov's method. Both approaches are derived from the variational principle but differ in the way the control is updated, additional costs are accounted for, and second-order-derivative information can be included. We find that GRAPE produces smoother control fields and works in a black-box manner, whereas Krotov with a suitably chosen step-size parameter converges faster but can produce sharp features in the control fields.

  12. Phase collapse and revival of a 1-mode Bose-Einstein condensate induced by an off-resonant optical probe field and superselection rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, L. G. E.; Prataviera, G. A.; de Oliveira, M. C.

    2018-02-01

    Phase collapse and revival for Bose-Einstein condensates are nonlinear phenomena appearing due to atomic collisions. While it has been observed in a general setting involving many modes, for one-mode condensates its occurrence is forbidden by the particle number superselection rule (SSR), which arises because there is no phase reference available. We consider a single mode atomic Bose-Einstein condensate interacting with an off-resonant optical probe field. We show that the condensate phase revival time is dependent on the atom-light interaction, allowing optical control on the atomic collapse and revival dynamics. Incoherent effects over the condensate phase are included by considering a continuous photo-detection over the probe field. We consider conditioned and unconditioned photo-counting events and verify that no extra control upon the condensate is achieved by the probe photo-detection, while further inference of the atomic system statistics is allowed leading to a useful test of the SSR on particle number and its imposition on the kind of physical condensate state.

  13. Pion condensation and instabilities: current theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyulassy, M.

    1980-05-01

    Current calculations of pion condensation phenomena in symmetric nuclear matter are reviewed. The RPA and MFA methods are compared. Latest results [LBL-10572] with a relativistic MFA theory constrained by bulk nuclear properties are presented. The differences between equilibrium (condensation) and nonequilibrium (dynamic) instabilities are discussed. Finally, two-proton correlation experiments aimed at looking for critical scattering phenomena and two-pion correlation experiments aimed at looking for pion field coherence are analyzed. 10 figures, 2 tables

  14. Dynamic experiments with high bisphenol-A concentrations modelled with an ASM model extended to include a separate XOC degrading microorganism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindblom, Erik Ulfson; Press-Kristensen, Kåre; Vanrolleghem, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    The perspective of this work is to develop a model, which can be used to better understand and optimize wastewater treatment plants that are able to remove xenobiotic organic compounds (XOCs) in combination with removal of traditional pollutants. Results from dynamic experiments conducted...... with the endocrine disrupting XOC bisphenol-A (BPA) in an activated sludge process with real wastewater were used to hypothesize an ASM-based process model including aerobic growth of a specific BPA-degrading microorganism and sorption of BPA to sludge. A parameter estimation method was developed, which...... simultaneously utilizes steady-state background concentrations and dynamic step response data, as well as conceptual simplifications of the plant configuration. Validation results show that biodegradation of BPA is sensitive to operational conditions before and during the experiment and that the proposed model...

  15. Liquid oil production from shale gas condensate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, James J.

    2018-04-03

    A process of producing liquid oil from shale gas condensate reservoirs and, more particularly, to increase liquid oil production by huff-n-puff in shale gas condensate reservoirs. The process includes performing a huff-n-puff gas injection mode and flowing the bottom-hole pressure lower than the dew point pressure.

  16. Diffusive instability of a kaon condensate in neutron star matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubis, Sebastian

    2004-01-01

    The beta equilibrated dense matter with kaon condensate is analyzed with respect to extended stability conditions, including charge fluctuations. This kind of the diffusive instability appeared to be common property in the kaon condensation case. Results for three different nuclear models are presented

  17. Optimal design of condenser weight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Jing; Yan Changqi; Wang Jianjun

    2011-01-01

    The condenser is an important component in nuclear power plants, which dimension and weight will effect the economical performance and the arrangement of the nuclear power plants. In this paper, the calculation model is established according to the design experience. The corresponding codes are also developed, and the sensitivity of design parameters which influence the condenser weight is analyzed. The present design optimization of the condenser, taking the weight minimization as the objective, is carried out with the self-developed complex-genetic algorithm. The results show that the reference condenser design is far from the best scheme, and also verify the feasibility of the complex-genetic algorithm. (authors)

  18. Condensed Matter Theories: Volume 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludeña, Eduardo V.; Bishop, Raymond F.; Iza, Peter

    2011-03-01

    dynamics and density functional theory. Exchange-correlation functionals from the identical-particle Ornstein-Zernike equation: Basic formulation and numerical algorithms / R. Cuevas-Saavedra and P. W. Ayers. Features and catalytic properties of RhCu: A review / S. Gonzalez, C. Sousa and F. Illas. Kinetic energy functionals: Exact ones from analytic model wave functions and approximate ones in orbital-free molecular dynamics / V. V. Karasiev ... [et al.]. Numerical analysis of hydrogen storage in carbon nanopores / C. Wexler ... [et al.] -- pt. F. Superconductivity. Generalized Bose-Einstein condensation in superconductivity / M. de Llano. Kohn anomaly energy in conventional superconductors equals twice the energy of the superconducting gap: How and why? / R. Chaudhury and M. P. Das. Collective excitations in superconductors and semiconductors in the presence of a condensed phase / Z. Koinov. Thermal expansion of ferromagnetic superconductors: Possible application to UGe[symbol] / N. Hatayama and R. Konno. Generalized superconducting gap in a Boson-Fermion model / T. A. Mamedov and M. de Llano. Influence of domain walls in the superconductor/ferromagnet proximity effect / E. J. Patino. Spin singlet and triplet superconductivity induced by correlated hopping interactions / L. A. Perez, J. S. Millan and C. Wang -- pt. G. Statistical mechanics, relativistic quantum mechanics. Boltzmann's ergodic hypothesis: A meeting place for two cultures / M. H. Lee. Electron-electron interaction in the non-relativistic limit / F. B. Malik.

  19. Femtosecond-laser induced dynamics of CO on Ru(0001): Deep insights from a hot-electron friction model including surface motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Robert; Floß, Gereon; Saalfrank, Peter; Füchsel, Gernot; Lončarić, Ivor; Juaristi, J. I.

    2016-10-01

    A Langevin model accounting for all six molecular degrees of freedom is applied to femtosecond-laser induced, hot-electron driven dynamics of Ru(0001)(2 ×2 ):CO. In our molecular dynamics with electronic friction approach, a recently developed potential energy surface based on gradient-corrected density functional theory accounting for van der Waals interactions is adopted. Electronic friction due to the coupling of molecular degrees of freedom to electron-hole pairs in the metal are included via a local density friction approximation, and surface phonons by a generalized Langevin oscillator model. The action of ultrashort laser pulses enters through a substrate-mediated, hot-electron mechanism via a time-dependent electronic temperature (derived from a two-temperature model), causing random forces acting on the molecule. The model is applied to laser induced lateral diffusion of CO on the surface, "hot adsorbate" formation, and laser induced desorption. Reaction probabilities are strongly enhanced compared to purely thermal processes, both for diffusion and desorption. Reaction yields depend in a characteristic (nonlinear) fashion on the applied laser fluence, as well as branching ratios for various reaction channels. Computed two-pulse correlation traces for desorption and other indicators suggest that aside from electron-hole pairs, phonons play a non-negligible role for laser induced dynamics in this system, acting on a surprisingly short time scale. Our simulations on precomputed potentials allow for good statistics and the treatment of long-time dynamics (300 ps), giving insight into this system which hitherto has not been reached. We find generally good agreement with experimental data where available and make predictions in addition. A recently proposed laser induced population of physisorbed precursor states could not be observed with the present low-coverage model.

  20. Faraday waves in Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolin, Alexandru I.; Carretero-Gonzalez, R.; Kevrekidis, P. G.

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on Faraday waves in Bose-Einstein condensates we investigate both analytically and numerically the dynamics of cigar-shaped Bose-condensed gases subject to periodic modulation of the strength of the transverse confinement. We offer a fully analytical explanation of the observed parametric resonance, based on a Mathieu-type analysis of the non-polynomial Schroedinger equation. The theoretical prediction for the pattern periodicity versus the driving frequency is directly compared to the experimental data, yielding good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the two. These results are corroborated by direct numerical simulations of both the one-dimensional non-polynomial Schroedinger equation and of the fully three-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation

  1. Response of Bose-Einstein condensates to external perturbations at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    We present a theory of the linear response of a Bose-Einstein-condensed gas to external perturbations at finite temperature. The theory developed here is the basis of a recent quantitative explanation of the measurements of condensate excitations and decay rates made at JILA [D. S. Jin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 764 (1997)]. The formalism is based on a dynamic, number-conserving, mean-field scheme and is valid in the collisionless limit of well-defined quasiparticles. The theory is gapless, consistent with the generalized Kohn theorem for the dipole modes, and includes the time-dependent normal and anomalous averages, Beliaev and Landau processes, and all relevant finite-size effects. The important physical process where the thermal cloud is driven directly by the external perturbation is explicitly included. This is required for consistency with the dipole modes and is also needed to explain the JILA observations

  2. From the X-rays to a reliable “low cost” computational structure of caffeic acid: DFT, MP2, HF and integrated molecular dynamics-X-ray diffraction approach to condensed phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Giuseppe M.; Portalone, Gustavo; Colapietro, Marcello; Rescifina, Antonio; Punzo, Francesco

    2011-05-01

    The ability of caffeic acid to act as antioxidant against hyperoxo-radicals as well as its recently found therapeutic properties in the treatment of hepatocarcinoma, still make this compound, more than 20 years later the refinement of its crystal structure, object of study. It belongs to the vast family of humic substances, which play a key role in the biodegradation processes and easily form complexes with ions widely diffused in the environment. This class of compounds is therefore interesting for potential environmental chemistry applications concerning the possible complexation of heavy metals. Our study focused on the characterization of caffeic acid as a starting necessary step, which will be followed in the future by the application of our findings on the study of the properties of caffeate anion interaction with heavy metal ions. To reach this goal, we applied a low cost approach - in terms of computational time and resources - aimed at the achievement of a high resolution, robust and trustable structure using the X-ray single crystal data, recollected with a higher resolution, as touchstone for a detailed check. A comparison between the calculations carried out with density functional theory (DFT), Hartree-Fock (HF) method and post SCF second order Møller-Plesset perturbation method (MP2), at the 6-31G ** level of the theory, molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) was performed. As a consequence we explained on one hand the possible reasons for the pitfalls of the DFT approach and on the other the benefits of using a good and robust force field developed for condensed phases, as AMBER, with MM and MD. The reliability of the latter, highlighted by the overall agreement extended up to the anisotropic displacement parameters calculated by means of MD and the ones gathered by X-ray measurements, makes it very promising for the above-mentioned goals.

  3. Condensed matter physics in electrochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornyshev, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    Some topics in electrochemistry are considered from the condensed matter physics viewpoint in relation to the problems discussed in this book. Examples of the successful application of condensed matter physics to electrochemistry are discussed together with prospective problems and pressing questions. (author). 127 refs, 4 figs

  4. Off gas condenser performance modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cains, P.W.; Hills, K.M.; Waring, S.; Pratchett, A.G.

    1989-12-01

    A suite of three programmes has been developed to model the ruthenium decontamination performance of a vitrification plant off-gas condenser. The stages of the model are: condensation of water vapour, NO x absorption in the condensate, RuO 4 absorption in the condensate. Juxtaposition of these stages gives a package that may be run on an IBM-compatible desktop PC. Experimental work indicates that the criterion [HNO 2 ] > 10 [RuO 4 ] used to determine RuO 4 destruction in solution is probably realistic under condenser conditions. Vapour pressures of RuO 4 over aqueous solutions at 70 o -90 o C are slightly lower than the values given by extrapolating the ln K p vs. T -1 relation derived from lower temperature data. (author)

  5. Apparatus and method for depressurizing, degassing, and affording decay of the radioactivity of weakly radioactive condensates in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.; Plotz, J.

    1976-01-01

    Described is an apparatus for depressurizing, degassing and affording decay of weakly radioactive condensates in nuclear power plants having a turbine and a main condenser turbine wherein exhaust steam of the turbine is condensed and forms a main condensate, and includes a collecting tank for the condensate situated below the condenser. A plurality of horizontal degassing channels, each having a lateral overflow, are disposed in the upper part of the condensate collecting tank and are filled with the main condensate up to the level of the overflow. At least one feedwater preheater which is heated by bleeder steam from the turbine provides a secondary condensate. Below the overflow height of the degassing channels extend horizontal feed pipes for the secondary condensate. The feed pipes are connected to the output of pressure relieving expanding devices and are provided on their underside with discharge openings for the bubbling of the secondary condensate into the main condensate to thereby degass the main condensate. The condensate collecting tank has mutually offset partitions therein providing an adequately long path for the decay of the main and secondary condensates. The condensate which is discharged from the condensate collecting tank is returned into the cycle as feedwater. Also disclosed is a method of operating the foregoing apparatus

  6. Hydrophilic structures for condensation management in refrigerator appliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehl, Steven John; Vonderhaar, John J; Wu, Guolian; Wu, Mianxue

    2014-10-21

    A refrigerator appliance that includes a freezer compartment having a freezer compartment door, and a refrigeration compartment having at least one refrigeration compartment door. The appliance further includes a mullion with an exterior surface. The mullion divides the compartments and the exterior surface directs condensation toward a transfer point. The appliance may also include a cabinet that houses the compartments and has two sides, each with an exterior surface. Further, at least one exterior surface directs condensation toward a transfer point.

  7. Universal properties of relaxation and diffusion in condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngai K L

    2017-01-01

    By and large the research communities today are not fully aware of the remarkable universality in the dynamic properties of many-body relaxation/diffusion processes manifested in experiments and simulations on condensed matter with diverse chemical compositions and physical structures. I shall demonstrate the universality first from the dynamic processes in glass-forming systems. This is reinforced by strikingly similar properties of different processes in contrasting interacting systems all having nothing to do with glass transition. The examples given here include glass-forming systems of diverse chemical compositions and physical structures, conductivity relaxation of ionic conductors (liquid, glassy, and crystalline), translation and orientation ordered phase of rigid molecule, and polymer chain dynamics. Universality is also found in the change of dynamics when dimension is reduced to nanometer size in widely different systems. The remarkable universality indicates that many-body relaxation/diffusion is governed by fundamental physics to be unveiled. One candidate is classical chaos on which the coupling model is based, Universal properties predicted by this model are in accord with diverse experiments and simulations. (paper)

  8. Method and apparatus for high-efficiency direct contact condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathan, Desikan; Parent, Yves; Hassani, A. Vahab

    1999-01-01

    A direct contact condenser having a downward vapor flow chamber and an upward vapor flow chamber, wherein each of the vapor flow chambers includes a plurality of cooling liquid supplying pipes and a vapor-liquid contact medium disposed thereunder to facilitate contact and direct heat exchange between the vapor and cooling liquid. The contact medium includes a plurality of sheets arranged to form vertical interleaved channels or passageways for the vapor and cooling liquid streams. The upward vapor flow chamber also includes a second set of cooling liquid supplying pipes disposed beneath the vapor-liquid contact medium which operate intermittently in response to a pressure differential within the upward vapor flow chamber. The condenser further includes separate wells for collecting condensate and cooling liquid from each of the vapor flow chambers. In alternate embodiments, the condenser includes a cross-current flow chamber and an upward flow chamber, a plurality of upward flow chambers, or a single upward flow chamber. The method of use of the direct contact condenser of this invention includes passing a vapor stream sequentially through the downward and upward vapor flow chambers, where the vapor is condensed as a result of heat exchange with the cooling liquid in the contact medium. The concentration of noncondensable gases in the resulting condensate-liquid mixtures can be minimized by controlling the partial pressure of the vapor, which depends in part upon the geometry of the vapor-liquid contact medium. In another aspect of this invention, the physical and chemical performance of a direct contact condenser can be predicted based on the vapor and coolant compositions, the condensation conditions. and the geometric properties of the contact medium.

  9. Signatures of exciton condensation in a transition metal dichalcogenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogar, Anshul; Rak, Melinda S.; Vig, Sean; Husain, Ali A.; Flicker, Felix; Joe, Young Il; Venema, Luc; MacDougall, Greg J.; Chiang, Tai C.; Fradkin, Eduardo; van Wezel, Jasper; Abbamonte, Peter

    2017-12-01

    Bose condensation has shaped our understanding of macroscopic quantum phenomena, having been realized in superconductors, atomic gases, and liquid helium. Excitons are bosons that have been predicted to condense into either a superfluid or an insulating electronic crystal. Using the recently developed technique of momentum-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy (M-EELS), we studied electronic collective modes in the transition metal dichalcogenide semimetal 1T-TiSe2. Near the phase-transition temperature (190 kelvin), the energy of the electronic mode fell to zero at nonzero momentum, indicating dynamical slowing of plasma fluctuations and crystallization of the valence electrons into an exciton condensate. Our study provides compelling evidence for exciton condensation in a three-dimensional solid and establishes M-EELS as a versatile technique sensitive to valence band excitations in quantum materials.

  10. Gravitino Condensates in the Early Universe and Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Mavromatos, Nick E

    2015-01-01

    We review work on the formation of gravitino condensates via the super-Higgs effect in the early Universe. This is a scenario for both inflating the early universe and breaking local supersymmetry (supergravity), entirely independent of any coupling to external matter. The goldstino mode associated with the breaking of (global) supersymmetry is "eaten" by the gravitino field, which becomes massive (via its own vacuum condensation) and breaks the local supersymmetry (supergravity) dynamically. The most natural association of gravitino condensates with inflation proceeds in an indirect way, via a Starobinsky-inflation-type phase. The higher-order curvature corrections of the (quantum) effective action of gravitino condensates induced by integrating out massive gravitino degrees of freedom in a curved space-time background, in the broken-supergravity phase, are responsible for inducing a scalar mode which inflates the Universe. The scenario is in agreement with Planck data phenomenology in a natural and phenomen...

  11. Plant-wide control of coupled distillation columns with partial condensers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Edris; Baxter, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Extractive distillation system for CO_2–ethane azeotrope separation. • Control of distillation column systems that have interconnected partial condenser and total condenser columns. • Single-end temperature control of distillation columns. • Aspen Dynamics tools applied for rigorous steady-state and dynamic simulations. - Abstract: Conventional distillation control processes use vapor distillate flowrate to control column pressure and condenser heat removal to control the reflux drum level. These intuitive control systems work well for isolated columns or columns with total condensers. However, these controls are not effective when columns with partial condensers occur in series. The pressure and reflux drum level interact in such systems in ways that defeat conventional control systems, rendering them unable to maintain product purities in the presence of large feed flowrate and composition disturbances. This investigation documents a plant-wide control structure that can address this issue by controlling pressure through reflux heat removal rate and reflux drum level by reflux flow rate. This control system demonstrates its capability to handle large disturbances in throughput and feed composition through a series of Aspen simulations. This alternative system is no more complicated than the conventional system and should work on distillation columns of nearly all designs, not just the coupled partial condenser designs for which it is essential. Common natural gas processing provides a specific example of this alternative control system. Natural gas commonly includes high concentrations of CO_2 that must be removed prior to pipeline or LNG distribution. The existence of a minimum-boiling temperature azeotrope between ethane, virtually always present in natural gas, and carbon dioxide complicates the separation of CO_2 from the hydrocarbons. This separation commonly employs extractive distillation with high-molecular-weight hydrocarbons. Our

  12. CONVECTION IN CONDENSIBLE-RICH ATMOSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, F. [Department of the Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Pierrehumbert, R. T., E-mail: fding@uchicago.edu [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-01

    Condensible substances are nearly ubiquitous in planetary atmospheres. For the most familiar case—water vapor in Earth’s present climate—the condensible gas is dilute, in the sense that its concentration is everywhere small relative to the noncondensible background gases. A wide variety of important planetary climate problems involve nondilute condensible substances. These include planets near or undergoing a water vapor runaway and planets near the outer edge of the conventional habitable zone, for which CO{sub 2} is the condensible. Standard representations of convection in climate models rely on several approximations appropriate only to the dilute limit, while nondilute convection differs in fundamental ways from dilute convection. In this paper, a simple parameterization of convection valid in the nondilute as well as dilute limits is derived and used to discuss the basic character of nondilute convection. The energy conservation properties of the scheme are discussed in detail and are verified in radiative-convective simulations. As a further illustration of the behavior of the scheme, results for a runaway greenhouse atmosphere for both steady instellation and seasonally varying instellation corresponding to a highly eccentric orbit are presented. The latter case illustrates that the high thermal inertia associated with latent heat in nondilute atmospheres can damp out the effects of even extreme seasonal forcing.

  13. A numerical study of bulk evaporation and condensation problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Z.; Anghaie, S.

    1996-01-01

    A numerical model is developed to simulate the dynamic behavior of bulk evaporation and condensation process in an encapsulated container with internal heat generation at micro-gravity level. Thermal performance of a multi-phase system with internal heat generation is investigated. The numerical simulation yields the evolution of the bulk liquid-vapor phase change process. This includes the evolution of the liquid-vapor interface, the formation and development of the liquid film covering the side wall surface, the temperature distribution and the convection flow field. An example of such systems is a phase change nuclear fuel element which was first introduced by Ding and Anghaie with application in high temperature space nuclear power and propulsion systems

  14. The phase transition to an inhomogeneous condensate state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voskresensky, D.N.

    1984-01-01

    The Lagrangian (free energy) of the model with a complex scalar order parameter in which the phase transition to an inhomogeneous condensate state exists is constructed in the coordinate representation. In the case of condensation of charged particles (for example paired electrons) interaction with the electromagnetic field is included. The excitation spectrum in the presence of the condensate is found. The oscillations are strongly anisotropic. It is shown that superfluidity is absent for an uncharged system but that the charged one has the property of superconductivity. The important role of thermal fluctuations is demonstrated. They drastically change the behaviour of the condensate system. The condensation in a finite system is considered. A study is carried out for the behaviour of an inhomogeneous condensate in magnetic field. It is shown that the inhomogeneous condensate is a type II superconductor with Ginzburg-Landau parameter kappa >> 1, but that the structure of the mixed state of the system is unusual - consisting of plane layers of the normal phase, when Hsub(c1)< H< H'sub(c2). The distribution of condensate in the strong magnetic field H'sub(c2)< H< Hsub(c2) is also studied. (Auth.)

  15. Chiral condensate from the twisted mass Dirac operator spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichy, Krzysztof [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Poznan Univ. (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Garcia-Ramos, Elena [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany); Jansen, Karl [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; Collaboration: European Twisted Mass Collaboration

    2013-03-15

    We present the results of our computation of the chiral condensate with N{sub f}=2 and N{sub f}=2+1+1 flavours of maximally twisted mass fermions. The condensate is determined from the Dirac operator spectrum, applying the spectral projector method proposed by Giusti and Luescher. We use 3 lattice spacings and several quark masses at each lattice spacing to reliably perform the chiral and continuum extrapolations. We study the effect of the dynamical strange and charm quarks by comparing our results for N{sub f}=2 and N{sub f}=2+1+1 dynamical flavours.

  16. Chiral condensate from the twisted mass Dirac operator spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cichy, Krzysztof; Jansen, Karl; Cyprus Univ., Nicosia

    2013-03-01

    We present the results of our computation of the chiral condensate with N f =2 and N f =2+1+1 flavours of maximally twisted mass fermions. The condensate is determined from the Dirac operator spectrum, applying the spectral projector method proposed by Giusti and Luescher. We use 3 lattice spacings and several quark masses at each lattice spacing to reliably perform the chiral and continuum extrapolations. We study the effect of the dynamical strange and charm quarks by comparing our results for N f =2 and N f =2+1+1 dynamical flavours.

  17. Experimental study of steam condensation regime map for simplified spargers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Yoon, Y. J.; Song, C. H.; Park, C. K.; Kang, H. S.; Jun, H. K.

    2003-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to produce a condensation regime map for single-hole and 4-hole steam spargers using GIRLS facility. The regime map for a single-hole sparger was derived using parameters such as the frequency and magnitude of the dynamic pressure. For 4-hole sparager, the regime map was derived using the trends of sound and dynamic pressure. Using the single-hole and 4-hole data, a steam jet condensation regime map was suggested with respect to pool temperature and steam mass flux

  18. Instability and dynamics of volatile thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hangjie; Witelski, Thomas P.

    2018-02-01

    Volatile viscous fluids on partially wetting solid substrates can exhibit interesting interfacial instabilities and pattern formation. We study the dynamics of vapor condensation and fluid evaporation governed by a one-sided model in a low-Reynolds-number lubrication approximation incorporating surface tension, intermolecular effects, and evaporative fluxes. Parameter ranges for evaporation-dominated and condensation-dominated regimes and a critical case are identified. Interfacial instabilities driven by the competition between the disjoining pressure and evaporative effects are studied via linear stability analysis. Transient pattern formation in nearly flat evolving films in the critical case is investigated. In the weak evaporation limit unstable modes of finite-amplitude nonuniform steady states lead to rich droplet dynamics, including flattening, symmetry breaking, and droplet merging. Numerical simulations show that long-time behaviors leading to evaporation or condensation are sensitive to transitions between filmwise and dropwise dynamics.

  19. Condensation in Nanoporous Packed Beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ally, Javed; Molla, Shahnawaz; Mostowfi, Farshid

    2016-05-10

    In materials with tiny, nanometer-scale pores, liquid condensation is shifted from the bulk saturation pressure observed at larger scales. This effect is called capillary condensation and can block pores, which has major consequences in hydrocarbon production, as well as in fuel cells, catalysis, and powder adhesion. In this study, high pressure nanofluidic condensation studies are performed using propane and carbon dioxide in a colloidal crystal packed bed. Direct visualization allows the extent of condensation to be observed, as well as inference of the pore geometry from Bragg diffraction. We show experimentally that capillary condensation depends on pore geometry and wettability because these factors determine the shape of the menisci that coalesce when pore filling occurs, contrary to the typical assumption that all pore structures can be modeled as cylindrical and perfectly wetting. We also observe capillary condensation at higher pressures than has been done previously, which is important because many applications involving this phenomenon occur well above atmospheric pressure, and there is little, if any, experimental validation of capillary condensation at such pressures, particularly with direct visualization.

  20. Landau damping in trapped Bose condensed gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, B; Zaremba, E [Department of Physics, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    We study Landau damping in dilute Bose-Einstein condensed gases in both spherical and prolate ellipsoidal harmonic traps. We solve the Bogoliubov equations for the mode spectrum in both of these cases, and calculate the damping by summing over transitions between excited quasiparticle states. The results for the spherical case are compared to those obtained in the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation, where the excitations take on a single-particle character, and excellent agreement between the two approaches is found. We have also taken the semiclassical limit of the HF approximation and obtain a novel expression for the Landau damping rate involving the time-dependent self-diffusion function of the thermal cloud. As a final approach, we study the decay of a condensate mode by making use of dynamical simulations in which both the condensate and thermal cloud are evolved explicitly as a function of time. A detailed comparison of all these methods over a wide range of sample sizes and trap geometries is presented.

  1. Condensation with two constraints and disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, J.; Mangeolle, L.

    2018-04-01

    We consider a set of positive random variables obeying two additive constraints, a linear and a quadratic one; these constraints mimic the conservation laws of a dynamical system. In the simplest setting, without disorder, it is known that such a system may undergo a ‘condensation’ transition, whereby one random variable becomes much larger than the others; this transition has been related to the spontaneous appearance of non linear localized excitations in certain nonlinear chains, called breathers. Motivated by the study of breathers in a disordered discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we study different instances of this problem in presence of a quenched disorder. Unless the disorder is too strong, the phase diagram looks like the one without disorder, with a transition separating a fluid phase, where all variables have the same order of magnitude, and a condensed phase, where one variable is much larger than the others. We then show that the condensed phase exhibits various degrees of ‘intermediate symmetry breaking’: the site hosting the condensate is chosen neither uniformly at random, nor is it fixed by the disorder realization. Throughout the article, our heuristic arguments are complemented with direct Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. Use of computational fluid dynamics codes for safety analysis of nuclear reactor systems, including containment. Summary report of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-11-01

    Safety analysis is an important tool for justifying the safety of nuclear power plants. Typically, this type of analysis is performed by means of system computer codes with one dimensional approximation for modelling real plant systems. However, in the nuclear area there are issues for which traditional treatment using one dimensional system codes is considered inadequate for modelling local flow and heat transfer phenomena. There is therefore increasing interest in the application of three dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes as a supplement to or in combination with system codes. There are a number of both commercial (general purpose) CFD codes as well as special codes for nuclear safety applications available. With further progress in safety analysis techniques, the increasing use of CFD codes for nuclear applications is expected. At present, the main objective with respect to CFD codes is generally to improve confidence in the available analysis tools and to achieve a more reliable approach to safety relevant issues. An exchange of views and experience can facilitate and speed up progress in the implementation of this objective. Both the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD/NEA) believed that it would be advantageous to provide a forum for such an exchange. Therefore, within the framework of the Working Group on the Analysis and Management of Accidents of the NEA's Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations, the IAEA and the NEA agreed to jointly organize the Technical Meeting on the Use of Computational Fluid Dynamics Codes for Safety Analysis of Reactor Systems, including Containment. The meeting was held in Pisa, Italy, from 11 to 14 November 2002. The publication constitutes the report of the Technical Meeting. It includes short summaries of the presentations that were made and of the discussions as well as conclusions and

  3. The application of condensate water as an additional cooling media intermittently in condenser of a split air conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardita, I. N.; Subagia, I. W. A.

    2018-01-01

    The condensate water produced by indoor a split air conditioning is usually not utilized and thrown away into the environment. The result of measurement shows that the temperature of condensate water produced by split air conditioning is quite low, that is 19-22 °C at the rate of 16-20 mL / min and it has PH balance. Under such conditions, Air Condensate produced by split air conditioning should still be recovered as an additional cooling medium on the condenser. This research will re-investigate the use of condensate water as an intermittent additional cooling of the condenser to increase the cooling capacity and performance of the air conditioning system. This research is done by experimental method whose implementation includes; designing and manufacturing of experimental equipment, mounting measuring tools, experimental data retrieval, data processing and yield analysis. The experimental results show that the use of condensate water as an intermittent additional cooling medium on split air conditioning condenser can increase the refrigeration effect about 2%, cooling capacity about 4% and 7% of COP system. Experimental results also show a decrease in power consumption in the system compressor about 3%

  4. A Local Condensation Analysis Representing Two-phase Annular Flow in Condenser/radiator Capillary Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Amir

    1991-01-01

    NASA's effort for the thermal environmental control of the Space Station Freedom is directed towards the design, analysis, and development of an Active Thermal Control System (ATCS). A two phase, flow through condenser/radiator concept was baselined, as a part of the ATCS, for the radiation of space station thermal load into space. The proposed condenser rejects heat through direct condensation of ATCS working fluid (ammonia) in the small diameter radiator tubes. Analysis of the condensation process and design of condenser tubes are based on the available two phase flow models for the prediction of flow regimes, heat transfer, and pressure drops. The prediction formulas use the existing empirical relationships of friction factor at gas-liquid interface. An attempt is made to study the stability of interfacial waves in two phase annular flow. The formulation is presented of a stability problem in cylindrical coordinates. The contribution of fluid viscosity, surface tension, and transverse radius of curvature to the interfacial surface is included. A solution is obtained for Kelvin-Helmholtz instability problem which can be used to determine the critical and most dangerous wavelengths for interfacial waves.

  5. CFD modelling of condensers for freeze-drying processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Freeze-drying; condenser; CFD simulation; mathematical modelling; ... it is used for the stabilization and storage of delicate, heat-sensitive materials .... The effect of the surface mass transfer has been included in the continuity equation and.

  6. Supporting Calculations For Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajunen, A. J.; Tedeschi, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    This document provides supporting calculations for the preparation of the Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study report. The supporting calculations include equipment sizing, Hazard Category determination, and LAW Melter Decontamination Factor Adjustments

  7. Supporting Calculations For Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajunen, A. J.; Tedeschi, A. R.

    2012-09-18

    This document provides supporting calculations for the preparation of the Submerged Bed Scrubber Condensate Disposal Preconceptual Study report The supporting calculations include equipment sizing, Hazard Category determination, and LAW Melter Decontamination Factor Adjustments.

  8. Bubbler condenser related research work. Present situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-02-01

    Intensive discussions within the OECD Support Group on 'VVER-440 Bubbler Condenser Containment Research Work' between 1991 and 1994 demonstrated the need for supplementary research work to achieve an adequate level of basic knowledge. In 1994, the European Commission (EC) asked for a specific 'VVER-440/213 Bubble Condenser Qualification Feasibility Study', which was finished early in 1996, confirming the need for additional research in this field. The Feasibility study formed the basis for the Bubble Condenser Experimental Qualification Project (BCEQ) with two separate experimental activities to be executed within the frame of the PHARE/TACIS 2.13/95 project of the European Commission. A first activity served to study the thermal-hydraulic phenomena and the associated structure dynamic interactions. This part of the project was performed at EREC, in Elektrogorsk, Russia. The design of the test facility was based on the prototypical bubbler condenser configuration for the Hungarian Paks nuclear power plant. A second activity addressed the structural integrity of certain components of the bubbler condenser steel structures under DBA-typical conditions. This part of the project was performed at VUEZ, in Levice, Slovak Republic. The design of the components of this facility was based on the structural properties of the Dukovany and/or Bohunice nuclear power plants. A third component of the BCEQ project was specified later asking for analytical studies, which should be supported by a number of small-scale separate effects tests to be performed at SVUSS, in Bechovice, Czech Republic. The main experimental and analytical results of the BCEQ test campaigns have been presented and discussed within the frame of the 4. meeting of the Technical Advisory Committee to the BCEQ (Bubble Condenser Experimental Qualification) Project in Brussels in December 1999 and on occasion of the 11. OECD Support Group Meeting in Berlin in April 2000. The discussions had evidenced several

  9. Models of coherent exciton condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littlewood, P B; Eastham, P R; Keeling, J M J; Marchetti, F M; Simons, B D; Szymanska, M H

    2004-01-01

    That excitons in solids might condense into a phase-coherent ground state was proposed about 40 years ago, and has been attracting experimental and theoretical attention ever since. Although experimental confirmation has been hard to come by, the concepts released by this phenomenon have been widely influential. This tutorial review discusses general aspects of the theory of exciton and polariton condensates, focusing on the reasons for coherence in the ground state wavefunction, the BCS to Bose crossover(s) for excitons and for polaritons, and the relationship of the coherent condensates to standard lasers

  10. Models of coherent exciton condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littlewood, P B [Theory of Condensed Matter, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Eastham, P R [Theory of Condensed Matter, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Keeling, J M J [Theory of Condensed Matter, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Marchetti, F M [Theory of Condensed Matter, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Simons, B D [Theory of Condensed Matter, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Szymanska, M H [Theory of Condensed Matter, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2004-09-08

    That excitons in solids might condense into a phase-coherent ground state was proposed about 40 years ago, and has been attracting experimental and theoretical attention ever since. Although experimental confirmation has been hard to come by, the concepts released by this phenomenon have been widely influential. This tutorial review discusses general aspects of the theory of exciton and polariton condensates, focusing on the reasons for coherence in the ground state wavefunction, the BCS to Bose crossover(s) for excitons and for polaritons, and the relationship of the coherent condensates to standard lasers.

  11. Bose condensation in (random traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Zagrebnov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a non-interacting (perfect Bose-gas in random external potentials (traps. It is shown that a generalized Bose-Einstein condensation in the random eigenstates manifests if and only if the same occurs in the one-particle kinetic-energy eigenstates, which corresponds to the generalized condensation of the free Bose-gas. Moreover, we prove that the amounts of both condensate densities are equal. This statement is relevant for justification of the Bogoliubov approximation} in the theory of disordered boson systems.

  12. A color magnetic vortex condensate in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambjoern, J.; Olesen, P.

    1980-03-01

    It is shown that there exists a very close analogy between a lattice of vorticies in a superconductor near the critical field and a condensate of color magnetic flux tubes due to the unstable mode in QCD. This analogy makes it possible to identify a dynamical Higgs field in QCD. It is shown that the color magnetic flux tubes are quantized in terms of the center group Z(2) in the SU(2) case. In the case of SU(N) it is possible to select a color direction of the field such that one has Z(N) quantization. (Auth.)

  13. Dissipative phenomena in condensed matter some applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dattagupta, Sushanta

    2004-01-01

    From the field of nonequilibrium statistical physics, this graduate- and research-level volume treats the modeling and characterization of dissipative phenomena. A variety of examples from diverse disciplines like condensed matter physics, materials science, metallurgy, chemical physics etc. are discussed. Dattagupta employs the broad framework of stochastic processes and master equation techniques to obtain models for a wide range of experimentally relevant phenomena such as classical and quantum Brownian motion, spin dynamics, kinetics of phase ordering, relaxation in glasses, dissipative tunneling. It provides a pedagogical exposition of current research material and will be useful to experimentalists, computational physicists and theorists.

  14. Nuclear track evolution by capillary condensation during etching in SSNT detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martín-Landrove, R.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Palacios, D.

    2013-01-01

    The microscopic process taking place during chemical etching is described in terms of a dynamic framework governed by capillary condensation. The aim is to obtain physical information on how the cone shaped tracks with curved walls evolve during chemical etching under a close examination of first principles. The results obtained with the proposed theory are compared with published values to establish their range of validity. - Highlights: ► Capillary condensation seems to play a role at early etched track evolution. ► The etched track shape and the first principles behind it are easily related. ► In spite of its simplicity, theory was able to pass stringent experimental tests. ► Theory results have a simple analytical form which includes etch induction time

  15. Steam generators, turbines, and condensers. Volume six

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Volume six covers steam generators (How steam is generated, steam generation in a PWR, vertical U-tube steam generators, once-through steam generators, how much steam do steam generators make?), turbines (basic turbine principles, impulse turbines, reaction turbines, turbine stages, turbine arrangements, turbine steam flow, steam admission to turbines, turbine seals and supports, turbine oil system, generators), and condensers (need for condensers, basic condenser principles, condenser arrangements, heat transfer in condensers, air removal from condensers, circulating water system, heat loss to the circulating water system, factors affecting condenser performance, condenser auxiliaries)

  16. Novel Quantum Condensates in Excitonic Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littlewood, P. B.; Keeling, J. M. J.; Simons, B. D.; Eastham, P. R.; Marchetti, F. M.; Szymanska, M. H.

    2009-01-01

    These lectures interleave discussion of a novel physical problem of a new kind of condensate with teaching of the fundamental theoretical tools of quantum condensed matter field theory. Polaritons and excitons are light mass composite bosons that can be made inside solids in a number of different ways. As bosonic particles, they are liable to make a phase coherent ground state - generically called a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) - and these lectures present some models to describe that problem, as well as general approaches to the theory. The focus is very much to explain how mean-field-like approximations that are often presented heuristically can be derived in a systematic fashion by path integral methods. Going beyond the mean field theory then produces a systematic approach to calculation of the excitation energies, and the derivation of effective low energy theories that can be generalised to more complex dynamical and spatial situations than is practicable for the full theory, as well as to study statistical properties beyond the semi-classical regime. in particular, for the polariton problem, it allows one to connect the regimes of equilibrium BEC and non-equilibrium laser. The lectures are self-sufficient, but not highly detailed. The methodological aspects are covered in standard quantum field theory texts and the presentation here is deliberately cursory: the approach will be closest to the book of Altland and Simons. Since these lectures concern a particular type of condensate, reference should also be made to texts on BEC, for example by Pitaevskii and Stringari. A recent theoretically focussed review of polariton systems covers many of the technical issues associated with the polariton problem in greater depth and provides many further references.

  17. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  18. Investigation of the condensing vapor bubble behavior through CFD simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sablania, Sidharth; Verma, Akash; Goyal, P.; Dutta, Anu; Singh, R.K.

    2013-09-01

    In nuclear systems the sub-cooled boiling flow is an important problem due to the behavior of condensing vapor bubble which has a large effect on the heat transfer characteristics as well as pressure drops and flow instability. The sub-cooled boiling flows become very complex and dynamic phenomena by the vapor bubble-water interaction. This happens due to the boiling/condensation, break-up, and coalescence of the bubble and needs to be addressed for characterizing the above mentioned flow parameters. There have been many researches to analyze the behavior of bubble experimentally and analytically. However, it is very difficult to get complete information about the behavior of bubble because of ever changing interface between vapor and water phase due to bubble condensation/evaporation Therefore, it is necessary to carry out a CFD simulation for better understanding the complex phenomenon of the bubble behavior. The present work focuses on the simulation of condensing bubble in subcooled boiling flow using (Volume of Fluid) VOF method in the CFD code CFD-ACE+. In order to simulate the heat and mass transfer through the bubble interface, CFD modeling for the bubble condensation was developed by modeling the source terms in the governing equations of VOF model using the User-Defined Function (UDF) in CFD-ACE+ code. The effect of condensation on bubble behavior was analyzed by comparing the behavior of condensing bubble with that of adiabatic bubble. It was observed that the behavior of condensing bubble was different from that of non condensing bubble in respect of bubble shape, diameter, velocity etc. The results obtained from the present simulation in terms of various parameters such as bubble velocity, interfacial area and bubble volume agreed well with the reported experimental results verified with FLUENT code in available literature. Hence, this CFD-ACE+ simulation of single bubble condensation will be a useful computational fluid dynamics tool for analyzing the

  19. Computational condensed matter physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However, the electronic structure based investigations of structural stabilities at high pressures involve tedious trial and error effort, which is avoided in the ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. ... Thus in some sense, it mimics the phenomena taking place during the cohesion of solids. Therefore significant changes are ...

  20. Structural Dynamics of the GW182 Silencing Domain Including its RNA Recognition motif (RRM) Revealed by Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak-Rotowska, Maja K.; Tarnowski, Krzysztof; Rubin, Marcin; Fabian, Marc R.; Sonenberg, Nahum; Dadlez, Michal; Niedzwiecka, Anna

    2018-01-01

    The human GW182 protein plays an essential role in micro(mi)RNA-dependent gene silencing. miRNA silencing is mediated, in part, by a GW182 C-terminal region called the silencing domain, which interacts with the poly(A) binding protein and the CCR4-NOT deadenylase complex to repress protein synthesis. Structural studies of this GW182 fragment are challenging due to its predicted intrinsically disordered character, except for its RRM domain. However, detailed insights into the properties of proteins containing disordered regions can be provided by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX/MS). In this work, we applied HDX/MS to define the structural state of the GW182 silencing domain. HDX/MS analysis revealed that this domain is clearly divided into a natively unstructured part, including the CCR4-NOT interacting motif 1, and a distinct RRM domain. The GW182 RRM has a very dynamic structure, since water molecules can penetrate the whole domain in 2 h. The finding of this high structural dynamics sheds new light on the RRM structure. Though this domain is one of the most frequently occurring canonical protein domains in eukaryotes, these results are - to our knowledge - the first HDX/MS characteristics of an RRM. The HDX/MS studies show also that the α2 helix of the RRM can display EX1 behavior after a freezing-thawing cycle. This means that the RRM structure is sensitive to environmental conditions and can change its conformation, which suggests that the state of the RRM containing proteins should be checked by HDX/MS in regard of the conformational uniformity. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Solar engineering - a condensed course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broman, Lars

    2011-11-15

    The document represents the material covered in a condensed two-week course focusing on the most important thermal and PV solar energy engineering topics, while also providing some theoretical background.

  2. Review of steam jet condensation in a water pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Song, C. H.; Park, C. K.; Kang, H. S.; Jeon, H. G.; Yoon, Y. J.

    2002-01-01

    In the advanced nuclear power plants including APR1400, the SDVS is adopted to increase the plant safety using the concept of feed-and-bleed operation. In the case of the TLOFW, the POSRV located at the top of the pressurizer is expected to open due to the pressurization of the reactor coolant system and discharges steam and/or water mixture into the water pool, where the mixture is condensed. During the condensation of the mixture, thermal-hydraulic loads such as pressure and temperature variations are induced to the pool structure. For the pool structure design, such thermal-hydraulic aspects should be considered. Understanding the phenomena of the submerged steam jet condensation in a water pool is helpful for system designers to design proper pool structure, sparger, and supports etc. This paper reviews and evaluates the steam jet condensation in a water pool on the physical phenomena of the steam condensation including condensation regime map, heat transfer coefficient, steam plume, steam jet condensation load, and steam jet induced flow

  3. Neutron stars with kaon condensation in relativistic effective model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chen; Ma, Yugang; Qian, Weiliang; Yang, Jifeng

    2013-01-01

    Relativistic mean-field theory with parameter sets FSUGold and IU-FSU is extended to study the properties of neutron star matter in β equilibrium by including Kaon condensation. The mixed phase of normal baryons and Kaon condensation cannot exist in neutron star matter for the FSUGold model and the IU-FSU model. In addition, it is found that when the optical potential of the K - in normal nuclear matter U K ≳ -100 MeV, the Kaon condensation phase is absent in the inner cores of the neutron stars. (author)

  4. Ice-condenser aerosol tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Eschbach, E.J.; Winegardner, W.K.

    1991-09-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental investigation of aerosol particle transport and capture using a full-scale height and reduced-scale cross section test facility based on the design of the ice compartment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) ice-condenser containment system. Results of 38 tests included thermal-hydraulic as well as aerosol particle data. Particle retention in the test section was greatly influenced by thermal-hydraulic and aerosol test parameters. Test-average decontamination factor (DF) ranged between 1.0 and 36 (retentions between ∼0 and 97.2%). The measured test-average particle retentions for tests without and with ice and steam ranged between DF = 1.0 and 2.2 and DF = 2.4 and 36, respectively. In order to apparent importance, parameters that caused particle retention in the test section in the presence of ice were steam mole fraction (SMF), noncondensible gas flow rate (residence time), particle solubility, and inlet particle size. Ice-basket section noncondensible flows greater than 0.1 m 3 /s resulted in stable thermal stratification whereas flows less than 0.1 m 3 /s resulted in thermal behavior termed meandering with frequent temperature crossovers between flow channels. 10 refs., 66 figs., 16 tabs

  5. Condensation En Film Liquidesur Une Surface Verticale Bordant Un ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aims to obtain the necessary information for the characterization and the precision of the dynamics of the condensation phenomenon in order to ... show the effect of the permeability porous medium and inclination of the principal axes on the liquid film thickness, liquid mass flow rate and surface heat transfer rate.

  6. Anomalous heat transport and condensation in convection of cryogenic helium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, Pavel; Schmoranzer, D.; Hanzelka, Pavel; Sreenivasan, K. R.; Skrbek, L.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 20 (2013), s. 8036-8039 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP203/12/P897 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : two-phase convection * temperature inversion * condensation * rain formation Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 9.809, year: 2013

  7. Spontaneous symmetry breaking in spinor Bose-Einstein condensates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scherer, Manuel; Lücke, Bernd; Peise, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We present an analytical model for the theoretical analysis of spin dynamics and spontaneous symmetry breaking in a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). This allows for an excellent intuitive understanding of the processes and provides good quantitative agreement with the experimental results...

  8. Applications of holography to condensed matter physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Simon F.

    2012-10-01

    Holography is one of the key insights to emerge from string theory. It connects quantum gravity to field theory, and thereby provides a non-perturbative formulation of string theory. This has enabled progress on a range of theoretical issues, from the quantum description of spacetime to the calculation of scattering amplitudes in supersymmetric field theories. There have been important insights into both the field theories and the spacetime picture. More recently, applied holography has been the subject of intense and rapid development. The idea here is to use the spacetime description to address questions about strongly coupled field theory relevant to application areas such as finite-temperature QCD and condensed matter physics; the focus in this special issue is on the latter. This involves the study of field theory at finite temperature and with chemical potentials for appropriate charges, described in spacetime by charged black hole solutions. The use of holography to study these systems requires a significant extrapolation, from the field theories where classical gravitational calculations in the bulk are a useful approximation to the experimentally relevant theories. Nonetheless, the approach has had some striking qualitative successes, including the construction of holographic versions of superconducting or superfluid phase transitions, the identification of Fermi liquids with a variety of thermal behaviours, and the construction of a map between a class of gravity solutions and the hydrodynamic regime in the field theory. The use of holography provides a qualitatively new perspective on these aspects of strong coupling dynamics. In addition to insight into the behaviour of the strongly coupled field theories, this work has led to new insights into the bulk dynamics and a deeper understanding of holography. The purpose of this focus issue is to strengthen the connections between this direction and other gravitational research and to make the gravity

  9. Kinetic theory of collective exitations and damping in Bose-Einstein condensed gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Khawaja, U.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2000-01-01

    We calculate the frequencies and damping rates of the low-lying collective modes of a Bose-Einstein condensed gas at nonzero temperature. We use a complex nonlinear Schrödinger equation to determine the dynamics of the condensate atoms. In this manner we take into account both collisions between

  10. Kinetic theory of collective excitations and damping in Bose-Einstein condensed gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Khawaja, U.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2000-01-01

    We calculate the frequencies and damping rates of the low-lying collective modes of a Bose-Einstein condensed gas at nonzero temperature. We use a complex nonlinear Schrödinger equation to determine the dynamics of the condensate atoms, and couple it to a Boltzmann equation for the noncondensate

  11. Effective-mass analysis of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices: Stabilization and levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu, H.; Zhang, W.; Meystre, P.; Baksmaty, L.O.; Bigelow, N.P.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the time evolution of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a periodic optical potential. Using an effective mass formalism, we study the equation of motion for the envelope function modulating the Bloch states of the lattice potential. In particular, we show how the negative effective-mass affects the dynamics of the condensate

  12. Thermodynamic potential with condensate fields in an SU(2) model of QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, D.

    1996-06-01

    We calculate the thermodynamic potential of the quark-gluon plasma in an SU(2) model of QCD, taking into account the gluon condensate configuration with a constant A 4 -potential and a uniform chromomagnetic field H. Within this scheme the interplay of condensate fields, as well as the role of quarks in the possible dynamical stabilization of the system is investigated. (orig.)

  13. Capillary Condensation with a Grain of Salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarom, Michal; Marmur, Abraham

    2017-11-21

    Capillary condensation (CC), namely, the formation from the vapor of a stable phase of drops below the saturation pressure, is a prevalent phenomenon. It may occur inside porous structures or between surfaces of particles. CC between surfaces, a liquid "bridge", is of particular practical interest because of its resulting adhesive force. To date, studies have focused on pure water condensation. However, nonvolatile materials, such as salts and surfactants, are prevalent in many environments. In the current study, the effect of these contaminants on CC is investigated from a thermodynamic point of view. This is done by computing the Gibbs energy of such systems and developing the modified Kelvin equation, based on the Kohler theory. The results demonstrate that nonvolatile solutes may have a number of major effects, including an increase in the critical radius and the stabilization of the newly formed phase.

  14. Condensation induced water hammer driven sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullberg, Craig M.

    2004-05-11

    A method and apparatus (10) for treating a fluid or materials therein with acoustic energy has a vessel (14) for receiving the fluid with inner walls shaped to focus acoustic energy to a target zone within the vessel. One or more nozzles (26) are directed into the vessel (14) for injecting a condensable vapor, such as steam, into the vessel (14). The system may include a steam source (18) for providing steam as the condensable vapor from an industrial waste heat source. Steam drums (88) are disposed between the steam source (18) and nozzles (26) to equalize and distribute the vapor pressure. A cooling source (30) provides a secondary fluid for maintaining the liquid in the vessel (14) in subcooled conditions. A heating jacket (32) surrounds the vessel (14) to heat the walls of the vessel (14) and prevent biological growth thereon. A pressurizer (33) may operate the system at elevated pressures.

  15. Laser Processed Condensing Heat Exchanger Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott; Wright, Sarah; Wallace, Sarah; Hamilton, Tanner; Dennis, Alexander; Zuhlke, Craig; Roth, Nick; Sanders, John

    2017-01-01

    The reliance on non-permanent coatings in Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX) designs is a significant technical issue to be solved before long-duration spaceflight can occur. Therefore, high reliability CHXs have been identified by the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) as critical technologies needed to move beyond low earth orbit. The Laser Processed Condensing Heat Exchanger project aims to solve these problems through the use of femtosecond laser processed surfaces, which have unique wetting properties and potentially exhibit anti-microbial growth properties. These surfaces were investigated to identify if they would be suitable candidates for a replacement CHX surface. Among the areas researched in this project include microbial growth testing, siloxane flow testing in which laser processed surfaces were exposed to siloxanes in an air stream, and manufacturability.

  16. Continuous condensation device for vapors in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tricot, M.

    1983-01-01

    The continuous condensation device for vapors from the atmosphere is such those in which this atmosphere circulates in contact with a cold source involving the condensation of these vapors. It includes a thermoelectric module using the Peltier effect; the hot side is bonded to a heat sink and the cold side is in contact with an insulated condensation chamber in which flows the atmosphere charged with vapors to be condensated. The condensation chamber has a metallic structure through which a low voltage direct current is passed; this structure has small blades with holes, through which the condensate flows under gravity in the lower part of the chamber which have a hole to evacuate this liquid. The thermoelectric module comprises an assembly of thermocouples made of an array of alloy plates. The temperature inside the condensation chamber is maintained at just above 0 0 C. This device is used for the sampling of atmosphere water especially in the determination of tritium content of the atmosphere around nuclear installations [fr

  17. Multiple atomic dark solitons in cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theocharis, G.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Weller, A.; Ronzheimer, J. P.; Gross, C.; Oberthaler, M. K.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the stability and dynamics of multiple dark solitons in cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates. Our study is motivated by the fact that multiple matter-wave dark solitons may naturally form in such settings as per our recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 130401 (2008)]. First, we study the dark soliton interactions and show that the dynamics of well-separated solitons (i.e., ones that undergo a collision with relatively low velocities) can be analyzed by means of particle-like equations of motion. The latter take into regard the repulsion between solitons (via an effective repulsive potential) and the confinement and dimensionality of the system (via an effective parabolic trap for each soliton). Next, based on the fact that stationary, well-separated dark multisoliton states emerge as a nonlinear continuation of the appropriate excited eigenstates of the quantum harmonic oscillator, we use a Bogoliubov-de Gennes analysis to systematically study the stability of such structures. We find that for a sufficiently large number of atoms, multiple soliton states are dynamically stable, while for a small number of atoms, we predict a dynamical instability emerging from resonance effects between the eigenfrequencies of the soliton modes and the intrinsic excitation frequencies of the condensate. Finally, we present experimental realizations of multisoliton states including a three-soliton state consisting of two solitons oscillating around a stationary one and compare the relevant results to the predictions of the theoretical mean-field model.

  18. Stochastic Field evolution of disoriented chiral condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettencourt, Luis M.A.

    2003-01-01

    I present a summary of recent work [1] where we describe the time-evolution of a region of disoriented chiral condensate via Langevin field equations for the linear σ model. We analyze the model in equilibrium, paying attention to subtracting ultraviolet divergent classical terms and replacing them by their finite quantum counter-parts. We use results from lattice gauge theory and chiral perturbation theory to fix nonuniversal constants. The result is a ultraviolet cutoff independent theory that reproduces quantitatively the expected equilibrium behavior of pion and σ quantum fields. We also estimate the viscosity η(T), which controls the dynamical timescale in the Langevin equation, so that the near equilibrium dynamical response agrees with theoretical expectations

  19. Imbibition Triggered by Capillary Condensation in Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Olivier; Marguet, Bastien; Stroock, Abraham D

    2017-02-21

    We study the spatiotemporal dynamics of water uptake by capillary condensation from unsaturated vapor in mesoporous silicon layers (pore radius r p ≃ 2 nm), taking advantage of the local changes in optical reflectance as a function of water saturation. Our experiments elucidate two qualitatively different regimes as a function of the imposed external vapor pressure: at low vapor pressures, equilibration occurs via a diffusion-like process; at high vapor pressures, an imbibition-like wetting front results in fast equilibration toward a fully saturated sample. We show that the imbibition dynamics can be described by a modified Lucas-Washburn equation that takes into account the liquid stresses implied by Kelvin equation.

  20. Dual approaches for defects condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rougemont, Romulo; Grigorio, Leonardo de Souza; Wotzasek, Clovis [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Guimaraes, Marcelo Santos [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Full text. Due to the fact that the QCD running coupling constant becomes larger as we go into the low energy (or large distance) limit of the theory, a perturbative treatment of its infrared (IR) region is impossible. In particular, a formal mathematical demonstration of color confinement and a complete physical understanding of the exact mechanism that confines quarks and gluons are two missing points in our current knowledge of the IR-QCD. It was known that due to the Meissner effect of expulsion of magnetic fields in a electric condensate that usual superconductors should confine magnetic monopoles. That point led to the conjecture that the QCD vacuum could be a condensate of chromomagnetic monopoles, a dual superconductor (DSC). Such a chromomagnetic condensate should be responsible for the dual Meissner effect which is expected to lead to the confinement of color charges immersed in this medium. In dual superconductor models of color confinement, magnetic monopoles appear as topological defects in points of the space where the abelian projection becomes singular. Also, condensation of other kinds of defects such as vortices in superfluids and line-like defects in solids are responsible for a great variety of phase transitions, which once more proves the relevance of the subject. In the present work we review two methods that allow us to approach the condensation of defects: the Kleinert Mechanism (KM) and the Julia-Toulouse Mechanism (JTM). We show that in the limit where the vortex gauge field goes to zero, which we identify as the signature of the condensation of defects in the dual picture, these are two equivalent dual prescriptions for obtaining an effective theory for a phase where defects are condensed, starting from the fundamental theory defined in the normal phase where defects are diluted. (author)

  1. Condensation: the new deal; Condensation: la nouvelle donne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-06-01

    The principle of condensation boilers is based on the recovery of the latent heat of the steam generated by the combustion of natural gas. This technology was introduced in France at the end of the 80's but failed in its promise because of the complexity of the equipments available at that time. Today, constructors' offer is more mature and reliable and the context has changed. This technology can conciliate three goals: a mastery of energy consumptions, the comfort of the user and the respect of environment. This meeting organized by the research center of Gaz de France (Cegibat), was a good opportunity to makes a status of the market of individual condensation systems in France and in Europe, to present the situation of this technology today and the 10 golden rules for the fitting and maintenance of individual condensation boilers, and to present some technical references, examples and results of today's offer. (J.S.)

  2. Resource Letter HCMP-1: History of Condensed Matter Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Joseph D.

    2017-02-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on the history of condensed matter physics, including discussions of the development of the field and strategies for approaching its complicated historical trajectory. Following the presentation of general resources, journal articles and books are cited for the following topics: conceptual development; institutional and community structure; social, cultural, and political history; and connections between condensed matter physics and technology.

  3. Global variability of cloud condensation nuclei concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkonen, Risto; Krüger, Olaf

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols can influence cloud optical and dynamical processes by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Globally, these indirect aerosol effects are significant to the radiative budget as well as a source of high uncertainty in anthropogenic radiative forcing. While historically many global climate models have fixed CCN concentrations to a certain level, most state-of-the-art models calculate aerosol-cloud interactions with sophisticated methodologies based on interactively simulated aerosol size distributions. However, due to scarcity of atmospheric observations simulated global CCN concentrations remain poorly constrained. Here we assess global CCN variability with a climate model, and attribute potential trends during 2000-2010 to changes in emissions and meteorological fields. Here we have used ECHAM5.5-HAM2 with model M7 microphysical aerosol model. The model has been upgraded with a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) scheme including ELVOCs. Dust and sea salt emissions are calculated online, based on wind speed and hydrology. Each experiment is 11 years, analysed after a 6-month spin-up period. The MODIS CCN product (Terra platform) is used to evaluate model performance throughout 2000-2010. While optical remote observation of CCN column includes several deficiencies, the products serves as a proxy for changes during the simulation period. In our analysis we utilize the observed and simulated vertical column integrated CCN concentration, and limit our analysis only over marine regions. Simulated annual CCN column densities reach 2ṡ108 cm-2 near strong source regions in central Africa, Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal and China sea. The spatial concentration gradient in CCN(0.2%) is steep, and column densities drop to coasts. While the spatial distribution of CCN at 0.2% supersaturation is closer to that of MODIS proxy, as opposed to 1.0% supersaturation, the overall column integrated CCN are too low. Still, we can compare the relative response of CCN

  4. Condensation phenomena in BWR-pressure suppression containments under LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aust, E.; McCauley, E.W.; Niemann, H.R.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental studies on condensation phenomena in pressure suppression systems (PSS) have shown, that chugging produces the major dynamic loads in a PSS. Time correlation of digital and visual data have produced understanding of the essential physics of this phenomenon: chugging events are characterized by pipe outside and pipe inside condensation. Pipe outside condensation is smooth, sometimes accompanied by vent pipe acoustic frequency. Pipe inside condensation is ring-like and induces a strong pressure pulse with ringdown frequency. The steam ring is caused by the retreating steam front in the pipe exit, which acts as a BORDA-mouth. (orig.) [de

  5. Bose-Einstein condensation of light: general theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sob'yanin, Denis Nikolaevich

    2013-08-01

    A theory of Bose-Einstein condensation of light in a dye-filled optical microcavity is presented. The theory is based on the hierarchical maximum entropy principle and allows one to investigate the fluctuating behavior of the photon gas in the microcavity for all numbers of photons, dye molecules, and excitations at all temperatures, including the whole critical region. The master equation describing the interaction between photons and dye molecules in the microcavity is derived and the equivalence between the hierarchical maximum entropy principle and the master equation approach is shown. The cases of a fixed mean total photon number and a fixed total excitation number are considered, and a much sharper, nonparabolic onset of a macroscopic Bose-Einstein condensation of light in the latter case is demonstrated. The theory does not use the grand canonical approximation, takes into account the photon polarization degeneracy, and exactly describes the microscopic, mesoscopic, and macroscopic Bose-Einstein condensation of light. Under certain conditions, it predicts sub-Poissonian statistics of the photon condensate and the polarized photon condensate, and a universal relation takes place between the degrees of second-order coherence for these condensates. In the macroscopic case, there appear a sharp jump in the degrees of second-order coherence, a sharp jump and kink in the reduced standard deviations of the fluctuating numbers of photons in the polarized and whole condensates, and a sharp peak, a cusp, of the Mandel parameter for the whole condensate in the critical region. The possibility of nonclassical light generation in the microcavity with the photon Bose-Einstein condensate is predicted.

  6. Bose-Einstein condensation in an ultra-hot gas of pumped magnons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serga, Alexander A; Tiberkevich, Vasil S; Sandweg, Christian W; Vasyuchka, Vitaliy I; Bozhko, Dmytro A; Chumak, Andrii V; Neumann, Timo; Obry, Björn; Melkov, Gennadii A; Slavin, Andrei N; Hillebrands, Burkard

    2014-03-11

    Bose-Einstein condensation of quasi-particles such as excitons, polaritons, magnons and photons is a fascinating quantum mechanical phenomenon. Unlike the Bose-Einstein condensation of real particles (like atoms), these processes do not require low temperatures, since the high densities of low-energy quasi-particles needed for the condensate to form can be produced via external pumping. Here we demonstrate that such a pumping can create remarkably high effective temperatures in a narrow spectral region of the lowest energy states in a magnon gas, resulting in strikingly unexpected transitional dynamics of Bose-Einstein magnon condensate: the density of the condensate increases immediately after the external magnon flow is switched off and initially decreases if it is switched on again. This behaviour finds explanation in a nonlinear 'evaporative supercooling' mechanism that couples the low-energy magnons overheated by pumping with all the other thermal magnons, removing the excess heat, and allowing Bose-Einstein condensate formation.

  7. The moon as a high temperature condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    The accretion during condensation mechanism, if it occurs during the early over-luminous stage of the sun, can explain the differences in composition of the terrestrial planets and the moon. An important factor is the variation of pressure and temperature with distance from the sun, and in the case of the moon and captured satellites of other planets, with distance from the median plane. Current estimates of the temperature and pressure in the solar nebula suggest that condensation will not be complete in the vicinity of the terrestrial planets, and that depending on location, iron, magnesium silicates and the volatiles will be at least partially held in the gaseous phase and subject to separation from the dust by solar wind and magnetic effects associated with the transfer of angular momentum just before the sun joins the Main Sequence. Many of the properties of the moon, including the 'enrichment' in Ca, Al, Ti, U, Th, Ba, Sr and the REE and the 'depletion' in Fe, Rb, K, Na and other volatiles can be understood if the moon represents a high temperature condensate from the solar nebula.

  8. Transition to instability in a kicked Bose-Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chuanwei; Raizen, Mark G.; Liu Jie; Niu Qian

    2004-01-01

    A periodically kicked ring of a Bose-Einstein condensate is considered as a nonlinear generalization of the quantum kicked rotor. For weak interactions between atoms, periodic motion (antiresonance) becomes quasiperiodic (quantum beating) but remains stable. There exists a critical strength of interactions beyond which quasiperiodic motion becomes chaotic, resulting in an instability of the condensate manifested by exponential growth in the number of noncondensed atoms. Similar behavior is observed for dynamically localized states (essentially quasiperiodic motions), where stability remains for weak interactions but is destroyed by strong interactions

  9. Condensational theory of stationary tornadoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarieva, A.M.; Gorshkov, V.G.; Nefiodov, A.V.

    2011-01-01

    Using the Bernoulli integral for air streamline with condensing water vapor a stationary axisymmetric tornado circulation is described. The obtained profiles of vertical, radial and tangential velocities are in agreement with observations for the Mulhall tornado, world's largest on record and longest-lived among the three tornadoes for which 3D velocity data are available. Maximum possible vortex velocities are estimated. -- Highlights: → Water vapor condensation causes a logarithmic drop of air pressure towards tornado center. → The first ever theoretical description of tornado velocities is obtained. → The maximum vortex velocity grows logarithmically with decreasing tornado eye radius. → Air motion with high velocities can only develop in sufficiently large condensation areas.

  10. Introduction. Cosmology meets condensed matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibble, T W B; Pickett, G R

    2008-08-28

    At first sight, low-temperature condensed-matter physics and early Universe cosmology seem worlds apart. Yet, in the last few years a remarkable synergy has developed between the two. It has emerged that, in terms of their mathematical description, there are surprisingly close parallels between them. This interplay has been the subject of a very successful European Science Foundation (ESF) programme entitled COSLAB ('Cosmology in the Laboratory') that ran from 2001 to 2006, itself built on an earlier ESF network called TOPDEF ('Topological Defects: Non-equilibrium Field Theory in Particle Physics, Condensed Matter and Cosmology'). The articles presented in this issue of Philosophical Transactions A are based on talks given at the Royal Society Discussion Meeting 'Cosmology meets condensed matter', held on 28 and 29 January 2008. Many of the speakers had participated earlier in the COSLAB programme, but the strength of the field is illustrated by the presence also of quite a few new participants.

  11. Nucleation and condensation in the primitive solar nebula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, A.G.W.; Fegley, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that the primitive solar nebula may be modeled using the frictionally induced transport theory of Lynden-Bell and Pringle (1974) if the principal frictional mechanism within the nebula is turbulent viscosity. The present investigation is concerned with the construction of a model of a section of the primitive solar nebula as a basis for the study of nucleation and condensation processes within this section. The construction involves a relatively simple application of the Lynden-Bell and Pringle theory subject to steady mass flow conditions. The calculations which are conducted in connection with the investigation indicate that by the time the gas in the primitive solar nebula has become sufficiently supercooled to nucleate condensation centers, several different compounds, including the magnesium silicates forsterite and enstatite (MgSiO 3 ), will probably be able to condense on the growing condensation center

  12. Condensation of sodium on a micromachined surface for AMTEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowley, C.J.; Izenson, M.G.

    1993-01-01

    A novel condenser component is being developed to enable Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Conversion (AMTEC) technology to achieve two critical goals: (1) optimization of conversion efficiency and (2) microgravity fluid management. The first goal is achieved by minimizing parasitic radiation heat transfer losses for condensers with a large view factor to the high-temperature β double-prime-alumina surface. The condenser geometry includes a specially designed, micromachined surface where large capillary forces are used to manage the fluid distribution to accomplish the second goal. We present and discuss the results of separate effects experiments investigating the wetting and condensation behavior of sodium on this capillary surface. Test results show that the micromachined surface maintains a smooth, high reflective film of liquid sodium on the surface, which implies reduced parasitic losses and increased conversion efficiencies in AMTEC cells. Accomplishing this in an adverse gravity gradient demonstrates the potential for management of the fluid even under spacecraft acceleration conditions

  13. Minimum Leakage Condenser Test Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    This report presents the results and analysis of tests performed on four critical areas of large surface condensers: the tubes, tubesheets, tube/tubesheet joints and the water chambers. Significant changes in operation, service duty and the reliability considerations require that certain existing design criteria be verified and that improved design features be developed. The four critical areas were treated analytically and experimentally. The ANSYS finite element computer program was the basic analytical method and strain gages were used for obtaining experimental data. The results of test and analytical data are compared and recommendations made regarding potential improvement in condenser design features and analytical techniques

  14. Study of gluon condensates using the Bogolyubov transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iracane, Daniel

    1985-01-01

    We describe the ground state of non-perturbative QCD as a gluon condensate. In the framework of the Coulomb gauge Hamiltonian, we introduce an effective interaction between infrared gluons by removing high-momentum gluons. The Bogoliubov transformation provides us with our variational space. The minimisation over this Fock subspace leads to a non-perturbative vacuum and its excitations. The minimum functional space for a boson dynamic is a distribution set. We find two kinds of condensation. The first one occurs only for zero-momentum states and looks like the Bose Condensation. In the second one, the quasiparticle spectrum shows a finite gap and the vacuum is a superconducting state. We give constraints on the interaction so that the superconducting phase is more bounded than the Bose one. (author) [fr

  15. Comparison of condensation correlations in CATHARE for modelling isolation condenser experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorjonen, J.; Kalli, H.

    1996-01-01

    CATHARE is a thermal-hydraulic computer code developed at the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble (CENG) for nuclear power plant safety analysis. Behaviour of a new Cathare condensation correlation have been studied. The code has been applied to Isolation Condenser (IC) experiment conducted in PIPER-ONE facility. PIPER-ONE simulates a General Electric BWR-6 with volume and height scaling ratios 1/2200 and 1/1, respectively. The facility is installed at Dipartimento di Costruzioni Meccaniche e Nucleari of Pisa University. The facility was equipped with an once-through heat exchanger immersed in a pool of ambient temperature water, installed roughly 10 m above the core, in the aim to reproduce qualitatively the phenomenologies expected for Isolation Condenser in the Simplified BWR (SBWR). Experiment PO-IC-02 included two subsequent power levels with initial pressure of 5.1 MPa. The IC was active during the whole experiment except in the time period between the two different power levels. A previous calculation of above mentioned experiment by Cathare2 V1.3E showed some lacks in the condensation correlation of the code. A new correlation has been developed in Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble (CENG). The new calculation of the PO-IC-02 experiment by Cathare2 Vl.3U 1 with the new correlation gave results consistent with the experiment in the condensing zone of the IC. Also the overall pressure trend was reproduced with estimated heat losses to the environment. A comparison with previously obtained Relap5/Mod3. 1 results is also shown in the present document. (author) (18 refs.)

  16. Discrete breathers in Bose–Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzosi, Roberto; Politi, Antonio; Livi, Roberto; Oppo, Gian-Luca

    2011-01-01

    Discrete breathers, originally introduced in the context of biopolymers and coupled nonlinear oscillators, are also localized modes of excitation of Bose–Einstein condensates (BEC) in periodic potentials such as those generated by counter-propagating laser beams in an optical lattice. Static and dynamical properties of breather states are analysed in the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation that is derived in the limit of deep potential wells, tight-binding and the superfluid regime of the condensate. Static and mobile breathers can be formed by progressive re-shaping of initial Gaussian wave-packets or by transporting atomic density towards dissipative boundaries of the lattice. Static breathers generated via boundary dissipations are determined via a transfer-matrix approach and discussed in the two analytic limits of highly localized and very broad profiles. Mobile breathers that move across the lattice are well approximated by modified analytical expressions derived from integrable models with two independent parameters: the core-phase gradient and the peak amplitude. Finally, possible experimental realizations of discrete breathers in BEC in optical lattices are discussed in the presence of residual harmonic trapping and in interferometry configurations suitable to investigate discrete breathers' interactions. (invited article)

  17. On condensation-induced waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, W.; Luo, X.; Dongen, van M.E.H.

    2010-01-01

    Complex wave patterns caused by unsteady heat release due to cloud formation in confined compressible flows are discussed. Two detailed numerical studies of condensation-induced waves are carried out. First, the response of a flow of nitrogen in a slender Laval nozzle to a sudden addition of water

  18. KAON CONDENSATION IN NEUTRON STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RAMOS, A.; SCHAFFNER-BIELICH, J.; WAMBACH, J.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the kaon-nucleon interaction and its consequences for the change of the properties of the kaon in the medium. The onset of kaon condensation in neutron stars under various scenarios as well its effects for neutron star properties are reviewed

  19. Thermodynamic entanglement of magnonic condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, H. Y.; Yung, Man-Hong

    2018-02-01

    Over the past decade, significant progress has been achieved to create Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) of magnetic excitations, i.e., magnons, at room temperature, which is a novel quantum many-body system with a strong spin-spin correlation, and contains potential applications in magnonic spintronics. For quantum information science, the magnonic condensates can become an attractive source of quantum entanglement, which plays a central role in most of the quantum information processing tasks. Here we theoretically study the entanglement properties of a magnon gas above and below the condensation temperature. We show that the thermodynamic entanglement of the spins is a manifestation of the off-diagonal long-range order; the entanglement of the condensate does not vanish, even if the spins are separated by an infinitely long distance, which is fundamentally distinct from the normal magnetic ordering below the Curie temperature. In addition, the phase-transition point occurs when the derivative of the entanglement changes abruptly. These results provide a theoretical foundation for a future investigation of the magnon BEC in terms of quantum entanglement.

  20. Rotary condenser for SC2

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    During 1975 the SC2 performance was improved among other things by redesigning some of the elements of the ROTCO (Annual Report 1975, p. 55). The photo shows an interior wiew of the housing of the rotary condenser and of the sixteen sets of shaped stator blades.

  1. Approaching Bose-Einstein Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Loris

    2011-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) is discussed at the level of an advanced course of statistical thermodynamics, clarifying some formal and physical aspects that are usually not covered by the standard pedagogical literature. The non-conventional approach adopted starts by showing that the continuum limit, in certain cases, cancels out the crucial…

  2. Capillary condenser/evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Javier A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A heat transfer device is disclosed for transferring heat to or from a fluid that is undergoing a phase change. The heat transfer device includes a liquid-vapor manifold in fluid communication with a capillary structure thermally connected to a heat transfer interface, all of which are disposed in a housing to contain the vapor. The liquid-vapor manifold transports liquid in a first direction and conducts vapor in a second, opposite direction. The manifold provides a distributed supply of fluid (vapor or liquid) over the surface of the capillary structure. In one embodiment, the manifold has a fractal structure including one or more layers, each layer having one or more conduits for transporting liquid and one or more openings for conducting vapor. Adjacent layers have an increasing number of openings with decreasing area, and an increasing number of conduits with decreasing cross-sectional area, moving in a direction toward the capillary structure.

  3. Condensation and transport in the totally asymmetric inclusion process (TASIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knebel, Johannes; Weber, Markus F.; Krueger, Torben; Frey, Erwin

    Transport phenomena are often modeled by the hopping of particles on regular lattices or networks. Such models describe, e.g., the exclusive movement of molecular motors along microtubules: no two motors may occupy the same site. In our work, we study inclusion processes that are the bosonic analogues of the fermionic exclusion processes. In inclusion processes, many particles may occupy a single site and hopping rates depend linearly on the occupation of departure and arrival sites. Particles thus attract other particles to their own site. Condensation occurs when particles collectively cluster in one or multiple sites, whereas other sites become depleted.We showed that inclusion processes describe both the selection of strategies in evolutionary zero-sum games and the condensation of non-interacting bosons into multiple quantum states in driven-dissipative systems. The condensation is captured by the antisymmetric Lotka-Volterra equation (ALVE), which constitutes a nonlinearly coupled dynamical system. We derived an algebraic method to analyze the ALVE and to determine the condensates. Our approach allows for the design of networks that result in condensates with oscillating occupations, and yields insight into the interplay between network topology and transport properties. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (SFB-TR12), German Excellence Initiative (Nanosystems Initiative Munich), Center for NanoScience Munich.

  4. Temperature dependence of the coherence in polariton condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozas, E.; Martín, M. D.; Tejedor, C.; Viña, L.; Deligeorgis, G.; Hatzopoulos, Z.; Savvidis, P. G.

    2018-02-01

    We present a time-resolved experimental study of the temperature effect on the coherence of traveling polariton condensates. The simultaneous detection of their emission both in real and reciprocal space allows us to fully monitor the condensates' dynamics. We obtain fringes in reciprocal space as a result of the interference between polariton wave packets (WPs) traveling with the same speed. The periodicity of these fringes is inversely proportional to the spatial distance between the interfering WPs. In a similar fashion, we obtain interference fringes in real space when WPs traveling in opposite directions meet. The visibility of both real- and reciprocal-space interference fringes rapidly decreases with increasing temperature and vanishes. A theoretical description of the phase transition, considering the coexistence of condensed and noncondensed particles, for an out-of-equilibrium condensate such as ours is still missing, yet a comparison with theories developed for atomic condensates allows us to infer a critical temperature for the BEC-like transition when the visibility goes to zero.

  5. Modeling of Kerena Emergency Condenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryk, Rafał; Schmidt, Holger; Mull, Thomas; Wagner, Thomas; Ganzmann, Ingo; Herbst, Oliver

    2017-12-01

    KERENA is an innovative boiling water reactor concept equipped with several passive safety systems. For the experimental verification of performance of the systems and for codes validation, the Integral Test Stand Karlstein (INKA) was built in Karlstein, Germany. The emergency condenser (EC) system transfers heat from the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) to the core flooding pool in case of water level decrease in the RPV. EC is composed of a large number of slightly inclined tubes. During accident conditions, steam enters into the tubes and condenses due to the contact of the tubes with cold water at the secondary side. The condensed water flows then back to the RPV due to gravity. In this paper two approaches for modeling of condensation in slightly inclined tubes are compared and verified against experiments. The first approach is based on the flow regime map. Depending on the regime, heat transfer coefficient is calculated according to specific semi-empirical correlation. The second approach uses a general, fully-empirical correlation. The models are developed with utilization of the object-oriented Modelica language and the open-source OpenModelica environment. The results are compared with data obtained during a large scale integral test, simulating loss of coolant accident performed at Integral Test Stand Karlstein (INKA). The comparison shows a good agreement.Due to the modularity of models, both of them may be used in the future in systems incorporating condensation in horizontal or slightly inclined tubes. Depending on his preferences, the modeller may choose one-equation based approach or more sophisticated model composed of several exchangeable semi-empirical correlations.

  6. Modeling of Kerena Emergency Condenser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryk Rafał

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available KERENA is an innovative boiling water reactor concept equipped with several passive safety systems. For the experimental verification of performance of the systems and for codes validation, the Integral Test Stand Karlstein (INKA was built in Karlstein, Germany. The emergency condenser (EC system transfers heat from the reactor pressure vessel (RPV to the core flooding pool in case of water level decrease in the RPV. EC is composed of a large number of slightly inclined tubes. During accident conditions, steam enters into the tubes and condenses due to the contact of the tubes with cold water at the secondary side. The condensed water flows then back to the RPV due to gravity. In this paper two approaches for modeling of condensation in slightly inclined tubes are compared and verified against experiments. The first approach is based on the flow regime map. Depending on the regime, heat transfer coefficient is calculated according to specific semi-empirical correlation. The second approach uses a general, fully-empirical correlation. The models are developed with utilization of the object-oriented Modelica language and the open-source OpenModelica environment. The results are compared with data obtained during a large scale integral test, simulating loss of coolant accident performed at Integral Test Stand Karlstein (INKA. The comparison shows a good agreement.Due to the modularity of models, both of them may be used in the future in systems incorporating condensation in horizontal or slightly inclined tubes. Depending on his preferences, the modeller may choose one-equation based approach or more sophisticated model composed of several exchangeable semi-empirical correlations.

  7. Implementation of wall film condensation model to two-fluid model in component thermal hydraulic analysis code CUPID - 15237

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Park, G.C.; Cho, H.K.

    2015-01-01

    In the containment of a nuclear reactor, the wall condensation occurs when containment cooling system and structures remove the mass and energy release and this phenomenon is of great importance to ensure containment integrity. If the phenomenon occurs in the presence of non-condensable gases, their accumulation near the condensate film leads to significant reduction in heat transfer during the condensation. This study aims at simulating the wall film condensation in the presence of non-condensable gas using CUPID, a computational multi-fluid dynamics code, which is developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) for the analysis of transient two-phase flows in nuclear reactor components. In order to simulate the wall film condensation in containment, the code requires a proper wall condensation model and liquid film model applicable to the analysis of the large scale system. In the present study, the liquid film model and wall film condensation model were implemented in the two-fluid model of CUPID. For the condensation simulation, a wall function approach with heat and mass transfer analogy was applied in order to save computational time without considerable refinement for the boundary layer. This paper presents the implemented wall film condensation model and then, introduces the simulation result using CUPID with the model for a conceptual condensation problem in a large system. (authors)

  8. Hidden Scale Invariance in Condensed Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    . This means that the phase diagram becomes effectively one-dimensional with regard to several physical properties. Liquids and solids with isomorphs include most or all van der Waals bonded systems and metals, as well as weakly ionic or dipolar systems. On the other hand, systems with directional bonding...... (hydrogen bonds or covalent bonds) or strong Coulomb forces generally do not exhibit hidden scale invariance. The article reviews the theory behind this picture of condensed matter and the evidence for it coming from computer simulations and experiments...

  9. Potentially Prebiotic Syntheses of Condensed Phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Anthony D.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1996-01-01

    In view of the importance of a prebiotic source of high energy phosphates, we have investigated a number of potentially prebiotic processes to produce condensed phosphates from orthophosphate and cyclic trimetaphosphate from tripolyphosphate. The reagents investigated include polymerizing nitriles, acid anhydrides, lactones, hexamethylene tetramine and carbon suboxide. A number of these processes give substantial yields of pyrophosphate from orthophosphate and trimetaphosphate from tripolyphosphate. Although these reactions may have been applicable in local areas, they are not sufficiently robust to have been of importance in the prebiotic open ocean.

  10. Construction of the blowdown and condensation loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Choon Kyung; Song, Chul Kyung; Cho, Seok; Chun, S. Y.; Chung, Moon Ki

    1997-12-01

    The blowdown and condensation loop (B and C loop) has been constructed to get experimental data for designing the safety depressurization system (SDS) and steam sparger which are considered to implement in the Korea Next Generation Reactor (KNGR). In this report, system description on the B and C loop is given in detail, which includes the drawings and technical specification of each component, instrumentation and control system, and the operational procedures and the results of the performance testing. (author). 7 refs., 11 tabs., 48 figs.

  11. Molecular simulation of steady-state evaporation and condensation in the presence of a non-condensable gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel

    2018-02-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study evaporation and condensation of fluid Ar in the presence of a non-condensable Ne gas in a nanochannel. The evaporation and condensation are driven by the temperature difference, ΔTL, between the evaporating and condensing liquid surfaces. The steady-state evaporation and condensation fluxes (JMD) are also affected by the Ne concentration, ρNe, and the nanochannel length. We find that across a wide range of ΔTL and ρNe, JMD is in good agreement with the prediction from Stefan's law and from Schrage relationships. Furthermore, for ΔTL less than ˜20% of the absolute average temperature, we find that both steady-state heat and mass fluxes are proportional to ΔTL. This allows us to determine the interfacial resistance to the heat and mass transfer and compare it with the corresponding resistances in the gas phase. In this context, we derive an analytical expression for the effective thermal conductivity of the gas region in the nanochannel and the mass transport interfacial resistance equivalent length, i.e., the length of the nanochannel for which the resistance to the mass flow is the same as the interfacial resistance to the mass flow.

  12. Quantum Quenches in a Spinor Condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamacraft, Austen

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the ordering of a spin-1 condensate when quenched from its paramagnetic phase to its ferromagnetic phase by reducing the magnetic field. We first elucidate the nature of the equilibrium quantum phase transition. Quenching rapidly through this transition reveals XY ordering either at a specific wave vector, or the ''light-cone'' correlations familiar from relativistic theories, depending on the end point of the quench. For a quench proceeding at a finite rate the ordering scale is governed by the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The creation of vortices through growth of the magnetization fluctuations is also discussed. The long-time dynamics again depends on the end point, conserving the order parameter in a zero field, but not at a finite field, with differing exponents for the coarsening of magnetic order. The results are discussed in the light of a recent experiment by Sadler et al

  13. Design of spiral fin type condenser for hydrogen cryogenic distillation column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Yasunori; Nishi, Masataka; Yamanishi, Toshihiko

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is the proposal of new concept condenser for hydrogen cryogenic distillation column of Hydrogen Isotope Separation System (ISS) in a fusion reactor, and the establishment of numerical evaluation method of the hydrogen isotope inventory in the condenser. A large amount of hydrogen isotopes including high concentration of tritium, radioactive hydrogen isotope, has been handled in the cryogenic distillation column. Therefore, from the safety point of view, cryogenic coolant tube was commonly arranged to surround the condensed area to prevent the mixing of tritium into the coolant. This inevitable arrangement leads the difficulty in the minimization of the condenser. The scale of condenser has influence on the scale of the ISS and its earthquake-resistance. The spiral fin type condenser, which introduces fins inside it and in coolant tube to enhance heat exchange, is proposed as a new concept condenser for hydrogen cryogenic distillation column to miniaturize the condenser. The volume of spiral fin type condenser is estimated to become less than half of that of coil tube type condenser currently in use. Accordingly, it is found that the adoption of spiral fin type condenser realizes the significant miniaturization of the ISS. Moreover, the numerical evaluation method of the hydrogen isotope inventory in the condenser is proposed. The validity of this method was confirmed by the experimental data. The synthetic design of the condenser for the hydrogen cryogenic distillation column is achieved by the combination of the proposed new concept condenser with the numerical evaluation method of the hydrogen isotope inventory. (author)

  14. Coherence and chaos in condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: nonlinearity in condensed matter; coherence and chaos in spatially extended condensed matter systems; nonlinearity and magnetism; and solitons and conducting polymers. 52 refs., 7 figs

  15. Measurement of the structure functions F2 and xF3 and comparison with QCD predictions including kinematical and dynamical higher twist effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varvell, K.; Wells, J.; Sansum, R.A.; Bullock, F.W.; Fitch, P.J.; Armenise, N.; Calicchio, M.; Erriquez, O.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ruggieri, F.; Baton, J.P.; Gerbier, G.; Kasper, P.; Kochowski, C.; Neveu, M.; Brisson, V.; Petiau, P.; Vallee, C.; Clayton, E.F.; Iaselli, G.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Petrides, A.; Jones, G.T.; Middleton, R.P.; O'Neale, S.W.; Mermikides, M.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.

    1987-01-01

    The isoscalar nucleon structure functions F 2 (x,Q 2 ) and xF 3 (x,Q 2 ) are measured in the range 0 2 2 , 1.7 2 2 , x 2 values, it is found that a low Λsub(anti Manti S) value in the neighbourhood of 100 MeV describes the data adequately and that the contribution of dynamical higher twist effects is small and negative. (orig.)

  16. Harvesting liquid from unsaturated vapor - nanoflows induced by capillary condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Olivier; Marguet, Bastien; Stroock, Abraham

    2016-11-01

    A vapor, even subsaturated, can spontaneously form liquid in nanoscale spaces. This process, known as capillary condensation, plays a fundamental role in various contexts, such as the formation of clouds or the dynamics of hydrocarbons in the geological subsurface. However, large uncertainties remain on the thermodynamics and fluid mechanics of the phenomenon, due to experimental challenges as well as outstanding questions about the validity of macroscale physics at the nanometer scale. We studied experimentally the spatio-temporal dynamics of water condensation in a model nanoporous medium (pore radius 2 nm), taking advantage of the color change of the material upon hydration. We found that at low relative humidities ( 60 % RH, driven by a balance between the pore capillary pressure and the condensation stress given by Kelvin equation. Further analyzing the imbibition dynamics as a function of saturation allowed us to extract detailed information about the physics of nano-confined fluids. Our results suggest excellent extension of macroscale fluid dynamics and thermodynamics even in pores 10 molecules in diameter.

  17. Charge Screening in a Charged Condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabadadze, Gregory; Rosen, Rachel A.

    2009-01-01

    We consider a highly dense system of helium-4 nuclei and electrons in which the helium-4 nuclei have condensed. We present the condensation mechanism in the framework of low energy effective field theory and discuss the screening of electric charge in the condensate.

  18. Some issues in the ghost condensation scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimov, A.

    2004-01-01

    In the recently proposed 'ghost condensation' scenario a model of consistent infrared modification of gravity was suggested. We first review the basic ideas of this scenario. We discuss various phenomenological aspects of the ghost condensation, such as stability of the condensate, bounds on the UV cut-off scale of the corresponding effective field theory and other issues. (author)

  19. Computations for a condenser. Experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walden, Jean.

    1975-01-01

    Computations for condensers are presented with experimental results. The computations are concerned with the steam flux at the condenser input, and inside the tube bundle. Experimental results are given for the flux inside the condenser sleeve and the flow passing through the tube bundle [fr

  20. CO2 capture by Condensed Rotational Separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benthum, van R.J.; Kemenade, van H.P.; Brouwers, J.J.H.; Golombok, M.

    2010-01-01

    Condensed Rotational Separation (CRS) technology is a patented method to upgrade gas mixtures. A novel application is thecapture of CO2 from coal-combustion fired power stations: Condensed Contaminant Centrifugal Separation in Coal Combustion(C5sep). CRS involves partial condensation of a gas

  1. Improved Cloud Condensation Nucleus Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    2010-01-01

    An improved thermal-gradient cloud condensation nucleus spectrometer (CCNS) has been designed to provide several enhancements over prior thermal- gradient counters, including fast response and high-sensitivity detection covering a wide range of supersaturations. CCNSs are used in laboratory research on the relationships among aerosols, supersaturation of air, and the formation of clouds. The operational characteristics of prior counters are such that it takes long times to determine aerosol critical supersaturations. Hence, there is a need for a CCNS capable of rapid scanning through a wide range of supersaturations. The present improved CCNS satisfies this need. The improved thermal-gradient CCNS (see Figure 1) incorporates the following notable features: a) The main chamber is bounded on the top and bottom by parallel thick copper plates, which are joined by a thermally conductive vertical wall on one side and a thermally nonconductive wall on the opposite side. b) To establish a temperature gradient needed to establish a supersaturation gradient, water at two different regulated temperatures is pumped through tubes along the edges of the copper plates at the thermally-nonconductive-wall side. Figure 2 presents an example of temperature and supersaturation gradients for one combination of regulated temperatures at the thermally-nonconductive-wall edges of the copper plates. c) To enable measurement of the temperature gradient, ten thermocouples are cemented to the external surfaces of the copper plates (five on the top plate and five on the bottom plate), spaced at equal intervals along the width axis of the main chamber near the outlet end. d) Pieces of filter paper or cotton felt are cemented onto the interior surfaces of the copper plates and, prior to each experimental run, are saturated with water to establish a supersaturation field inside the main chamber. e) A flow of monodisperse aerosol and a dilution flow of humid air are introduced into the main

  2. Aerosol simulation including chemical and nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwil, E.S.; Lemmon, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical simulation of aerosol transport, including the effects of chemical and nuclear reactions presents a challenging dynamic accounting problem. Particles of different sizes agglomerate and settle out due to various mechanisms, such as diffusion, diffusiophoresis, thermophoresis, gravitational settling, turbulent acceleration, and centrifugal acceleration. Particles also change size, due to the condensation and evaporation of materials on the particle. Heterogeneous chemical reactions occur at the interface between a particle and the suspending medium, or a surface and the gas in the aerosol. Homogeneous chemical reactions occur within the aersol suspending medium, within a particle, and on a surface. These reactions may include a phase change. Nuclear reactions occur in all locations. These spontaneous transmutations from one element form to another occur at greatly varying rates and may result in phase or chemical changes which complicate the accounting process. This paper presents an approach for inclusion of these effects on the transport of aerosols. The accounting system is very complex and results in a large set of stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The techniques for numerical solution of these ODEs require special attention to achieve their solution in an efficient and affordable manner. 4 refs

  3. Fundamentals of condensed matter physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Marvin L

    2016-01-01

    Based on an established course and covering the fundamentals, central areas, and contemporary topics of this diverse field, Fundamentals of Condensed Matter Physics is a much-needed textbook for graduate students. The book begins with an introduction to the modern conceptual models of a solid from the points of view of interacting atoms and elementary excitations. It then provides students with a thorough grounding in electronic structure as a starting point to understand many properties of condensed matter systems - electronic, structural, vibrational, thermal, optical, transport, magnetic and superconductivity - and methods to calculate them. Taking readers through the concepts and techniques, the text gives both theoretically and experimentally inclined students the knowledge needed for research and teaching careers in this field. It features 200 illustrations, 40 worked examples and 150 homework problems for students to test their understanding. Solutions to the problems for instructors are available at w...

  4. Measuring condensate fraction in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarty, Sudip; Kee, Hae-Young

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of off-diagonal long-range order in superconductors shows that the spin-spin correlation function is significantly influenced by the order if the order parameter is anisotropic on a microscopic scale. Thus, magnetic neutron scattering can provide a direct measurement of the condensate fraction of a superconductor. It is also argued that recent measurements in high-temperature superconductors come very close to achieving this goal. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  5. Advances in condensed matter optics

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Liangyao; Jiang, Xunya; Jin, Kuijuan; Liu, Hui; Zhao, Haibin

    2015-01-01

    This book describes some of the more recent progresses and developmentsin the study of condensed matter optics in both theoretic and experimental fields.It will help readers, especially graduate students and scientists who are studying and working in the nano-photonic field, to understand more deeply the characteristics of light waves propagated in nano-structure-based materials with potential applications in the future.

  6. LOFCON-LOFT condenser program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmon, E.C.; MacKay, D.B.

    1978-01-01

    LOFCON is a program developed for the LOFT air condenser system contained in the secondary coolant system. Although the basic theory described herein is general, the program given is not--it is specifically for the LOFT configuration. LOFCON is presented in subroutine form so that it may be easily incorporated into a larger program describing the complete secondary side. Specifically LOFCON was written to be incorporated into the detailed CSMP model of the LOFT secondary coolant system simulation

  7. Theory of laminar film condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, Tetsu

    1991-01-01

    Since the petroleum crisis in the 1970s, a lot of effort to save energy was made in industry, and remarkable achievements have been made. In the research and development concerning thermal energy, however, it was clar­ ified that one of the most important problems was manufacturing con­ densing systems with smaller size and higher performance. To solve this problem we need a method which synthesizes selections_ of the type of con­ denser, cooling tube and its arrangement, assessment of fouling on the cooling surfaces, consideration of transient characteristics of a condenser, etc. The majority of effort, however, has been to devise a surface element which enhances the heat transfer coefficient in condensation of a single or multicomponent vapor. Condensation phenomena are complexly affected by a lot of physical property values, and accordingly the results of theo­ retical research are expressed with several dimensionless parameters. On the other hand, the experimental research is limited to those with som...

  8. Scandinavian experience of titanium condensers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multer, I.; Hedstroem, M.

    1985-01-01

    The Albrass condenser tubing in Sweden and Finnish nuclear power plants has caused much concern. After the appearance of the first tube leak, the deterioration has been very rapid. A typical development is represented by the Ringhals unit 2 eddy current (EC) measurements. They are, despite the difference in salinity, almost identical with Forsmark units 1 and 2 and units 1 and 2 of the TVO power company at Olkiluoto, Finland. For instance, in summer 1984, 3000 tubes were plugged in TVO 2 after four years of operation. The cause was pitting and/or erosion-corrosion. The failure rate, although the plugging criteria have been different from the EPRI concept, has exceeded that reported in the US and UK; and it has been necessary, especially with the strict feed water chemistry requirements in the PWR's, to arrange for retubing after a very short time, approximately 3 years after the first leak. The history of the nuclear plant condensers is shown; the average condenser life span has been approximately 6.5 years

  9. Accelerators for condensed matter research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    The requirement for high energy, high luminosity beams has stimulated the science and engineering of accelerators to a point where they open up opportunities for new areas of scientific application to benefit from the advances driven by particle physics. One area of great importance is the use of electron or positron storage rings as a source of intense VUV or X-ray synchrotron radiation. An accelerator application that has grown in prominence over the last 10 years has been spallation neutron sources. Neutrons offer an advantage over X-rays as a condensed matter probe because the neutron energy is usually of the same order as the room temperature thermal energy fluctuations in the sample being studied. Another area in which accelerators are playing an increasingly important role in condensed matter research concerns the use of Mu mesons, Muons, as a probe. This paper also presents a description of the ISIS Spallation Neutron Source. The design and status of the facility are described, and examples are given of its application to the study of condensed matter. (N.K.)

  10. Condensation on Slippery Asymmetric Bumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-11-01

    Controlling dropwise condensation by designing surfaces that enable droplets to grow rapidly and be shed as quickly as possible is fundamental to water harvesting systems, thermal power generation, distillation towers, etc. However, cutting-edge approaches based on micro/nanoscale textures suffer from intrinsic trade-offs that make it difficult to optimize both growth and transport at once. Here we present a conceptually different design approach based on principles derived from Namib desert beetles, cacti, and pitcher plants that synergistically couples both aspects of condensation and outperforms other synthetic surfaces. Inspired by an unconventional interpretation of the role of the beetle's bump geometry in promoting condensation, we show how to maximize vapor diffusion flux at the apex of convex millimetric bumps by optimizing curvature and shape. Integrating this apex geometry with a widening slope analogous to cactus spines couples rapid drop growth with fast directional transport, by creating a free energy profile that drives the drop down the slope. This coupling is further enhanced by a slippery, pitcher plant-inspired coating that facilitates feedback between coalescence-driven growth and capillary-driven motion. We further observe an unprecedented six-fold higher exponent in growth rate and much faster shedding time compared to other surfaces. We envision that our fundamental understanding and rational design strategy can be applied to a wide range of phase change applications.

  11. Condensation During Nuclear Reactor Loca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rihan, Y.; Teamah, M.; Sorour, M.; Soliman, S.

    2008-01-01

    Two-phase channel flow with condensation is a common phenomenon occurs in a number of nuclear reactor accident scenarios. It also plays an important role during the operation of the safety coolant injection systems in advanced nuclear reactors. Semiempirical correlations and simple models based on the analogy between heat and mass transfer processes have been previously applied. Rigorous models, compatible with the state-of-the-art numerical algorithms used in thermal-hydraulic computer codes, are scare, and are of great interest. The objective of this research is to develop a method for modeling condensation, with noncondensable gases, compatible with the state-of-the-art numerical methods for the solution of multi-phase field equations. A methodology for modeling condensation, based on the stagnant film theory, and compatible with the reviewed numerical algorithms, is developed. The model treats the coupling between the heat and mass transfer processes, and allows for an implicit treatment of the mass and momentum exchange terms as the gas-liquid interphase, without iterations. The developed model was used in the application of loss of coolant in pressurized water reactor accidents

  12. Multiple spectator condensates from inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwick, Robert J.

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the development of spectator (light test) field condensates due to their quantum fluctuations in a de Sitter inflationary background, making use of the stochastic formalism to describe the system. In this context, a condensate refers to the typical field value found after a coarse-graining using the Hubble scale H, which can be essential to seed the initial conditions required by various post-inflationary processes. We study models with multiple coupled spectators and for the first time we demonstrate that new forms of stationary solution exist (distinct from the standard exponential form) when the potential is asymmetric. Furthermore, we find a critical value for the inter-field coupling as a function of the number of fields above which the formation of stationary condensates collapses to H. Considering some simple two-field example potentials, we are also able to derive a lower limit on the coupling, below which the fluctuations are effectively decoupled, and the standard stationary variance formulae for each field separately can be trusted. These results are all numerically verified by a new publicly available python class (nfield) to solve the coupled Langevin equations over a large number of fields, realisations and timescales. Further applications of this new tool are also discussed.

  13. Theory and design of heat exchanger : shell and tube condenser and reboiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Ui Dong

    1996-02-01

    This book gives descriptions of shell and tube heat exchanger including from, sorts, structure like shell and shell side, channel, and sliding bar, basic design of heat exchanger, flow-induced vibration, shell side condenser, tube side condenser and design of basic structure of condenser by types, selection of reboiler type, kettle type reboiler, internal reboiler, pump through reboiler, design of reboiler like kettle and internal reboiler, and horizontal and vertical thermosyphon reboiler.

  14. Coherent oscillations between two weakly coupled Bose-Einstein condensates: Josephson effects, π oscillations, and macroscopic quantum self-trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghavan, S.; Smerzi, A.; Fantoni, S.; Shenoy, S.R.

    2001-03-01

    We discuss the coherent atomic oscillations between two weakly coupled Bose-Einstein condensates. The weak link is provided by a laser barrier in a (possibly asymmetric) double-well trap or by Raman coupling between two condensates in different hyperfine levels. The boson Josephson junction (BJJ) dynamics is described by the two-mode nonlinear Gross-Pitaevskii equation that is solved analytically in terms of elliptic functions. The BJJ, being a neutral, isolated system, allows the investigations of dynamical regimes for the phase difference across the junction and for the population imbalance that are not accessible with superconductor Josephson junctions (SJJ's). These include oscillations with either or both of the following properties: (i) the time-averaged value of the phase is equal to π (π-phase oscillations); (ii) the average population imbalance is nonzero, in states with macroscopic quantum self-trapping. The (nonsinusoidal) generalization of the SJJ ac and plasma oscillations and the Shapiro resonance can also be observed. We predict the collapse of experimental data (corresponding to different trap geometries and the total number of condensate atoms) onto a single universal curve for the inverse period of oscillations. Analogies with Josephson oscillations between two weakly coupled reservoirs of 3 He-B and the internal Josephson effect in 3 He-A are also discussed. (author)

  15. Equation of state of warm condensed matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbee, T.W., III; Young, D.A.; Rogers, F.J.

    1998-03-01

    Recent advances in computational condensed matter theory have yielded accurate calculations of properties of materials. These calculations have, for the most part, focused on the low temperature (T=0) limit. An accurate determination of the equation of state (EOS) at finite temperature also requires knowledge of the behavior of the electron and ion thermal pressure as a function of T. Current approaches often interpolate between calculated T=0 results and approximations valid in the high T limit. Plasma physics-based approaches are accurate in the high temperature limit, but lose accuracy below T{approximately}T{sub Fermi}. We seek to ``connect up`` these two regimes by using ab initio finite temperature methods (including linear-response[1] based phonon calculations) to derive an equation of state of condensed matter for T{<=}T{sub Fermi}. We will present theoretical results for the principal Hugoniot of shocked materials, including carbon and aluminum, up to pressures P>100 GPa and temperatures T>10{sup 4}K, and compare our results with available experimental data.

  16. Reflux condensation behavior in SBLOCA tests of ATLAS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeon-Sik; Park, Hyun-Sik; Cho, Seok; Choi, Ki-Yong; Kang, Kyoung-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Behavior of a reflux condensation heat transfer was investigated for SBLOCA tests. • Behavior of the reflux condensate in HL, SG inlet plenum, and U-tubes were evaluated. • Concept of a steam moisturizing phenomenon was introduced and discussed. • Test data and MARS calculations were compared and discussed on the reflux condensate. - Abstract: The behavior of the reflux condensation heat transfer in a hot side steam generator (SG) U-tubes during a cold leg (CL) pipe and a direct vessel injection (DVI) line break in small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) tests of the ATLAS facility was investigated including MARS code calculations. Among the SBLOCA tests, a 6″-CL pipe and 50%-DVI line break SBLOCA test were selected to investigate the behavior of the reflux condensation. A reflux condensation heat transfer seemed to occur from the time the SG U-tubes were half-empty to near the loop seal clearing (LSC). It was found that a transition regime existed between the reflux condensation heat transfer and reverse heat transfer. The remaining reflux condensate in SG U-tubes owing to the counter-current flow limit (CCFL) phenomenon and a separating effect of liquid carry-over and/or entrainment with steam moisturizing seemed to affect the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the transition regime. It was also found that the steam flowrate of the loop pipings and SG U-tubes seemed to have a strong effect on the duration time of the transition regime, e.g., a larger steam flowrate results in a longer duration. From a comparison of the reflux condensation behavior between the ATLAS tests and MARS code calculations, overall qualitative agreements were found between the two cases. The largest discrepancies were found in the SG inlet plenum water level between the two cases, and the authors suggest that the combination effects of the remaining reflux condensate in SG U-tubes and a separating effect of liquid carry-over and/or entrainment with steam

  17. Direct contact condensation induced transition from stratified to slug flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strubelj, Luka; Ezsoel, Gyoergy; Tiselj, Iztok

    2010-01-01

    Selected condensation-induced water hammer experiments performed on PMK-2 device were numerically modelled with three-dimensional two-fluid models of computer codes NEPTUNE C FD and CFX. Experimental setup consists of the horizontal pipe filled with the hot steam that is being slowly flooded with cold water. In most of the experimental cases, slow flooding of the pipe was abruptly interrupted by a strong slugging and water hammer, while in the selected experimental runs performed at higher initial pressures and temperatures that are analysed in the present work, the transition from the stratified into the slug flow was not accompanied by the water hammer pressure peak. That makes these cases more suitable tests for evaluation of the various condensation models in the horizontally stratified flows and puts them in the range of the available CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes. The key models for successful simulation appear to be the condensation model of the hot vapour on the cold liquid and the interfacial momentum transfer model. The surface renewal types of condensation correlations, developed for condensation in the stratified flows, were used in the simulations and were applied also in the regions of the slug flow. The 'large interface' model for inter-phase momentum transfer model was compared to the bubble drag model. The CFD simulations quantitatively captured the main phenomena of the experiments, while the stochastic nature of the particular condensation-induced water hammer experiments did not allow detailed prediction of the time and position of the slug formation in the pipe. We have clearly shown that even the selected experiments without water hammer present a tough test for the applied CFD codes, while modelling of the water hammer pressure peaks in two-phase flow, being a strongly compressible flow phenomena, is beyond the capability of the current CFD codes.

  18. Quasiparticles in Raman scattering of an electromagnetic wave by an atomic condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il’ichev, L. V.

    2011-01-01

    Raman scattering of an intense electromagnetic wave by a free atomic Bose condensate is considered. In a system of atoms and photons, a subsystem is separated whose dynamics can be naturally described in terms of quasiparticles: quasi-atoms and quasi-photons. The dispersion laws of quasiparticles are interrupted by the instability interval. The introduction of quasiparticles within this interval is impossible, while dispersion laws that are continued formally acquire imaginary components. The dynamic scattering model is generalized by including dissipative annihilation processes of scattered photons and uncondensed atoms. A stationary solution of the corresponding quantum control equation is found, allowing the calculation of momentum distributions of real particles and quasiparticles. The outlook for the experimental detection of quasiparticles is discussed.

  19. Quality factors to consider in condensate selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lywood, B. [Crude Quality Inc., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Many factors must be considered when assessing the feasibility of using condensates as a diluent for bitumen or heavy crude production blending. In addition to commercial issues, the effect of condensate quality is a key consideration. In general, condensate quality refers to density and viscosity. However, valuation decisions could be enhanced through the expansion of quality definitions and understanding. This presentation focused on the parameters that are important in choosing a diluent grade product. It also reviewed pipeline and industry specifications and provided additional information regarding general properties for bitumen and condensate compatibility; sampling and quality testing needs; and existing sources of information regarding condensate quality. tabs., figs.

  20. Flow, simulation and dynamics. Including a contribution of Vienna University (TU Wien); Stroemung, Simulation und Dynamik. Mit einem Beitrag der TU Wien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauder, K. [ed.

    1998-12-31

    This report covers the following topics: Gas-flow through clearances in screw vacuum pumps - part 1, gas flow research at a plane screw type machine model - part 2, two-phase screw-type engine - problems of the filling process, oil as a design parameter in screw-type engines - use of non-newtonian oils, experimental determination of the dynamic properties of screw compressors, hot gas screw-type engine - simulations as a basis for construction - part 3. [Deutsch] Dieser Bericht hat folgende Inhalte: Gasspaltstroemungen in Schraubenspindel-Vakuumpumpen - Teil 1, Gasspaltstroemungen in einem ebenen Schraubenmaschinenmodell - Teil 2, Zweiphasen-Schraubenmotor-Probleme des Fuellungsvorganges, Oel als Konstruktionselement - Einsatz nicht-newtonscher Oele, die experimentelle Bestimmung der dynamischen Eigenschaften von Schraubenkompressoren, die Heissgasschraubenmaschine - simulationsgestuetzte Auslegung - Teil 3

  1. Measurement of the structure functions F 2 and xF 3 and comparison with QCD predictions including kinematical and dynamical higher twist effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varvell, K.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Parker, M. A.; Sansum, R. A.; Aderholz, M.; Armenise, N.; Baton, J. P.; Bullock, F. W.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Brisson, V.; Burkot, W.; Calcchio, M.; Claytoh, E. F.; Coghen, T.; Erriquez, O.; Fitch, P. J.; Gerbier, G.; Guy, J.; Hulth, P. O.; Iaselli, G.; Jones, G. T.; Kasper, P.; Klein, H.; Kochowski, C.; Marage, P.; Mermikides, M.; Middleton, R. P.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Natali, S.; Neveu, M.; Nuzzo, S.; O'Neale, S. W.; Petiau, P.; Petrides, A.; Ruggieri, F.; Sacton, J.; Simopoulou, E.; Vallee, C.; Vayaki, A.; Venus, W. A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wells, J.; Wittek, W.

    1987-03-01

    The isoscalar nucleon structure functions F 2( x, Q 2) and xF 3( x, Q 2) are measured in the range 0< Q 2<64 GeV2, 1.7< W 2<250 GeV2, x<0.7 using ν andbar v interactions on neon in BEBC. The data are used to evaluate possible higher twist contributions and to determine their impact on the evaluation of the QCD parameter Λ. In contrast to previous analyses reaching to such low W 2 values, it is found that a lowΛ _{overline {MS} } value in the neighbourhood of 100 MeV describes the data adequately and that the contribution of dynamical higher twist effects is small and negative.

  2. Ghost condensate and generalized second law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukohyama, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    Dubovsky and Sibiryakov recently proposed a scenario in which particles of different species propagate with different speeds due to their direct couplings to ghost condensate. It was argued that this extended version of ghost condensate allows a gedanken experiment leading to violation of the generalized second law. However, in the original ghost condensate scenario, difference in propagation speeds is suppressed by M 2 /M Pl 2 , where M is the order parameter of spontaneous Lorentz breaking and M Pl is the Planck scale. In this case the energy transfer necessary for the gedanken experiment is so slow that the timescale of decrease of entropy, if any, is always longer than the Jeans timescale of ghost condensate. Hence the generalized second law is not violated by the gedanken experiment in the original ghost condensate scenario. This conclusion trivially extends to gauged ghost condensation by taking into account accretion of gauged ghost condensate into a black hole.

  3. Universal Themes of Bose-Einstein Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proukakis, Nick P.; Snoke, David W.; Littlewood, Peter B.

    2017-04-01

    Foreword; List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Universality and Bose-Einstein condensation: perspectives on recent work D. W. Snoke, N. P. Proukakis, T. Giamarchi and P. B. Littlewood; 2. A history of Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic hydrogen T. Greytak and D. Kleppner; 3. Twenty years of atomic quantum gases: 1995-2015 W. Ketterle; 4. Introduction to polariton condensation P. B. Littlewood and A. Edelman; Part II. General Topics: Editorial notes; 5. The question of spontaneous symmetry breaking in condensates D. W. Snoke and A. J. Daley; 6. Effects of interactions on Bose-Einstein condensation R. P. Smith; 7. Formation of Bose-Einstein condensates M. J. Davis, T. M. Wright, T. Gasenzer, S. A. Gardiner and N. P. Proukakis; 8. Quenches, relaxation and pre-thermalization in an isolated quantum system T. Langen and J. Schmiedmayer; 9. Ultracold gases with intrinsic scale invariance C. Chin; 10. Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase of a driven-dissipative condensate N. Y. Kim, W. H. Nitsche and Y. Yamamoto; 11. Superfluidity and phase correlations of driven dissipative condensates J. Keeling, L. M. Sieberer, E. Altman, L. Chen, S. Diehl and J. Toner; 12. BEC to BCS crossover from superconductors to polaritons A. Edelman and P. B. Littlewood; Part III. Condensates in Atomic Physics: Editorial notes; 13. Probing and controlling strongly correlated quantum many-body systems using ultracold quantum gases I. Bloch; 14. Preparing and probing chern bands with cold atoms N. Goldman, N. R. Cooper and J. Dalibard; 15. Bose-Einstein condensates in artificial gauge fields L. J. LeBlanc and I. B. Spielman; 16. Second sound in ultracold atomic gases L. Pitaevskii and S. Stringari; 17. Quantum turbulence in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates N. G. Parker, A. J. Allen, C. F. Barenghi and N. P. Proukakis; 18. Spinor-dipolar aspects of Bose-Einstein condensation M. Ueda; Part IV. Condensates in Condensed Matter Physics: Editorial notes; 19. Bose

  4. Black holes in the ghost condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukohyama, Shinji

    2005-01-01

    We investigate how the ghost condensate reacts to black holes immersed in it. A ghost condensate defines a hypersurface-orthogonal congruence of timelike curves, each of which has the tangent vector u μ =-g μν ∂ ν φ. It is argued that the ghost condensate in this picture approximately corresponds to a congruence of geodesics. In other words, the ghost condensate accretes into a black hole just like a pressureless dust. Correspondingly, if the energy density of the ghost condensate at large distance is set to an extremely small value by cosmic expansion then the late-time accretion rate of the ghost condensate should be negligible. The accretion rate remains very small even if effects of higher derivative terms are taken into account, provided that the black hole is sufficiently large. It is also discussed how to reconcile the black-hole accretion with the possibility that the ghost condensate might behave like dark matter

  5. Modulated amplitude waves in Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, Mason A.; Cvitanovic, Predrag

    2004-01-01

    We analyze spatiotemporal structures in the Gross-Pitaevskii equation to study the dynamics of quasi-one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with mean-field interactions. A coherent structure ansatz yields a parametrically forced nonlinear oscillator, to which we apply Lindstedt's method and multiple-scale perturbation theory to determine the dependence of the intensity of periodic orbits ('modulated amplitude waves') on their wave number. We explore BEC band structure in detail using Hamiltonian perturbation theory and supporting numerical simulations

  6. Dispersion Engineering of Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamehchi, Mohammad Amin

    The subject of this dissertation is engineering the dispersion relation for dilute Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). When a BEC is immersed into suitably tailored laser fields its dispersion can be strongly modified. Prominent examples for such laser fields include optical lattice geometries and Raman dressing fields. The ability to engineer the dispersion of a BEC allows for the investigation of a range of phenomena related to quantum hydrodynamics and condensed matter. In the first context, this dissertation studies the excitation spectrum of a spin-orbit coupled (SOC) BEC. The spin-orbit coupling is generated by " dressing" the atoms with two Raman laser fields. The excitation spectrum has a Roton-like feature that can be altered by tuning the Raman laser parameters. It is demonstrated that the Roton mode can be softened, but it does not reach the ground state energy for the experimental conditions we had. Furthermore, the expansion of SOC BECs in 1D is studied by relaxing the trap allowing the BEC to expand in the SOC direction. Contrary to the findings for optical lattices, it is observed that the condensate partially occupies quasimomentum states with negative effective mass, and therefore an abrupt deceleration is observed although the mean field force is along the direction of expansion. In condensed-matter systems, a periodic lattice structure often plays an important role. In this context, an alternative to the Raman dressing scheme can be realized by coupling the s- and p- bands of a static optical lattice via a weak moving lattice. The bands can be treated as pseudo-spin states. It is shown that similar to the dispersion relation of a Raman dressed SOC, the quasimomentum of the ground state is different from zero. Coherent coupling of the SOC dispersion minima can lead to the realization of the stripe phase even though it is not the thermodynamic ground state of the system. Along the lines of studying the hydrodynamics of BECs, three novel

  7. Influence of the distribution of non-condensables on passive containment condenser performance in PANDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandurski, Th.; Huggenberger, M.; Dreier, J.; Aubert, C.; Putz, F.; Gamble, R.E.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    2001-01-01

    Recently passive cooling systems have been designed for the long-term decay heat removal from the containment of Advanced Light Water Reactors. In particular, the long-term LOCA response of the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) for the General Electric European Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) has been tested in the large-scale PANDA facility. The PANDA tests achieved the dual objectives of improving confidence in the performance of the passive heat removal mechanisms underlying the design of the system, and extending the database available for containment analysis code qualification. The tests conducted subject the PCCS to a variety of conditions representing design-basis and beyond-design-basis accident conditions. These include operation in the presence of both heavier and lighter than steam non-condensable gases, as well as a variety of asymmetric and challenging start-up conditions. The present paper addresses the transient distribution of non-condensables in PANDA, and their effect on (passive) condenser performance. (author)

  8. Influence of the distribution of non-condensables on passive containment condenser performance in PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandurski, Th.; Huggenberger, M.; Dreier, J.; Aubert, C.; Putz, F.; Gamble, R.E.; Yadigaroglu, G

    2001-03-01

    Recently passive cooling systems have been designed for the long-term decay heat removal from the containment of Advanced Light Water Reactors. In particular, the long-term LOCA response of the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) for the General Electric European Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) has been tested in the large-scale PANDA facility. The PANDA tests achieved the dual objectives of improving confidence in the performance of the passive heat removal mechanisms underlying the design of the system, and extending the database available for containment analysis code qualification. The tests conducted subject the PCCS to a variety of conditions representing design-basis and beyond-design-basis accident conditions. These include operation in the presence of both heavier and lighter than steam non-condensable gases, as well as a variety of asymmetric and challenging start-up conditions. The present paper addresses the transient distribution of non-condensables in PANDA, and their effect on (passive) condenser performance. (author)

  9. Dynamics in copy numbers of five plasmids of a dairy Lactococcus lactis in dairy-related conditions including near-zero growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mastrigt, Oscar; Lommers, Marcel M A N; de Vries, Yorick C; Abee, Tjakko; Smid, Eddy J

    2018-03-23

    Lactic acid bacteria can carry multiple plasmids affecting their performance in dairy fermentations. The expression of plasmid-encoded genes and the activity of the corresponding proteins is severely affected by changes in the number of plasmid copies. We studied the impact of growth rate on dynamics of plasmid copy numbers at high growth rates in chemostat cultures and down to near-zero growth rates in retentostat cultures. Five plasmids of the dairy strain Lactococcus lactis FM03-V1 were selected which varied in size (3 to 39 kb), in replication mechanism (theta or rolling-circle) and in putative (dairy-associated) functions. Copy numbers ranged from 1.5 to 40.5 and the copy number of theta-type replicating plasmids were negatively correlated to the plasmid size. Despite the extremely wide range of growth rates (0.0003 h -1 to 0.6 h -1 ), copy numbers of the five plasmids were stable and only slightly increased at near-zero growth rates showing that the plasmid replication rate was strictly controlled. One low-copy number plasmid, carrying a large exopolysaccharide gene cluster, was segregationally unstable during retentostat cultivations reflected in complete loss of the plasmid in one of the retentostat cultures. The copy number of the five plasmids was also hardly affected by varying the pH value, nutrient limitation or presence of citrate (maximum 2.2-fold) signifying the stability in copy number of the plasmids. Importance Lactococcus lactis is extensively used in starter cultures for dairy fermentations. Important traits for growth and survival of L. lactis in dairy fermentations are encoded by genes located on plasmids, such as genes involved in lactose and citrate metabolism, protein degradation and oligopeptide uptake and bacteriophage resistance. Because the number of plasmid copies could affect the expression of plasmid-encoded genes, it is important to know the factors that influence the plasmid copy numbers. We monitored plasmid copy numbers of L

  10. Dynamic Regulation of a Cell Adhesion Protein Complex Including CADM1 by Combinatorial Analysis of FRAP with Exponential Curve-Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai-Yageta, Mika; Maruyama, Tomoko; Suzuki, Takashi; Ichikawa, Kazuhisa; Murakami, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Protein components of cell adhesion machinery show continuous renewal even in the static state of epithelial cells and participate in the formation and maintenance of normal epithelial architecture and tumor suppression. CADM1 is a tumor suppressor belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecule and forms a cell adhesion complex with an actin-binding protein, 4.1B, and a scaffold protein, MPP3, in the cytoplasm. Here, we investigate dynamic regulation of the CADM1-4.1B-MPP3 complex in mature cell adhesion by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis. Traditional FRAP analysis were performed for relatively short period of around 10min. Here, thanks to recent advances in the sensitive laser detector systems, we examine FRAP of CADM1 complex for longer period of 60 min and analyze the recovery with exponential curve-fitting to distinguish the fractions with different diffusion constants. This approach reveals that the fluorescence recovery of CADM1 is fitted to a single exponential function with a time constant (τ) of approximately 16 min, whereas 4.1B and MPP3 are fitted to a double exponential function with two τs of approximately 40-60 sec and 16 min. The longer τ is similar to that of CADM1, suggesting that 4.1B and MPP3 have two distinct fractions, one forming a complex with CADM1 and the other present as a free pool. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching analysis supports the presence of a free pool of these proteins near the plasma membrane. Furthermore, double exponential fitting makes it possible to estimate the ratio of 4.1B and MPP3 present as a free pool and as a complex with CADM1 as approximately 3:2 and 3:1, respectively. Our analyses reveal a central role of CADM1 in stabilizing the complex with 4.1B and MPP3 and provide insight in the dynamics of adhesion complex formation. PMID:25780926

  11. Bose-Einstein condensation and chiral phase transition in linear sigma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu Song; Li Jiarong

    2005-01-01

    With the linear sigma model, we have studied Bose-Einstein condensation and the chiral phase transition in the chiral limit for an interacting pion system. A μ-T phase diagram including these two phenomena is presented. It is found that the phase plane has been divided into three areas: the Bose-Einstein condensation area, the chiral symmetry broken phase area and the chiral symmetry restored phase area. Bose-Einstein condensation can occur either from the chiral symmetry broken phase or from the restored phase. We show that the onset of the chiral phase transition is restricted in the area where there is no Bose-Einstein condensation

  12. Design of condenser for 500 MWe pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWRs) - a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, N.K.; Subbarao, A.; Chaudhary, K.

    1996-01-01

    Condenser forms the major heat sink in the power plants. In recent years, power plant availability and performance have become great concern to the industry. The detailed design of the condenser and its associated cooling water (CW) system require careful optimisation of parameters which include material selection, cooling water flow rate, condenser surface areas, turbine exhaust pressures etc. This is required to produce a design offering maximum efficiency and reliability and minimum maintenance. The various parameters involved in condenser design are discussed. 5 refs., 1 fig

  13. Annual progress report of the Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department. 1 January - 31 December 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebech, B.

    2001-03-01

    The Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department is concerned with both fundamental and applied research into the physical and chemical properties of materials. The principal activities in the year 2000 are presented in this progress report. The research in physics is concentrated on neutron and x-ray scattering measurements and the problems studied include two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering and spin dynamics, superconductivity, phase transitions and nano-scale structures. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface-modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Theoretical work related to these problems is undertaken, including Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au)

  14. Annual progress report of the Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department. 1 January - 31 December 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebech, B [ed.

    2000-02-01

    The Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department is concerned with both fundamental and applied research into the physical and chemical properties of materials. The principal activities in the year 1999 are presented in this progress report. The research in physics is concentrated on neutron and x-ray scattering measurements and the problems studied include two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering and spin dynamics, superconductivity, phase transitions and nano-scalestructures. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface-modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Theoretical work related to these problems is undertaken, including Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au)

  15. Annual progress report of the Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department 1 January - 31 December 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, M.; Bechgaard, K.; Clausen, K.N.; Feidenhans'l, R.; Johannsen, I.

    1998-01-01

    The Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department is concerned with both fundamental and applied research into the physical and chemical properties of materials. The principal activities in the year 1997 are presented in this progress report. The research in physics in concentrated on neutron and x-ray scattering measurements and the problems studied include two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering and spin dynamics, superconductivity, phase transitions and nano-scale structures. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface-modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Theoretical work related to these problems in undertaken, including Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au)

  16. Annual progress report of the Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department. 1 January - 31 December 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebech, B.

    2000-02-01

    The Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department is concerned with both fundamental and applied research into the physical and chemical properties of materials. The principal activities in the year 1999 are presented in this progress report. The research in physics is concentrated on neutron and x-ray scattering measurements and the problems studied include two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering and spin dynamics, superconductivity, phase transitions and nano-scale structures. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface-modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Theoretical work related to these problems is undertaken, including Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au)

  17. Annual progress report of the Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department 1 January - 31 December 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechgaard, K.; Clausen, K.N.; Feidenhans`l, R.; Johannsen, I. [eds.

    1999-04-01

    The Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department is concerned with both fundamental and applied research into the physical properties of materials. The principal activities in the year 1998 are presented in this progress report. The research in physics is concentrated on neutron and x-ray scattering measurements and the problems studied include two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering and spin dynamics, superconductivity, phase transitions and nano-scale structures. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface-modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Theoretical work related to these problems is undertaken, including Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au) 2 tabs., 142 ills., 169 refs.

  18. Annual progress report of the Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department 1 January - 31 December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, M; Bechgaard, K; Clausen, K N; Feidenhans` l, R; Johannsen, I [eds.

    1998-01-01

    The Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department is concerned with both fundamental and applied research into the physical and chemical properties of materials. The principal activities in the year 1997 are presented in this progress report. The research in physics in concentrated on neutron and x-ray scattering measurements and the problems studied include two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering and spin dynamics, superconductivity, phase transitions and nano-scale structures. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface-modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Theoretical work related to these problems in undertaken, including Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au). 129 ills., 213 refs.

  19. Annual progress report of the Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department 1 January - 31 December 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechgaard, K.; Clausen, K.N.; Feidenhans'l, R.; Johannsen, I.

    1999-04-01

    The Condensed Matter Physics and Chemistry Department is concerned with both fundamental and applied research into the physical properties of materials. The principal activities in the year 1998 are presented in this progress report. The research in physics is concentrated on neutron and x-ray scattering measurements and the problems studied include two- and three-dimensional structures, magnetic ordering and spin dynamics, superconductivity, phase transitions and nano-scale structures. The research in chemistry includes chemical synthesis and physico-chemical investigation of small molecules and polymers, with emphasis on polymers with new optical properties, block copolymers, surface-modified polymers, and supramolecular structures. Theoretical work related to these problems is undertaken, including Monte Carlo simulations, computer simulation of molecules and polymers and methods of data analysis. (au)

  20. Atomic structure of surface defects in alumina studied by dynamic force microscopy: strain-relief-, translation- and reflection-related boundaries, including their junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, G H; König, T; Heinke, L; Lichtenstein, L; Heyde, M; Freund, H-J

    2011-01-01

    We present an extensive atomic resolution frequency modulation dynamic force microscopy study of ultrathin aluminium oxide on a single crystalline NiAl(110) surface. One-dimensional surface defects produced by domain boundaries have been resolved. Images are presented for reflection domain boundaries (RDBs), four different types of antiphase domain boundaries, a nucleation-related translation domain boundary and also domain boundary junctions. New structures and aspects of the boundaries and their network are revealed and merged into a comprehensive picture of the defect arrangements. The alumina film also covers the substrate completely at the boundaries and their junctions and follows the structural building principles found in its unit cell. This encompasses square and rectangular groups of surface oxygen sites. The observed structural elements can be related to the electronic signature of the boundaries and therefore to the electronic defects associated with the boundaries. A coincidence site lattice predicted for the RDBs is in good agreement with experimental data. With Σ = 19 it can be considered to be of low-sigma type, which frequently coincides with special boundary properties. Images of asymmetric RDBs show points of good contact alternating with regions of nearly amorphous disorder in the oxygen sublattice. (paper)