WorldWideScience

Sample records for include concrete actions

  1. PROPERTIES AND MICROSTRUCTURE OF CEMENT PASTE INCLUDING RECYCLED CONCRETE POWDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Topič

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The disposal and further recycling of concrete is being investigated worldwide, because the issue of complete recycling has not yet been fully resolved. A fundamental difficulty faced by researchers is the reuse of the recycled concrete fines which are very small (< 1 mm. Currently, full recycling of such waste fine fractions is highly energy intensive and resulting in production of CO2. Because of this, the only recycling methods that can be considered as sustainable and environmentally friendly are those which involve recycled concrete powder (RCP in its raw form. This article investigates the performance of RCP with the grain size < 0.25 mm as a potential binder replacement, and also as a microfiller in cement-based composites. Here, the RCP properties are assessed, including how mechanical properties and the microstructure are influenced by increasing the amount of the RCP in a cement paste (≤ 25 wt%.

  2. THORP steps up the concrete action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, D.

    1987-01-01

    The construction of the THORP reprocessing plant at the BNFL Sellafield site is complex and made more so by design modifications. Over 100 huge concrete cells, each enclosed by heavily reinforced 1.5m thick walls will eventually be clad in metal sheeting to make one vast long building 285m long and 50m tall. The quality assurance tolerances required are tight. Currently the building is behind schedule so the construction is now going throughout the night as well as the day. As well as the demands made by building complexities the requirements of nuclear engineering must be met. Also, this is the first building in the UK which will have to comply with the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate demands for seismic safety. An idea of the scale of the building in the UK which will have to comply with the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate demands for seismic safety. An idea of the scale of the building, the logistical problems, their solutions and the timescale of the construction are given. (UK)

  3. Development of realistic concrete models including scaling effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpinteri, A.

    1989-09-01

    Progressive cracking in structural elements of concrete is considered. Two simple models are applied, which, even though different, lead to similar predictions for the fracture behaviour. Both Virtual Crack Propagation Model and Cohesive Limit Analysis (Section 2), show a trend towards brittle behaviour and catastrophical events for large structural sizes. A numerical Cohesive Crack Model is proposed (Section 3) to describe strain softening and strain localization in concrete. Such a model is able to predict the size effects of fracture mechanics accurately. Whereas for Mode I, only untieing of the finite element nodes is applied to simulate crack growth, for Mixed Mode a topological variation is required at each step (Section 4). In the case of the four point shear specimen, the load vs. deflection diagrams reveal snap-back instability for large sizes. By increasing the specimen sizes, such instability tends to reproduce the classical LEFM instability. Remarkable size effects are theoretically predicted and experimentally confirmed also for reinforced concrete (Section 5). The brittleness of the flexural members increases by increasing size and/or decreasing steel content. On the basis of these results, the empirical code rules regarding the minimum amount of reinforcement could be considerably revised

  4. Modelling Dowel Action of Discrete Reinforcing Bars in Cracked Concrete Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, A. K. H.; Ng, P. L.; Lam, J. Y. K.

    2010-01-01

    Dowel action is one of the component actions for shear force transfer in cracked reinforced concrete. In finite element analysis of concrete structures, the use of discrete representation of reinforcing bars is considered advantageous over the smeared representation due to the relative ease of modelling the bond-slip behaviour. However, there is very limited research on how to simulate the dowel action of discrete reinforcing bars. Herein, a numerical model for dowel action of discrete reinforcing bars crossing cracks in concrete is developed. The model features the derivation of dowel stiffness matrix based on beam-on-elastic-foundation theory and the direct assemblage of dowel stiffness into the concrete element stiffness matrices. The dowel action model is incorporated in a nonlinear finite element programme with secant stiffness formulation. Deep beams tested in the literature are analysed and it is found that the incorporation of dowel action model improves the accuracy of analysis.

  5. Comparison on Heat of Hydration between Current Concrete for NPP and High Fluidity Concrete including Pozzolan Powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Jea Myoung; Cho, Myung Sug

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear power plant (NPP) concrete structures are exposed to many construction factors that lower the quality of concrete due to densely packed reinforcements and heat of hydration since they are mostly constructed with mass concrete. The concrete currently being used in Korean NPPs is mixed with Type I cement and fly ash. However, there is a demand to improve the performance of concrete with reduced heat of hydration and superior constructability. Many advantages such as improving workability and durability of concrete and decreasing heat of hydration are introduced by replacing cement with pozzolan binders. Therefore, the manufacturing possibility of high fluidity concrete should be investigated through applying multi-component powders blended with pozzolan binders to the concrete structure of NPPs, while the researches on properties, characteristic of hydration, durability and long-term behavior of high fluidity concrete using multi-component cement should be carried out. High fluidity concrete which is made using portland cement and pozzlonan powders such as fly ash and blast furnace slag has better properties on heat of hydration than the concrete currently in use for NPPs

  6. 40 CFR 1502.14 - Alternatives including the proposed action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... impacts of the proposal and the alternatives in comparative form, thus sharply defining the issues and... action so that reviewers may evaluate their comparative merits. (c) Include reasonable alternatives not... identify such alternative in the final statement unless another law prohibits the expression of such a...

  7. The action of the fire on the components of the concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilson Morales

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The concrete is a composed material where different materials constitute that it do not react ahead in the same way of the action of high temperatures, becoming the effect of the fire on the concrete structures a problem clearly. The time of exposition to the fire, reached level of temperature and the trace of the concrete, will influence in the alteration degree that could be produced in the concrete affected for these factors. To study the effect of the fire, where a fire is different of the other, it is necessary to carry through a fire real, due to the different variable. The effect produced for the fire in the armed concrete can be analyzed observing the results gotten in the mortar, the steel, the entailing enter both in the armed concrete, the consequences of the when hindered dilatations total or partially and production of resultant efforts of fires. The effect of the rise of the temperature in cylindrical bodies of mortar test had been analyzed, kept in humid chamber, to air, during 7 days. It was used siliceous sand of river and Portland cement CP-V, submitted to the rise of temperature in muffle. The concrete ones submitted to the action of the fire lose considerably its resistance, where, as the temperature increase increases its loss, and its elasticity is below of the desired levels, as it can confirm these data gotten through the bibliographical revision.

  8. Computerised analysis of sulphate action on model concrete piles

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Deshmukh, A.M.; Balasubramanian, S.; Venugopal, C.

    Sulphate action severely affects the durability of marine structures. It is imperative to study precisely the effects of magnesium sulphate on pile foundations in the marine environment. In the present paper an attempt is made to assess and analyse...

  9. Sulfate and Chloride Resistance of High Fluidity Concrete including Fly Ash and GGBS for NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Jea Myoung; Cho, Myung Sug

    2010-01-01

    Fly ash mixed concrete has been used for NPP concrete structures in Korea in order to prevent aging and improve durability since the Shin.Kori no.1,2 in 2005. Concentrated efforts to develop technology for the streamlining of construction work and to affect labor savings have been conducted in construction. The application of high fluidity concrete for nuclear power plants has been the research subject with the aim of further rationalization of construction works. Since high fluidity concrete can have the characteristics of high density and high strength without compaction. However, high fluidity concrete can cause thermal cracking by heat of hydration. For this reason, the amount of pozzolan binder should be increased in high fluidity concrete for nuclear power plants. In this study, the resistance of high fluidity concrete on sulfate and chloride was compared with that of the concrete currently using for nuclear power plants

  10. Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Concrete is a component of coherent transition between a concrete base and a wooden construction. The structure is based on a quantity of investigations of the design possibilities that arise when combining digital fabrication tools and material capacities. Through tangible experiments the project...... specific for this to happen. And the knowledge and intention behind the drawing becomes specialised through the understanding of the fabrication processes and their affect on the materials.The structure Concrete is a result of a multi-angled kerf series in ash wood and a concrete base. The ash wood is cut...... using a 5-axis CNC router with a thin saw blade attached. The programming of the machining results in variations of kerfs that lets the ash wood twist into unique shapes.The shapes of the revolving ash ribbons continue into the concrete creating a cohesive shape. The form for the concrete itself is made...

  11. Unintended out-of-plane actions in size effect tests of structural concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramallo, J.C.; Danesi, R.F.; Kotsovos, M.D.; Pavlovic, M.N.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is part of a larger research program on the causes of size-effect in structural concrete. The obtained results through the application of a nonlinear finite element analysis using material models extensive tested reliability, pointed out a possible connection between unintended out-of-plane actions and the ultimate strength of reinforced concrete (RC) structures, The computational analysis brought up unacceptable discrepancies only in those cases where possible unintended out-of-plane actions could not be negligible nor neutralized. Herein, it arises the need of experimental on such situations to inquire into the role played for those actions and. if they really were detected, to try to link them to some suitable parameters that would allow to take into account their presence in numerical analysis. (author). 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Model - including thermal creep effects - for the analysis of three-dimensional concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, C.; Rebora, B.; Favrod, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    This article presents the most recent developments and results of research carried out by IPEN to establish a mathematical model for the non-linear rheological three-dimensional analysis of massive prestressed concrete structures. The main point of these latest developments is the simulation of the creep of concrete submitted to high temperatures over a long period of time. This research, financed by the Swiss National Science Foundation, has taken an increased importance with the advent of nuclear reactor vessels of the HHT type and new conceptions concerning the cooling of their concrete (replacement of the thermal insulation by a zone of hot concrete). (orig.)

  13. Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Kruse Aagaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Concrete is a component of coherent transition between a concrete base and a wooden construction. The structure is based on a quantity of investigations of the design possibilities that arise when combining digital fabrication tools and material capacities.Through tangible experiments the project discusses materiality and digitally controlled fabrications tools as direct expansions of the architect’s digital drawing and workflow. The project sees this expansion as an opportunity to connect th...

  14. Mechanical and Physical Performance of Concrete Including Waste Electrical Cable Rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taner Yildirim, Salih; Pelin Duygun, Nur

    2017-10-01

    Solid wastes are important environmental problem all over the World. Consumption of the plastic solid waste covers big portion within the total solid waste. Although a numerous plastic material is subjected to the recycling process, it is not easy to be destroyed by nature. One of the recommended way to prevent is to utilize as an aggregate in cement-based material. There are many researches on use of recycling rubber in concrete. However, studies on recycling of waste electrical cable rubber (WECR) in concrete is insufficient although there are many research on waste tyre rubbers in concrete. In this study, fine aggregate was replaced with WECR which were 5%, 10%, and 15 % of the total aggregate volume in the concrete and researched workability, unit weight, water absorption, compressive strength, flexural strength, ultrasonic pulse velocity, modulus of elasticity, and abrasion resistance of concrete. As a result of experimental studies, increase of WECR amount in concrete increases workability due to lack of adherence between cement paste and WECR, and hydrophobic structure of WECR while it influences negatively mechanical properties of concrete. It is possible to use WECR in concrete taking into account the reduction in mechanical properties.

  15. Effect of shear connectors on local buckling and composite action in steel concrete composite walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Kai; Varma, Amit H.; Malushte, Sanjeev R.; Gallocher, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Steel concrete composite (SC) walls are being used for the third generation nuclear power plants, and also being considered for small modular reactors. SC walls consist of thick concrete walls with exterior steel faceplates serving as reinforcement. These steel faceplates are anchored to the concrete infill using shear connectors, for example, headed steel studs. The steel faceplate thickness (t p ) and yield stress (F y ), and the shear connector spacing (s), stiffness (k s ), and strength (Q n ) determine: (a) the level of composite action between the steel plates and the concrete infill, (b) the development length of steel faceplates, and (c) the local buckling of the steel faceplates. Thus, the shear connectors have a significant influence on the behavior of composite SC walls, and should be designed accordingly. This paper presents the effects of shear connector design on the level of composite action and development length of steel faceplates in SC walls. The maximum steel plate slenderness, i.e., ratio of shear connector spacing-to-plate thickness (s/t p ) ratio to prevent local buckling before yielding is also developed based on the existing experimental database and additional numerical analysis

  16. Effect of shear connectors on local buckling and composite action in steel concrete composite walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kai, E-mail: kai-zh@purdue.edu [School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Varma, Amit H., E-mail: ahvarma@purdue.edu [School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Malushte, Sanjeev R., E-mail: smalusht@bechtel.com [Bechtel Power Corporation, Frederick, MD (United States); Gallocher, Stewart, E-mail: stewart.gallocher@steelbricks.com [Modular Walling Systems Ltd., Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    Steel concrete composite (SC) walls are being used for the third generation nuclear power plants, and also being considered for small modular reactors. SC walls consist of thick concrete walls with exterior steel faceplates serving as reinforcement. These steel faceplates are anchored to the concrete infill using shear connectors, for example, headed steel studs. The steel faceplate thickness (t{sub p}) and yield stress (F{sub y}), and the shear connector spacing (s), stiffness (k{sub s}), and strength (Q{sub n}) determine: (a) the level of composite action between the steel plates and the concrete infill, (b) the development length of steel faceplates, and (c) the local buckling of the steel faceplates. Thus, the shear connectors have a significant influence on the behavior of composite SC walls, and should be designed accordingly. This paper presents the effects of shear connector design on the level of composite action and development length of steel faceplates in SC walls. The maximum steel plate slenderness, i.e., ratio of shear connector spacing-to-plate thickness (s/t{sub p}) ratio to prevent local buckling before yielding is also developed based on the existing experimental database and additional numerical analysis.

  17. ANALYSIS OF STRESS STATE IN UPPER LAYER OF ROAD CONCRETE PAVEMENT WITH TEMPERATURE ACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Pshembaev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While being operated auto-road pavements are subjected to intensive mechanical impacts, ultraviolet ray irradiation, freeze-thaw temperatures, freezing and thawing, drying and moistening. Due to these actions various types of pavement distresses appear on the road pavement. The most significant and dangerous type of distresses is micro-cracks on the road surface. One of the main reasons for their formation is an action of weather and climatic factors that initiate large changes in temperature of coating surface and occurrence of large temperature gradients in the upper layer. In this context while designing and operating auto-roads it is rather essential to investigate a stress state in road surface which is caused by temperature action. Purpose of the described investigations is to determine permissible temperature gradients for cement-concrete pavements that exclude formation of micro-cracks on their surface and thickness of damaged surface layer. Calculations of road pavement have been carried out at various laws for temperature distribution in its depth. A finite difference method realized in PARUS software has been used for studying a stress state of cement-concrete auto-roads. Regularities for distribution of stresses in cement-concrete pavement of auto-roads have been obtained at various surface temperatures. Permissible temperature gradients in the upper pavement layer have been determined and thickness of the layer where micro-cracks are formed has been assessed in the paper. Strength criterion based on the process of micro-crack formation and development in the concrete has been used for calculations. Risk of micro-crack formation on the auto-road pavement depends on material strength, conditions of plate fixing and temperature gradients.

  18. Fracture energy evolution of two concretes resistant to the action of freeze-thaw cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enfedaque, A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The current standards that regulate use of structural concrete have highlighted the durability of concrete. However, how the fracture energy of concrete evolves under the action of freeze-thaw cycles is not well known. The fracture energy of two types of concrete, one with an air-entraining additive and the other with silica fume addition, is studied after four, 14 and 28 freeze-thaw cycles. The results obtained show that the concrete with an air-entraining additive was undamaged and that fracture energy grew slightly. In addition to this, they also showed that the concrete with silica fume addition suffered severe surface scaling and its fracture energy changed due to the greater fracture areas generated.La actual normativa que rige el empleo de hormigón estructural ha puesto enfásis en la durabilidad del hormigón. Sin embargo, no se conoce cómo evoluciona la energía de fractura del hormigón sometido a ciclos hielo- deshielo, lo cual es de vital importancia para asegurar la durabilidad y el correcto comportamiento mecánico de las estructuras de hormigón en entornos con heladas durante su vida útil. Se ha estudiado la evolución de la energía de fractura de un hormigón con aireante y de un hormigón con humo de sílice después de 4, 14 y 28 ciclos hielo-deshielo realizando ensayos de fractura. Los resultados muestran cómo el hormigón con aireante no sufre daño por los ciclos hielo-deshielo y cómo la energía de fractura del mismo aumenta ligeramente. El hormigón con humo de sílice se daña por los ciclos hielo-deshielo y reduce su energía de fractura al aumentar el area fracturada.

  19. On the Determination of Concrete Armour Unit Stress including Specific Results related to Dolosse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Howell, G.L.; Liu, Z.

    1991-01-01

    Failures of rubble mound breakwaters armoured with complex types of unreinforced concrete armour units are often due to breakage. This happens when the stresses exceed the material strength. Sufficient parametric studies of the stresses are not yet available to produce design diagrams for structu......Failures of rubble mound breakwaters armoured with complex types of unreinforced concrete armour units are often due to breakage. This happens when the stresses exceed the material strength. Sufficient parametric studies of the stresses are not yet available to produce design diagrams...... and scale effects. Moreover, some results from the Crescent City Prototype Dolosse study are presented and related to results from small-de model tests. A preliminary design diagram for Dolosse ir presented as well....

  20. On the Determination of Concrete Armour Unit Stress including Specific Results related to Dolosse

    OpenAIRE

    Burcharth, H. F.; Howell, G.L.; Liu, Z.

    1991-01-01

    Failures of rubble mound breakwaters armoured with complex types of unreinforced concrete armour units are often due to breakage. This happens when the stresses exceed the material strength. Sufficient parametric studies of the stresses are not yet available to produce design diagrams for structural integrity. The paper presents a general discussion of the problems related to stress etermination and describes the results and the analyses of model tests with 200 kg and 200 g load-cell instrume...

  1. Concrete Cracking Prediction Including the Filling Proportion of Strand Corrosion Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Dai, Lizhao; Zhang, Xuhui; Zhang, Jianren

    2016-01-01

    The filling of strand corrosion products during concrete crack propagation is investigated experimentally in the present paper. The effects of stirrups on the filling of corrosion products and concrete cracking are clarified. A prediction model of crack width is developed incorporating the filling proportion of corrosion products and the twisting shape of the strand. Experimental data on cracking angle, crack width, and corrosion loss obtained from accelerated corrosion tests of concrete beams are presented. The proposed model is verified by experimental data. Results show that the filling extent of corrosion products varies with crack propagation. The rust filling extent increases with the propagating crack until a critical width. Beyond the critical width, the rust-filling extent remains stable. Using stirrups can decrease the critical crack width. Stirrups can restrict crack propagation and reduce the rust filling. The tangent of the cracking angle increases with increasing corrosion loss. The prediction of corrosion-induced crack is sensitive to the rust-filling extent. PMID:28772367

  2. Assessment of waterfront location in hardened concrete by GPR within COST Action TU1208

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Abad, Isabel; Klysz, Gilles; Balayssac, Jean Paul; Pajewski, Lara

    2016-04-01

    This work focuses on the analysis of the capability of Ground-Penetrating radar (GPR) technique for evaluating how the water penetrates into concrete samples by means of the assessment of the waterfront advance. Research activities have been carried out during a Short-Term Scientific Missions (STSMs) funded by the COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar" in November 2015. The evaluation of water penetrability is crucial in most building materials, such us concrete, since, water and aggressive chemical agents dissolved therein contribute to the deterioration of the material. A number of techniques have been developed to measure their advance in concrete. Although the most common method for measuring water content is the gravimetric method by observing the change in mass, this method has a large number of disadvantages. In this context, non-destructive techniques as GPR play an interesting role. In particular, the application of GPR in the building materials area is providing very promising and interesting results regarding the building materials characterization and especially concrete deterioration evaluation [1-3]. In addition, recent experimental studies highlight the strong relation between wave propagation parameters (velocity and energy level) and water content advance [4-5]. Water content has a decisive influence on dielectric properties and those might be assessed by the study of the wave properties that are derived by using GPR. Therefore, the waterfront advance will result in a change on wave parameters. In line with this, this research is focused on the development of specific processing algorithms necessary to understand how the water penetrates and how the wave parameters will be affected regarding the location of the antenna in reference to the water absorption direction. For this purpose, concrete samples were manufactured, which after curing (90 days) and oven

  3. Review of the sodium fire experiments including sodium-concrete-reactions and summary of the results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherdron, W.

    1996-01-01

    In the technical and design concept of containment systems of sodium cooled breeder reactors it has to be considered, that leakages in sodium pipes lead to sodium fires. The temperature and pressure rise caused by sodium fires makes it indispensable to analyse these accidents to be able to assess the safety of the whole system. Generally sodium leakages may lead to three different types of fires with different consequences. The main influences are the geometry of the leakage, shape, size, location, and the sodium conditions, such as temperature, flow rate and velocity. It must be also considered the reaction of sodium with surfaces like concrete. The paper gives an overview over all the sodium fire experiments performed in the FAUNA-facility (220 m 3 ) of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe in the years 1979 to 1993. The experimental program started with the investigation of pool fires on burning areas between 2 and 12 m 2 with up to 500 kg of Sodium. The experiments had been continued with 3 combined fires and 40 experiments on spray fires. 7 experiments on sodium-concrete reactions completed the program. (author)

  4. Contributions and mechanisms of action of graphite nanomaterials in ultra high performance concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbia, Libya Ahmed

    Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) reaches high strength and impermeability levels by using a relatively large volume fraction of a dense binder with fine microstructure in combination with high-quality aggregates of relatively small particle size, and reinforcing fibers. The dense microstructure of the cementitions binder is achieved by raising the packing density of the particulate matter, which covers sizes ranging from few hundred nanometers to few millimeters. The fine microstructure of binder in UHPC is realized by effective use of pozzolans to largely eliminate the coarse crystalline particles which exist among cement hydrates. UHPC incorporates (steel) fibers to overcome the brittleness of its dense, finely structured cementitious binder. The main thrust of this research is to evaluate the benefits of nanmaterials in UHPC. The dense, finely structure cementitious binder as well as the large volume fraction of the binder in UHPC benefit the dispersion of nanomaterials, and their interfacial interactions. The relatively close spacing of nanomaterials within the cementitious binder of UHPC enables them to render local reinforcement effects in critically stressed regions such as those in the vicinity of steel reinforcement and prestressing strands as well as fibers. Nanomaterials can also raise the density of the binder in UHPC by extending the particle size distribution down to the few nanometers range. Comprehensive experimental studies supported by theoretical investigations were undertake in order to optimize the use of nanomaterials in UHPC, identity the UHPC (mechanical) properties which benefit from the introduction of nanomaterials, and define the mechanisms of action of nanomaterials in UHPC. Carbon nanofiber was the primary nanomaterial used in this investigation. Some work was also conducted with graphite nanoplates. The key hypotheses of the project were as follows: (i) nanomaterials can make important contributions to the packing density of the

  5. The investigation of gamma and neutron shielding properties of concrete including basalt fibre for nuclear energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nulk, H.; Ipbuker, C.; Gulik, V.; Tkaczyk, A.; Biland, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we would like to draw attention to the prospect of basalt fibre as the main component for concrete reinforcement of NPP. This work describes the computational study of gamma attenuation parameters, the effective atomic number Z(eff) and the effective electron density N e (eff), of relatively light-weight concrete with chopped basalt fibre used as reinforcement in different mixture rates. We can draw the following conclusions. Basalt fibre is a relatively cheap material that can be used as reinforcement instead of metallic fibers. Basalt fibre has a similar specific gravity to that of concrete elements. Basalt fibre has high chemical and abrasion resistance. Basalt fibre has almost 10 times the tensile strength of steel re-bars. Gamma-ray attenuation coefficients increase with addition of basalt fibre into concrete in every case. The effective atomic number of the concrete increases with the addition of basalt fibre. The results show that basalt fibre reinforced concrete have improved shielding properties against gamma rays in comparison with regular concrete. This result is based on a regular concrete with only basalt fiber reinforcement. We estimate that with addition of standard aggregates for radiation shielding concrete, such as barite, magnetite or hematite, the shielding properties will increase exponentially

  6. From A Climate Action Plan (CAP to a Microgrid: The SEEU Sustainability Concept Including Social Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alajdin Abazi

    2011-07-01

    The paper delves into the recent events and attacks either undertaken or influenced by Al-Shabaab, including a snap shot of its threat to humanitarian aid personnel as well as the Africa Union troops who are desperately trying to lower the intensity of conflict along the Somalia Kenya border area and Al-Shabaab’s actions to secure financial resources.

  7. Equations of motion for a rotor blade, including gravity, pitch action and rotor speed variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallesøe, Bjarne Skovmose

    2007-01-01

    This paper extends Hodges-Dowell's partial differential equations of blade motion, by including the effects from gravity, pitch action and varying rotor speed. New equations describing the pitch action and rotor speeds are also derived. The physical interpretation of the individual terms...... in the equations is discussed. The partial differential equations of motion are approximated by ordinary differential equations of motion using an assumed mode method. The ordinary differential equations are used to simulate a sudden pitch change of a rotating blade. This work is a part of a project on pitch blade...

  8. Modelling of stiffness and damping change in reinforced concrete structures under seismic actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, G.; Oetes, A.

    1985-01-01

    Restoring force and energy dissipation properties of ductile reinforced concrete structures during seismic excitation are investigated. Interpreting the results of earthquake simulation experiments with large scale reinforced concrete structural members mainly subjected to cyclic bending the various types of the force-deflection response and energy dissipation capability will be identified. Two alternative concepts are suggested for modelling: A rigorous model which considers the numerous deformation and dissipation mechanisms using a step by step algorithm for analysis and a simplified practical model which employs a modified spectrum analysis technique and a simple updating procedure for changing stiffness and damping properties of the members. (orig.)

  9. The WECHSL-Mod2 code: A computer program for the interaction of a core melt with concrete including the long term behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimann, M.; Stiefel, S.

    1989-06-01

    The WECHSL-Mod2 code is a mechanistic computer code developed for the analysis of the thermal and chemical interaction of initially molten LWR reactor materials with concrete in a two-dimensional, axisymmetrical concrete cavity. The code performs calculations from the time of initial contact of a hot molten pool over start of solidification processes until long term basemat erosion over several days with the possibility of basemat penetration. The code assumes that the metallic phases of the melt pool form a layer at the bottom overlayed by the oxide melt atop. Heat generation in the melt is by decay heat and chemical reactions from metal oxidation. Energy is lost to the melting concrete and to the upper containment by radiation or evaporation of sumpwater possibly flooding the surface of the melt. Thermodynamic and transport properties as well as criteria for heat transfer and solidification processes are internally calculated for each time step. Heat transfer is modelled taking into account the high gas flux from the decomposing concrete and the heat conduction in the crusts possibly forming in the long term at the melt/concrete interface. The WECHSL code in its present version was validated by the BETA experiments. The test samples include a typical BETA post test calculation and a WECHSL application to a reactor accident. (orig.) [de

  10. Concrete structures

    CERN Document Server

    Setareh, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    This revised, fully updated second edition covers the analysis, design, and construction of reinforced concrete structures from a real-world perspective. It examines different reinforced concrete elements such as slabs, beams, columns, foundations, basement and retaining walls and pre-stressed concrete incorporating the most up-to-date edition of the American Concrete Institute Code (ACI 318-14) requirements for the design of concrete structures. It includes a chapter on metric system in reinforced concrete design and construction. A new chapter on the design of formworks has been added which is of great value to students in the construction engineering programs along with practicing engineers and architects. This second edition also includes a new appendix with color images illustrating various concrete construction practices, and well-designed buildings. The ACI 318-14 constitutes the most extensive reorganization of the code in the past 40 years. References to the various sections of the ACI 318-14 are pro...

  11. Passivating action of an organic inhibitor on the steel of reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzola, E.; Malave, R.; Barrios, V.; Villarroel, D.; Tiso, A.; Parra, M.

    2003-01-01

    An electrochemical evaluation has been made on a concrete mix with an organic inhibitor added, in order to establish its contribution to the formation of a protective film on the steel surface. Concrete cylinders (6''x ), each with a 3/8 steel bar and two graphite electrodes embedded, with two water/cement ratios (0.40 and 0.55) were used as testing samples. Reinforced steel bars, both chemically cleaned and in the as rolled condition, embedded in salted and unsalted concrete mixes, were used to test if chemical adsorption occurs in each condition. Samples were soaked into brine solution during 365 days as to simulate a sea environment. During exposure period readings of potential, corrosion rate and potentiodynamical cyclic curves were made. It can be, concluded that the organic inhibitor needs a low water(cement ratio mix (0.40) in order to react via a chemical adsorption on the steel, being more effective on cleaned surfaces. (Author) 10 refs

  12. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Errata Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2004-04-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's corrective action alternative recommendation for each of the corrective action sites (CASs) within Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. An evaluation of analytical data from the corrective action investigation, review of current and future operations at each CAS, and a detailed comparative analysis of potential corrective action alternatives were used to determine the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. There are six CASs in CAU 204, which are all located between Areas 1, 2, 3, and 5 on the NTS. The No Further Action alternative was recommended for CASs 01-34-01, 02-34-01, 03-34-01, and 05-99-02; and a Closure in Place with Administrative Controls recommendation was the preferred corrective action for CASs 05-18-02 and 05-33-01. These alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated as well as applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the sites and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated media at CAU 204.

  13. Passivating action of an organic inhibitor on the steel of reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzola, E.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical evaluation has been made on a concrete mix with an organic inhibitor added, in order to establish its contribution to the formation of a protective film on the steel surface. Concrete cylinders (6" x 3", each with a 3/8" steel bar and two graphite electrodes embedded, with two water/cement ratios (0.40 and 0.55 were used as testing samples. Reinforced steel bars, both chemically cleaned and in the as rolled condition, embedded in salted and unsalted concrete mixes, were used to test if chemical adsorption occurs in each condition. Samples were soaked into brine solution during 365 days as to simulate a sea environment. During exposure period readings of potential, corrosion rate and potentiodynamical cyclic curves were made. It can be concluded that the organic inhibitor needs a low water/cement ratio mix (0.40 in order to react via a chemical adsorption on the steel, being more effective on cleaned surfaces.

    El objetivo del trabajo es hacer una evaluación electroquímica para inferir sobre la formación de la película pasivante en la superficie del acero, por parte de un inhibidor orgánico adicionado a la mezcla de concreto. Para esto se elaboraron probetas de concreto armado de 3 x 6 pulgadas con acero de refuerzo de 3/8 pulgadas de diámetro y dos electrodos de grafito en su interior, usando mezclas de relación agua/cemento 0,40 y 0,55; con y sin sal. Se utilizó acero limpiado por medios químicos y también en condiciones normales de uso. Las probetas se colocaron en agua salada durante 365 d, realizándoseles mediciones de potencial, velocidad de corrosión y curvas cíclicas potenciodinámicas. Se puede decir que el inhibidor actúa solo para relaciones agua/cemento de 0,40, observándose mejores resultados en las probetas con acero limpiado, indicando que el estado superficial del acero influye en la reacción de quimiadsorción del inhibidor.

  14. Shakedown Analysis of Composite Steel-Concrete Frame Systems with Plastic and Brittle Elements Under Seismic Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alawdin Piotr

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the earthquake analysis of composite steel-concrete frames is performed by finding solution of the optimization problem of shakedown analysis, which takes into account the nonlinear properties of materials. The constructions are equipped with systems bearing structures of various elastic-plastic and brittle elements absorbing energy of seismic actions. A mathematical model of this problem is presented on the base of limit analysis theory with partial redistribution of self-stressed internal forces. It is assumed that the load varies randomly within the specified limits. These limits are determined by the possible direction and magnitude of seismic loads. The illustrative example of such analysis of system is introduced. Some attention has been paid to the practical application of the proposed mathematical model.

  15. Shakedown Analysis of Composite Steel-Concrete Frame Systems with Plastic and Brittle Elements Under Seismic Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawdin, Piotr; Bulanov, George

    2017-06-01

    In this paper the earthquake analysis of composite steel-concrete frames is performed by finding solution of the optimization problem of shakedown analysis, which takes into account the nonlinear properties of materials. The constructions are equipped with systems bearing structures of various elastic-plastic and brittle elements absorbing energy of seismic actions. A mathematical model of this problem is presented on the base of limit analysis theory with partial redistribution of self-stressed internal forces. It is assumed that the load varies randomly within the specified limits. These limits are determined by the possible direction and magnitude of seismic loads. The illustrative example of such analysis of system is introduced. Some attention has been paid to the practical application of the proposed mathematical model.

  16. The WECHSL-Mod3 code: A computer program for the interaction of a core melt with concrete including the long term behavior. Model description and user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foit, J.J.; Adroguer, B.; Cenerino, G.; Stiefel, S.

    1995-02-01

    The WECHSL-Mod3 code is a mechanistic computer code developed for the analysis of the thermal and chemical interaction of initially molten reactor materials with concrete in a two-dimensional as well as in a one-dimensional, axisymmetrical concrete cavity. The code performs calculations from the time of initial contact of a hot molten pool over start of solidification processes until long term basemat erosion over several days with the possibility of basemat penetration. It is assumed that an underlying metallic layer exists covered by an oxidic layer or that only one oxidic layer is present which can contain a homogeneously dispersed metallic phase. Heat generation in the melt is by decay heat and chemical reactions from metal oxidation. Energy is lost to the melting concrete and to the upper containment by radiation or evaporation of sumpwater possibly flooding the surface of the melt. Thermodynamic and transport properties as well as criteria for heat transfer and solidification processes are internally calculated for each time step. Heat transfer is modelled taking into account the high gas flux from the decomposing concrete and the heat conduction in the crusts possibly forming in the long term at the melt/concrete interface. The CALTHER code (developed at CEA, France) which models the radiative heat transfer from the upper surface of the corium melt to the surrounding cavity is implemented in the present WECHSL version. The WECHSL code in its present version was validated by the BETA, ACE and SURC experiments. The test samples include a BETA and the SURC2 post test calculations and a WECHSL application to a reactor accident. (orig.) [de

  17. A global call for action to include gender in research impact assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovseiko, Pavel V; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Adam, Paula; Grant, Jonathan; Hinrichs-Krapels, Saba; Graham, Kathryn E; Valentine, Pamela A; Sued, Omar; Boukhris, Omar F; Al Olaqi, Nada M; Al Rahbi, Idrees S; Dowd, Anne-Maree; Bice, Sara; Heiden, Tamika L; Fischer, Michael D; Dopson, Sue; Norton, Robyn; Pollitt, Alexandra; Wooding, Steven; Balling, Gert V; Jakobsen, Ulla; Kuhlmann, Ellen; Klinge, Ineke; Pololi, Linda H; Jagsi, Reshma; Smith, Helen Lawton; Etzkowitz, Henry; Nielsen, Mathias W; Carrion, Carme; Solans-Domènech, Maite; Vizcaino, Esther; Naing, Lin; Cheok, Quentin H N; Eckelmann, Baerbel; Simuyemba, Moses C; Msiska, Temwa; Declich, Giovanna; Edmunds, Laurel D; Kiparoglou, Vasiliki; Buchan, Alison M J; Williamson, Catherine; Lord, Graham M; Channon, Keith M; Surender, Rebecca; Buchan, Alastair M

    2016-07-19

    Global investment in biomedical research has grown significantly over the last decades, reaching approximately a quarter of a trillion US dollars in 2010. However, not all of this investment is distributed evenly by gender. It follows, arguably, that scarce research resources may not be optimally invested (by either not supporting the best science or by failing to investigate topics that benefit women and men equitably). Women across the world tend to be significantly underrepresented in research both as researchers and research participants, receive less research funding, and appear less frequently than men as authors on research publications. There is also some evidence that women are relatively disadvantaged as the beneficiaries of research, in terms of its health, societal and economic impacts. Historical gender biases may have created a path dependency that means that the research system and the impacts of research are biased towards male researchers and male beneficiaries, making it inherently difficult (though not impossible) to eliminate gender bias. In this commentary, we - a group of scholars and practitioners from Africa, America, Asia and Europe - argue that gender-sensitive research impact assessment could become a force for good in moving science policy and practice towards gender equity. Research impact assessment is the multidisciplinary field of scientific inquiry that examines the research process to maximise scientific, societal and economic returns on investment in research. It encompasses many theoretical and methodological approaches that can be used to investigate gender bias and recommend actions for change to maximise research impact. We offer a set of recommendations to research funders, research institutions and research evaluators who conduct impact assessment on how to include and strengthen analysis of gender equity in research impact assessment and issue a global call for action.

  18. Life-cycle cost assessment of optimally designed reinforced concrete buildings under seismic actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitropoulou, Chara Ch.; Lagaros, Nikos D.; Papadrakakis, Manolis

    2011-01-01

    Life-cycle cost analysis (LCCA) is an assessment tool for studying the performance of systems in many fields of engineering. In earthquake engineering LCCA demands the calculation of the cost components that are related to the performance of the structure in multiple earthquake hazard levels. Incremental static and dynamic analyses are two procedures that can be used for estimating the seismic capacity of a structural system and can therefore be incorporated into the LCCA methodology. In this work the effect of the analysis procedure, the number of seismic records imposed, the performance criterion used and the structural type (regular or irregular) is investigated, on the life-cycle cost analysis of 3D reinforced concrete structures. Furthermore, the influence of uncertainties on the seismic response of structural systems and their impact on LCCA is examined. The uncertainty on the material properties, the cross-section dimensions and the record-incident angle is taking into account with the incorporation of the Latin hypercube sampling method into the incremental dynamic analysis procedure. In addition, the LCCA methodology is used as an assessment tool for the designs obtained by means of prescriptive and performance-based optimum design methodologies. The first one is obtained from a single-objective optimization problem, where the initial construction cost was the objective to be minimized, while the second one as a two-objective optimization problem where the life-cycle cost was the additional objective also to be minimized.

  19. 78 FR 42805 - HarperCollins Publishers Distribution Operations Including On-Site Leased Workers From Action...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... Distribution Operations Including On- Site Leased Workers From Action Personnel, CGA Staffing Services, Dynamic... from Action Personnel, CGA Staffing Services, Dynamic Staffing, Kelly Services, and Manpower, Scranton... (Volume 78 FR Pages 28628-28630). At the request of the State Workforce Office, the Department reviewed...

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (December 2002, Revision No.: 0), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NNSA/NSO

    2002-12-12

    The Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 204 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 204 is located on the Nevada Test Site approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which include: 01-34-01, Underground Instrument House Bunker; 02-34-01, Instrument Bunker; 03-34-01, Underground Bunker; 05-18-02, Chemical Explosives Storage; 05-33-01, Kay Blockhouse; 05-99-02, Explosive Storage Bunker. Based on site history, process knowledge, and previous field efforts, contaminants of potential concern for Corrective Action Unit 204 collectively include radionuclides, beryllium, high explosives, lead, polychlorinated biphenyls, total petroleum hydrocarbons, silver, warfarin, and zinc phosphide. The primary question for the investigation is: ''Are existing data sufficient to evaluate appropriate corrective actions?'' To address this question, resolution of two decision statements is required. Decision I is to ''Define the nature of contamination'' by identifying any contamination above preliminary action levels (PALs); Decision II is to ''Determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs. If PALs are not exceeded, the investigation is completed. If PALs are exceeded, then Decision II must be resolved. In addition, data will be obtained to support waste management decisions. Field activities will include radiological land area surveys, geophysical surveys to identify any subsurface metallic and nonmetallic debris, field screening for applicable contaminants of potential concern, collection and analysis of surface and subsurface soil samples from biased locations

  1. Composite action of steel frames and precast concrete infill panels with corner connections – Part 2 : finite element analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenderkamp, J.C.D.; Hofmeyer, H.; Snijder, H.H.; Liew, J.Y.R.; Lee, S.C.

    2012-01-01

    When precast concrete infill panels are connected to steel frames at discrete locations, interaction at the structural interface is neither complete nor absent. The contribution of precast concrete infill panels to the lateral stiffness and strength of steel frames can be significant depending on

  2. Composite action of steel frames and precast concrete infill panels with corner connections – Part 1 : experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenderkamp, J.C.D.; Snijder, H.H.; Hofmeyer, H.; Liew, J.Y.R.; Lee, S.C.

    2012-01-01

    When precast concrete infill panels are connected to steel frames at discrete locations, interaction at the structural interface is neither complete nor absent. The contribution of precast concrete infill panels to the lateral stiffness and strength of steel frames can be significant depending on

  3. Investigation of Mechanism of Action of Modifying Admixtures Based on Products of Petrochemical Synthesis on Concrete Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukhareli, V. D.; Tukhareli, A. V.; Cherednichenko, T. F.

    2017-11-01

    The creation of composite materials for generating structural elements with the desired properties has always been and still remains relevant. The basis of a modern concrete technology is the creation of a high-quality artificial stone characterized by low defectiveness and structure stability. Improving the quality of concrete compositions can be achieved by using chemical admixtures from local raw materials which is a very promising task of modern materials’ science for creation of a new generation of concretes. The new generation concretes are high-tech, high-quality, multicomponent concrete mixes and compositions with admixtures that preserve the required properties in service under all operating conditions. The growing complexity of concrete caused by systemic effects that allow you to control the structure formation at all stages of the technology ensures the obtaining of composites with "directional" quality, compositions, structure and properties. The possibility to use the organic fraction of oil refining as a multifunctional hydrophobic-plasticizing admixture in the effective cement concrete is examined.

  4. How Concrete Is Concrete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravemeijer, Koeno

    2011-01-01

    If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, "manipulatives", in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own,…

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0 (includes ROTCs 1, 2, and 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NNSA/NV

    2002-07-16

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 410 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 410 is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), which is included in the Nevada Test and Training Range (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range) approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of five Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-19-002-TAB2, Debris Mound; TA-21-003-TANL, Disposal Trench; TA-21-002-TAAL, Disposal Trench; 09-21-001-TA09, Disposal Trenches; 03-19-001, Waste Disposal Site. This CAU is being investigated because contaminants may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment, and waste may have been disposed of with out appropriate controls. Four out of five of these CASs are the result of weapons testing and disposal activities at the TTR, and they are grouped together for site closure based on the similarity of the sites (waste disposal sites and trenches). The fifth CAS, CAS 03-19-001, is a hydrocarbon spill related to activities in the area. This site is grouped with this CAU because of the location (TTR). Based on historical documentation and process know-ledge, vertical and lateral migration routes are possible for all CASs. Migration of contaminants may have occurred through transport by infiltration of precipitation through surface soil which serves as a driving force for downward migration of contaminants. Land-use scenarios limit future use of these CASs to industrial activities. The suspected contaminants of potential concern which have been identified are volatile organic compounds; semivolatile organic compounds; high explosives; radiological constituents including depleted

  6. Concrete aggregate durability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    There are many factors that affect the durability of Portland cement concrete (PCC), including the mix design and the : materials used, the quality of construction, and the environment. Durability is not an intrinsic property of the concrete, but : i...

  7. Improving the self-healing properties of concrete materials by using composite actions with fiber reinforced polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This research study is motivated by the need to reduce the costs of maintenance and repair of the aging transportation infrastructure in the US. The proposed approach is to use self-healing concrete. The objectives of this study were: (1) to evaluate...

  8. Fibre Concrete 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    9th international conference on fibre reinforced concretes (FRC), textile reinforced concretes (TRC) and ultra-high performance concretes (UHPC) Preface The Fibre Concrete Conference series is held biennially to provide a platform to share knowledge on fibre reinforced concretes, textile concretes and ultra-high performance concretes regarding material properties and behaviour, technology procedures, topics of long-term behaviour, creep, durability; sustainable aspects of concrete including utilisation of waste materials in concrete production and recycling of concrete. The tradition of Fibre Concrete Conferences started in eighties of the last century. Nowadays the conference is organized by the Department of Concrete and Masonry Structures of the Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Civil Engineering. The 9th International Conference Fibre Concrete 2017 had 109 participants from 27 countries all over the world. 55 papers were presented including keynote lectures of Professor Bažant, Professor Bartoš and Dr. Broukalová. The conference program covered wide range of topics from scientific research to practical applications. The presented contributions related to performance and behaviour of cement based composites, their long-term behaviour and durability, sustainable aspects, advanced analyses of structures from these composites and successful applications. This conference was organized also to honour Professor Zděnek P. Bažant on the occasion of his jubilee and to appreciate his merits and discoveries in the field of fibre reinforced composites, structural mechanics and engineering.

  9. TRANSPARENT CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep Sharma*, Dr. O.P. Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Transparent concrete is the new type of concrete introduced in todays world which carries special property of light transmitting due to presence of light Optical fibres. Which is also known as translucent concrete or light transmitting concrete, it is achieved by replacing coarse aggregates with transparent alternate materials (Optical fibres). The binding material in transparent concrete may be able to transmit light by using clear resins the concrete mix. The concrete used in industry in pr...

  10. Self-management interventions including action plans for exacerbations versus usual care in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenferink, Anke; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein; van der Valk, Paul Dlpm; Frith, Peter A; Zwerink, Marlies; Monninkhof, Evelyn M; van der Palen, Job; Effing, Tanja W

    2017-08-04

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) self-management interventions should be structured but personalised and often multi-component, with goals of motivating, engaging and supporting the patients to positively adapt their behaviour(s) and develop skills to better manage disease. Exacerbation action plans are considered to be a key component of COPD self-management interventions. Studies assessing these interventions show contradictory results. In this Cochrane Review, we compared the effectiveness of COPD self-management interventions that include action plans for acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) with usual care. To evaluate the efficacy of COPD-specific self-management interventions that include an action plan for exacerbations of COPD compared with usual care in terms of health-related quality of life, respiratory-related hospital admissions and other health outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of trials, trials registries, and the reference lists of included studies to May 2016. We included randomised controlled trials evaluating a self-management intervention for people with COPD published since 1995. To be eligible for inclusion, the self-management intervention included a written action plan for AECOPD and an iterative process between participant and healthcare provider(s) in which feedback was provided. We excluded disease management programmes classified as pulmonary rehabilitation or exercise classes offered in a hospital, at a rehabilitation centre, or in a community-based setting to avoid overlap with pulmonary rehabilitation as much as possible. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We resolved disagreements by reaching consensus or by involving a third review author. Study authors were contacted to obtain additional information and missing outcome data where possible. When appropriate, study results were pooled using a random-effects modelling meta-analysis. The primary

  11. How Concrete is Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Koeno Gravemeijer

    2010-01-01

    If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, ‘manipulatives’, in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own, abstract, knowledge; in the latter, we try to find an example that the others will be familiar with. This article first looks at the tension between these two diff...

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0 / June 2003), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-06-27

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 536 consists of a single Corrective Action Site (CAS): 03-44-02, Steam Jenny Discharge. The CAU 536 site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of possible contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for CAS 03-44-02. The additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of this field investigation are to be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3-2004.

  13. Technical assistance to Ohio closure sites; Recommendations toaddress contaminated soils, concrete, and corrective action managementunit/groundwater contamination at Ashtabula, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charoglu, Emily; Eddy-Dilek, Carol; Gombert, Dirk; Hazen, Terry; Johnson, Bob; Looney, Brian; Krstich, Michael A.; Rautman, Chris; Tripp,Julia; Whitmill, Larry

    2002-08-26

    The Ashtabula Environmental Management Project (AEMP) at Department of Energy-Ohio (DOE-OH) requested technical assistance from the EM-50 Lead Lab to aid in defining new cost and time effective approaches in the following problem areas: soils, concrete, and groundwater/Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) at RMIES in Ashtabula, Ohio. Attachment 1 provides the site request for assistance. The technical assistance team assembled for this request is provided in Attachment 2. These individuals reviewed key site information prior to convening with DOE and contractor personnel (RMIES and Earthline) for a three-and-a-half-day meeting to better understand baseline technologies, limitations, and site-specific issues. After listening to presentations about the nature and extent of known contamination, the team broke out into several groups to brainstorm ideas and develop viable solutions. This executive summary details unresolved issues requiring management attention as well as recommendations to address soils, concrete, and groundwater/CAMU. It also provides a summary of additional technical assistance that could be provided to the site. More details are presented in the body of this report.

  14. How Concrete is Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koeno Gravemeijer

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, ‘manipulatives’, in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own, abstract, knowledge; in the latter, we try to find an example that the others will be familiar with. This article first looks at the tension between these two different ways of making things concrete. Next another role of manipulatives, will be discussed, namely that of means for scaffolding and communication. In this role, manipulatives may function as means of support in a process that aims at helping students to build on their own thinking while constructing more sophisticated mathematics

  15. Reinforced plaster by means of the synergic action between concrete additives (superfluidifiers, fluidiflers and airing-plasticizers and E glass fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Río Merino, M.

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Through the analysis of the different compounds (plaster + additives + E glass fibres we pretend to demostrate that a synergic action is present between certain concrete additives (superfluidifiers, fluidiflers, and airingplasticizers and E glass fibre, on the basis of the flection resistance of plaster matrix based compound materials.

    Mediante el análisis de diferentes compuestos (escayola + aditivos + fibras de vidrio E se pretende demostrar que existe una acción sinérgica entre ciertos aditivos del hormigón (superfluidificantes, fluidificantes y aireantes-plastificantes y los refuerzos a base de fibras de vidrio E, sobre la resistencia a flexión de los materiales compuestos de matriz principal escayola.

  16. A General Discussion of Problems Related to the Determination of Concrete Armour Unit Stresses Including Specific Results related to Static and Dynamic Stresses in Dolosse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Zhou

    1989-01-01

    Recent breakwater failures revealed the shortcomings of the traditional design procedures for concrete armour units. This paper deals with one of them, which can be expressed as the "lack of balance between the hydraulic stability of the armour layer and the mechanical strength or integrity...... of the units". This problem is related mainly to the slender types of armour units. The paper discusses the various types of loads, and the practical determination of the wave and gravity induced loads and stresses, especially the model test technique and its restrictions. Examples related to Dolosse...

  17. Concrete portable handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Woodson, R Dodge

    2011-01-01

    Whether or not, you are on the job site or back in the office, this book will help you to avoid mistakes, code violations, and wasted time and money. The book's four part treatment begins with constituent materials followed by self contained parts on Concrete Properties, Processes, and Concrete Repair and Rehabilitation. Designed to be an ""all in one"" reference, the author includes a wealth information for the most popular types of testing. This includes: Analysis of Fresh Concrete; Testing Machines; Accelerated Testing Methods; Analysis of Hardened Concrete and Mortar; Core Sampl

  18. Development of an antimicrobial concrete to inhibiting corrosion; Konkurito wo fushoku kara gado suru kokin konkurito no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurihara, Y.

    1999-11-10

    It has been clarified that the corrosion of concrete in sewage facilities is caused by the action of specific microorganism. The corrosion of concrete is caused by the complicate interaction of chemical substances and microorganisms existing in sewage water. As microorganisms related to this phenomenon, lead sulfate reductase and sulfur oxidase are well known. This paper introduces antimicrobials for concrete using zeolite as a main component and a concrete containing these antimicrobials, which were developed for killing or suppressing the generation of these microorganisms causing the corrosion of concrete. The sales results during 2 years since the start of the sales in May 1997 was 16 tons for antimicrobials including zeolite-supported silver - copper catalyst, and 8,138 tons for antimicrobial concrete. Sixty-eight companies have organized concrete workshop>, which will promote the popularization and technical guidance of antimicrobial concrete. (NEDO)

  19. How Concrete is Concrete?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koeno Gravemeijer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, ‘manipulatives’, in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own, abstract, knowledge; in the latter, we try to find an example that the others will be familiar with. This article first looks at the tension between these two different ways of making things concrete. Next another role of manipulatives, will be discussed, namely that of means for scaffolding and communication. In this role, manipulatives may function as means of support in a process that aims at helping students to build on their own thinking while constructing more sophisticated mathematics.Key words:  Conceret Learning Materials, School Math, Common Sense, Scaffolding, Communication DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.2.1.780.1-14

  20. Concrete laying laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastlova, K.

    1986-01-01

    The task of the concrete laying laboratory established within a special department for quality control and assurance at the Dukovany nuclear power plant, is to check the composition of concrete mixes produced by the central concrete production plant on the site, and the shipment, laying and processing of concrete. The composition is given of special barite and serpentinite concretes designed for biological shields. The system of checks and of filing the results is briefly described. Esperience is summed up from the operation of the concrete laying laboratory, and conclusions are formulated which should be observed on similar large construction sites. They include the precise definition of the designer's requirements for the quality of concrete, the surface finish of concrete surfaces, the method of concreting specific structures around bushings, increased density reinforcements and various technological elements, and requirements for shipment to poorly accessible or remote places. As for the equipment of the laboratory, it should be completed with an instrument for the analysis of fresh concrete mixes, a large capacity drying kiln, etc. (Z.M.)

  1. Constitutive equations for cracked reinforced concrete based on a refined model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geistefeldt, H.

    1977-01-01

    Nonlinear numerical methods to calculate structures of reinforced concrete or of prestressed concrete are mostly based on two idealizing assumptions: tension stiffness perpendicular to cracks is equal to the stiffness of reinforcement alone and shear modulus is taken as constant. In real reinforced concrete structures concrete contributes to the tension-stiffness perpendicular to cracks and thus to the global stiffness matrix because of bond action between concrete and reinforcement and shear transfer in cracks is depending on stresses acting in cracks. Only few authors are taking these aspects into account and only with rough semiempirical assumptions. In this paper a refined nonlinear three-dimensional mechanical model for reinforced concrete is presented which can include these effects, hitherto neglected, depending on the given state of stress. The model is composed of three model-elements: component u - uncracked reinforced concrete with perfect bond (stiffness equal to the sum of the stiffnesses of concrete and reinforcement), component r - reinforcement free in surrounding concrete (reinforcement and concrete are having equal normal strains in noncracked directions and equal shear strains), component c - crack-part (shear stiffnesses in cracks is equal to the sum of shear stiffnesses of the reinforcement mesh, interface shear transfer and dowel action in cracks). (Auth.)

  2. Characterisation and management of concrete grinding residuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Matt; Gupta, Nautasha; Watts, Ben; Chadik, Paul A; Ferraro, Christopher; Townsend, Timothy G

    2018-02-01

    Concrete grinding residue is the waste product resulting from the grinding, cutting, and resurfacing of concrete pavement. Potential beneficial applications for concrete grinding residue include use as a soil amendment and as a construction material, including as an additive to Portland cement concrete. Concrete grinding residue exhibits a high pH, and though not hazardous, it is sufficiently elevated that precautions need to be taken around aquatic ecosystems. Best management practices and state regulations focus on reducing the impact on such aquatic environment. Heavy metals are present in concrete grinding residue, but concentrations are of the same magnitude as typically recycled concrete residuals. The chemical composition of concrete grinding residue makes it a useful product for some soil amendment purposes at appropriate land application rates. The presence of unreacted concrete in concrete grinding residue was examined for potential use as partial replacement of cement in new concrete. Testing of Florida concrete grinding residue revealed no dramatic reactivity or improvement in mortar strength.

  3. Pervious Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Torsvik, Øyvind André Hoff

    2012-01-01

    Pervious concrete is a material with a high degree of permeability but generally low strength. The material is primarily used for paving applications but has shown promise in many other areas of usage. This thesis investigates the properties of pervious concrete using normal Norwegian aggregates and practices. An overview of important factors when it comes to designing and producing pervious concrete is the result of this investigation. Several experiments have been performed in the concrete ...

  4. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory actions of various functional food materials including glucosamine on synovial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Yoshie; Someya, Akimasa; Imai, Kensuke; Nagao, Junji; Nagaoka, Isao

    2017-08-01

    The anti-inflammatory actions of glucosamine (GlcN) on arthritic disorders involve the suppression of inflammatory mediator production from synovial cells. GlcN has also been reported to inhibit the activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. The present study aimed to determine the cooperative and anti‑inflammatory actions of functional food materials and evaluated the production of interleukin (IL)‑8 and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in IL-1β-activated synovial cells, incubated with the combination of GlcN and various functional food materials containing L‑methionine (Met), undenatured type II collagen (UC‑II), chondroitin sulfate (CS), methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) and agaro-oligosaccharide (AO). The results indicated that Met, UC‑II, CS, MSM and AO slightly or moderately suppressed the IL-1β-stimulated IL‑8 production by human synovial MH7A cells. The same compounds further decreased the IL‑8 level lowered by GlcN. Similarly, they slightly suppressed the phosphorylation level of p38 MAPK and further reduced the phosphorylation level lowered by GlcN. These observations suggest a possibility that these functional food materials exert an anti‑inflammatory action (inhibition of IL‑8 production) in combination with GlcN by cooperatively suppressing the p38 MAPK signaling (phosphorylation).

  5. Structural Precast Concrete Handbook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærbye, Per Oluf H

    Structural concept for precast concrete systems. Design og precast reinforced concrete components. Design of precast concrete connections. Illustrations on design of precast concrete buildings. Precast concrete assembly.......Structural concept for precast concrete systems. Design og precast reinforced concrete components. Design of precast concrete connections. Illustrations on design of precast concrete buildings. Precast concrete assembly....

  6. Usage of Crushed Concrete Fines in Decorative Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilipenko, Anton; Bazhenova, Sofia

    2017-10-01

    The article is devoted to the questions of usage of crushed concrete fines from concrete scrap for the production of high-quality decorative composite materials based on mixed binder. The main problem in the application of crushed concrete in the manufacture of decorative concrete products is extremely low decorative properties of crushed concrete fines itself, as well as concrete products based on them. However, crushed concrete fines could have a positive impact on the structure of the concrete matrix and could improve the environmental and economic characteristics of the concrete products. Dust fraction of crushed concrete fines contains non-hydrated cement grains, which can be opened in screening process due to the low strength of the contact zone between the hydrated and non-hydrated cement. In addition, the screening process could increase activity of the crushed concrete fines, so it can be used as a fine aggregate and filler for concrete mixes. Previous studies have shown that the effect of the usage of the crushed concrete fines is small and does not allow to obtain concrete products with high strength. However, it is possible to improve the efficiency of the crushed concrete fines as a filler due to the complex of measures prior to mixing. Such measures may include a preliminary mechanochemical activation of the binder (cement binder, iron oxide pigment, silica fume and crushed concrete fines), as well as the usage of polycarboxylate superplasticizers. The development of specific surface area of activated crushed concrete fines ensures strong adhesion between grains of binder and filler during the formation of cement stone matrix. The particle size distribution of the crushed concrete fines could achieve the densest structure of cement stone matrix and improve its resistance to environmental effects. The authors examined the mechanisms of structure of concrete products with crushed concrete fines as a filler. The results of studies of the properties of

  7. Glazed Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Anja Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    Why glazed concrete? Concrete hardens and finds its strength at room temperature whereas clay products must first be fired before they achieve this strength. They are stronger and three times as durable as clay products, which is a weighty reason for choosing concrete.5 Another reason, which....... If this succeeds, it will be possible to manufacture thin, large-scale glazed concrete panels comparable in size to concrete sandwich construction and larger which, with or without back-casting, can work as load-bearing construction elements....

  8. Long-life concrete : how long will my concrete last?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    There is an ongoing discussion about moving toward performance-based specifications for concrete pavements. This document seeks to : move the discussion forward by outlining the needs and the challenges, and proposing some immediate actions. However,...

  9. Concrete Hinges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halding, Philip Skov; Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2014-01-01

    In the first part of the 20th century concrete hinges developed by Freyssinet and Mesnager were widely tested and implemented in concrete structures. The concrete hinges were used a great deal in closed-spandrel arch bridges. Since such a bridge type has not been competitive for the past 40 years......, the research in concrete hinges has not evolved significantly in that period. But introducing a new state-of-the-art concrete arch bridge solution (Pearl-Chain arches invented at the Technical University of Denmark) creates a necessity of a concrete hinge research based on modern standards. Back when research...... in concrete hinges was more common different designs were proposed for the geometry and reinforcement. Previous research focused on fatigue, multi-axial stresses around the hinge throat, and the relation between rotation- and moment. But many different test-setups were proposed by different researchers...

  10. LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE BASED GRANSHLAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NETESA M. I.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. Concrete advisable to obtain a low strength with local secondary resources for recycling and reduce the environmental burden on the environment. But it is important to design such concrete compositions with a reduced flow of cement. It is known that the coefficient of efficiency of use of cement in the concrete of the heavy and B10 is less than about 0.5, which is almost two times smaller than in class B15 concrete and above. Even lower coefficient of efficiency in light concrete cement low strength. Therefore, it is important to find patterns determining the composition of lightweight concrete based on local-products industry with more efficient use of cement in them. Purpose.. Based on the analysis of earlier research results, including with the use of methods of mathematical planning of experiments to determine the concrete contents, which can provide the requirements for the underlying layers of the floor, the compressive strength of which should correspond to the class B5. It is important to provide the required strength at minimum flow of the cement, which is the most expensive and energy-intensive part of concrete. Conclusion. Analysis of the test results of control samples of concrete in 28-day-old, the following laws. The required tensile strength of concrete compressive strength of 7.0 MPa can be obtained in the test range when used in formulations as a filler as the Dnieper hydroelectric power station fly ash and tailings Krivoy Rog iron ore YuGOK. To ensure providing the required characteristic strength of the concrete in the underlying layers of the floor is advisable to use a nominal composition per cubic meter of concrete: cement 160 kg granshlaka Plant named after Petrovsky, 675 kg of fly ash Dnieper HPP 390 kg, 400 kg of sand, 230 liters of water. Thus, while ensuring rational grain composition components can obtain the desired strength lightweight concrete based granshlaka plant Petrovsky, using as fillers

  11. Prestressed concrete design

    CERN Document Server

    Hurst, MK

    1998-01-01

    This edition provides up-to-date guidance on the detailed design of prestressed concrete structures. All major topics are dealt with, including prestressed flat slabs, an important and growing application in the design of buildings.

  12. Concrete Fibrations

    OpenAIRE

    Pagnan, Ruggero

    2017-01-01

    As far as we know, no notion of concrete fibration is available. We provide one such notion in adherence to the foundational attitude that characterizes the adoption of the fibrational perspective in approaching fundamental subjects in category theory and discuss it in connection with the notion of concrete category and the notions of locally small and small fibrations. We also discuss the appropriateness of our notion of concrete fibration for fibrations of small maps, which is relevant to a...

  13. 30 CFR 254.23 - What information must I include in the “Emergency response action plan” section?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... response operations on your behalf. You must describe the team's organizational structure as well as the... include the number and types of personnel available from each identified labor source. (d) A planned... primary and secondary radio frequencies that will be used. (e) A listing of the types and characteristics...

  14. NANOMODIFIED CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Khroustalev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main directions in construction material science is the development of  next generation concrete that is ultra-dense, high-strength, ultra-porous, high heat efficient, extra corrosion-resistant. Selection of such direction is caused by extreme operational impacts on the concrete, namely: continuously increasing load on the concrete and various dynamics of such loads; the necessity in operation of concrete products in a wide temperature range and their exposure to various chemical and physical effects.The next generation concrete represents high-tech concrete mixtures with additives that takes on and retain the required properties when hardening and being used under any operational conditions. A differential characteristic of the next generation concrete is its complexity that presumes usage of various mineral dispersed components, two- and three fractional fine and coarse aggregates, complex chemical additives, combinations of polymer and iron reinforcement.Design strength and performance properties level of the next generation concrete is achieved by high-quality selection of the composition, proper selection of manufacturing techniques, concrete curing, bringing the quality of concrete items to the required level of technical condition during the operational phase. However, directed formation of its structure is necessary in order to obtain high-tech concrete.Along with the traditional methods for regulation of the next generation concrete structure, modification of concrete while using silica nanoparticles is also considered as a perspective one because the concrete patterning occurs due to introduction of a binder in a mineral matrix. Due to this it is possible to obtain nano-modified materials with completely new properties.The main problem with the creation of nano-modified concrete is a uniform distribution of nano-materials in the volume of the cement matrix which is particularly important in the cases of adding a modifier in

  15. An historical examination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallinson, L.G.

    1986-03-01

    The requirement that concrete in nuclear waste repositories be stable physically and chemically for hundreds, if not thousands, of years has initiated studies of ancient and old concretes. The history of cement and concrete is described. The oldest know concrete, from Yugoslavia, is ca. 7,500 years old. Concrete was used in many ancient civilisations, including those of Egypt, Greece and Rome. Ancient concretes were usually based upon lime, but sometimes gypsum was used. Pure lime concretes hardened by atomospheric carbonation but the Ancients, in particular the Romans, also employed hydraulic limes and discovered pozzolanas to make superior concretes which, upon hardening, contained complex cementitious hydrates including calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH), the principal binding element in Portland cement concrete. Portland cement was not invented until 1824 or later and consists principally of calcium silicates formed by clinkerisation of a mixture of limestone and clay in carefully measured proportions. The cement sets hydraulically to form, principally, calcium hydroxide and CSH, the latter being an amorphous or semi-amorphous substance of variable composition. The published literature relating to the analysis of old and ancient cements and concretes is reviewed. A suite of samples spanning the history of concrete has been obtained. A variety of physical and chemical techniques have been employed to characterise these samples. (author)

  16. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomasney, H.L.; SenGupta, A.K.; Yachmenev, V.

    1996-01-01

    ELECTROSORB Electrokinetic Extraction Technology, developed by ISOTRON Corp., offers a cost-effective approach to treating contaminated concrete. Heavy metals/radionuclides trapped in concrete can be extracted using this process if they are chemically solubilized; solubilizers used are citric acid alone and a mixture of citric and nitric acids. A DC electric field is applied across the contaminated concrete to electrokinetically transport the solubilized contaminants from the concrete pores to a collector on the concrete surface. The collector is an extraction pad laid on the surface. The pad provides confinement for a planar electrode and solubilizer solution; it is operated under a vacuum to hold the pad against the concrete surface. Operation requires little attendance, reducing the workers' health hazards. The process incorporates a mechanism for recycling the solubilizer solution. A field demonstration of the process took place in Building 21 of DOE's Mound facility in Miamisburg, OH, over 12 days in June 1996. The thorium species present in this building's concrete floors included ThO 2 and thorium oxalate. The nitric acid was found to facilitate Th extraction

  17. Steel fiber reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, S.U.

    2005-01-01

    Steel-Fiber Reinforced Concrete is constructed by adding short fibers of small cross-sectional size .to the fresh concrete. These fibers reinforce the concrete in all directions, as they are randomly oriented. The improved mechanical properties of concrete include ductility, impact-resistance, compressive, tensile and flexural strength and abrasion-resistance. These uniqlte properties of the fiber- reinforcement can be exploited to great advantage in concrete structural members containing both conventional bar-reinforcement and steel fibers. The improvements in mechanical properties of cementitious materials resulting from steel-fiber reinforcement depend on the type, geometry, volume fraction and material-properties of fibers, the matrix mix proportions and the fiber-matrix interfacial bond characteristics. Effects of steel fibers on the mechanical properties of concrete have been investigated in this paper through a comprehensive testing-programme, by varying the fiber volume fraction and the aspect-ratio (Lid) of fibers. Significant improvements are observed in compressive, tensile, flexural strength and impact-resistance of concrete, accompanied by marked improvement in ductility. optimum fiber-volume fraction and aspect-ratio of steel fibers is identified. Test results are analyzed in details and relevant conclusions drawn. The research is finally concluded with future research needs. (author)

  18. Intracellular actions of steroid hormones and their therapeutic value, including the potential of radiohalosteroids against ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, J.A. (Chicago Univ. (United States). Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology); Scharl, A. (Koeln Univ., Cologne (Germany). Frauen-Klinik); Kullander, S. (Lund Univ. (Sweden). Womens Hospital Malmoe); Beckmann, M.W. (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Zentrum fuer Frauenheilkunde und Geburtshilfe)

    1992-01-01

    With recombinant cDNA technology, yeast and cultured animal cells can be made to express mammalian cDNA steroid receptors from cDNA clones that contain deletions and substitutions. Among the leading problems addressed in these models is the characterization of sequences that promote association or interaction with other transcription regulating molecules, including oncogene products. Recently it has been found that heat shock proteins may serve not only to stabilize the receptor proteins but also to precondition the activation imparted by ligand binding. Aberrant receptor proteins can be found in ovarian cancer. Whether aberrant receptor proteins are associated with transformation in general or with a variable clinical response to steroidal or anti-steroidal therapy is not known. Even after chemotherapy, steroid receptors are expressed in the metastases of ovarian cancers seen clinically, and they may have potential use for localization and treatment of receptor-rich cancers. Radioligand pharmaceuticals appropriate for imaging or for site-directed radiocytotoxicity can be sequestered to the nuclei of receptor-rich cancers. Initial clinical imaging and therapy trials with such pharmaceuticals have been approved and begun. In the use of halogenated estrogen radiopharmaceuticals, liver metabolism and enterohepatic recirculation are important considerations. Ascites prolongs retention of radiohalogenated estrogen in the abdominal cavity. Distant metastases have been localized with [[sup 123]I]-estrogen in breast cancer patients in pre-operative procedures. Receptor-mediated cytotoxicity occurs when estrogen receptor radioligand pharmaceuticals that are Auger electron emitters are used in vitro. (au) (119 refs., 3 figs.).

  19. Monitoring water loss form fresh concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2006-01-01

    Desiccation of concrete before or during setting may lead to detrimental plastic shrinkage cracking in the concrete surface zone. Cracking due to plastic shrinkage is a major technological problem for any concrete, however, modern high-performance concretes are especially susceptible to this...... determination of the evaporation loss from hardening concrete and thus better possibility for preventing curing problems, including detrimental crack damage due to plastic shrinkage....

  20. Sulfur polymer cement concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.H.; McBee, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Sulfur-based composite materials formulated using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) and mineral aggregates are described and compared with conventional portland cement based materials. Materials characteristics presented include mechanical strength, chemical resistance, impact resistance, moisture permeation, and linear shrinkage during placement and curing. Examples of preparation and placement of sulfur polymer cement concrete (SC) are described using commercial scale equipment. SC applications presented are focused into hostile chemical environments where severe portland cement concrete (PCC) failure has occurred

  1. ADVANCEMENTS IN CONCRETE TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Shri Purvansh B. Shah; Shri Prakash D. Gohil; Shri Hiren J. Chavda; Shri Tejas D. Khediya

    2015-01-01

    Developing and maintaining world’s infrastructure to meet the future needs of industrialized and developing countries is necessary to economically grow and improve the quality of life. The quality and performance of concrete plays a key role for most of infrastructure including commercial, industrial, residential and military structures, dams, power plants. Concrete is the single largest manufactured material in the world and accounts for more than 6 billion metric tons of materials annual...

  2. Life Cycle Assessment of Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjunnesson, Jeannette

    2005-09-15

    This is an environmental study on concrete that follows the standard protocol of life cycle assessment (LCA). The study is done for two types of concrete, ordinary and frost-resistant concrete, and has an extra focus on the superplasticizers used as admixtures. The utilization phase is not included in this study since the type of construction for which the concrete is used is not defined and the concrete is assumed to be inert during this phase. The results show that it is the production of the raw material and the transports involved in the life cycle of concrete that are the main contributors to the total environmental load. The one single step in the raw material production that has the highest impact is the production of cement. Within the transportation operations the transportation of concrete is the largest contributor, followed by the transportation of the cement. The environmental impact of frost-resistant concrete is between 24-41 % higher than that of ordinary concrete due to its higher content of cement. Superplasticizers contribute with approximately 0.4-10.4 % of the total environmental impact of concrete, the least to the global warming potential (GWP) and the most to the photochemical ozone creation potential (POCP). Also the toxicity of the superplasticizers is investigated and the conclusion is that the low amount of leakage of superplasticizers from concrete leads to a low risk for the environment and for humans.

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 214: Bunkers and Storage Areas Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1 and No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-05-16

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 214 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Areas 5, 11, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, CAU 214 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-99-01, Fallout Shelters; 11-22-03, Drum; 25-99-12, Fly Ash Storage; 25-23-01, Contaminated Materials; 25-23-19, Radioactive Material Storage; 25-99-18, Storage Area; 25-34-03, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker); 25-34-04, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker); and 25-34-05, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker). These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). The suspected contaminants and critical analyte s for CAU 214 include oil (total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel-range organics [TPH-DRO], polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs]), pesticides (chlordane, heptachlor, 4,4-DDT), barium, cadmium, chronium, lubricants (TPH-DRO, TPH-gasoline-range organics [GRO]), and fly ash (arsenic). The land-use zones where CAU 214 CASs are located dictate that future land uses will be limited to nonresidential (i.e., industrial) activities. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the corrective action decision document.

  4. Concrete sample point: 304 Concretion Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollison, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    This report contains information concerning the analysis of concretes for volatile organic compounds. Included are the raw data for these analysis and the quality control data, the standards data, and all of the accompanying chains-of-custody records and requests for special analysis

  5. Basic principles of concrete structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Xianglin; Zhou, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Based on the latest version of designing codes both for buildings and bridges (GB50010-2010 and JTG D62-2004), this book starts from steel and concrete materials, whose properties are very important to the mechanical behavior of concrete structural members. Step by step, analysis of reinforced and prestressed concrete members under basic loading types (tension, compression, flexure, shearing and torsion) and environmental actions are introduced. The characteristic of the book that distinguishes it from other textbooks on concrete structures is that more emphasis has been laid on the basic theories of reinforced concrete and the application of the basic theories in design of new structures and analysis of existing structures. Examples and problems in each chapter are carefully designed to cover every important knowledge point. As a basic course for undergraduates majoring in civil engineering, this course is different from either the previously learnt mechanics courses or the design courses to be learnt. Compa...

  6. Prestressed concrete reactor vessel for the HHT-670 MW(e) demonstration plant. Pt.2. Three-dimensional analysis of the temperature and stress fields in a HHT vessel, including effects of the thermal creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, C.; Rebora, B.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal rheological calculation of the prestressed concrete reactor vessel for the HHT-670 MW(e) Demonstration Plant is presented in the paper. The main aim of this calculation is to evaluate the effects of the elevated temperature and various loads on the liner as well as on the hot concrete

  7. Concrete domains

    OpenAIRE

    Kahn, G.; Plotkin, G.D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper introduces the theory of a particular kind of computation domains called concrete domains. The purpose of this theory is to find a satisfactory framework for the notions of coroutine computation and sequentiality of evaluation.

  8. Photocatalyticpaving concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Lyapidevskaya Ol'ga Borisovna; Fraynt Mikhail Aleksandrovich

    2014-01-01

    Today bituminous concrete is a conventional paving material. Among its advantages one can name dustlessness and noiselessness, fine wear (up to 1 mm a year) and fine maintainability. As the main disadvantages of this material one can name high slipperiness under humidification, low durability and weather resistance. Besides that, during placement of the bituminous concrete a lot of different air pollutants are emitted, which are harmful for environment and human’s health (they are listed in t...

  9. Photocatalyticpaving concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyapidevskaya Ol'ga Borisovna

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Today bituminous concrete is a conventional paving material. Among its advantages one can name dustlessness and noiselessness, fine wear (up to 1 mm a year and fine maintainability. As the main disadvantages of this material one can name high slipperiness under humidification, low durability and weather resistance. Besides that, during placement of the bituminous concrete a lot of different air pollutants are emitted, which are harmful for environment and human’s health (they are listed in the paper according to the US Environmental Protection Agency materials. As an alternative, one can use cement-concrete pavement, which is in many ways more efficient than the bituminous concrete. It is proposed to enhance environmental performance of the cement-concrete pavement via usage of photocatalysis. The mechanism of different photocatalytic reactions is described in the paper, namely heterogeneous and homogeneous photocatalysis, photo-induces, photoactivated catalysis and catalytical photoreactions. It is pro-posed to use heterogeneous photocatalysis with titanium dioxide as a photocatalyst. The mechanism of photo oxidation of air contaminants, with the usage of titanium dioxide is2described. The paper sets problems, connected with the sensibilization of TiOto thevisible light (it is proposed to use titanium dioxide, doped with the atoms of certain elements to increase its sensibility to the visible light and with the development of a new photocatalytic paving concrete, which will meet the requirements, specified for paving in the climatic and traffic conditions of the Russian Federation.

  10. Fracture properties of high-strength concrete obtained by direct modification of structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solodkyy Serhiy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-strength concrete is effectively used worldwide in the last three decades, but it is more brittle in comparison with normal strength concretes. Partial substitution of cement in concrete by active mineral additives and usage of chemical admixture of plasticizing and air-entraining action can considerably change their fracture properties. The obtained results show that the increase of the fracture properties is observed in concretes modified with chemical admixtures incorporating mineral additives such as zeolite and limestone due to consolidation of the concrete microstructure. Densification takes place as a result of limiting the amount of calcium hydroxide (CH due to its reaction with active silica included in the zeolite and the formation of larger amounts of hydrated calcium silicates of tobermorite type as well as calcium hydroaluminate and hydrocarboaluminate with the simultaneous adsorption modification of hydrated products by chemical admixtures.

  11. Self-Placing Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Certain concrete pours have areas where the congestion of reinforcing bars make placement of concrete almost impossible. Using conventional placing and vibration techniques, the resulting concrete can have considerable honeycombing due to the development of voids. Self-placing concrete is a possible solution to the problem. Also known as self-compactable concrete, self-consolidating concrete, flowable concrete, and non-vibration concrete. These concretes eliminate the need for vibration in a ...

  12. Nonlinear finite element analysis of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottosen, N.S.

    1980-05-01

    This report deals with nonlinear finite element analysis of concrete structures loaded in the short-term up until failure. A profound discussion of constitutive modelling on concrete is performed; a model, applicable for general stress states, is described and its predictions are compared with experimental data. This model is implemented in the AXIPLANE-program applicable for axisymmetrick and plane structures. The theoretical basis for this program is given. Using the AXIPLANE-program various concrete structures are analysed up until failure and compared with experimental evidence. These analyses include panels pressure vessel, beams failing in shear and finally a specific pull-out test, the Lok-Test, is considered. In these analyses, the influence of different failure criteria, aggregate interlock, dowel action, secondary cracking, magnitude of compressive strenght, magnitude of tensile strenght and of different post-failure behaviours of the concrete are evaluated. Moreover, it is shown that a suitable analysis of the theoretical data results in a clear insight into the physical behaviour of the considered structures. Finally, it is demonstrated that the AXISPLANE-program for widely different structures exhibiting very delicate structural aspects gives predictions that are in close agreement with experimental evidence. (author)

  13. CONCRETE MIX DESIGN FOR STRUCTURES SUBJECTED TO EXPOSURE CLASS XC1 DEPENDING ON CONCRETE COVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Cherniakevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The reinforced steel corrosion which is the most important problem of reinforced concrete structures durability is generally stipulated for carbonization of concrete surrounding it. Concrete cover calculation at the design stage is predicated one because of the differences in manufacturing conditions and use of constructions. The applying of the probabilistic approaches to the carbonation process modeling allows to get predicated grade of the depth of carbonization of concrete and, thus, to settle minimum concrete cover thickness for a given projected service life of a construction. The procedures for concrete mix design for different strength classes of concrete are described in the article. Current recommendations on assignment of concrete strength class as well as concrete cover are presented. The European Standard EN 206:2013 defines the content requirements for the concrete structures operated in the exposure class XC1, including the minimum values of water-cement ratio, minimum cement content, and minimum strength class of concrete. Since the standard does not include any basis or explanations of the requirements, we made an effort to develop a scientific justification for the mentioned requirements. We developed the probabilistic models for the process of carbonation of concrete based on the concrete mix which was designed using the software VTK-Korroziya. The reinforced concrete structures with concrete cover 20–35 mm operated in the most unfavorable conditions within the exposure class XC1 were analyzed. The corresponding probabilistic calculations of the depth of carbonated concrete are described in the article. 

  14. Recycled materials in Portland cement concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    This report pertains to a comprehensive study involving the use of recycled materials in Portland cement concrete. Three different materials were studied including crushed glass (CG), street sweepings (SS), and recycled concrete (RC). Blast furnace s...

  15. Sustainable monitoring of concrete structures : strength and durability performance of polymer-modified self-sensing concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Torgal, Fernando Pacheco; Gonzalez, J.; Jalali, Said

    2012-01-01

    Concrete structures all over the world are reaching the end of their service life sooner than expected. This is due to the fact that ordinary Portland cement-based concrete deteriorates under environmental actions and also that structural inspections and conservation actions are expensive. Besides, as they consume energy and non-renewable resources, they have negative environmental impacts. Self-sensing concrete provides an alternative way of monitoring concrete-reinforced structures...

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 165: Areas 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, and 3) (January 2002, Rev. 0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV)

    2002-01-09

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 165 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 165 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well; CAS 25-51-02, Dry Well; CAS 25-59-01, Septic System; CAS 26-59-01, Septic System; CAS 25-07-06, Train Decontamination Area; CAS 25-07-07, Vehicle Washdown; CAS 26-07-01, Vehicle Washdown Station; and CAS 25-47-01, Reservoir and French Drain. All eight CASs are located in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Six of these CASs are located in Area 25 facilities and two CASs are located in Area 26 facilities. The eight CASs at CAU 165 consist of dry wells, septic systems, decontamination pads, and a reservoir. The six CASs in Area 25 are associated with the Nuclear Rocket Development Station that operated from 1958 to 1973. The two CASs in Area 26 are associated with facilities constructed for Project Pluto, a series of nuclear reactor tests conducted between 1961 to 1964 to develop a nuclear-powered ramjet engine. Based on site history, the scope of this plan will be a two-phased approach to investigate the possible presence of hazardous and/or radioactive constituents at concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The Phase I analytical program for most CASs will include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and radionuclides. If laboratory data obtained from the Phase I investigation indicates the presence of contaminants of concern, the process will continue with a Phase II investigation to define the extent of contamination. Based on the

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 5: Landfills, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0) includes Record of Technical Change No. 1 (dated 9/17/2002)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IT Corporation, Las Vegas, NV

    2002-05-28

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 5 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 5 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-15-01, Sanitary Landfill; 05-16-01, Landfill; 06-08-01, Landfill; 06-15-02, Sanitary Landfill; 06-15-03, Sanitary Landfill; 12-15-01, Sanitary Landfill; 20-15-01, Landfill; 23-15-03, Disposal Site. Located between Areas 5, 6, 12, 20, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), CAU 5 consists of unlined landfills used in support of disposal operations between 1952 and 1992. Large volumes of solid waste were produced from the projects which used the CAU 5 landfills. Waste disposed in these landfills may be present without appropriate controls (i.e., use restrictions, adequate cover) and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment. During the 1992 to 1995 time frame, the NTS was used for various research and development projects including nuclear weapons testing. Instead of managing solid waste at one or two disposal sites, the practice on the NTS was to dispose of solid waste in the vicinity of the project. A review of historical documentation, process knowledge, personal interviews, and inferred activities associated with this CAU identified the following as potential contaminants of concern: volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel- and gasoline-range organics), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Metals, plus nickel and zinc. A two-phase approach has been selected to collect information and generate data to satisfy needed resolution

  18. Concrete durability

    OpenAIRE

    Gaspar Tébar, Demetrio

    1991-01-01

    The evidence that the concrete is not a material for ever was noticed from the beginning of its industrial use. In the present work, the author describes the studies carried out during the last century and the early ages of the present one, mainly devoted to the study of the durability in sea water. At the present days, and in spite of the numerous papers published from then, the study of the concrete durability continues focusing the research priorities and economical resources of rese...

  19. Historic Concrete : From Concrete Repair to Concrete Conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinemann, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Concrete like materials were already applied during the Roman Empire. After the decline of the Roman Empire, a wide scale application of concrete only reappeared in the 19th century. Here lies also the origin of modern (reinforced) concrete. Since then, both concrete application and composition have

  20. Parameters of Concrete Modified with Glass Meal and Chalcedonite Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwa, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Additives used for production of concrete mixtures affect the rheological properties and parameters of hardened concrete, including compressive strength, water resistance, durability and shrinkage of hardened concrete. By their application, the use of cement and production costs may be reduced. The scheduled program of laboratory tests included preparation of six batches of concrete mixtures with addition of glass meal and / or chalcedonite dust. Mineral dust is a waste product obtained from crushed aggregate mining, with grain size below 0,063μm. The main ingredient of chalcedonite dust is silica. Glass meal used in the study is a material with very fine grain size, less than 65μm. This particle size is present in 60% - 90% of the sample. Additives were used to replace cement in concrete mixes in an amount of 15% and 25%. The amount of aggregate was left unchanged. The study used Portland cement CEM I 42.5R. Concrete mixes were prepared with a constant rate w / s = 0.4. The aim of the study was to identify the effect of the addition of chalcedonite dust and / or glass meal on the parameters of hardened concrete, i.e. compressive strength, water absorption and capillarity. Additives used in the laboratory tests significantly affect the compressive strength. The largest decrease in compressive strength of concrete samples was recorded for samples with 50% substitutes of cement additives. This decrease is 34.35%. The smallest decrease in compressive strength was noted in concrete with the addition of 15% of chalcedonite dust or 15% glass meal, it amounts to an average of 15%. The study of absorption shows that all concrete with the addition of chalcedonite dust and glass meal gained a percentage weight increase between 2.7 ÷ 3.1% for the test batches. This is a very good result, which is probably due to grout sealing. In capillary action for the test batches, the percentage weight gains of samples ranges from 4.6% to 5.1%. However, the reference concrete obtained

  1. Studies of historic concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jull, S.P.; Lees, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    Underground concrete repositories for nuclear waste will have to maintain their integrity for hundreds of years. This study examines ancient concretes and assesses the suitability of equivalent modern materials for underground storage. Thirty four ancient samples have been obtained from Great Britain, Austria and Italy. One 19th century sample was also collected. The samples were examined using a variety of analytical techniques (including scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, chemical analysis and pH determination). The samples were also subjected to a range of physical tests. Most of the samples examined were very weak and porous although they had retained full structural integrity. With the exception of the 19th century sample, none of the concretes had maintained pH alkaline enough to immobilize radionuclides. Hydrated calcium silicates have been detected in some samples which are similar to those observed in modern Portland cement concretes. These stable cementitious species have endured for almost two thousand years. All the ancient concretes and mortars examined contained natural pozzolanic material or crushed burnt clay. This may have had some effect on the reduction in alkalinity although the main reason was full carbonation of calcium hydroxide

  2. Constitutive equations for cracked reinforced concrete based on a refined model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geistefeldt, H.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper a refined nonlinear three-dimensional mechanical model for reinforced concrete is presented which can include the effects, depending on the given state of stress. The model is composed of three model-elements: component u-uncracked reinforced concrete with perfect bond (stiffness equal to the sum of the stiffnesses of concrete and reinforcement), component r-reinforcement free in surrounding concrete (reinforcement and concrete are having equal normal strains in noncracked directions and equal shear strains), component c-crack-part (shear stiffnesses in cracks is equal to the sum of shear stiffnesses of the reinforcement mesh, interface shear transfer and dowel action in cracks). The stress tensor of all components is equal to the global stress tensor. The strains are different from component to component corresponding to the local strain distribution in cracked reinforced concrete. For example the uniaxial behavior of reinforced concrete is modelled out of three springs k(u), k(r) and k(c) in series each having variable length l(u), l(r) or l(c). The uncracked structure is represented by k(u) only, l(r) and l(c) are zero. After cracking l(r) and l(c) are growing with the tensile load. When concrete tension stiffness between cracks has diminished, l(u) has reached the zero-value. The stress-dependent weights of the components in the model are derived from uniaxial theory and uniaxial test results

  3. 1.5. The concrete mix properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidov, D.Kh.

    2011-01-01

    Different properties of concrete mix, including connectivity, mobility and water demand were considered in this work. The steps of water demand of concrete mix obtained from Portland cement, sand and gravel are presented in this work. The classification of concrete mixes is presented as well.

  4. Laterally Loaded Partially Prestressed Concrete Piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    of an extensive test program onl laterali y ioadeu. partially pr- estressed concrete fender piles. The study Included service load range as well ats...12,000-psi design strength). Configura- tion G utilized 14 r:- estress strand, in an unsymmetric pattern. To provide a uniform concrete prestress of 540...sudden loss in load carrying capacity directly related to the loss of concrete area. The compression concrete fractured longitudinally and along the

  5. INFLUENCE OF INTERMITTENT CYCLIC LOADING ON REINFORCED CONCRETE RESISTANCE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasyl Karpiuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the study of reinforced concrete span bending structures under conditions of high-level cyclic loading. Previous studies on the development of physical models of bending reinforced concrete element fatigue resistance, cyclic effect of lateral forces, and methods of calculation, are important and appropriate owing to certain features and the essential specificity of the mentioned loading type. These primarily include the nonlinearity of deformation, damage accumulation in the form of fatigue micro- and macro-cracks, and exhausting destruction of construction materials. In this paper, key expressions determining the endurance limits of concrete, longitudinal reinforcement, and anchoring longitudinal reinforcement, which contribute to endurance throughout the entire construction, are considered. Establishing a link between stresses in the elements and deformations in the element under conditions of cyclic loading action is of equal importance because of the presence of cyclic stress-induced creep deformation.

  6. Study on reinforced lightweight coconut shell concrete beam behavior under shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunasekaran, K.; Annadurai, R.; Kumar, P.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Coconut shell used as aggregate in concrete production. • Coconut shell concrete beam behavior studied under shear. • Coconut shell concrete beam behavior are compared with control concrete beams. - Abstract: Lightweight concrete has been produced using crushed coconut shell as coarse aggregate. The shear behavior of reinforced concrete beam made with coconut shell is analyzed and compared with the normal control concrete. Eight beams, four with coconut shell concrete and four with normal control concrete were fabricated and tested. Study includes the structural shear behavior, shear capacity, cracking behavior, deflection behavior, ductility, strains in concrete and in reinforcement. It was observed that the shear behavior of coconut shell concrete is comparable to that of other lightweight concretes. The results of concrete compression strain and steel tension strain showed that coconut shell concrete is able to achieve its full strain capacity under shear loadings. However, the failure zones of coconut shell concrete were larger than for control concrete beams

  7. Comparative evaluation of concrete sealers and multiple layer polymer concrete overlays. Interim report no. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The report presents comparisons of initial evaluations of several concrete sealers and multiple layer polymer concrete overlays. The sealers evaluated included a solvent-dlspersed epoxy, a water-dlspersed epoxy, a silane, and a high molecular weight ...

  8. High Performance Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traian Oneţ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the last studies and researches accomplished in Cluj-Napoca related to high performance concrete, high strength concrete and self compacting concrete. The purpose of this paper is to raid upon the advantages and inconveniences when a particular concrete type is used. Two concrete recipes are presented, namely for the concrete used in rigid pavement for roads and another one for self-compacting concrete.

  9. Automatic dam concrete placing system; Dam concrete dasetsu sagyo no jidoka system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneda, Y; Hori, Y; Nakayama, T; Yoshihara, K; Hironaka, T [Okumura Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1994-11-15

    An automatic concrete placing system was developed for concrete dam construction. This system consists of the following five subsystems: a wireless data transmission system, an automatic dam concrete mixing system, a consistency determination system, an automatic dam concrete loading and transporting system, and a remote concrete bucket opening and closing system. The system includes the following features: mixing amount by mixing ratio and mixing intervals can be instructed from a concrete placing site by using a wireless handy terminal; concrete is mixed automatically in a batcher plant; a transfer car is started, and concrete is charged into a bucket automatically; the mixed concrete is determined of its properties automatically; labor cost can be reduced, the work efficiency improved, and the safety enhanced; and the system introduction has resulted in unattended operation from the aggregate draw-out to a bunker line, manpower saving of five persons, and reduction in cycle time by 10%. 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. HYDRAULIC CONCRETE COMPOSITION AND PROPERTIES CONTROL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Pshinko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Scientific work aims at the development and testing of information system to meet the challenges of concrete composition design and control (for railway structures and buildings based on the physico-analytical method algorithm for hydraulic concrete composition calculation. Methodology. The proposed algorithm of hydraulic concrete composition calculation is based on the physicochemical mechanics and in particular on the rheology of elastic–viscous–plastic bodies. The system of canonical equations consists of the equations for concrete strength, absolute volume, concrete mix consistency as well as the equation for optimal concrete saturation with aggregates while minimizing cement content. The joint solution of these four equations related to composition allows determining for the materials the concrete composition of required strength, concrete workability with minimum cement content. The procedure for calculation of hydraulic concrete composition according to the physico-analytical method consists of two parts: 1 physical, which is laboratory testing of concrete mix components in different concrete compositions; 2 analytical, which represents the calculation algorithm for concrete compositions equivalent in concrete strength and workability that comply with the specific conditions of concrete placing. Findings. To solve the problem of designing the concrete composition with the desired properties for railway structures and buildings it was proposed to use the information technology in the form of a developed computer program whose algorithm includes the physico-analytical method for hydraulic concrete composition determination. Originality. The developed concrete composition design method takes into account the basic properties of raw materials, concrete mix and concrete, which are pre-determined. The distinctive feature of physico-analytical method is obtaining of a set of equivalent compositions with a certain concrete mix

  11. Concrete spirituality

    OpenAIRE

    Kritzinger, Johannes N.J.

    2014-01-01

    This article reflects on a number of liturgical innovations in the worship of Melodi ya Tshwane, an inner-city congregation of the Uniting Reformed Church in Southern Africa (URCSA). The focus of the innovations was to implement the understanding of justice in Article 4 of the Confession of Belhar, a confessional standard of the URCSA. The basic contention of the article is that well designed liturgies that facilitate experiences of beauty can nurture a concrete spirituality to mobilise urba...

  12. Sustainable concretes for transportation infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    performance in concrete for structural and transportation applications. Based on the challenges associated with coal ash (including SDA) and the economic costs linked to cement production, this research seeks to develop an environmentally friendly an...

  13. Application of Crushed Concrete in Geotechnical Engineering - Selected Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawalec, Jacek; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Pilipenko, Anton; Rybak, Jarosław

    2017-12-01

    The reuse of building materials becomes an important issue in sustainable engineering. As the technical requirements for civil engineering structures changes with time and the life time is limited, the need of building new objects meets the necessity of recycling of the existing ones. In the case of steel structures, the possibility of recycling is obvious, also in the case of wooden constructions, the possibility of “burning” solves the problem. The concrete waste is generated mainly as a result of the demolition and reconstruction of residential and industrial buildings. These types of waste are basically made from crushed rocks and cement minerals and contain non-hydrated cement particles in its composition. Concrete poses a lot of problems mainly for two reasons. It is difficult to crush, heavy and hard to transport and demanding in reuse. Different fractions (particle sizes) may be used for different purposes. Starting from very fine particles which can be used in concrete production, through regular 16-300 mm fractions used to form new fills and fill the mats, up to very irregular mixtures used to form stone columns by means of Impulse Compaction or in Dynamic Replacement. The presented study juxtaposes authors experience with crushed concrete used in civil engineering, mainly in geotechnical projects. Authors’ experiences comprise the application of crushed concrete in the new concrete production in Russia, changing pulverized bridge into the fill of mesh sacks, or mattresses used as an effective way to protect the shoreline and the New Orleans East land bridge after Katrina storm (forming a new shoreline better able to withstand wave actions), and finally the use of very irregular concrete fractions to form stone columns in week soils on the example of railway and road projects in Poland. Selected case studies are presented and summarized with regard to social, technical and economic issues including energy consumption needed for proposed technologies

  14. Potential of waste tires as aggregates in concrete | Mutuku | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potential use of this kind of concrete includes nonstructural purposes such as lightweight concrete walls and blocks, building facades and crash barriers. Keywords: concrete aggregates, rubber chips, rubberized concrete, used tires, waste recycling. Journal of Civil Engineering Research and Practice Vol. 3(1) 2006: 75-84 ...

  15. Elastic-plastic constitutive modeling of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Y.

    1983-03-01

    The need to understand concrete behavior under high temperatures in the nuclear industry has become rather accute. For this purpose, a constitutive model of concrete especially developed for this severe environment is indispensable. This report reviews the presently available constitutive models of concrete at standard-temperature conditions and considers their advantages and drawbacks. A rather simple but effective approach is selected to treat concrete behavior at high temperatures. Special emphasis is devoted to the modeling of concrete up to and including failure. The derived constitutive model is checked with biaxial and triaxial benchmark experimental results. Very good agreement is obtained

  16. Concrete containment modeling and management, Conmod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovall, O.; Larsson, J.-A.; Shaw, P.; Touret, J.-P.; Karlberg, G.

    2003-01-01

    The CONMOD project aims to create a system which will ensure that safety requirements for concrete containment structures will be up-held during the entire planned lifetime of plants and possibly during an extended lifetime. An important part of the project is to develop the application and understanding of Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) techniques for the assessment of conformity and condition of concrete reactor containments and to integrate this with state-of-the-art and developed Finite Element (FE) modelling techniques and analysis of structural behaviour. The objective being to create a diagnostic method for evaluation of ageing and degradation of concrete containments. This method, the C ONMOD-methodology , will help in the planning and execution of actions that will improve safety in a manner which is optimal both in terms of economy and safety. The knowledge gained during the project will be presented in a handbook of best practice. The decommissioned Barsebaeck unit 1 reactor containment will be accessible for non-destructive examination throughout the duration of the project. Intrusive investigations will also be made including coring and material tests as a valuable complement to NDT. (author)

  17. Refractory concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Novel concrete compositions comprise particles of aggregate material embedded in a cement matrix, said cement matrix produced by contacting an oxide selected from the group of Y 2 O 3 , La 2 O 3 , Nd 2 O 3 , Sm 2 O 3 , Eu 2 O 3 and Gd 2 O 3 with an aqueous solution of a salt selected from the group of NH 4 HO 3 , NH 4 Cl, YCl 3 and Mg(NO 3 ) 2 to form a fluid mixture; and allowing the fluid mixture to harden

  18. Concrete construction engineering handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Nawy, Edward G

    2008-01-01

    Provides coverage of concrete construction engineering and technology. This work features discussions focusing on: the advances in engineered concrete materials; reinforced concrete construction; specialized construction techniques; and, design recommendations for high performance.

  19. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-07-16

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 322 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 01-25-01, AST Release (Area 1); 03-25-03, Mud Plant AST Diesel Release (Area 3); 03-20-05, Injection Wells (Area 3). Corrective Action Unit 322 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. The investigation of three CASs in CAU 322 will determine if hazardous and/or radioactive constituents are present at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  20. Recycled concrete aggregate in portland cement concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Aggregates can be produced by crushing hydraulic cement concrete and are known as recycled concrete : aggregates (RCA). This report provides results from a New Jersey Department of Transportation study to identify : barriers to the use of RCA in new ...

  1. The Future Concrete: Self-Compacting Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Iureş

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the characteristics of the self-compacting concretes, their advantages and disadvantages when they are used in buildings. Due to its properties and composition, the self-compacting concrete is described here as being one of the future friendly enviromental material for buildings. Tests concerning to obtaining a self-compacting concrete, together with the specific fresh concrete properties tests, are described.

  2. The Future Concrete: Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Iureş, Liana; Bob, Corneliu

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents the characteristics of the self-compacting concretes, their advantages and disadvantages when they are used in buildings. Due to its properties and composition, the self-compacting concrete is described here as being one of the future friendly enviromental material for buildings. Tests concerning to obtaining a self-compacting concrete, together with the specific fresh concrete properties tests, are described.

  3. Concrete durability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaspar Tébar, Demetrio

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available The evidence that the concrete is not a material for ever was noticed from the beginning of its industrial use. In the present work, the author describes the studies carried out during the last century and the early ages of the present one, mainly devoted to the study of the durability in sea water. At the present days, and in spite of the numerous papers published from then, the study of the concrete durability continues focusing the research priorities and economical resources of researchers and industries related with this material. Moreover, the new laboratory techniques are allowing to understand old problems and even to open again the discussion on reaction mechanisms which were believed to be completely understood. The article finalizes with a brief description of the numerous studies carried out at the Institute Eduardo Torroja on concrete durability, mainly those related with the resistance against gypsum attack (so abundant in our country land and against sea water attack.

    La realidad de que el hormigón no es un material eterno y es susceptible de sufrir ataques por agentes químicos, fue constatada desde el comienzo mismo de su uso industrial. En el presente trabajo el autor enumera los estudios realizados el siglo pasado y a comienzos del presente sobre la durabilidad del hormigón en agua de mar. En la actualidad y a pesar de los numerosos trabajos desarrollados desde entonces, el estudio de la durabilidad del hormigón sigue centrando la atención prioritaria y los recursos económicos de los investigadores e industrias relacionadas con este material. Además las nuevas técnicas de estudio están permitiendo comprender antiguos problemas e incluso reabrir la discusión sobre mecanismos de reacción que se creían completamente explicados. Finaliza el artículo con una descripción somera de los múltiples trabajos realizados en el Instituto Eduardo Torreja sobre la materia, en especial los estudios realizados sobre

  4. Concrete Memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegand, Frauke Katharina

    2015-01-01

    This article traces the presence of Atlantikwall bunkers in amateur holiday snapshots and discusses the ambiguous role of the bunker site in visual cultural memory. Departing from my family’s private photo collection from twenty years of vacationing at the Danish West coast, the different mundane...... and poetic appropriations and inscriptions of the bunker site are depicted. Ranging between overlooked side presences and an overwhelming visibility, the concrete remains of fascist war architecture are involved in and motivate different sensuous experiences and mnemonic appropriations. The article meets...... the bunkers’ changing visuality and the cultural topography they both actively transform and are being transformed by through juxtaposing different acts and objects of memory over time and in different visual articulations....

  5. Tremie Concrete for Bridge Piers and Other Massive Underwater Placements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    This study reviewed the placement of mass concrete under water using a tremie. Areas investigated included (a) Mixture design of tremie concrete including the use of pozzolanic replacement of portions of the cement; (b) Flow patterns and flow related...

  6. PCM Concrete. [Phase Change Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juul Andersen, T. [Danish Technological Institute, Taastrup (Denmark); Poulsen, H.-H. [BASF A/S, Roedekro (Denmark); Passov, F. [Spaencom A/S, Hedehusene (Denmark); Heiselberg, P. [Aalborg Univ..Aalborg (Denmark)

    2013-04-01

    PCM-Concrete was a research and development project launched in 2009 and finished in 2012. The project, which was funded by The Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation, had a total budget of 1.7 million Euros and included 4 partners: Danish Technological Institute (project manager), Aalborg University, BASF A/S and Spaencom A/S. The overall vision of the project was to reduce energy consumption for heating and cooling in buildings by developing high-performance concrete structures microencapsulated Phase Change Materials (PCM). The PCM used in the project was Micronal produced by BASF A/S. Micronal is small capsules with an acrylic shell and inside a wax with a melting point at approx. 23 deg. C equal to a comfortable indoor temperature. During the melting process thermal energy is transferred to chemical reaction (melting/solidification) depending on PCM being heated up or cooled down. Adding Micronal to concrete would theoretically increase the thermal mass of the concrete and improve the diurnal heat capacity which is the amount of energy that can be stored and released during 24 hours. Nevertheless, it is a relatively new technology that has not received much attention, yet. In the PCM-Concrete project 5 main investigations were carried out: 1) Development of concrete mix design with PCM. 2) Investigation of thermal properties of the PCM concrete: thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity, density. 3) Up-scaling the research to industrial production of PCM-concrete structures. 4) Testing energy efficiency in full scale. 5) Confronting aesthetic and acoustic barriers to full exploitation of the potential of PCM-concrete structures. The results from the test program showed: 1) That the diurnal heat storage capacity is higher for all 4 hollow core decks with tiles attached compared to the reference hollow core deck. 2) The hollow core decks with concrete tiles without PCM performs slightly better than the tiles with PCM. 3) That is was impossible to

  7. Direct Shear Behavior of Fiber Reinforced Concrete Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Al-Quraishi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving the accuracy of load-deformation behavior, failure mode, and ultimate load capacity for reinforced concrete members subjected to in-plane loadings such as corbels, wall to foundation connections and panels need shear strength behavior to be included. Shear design in reinforced concrete structures depends on crack width, crack slippage and roughness of the surface of cracks. This paper illustrates results of an experimental investigation conducted to investigate the direct shear strength of fiber normal strength concrete (NSC and reactive powder concrete (RPC. The tests were performed along a pre-selected shear plane in concrete members named push-off specimens. The effectiveness of concrete compressive strength, volume fraction of steel fiber, and shear reinforcement ratio on shear transfer capacity were considered in this study. Furthermore, failure modes, shear stress-slip behavior, and shear stress-crack width behavior were also presented in this study. Tests’ results showed that volume fraction of steel fiber and compressive strength of concrete in NSC and RPC play a major role in improving the shear strength of concrete. As expectedly, due to dowel action, the shear reinforcement is the predominant factor in resisting the shear stress. The shear failure of NSC and RPC has the sudden mode of failure (brittle failure with the approximately linear behavior of shear stress-slip relationship till failure. Using RPC instead of NSC with the same amount of steel fibers in constructing the push-off specimen result in high shear strength. In NSC, shear strength influenced by the three major factors; crack surface friction, aggregate interlock and steel fiber content if present. Whereas, RPC has only steel fiber and cracks surface friction influencing the shear strength. Due to cementitious nature of RPC in comparisons with NSC, the RPC specimen shows greater cracks width. It is observed that the Mattock model gives very satisfactory

  8. Review of concrete properties for prestressed concrete pressure vesssels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.

    1976-10-01

    The desire for increasing power output along with safety requirements has resulted in consideration of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel (PCPV) for most current nuclear reactor systems, as well as for the very-high-temperature reactor for process heat and as primary pressure vessels for coal conversion systems. Results are presented of a literature review to ascertain current knowledge regarding plain concrete properties under conditions imposed by a mass concrete structure such as PCRV. The effects of high temperature on such properties as strength, elasticity, and creep are discussed, as well as changes in thermal properties, multiaxial behavior, and the mechanisms thought to be responsible for the observed behavior. In addition, the effects of radiation and moisture migration are discussed. It is concluded that testing results found in the technical literature show much disagreement as to the effects of temperature on concrete properties. The variations in concrete mixtures, curing and testing procedures, age at loading, and moisture conditions during exposure and testing are some of the reasons for such disagreement. Test results must be limited, in most cases, to the materials and conditions of a given test rather than applied to such a general class of materials such as concrete. It is also concluded that sustained exposure of normal concretes to current PCRV operating conditions will not result in any significant loss of properties. However, lack of knowledge regarding effects of temperatures exceeding 100 0 C (212 0 F), moisture migration, and multiaxial behavior precludes a statement advocating operation beyond current design limits. The report includes recommendations for future research on concrete for PCPVs

  9. Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Okamura, Hajime; Ouchi, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete was first developed in 1988 to achieve durable concrete structures. Since then, various investigations have been carried out and this type of concrete has been used in practical structures in Japan, mainly by large construction companies. Investigations for establishing a rational mix-design method and self-compactability testing methods have been carried out from the viewpoint of making self-compacting concrete a standard concrete.

  10. 77 FR 69508 - Inservice Inspection of Prestressed Concrete Containment Structures With Grouted Tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    ... Containment Structures With Grouted Tendons AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Regulatory guide... (RG) 1.90, ``Inservice Inspection of Prestressed Concrete Containment Structures with Grouted Tendons... appropriate surveillance program for prestressed concrete containment structures with grouted tendons...

  11. Continuity diaphragm for skewed continuous span precast prestressed concrete girder bridges : technical summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-01

    Most highway bridges are built as cast-in-place : reinforced concrete slabs and prestressed concrete : girders. The shear connectors on the top of the girders : assure composite action between the slabs and : girders. The design guidelines for bridge...

  12. Microencapsulation of Self-healing Concrete Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    design and development. Other factors that can affect concrete and its lifespan include shrinkage , design flaws or poor quality of construction...possible shrinkage , design flaws or poor quality of construction materials, reinforced concrete will eventually develop cracks. Inevitable damage to...SELF-HEALING CONCRETE PROPERTIES N00244-l 0-G-0004 Sb. GRANT NUMBER Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT NUMBER James Gilford III

  13. Concrete spaller. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has numerous buildings and facilities that have become contaminated through operation of nuclear reactors, fuel fabrication processes, and research laboratory operations. These buildings and facilities, often constructed of concrete, need to be decontaminated before they can be safely decommissioned or demolished. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's concrete spaller is a hand-held tool that can be used for decontaminating flat or slightly curved concrete surfaces, obtaining concrete samples, and in-depth removal from cracks in concrete. The concrete spaller includes a 9-ton hydraulic cylinder and spalling bit. It runs from a hydraulic pump that expands the spaller in pre-drilled holes in the concrete. The result is removal of concrete chunks that fall into the attached metal shroud. The concrete spaller is more efficient than traditional tools such as hand-held pneumatic scabblers and scalers. For example, the spaller is capable of spalling 1.3 m 3 /hr (0.23 ft 2 /min), compared to 1.1 m 2 /hr (0.20 ft 2 /min), for the baseline scabbler and scaler demonstrated at 3-mm (1/8-in.) depth. The spaller is also capable of removing concrete at a greater depth than traditional tools. Operating cost of the spaller ($128/m 2 or $11.93/ft 2 [optimum conditions]) is less than the baseline tools: scaler ($155/m 2 or $14.40/ft 2 ) and scabbler ($156/m 2 or $14.53/ft 2 )

  14. A Simple Demonstration of Concrete Structural Health Monitoring Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cai, Guowei [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nath, Paromita [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bao, Yanqing [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bru Brea, Jose Maria [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Koester, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Adams, Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kosson, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear power plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Structural health monitoring of concrete structures aims to understand the current health condition of a structure based on heterogeneous measurements to produce high confidence actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. This ongoing research project is seeking to develop a probabilistic framework for health diagnosis and prognosis of aging concrete structures in a nuclear power plant subjected to physical, chemical, environment, and mechanical degradation. The proposed framework consists of four elements—damage modeling, monitoring, data analytics, and uncertainty quantification. This report describes a proof-of-concept example on a small concrete slab subjected to a freeze-thaw experiment that explores techniques in each of the four elements of the framework and their integration. An experimental set-up at Vanderbilt University’s Laboratory for Systems Integrity and Reliability is used to research effective combination of full-field techniques that include infrared thermography, digital image correlation, and ultrasonic measurement. The measured data are linked to the probabilistic framework: the thermography, digital image correlation data, and ultrasonic measurement data are used for Bayesian calibration of model parameters, for diagnosis of damage, and for prognosis of future damage. The proof-of-concept demonstration presented in this report highlights the significance of each element of the framework and their integration.

  15. Interim Report on Concrete Degradation Mechanisms and Online Monitoring Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Neal, Kyle [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kosson, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Adams, Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The existing nuclear power plants in the United States have initial operating licenses of 40 years, though most of these plants have applied for and received license extensions. As plant structures, systems, and components age, their useful life—considering both structural integrity and performance—is reduced as a result of deterioration of the materials. The research on online monitoring of concrete structures conducted under the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program at Idaho National Laboratory will develop and demonstrate concrete structures health monitoring capabilities. Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Therefore, structural health monitoring is required to produce actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. Through this research project, several national laboratories and Vanderbilt University propose to develop a framework of research activities for the health monitoring of nuclear power plant concrete structures that includes the integration of four elements—damage modeling, monitoring, data analytics, and uncertainty quantification. This report briefly discusses available techniques and ongoing challenges in each of the four elements of the proposed framework with emphasis on degradation mechanisms and online monitoring techniques.

  16. Transitional Thermal Creep of Early Age Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauggaard-Nielsen, Anders Boe; Damkilde, Lars; Freiesleben Hansen, Per

    1999-01-01

    Couplings between creep of hardened concrete and temperature/water effects are well-known. Both the level and the gradients in time of temperature or water content influence the creep properties. In early age concrete the internal drying and the heat development due to hydration increase the effect...... of these couplings. The purpose of this work is to set up a mathematical model for creep of concrete which includes the transitional thermal effect. The model govern both early age concrete and hardened concrete. The development of the material properties in the model are assumed to depend on the hydration process...... termed the microprestresses, which reduces the stiffness of the concrete and increase the creep rate. The aging material is modelled in an incremental way reflecting the hydration process in which new layers of cement gel solidifies in a stress free state and add stiffness to the material. Analysis...

  17. Material law for concrete under multiaxial stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geistefeldt, H.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper a general triaxial set of finite strain-stress relations is derived, which can include a step-by-step way nearly all known factors and curves of material response. The finite constitutive equations representing the behaviour of concrete are related to the main strain-directions. The elastic part, the functions for uniaxial behaviour, those for biaxial response and finally the relation-parts, nonzero only in triaxial stress-state, can be reset separately by suitable functions which have been adjusted to the material response of actual concrete known from special tests. With a new and very short biaxial failure criterion for concrete, which has been stated and compared with test results, the analytic description of the biaxial behaviour of Kupfer's concrete is completed. With some additional assumptions the proposed failure criteria and the strain-stress equations for concrete are extended to the biaxial response of uncracked orthogonally reinforced concrete response. (Auth.)

  18. Digital Image Correlation of Concrete Slab at University of Tennessee, Knoxville

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pham, Binh T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kyle, Neal [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear power plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Some degradation mechanisms of concrete manifest themselves via swelling or by other shape deformation of the concrete. Specifically, degradation of concrete structure damaged by ASR is viewed as one of the dominant factors impacting the structural integrity of aging nuclear power plants. Structural health monitoring of concrete structures aims to understand the current health condition of a structure based on heterogeneous measurements to produce high-confidence actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. Number of nondestructive examination techniques (i.e., thermography, digital image correlation, mechanical deformation measurements, nonlinear impact resonance (DIC) acoustic spectroscopy, and vibro-acoustic modulation) is used to detect the damage caused by ASR. DIC techniques have been increasing in popularity, especially in micro- and nano-scale mechanical testing applications due to its relative ease of implementation and use. Advances in computer technology and digital cameras help this method moving forward. To ensure the best outcome of the DIC system, important factors in the experiment are identified. They include standoff distance, speckle size, speckle pattern, and durable paint. These optimal experimental options are selected basing on a thorough investigation. The resulting DIC deformation map indicates that this technique can be used to generate data related to degradation assessment of concrete structure damaged by the impact of ASR.

  19. Digital Image Correlation of Concrete Slab at University of Tennessee, Knoxville

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Agarwal, Vivek; Pham, Binh T.; Kyle, Neal

    2016-01-01

    Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear power plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Some degradation mechanisms of concrete manifest themselves via swelling or by other shape deformation of the concrete. Specifically, degradation of concrete structure damaged by ASR is viewed as one of the dominant factors impacting the structural integrity of aging nuclear power plants. Structural health monitoring of concrete structures aims to understand the current health condition of a structure based on heterogeneous measurements to produce high-confidence actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. Number of nondestructive examination techniques (i.e., thermography, digital image correlation, mechanical deformation measurements, nonlinear impact resonance (DIC) acoustic spectroscopy, and vibro-acoustic modulation) is used to detect the damage caused by ASR. DIC techniques have been increasing in popularity, especially in micro- and nano-scale mechanical testing applications due to its relative ease of implementation and use. Advances in computer technology and digital cameras help this method moving forward. To ensure the best outcome of the DIC system, important factors in the experiment are identified. They include standoff distance, speckle size, speckle pattern, and durable paint. These optimal experimental options are selected basing on a thorough investigation. The resulting DIC deformation map indicates that this technique can be used to generate data related to degradation assessment of concrete structure damaged by the impact of ASR.

  20. Use of SCC in Prefabricated Concrete Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Lars Nyholm; Lauritsen, Ib

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents observations made on the use of self-compacting concrete for pre-cast elements at Byggebjerg Beton A/S during the last 3 years. The elements include L- and sandwich elements and are mainly produced for agriculture purposes. In general, the flow properties and air content...... of the concrete to achieve a good surface quality with a limited number of blowholes. For horizontal castings it is important to keep the concrete flowing to avoid casting joints. Blocking is avoided by using the right type of spacers and a maximum size aggregate of 8mm. However, if the concrete has to flow over...

  1. Concretes characterization for spent radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez B, J.; Monroy G, F. P.

    2013-10-01

    The present work includes the preparation and characterization of the concrete used as conditioning matrix of spent radioactive sources in the Treatment Plant of Radioactive Wastes of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ). The concrete tests tubes were subjected to resistance assays to the compression, leaching, resistance to the radiation and porosity, and later on characterized by means of X rays diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectrometry, with the purpose of evaluating if this concrete accredits the established tests by the NOM-019-Nucl-1995. The results show that the concrete use in the Treatment Plant fulfills the requirements established by the NOM-019-Nucl-1995. (author)

  2. Economic analysis of recycling contaminated concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen, A.; Ayers, K.W.; Boren, J.K.; Parker, F.L. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Decontamination and Decommissioning activities in the DOE complex generate large volumes of radioactively contaminated and uncontaminated concrete. Currently, this concrete is usually decontaminated, the contaminated waste is disposed of in a LLW facility and the decontaminated concrete is placed in C&D landfills. A number of alternatives to this practice are available including recycling of the concrete. Cost estimates for six alternatives were developed using a spreadsheet model. The results of this analysis show that recycling alternatives are at least as economical as current practice.

  3. Penetration analysis of projectile with inclined concrete target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim S.B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents numerical analysis result of projectile penetration with concrete target. We applied dynamic material properties of 4340 steels, aluminium and explosive for projectile body. Dynamic material properties were measured with static tensile testing machine and Hopkinson pressure bar tests. Moreover, we used three concrete damage models included in LS-DYNA 3D, such as SOIL_CONCRETE, CSCM (cap model with smooth interaction and CONCRETE_DAMAGE (K&C concrete models. Strain rate effect for concrete material is important to predict the fracture deformation and shape of concrete, and penetration depth for projectiles. CONCRETE_DAMAGE model with strain rate effect also applied to penetration analysis. Analysis result with CSCM model shows good agreement with penetration experimental data. The projectile trace and fracture shapes of concrete target were compared with experimental data.

  4. Penetration analysis of projectile with inclined concrete target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. B.; Kim, H. W.; Yoo, Y. H.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents numerical analysis result of projectile penetration with concrete target. We applied dynamic material properties of 4340 steels, aluminium and explosive for projectile body. Dynamic material properties were measured with static tensile testing machine and Hopkinson pressure bar tests. Moreover, we used three concrete damage models included in LS-DYNA 3D, such as SOIL_CONCRETE, CSCM (cap model with smooth interaction) and CONCRETE_DAMAGE (K&C concrete) models. Strain rate effect for concrete material is important to predict the fracture deformation and shape of concrete, and penetration depth for projectiles. CONCRETE_DAMAGE model with strain rate effect also applied to penetration analysis. Analysis result with CSCM model shows good agreement with penetration experimental data. The projectile trace and fracture shapes of concrete target were compared with experimental data.

  5. Transfer and development length of prestressing tendons in full-scale AASHTO prestressed concrete girders using self-consolidating concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Self-consolidating concrete (SCC) is a highly workable concrete that flows through densely reinforced or : complex structural elements under its own weight. The benefits of using SCC include: a) Reducing labor costs : by eliminating the need for mech...

  6. Concrete manufacture with un-graded recycled aggregates

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Alan; Coventry, Kathryn; Graham, Sue

    2009-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether concrete that includes un-graded recycled aggregates can be manufactured to a comparable strength to concrete manufactured from virgin aggregates. \\ud \\ud Design/methodology/approach – A paired comparison test was used to evaluate the difference between concrete made with virgin aggregates (plain control) and concrete including recycled waste. Un-graded construction demolition waste and un-graded ground glass were used as aggregate...

  7. Concrete under severe conditions. Environment and loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the CONSEC Conferences is to focus on concrete infrastructures, either subjected to severe environment or severe loading, or any combination of severe conditions. Experience from the performance of existing concrete structures, and especially under severe environmental conditions, severe accidental loading or extended lifespan, has demonstrated the need for better integration of structural and durability design, new design concepts including reliability-based durability design, performance-based material requirements, structural robustness, and an improved basis for documentation of obtained construction quality and durability properties during concrete construction. An improved basis for operation and preventive maintenance of concrete structures including repairs and retrofitting is also very important. Premature corrosion of reinforcing steel, inadequate structural design for seismic or blast loading, are examples of reduced service life of concrete structures that not only represent technical and economical problems, but also a huge waste of natural resources and hence also, an environmental and ecological problem. Experience of structures effectively submitted to severe conditions represents a unique benchmark for quantifying the actual safety and durability margin of concrete structures. In fact for several reasons, most concrete design codes, job specifications and other requirements for concrete structures have frequently shown to yield insufficient and unsatisfactory results and ability to solve the above problems, as well as issues raised by specific very long-term or very severe requirements for nuclear and industrial waste management, or civil works of strategic relevance. Recently available high to ultra-high performance concrete may find rational and valuable application in such cases. It is very important, therefore, to bring people with different professional backgrounds together to exchange experience and develop multi

  8. Sustainable Concrete Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sim J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The growing concern over global warming and significant ecological changes requires sustainable development in all fields of science and technology. Concrete not only consumes huge amount of energy and natural sources, but also emits large amount of CO2, mainly due to the production of cement. It is evident that such large amount of concrete production has put significant impact on the energy, resource, environment, and ecology of the society. Hence, how to develop the concrete technology in a sustainable way has become a significant issue. In this paper, some of Korean researches for sustainable development of concrete are presented. These are sustainable strengthening for deteriorated concrete structure, sustainable reinforcement of new concrete structure, sustainable concrete using recycled aggregate and supplementary cementing materials and finally application of each technique to precast concrete.

  9. Concrete pavement joint deterioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Concrete pavements are an important part of our national infrastructure. In recent years the relatively small number of reported joints deteriorating prematurely in concrete pavements around Indiana has increased. Changes over the past 45 years in IN...

  10. Lunar concrete for construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; Keller, M. Dean

    1988-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar-base construction has been discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the moon are provided in this paper along with specific conclusions from the existing data base.

  11. Reinforced sulphur concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2014-01-01

    Reinforced sulphur concrete wherein one or more metal reinforcing members are in contact with sulphur concrete is disclosed. The reinforced sulphur concrete comprises an adhesion promoter that enhances the interaction between the sulphur and the one or more metal reinforcing members.

  12. Deterioration of Concrete Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Chloride ingress is a common cause of deterioration of reinforced concrete bridges. Concrete may be exposed to chloride by seawater or de-icing salts. The chloride initiates corrosion of the reinforcement, which through expansion disrupts the concrete. In addition, the corrosion reduces the cross...

  13. concrete5 for developers

    CERN Document Server

    Uzayr, Sufyan bin

    2014-01-01

    Whether you have had some previous experience with concrete5 or are entirely new to it, this book will help you understand all that you need to know in order to get started with concrete5 development. A background in PHP is required; some knowledge of HTML/CSS is needed in order to fully grasp the concepts underlying concrete5 theme development.

  14. 7 CFR 2902.42 - Wood and concrete sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wood and concrete sealers. 2902.42 Section 2902.42... Items § 2902.42 Wood and concrete sealers. (a) Definition. (1) Products that are penetrating liquids formulated to protect wood and/or concrete, including masonry and fiber cement siding, from damage caused by...

  15. Quality assurance of polymer concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, H.

    1984-01-01

    With polymer concrete, a whole range of organisational and functional measures have to be met in order to assure the required quality with an economic expenditure. Quality assurance begins in the design and does not end in the production, rather includes all fields of the enterprise. The following deals with a particular range of the total complex, the inspection methods for assuring the quality of machine components of polymer concrete, particularly machine tool bases, this being through the control of the raw material, the production and the finished product. (orig.) [de

  16. Modified pavement cement concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botsman, L. N.; Ageeva, M. S.; Botsman, A. N.; Shapovalov, S. M.

    2018-03-01

    The paper suggests design principles of pavement cement concrete, which covers optimization of compositions and structures at the stage of mixture components selection due to the use of plasticizing agents and air-retaining substances that increase the viability of a concrete mixture. It also demonstrates advisability of using plasticizing agents together with air-retaining substances when developing pavement concrete compositions, which provides for the improvement of physical and mechanical properties of concrete and the reduction of cement binding agent consumption thus preserving strength indicators. The paper shows dependences of the main physical-mechanical parameters of concrete on cement consumption, a type and amount of additives.

  17. Material properties characterization - concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, G.L.; MacLeod, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    A review is presented of the six contributions in the SMiRT 4 conference to Session H5 on structural analysis of prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels. These relate to short term stress-strain aspects of concrete loaded beyond the linear range in uniaxial and biaxial stress fields, to some time and temperature dependent properties of concrete at working stress levels, and to a programme of strain-gauge testing for the assessment of concrete properties. From the information discussed, it is clear that there are difficulties in determining material properties for concrete, and these are summarised. (UK)

  18. The Fire Resistance Performance of Recycled Aggregate Concrete Columns with Different Concrete Compressive Strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongying; Cao, Wanlin; Bian, Jianhui; Zhang, Jianwei

    2014-12-08

    In order to ascertain the fire resistance performance of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) components with different concrete compressive strengths, four full-scaled concrete columns were designed and tested under high temperature. Two of the four specimens were constructed by normal concrete with compressive strength ratings of C20 and C30, respectively, while the others were made from recycled coarse aggregate (RCA) concrete of C30 and C40, respectively. Identical constant axial forces were applied to specimens while being subjected to simulated building fire conditions in a laboratory furnace. Several parameters from the experimental results were comparatively analyzed, including the temperature change, vertical displacement, lateral deflection, fire endurance, and failure characteristics of specimens. The temperature field of specimens was simulated with ABAQUS Software (ABAQUS Inc., Provindence, RI, USA) and the results agreed quite well with those from the experiments. Results show that the rate of heat transfer from the surface to the interior of the column increases with the increase of the concrete's compressive strength for both RAC columns and normal concrete columns. Under the same initial axial force ratio, for columns with the same cross section, those with lower concrete compressive strengths demonstrate better fire resistance performance. The fire resistance performance of RAC columns is better than that of normal concrete columns, with the same concrete compressive strength.

  19. Autogenous Deformation of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autogenous deformation of concrete can be defined as the free deformation of sealed concrete at a constant temperature. A number of observed problems with early age cracking of high-performance concretes can be attributed to this phenomenon. During the last 10 years , this has led to an increased...... focus on autogenous deformation both within concrete practice and concrete research. Since 1996 the interest has been significant enough to hold international, yearly conferences entirely devoted to this subject. The papers in this publication were presented at two consecutive half-day sessions...... at the American Concrete Institute’s Fall Convention in Phoenix, Arizona, October 29, 2002. All papers have been reviewed according to ACI rules. This publication, as well as the sessions, was sponsored by ACI committee 236, Material Science of Concrete. The 12 presentations from 8 different countries indicate...

  20. Recycled Concrete as Aggregate for Structural Concrete Production

    OpenAIRE

    Mirjana Malešev; Vlastimir Radonjanin; Snežana Marinković

    2010-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the experimental results of the properties of fresh and hardened concrete with different replacement ratios of natural with recycled coarse aggregate is presented in the paper. Recycled aggregate was made by crushing the waste concrete of laboratory test cubes and precast concrete columns. Three types of concrete mixtures were tested: concrete made entirely with natural aggregate (NAC) as a control concrete and two types of concrete made with natural fine and recycle...

  1. mode of collapse of square single panel reinforced concrete space

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    The behavior of the structural elements of a space-framed structure depends on their support conditions. These .... storey frame system, the combination of strut action and of a ... provided by concrete can be estimated using equation. (4). = +.

  2. 75 FR 81663 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Concrete...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... for OMB Review; Comment Request; Concrete and Masonry Construction Standard ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Administration (OSHA) sponsored information collection request (ICR) titled, ``Concrete and Masonry Construction...: Construction firms engaged in the erection of concrete formwork are required to post warning signs/barriers in...

  3. Conductive concrete wins Popular Science prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1997-06-01

    A conductive concrete developed by a research team at IRC (Institute for Research in Construction, National Research Council of Canada) has won a prize in the home technology category because of its possible use in heating homes. Following the award, there have been a number of inquiries regarding possible applications for the concrete. Greatest interests in the concrete have been in its potential to heat buildings by using it as flooring. Other possible applications included de-icing pavements to building warming pads for parking aircraft. Essentially, carbon fibres and conductive particles are added to a concrete mix in such a quantity that they form a network within the mix, ensuring high electrical conductivity. A demonstration project is underway to build a 20 by 80 foot conductive concrete pad to test the material`s capability as a snow removal and de-icing tool.

  4. Concrete Waste Recycling Process for High Quality Aggregate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikura, Takeshi; Fujii, Shin-ichi

    2008-01-01

    Large amount of concrete waste generates during nuclear power plant (NPP) dismantling. Non-contaminated concrete waste is assumed to be disposed in a landfill site, but that will not be the solution especially in the future, because of decreasing tendency of the site availability and natural resources. Concerning concrete recycling, demand for roadbeds and backfill tends to be less than the amount of dismantled concrete generated in a single rural site, and conventional recycled aggregate is limited of its use to non-structural concrete, because of its inferior quality to ordinary natural aggregate. Therefore, it is vital to develop high quality recycled aggregate for general uses of dismantled concrete. If recycled aggregate is available for high structural concrete, the dismantling concrete is recyclable as aggregate for industry including nuclear field. Authors developed techniques on high quality aggregate reclamation for large amount of concrete generated during NPP decommissioning. Concrete of NPP buildings has good features for recycling aggregate; large quantity of high quality aggregate from same origin, record keeping of the aggregate origin, and little impurities in dismantled concrete such as wood and plastics. The target of recycled aggregate in this development is to meet the quality criteria for NPP concrete as prescribed in JASS 5N 'Specification for Nuclear Power Facility Reinforced Concrete' and JASS 5 'Specification for Reinforced Concrete Work'. The target of recycled aggregate concrete is to be comparable performance with ordinary aggregate concrete. The high quality recycled aggregate production techniques are assumed to apply for recycling for large amount of non-contaminated concrete. These techniques can also be applied for slightly contaminated concrete dismantled from radiological control area (RCA), together with free release survey. In conclusion: a technology on dismantled concrete recycling for high quality aggregate was developed

  5. Special protective concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouniol, P.

    2001-01-01

    Concrete is the most convenient material when large-scale radiation protection is needed. Thus, special concretes for nuclear purposes are used in various facilities like reactors, reprocessing centers, storage sites, accelerators, hospitals with nuclear medicine equipment, food ionization centers etc.. The recent advances made in civil engineering for the improvement of concrete durability and compactness are for a large part transposable to protection concretes. This article presents the basic knowledge about protection concretes with the associated typological and technological aspects. A large part is devoted to the intrinsic properties of concretes and to their behaviour in irradiation and temperature conditions: 1 - definition and field of application of special protective concretes; 2 - evolution of concepts and technologies (durability of structures, techniques of formulation, new additives, market evolution); 3 - design of protective structures (preliminary study, radiation characteristics, thermal constraints, damping and dimensioning, mechanical criteria); 4 - formulation of special concretes (general principles, granulates, hydraulic binders, pulverulent additives, water/cement ratio, reference composition of some special concretes); 5 - properties of special concretes (damping and thermo-mechanical properties); 6 - induced-irradiation and temperature phenomena (activation, radiolysis, mineralogical transformations, drying, shrinking, creep, corrosion of reinforcement). (J.S.)

  6. In-Plane Strengthening Effect of Prefabricated Concrete Walls on Masonry Structures: Shaking Table Test

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Weiwei; Liu, Weiqing; Wang, Shuguang; Du, Dongsheng

    2017-01-01

    The improvement effect of a new strengthening strategy on dynamic action of masonry structure, by installing prefabricated concrete walls on the outer facades, is validated by shaking table test presented in this paper. We carried out dynamic tests of two geometrically identical five-story reduced scaled models, including an unstrengthened and a strengthened masonry model. The experimental analysis encompasses seismic performances such as cracking patterns, failure mechanisms, amplification f...

  7. Radiation Damage In Reactor Cavity Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G [ORNL; Le Pape, Yann [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Remec, Igor [ORNL; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Rosseel, Thomas M [ORNL; Wall, Dr. James Joseph [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

    2015-01-01

    License renewal up to 60 years and the possibility of subsequent license renewal to 80 years has established a renewed focus on long-term aging of nuclear generating stations materials, and recently, on concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis (EMDA), jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Industry, identified the urgent need to develop a consistent knowledge base on irradiation effects in concrete. Much of the historical mechanical performance data of irradiated concrete does not accurately reflect typical radiation conditions in NPPs or conditions out to 60 or 80 years of radiation exposure. To address these potential gaps in the knowledge base, The Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working to disposition radiation damage as a degradation mechanism. This paper outlines the research program within this pathway including: (i) defining the upper bound of the neutron and gamma dose levels expected in the biological shield concrete for extended operation (80 years of operation and beyond), (ii) determining the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation as well as extended time at temperature on concrete, (iii) evaluating opportunities to irradiate prototypical concrete under accelerated neutron and gamma dose levels to establish a conservative bound and share data obtained from different flux, temperature, and fluence levels, (iv) evaluating opportunities to harvest and test irradiated concrete from international NPPs, (v) developing cooperative test programs to improve confidence in the results from the various concretes and research reactors, (vi) furthering the understanding of the effects of radiation on concrete (see companion paper) and (vii) establishing an international collaborative research and information exchange effort to leverage capabilities and knowledge.

  8. Behaviour of concrete structures in fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fletcher Ian A.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a "state-of-the-art" review of research into the effects of high temperature on concrete and concrete structures, extending to a range of forms of construction, including novel developments. The nature of concrete-based structures means that they generally perform very well in fire. However, concrete is fundamentally a complex material and its properties can change dramatically when exposed to high temperatures. The principal effects of fire on concrete are loss of compressive strength, and spalling - the forcible ejection of material from the surface of a member. Though a lot of information has been gathered on both phenomena, there remains a need for more systematic studies of the effects of thermal exposures. The response to realistic fires of whole concrete structures presents yet greater challenges due to the interactions of structural elements, the impact of complex small-scale phenomena at full scale, and the spatial and temporal variations in exposures, including the cooling phase of the fire. Progress has been made on modeling the thermomechanical behavior but the treatment of detailed behaviors, including hygral effects and spalling, remains a challenge. Furthermore, there is still a severe lack of data from real structures for validation, though some valuable insights may also be gained from study of the performance of concrete structures in real fires. .

  9. Evaluation of concrete pavement patching techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    This final report presents the results of a study undertaken to improve in concrete pavement patching techniques. Activities included an evaluation of the suitability of the impact hammer and maturity calculations for determining when a patch is read...

  10. Evaluation of crushed concrete base strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This research project was conducted with two primary objectives, which include: 1) determine whether current Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT) requirements for recycled concrete aggregates (RCA) provide adequate materials for a roadway ...

  11. Nanostructured silicate polymer concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figovskiy Oleg L'vovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been known that acid-resistant concretes on the liquid glass basis have high porosity (up to 18~20 %, low strength and insufficient water resistance. Significant increasing of silicate matrix strength and density was carried out by incorporation of special liquid organic alkali-soluble silicate additives, which block superficial pores and reduce concrete shrinkage deformation. It was demonstrated that introduction of tetrafurfuryloxisilane additive sharply increases strength, durability and shock resistance of silicate polymer concrete in aggressive media. The experiments showed, that the strength and density of silicate polymer concrete increase in case of decreasing liquid glass content. The authors obtained optimal content of silicate polymer concrete, which possesses increased strength, durability, density and crack-resistance. Diffusive permeability of concrete and its chemical resistance has been investigated in various corroding media.

  12. 1.3. Chemical and mineral additives of concretes and water used for concrete mix preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidov, D.Kh.

    2011-01-01

    It is known that chemical and mineral additives increase physicochemical properties of concretes, thus, chemical and mineral additives, including super plasticizer and organo mineral additives are examined in this work. It was noted that along with salt water fresh water can also be used for concrete mix preparation.

  13. Durability of thin-walled concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomon, M.; Gallias, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the present document is to draw up a survey of knowledge of the problems of ageing of reinforced concrete shell structure atmospheric coolers. The exposure conditions are particularly favourable to the induction and development of degradation which, because of the thinness of the reinforced concrete can compromise the stability and the durability of coolers. The study will be axed on the link between the specific characteristics of coolers from the point of view of operation, design and environment, also the durability of reinforced concrete. The set of factors exerting their influence on the reinforced concrete of the shell structure (condensates, rain water, temperature and humidity gradients, dynamic loads, weathering, etc.) is particularly complex. The principal degradation reactions involved are classified according to the chemical and physical action on concrete and on the reinforcement. Particular emphasis is placed on the analysis of degradation processes and the influence of the characteristics of the materials and of the medium. The aim is to determine the mechanisms which present the greatest risk for coolers. The interaction between the degradation to concrete and the change in mechanical characteristics is also studied [fr

  14. Performance of Microbial Concrete Developed Using Bacillus Subtilus JC3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. V. Seshagiri; Reddy, V. Srinivasa; Sasikala, Ch.

    2017-12-01

    Concrete is vulnerable to deterioration, corrosion, and cracks, and the consequent damage and loss of strength requires immensely expensive remediation and repair. So need for special concrete that they would respond to crack formation with an autonomous self-healing action lead to research and development of microbial concrete. The microbial concrete works on the principle of calcite mineral precipitation by a specific group of alkali-resistant spore-forming bacteria related to the genus Bacillus called Bacillus subtilis JC3, this phenomenon is called biomineralization or Microbiologically Induced Calcite Crystal Precipitation. Bacillus subtilis JC3, a common soil bacterium, has inherent ability to precipitate calcite crystals continuously which enhances the strength and durability performance of concrete enormously. This microbial concrete can be called as a "Self healing Bacterial Concrete" because it can remediate its cracks by itself without any human intervention and would make the concrete more durable and sustainable. This paper discuss the incorporation of microorganism Bacillus subtilis JC3 (developed at JNTU, India) into concrete and presents the results of experimental investigations carried out to study the improved durability and sustainability characteristics of microbial concrete.

  15. Slippage of steel in high and normal strength concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, K.; Siddiqi, Z.A.; Yousaf, M.

    2007-01-01

    Composite action of any reinforced concrete member is only possible if sufficient bond strength exists between steel reinforcing bars and concrete, which can adequately transfer shear stress between them. Bond strength is a function of compressive strength of concrete and hence high strength concrete has higher bond strength (1-2). Therefore required development length can be reduced. In order to investigate the effect of development length on bond stress and slip relationships, experimental investigation was carried out. In this experimentation 24 pull-out samples of high strength concrete and normal strength concrete were casted and tested. The results of this investigation revealed that by increasing the development length from 5db to 10db bond strength increases for both high and normal strength concrete as shown in Figure 11, 12 and 13. However in case of normal strength concrete increase in bond strength is more compared to that in high strength concrete as it is clear from Figure 11 and Figure 13. The increase in bond strength is observed even at 10db development length but the extent is less for 19 mm than 16 mm bars as shown in Figure 12 and Figure 13. This is in agreement with the earlier findings of Chen et al (3) and Harajli et al (1). However in case of HSC the total slippage at 10db is 50% greater than at 5db. This may be due to the fact that more no of concrete keys participate in resisting the slippage. (author)

  16. Mixed materials for concrete. Concrete yo konwazai ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kono, K [Tokushima Univ., Tokushima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1994-07-05

    The materials except cement, water and aggregate added into the cement paste, mortar or concrete before the execution of smashing are called mixed materials. The mixed materials are indispensable to the concrete for improving the quality of the fresh concrete as well as the hardened concrete; providing the characteristics suitable for the operation; and increasing the economy. In this paper, the main mixed materials including fly ash, which is the by-product in coal thermoelectric power station; silica fume; micropowder of slag in blast furnace; expansive materials and so on are described summarily. Especially, silica fume is the by-product, which are the super micro-powders with the average size around 0.1 micrometer, collected by the dust-collector from the waste gas generated during the manufacture in the electric furnace of ferrosilicon, which is an alloy iron, or silicon metal used as the deacidificating and desulfurizing agents in the steel production. But the most part thereof is depended on the import since the domestic output is low. 38 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Physical Characteristics of Laboratory Tested Concrete as a Substituion of Gravel on Normal Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butar-butar, Ronald; Suhairiani; Wijaya, Kinanti; Sebayang, Nono

    2018-03-01

    Concrete technology is highly potential in the field of construction for structural and non-structural construction. The amount uses of this concrete material raise the problem of solid waste in the form of concrete remaining test results in the laboratory. This waste is usually just discarded and not economically valuable. In solving the problem, this experiment was made new materials by using recycle material in the form of recycled aggregate which aims to find out the strength characteristics of the used concrete as a gravel substitution material on the normal concrete and obtain the value of the substitution composition of gravel and used concrete that can achieve the strength of concrete according to the standard. Testing of concrete characteristic is one of the requirements before starting the concrete mixture. This test using SNI method (Indonesian National Standard) with variation of comparison (used concrete : gravel) were 15: 85%, 25: 75%, 35:65%, 50:50 %, 75: 25%. The results of physical tests obtained the mud content value of the mixture gravel and used concrete is 0.03 larger than the standard of SNI 03-4142-1996 that is equal to 1.03%. so the need watering or soaking before use. The water content test results show an increase in the water content value if the composition of the used concrete increases. While the specific gravity value for variation 15: 85% until 35: 65% fulfilled the requirements of SNI 03-1969-1990. the other variasion show the specifics gravity value included on the type of light materials.

  18. Fine-grained semantic categorization across the abstract and concrete domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Ghio

    Full Text Available A consolidated approach to the study of the mental representation of word meanings has consisted in contrasting different domains of knowledge, broadly reflecting the abstract-concrete dichotomy. More fine-grained semantic distinctions have emerged in neuropsychological and cognitive neuroscience work, reflecting semantic category specificity, but almost exclusively within the concrete domain. Theoretical advances, particularly within the area of embodied cognition, have more recently put forward the idea that distributed neural representations tied to the kinds of experience maintained with the concepts' referents might distinguish conceptual meanings with a high degree of specificity, including those within the abstract domain. Here we report the results of two psycholinguistic rating studies incorporating such theoretical advances with two main objectives: first, to provide empirical evidence of fine-grained distinctions within both the abstract and the concrete semantic domains with respect to relevant psycholinguistic dimensions; second, to develop a carefully controlled linguistic stimulus set that may be used for auditory as well as visual neuroimaging studies focusing on the parametrization of the semantic space beyond the abstract-concrete dichotomy. Ninety-six participants rated a set of 210 sentences across pre-selected concrete (mouth, hand, or leg action-related and abstract (mental state-, emotion-, mathematics-related categories, with respect either to different semantic domain-related scales (rating study 1, or to concreteness, familiarity, and context availability (rating study 2. Inferential statistics and correspondence analyses highlighted distinguishing semantic and psycholinguistic traits for each of the pre-selected categories, indicating that a simple abstract-concrete dichotomy is not sufficient to account for the entire semantic variability within either domains.

  19. Maintenance and preservation of concrete structures. Report 3: Abrasion-erosion resistance of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T. C.

    1980-07-01

    This report describes a laboratory test program on abrasion-erosion resistance of concrete, including the development of a new underwater abrasion-erosion test method. This program was designed to evaluate the relative abrasion-erosion resistance of various materials considered for use in the repair of erosion-damaged concrete structures. The test program encompassed three concrete types (conventional concrete, fiber-reinforced concrete, and polymer concrete); seven aggregate types (limestone, chert, trap rock, quartzite, granite, siliceous gravel, and slag); three principal water-cement rations (0.72, 0.54, and 0.40); and six types of surface treatment (vacuum, polyurethane coating, acrylic mortar coating, epoxy mortar coating, furan resin mortar coating, and iron aggregate topping). A total of 114 specimens made from 41 batches of concrete was tested. Based on the test data obtained, a comprehensive evaluation of the effects of various parameters on the abrasion-erosion resistance of concrete was presented. Materials suitable for use in the repair of erosion-damaged concrete structures were recommended. Additional work to correlate the reported findings with field performance was formulated.

  20. The Fire Resistance Performance of Recycled Aggregate Concrete Columns with Different Concrete Compressive Strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongying; Cao, Wanlin; Bian, Jianhui; Zhang, Jianwei

    2014-01-01

    In order to ascertain the fire resistance performance of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) components with different concrete compressive strengths, four full-scaled concrete columns were designed and tested under high temperature. Two of the four specimens were constructed by normal concrete with compressive strength ratings of C20 and C30, respectively, while the others were made from recycled coarse aggregate (RCA) concrete of C30 and C40, respectively. Identical constant axial forces were applied to specimens while being subjected to simulated building fire conditions in a laboratory furnace. Several parameters from the experimental results were comparatively analyzed, including the temperature change, vertical displacement, lateral deflection, fire endurance, and failure characteristics of specimens. The temperature field of specimens was simulated with ABAQUS Software (ABAQUS Inc., Provindence, RI, USA) and the results agreed quite well with those from the experiments. Results show that the rate of heat transfer from the surface to the interior of the column increases with the increase of the concrete’s compressive strength for both RAC columns and normal concrete columns. Under the same initial axial force ratio, for columns with the same cross section, those with lower concrete compressive strengths demonstrate better fire resistance performance. The fire resistance performance of RAC columns is better than that of normal concrete columns, with the same concrete compressive strength. PMID:28788279

  1. Application of nanotechnology in self-compacting concrete design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maghsoudi, A. A.; Arabpour Dahooei, F.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, first, different mix design of four types of Self-Compacting Concrete, 1. Self-Compacting Concrete consisted of only nano silica, 2. Self-Compacting Concrete included only micro silica, 3. Self-Compacting Concrete consisted of both micro silica and nano silica and 4. Self-Compacting Concrete without micro silica and nano silica called as control mix, were casted and tested to find out the values of the Slump Flow, L-Box and 7 and 28 days compressive strength. Then, based on the results obtained and as yet there is no universally accepted standard for characterizing of Self-Compacting Concrete, the most suitable four concrete mixes were selected for further investigation of fresh and hardened concrete. For selected mixes, the fresh concrete properties such as values of the Slump Flow, L-Box, V-Funnel, J-Ring and hardened engineering properties such as compressive and flexural strength, shrinkage and swelling values were investigated for three curing conditions at short and long term. The results showed that the engineering properties of Self-Compacting Concrete mixes could not be improved by adding only nano silica. However, a satisfactory behavior can be achieved using micro silica in the Self-Compacting Concrete mixes. However, by adding both micro silica and nano silica to the Self-Compacting Concrete mixtures, the best effect on the engineering properties was reported while comparing to the control mixes.

  2. Low Shrinkage Cement Concrete Intended for Airfield Pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małgorzata, Linek

    2017-10-01

    The work concerns the issue of hardened concrete parameters improvement intended for airfield pavements. Factors which have direct or indirect influence on rheological deformation size were of particular interest. The aim of lab testing was to select concrete mixture ratio which would make hardened concrete less susceptible to influence of basic operating factors. Analyses included two research groups. External and internal factors were selected. They influence parameters of hardened cement concrete by increasing rheological deformations. Research referred to innovative cement concrete intended for airfield pavements. Due to construction operation, the research considered the influence of weather conditions and forced thermal loads intensifying concrete stress. Fresh concrete mixture parameters were tested and basic parameters of hardened concrete were defined (density, absorbability, compression strength, tensile strength). Influence of the following factors on rheological deformation value was also analysed. Based on obtained test results, it has been discovered that innovative concrete, made on the basis of modifier, which changes internal structure of concrete composite, has definitely lower values of rheological deformation. Observed changes of microstructure, in connection with reduced deformation values allowed to reach the conclusion regarding advantageous characteristic features of the newly designed cement concrete. Applying such concrete for airfield construction may contribute to extension of its operation without malfunction and the increase of its general service life.

  3. Evaluation of recycled concrete as aggregate in new concrete pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    This study evaluated the use of recycled concrete as coarse aggregate in new concrete pavements. : Recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) produced from demolished pavements in three geographically dispersed locations in Washington state were used to perfo...

  4. Investigation and assessment of lead slag concrete as nuclear shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaghloul, Y.R.

    2009-01-01

    The present work is concerned with the efficiency of heavy weight concrete as a shielding material in constructing nuclear installations as well as for radioactive wastes disposal facilities.In this context, lead slag was used as a replacement for fine aggregates in heavy concrete shields that include local heavy weight aggregates (namely; barite and ilmenite) as well as normal concrete includes dolomite and sand as coarse and fine aggregates, as a reference. The effect of different percentages of lead slag was investigated to assess the produced lead slag concrete as a nuclear shielding material. The different properties (physical, mechanical and nuclear) of the produced lead slag concrete were investigated. The results obtained showed that increasing the lead slag percentage improving the investigated properties of the different concrete mixes. In addition, ilmenite concrete with 20% lead slag showed the best results for all the investigated properties.

  5. Early corrosion monitoring of prestressed concrete piles using acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez, William; Matta, Fabio; Ziehl, Paul H.

    2013-04-01

    The depassivation and corrosion of bonded prestressing steel strands in concrete bridge members may lead to major damage or collapse before visual inspections uncover evident signs of damage, and well before the end of the design life. Recognizing corrosion in its early stage is desirable to plan and prioritize remediation strategies. The Acoustic Emission (AE) technique is a rational means to develop structural health monitoring and prognosis systems for the early detection and location of corrosion in concrete. Compelling features are the sensitivity to events related to micro- and macrodamage, non-intrusiveness, and suitability for remote and wireless applications. There is little understanding of the correlation between AE and the morphology and extent of early damage on the steel surface. In this paper, the evidence collected from prestressed concrete (PC) specimens that are exposed to salt water is discussed vis-à-vis AE data from continuous monitoring. The specimens consist of PC strips that are subjected to wet/dry salt water cycles, representing portions of bridge piles that are exposed to tidal action. Evidence collected from the specimens includes: (a) values of half-cell potential and linear polarization resistance to recognize active corrosion in its early stage; and (b) scanning electron microscopy micrographs of steel areas from two specimens that were decommissioned once the electrochemical measurements indicated a high probability of active corrosion. These results are used to evaluate the AE activity resulting from early corrosion.

  6. Civil engineering: EDF needs for concrete modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didry, O.; Gerard, B.; Bui, D.

    1997-01-01

    Concrete structures which are encountered at EDF, like all civil engineering structures, age. In order to adapt the maintenance conditions of these structures, particularly to extend their service life, and also to prepare constructions of future structures, tools for predicting the behaviour of these structures in their environment should be available. For EDF the technical risks are high and consequently very appropriate R and D actions are required. In this context the Direction des Etudes et Recherches (DER) has developed a methodology for analysing concrete structure behaviour modelling. This approach has several aims: - making a distinction between the problems which refer to the existing models and those which require R and D; - displaying disciplinary links between different problems encountered on EDF structures (non-linear mechanical, chemical - hydraulic - mechanical coupling, etc); - listing of the existing tools and positioning the DER 'Aster' finite element code among them. This document is a state of the art of scientific knowledge intended to shed light on the fields in which one should be involved when there is, on one part a strong requirement on the side of structure operators, and on the other one, the present tools do not allow this requirement to be satisfactorily met. The analysis has been done on 12 scientific subjects: 1) Hydration of concrete at early ages: exothermicity, hardening, autogenous shrinkage; 2) Drying and drying shrinkage; 3) Alkali-silica reaction and bulky stage formation; 4) Long term deterioration by leaching; 5) Ionic diffusion and associated attacks: the chlorides case; 6) Permeability / tightness of concrete; 7) Concretes -nonlinear behaviour and cracking (I): contribution of the plasticity models; 8) Concretes - nonlinear behaviour and cracking (II): contribution of the damage models; 9) Concretes - nonlinear behaviour and cracking (III): the contribution of the probabilistic analysis model; 10) Delayed behaviour of

  7. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, D. H.

    2000-01-01

    The Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks site Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 135 will be closed by unrestricted release decontamination and verification survey, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consert Order (FFACO, 1996). The CAU includes one Corrective Action Site (CAS). The Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, (CAS 25-02-01), referred to as the Engine-Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly (E-MAD) Waste Holdup Tanks and Vault, were used to receive liquid waste from all of the radioactive drains at the E-MAD Facility. Based on the results of the Corrective Action Investigation conducted in June 1999 discussed in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (DOE/NV,1999a), one sample from the radiological survey of the concrete vault interior exceeded radionuclide preliminary action levels. The analytes from the sediment samples that exceeded the preliminary action levels are polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics, and radionuclides. Unrestricted release decontamination and verification involves removal of concrete and the cement-lined pump sump from the vault. After verification that the contamination has been removed, the vault will be repaired with concrete, as necessary. The radiological- and chemical-contaminated pump sump and concrete removed from the vault would be disposed of at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site. The vault interior will be field surveyed following removal of contaminated material to verify that unrestricted release criteria have been achieved

  8. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. H. Cox

    2000-07-01

    The Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks site Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 135 will be closed by unrestricted release decontamination and verification survey, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consert Order (FFACO, 1996). The CAU includes one Corrective Action Site (CAS). The Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, (CAS 25-02-01), referred to as the Engine-Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly (E-MAD) Waste Holdup Tanks and Vault, were used to receive liquid waste from all of the radioactive drains at the E-MAD Facility. Based on the results of the Corrective Action Investigation conducted in June 1999 discussed in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (DOE/NV,1999a), one sample from the radiological survey of the concrete vault interior exceeded radionuclide preliminary action levels. The analytes from the sediment samples that exceeded the preliminary action levels are polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics, and radionuclides. Unrestricted release decontamination and verification involves removal of concrete and the cement-lined pump sump from the vault. After verification that the contamination has been removed, the vault will be repaired with concrete, as necessary. The radiological- and chemical-contaminated pump sump and concrete removed from the vault would be disposed of at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site. The vault interior will be field surveyed following removal of contaminated material to verify that unrestricted release criteria have been achieved.

  9. Durability of heavyweight concrete containing barite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binici, Hanifi

    2010-01-01

    The supplementary waste barite aggregates deposit in Osmaniye, southern Turkey, has been estimated at around 500 000 000 tons based on 2007 records. The aim of the present study is to investigate the durability of concrete incorporating waste barite as coarse and river sand (RS), granule blast furnace slag (GBFS), granule basaltic pumice (GBP) and ≤ 4 mm granule barite (B) as fine aggregates. The properties of the fresh concrete determined included the air content, slump, slump loss and setting time. They also included the compressive strength, flexural and splitting tensile strengths and Young's modulus of elasticity, resistance to abrasion and sulphate resistance of hardened concrete. Besides these, control mortars were prepared with crushed limestone aggregates. The influence of waste barite as coarse aggregates and RS, GBFS, GBP and B as fine aggregates on the durability of the concretes was evaluated. The mass attenuation coefficients were calculated at photon energies of 1 keV to 100 GeV using XCOM and the obtained results were compared with the measurements at 0.66 and 1.25 MeV. The results showed the possibility of using these waste barite aggregates in the production of heavy concretes. In several cases, some of these properties have been improved. Durability of the concrete made with these waste aggregates was improved. Thus, these materials should be preferably used as aggregates in heavyweight concrete production. (orig.)

  10. Increased Durability of Concrete Made with Fine Recycled Concrete Aggregates Using Superplasticizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartuxo, Francisco; de Brito, Jorge; Evangelista, Luis; Jiménez, José Ramón; Ledesma, Enrique F

    2016-02-08

    This paper evaluates the influence of two superplasticizers (SP) on the durability properties of concrete made with fine recycled concrete aggregate (FRCA). For this purpose, three families of concrete were tested: concrete without SP, concrete made with a regular superplasticizer and concrete made with a high-performance superplasticizer. Five volumetric replacement ratios of natural sand by FRCA were tested: 0%, 10%, 30%, 50% and 100%. Two natural gravels were used as coarse aggregates. All mixes had the same particle size distribution, cement content and amount of superplasticizer. The w/c ratio was calibrated to obtain similar slump. The results showed that the incorporation of FRCA increased the water absorption by immersion, the water absorption by capillary action, the carbonation depth and the chloride migration coefficient, while the use of superplasticizers highly improved these properties. The incorporation of FRCA jeopardized the SP's effectiveness. This research demonstrated that, from a durability point of view, the simultaneous incorporation of FRCA and high-performance SP is a viable sustainable solution for structural concrete production.

  11. Magnesium oxychloride cement concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The durability of MOC concrete compositions against extreme environmental conditions viz. heating–cooling, freezing–thawing, wetting–drying and penetration and deposition of salts etc were investigated. The results reveal that MOC concrete has high compressive strength associated with high flexural strength and the ...

  12. Radiographic testing of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, James F.

    1997-01-01

    The increase in construction activity in the Philippines, reinforced concrete building is still a favorite among designers, because it is much cheaper to build and it requires qualified welders, etc. and extensive nondestructive testing and inspection of metals, welds and castings. Of all the techniques radiography is widely used for concrete

  13. Concrete deck material properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The two-fold focus of this study was (a) to develop an understanding of the mechanisms responsible for causing : cracking in the concrete; and (b) to study the influence of the local materials on the performance of NYSDOTs HP : concrete mixture. R...

  14. Concrete-Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leczovics Péter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Present paper introduces a new interpretation of concrete, demonstrating some extreme possibilities of this rigid material such as a design element. In the first part a brief overview of the previous achievements are shown. The second part of this paper focuses on the relationship between concrete and fashion.

  15. Danish High Performance Concretes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. P.; Christoffersen, J.; Frederiksen, J.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the main results obtained in the research program High Performance Concretes in the 90's are presented. This program was financed by the Danish government and was carried out in cooperation between The Technical University of Denmark, several private companies, and Aalborg University...... concretes, workability, ductility, and confinement problems....

  16. Concrete, hardened: Self desiccation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Persson, Bertil

    1999-01-01

    The test method covers the determination of internal relative humidity (RH) in hardened concrete and cement mortar using RH instruments. The determination of RH is done on crushed samples of concrete or cement motar. This test method is only for measuring equipment which gives off or takes up...

  17. concrete5 Beginner's Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Laubacher, Remo

    2011-01-01

    This book is part of Packt's Beginner's Guide series. You will be guided through the set up of a Concrete5 site with step-by-step practical examples. This book is ideal for developers who would like to build their first site with Concrete5. Some k

  18. Models of transport processes in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pommersheim, J.M.; Clifton, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    An approach being considered by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for disposal of low-level radioactive waste is to place the waste forms in concrete vaults buried underground. The vaults would need a service life of 500 years. Approaches for predicting the service life of concrete of such vaults include the use of mathematical models. Mathematical models are presented in this report for the major degradation processes anticipated for the concrete vaults, which are corrosion of steel reinforcement, sulfate attack, acid attack, and leaching. The models mathematically represent rate controlling processes including diffusion, convection, and reaction and sorption of chemical species. These models can form the basis for predicting the life of concrete under in-service conditions. 33 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs

  19. Relating Fresh Concrete Viscosity Measurements from Different Rheometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Chiara F; Martys, Nicos S

    2003-01-01

    Concrete rheological properties need to be properly measured and predicted in order to characterize the workability of fresh concrete, including special concretes such as self-consolidating concrete (SCC). It was shown by a round-robin test held in 2000 [1,2] that different rheometer designs gave different values of viscosity for the same concrete. While empirical correlation between different rheometers was possible, for a procedure that is supposed to "scientifically" improve on the empirical slump tests, this situation is unsatisfactory. To remedy this situation, a new interpretation of the data was developed. In this paper, it is shown that all instruments tested could be directly and quantitatively compared in terms of relative plastic viscosity instead of the plastic viscosity alone. This should eventually allow the measurements from various rheometer designs to be directly calibrated against known standards of plastic viscosity, putting concrete rheometry and concrete workability on a sounder materials science basis.

  20. UO2/magnetite concrete interaction and penetration study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhadieh, R.; Purviance, R.; Carlson, N.

    1983-01-01

    The concrete structure represents a line of defense in safety assessment of containment integrity and possible minimization of radiological releases following a reactor accident. The penetration study of hot UO 2 particles into limestone concrete and basalt concrete highlighted some major differences between the two concretes. These included penetration rate, melting and dissolution phenomena, released gases, pressurization of the UO 2 chamber, and characteristics of post-test concrete. The present study focuses on the phenomena associated with core debris interaction with and penetration into magnetite type concrete. The real material experiment was carried out with UO 2 particles and magnetite concrete in a test apparatus similar to the one utilized in the UO 2 /limestone experiment

  1. Radiation shielding concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunishima, Shigeru.

    1990-01-01

    The radiation shielding concretes comprise water, cement, fine aggregates consisting of serpentines and blown mist slags, coarse aggregates consisting of serpentines and kneading materials. Since serpentines containing a relatively great amount of water of crystallization in rocks as coarse aggregates and fine aggregates, the hydrogen content in the radiation shielding concretes is increased and the neutron shielding effect is improved. In addition, since serpentines are added as the fine aggregates and blown mists slags of a great specific gravity are used, the specific gravity of the shielding concretes is increased to improve the γ-ray shielding effect. Further, by the use of the kneading material having a water reducing effect and fluidizing effect, and by the bearing effect of the spherical blown mist slags used as the fine aggregates, concrete fluidity can be increased. Accordingly, workability of the radiation shielding concretes can be improved. (T.M.)

  2. Concrete quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holz, N. [Harza Engineering Company, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2000-08-01

    This short article reports on progress at the world's largest civil construction project, namely China's Three Gorges hydro project. Work goes on around the clock to put in place nearly 28 M m{sup 3} of concrete. At every stage of the work there is strong emphasis on quality assurance (QA) and concrete is no exception. The US company Harza Engineering has been providing QA since the mid-1980s and concrete QA has been based on international standards. Harza personnel work in the field with supervisors developing educational tools for supervising concrete construction and quality, as well as providing training courses in concrete technology. Some details on flood control, capacity, water quality and environmental aspects are given..

  3. Shrinkage stress in concrete under dry-wet cycles: an example with concrete column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Jun; Luosun, Yiming

    2014-02-01

    This paper focuses on the simulation of shrinkage stress in concrete structures under dry-wet environments. In the modeling, an integrative model for autogenous and drying shrinkage predictions of concrete under dry-wet cycles is introduced first. Second, a model taking both cement hydration and moisture diffusion into account synchronously is used to calculate the distribution of interior humidity in concrete. Using the above two models, the distributions of shrinkage strain and stress in concrete columns made by normal and high strength concrete respectively under dry-wet cycles are calculated. The model results show that shrinkage gradient along the radial direction of the column from the center to outer surface increases with age as the outer circumference suffers to dry. The maximum and minimum shrinkage occur at the outer surface and the center of the column, respectively, under drying condition. As wetting starts, the shrinkage strain decreases with increase of interior humidity. The closer to the wetting face, the higher the humidity and the lower the shrinkage strain, as well as the lower the shrinkage stress. As results of the dry-wet cycles acting on the outer circumference of the column, cyclic stress status is developed within the area close to the outer surface of the column. The depth of the influencing zone of dry-wet cyclic action is influenced by concrete strength and dry-wet regime. For low strength concrete, relatively deeper influencing zone is expected compared with that of high strength concrete. The models are verified by concrete-steel composite ring tests and a good agreement between model and test results is found.

  4. Outline of principle of design construction of demolished concrete from electric power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Tomohiko; Sakagami, Takeharu; Inagaki, Hirokazu; Morozumi, Hironori; Muranaka, Kenji

    2005-01-01

    'The principle of design construction of recycled demolished concrete from electric power plant' (a plan) is going to be published by TSCE Concrete Committee in 2005. The abstract of the above principle is described. A large amount of demolished concrete is generated by decommissioning of atomic power plant. About 450,000 to 500,000t of concrete with small radiation level per an atomic power plant will be generated. This report included decommissioning of Tokai power plant, characteristics of subject of demolished concrete, the recycled demolished concrete, fresh conditions of the recycled demolished concrete, the strength, deformation properties, durability, alkali silica reactivity of them and control measurement. (S.Y.)

  5. Precast concrete unit assessment through GPR survey and FDTD modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Davide

    2017-04-01

    Precast concrete elements are widely used within United Kingdom house building offering ease in assembly and added values as structural integrity, sound and thermal insulation; most common concrete components include walls, beams, floors, panels, lintels, stairs, etc. The lack of respect of the manufacturer instruction during assembling, however, may induce cracking and short/long term loss of bearing capacity. GPR is a well-established not destructive technique employed in the assessment of structural elements because of real-time imaging, quickness of data collecting and ability to discriminate finest structural details. In this work, GPR has been used to investigate two different precast elements: precast reinforced concrete planks constituting the roof slab of a school and precast wood-cement blocks with insulation material pre-fitted used to build a perimeter wall of a private building. Visible cracks affected both constructions. For the assessment surveys, a GSSI 2.0 GHz GPR antenna has been used because of the high resolution required and the small size of the antenna case (155 by 90 by 105mm) enabling scanning up to 45mm from any obstruction. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) numerical modelling was also performed to build a scenario of the expected GPR signal response for a preliminary real-time interpretation and to help solve uncertainties due to complex reflection patterns: simulated radargrams were built using Reflex Software v. 8.2, reproducing the same GPR pulse used for the surveys in terms of wavelet, nominal frequency, sample frequency and time window. Model geometries were derived from the design projects available both for the planks and the blocks; the electromagnetic properties of the materials (concrete, reinforcing bars, air-filled void, insulation and wooden concrete) were inferred from both values reported in literature and a preliminary interpretation of radargrams where internal layer interfaces were clearly recognizable and

  6. Advances in Modeling Concrete Service Life : Proceedings of 4th International RILEM PhD Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Gulikers, Joost

    2012-01-01

    In this book, a critical analysis is made on service life models related to reinforcement corrosion. The contributors are on the frontier of knowledge in the field of durability of reinforced concrete. Topics covered in the book include: causes and mechanisms of deterioration, transport mechanisms in concrete, numerical modeling of concrete behavior, durability modeling and prediction, reliability approach to structural design for durability, structural behavior following degradation of concrete structures, deterioration and repair of concrete structures, and corrosion measurement techniques.

  7. Preliminary model for core/concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murfin, W.B.

    1977-08-01

    A preliminary model is described for computing the rate of penetration of concrete by a molten LWR core. Among the phenomena included are convective stirring of the melt by evolved gases, admixture of concrete decomposition products to the melt, chemical reactions, radiative heat loss, and variation of heat transfer coefficients with local pressure. The model is most applicable to a two-phase melt (metallic plus oxidic) having a fairly high metallic content

  8. Reusing recycled aggregates in structural concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Shicong

    The utilization of recycled aggregates in concrete can minimize environmental impact and reduce the consumption of natural resources in concrete applications. The aim of this thesis is to provide a scientific basis for the possible use of recycled aggregates in structure concrete by conducting a comprehensive programme of laboratory study to gain a better understanding of the mechanical, microstructure and durability properties of concrete produced with recycled aggregates. The study also explored possible techniques to of improve the properties of recycled aggregate concrete that is produced with high percentages (≧ 50%) of recycled aggregates. These techniques included: (a) using lower water-to-cement ratios in the concrete mix design; (b) using fly ash as a cement replacement or as an additional mineral admixture in the concrete mixes, and (c) precasting recycled aggregate concrete with steam curing regimes. The characteristics of the recycled aggregates produced both from laboratory and a commercially operated pilot construction and demolition (C&D) waste recycling plant were first studied. A mix proportioning procedure was then established to produce six series of concrete mixtures using different percentages of recycled coarse aggregates with and without the use of fly ash. The water-to-cement (binder) ratios of 0.55, 0.50, 0.45 and 0.40 were used. The fresh properties (including slump and bleeding) of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) were then quantified. The effects of fly ash on the fresh and hardened properties of RAC were then studied and compared with those RAC prepared with no fly ash addition. Furthermore, the effects of steam curing on the hardened properties of RAC were investigated. For micro-structural properties, the interfacial transition zones of the aggregates and the mortar/cement paste were analyzed by SEM and EDX-mapping. Moreover, a detailed set of results on the fracture properties for RAC were obtained. Based on the experimental

  9. Concrete decontamination by electro-hydraulic scabbling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfarb, V.; Gannon, R.

    1995-01-01

    Textron Defense Systems (TDS) is developing an electro-hydraulic device that has the potential for faster, safer, and less expensive scabbling of contaminated concrete surfaces. In the device, shock waves and cavitating bubbles are produced in water by the electric pulses, and the direct and reflected shock waves impinging on the concrete surface result in the crushing and cracking of the concrete. Pulse energy, frequency, and traverse speed control the depth of the scabbling action. Performance thus far has demonstrated the capability of a prototype unit to process a swath 24 inches wide, up to 3/4 inches deep at a linear velocity of up to 6 feet per hour, i.e., at a scabbling rate of 12 sq. ft. per hour

  10. Concrete decontamination by electro-hydraulic scabbling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldfarb, V.; Gannon, R. [Textron Defense System, Everett, MA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Textron Defense Systems (TDS) is developing an electro-hydraulic device that has the potential for faster, safer, and less expensive scabbling of contaminated concrete surfaces. In the device, shock waves and cavitating bubbles are produced in water by the electric pulses, and the direct and reflected shock waves impinging on the concrete surface result in the crushing and cracking of the concrete. Pulse energy, frequency, and traverse speed control the depth of the scabbling action. Performance thus far has demonstrated the capability of a prototype unit to process a swath 24 inches wide, up to 3/4 inch deep at a linear velocity of up to 6 feet per hour, i.e., at a scabbling rate of 12 sq. ft. per hour.

  11. Development of measures to assess the safety of existing NPPs and the effectiveness of regulations and regulatory actions (including 'prescriptive' and 'performance based' approaches). Peer discussions on regulatory practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    This report arises from the fourth series of peer discussions on regulatory practices entitled D evelopment of measures to assess the safety of existing nuclear power plants and the effectiveness of regulations and regulatory actions (including 'prescriptive' and 'performance based' approaches) . Senior regulators from 23 Member States participated in four peer group discussions during 1995-1996. This report presents the outcome of these meetings and recommendations of good practices identified by these senior regulators. The purpose of this report is to disseminate the views which the senior regulators presented at the meetings relating to measures used for assessing the safety of existing nuclear power plants and evaluating the effectiveness of regulators and regulatory actions. The intention in doing this is to assist Member States in the enhancement of their regulatory practices by identifying commonly accepted good practices. This report is structured so that it covers the subject matter under the following main headings: 'Prescriptive and Performance Based' Approaches to Regulation; Common Features of Regulatory Approaches; Effectiveness of the Regulator and Regulatory Actions; Recommendations of Good Practice. It is important to note that recommendations of good practice are included if they have been identified by at least one of the groups. It does not follow that all of the groups or individual Member States would necessarily endorse all of the recommendations. However, it is considered that if a single group of senior regulators judge that a particular practice is worthy of recommendation then it should be included for serious consideration. In some cases the same recommendations arise from all of the Groups

  12. Beta Bremsstrahlung dose in concrete shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjunatha, H.C., E-mail: manjunatha@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Government college for women, Kolar 563101, Karnataka (India); Chandrika, B.M. [Shravana, 592, Ist Cross, Behind St.Anne s School, PC Extension, Kolar 563101, Karnataka (India); Rudraswamy, B. [Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bangalore 560056, Karnataka (India); Sankarshan, B.M. [Shravana, 592, Ist Cross, Behind St.Anne s School, PC Extension, Kolar 563101, Karnataka (India)

    2012-05-11

    In a nuclear reactor, beta nuclides are released during nuclear reactions. These betas interact with shielding concrete and produces external Bremsstrahlung (EB) radiation. To estimate Bremsstrahlung dose and shield efficiency in concrete, it is essential to know Bremsstrahlung distribution or spectra. The present work formulated a new method to evaluate the EB spectrum and hence Bremsstrahlung dose of beta nuclides ({sup 32}P, {sup 89}Sr, {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y, {sup 90}Y, {sup 91}Y, {sup 208}Tl, {sup 210}Bi, {sup 234}Pa and {sup 40}K) in concrete. The Bremsstrahlung yield of these beta nuclides in concrete is also estimated. The Bremsstrahlung yield in concrete due to {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y is higher than those of other given nuclides. This estimated spectrum is accurate because it is based on more accurate modified atomic number (Z{sub mod}) and Seltzer's data, where an electron-electron interaction is also included. Presented data in concrete provide a quick and convenient reference for radiation protection. The present methodology can be used to calculate the Bremsstrahlung dose in nuclear shielding materials. It can be quickly employed to give a first pass dose estimate prior to a more detailed experimental study. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Betas released in a nuclear reactor interact with shielding concrete and produces Bremsstrahlung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The present work formulated a new method to evaluate the Bremsstrahlung spectrum and dose in concrete. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presented data in concrete provide a quick and convenient reference for radiation protection.

  13. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1990) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. Also included are a number of enforcement actions that had been previously resolved but not published in this NUREG. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  14. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. Also included are a number of enforcement actions that had been previously resolved but not published in this NUREG. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  15. OPTIMIZATION OF PRESERVATIVE FOR PROTECTION OF CONCRETE PAVEMENT OF HIGHWAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Pshembaev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Disadvantages of road concrete pavement quite well known professionals-standards. They were mainly low elasticity modulus asphaltic concrete, as well as a fairly rapid aging of asphalt concrete core component-bitumen. And, as a consequence, is relatively low durability of the coating, the need for frequent repair. To some extent, cement concrete cover signifi cantly outperform this index of asphalt, convinces experience roads of Germany, the United States and other countries. The correct structure of concrete, overall compliance technology laying concrete, comprehensive quality control production  work, sufficient technical personnel qualifications provide long defect-free work road re-coated. However, violations by manufacture of works or in the process of exploitation, particularly in the harsh conditions of freezing and thawing, saturation-drying, especially under the influence of salts-defrosting, cause defects, reduce its durability. There are two directions of increase of durability of the coating. Firstly, it is the primary protection is the creation of concrete with minimal possible on data components mixture water cement ratio that provides reception of concrete with minimum porosity and consequently with maximum durability. Secondly, the secondary protection, providing increased resistance already ready-mixed concrete cover external aggressive actions. In this case against the background of other ways quite promising looks impregnation of the surface concrete integrated structure. Composition must contain multiple components, primarily water repellents, preventing penetration of fluid into the body of the concrete, and finely dispersed silica sol in particular silica, providing reduction of the porosity of the surface layers of concrete by interacting with the free calcium hydroxide. The problem of optimization of impregnation structure and is dedicated to this work.

  16. Performance of Waterless Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutanji, Houssam; Evans, Steve; Grugel, Richard N.

    2010-01-01

    The development of permanent lunar bases is constrained by performance of construction materials and availability of in-situ resources. Concrete seems a suitable construction material for the lunar environment, but water, one of its major components, is an extremely scarce resource on the Moon. This study explores an alternative to hydraulic concrete by replacing the binding mix of concrete (cement and water) with sulfur. Sulfur is a volatile element on the lunar surface that can be extracted from lunar soils by heating. Sulfur concrete mixes were prepared to investigate the effect of extreme environmental conditions on the properties of sulfur concrete. A hypervelocity impact test was conducted, having as its target a 5-cm cubic sample of sulfur concrete. This item consisted of JSC-1 lunar regolith simulant (65%) and sulfur (35%). The sample was placed in the MSFC Impact Test Facility s Micro Light Gas Gun target chamber, and was struck by a 1-mm diameter (1.4e-03 g) aluminum projectile at 5.85 km/s. In addition, HZTERN code, provided by NASA was used to study the effectiveness of sulfur concrete when subjected to space radiation.

  17. Calculations of concrete containment tight loss: Studies of a reinforced concrete slab with non uniform thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamet, P.; Berriaud, C.; Humbert, J.M.; Millard, A.; Nahas, G.

    1983-01-01

    A study was carried out in order to investigate the validity of a concrete model including tensile fracture and strain-softening under compressive loading. Triaxial tests were performed on micro-concrete specimens, and the post-peak behaviour of the material was characterized. The parameters required by the model were therefore obtained. The case of a circular slab loaded up to failure was then considered, in order to compare the numerical results obtained by a finite elements analysis including the concrete model, to the experimental data. (orig.)

  18. Calculations of concrete containment tight loss: studies of a reinforced concrete SLAB with non uniform thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamet, P.

    1983-08-01

    A study was carried out in order to investigate the validity of a concrete model including tensile fracture and strain-softening under compressive loading. Triaxial tests were performed on micro-concrete specimens, and the post-peak behaviour of the material was characterized. The parameters required by the model were therefore obtained. The case of a circular slab loaded up to failure was then considered, in order to compare the numerical results obtained by a finite elements analysis including the concrete model, to the experimental data

  19. Effect of insulating concrete forms in concrete compresive strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Jerez, Silvio R.

    The subject presented in this thesis is the effect of Insulating Concrete Forms (ICF's) on concrete compressive strength. This work seeks to identify if concrete cured in ICF's has an effect in compressive strength due to the thermal insulation provided by the forms. Modern construction is moving to energy efficient buildings and ICF's is becoming more popular in new developments. The thesis used a concrete mixture and a mortar mixture to investigate the effects of ICF's on concrete compressive strength. After the experimentations were performed, it was concluded that the ICF's do affect concrete strength. It was found that the forms increase concrete strength without the need for additional curing water. An increase of 50% in strength at 56 days was obtained. It was concluded that the longer concrete cures inside ICF's, the higher strength it reaches, and that ICF's effect on concrete strength is proportional to volume of concrete.

  20. Concrete and criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Concrete is a widely used structural material which occurs frequently in systems requiring criticality analyses. Ordinarily, we give little thought to what its actual composition is (as compared to reference compositions), yet in criticality safety, differences in composition can cause large changes in k-effective and it may not be easy to predict in which direction the change will occur. Concrete composition is quite variable with differences in the aggregate used in the concrete in various parts of the country providing relative large differences in k-effective. The water content of concrete can also strongly affect the reactivity of a system in which it acts as a reflector or is interspersed between fissile units. Because concrete is so common and is often (but not always) a better reflector than water, one must know the concrete compositions or be prepared to use a ''worst case'' composition. It may be a problem, however, to determine just what is the worst case. At the Hanford Plant, the aggregate normally used is basalt, which gives a composition very low in carbon as opposed to those areas (e.g., Oak Ridge) where the use of limestone aggregate will result in concrete with a high carbon content. The data presented show some of the effects found in situations using ''Hanford'' concrete, but similar effects might be found with other compositions. In some cases, the use of concrete may be incidental to the effects shown. While the numbers shown are those for actual systems, the primary intent is to alert the reader that these effects can occur. In applying this information, the analyst should use material specific to the systems being analyzed

  1. Biodecontamination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.A.; Rogers, R.D.; Benson, J.

    1996-01-01

    A novel technology for biologically decontaminating concrete is being jointly developed by scientists at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL). The technology exploits a naturally occurring phenomenon referred to as microbially influenced degradation (MID) in which bacteria produce acids that dissolve the cement matrix of concrete. Most radionuclide contamination of concrete is fixed in the outer few mm of the concrete surface. By capturing and controlling this natural process, a biological method of removing the surface of concrete to depths up to several mm is being developed. Three types of bacteria are known to be important in MID of concrete: nitrifying bacteria that produce nitric acid, sulfur oxidizing bacteria that produce sulfuric acid, and certain heterotrophic bacteria that produce organic acids. An investigation of natural environments demonstrated with scanning electron microscopy the presence of bacteria on concrete surfaces of a variety of structures, such as bridges and dams, where corrosion is evident. Enumeration of sulfur oxidizing and nitrifying bacteria revealed their presence and activity on structures to varying degrees in different environments. Under ideal conditions, Thiobacillus thiooxidans, a sulfur oxidizing bacteria, attached to and colonized the surface of concrete specimens. Over 1mm depth of material from a 10 cm x 10 cm square surface was removed in 68 days in the Thiobacillus treated specimen compared to a sterile control. Laboratory and field demonstrations are currently being conducted using experimental chambers designed to be mounted directly to concrete surfaces where radionuclide contamination exists. Data is being obtained in order to determine actual rates of surface removal and limitations to the system. This information will be used to develop a full scale decontamination technology

  2. Carbonation and CO2 uptake of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Seo, Eun-A; Tae, Sung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    This study developed a reliable procedure to assess the carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) uptake of concrete by carbonation during the service life of a structure and by the recycling of concrete after demolition. To generalize the amount of absorbable CO 2 per unit volume of concrete, the molar concentration of carbonatable constituents in hardened cement paste was simplified as a function of the unit content of cement, and the degree of hydration of the cement paste was formulated as a function of the water-to-cement ratio. The contribution of the relative humidity, type of finishing material for the concrete surface, and the substitution level of supplementary cementitious materials to the CO 2 diffusion coefficient in concrete was reflected using various correction factors. The following parameters varying with the recycling scenario were also considered: the carbonatable surface area of concrete crusher-runs and underground phenomena of the decreased CO 2 diffusion coefficient and increased CO 2 concentration. Based on the developed procedure, a case study was conducted for an apartment building with a principal wall system and an office building with a Rahmen system, with the aim of examining the CO 2 uptake of each structural element under different exposure environments during the service life and recycling of the building. As input data necessary for the case study, data collected from actual surveys conducted in 2012 in South Korea were used, which included data on the surrounding environments, lifecycle inventory database, life expectancy of structures, and recycling activity scenario. Ultimately, the CO 2 uptake of concrete during a 100-year lifecycle (life expectancy of 40 years and recycling span of 60 years) was estimated to be 15.5%–17% of the CO 2 emissions from concrete production, which roughly corresponds to 18%–21% of the CO 2 emissions from the production of ordinary Portland cement. - Highlights: • CO 2 uptake assessment approach owing to the

  3. Motor cognition-motor semantics: action perception theory of cognition and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Moseley, Rachel L; Egorova, Natalia; Shebani, Zubaida; Boulenger, Véronique

    2014-03-01

    A new perspective on cognition views cortical cell assemblies linking together knowledge about actions and perceptions not only as the vehicles of integrated action and perception processing but, furthermore, as a brain basis for a wide range of higher cortical functions, including attention, meaning and concepts, sequences, goals and intentions, and even communicative social interaction. This article explains mechanisms relevant to mechanistic action perception theory, points to concrete neuronal circuits in brains along with artificial neuronal network simulations, and summarizes recent brain imaging and other experimental data documenting the role of action perception circuits in cognition, language and communication. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October - December 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  5. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July - September 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  6. concrete5 cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Strack, David

    2013-01-01

    The Cookbook-style recipes allow you to go both directly to your topic of interest or follow topics throughout a chapter to gain in-depth knowledge. This practical Cookbook will cater to the needs of both intermediate and advanced concrete5 developers.This book is geared towards intermediate to advanced PHP developers who would like to learn more about the concrete5 content management system. Developers already familiar with concrete5 will learn new time-saving tricks and will find the book to be a great reference tool.

  7. Concrete = aggregate, cement, water?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelinek, J.

    1990-01-01

    Concrete for the Temelin nuclear power plant is produced to about 70 different formulae. For quality production, homogeneous properties of aggregates, accurate proportioning devices, technological discipline and systematic inspections and tests should be assured. The results are reported of measuring compression strength after 28 days for different concrete samples. The results of such tests allow reducing the proportion of cement, which brings about considerable savings. Reduction in cement quantities can also be achieved by adding ash to the concrete mixes. Ligoplast, a plasticizer addition is used for improving workability. (M.D). 8 figs

  8. Properties of high-workability concrete with recycled concrete aggregate

    OpenAIRE

    Safiuddin,; Alengaram,Ubagaram Johnson; Salam,Abdus; Jumaat,Mohd Zamin; Jaafar,Fahrol Fadhli; Saad,Hawa Binti

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the effects of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) on the key fresh and hardened properties of concrete. RCA was used to produce high-workability concrete substituting 0-100% natural coarse aggregate (NCA) by weight. The slump and slump flow of fresh concretes were determined to ensure high workability. In addition, the compressive, flexural and splitting tensile strengths, modulus of elasticity, and permeable voids of hardened concretes were determined. The test results rev...

  9. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF GLASS FIBRE CONCRETE AND NORMAL CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    Mr.Yogesh S.Lanjewar*

    2018-01-01

    Concrete is basically the most important material concerning with the construction and infrastructural procedures, for which it should be of good strength and durability. Many researches are being conducted to make concrete more sustainable and of more strength and durability. Therefore keeping this in mind i have chosen to do the comparative study regarding the strength of normal concrete with the glass fibre added concrete using mix design procedure as per IS 10262-2009 for concrete. As w...

  10. Electrokenitic Corrosion Treatment of Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Henry E (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and apparatus for strengthening cementitious concrete by placing a nanoparticle carrier liquid in contact with a first surface of a concrete section and inducing a current across the concrete section at sufficient magnitude and for sufficient time that nanoparticles in the nanoparticle carrier liquid migrate through a significant depth of the concrete section.

  11. Electrokinetic Strength Enhancement of Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Henry E. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and apparatus for strengthening cementitious concrete by placing a nanoparticle carrier liquid in contact with a first surface of a concrete section and inducing a current across the concrete section at sufficient magnitude and for sufficient time that nanoparticles in the nanoparticle carrier liquid migrate through a significant depth of the concrete section.

  12. Shrinkage Reducing Admixture for Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Concrete shrinkage cracking is a common problem in all types of concrete structures, especially for structures and environments where the cracks are prevalent and the repercussions are most severe. A liquid shrinkage reducing admixture for concrete, developed by GRACE Construction Products and ARCO Chemical Company, that reduces significantly the shrinkage during concrete drying and potentially reduces overall cracking over time.

  13. Aging Evaluation of Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitsutaka, Y.; Takesue, N.; Tsukagoshi, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, method on the aging evaluation in nuclear power plant concrete structures was investigated. Problems on the durability evaluation of reinforced concrete structures were pointed out and an evaluation framework was considered. In view of the importance of evaluating the degree of deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, relationships should be formulated among the number of years elapsed, t, the amount of action of a deteriorative factor, F, the degree of material deterioration, D, and the performance of the structure, P. Evaluation by PDFt diagrams combining these relationships may be effective. A detailed procedure of durability evaluation for a reinforced concrete structure using PDFt concept is presented for the deterioration factors of thermal effect, irradiation, neutralization and penetration of salinity by referring to the recent papers. And the evaluation framework of the deteriorated material constitutive model which can be used for the numerical analysis of the integrity evaluation for the concrete structure was proposed. (author)

  14. Dysregulation in level of goal and action identification across psychological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Goals, events, and actions can be mentally represented within a hierarchical framework that ranges from more abstract to more concrete levels of identification. A more abstract level of identification involves general, superordinate, and decontextualized mental representations that convey the meaning of goals, events, and actions, “why” an action is performed, and its purpose, ends, and consequences. A more concrete level of identification involves specific and subordinate mental representations that include contextual details of goals, events, and actions, and the specific “how” details of an action. This review considers three lines of evidence for considering that dysregulation of level of goal/action identification may be a transdiagnostic process. First, there is evidence that different levels of identification have distinct functional consequences and that in non-clinical samples level of goal/action identification appears to be regulated in a flexible and adaptive way to match the level of goal/action identification to circumstances. Second, there is evidence that level of goal/action identification causally influences symptoms and processes involved in psychological disorders, including emotional response, repetitive thought, impulsivity, problem solving and procrastination. Third, there is evidence that the level of goal/action identification is biased and/or dysregulated in certain psychological disorders, with a bias towards more abstract identification for negative events in depression, GAD, PTSD, and social anxiety. PMID:20579789

  15. A historical examination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallinson, L.G.; Li Davies, I.

    1987-01-01

    The requirement that concrete in radioactive waste repositories be stable physically and chemically for very long times has initiated studies of ancient and old concretes. This report is a contribution to this effort. After a description of the history of cement and concrete, the published literature relating to the analysis of old and ancient concrete is reviewed. A series of samples spanning the history of concrete has been obtained; a variety of physical and chemical techniques have been employed to characterize these samples. Reasons for survival of ancient concretes, and for durability of early, reinforced concretes are identified. Recommendations for further studies are given. 132 refs

  16. Online Monitoring of Concrete Structures in Nuclear Power Plants: Interim Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cai, Guowei [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants in the United States have initial operating licenses of 40 years, and many of these plants have applied for and received license extensions. As plant structures, systems, and components age, their useful life—considering both structural integrity and performance—is reduced as a result of deterioration of the materials. Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code-based design margins of safety. Structural health monitoring is required to produce actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. The online monitoring of concrete structures project conducted under the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Technologies Pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory is seeking to develop and demonstrate capabilities for concrete structures health monitoring. Through this research project, several national laboratories and Vanderbilt University propose to develop a framework of research activities for the health monitoring of nuclear power plant concrete structures that includes the integration of four elements—damage modeling, monitoring, data analytics, and uncertainty quantification. This report briefly discusses activities in this project during October-December, 2014. The most significant activity during this period was the organizing of a two-day workshop on research needs in online monitoring of concrete structures, hosted by Vanderbilt University in November 2014. Thirty invitees from academia, industry and government participated in the workshop. The presentations and discussions at the workshop surveyed current activities related to concrete structures deterioration modeling and monitoring, and identified the challenges, knowledge gaps, and opportunities for advancing the state of the art; these

  17. Anchorage in concrete construction

    CERN Document Server

    Eligehausen, Rolf; Silva, John F

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive treatment of current fastening technology using inserts (anchor channels, headed stud), anchors (metal expansion anchor, undercut anchor, bonded anchor, concrete screw and plastic anchor) as well as power actuated fasteners in concrete. It describes in detail the fastening elements as well as their effects and load-bearing capacities in cracked and non-cracked concrete. It further focuses on corrosion behaviour, fire resistance and characteristics with earthquakes and shocks. It finishes off with the design of fastenings according to the European Technical Approval Guideline (ETAG 001), the Final Draft of the CEN Technical Specification 'Design of fastenings for use in concrete' and the American Standards ACI 318-05, Appendix D and ACI 349-01, Appendix B.

  18. Concrete Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is a 20,000-sq ft laboratory that supports research on all aspects of concrete and materials technology. The staff of this facility offer wide-ranging expertise...

  19. Magnesium oxychloride cement concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    exposure to water and salt attack by replacing 10% magnesium chloride solution by magnesium sulphate solution ... Having tremendous load bearing capacity, it can withstand .... retention coefficients for similar concrete compositions.

  20. Improving concrete overlay construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Several road construction projects involving concrete overlays at the state and county levels in Iowa in 2009 were studied for : construction techniques and methods. The projects that were evaluated consisted of sites in four Iowa counties: Osceola, ...

  1. Concrete decontamination scoping tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archibald, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    This report details the research efforts and scoping tests performed at the Idaho Chemical Process Plant using scabbling, chemical, and electro-osmotic decontamination techniques on radiologically contaminated concrete

  2. Modeling reinforced concrete durability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This project developed a next-generation modeling approach for projecting the extent of : reinforced concrete corrosion-related damage, customized for new and existing Florida Department of : Transportation bridges and suitable for adapting to broade...

  3. Injection technologies for the repair of damaged concrete structures

    CERN Document Server

    Panasyuk, V V; Sylovanyuk, V P

    2014-01-01

    This book analyzes the most important achievements in science and engineering practice concerning operational factors that cause damage to concrete and reinforced concrete structures. It includes methods for assessing their strength and service life, especially those that are based on modern concepts of the fracture mechanics of materials. It also includes basic approaches to the prediction of the remaining service life for long-term operational structures. Much attention is paid to injection technologies for restoring the serviceability of damaged concrete and reinforced concrete structures. In particular, technologies for remedying holes, cracks, corrosion damages etc. The books contains sample cases in which the above technologies have been used to restore structural integrity and extend the reliable service life of concrete and reinforced concrete constructions, especially NPPs, underground railways, bridges, seaports and historical relics.

  4. Recycling of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halaszovich, S.

    1988-01-01

    The paper reviews potentials and problems of disposal or recycling of concrete removed from nuclear installations. Due to the difficulties in determining radioactivity limits that are compatible with utilization of recycled material in practice, a method is proposed that takes into account inhalation of dusts, as occurring during the reprocessing or recycling of the concrete, for instance in road building. This method is based on the maximum permissible radioactivity uptake by inhalation of a nuclide mixture of unknown composition. (RB) [de

  5. Performance of "Waterless Concrete"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutanji, H. A.; Grugel, R. N.

    2009-01-01

    Waterless concrete consists of molten elementary sulfur and aggregate. The aggregates in a lunar environment will be lunar rocks and soil. Sulfur is present on the Moon in Troilite soil (FeS) and, by oxidation of the soil, iron and sulfur can be produced. Sulfur concrete specimens were cycled between liquid nitrogen (approx.]91 C) and room temperature (^21 C) to simulate exposure to a lunar environment. Cycled and control specimens were subsequently tested in compression at room temperatures (^21 C) and ^-101 C. Test results showed that due to temperature cycling, the compressive strength of cycled specimens was 20% of those non-cycled. This reduction in strength can be attributed to the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of the materials constituting the concrete which promoted cracking. Similar sulfur concrete mixtures were strengthened with short and long glass fibres. The lunar regolith simulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt- Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600 C for times of 30 min to i hour. Glass fibres and small rods were pulled from the melt. The glass fibres were used to reinforce sulfur concrete plated to improve the flexural strength of the sulfur concrete. Beams strengthened with glass fibres showed to exhibit an increase in the flexural strength by as much as 45%.

  6. Fracture Mechanics of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulfkjær, Jens Peder

    Chapter 1 Chapter l contains the introduction to this thesis. The scope of the thesis is partly to investigate different numerical and analytical models based on fracture mechanical ideas, which are able to predict size effects, and partly to perform an experimental investigation on high-strength......Chapter 1 Chapter l contains the introduction to this thesis. The scope of the thesis is partly to investigate different numerical and analytical models based on fracture mechanical ideas, which are able to predict size effects, and partly to perform an experimental investigation on high......-strength concrete. Chapter 2 A description of the factors which influence the strength and cracking of concrete and high strength concrete is made. Then basic linear fracture mechanics is outlined followed by a description and evaluation of the models used to describe concrete fracture in tension. The chapter ends...... and the goveming equations are explicit and simple. These properties of the model make it a very powerful tool, which is applicable for the designing engineer. The method is also extended to reinforced concrete, where the results look very promising. The large experimental investigation on high-strength concrete...

  7. Fibre-concrete container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In this leaflet the fibre-concrete container for radioactive wastes is described. The fibre container is made of fibre-concrete that contains cement, aggregate, sand, filter, flame-silica, super-plastificator, water and scattered metal fibres. The fibre-concrete container has a dice shape with outer dimension 1.7 x 1.7 x 1.7 m. It is mounted of a container body, a container cover and two caps. Total weight of container is 4,240 kg, maximum weight of loaded container do not must exceed 15,000 kg. The physical and mechanical properties of the fibre-concrete container are described in detail. The fibre-concrete container manufactured for storing of low and intermediate radioactive wastes. A fibre-concrete container utilization to store of radioactive wastes solves these problems: increase of stability of stored packages of radioactive waste; watertightness within 300 years at least; static stability of bearing space; better utilization of bearing spaces; insulation of radioactive waste in a case of seismic and geological event; increase of fire resistance; and transport of radioactive waste

  8. Concrete radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, M.F.

    1989-01-01

    The increased use of nuclear energy has given rise to a growth in the amount of artificially produced radiation and radioactive materials. The design and construction of shielding to protect people, equipment and structures from the effects of radiation has never been more important. Experience has shown that concrete is an effective, versatile and economical material for the construction of radiation shielding. This book provides information on the principles governing the interaction of radiation with matter and on relevant nuclear physics to give the engineer an understanding of the design and construction of concrete shielding. It covers the physical, mechanical and nuclear properties of concrete; the effects of elevated temperatures and possible damage to concrete due to radiation; basic procedures for the design of concrete radiation shields and finally the special problems associated with their construction and cost. Although written primarily for engineers concerned with the design and construction of concrete shielding, the book also reviews the widely scattered data and information available on this subject and should therefore be of interest to students and those wishing to research further in this field. (author)

  9. Separation of contaminated concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakiewicz, J.L.; Reymer, A.P.S.

    1990-01-01

    Separating the contaminated parts from the non-contaminated parts from decommissioned nuclear facilities may strongly reduce the amount of contaminated concrete. The reduction in volume of the radioactive contaminated concrete is dependent on how much cementstone is in the concrete. This research program shows that the radioactive contamination is mostly in the cementstone. However the choice that the cementstone parts, (or better said the radioactive parts) are smaller than 1 mm may not always be true. Normally the cementstone takes about 30% of the total concrete volume. A separation procedure composed by a combination of milling and thermal shock has been assessed. Both the cold and hot thermal shock in combination with milling are not able to separate the cementstone from the larger aggregates completely. However, the cementstone from the concrete with a low nominal grain size seems to be almost completely removed by the combination cold thermal shock/milling, while the cementstone from the concrete with a high nominal grain size seems to be almost completely removed by the combination hot thermal shock/milling. After both methods a layer of cementstone was still visible on the aggregates. Washing followed by a nitric acid treatment removed each 2 wt% of cementstone

  10. Effectiveness of Horizontal Rebar on Concrete Block Retaining Wall Strength

    OpenAIRE

    Krishpersad Manohar; Rikhi Ramkissoon

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of including a horizontal rebar compared to only a vertical rebar in concrete filled core interlocking concrete block retaining wall sections was investigated with respect to the horizontal retaining force. Experimental results for three specimens of interlocking blocks with vertical rebar and concrete filled cores showed an average horizontal retaining force of 24546 N ± 5.7% at an average wall deflection of 13.3 mm. Experimental results for three wall specimens of interloc...

  11. Prevention of shrinkage cracking in tight concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvaredo, A.M.; Wittmann, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that crack formation and propagation in concrete members subjected to restrained shrinkage can be realistically predicted by means of a comprehensive approach including a diffusion analysis and fracture mechanics considerations. The conditions for stable crack propagation regarding dimensions of the concrete member, degree of restraint to the imposed deformation and material properties are discussed. Guidelines on the prevention of shrinkage cracking of concrete structures are given. (author). 10 refs., 5 figs

  12. Durability evaluation method on rebar corrosion of reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitsutaka, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, method on the durability evaluation in nuclear power plant concrete structures was investigated. In view of the importance of evaluating the degree of deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, relationships should be formulated among the number of years elapsed, t, the amount of action of a deteriorative factor, F, the degree of material deterioration, D, and the performance of the structure, P. Evaluation by PDFt diagrams combining these relationships may be effective. A detailed procedure of durability evaluation for a reinforced concrete structure using PDFt concept is presented for the deterioration of rebar corrosion caused by neutralization and penetration of salinity by referring to the recent papers. (author)

  13. Offshore concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamas Pardo, M.; Carral Couce, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    In the offshore industry there are two possible materials for the construction of the hull of a structure; the steel and concrete, with the first one widely used until now, as in the rest of the shiphuidling industry of merchant ships, warships, etc. Materials such as aluminum, GRP or timber areused in small units with lengths lower than 100 m, and in less adverse conditions than in the offshore industry. Nevertheless, some ships/barges have been built of concrete in the past, but have been rather isolated cases which have not changed the practice in the industry. In the First and Second World War were built by the scarcity of materials, while the series of barges by Alfred A. Yee was a rare exception. Other units were also made in concrete, but almost anecdotal. Still, the behaviour of these concrete structures, especially in terms of maintenance, has been excellent. Therefore, the fact that the concrete has not had an adequate reception so far in shipbuilding, does not mean that in will not be the material best suited for the offshore industry in the future. The extra displacement and associated fuel costs in concrete ships have been found prohibitive in the past. But the loss of mobility of a concrete hull in relation to a steel hull can be perfectly offset by the advantages offered by the concrete, as the shipping and offshore industry have very different priorities. One of the main differences in these priorities is in terms of maintenance and resistance to fatigue, precisely where the concrete performs better. ships can easily be dry docked for maintenance and repair, while in the offshore platforms these works have to be done in situ so maintenance and fatigue are crucial to them. Besides these, the concrete has other advantages according to findings of several studies. And although they are interested in the conclusions that the makes as they came from people in the concrete industry, the fact that in recent years concrete offshore unit shave been built

  14. Strain rate effects for spallation of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häussler-Combe, Ulrich; Panteki, Evmorfia; Kühn, Tino

    2015-09-01

    Appropriate triaxial constitutive laws are the key for a realistic simulation of high speed dynamics of concrete. The strain rate effect is still an open issue within this context. In particular the question whether it is a material property - which can be covered by rate dependent stress strain relations - or mainly an effect of inertia is still under discussion. Experimental and theoretical investigations of spallation of concrete specimen in a Hopkinson Bar setup may bring some evidence into this question. For this purpose the paper describes the VERD model, a newly developed constitutive law for concrete based on a damage approach with included strain rate effects [1]. In contrast to other approaches the dynamic strength increase is not directly coupled to strain rate values but related to physical mechanisms like the retarded movement of water in capillary systems and delayed microcracking. The constitutive law is fully triaxial and implemented into explicit finite element codes for the investigation of a wide range of concrete structures exposed to impact and explosions. The current setup models spallation experiments with concrete specimen [2]. The results of such experiments are mainly related to the dynamic tensile strength and the crack energy of concrete which may be derived from, e.g., the velocity of spalled concrete fragments. The experimental results are compared to the VERD model and two further constitutive laws implemented in LS-Dyna. The results indicate that both viscosity and retarded damage are required for a realistic description of the material behaviour of concrete exposed to high strain effects [3].

  15. Strain rate effects for spallation of concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häussler-Combe Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate triaxial constitutive laws are the key for a realistic simulation of high speed dynamics of concrete. The strain rate effect is still an open issue within this context. In particular the question whether it is a material property – which can be covered by rate dependent stress strain relations – or mainly an effect of inertia is still under discussion. Experimental and theoretical investigations of spallation of concrete specimen in a Hopkinson Bar setup may bring some evidence into this question. For this purpose the paper describes the VERD model, a newly developed constitutive law for concrete based on a damage approach with included strain rate effects [1]. In contrast to other approaches the dynamic strength increase is not directly coupled to strain rate values but related to physical mechanisms like the retarded movement of water in capillary systems and delayed microcracking. The constitutive law is fully triaxial and implemented into explicit finite element codes for the investigation of a wide range of concrete structures exposed to impact and explosions. The current setup models spallation experiments with concrete specimen [2]. The results of such experiments are mainly related to the dynamic tensile strength and the crack energy of concrete which may be derived from, e.g., the velocity of spalled concrete fragments. The experimental results are compared to the VERD model and two further constitutive laws implemented in LS-Dyna. The results indicate that both viscosity and retarded damage are required for a realistic description of the material behaviour of concrete exposed to high strain effects [3].

  16. Recycled Concrete as Aggregate for Structural Concrete Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Malešev

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A comparative analysis of the experimental results of the properties of fresh and hardened concrete with different replacement ratios of natural with recycled coarse aggregate is presented in the paper. Recycled aggregate was made by crushing the waste concrete of laboratory test cubes and precast concrete columns. Three types of concrete mixtures were tested: concrete made entirely with natural aggregate (NAC as a control concrete and two types of concrete made with natural fine and recycled coarse aggregate (50% and 100% replacement of coarse recycled aggregate. Ninety-nine specimens were made for the testing of the basic properties of hardened concrete. Load testing of reinforced concrete beams made of the investigated concrete types is also presented in the paper. Regardless of the replacement ratio, recycled aggregate concrete (RAC had a satisfactory performance, which did not differ significantly from the performance of control concrete in this experimental research. However, for this to be fulfilled, it is necessary to use quality recycled concrete coarse aggregate and to follow the specific rules for design and production of this new concrete type.

  17. Monitoring of Concrete Structures Using Ofdr Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henault, J. M.; Salin, J.; Moreau, G.; Delepine-Lesoille, S.; Bertand, J.; Taillade, F.; Quiertant, M.; Benzarti, K.

    2011-06-01

    Structural health monitoring is a key factor in life cycle management of infrastructures. Truly distributed fiber optic sensors are able to provide relevant information on large structures, such as bridges, dikes, nuclear power plants or nuclear waste disposal facilities. The sensing chain includes an optoelectronic unit and a sensing cable made of one or more optical fibers. A new instrument based on Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR), enables to perform temperature and strain measurements with a centimeter scale spatial resolution over hundred of meters and with a level of precision equal to 1 μstrain and 0.1 °C. Several sensing cables are designed with different materials targeting to last for decades in a concrete aggressive environment and to ensure an optimal transfer of temperature and strain from the concrete matrix to the optical fiber. Tests were carried out by embedding various sensing cables into plain concrete specimens and representative-scale reinforced concrete structural elements. Measurements were performed with an OFDR instrument; meanwhile, mechanical solicitations were imposed to the concrete element. Preliminary experiments are very promising since measurements performed with distributed sensing system are comparable to values obtained with conventional sensors used in civil engineering and with the Strength of Materials Modelling. Moreover, the distributed sensing system makes it possible to detect and localize cracks appearing in concrete during the mechanical loading.

  18. Organic compounds in concrete from demolition works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praagh, M; Modin, H; Trygg, J

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to verify the effect of physically removing the outer surface of contaminated concrete on total contents and on potential mobility of pollutants by means of leaching tests. Reclaimed concrete from 3 industrial sites in Sweden were included: A tar impregnated military storage, a military tar track-depot, as well as concrete constructions used for disposing of pesticide production surplus and residues. Solid materials and leachates from batch and column leaching tests were analysed for metals, Cl, F, SO4, DOC and contents of suspected organic compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAH, and pesticides/substances for pesticide production such as phenoxy acids, chlorophenols and chlorocresols, respectively). In case of PAH contaminated concrete, results indicate that removing 1 or 5 mm of the surface lead to total concentrations below the Swedish guidelines for recycling of aggregates and soil in groundwork constructions. 3 out of 4 concrete samples contaminated with pesticides fulfilled Swedish guidelines for contaminated soil. Results from batch and column leaching tests indicated, however, that concentrations above environmental quality standards for certain PAH and phenoxy acids, respectively, might occur at site when the crushed concrete is recycled in groundwork constructions. As leaching tests engaged in the study deviated from leaching test standards with a limited number of samples, the potential impact of the leaching tests' equipment on measured PAH and pesticide leachate concentrations has to be evaluated in future work. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Ageing management of CANDUtm concrete containment buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipose, K.E.; Gregor, F.E.

    2009-01-01

    The containment system in a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) provides the final physical barrier against release of radioactive materials to the external environment. Even though there are different physical configurations to meet this fundamental safety function in various reactor types, a common feature is the use of a thick-walled concrete structure as part of the containment system commonly referred to as 'Concrete Containment Building'. In order for the concrete containment buildings to continue to provide the required safety function, it has to maintain its structural integrity. As well, its leak rates under test pressures must be maintained below acceptable limits. As some of the containment buildings of the CANDU nuclear power plants are approaching their fourth decade of successful operation, questions regarding the impact of ageing on their ultimate useful service life emerge. Ageing Management has become the tool for addressing those questions. In this paper, the ageing and ageing management of the CANDU concrete containments are discussed, including the specific programs being implemented to monitor and trend the ageing conditions. Specifically, the usefulness of the embedded strain gauges as a tool for the assessment of the condition of the containment concrete structure is discussed. Some of the operational and test data accumulated over the last 30 years have been evaluated and trended to provide some results and conclusions regarding the satisfactory long-term behaviour of the concrete containment buildings. (authors)

  20. Review of concrete biodeterioration in relation to nuclear waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turick, Charles E; Berry, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Storage of radioactive waste in concrete structures is a means of containing wastes and related radionuclides generated from nuclear operations in many countries. Previous efforts related to microbial impacts on concrete structures that are used to contain radioactive waste showed that microbial activity can play a significant role in the process of concrete degradation and ultimately structural deterioration. This literature review examines the research in this field and is focused on specific parameters that are applicable to modeling and prediction of the fate of concrete structures used to store or dispose of radioactive waste. Rates of concrete biodegradation vary with the environmental conditions, illustrating a need to understand the bioavailability of key compounds involved in microbial activity. Specific parameters require pH and osmotic pressure to be within a certain range to allow for microbial growth as well as the availability and abundance of energy sources such as components involved in sulfur, iron and nitrogen oxidation. Carbon flow and availability are also factors to consider in predicting concrete biodegradation. The microbial contribution to degradation of the concrete structures containing radioactive waste is a constant possibility. The rate and degree of concrete biodegradation is dependent on numerous physical, chemical and biological parameters. Parameters to focus on for modeling activities and possible options for mitigation that would minimize concrete biodegradation are discussed and include key conditions that drive microbial activity on concrete surfaces. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Performance of Lightweight Natural-Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardjasaputra Harianto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete, the most common construction material, has negligible tension capacity. However, a reinforcement material such as natural fibers, can be used to improve the tensile properties of concrete. This paper presents experiments conducted on Super Lightweight Concrete mixed with coconut fibers (SLNFRC. Coconut fibers are regarded as one of the toughest natural fibers to strengthen concrete. Coconut fiber reinforced composites have been considered as a sustainable construction material because the fibers are derived from waste. These wastes, which are available in large quantities in Asia, have to be extracted from the husk of coconut fruits and must pass a mechanical process before being added to a concrete mixture. The Super Lightweight Concrete was made by mixing concrete paste with foam agent that can reduce the overall weight of concrete up to 60% with compressive strength up to 6 MPa. The Super Lightweight Concrete is intended to be used for non-structural walls, as alternative conventional construction materials such as brick walls. The influence of coconut fibers content in increasing the flexural tensile strength of Super Lightweight Concrete was studied in this research. The fiber content studied include 0%, 0.1%, 0.175%, and 0.25% by weight of cement content. Sixteen specimens of SLNFRC mini beams of 60 mm x 60 mm x 300 mm were tested to failure to investigate their flexural strengths. The optimum percent fibers yielding higher tensile strength was found to be 0.175%

  2. Physical and mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete containing superplasticizer and metakaolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidan, Shahiron; Tayeh, Bassam A.; Jamaludin, A. A.; Bahari, N. A. A. S.; Mohd, S. S.; Zuki Ali, N.; Khalid, F. S.

    2017-11-01

    The development of concrete technology shows a variety of admixtures in concrete to produce special concrete. This includes the production of self-compacting concrete which is able to fill up all spaces, take formwork shapes and pass through congested reinforcement bars without vibrating or needing any external energy. In this study, the main objective is to compare the physical and mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete containing metakaolin with normal concrete. Four types of samples were produced to study the effect of metakaolin towards the physical and mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete where 0%, 5%, 10% and 15% of metakaolin were used as cement replacement. The physical properties were investigated using slump test for normal concrete and slump flow test for self-compacting concrete. The mechanical properties were tested for compressive strength and tensile strength. The findings of this study show that the inclusion of metakaolin as cement replacement can increase both compressive and tensile strength compared to normal concrete. The highest compressive strength was found in self-compacting concrete with 15% metakaolin replacement at 53.3 MPa while self-compacting concrete with 10% metakaolin replacement showed the highest tensile strength at 3.6 MPa. On top of that, the finishing or concrete surface of both cube and cylinder samples made of self-compacting concrete produced a smooth surface with the appearance of less honeycombs compared to normal concrete.

  3. Sodium-concrete reactions experiments and code development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casselman, C.; Malet, J.C.; Dufresne, J.; Bolvin, M.

    1988-01-01

    Hypothesis of hot sodium leak in a fast breeder reactor implies, for the safety organism to consider spillage of sodium on concrete. This safety analysis involves the understanding of sodium-concrete reactions, the knowledge of their consequences and to test the choiced preventive solutions. In association with EDF, the nuclear safety department had carried out an extensive experimental program, the different parts of which are connected with each aspect of this problem: - firstly, interaction between sodium and bare surface of usual concrete; - secondly, the case of a sodium spillage on a concrete surface covered with a defected liner; - thirdly, special concrete tests for a comparison with usual concrete behavior, in direct contact with hot sodium; - at last, a test which concerns a new design with a layer of the selected concrete protected with a defected liner. On the same time, theoretical work leads to elaborate a physical model to describe temporal evolution of thermal and chemical decomposition of a concrete slab under hot sodium action. SORBET-REBUS system will use quoted above test results to its validation

  4. The confused world of sulfate attack on concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neville, Adam

    2004-01-01

    External sulfate attack is not completely understood. Part I identifies the issues involved, pointing out disagreements, and distinguishes between the mere occurrence of chemical reactions of sulfates with hydrated cement paste and the damage or deterioration of concrete; only the latter are taken to represent sulfate attack. Furthermore, sulfate attack is defined as deleterious action involving sulfate ions; if the reaction is physical, then, it is physical sulfate attack that takes place. The discussion of the two forms of sulfate attack leads to a recommendation for distinct nomenclature. Sulfate attack on concrete structures in service is not widespread, and the amount of laboratory-based research seems to be disproportionately large. The mechanisms of attack by different sulfates--sodium, calcium, and magnesium--are discussed, including the issue of topochemical and through-solution reactions. The specific aspects of the action of magnesium sulfate are discussed, and the differences between laboratory conditions and field exposure are pointed out. Part II discusses the progress of sulfate attack and its manifestations. This is followed by a discussion of making sulfate-resisting concrete. One of the measures is to use Type V cement, and this topic is extensively discussed. Likewise, the influence of w/c on sulfate resistance is considered. The two parameters are not independent of one another. Moreover, the cation in the sulfate salt has a strong bearing on the efficiency of the Type V cement. Recent interpretations of the Bureau of Reclamation tests, both long term and accelerated, are evaluated, and it appears that they need reworking. Part III reviews the standards and guides for the classification of the severity of exposure of structures to sulfates and points out the lack of calibration of the various classes of exposure. A particular problem is the classification of soils because much depends on the extraction ratio of sulfate in the soil: there is a

  5. Radon emanation fractions from concretes containing fly ash and metakaolin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor-Lange, Sarah C.; Juenger, Maria C.G.; Siegel, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Radon ( 222 Rn) and progenies emanate from soil and building components and can create an indoor air quality hazard. In this study, nine concrete constituents, including the supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) fly ash and metakaolin, were used to create eleven different concrete mixtures. We investigated the effect of constituent radium specific activity, radon effective activity and emanation fraction on the concrete emanation fraction and the radon exhalation rate. Given the serious health effects associated with radionuclide exposure, experimental results were coupled with Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate predictive differences in the indoor radon concentration due to concrete mixture design. The results from this study show that, on average, fly ash constituents possessed radium specific activities ranging from 100 Bq/kg to 200 Bq/kg and emanation fractions ranging from 1.1% to 2.5%. The lowest emitting concrete mixture containing fly ash resulted in a 3.4% reduction in the concrete emanation fraction, owing to the relatively low emanation that exists when fly ash is part of concrete. On average, the metakaolin constituents contained radium specific activities ranging from 67 Bq/kg to 600 Bq/kg and emanation fractions ranging from 8.4% to 15.5%, and changed the total concrete emanation fraction by roughly ± 5% relative to control samples. The results from this study suggest that SCMs can reduce indoor radon exposure from concrete, contingent upon SCM radionucleotide content and emanation fraction. Lastly, the experimental results provide SCM-specific concrete emanation fractions for indoor radon exposure modeling. - Highlights: • Fly ash or metakaolin SCMs can neutralize or reduce concrete emanation fractions. • The specific activity of constituents is a poor predictor of the concrete emanation fraction. • Exhalation from fly ash concretes represents a small fraction of the total indoor radon concentration

  6. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 168: Areas 25 and 26 Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0) includes Record of Technical Change No. 1 (dated 8/28/2002), Record of Technical Change No. 2 (dated 9/23/2002), and Record of Technical Change No. 3 (dated 6/2/2004)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada

    2001-11-21

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 168 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 168 consists of a group of twelve relatively diverse Corrective Action Sites (CASs 25-16-01, Construction Waste Pile; 25-16-03, MX Construction Landfill; 25-19-02, Waste Disposal Site; 25-23-02, Radioactive Storage RR Cars; 25-23-18, Radioactive Material Storage; 25-34-01, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; 25-34-02, NRDS Contaminated Bunker; CAS 25-23-13, ETL - Lab Radioactive Contamination; 25-99-16, USW G3; 26-08-01, Waste Dump/Burn Pit; 26-17-01, Pluto Waste Holding Area; 26-19-02, Contaminated Waste Dump No.2). These CASs vary in terms of the sources and nature of potential contamination. The CASs are located and/or associated wit h the following Nevada Test Site (NTS) facilities within three areas. The first eight CASs were in operation between 1958 to 1984 in Area 25 include the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility; the Missile Experiment Salvage Yard; the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility; the Radioactive Materials Storage Facility; and the Treatment Test Facility Building at Test Cell A. Secondly, the three CASs located in Area 26 include the Project Pluto testing area that operated from 1961 to 1964. Lastly, the Underground Southern Nevada Well (USW) G3 (CAS 25-99-16), a groundwater monitoring well located west of the NTS on the ridgeline of Yucca Mountain, was in operation during the 1980s. Based on site history and existing characterization data obtained to support the data quality objectives process, contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) for CAU 168 are primarily radionuclide; however, the COPCs for several CASs were not defined. To address COPC

  7. A study of the path-integral quantization of Abelian gauge theories when no explicit gauge-fixing term is included in the bilinear part of the gauge-field action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, S.

    1985-01-01

    The mathematical problem of inverting the operator Δ x μν ≡ g μν g αβ δ x α δ x β -δ x μ δ x ν , as it arises in the path-integral quantization of an Abelian gauge theory, such as quantum electrodynamics, when no gauge-fixing Lagrangian field density is included, is studied in this article. Making use of the fact that the Schwinger source functions, which are introduced for the purpose of generating Green's functions, are free of divergence, a result that follows from the conversion of the exponentiated action into a Gaussian form, the apparently noninvertible partial differential equation, Δ x μν L ν (x) J μ (x), can, by the addition and subsequent subtraction of terms containing the divergence of the source function, be cast into a form that does possess a Green's function solution. The gauge-field propagator is the same as that obtained by the conventional technique, which involves gauge fixing when the gauge parameter, α, is set equal to one. Such an analysis suggests also that, provided the effect of fictitious particles that propagate only in closed loops are included for the study of Green's functions in non-Abelian gauge theories in Landau-type gauges, then, in quantizing either Abelian gauge theories or non-Abelian gauge theories in this generic kind of gauge, it is not necessary to add an explicit gauge-fixing term to the bilinear part of the gauge-field action

  8. Ultrasonic imaging in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribay, G.; Paris, O.; Rambach, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The third and final protection barrier confining nuclear reactors is usually a concrete containment structure. Monitoring the structural integrity of these barriers is critical in ensuring the safety of nuclear power plants. The Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) in France in collaboration with the French Atomic commission (CEA/LIST) has developed an ultrasonic phased-array technique capable of inspecting thick concrete walls. The non-destructive method is dedicated to detect cracks and bulk defects. Given the thickness of the structure (1.2 m) undergoing inspection and the heterogeneity of the concrete, the optimal frequency lies in the 50-300 kHz range. At these frequencies, the ultrasonic beam profiles are widespread (non-directive) with poor signal-to-noise ratio. Previous studies have shown the potential of using phased-array techniques (i.e., beam focusing and beam steering) in order to improve detection resolution and sizing accuracy. In this paper we present experimental studies performed with array up to 16 transducers working at 200 kHz. Experiments are carried out on representative concrete blocks containing artificial defects. One is a reinforced mock-up representative of the first reinforcing mesh of wall containment. Experimental results show that in spite of the reinforcement, artificial defects deep as half a meter can be detected. Reconstructed images resulting from phased array acquisitions on an artificial crack embedded in a concrete block are also presented and discussed. The presented method allows detecting oriented defects in concrete with improved signal to noise ratio and sensibility. A simulation model of the interaction of ultrasound with a heterogeneous medium like concrete is briefly commented. (authors)

  9. Using of Porcelinite as Coarse Aggregate in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifa Saleh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this research the ability of using porcelinite as coarse aggregate to produce light weight concrete was investigated.  The experimental program consists of preparing and testing a mixes to investigate mechanical properties of concrete, with a total of 15 cubes (100×100×100 mm, 30 cylinders (100×200 mm. The tests include compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, fresh and hardened density of  light weight concrete for different porcelinite percentages ranged between(0% to 100% of the coarse aggregate weight. The obtained results for tested specimens were compared to control one. Test results indicated that using of porcelinite in concrete mix reduces the strength of concrete Porcelinite aggregate represents a reduction in density ranging between (10%-36% of normal weight concrete, therefore there is an advantage  using this type of light weight aggregate in this country where soil bearing capacity is low in most construction sites.

  10. Design for whipping pipe impact on reinforced concrete panels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.C.; Gurbuz, O.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes determination of local and overall effects on reinforced concrete panels due to whipping pipe impact in postulated pipe break events. Local damage includes the prediction of minimum concrete panel thickness required to prevent spalling from the back face of the target reinforced concrete panels. Evaluation of overall effect deals with the ductility ratio calculation for the target reinforced concrete panels. Design curves for determining the minimum panel thickness and the minimum reinforcement of reinforced concrete panels are presented in this paper for some cases commonly encountered in nuclear applications. The methodology and the results provided can be used to determine if an existing reinforced concrete wall is capable of resisting the whipping pipe impact, and consequently, if pipe whip restraints can be eliminated

  11. Rational and Safe Design of Concrete Transportation Structures for Size Effect and Multi-Decade Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The overall goal of this project was to improve the safety and sustainability in the design of large : prestressed concrete bridges and other transportation structures. The safety of large concrete : structures, including bridges, has been insufficie...

  12. Creep of concrete under various temperature, moisture, and loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to obtain information on the time-dependent deformation behavior of concrete in the presence of temperature, moisture, and loading conditions similar to those encountered in a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). Variables included concrete strength, aggregate types, curing history, temperature, and types of loading (uniaxial, hydrostatic, biaxial, and triaxial). There were 66 test conditions for creep tests and 12 test conditions for unloaded or control specimens. Experimental results are presented and discussed. Comparisons are made concerning the effect of the various test conditions on the behavior of concrete, and general conclusions are formulated

  13. Penetration of molten core materials into basaltic and limestone concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    In conjunction with the small-scale, melt-concrete interaction tests being conducted at Sandia Laboratories, an acoustic technique has been used to monitor the penetration of molten core materials into basaltic and limestone concrete. Real time plots of the position of the melt/concrete interface have been obtained, and they illustrate that the initial penetration rate of the melt may be of the order of 80 mm/min. Phenomena deduced by the technique include a non-wetted melt/concrete interface

  14. Investigation of early timber–concrete composite bridges in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    James P. Wacker; Alfredo Dias; Travis K. Hosteng

    2017-01-01

    The use of timber–concrete composite (TCC) bridges in the United States dates back to circa 1925. Two different TCC systems were constructed during this early period. The first system included a longitudinal nail-laminated deck composite with a concrete deck top layer. The second system included sawn timber stringers supporting a concrete deck top layer. Records...

  15. Let’s Get Concrete!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Candace; Boxenbaum, Eva

    whereas in the United States market and professional logics interacted: manufacturers cooperated to create standards for concrete and appealed to architects as consumers. Our findings also illuminate that concrete was legitimated initially by imitation of stone, but this strategy soon de......-legitimated not only concrete but also stone. Concrete was perceived as merely imitative and thus inauthentic. For concrete to become a legitimate and widely adopted material, architects had to theorize concrete as unique material with distinctive aesthetic possibilities, which led to new kinds of buildings and new...... architectural styles. Our study illuminates the key role that materials and aesthetics played within architects’ professional logic and shaped processes of institutional change....

  16. Study on reinforced lightweight coconut shell concrete beam behavior under flexure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunasekaran, K.; Annadurai, R.; Kumar, P.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Use of coconut shell as aggregate in concrete. ► Behavior of coconut shell concrete under flexure. ► SEM images of cement, sand, coconut shell and coconut shell aggregate concrete. ► Coconut shell hollow blocks and precast slabs are used in practice. - Abstract: Coconut shell has been used as coarse aggregate in the production of concrete. The flexural behavior of reinforced concrete beam made with coconut shell is analyzed and compared with the normal control concrete. Twelve beams, six with coconut shell concrete and six with normal control concrete, were fabricated and tested. This study includes the moment capacity, deflection, cracking, ductility, corresponding strains in both compression and tension, and end rotation. It was found that the flexural behavior of coconut shell concrete is comparable to that of other lightweight concretes. The results of concrete compression strain and steel tension strain showed that coconut shell concrete is able to achieve its full strain capacity under flexural loadings. Under serviceability condition, deflection and cracking characteristics of coconut shell concrete are comparable with control concrete. However, the failure zones of coconut shell concrete were larger than for control concrete beams. The end rotations of the coconut shell concrete beams just prior to failure values are comparable to other lightweight concretes. Coconut shell concrete was used to produce hollow blocks and precast slab in 2007 and they are being subjected to some practical loading till today without any problems such as deflection, bending, cracks, and damages for the past five years

  17. Concrete material characterization reinforced concrete tank structure Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkel, B.V.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project position on the concrete mechanical properties needed to perform design/analysis calculations for the MWTF secondary concrete structure. This report provides a position on MWTF concrete properties for the Title 1 and Title 2 calculations. The scope of the report is limited to mechanical properties and does not include the thermophysical properties of concrete needed to perform heat transfer calculations. In the 1970's, a comprehensive series of tests were performed at Construction Technology Laboratories (CTL) on two different Hanford concrete mix designs. Statistical correlations of the CTL data were later generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). These test results and property correlations have been utilized in various design/analysis efforts of Hanford waste tanks. However, due to changes in the concrete design mix and the lower range of MWTF operating temperatures, plus uncertainties in the CTL data and PNL correlations, it was prudent to evaluate the CTL data base and PNL correlations, relative to the MWTF application, and develop a defendable position. The CTL test program for Hanford concrete involved two different mix designs: a 3 kip/in 2 mix and a 4.5 kip/in 2 mix. The proposed 28-day design strength for the MWTF tanks is 5 kip/in 2 . In addition to this design strength difference, there are also differences between the CTL and MWTF mix design details. Also of interest, are the appropriate application of the MWTF concrete properties in performing calculations demonstrating ACI Code compliance. Mix design details and ACI Code issues are addressed in Sections 3.0 and 5.0, respectively. The CTL test program and PNL data correlations focused on a temperature range of 250 to 450 F. The temperature range of interest for the MWTF tank concrete application is 70 to 200 F

  18. Concrete and prestressing process, container made with this concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, M.

    1992-01-01

    Shape memory alloy fibers or heat shrinking fibers are encapsulated in a standard concrete. Prestressed concrete is obtained by heat treatment. Application is made to the fabrication of radioactive waste containers

  19. Concrete with onyx waste aggregate as aesthetically valued structural concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyowati E., W.; Soehardjono, A.; Wisnumurti

    2017-09-01

    The utillization of Tulungagung onyx stone waste as an aggregate of concrete mixture will improve the economic value of the concrete due to the brighter color and high aesthetic level of the products. We conducted the research of 75 samples as a test objects to measure the compression stress, splits tensile stress, flexural tensile stress, elasticity modulus, porosity modulus and also studied 15 test objects to identify the concrete micro structures using XRD test, EDAX test and SEM test. The test objects were made from mix designed concrete, having ratio cement : fine aggregate : coarse aggregate ratio = 1 : 1.5 : 2.1, and W/C ratio = 0.4. The 28 days examination results showed that the micro structure of Tulungagung onyx waste concrete is similar with normal concrete. Moreover, the mechanical test results proved that Tulungagung onyx waste concretes also have a qualified level of strength to be used as a structural concrete with higher aesthetic level.

  20. Durability of lightweight concrete : Phase I : concrete temperature study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-08-01

    This report describes a study conducted to determine the temperature gradient throughout the depth of a six inch concrete bridge deck. The bridge deck selected for study was constructed using lightweight concrete for the center spans and sand and gra...

  1. Civil engineering: calculations of pre-stressed concrete structures using CodeAster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, B.; Ulm, F.

    1997-11-01

    This document presents an analysis of the different calculation methods for pre-stressed concrete structure which can be performed by using finite element methods. Two methods of calculating the pre-stressing of concrete structures with finite elements have been determined. The equivalent method which consists of replacing the action of pre-stressing the concrete by equivalent forces. These method is well suited to dimensioning and studying the overall stability of a structure. It is not an easy matter to take into account the coupled or time-varying phenomena. This approach ignores the evolution of the interaction between the pre-stressing and the concrete. The explicit method which consists of including the mechanical resolution of the pre-stressed cables in that of a concrete structure. Not only does this allow a local study of the pre-stressed to be made, it also allows the coupling which developed over time to be determined, e.g. slip, deferred deformation and coupling between the steel and concrete behaviours. This method enables non-linear phenomena with varying degrees of complexity, such as fracture or yielding of the steels, drying out of the concrete, creep, etc to be described. The two methods are complementary. This document presents the mathematical and computer developments relating to each of this method. In the case of the explicit method, certain of the Code-Aster functions already make it possible to meet several EDF application requirements. Several couplings can be taken into account, such as thermomechanical, shrinkage in drying, creep, relaxation and injection of the cables. Three immediate developments of Code-Aster are proposed for the following applications: - a procedure for calculating the pre-stress losses along the pre-stressing cables; - a command to allocate these forces in the form of an initial force field in the bar elements associated with the cables; - a procedure for linking elements whose nodes do not coincide with each other

  2. On-site concrete cask storage system for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, P.A.; Haelsig, R.T.; Kent, J.D.; Schmoker, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    A method is described of storing spent nuclear fuel assemblies including the steps of: transferring the fuel assemblies from a spent-fuel pool to a moveable concrete storage cask located outside the spent-fuel pool; maintaining a barrier between the fuel and the concrete in the cask to prevent contamination of the concrete by the fuel; maintaining the concrete storage cask containing the spent-fuel on site at the reactor complex for some predetermined period; transferring the fuel assemblies from the concrete storage cask to a shipping container; and, recycling the concrete storage cask

  3. Ductility of Reinforced Concrete Structures in Flexure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbech, Lars

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, a rotational capacity model for flexural reinforced concrete elements is presented. The model is based on the general assumption, that any other failure mode than bending is prevented by proper design. This includes failure due to shear, anchorage, concentrated loads etc. Likewise...... are not necessarily so. An example shows the applicability of the model and a parametric study shows the advantages of the model compared with code provisions. Finally, improvements of the compression zone modelling is performed in order to include a better performance when concrete crushing is the failure criterion...

  4. Strength Calculation of Inclined Sections of Reinforced Concrete Elements under Transverse Bending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, V. B.

    2017-11-01

    The authors propose a design model to determine the strength of inclined sections of bent reinforced concrete elements without shear reinforcement for the action of transverse force taking into account the aggregate interlock forces in the inclined crack. The calculated dependences to find out the components of forces acting in an inclined section are presented. The calculated dependences are obtained from the consideration of equilibrium conditions of the block over the inclined crack. A comparative analysis of the experimental values of the failure loads of the inclined section and the theoretical values obtained for the proposed dependencies and normative calculation methods is performed. It is shown that the proposed design model makes it possible to take into account the effect the longitudinal reinforcement percentage has on the inclined section strength, the element cross section height without the introduction of empirical coefficients which contributes to an increase in the structural safety of design solutions including the safety of high-strength concrete elements.

  5. SUSTAINABLE CONCRETE FOR WIND TURBINE FOUNDATIONS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BERNDT,M.L.

    2004-06-01

    The use of wind power to generate electricity continues to grow, especially given commitments by various countries throughout the world to ensure that a significant percentage of energy comes from renewable sources. In order to meet such objectives, increasingly larger turbines with higher capacity are being developed. The engineering aspects of larger turbine development tend to focus on design and materials for blades and towers. However, foundations are also a critical component of large wind turbines and represent a significant cost of wind energy projects. Ongoing wind research at BNL is examining two areas: (a) structural response analysis of wind turbine-tower-foundation systems and (b) materials engineering of foundations. This work is investigating the dynamic interactions in wind turbine systems, which in turn assists the wind industry in achieving improved reliability and more cost efficient foundation designs. The results reported herein cover initial studies of concrete mix designs for large wind turbine foundations and how these may be tailored to reduce cost and incorporate sustainability and life cycle concepts. The approach taken was to investigate material substitutions so that the environmental, energy and CO{sub 2}-impact of concrete could be reduced. The use of high volumes of ''waste'' materials in concrete was examined. These materials included fly ash, blast furnace slag and recycled concrete aggregate. In addition, the use of steel fiber reinforcement as a means to improve mechanical properties and potentially reduce the amount of bar reinforcement in concrete foundations was studied. Four basic mixes were considered. These were: (1) conventional mix with no material substitutions, (2) 50% replacement of cement with fly ash, (3) 50% replacement of cement with blast furnace slag and (4) 25% replacement of cement with fly ash and 25% replacement with blast furnace slag. Variations on these mixes included the addition of 1

  6. Water Entrainment in Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben

    This report gives a survey of different techniques for incorporation of designed, water-filled cavities in concrete: Water entrainment. Also an estimate of the optimum size of the water inclusions is given. Water entrainment can be used to avoid self-desiccation and self-desiccation shrinkage...... during hydration [1,26]. What is needed is some sort of container which retains the shape of the water when mixed into the concrete. The container may function based on several different physical or chemical principles. Cells and gels are examples of containers found in nature. A cell membrane provides...... a boundary to water, whereas a polymer network incorporates water in its intersticious space with its affinity due to interaction energy and polymer entropy. Such containers allow water to be stored as an entity. In relation to concrete the water encapsulation may be accomplished either before or after start...

  7. Drying of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Geiker, Mette Rica; Nygaard, Peter Vagn

    2002-01-01

    Estimated and measured relative humidity (RH) change during drying are compared for two concretes, 1: w/c=0.46 and 2: w/(c+0.5fa+2sf)=0.50. The estimations were undertaken by means of the Swedish program TorkaS 1.0. Measurements were performed by RH-sensors type Humi-Guard. Drying of 150 mm thick...... samples from sides at 60% RH and 22 °C took place from 4 to 56 days after casting. At the end of the drying period the measured RH was about 4% lower than the estimated RH at 1/5th depth from the exposed surface for both concretes. In the middle of the samples, the measured RH of concretes 1 and 2 were 2...

  8. Use of fiber reinforced concrete for concrete pavement slab replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Unlike ordinary concrete pavement, replacement concrete slabs need to be open to traffic within 24 hours (sooner in : some cases). Thus, high early-strength concrete is used; however, it frequently cracks prematurely as a result of high : heat of hyd...

  9. High temperature polymer concrete compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Jack J.; Reams, Walter

    1985-01-01

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system. A preferred formulation emphasizing the major necessary components is as follows: ______________________________________ Component A: Silica sand 60-77 wt. % Silica flour 5-10 wt. % Portland cement 15-25 wt. % Acrylamide 1-5 wt. % Component B: Styrene 50-60 wt. % Trimethylolpropane 35-40 wt. % trimethacrylate ______________________________________ and necessary initiators, accelerators, and surfactants.

  10. Concentrated loads on concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Karen Grøndahl; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1997-01-01

    This report deals with concentrated loads on concrete.A new upper bound solution in the axisymmetrical case of a point load in the center of the end face of a cylinder is developed.Based on previous work dealing with failure mechanisms and upper bound solutions, new approximate formulas are devel......This report deals with concentrated loads on concrete.A new upper bound solution in the axisymmetrical case of a point load in the center of the end face of a cylinder is developed.Based on previous work dealing with failure mechanisms and upper bound solutions, new approximate formulas...

  11. Sprayed concrete linings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindle, D.

    1999-12-01

    Sprayed concrete, or shotcrete, was invented in the 1920s for preserving dinosaur skeletons and was used underground initially in coalmines for the preservation and fine proofing of timber supports. Its use as a support lining in rock tunnelling was developed in the 1950s and 60s. The article surveys equipment available from major manufacturers and suppliers of concrete spraying equipment (Aliva, Cifa, GIA, Industri, Ingersoll Rand, etc.), specialist cement and additive manufacturers (Castle, Cement, Moria Carbotech). manufacturers of lattice girders and fibre reinforcement, and manufacturers of instrumentation for tunnel linings. 5 tabs., 9 photos.

  12. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomasney, H. [ISOTRON Corp., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has assigned a priority to the advancement of technology for decontaminating concrete surfaces which have become contaminated with radionuclides, heavy metals, and toxic organics. This agency is responsible for decontamination and decommissioning of thousands of buildings. Electrokinetic extraction is one of the several innovative technologies which emerged in response to this initiative. This technique utilizes an electropotential gradient and the subsequent electrical transport mechanism to cause the controlled movement of ionics species, whereby the contaminants exit the recesses deep within the concrete. This report discusses the technology and use at the Oak Ridge k-25 plant.

  13. Structural Materials: 95. Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, Dan J.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power plant concrete structures and their materials of construction are described, and their operating experience noted. Aging and environmental factors that can affect the durability of the concrete structures are identified. Basic components of a program to manage aging of these structures are identified and described. Application of structural reliability theory to devise uniform risk-based criteria by which existing facilities can be evaluated to achieve a desired performance level when subjected to uncertain demands and to quantify the effects of degradation is outlined. Finally, several areas are identified where additional research is desired.

  14. Assessing relationships among properties of demolished concrete, recycled aggregate and recycled aggregate concrete using regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Vivian W Y; Wang, K; Tam, C M

    2008-04-01

    Recycled demolished concrete (DC) as recycled aggregate (RA) and recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) is generally suitable for most construction applications. Low-grade applications, including sub-base and roadwork, have been implemented in many countries; however, higher-grade activities are rarely considered. This paper examines relationships among DC characteristics, properties of their RA and strength of their RAC using regression analysis. Ten samples collected from demolition sites are examined. The results show strong correlation among the DC samples, properties of RA and RAC. It should be highlighted that inferior quality of DC will lower the quality of RA and thus their RAC. Prediction of RAC strength is also formulated from the DC characteristics and the RA properties. From that, the RAC performance from DC and RA can be estimated. In addition, RAC design requirements can also be developed at the initial stage of concrete demolition. Recommendations are also given to improve the future concreting practice.

  15. Fracture Energy of High-Strength Concrete in Compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, H.; Brincker, Rune

    1989-01-01

    is essential for understanding the fracture mechanism of concrete in compression. In this paper a series of tests is reported, carried out for the purpose of studying the fracture mechanical properties of concrete in compression. Including the measurement and study of the descending branch, a new experimental...

  16. Effect of Neem Seed Husk Ash on Concrete Strength Properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neem Seed Husk is a by-product obtained during industrial processing of Neem Seed to extract oil and produce fertilizer. Laboratory tests on Neem seed husk ash (NSHA) mixed with cement were conducted to find its effect on concrete strength and workability. Tests including slump test, compressive strength test, concrete ...

  17. Improved concretes for corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The deterioration of various reinforced concrete bridge components containing conventional black steel reinforcement is the most important problem facing U.S. highway agencies. A major cause of this concrete deterioration (cracking, delamination, and...

  18. Modeling reinforced concrete durability : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Many Florida bridges are built of steel-reinforced concrete. Floridas humid and marine : environments subject steel in these structures : to corrosion once water and salt penetrate the : concrete and contact the steel. Corroded steel : takes up mo...

  19. Advance Organizers: Concret Versus Abstract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkill, Alice J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Two experiments examined the relative effects of concrete and abstract advance organizers on students' memory for subsequent prose. Results of the experiments are discussed in terms of the memorability, familiarity, and visualizability of concrete and abstract verbal materials. (JD)

  20. Concrete shaver. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) for many of its nuclear facilities throughout the United States. These facilities must be dismantled and the demolition waste sized into manageable pieces for handling and disposal. The facilities undergoing D and D are typically chemically and/or radiologically contaminated. To facilitate this work, DOE requires a tool capable of removing the surface of radiologically contaminated concrete floors. Operating requirements for the tool include simple and economical operation, the capability of operating in ambient temperatures from 3 C to 40 C (37 F to 104 F), and the ability to be easily decontaminated. The tool also must be safe for workers. The Marcrist Industries Limited concrete shaver is an electrically driven, self-propelled concrete and coating removal system. This technology consists of a 25-cm (10-in.)-wide diamond impregnated shaving drum powered by an electric motor and contains a vacuum port for dust extraction. The concrete shaver is ideal for use on open, flat, floor areas. The shaver may also be used on slightly curved surfaces. This shaver is self-propelled and produces a smooth, even surface with little vibration. The concrete shaver is an attractive alternative to traditional pneumatic scabbling tools, which were considered the baseline in this demonstration. The use of this tool reduces worker fatigue (compared to the baseline) due to lower vibration. The shaver is more than five times faster than the five-piston pneumatic scabbler at removing contamination from concrete. Because of this increased productivity, the shaver is 50% less costly to operate than baseline technologies. The DOE has successfully demonstrated the concrete shaver for decontaminating floors for free-release surveys prior to demolition work

  1. Life Cycle Cost Analysis of Ready Mix Concrete Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topkar, V. M.; Duggar, A. R.; Kumar, A.; Bonde, P. P.; Girwalkar, R. S.; Gade, S. B.

    2013-11-01

    India, being a developing nation is experiencing major growth in its infrastructural sector. Concrete is the major component in construction. The requirement of good quality of concrete in large quantities can be fulfilled by ready mix concrete batching and mixing plants. The paper presents a technique of applying the value engineering tool life cycle cost analysis to a ready mix concrete plant. This will help an investor or an organization to take investment decisions regarding a ready mix concrete facility. No economic alternatives are compared in this study. A cost breakdown structure is prepared for the ready mix concrete plant. A market survey has been conducted to collect realistic costs for the ready mix concrete facility. The study establishes the cash flow for the ready mix concrete facility helpful in investment and capital generation related decisions. Transit mixers form an important component of the facility and are included in the calculations. A fleet size for transit mixers has been assumed for this purpose. The life cycle cost has been calculated for the system of the ready mix concrete plant and transit mixers.

  2. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  3. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  4. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1990) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  5. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  6. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1990) and includes copies of letters, notices, and orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  7. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  8. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1990) and includes copies of letters, notices, and orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  9. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  10. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  11. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  12. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  13. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April-June 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  14. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  15. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  16. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  17. Applications of Foamed Lightweight Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Sari Kamarul Aini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of foamed concrete is increasing at present due to high demand on foamed concrete structures with good mechanical and physical properties. This paper discusses on the use of basic raw materials, their characteristics, production process, and their application in foamed lightweight concrete with densities between 300 kg/m3 and 1800 kg/m3. It also discusses the factors that influence the strengths and weaknesses of foamed concrete based on studies that were conducted previously.

  18. TEXTILE TECHNOLOGIES IN CONCRETE ENVIRONMENTS."

    OpenAIRE

    Morrow, Ruth; Belford, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Girli Concrete is a cross disciplinary funded research project based in the University of Ulster involving a textile designer/ researcher, an architect/ academic and a concrete manufacturing firm.Girli Concrete brings together concrete and textile technologies, testing ideas ofconcrete as textile and textile as structure. It challenges the perception of textiles as only the ‘dressing’ to structure and instead integrates textile technologies into the products of building products. Girli Concre...

  19. Stochastic modeling of reinforced concrete structures exposed to chloride attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Frier, Christian

    2004-01-01

    For many reinforced concrete structures corrosion of reinforcement is an important problem since it can result in expensive maintenance and repair actions. Further, a significant reduction of the load-bearing capacity can occur. One mode of corrosion initiation is that the chloride content around...... concentration and reinforcement cover depth are modeled by stochastic fields. The paper contains a description of the parameters to be included in a stochastic model and a proposal for the information needed to obtain values for the parameters in order to be able to perform reliability investigations....... The distribution of the time to initiation of corrosion is estimated by simulation. As an example a bridge pier in a marine environment is considered....

  20. Stochastic Modeling of Reinforced Concrete Structures Exposed to Chloride Attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Frier, Christian

    2003-01-01

    For many reinforced concrete structures corrosion of reinforcement is an important problem since it can result in expensive maintenance and repair actions. Further, a significant reduction of the load-bearing capacity can occur. One mode of corrosion initiation is that the chloride content around...... concentration and reinforcement cover depth are modeled by stochastic fields. The paper contains a description of the parameters to be included in a stochastic model and a proposal for the information needed to obtain values for the parameters in order to be ab le to perform reliability investigations....... The distribution of the time to initiation of corrosion is estimated by simulation. As an example a bridge pier in a marine environment is considered....

  1. Durability reliability analysis for corroding concrete structures under uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a durability reliability analysis of reinforced concrete structures subject to the action of marine chloride. The focus is to provide insight into the role of epistemic uncertainties on durability reliability. The corrosion model involves a number of variables whose probabilistic characteristics cannot be fully determined due to the limited availability of supporting data. All sources of uncertainty, both aleatory and epistemic, should be included in the reliability analysis. Two methods are available to formulate the epistemic uncertainty: the imprecise probability-based method and the purely probabilistic method in which the epistemic uncertainties are modeled as random variables. The paper illustrates how the epistemic uncertainties are modeled and propagated in the two methods, and shows how epistemic uncertainties govern the durability reliability.

  2. Concrete decontamination and demolition methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaGuardia, T.S.

    1980-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Division of Environmental Control Technology, requested Nuclear Energy Services to prepare a handbook for the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of DOE-owned and commercially-owned radioactive facilities. the objective of the handbook is to provide the nuclear industry with guidance on the state-of-the-art methods and equipment available for decommissioning and to provide the means to estimate decommissioning costs and environmental impact. The methods available for concrete decontamination and demolition are summarized to provide an overview of some of the state-of-the-art techniques to be discussed at this workshop. The pertinent information on each method will include the selection factors such as the rate of performance in terms of concrete removal per unit time (cubic yards per day), manpower required by craft, unit cost (dollars per cubic yard) and the advantages and disadvantages. The methods included in this overview are those that have been routinely used in nuclear and nonnuclear applications or demonstrated in field tests. These methods include controlled blasting, wrecking ball or slab, backhoe mounted ram, flame torch, thermic lance, rock splitter, demolition compound, sawing, core stitch drilling, explosive cutting, paving breaker and power chisel, drill and spall, scarifying, water cannon and grinding

  3. Constitutive model for reinforced concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feenstra, P.H.; Borst, de R.

    1995-01-01

    A numerical model is proposed for reinforced-concrete behavior that combines the commonly accepted ideas from modeling plain concrete, reinforcement, and interaction behavior in a consistent manner. The behavior of plain concrete is govern by fracture-energy-level-based formulation both in tension

  4. Porous Concrete and Its Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Opekunov

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Some aspects of resource saving problem in the process of mass construction and operation of heated construction installations are considered in the paper. A special attention is paid to necessary application of porous concrete products in the process of the housing construction. The preference is given to the products made of autoclave cellular concrete and cement hydrophobisized cement perlite concrete.

  5. Concrete produced with recycled aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. L. Tenório

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of the mechanical and durable properties of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC for using in concrete. The porosity of recycled coarse aggregates is known to influence the fresh and hardened concrete properties and these properties are related to the specific mass of the recycled coarse aggregates, which directly influences the mechanical properties of the concrete. The recycled aggregates were obtained from construction and demolition wastes (CDW, which were divided into recycled sand (fine and coarse aggregates. Besides this, a recycled coarse aggregate of a specific mass with a greater density was obtained by mixing the recycled aggregates of the CDW with the recycled aggregates of concrete wastes (CW. The concrete was produced in laboratory by combining three water-cement ratios, the ratios were used in agreement with NBR 6118 for structural concretes, with each recycled coarse aggregates and recycled sand or river sand, and the reference concrete was produced with natural aggregates. It was observed that recycled aggregates can be used in concrete with properties for structural concrete. In general, the use of recycled coarse aggregate in combination with recycled sand did not provide good results; but when the less porous was used, or the recycled coarse aggregate of a specific mass with a greater density, the properties of the concrete showed better results. Some RAC reached bigger strengths than the reference concrete.

  6. Structural Concrete, Science into Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggeling, A.S.G.

    1987-01-01

    There is a need for a more rational and unified approach to all types of concrete structure, reinforced of prestressed. The first chapter explains in a historical review why the approach of reinforced concrete and that of prestressed concrete have hitherto been very different. In outlining the

  7. Phosphoproteome and transcription factor activity profiling identify actions of the anti-inflammatory agent UTL-5g in LPS stimulated RAW 264.7 cells including disrupting actin remodeling and STAT-3 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Nicholas J; Stemmer, Paul M; Chen, Ben; Valeriote, Frederick; Gao, Xiaohua; Guatam, Subhash C; Shaw, Jiajiu

    2017-09-15

    UTL-5g is a novel small-molecule TNF-alpha modulator. It reduces cisplatin-induced side effects by protecting kidney, liver, and platelets, thereby increasing tolerance for cisplatin. UTL-5g also reduces radiation-induced acute liver toxicity. The mechanism of action for UTL-5g is not clear at the present time. A phosphoproteomic analysis to a depth of 4943 phosphopeptides and a luminescence-based transcription factor activity assay were used to provide complementary analyses of signaling events that were disrupted by UTL-5g in RAW 264.7 cells. Transcriptional activity downstream of the interferon gamma, IL-6, type 1 Interferon, TGF-β, PKC/Ca 2+ and the glucocorticoid receptor pathways were disrupted by UTL-5g. Phosphoproteomic analysis indicated that hyperphosphorylation of proteins involved in actin remodeling was suppressed by UTL-5g (gene set analysis, FDR 5g. This global characterization of UTL-5g activity in a macrophage cell line discovered that it disrupts selected aspects of LPS signaling including Stat3 activation and actin remodeling providing new insight on how UTL-5g acts to reduce cisplatin-induced side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Decrease of non-point zinc runoff using porous concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Shigeki; Komuro, Yoshinori

    2010-01-01

    The use of porous concrete columns to decrease the amount of zinc in stormwater runoff is examined. The concentration of zinc in a simulated stormwater fluid (zinc acetate solution), fed through concrete columns (slashed circle10x10cm) decreased by 50-81%, suggesting physical adsorption of zinc by the porous concrete. We propose the use of porous concrete columns (slashed circle50x10cm) as the base of sewage traps. Longer-term, high-zinc concentration monitoring revealed that porous concrete blocks adsorb 38.6mgcm(-3) of zinc. A period of no significant zinc runoff (with an acceptable concentration of zinc in runoff of 0.03mgL(-1), a zinc concentration equal to the Japanese Environmental Standard) is estimated for 41years using a 1-ha catchment area with 20 porous concrete sewage traps. Scanning electron microscopy of the porous concrete used in this study indicates that the needle-like particles formed by hydration action significantly increase zinc adsorption. Evidence suggests that the hydrant is ettringite and has an important role in zinc adsorption, the resulting immobilization of zinc and the subsequent effects on groundwater quality. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Forterra Concrete Products, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against Forterra Concrete Products, Inc., a business located at 511 E. John Carpenter Freeway, Irving, TX, 75062, for alleged violations at its facility located at 23600 W. 40th St

  10. Teaching concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Per

    2014-01-01

    The teaching of concrete structures has been revised and a number of new approaches have been developed, implemented and evaluated. Inductive teaching, E-learning and “patches” have been found to be improvements and may be an inspiration and help for others development of the teaching and learning...

  11. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...

  12. Continuous Reinforced Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1996-01-01

    This report deals with stress and stiffness estimates of continuous reinforced concrete beams with different stiffnesses for negative and positive moments e.g. corresponding to different reinforcement areas in top and bottom. Such conditions are often met in practice.The moment distribution...

  13. Hydrophobic treatment of concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, J. de; Polder, R.B.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the maintenance policy of the Dutch Ministry of Transport, Civil Engineering Division, hydrophobic treatment of concrete was considered as an additional protective measure against penetration of aggressive substances, for instance deicing salts in bridge decks. A set of tests was designed

  14. Concrete longevity overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, W.; Morreale, B.

    1991-01-01

    A number of compact host states and unaffiliated states are currently selecting appropriate disposal technology and construction materials for their planned low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. Concrete is one of the candidate materials under consideration for the construction of LLW disposal facilities because of its strength, durability, abundant availability, and relatively low cost. The LLW disposal facilities must maintain intruder barrier integrity for up to 500 years, without active maintenance after the first 100 years. The ability of concrete to survive for such a long time as a construction material is a critical issue. This report provides a basic understanding of the composition and workings of concrete as a structural material in LLW disposal facilities and a description of degradation factors and state-of-the-art mitigative measures available to preserve the durability and longevity of concrete. Neither the paper nor the report is intended to be a design guidance document, and neither addresses using cement as a waste solidification agent. 5 refs., 1 tab

  15. Fracture Mechanics of Concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    the international workshop on concrete fracture, organised by A Carpinteri, at Torino ... The next question is how to bring the size effect into codes of practice on the ... analysis of the recent collapse of the World Trade Center in New York by Z P ...

  16. Contaminated soil concrete blocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korte, A.C.J.; Brouwers, Jos; Limbachiya, Mukesh C.; Kew, Hsein Y.

    2009-01-01

    According to Dutch law the contaminated soil needs to be remediated or immobilised. The main focus in this article is the design of concrete blocks, containing contaminated soil, that are suitable for large production, financial feasible and meets all technical and environmental requirements. In

  17. Electrical pulses protect concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.; Fraaij, A.; Van Kasteren, J.

    2006-01-01

    Even concrete is not as hard as it looks. Sea water, salt on icy roads, and indirectly even carbon dioxide from the air can corrode the steel of the reinforcing bars and so threaten the strength and integrity of a bridge pier, jetty, or viaduct. Dessi Koleva, a chemical engineer from Bulgaria, spent

  18. CONCRETE REACTOR CONTAINMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumb, Ralph F.; Hall, William F.; Fruchtbaum, Jacob

    1963-06-15

    The results of various leak-rate tests demonstrate the practicality of concrete as primary containment for the maximum credible accident for a research reactor employing plate-type fuel and having a power in excess of one megawatt. Leak-test time was shortened substantially by measuring the relaxation time for overpressure decay, which is a function of leak rate. (auth)

  19. Electroosmotic decontamination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, W.D.; Bush, S.A.; Marsh, G.C.; Henson, H.M.; Box, W.D.; Morgan, I.L.

    1993-03-01

    A method is described for the electroosmotic decontamination of concrete surfaces, in which an electrical field is used to induce migration of ionic contaminants from porous concrete into an electrolyte solution that may be disposed of as a low-level liquid radioactive waste (LLRW); alternately, the contaminants from the solution can be sorbed onto anion exchange media in order to prevent contaminant buildup in the solution and to minimize the amount of LLRW generated. We have confirmed the removal of uranium (and infer the removal of 99 Tc) from previously contaminated concrete surfaces. In a typical experimental configuration, a stainless steel mesh is placed in an electrolyte solution contained within a diked cell to serve as the negative electrode (cathode) and contaminant collection medium, respectively, and an existing metal penetration (e.g., piping, conduit, or rebar reinforcement within the concrete surface) serves as the positive electrode (anode) to complete the cell. Typically we have achieved 70 to >90% reductions in surface activity by applying 2 )

  20. Polyester polymer concrete overlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Polyester polymer concrete (PPC) was used in a trial application on a section of pavement that suffers from extensive studded tire wear. The purpose of the trial section is to determine if PPC is a possible repair strategy for this type of pavement d...

  1. Concrete. Connecting Creative Technologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, T.P.; Huijboom, N.M.; Koops, R.; Kotterink, B.; Nieuwenhuis, O.A.; Seiffert, L.; Siem, R.; Zee, F.A. van der

    2015-01-01

    Kruisbestuiving tussen de creatieve en high-tech sector biedt enorme kansen, bijvoorbeeld op het gebied van Smart Industry. Desondanks blijven deze kansen in de praktijk vaak onderbenut. In het project 'CONCRETE' heeft TNO op basis van een aantal case studies onderzocht welke succesfactoren tot een

  2. Ageing management of concrete structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parthipan, P.; Ramaprasad, G.S.; Senthil, R.

    2006-01-01

    It is a generally accepted fact that while designing a concrete structure the durability parameters of construction materials should be evaluated as carefully as possible like other properties such as mechanical, physical and chemical properties. No material is inherently durable as result of environmental interaction with microstructure and consequently, the properties of the materials change with time due to weathering action, chemical attack, abrasion or any mode of degradation. The main cause of ageing on structure, water, which is primary for both creation and destruction on many natural materials. In porous materials, water creates different types of physical and chemical process of degradation. The water movement through porous materials are controlled by the permeability of the respective materials. The rate of deterioration is affected by type of concentration of ions present in the water and chemical deposition of materials. Controlling weathering action, chemical attack, abrasion and selecting good quality construction material and methods of construction can increase the service life of the structure. (author)

  3. Preliminary study of tin slag concrete mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Mohd Jamil; Mansor, Ishak; Pauzi Ismail, Mohamad; Sani, Suhairy; Azmi, Azhar; Sayuti, Shaharudin; Zaidi Ibrahim, Mohd; Adli Anuar, Abul; Rahim, Abdul Adha Abdul

    2018-01-01

    The study focuses on practices to facilitate tin smelting industry to reduce radioactive waste product (Tin Slag) by diluting its radioactivity to a safe level and turning it to a safer infrastructural building product. In the process the concrete mix which include Portland cement, sand, tin slag, water and plasticizer are used to produce interlocking brick pavements, piles and other infrastructural products. The mixing method follows DOE (UK) standard method of mixing targeted at in selected compressive strength suitable for its function and durability. A batching machine is used in the mixing and six test cubes are produced for the test. The testing equipment used are a compressional machine, ultrasonic measurement and a Geiger Muller counter to evaluate of the concrete mix to find the lowest emission of radiation surface dose without compromising the strength of concrete mix. The result obtained indicated the radioactivity of tin slag in the mixing process has reduced to background level that is 0.5μSv/h while the strength and workability of the concrete has not been severely affected. In conclusion, the concrete mix with tin slag has shown the potential it can be turned into a safe beneficial infrastructural product with good strength.

  4. Chloride Transport in Undersea Concrete Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanzhu Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on water penetration in unsaturated concrete of underwater tunnel, a diffusion-advection theoretical model of chloride in undersea concrete tunnel was proposed. The basic parameters including porosity, saturated hydraulic conductivity, chloride diffusion coefficient, initial water saturation, and moisture retention function of concrete specimens with two water-binder ratios were determined through lab-scale experiments. The variation of chloride concentration with pressuring time, location, solution concentration, initial saturation, hydraulic pressure, and water-binder ratio was investigated through chloride transport tests under external water pressure. In addition, the change and distribution of chloride concentration of isothermal horizontal flow were numerically analyzed using TOUGH2 software. The results show that chloride transport in unsaturated concrete under external water pressure is a combined effect of diffusion and advection instead of diffusion. Chloride concentration increased with increasing solution concentration for diffusion and increased with an increase in water pressure and a decrease in initial saturation for advection. The dominant driving force converted with time and saturation. When predicting the service life of undersea concrete tunnel, it is suggested that advection is taken into consideration; otherwise the durability tends to be unsafe.

  5. SLAM: a sodium-limestone concrete ablation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suo-Anttila, A.J.

    1983-12-01

    SLAM is a three-region model, containing a pool (sodium and reaction debris) region, a dry (boundary layer and dehydrated concrete) region, and a wet (hydrated concrete) region. The model includes a solution to the mass, momentum, and energy equations in each region. A chemical kinetics model is included to provide heat sources due to chemical reactions between the sodium and the concrete. Both isolated model as well as integrated whole code evaluations have been made with good results. The chemical kinetics and water migration models were evaluated separately, with good results. Several small and large-scale sodium limestone concrete experiments were simulated with reasonable agreement between SLAM and the experimental results. The SLAM code was applied to investigate the effects of mixing, pool temperature, pool depth and fluidization. All these phenomena were found to be of significance in the predicted response of the sodium concrete interaction. Pool fluidization is predicted to be the most important variable in large scale interactions

  6. Colour alterations of historic concrete surfaces during the Dutch Interwar Period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinemann, H.A.

    2017-01-01

    In the 1920s, the improved concrete technology and growing acceptance of concrete as an aesthetical material resulted in an increased application of coloured concrete. This includes the use of organic and inorganic pigments, ground natural stone, consciously chosen coarse aggregates, and also a new

  7. The use of image analysis to quantify the orientation of cracks in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Einar N.; Elbrønd, Andreas B.; Hasholt, Marianne Tange

    2016-01-01

    Cracks formed in concrete due to frost action (or other expansive reactions) can lead to further damage e.g. because they increase moisture transport. The extent of the consequential damage in concrete is likely influenced by the orientation of the initial cracks. Traditional quantification...

  8. Determination of the Fracture Energy of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Stang, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    In a NORDTEST project two methods for determination of the fracture energy of concrete are compared; the Three-Point Bend Test (TPBT) and the Wedge Splitting Test (WST). The methods involve notched beams and notched, grooved cubes, respectively. The two methods are compared in relation to handling...... and precision (repeatability, reproducibility). Concrete with a water/cement ratio of 0.43 including fly ash as well as silica fume is investigated. The results show that WST is significantly faster to work with compared to TPBT, although the sawing procedure is more time consuming. Only when using laboratory...

  9. Anisotropic damage model for concrete including unilateral effects: application to numerical simulation of confinement vessels; Modelisation de l'endommagement anisotrope du beton avec prise en compte de l'effet unilateral: application a la simulation des enceintes de confinement nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godard, V

    2005-01-15

    The behaviour of concrete, considered as isotropic for a sound material, becomes anisotropic and unilateral as soon as microcracks are initiated. Concrete also shows a different behaviour in tension than in compression. However, isotropic models, which are more simple and time costless, are still widely used for industrial applications. An anisotropic and unilateral model, with few parameters, is thus proposed in the present work, which enhances the accuracy of the description of concrete's behaviour, while remaining suitable for industrial studies. The validation of the model is based on experimental results. Numerical simulations of structures are also proposed, among which one concerns a representative volume of a confinement vessel. Finally, a non local theory is investigated to overcome the problems induced by strain localisation. (author)

  10. Self-compacting concrete (SCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Mette Rica

    2008-01-01

    In many aspects Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC, “Self-Consolidating Concrete” in North America) can be considered the concrete of the future. SCC is a family of tailored concretes with special engineered properties in the fresh state. SCC flows into the formwork and around even complicated...... reinforcement arrangements under its own weight. Thus, SCC is not vibrated like conventional concrete. This drastically improves the working environment during construction, the productivity, and potentially improves the homogeneity and quality of the concrete. In addition SCC provides larger architectural...

  11. Early Property Development in Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Normann, Gitte; Munch-Petersen, Christian

    The Freiesleben Maturity function is widely used for planning of execution. We tested if for concrete with and without fly ash. The test showed surprisingly that the maturity function in general is not valid. We found that curing at high temperature gave a significant decrease in strength. Fly ash...... appears to reduce this decrease somewhat. We also examined the resistance against chloride penetration for the different concrete types. The resistance was reduced at high temperatures for concrete without fly ash. For concrete with fly ash, it was the opposite; concrete with fly ash obtained higher...

  12. Estimating Durability of Reinforced Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlamov, A. A.; Shapovalov, E. L.; Gavrilov, V. B.

    2017-11-01

    In this article we propose to use the methods of fracture mechanics to evaluate concrete durability. To evaluate concrete crack resistance characteristics of concrete directly in the structure in order to implement the methods of fracture mechanics, we have developed special methods. Various experimental studies have been carried out to determine the crack resistance characteristics and the concrete modulus of elasticity during its operating. A comparison was carried out for the results obtained with the use of the proposed methods and those obtained with the standard methods for determining the concrete crack resistance characteristics.

  13. In-Plane Strengthening Effect of Prefabricated Concrete Walls on Masonry Structures: Shaking Table Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The improvement effect of a new strengthening strategy on dynamic action of masonry structure, by installing prefabricated concrete walls on the outer facades, is validated by shaking table test presented in this paper. We carried out dynamic tests of two geometrically identical five-story reduced scaled models, including an unstrengthened and a strengthened masonry model. The experimental analysis encompasses seismic performances such as cracking patterns, failure mechanisms, amplification factors of acceleration, and displacements. The results show that the strengthened masonry structure shows much more excellent seismic capacity when compared with the unstrengthened one.

  14. Ultrafine particles in concrete: Influence of ultrafine particles on concrete properties and application to concrete mix design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Carsten

    2010-07-01

    shrinkage was found to continue over long periods of time, even after more than 4 years of testing the final shrinkage was not reached. The total water content of concrete was found to be the governing factor for the drying shrinkage. With the help of the modified Andreassen model, concrete compositions with low cement content and high content of ultrafines were optimised. With only 100 kg/m3 of cement, suitable inert ultrafine particles and an optimised particle size distribution, a compressive strength of more than 65 MPa can be achieved.The most effective way to apply the modified Andreassen model to concrete is the combination of inert ultrafine fillers and silica fume. In doing so, concrete with low cement content and compressive strength of more than 100 MPa can be produced. The paste structure of such mixes is homogeneous without distinct interfacial transition zones or agglomeration of portlandite crystals. The microstructure is dense, that was confirmed by mercury intrusion porosimetry, capillary suction and microscopy. The early shrinkage of such mix compositions is due to the autogenous shrinkage contribution of the silica fume higher than for a traditional concrete. After a longer period of time, the difference diminishes. The concept of replacing cement by inert ultrafine particles is also applicable to high strength concrete and reactive powder concrete. The cement content was reduced by more than 30 % without negative influence on strength and durability. Again, the modified Andreassen model proved to be a valuable tool in the design of the mixes. This work includes also practical applications of some of the concepts tested. Self-compacting concrete with low cement content and low pH (pH < 11), to be used in a repository for spent nuclear fuel, was developed. The concrete contained high amounts of inert ultrafine particles and silica fume, the modified Andreassen model was used to optimise the particle size distribution of the mixes and thus packing density

  15. PROSPECTS OF ESTABLISHING EARTHQUAKE RESISTANT BUILDINGS FROM TUBE CONCRETE CONSTRUCTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdujafar I. Akaev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Objectives The aim of the research is to find optimal design solutions for the erection of buildings that will ensure their reliability and durability, compliance with environmental requirements, fire resistance and earthquake resistance. In this regard, the task is to determine the advantages and prospects of erecting earthquake resistant buildings from tube concrete constructions, since they are distinct in constructive, technological and economic efficiency when are used as vertical load-bearing struts of high-rise buildings. Method The technique for calculating the strength of normal sections of eccentrically-compressed tube concrete elements uses a nonlinear deformation model, taking into account the joint operation of the steel shell and the concrete core under the conditions of triaxial compression. Results In the article the review of the newest world experience of using tube concrete as vertical load-bearing structures for public facilities from the standpoint of earthquake resistant construction is given. The international practices of public facility construction ranging in height from 100 to 600 m with the use of tube concrete technology, including regions with dangerous natural and man-made conditions, have been studied. The structural, operational and technological advantages and disadvantages of tube concrete technology are analysed. Methods for calculating the strength of concrete tube elements in the case of central compression are considered: according to the so-called deformation theory, the state of total destruction of both concrete and tube fluidity attained at maximum pressure are indicated by the beginning of "tube flow on the longitudinal axis". The advantages and disadvantages of both methods are shown. Factors constraining the introduction and wider application of tube concrete constructions in Russia are considered. Conclusion While the advantages of concrete tube constructions in their extensive

  16. Topology optimization of reinforced concrete structures considering control of shrinkage and strength failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yangjun; Wang, Michael Yu; Zhou, Mingdong

    2015-01-01

    To take into account the shrinkage effect in the early stage of Reinforced Concrete (RC) design, an effective continuum topology optimization method is presented in this paper. Based on the power-law interpolation, shrinkage of concrete is numerically simulated by introducing an additional design......-dependent force. Under multi-axial stress conditions, the concrete failure surface is well fitted by two Drucker-Prager yield functions. The optimization problem aims at minimizing the cost function under yield strength constraints on concrete elements and a structural shrinkage volume constraint. In conjunction...... to ensure the structural safety under the combined action of external loads and shrinkage....

  17. Influence of lithium slag from lepidolite on the durability of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Luo; Shaowen, Huang; Yuxuan, Zhou; Jinyang, Li; Weiliang, Peng; Yufeng, Wen

    2017-04-01

    This paper mainly studies the effect of lithium slag from lepidolite on the property of concrete including dry shrinkage, anti-carbonation, wear resistance and chloride ion resistance. Concrete interface structure has been observed with SEM. The results show that adding lithium slag to concrete can improve concrete property including dry shrinkage, wear resistance and chloride ion resistance. However, the wear resistance tends to decrease when the amount of lithium slag reach 20%. Lithium slag also has negative effect on anti-carbonation property. With the increasing amount of lithium slag, anti-carbonation property of concrete decrease gradually.

  18. Long-term analysis of slender concrete structures with cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chern, J.C.; Marchertas, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    A special form of the finite element program, which is based on the equilibrium of forces in various cross sections of the beam together with the principle of virtual work, is presented for solving concrete beam problems. This analytical method uses the newly developed rheological element and exponential algorithm for computing time-dependent deformation and stress distribution in cracked concrete members subjected to sustained loads, temperature, or drying. Temperature and moisture effects on hydration (aging) and creep rate are included. The rate effects of temperature and moisture on the deformation of concrete are also taken into account in the formulation. Numerical examples are used to illustrate the validity of the analysis on concrete beams. Plain and reinforced concrete beams subjected to bending, heating or drying are analyzed and checked against experimental data

  19. Preplaced aggregate concrete application on Fort St. Vrain PCRV construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ople, F.S. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Two distinct concreting methods were employed in the construction of the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) Nuclear Generating Station, a 330 MW(e) High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor installation near Denver, Colorado. Preplaced aggregate concrete (PAC) techniques were employed in the PCRV bottom head and the core support floor; conventional job-mixed concrete was used in the PCRV sidewall and top head regions. This paper describes the successful application of PAC techniques utilized primarily in solving construction difficulties associated with confined and heavily congested regions of the PCRV. The PAC technique consists of placing coarse aggregate inside the forms, followed by injection of grout under pressure through embedded pipes to fill the interstices in the aggregate mass. Details of the PAC construction method including grout mix development, grouting equipment, grout pipe layout, grouting sequence, grout level monitoring, concrete temperature control, and pre-construction mockups are described. (author)

  20. Temperature field in concrete when in contact with hot liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade Lima, F.R. de.

    1981-09-01

    In an HCDA (Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident) it is postulated that liquid metal coolants and core materials come in contact with the retaining concrete structure. A mathematical model and an associated computer program was previously developed to describle the transient heat and mass transfer in the concrete. Implementations on the original program-USINT- are included to consider the variations of the thermal conductivity as a function of the temperature. Also a subroutine - PLOTTI - is incorporated to the program for the plotting of the results. The new program - USINTG - is used to calculate the temperature and pressure fields and the water released from concrete structures during a sodium leak simulation and with the concrete structures in contact with liquid sodium. No consideration about chemical reactions involving the sodium when in contact with concrete is considered. (Author) [pt

  1. Lithuanian Quarry Aggregates Concrete Effects of Alkaline Corrosion Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurimas Rutkauskas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate alkaline corrosion of cement in concrete is going to respond in sodium and potassium hydroxide (lye with active SiO2 found in some aggregates. During this reaction, the concrete has resulted in significant internal stresses which cause deformation of the concrete, cracking and disintegration. The reaction is slow and concrete signs of decomposition appear only after a few months or years. The study used two different aggregates quarries. Studies show that Lithuania gravel contaminated with reactive particles having amorphous silicon dioxide reacting with cement in sodium and potassium hydroxide and the resulting alkaline concrete corrosion. It was found that, according to AAR 2 large aggregates include Group II – potentially reactive because of their expansion after 14 days, higher than 0.1%.

  2. Quality inspection of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellmann, G.

    1983-01-01

    The testing instruction named in the pertinent standards for concrete vary considerably. They can best be judged through comparing their operating characteristic curves. Here it is noticed for the proof of the solidity of the building, that with the compressive resistances derived from the impact test, method-related severe variations influence the evaluation of the results. In the scope of tests carried out by the Federal Institute for Material Testing, through non destructive, ultrasonic echo return measurements and impact tests as well as through combined evaluation with the aid of a multiple linear regression analysis, it could be proven that a greater confidence level can be achieved and thus a more appropriate judgement of the quality of the concrete of a building is possible. (orig.) [de

  3. Drilling waste makes concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosfjord, A.

    1993-01-01

    The article deals with a method of drilling waste reclamation by utilizing the converted oil-containing cuttings from the North Sea in the concrete production in Norway. The oil content is to be removed in an incineration process by heating the cuttings to about 800 o C. The output capacity from the exhaust gas water cooling system is 7500 kW/hour, and is to be used in different industrial heating processes. The remaining content of pollutants in the cleaned exhaust gas outlet corresponds to the required limits with the exception of SO 2 and HCl. In addition, an exhaust gas washing plant is to be installed in the near future designed for the further reduction of pollutants by 90%. The converted raw materials are used as a supplement for lessening the demand of sand and cement in the production of concrete-made pipes. 1 fig

  4. Reinforced concrete tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariscotti, M.A.J.; Morixe, M.; Tarela, P.A.; Thieberger, P.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we describe the technique of reinforced concrete tomography, its historical background, recent technological developments and main applications. Gamma radiation sensitive plates are imprinted with radiation going through the concrete sample under study, and then processed to reveal the presence of reinforcement and defects in the material density. The three dimensional reconstruction, or tomography, of the reinforcement out of a single gammagraphy is an original development alternative to conventional methods. Re-bar diameters and positions may be determined with an accuracy of ± 1 mm 0.5-1 cm, respectively. The non-destructive character of this technique makes it particularly attractive in cases of inhabited buildings and diagnoses of balconies. (author) [es

  5. Neural correlates of concreteness in semantic categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pexman, Penny M; Hargreaves, Ian S; Edwards, Jodi D; Henry, Luke C; Goodyear, Bradley G

    2007-08-01

    In some contexts, concrete words (CARROT) are recognized and remembered more readily than abstract words (TRUTH). This concreteness effect has historically been explained by two theories of semantic representation: dual-coding [Paivio, A. Dual coding theory: Retrospect and current status. Canadian Journal of Psychology, 45, 255-287, 1991] and context-availability [Schwanenflugel, P. J. Why are abstract concepts hard to understand? In P. J. Schwanenflugel (Ed.), The psychology of word meanings (pp. 223-250). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum, 1991]. Past efforts to adjudicate between these theories using functional magnetic resonance imaging have produced mixed results. Using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, we reexamined this issue with a semantic categorization task that allowed for uniform semantic judgments of concrete and abstract words. The participants were 20 healthy adults. Functional analyses contrasted activation associated with concrete and abstract meanings of ambiguous and unambiguous words. Results showed that for both ambiguous and unambiguous words, abstract meanings were associated with more widespread cortical activation than concrete meanings in numerous regions associated with semantic processing, including temporal, parietal, and frontal cortices. These results are inconsistent with both dual-coding and context-availability theories, as these theories propose that the representations of abstract concepts are relatively impoverished. Our results suggest, instead, that semantic retrieval of abstract concepts involves a network of association areas. We argue that this finding is compatible with a theory of semantic representation such as Barsalou's [Barsalou, L. W. Perceptual symbol systems. Behavioral & Brain Sciences, 22, 577-660, 1999] perceptual symbol systems, whereby concrete and abstract concepts are represented by similar mechanisms but with differences in focal content.

  6. Material law for concrete under multiaxial stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geistefeldt, H.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper a general triaxial set of finite strain-stress relations is derived, which can include in a step-by-step way nearly all known factors and curves of material response. The finite constitutive equations representing the behavior of concrete are related to the main strain-directions. The elastic part, the functions for uniaxial behavior, those for biaxial response and finally the relation-parts, nonzero only in triaxial stress-state, can be reset separately by suitable functions which have been adjusted to the material response of actual concrete known from special tests. In nonlinear incremental analysis a potential is usually assumed in incremental material behavior to keep incremental stiffness matrices symmetric. If the proposed generalized set of constitutive equations is restricted to special types of functions, the resulting tangent stiffness is symmetric. Special functions for the various parts are presented, the tangent stiffness of which can easily be derived explicitly by partial differentiation of the related strain-stress relations. Thus the application of the proposed constitutive equations in incremental nonlinear analysis is very effective. The free coefficients of one general set of equations are adjusted step by step to the results of Kupfer's biaxial tests under shorttime loading. With a new and very short bixial failure criterion for concrete, which has been stated and compared with test results, the analytic description of the biaxial behavior of Kupfer's concrete is completed. With some additional assumptions the proposed failure criteria and the strain-stress equations for concrete are extended to the biaxial response of uncracked othogonally reinforced concrete response

  7. Hypervelocity impact of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, A.J.; Anderson, W.F.; Archer, B.

    1982-01-01

    Blocks of concrete and various other materials were impacted by high speed copper jets at the centre of one face, the resulting transient phenomena were measured using ultra high speed photography and various electrical signal transducers. Measurements were made of the jet velocity, penetration rate, crack velocity and initiation time, and strain pulse propagation. Post test measurements were made using electron microscopy, ultra sonics and stereoscopic photography. (orig.) [de

  8. Concrete decontamination by electro-hydraulic scabbling (EHS). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    Contamination of concrete structures by radionuclides, hazardous metals and organic substances (including PCB's) occurs at many DOE sites. The contamination of concrete structures (walls, floors, ceilings, etc.) varies in type, concentration, and especially depth of penetration into the concrete. In many instances, only the surface layer of concrete is contaminated, up to a depth of one inch, according to estimates provided in the R and D ID document. Then, removal of the concrete surface layer (scabbling) is considered to be the most effective decontamination method. Textron Systems Corp. (TSC) has developed a scabbling concept based on electro-mechanical phenomena accompanying strong electric pulses generated by applying high voltage at the concrete/water interface. Depending on the conditions, the electric discharge may occur either through a waste layer or through the concrete body itself. This report describes the development, testing, and results of this electro-mechanical process. Phase 1 demonstrated the feasibility of the process for the controlled removal of a thin layer of contaminated concrete. Phase 2 designed, fabricated, and tested an integrated subscale unit. This was tested at Fernald. In Phase 3, the scabbling unit was reconfigured to increase its power and processing rate. Technology transfer to an engineering contracting company is continuing

  9. Concrete decontamination by electro-hydraulic scabbling (EHS). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    Contamination of concrete structures by radionuclides, hazardous metals and organic substances (including PCB`s) occurs at many DOE sites. The contamination of concrete structures (walls, floors, ceilings, etc.) varies in type, concentration, and especially depth of penetration into the concrete. In many instances, only the surface layer of concrete is contaminated, up to a depth of one inch, according to estimates provided in the R and D ID document. Then, removal of the concrete surface layer (scabbling) is considered to be the most effective decontamination method. Textron Systems Corp. (TSC) has developed a scabbling concept based on electro-mechanical phenomena accompanying strong electric pulses generated by applying high voltage at the concrete/water interface. Depending on the conditions, the electric discharge may occur either through a waste layer or through the concrete body itself. This report describes the development, testing, and results of this electro-mechanical process. Phase 1 demonstrated the feasibility of the process for the controlled removal of a thin layer of contaminated concrete. Phase 2 designed, fabricated, and tested an integrated subscale unit. This was tested at Fernald. In Phase 3, the scabbling unit was reconfigured to increase its power and processing rate. Technology transfer to an engineering contracting company is continuing.

  10. Life cycle uses of concrete for more sustainable construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2001-07-01

    This paper examined ways in which the environmental burdens of construction in general and concrete production in particular can be reduced. Aggregates for concrete production include sand, gravel and stone. They account for most (80 per cent) of the materials used in the United States. This paper argued that given the fact that environmental concerns are an important social issue, the issue of natural resource conservation should be addressed. Some of the life-cycle assessments and comparative design issues associated with concrete construction were summarized. The author presented the example that often the initial cost of a new pavement application may indicate a lower environmental impact than an equivalent design when asphalt is used over reinforced concrete. However, annualized impacts may result in comparable environmental assessments. The same is true for bridge girders, reinforced concrete also seems to be a better environmental choice than steel. This paper also described end-of-life options that involve the use of waste products and recycled products in concrete and other materials to reduce the overall environmental impacts of a product or facility. This paper was divided into several sections entitled: life cycle assessments; life cycle inventory assessment of concretes and asphalt pavements; and, life cycle inventory assessment of concrete and steel bridge girders. 16 refs., 4 tabs.

  11. Thirty Years Researches on Development for Sustainable Concrete Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sim Jongsung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The enormous amount of concrete production has a serious impact on energy, resources, environment and ecosystem. Therefore, the issue of development of sustainable concrete technology with little impact on the environment is becoming a major issue. In this paper, researches related with sustainable development of concrete are presented in last three decades. FRP has high corrosion resistance and lightweight, thus it can be potential solution for sustainable development of concrete structures as strengthening material or reinforcement instead of steel. Researches and techniques are presented on performance of concrete beam with FRP rebar and enhancing performance of existing concrete structure using FRP strengthening methods. The application of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA has sometimes been limited in the practice and remained in the low-valued purposes only such as road base materials. In past 10 years, a great improvement in the recycling technique to produce RCA of which quality is close to natural aggregate, hence the applicability and evaluation of RCA are presented in this paper. This paper includes experimental studies for application of waste glass which could decrease CO2 emission from cement producing. The achievements of these studies are presented in this paper to contribute for sustainable development of concrete infrastructures.

  12. Durable concrete for a waste repository - Measurement of ionic ingress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, R.F.; Beaudoin, J.J.; Philipose, K.E.

    1990-01-01

    A waste repository for the below ground disposal of low level radioactive waste is planned at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. It relies greatly on the durability of concrete for the required 500 year service life. A research program to design durable concrete and predict its service life is in progress. The degradation of the concrete depends to a large extent on the rate of ingress of corrosive agents. Penetration of chloride and sulfate ions are particularly relevant. Twenty mix formulations were developed to create various types and qualities of concrete, and to study their behavior in different site environmental conditions. A total of 1,000 concrete specimens are being exposed at 20C and 45C to 25 different combinations of the corrosive agents including CO 2 . Procedures to measure the ionic profiles and to determine the factors controlling diffusion of the ions in the various concretes have been developed. Results of selected concrete systems exposed to chloride and sulfate solutions for 1 year are presented and discussed in terms of pore structure and permeability parameters of the concrete

  13. Numerical simulation of impact tests on reinforced concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Hua; Wang, Xiaowo; He, Shuanhai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Predictions using advanced concrete model compare well with the impact test results. ► Several important behavior of concrete is discussed. ► Two mesh ways incorporating rebar into concrete mesh is also discussed. ► Gives a example of using EPDC model and references to develop new constitutive models. -- Abstract: This paper focuses on numerical simulation of impact tests of reinforced concrete (RC) beams by the LS-DYNA finite element (FE) code. In the FE model, the elasto-plastic damage cap (EPDC) model, which is based on continuum damage mechanics in combination with plasticity theory, is used for concrete, and the reinforcement is assumed to be elasto-plastic. The numerical results compares well with the experimental values reported in the literature, in terms of impact force history, mid-span deflection history and crack patterns of RC beams. By comparing the numerical and experimental results, several important behavior of concrete material is investigated, which includes: damage variable to describe the strain softening section of stress–strain curve; the cap surface to describe the plastic volume change; the shape of the meridian and deviatoric plane to describe the yield surface as well as two methods of incorporating rebar into concrete mesh. This study gives a good example of using EPDC model and can be utilized for the development new constitutive models for concrete in future.

  14. Mechanical properties of recycled PET fibers in concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Pelisser

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-reinforced concrete represents the current tendency to apply more efficient crack-resistant concrete. For instance, polyethylene terephthalate (PET is a polyester polymer obtained from recyclable bottles; it has been widely used to produce fibers to obtain cement-based products with improved properties. Therefore, this paper reports on an experimental study of recycled-bottle-PET fiber-reinforced concrete. Fibers with lengths of 10, 15 and 20 mm and volume fractions of 0.05, 0.18 and 0.30% related to the volume of the concrete were used. Physical and mechanical characterization of the concrete was performed, including the determination of compressive strength, flexural strength, Young's modulus and fracture toughness as well as analysis using mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Flexure and impact tests were performed after 28 and 150 days. No significant effect of the fiber addition on the compressive strength and modulus of elasticity was observed. However, the Young's modulus was observed to decrease as the fiber volume increased. At 28 days, the concrete flexural toughness and impact resistance increased with the presence of PET fibers, except for the 0.05 vol.% sample. However, at 150 days, this improvement was no longer present due to recycled-bottle-PET fiber degradation in the alkaline concrete environment, as visualized by SEM observations. An increase in porosity also has occurred at 365 days for the fiber-reinforced concrete, as determined by MIP.

  15. Design of ultra-lightweight concrete: towards monolithic concrete structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qing Liang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the development of ultra-lightweight concrete. A moderate strength and an excellent thermal conductivity of the lightweight concrete are set as the design targets. The designed lightweight aggregates concrete is targeted to be used in monolithic concrete façade structure, performing as both load bearing element and thermal insulator. The developed lightweight concrete shows excellent thermal properties, with a low thermal conductivity of about 0.12 W/(m·K; and moderate mechanical properties, with 28-day compressive strengths of about 10-12 N/mm . This combination of values exceeds, to the researchers’ knowledge, the performance of all other lightweight building materials. Furthermore, the developed lightweight concrete possesses excellent durability properties.

  16. 75 FR 8113 - Prestressed Concrete Steel Wire Strand From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 701-TA-464 and 731-TA-1160 (Final)] Prestressed Concrete Steel Wire Strand From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Revised schedule for the subject investigations. DATES: Effective Date: February 16, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  17. Effect of filler types on physical, mechanical and microstructure of self compacting concrete and Flow-able concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafez E. Elyamany

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of various filler types on the fresh and hardened properties of self-compacting concrete (SCC and Flow-able concrete. For this purpose, two groups of fillers were selected. The first group was pozzolanic fillers (silica fume and metakaolin while the second group was non-pozzolanic fillers (limestone powder, granite dust and marble dust. Cement contents of 400 kg/m3 and 500 kg/m3 were considered while the used filler material was 7.5%, 10% and 15%. Slump and slump flow, T50, sieve stability and bleeding tests were performed on fresh concrete. The studied hardened properties included unit weight, voids ratio, porosity, and water absorption and cube compressive strength. In addition, thermo-gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electronic microscope were performed. The test results showed that filler type and content have significant effect on fresh concrete properties where non-pozzolanic fillers improve segregation and bleeding resistance. Generally, filler type and content have significant effect on unit weight, water absorption and voids ratio. In addition, non-pozzolanic fillers have insignificant negative effect on concrete compressive strength. Finally, there was a good correlation between fresh concrete properties and hardened concrete properties for SCC and Flow-able concrete.

  18. Finite element analysis of GFRP reinforced concrete pavement under static load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiping; Hu, Chunhua

    2018-02-01

    GFRP was more corrosion resistant than traditional reinforced, it is lightweight, high strength thermal expansion coefficient is more close to the concrete and a poor conductor of electromagnetic. Therefore, the use of GFRP to replace the traditional reinforcement in concrete pavement application has excellent practical value. This paper uses ANSYS to establish delamination and reinforcement of Pavement model and analyzed response of GFRP concrete and ordinary concrete pavement structural mechanics on effects of different factors under the action of static. The results showed that under static load, pavement surface layer presented similar changes on stress of surface layer, vertical and horizontal deformation in two kinds of pavement structure, but indicators of GFRP reinforced concrete pavement were obviously better than that of ordinary concrete pavement.

  19. Advanced Numerical Model for Irradiated Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorla, Alain B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-03-01

    In this report, we establish a numerical model for concrete exposed to irradiation to address these three critical points. The model accounts for creep in the cement paste and its coupling with damage, temperature and relative humidity. The shift in failure mode with the loading rate is also properly represented. The numerical model for creep has been validated and calibrated against different experiments in the literature [Wittmann, 1970, Le Roy, 1995]. Results from a simplified model are shown to showcase the ability of numerical homogenization to simulate irradiation effects in concrete. In future works, the complete model will be applied to the analysis of the irradiation experiments of Elleuch et al. [1972] and Kelly et al. [1969]. This requires a careful examination of the experimental environmental conditions as in both cases certain critical information are missing, including the relative humidity history. A sensitivity analysis will be conducted to provide lower and upper bounds of the concrete expansion under irradiation, and check if the scatter in the simulated results matches the one found in experiments. The numerical and experimental results will be compared in terms of expansion and loss of mechanical stiffness and strength. Both effects should be captured accordingly by the model to validate it. Once the model has been validated on these two experiments, it can be applied to simulate concrete from nuclear power plants. To do so, the materials used in these concrete must be as well characterized as possible. The main parameters required are the mechanical properties of each constituent in the concrete (aggregates, cement paste), namely the elastic modulus, the creep properties, the tensile and compressive strength, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the drying shrinkage. These can be either measured experimentally, estimated from the initial composition in the case of cement paste, or back-calculated from mechanical tests on concrete. If some

  20. Evaluation of precast concrete slabs using a heavy vehicle simulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kohler, E

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Precast slabs are considered an attractive pavement option for rehabilitation or reconstruction cases where traffic closures of less than eight hours are required. Benefits include long life expectancy of concrete cast in factory...

  1. Phase I development of an aesthetic, precast concrete bridge rail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Precast concrete bridge rail systems offer several advantages over traditional cast-in-place rail designs, including reduced construction : time and costs, installation in a wide range of environmental conditions, easier maintenance and repair, impro...

  2. Forensic Study of Early Failures with Unbonded Concrete Overlays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    A forensic investigation was conducted to identify failure mechanisms responsible for early failures of unbonded concrete overlays on selected projects in Ohio, including I-70 in Madison County, I-77 in Washington and Noble Counties, and I-90 in Lake...

  3. Operational features of decorative concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhenova, Olga; Kotelnikov, Maxim

    2018-03-01

    This article deals with the questions of creation and use of decorative and finishing concrete and mortar. It has been revealed that the most effective artificial rock-imitating stone materials are those made of decorative concrete with the opened internal structure of material. At the same time it is important that the particles of decorative aggregate should be distributed evenly in the concrete volume. It can be reached only at a continuous grain-size analysis of the aggregate from the given rock. The article tackles the necessity of natural stone materials imitation for the cement stone color to correspond to the color of the rock. The possibility of creation of the decorative concrete imitating rocks in the high-speed turbulent mixer is considered. Dependences of durability and frost resistance of the studied concrete on the pore size and character and also parameters characterizing crack resistance of concrete are received.

  4. Freeze-thaw durability of air-entrained concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Huai-Shuai; Yi, Ting-Hua

    2013-01-01

    One of the most damaging actions affecting concrete is the abrupt temperature change (freeze-thaw cycles). The types of deterioration of concrete structures by cyclic freeze-thaw can be largely classified into surface scaling (characterized by the weight loss) and internal crack growth (characterized by the loss of dynamic modulus of elasticity). The present study explored the durability of concrete made with air-entraining agent subjected to 0, 100, 200, 300, and 400 cycles of freeze-thaw. The experimental study of C20, C25, C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete specimens was completed according to "the test method of long-term and durability on ordinary concrete" GB/T 50082-2009. The dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss of specimens were measured after different cycles of freeze-thaw. The influence of freeze-thaw cycles on the relative dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss was analyzed. The findings showed that the dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight decreased as the freeze-thaw cycles were repeated. They revealed that the C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete was still durable after 300 cycles of freeze-thaw according to the experimental results.

  5. A Study on the Reuse of Plastic Concrete Using Extended Set-Retarding Admixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Colin; Guthrie, William F.; Kacker, Raghu

    1995-01-01

    The disposal of ready mixed concrete truck wash water and returned plastic concrete is a growing concern for the ready mixed concrete industry. Recently, extended set-retarding admixtures, or stabilizers, which slow or stop the hydration of portland cement have been introduced to the market. Treating truck wash-water or returned plastic concrete with stabilizing admixtures delays its setting and hardening, thereby facilitating the incorporation of these typically wasted materials in subsequent concrete batches. In a statistically designed experiment, the properties of blended concrete containing stabilized plastic concrete were evaluated. The variables in the study included (1) concrete age when stabilized, (2) stabilizer dosage, (3) holding period of the treated (stabilized) concrete prior to blending with fresh ingredients, and (4) amount of treated concrete in the blended batch. The setting time, strength, and drying shrinkage of the blended concretes were evaluated. For the conditions tested, batching 5 % treated concrete with fresh material did not have a significant effect on the setting time, strength, or drying shrinkage of the resulting blended concrete. Batching 50 % treated concrete with fresh materials had a significant effect on the setting characteristics of the blended cocnrete, which in turn affected the water demand to maintain slump. The data suggests that for a known set of conditions, the stabilizer dosage can be optimized within a relatively narrow range to produce desired setting characteristics. The strength and drying shrinkage of the blended concretes were essentially a function of the water content at different sampling ages and the relationship followed the general trend of control concrete. PMID:29151762

  6. A Study on the Reuse of Plastic Concrete Using Extended Set-Retarding Admixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Colin; Guthrie, William F; Kacker, Raghu

    1995-01-01

    The disposal of ready mixed concrete truck wash water and returned plastic concrete is a growing concern for the ready mixed concrete industry. Recently, extended set-retarding admixtures, or stabilizers, which slow or stop the hydration of portland cement have been introduced to the market. Treating truck wash-water or returned plastic concrete with stabilizing admixtures delays its setting and hardening, thereby facilitating the incorporation of these typically wasted materials in subsequent concrete batches. In a statistically designed experiment, the properties of blended concrete containing stabilized plastic concrete were evaluated. The variables in the study included (1) concrete age when stabilized, (2) stabilizer dosage, (3) holding period of the treated (stabilized) concrete prior to blending with fresh ingredients, and (4) amount of treated concrete in the blended batch. The setting time, strength, and drying shrinkage of the blended concretes were evaluated. For the conditions tested, batching 5 % treated concrete with fresh material did not have a significant effect on the setting time, strength, or drying shrinkage of the resulting blended concrete. Batching 50 % treated concrete with fresh materials had a significant effect on the setting characteristics of the blended cocnrete, which in turn affected the water demand to maintain slump. The data suggests that for a known set of conditions, the stabilizer dosage can be optimized within a relatively narrow range to produce desired setting characteristics. The strength and drying shrinkage of the blended concretes were essentially a function of the water content at different sampling ages and the relationship followed the general trend of control concrete.

  7. Concrete workability and fibre content

    OpenAIRE

    Vikan, Hedda

    2007-01-01

    Research report Parameters influencing the workability of fibre concrete and maximum fibre content are given in this state of the art report along with the range of fibre types available on today’s market. The study reveales that new placing techniques and production methods are crucial in order to increase fibre content and concrete strength. Achieving the same mechanical properties as traditionally reinforced concrete will probably also demand changes of the matrix. Finally, reco...

  8. Inspection Strategies for Concrete Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    1989-01-01

    In this paper an optimal inspection strategy for concrete bridges based on periodic routine and detailed inspections is presented. The failure mode considered is corrosion of the reinforcement due to chlorides. A simple modelling of the corrosion and of the inspection strategy is presented....... The optimal inspection strategy is determined from an optimization problem, where the design variables are time intervals between detailed inspections and the concrete cover. The strategy is illustrated on a simple structure, namely a reinforced concrete beam....

  9. Concrete-Filled Steel Tube Arch Bridges in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jielian Zheng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the past 20 years, great progress has been achieved in China in the construction of concrete-filled steel tube (CFST arch bridges and concrete arch bridges with a CFST skeleton. The span of these bridges has been increasing rapidly, which is rare in the history of bridge development. The large-scale construction of expressways and high-speed railways demands the development of long-span arch bridges, and advances in design and construction techniques have made it possible to construct such bridges. In the present study, the current status, development, and major innovative technologies of CFST arch bridges and concrete arch bridges with a CFST skeleton in China are elaborated. This paper covers the key construction technologies of CFST arch bridges, such as the design, manufacture, and installation of steel tube arch trusses, the preparation and pouring of in-tube concrete, and the construction of the world’s longest CFST arch bridge—the First Hejiang Yangtze River Bridge. The main construction technologies of reinforced concrete arch bridges are also presented, which include cable-stayed fastening-hanging cantilever assembly, adjusting the load by means of stay cables, surrounding the concrete for arch rib pouring, and so forth. In addition, the construction of two CFST skeleton concrete arch bridges—the Guangxi Yongning Yong River Bridge and the Yunnan–Guangxi Railway Nanpan River Bridge—is discussed. CFST arch bridges in China have already gained a world-leading position; with the continuous innovation of key technologies, China will become the new leader in promoting the development of arch bridges. Keywords: Concrete-filled steel tube (CFST arch bridge, Steel-reinforced concrete arch bridge, Cable-stayed fastening-hanging cantilever assembly, Vacuum-assisted pouring in-tube concrete, Adjusting load by stay cables

  10. Radon emanation fractions from concretes containing fly ash and metakaolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Lange, Sarah C; Juenger, Maria C G; Siegel, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Radon ((222)Rn) and progenies emanate from soil and building components and can create an indoor air quality hazard. In this study, nine concrete constituents, including the supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) fly ash and metakaolin, were used to create eleven different concrete mixtures. We investigated the effect of constituent radium specific activity, radon effective activity and emanation fraction on the concrete emanation fraction and the radon exhalation rate. Given the serious health effects associated with radionuclide exposure, experimental results were coupled with Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate predictive differences in the indoor radon concentration due to concrete mixture design. The results from this study show that, on average, fly ash constituents possessed radium specific activities ranging from 100 Bq/kg to 200 Bq/kg and emanation fractions ranging from 1.1% to 2.5%. The lowest emitting concrete mixture containing fly ash resulted in a 3.4% reduction in the concrete emanation fraction, owing to the relatively low emanation that exists when fly ash is part of concrete. On average, the metakaolin constituents contained radium specific activities ranging from 67 Bq/kg to 600 Bq/kg and emanation fractions ranging from 8.4% to 15.5%, and changed the total concrete emanation fraction by roughly ±5% relative to control samples. The results from this study suggest that SCMs can reduce indoor radon exposure from concrete, contingent upon SCM radionucleotide content and emanation fraction. Lastly, the experimental results provide SCM-specific concrete emanation fractions for indoor radon exposure modeling. © 2013.

  11. Another Concrete In the Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Meric, Asli Duru

    2015-01-01

    concrete has a memory. It stores the construction sequences. It shows what it is made of and how it is made. The texture of the formwork, the color difference of the pours, and the shadows of the metal ties combine to layer the beauty of concrete. The aim of this study is to explore the instruments of a concrete surface in order to enhance this multi-sensory experience. This study began with the design of a concrete wall and evolved into the design of a single-family home. MARCH

  12. Build-up Factor Calculation for Ordinary Concrete, Baryte Concrete and Blast-furnace Slugges Concrete as γ Radiation Shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isman MT; Elisabeth Supriatni; Tochrul Binowo

    2002-01-01

    Calculation of build up factor ordinary concrete, baryte concrete and blast-furnace sludge concrete have been carried out. The calculations have been carried out by dose rate measurement of Cs 137 source before and after passing through shielding. The investigated variables were concrete type, thickness of concrete and relative possession of concrete. Concrete type variables are ordinary concrete, baryte concrete and blast sludge furnace concrete. The thickness variables were 6, 12, 18, 24, 30 and 36 cm. The relative position variables were dose to the source and close to detector. The result showed that concrete type and position did not have significant effect to build-up factor value, while the concrete thickness (r) and the attenuation coefficient (μ) were influenced to the build-up factor. The higher μr value the higher build-up factor value. (author)

  13. Conceptual model for concrete long time degradation in a deep nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerblad, B.; Traegaardh, J.

    1994-02-01

    This report is mainly a state-of-the-art report of concrete long time durability in the environment expected in a deep site underground nuclear waste repository in Swedish crystalline bedrock. The report treats how the concrete and the surrounding groundwater will interact and how they will be affected by cement chemistry, type of aggregate etc. The different mechanisms for concrete alteration treated include sulphate attack, carbonation, chloride attack, alkali-silica reaction and leaching phenomena. In a long time perspective, the chemical alterations in concrete is mainly governed by the surrounding groundwater composition. After closure the composition of the groundwater will change character from a modified meteoric to a saline composition. Therefore two different simulated groundwater compositions have been used in modelling the chemical interaction between concrete and groundwater. The report also includes a study of old and historical concrete which show observations concerning recrystallization phenomena in concrete. 72 refs, 39 figs

  14. Conceptual model for concrete long time degradation in a deep nuclear waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerblad, B; Traegaardh, J [Swedish Cement and Concrete Research Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1994-02-01

    This report is mainly a state-of-the-art report of concrete long time durability in the environment expected in a deep site underground nuclear waste repository in Swedish crystalline bedrock. The report treats how the concrete and the surrounding groundwater will interact and how they will be affected by cement chemistry, type of aggregate etc. The different mechanisms for concrete alteration treated include sulphate attack, carbonation, chloride attack, alkali-silica reaction and leaching phenomena. In a long time perspective, the chemical alterations in concrete is mainly governed by the surrounding groundwater composition. After closure the composition of the groundwater will change character from a modified meteoric to a saline composition. Therefore two different simulated groundwater compositions have been used in modelling the chemical interaction between concrete and groundwater. The report also includes a study of old and historical concrete which show observations concerning recrystallization phenomena in concrete. 72 refs, 39 figs.

  15. Experimental Study on Modification of Concrete with Asphalt Admixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bołtryk, Michał; Małaszkiewicz, Dorota; Pawluczuk, Edyta

    2017-10-01

    Durability of engineering structures made of cement concrete with high compressive strength is a very vital issue, especially when they are exposed to different aggressive environments and dynamic loads. Concrete resistance to weathering actions and chemical attack can be improved by combined chemical and mechanical modification of concrete microstructure. Asphalt admixture in the form of asphalt paste (AP) was used for chemical modification of cement composite microstructure. Concrete structure was formed using special technology of compaction. A stand for vibro-vibropressing with regulated vibrator force and pressing force was developed. The following properties of the modified concrete were tested: compressive strength, water absorption, freeze-thaw resistance, scaling resistance in the presence of de-icing agents, chloride migration, resistance to CO2 and corrosion in aggressive solutions. Corrosion resistance was tested alternately in 1.8% solutions of NH4Cl, MgSO4, (NH2)2CO and CaCl2, which were altered every 7 days; the experiment lasted 9.5 months. Optimum compaction parameters in semi-industrial conditions were determined: ratio between piston stress (Qp ) and external top vibrator force (Po ) in the range 0.4÷-0.5 external top vibrator force 4 kN. High strength concretes with compressive strength fcm = 60÷70 MPa, very low water absorption (barrier formed in pores of cement hydrates against dioxide and chloride ions. Concrete specimens containing AP 4% c.m. and consolidated by vibro-vibropressing method proved to be practically resistant to highly corrosive environment. Vibro-vibropressing compaction technology of concrete modified with AP can be applied in prefabrication plants to produce elements for road, bridge and hydraulic engineering constructions.

  16. A Study on the Evaluation of Field Application of High-Fluidity Concrete Containing High Volume Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Wang Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent concrete industry, high-fluidity concrete is being widely used for the pouring of dense reinforced concrete. Normally, in the case of high-fluidity concrete, it includes high binder contents, so it is necessary to replace part of the cement through admixtures such as fly ash to procure economic feasibility and durability. This study shows the mechanical properties and field applicability of high-fluidity concrete using mass of fly ash as alternative materials of cement. The high-fluidity concrete mixed with 50% fly ash was measured to manufacture concrete that applies low water/binder ratio to measure the mechanical characteristics as compressive strength and elastic modulus. Also, in order to evaluate the field applicability, high-fluidity concrete containing high volume fly ash was evaluated for fluidity, compressive strength, heat of hydration, and drying shrinkage of concrete.

  17. Alkali aggregate reactivity in concrete structures in western Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, D.R.; Empey, D.

    1989-01-01

    In several regions of Canada, particularly parts of Ontario, Quebec and the Maritime Provinces, research, testing and evaluation of aged concrete structures in the field has shown that alkali aggregate reactivity can give rise to pronounced concrete deterioration, particularly in hydraulic structures subjected to saturation or alternate wetting and drying such as locks, dams, canals, etc. Concrete deterioration is mainly caused by alkali-silica reactions and alkali-carbonate reactions, but a third type of deterioration involves slow/late expanding alkali-silicate/silica reactivity. The alkalies NaOH and KOH in the concrete pore solutions are mainly responsible for attack on expansive rocks and minerals in concrete. Methods for evaluating alkali-aggregate reaction potential in aggregates, and field and laboratory methods for detecting deterioration are discussed. Examples of alkali-aggregate reactions in structures is western Canada are detailed, including a water reservoir at Canadian Forces Base Chilliwack in British Columbia, the Oldman River diversion and flume, the Lundbreck Falls Bridge, and the St Mary's Reservoir spillway, all in southern Alberta. Mitigative measures include avoidance of use of suspect aggregates, but if this cannot be avoided it is recommended to keep the total alkalies in the concrete as low as possible and minimize opportunities for saturation of concrete by moisture. 16 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  18. GPR measurements of attenuation in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenmann, David, E-mail: djeisen@cnde.iastate.edu; Margetan, Frank J., E-mail: djeisen@cnde.iastate.edu; Pavel, Brittney, E-mail: djeisen@cnde.iastate.edu [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, 1915 Scholl Road, Ames, IA 50011-3042 (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) signals from concrete structures are affected by several phenomenon, including: (1) transmission and reflection coefficients at interfaces; (2) the radiation patterns of the antenna(s) being used; and (3) the material properties of concrete and any embedded objects. In this paper we investigate different schemes for determining the electromagnetic (EM) attenuation of concrete from measured signals obtained using commercially-available GPR equipment. We adapt procedures commonly used in ultrasonic inspections where one compares the relative strengths of two or more signals having different travel paths through the material of interest. After correcting for beam spread (i.e., diffraction), interface phenomena, and equipment amplification settings, any remaining signal differences are assumed to be due to attenuation thus allowing the attenuation coefficient (say, in dB of loss per inch of travel) to be estimated. We begin with a brief overview of our approach, and then discuss how diffraction corrections were determined for our two 1.6 GHz GPR antennas. We then present results of attenuation measurements for two types of concrete using both pulse/echo and pitch/catch measurement setups.

  19. GPR measurements of attenuation in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, David; Margetan, Frank J.; Pavel, Brittney

    2015-03-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) signals from concrete structures are affected by several phenomenon, including: (1) transmission and reflection coefficients at interfaces; (2) the radiation patterns of the antenna(s) being used; and (3) the material properties of concrete and any embedded objects. In this paper we investigate different schemes for determining the electromagnetic (EM) attenuation of concrete from measured signals obtained using commercially-available GPR equipment. We adapt procedures commonly used in ultrasonic inspections where one compares the relative strengths of two or more signals having different travel paths through the material of interest. After correcting for beam spread (i.e., diffraction), interface phenomena, and equipment amplification settings, any remaining signal differences are assumed to be due to attenuation thus allowing the attenuation coefficient (say, in dB of loss per inch of travel) to be estimated. We begin with a brief overview of our approach, and then discuss how diffraction corrections were determined for our two 1.6 GHz GPR antennas. We then present results of attenuation measurements for two types of concrete using both pulse/echo and pitch/catch measurement setups.

  20. GPR measurements of attenuation in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenmann, David; Margetan, Frank J.; Pavel, Brittney

    2015-01-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) signals from concrete structures are affected by several phenomenon, including: (1) transmission and reflection coefficients at interfaces; (2) the radiation patterns of the antenna(s) being used; and (3) the material properties of concrete and any embedded objects. In this paper we investigate different schemes for determining the electromagnetic (EM) attenuation of concrete from measured signals obtained using commercially-available GPR equipment. We adapt procedures commonly used in ultrasonic inspections where one compares the relative strengths of two or more signals having different travel paths through the material of interest. After correcting for beam spread (i.e., diffraction), interface phenomena, and equipment amplification settings, any remaining signal differences are assumed to be due to attenuation thus allowing the attenuation coefficient (say, in dB of loss per inch of travel) to be estimated. We begin with a brief overview of our approach, and then discuss how diffraction corrections were determined for our two 1.6 GHz GPR antennas. We then present results of attenuation measurements for two types of concrete using both pulse/echo and pitch/catch measurement setups

  1. New rheological model for concrete structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chern, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Long time deformation is of interest in estimating stresses of the prestressed concrete reactor vessel, in predicting cracking due to shrinkage or thermal dilatation, and in the design of leak-tight structures. Many interacting influences exist among creep, shrinkage and cracking for concrete. An interaction which researchers have long observed, is that at simultaneous drying and loading, the deformation of a concrete structure under the combined effect is larger than the sum of the shrinkage deformation of the structure at no load and the deformation of the sealed structure. The excess deformation due to the difference between observed test data and conventional analysis is regarded as the Pickett Effect. A constitutive relation explaining the Pickett Effect and other similar superposition problems, which includes creep, shrinkage (or thermal dilation), cracking, aging was developed with an efficient time-step numerical algorithm. The total deformation in the analysis is the sum of strain due to elastic deformation and creep, cracking and shrinkage with thermal dilatation. Instead of a sudden stress reduction to zero after the attainment of the strength limit, the gradual strain-softening of concrete (a gradual decline of stress at increasing strain) is considered

  2. Tension tests of concrete containment wall elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, D.M.; Julien, J.T.; Russel, H.G.

    1984-01-01

    Tension tests of concrete containment wall elements were conducted as part of a three-phase research program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The objective of the EPRI experimental/analytical program is twofold. The first objective is to provide the utility industry with a test-verified analytical method for making realistic estimates of actual capacities of reinforced and prestressed concrete containments under internal over-pressurization from postulated degraded core accidents. The second objective is to determine qualitative and quantitative leak rate characteristics of typical containment cross-sections with and without penetrations. This paper covers the experimental portion to the EPRI program. The testing program for Phase 1 included eight large-scale specimens representing elements from the wall of a containment. Each specimen was 60-in (1525-mm) square, 24-in (610-mm) thick, and had full-size reinforcing bars. Six specimens were representative of prototypical reinforced concrete containment designs. The remaining two specimens represented prototypical prestressed containment designs. Various reinforcement configurations and loading arrangements resulted in data that permit comparisons of the effects of controlled variables on cracking and subsequent concrete/reinforcement/liner interaction in containment elements. Subtle differences, due to variations in reinforcement patterns and load applications among the eight specimens, are being used to benchmark the codes being developed in the analytical portion of the EPRI program. Phases 2 and 3 of the test program will examine leak rate characteristics and failure mechanisms at penetrations and structural discontinuities. (orig.)

  3. A study on the water permeability of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loadsman, R.V.C.; Acres, D.H.; Stokes, C.J.; Wadeson, L.

    1988-03-01

    This report forms part of the DoE's research programme on the disposal of nuclear waste. The information available on the permeability of concrete and the effects of various factors on this value are reviewed. The effect of defects on the overall permeability of concrete structures is examined and the recorded performance of a range of existing concrete structures is considered with identification of some of the factors that are significant in practice. Deficiencies in the information available on this subject are identified and recommendations for further work are made including a list of structures suitable for future monitoring. (author)

  4. Concrete pedestals for high-performance semiconductor production equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogen, Wayne; Franklin, Craig L.; Morneault, Joseph

    1999-09-01

    Concrete pedestals have many vibration and stiffness characteristics that make them a superior choice for sensitive semiconductor production equipment including scanners, scanning electron microscopes, focused ion beam millers and optical inspection equipment. Among the advantages of concrete pedestals are high inherent damping, monolithic construction that eliminates low stiffness joints common in steep pedestals, ability to reuse and ease of installation. Steel pedestals that have plates attached to the top of the frame are easily excited by acoustic excitation, especially in the range from 50 Hertz to 400 Hertz. Concrete pedestals do not suffer from this phenomenon because of the high mass and damping of the top surface.

  5. Fracture Energy of High-Strength Concrete in Compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Henrik; Brincker, Rune

    is essential for understanding the fracture mechanism of concrete in compression. In this paper a series of tests is reported, carried out for the purpose of studying the fracture mechanical properties of concrete in compression. Including the measurement and study of the descending branch, a new experimental...... method has been used to investigate the influence of boundary conditions, loading rate, size effects and the influence of the strength on the fracture energy of high-strength concrete over the range 70 MPa to 150 MPa, expressed in nominal values....

  6. The influence of recycled concrete aggregates in pervious concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. TAVARES

    Full Text Available The expansion of urban areas under constant changes in the hydrological cycle directly affects the drainage of rainwater. The problems of urban drainage become major engineering problems to be solved in order to avoid negative consequences for local populations. Another urban problem is the excessive production of construction and demolition waste (CDW, in which , even with a increasingly policy of waste management , have been an end up being thrown in inappropriate disposal sites. Alternatively aiming to a minimization of the problems presented, we propose the study of permeable concrete using recycled concrete aggregate. In this study, there were evaluated the performance of concrete by means of permeability, consistency, strength, and interface conditions of the materials . Satisfactory relationships of resistance/permeability of concrete with recycled aggregate in relation to the concrete with natural aggregates was obtained, showing their best potential.

  7. Dynamic performance of concrete undercut anchors for Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahrenholtz, Christoph, E-mail: christoph@mahrenholtz.net; Eligehausen, Rolf

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Behavior of undercut anchors under dynamic actions simulating earthquakes. • First high frequency load and crack cycling tests on installed concrete anchors ever. • Comprehensive review of anchor qualification for Nuclear Power Plants. - Abstract: Post-installed anchors are widely used for structural and nonstructural connections to concrete. In many countries, concrete anchors used for Nuclear Power Plants have to be qualified to ensure reliable behavior even under extreme conditions. The tests required for qualification of concrete anchors are carried out at quasi-static loading rates well below the rates to be expected for dynamic actions deriving from earthquakes, airplane impacts or explosions. To investigate potentially beneficial effects of high loading rates and cycling frequencies, performance tests on installed undercut anchors were conducted. After introductory notes on anchor technology and a comprehensive literature review, this paper discusses the qualification of anchors for Nuclear Power Plants and the testing carried out to quantify experimentally the effects of dynamic actions on the load–displacement behavior of undercut anchors.

  8. Fundamental experiment on simulated molten core/concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, S.; Katsumura, Y.

    1994-01-01

    If a complete and prolonged failure of coolant flow were to occur in a LWR or FBR, fission product decay heat would cause the fuel to overheat. If no available action to cool the fuel were taken, it would eventually melt. Ibis could lead to slumping of the molten core material and to the failure of the reactor pressure vessel and deposition of these materials into the concrete reactor cavity. Consequently, the molten core could melt and decompose the concrete. Vigorous agitation of the molten core pool by concrete decomposition gases is expected to enhance the convective heat transfer process. Besides the decomposition gases, melting concrete (slag) generated under the molten core pool will be buoyed up, and will also affect the downward heat transfer. Though, in this way, the heat transfer process across the interface is complicated by the slag and the gases evolved from the decomposed concrete, it is very important to make its process clear for the safety evaluation of nuclear reactors. Therefore, in this study, fundamental experiments were performed using simulated materials to observe the behaviors of the hot pool, slag and gases at the interface. Moreover, from the experimental observation, a correlation without empirical constants was proposed to calculate the interface heat transfer. The heat transfer across the interface would depend on thermo-physical interactions between the pool, slag and concrete which are changed by their thermal properties and interface temperature and so on. For example, the molten concrete is miscible in molten oxidic core debris, but is immiscible in metallic core debris. If a contact temperature between the molten core pool and the concrete falls below the solidus of the pool, solidification of the pool will occur. In this study, the case of immiscible slag in the pool is treated and solidification of the pool does not occur. Thus, water, paraffin and air were selected as the simulated molten core pool, concrete, and decomposition

  9. Nuclear radiation and the properties of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, M.F.

    1983-08-01

    Concrete is used for structures in which the concrete is exposed to nuclear radiation. Exposure to nuclear radiation may affect the properties of concrete. The report mentions the types of nuclear radiation while radiation damage in concrete is discussed. Attention is also given to the effects of neutron and gamma radiation on compressive and tensile strength of concrete. Finally radiation shielding, the attenuation of nuclear radiation and the value of concrete as a shielding material is discussed

  10. Comparative environmental assessment of natural and recycled aggregate concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinković, S; Radonjanin, V; Malešev, M; Ignjatović, I

    2010-11-01

    Constant and rapid increase in construction and demolition (C&D) waste generation and consumption of natural aggregate for concrete production became one of the biggest environmental problems in the construction industry. Recycling of C&D waste represents one way to convert a waste product into a resource but the environment benefits through energy consumption, emissions and fallouts reductions are not certain. The main purpose of this study is to determine the potentials of recycled aggregate concrete (concrete made with recycled concrete aggregate) for structural applications and to compare the environmental impact of the production of two types of ready-mixed concrete: natural aggregate concrete (NAC) made entirely with river aggregate and recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) made with natural fine and recycled coarse aggregate. Based on the analysis of up-to-date experimental evidence, including own tests results, it is concluded that utilization of RAC for low-to-middle strength structural concrete and non-aggressive exposure conditions is technically feasible. The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is performed for raw material extraction and material production part of the concrete life cycle including transport. Assessment is based on local LCI data and on typical conditions in Serbia. Results of this specific case study show that impacts of aggregate and cement production phases are slightly larger for RAC than for NAC but the total environmental impacts depend on the natural and recycled aggregates transport distances and on transport types. Limit natural aggregate transport distances above which the environmental impacts of RAC can be equal or even lower than the impacts of NAC are calculated for the specific case study. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The concrete canister program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, M.M.

    1978-02-01

    In the spring of 1974, WNRE began development and demonstration of a dry storage concept, called the concrete canister, as a possible alternative to storage of irradiated CANDU fuel in water pools. The canister is a thick-walled concrete monolith containing baskets of fuel in the dry state. The decay heat from the fuel is dissipated to the environment by natural heat transfer. Four canisters were designed and constructed. Two canisters containing electric heaters have been subjected to heat loads of 2.5 times the design, ramp heat-load cycling, and simulated weathering tests. The other two canisters were loaded with irradiated fuel, one containing fuel bundles of uniform decay heat and the other containing bundles of non-uniform decay heat in a non-symmetrical radial and axial array. The collected data were used to verify the analytical tools for prediction of effectiveness of heat transfer and radiation shielding and to verify the design of the basket and canisters. The demonstration canisters have shown that this concept is a viable alternative to water pools for the storage of irradiated CANDU fuel. (author)

  12. CONCRETE PROPERTIES IMPROVEMENT OF SLAB TRACKS USING CHEMICAL ADDITIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Pristinskaya

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. On the Railways of Ukraine a very large number of slab tracks are operated with cracks. Many scientific works of previous years are dedicated to improving the design of slab tracks. The main causes of defects are: poor exploitation of the track; insufficient physic-mechanical characteristics of concrete; poor quality of initial materials. It is therefore necessary to develop an optimum concrete mix for the manufacture of these concrete products. Methodology. To assess the impact of individual factors and effects of their interactions on properties of concrete mix and concrete method of experimental and statistical modeling was used. At this, methodological fundamentals of mathematical experiment planning in concrete technology and modern methods of optimization of composite materials were taking into account. Based on the obtained data during the planned experiment conducting, including15 studies and using the computer program MathCad, were obtained the regression equations, which describe the relevant physical and mechanical properties of concrete. On the basis of the equations with the help of computer program MATLAB R2012b the graphs were drawn, illustrating the dependences of system response from the changes of two factors at a fixed value of the third factor. Findings. Firstly was the analysis of cracks that occur in the process of operation in the constructions of slab tracks. Further reasons of possible occurrence of these cracks were presented. In the process of the conducted research the author has concluded that for rational concrete mix development it is necessary to conduct the planned experiment with the use of quality materials. It was established that to increase the strength, chemical additives should be added in to concrete mix, it will let reduce cement amount. Originality. Experiments proved the usage of modern chemical additives in order to improve the properties of concrete. Models were developed, reflecting

  13. The Concrete and Pavement Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world is characterized by the extensive use of concrete and asphalt pavement. Periodically, these materials are replaced and the old materials disposed of. In this challenge, students will be asked to develop ways to reuse the old materials. It is important for students to understand how concrete and asphalt are made and applied, as…

  14. Revised Rules for Concrete Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Jensen, F. M.; Middleton, C.

    This paper is based on research performed for the Highway Agency, London, UK under the project DPU/9/44 "Revision of Bridge Assessment Rules Based on Whole Life Performance: Concrete Bridges" It contains details of a methodology which can be used to generate Whole Life (WL) reliability profiles....... These WL reliability profiles may be used to establish revised rules for Concrete Bridges....

  15. Proportioning of light weight concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmus, Lars

    1996-01-01

    Development of a method to determine the proportions of the raw materials in light weight concrete made with leight expanded clay aggregate. The method is based on composite theory......Development of a method to determine the proportions of the raw materials in light weight concrete made with leight expanded clay aggregate. The method is based on composite theory...

  16. Fatigue of Concrete Armour Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, N. B.; Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.

    1995-01-01

    In the present article fatigue as a possible reason for failure of Dolosse armour units made of plain concrete is discussed.......In the present article fatigue as a possible reason for failure of Dolosse armour units made of plain concrete is discussed....

  17. Concrete for γ radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo e Souza, A.C. de; Rogers, John Douglas

    1980-01-01

    The attenuation characteristics of γ radiation in concrete slabs, considering their mechanical resistence and densities were determined. One heavy concrete which was used, was prepared using as additives iron ore and Fe 2 O 3 pellets in various grain sizes. Fortran programs were used for analysing data and determining the absorption coefficients and attenuation factors. (Author) [pt

  18. Radiographic testing in concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, D. de

    1987-01-01

    The radiographic testing done in concrete structures is used to analyse the homogeneity, position and corrosion of armatures and to detect discontinuity in the concrete such as: gaps, cracks and segregations. This work develops a Image quality Indicator (IQI) with an adequated sensibility to detect discontinuites based on BS4408 norm. (E.G.) [pt

  19. Wood and concrete polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, K.

    1974-01-01

    There are several ways to prepare and use wood and concrete polymer composites. The most important improvements in the case of concrete polymer composites are obtained for compressive and tensile strengths. The progress in this field in United States and other countries is discussed in this rview. (M.S.)

  20. Concrete for. gamma. radiation shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Azevedo e Souza, A.C. (Rio de Janeiro Univ. (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica); Rogers, J D [Rio de Janeiro Univ. (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia

    1980-06-01

    The attenuation characteristics of ..gamma.. radiation in concrete slabs, considering their mechanical resistence and densities were determined. One heavy concrete which was used, was prepared using as additives iron ore and Fe/sub 2/ O/sub 3/ pellets in various grain sizes. Fortran programs were used for analysing data and determining the absorption coefficients and attenuation factors.

  1. Concrete shielding exterior to iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurista, P.; Cossairt, D.

    1983-08-01

    A rule of thumb at Fermilab has been to use 3 feet of concrete exterior to iron shielding. A recent design of a shield with a severe dimensional constraint has prompted a re-evaluation of this rule of thumb and has led to the following calculations of the concrete thickness required to nullify this problem. 4 references, 4 figures

  2. Urban heritage, building maintenance : Concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, L.G.W.

    1999-01-01

    Concrete as a conglomerate of sand, stone and a binder, is a very old material indeed. In the Roman period earth from Puozzoli, together with lime and water could bind the sand and the stones to form a conglomerate that has an affmity to our modem concrete. Later, in the more northem areas of

  3. Concrete Operations and Attentional Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Michael; Lindenberger, Ulman

    1989-01-01

    To test predictions regarding the attentional capacity requirements of Piaget's stage of concrete operations, a battery of concrete operational tasks and two measures of attentional capacity were administered to 120 first-, second-, and third-graders. Findings concern class inclusion, transitivity of length and weight, and multiplication of…

  4. Shear reinforced beams in autoclaved aerated concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelius, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Shear behaviour in concrete materials is very well documented, for normal density concrete materials. In this paper results of various tests on low density concrete materials like aerated autoclaved concrete (in the following denoted aircrete) will be presented and analyzed for different combinat....... Codes for designing prefabricated reinforced components of aircrete structures have adopted these recently developed approaches.......Shear behaviour in concrete materials is very well documented, for normal density concrete materials. In this paper results of various tests on low density concrete materials like aerated autoclaved concrete (in the following denoted aircrete) will be presented and analyzed for different...

  5. Qualifying concrete for a low-level waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipose, K.E.

    1990-06-01

    A waste repository for the belowground disposal of low-level radioactive waste, labelled IRUS (Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure), is planned at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. It relies greatly on the durability of concrete for a minimum of 500 years of service life. A research program based on laboratory testing to design a durable concrete and predict its useful engineered service life is in progress. Durability of concrete depends on its resistance of deterioration from both internal and external causes. Since the rate of degradation depends to a major extent on the rate of ingress of aggressive ions into concrete, laboratory testing is in progress to establish the diffusion rates of ions, especially chlorides, sulphate and carbonate ions. A total of 1000 concrete specimens and 500 paste specimens are being exposed at 22 and 45 degrees C to twenty-five different combinations of corrosive agents, including CO 2 . Procedures to measure the ionic profile and to determine the factors controlling diffusion of ions in the various concretes have been developed. The paper presents the initial results from the research program and the longevity predictions to qualify concretes for the IRUS waste repository, based on twelve months of diffusion testing on laboratory specimens

  6. Energy efficiency action plan. Policy action plan for promotion of energy efficiency in the Czech Republic to 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    Energy efficiency and renewable energy production contribute to the three major goals of the national energy policy of the Czech Republic: overall competitiveness, security of supply and environmental protection. Therefore, the Czech government aims to promote these two sustainable options. The Energy Policy White Paper, which is being developed at the time of writing (June 1999), will provide the general framework for the future role of energy efficiency and renewable energy in the Czech Republic. In addition, it is necessary to develop specific policies. The National Energy Efficiency Study aimed to support the Czech government in the formulation of energy efficiency and renewable energy policy. The National Energy Efficiency Study has resulted in the following documents: (1) The Energy Efficiency Action Plan focuses on promotion of energy efficiency in end-use (this report); The Renewable Energy Action Plan (separate report; ECN-C--99-064) deals with policy on promotion of renewable energy production. These two Action Plans provide policy makers in the Czech government with essential information on potentials, targets, budgets and recommended policy instruments. The core of the Action Plans is the list of concrete policy actions, ready for implementation; and (2) The National Energy Efficiency Study NEES (separate report; ECN-C--99-063). This report is the background document to the two Action Plans. It contains detailed information on options and measures, potentials, barriers and policy instruments for energy efficiency and renewables. The main part is a detailed outline for a new energy efficiency and renewable policy. Also, it includes recommendations for financing schemes to overcome the investment constraints in the Czech Republic. Finally, a list of concrete projects is included to support project identification

  7. Renewable energy action plan. Policy action plan for promotion of renewable energy in the Czech Republic to 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    Energy efficiency and renewable energy production contribute to the three major goals of the national energy policy of the Czech Republic: overall competitiveness, security of supply; and environmental protection. Therefore, the Czech government promotes these two sustainable options. The Energy Policy White Paper, which is being developed at the time of writing (June 1999), will provide the general framework for the future role of energy efficiency and renewable energy in the Czech Republic. However, in addition, it is necessary to develop specific policies. The National Energy Efficiency Study aimed to support the Czech government in the formula tion of energy efficiency and renewable energy policy. The National Energy Efficiency Study has resulted in the following documents: (1) The Renewable Energy Action Plan (this report) addresses renewable energy production. The Energy Efficiency Action Plan focuses on the promotion of energy efficiency in end use (separate report; ECN-C--99-065). These two Action Plans provide policy makers in the Czech government with information on potentials, targets, budgets and recommended policy instruments. The core of the Action Plans is the list of concrete policy actions, ready for implementation; (2) The National Energy Efficiency Study NEES (separate report; ECN-C--99-063). This report is the background document to the two Action Plans. It contains detailed information on options and measures, potentials, barriers and policy instruments for energy efficiency and renewables. The main part is a detailed outline for a new energy efficiency and renewable policy. Also, it includes recommendations for financing schemes to overcome the invest ment constraints in the Czech Republic. Finally, a list of concrete projects is included to support project identification

  8. Evaluation of Concrete Cylinder Tests Using Finite Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saabye Ottosen, Niels

    1984-01-01

    Nonlinear axisymmetric finite element analyses are performed on the uniaxial compressive test of concrete cylinders. The models include thick steel loading plates, and cylinders with height‐to‐diameter ratios (h/d) ranging from 1‐3 are treated. A simple constitutive model of the concrete is emplo......Nonlinear axisymmetric finite element analyses are performed on the uniaxial compressive test of concrete cylinders. The models include thick steel loading plates, and cylinders with height‐to‐diameter ratios (h/d) ranging from 1‐3 are treated. A simple constitutive model of the concrete...... uniaxial strength the use of geometrically matched loading plates seems to be advantageous. Finally, it is observed that for variations of the element size within limits otherwise required to obtain a realistic analysis, the results are insensitive to the element size....

  9. Survey of concrete waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    The incorporation of radioactive waste in cement has been widely studied for many years. It has been routinely used at nuclear research and production sites for some types of nuclear waste for almost three decades and at power reactor plants for nearly two decades. Cement has many favorable characteristics that have contributed to its popularity. It is a readily available material and has not required complex and/or expensive equipment to solidify radioactive waste. The resulting solid products are noncombustible, strong, radiation resistant, and have reasonable chemical and thermal stability. As knowledge increased on the possible dangers from radioactive waste, requirements for waste fixation became more stringent. A brief survey of some of the research efforts used to extend and improve cementitious waste hosts to meet these requirements is given in this paper. Selected data are presented from the rather extensive study of the applicability of concrete as a waste form for Savannah River defense waste and the use of polymer impregnation to reduce the leachability and improve the durability of such waste forms. Hot-pressed concretes that were developed as prospective host solids for high-level wastes are described. Highlights are given from two decades of research on cementitious waste forms at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The development of the hydrofracture process for the disposal of all locally generated radioactive waste led to a process for the disposal of I-129 and to the current research on the German in-situ solidification process for medium-level waste and the Oak Ridge FUETAP process for all classes of waste including commercial and defense high-level wastes. Finally, some of the more recent ORNL concepts are presented for the use of cement in the disposal of inorganic and biological sludges, waste inorganic salts, trash, and krypton

  10. Nonlinear FE analysis of reinforced concrete panels subjected to in-plane force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. P.; Lee, S. J.; Jun, Y. S.; Su, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structures subjected to in-plane force exhibit strong nonlinear behaviour due to complex material properties, cracks, interactions between concrete and steel and shear transfer exists in crack surface. Especially if there is crack formations, nonlinear behaviour increases. Thus the prediction of nonlinear behaviour of reinforced concrete includes failure or crushing is very difficult task. Various constitutive equations for concrete stress-strain relationship to predict nonlinear behaviour of reinforced concrete have been proposed. But the study for reinforced concrete analysis model using plastic material model is still demanded. So the purpose of this research is to formulate standard 8-node shell element using plasticity material model for concrete and to analyze nonlinear behaviour of RC panel subjected to in-plane force

  11. Prediction of the Service Life of a Reinforced Concrete Column under Chloride Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad K. Alkam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, service life of a reinforced concrete column exposed to chloride environment has been predicted. This study has been based on numerical simulation of chloride ion diffusion in a concrete column during its anticipated life span. The simulation process has included the concrete cover replacement whenever chloride ion concentration has reached the critical threshold value at the reinforcement surface. Repair scheduling of the concrete column under consideration has been discussed. Effects of the concrete cover thickness and the water cement ratio on the service life of the concrete column at hand have been presented. A new approach for arranging locations of reinforcement steel bars has been introduced. This approach is intended to prolong the service life of the concrete column under consideration against chloride induced corrosion.

  12. Novel techniques for concrete curing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovler, Konstantin; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2005-01-01

    It is known that some high-strength/high-performance concretes (HSC/HPC) are prone to cracking at an early age unless special precautions are taken. The paper deals with the methods of curing as one of the main strategies to ensure good performance of concrete. Curing by both external (conventional......) and internal methods is reviewed and analyzed, among other methods of mitigating shrinkage and cracking of concrete. The focus is on the mitigation of autogenous shrinkage of low water to binder ratio (w/b) concrete by means of internal curing. The concepts of internal curing are based on using lightweight...... aggregate, superabsorbent polymers or water-soluble chemicals, which reduce water evaporation (so called "internal sealing"). These concepts have been intensively researched in the 90s, but still are not widespread among contractors and concrete suppliers. The differences between conventional methods...

  13. Sodium concrete reaction - Structural considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferskakis, G.N.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the sodium concrete reaction phenomenon, with emphasis on structural considerations, is presented. Available test results for limestone, basalt, and magnetite concrete with various test article configurations are reviewed. Generally, tests indicate reaction is self limiting before all sodium is used. Uncertainties, however, concerning the mechanism for penetration of sodium into concrete have resulted in different theories about a reaction model. Structural behavior may be significant in the progression of the reaction due to thermal-structuralchemical interactions involving tensile cracking, compressive crushing, or general deterioration of concrete and the exposure of fresh concrete surfaces to react with sodium. Structural behavior of test articles and potential factors that could enhance the progression of the reaction are discussed

  14. Concrete poetry in three languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Kremer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes different paths of the development of both the movement and the notion of concrete poetry in three linguistic regions. The German-language konkrete Dichtung turns out to usually denote the original, historical shape of the movement, which was partly created in German- speaking countries and which has been treated as a literary phenomenon. The Englishlanguage term concrete poetry is a much broader category which also encompasses visual poetry and avant-garde texts that are distant from the sources of concretism in its early form. The Polish understanding of ‘poezja konkretna’ [concrete poetry] was influenced by both German- and English- language books and by the movement’s regional version, which appeared in Poland as late as in the 1970s. The selected linguistic areas allowed the author to show three basic ways of thinking about concretism, i.e. about its initial, international, and regional versions.

  15. Amending heavy-weight high performance concrete demystified to deleterious milieux in nuclear vicinities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, W.M.K.S

    2010-01-01

    constituents employed in present research, such as aggregates (Br and Il), cement, additives. Then it explains the course of actions of the experiment, carried out in the current research. Chapter 5: This chapter exhibits and discusses the experimental results obtained in the current research within various tables and figures. Moreover, charts and slides of both physico-chemical and petrographic examinations are illustrated respectively.Chapter 6: This chapter is mainly devoted to explain and to exhibit the computer program developed specially for this dissertation, including both flow charts and the interface screens of this computer program. Chapter 7: The onset of this chapter discusses extra factors to be considered while designing for HWHPC. Then it is followed by a summary of results, after that suggested potential research issues recommendations are illustrated. Several outcomes leading to practical applications were concluded throughout the present research, where some of which can be summarized as followed:Recognizing micro-structural alterations, through physico-chemical investigations, lead to understand mechanisms of HWHP concrete deterioration that eventually end with macro catastrophes. -Addition of more pozzolans have enhanced the performance in terms of compressive strength and duration of both HWHP 2-Br and 2-Il, when exposed to relentless milieux. - Results propose that it is plausible to amalgamate benefits achieved in each of the above mixtures into new mixtures.-The developed computer program attempts to construct a preliminary interaction data-base for various concrete mixtures. This dissertation is trailed with four glossaries regarding the terms that have been employed during research procedures. Finally, the dissertation ends up with a list including all the 173 references that documented the present research, which were accessed and reviewed during the course of work of this study. Such references, varied between scientific papers, books, and

  16. Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Prabir [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Labbe, Pierre [Electricity of France (EDF); Naus, Dan [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2013-01-01

    A nuclear power plant (NPP) involves complex engineering structures that are significant items of the structures, systems and components (SSC) important to the safe and reliable operation of the NPP. Concrete is the commonly used civil engineering construction material in the nuclear industry because of a number of advantageous properties. The NPP concrete structures underwent a great degree of evolution, since the commissioning of first NPP in early 1960. The increasing concern with time related to safety of the public and environment, and degradation of concrete structures due to ageing related phenomena are the driving forces for such evolution. The concrete technology underwent rapid development with the advent of chemical admixtures of plasticizer/super plasticizer category as well as viscosity modifiers and mineral admixtures like fly ash and silica fume. Application of high performance concrete (HPC) developed with chemical and mineral admixtures has been witnessed in the construction of NPP structures. Along with the beneficial effect, the use of admixtures in concrete has posed a number of challenges as well in design and construction. This along with the prospect of continuing operation beyond design life, especially after 60 years, the impact of extreme natural events ( as in the case of Fukushima NPP accident) and human induced events (e.g. commercial aircraft crash like the event of September 11th 2001) has led to further development in the area of NPP concrete structures. The present paper aims at providing an account of evolution of NPP concrete structures in last two decades by summarizing the development in the areas of concrete technology, design methodology and construction techniques, maintenance and ageing management of concrete structures.

  17. POROUS STRUCTURE OF ROAD CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Pshembaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Having a great number of concrete structure classifications it is recommended to specify the following three principal types: microstructure – cement stone structure; mesostructure – structure of cement-sand mortar in concrete; macrostucture – two-component system that consists of mortar and coarse aggregate. Every mentioned-above structure has its own specific features which are related to the conditions of their formation. Thus, microstructure of cement stone can be characterized by such structural components as crystal intergrowth, tobermorite gel, incompletely hydrated cement grains and porous space. The most important technological factors that influence on formation of cement stone microstructure are chemical and mineralogical cement composition, its grinding fineness, water-cement ratio and curing condition. Specific cement stone microstructure is formed due to interrelation of these factors. Cement stone is a capillary-porous body that consists of various solid phases represented predominantly by sub-microcrystals of colloidal dispersion. The sub-microcrystals are able adsorptively, osmotically and structurally to withhold (to bind some amount of moisture. Protection of road concrete as a capillary-porous body is considered as one of the topical issues. The problem is solved with the help of primary and secondary protection methods. Methods of primary protection are used at the stage of designing, preparation and placing of concrete. Methods of secondary protection are applied at the operational stage of road concrete pavement. The paper considers structures of concrete solid phase and characteristics of its porous space. Causes of pore initiation, their shapes, dimensions and arrangement in the concrete are presented in the paper. The highest hazard for road concrete lies in penetration of aggressive liquid in it and moisture transfer in the cured concrete. Water permeability of concrete characterizes its filtration factor which

  18. Properties of concretes produced with waste concrete aggregate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topcu, Ilker Bekir; Sengel, Selim

    2004-01-01

    An environmentally friendly approach to the disposal of waste materials, a difficult issue to cope with in today's world, would only be possible through a useful recycling process. For this reason, we suggest that clearing the debris from destroyed buildings in such a way as to obtain waste concrete aggregates (WCA) to be reused in concrete production could well be a partial solution to environmental pollution. For this study, the physical and mechanical properties along with their freeze-thaw durability of concrete produced with WCAs were investigated and test results presented. While experimenting with fresh and hardened concrete, mixtures containing recycled concrete aggregates in amounts of 30%, 50%, 70%, and 100% were prepared. Afterward, these mixtures underwent freeze-thaw cycles. As a result, we found out that C16-quality concrete could be produced using less then 30% C14-quality WCA. Moreover, it was observed that the unit weight, workability, and durability of the concretes produced through WCA decreased in inverse proportion to their endurance for freeze-thaw cycle

  19. DURABILITY OF ASPHALT CONCRETE MIXTURES USING DOLOMITE AGGREGATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imad Al-Shalout

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the durability of asphalt concrete, including the effects of different gradations, compaction temperatures and immersion time on the durability potential of mixtures. The specific objectives of this study are: to investigate the effect of compaction temperature on the mechanical properties of asphalt concrete mixtures; investigate the effect of bitumen content and different aggregate gradations on the durability potential of bituminous mixtures.

  20. Criticality study of PWR fuel elements separated by concrete shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillemot, M.; Colomb, G.; Maubert, L.

    1984-01-01

    The development of nuclear energy involved a need of neutronic shield studies to reduce the size and the cost of nuclear liquid storage units, of storage pools, and of transport casks. A concrete has been developed of the laboratory of concretes and coatings of Saclay; the validation of calculation codes including this material, as also the presence of free water and linked water necessitated an experimental confirmation of which program is presented here [fr

  1. Toxicity and environmental and economic performance of fly ash and recycled concrete aggregates use in concrete: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurda, Rawaz; Silvestre, José D; de Brito, Jorge

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of previous studies on the environmental impact (EI) and toxicity of producing recycled concrete aggregates (RCA), fly ash (FA), cement, superplasticizer, and water as raw materials, and also on the effect of replacing cement and natural aggregates (NA) with FA and RCA, respectively, on the mentioned aspects. EI and toxicity were analysed simultaneously because considering concrete with alternative materials as sustainable depends on whether their risk assessment is high. Therefore, this study mainly focuses on the cradle-to-gate EI of one cubic meter of concrete, namely abiotic depletion potential (ADP), global warming potential (GWP), ozone depletion potential (ODP), photochemical ozone creation (POCP), acidification potential (AP), eutrophication potential (EP), non-renewable energy (PE-NRe) and renewable energy (PE-Re). In terms of toxicity, leachability (chemical and ecotoxicological characterization) was considered. The results also include the economic performance of these materials, and show that the incorporation of FA in concrete significantly decreases the EI and cost of concrete. Thus, the simultaneous incorporation of FA and RCA decrease the EI, cost, use of landfill space and natural resources extraction. Nonetheless, the leaching metals of FA decrease when they are incorporated in concrete. Relative to FA, the incorporation of RCA does not significantly affect the EI and cost of concrete, but it significantly reduces the use of landfill space and the need of virgin materials.

  2. Toxicity and environmental and economic performance of fly ash and recycled concrete aggregates use in concrete: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawaz Kurda

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview of previous studies on the environmental impact (EI and toxicity of producing recycled concrete aggregates (RCA, fly ash (FA, cement, superplasticizer, and water as raw materials, and also on the effect of replacing cement and natural aggregates (NA with FA and RCA, respectively, on the mentioned aspects. EI and toxicity were analysed simultaneously because considering concrete with alternative materials as sustainable depends on whether their risk assessment is high. Therefore, this study mainly focuses on the cradle-to-gate EI of one cubic meter of concrete, namely abiotic depletion potential (ADP, global warming potential (GWP, ozone depletion potential (ODP, photochemical ozone creation (POCP, acidification potential (AP, eutrophication potential (EP, non-renewable energy (PE-NRe and renewable energy (PE-Re. In terms of toxicity, leachability (chemical and ecotoxicological characterization was considered. The results also include the economic performance of these materials, and show that the incorporation of FA in concrete significantly decreases the EI and cost of concrete. Thus, the simultaneous incorporation of FA and RCA decrease the EI, cost, use of landfill space and natural resources extraction. Nonetheless, the leaching metals of FA decrease when they are incorporated in concrete. Relative to FA, the incorporation of RCA does not significantly affect the EI and cost of concrete, but it significantly reduces the use of landfill space and the need of virgin materials. Keywords: Materials science, Environmental science, Industry, Economics, Safety engineering

  3. Numerical analysis on seismic behavior of reinforced concrete beam to concrete filled steel tubular column connections with ring-beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yi., E-mail: zhaoyi091218@163.com [School of Civil and Architectural Engineering, Zhongyuan University of Technology,Zhengzhou 450000 (China); Xu, Li. Hua. [School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, No.8, Donghu Road, WuHan 430072 (China)

    2016-06-08

    This paper presents numerical study of the seismic behavior of reinforced concrete beam to concrete filled steel tube column connections with ring-beam. The material stress-strain relations, element type and boundary condition are selected, which are consistent with actual situation. Then the seismic behavior of this type of joint are researched by ABAQUS, and finite element analyses are conducted under cyclic loading. Its parameters are discussed including thickness of steel tubular column wall, sectional dimension of the ring-beam and strength of the core concrete. The results show that the ultimate capacity of the connections is improved with sectional dimension of the ring-beam increased. In the meanwhile, the influence on skeleton curve of the joints is slight of which included thickness of steel tubular column wall and strength of the core concrete.

  4. An Investigation of Bond Strength of Reinforcing Bars in Fly Ash and GGBS Based Geopolymer Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boopalan C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymers are amorphous aluminosilicate materials. Geopolymers are binders formed by alkali activation of Geopolymer Source Materials (GSM using an alkaline activator solution. Concretes made using Geopolymer binders are excellent alternative to the Ordinary Portland Cement concretes from strength, durability, and ecological considerations. Especially, usage of industrial waste materials such as Fly Ash and Slags as GSMs considerably lower the carbon footprint of concrete and mitigate the damage due to the unscientific dumping/disposal of these materials. To use the Geopolymer concrete (GPC for reinforced structural members, the composite action of reinforcing bars with Geopolymer concrete i.e. the bond behaviour should be well understood. This paper describes the bond behaviour of 12mm and 16mm dia. bars embedded in Fly ash and GGBS based Geopolymer concrete and conventional Portland Pozzolana cement concrete specimens investigated using the pull-out tests as per Indian Standard Code IS:2770(Part-I; the bond stresses and corresponding slips were found out. The bond stress increased with increase in compressive strength. The peak bond stress was found to be 4.3 times more than the design bond stress as per IS:456-2000. The Geopolymer concretes possess higher bond strength compared to the conventional cement concretes.

  5. On Deterioration Mechanism of Concrete Exposed to Freeze-Thaw Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, B. Ya; Kramar, L. Ya; Schuldyakov, K. V.

    2017-11-01

    At present, concrete and reinforced concrete are gaining ground in all sectors of construction including construction in the extreme north, on shelves, etc. Under harsh service conditions, the durability of reinforced concrete structures is related to concrete frost resistance. Frost resistance tests are accompanied by the accumulation of residual dilation deformations affected by temperature-humidity stresses, ice formation and other factors. Porosity is an integral part of the concrete structure which is formed as a result of cement hydration. The prevailing hypothesis of a deterioration mechanism of concrete exposed to cyclic freezing, i.e. the hypothesis of hydraulic pressure of unfrozen water in microcapillaries, does not take into account a number of phenomena that affect concrete resistance to frost aggression. The main structural element of concrete, i.e. hardened cement paste, contains various hydration products, such as crystalline, semicrystalline and gel-like products, pores and non-hydrated residues of clinker nodules. These structural elements in service can gain thermodynamic stability which leads to the concrete structure coarsening, decrease in the relaxation capacity of concrete when exposed to cycling. Additional destructive factors are leaching of portlandite, the difference in thermal dilation coefficients of hydration products, non-hydrated relicts, aggregates and ice. The main way to increase concrete frost resistance is to reduce the macrocapillary porosity of hardened cement paste and to form stable gel-like hydration products.

  6. Study on reinforced lightweight coconut shell concrete beam behavior under torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunasekaran, K.; Ramasubramani, R.; Annadurai, R.; Prakash Chandar, S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Use of coconut shell as aggregate in concrete production. • Behavior of coconut shell concrete under torsion. • Pre and post cracking behavior and analysis. • Torsional reinforcement and ductility. • Crack width and stiffness. - Abstract: This research investigates and evaluates the results of coconut shell concrete beams subjected to torsion and compared with conventional concrete beams. Eight beams, four with coconut shell concrete and four with conventional concrete were fabricated and tested. Study includes the general cracking characteristics, pre cracking behavior and analysis, post cracking behavior and analysis, minimum torsional reinforcement, torsional reinforcement, ductility, crack width and stiffness. It was observed that the torsional behavior of coconut shell concrete is comparable to that of conventional concrete. Compare to ACI prediction, equation suggested by Macgregor is more conservative in calculating cracking torsional resistance. But for the calculation of ultimate torque strength ACI prediction is more conservative compared to the equation suggested by Macgregor. Indian standard is also conservative in this regard, but it was under estimated compared to ACI and Macgregor equations. Minimum torsional reinforcement in beams is necessary to ensure that the beam do not fail at cracking. Compared to conventional concrete specimens, coconut shell concrete specimens have more ductility. Crack width at initial cracking torque for both conventional and coconut shell concrete with corresponding reinforcement ratios is almost similar

  7. Shear strength of palm oil clinker concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, Bashar S.; Foo, W.L.; Hossain, K.M.A.; Abdullahi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Palm oil clinker can be used as lightweight aggregate for the production of structural concrete. ► The palm oil clinker concrete can be classified as lightweight concrete. ► Full scale reinforced palm oil clinker concrete beams without shear reinforcement were tested. ► The CSA based design equation can be used for the prediction of shear capacity with a limit. - Abstract: This paper presents experimental results on the shear behavior of reinforced concrete beams made of palm oil clinker concrete (POCC). Palm oil clinker (POC) is a by-product of palm oil industry and its utilization in concrete production not only solves the problem of disposing this solid waste but also helps to conserve natural resources. Seven reinforced POCC beams without shear reinforcement were fabricated and their shear behavior was tested. POCC has been classified as a lightweight structural concrete with air dry density less than 1850 kg/m 3 and a 28-day compressive strength more than 20 MPa. The experimental variables which have been considered in this study were the POCC compressive strength, shear span–depth ratio (a/d) and the ratio of tensile reinforcement (ρ). The results show that the failure mode of the reinforced POCC beam is similar to that of conventional reinforced concrete beam. In addition, the shear equation of the Canadian Standard Association (CSA) can be used in designing reinforced POCC beam with ρ ⩾ 1. However, a 0.5 safety factor should be included in the formula for ρ < 1

  8. Viscoelastic creep of high-temperature concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Marchertas, A.H.; Bazant, Z.P.

    1985-01-01

    Presented in this report is the analytical model for analysis of high temperature creep response of concrete. The creep law used is linear (viscoelastic), the temperature and moisture effects on the creep rate and also aging are included. Both constant and transient temperature as well as constant and transient moisture conditions are considered. Examples are presented to correlate experimental data with parameters of the analytical model by the use of a finite element scheme

  9. SIMULATION MODELS OF RESISTANCE TO CONCRETE MOVEMENT IN THE CONCRETE CONVEYING PIPE OF THE AUTOCONCRETE PUMP

    OpenAIRE

    Anofriev, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. In modern construction the placing of concrete is often performed using distribution equipment of concrete pumps. Increase of productivity and quality of this construction work requires improvement of both concrete pumps and their tooling. The concrete pumps tooling consists of standardized concrete conveying pipes and connector bends radius of up to 2 m. A promising direction of tooling improvement is the reduce of resistance to movement of the concrete in the concrete conveying pip...

  10. Effect of fly ash composition on the sulfate resistance of concrete[Includes the CSCE forum on professional practice and career development : 1. international engineering mechanics and materials specialty conference : 1. international/3. coastal, estuarine and offshore engineering specialty conference : 2. international/8. construction specialty conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhole, R.D.; Thomas, M.D.A. [New Brunswick Univ., Fredericton, NB (Canada); Folliard, K.J.; Drimalas, T. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Studies have shown that low-calcium Class F fly ashes obtained from burning coal in power stations can increase the sulfate resistance of Portland cement concrete. In many cases the sulfate resistance of concrete containing high-calcium Class C fly ash can be reduced compared to concrete without fly ash, due to the presence of crystalline C3A in the fly ash and calcium aluminate in the glass. This study investigated the differences in the glass composition and sulfate resistance of fly ashes with a range of calcium contents. The objective was to determine whether the behaviour of high-calcium fly ashes could be improved by blending with low-calcium fly ash. The sulfate resistance of cementitious systems consisting of a Type I Portland cement blended with Class F and Class C fly ashes of varying composition was evaluated by monitoring the length change of mortar bars stored in 5 per cent sodium sulfate solution. Scanning electron microscopy and electron dispersive X-ray analysis were used to characterize the glass phases of the fly ashes. The position occupied by the glass when plotted on a CaO-SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ternary was identified as belonging to one of the fields occupied by the mineral phases mullite, anorthosite or gehlenite. The glass showed a transition from alumino-silicate in Class F fly ash to a calcium alumino-silicate or mixed calcium-aluminate/alumino-silicate in Class C fly ashes with higher calcium contents. Fly ashes with high amounts of calcium-aluminate glass had reduced sulfate resistance when tested in mortars. Blends of Class C and Class F fly ashes had better sulfate resistance than mixes made with only Class C fly ash. A relationship was established between the calcium oxide content of the blended fly ash and sulfate resistance of mortar. 8 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs.

  11. Review of Japanese recommendations on design and construction of different classes of fiber reinforced concrete and application examples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uchida, Yuichi; Fischer, Gregor; Hishiki, Yoshihiro

    2008-01-01

    The development of concrete and cementitious composites with fiber reinforcement to improve the tensile load-deformation behavior has resulted in three distinct classes of materials. These include conventional Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC) with tension softening response, High Performance Fiber...... Reinforced Cement Composites (HPFRCC) with strain hardening and multiple cracking behavior, and Ultra High-strength Fiber Reinforced concrete (UFC) with increased tensile strength. The recommendations on the design, production, and application of these classes of fiber reinforced concrete have been...

  12. Durability of Self Compacting Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benmarce, A.; Boudjehem, H.; Bendjhaiche, R.

    2011-01-01

    Self compacting concrete (SCC) seem to be a very promising materials for construction thanks to their properties in a fresh state. Studying of the influence of the parameters of specific designed mixes to their mechanical, physical and chemical characteristics in a state hardened is an important stage so that it can be useful for new-to-the-field researchers and designers (worldwide) beginning studies and work involving self compacting concrete. The objective of this research is to study the durability of self compacting concrete. The durability of concrete depends very much on the porosity; the latter determines the intensity of interactions with aggressive agents. The pores inside of concrete facilitate the process of damage, which began generally on the surface. We are interested to measure the porosity of concrete on five SCC with different compositions (w/c, additives) and vibrated concrete to highlight the influence of the latter on the porosity, thereafter on the compressive strength and the transfer properties (oxygen permeability, chloride ion diffusion, capillary absorption). (author)

  13. Monitoring device for reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Tetsuo; Saito, Koichi; Furukawa, Hideyasu.

    1994-01-01

    A reactor container made of reinforced concretes is monitored for the temperature at each of portions upon placing concretes under construction of a plant, upon pressure-proof test and during plant operation. That is, optical fibers are uniformly laid spirally throughout the inside of the concretes. Pulses are injected from one end of the optical fibers, and the temperature at a reflection point can be measured by measuring specific rays (Raman scattering rays) among lights reflected after a predetermined period of time. According to the present invention, measurement for an optional position within a range where one fiber cable is laid can be conducted. Accordingly, it is possible to conduct temperature control upon concrete placing and apply temperature compensation for the measurement for stresses of the concretes and the reinforcing steels upon container pressure-proof. Further, during plant operation, if the temperature of the concretes rises due to thermal conduction of the temperature in the container, integrity of the concretes can be ensured by a countermeasures such as air conditioning. (I.S.)

  14. Freeze-Thaw Durability of Air-Entrained Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Shuai Shang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most damaging actions affecting concrete is the abrupt temperature change (freeze-thaw cycles. The types of deterioration of concrete structures by cyclic freeze-thaw can be largely classified into surface scaling (characterized by the weight loss and internal crack growth (characterized by the loss of dynamic modulus of elasticity. The present study explored the durability of concrete made with air-entraining agent subjected to 0, 100, 200, 300, and 400 cycles of freeze-thaw. The experimental study of C20, C25, C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete specimens was completed according to “the test method of long-term and durability on ordinary concrete” GB/T 50082-2009. The dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss of specimens were measured after different cycles of freeze-thaw. The influence of freeze-thaw cycles on the relative dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss was analyzed. The findings showed that the dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight decreased as the freeze-thaw cycles were repeated. They revealed that the C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete was still durable after 300 cycles of freeze-thaw according to the experimental results.

  15. Feasibility of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Rubberized Concrete in Cold Regions for High Volume Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Eid, Mahear A.

    There are many challenges faced with the use of Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) in cold regions, but with the inclusion of new technologies such as steel fibers and recycled tire crumb rubber efficient construction may be possible. Research was conducted on a modified concrete material that included both steel fibers and crumb rubber. The composite material was called Steel Fiber-Reinforced Rubberized Concrete (SFRRC). The objective of this investigation was to provide evidence showing that SFRRC can reduce tire rutting compared to asphaltic pavement. In addition, the research showed that the SFRRC could withstand freeze-thaw cycles and increase service life of roadways. Several tests were performed to determine the characteristics of the material. Freeze-thaw testing was performed to determine compressive strength loss and visual deterioration of the material. Wheel tracker rut testing was performed both with the standard steel wheel and with a modified studded rubber tire to determine plastic deformation and rut resistance. An experimental test slab was cast in place on a public approach to observe the construction procedures, the effects of studded tire wear and the frost actions in cold region conditions. Based on freeze-thaw and wheel tracker test results and observations of the experimental test slab, the SFRRC material shows viability in cold regions for resisting freeze-thaw actions. The freeze-thaw testing resulted in increased compressive strength after 300 freeze-thaw cycles and very low deterioration of material compared to standard PCC. The wheel tracker testing resulted in very low plastic deformation and minor material rutting with use of the studded rubber tire. The test slab showed very minor surface wear, no freeze-thaw cracking and no rutting after one winter of use. It is recommended that further testing of the material be conducted by means of a large-scale trial section. This would provide information with respect to cost analysis and

  16. A new concept for the targeted cutting of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, Steffen; Gentes, Sascha; Weidemann, Roman; Geimer, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    The decontamination and crushing of reinforced concrete is a main part during deconstruction of nuclear facilities. The selective treatment of contaminated or activated material is of special interest, since the non-contaminated material can be transferred into the normal reprocessing cycle. In the frame of a project concerning the innovative cutting of massive reinforced concrete structures an all-purpose system for spatially restricted and defined cutting of strongly reinforced concrete including packaging suitable for final disposal was developed. Due to the remote handling of the machine the dose rate for personnel can be reduced significantly. Main part of the system is the tool that can cut highly reinforced concrete without system or component replacement. The authors describe preliminary tests of these tools, further experiments and process optimization are necessary before the tools can be integrated into the new system.

  17. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  18. Observations on the electrical resistivity of steel fibre reinforced concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, Anders Ole Stubbe; Geiker, Mette Rica; Edvardsen, Carola

    2014-01-01

    concrete the model underestimated the influence of the addition of fibres. The results indicate that the addition of steel fibres reduce the electrical resistivity of concrete if the fibres are conductive. This represents a hypothetical case where all fibres are depassivated (corroding) which was created......Steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) is in many ways a well-known construction material, and its use has gradually increased over the last decades. The mechanical properties of SFRC are well described based on the theories of fracture mechanics. However, knowledge on other material properties......, including the electrical resistivity, is sparse. Among others, the electrical resistivity of concrete has an effect on the corrosion process of possible embedded bar reinforcement and transfer of stray current. The present paper provides experimental results concerning the influence of the fibre volume...

  19. Leakage of pressurized gases through unlined concrete containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizkalla, S.H.; Simmonds, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    Eight reinforced concrete specimens were fabricated and subjected to tensile membrane forces and air pressure to study the air leakage characteristics in cracked reinforced concrete members. A mathematical expression for the rate of pressurized air flowing through an idealized crack is presented. The mathematical expression is refined by using the experimental data to describe the air flow rate through any given crack pattern. Graphical charts are also presented for the calculation of the air leakage rate through concrete cracks. The concept of equivalent crack width for a given crack pattern is introduced. The mathematical expression and graphical charts are modified to include this equivalent crack width concept. The proposed technique is applicable for the prediction of the leakage from concrete containment structures or any similar structures due to high internal pressure sufficient to initiate cracking. (orig.)

  20. Urban Experiments and Concrete Utopias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Lasse

    2009-01-01

    The paper explores how concrete urban experiments can challenge the pecuniary version of the experience city and stimulate a locally rooted and democratic version of an experience based city using heterotopias and concrete utopias as the link between top down planning and bottom up experiments...... administrations with public participation in order to shape a cultural agenda. The second part of the paper looks at two cases: NDSM in Amsterdam and Platform4 in Aalborg suggesting that it is concrete urban experiments like these that can create a link between visions and local reality in the Experience city...

  1. DETERMINATION OF ADHESIVE STRENGTH LAYER’S ROLLER COMPACTED CONCRETE THE METHOD AXIAL EXTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Van Lam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Roller compacted concrete for the construction of hydraulic and hydroelectric buildings is a composite material, which consists of a binder, fine aggregate (sand, coarse aggregate (gravel or crushed stone, water and special additives that provide the desired concrete workability and impart the required concrete performance properties. Concrete mixture is prepared at from concrete mixing plants strictly metered quantities of cement, water, additives and graded aggregates, whereupon they are delivered to the site laying Mixer Truck and sealing layers with each stack layer. The advantages of roller compaction technology should include the reduction of construction time, which allows fast commissioning construction projects, as well as reduce the amount of investment required. One of the main problems encountered in the process of roller compaction of the concrete mix is the need to provide the required adhesion strength between layers of concrete. This paper presents a method for determining the strength of adhesion between the concrete layers of different ages roller compacted concrete using axial tension. This method makes it possible to obtain objective and accurate results with a total thickness of layers of compacted concrete of up to 300…400 mm. Results from this method, studies have shown that the value of strength between the concrete layers in addition to the composition of the concrete and adhesion depends on the quality and the parallel end surfaces of the cylinder-models, which are mounted steel plates for axial tension, as well as the state of the contact surfaces of the concrete layer. The method can be used to determine the strength of interlayer adhesion in roller compacted concrete, which are used in the construction of dams and other hydraulic structures.

  2. Precast concrete sandwich panels subjected to impact loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Matthew W.

    Precast concrete sandwich panels are a relatively new product in the construction industry. The design of these panels incorporates properties that allow for great resilience against temperature fluctuation as well as the very rapid and precise construction of facilities. The concrete sandwich panels investigated in this study represent the second generation of an ongoing research and development project. This second generation of panels have been engineered to construct midsized commercial buildings up to three stories in height as well as residential dwellings. The panels consist of a double-tee structural wythe, a foam core and a fascia wythe, joined by shear connectors. Structures constructed from these panels may be subjected to extreme loading including the effects of seismic and blast loading in addition to wind. The aim of this work was to investigate the behaviour of this particular sandwich panel when subjected to structural impact events. The experimental program consisted of fourteen concrete sandwich panels, five of which were considered full-sized specimens (2700 mm X 1200mm X 270 mm) and nine half-sized specimens (2700mm X 600mm X 270 mm) The panels were subjected to impact loads from a pendulum impact hammer where the total energy applied to the panels was varied by changing the mass of the hammer. The applied loads, displacements, accelerations, and strains at the mid-span of the panel as well as the reaction point forces were monitored during the impact. The behaviour of the panels was determined primarily from the experimental results. The applied loads at low energy levels that caused little to no residual deflection as well as the applied loads at high energy levels that represent catastrophic events and thus caused immediate failure were determined from an impact on the structural and the fascia wythes. Applied loads at intermediate energy levels representing extreme events were also used to determine whether or not the panels could withstand

  3. Betonreparationers holdbarhed (Durability of Concrete Repairs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brimnes, Eydbjørn; Dali, Bogi í; Larsen, Erik Stoklund

    1999-01-01

    Concrete repairs on 11 pillars on bridges built in the sixties and repaired 8 to 9 years ago have been examined. Especially the chloride penetration in the repair concrete have been measured. Chloride penetration in the repair concrete is much lower than in the original concrete....

  4. Biaxial Stress Tests of Plain Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.K.; Cho, M.S.; Song, Y.C. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2001-07-01

    Containment concrete specimens(4000, 5000psi) were tested under biaxial stress and presented basic physical properties and biaxial failure envelops for the concrete specimens. Failure behaviors of concrete under biaxial stress were assessed with stress-strain responses and failure modes. Here provided real test data to develop nonlinear finite element concrete models. (author). 15 refs., 46 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Durability of fibre reinforced concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    1996-01-01

    The planned research will indicate, whether fibre reinforced concrete has better or worse durability than normal concrete. Durability specimens will be measured on cracked as well as uncracked specimens. Also the pore structure in the concrete will be characterized.Keywords: Fibre reinforced...... concrete, durability, pore structure, mechanical load...

  6. Rotational Capacity of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulfkjær, J. P.; Henriksen, M. S.; Brincker, Rune

    1995-01-01

    programme where 120 reinforced concrete beams, 54 plain concrete beams and 324 concrete cylinders are tested. For the reinforced concrete beams four different parar meters are varied. The slenderness is 6, 12 and 18, the beam depth is 100 mm, 200 mm and 400 mm giving nine different geometries, five...

  7. Determination of concrete cover thickness in a reinforced concrete pillar by observation of the scattered electromagnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, Pietro Paolo; Frezza, Fabrizio; Mangini, Fabio; Pajewski, Lara

    2017-04-01

    concrete; it ensures also an optimal transmission and distribution of the adhesion forces in the pillar. Acknowledgement This work is a contribution to COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar" (www.GPRadar.eu, www.cost.eu).

  8. Engineering properties of inorganic polymer concretes (IPCs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofi, M.; Deventer, J.S.J. van; Mendis, P.A.; Lukey, G.C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the engineering properties of inorganic polymer concretes (IPCs) with a compressive strength of 50 MPa. The study includes a determination of the modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, compressive strength, and the splitting tensile strength and flexural strength of IPCs, formulated using three different sources of Class-F fly ash. Six IPC mix designs were adopted to evaluate the effects of the inclusion of coarse aggregates and granulated blast furnace slag into the mixes. A total of 90 cylindrical and 24 small beam specimens were investigated, and all tests were carried out pursuant to the relevant Australian Standards. Although some variability between the mixes was observed, the results show that, in most cases, the engineering properties of IPCs compare favorably to those predicted by the relevant Australian Standards for concrete mixtures

  9. Mechanical properties of high-strength concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtarzadeh, Alireza

    This report summarizes an experimental program conducted to investigate production techniques and mechanical properties of high strength concrete in general and to provide recommendations for using these concretes in manufacturing precast/prestressed bridge girders. Test variables included total amount and composition of cementitious material (portland cement, fly ash, and silica fume), type and brand of cement, type of silica fume (dry densified and slurry), type and brand of high-range water-reducing admixture, type of aggregate, aggregate gradation, maximum aggregate size, and curing. Tests were conducted to determine the effects of these variables on changes in compressive strength and modulus of elasticity over time, splitting tensile strength, modulus of rupture, creep, shrinkage, and absorption potential (as an indirect indicator of permeability). Also investigated were the effects of test parameters such as mold size, mold material, and end condition. Over 6,300 specimens were cast from approximately 140 mixes over a period of 3 years.

  10. Physio-chemical reactions in recycle aggregate concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, Vivian W.Y.; Gao, X.F.; Tam, C.M.; Ng, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    Concrete waste constitutes the major proportion of construction waste at about 50% of the total waste generated. An effective way to reduce concrete waste is to reuse it as recycled aggregate (RA) for the production of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC). This paper studies the physio-chemical reactions of cement paste around aggregate for normal aggregate concrete (NAC) and RAC mixed with normal mixing approach (NMA) and two-stage mixing approach (TSMA) by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Four kinds of physio-chemical reactions have been recorded from the concrete samples, including the dehydration of C 3 S 2 H 3 , iron-substituted ettringite, dehydroxylation of CH and development of C 6 S 3 H at about 90 deg. C, 135 deg. C, 441 deg. C and 570 deg. C, respectively. From the DSC results, it is confirmed that the concrete samples with RA substitution have generated less amount of strength enhancement chemical products when compared to those without RA substitution. However, the results from the TSMA are found improving the RAC quality. The pre-mix procedure of the TSMA can effectively develop some strength enhancing chemical products including, C 3 S 2 H 3 , ettringite, CH and C 6 S 3 H, which shows that RAC made from the TSMA can improve the hydration processes

  11. Physio-chemical reactions in recycle aggregate concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Vivian W Y; Gao, X F; Tam, C M; Ng, K M

    2009-04-30

    Concrete waste constitutes the major proportion of construction waste at about 50% of the total waste generated. An effective way to reduce concrete waste is to reuse it as recycled aggregate (RA) for the production of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC). This paper studies the physio-chemical reactions of cement paste around aggregate for normal aggregate concrete (NAC) and RAC mixed with normal mixing approach (NMA) and two-stage mixing approach (TSMA) by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Four kinds of physio-chemical reactions have been recorded from the concrete samples, including the dehydration of C(3)S(2)H(3), iron-substituted ettringite, dehydroxylation of CH and development of C(6)S(3)H at about 90 degrees C, 135 degrees C, 441 degrees C and 570 degrees C, respectively. From the DSC results, it is confirmed that the concrete samples with RA substitution have generated less amount of strength enhancement chemical products when compared to those without RA substitution. However, the results from the TSMA are found improving the RAC quality. The pre-mix procedure of the TSMA can effectively develop some strength enhancing chemical products including, C(3)S(2)H(3), ettringite, CH and C(6)S(3)H, which shows that RAC made from the TSMA can improve the hydration processes.

  12. Current challenges and future directions for bacterial self-healing concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun Suk; Park, Woojun

    2018-04-01

    Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP) has been widely explored and applied in the field of environmental engineering over the last decade. Calcium carbonate is naturally precipitated as a byproduct of various microbial metabolic activities. This biological process was brought into practical use to restore construction materials, strengthen and remediate soil, and sequester carbon. MICP has also been extensively examined for applications in self-healing concrete. Biogenic crack repair helps mitigate the high maintenance costs of concrete in an eco-friendly manner. In this process, calcium carbonate precipitation (CCP)-capable bacteria and nutrients are embedded inside the concrete. These bacteria are expected to increase the durability of the concrete by precipitating calcium carbonate in situ to heal cracks that develop in the concrete. However, several challenges exist with respect to embedding such bacteria; harsh conditions in concrete matrices are unsuitable for bacterial life, including high alkalinity (pH up to 13), high temperatures during manufacturing processes, and limited oxygen supply. Additionally, many biological factors, including the optimum conditions for MICP, the molecular mechanisms involved in MICP, the specific microorganisms suitable for application in concrete, the survival characteristics of the microorganisms embedded in concrete, and the amount of MICP in concrete, remain unclear. In this paper, metabolic pathways that result in conditions favorable for calcium carbonate precipitation, current and potential applications in concrete, and the remaining biological challenges are reviewed.

  13. Physical Model Method for Seismic Study of Concrete Dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Roşca

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the dynamic behaviour of concrete dams by means of the physical model method is very useful to understand the failure mechanism of these structures to action of the strong earthquakes. Physical model method consists in two main processes. Firstly, a study model must be designed by a physical modeling process using the dynamic modeling theory. The result is a equations system of dimensioning the physical model. After the construction and instrumentation of the scale physical model a structural analysis based on experimental means is performed. The experimental results are gathered and are available to be analysed. Depending on the aim of the research may be designed an elastic or a failure physical model. The requirements for the elastic model construction are easier to accomplish in contrast with those required for a failure model, but the obtained results provide narrow information. In order to study the behaviour of concrete dams to strong seismic action is required the employment of failure physical models able to simulate accurately the possible opening of joint, sliding between concrete blocks and the cracking of concrete. The design relations for both elastic and failure physical models are based on dimensional analysis and consist of similitude relations among the physical quantities involved in the phenomenon. The using of physical models of great or medium dimensions as well as its instrumentation creates great advantages, but this operation involves a large amount of financial, logistic and time resources.

  14. Influence of length-to-diameter ratio on shrinkage of basalt fiber concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijie, MA; Yang, Jiansen; Liu, Yuan; Zheng, Xiaojun

    2017-09-01

    In order to study the shrinkage performance of basalt concrete, using the shrinkage rate as index, the work not only studied the influence of different length-to-diameter ratio (LDR) on plastic shrinkage and drying shrinkage of basalt fiber concrete, but also analyzed the action mechanism. The results show that when the fiber content is 0.1%, the LDR of 800 and 1200 take better effects on reducing plastic shrinkage, however the fiber content is 0.3%, that of LDR 600 is better. To improve drying shrinkage, the fiber of LDR 800 takes best effect. In the concrete structure, the adding basalt fibers form a uniform and chaotic supporting system, optimize the pore and the void structure of concrete, make the material further compacted, reduce the water loss, so as to decrease the shrinkage of concrete effectively.

  15. A multifunctional design approach for sustainable concrete : with application to concrete mass products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hüsken, G.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis provides a multifunctional design approach for sustainable concrete, particularly earth-moist concrete (EMC), with application to concrete mass products. EMC is a concrete with low water content and stiff consistency that is used for the production of concrete mass products, such as

  16. Towards Better Understanding of Concrete Containing Recycled Concrete Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham Qasrawi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of using recycled concrete aggregates (RCA on the basic properties of normal concrete is studied. First, recycled aggregate properties have been determined and compared to those of normal aggregates. Except for absorption, there was not a significant difference between the two. Later, recycled aggregates were introduced in concrete mixes. In these mixes, natural coarse aggregate was partly or totally replaced by recycled aggregates. Results show that the use of recycled aggregates has an adverse effect on the workability and air content of fresh concrete. Depending on the water/cement ratio and on the percent of the normal aggregate replaced by RCA, the concrete strength is reduced by 5% to 25%, while the tensile strength is reduced by 4% to 14%. All results are compared with previous research. As new in this research, the paper introduces a simple formula for the prediction of the modulus of elasticity of RCA concrete. Furthermore, the paper shows the variation of the air content of RAC.

  17. Concrete density estimation by rebound hammer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, Mohamad Pauzi bin; Masenwat, Noor Azreen bin; Sani, Suhairy bin; Mohd, Shukri; Jefri, Muhamad Hafizie Bin; Abdullah, Mahadzir Bin; Isa, Nasharuddin bin; Mahmud, Mohamad Haniza bin

    2016-01-01

    Concrete is the most common and cheap material for radiation shielding. Compressive strength is the main parameter checked for determining concrete quality. However, for shielding purposes density is the parameter that needs to be considered. X- and -gamma radiations are effectively absorbed by a material with high atomic number and high density such as concrete. The high strength normally implies to higher density in concrete but this is not always true. This paper explains and discusses the correlation between rebound hammer testing and density for concrete containing hematite aggregates. A comparison is also made with normal concrete i.e. concrete containing crushed granite

  18. Nondestructive testing of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rufino, Randy R.; Relunia, Estrella

    1999-01-01

    Nondestructive testing of concrete is highly inhomogeneous which makes it cumbersome to setup experimental procedures and analyze experimental data. However, recent research and development activities have discovered the different methods of NDT, like the electromagnetic method, ultrasonic pulse velocity test, pulse echo/impact echo test, infrared thermography, radar or short pulse radar techniques, neutron and gamma radiometry, radiography, carbonation test and half-cell potential method available for NDT of concrete structures. NDT of concrete is emerging as a useful tool for quality control and assurance. This papers also describes the more common NDT methods discussed during the two-week course on 'Nondestructive Testing of Concrete Structures', held at the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) in Malaysia, which was jointly organized by MINT and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

  19. Tests on standard concrete samples

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    Compression and tensile tests on standard concrete samples. The use of centrifugal force in tensile testing has been developed by the SB Division and the instruments were built in the Central workshops.

  20. An fMRI study of concreteness effects during spoken word recognition in aging. Preservation or attenuation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy eRoxbury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is unclear whether healthy aging influences concreteness effects (ie. the processing advantage seen for concrete over abstract words and its associated neural mechanisms. We conducted an fMRI study on young and older healthy adults performing auditory lexical decisions on concrete versus abstract words. We found that spoken comprehension of concrete and abstract words appears relatively preserved for healthy older individuals, including the concreteness effect. This preserved performance was supported by altered activity in left hemisphere regions including the inferior and middle frontal gyri, angular gyrus, and fusiform gyrus. This pattern is consistent with age-related compensatory mechanisms supporting spoken word processing.

  1. Study on effects of solar radiation and rain on shrinkage, shrinkage cracking and creep of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asamoto, Shingo; Ohtsuka, Ayumu; Kuwahara, Yuta; Miura, Chikako

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of actual environmental actions on shrinkage, creep and shrinkage cracking of concrete are studied comprehensively. Prismatic specimens of plain concrete were exposed to three sets of artificial outdoor conditions with or without solar radiation and rain to examine the shrinkage. For the purpose of studying shrinkage cracking behavior, prismatic concrete specimens with reinforcing steel were also subjected to the above conditions at the same time. The shrinkage behavior is described focusing on the effects of solar radiation and rain based on the moisture loss. The significant environment actions to induce shrinkage cracks are investigated from viewpoints of the amount of the shrinkage and the tensile strength. Finally, specific compressive creep behavior according to solar radiation and rainfall is discussed. It is found that rain can greatly inhibit the progresses of concrete shrinkage and creep while solar radiation is likely to promote shrinkage cracking and creep.

  2. Modelling reinforcement corrosion in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    A physio-chemical model for the simulation of reinforcement corrosion in concrete struc-tures was developed. The model allows for simulation of initiation and subsequent propaga-tion of reinforcement corrosion. Corrosion is assumed to be initiated once a defined critical chloride threshold......, a numerical example is pre-sented, that illustrates the formation of corrosion cells as well as propagation of corrosion in a reinforced concrete structure....

  3. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Jack J.; Elling, David; Reams, Walter

    1990-01-01

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  4. Annotated Bibliography: Polymers in Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    Berka , L., "Determination of the Creeping and Relaxation Functions . from the Results of the Creeping and Relaxation Tests," RILE. Symposium on Synthetic...However, for both foamed glass and . Mearlcrete concretes the agreement between prediction and experiment is not too bad . The reason for the serious...chemical resistance of various concretes is in the following order: (good) PIAC > AC > WCC ( bad ). The aggressive chemical agents that attack markedly

  5. Concrete with supplementary cementitious materials

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Ole M; Kovler, Konstantin; De Belie, Nele

    2016-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the MSSCE 2016 conference segment on “Concrete with Supplementary Cementitious Materials” (SCM). The conference segment is organized by the RILEM technical committee TC 238-SCM: Hydration and microstructure of concrete with supplementary cementitious materials. TC 238-SCM started activities in 2011 and has about 50 members from all over the world. The main objective of the committee is to support the increasing utilisation of hydraulic...

  6. Porous Structure of Road Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Пшембаев, М. К.; Гиринский, В. В.; Ковалев, Я. Н.; Яглов, В. Н.; Будниченко, С. С.

    2016-01-01

    Having a great number of concrete structure classifications it is recommended to specify the following three principal types: microstructure – cement stone structure; mesostructure – structure of cement-sand mortar in concrete; macrostucture – two-component system that consists of mortar and coarse aggregate. Every mentioned-above structure has its own specific features which are related to the conditions of their formation. Thus, microstructure of cement stone can be characterized by such st...

  7. Hierarchical processing in music, language, and action: Lashley revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, W Tecumseh; Martins, Mauricio D

    2014-05-01

    Sixty years ago, Karl Lashley suggested that complex action sequences, from simple motor acts to language and music, are a fundamental but neglected aspect of neural function. Lashley demonstrated the inadequacy of then-standard models of associative chaining, positing a more flexible and generalized "syntax of action" necessary to encompass key aspects of language and music. He suggested that hierarchy in language and music builds upon a more basic sequential action system, and provided several concrete hypotheses about the nature of this system. Here, we review a diverse set of modern data concerning musical, linguistic, and other action processing, finding them largely consistent with an updated neuroanatomical version of Lashley's hypotheses. In particular, the lateral premotor cortex, including Broca's area, plays important roles in hierarchical processing in language, music, and at least some action sequences. Although the precise computational function of the lateral prefrontal regions in action syntax remains debated, Lashley's notion-that this cortical region implements a working-memory buffer or stack scannable by posterior and subcortical brain regions-is consistent with considerable experimental data. © 2014 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of The New York Academy of Sciences.

  8. Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Hybrid Trapezoidal Box Girders Using Ordinary and Highly Strength Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nameer A. Alawsh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the general behavior of reinforced concrete hybrid box girders is studied by experimental and numerical investigation. Experimental work is included casting monolithically five specimens of box girders with trapezoidal cross section and testing it as simply supported under two point loading. Two specimens were cast as homogenous box girders (full normal strength concrete (NSC (about 35 MPa and full high strength concrete (HSC (about 55 MPa and three specimens were cast as hybrid box girders (HSC in upper flange only, HSC in upper flange and half depth of webs, and HSC in bottom flange and total depth of webs. Experimental results showed significant effects of concrete hybridization on the structural behavior of box girders specimens such as: cracking loads, cracking patterns, ultimate strengths, and failure modes. The ultimate strength of Hybrid box girders increased by 23% as average when compared with the homogenous box girder (full NSC and decreased by 9% as average when compared with homogenous box girder (full HSC. In numerical investigation, the tested specimens were modeled and analyzed using three dimensional non-linear finite element analysis. The analysis was carried out by using a computer program (ANSYS V16.1. The numerical results showed an acceptable agreement with the experimental work with difference about (3.12% and 9.588% as average for ultimate load and deflection, respectively.

  9. Chlorine signal attenuation in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; Ur-Rehman, Khateeb; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2015-11-01

    The intensity of prompt gamma-ray was measured at various depths from chlorine-contaminated silica fume (SF) concrete slab concrete specimens using portable neutron generator-based prompt gamma-ray setup. The intensity of 6.11MeV chloride gamma-rays was measured from the chloride contaminated slab at distance of 15.25, 20.25, 25.25, 30.25 and 35.25cm from neutron target in a SF cement concrete slab specimens. Due to attenuation of thermal neutron flux and emitted gamma-ray intensity in SF cement concrete at various depths, the measured intensity of chlorine gamma-rays decreases non-linearly with increasing depth in concrete. A good agreement was noted between the experimental results and the results of Monte Carlo simulation. This study has provided useful experimental data for evaluating the chloride contamination in the SF concrete utilizing gamma-ray attenuation method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Concrete waste reduction of 50%

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, R.M. de; Van der Wagt, K.M.; Van der Kruk, E.; Meeussen, H.W.

    2016-01-01

    During decommissioning quite a volume of concrete waste is produced. The degree of activation of the waste can range from clearly activated material to slightly activated or contaminated concrete. The degree of activation influences the applicable waste management processes that can be applied. The subsequent waste management processes can be identified for concrete waste are; disposal, segregation, re-use, conditional release and release. With each of these steps, the footprint of radioactive decommissioning waste is reduced. Future developments for concrete waste reduction can be achieved by applying smart materials in new build facilities (i.e. fast decaying materials). NRG (Nuclear Research and consultancy Group) has investigated distinctive waste management processes to reduce the foot-print of concrete waste streams resulting from decommissioning. We have investigated which processes can be applied in the Netherlands, both under current legislation and with small changes in legislation. We have also investigated the separation process in more detail. Pilot tests with a newly patented process have been started in 2015. We expect that our separation methods will reduce the footprint reduction of concrete waste by approximately 50% due to release or re-use in the nuclear sector or in the conventional industry. (authors)

  11. Compressive behavior of steel fiber reinforced recycled aggregate concrete after exposure to elevated temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, G. M.; He, Y. H.; Yang, H.; Chen, J. F.; Guo, Y.C.

    2014-01-01

    For sustainability considerations, the use of recycled aggregate in concrete has attracted many interests in the research community. One of the main concerns for using such concrete in buildings is its spalling in fire. This may be alleviated by adding steel fibers to form steel fiber reinforced recycled aggregate concrete (SFRAC). This paper presents an experimental investigation into the compressive properties of SFRAC cylinders after exposure to elevated temperatures, including the compres...

  12. The Effect of High Temperatures on the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidenfeld, G.; Aharon, G.; Hochbaum, I.

    2002-01-01

    Concrete thermal conductivity is an important property for thermal analysis of nuclear accidents.Concrete compositions include water,sand,cement and aggregates of various kinds and combinations.Values of concrete's thermal conductivity for some different compositions can be found in the literature[1]but since the material composition and its temperature significantly affect this property,the exact value of a specific composition should be measured

  13. STRENGTH AND DURABILITY STUDIES ON SODIUM NITRITE INHIBITOR IN ORDINARY AND HIGH PERFORMANCE CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    Madhavan, V.; Jeyasehar, C. Antony

    2013-01-01

    Deterioration of concrete occurs due to physical actions, chemical reactions and electro chemical reactions at steel / concrete interface causing reinforcement corrosion. Among these, reinforcement corrosion is one of the most important causes of deterioration. Reinforcement corrosion induced by chlorides is one of the most frequent causes of corrosion of steel and 40 percent of steel corrodes due to chloride attack. To delay the corrosion process many techniques such as increasing the concre...

  14. Method on the aging evaluation in nuclear power plant concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitsutaka, Yoshinori; Tsukagoshi, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, method on the durability evaluation in nuclear power plant concrete structures was investigated. In view of the importance of evaluating the degree of deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, relationships should be formulated among the number of years elapsed, t, the amount of action of a deteriorative factor, F, the degree of material deterioration, D, and the performance of the structure, P. Evaluation by PDFt diagrams combining these relationships may be effective. A detailed procedure of durability evaluation for a reinforced concrete structure using PDFt concept is presented for the deterioration factors of thermal effect, irradiation, neutralization and penetration of salinity by referring to the recent papers

  15. Evaluation and rehabilitation of corrosion damaged reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, I.S.

    1999-01-01

    For the last two decades, rehabilitation of corrosion damaged concrete structures has been one of the most important challenges faced by the construction industry throughout the world. The extent of the damage is significant in cold climates and also in hot and humid climates. In both cases, the corrosion is invariably initiated by ingress of salts into the concrete either from de-icing salts used on roads, or from salt-laden air, soils or ground water. However, there is a contrast in sites of distress in the two climatic regions mentioned above. In cold climates, where de-icing salts are used, the damage is generally to superstructures and is therefore visible, but in hot, humid coastal regions damage is primarily in the substructures and may not be so clearly apparent. This paper presents the corrosion mechanism in concrete deterioration, the methods of evaluation of the damaged structures, and rehabilitation strategies. A case history of a concrete rehabilitation project is included together with some lessons learned in rehabilitation of corrosion damaged structures. Recommendations are made for maintenance of concrete structures and a warning is issued that salt run-off from roads in cold climates may cause distress in below ground concrete structures, similar to structures in hot and humid climates with saline groundwater and soils. (author)

  16. Use of selected waste materials in concrete mixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batayneh, Malek; Marie, Iqbal; Asi, Ibrahim

    2007-01-01

    A modern lifestyle, alongside the advancement of technology has led to an increase in the amount and type of waste being generated, leading to a waste disposal crisis. This study tackles the problem of the waste that is generated from construction fields, such as demolished concrete, glass, and plastic. In order to dispose of or at least reduce the accumulation of certain kinds of waste, it has been suggested to reuse some of these waste materials to substitute a percentage of the primary materials used in the ordinary portland cement concrete (OPC). The waste materials considered to be recycled in this study consist of glass, plastics, and demolished concrete. Such recycling not only helps conserve natural resources, but also helps solve a growing waste disposal crisis. Ground plastics and glass were used to replace up to 20% of fine aggregates in concrete mixes, while crushed concrete was used to replace up to 20% of coarse aggregates. To evaluate these replacements on the properties of the OPC mixes, a number of laboratory tests were carried out. These tests included workability, unit weight, compressive strength, flexural strength, and indirect tensile strength (splitting). The main findings of this investigation revealed that the three types of waste materials could be reused successfully as partial substitutes for sand or coarse aggregates in concrete mixtures.

  17. Corrosion initiation and service life of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byung Hwan Oh; Bong Seok Jang

    2005-01-01

    The Corrosion of steel reinforcements in concrete is of great concern in the view of safety and durability of reinforced concrete structures. The reinforced concrete structures exposed to sea environments suffer from corrosion of steel bars due to chloride ingress. The chloride penetration into concrete is influenced by many parameters such as type of cement, mixture proportions and existence of rebars. The conventional diffusion analyses have neglected the existence of steel bar in concrete. The purpose of the present paper is, therefore, to explore the effects of reinforcement on the chloride diffusion in concrete structures by incorporating realistic diffusion models. To this end, the nonlinear binding isotherm which includes the effects of cement types and mixture proportion has been introduced in the chloride diffusion analysis. The effects of reinforcements on the chloride penetration have been analyzed through finite element analysis. The present study indicates that the chlorides are accumulated in front of a reinforcing bar and the accumulation of chlorides is much more pronounced for the case of larger-size bars. The higher accumulation of chlorides at bar location causes faster corrosion of reinforcing bars. The corrosion initiation time reduces by about 30-40 percent when the existence of rebar is considered in the chloride diffusion analysis. (authors)

  18. Identification of Delamination in Concrete Slabs by SIBIE Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, M.; Yagi, Y.; Ohtsu, M.

    2017-01-01

    The Impact-Echo method is known as a non-destructive testing for concrete structures. The technique is based on the use of low-frequency elastic waves that propagate in concrete to determine the thickness and to detect internal flaws in concrete. The presence and locations of defects in concrete are estimated from identifying peak frequencies in the frequency spectra, which are responsible for the resonance due to time-of-flight from the defects. In practical applications, however, obtained spectra include so many peak frequencies that it is fairly difficult to identify the defects correctly. In order to improve the Impact-Echo method, Stack Imaging of spectral amplitudes Based on Impact-Echo (SIBIE) procedure is developed as an imaging technique applied to the Impact-Echo data, where defects in concrete are identified visually at the cross-section. In this study, the SIBIE procedure is applied to identify the delamination in a concrete slab. It is demonstrated that the delamination can be identified with reasonable accuracy. (paper)

  19. Use of selected waste materials in concrete mixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batayneh, Malek; Marie, Iqbal; Asi, Ibrahim

    2007-01-01

    A modern lifestyle, alongside the advancement of technology has led to an increase in the amount and type of waste being generated, leading to a waste disposal crisis. This study tackles the problem of the waste that is generated from construction fields, such as demolished concrete, glass, and plastic. In order to dispose of or at least reduce the accumulation of certain kinds of waste, it has been suggested to reuse some of these waste materials to substitute a percentage of the primary materials used in the ordinary portland cement concrete (OPC). The waste materials considered to be recycled in this study consist of glass, plastics, and demolished concrete. Such recycling not only helps conserve natural resources, but also helps solve a growing waste disposal crisis. Ground plastics and glass were used to replace up to 20% of fine aggregates in concrete mixes, while crushed concrete was used to replace up to 20% of coarse aggregates. To evaluate these replacements on the properties of the OPC mixes, a number of laboratory tests were carried out. These tests included workability, unit weight, compressive strength, flexural strength, and indirect tensile strength (splitting). The main findings of this investigation revealed that the three types of waste materials could be reused successfully as partial substitutes for sand or coarse aggregates in concrete mixtures

  20. Processed wastewater sludge for improvement of mechanical properties of concretes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera-Diaz, Carlos, E-mail: cbd0044@yahoo.com [Centro Conjunto de Investigacion en Quimica Sustentable, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico - Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UAEM-UNAM), Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, km 14.5, Unidad El Rosedal, C.P. 50200, Toluca, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Martinez-Barrera, Gonzalo [Laboratorio de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Materiales Avanzados (LIDMA), Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, Km.12, San Cayetano C.P. 50200, Toluca, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Gencel, Osman [Civil Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Bartin University, 74100 Bartin (Turkey); Bernal-Martinez, Lina A. [Centro Conjunto de Investigacion en Quimica Sustentable, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico - Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UAEM-UNAM), Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, km 14.5, Unidad El Rosedal, C.P. 50200, Toluca, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Brostow, Witold [Laboratory of Advanced Polymers and Optimized Materials (LAPOM), Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Center for Advanced Research and Technology (CART), University of North Texas, 1150 Union Circle 305310, Denton, TX 76203-5017 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Electrochemical methods produce less amount of residual sludge as compared with chemical procedures. {yields} Wastewater sludge contains a large amount of water. {yields} The residual sludge is used to prepare cylinder specimen concrete. {yields} There are improvements in the elastic modulus of the concrete when is prepared with residual sludge. - Abstract: Two problems are addressed simultaneously. One is the utilisation of sludge from the treatment of wastewater. The other is the modification of the mechanical properties of concrete. The sludge was subjected to two series of treatments. In one series, coagulants were used, including ferrous sulphate, aluminium sulphate or aluminium polyhydroxychloride. In the other series, an electrochemical treatment was applied with several starting values of pH. Then, concretes consisting of a cement matrix, silica sand, marble and one of the sludges were developed. Specimens without sludge were prepared for comparison. Curing times and aggregate concentrations were varied. The compressive strength, compressive strain at yield point, and static and dynamic elastic moduli were determined. Diagrams of the compressive strength and compressive strain at the yield point as a function of time passed through the minima as a function of time for concretes containing sludge; therefore, the presence of sludge has beneficial effects on the long term properties. Some morphological changes caused by the presence of sludge are seen in scanning electron microscopy. A way of utilising sludge is thus provided together with a way to improve the compressive strain at yield point of concrete.