WorldWideScience

Sample records for include classroom correspondence

  1. Information for Teachers (Including Classroom Activities), Skylab Student Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This program is intended to directly involve the educational community in space experiments, many of which can be related to existing curricula. Included in this first packet are: 1) a brief description of the Skylab Program and the National Science Teachers Association-National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NSTA-NASA) Skylab Student…

  2. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ias

    tum associated with such an apparently simple purely oscillatory 1D harmonic lattice system. The classroom exercise will conclude with a sug- gestion for the possibility that the 'Concrete' case may well correspond to that of hard nanopar- ticulate crystallites embedded in a 1D elastic con- tinuum, e.g., a spider dragline silk, ...

  3. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. Jyoti Ramakrishnan. M.Stat. lind Year. Indian Statistical Institute ... is, as evident from the normal meaning of the English word, a correspondence which associates ...

  4. Discovery of scientific correspondence of P.P.C. Hoek (1851—1914), including three unpublished letters by Charles Darwin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Florence F.J.M.; Winthagen, Diny

    1990-01-01

    Recently the scientific correspondence of the Dutch zoologist P.P.C. Hoek (1851—1914) turned up in the Artis Library. This collection contains three hitherto unpublished letters from Charles Darwin. It appears that Charles Darwin recommended Hoek to the favour of Sir Charles Wyville Thomson upon

  5. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CLASSROOM. The subscript on S corresponds to the value of n in (4). Various distances are measured. The angle of grazing incidence can be calculated from. 2fJ = tan-1 (OS/PO). (6). Note that () is not pre-decided. The scale is fixed at a certain inclination and () is obtained by measuring OS and PO. The angle d ()n can be ...

  6. Including children with autism in general education classrooms. A review of effective strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrower, J K; Dunlap, G

    2001-10-01

    Children with autism can benefit from participation in inclusive classroom environments, and many experts assert that inclusion is a civil right and is responsible for nurturing appropriate social development. However, most children with autism require specialized supports to experience success in these educational contexts. This article provides a review of the empirical research that has addressed procedures for promoting successful inclusion of students with autism. Strategies reviewed include antecedent manipulations, delayed contingencies, self-management, peer-mediated interventions, and other approaches that have been demonstrated in the literature to be useful. The article concludes with a discussion of future research needs.

  7. Toward a More Inclusive Multicultural Education: Methods for Including LGBT Themes in K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Although multicultural education scholars and the National Association for Multicultural Education (NAME) have encouraged the implementation of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender themes in the classroom (NAME, 2005), many classroom educators look the other way because of fear, retaliation, or personal discomfort. The following article will…

  8. General Education Pre-Service Teachers Perceptions of Including Students with Disabilities in Their Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajuwon, Paul M.; Lechtenberger, DeAnn; Griffin-Shirley, Nora; Sokolosky, Stephanie; Zhou, Li; Mullins, Frank E.

    2012-01-01

    In this empirical study, the authors compare the perceptions of future general educators on two dichotomous scales (hostility/receptivity and anxiety/calmness) regarding the teaching of students with exceptionalities in their classrooms. A total of 116 teacher candidates from one southwestern and two Midwestern universities in the United States…

  9. Secondary Teacher Attitudes toward Including English-Language Learners in Mainstream Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Jenelle R.

    2006-01-01

    Researchers have given limited attention to teacher attitudes toward inclusion of English-language learners (ELLs) in mainstream classrooms. The author explored 4 categories within secondary teacher attitudes toward ELL inclusion: (a) ELL inclusion, (b) coursework modification for ELLS, (c) professional development for working with ELLs, and (d)…

  10. An extended corresponding-states model for predicting thermodynamic properties of N2-Ar-O2 mixtures including vapor-liquid equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, W. P.; Jacobsen, R. T.; Lemmon, E. W.; Penoncello, S. G.; Beyerlein, S. W.

    1994-11-01

    A formulation developed previously for the prediction of the thermodynamic properties of single-phase states of binary and ternary mixtures in the nitrogen-argon-oxygen system has been revised to include the calculation of vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) properties. The model is based on the theory of extended corresponding states with van der Waals mixing rules. Binary interaction parameters have been determined with single-phase P-p-T and vaporliquid equilibrium data to improve the accuracy of thermodynamic property predictions. The model accurately represents single-phase and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties over a wide range of compositions for binary and ternary mixtures. Comparisons of calculated properties to selected mixture data for both single-phase and VLE states are included.

  11. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invitt responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching ...

  12. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters reiated to ...

  13. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues arid sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to ...

  14. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CLASSROOM. Environmental Education in a 'Green Classroom'. Keywords. Environmental attitudes, expe- riential learning, learning outside school, small animals (inverte- brates, insects). Jürgen Drissner1, Hans-Martin. Haase2, Mara Nikolajek3 and. Katrin Hille4. 1,3 Botanical Garden, University of Ulm, D–89081 ULM, ...

  15. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to ...

  16. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. How Stimulating Ideas Can Generate An Attitude of Inquiry.

  17. Foreign correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Hamilton, John Maxwell

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of foreign news, its history, transformation and indeed its future have not been much studied. The scholarly community often calls attention to journalism's shortcomings covering the world, yet the topic has not been systematically examined across countries or over time. The need to redress this neglect and the desire to assess the impact of new media technologies on the future of journalism - including foreign correspondence - provide the motivation for this stimulating, exciting and thought-provoking book. While the old economic models supporting news have crumbled in

  18. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Classroom" section of Resonance, February 1996. As a teacher of chemistry, I read the author's observations on the textbook experiment to determine the percentage of oxygen in air, with great interest. I carried out this experiment carefully, as follows:.

  19. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. 5 N Moitra. Mathematics Department. National Defence Academy. Khadakvasla ...

  20. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vite responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and 'Viewpoints on matter·s related to teaching and learning science. , Teaching and Learning Genetics with Drosophila. 2.

  1. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. N Kumar. Raman Research Institute. C V Raman Avenue, Bangalore. 560 080, India.

  2. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and 'Viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. R Vasudeva, Department of. Statistics, University of Mysore,. Mysore 570006, India ...

  3. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. Ashok Singh. Department of Mathematics. Government Nehru Memorial. College.

  4. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. P H Talapadtur c/o Secretary. School of Mathematics. TlFR, Homi Bhabha Road.

  5. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. School in the forest. A joint experiment between Centre for Learning and Gurukula. Botanical Sanctuary. What do a school in Bangalore and a forest garden in the.

  6. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ite image of the Mercury. Transit, taken by Domin- ique Derrick, Belgium, on the 7th of May 2003. (repro- duced with permission). CLASSROOM scale in our understanding of the Universe - the Astronomical. Unit, or the mean distance between the Earth and the Sun. Historically, the transits of Venus were the first opportunity.

  7. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. “Classroom” is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to ...

  8. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally ti forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. .... Rate (R) = k [Acid]P [NaHC0. 3. ] q. The values of p and q for HCOOH-NaHC0. 3 reaction are calculated as follows as an illustration. Rset - I.

  9. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    them, or invite responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters ... find the values taken by f at some n distinct points ao, aI,. ,an-I, one can determine the values of the Ci'S from the usual method of solving a system of linear equa- tions.

  10. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. “Classroom” is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. Surya Majjana ... MES College of Arts, Com- merce and Science ...

  11. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. “Classroom” is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. Pythagorean Theorem From Heron's Formula: Another Proof.

  12. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reduction in dimensionality of bio- logical diffusion pro- cesses, in Structural. Chemistry and Molecular. Biology, (Edns) N David- son and A Rich, W H. Freeman, San Francisco,. 1968. From Uday Maitra, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. ClASSROOM what happens. Given any point, however far away from the origin,.

  13. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    "Classroom" is equally a foru11J. for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. Point Set Topological Proof of 'no-retraction'. Theorem for 2 and 3 Dimensional Cases. Sourav Chakraborty. C/o Suprakash Chakraborty. D-138, Grissom Street.

  14. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    manipulate and gain experimental knowledge from. The minds-on examples serve to consistently stimulate the mind of both the self-starter student and the bored/disinterested student to develop an attitude of inquiry. Motivation in the Classroom. What, exactly, is a discrepant event? A discrepant event is a phenomenon that ...

  15. Evaluating and Using Literature Including People with Disabilities in All Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oslick, Mary Ellen; Pearson, Mary

    2016-01-01

    To help students see their worlds differently and to expand those views beyond their own backyards, educators can expose them to quality multicultural children's literature. In this article, we focus on a subtopic within the genre of multicultural children's literature: literature including people with disabilities. We chose seven recent texts…

  16. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1048. RESONANCE │ November 2011. CLASSROOM. Recall that spheres are smooth and there is no force along the ^z-axis. Therefore viz = v0iz and vjz = v0jz : (6). Using the above equations we can show that v0in = vin1 − e. 2. + vjn. 1 + e. 2. ;. (7) v0jn = vin. 1 + e. 2. + vjn1 − e. 2. : (8). The change in kinetic energy can ...

  17. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    are told to take a pair of bunsen burners and keep them burning at a distance of roughly six ... burners. We were expecting to demonstrate that within the six inch aseptic zone there would be fey.l or no bacteria. To our great surprise, this didn't happen. CLASSROOM .... else can we do if there is no power?). One teacher said ...

  18. Crossmodal Correspondences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Spence

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In many everyday situations, our senses are bombarded by numerous different unisensory signals at any given time. In order to gain the most veridical, and least variable, estimate of environmental stimuli/properties, we need to combine the individual noisy unisensory perceptual estimates that refer to the same object, while keeping those estimates belonging to different objects or events separate. How, though, does the brain ‘know’ which stimuli to combine? Traditionally, researchers interested in the crossmodal binding problem have focused on the role that spatial and temporal factors play in modulating multisensory integration. However, crossmodal correspondences between various unisensory features (such as between auditory pitch and visual size may provide yet another important means of constraining the crossmodal binding problem. A large body of research now shows that people exhibit consistent crossmodal correspondences between many stimulus features in different sensory modalities. So, for example, people will consistently match high-pitched sounds with small, bright objects that are located high up in space. In this talk, the latest literature is reviewed. We will argue that crossmodal correspondences need to be considered alongside semantic and spatiotemporal congruency, among the key constraints that help our brains to solve the crossmodal binding problem. Crossmodal correspondences will also be distinguished from synaesthesia.

  19. Expression of IGF‐I, IGF‐II, and IGF‐IR in gallbladder carcinoma. A systematic analysis including primary and corresponding metastatic tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornprat, P; Rehak, P; Rüschoff, J; Langner, C

    2006-01-01

    Aims The insulin‐like growth factor (IGF) system has been implicated in tumour development and progression. This study was designed to analyse the expression of the IGF‐I receptor (IGF‐IR) and its ligands (IGF‐I, IGF‐II) in gallbladder cancer. Methods IGF‐I, IGF‐II, and IGF‐IR immunoreactivity was investigated in 57 gallbladder carcinomas and corresponding lymph node (n  =  11) and hepatic (n  =  7) metastases using a tissue microarray technique and correlated with tumour stage, grade, and patient outcome. Results Cancer tissue allowing a reliable evaluation of IGF‐I, IGF‐II, and IGF‐IR was present in 55 of 57 primary tumours and 17 of 18 metastases. IGF‐I and IGF‐II immunoreactivity was seen in 25 and 14 of the 55 primary tumours, in addition to six and three of the 17 metastases, respectively. No associations with tumour stage, grade, or prognosis were detected. IGF‐IR was expressed in 52 of 55 primary tumours and all 17 metastases. IGF‐IR staining intensity decreased with tumour cell dedifferentiation. Moreover, IGF‐IR expression in less than 50% of cancer cells was an independent marker of poor prognosis in multivariate analysis (risk ratio, 4.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.4 to 11.2; p  =  0.01). Conclusions The expression of IGF‐IR and its ligands provides evidence for the existence of an auto/paracrine loop of tumour cell stimulation in gallbladder cancer and makes this type of cancer a candidate for therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with the IGF pathway. The recognition of IGF‐IR as a new independent prognostic biomarker may help to identify patients who might benefit from adjuvant treatment. PMID:16443739

  20. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of internal energy U of a system with its entropy S , keeping other independent variables, like volume, constant ... electron spins interact among themselves with a spin-spin relaxation time 't s. They also interact with the ... quantity of heat (dQ+ ) and the body at negative temperature T- acquire a corresponding quantity (dQ-).

  1. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    corresponding to 6 is Saturday. So 1-1-2000 is a Saturday! Thus, we enter into the new millennium (so to speak) on a. Saturday and this may be verified from the calendar for the current year. May it be a peaceful and happy one! Example 2: As a second example let us find the day on which. India became independent.

  2. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    What corresponding statement can be made for the hy- perbolic functions? The answer is much less obvious. Consider any point P (x, y) on the rectangular hyper- bola x2. - y2 = 1 (Figure 2). Let S (x, 0) be the foot of the perpendicular from P to the x-axis, and let R. (1,0) be the vertex of the hyperbola. Let 0 (0,0) be the origin.

  3. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the slope, the approximate equality ∆θ = tan–1 ∆k ≈ ∆k holds. Angle's main idea is to express an angle as the sum of small angles, where a small angle is one for which ∆θ ≈ ∆k. Wanting to fix an appropriate small unit and being his 45th birthday, he considers. 1/45 of the angle corresponding to the slope k = 1, that is.

  4. Controlled Correspondence Tracking -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — This data set contains information on external and internal correspondence addressed to the Secretary, Deputy Secretary, or Chief of Staff. Data include information...

  5. The Challenges of Implementing Group Work in Primary School Classrooms and Including Pupils with Special Educational Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, Ed; Blatchford, Peter; Webster, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Findings from two studies are discussed in relation to the experiences and challenges faced by teachers trying to implement effective group work in schools and classrooms and to reflect on the lessons learnt about how to involve pupils with special educational needs (SEN). The first study reports on UK primary school teachers' experiences of…

  6. Twenty Careers and Classroom Experiences for Teaching Science. Includes: Job Descriptions, Teaching Suggestions and Answers, Work Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondrake, Greg

    Part 1 of this teacher's guide contains job descriptions, teaching suggestions/answers, and worksheets for twenty careers and classroom experiences which are designed to be used in teaching science. The following twenty careers are covered: meteorologist, geologist, musical instrument maker/repairman, opthalmologist, astronomer, paint chemist,…

  7. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    an extremely low-cost experiment of head-on collision of two balls in a vertical direction. The advantages of this phenomenon in the vertical direction are clarified. Some simple estimates are made. A thorough analysis of this simple topic is then made, which includes various special and limiting cases, conditions of collision ...

  8. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of practical applications: A manometer consists of a U- tube containing liquid such as mercury or water [1]. A. U-shaped viscometer is used to determine viscosity of both Newtonian [2] and non-Newtonian fluids, including blood [3,4]. The roll motion of a ship can be stabilized by water inside a pair of tanks (known as the U- ...

  9. A systematic review of pedagogical approaches that can effectively include children with special educational needs in mainstream classrooms with a particular focus on peer group interactive approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Nind, Melanie; Wearmouth, Janice

    2005-01-01

    Background The broad background to this review is a long history of concepts of special pupils and special education and a faith in special pedagogical approaches. The rise of inclusive schools and some important critiques of special pedagogy (e.g. Hart, 1996; Norwich and Lewis, 2001; Thomas and Loxley, 2001) have raised the profile of teaching approaches that ordinary teachers can and do use to include children with special educational needs in mainstream classrooms. Inclusive education i...

  10. Should professional development include analyzing and coaching ways of speaking during inquiry-based science instruction in elementary classrooms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zee, Emily H.

    2009-12-01

    In this commentary, I first consider what Oliveira defines inquiry-based science instruction to be. Next I discuss what the discourse practices are that he is advocating. Then I examine what he presents as evidence of changes in two teachers' discourse practices due to a summer institute and how their pragmatic awareness seems to have been enhanced through institute activities. Finally I ponder whether, when, how, and why professional development should include a focus on ways of speaking during inquiry-based science instruction.

  11. Correspondence Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — CMS is EPA's correspondence tracking and workflow management system. It scans, logs, routes, tracks, and stores incoming and outgoing correspondence in all Program...

  12. Correspondences. Equivalence relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouligand, G.M.

    1978-03-01

    We comment on sections paragraph 3 'Correspondences' and paragraph 6 'Equivalence Relations' in chapter II of 'Elements de mathematique' by N. Bourbaki in order to simplify their comprehension. Paragraph 3 exposes the ideas of a graph, correspondence and map or of function, and their composition laws. We draw attention to the following points: 1) Adopting the convention of writting from left to right, the composition law for two correspondences (A,F,B), (U,G,V) of graphs F, G is written in full generality (A,F,B)o(U,G,V) = (A,FoG,V). It is not therefore assumed that the co-domain B of the first correspondence is identical to the domain U of the second (EII.13 D.7), (1970). 2) The axiom of choice consists of creating the Hilbert terms from the only relations admitting a graph. 3) The statement of the existence theorem of a function h such that f = goh, where f and g are two given maps having the same domain (of definition), is completed if h is more precisely an injection. Paragraph 6 considers the generalisation of equality: First, by 'the equivalence relation associated with a map f of a set E identical to (x is a member of the set E and y is a member of the set E and x:f = y:f). Consequently, every relation R(x,y) which is equivalent to this is an equivalence relation in E (symmetrical, transitive, reflexive); then R admits a graph included in E x E, etc. Secondly, by means of the Hilbert term of a relation R submitted to the equivalence. In this last case, if R(x,y) is separately collectivizing in x and y, theta(x) is not the class of objects equivalent to x for R (EII.47.9), (1970). The interest of bringing together these two subjects, apart from this logical order, resides also in the fact that the theorem mentioned in 3) can be expressed by means of the equivalence relations associated with the functions f and g. The solutions of the examples proposed reveal their simplicity [fr

  13. Development of a method for calculating the cost of the program for decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Prognosis of future costs for the authorities including the corresponding net present value. Analysis performed May 6-7 and June 8 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, Lorens; Lichtenberg, Steen; Lindskog, Staffan

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this report is to present a calculation of the authorities' total future costs in terms of their activities to monitor a safe and prudent decommission of the power plants, including the long term storage of the used fuel. An assessment of the inherent uncertainty in this estimate is also made. The study forms an integrated part of the total monitoring into the financial assessment of the whole programme of decommissioning and demolition of the Swedish nuclear power plants that continuously is made by SKI. Hence, the estimate is presented with the additional function of supporting SKI's annual calculations of fees and contingencies in accordance with the Swedish Finance Act. Main result The expected Net Present Value of the authorities' costs as at January 2004 price level have consequently been estimated as follows: Mean Value (M): 2303 MSEK Standard deviation (S): 538 MSEK 8 This result tallies with the corresponding prognoses for the last two years. An additional clarification of a number of key figures resulted in some reduction of the total Net Present Value. By way of supplement to this main result, the undiscounted costs have been estimated (calculation 2). Besides, a tentative estimate has also been made by incorporating the official view on the future development on real rate of return in a long time perspective (calculation 3). The uncertainty of the result is significant in terms of the final budget figures and of the scale of the supplementary amounts in those situations where the budgets must be prudent and conservative. There may be a potential for further reduction of the current uncertainty in that the greatest causes of uncertainty now have been identified and ranked in order of priority. The greatest causes of uncertainty are set out in the table below. No. Cause of uncertainty Uncertainty group 1 Priority 2 1 Correction allowing for the uncertainty of the real interest rate N 55 % 2 Productivity E2 8 % 3 Uncertainty in the current base

  14. Unified correspondence and canonicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Z.

    2018-01-01

    Correspondence theory originally arises as the study of the relation between modal formulas and first-order formulas interpreted over Kripke frames. We say that a modal formula and a first-order formula correspond to each other if they are valid on the same class of Kripke frames. Canonicity theory

  15. Coherence and correspondence in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Tape

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Many controversies in medical science can be framed as tension between a coherence approach (which seeks logic and explanation and a correspondence approach (which emphasizes empirical correctness. In many instances, a coherence-based theory leads to an understanding of disease that is not supported by empirical evidence. Physicians and patients alike tend to favor the coherence approach even in the face of strong, contradictory correspondence evidence. Examples include the management of atrial fibrillation, treatment of acute bronchitis, and the use of Vitamin E to prevent heart disease. Despite the frequent occurrence of controversy stemming from coherence-correspondence conflicts, medical professionals are generally unaware of these terms and the philosophical traditions that underlie them. Learning about the coherence-correspondence distinction and using the best of both approaches could not only help reconcile controversy but also lead to striking advances in medical science.

  16. The Bohr Correspondence Principle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    corresponding to the two values of the electron spin), if it is known to have the mini- mum energy. But in Bohr's theory, the orientation of the plane of orbit is arbitrary, and hence the number of distinct states is infinite. In fact,“Bohr theory of hydrogen ...

  17. Continuing Education by Correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussow, Milton

    1974-01-01

    By means of portable laboratory modules and instructional materials, it is possible to construct a home study program in most technologies, as a technical institute and a proprietary school have done, creating a career path by which students can earn an Associate Degree in Electronics, mainly through correspondence study. (AJ)

  18. Rotation in correspondence analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Velden, Michel; Kiers, Henk A.L.

    2005-01-01

    In correspondence analysis rows and columns of a nonnegative data matrix are depicted as points in a, usually, two-dimensional plot. Although such a two-dimensional plot often provides a reasonable approximation, the situation can occur that an approximation of higher dimensionality is required.

  19. The cover letter should include the corresponding author's full ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uaf

    Integrated Pest Management Laboratory, University of Agriculture,. Faisalabad, Pakistan, during the same season. For this purpose, fully mature leaves of tested plant species were selected for the study of the thickness of leaf lamina (µm), trichome density from leaf lamina (per cm2), as well as length of hair (mm) from the ...

  20. Three Dimensional Tropical Correspondence Formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Brett

    2017-07-01

    A tropical curve in R3 contributes to Gromov-Witten invariants in all genus. Nevertheless, we present a simple formula for how a given tropical curve contributes to Gromov-Witten invariants when we encode these invariants in a generating function with exponents of {λ} recording Euler characteristic. Our main modification from the known tropical correspondence formula for rational curves is as follows: a trivalent vertex, which before contributed a factor of n to the count of zero-genus holomorphic curves, contributes a factor of {2sin(nλ/2)}. We explain how to calculate relative Gromov-Witten invariants using this tropical correspondence formula, and how to obtain the absolute Gromov-Witten and Donaldson-Thomas invariants of some 3-dimensional toric manifolds including {CP3}. The tropical correspondence formula counting Donaldson-Thomas invariants replaces n by {i^{-(1+n)}q^{n/2}+i^{1+n}q^{-n/2}}.

  1. Agency Correspondence Tracking System (ACTS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Agency Correspondence Tracking System: is an executive correspondence tracking system for the Administrator. It collects and organizes information on reports...

  2. CORRESPONDENCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In light of suspected infection, the neonatologist performed microbiological cultures and started broad-spectrum antibiotics. Meanwhile, the child underwent a transfontanellar ... central core of the masses restricts strongly on the diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map. MRI features are ...

  3. CORRESPONDENCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    REDS-II Donor Iron Status Evaluation (RISE) study documents that among frequent US blood donors, two-thirds (66%) ... which determines the percentage of blood volume that is made up of red blood cells. ... doctors with reduced red cell indices on the full blood count (FBC), with associated reduced ferritin, with or without ...

  4. Correspondence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    employees, and their primary obligation is to patients who use public medical services. It is therefore sheer ... state employees, some at senior consultant level, who run full-on single-handed private practices, ... altered, this must be done through proper engagement and negotiation. To do otherwise sets a dangerous ...

  5. Correspondence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-07-30

    Jul 30, 2015 ... goal of the H3A is to use data obtained from research efforts to influence and inform strategies that will address .... challenges associated with obtaining a valid informed consent [24,. 25]. Genetic studies are extremely ... Multidisciplinary approach is the silver lining in the dark cloud that has befallen genetic ...

  6. CORRESPONDENCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    breast surgeons does not reflect the mammography workflow at our institution. Throughout the review period, same-day reporting of all TBH mammograms was done by senior radiology registrars working under the supervision of consultant radiologists; the latter were solely responsible for sign-off of the final mammography ...

  7. CORRESPONDENCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    What is the nature of a conflict of interest in a scientific publication? To the Editor: The use, misuse and, sometimes, failure to recognise conflict of interest (CoI) is a growing problem in medical publi cations.[1] The critique by Harcombe and Noakes[2] published in the. December 2016 SAMJ, purporting to find many ...

  8. Correspondence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2011-12-14

    Dec 14, 2011 ... This resulted from an expressed need to develop a network that would advocate for the unique needs of African FETPs and ..... Sub-recipient. *: Substantial funding from USAID to AFENET received through a Cooperative Agreement. Table 2: Number of epidemiologists trained through 2-year programs.

  9. CORRESPONDENCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    9 years). Sixty-five percent of children had rhinitis, asthma or pneumonia. There are two different seasons in Senegal: a dry season (from October to June) and a rainy season (from July to September). During the dry season, we noted 33 cases of strangulated umbilical hernias compared with two cases in the rainy season.

  10. CORRESPONDENCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Misnaming something can have negative implications. This is why it is so crucial that leaders in the specialty of emergency medicine unite in choosing the name of the department in which we work – the Emergency Department. We are still fighting the demons of 'Casualty', and now another misnomer has arisen: that of.

  11. CORRESPONDENCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    regular blood donation on iron stores, and consequent risks of iron depletion and iron deficiency anaemia. There is little doubt that frequent blood donation may result in reduced iron stores. It is also important to note that haemoglobin (Hb) levels may remain relatively normal in spite of reduced iron stores, although changes.

  12. CORRESPONDENCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While most HIV-infected patients are screened for renal dysfunction and hepatitis before ART initiation and regularly thereafter, screening for DM complications occurs far less frequently. Furthermore, the diagnostic infrastructure to screen for diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy is largely unavailable outside Gaborone.

  13. CORRESPONDENCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for subsets of CDs are often interpreted as the totality of CDs when it is not the case. If single-gene disorders, accounting for 30.0% of CDs. (B Modell − personal communication, 2016), were pooled with con- genital abnormalities in the study by Reid et al.,[1] a greater proportion of under-5 deaths may be attributed to CDs.

  14. Correspondence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is itself reasonable, fair and ethical. Clearly, there are glaring deficiencies in the existing coding and billing structure that do not allow for the addition of codes applicable to new procedures. Equally importantly, intertwined with a coding structure, is the billing structure. Each code has a unit value and each unit a Rand value, ...

  15. CORRESPONDENCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article claims to explore parents' views on the HIV counselling and testing campaign to be conducted in high schools, within an interpretative qualitative paradigm. This is an interesting and important topic. However, the methodology of the study is deeply flawed and unfortunately gives qualitative research a bad name.

  16. Correspondence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Finally, SAMA remains deeply concerned about the sensationalist way in which the media and government alike are dealing with this matter. Generalisations are being made and doctors are being vilified by forensic reports without the courtesy of engaging with or informing SAMA. Equally, if high-ranking officials and MECs ...

  17. CORRESPONDENCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recommendations for the handling of fluorescent lamps in public schools in. Johannesburg, South Africa. To the Editor: Fluorescent lamps are regarded as hazardous waste because of their mercury content.[1] Mercury has toxic properties that may have acute or chronic detrimental impacts on human health and the ...

  18. Correspondence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) diagnostic algorithm ... negative, the algorithm should cover the non-TB pathology that may be causing the patient symptoms as well ... The diagnosis of TB in SA with our dual TB/HIV epidemic cannot rely on an algorithm that only considers ...

  19. Managing Classroom Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, James D.

    Schools need to meet unique problems through the development of special classroom management techniques. Factors which contribute to classroom problems include lack of supervision at home, broken homes, economic deprivation, and a desire for peer attention. The educational atmosphere should encourage creativity for both the student and the…

  20. Correspondence analysis theory, practice and new strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Beh, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of the internationalisation of correspondence analysis Correspondence Analysis: Theory, Practice and New Strategies examines the key issues of correspondence analysis, and discusses the new advances that have been made over the last 20 years. The main focus of this book is to provide a comprehensive discussion of some of the key technical and practical aspects of correspondence analysis, and to demonstrate how they may be put to use.  Particular attention is given to the history and mathematical links of the developments made. These links include not just those majo

  1. Revisiting Ethics in Correspondence Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Zschirnt, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Questions of research ethics always arise when planning a correspondence test to study discrimination in the market place. However, the issue is addressed relatively little in published correspondence tests with authors usually referring to the two seminal articles written in this field (i.e. Banton (1997) and Riach and Rich (2004)). Since then correspondence testing has become more widespread and the technique is increasingly relying on the internet to find and send applications. It is there...

  2. Guidance for Technology Decisions from Classroom Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielefeldt, Talbot

    2012-01-01

    Correlational analysis of two years of classroom observation indicates relationships between technology use and various classroom characteristics, including teacher roles and instructional strategies. Three observers used the ISTE Classroom Observation Tool (ICOT) to record 144 observations of classrooms participating in a variety of educational…

  3. Mathematics difficulties & classroom leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Maria Christina Secher

    2016-01-01

    are presented: 1) descriptions of the teachers’ classroom leadership to include all their students in the learning community, 2) the learning community produced by stated and practiced rules for teaching and learning behavior, 3) the classroom behavior of students who experience difficulties with mathematics....... The findings suggest that the teachers’ pedagogical choices and actions support an active learning environment for students in diverse learning needs, and that the teachers practise dimensions of inclusive classroom leadership that are known to be successful for teaching mathematics to all students. Despite......This article investigates possible links between inclusion, students, for whom mathematics is extensively difficult, and classroom leadership through a case study on teaching strategies and student participation in four classrooms at two different primary schools in Denmark. Three sets of results...

  4. The Classroom Animal: Mealworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David C., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Describes appearance, longevity, and changes in each step of the mealworm life cycle. Guidelines for starting a classroom colony are given with housing and care instructions. Suggested observations, activities, and questions for students are included. (DH)

  5. In the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    History and Social Science Teacher, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Using cartoons and comic strips to teach the concept of social class and newspapers to teach economic principles are suggested classroom activities for elementary and secondary courses. A lesson plan for teaching democratic values is also included. (JR)

  6. EFFECTIVENESS OF FLIPPED CLASSROOM IN MATHEMATICS TEACHING

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. N. Ramakrishnan; Mrs. J. Johnsi Priya

    2016-01-01

    Flipped Classroom is an instructional strategy and a type of blended learning that reverses the traditional learning environment by delivering instructional content, often online, outside of the classroom. It moves activities, including those that may have traditionally been considered homework, into the classroom. In a flipped classroom, students watch online lectures, collaborate in online discussions, or carry out research at home and engage in concepts in the classroom with the guidance o...

  7. Correspondence propagation with weak priors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Yan, Shuicheng; Liu, Jianzhuang; Tang, Xiaoou; Huang, Thomas S

    2009-01-01

    For the problem of image registration, the top few reliable correspondences are often relatively easy to obtain, while the overall matching accuracy may fall drastically as the desired correspondence number increases. In this paper, we present an efficient feature matching algorithm to employ sparse reliable correspondence priors for piloting the feature matching process. First, the feature geometric relationship within individual image is encoded as a spatial graph, and the pairwise feature similarity is expressed as a bipartite similarity graph between two feature sets; then the geometric neighborhood of the pairwise assignment is represented by a categorical product graph, along which the reliable correspondences are propagated; and finally a closed-form solution for feature matching is deduced by ensuring the feature geometric coherency as well as pairwise feature agreements. Furthermore, our algorithm is naturally applicable for incorporating manual correspondence priors for semi-supervised feature matching. Extensive experiments on both toy examples and real-world applications demonstrate the superiority of our algorithm over the state-of-the-art feature matching techniques.

  8. Computing effects for correspondence types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüttel, Hans

    2010-01-01

    We show that type and effect inference is possible for a type and  effect system for authenticity using non-injective correspondences, opponent  types and a spi-calculus with symmetric encryption. We do this by a general  account of how effects can be computed given knowledge of how and where they...

  9. Computing effects for correspondence types

    OpenAIRE

    Hüttel, Hans

    2010-01-01

    We show that type and effect inference is possible for a type and  effect system for authenticity using non-injective correspondences, opponent  types and a spi-calculus with symmetric encryption. We do this by a general  account of how effects can be computed given knowledge of how and where they  appear in type judgments. 

  10. Pose estimation with correspondences determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hang; Sun, Changku; Zhu, Ruizhe; Wang, Peng

    2018-01-01

    Pose estimation by monocular is finding the pose of the object by a single image of feature points on the object, which must meet the requirements of detecting all the feature points and matching them in the image. But it will be difficult to obtain the correct pose if part of the feature points are occluded when the object moving a large scale. We proposed a method for finding the pose on the condition that the correspondences between the object points and the image points are unknown. The method combines two algorithms: one algorithm is SoftAssign, which constructs a weight matrix of feature points and image points, and determines the correspondences by iteration loop processing; the other algorithm is OI(orthogonal iteration), which derives an iterative algorithm which directly computes orthogonal and globally convergent rotation matrices.We nest the two algorithms into one iteration loop.An appropriate pose will be chosen from a set of reference poses as the initial pose of object at the beginning of the loop, then we process the weight matrix to confirm the correspondences and calculate the optimal solution of rotation matrices alternately until the object space collinearity error is less than the threshold, each estimation will be closer to the truth pose than the last one through every iteration loop. Experimentally, the method proved to be efficient and have a high precision pose estimation of 3D object with large-scale motion.

  11. Flipped classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Tobias Kidde; Jørgensen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Artiklen beskriver Flipped Classroom som et didaktisk princip, der kan være med til at organisere og tilrettelægge en undervisning, med fokus på forskellige læringsformer. Det handler om at forstå Flipped Classroom som en opdeling i 2 faser og 3 led, som samlet set skaber en didaktisk organisering....

  12. Effective Classroom Management Techniques for Secondary Schools

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results obtained revealed the effective classroom management techniques included among others constant engagement of students in activities, use of innovative instructional strategies by teachers, teachers acting as models, monitoring, effective communication, stimulating classroom environment and regular use of ...

  13. Examining the Correspondence between Self-Regulated Learning and Academic Achievement: A Case Study Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Cleary

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Four high school students received 11 weeks of a self-regulated learning (SRL intervention, called the Self-Regulation Empowerment Program (SREP, to improve their classroom-based biology exam scores, SRL, and motivated behaviors. This mixed model case study examined the correspondence between shifts in students’ strategic, regulated behaviors with their performance on classroom-based biology tests. The authors used traditional SRL assessment tools in a pretest-posttest fashion (e.g., self-report questionnaires, teaching rating scales and gathered SRL data during the intervention using field note observations and contextualized structured interviews. This multidimensional assessment approach was used to establish convergence among the assessment tools and to facilitate interpretation of trends in students’ biology test performance relative to their SRL processes. Key themes in this study included the following: (a the close correspondence between changes in students SRL, biology exam performance, and SREP attendance; (b individual variability in student performance, SRL behaviors, and beliefs in response to SREP; and (c the importance of using a multi-dimensional assessment approach in SRL intervention research. Furthermore, this study provided additional support for the potential effectiveness of SREP in academic contexts.

  14. The Schwarzschild/CFT Correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shajiee, Vahid Reza

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the holographic description of the Schwarzschild black hole is investigated. Since the Schwarzschild solution could be mapped to the near horizon limit of the Reissner-Nordstrom solution, the dual metric is obtained by using hidden conformal symmetry. Because the near horizon spacetime admits an A d S 2 factor, a well-defined 2D (quantum) gravity, dimensionally reduced from near horizon metric, is elected. It is demonstrated that the dual CFT has a central charge c=96 M 3 which is an asymptotic conserved charge of the near horizon solution. As the most important consequence of AdS/CFT correspondence for a black hole, the entropy of Schwarzschild black hole is obtained by using Cardy formula. It is shown that the microscopic entropy of CFT is equal to the macroscopic Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of the Schwarzschild black hole.

  15. Type inference for correspondence types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüttel, Hans; Gordon, Andy; Hansen, Rene Rydhof

    2009-01-01

    We present a correspondence type/effect system for authenticity in a π-calculus with polarized channels, dependent pair types and effect terms and show how one may, given a process P and an a priori type environment E, generate constraints that are formulae in the Alternating Least Fixed......-Point (ALFP) logic. We then show how a reasonable model of the generated constraints yields a type/effect assignment such that P becomes well-typed with respect to E if and only if this is possible. The formulae generated satisfy a finite model property; a system of constraints is satisfiable if and only...... if it has a finite model. As a consequence, we obtain the result that type/effect inference in our system is polynomial-time decidable....

  16. Fight Obesity in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsis, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    U.S. health experts declared obesity an epidemic over a decade ago. Schools have tried to implement prevention programs for students, but as budgets shrink, educating students about obesity is increasingly falling to classroom instructors, including science teachers. The good news is that obesity-related classroom activities can be engaging, and…

  17. Stereo Correspondence Using Moment Invariants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premaratne, Prashan; Safaei, Farzad

    Autonomous navigation is seen as a vital tool in harnessing the enormous potential of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) and small robotic vehicles for both military and civilian use. Even though, laser based scanning solutions for Simultaneous Location And Mapping (SLAM) is considered as the most reliable for depth estimation, they are not feasible for use in UAV and land-based small vehicles due to their physical size and weight. Stereovision is considered as the best approach for any autonomous navigation solution as stereo rigs are considered to be lightweight and inexpensive. However, stereoscopy which estimates the depth information through pairs of stereo images can still be computationally expensive and unreliable. This is mainly due to some of the algorithms used in successful stereovision solutions require high computational requirements that cannot be met by small robotic vehicles. In our research, we implement a feature-based stereovision solution using moment invariants as a metric to find corresponding regions in image pairs that will reduce the computational complexity and improve the accuracy of the disparity measures that will be significant for the use in UAVs and in small robotic vehicles.

  18. The Flipped Classroom in Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Kristen; Milsom, Amy

    2015-01-01

    The flipped classroom is proposed as an effective instructional approach in counselor education. An overview of the flipped-classroom approach, including advantages and disadvantages, is provided. A case example illustrates how the flipped classroom can be applied in counselor education. Recommendations for implementing or researching flipped…

  19. Correspondence model of occupational accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Conte

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a new generalized model for the diagnosis and prediction of accidents among the Spanish workforce. Based on observational data of the accident rate in all Spanish companies over eleven years (7,519,732 accidents, we classified them in a new risk-injury contingency table (19×19. Through correspondence analysis, we obtained a structure composed of three axes whose combination identifies three separate risk and injury groups, which we used as a general Spanish pattern. The most likely or frequent relationships between the risk and injuries identified in the pattern facilitated the decision-making process in companies at an early stage of risk assessment. Each risk-injury group has its own characteristics, which are understandable within the phenomenological framework of the accident. The main advantages of this model are its potential application to any other country and the feasibility of contrasting different country results. One limiting factor, however, is the need to set a common classification framework for risks and injuries to enhance comparison, a framework that does not exist today. The model aims to manage work-related accidents automatically at any level.Apresentamos aqui um modelo generalizado para o diagnóstico e predição de acidentes na classe de trabalhadores da Espanha. Baseados em dados sobre a frequência de acidentes em todas as companhias da Espanha em 11 anos (7.519.732 acidentes, nós os classificamos em uma nova tabela de contingência risco-injúria (19×19. Através de uma análise por correspondência obtivemos uma estrutura composta por 3 eixos cuja combinação identifica 3 grupos separados de risco e injúria, que nós usamos como um perfil geral na Espanha. As mais prováveis ou frequentes relações entre risco e injúrias identificadas nesse perfil facilitaram o processo de decisão nas companhias em um estágio inicial de apreciação do risco. Cada grupo de risco-injúria tem suas próprias caracter

  20. Classroom Action Research: Penelitian Tindakan Kelas

    OpenAIRE

    Juliandi, Azuar

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to provide a basic knowledge of classroom action research, systematic proposal and classroom action reporting. The Knowledge is so important because a professional lecturer must be able to understand the problems themselves and their learning environment through classroom action research activities. Various issues in classroom action research, including: planning, process, use of methods, media, resources and learning evaluations and other relevant issues. ...

  1. Introduction to AdS/CFT correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Nastase, Horatiu

    2015-01-01

    Providing a pedagogical introduction to the rapidly developing field of AdS/CFT correspondence, this is one of the first texts to provide an accessible introduction to all the necessary concepts needed to engage with the methods, tools and applications of AdS/CFT. Without assuming anything beyond an introductory course in quantum field theory, it begins by guiding the reader through the basic concepts of field theory and gauge theory, general relativity, supersymmetry, supergravity, string theory and conformal field theory, before moving on to give a clear and rigorous account of AdS/CFT correspondence. The final section discusses the more specialised applications, including QCD, quark-gluon plasma and condensed matter. This book is self-contained and learner-focused, featuring numerous exercises and examples. It is essential reading for both students and researchers across the fields of particle, nuclear and condensed matter physics.

  2. CONSERVATION AND THE CLASSROOM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    THE MUSEUM COURSE. The McGregor Museum offered a 'Bring Conservation to the Classroom' course for teachers of all subjects at all levels at the Teachers' Centre in March 1985. As the Museum is both a Cultural and Natural History museum the course included both these aspects of the environment. The aims of the ...

  3. Classroom Contexts for Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghetto, Ronald A.; Kaufman, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Various factors influence the development of creative potential, including everything from individual differences to the kinds of experiences and opportunities that creators experience throughout the lifespan. When it comes to nurturing creativity in the classroom, the learning environment is one of the most important factors--determining, in…

  4. Flexible Classroom Furniture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim Hassell,

    2011-01-01

    Classroom design for the 21st-century learning environment should accommodate a variety of learning skills and needs. The space should be large enough so it can be configured to accommodate a number of learning activities. This also includes furniture that provides flexibility and accommodates collaboration and interactive work among students and…

  5. Animals in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Use of animals in middle school science classrooms is a curriculum component worthy of consideration, providing proper investigation and planning are addressed. A responsible approach to this action, including safety, must be adopted for success. In this month's column, the author provides some suggestions on incorporating animals into the…

  6. Differentiation in Classroom Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mottelson, Martha

    Differentiation in School Practice is an ongoing research project currently being carried out in UCC’s research department by myself and my coworker Christina Jørgensen. The project includes a field study of everyday life in a Danish 5th grade classroom with the aim to observe, describe and analyze...

  7. Attitudes towards Teachers’ Motivation, and Classroom Strategy, in English Language classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Pahlavanpoorfard

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at investigating the attitudes of Iranian EFL students towards teachers’ motivation and classroom strategy in English classroom. The subjects of the study included a sample of 235 students in their classes. The findings of this study revealed that teachers’ motivation and classroom strategy used by teachers have effects on the students’ motivation.

  8. Attitudes towards Teachers' Motivation, and Classroom Strategy, in English Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlavanpoorfard, Samira; Soori, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the attitudes of Iranian EFL students towards teachers' motivation and classroom strategy in English classroom. The subjects of the study included a sample of 235 students in their classes. The findings of this study revealed that teachers' motivation and classroom strategy used by teachers have effects on the…

  9. Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mendell, Mark J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Davies, Molly [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Eliseeva, Ekaterina [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faulkner, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hong, Tienzen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sullivan, Douglas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling.

  10. Demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mendell, Mark J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Davies, Molly [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Eliseeva, Ekaterina [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faulkner, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hong, Tienzen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sullivan, Douglas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-06

    This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling.

  11. Associations between classroom CO2 concentrations and student attendance in Washington and Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shendell, Derek G.; Prill, Richard; Fisk, William J.; Apte, Michael G.; Blake, David; Faulkner, David

    2004-01-01

    Student attendance in American public schools is a critical factor in securing limited operational funding. Student and teacher attendance influence academic performance. Limited data exist on indoor air and environmental quality (IEQ) in schools, and how IEQ affects attendance, health, or performance. This study explored the association of student absence with measures of indoor minus outdoor carbon dioxide concentration (dCO{sub 2}). Absence and dCO{sub 2} data were collected from 409 traditional and 25 portable classrooms from 14 schools located in six school districts in the states of Washington and Idaho. Study classrooms had individual heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, except two classrooms without mechanical ventilation. Classroom attributes, student attendance and school-level ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status (SES) were included in multivariate modeling. Forty-five percent of classrooms studied had short-term indoor CO{sub 2} concentrations above 1000 parts-per-million (ppm). A 1000 ppm increase in dCO{sub 2} was associated (p < 0.05) with a 0.5% to 0.9% decrease in annual average daily attendance (ADA), corresponding to a relative 10% to 20% increase in student absence. Outside air (ventilation) rates estimated from dCO{sub 2} and other collected data were not associated with absence. Annual ADA was 2% higher (p < 0.0001) in traditional than in portable classrooms.

  12. Correspondence principle for black holes and strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, G.T.; Polchinski, J.

    1997-01-01

    For most black holes in string theory, the Schwarzschild radius in string units decreases as the string coupling is reduced. We formulate a correspondence principle, which states that (i) when the size of the horizon drops below the size of a string, the typical black hole state becomes a typical state of strings and D-branes with the same charges, and (ii) the mass does not change abruptly during the transition. This provides a statistical interpretation of black hole entropy. This approach does not yield the numerical coefficient, but gives the correct dependence on mass and charge in a wide range of cases, including neutral black holes. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  13. Refined 3d-3d correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alday, Luis F.; Genolini, Pietro Benetti; Bullimore, Mathew; van Loon, Mark

    2017-04-01

    We explore aspects of the correspondence between Seifert 3-manifolds and 3d N = 2 supersymmetric theories with a distinguished abelian flavour symmetry. We give a prescription for computing the squashed three-sphere partition functions of such 3d N = 2 theories constructed from boundary conditions and interfaces in a 4d N = 2∗ theory, mirroring the construction of Seifert manifold invariants via Dehn surgery. This is extended to include links in the Seifert manifold by the insertion of supersymmetric Wilson-'t Hooft loops in the 4d N = 2∗ theory. In the presence of a mass parameter cfor the distinguished flavour symmetry, we recover aspects of refined Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group, and in particular construct an analytic continuation of the S-matrix of refined Chern-Simons theory.

  14. Dense image correspondences for computer vision

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ce

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the fundamental building-block of many new computer vision systems: dense and robust correspondence estimation. Dense correspondence estimation techniques are now successfully being used to solve a wide range of computer vision problems, very different from the traditional applications such techniques were originally developed to solve. This book introduces the techniques used for establishing correspondences between challenging image pairs, the novel features used to make these techniques robust, and the many problems dense correspondences are now being used to solve. The book provides information to anyone attempting to utilize dense correspondences in order to solve new or existing computer vision problems. The editors describe how to solve many computer vision problems by using dense correspondence estimation. Finally, it surveys resources, code, and data necessary for expediting the development of effective correspondence-based computer vision systems.   ·         Provides i...

  15. The Classroom Animal: Crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David C.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using crickets for classroom activities, providing background information on their anatomy and reproduction and tips on keeping individual organisms or a breeding colony in the classroom. (JN)

  16. Classroom Management in Elementary Mainstreaming Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Walter R.; Ascione, Frank R.

    1982-01-01

    This research was aimed at adapting the Utah State University Classroom Management Program for use in elementary mainstreaming classrooms and evaluating the program's effectiveness in changing teacher and pupil behavior. The program appears to be powerful in changing teacher behavior and an effective classroom management training tool. (Author/AL)

  17. A Phenomenological Study of Undergraduate Instructors Using the Inverted or Flipped Classroom Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Anna F.

    2012-01-01

    The changing educational needs of undergraduate students have not been addressed with a corresponding development of instructional methods in higher education classrooms. This study used a phenomenological approach to investigate a classroom-based instructional model called the "inverted" or "flipped" classroom. The flipped…

  18. Coherence and correspondence in engineering design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos V. Katsikopoulos

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available I show how the coherence/correspondence distinction can inform the conversation about decision methods for engineering design. Some engineers argue for the application of multi-attribute utility theory while others argue for what they call heuristics. To clarify the differences among methods, I first ask whether each method aims at achieving coherence or correspondence. By analyzing statements in the design literature, I argue that utility theory aims at achieving coherence and heuristics aim at achieving correspondence. Second, I ask if achieving coherence always implies achieving correspondence. It is important to provide an answer because while in design the objective is correspondence, it is difficult to assess it, and coherence that is easier to assess is used as a surrogate. I argue that coherence does not always imply correspondence in design and that this is also the case in problems studied in judgment and decision-making research. Uncovering the conditions under which coherence implies, or does not imply, correspondence is a topic where engineering design and judgment and decision-making research might connect.

  19. The AdS/CFT correspondence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubeny, Veronika E

    2015-01-01

    We give a brief review of the AdS/CFT correspondence, which posits the equivalence between a certain gravitational theory and a lower-dimensional non-gravitational one. This remarkable duality, formulated in 1997, has sparked a vigorous research program that has gained in breadth over the years, with applications to many aspects of theoretical (and even experimental) physics, not least to general relativity and quantum gravity. To put the AdS/CFT correspondence into historical context, we start by reviewing the relevant aspects of string theory (of which no prior knowledge is assumed). We then develop the statement of the correspondence, and explain how the two sides of the duality map into each other. Finally, we discuss the implications and applications of the correspondence, and indicate some of the current trends in this subject. The presentation attempts to convey the main concepts in a simple and self-contained manner, relegating supplementary remarks to footnotes. (paper)

  20. Movement and Dance in the Inclusive Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoning, Stacey N.

    2008-01-01

    Benefits to using creative movement and dance as teaching tools in the classroom include increased student understanding of content, improved classroom behavior, and the development of new forms of assessment. Integration of these activities within the instructional day will meet the needs of a variety of learners, especially kinesthetic learners,…

  1. Gender Equity in the Classroom: An Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Jeanne; Hart, Betty L.

    1992-01-01

    Asserts that sexist communication (including gender doublespeak and sex role stereotyping) perpetuates social and educational injustices. Discusses classroom communication patterns, how to remove sexist language, and how to become aware of classroom prejudices. Offers techniques to help improve communication skills. (PRA)

  2. Guinea Pigs: Versatile Animals for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Charles R.

    1977-01-01

    Guinea pigs are presented as versatile classroom animals. Suggestions for animal behavior and genetics studies are given. Also included is information concerning sex determination and the breeding of guinea pigs, and hints on keeping these animals in the classroom. References and illustrations complete the article. (MA)

  3. Teaching Strategies for the Multicultural Journalism Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Mary

    1992-01-01

    Points out that journalism teachers must address issues of diversity in the multicultural classroom. Considers strategies for the multicultural classroom, including (1) using cross-cultural materials and explaining why such materials are being used; (2) making assignments that allow students to pursue culture-specific knowledge; and (3) permitting…

  4. Effective diameters and corresponding states of fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Río, Fernando

    Effective hard-sphere diameters of fluids with purely repulsive interactions are derived from a generalized corresponding-states principle of Leland, Rowlinson and coworkers. Various alternative definitions are discussed and related. Virial expansions of the effective diameters and their corresponding volumes are obtained and compared with results of perturbation theory. Applications are made to inverse-power potentials, the repulsive part of the Lennard-Jones potential and hard spherocylinders and dumbells.

  5. Measurement of vocal doses in virtual classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottalico, Pasquale; Pelegrin Garcia, David

    2010-01-01

    with an artificial head (corresponding to the mouth-ears path) placed at the talker position while simulating the classrooms. Time histories of the vocal fold vibration readings, with the trend of the fundamental frequency and an estimation of the sound pressure level, sampled every 50 ms, were obtained. From...

  6. On the causal set–continuum correspondence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saravani, Mehdi; Aslanbeigi, Siavash

    2014-01-01

    We present two results that concern certain aspects of the question: when is a causal set well approximated by a Lorentzian manifold? The first result is a theorem that shows that the number–volume correspondence, if required to hold even for arbitrarily small regions, is best realized via Poisson sprinkling. The second result concerns a family of lattices in 1+1 dimensional Minkowski space, known as Lorentzian lattices, which we show provide a much better number–volume correspondence than Poisson sprinkling for large volumes. We argue, however, that this feature should not persist in higher dimensions. We conclude by conjecturing a form of the aforementioned theorem that holds under weaker assumptions, namely that Poisson sprinkling provides the best number–volume correspondence in 3+1 dimensions for spacetime regions with macroscopically large volumes. (paper)

  7. Tensor network state correspondence and holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sukhwinder

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, tensor network states have emerged as a very useful conceptual and simulation framework to study quantum many-body systems at low energies. In this paper, we describe a particular way in which any given tensor network can be viewed as a representation of two different quantum many-body states. The two quantum many-body states are said to correspond to each other by means of the tensor network. We apply this "tensor network state correspondence"—a correspondence between quantum many-body states mediated by tensor networks as we describe—to the multi-scale entanglement renormalization ansatz (MERA) representation of ground states of one dimensional (1D) quantum many-body systems. Since the MERA is a 2D hyperbolic tensor network (the extra dimension is identified as the length scale of the 1D system), the two quantum many-body states obtained from the MERA, via tensor network state correspondence, are seen to live in the bulk and on the boundary of a discrete hyperbolic geometry. The bulk state so obtained from a MERA exhibits interesting features, some of which caricature known features of the holographic correspondence of String theory. We show how (i) the bulk state admits a description in terms of "holographic screens", (ii) the conformal field theory data associated with a critical ground state can be obtained from the corresponding bulk state, in particular, how pointlike boundary operators are identified with extended bulk operators. (iii) We also present numerical results to illustrate that bulk states, dual to ground states of several critical spin chains, have exponentially decaying correlations, and that the bulk correlation length generally decreases with increase in central charge for these spin chains.

  8. 34 CFR 686.25 - Correspondence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Correspondence study. 686.25 Section 686.25 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TEACHER EDUCATION ASSISTANCE FOR COLLEGE AND HIGHER EDUCATION (TEACH) GRANT PROGRAM...

  9. of the related period. Accordingly, the corresponding

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reasons during about just over 10% of the total observation time no records could be taken. The charts were analized to obtain characteristical maximum values for the intensity-duration :function of the related period. Accordingly, the corresponding values of precipitation data (height of rainfall measured and of the time of its ...

  10. Fundamentals of Solar Heating. Correspondence Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association, Vienna, VA.

    This course is designed for the use of employees of the air conditioning industry, and offers supervised correspondence instruction about solar technology. The following aspects of applied solar technology are covered: solar heating and cooling, solar radiation, solar collectors, heat storage control devices and specialty items, sizing solar…

  11. Using Correspondence Analysis in Multiple Case Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kienstra, Natascha; van der Heijden, Peter G.M.

    2015-01-01

    In qualitative research of multiple case studies, Miles and Huberman proposed to summarize the separate cases in a so-called meta-matrix that consists of cases by variables. Yin discusses cross-case synthesis to study this matrix. We propose correspondence analysis (CA) as a useful tool to study

  12. 12 CFR 7.5007 - Correspondent services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Electronic Activities § 7.5007 Correspondent services. It is part of the business of banking for a national... of software that performs data processing functions; (d) The development, operation, management, and marketing of products and processing services for transactions conducted at electronic terminal devices; (e...

  13. Thermodynamic Properties from Corresponding States Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Jørgen

    1980-01-01

    A corresponding states approach has been applied to the two-constant equations of state by Wilson, Soave, Peng—Robinson, Hamam et al., Lu et al., Simonet—Behar, and Chaudron et al. in order to obtain the equivalent shape-factor correlations. The correlations derived are compared with the Leach—Le...

  14. Science Teacher Beliefs and Classroom Practice Related to Constructivism in Different School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasci, Funda; Berlin, Donna F.

    2012-01-01

    Science teacher beliefs and classroom practice related to constructivism and factors that may influence classroom practice were examined in this cross-case study. Data from four science teachers in two schools included interviews, demographic questionnaire, Classroom Learning Environment Survey (preferred/perceived), and classroom observations and…

  15. Classroom Management with Exceptional Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Diane; Freeman, Jennifer; Simonsen, Brandi; Sugai, George

    2017-01-01

    Effective and engaging instruction is the cornerstone of any well-managed classroom. Even the best behavior support practices will not lead to academic achievement if the academic instruction is ineffective. Specific teacher practices associated with improved student behavior include high rates of opportunities to respond, direct instruction, and…

  16. Using Technology in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boles, Stephanie Reeve

    2011-01-01

    The author describes how she has come to use technology in her classroom over the years. Her main topics include using the internet, experiencing podcasts, using technology for assessment, and recording results from science research. (Contains 3 online resources and 5 figures.)

  17. Encouraging Classroom Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Joseph McKee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Classroom discussion has the potential to enhance the learning environment and encourages students to become active participants in the educational process. Student participation in classroom discussion has been shown to significantly improve the student learning experience. Research suggests that classroom discussion is an effective method for encouraging student classroom participation and for motivating student learning beyond the classroom. Participation in classroom discussion encourages students to become active collaborators in the learning process, while at the same time providing instructors with a practical method of assessing student learning. Classroom discussion is an effective tool for developing higher-level cognitive skills like critical thinking. Despite the potential discussion holds for student learning, many in academia lament the lack of participation in the classroom. The lack of student participation in classroom discussion is not a recent problem; it is one that has frustrated instructors for decades. Instructors report that some of the more current methods for encouraging classroom discussion can be exasperating and at times non-productive. This two-year study of 510 college and university students provides insight into the reasons why some students do not participate in classroom discussion. This study, which also elicited input from sixteen college and university professors and two high school teachers, offers some suggestions for creating and encouraging an environment conducive to student participation in the classroom.

  18. Critical Classroom Discourse Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaravadivelu, B.

    1999-01-01

    Conceptualizes a framework for conducting critical classroom-discourse analysis. Critiques the scope and method of current models of classroom-interaction analysis and classroom-discourse analysis and advocates using poststructuralist and postcolonialist understandings of discourse to develop a critical framework for understanding what actually…

  19. Functional Correspondence between Evaluators and Abstract Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ager, Mads Stig; Biernacki, Dariusz; Danvy, Olivier

    2003-01-01

    We bridge the gap between functional evaluators and abstract machines for the λ-calculus, using closure conversion, transformation into continuation-passing style, and defunctionalization.We illustrate this approach by deriving Krivine's abstract machine from an ordinary call-by-name evaluator...... and by deriving an ordinary call-by-value evaluator from Felleisen et al.'s CEK machine. The first derivation is strikingly simpler than what can be found in the literature. The second one is new. Together, they show that Krivine's abstract machine and the CEK machine correspond to the call-by-name and call......-by-value facets of an ordinary evaluator for the λ-calculus.We then reveal the denotational content of Hannan and Miller's CLS machine and of Landin's SECD machine. We formally compare the corresponding evaluators and we illustrate some degrees of freedom in the design spaces of evaluators and of abstract...

  20. Correspondence Theory and Phonological Blending in French

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Scott

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Though less productive than rival word-formation processes like compounding and affixation, blending is still a rich source of neologisms in French. Despite this productivity, however, blends are often seen by scholars as unpredictable, uninteresting, or both. This analysis picks up where recent studies of blending have left off, using Correspondence Theory and a bundle of segmental constraints to deal with this phenomenon as it pertains to French. More specifically, it shows that blending is the result of a single output standing in correspondence with two or more other outputs, and that we do not need to refer to prosodic information, which is crucial in accounts of blending in languages with lexical stress like English, to account for the process in French. The analysis also differs from previous studies in that it locates blending exclusively within the phonology, leaving its morphological and semantic characteristics to be handled by other processes in the grammar.

  1. Topological correspondance between hadrons and partons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Hassouni, Abdellah.

    1981-06-01

    The idea is to demonstrate the existence of a point structure of hadrons by D.T.U. (dual topological unitarization), an approach which involves confinement since its fundamental objects are hadrons. The aim is: - to establish rules of complementarity or correspondance between DTU and QCD at the level of invariant scale distributions; - to use these rules to predict either parton densities from hadron processes, or hadron distributions on the basis of the parton densities taken from deep inelastic processes [fr

  2. Skeletal shape correspondence via entropy minimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Liyun; Styner, Martin; Vicory, Jared; Paniagua, Beatriz; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Yang, Dan; Pizer, Stephen M.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Improving the shape statistics of medical image objects by generating correspondence of interior skeletal points. Data: Synthetic objects and real world lateral ventricles segmented from MR images. Method(s): Each object's interior is modeled by a skeletal representation called the s-rep, which is a quadrilaterally sampled, folded 2-sided skeletal sheet with spoke vectors proceeding from the sheet to the boundary. The skeleton is divided into three parts: up-side, down-side and fold-curve. The spokes on each part are treated separately and, using spoke interpolation, are shifted along their skeletal parts in each training sample so as to tighten the probability distribution on those spokes' geometric properties while sampling the object interior regularly. As with the surface-based correspondence method of Cates et al., entropy is used to measure both the probability distribution tightness and sampling regularity. The spokes' geometric properties are skeletal position, spoke length and spoke direction. The properties used to measure the regularity are the volumetric subregions bounded by the spokes, their quadrilateral sub-area and edge lengths on the skeletal surface and on the boundary. Results: Evaluation on synthetic and real world lateral ventricles demonstrated improvement in the performance of statistics using the resulting probability distributions, as compared to methods based on boundary models. The evaluation measures used were generalization, specificity, and compactness. Conclusions: S-rep models with the proposed improved correspondence provide significantly enhanced statistics as compared to standard boundary models.

  3. Scaffolding in Business English Correspondence Classes at College Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Sulindra Widjojokoesoemo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Language teaching and education have been so long influenced by developmental psychology, namely constructivism. This idea enlightens the world of language teaching. Constructivism has received both praises and critics. Communicative approach followers claim that the principles in constructivism support their thoughts while the followers of a more traditional approach, namely, Grammar Translation Method, claim that the constructivism is just another experiment in language teaching, just like other methods. This article is based on a classroom action research investigation of how scaffolding instruction, the operational ‘terms’ of constructivism, based on its ‘ZPD’ (Zone of Proximal Development, play roles in language teaching, specifically in Business English Writing. The investigation has perceived several important aspects in scaffolding instruction for teaching Business English Correspondence, such as the importance of modeling or giving examples, as well as corrective and immediate feedback, together with positive reinforcement, to improve the learners’ performance. It showed that modeling or giving examples, peer reviewing, together with immediate feedback, brought significant influence on the learners’ perspective, about their learning performance. Keywords: constructivism, Scaffolding, ZPD, Business English Writing

  4. Classroom Demonstrations of Social Psychological Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Royce Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Describes eight classroom activities which instruct college level sociology students about major concepts and principles of social psychology. Concepts include gestalt psychology, nonverbal communication, adaptation level, relative deprivation, selective exposure, labeling, sexism, and perceptual distortion. (Author/DB)

  5. Emotional Bias in Classroom Observations: Within-Rater Positive Emotion Predicts Favorable Assessments of Classroom Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floman, James L.; Hagelskamp, Carolin; Brackett, Marc A.; Rivers, Susan E.

    2017-01-01

    Classroom observations increasingly inform high-stakes decisions and research in education, including the allocation of school funding and the evaluation of school-based interventions. However, trends in rater scoring tendencies over time may undermine the reliability of classroom observations. Accordingly, the present investigations, grounded in…

  6. Classroom Profiling Training: Increasing Preservice Teachers' Confidence and Knowledge of Classroom Management Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Cliff; Simoncini, Kym; Davidson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Classroom management is a serious concern for beginning teachers including preservice teachers. The Queensland Department of Education, Training and Employment (DETE) has developed the Essential Skills for Classroom Management (ESCM), a system of positive and pro-active strategies for maintaining supportive learning environments. In addition, the…

  7. The correspondence of Michael Faraday, v.2 1832-1840

    CERN Document Server

    James, F

    1993-01-01

    Volume 2 covers the 1830s, a period when Faraday pursued the consequences of his discovery of electromagnetic induction and revised entirely the theories of electrochemistry and the nature of electricity.His correspondents include scientists of the day as well as antiquaries, military men, artists and politicians.

  8. International law and regulation of aeronautical public correspondence by satellite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brisibe, Tare

    2006-01-01

    This work covers the evolution of satellite based Aeronautical Public Correspondence and the operational environment in which services are being offered. Followed by an examination of applicable rules, including the relevant institutions from which they emanate, attention is devoted to questions on

  9. Correspondence normalized ghost imaging on compressive sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Sheng-Mei; Zhuang Peng

    2014-01-01

    Ghost imaging (GI) offers great potential with respect to conventional imaging techniques. It is an open problem in GI systems that a long acquisition time is be required for reconstructing images with good visibility and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). In this paper, we propose a new scheme to get good performance with a shorter construction time. We call it correspondence normalized ghost imaging based on compressive sensing (CCNGI). In the scheme, we enhance the signal-to-noise performance by normalizing the reference beam intensity to eliminate the noise caused by laser power fluctuations, and reduce the reconstruction time by using both compressive sensing (CS) and time-correspondence imaging (CI) techniques. It is shown that the qualities of the images have been improved and the reconstruction time has been reduced using CCNGI scheme. For the two-grayscale ''double-slit'' image, the mean square error (MSE) by GI and the normalized GI (NGI) schemes with the measurement number of 5000 are 0.237 and 0.164, respectively, and that is 0.021 by CCNGI scheme with 2500 measurements. For the eight-grayscale ''lena'' object, the peak signal-to-noise rates (PSNRs) are 10.506 and 13.098, respectively using GI and NGI schemes while the value turns to 16.198 using CCNGI scheme. The results also show that a high-fidelity GI reconstruction has been achieved using only 44% of the number of measurements corresponding to the Nyquist limit for the two-grayscale “double-slit'' object. The qualities of the reconstructed images using CCNGI are almost the same as those from GI via sparsity constraints (GISC) with a shorter reconstruction time. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  10. Quantum classical correspondence in nonrelativistic electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, B.; Weatherford, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    A form of classical electrodynamic field exists which gives exact agreement with the operator field of quantum electrodynamics (QED) for the Lamb shift of a harmonically bound point electron. Here it is pointed out that this form of classical theory, with its physically acceptable interpretation, is the result of an unconventional resolution of a mathematically ambiguous term in classical field theory. Finally, a quantum classical correspondence principle is shown to exist in the sense that the classical field and expectation value of the QED operator field are identical, if retardation is neglected in the latter

  11. Fluid/gravity correspondence and the CFM black brane solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casadio, R. [Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Bologna (Italy); I.N.F.N., Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Cavalcanti, R.T. [Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Bologna (Italy); Universidade Federal do ABC-UFABC, Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas, Santo Andre (Brazil); Rocha, Roldao da [Universidade Federal do ABC-UFABC, Centro de Matematica, Computacao e Cognicao, Santo Andre (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    We consider the lower bound for the shear viscosity-to-entropy density ratio, obtained from the fluid/gravity correspondence, in order to constrain the post-Newtonian parameter of brane-world metrics. In particular, we analyse the Casadio-Fabbri-Mazzacurati (CFM) effective solutions for the gravity side of the correspondence and argue that including higher-order terms in the hydrodynamic expansion can lead to a full agreement with the experimental bounds, for the Eddington-Robertson-Schiff post-Newtonian parameter in the CFM metrics. This lends further support to the physical relevance of the viscosity-to-entropy ratio lower bound and fluid/gravity correspondence. Hence we show that CFM black branes are, effectively, Schwarzschild black branes. (orig.)

  12. Fast correspondences search in anatomical trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Thiago R.; Gergel, Ingmar; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Maier-Hein, Lena

    2010-03-01

    Registration of multiple medical images commonly comprises the steps feature extraction, correspondences search and transformation computation. In this paper, we present a new method for a fast and pose independent search of correspondences using as features anatomical trees such as the bronchial system in the lungs or the vessel system in the liver. Our approach scores the similarities between the trees' nodes (bifurcations) taking into account both, topological properties extracted from their graph representations and anatomical properties extracted from the trees themselves. The node assignment maximizes the global similarity (sum of the scores of each pair of assigned nodes), assuring that the matches are distributed throughout the trees. Furthermore, the proposed method is able to deal with distortions in the data, such as noise, motion, artifacts, and problems associated with the extraction method, such as missing or false branches. According to an evaluation on swine lung data sets, the method requires less than one second on average to compute the matching and yields a high rate of correct matches compared to state of the art work.

  13. Dynamical Correspondence in a Generalized Quantum Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niestegge, Gerd

    2015-05-01

    In order to figure out why quantum physics needs the complex Hilbert space, many attempts have been made to distinguish the C*-algebras and von Neumann algebras in more general classes of abstractly defined Jordan algebras (JB- and JBW-algebras). One particularly important distinguishing property was identified by Alfsen and Shultz and is the existence of a dynamical correspondence. It reproduces the dual role of the selfadjoint operators as observables and generators of dynamical groups in quantum mechanics. In the paper, this concept is extended to another class of nonassociative algebras, arising from recent studies of the quantum logics with a conditional probability calculus and particularly of those that rule out third-order interference. The conditional probability calculus is a mathematical model of the Lüders-von Neumann quantum measurement process, and third-order interference is a property of the conditional probabilities which was discovered by Sorkin (Mod Phys Lett A 9:3119-3127, 1994) and which is ruled out by quantum mechanics. It is shown then that the postulates that a dynamical correspondence exists and that the square of any algebra element is positive still characterize, in the class considered, those algebras that emerge from the selfadjoint parts of C*-algebras equipped with the Jordan product. Within this class, the two postulates thus result in ordinary quantum mechanics using the complex Hilbert space or, vice versa, a genuine generalization of quantum theory must omit at least one of them.

  14. Including Children Dependent on Ventilators in School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jack M.

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for including ventilator-dependent children in school are offered, based on experience with six such students at a New York State school. Guidelines stress adherence to the medical management plan, the school-family partnership, roles of the social worker and psychologist, orientation, transportation, classroom issues, and steps toward…

  15. Associations between classroom CO2 concentrations and student attendance in Washington and Idaho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shendell, D G; Prill, R; Fisk, W J; Apte, M G; Blake, D; Faulkner, D

    2004-10-01

    Student attendance in American public schools is a critical factor in securing limited operational funding. Student and teacher attendance influence academic performance. Limited data exist on indoor air and environmental quality (IEQ) in schools, and how IEQ affects attendance, health, or performance. This study explored the association of student absence with measures of indoor minus outdoor carbon dioxide concentration (dCO(2)). Absence and dCO(2) data were collected from 409 traditional and 25 portable classrooms from 22 schools located in six school districts in the states of Washington and Idaho. Study classrooms had individual heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, except two classrooms without mechanical ventilation. Classroom attributes, student attendance and school-level ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status (SES) were included in multivariate modeling. Forty-five percent of classrooms studied had short-term indoor CO(2) concentrations above 1000 p.p.m. A 1000 p.p.m. increase in dCO(2) was associated (P attendance (ADA), corresponding to a relative 10-20% increase in student absence. Annual ADA was 2% higher (P student attendance, and occupant health and student performance, with longer term indoor minus outdoor CO(2) concentrations and more accurately measured ventilation rates. If our findings are confirmed, improving classroom ventilation should be considered a practical means of reducing student absence. Adequate or enhanced ventilation may be achieved, for example, with educational training programs for teachers and facilities staff on ventilation system operation and maintenance. Also, technological interventions such as improved automated control systems could provide continuous ventilation during occupied times, regardless of occupant thermal comfort demands.

  16. Measurement of vocal doses in virtual classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottalico, Pasquale; Pelegrin Garcia, David

    2010-01-01

    different acoustical conditions, that combined different kind of background noise and virtual classroom acoustics. Readings from the vocal fold vibrations were registered with an Ambulatory Phonation Monitor device. The speech signal from the talker in the center of the facility was picked up with a head...... with an artificial head (corresponding to the mouth-ears path) placed at the talker position while simulating the classrooms. Time histories of the vocal fold vibration readings, with the trend of the fundamental frequency and an estimation of the sound pressure level, sampled every 50 ms, were obtained. From...... these data the vocal doses Time dose, Vocal Loading Index, Distance Dose, Energy Dissipation Dose, and Radiated Energy Dose were calculated and correlated with the acoustical features of the classrooms....

  17. The dS/dS correspondence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alishahiha, M.; Karch, A.; Silverstein, E.; Tong, D.

    2004-07-01

    We present a holographic duality for the de Sitter static patch which consolidates basic features of its geometry and the behavior of gravity and brane probes, valid on timescales short compared to the decay or Poincare recurrence times. Namely de Sitter spacetime dS d (R) in d dimensions with curvature radius R is holographically dual to two conformal field theories on dS d-l (R), cut off at an energy scale 1/R where they couple to each other and to d-1 dimensional gravity. As part of our analysis, we study brane probes in de Sitter and thermal Anti de Sitter spaces, and interpret the terms in the corresponding DBI action via strongly coupled thermal field theory. This provides a dual field theoretic interpretation of the fact that probes take forever to reach a horizon in general relativity. (author)

  18. Professional Vision of Classroom Management and Learning Support in Science Classrooms--Does Professional Vision Differ across General and Content-Specific Classroom Interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensky, Mirjam; Gold, Bernadette; Holdynski, Manfred; Möller, Kornelia

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates the internal structure of professional vision of in-service teachers and student teachers with respect to classroom management and learning support in primary science lessons. Classroom management (including monitoring, managing momentum, and rules and routines) and learning support (including cognitive activation…

  19. Considering the Chalkless Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis-Monaghan, Joanna A.

    2010-01-01

    This article shares some personal reflections on several years of integrating educational technology into mathematics courses while retaining the direct interaction strengths of the traditional classroom.

  20. Flipped Classroom Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fezile Ozdamli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Flipped classroom is an active, student-centered approach that was formed to increase the quality of period within class. Generally this approach whose applications are done mostly in Physical Sciences, also attracts the attention of educators and researchers in different disciplines recently. Flipped classroom learning which wide-spreads rapidly in the world, is not well recognized in our country. That is why the aim of study is to attract attention to its potential in education field and provide to make it recognize more by educators and researchers. With this aim, in the study what flipped classroom approach is, flipped classroom technology models, its advantages and limitations were explained.

  1. La correspondance comme genre éthique Correspondance as an Ethical Genre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Jaubert

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Les caractéristiques d’un genre de discours découlent de la situation de communication dans laquelle il s’inscrit, et qu’il reflète. Pour une correspondance, et singulièrement pour une correspondance d’auteurs, cette situation est celle d’une interaction à la fois directe et biaisée qui engage l’ethos de l’épistolier. Nous analysons les idéaux qu’il produit sur un fond de valeurs partagées. Le champ d’investigation retenu est celui de certaines correspondances célèbres du 18e siècle, car la lettre est à cette époque une manifestation très accomplie de la sociabilité. De ce fait, elle a connu une dérive littérarisante, source d’un décalage pragmatique qui l’attire dans la mouvance d’un genre second, la correspondance littéraire, où l’implication éthique du discours devient sa détermination majeure.The characteristics of a genre of discourse depend upon its specific situation of communication - the genre being embedded in this situation and, at the same time, reflecting it. Concerning correspondences, especially between authors, this situation consists of an interaction both direct and indirect, involving the ethos of the letter writer. Our analysis focuses on the ideals it produces on a background of shared values. The field of inquiry is a choice of famous correspondences of the 18th century, since the letter was at that time an accomplished manifestation of sociability. As such, it adopted a literary form, which created a pragmatic gap and put it under the dependence of another genre, the fictional correspondence, in which ethic implications became its determining factor.

  2. Markedness Correspondence in Translation of Books’ Titles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoha Bayati Doosti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Translation is a multi-dimensional task which requires different aspects of competencies one of which is linguistics. Falling within the realm of linguistic competence is the ability to produce relatively similar degree of markedness throughout the translation. Such ability contributes to keep the thematic structure of sentences intact and make the same propositional meanings have different communicative meanings. The present study which is a descriptive analytical corpus-based one aimed to analyze the thematic structure of titles of all English books rendered into Persian from the beginning of translation in Iran to 2004drawing on Hallidayan linguistic taxonomy of marked sentences as proposed by Baker (1992. The corpus is a parallel one consisting of 141 marked English book titles and their Persian translations. Comparative analyses of items revealed that about 56.7% of all marked English sentences havebeen translated into marked Persian sentences, i.e. the thematic structure of ST has been preserved. The similar thematic structure entails corresponding communicative meaning of STand TT. Keywords: Translation, Information structure (IS, Theme/Rheme, Markedness

  3. The scientific correspondence of Arcangelo Scacchi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella De Ceglie

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

    The scientist Arcangelo Scacchi (1810-1893, is today rarely mentioned in histories of Italian science in the

    nineteenth century. Even a brief consideration of his career, however, reveals that his work was of great importance to the scientific community of his age. For more than fifty years he was Professor of Mineralogy at the University of Naples and Curator of the Royal Mineralogical Museum, which under his guidance enjoyed a period of unprecedented success. The as yet unpublished Scacchi papers shed interesting light on the world of this Italian naturalist. His correspondence reveals much about Scacchi’s role in the scientific community both in Italy and abroad, and illustrate the extent to which he was involved in contemporary debates and research in the fields of geology, mineralogy, volcanology and crystallography.


  4. Correspondence Urging Bombing of Auschwitz during World War II. Teaching with Documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondo, Richard A.; Schmael, Wynell Burroughs

    1993-01-01

    Presents a classroom lesson that utilizes primary sources about Auschwitz, the World War II Nazi concentration camp. Two letters confronting the issue of whether or not U.S. planes should bomb the camps are included. Recommends seven teaching strategies for the lesson and identifies additional resources. (CFR)

  5. Classroom -RE-SONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. Proving a Result in Combinatorics using Equations.

  6. Flipped Classroom Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdamli, Fezile; Asiksoy, Gulsum

    2016-01-01

    Flipped classroom is an active, student-centered approach that was formed to increase the quality of period within class. Generally this approach whose applications are done mostly in Physical Sciences, also attracts the attention of educators and researchers in different disciplines recently. Flipped classroom learning which wide-spreads rapidly…

  7. Classroom -RE-SONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to· teaching and learning science. Logarithm and agM. In [1] we had discussed the evaluation.

  8. Register Variation in Electronic Business Correspondence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Giménez Moreno

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Electronic correspondence is a highly dynamic genre within the business world in which Register Variation (RV is frequently used as a tool to improve communication but it often can lead to misunderstanding. In order to shed some light on this still unexplored area, the present study firstly offers a practical approach to classify and analyse RV within professional communication. After this, it reviews previous studies on email writing to apply their findings to this approach and, in the third part of the study, a corpus of recent business emails in English is analysed to examine how the key parameters of RV are currently used within this genre. The results will show that, not only the context, but also the roles and intentions of the senders influence an email’s register, often causing internal oscillations between different registers within the same text.La correspondencia electrónica es un género comunicativo de especial dinamismo dentro del mundo empresarial en el que la variación de registros se utiliza como herramienta para mejorar la interacción y las relaciones entre los interlocutores, pero que a menudo también genera confusión y malentendidos. Para aportar luz a esta área, el presente trabajo ofrece una aproximación práctica para la clasificación y el análisis de los registros lingüísticos dentro de la comunicación profesional. A continuación, revisa los estudios previos sobre este género con el fin de adaptar sus resultados a la teoría propuesta. Finalmente, se analiza un corpus de mensajes escritos en inglés para examinar el funcionamiento de los registros dentro de este género. Los resultados mostrarán que, no solo el contexto situacional, sino sobre todo los roles e intenciones de los emisores determinan el registro de un mensaje, provocando a menudo oscilación interna entre varios registros dentro del mismo texto.

  9. Medical Records and Correspondence Demand Respect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Benamer

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To The Editor: I was amazed recently to see a patient from Libya who came to the UK for treatment based on the advice of his Libyan physicians. The patient carried with him no referral letter whatsoever. Not one physician familiar with his case bothered to write a few lines for the poor patient, although each of those doctors saw the patient at least twice and prescribed one or more treatment. The patient carried with him different medications that had been prescribed, and a few empty containers of other medicines he had used. I mention the above short tale to bring to light what I feel is a major ethical problem with the way medicine is practiced in Libya [1]. The keeping of good medical records together with clear and concise correspondence between physicians is imperative for several reasons. Not only does it avoid duplication of services and unnecessary costs, it decreases the time invested by both the patient and physician, and it fosters a collegial relationship among healthcare providers. Many times, referring physicians may not know each other. It provides a channel for them to learn from each other as well as a method for them to form professional relationships. It occurred to me that colleagues in Libya may be shy of writing referral letters or may even be phobic about disclosing their practice habits. Patient information can best be written as referral letters which summaries the patient presentation, testing, response to treatment, possible consultation, and reason for referral. The referral may be because the physician(s initially treating the patient simply have tried all treatments known to them, or they may need to refer if they lack certain diagnostic equipment necessary to continue the care. To refer the patient to colleagues simply says “we think more can be done for this patient but we may not be able to do it here; please evaluate.” It shows respect for the patient and for the colleague. No physician knows everything

  10. CORRESPONDENCE OF NEEDS COURSES -A SURVEY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the courses should take. A questionnaire and covering letter were sent to. 35 individuals identified as being engaged in EE in one form or another. The list included lectur- ers at colleges and universities and persons em- ployed by conservation organisations. Selection was however based on individuals and not the organ-.

  11. Correspondences in Art Education: Approaching Authenticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurmuehlen, Marilyn, Ed.

    This document excerpts journals of eight artists, as they observe and comment on events in their daily lives. Seemingly mundane moments become aesthetic experiences through their eyes, and rare glimpses are afforded of approaches to learning, teaching, and preliminaries to studio work. The artists included are: (1) Amidon Perfond (edited by…

  12. Classroom risks and resources: Teacher burnout, classroom quality and children's adjustment in high needs elementary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoglund, Wendy L G; Klingle, Kirsten E; Hosan, Naheed E

    2015-10-01

    The current paper presents two related sets of findings on the classroom context in high needs elementary schools. First, we investigated change over one school term in teacher burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, personal accomplishment) and classroom quality (emotional and instructional support, organization) and assessed the degree to which burnout and classroom quality co-varied over the term with each other and with aggregate externalizing behaviors (average child externalizing behaviors in the classroom). These analyses describe the classroom context in which the children are nested. Second, we examined change over one school term in children's social adjustment (relationship quality with teachers and friends) and academic adjustment (school engagement, literacy skills) and assessed how adjustment co-varied over time with child externalizing behaviors and was predicted by teacher burnout, classroom quality and aggregate externalizing behaviors. These models were tested with a sample of low-income, ethnically diverse children in kindergarten to grade 3 and their teachers. The children and teachers were assessed three times over one school term. Personal accomplishment co-varied positively with overall classroom quality. Reciprocally, classroom organization co-varied positively with overall teacher burnout. Aggregate externalizing behaviors co-varied positively with depersonalization and negatively with personal accomplishment and overall classroom quality, including emotional support and organization. In turn, teacher burnout interacted with aggregate externalizing behaviors to predict change in child social and academic adjustment. Alternatively, classroom quality interacted with aggregate and child externalizing behaviors to predict change in child social and academic adjustment. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Classical chaos and its correspondence in superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, C.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fang, M.; Hoi, I.; Kelly, J.; Megrant, A.; O'Malley, P.; Quintana, C.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T.; Barends, R.; Chen, Yu; Fowler, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Mutus, J.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Martinis, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    Advances in superconducting qubits have made it possible to experimentally investigate quantum-classical correspondence by constructing quantum systems with chaotic classical limits. We study the quantum equivalent of a classical spinning top using three fully coupled qubits that behave as a single spin-3/2 and subject the spin to a sequence of non-linear rotations. The resulting entanglement bears a striking resemblance to the classical phase space, including bifurcation, and suggests that classical chaos manifests itself as quantum entanglement. Studying the orientation of the spin-3/2 reveals that the rotations which generate chaos and entanglement are at the same time the source of disagreement between the quantum and classical trajectories. Our experiment highlights the correspondence between classical non-linear dynamics and interacting quantum systems.

  14. [Study on the history of formulas corresponding to syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xing-Jiang

    2010-06-01

    The theory of formulas corresponding to syndromes is a relatively mature and integrated method contained in the classics of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for diagnosing and treatment of diseases. The development of the theory mainly includes three stages, i.e. prototype stage before Han Dynasty, sublimation stage of late Eastern Han Dynasty and the following improving stage. People recorded what they saw and heard of during their medical activities in prototype stage. In sublimation stage, Treatise on Febrile Diseases written by Zhang Zhong-jing found out the relationship of structure-fixed prescriptions used more often with symptoms and signs. Doctors after Han Dynasty repeated and verified the truth of classical prescriptions and the theory of formulas corresponding to syndromes. They also developed and improved the theory. Based on clinical experience, and classics, it was enriched, advanced and improved by doctors after then. It could provide reference for clinical treatment through systematically hackling the theories.

  15. The Chomsky-Place correspondence 1993-1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, N; Place, U T

    2000-01-01

    Edited correspondence between Ullin T. Place and Noam Chomsky, which occurred in 1993-1994, is presented. The principal topics are (a) deep versus surface structure; (b) computer modeling of the brain; (c) the evolutionary origins of language; (d) behaviorism; and (e) a dispositional account of language. This correspondence includes Chomsky's denial that he ever characterized deep structure as innate; Chomsky's critique of computer modeling (both traditional and connectionist) of the brain; Place's critique of Chomsky's alleged failure to provide an adequate account of the evolutionary origins of language, and Chomsky's response that such accounts are "pop-Darwinian fairy tales"; and Place's arguments for, and Chomsky's against, the relevance of behaviorism to linguistic theory, especially the relevance of a behavioral approach to language that is buttressed by a dispositional account of sentence construction.

  16. The Chomsky—Place correspondence 1993–1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, Noam; Place, Ullin T.

    2000-01-01

    Edited correspondence between Ullin T. Place and Noam Chomsky, which occurred in 1993–1994, is presented. The principal topics are (a) deep versus surface structure; (b) computer modeling of the brain; (c) the evolutionary origins of language; (d) behaviorism; and (e) a dispositional account of language. This correspondence includes Chomsky's denial that he ever characterized deep structure as innate; Chomsky's critique of computer modeling (both traditional and connectionist) of the brain; Place's critique of Chomsky's alleged failure to provide an adequate account of the evolutionary origins of language, and Chomsky's response that such accounts are “pop-Darwinian fairy tales”; and Place's arguments for, and Chomsky's against, the relevance of behaviorism to linguistic theory, especially the relevance of a behavioral approach to language that is buttressed by a dispositional account of sentence construction. PMID:22477211

  17. Classroom Management and the Librarian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Heidi; Hays, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    As librarians take on more instructional responsibilities, the need for classroom management skills becomes vital. Unfortunately, classroom management skills are not taught in library school and therefore, many librarians are forced to learn how to manage a classroom on the job. Different classroom settings such as one-shot instruction sessions…

  18. Flipping the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riendeau, Diane

    2012-11-01

    A recent trend in education is the ``flipped'' or ``reversed'' classroom. In this educational model, students view videos of the lectures as their homework and class time is used for activities and solving problems that might have been assigned as homework in a traditional classroom. Although far from an expert on flipping the classroom, I can see some merit in the idea. When students watch the videos at home, they can start and restart the lecture as often as they like. The lectures are also available for review before the exam. Class time can be used for higher-order questioning, experiments, and problem solving.

  19. Acoustical conditions for speech communication in active elementary school classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Bradley, John

    2005-04-01

    Detailed acoustical measurements were made in 34 active elementary school classrooms with typical rectangular room shape in schools near Ottawa, Canada. There was an average of 21 students in classrooms. The measurements were made to obtain accurate indications of the acoustical quality of conditions for speech communication during actual teaching activities. Mean speech and noise levels were determined from the distribution of recorded sound levels and the average speech-to-noise ratio was 11 dBA. Measured mid-frequency reverberation times (RT) during the same occupied conditions varied from 0.3 to 0.6 s, and were a little less than for the unoccupied rooms. RT values were not related to noise levels. Octave band speech and noise levels, useful-to-detrimental ratios, and Speech Transmission Index values were also determined. Key results included: (1) The average vocal effort of teachers corresponded to louder than Pearsons Raised voice level; (2) teachers increase their voice level to overcome ambient noise; (3) effective speech levels can be enhanced by up to 5 dB by early reflection energy; and (4) student activity is seen to be the dominant noise source, increasing average noise levels by up to 10 dBA during teaching activities. [Work supported by CLLRnet.

  20. Mobile Phone Application Development for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, P.; Oostra, D.; Crecelius, S.; Chambers, L. H.

    2012-08-01

    With smartphone sales currently surpassing laptop sales, it is hard not to think that these devices will have a place in the classroom. More specifically, with little to no monetary investment, classroom-centric mobile applications have the ability to suit the needs of teachers. Previously, programming such an item was a daunting task to the classroom teacher. But now, through the use of online visual tools, anyone has the ability to generate a mobile application to suit individual classroom needs. The "MY NASA DATA" (MND) project has begun work on such an application. Using online tools that are directed at the non-programmer, the team has developed two usable mobile applications ("apps") that fit right into the science classroom. The two apps generated include a cloud dichotomous key for cloud identification in the field, and an atmospheric science glossary to help with standardized testing key vocabulary and classroom assignments. Through the use of free online tools, teachers and students now have the ability to customize mobile applications to meet their individual needs. As an extension of the mobile applications, the MND team is planning web-based application programming interfaces (API's) that will be generated from data that is currently included in the MND Live Access Server. This will allow teachers and students to choose data sets that they want to include in the mobile application without having to populate the API themselves. Through the use of easy to understand online mobile app tutorials and MND data sets, teachers will have the ability to generate unit-specific mobile applications to further engage and empower students in the science classroom.

  1. Corresponding Habits of Mind and Mathematical Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwirahayu, G.; Kustiawati, D.; Bidari, I.

    2017-09-01

    Objective of learning process regarding system of Indonesia government should be consist of knowledge, attitudes, and skills, or in general we call cognitive, affective and psychomotor. These objective are apply to mathematics education also. Attitude in mathematics known as habits of mind. The teacher should create a learning objective which including all, cognitive, affective and psychomotor. In general, math teachers in Indonesia pay attention to aspects of knowledge, and they ignore other aspects. Habits of mind is term which means the tendency to behave intellectually or intelligently when faced with problems which is immediately known solution. This article examines the math teacher’s attention to students’ habits of mind. The research done by survey method to 38 students at Islamic School 32 Jakarta academic year 2015/2016 from April to May 2016. Habits of mind are observed in this research restricted to persisting, thinking about thinking, thinking flexible and applying past knowledge to new situation. Based on survey, conclude that teacher, without realizing, they have to improve students’ habits of mind, as long as teaching and learning only persisting and thinking about thinking are already well developed, while flexible thinking and applying past knowledge to new situation has not well developed. We hope, math teacher can pay attention not only cognitive aspect but habits of mind also.

  2. A brief of activities corresponding to 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This document describes the main activities developed during 1990 in those Managements, Departments and other units of the Direction of Research and Development of the ININ in Mexico. It has been conserved in general the writing provided by the Chiefs of Project and Responsible for Activities, save by modifications made in some parts with the purpose of giving bigger clarity and precision to the report. Being this the first occasion in that it gets ready a document of this nature in the Division of Research and Development (DID) it is of to be expected that errors and omissions exist whose number it is hoped to reduce in the future reports. In particular, the relative data have not been included to the number of people attributed to the DID neither the personnel distribution in the different areas. It doesn't consider appropriate to contain the agreement reports with the scientific or technological disciplines that they try, with the purpose of highlighting the particular achievements of the Managements and Departments. (Author)

  3. Sir Rudolf Peierls Selected private and scientific correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Sabine

    2007-01-01

    This edition of the private and scientific correspondence of Sir Rudolf Peierls gives a unique insight into the life and work of one of the greatest theoretical physicists of the 20th century. Rudolf Peierls' scientific work contributed to the early developments in quantum mechanics, and he is well known and much appreciated for his contributions to various disciplines, including solid state physics, nuclear physics, and particle physics. As an enthusiastic and devoted teacher, he passed on his knowledge and understanding and inspired the work of collaborators and students alike. As an effecti

  4. Boardgames in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Robert F.

    1979-01-01

    The article describes the program at Wellesley (Massachusetts) High School's Academic Resource Center, a program in which game-playing is used to improve the academic functioning of special needs students in preparation for reintegration into the regular classroom. (SBH)

  5. Culture in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medin, Douglas L.; Bang, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Culture plays a large but often unnoticeable role in what we teach and how we teach children. We are a country of immense diversity, but in classrooms the dominant European-American culture has become the language of learning.

  6. Critters in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert W.; Fleisher, Paul

    1984-01-01

    The use of invertebrates as classroom "pets" can develop students' skills in scientific inquiry and instill respect for science. Few materials are needed for projects involving invertebrates. Suggested activities using snails, crickets, earthworms, crayfish, and guppies are offered. (DF)

  7. Student Responsibility and Classroom Discipline in Australia, China, and Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romi, Shlomo; Lewis, Ramon; Katz, Yaacov J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between teachers' classroom discipline techniques and students' individual and communal responsibility in Australian, Chinese, and Israeli classrooms. The sample comprised 5521 students in grades 7-12 and 748 teachers. The participating Australian, Chinese, and Israeli schools included both…

  8. Geography Teachers' Attitudes and Beliefs Regarding Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikmenli, Yurdal; Çifçi, Taner

    2016-01-01

    This study scrutinizes geography teachers' attitude and belief levels regarding classroom management. As a matter of fact, classroom management is one of the prominent areas emphasized by all educators. Descriptive correlational survey model was used in the study. Study group includes 58 geography teachers working in Sivas province during the…

  9. The Use and Effectiveness of Computers in the Elementary Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caster, Tonja

    Practical issues that should be considered in placing a classroom computer for use with elementary students include where to locate computer equipment in relation to electrical sockets, windows, and chalkboards; the program sound; who will be able to see the screen; and classroom traffic patterns. Decisions must be made regarding the size of…

  10. Using a Virtual Classroom to Teach Online Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yun

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to share the author's experience of using the virtual classroom when teaching online mathematics course. Various softwares including MyMathLab and Wimba are introduced and the teaching methods and tips are provided and analyzed. Results show that the use of the virtual classroom enhance the communication in the online…

  11. Removing Supplementary Materials from Montessori Classrooms Changed Child Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillard, Angeline S.; Heise, Megan J.

    2016-01-01

    Montessori classrooms vary in the degree to which they adhere to Maria Montessori's model, including in the provision of materials. Specifically, some classrooms use only Montessori materials, whereas others supplement the Montessori materials with commercially available materials like puzzles and games. A prior study suggested such…

  12. Effectiveness of Breakfast in the Classroom in Five Exemplary Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainville, Alice Jo; King, Amber D.; Nettles, Mary Frances

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: A national trend to improve school breakfast participation is the integration of breakfast within the school day. Breakfast in the classroom programs increase student access to school breakfast. Service models include "grab and go," distribution of breakfasts to each classroom, and mobile breakfast carts in hallways.…

  13. Baddies in the Classroom: Media Education and Narrative Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Rebekah

    2005-01-01

    When teachers allow students to write stories that include elements of popular media, we must ask what to do with these media elements once they have entered the classroom. This article relates findings from a classroom study focusing on children's media-based story writing. The study looks at children as producers of new media texts and describes…

  14. Classroom Emotional Climate, Teacher Affiliation, and Student Conduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackett, Marc A.; Reyes, Maria Regina; Rivers, Susan E.; Elbertson, Nicole A.; Salovey, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Using a multi-method, multi-level approach, this study examined the link between classroom emotional climate and student conduct, including as a mediator the role of teacher affiliation, i.e., students' perceptions of their relationships with their teachers. Data were collected from 90 fifth- and sixth-grade classrooms (n = 2,000 students) and…

  15. Functional Language Intervention in the Classroom: Avoiding the Tutoring Trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Janet A.

    1997-01-01

    This article urges speech language pathologists (SLPs) to avoid the tutoring role in the effort to provide individualized services to children in regular classroom settings. Suggested alternatives to the tutoring role include acting in a consultative role to help modify classroom practices early in the year and later on providing direct services…

  16. A Case Study in Distance Learning Systems: The University of Lagos Correspondence and Open Studies Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, Keith

    A case study of the correspondence and open studies unit of the University of Lagos, an Open University school, is presented. Areas of discussion include characteristics of the country, the educational system in Nigeria, and the correspondence and open studies unit. Specific topics include: the physical setting of Nigeria; the population; the…

  17. A Model for Online Support in Classroom Management: Perceptions of Beginning Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Credence; Gentry, James; Larmer, William

    2016-01-01

    Classroom management is a challenge for beginning teachers. To address this challenge, a model to provide support for beginning teachers was developed, consisting of a one-day workshop on classroom management, followed with online support extending over eight weeks. Specific classroom management strategies included (a) developing a foundation…

  18. A Theoretical Understanding of the Literature on Student Voice in the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Katie

    2018-01-01

    Background: Incorporating student voice into the science classroom has the potential to positively impact science teaching and learning. However, students are rarely consulted on school and classroom matters. This literature review examines the effects of including student voice in the science classroom. Purpose: The purpose of this literature…

  19. Classroom Management through the Eyes of Elementary Teachers in Turkey: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Sibel; Yildirim, Ali; Goodwin, A. Lin

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore Turkish elementary teachers' (1) perceptions of classroom management, (2) classroom management problems they experience, (3) factors causing these problems, and (4) their classroom management practices. The study employed phenomenological research design in the qualitative tradition. The participants included 15…

  20. Exploring Sexual Attitudes and Experiences: A Classroom Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Casey T.

    2011-01-01

    This classroom exercise is designed to facilitate insight and understanding of the relationships between sexual attitudes and sexual experiences among college students. First, students complete a 65-item survey on which they indicate their moderate to traditional sexual attitudes and their corresponding sexual experiences. Next, correlations,…

  1. Audiovisual correspondence between musical timbre and visual shapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad eAdeli

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the cross-modal correspondences between musical timbre and shapes. Previously, such features as pitch, loudness, light intensity, visual size, and color characteristics have mostly been used in studies of audio-visual correspondences. Moreover, in most studies, simple stimuli e.g. simple tones have been utilized. In this experiment, 23 musical sounds varying in fundamental frequency and timbre but fixed in loudness were used. Each sound was presented once against colored shapes and once against grayscale shapes. Subjects had to select the visual equivalent of a given sound i.e. its shape, color (or grayscale and vertical position. This scenario permitted studying the associations between normalized timbre and visual shapes as well as some of the previous findings for more complex stimuli. 119 subjects (31 females and 88 males participated in the online experiment. Subjects included 36 claimed professional musicians, 47 claimed amateur musicians and 36 claimed non-musicians. 31 subjects have also claimed to have synesthesia-like experiences. A strong association between timbre of envelope normalized sounds and visual shapes was observed. Subjects have strongly associated soft timbres with blue, green or light gray rounded shapes, harsh timbres with red, yellow or dark gray sharp angular shapes and timbres having elements of softness and harshness together with a mixture of the two previous shapes. Color or grayscale had no effect on timbre-shape associations. Fundamental frequency was not associated with height, grayscale or color. The significant correspondence between timbre and shape revealed by the present work allows designing substitution systems which might help the blind to perceive shapes through timbre.

  2. A logical correspondence between natural semantics and abstract machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmons, Robert J.; Zerny, Ian

    2013-01-01

    We present a logical correspondence between natural semantics and abstract machines. This correspondence enables the mechanical and fully-correct construction of an abstract machine from a natural semantics. Our logical correspondence mirrors the Reynolds functional correspondence, but we...... manipulate semantic specifications encoded in a logical framework instead of manipulating functional programs. Natural semantics and abstract machines are instances of substructural operational semantics. As a byproduct, using a substructural logical framework, we bring concurrent and stateful models...

  3. An Alternative to Correspondence Analysis Using Hellinger Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Correspondence Analysis Using Hellinger Distance 6. AuTHOR(Si C.R. Rao 7 PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAMES(S) AND ADDRESSEES) Center for Multivariate...chart is discussed. 14. SUBJECT TERMS Canonical coordinates, Chisquare distance, Contingency tables, Correspondence analysis, Hellinger distance...FURNISHED TO DTIC CONTAINED A SIGNIFICANT NUMBER OF PAGES WHICH DO NOT REPRODUCE LEGIBLY. AN ALTERNATIVE TO CORRESPONDENCE ANALYSIS USING HELLINGER

  4. 48 CFR 252.225-7041 - Correspondence in English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Correspondence in English... of Provisions And Clauses 252.225-7041 Correspondence in English. As prescribed in 225.1103(2), use the following clause: Correspondence in English (JUN 1997) The Contractor shall ensure that all...

  5. The GL(1 vertical stroke 1)-symplectic fermion correspondence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creutzig, Thomas; Roenne, Peter B.

    2008-12-15

    In this note we prove a correspondence between the Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten model of the Lie supergroup GL(1 vertical stroke 1) and a free model consisting of two scalars and a pair of symplectic fermions. This model was discussed earlier by LeClair. Vertex operators for the symplectic fermions include twist fields, and correlation functions of GL(1 vertical stroke 1) agree with the known results for the scalars and symplectic fermions. We perform a detailed study of boundary states for symplectic fermions and apply them to branes in GL(1 vertical stroke 1). This allows us to compute new amplitudes of strings stretching between branes of different types and confirming Cardy's condition. (orig.)

  6. All order linearized hydrodynamics from fluid-gravity correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Yanyan; Lublinsky, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Using fluid-gravity correspondence, we determine the (linearized) stress energy tensor of N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling with all orders in derivatives of fluid velocity included. We find that the dissipative effects are fully encoded in the shear term and a new one, which emerges starting from the third order. We derive, for the first time, closed linear holographic renormalization group flow-type equations for (generalized) momenta-dependent viscosity functions. In the hydrodynamic regime, we obtain the stress tensor up to third order in derivative expansion analytically. We then numerically determine the viscosity functions up to large momenta. As a check of our results, we also derive the generalized Navier-Stokes equations from the Einstein equations in the dual gravity.

  7. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, October 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner Educational Services, Inc., Newtown, PA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of October 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: Chinese authorities detain Falun Gong protesters on Tiananmen Square…

  8. Stuttering: The Role of the Classroom Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBlance, Gary R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Information about children who stutter is provided, including the characteristics of stutterers and techniques that preschool and elementary teachers can use in the classroom to help these students. Suggestions focus on ways to provide a good speech model, improve the child's self-esteem, and create a good speech environment. (DB)

  9. Bringing History Alive in the Classroom!

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Lee, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This document consists of the first four issues of a serial publication, "Bringing History Alive in the Classroom!" The volumes focus on: (1) "A Sampling of Renaissance Instruments," which includes: information on Christopher Columbus, Leondardo da Vinci, and William Shakespeare, a timeline from the middle ages through the renaissance, Queen…

  10. Plate Tectonics and Continental Drift: Classroom Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Prentice K.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests various classroom studies related to plate tectonics and continental drift, including comments on and sources of resource materials useful in teaching the topics. A complete list of magazine articles on the topics from the Sawyer Marine Resource Collection may be obtained by contacting the author. (JN)

  11. Classroom Critters and the Scientific Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneidel, Sally

    This resource book presents 37 behavioral experiments that can be performed with commonly-found classroom animals including hamsters, gerbils, mice, goldfish, guppies, anolis lizards, kittens, and puppies. Each experiment explores the five steps of the scientific method: (1) Question; (2) Hypothesis; (3) Methods; (4) Result; and (5) Conclusion.…

  12. Superconductors in the High School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, James

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the behavior of high-temperature superconductors and how to demonstrate them safely and effectively in the high school or introductory physics classroom. Included here is a discussion of the most relevant physics topics that can be demonstrated, some safety tips, and a bit of the history of superconductors. In an effort…

  13. Academically Productive Talk in a College Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybakova, Katie; Whitt, Kate Cook

    2017-01-01

    The classic image of a college classroom often includes a professor standing at the front of a room or hall, often standing near a chalkboard or projector screen, lecturing to a room full of 30 to 100 students diligently taking notes. This model of instruction, often referred to as direct instruction, however, is grounded in somewhat-outdated…

  14. Demonstrating the Curie Temperature in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David; Banks, Octavia; Eichmeyer, Livia; Wu, Cherrin

    2018-01-01

    Recent GCSE and IGCSE specifications include reference to both permanent and induced magnetism, giving the opportunity for novel classroom demonstrations based on ferromagnetism and paramagnetism, and the transition between these phases. Ferromagnetic materials lose their magnetism if raised above their Curie Temperature, a specific temperature…

  15. Letting Your Students "Fly" in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    Students investigate the concept of motion by making simple paper airplanes and flying them in the classroom. Students are introduced to conversion factors to calculate various speeds. Additional activities include rounding decimal numbers, estimating, finding averages, making bar graphs, and solving problems. Offers ideas for extension such as…

  16. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, June 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of June 2002, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Major topics covered include: the Kashmir conflict; the Pakistan and the Kazahkstan Summit;…

  17. Library Databases as Unexamined Classroom Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faix, Allison

    2014-01-01

    In their 1994 article, "The Politics of the Interface: Power and its Exercise in Electronic Contact Zones," compositionists Cynthia Selfe and Richard Selfe give examples of how certain features of word processing software and other programs used in writing classrooms (including their icons, clip art, interfaces, and file structures) can…

  18. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, July 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of July 2000, provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: Mexican voters go to polls in a landmark election (July 3); Mexico's…

  19. Visible Disability in the College Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossman, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Investigates how disability is discovered, constructed, and performed in a certain type of cultural practice, that is, in a postmodern, undergraduate college classroom. Argues that the implementation of an autobiographical pedagogy must extend beyond the dimensions of race, gender, and sexuality and must include disabled persons in these…

  20. Pretend Play in the Early Childhood Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntire, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    This article presents and summarizes recent resources related to pretend play in the early childhood classroom. These include "Contemporary Perspectives on Play in Early Childhood Education" by Olivia N. Sarachoe and Bernard Spodek; "Dramatic Play: Bring It Back" by Tammy Benson; and "The Importance of Being Playful" by Elena Bodrova and Deborah…

  1. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, September 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of September 2001 provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: shark attacks ignite controversy in some Florida communities,…

  2. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides, July 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides, designed to accompany the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of July 2001 provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Top stories include: Slobodan Milosevic prepares to go before the U.N. war crimes tribunal,…

  3. Using Concept Mapping in the Biology Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Edward P.

    Concept mapping, a technique based on David Ausubel's theory of meaningful learning, involves the organization of concepts into an hierarchical arrangement. Suggestions for incorporating this learning strategy into the biology classroom are presented and discussed. Steps in concept mapping include: (1) identifying important concepts in the study…

  4. General Equilibrium Models: Improving the Microeconomics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Walter; Westhoff, Frank

    2009-01-01

    General equilibrium models now play important roles in many fields of economics including tax policy, environmental regulation, international trade, and economic development. The intermediate microeconomics classroom has not kept pace with these trends, however. Microeconomics textbooks primarily focus on the insights that can be drawn from the…

  5. Coin Counter: Gamification for Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, John; Harris, Ranida; Harris, Ken

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, gamification has been utilized in a number of different contexts, including educational applications. This paper describes a unique application of coin-based gamification classroom management system in undergraduate programming classes. The coin-based gamification allowed students to earn and spend coins as a form of classroom…

  6. Integrating Facebook in the Classroom: Pedagogical Dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Jesse Perez; Le, Ky; De La Cruz, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Social networking sites (SNS) such as Facebook remain prolific on college campuses across the country and touches on various aspects of collegiate life, including the classroom. This case study examines student usage of Facebook, its potential impact on faculty interaction, and institutional policy. After providing a literature review and context…

  7. Inverting the Linear Algebra Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbert, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The inverted classroom is a course design model in which students' initial contact with new information takes place outside of class meetings, and students spend class time on high-level sense-making activities. The inverted classroom model is so called because it inverts or "flips" the usual classroom design where typically class…

  8. The Global Classroom Video Conferencing Model and First Evaluations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke; Ørngreen, Rikke; Levinsen, Karin

    2013-01-01

    pedagogical innovativeness, including collaborative and technological issues. The research is based on the Global Classroom Model as it is implemented and used at an adult learning center in Denmark (VUC Storstrøm). VUC Storstrøms (VUC) Global Classroom Model is an approach to video conferencing and e...... are present on campus in the classroom, while other students are participating simultaneously from their home using laptops. Although the Global Classroom Model is pedagogically flexible, the students are required to attend according to regulations from the Ministry of Children and Education to pass....... All these matters need to be taken into consideration when implementing the Global Classroom Model. Through the start-up period of a PhD study and through a research-based competence development project with senior researchers, we have gained knowledge about the experiences, challenges, and potentials...

  9. Does the Flipped Classroom Improve Learning in Graduate Medical Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, Jeff; Jhun, Paul; Fung, Cha-Chi; Comes, James; Sawtelle, Stacy; Tabatabai, Ramin; Joseph, Daniel; Shoenberger, Jan; Chen, Esther; Fee, Christopher; Swadron, Stuart P

    2017-08-01

    The flipped classroom model for didactic education has recently gained popularity in medical education; however, there is a paucity of performance data showing its effectiveness for knowledge gain in graduate medical education. We assessed whether a flipped classroom module improves knowledge gain compared with a standard lecture. We conducted a randomized crossover study in 3 emergency medicine residency programs. Participants were randomized to receive a 50-minute lecture from an expert educator on one subject and a flipped classroom module on the other. The flipped classroom included a 20-minute at-home video and 30 minutes of in-class case discussion. The 2 subjects addressed were headache and acute low back pain. A pretest, immediate posttest, and 90-day retention test were given for each subject. Of 82 eligible residents, 73 completed both modules. For the low back pain module, mean test scores were not significantly different between the lecture and flipped classroom formats. For the headache module, there were significant differences in performance for a given test date between the flipped classroom and the lecture format. However, differences between groups were less than 1 of 10 examination items, making it difficult to assign educational importance to the differences. In this crossover study comparing a single flipped classroom module with a standard lecture, we found mixed statistical results for performance measured by multiple-choice questions. As the differences were small, the flipped classroom and lecture were essentially equivalent.

  10. Everyday classroom assessment practices in science classrooms in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, María del Carmen; Jakobsson, Anders

    2014-12-01

    The focus of this study is to examine to what extent and in what ways science teachers practice assessment during classroom interactions in everyday activities in an upper-secondary school in Sweden. We are science teachers working now with a larger research project on assessment in science education that seeks to examine teachers' assessment practices in the upper-secondary school. Framing questions include: are teachers performing an integrated assessment of students' skills as the national curriculum mandates? If so, what do the instructional discourses look like in those situations and what are students' experiences regarding their agency on learning and assessment? We emphasize the social, cultural and historic character of assessment and sustain a situated character of learning instead of the notion that learning is "stored inside the head". Teacher led lessons in three science classrooms were video-recorded and analyzed by combining ethnographic and discourse methods of analysis. Both methods are appropriate to the theoretical foundation of our approach on learning and can give some answers to questions about how individuals interact socially, how their experience is passed on to next generations through language and how language use may reveal cultural changes in the studied context. Making the study of action in a classroom the focal point of sociocultural analysis supports the examination of assessment processes and identification of the social roles in which teachers and students are immersed. Such an approach requires observations of how teachers act in authentic teaching situations when they interact with their students in classroom making possible to observe negotiation processes, agencies when both teachers and students are involved in every-day activities. Our study showed that teachers mostly ignored students' questions and that students solved their own problems by helping each other. Teachers did not provide opportunities for students to discuss

  11. Mathematics and Science Learning Opportunities in Preschool Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasta, Shayne B.; Pelatti, Christina Yeager; Miller, Heather Lynnine

    2014-01-01

    Research findings The present study observed and coded instruction in 65 preschool classrooms to examine (a) overall amounts and (b) types of mathematics and science learning opportunities experienced by preschool children as well as (c) the extent to which these opportunities were associated with classroom and program characteristics. Results indicated that children were afforded an average of 24 and 26 minutes of mathematics and science learning opportunities, respectively, corresponding to spending approximately 25% of total instructional time in each domain. Considerable variability existed, however, in the amounts and types of mathematics and science opportunities provided to children in their classrooms; to some extent, this variability was associated with teachers’ years of experience, teachers’ levels of education, and the socioeconomic status of children served in the program. Practice/policy Although results suggest greater integration of mathematics and science in preschool classrooms than previously established, there was considerable diversity in the amounts and types of learning opportunities provided in preschool classrooms. Affording mathematics and science experiences to all preschool children, as outlined in professional and state standards, may require additional professional development aimed at increasing preschool teachers’ understanding and implementation of learning opportunities in these two domains in their classrooms. PMID:25489205

  12. A Visit from Pythagoras--Using Costumes in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Lawrence H.

    2000-01-01

    Presents ways of making mathematics come alive for students including inviting historical mathematicians into the classroom. Suggests that costumes and drama add special appeal to looking at the history of mathematics. (KHR)

  13. Biofouling Organisms in the Field and for the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Prentice K.

    1983-01-01

    Biofouling organisms are marine organisms that affix themselves to navigational buoys, floating docks, and pilings. Techniques for collecting these organisms for classroom use are described. General background information on the organisms and a list of common species are included. (JN)

  14. Classroom Management and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Jere E.

    1982-01-01

    Survey results show that planning and constant vigilance are the price of effective teaching. Effective classroom management involves awareness, good organizational skills, preparation, letting students know what is expected of them and following through, and the ability to diagnose student problems. (CT)

  15. My Classroom: Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Cerise

    2017-01-01

    In his first teaching assignment, as a fifth-grade English teacher, Edgar Manaran had only 20 desks for 48 students. Yet he was able to apply productive classroom strategies throughout his 25-hour teaching week. Some of his students sat on plastic chairs due to the shortage of desks, but that did not change the dynamic of Mr. Manaran's classes. He…

  16. My Classroom: Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Yulia Bulatkulova discovered her passion for English language teaching at a young age as a result of the example set by an esteemed childhood English teacher, Elvira Kuyanova. This article discusses how Ms. Bulatkulova's interactions with her students, both inside and outside the classroom, demonstrate that she has followed in the footsteps of her…

  17. Tips from the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TESOL Journal, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Seven articles on classroom icebreakers are compiled: "Picture Stories and Other Opportunities" (Joy Egbert, Deborah Hanley, Rosemary Delaney); "Hey, What's Your Name" (Janet Leamy); "Surprise!" (Lynne Burgess); "Memory Game" (Sally Winn); "Picturesque" (Margaret Beiter); "The Name Game" (Jeanne-Marie Garcia); "Exercise the Body--And the Mind…

  18. Bibliotherapy for Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsenman, Gordon; Harper, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The focus and goal of classroom management should be first and foremost learning. When trying to prevent interruptions to learning, or dealing with interruptions to learning when they occur, teachers need to move beyond simply imposing a consequence and assuming students have learned from the interaction. Students need to be taught the skills and…

  19. Effective Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Azlin Norhaini; Eng, Wong Kim; Rasul, Mohamad Sattar; Hamzah, Mohd Izham Mohd; Hamid, Aida Hanim A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper attempts to explore and identify the characteristics of an effective teacher who teaches English as a second language to 10 year old students from different ethnics, various social economic background and multi-level language ability, at a private primary school in Malaysia. The study focused on classroom management using a case study…

  20. The Classroom Traffic Jam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Arthur W.

    1977-01-01

    The importance of energy conservation is developed in this simulation. Children draw an automobile and then are asked to drive it through the classroom roadways. When a traffic jam results, students offer ways to eliminate it. The importance of mass transportation and car pools is stressed by the teacher. (MA)

  1. Flipping the Classroom Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riendeau, Diane

    2013-02-01

    I received many emails following the first column on flipping the classroom. Many of my local colleagues also approached me at our physics alliance, Physics Northwest. Teachers are very interested in this new pedagogy. As I result, I wanted to share some more videos to inspire you.

  2. "Frankenstein" in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veidemanis, Gladys V.

    1986-01-01

    Presents five reasons for classroom study of Mary Shelley's gothic work: (1)intriguing style and subject matter, brevity and novelty; (2)narrative versatility; (3)representation of the Romantic Era in English literature; (4)female authorship; (5)significance of the central theme of "scientific aims pursued in reckless disregard of human…

  3. Computers and Classroom Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Janet Ward

    This book explores the meaning of computer technology in schools. The book is based on data gathered from a two-year observation of more than 30 different classrooms in an urban high school: geometry classes in which students used artificially intelligent tutors; business classes in which students learned word processing; and computer science…

  4. Classroom Social Signal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raca, Mirko; Dillenbourg, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    We present our efforts towards building an observational system for measuring classroom activity. The goal is to explore visual cues which can be acquired with a system of video cameras and automatically processed to enrich the teacher's perception of the audience. The paper will give a brief overview of our methodology, explored features, and…

  5. Classroom Teacher's Idea Notebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Norv; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Offers activities for high school and middle school classrooms. First activity deals with war crimes by projecting fictitious Soviet fighting in Afghanistan into the story of William Calley in Vietnam. Second activity uses the Underground Railroad during the U.S. Civil War in an interdisciplinary approach. Third activity is a self-discovery…

  6. When classroom becomes school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noer, Vibeke Røn

    & Perrenoud, 2006). In Denmark alone changes have been made numerously times in the last two decades. Concurrently, a considerable amount of studies has been published focusing on the nursing education, stressing a call for transformation. Division of learning contexts into clinical and classroom settings...

  7. Singing Smoothes Classroom Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    Just as humming a merry tune helped Snow White and her furry animal friends to quickly clean a filthy cottage in the movie "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (Disney & Cottrell, 1937), singing can be an effective way to help keep young children fully engaged during classroom transitions. The purposes of this article are to: (1) consider why…

  8. Artists in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Stephen R., Ed.; Place, Richard, Ed.

    Since 1970, the Connecticut Commission on the Arts has sponsored educational programs in which artists participate actively in the classroom with students and teachers. This book contains eight case studies showing the effects of visiting artists in eight Connecticut schools. Topics of these studies are song writing, dance movement in suburbia,…

  9. The flipped classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantafyllou, Evangelia

    2015-01-01

    communication and information sharing in such classrooms. Furthermore, it provides guidelines for supporting out-of-class instruction in the flipped model by using quizzes and feedback in Moodle, and comments on the potential to follow student use of resources by using Moodle reports. This paper concludes...

  10. The Classroom Animal: Snails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David S.

    1985-01-01

    Points out that snails are interesting and easily-managed classroom animals. One advantage of this animal is that it requires no special attention over weekends or holidays. Background information, anatomy, reproduction, and feeding are discussed, along with suggestions for housing aquatic and/or land snails. (DH)

  11. Consultation in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, H A

    2001-01-01

    The advantages of classroom, playground, and hallway observation are that the diagnosing child and adolescent psychiatrist can directly observe the difficulties the child is having. When the psychiatrist is an employee of the school district, there can be easier access and quicker help for challenging students.

  12. Crisis and Correspondence: Style in the Nineteenth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Hvattum

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In his manifesto 'Das Kunstwerk der Zukunft' (1850, Richard Wagner characterised the nineteenth century as a time of crisis. Echoing Saint-Simon, he defined this crisis as a discrepancy between the spirit of the age and the actual, historical conditions. Evoking some of the most potent concepts of modern thinking—Zeitgeist, genius, and the Gesamtkunstwerk—Wagner outlined an aesthetic theory by which the artwork (including architecture simultaneously reflects and shapes its context, serving both as a mirror of its age and an agent of change.      Wagner’s seemingly paradoxical notion of art provides an apt introduction to historicist thinking. Obsessed with the idea of correspondence (or the lack of it between art and its times, nineteenth-century thinkers such as Heinrich Hübsch, Carl Bötticher and Gottfried Semper all responded to the perceived crisis. While Hübsch and Bötticher sought to alleviate the crisis by redefining this correspondence for a modern world, Semper presented a far more radical alternative. Not only did he see the current crisis as inevitable; he welcomed it as a necessary dissolution of an old order, out of which a new architecture could emerge. He thus anticipated modernists, such as Sigfried Giedion, for whom historicism was a necessary melt-down; an apocalypse, preparing for the advent of modernism. In this essay, I propose that crisis and style are intrinsically linked in modern thinking. To look closely at this coupling may throw new light not only on historicism but also on the noticeable unease with which the notion of style is treated in contemporary architectural history.

  13. Science Students' Classroom Discourse: Tasha's Umwelt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jenny

    2012-04-01

    Over the past twenty-five years researchers have been concerned with understanding the science student. The need for such research is still grounded in contemporary issues including providing opportunities for all students to develop scientific literacy and the failure of school science to connect with student's lives, interests and personal identities. The research reported here is unusual in its use of discourse analysis in social psychology to contribute to an understanding of the way students make meaning in secondary school science. Data constructed for the study was drawn from videotapes of nine consecutive lessons in a year-seven science classroom in Melbourne, post-lesson video-stimulated interviews with students and the teacher, classroom observation and the students' written work. The classroom videotapes were recorded using four cameras and seven audio tracks by the International Centre for Classroom Research at the University of Melbourne. Student talk within and about their science lessons was analysed from a discursive perspective. Classroom episodes in which students expressed their sense of personal identity and agency, knowledge, attitude or emotion in relation to science were identified for detailed analysis of the function of the discourse used by students, and in particular the way students were positioned by others or positioned themselves. This article presents the discursive Umwelt or life-space of one middle years science student, Tasha. Her case is used here to highlight the complex social process of meaning making in science classrooms and the need to attend to local moral orders of rights and duties in research on student language use, identity and learning in science.

  14. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  15. The Mathematical correspondence between Julius Petersen and Ludvig Sylow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Jesper

    1992-01-01

    The correspondence between Petersen and Sylow is an important source for the history of group theory and Galois theory. The paper contains an annotated translation of the first letters beteen the two and an account of the remaining part of the correspondence......The correspondence between Petersen and Sylow is an important source for the history of group theory and Galois theory. The paper contains an annotated translation of the first letters beteen the two and an account of the remaining part of the correspondence...

  16. Becoming Galileo in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavicchi, Elizabeth

    2011-04-01

    Galileo's contributions are so familiar as to be taken for granted, obscuring the exploratory process by which his discoveries arose. The wonder that Galileo experienced comes alive for undergraduates and teachers that I teach, when they find themselves taking Galileo's role by means of their own explorations. These classroom journeys include: sighting through picture frames to understand perspective, watching the night sky, experimenting with lenses and motion, and responding to Galileo's story. In teaching, I use critical exploration, the research pedagogy developed by Eleanor Duckworth that arose historically from both the clinical interviewing of Jean Piaget and B"arbel Inhelder and the Elementary Science Study of the 1960s. During critical explorations, the teacher supports students' investigations by posing provocative experiences while interactively following students' emergent understandings. In the context of Galileo, students learned to observe carefully, trust their observations, notice things they had never noticed before, and extend their understanding in the midst of pervasive confusion. Personal investment moved students to question assumptions that they had never critically evaluated. By becoming Galileo in today's classroom, we found the ordinary world no less intriguing and unsettling to explore, as the historical world of protagonists in Galileo's Dialogue.

  17. Optical modulator including grapene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  18. Correspondence Analysis in R, with Two- and Three-dimensional Graphics: The ca Package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Nenadic

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe an implementation of simple, multiple and joint correspondence analysis in R. The resulting package comprises two parts, one for simple correspondence analysis and one for multiple and joint correspondence analysis. Within each part, functions for computation, summaries and visualization in two and three dimensions are provided, including options to display supplementary points and perform subset analyses. Special emphasis has been put on the visualization functions that offer features such as different scaling options for biplots and three-dimensional maps using the rgl package. Graphical options include shading and sizing plot symbols for the points according to their contributions to the map and masses respectively.

  19. Deaf History in K-12 DHH Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Allison H

    2015-01-01

    Deaf children, like all children, deserve a quality education; one that includes the history of their own culture and people. Unfortunately, Deaf history curriculum for Deaf students is seriously lacking in availability. The goal of this thesis is simple; to provide D/deaf students with a quality Deaf history curriculum, from which they can learn about themselves, thus helping them to develop their Deaf identities.The curriculum included in Deaf History in K-12 Classrooms consists of two unit...

  20. The Bohr-Heisenberg correspondence principle viewed from phase space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jens Peder

    2002-01-01

    Phase-space representations play an increasingly important role in several branches of physics. Here, we review the author's studies of the Bohr-Heisenberg correspondence principle within the Weyl-Wigner phase-space representation. The analysis leads to refined correspondence rules that can...

  1. 37 CFR 7.3 - Correspondence must be in English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... English. 7.3 Section 7.3 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... English. International applications and registrations, requests for extension of protection and all other related correspondence with the Office must be in English. The Office will not process correspondence that...

  2. Simultaneous Two-Way Clustering of Multiple Correspondence Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Heungsun; Dillon, William R.

    2010-01-01

    A 2-way clustering approach to multiple correspondence analysis is proposed to account for cluster-level heterogeneity of both respondents and variable categories in multivariate categorical data. Specifically, in the proposed method, multiple correspondence analysis is combined with k-means in a unified framework in which "k"-means is…

  3. 38 CFR 21.4279 - Combination correspondence-residence program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... correspondence-residence program. 21.4279 Section 21.4279 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... Assistance Programs Assessment and Pursuit of Courses § 21.4279 Combination correspondence-residence program. (a) Requirements for pursuit. A program of education may be pursued partly in residence and partly by...

  4. Introduction to the AdS/CFT correspondence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, J.; Baulieu, L.; Benakli, K.; Douglas, M.R.; Mansoulié, B.; Rabinovici, E.; Cugliandolo, L.F.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a summary of some of the most important aspects of the AdS/CFT correspondence, together with pointers to some of the vast number of papers that have been published on this subject. The AdS/CFT correspondence is one of the most exciting discoveries in theoretical physics of the

  5. 12 CFR 206.5 - Capital levels of correspondents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... not identical to the definition of that term as used for the purposes of the prompt corrective action... capital levels. A bank shall obtain information to demonstrate that a correspondent is at least adequately..., Thrift Financial Report, financial statement, or bank rating report for the correspondent. For a foreign...

  6. Breaking object correspondence across saccadic eye movements deteriorates object recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian H. Poth

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Visual perception is based on information processing during periods of eye fixations that are interrupted by fast saccadic eye movements. The ability to sample and relate information on task-relevant objects across fixations implies that correspondence between presaccadic and postsaccadic objects is established. Postsaccadic object information usually updates and overwrites information on the corresponding presaccadic object. The presaccadic object representation is then lost. In contrast, the presaccadic object is conserved when object correspondence is broken. This helps transsaccadic memory but it may impose attentional costs on object recognition. Therefore, we investigated how breaking object correspondence across the saccade affects postsaccadic object recognition. In Experiment 1, object correspondence was broken by a brief postsaccadic blank screen. Observers made a saccade to a peripheral object which was displaced during the saccade. This object reappeared either immediately after the saccade or after the blank screen. Within the postsaccadic object, a letter was briefly presented (terminated by a mask. Observers reported displacement direction and letter identity in different blocks. Breaking object correspondence by blanking improved displacement identification but deteriorated postsaccadic letter recognition. In Experiment 2, object correspondence was broken by changing the object’s contrast-polarity. There were no object displacements and observers only reported letter identity. Again, breaking object correspondence deteriorated postsaccadic letter recognition. These findings identify transsaccadic object correspondence as a key determinant of object recognition across the saccade. This is in line with the recent hypothesis that breaking object correspondence results in separate representations of presaccadic and postsaccadic objects which then compete for limited attentional processing resources (Schneider, 2013. Postsaccadic

  7. CLASSROOM CULTURE OF PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia FĂT

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results obtained during an enquiry based on a questionnaire about the classroom culture. This concept it is understood as a micro-society with its own characteristics derived from the dynamic of socialization and training process. This research aims to investigate certain specific aspects of micro-sociology and emphasis on classroom culture. A relatively new concept is reflected by the normative consensus or the integrated system of values that belongs to the teachers, pupils and school, as a social entity. The integrative ensemble of values, class cohesion degree and training strategies are only a few of the aspects described by 62 pupils aged 17-18 years old, from a very prestigious school in Bucharest. The perception of pupils regarding our concept is the effect of the relational practices and training used constantly by the teachers. Those practices reflect the school’s focus mostly on cognitive performance.

  8. Marginalia, commonplaces, and correspondence: scribal exchange in early modern science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yale, Elizabeth

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, historians of science have increasingly turned their attention to the "print culture" of early modern science. These studies have revealed that printing, as both a technology and a social and economic system, structured the forms and meanings of natural knowledge. Yet in early modern Europe, naturalists, including John Aubrey, John Evelyn, and John Ray, whose work is discussed in this paper, often shared and read scientific texts in manuscript either before or in lieu of printing. Scribal exchange, exemplified in the circulation of writings like commonplace books, marginalia, manuscript treatises, and correspondence, was the primary means by which communities of naturalists constructed scientific knowledge. Print and manuscript were necessary partners. Manuscript fostered close collaboration, and could be circulated relatively cheaply; but, unlike print, it could not reliably secure priority or survival for posterity. Naturalists approached scribal and print communication strategically, choosing the medium that best suited their goals at any given moment. As a result, print and scribal modes of disseminating information, constructing natural knowledge, and organizing communities developed in tandem. Practices typically associated with print culture manifested themselves in scribal texts and exchanges, and vice versa. "Print culture" cannot be hived off from "scribal culture." Rather, in their daily jottings and exchanges, naturalists inhabited, and produced, one common culture of communication. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The lattice correspondence and diffusional-displacive phase transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie, J.F.; Muddle, B.C.

    1999-01-01

    When a coherent interface is maintained between parent and product phases in a solid state phase transformation, then it is always possible to define a lattice correspondence across this interface and describe the structural change by a homogeneous lattice deformation, S T . For certain transformations, this strain is an invariant plane strain, with the invariant plane defining the planar, coherent interface between parent and product. This group includes the familiar martensitic face-centred cubic to close-packed hexagonal transformation in, for example, cobalt-based alloys, but it is demonstrated here that it also contains transformations giving rise to a broad range of plate-shaped, diffusional precipitation products. For many such transformation products, the transformation strain has a significant shear component and the accommodation of shear strain energy is potentially an important, and often overlooked, factor in both the nucleation and growth of such products. More commonly S T is not an invariant plane strain and, if a planar interface is to be preserved between parent and product, it is necessary to combine S T with a lattice invariant strain to allow a partially-coherent interface that is macroscopically invariant. It is demonstrated that there are diffusional transformation products which also have the geometric and crystallographic features of both of the common forms of partially-coherent martensitic products

  10. Revisiting Classroom Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gloria Lodato

    2016-01-01

    Most co-teachers agree that there just isn't enough time for co-teachers to appropriately and effectively preplan every aspect of every activity in every lesson. This lack of time leads co-teachers to turn to models that fail to maximize the benefits of a two-teacher classroom. Wilson suggests that if co-teachers use their limited planning time to…

  11. Classroom social climate

    OpenAIRE

    Sivevska, Despina

    2015-01-01

    One of the important factors which effects the educational process is the climate that reigns in the school. School climate is defined as the sum of all the circumstances in which the educational process is realized, as a network of relationships which exist between participants in the educational process. Social climate is part of school climate created in the classroom through general atmosphere in school, in the manner that overall work organization in a school functions and the way tea...

  12. Controlling Multiple Virtual Machines in Computer Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Zach

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A management of computer classroom is undoubtedly a difficult task for the administrator which has to prepare virtual operating systems for education. It is quite common that lectors need to edit the particular machine during the semester, and that is the case where the main problems can appear. The process of changes deployment is not just very time-consuming but during it a virtual machine inconsistency can appear. The main part of this paper focuses on system process diagrams and its pseudocode. At first, the machine is created on the remote server by lector or administrator. After a proper approval, the machine is able to be deployed. The lector then specifies the details about date, time and destinations of the virtual machine deployment. Once these details are approved, the virtual machine will be automatically deployed at the specified time. The automatic deployment includes also an initial configuration of the virtual machine at remote desktop and its post-install configuration (hostname, MAC address, etc.. Once all steps are completed, the process will be marked as succeed. We present an automatized solution which provides a possibility how to easily manage computer classroom with virtual operating systems. The proposed solution should deliver a greater flexibility, more reliability and faster deployment in comparison with the current solution used in our computer classroom. The proposal is also able to manipulate with already deployed machines for easy changes (e.g. software updates. The main advantage is the improvement of classroom management process automation.

  13. Efficacy of formative evaluation using a focus group for a large classroom setting in an accelerated pharmacy program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolette, Shaun; Nguyen, Alyssa; Kogan, David; Oswald, Catherine; Whittaker, Alana; Chakraborty, Arup

    2017-07-01

    Formative evaluation is a process utilized to improve communication between students and faculty. This evaluation method allows the ability to address pertinent issues in a timely manner; however, implementation of formative evaluation can be a challenge, especially in a large classroom setting. Using mediated formative evaluation, the purpose of this study is to determine if a student based focus group is a viable option to improve efficacy of communication between an instructor and students as well as time management in a large classroom setting. Out of 140 total students, six students were selected to form a focus group - one from each of six total sections of the classroom. Each focus group representative was responsible for collecting all the questions from students of their corresponding sections and submitting them to the instructor two to three times a day. Responses from the instructor were either passed back to pertinent students by the focus group representatives or addressed directly with students by the instructor. This study was conducted using a fifteen-question survey after the focus group model was utilized for one month. A printed copy of the survey was distributed in the class by student investigators. Questions were of varying types, including Likert scale, yes/no, and open-ended response. One hundred forty surveys were administered, and 90 complete responses were collected. Surveys showed that 93.3% of students found that use of the focus group made them more likely to ask questions for understanding. The surveys also showed 95.5% of students found utilizing the focus group for questions allowed for better understanding of difficult concepts. General open-ended answer portions of the survey showed that most students found the focus group allowed them to ask questions more easily since they did not feel intimidated by asking in front of the whole class. No correlation was found between demographic characteristics and survey responses. This may

  14. Weyl-Wigner correspondence in two space dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jens Peder; Varro, S.; Wolf, A.

    2007-01-01

    We consider Wigner functions in two space dimensions. In particular, we focus on Wigner functions corresponding to energy eigenstates of a non-relativistic particle moving in two dimensions in the absence of a potential. With the help of the Weyl-Wigner correspondence we first transform the eigen...... the eigenvalue equations for energy and angular momentum into phase space. As a result we arrive at partial differential equations in phase space which determine the corresponding Wigner function. We then solve the resulting equations using appropriate coordinates....

  15. (Anti)symmetric multivariate exponential functions and corresponding Fourier transforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimyk, A U; Patera, J

    2007-01-01

    We define and study symmetrized and antisymmetrized multivariate exponential functions. They are defined as determinants and antideterminants of matrices whose entries are exponential functions of one variable. These functions are eigenfunctions of the Laplace operator on the corresponding fundamental domains satisfying certain boundary conditions. To symmetric and antisymmetric multivariate exponential functions there correspond Fourier transforms. There are three types of such Fourier transforms: expansions into the corresponding Fourier series, integral Fourier transforms and multivariate finite Fourier transforms. Eigenfunctions of the integral Fourier transforms are found

  16. Pseudo-Supersymmetry and the Domain-Wall/Cosmology Correspondence

    OpenAIRE

    Skenderis, K.; Townsend, P. K.

    2006-01-01

    The correspondence between domain-wall and cosmological solutions of gravity coupled to scalar fields is explained. Any domain wall solution that admits a Killing spinor is shown to correspond to a cosmology that admits a pseudo-Killing spinor: whereas the Killing spinor obeys a Dirac-type equation with hermitian `mass'-matrix, the corresponding pseudo-Killing spinor obeys a Dirac-type equation with a anti-hermitian `mass'-matrix. We comment on some implications of (pseudo)supersymmetry.

  17. Broadcasting simulation case studies to the didactic classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmakis, Karen A; Cunningham, Helene; Lamoureux, Erin T; Ahmed, Elshaymaa M

    2010-01-01

    To explore the potential of using simulation in new ways, it is time to think "outside the lab." To do this, the authors expanded the use of case-study simulations by broadcasting them to classrooms where didactic content could be reinforced with simulation content. Advantages included students' active classroom engagement, simultaneously sharing simulations with many students, modeling students' thinking in clinical situations, and connecting theory to practice.

  18. The Classroom Animal: Box Turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Provides basic information on the anatomy, physiology, behaviors, and distribution patterns of the box turtle. Offers suggestions for the turtle's care and maintenance in a classroom environment. (ML)

  19. The Correspondence of Bruno Bettelheim and Rudolf Ekstein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, David James

    2006-01-01

    correspondence that gradually evolved into an intimate friendship. They both engaged in a polemic with Bernard Rimland, who was massively critical of their clinical work and a hostile critic of psychoanalytic approaches to the treatment of disturbed children. Rimland was an advocate of a neurological approach to mental illness, with an emphasis on biology and psychopharmacology. The 22 letters that constitute the Bettelheim-Ekstein exchange began with clinical concerns, including the varieties of solitude, isolation and countertransference disruptions that may trouble the psychoanalytic researcher and clinician in dealing with primitively disordered children. It moves to other issues, including mutual support during the Rimland Affair. As the two became more friendly, a pattern of good-natured competition and envy appeared. The two engaged in a heated exchange on the question of whether contemporary Vienna remained as anti-Semitic as it had been in their respective youths: Bettelheim, the concentration camp survivor, argued that nothing had changed and that most Austrians remained viscerally anti-Semitic; Ekstein, the Austro-Marxist, contended that one could not blame a generation born after World War II, holding that in his experience many Austrians had examined their consciences and held distinctly different options from their parents or grandparents. Toward the end of their correspondence, we encounter Ekstein's tender sensitivity to Bettelheim's descent into depression as a result of the death of his wife, Trude, leading eventually to recurrent episodes of suicidal ideation and plans for his own suicide. The letters testify to a unique friendship with a somewhat old-world quality.

  20. Privacy Impact Assessment for the Correspondence Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Correspondence Management System collects basic contact information (name, address, e-mail and phone number). Learn how this data is collected, how it will be used, access to the data, the purpose of data collection, and record retention policies.

  1. Twisted vertex algebras, bicharacter construction and boson-fermion correspondences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anguelova, Iana I.

    2013-01-01

    The boson-fermion correspondences are an important phenomena on the intersection of several areas in mathematical physics: representation theory, vertex algebras and conformal field theory, integrable systems, number theory, cohomology. Two such correspondences are well known: the types A and B (and their super extensions). As a main result of this paper we present a new boson-fermion correspondence of type D-A. Further, we define a new concept of twisted vertex algebra of order N, which generalizes super vertex algebra. We develop the bicharacter construction which we use for constructing classes of examples of twisted vertex algebras, as well as for deriving formulas for the operator product expansions, analytic continuations, and normal ordered products. By using the underlying Hopf algebra structure we prove general bicharacter formulas for the vacuum expectation values for two important groups of examples. We show that the correspondences of types B, C, and D-A are isomorphisms of twisted vertex algebras

  2. Quantum-classical correspondence of the Dirac equation with a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    classical correspondence; scalar-like potential; Dirac equation; Klein–Gordon equation. ... Quantum matrix elements of the coordinate, momentum and the velocity operator for a spin-1/2 particle moving in a scalar-like potential are calculated.

  3. Dimensions of cultural consumption among tourists : Multiple correspondence analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richards, G.W.; van der Ark, L.A.

    2013-01-01

    The cultural tourism market has diversified and fragmented into many different niches. Previous attempts to segment cultural tourists have been largely unidimensional, failing to capture the complexity of cultural production and consumption. We employ multiple correspondence analysis to visualize

  4. Soc.ca: Specific Correspondence Analysis for the Social Sciences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Specific and class specific multiple correspondence analysis on survey-like data. Soc.ca is optimized to the needs of the social scientist and presents easily interpretable results in near publication ready quality.......Specific and class specific multiple correspondence analysis on survey-like data. Soc.ca is optimized to the needs of the social scientist and presents easily interpretable results in near publication ready quality....

  5. Robustifying Correspondence Based 6D Object Pose Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hietanen, Antti; Halme, Jussi; Buch, Anders Glent

    2017-01-01

    We propose two methods to robustify point correspondence based 6D object pose estimation. The first method, curvature filtering, is based on the assumption that low curvature regions provide false matches, and removing points in these regions improves robustness. The second method, region pruning....... For the experiments, we evaluated three correspondence selection methods, Geometric Consistency (GC) [1], Hough Grouping (HG) [2] and Search of Inliers (SI) [3] and report systematic improvements for their robustified versions with two distinct datasets....

  6. Calculation of propellant gas pressure by simple extended corresponding state principle

    OpenAIRE

    Bin Xu; San-jiu Ying; Xin Liao

    2016-01-01

    The virial equation can well describe gas state at high temperature and pressure, but the difficulties in virial coefficient calculation limit the use of virial equation. Simple extended corresponding state principle (SE-CSP) is introduced in virial equation. Based on a corresponding state equation, including three characteristic parameters, an extended parameter is introduced to describe the second virial coefficient expressions of main products of propellant gas. The modified SE-CSP second ...

  7. Banzhuren and Classrooming: Democracy in the Chinese Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiacheng; Chen, Jing

    2013-01-01

    The issue of education and democracy has become more and more important in China. This paper firstly explains the theory of democracy in Chinese classrooms, and then focuses on the Chinese banzhuren who is responsible for classrooming, an important educational area equal to instruction. We illustrate how Chinese students achieve development…

  8. Exploring gender differences in the EFL classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Norma Constanza Durán

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to describe a case study which explores teacher and students` conceptions about gender in an EFL setting and the way they are manifested in their discourse patterns. This exploratory case study was carried out with a group of eleventh grade students and an English teacher at Liceo de la Universidad Católica high school in Bogotá Colombia. The data collected included direct observation of classroom interaction, audio and video recording of the teacher and students` interactio...

  9. Automatic correspondence detection in mammogram and breast tomosynthesis images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, Jan; Krüger, Julia; Bischof, Arpad; Barkhausen, Jörg; Handels, Heinz

    2012-02-01

    Two-dimensional mammography is the major imaging modality in breast cancer detection. A disadvantage of mammography is the projective nature of this imaging technique. Tomosynthesis is an attractive modality with the potential to combine the high contrast and high resolution of digital mammography with the advantages of 3D imaging. In order to facilitate diagnostics and treatment in the current clinical work-flow, correspondences between tomosynthesis images and previous mammographic exams of the same women have to be determined. In this paper, we propose a method to detect correspondences in 2D mammograms and 3D tomosynthesis images automatically. In general, this 2D/3D correspondence problem is ill-posed, because a point in the 2D mammogram corresponds to a line in the 3D tomosynthesis image. The goal of our method is to detect the "most probable" 3D position in the tomosynthesis images corresponding to a selected point in the 2D mammogram. We present two alternative approaches to solve this 2D/3D correspondence problem: a 2D/3D registration method and a 2D/2D mapping between mammogram and tomosynthesis projection images with a following back projection. The advantages and limitations of both approaches are discussed and the performance of the methods is evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively using a software phantom and clinical breast image data. Although the proposed 2D/3D registration method can compensate for moderate breast deformations caused by different breast compressions, this approach is not suitable for clinical tomosynthesis data due to the limited resolution and blurring effects perpendicular to the direction of projection. The quantitative results show that the proposed 2D/2D mapping method is capable of detecting corresponding positions in mammograms and tomosynthesis images automatically for 61 out of 65 landmarks. The proposed method can facilitate diagnosis, visual inspection and comparison of 2D mammograms and 3D tomosynthesis images for

  10. Measuring and Modeling Sound Interference and Reverberation Time in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumina, Kaitlyn; Martell, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Research shows that children, even those without hearing difficulties, are affected by poor classroom acoustics, especially children with hearing loss, learning disabilities, speech delay, and attention problems. Poor acoustics can come in a variety of forms, including destructive interference causing ``dead spots'' and extended Reverberation Times (RT), where echoes persist too long, interfering with further speech. In this research, I measured sound intensity at locations throughout three different types of classrooms at frequencies commonly associated with human speech to see what effect seating position has on intensity. I also used a program called Wave Cloud to model the time necessary for intensity to decrease by 60 decibels (RT50), both in idealized classrooms and in classrooms modeled on the ones I studied.

  11. HTML5 digital classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Osborn, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    This training package - complete with full-color book and instructional video - is the easiest way to learn HTML5!HTML5 boasts extensive new features that allow you to create dynamic web pages and present users with amazing multimedia experiences, and this one-of-a-kind training package is your guide to creating websites that wow! HTML5 Digital Classroom provides step-by-step instruction to help you gain the essential HTML5 knowledge you need to master the latest HTML5 specifications. This book-and-video package will have you creating web pages and web applications using HTML5, styling using

  12. Incivility in the Accounting Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinney, Laurie; Elder, Bruce; Seaton, Lloyd

    2010-01-01

    Classroom incivility is any action that interferes with a harmonious and cooperative learning atmosphere in the classroom (Feldman, 2001). We compared the perceptions of accounting faculty to the perceptions of cross-disciplinary faculty relating to both the definition of student actions as incivility and the occurrence of incivility. We also…

  13. Mendel in the Modern Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mike U.; Gericke, Niklas M.

    2015-01-01

    Mendel is an icon in the history of genetics and part of our common culture and modern biology instruction. The aim of this paper is to summarize the place of Mendel in the modern biology classroom. In the present article we will identify key issues that make Mendel relevant in the classroom today. First, we recount some of the historical…

  14. Inverting an Introductory Statistics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraut, Gertrud L.

    2015-01-01

    The inverted classroom allows more in-class time for inquiry-based learning and for working through more advanced problem-solving activities than does the traditional lecture class. The skills acquired in this learning environment offer benefits far beyond the statistics classroom. This paper discusses four ways that can make the inverted…

  15. Nurturing Creativity in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghetto, Ronald A., Ed.; Kaufman, James C., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Nurturing Creativity in the Classroom" is a groundbreaking collection of essays by leading scholars, who examine and respond to the tension that many educators face in valuing student creativity but believing that they cannot support it given the curricular constraints of the classroom. Is it possible for teachers to nurture creative…

  16. Classroom Management: Implications for Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Gonzalo

    Classroom management may be the most fundamental and most difficult task the teacher performs. A search of the literature reveals at least five rather different definitions of classroom management that represent particular philosophical approaches: 1) the authoritarian approach, 2) the permissive approach, 3) the behavior modification approach, 4)…

  17. Classroom Furniture: The Mod Squad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    This is the first article in a six-part series on the elements of a collaborative classroom: furniture, social media, video/web conferencing tools, collaborative software, interactive devices, and mobile devices. With most universities facing tight budgets, convincing administrators to invest in expensive new classrooms is a challenge. Many higher…

  18. Improving Technology in Agriscience Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Krista

    2014-01-01

    Teachers must make persistent efforts in integrating technology in the classroom. In Georgia agriscience curriculum, no data are available regarding the type and amount of technology integration used in the classrooms. Some teachers integrate actively while others incorporate very little technology in their teaching. The purpose of this…

  19. Hardware Design Considerations for Edge-Accelerated Stereo Correspondence Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Ttofis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereo correspondence is a popular algorithm for the extraction of depth information from a pair of rectified 2D images. Hence, it has been used in many computer vision applications that require knowledge about depth. However, stereo correspondence is a computationally intensive algorithm and requires high-end hardware resources in order to achieve real-time processing speed in embedded computer vision systems. This paper presents an overview of the use of edge information as a means to accelerate hardware implementations of stereo correspondence algorithms. The presented approach restricts the stereo correspondence algorithm only to the edges of the input images rather than to all image points, thus resulting in a considerable reduction of the search space. The paper highlights the benefits of the edge-directed approach by applying it to two stereo correspondence algorithms: an SAD-based fixed-support algorithm and a more complex adaptive support weight algorithm. Furthermore, we present design considerations about the implementation of these algorithms on reconfigurable hardware and also discuss issues related to the memory structures needed, the amount of parallelism that can be exploited, the organization of the processing blocks, and so forth. The two architectures (fixed-support based versus adaptive-support weight based are compared in terms of processing speed, disparity map accuracy, and hardware overheads, when both are implemented on a Virtex-5 FPGA platform.

  20. A Meta-Analysis of Classroom-Wide Interventions to Build Social Skills: Do They Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    January, Alicia M.; Casey, Rita J.; Paulson, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Outcomes of 28 peer-reviewed journal articles published between 1981 and 2007 were evaluated quantitatively to assess the effectiveness of classroom-wide interventions for the improvement of social skills. All interventions included in the study were implemented with intact classrooms that included both socially competent children and those with…

  1. Evaluation of a flipped classroom approach to learning introductory epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiau, Stephanie; Kahn, Linda G; Platt, Jonathan; Li, Chihua; Guzman, Jason T; Kornhauser, Zachary G; Keyes, Katherine M; Martins, Silvia S

    2018-04-02

    Although the flipped classroom model has been widely adopted in medical education, reports on its use in graduate-level public health programs are limited. This study describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of a flipped classroom redesign of an introductory epidemiology course and compares it to a traditional model. One hundred fifty Masters-level students enrolled in an introductory epidemiology course with a traditional format (in-person lecture and discussion section, at-home assignment; 2015, N = 72) and a flipped classroom format (at-home lecture, in-person discussion section and assignment; 2016, N = 78). Using mixed methods, we compared student characteristics, examination scores, and end-of-course evaluations of the 2016 flipped classroom format and the 2015 traditional format. Data on the flipped classroom format, including pre- and post-course surveys, open-ended questions, self-reports of section leader teaching practices, and classroom observations, were evaluated. There were no statistically significant differences in examination scores or students' assessment of the course between 2015 (traditional) and 2016 (flipped). In 2016, 57.1% (36) of respondents to the end-of-course evaluation found watching video lectures at home to have a positive impact on their time management. Open-ended survey responses indicated a number of strengths of the flipped classroom approach, including the freedom to watch pre-recorded lectures at any time and the ability of section leaders to clarify targeted concepts. Suggestions for improvement focused on ways to increase regular interaction with lecturers. There was no significant difference in students' performance on quantitative assessments comparing the traditional format to the flipped classroom format. The flipped format did allow for greater flexibility and applied learning opportunities at home and during discussion sections.

  2. Quantum hair and the string-black hole correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Veneziano, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    We consider a thought experiment in which an energetic massless string probes a "stringhole" (a heavy string lying on the correspondence curve between strings and black holes) at large enough impact parameter for the regime to be under theoretical control. The corresponding, explicitly unitary, $S$-matrix turns out to be perturbatively sensitive to the microstate of the stringhole: in particular, at leading order in $l_s/b$, it depends on a projection of the stringhole's Lorentz-contracted quadrupole moment. The string-black hole correspondence is therefore violated if one assumes quantum hair to be exponentially suppressed as a function of black-hole entropy. Implications for the information paradox are briefly discussed.

  3. A study of corresponding states for the liquid alkali metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mountain, R.D.

    1977-01-01

    The pseudopotential pair potentials developed by Price et al (Phys.Rev.;B2:2983(1970)) and by Dagens et al (Phys.Rev.;B11:2726(1975)) are used to investigate the microscopic basis for a law of corresponding states for the liquid alkali metals. Both sets of potential functions show small departures from corresponding states. Monte Carlo simulation is used to show that the temperature-dependent part of the equations of state for Na and K scale with an error of the order of 10%. The pair distribution functions for Na are in good agreement with the results of x-ray diffraction measurements. These studies suggest that corresponding states is a reasonable, but not completely accurate, way of describing the thermodynamic properties of the liquid alkali metals. (author)

  4. Les pratiques photo-journalistiques des correspondants de presse locale

    OpenAIRE

    Thierry, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    La photographie de la presse locale considérée comme une forme mineure du photo­journalistique est peu étudiée, elle montre pourtant le professionnalisme des correspondants de presse locale qui la produisent. L’analyse de corpus d’images de pqr et de phr ainsi que des entretiens avec ces correspondants révèlent comment le photojournalisme de l’ultraproximité s’inscrit dans un genre journalistique qui fait le succès de cette presse peu concurrencée. Considered as a minor form of photojourna...

  5. Toward the virtual classroom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pihlman, M.; Dirks, D.H.

    1990-01-03

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) encourages its employees to remotely attend classes given by Stanford University, University of California at Davis, and the National Technological University (NTU). To improve the quality of education for LLNL employees, we are cooperating with Stanford University in upgrading the Stanford Instructional Television Network (SITN). A dedicated high-speed communication link (Tl) between Stanford and LLNL will be used for enhanced services such as videoconferencing, real time classnotes distribution, and electronic distribution of homework assignments. The new network will also allow students to take classes from their offices with the ability to ask the professor questions via an automatically dialed telephone call. As part of this upgrade, we have also proposed a new videoconferencing based classroom environment where students taking remote classes would feel as though they are attending the live class. All paperwork would be available in near real time and students may converse normally with, and see, other remote students as though they were all in the same physical location. We call this the Virtual Classroom.'' 1 ref., 6 figs.

  6. Planning using dynamic epistemic logic: Correspondence and complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Holm

    2013-01-01

    A growing community investigates planning using dynamic epistemic logic. Another framework based on similar ideas is knowledge-based programs as plans. Here we show how actions correspond in the two frameworks. We finally discuss fragments of DEL planning obtained by the restriction of event models...

  7. 78 FR 52431 - Amendments to ONRR's Service of Official Correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... of official correspondence on companies and reporting entities. II. Explanation of Amendments This... employees and agents designated as points of contact by each company and reporting entity from Forms ONRR... and an open exchange of ideas. We have developed this rule in a manner consistent with these...

  8. An Australian war correspondent in Ladysmith: The siege report of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Africa on 21 October 1899, the day of the battle at Elandslaagte, as war correspondent to the Melbourne Argus. This book .... modern historians, have hinted that Australians learned racism and 'absorbed the local settlers' view' during their ... dehurnanisation of the enemy is oft-used propaganda. By Christmas, Macdonald's.

  9. Open-closed string correspondence in open string field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartl, M.; Sachs, I.

    2008-01-01

    We address the problem of describing different closed string backgrounds in background independent open string field theory: A shift in the closed string background corresponds to a collective excitation of open strings. As an illustration we apply the formalism to the case where the closed string background is a group manifold. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Ionizing radiation measurements and assay of corresponding dose

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PUBLICATIONS1

    Measurements of ionizing radiation and corresponding dose rate around bottling and pharma- ceutical facilities in Ilorin, Nigeria, have been ... hanced naturally occurring radioactive materi- als are produced as a result of industrial activi- ... that the quality of our environment be main- tained in a good state, to ensure a high ...

  11. Virtual Foreign Correspondence: Experimental Instructions in Digital Foreign News Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Oliver; Stalph, Florian; Steller, Tom

    2018-01-01

    Within a series of six qualitative studies over seven years, this research in instructing journalism students investigates whether or not covering foreign news from home via Internet technology can substitute foreign correspondents on-site to reduce costs. Co-orientation and decontextualization can be described as characteristic for virtual…

  12. Matching interpolation of CT faulted images based on corresponding object

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lingna

    2005-01-01

    For CT faulted images interpolation this paper presents a corresponding pint matching interpolation algorithm, which is based on object feature. Compared with the traditional interpolation algorithms, the new algorithm improves visual effect and its interpolation error. The computer experiments show that the algorithm can effectively improve the interpolation quality, especially more clear scene at the boundary. (authors)

  13. The Correspondence of René Descartes: 1643

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, T.; Bos, E.-J. (Erik-Jan); Ven, Jeroen van de

    2003-01-01

    There is little disagreement that the standard edition of Descartes by Charles Adam and Paul Tannery (1897-1913, known as AT) should be redone, in any case as far as the correspondence is concerned. The reason is not only that its chronology is defective and that in its latest reprint the

  14. mckay correspondence in quasi-sl quasitoric orbifolds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    57

    McKay correspondence we have in mind. More precisely, the .... blowdown maps. In these notes, we establish the invariance of Betti numbers of. Chen-Ruan cohomology of quasi-SL quasitoric orbifolds under crepant blowdowns. ...... [1] Walter L. Baily, Jr The Decomposition Theorem for V-Manifolds American Journal of.

  15. Multiple correspondence analysis as a tool for analysis of large ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sea level7,8, epidemics of malaria are relatively high6,9,10. Corresponding author: Ayele Dawit. University of KwaZulu-Natal, .... MCA is useful to map both vari- ables and individuals, so allowing the construction ..... It is important to note that this two-dimensional chart is part of the twenty two dimensional solutions. Interpret-.

  16. Entropy-based particle correspondence for shape populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Ipek; Cates, Josh; Datar, Manasi; Paniagua, Beatriz; Fletcher, Thomas; Vachet, Clement; Styner, Martin; Whitaker, Ross

    2016-07-01

    Statistical shape analysis of anatomical structures plays an important role in many medical image analysis applications such as understanding the structural changes in anatomy in various stages of growth or disease. Establishing accurate correspondence across object populations is essential for such statistical shape analysis studies. In this paper, we present an entropy-based correspondence framework for computing point-based correspondence among populations of surfaces in a groupwise manner. This robust framework is parameterization-free and computationally efficient. We review the core principles of this method as well as various extensions to deal effectively with surfaces of complex geometry and application-driven correspondence metrics. We apply our method to synthetic and biological datasets to illustrate the concepts proposed and compare the performance of our framework to existing techniques. Through the numerous extensions and variations presented here, we create a very flexible framework that can effectively handle objects of various topologies, multi-object complexes, open surfaces, and objects of complex geometry such as high-curvature regions or extremely thin features.

  17. Sequence analysis corresponding to the PPE and PE proteins in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Amino acid sequence analysis corresponding to the PE proteins resulted in the identification of tandem repeats comprising 41–43 amino acid ..... Q9RAP8. Leptospira interrogans serovar ictero- haemorrhagiae-B. ORFC protein. 5. P71003. Bacillus subtilis-B. Hypothetical 49⋅4 kDa protein. 5. ALL2941. Anabaena sp.

  18. Shape Modelling Using Markov Random Field Restoration of Point Correspondences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Hilger, Klaus Baggesen

    2003-01-01

    A method for building statistical point distribution models is proposed. The novelty in this paper is the adaption of Markov random field regularization of the correspondence field over the set of shapes. The new approach leads to a generative model that produces highly homogeneous polygonized...

  19. Writing through Bureaucracy: Migrant Correspondence and Managed Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Rebecca Lorimer

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary international migration produces a great deal of bureaucratic writing activity. This article reports on a study of one bureaucratic literacy practice--correspondence--of 25 international migrants in the United States. Contextual and practice-based analysis of data collected through literacy history interviews shows that (a) by virtue…

  20. 24 CFR 202.8 - Loan correspondent lenders and mortgagees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... terminated. (3) Audit report. A loan correspondent lender or mortgagee must comply with the financial... definition of a supervised lender or mortgagee in § 202.6(a) need not file annual audit reports. Audit... Secretary and an analysis of escrow funds; and (ii) Such other financial information as the Secretary may...

  1. Correspondence courses - a survey of needs | Hurry | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A report on a survey conducted to investigate the need for correspondence courses in environmental education and the form such courses might take. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL.

  2. Deformation theory and local-global compatibility of Langlands correspondences

    CERN Document Server

    Luu, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The deformation theory of automorphic representations is used to study local properties of Galois representations associated to automorphic representations of general linear groups and symplectic groups. In some cases this allows to identify the local Galois representations with representations predicted by a local Langlands correspondence.

  3. Fluid/Gravity Correspondence with Scalar Field and Electromagnetic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Chou, Chia-Jui; Wu, Xiaoning; Yang, Yi; Yuan, Pei-Hung

    2016-01-01

    We consider fluid/gravity correspondence in a general rotating black hole background with scalar and electromagnetic fields. Using the method of Petrov-like boundary condition, we show that the scalar and the electromagnetic fields contribute external forces to the dual Navier-Stokes equation and the rotation of black hole induces the Coriolis force.

  4. A correspondence between IBA-1 and IBA-2 models and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The interacting boson approximation IBA-1 model space, in which neutron and proton degrees of freedom are not distinguished, can be considered as a subspace of the IBA-2 model space. Using the microscopic background of the IBA-2 model, a correspondence can be established between IBA-1 and IBA-2 model space.

  5. Applications of the AdS/CFT correspondence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-11-17

    Nov 17, 2012 ... The AdS/CFT correspondence is equiped with a dictionary that relates the boundary values of the bulk fields like the ... Using this dictionary it is in principle possible to reformulate the familiar local ..... electronic occupation numbers and so the charge of the system. A system is compressible if it is not ...

  6. The Relationship between British War Correspondents in the Field ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In particular, the article looks at the problem and issues relating to the relationship: licensing correspondents, censorship, monitoring journalists' activities, as well as the successful attempt of the intelligence sector to bring the press into their campaign to spread pro-British propaganda. The role of the press in the saga of the ...

  7. AdS/CFT correspondence in the Euclidean context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, H. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Mathematik; Thaler, H. [Camerino Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Matematica e Informatica

    2007-01-15

    We study two possible prescriptions for AdS/CFT correspondence by means of functional integrals. The considerations are non-perturbative and reveal certain divergencies which turn out to be harmless, in the sense that reflection-positivity and conformal invariance are not destroyed. (orig.)

  8. ICTs for Microcredit Delivery : Correspondent Banking in Brazil ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Although microfinance has proved a powerful tool in fighting poverty in developing countries, it has been slow to catch on in Latin America, particularly Brazil. On the other hand, correspondent banking enabled by information and communication technologies (ICTs) has allowed Brazil to reach low-income families in remote ...

  9. Algorithms and biplots for double constrained correspondence analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braak, Ter Cajo J.F.; Šmilauer, Petr; Dray, Stéphane

    2018-01-01

    Correspondence analysis with linear external constraints on both the rows and the columns has been mentioned in the ecological literature, but lacks full mathematical treatment and easily available algorithms and software. This paper fills this gap by defining the method as maximizing the

  10. Sequence analysis corresponding to the PPE and PE proteins in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amino acid sequence analysis corresponding to the PPE proteins in H37Rv and CDC1551 strains of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genomes resulted in the identification of a previously uncharacterized 225 amino acidresidue common region in 22 proteins. The pairwise sequence identities were as low as 18%.

  11. Radial Matrix Elements of Hydrogen Atom and the Correspondence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. Radial dipole matrix elements having astrophysical impor- tance have been computed for highly excited states of hydrogen atom. Computation is based on Heisenberg's form of correspondence principle for Coulomb potential. Particular attention has been paid to the choice of classical analogue (nc) of principal ...

  12. AdS/CFT correspondence in the Euclidean context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk, H.; Thaler, H.

    2007-01-01

    We study two possible prescriptions for AdS/CFT correspondence by means of functional integrals. The considerations are non-perturbative and reveal certain divergencies which turn out to be harmless, in the sense that reflection-positivity and conformal invariance are not destroyed. (orig.)

  13. Correspondence Effects for Objects with Opposing Left and Right Protrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Dongbin; Proctor, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Choice reactions to a property of an object stimulus are often faster when the location of a graspable part of the object corresponds with the location of a keypress response than when it does not, a phenomenon called the object-based Simon effect. Experiments 1-3 examined this effect for variants of teapot stimuli that were oriented to the left…

  14. Correspondence Analysis-Theory and Application in Management Accounting Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duller, Christine

    2010-09-01

    Correspondence analysis is an explanatory data analytic technique and is used to identify systematic relations between categorical variables. It is related to principal component analysis and the results provide information on the structure of categorical variables similar to the results given by a principal component analysis in case of metric variables. Classical correspondence analysis is designed two-dimensional, whereas multiple correspondence analysis is an extension to more than two variables. After an introductory overview of the idea and the implementation in standard software packages (PASW, SAS, R) an example in recent research is presented, which deals with strategic management accounting in family and non-family enterprises in Austria, where 70% to 80% of all enterprises can be classified as family firms. Although there is a growing body of literature focusing on various management issues in family firms, so far the state of the art of strategic management accounting in family firms is an empirically under-researched subject. In relevant literature only the (empirically untested) hypothesis can be found, that family firms tend to have less formalized management accounting systems than non-family enterprises. Creating a correspondence analysis will help to identify the underlying structure, which is responsible for differences in strategic management accounting.

  15. Fourth Order Nonlinear Intensity and the corresponding Refractive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nonlinear effects occur whenever the optical fields associated with one or more intense light such as from laser beams propagating in a crystal are large enough to produce polarization fields. This paper describes how the fourth order nonlinear intensity and the corresponding effective refractive index that is intensity ...

  16. Canonical correspondence analysis and related multivariate methods in aquatic ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braak, Ter Cajo J.F.; Verdonschot, Piet F.M.

    1995-01-01

    Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) is a multivariate method to elucidate the relationships between biological assemblages of species and their environment. The method is designed to extract synthetic environmental gradients from ecological data-sets. The gradients are the basis for succinctly

  17. Examining the Flipped Classroom through Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chung Kwan

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing interest in using a flipped classroom format in day-to-day teaching. Direct computer-based individual instruction outside the classroom and interactive group learning activities inside the classroom are the two essential components of the flipped classroom model. By watching instructional videos, students can work through some…

  18. Classroom Management: What Does Research Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postholm, May Britt

    2013-01-01

    The article reviews studies that focus on classroom management. The aim of classroom management is twofold. The first is to establish a quiet and calm environment in the classroom so that the pupils can take part in meaningful learning in a subject. The second aim is that classroom management contributes to the pupils' social and moral…

  19. The Effectiveness of Classroom Capture Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Maire B.; Burns, Colleen E.; Mitch, Nathan; Gomez, Melissa M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of classroom capture systems (systems that capture audio and video footage of a lecture and attempt to replicate a classroom experience) is becoming increasingly popular at the university level. However, research on the effectiveness of classroom capture systems in the university classroom has been limited due to the recent development and…

  20. Classroom climate in Serbia: The perspective of primary school teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ševkušić Slavica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research is to gain insight into the classroom climate in schools in Serbia from the perspective of teachers. To realize this goal, we set up two research questions: (1 How do teachers assess the importance of certain aspects of the classroom climate and their own engagement in creating favourable climate, and (2 which factors determine the quality of classroom climate. We considered four dimensions of classroom climate: equality in communication, social relationships between students, respect for students’ feelings and the organizing group work. The sample consisted of primary school teachers in Serbia (N=1441, who completed a questionnaire made for our research needs. The results of factor analysis confirmed the initial assumption that the selected dimensions are related in terms of their belonging to the same construct and sufficiently different to be considered as selfcontained. The obtained results show that teachers in Serbia highly value the importance of all researched aspects of the classroom climate and believe that they are engaged to a large extent in creating a positive classroom climate. Also, it was shown that teachers’ gender and the teaching level are the most important determinants of classroom climate quality. Bearing in mind the limitations of the applied instrument it is concluded that the results should be considered with caution and that future research should include students’ perspective, direct class observation and qualitative methods to gain a more objective and more comprehensive understanding of the classroom climate. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179034: From encouraging initiative, cooperation and creativity in education to new roles and identities in society i br. 47008: Improving the quality and accessibility of education in modernization processes in Serbia

  1. Science Teacher Beliefs and Classroom Practice Related to Constructivism in Different School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasci, Funda; Berlin, Donna F.

    2012-02-01

    Science teacher beliefs and classroom practice related to constructivism and factors that may influence classroom practice were examined in this cross-case study. Data from four science teachers in two schools included interviews, demographic questionnaire, Classroom Learning Environment Survey (preferred/perceived), and classroom observations and documents. Using an inductive analytic approach, results suggested that the teachers embraced constructivism, but classroom observations did not confirm implementation of these beliefs for three of the four teachers. The most preferred constructivist components were personal relevance and student negotiation; the most perceived component was critical voice. Shared control was the least preferred, least perceived, and least observed constructivist component. School type, grade, student behavior/ability, curriculum/standardized testing, and parental involvement may influence classroom practice.

  2. Trout in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Trout in the Classroom (TIC) is a conservation-oriented environmental education program for elementary, middle, and high school students. During the year each teacher tailors the program to fit his or her curricular needs. Therefore, each TIC program is unique. TIC has interdisciplinary applications in science, social studies, mathematics, language arts, fine arts, and physical education. In the program, students and teachers raise trout from fertilized eggs supplied by Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VGIF) hatcheries, in aquariums equipped with special chillers designed to keep the water near 50 degrees F. The students make daily temperature measurements, and monitor pH, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, and ammonia levels. They record their data, plot trends, and make sure that the water quality is sufficient to support trout development. The fingerlings, which hatch in late October, are almost an inch and a half long by mid-January. And towards the end of the school year, students will release the fry into VGIF approved watersheds. TIC programs have been in place all across the country for more than 20 years, and are the result of numerous collaborations between teachers, volunteers, government agencies, and local organizations like Trout Unlimited. The programs were designed specifically for teachers who wanted to incorporate more environmental education into their curriculum. While the immediate goal of Trout in the Classroom is to increase student knowledge of water quality and cold water conservation, its long-term goal is to reconnect an increasingly urbanized population of youth to the system of streams, rivers, and watersheds that sustain them. Successful programs have helped: connect students to their local environments and their local watersheds; teach about watershed health and water quality, and; get students to care about fish and the environment. In Virginia, the TIC program is now in its 8th year. Over the past year, the program

  3. Association between classroom ventilation mode and learning outcome in Danish schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Kjeldsen, Birthe Uldahl; Wargocki, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    opening. Also, the carbon dioxide concentration was lower in classrooms with balanced mechanical ventilation. There was no consistent association between the achievement indicators and the person specific room volume, construction/renovation year, or the occupancy. Measurements of carbon dioxide...... concentrations and temperatures in 820 classrooms in 389 schools were available. In 56% and 66% of the classrooms included in the two studies, the measured CO2 concentration was higher than 1000ppm. The findings of this study add to the growing evidence that insufficient classroom ventilation have impacts...

  4. The implementation of flipped classroom model in CIE in the environment of non-target language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Renfei; Mustofa, Ali; Zhang, Fang; Su, Xiaoxue

    2018-01-01

    This paper sets a theoretical framework that it’s both feasible and indispensable of flipping classroom in Chinese International Education (CIE) in the non-target language environments. There are mainly three sections included: 1) what is flipped classroom and why it becomes inevitable existence; 2) why should we flip the classroom in CIE environments, especially in non-target language environments; 3) take Pusat Bahasa Mandarin Universitas Negeri Surabaya as an instance to discuss the application of flipped classroom in non-target language environments.

  5. The Social Network Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunus, Peter

    Online social networking is an important part in the everyday life of college students. Despite the increasing popularity of online social networking among students and faculty members, its educational benefits are largely untested. This paper presents our experience in using social networking applications and video content distribution websites as a complement of traditional classroom education. In particular, the solution has been based on effective adaptation, extension and integration of Facebook, Twitter, Blogger YouTube and iTunes services for delivering educational material to students on mobile platforms like iPods and 3 rd generation mobile phones. The goals of the proposed educational platform, described in this paper, are to make the learning experience more engaging, to encourage collaborative work and knowledge sharing among students, and to provide an interactive platform for the educators to reach students and deliver lecture material in a totally new way.

  6. dS/CFT correspondence on a brane

    CERN Document Server

    Petkou, Anastasios C

    2002-01-01

    We study branes moving in an AdS Schwarzschild black hole background. When the brane tension exceeds a critical value, the induced metric on the brane is of FRW type and asymptotically de Sitter. We discuss the relevance of such configurations to dS/CFT correspondence. When the black hole mass reaches a critical value that depends on the brane tension, the brane interpolates in the infinite past and future between a dS space and a finite space of zero Hubble constant. This corresponds to a cosmological evolution without a Big Bang or a Big Crunch. Moreover, the central charge of the CFT dual to the dS brane enters the Cardy-Verlinde formula that gives the entropy of the thermal CFT dual to the bulk AdS black hole.

  7. dS/CFT correspondence on a brane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkou, Anastasios C.; Siopsis, George

    2002-02-01

    We study branes moving in an AdS Schwarzschild black hole background. When the brane tension exceeds a critical value, the induced metric on the brane is of FRW type and asymptotically de Sitter. We discuss the relevance of such configurations to dS/CFT correspondence. When the black hole mass reaches a critical value that depends on the brane tension, the brane interpolates in the infinite past and future between a dS space and a finite space of zero Hubble constant. This corresponds to a cosmological evolution without a Big Bang or a Big Crunch. Moreover, the central charge of the CFT dual to the dS brane enters the Cardy-Verlinde formula that gives the entropy of the thermal CFT dual to the bulk AdS black hole.

  8. Correspondence between n- and m-dimensional inflationary cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Alberto A.; Garcia-Quiroz, Alberto; Cataldo, Mauricio; Campo, Sergio del

    2004-01-01

    It is shown that, from any n-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology determined for a single scalar field minimally coupled to gravity, one can construct its m-dimensional counterpart, under the assumption of a common time coordinate and a structurally invariant scale factor for both spacetimes, by means of a simple algebraic correspondence relating gravitational constants and scalar field structural functions. If the considered cosmologies are supplemented with a perfect fluid, fitting a wide class of state equations of the form p+ρ=γf(ρ), then any n-dimensional FRW cosmology, coupled to a perfect fluid and a scalar field, possesses an m-dimensional counterpart, and vice versa. In particular, these assertions hold for single scalar field inflation models. A theorem on this respect is demonstrated. Various families of solutions are explicitly given and exhibit their correspondence with 3+1 cosmological spacetimes

  9. Applications of the AdS/CFT correspondence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-11-17

    Nov 17, 2012 ... E-mail: minwalla@theory.tifr.res.in. Abstract. In this writeup of a talk delivered at the Lepton Photon Conference 2011, applications of the AdS/CFT correspondence in diverse areas of physics are reviewed. Keywords. AdS/CFT; gauge theory; gravity; string theory. PACS Nos 11.15.−q; 11.25.−w; 11.10.kk. 1.

  10. Coherence and correspondence in the psychological analysis of numerical predictions

    OpenAIRE

    Yoav Ganzach

    2009-01-01

    Numerical predictions are of central interest for both coherence-based approaches to judgment and decisions --- the Heuristic and Biases (HB) program in particular --- and to correspondence-based approaches --- Social Judgment Theory (SJT). In this paper I examine the way these two approaches study numerical predictions by reviewing papers that use Cue Probability Learning (CPL), the central experimental paradigm for studying numerical predictions in the SJT tradition, while attempting to loo...

  11. Fluid/Gravity Correspondence, Second Order Transport and Gravitational Anomaly*,**

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megías Eugenio

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the transport properties of a relativistic fluid affected by chiral and gauge-gravitational anomalies. The computation is performed in the framework of the fluid/gravity correspondence for a 5 dim holographic model with Chern-Simons terms in the action. We find new anomalous and non anomalous transport coefficients, as well as new contributions to the existing ones coming from the mixed gauge-gravitational anomaly. Consequences for the shear waves dispersion relation are analyzed.

  12. On Perturbation Components Correspondence between Diffusion and Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Palmiotti

    2012-11-01

    We have established a correspondence between perturbation components in diffusion and transport theory. In particular we have established the correspondence between the leakage perturbation component of the diffusion theory to that of the group self scattering in transport theory. This has been confirmed by practical applications on sodium void reactivity calculations of fast reactors. Why this is important for current investigations? Recently, there has been a renewed interest in designing fast reactors where the sodium void reactivity coefficient is minimized. In particular the ASTRID8,9 reactor concept has been optimized with this goal in mind. The correspondence on the leakage term that has been established here has a twofold implication for the design of this kind of reactors. First, this type of reactor has a radial reflector; therefore, as shown before, the sodium void reactivity coefficient calculation requires the use of transport theory. The minimization of the sodium reactivity coefficient is normally done by increasing the leakage component that has a negative sign. The correspondence established in this paper allows to directly look at this component in transport theory. The second implication is related to the uncertainty evaluation on sodium void reactivity. As it has shown before, the total sodium void reactivity effect is the result of a large compensation (opposite sign) between the scattering (called often spectral) component and the leakage one. Consequently, one has to evaluate separately the uncertainty on each separate component and then combine them statistically. If one wants to compute the cross section sensitivity coefficients of the two different components, the formulation established in this paper allows to achieve this goal by playing on the contribution to the sodium void reactivity coming from the group self scattering of the sodium cross section.

  13. Quantum-classical correspondence for the inverted oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maamache, Mustapha; Ryeol Choi, Jeong

    2017-11-01

    While quantum-classical correspondence for a system is a very fundamental problem in modern physics, the understanding of its mechanism is often elusive, so the methods used and the results of detailed theoretical analysis have been accompanied by active debate. In this study, the differences and similarities between quantum and classical behavior for an inverted oscillator have been analyzed based on the description of a complete generalized Airy function-type quantum wave solution. The inverted oscillator model plays an important role in several branches of cosmology and particle physics. The quantum wave packet of the system is composed of many sub-packets that are localized at different positions with regular intervals between them. It is shown from illustrations of the probability density that, although the quantum trajectory of the wave propagation is somewhat different from the corresponding classical one, the difference becomes relatively small when the classical excitation is sufficiently high. We have confirmed that a quantum wave packet moving along a positive or negative direction accelerates over time like a classical wave. From these main interpretations and others in the text, we conclude that our theory exquisitely illustrates quantum and classical correspondence for the system, which is a crucial concept in quantum mechanics. Supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2016R1D1A1A09919503)

  14. Modified Van der Waals equation and law of corresponding states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wei; Xiao, Changming; Zhu, Yongkai

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that the Van der Waals equation is a modification of the ideal gas law, yet it can be used to describe both gas and liquid, and some important messages can be obtained from this state equation. However, the Van der Waals equation is not a precise state equation, and it does not give a good description of the law of corresponding states. In this paper, we expand the Van der Waals equation into its Taylor's series form, and then modify the fourth order expansion by changing the constant Virial coefficients into their analogous ones. Via this way, a more precise result about the law of corresponding states has been obtained, and the law of corresponding states can then be expressed as: in terms of the reduced variables, all fluids should obey the same equation with the analogous Virial coefficients. In addition, the system of 3 He with quantum effects has also been taken into consideration with our modified Van der Waals equation, and it is found that, for a normal system without quantum effect, the modification on ideal gas law from the Van der Waals equation is more significant than the real case, however, for a system with quantum effect, this modification is less significant than the real case, thus a factor is introduced in this paper to weaken or strengthen the modification of the Van der Waals equation, respectively.

  15. Crowdsourcing for reference correspondence generation in endoscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier-Hein, Lena; Mersmann, Sven; Kondermann, Daniel; Stock, Christian; Kenngott, Hannes Gotz; Sanchez, Alexandro; Wagner, Martin; Preukschas, Anas; Wekerle, Anna-Laura; Helfert, Stefanie; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; Speidel, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted minimally-invasive surgery (MIS) is often based on algorithms that require establishing correspondences between endoscopic images. However, reference annotations frequently required to train or validate a method are extremely difficult to obtain because they are typically made by a medical expert with very limited resources, and publicly available data sets are still far too small to capture the wide range of anatomical/scene variance. Crowdsourcing is a new trend that is based on outsourcing cognitive tasks to many anonymous untrained individuals from an online community. To our knowledge, this paper is the first to investigate the concept of crowdsourcing in the context of endoscopic video image annotation for computer-assisted MIS. According to our study on publicly available in vivo data with manual reference annotations, anonymous non-experts obtain a median annotation error of 2 px (n = 10,000). By applying cluster analysis to multiple annotations per correspondence, this error can be reduced to about 1 px, which is comparable to that obtained by medical experts (n = 500). We conclude that crowdsourcing is a viable method for generating high quality reference correspondences in endoscopic video images.

  16. Integrability and the AdS/CFT correspondence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serban, Didina

    2011-01-01

    The description of gauge theories at strong coupling is one of the long-standing problems in theoretical physics. The idea of a relation between strongly coupled gauge theories and string theory was pioneered by 't Hooft, Wilson and Polyakov. A decade ago, Maldacena made this relation explicit by conjecturing the exact equivalence of a conformally invariant theory in four dimensions, the maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory, with string theory in the AdS 5 x S 5 background. Other examples of correspondence between a conformally invariant theory and string theory in an AdS background were discovered recently. The comparison of the two sides of the correspondence requires the use of non-perturbative methods. The discovery of integrable structures in gauge theory and string theory led to the conjecture that the two theories are integrable for any value of the coupling constant and that they share the same integrable structure defined non-perturbatively. The last 8 years brought remarkable progress in identifying this solvable model and in explicitly solving the problem of computing the spectrum of conformal dimensions of the theory. The progress came from the identification of the dilatation operator with an integrable spin chain and from the study of the string sigma model. In this review, I present the evolution of the concept of integrability in the framework of the AdS/CFT correspondence and the main results obtained using this approach. (review)

  17. Adobe Photoshop CS6 digital classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    A complete training package on the newest version of Photoshop! The Digital Classroom series combines a full-color book with a full-featured DVD, resulting in a complete training package written by expert instructors. Photoshop is the industry standard for image editing, and this guide gets photographers, commercial designers, web developers, fine artists, and serious hobbyists up to speed on the newest version. It includes 13 self-paced lessons that allow you to progress at your own speed, with complete lesson files and tutorials on the DVD. Topics include Camera RAW, masks and la

  18. Superconductors in the high school classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, James

    2017-11-01

    In this article, we discuss the behavior of high-temperature superconductors and how to demonstrate them safely and effectively in the high school or introductory physics classroom. Included here is a discussion of the most relevant physics topics that can be demonstrated, some safety tips, and a bit of the history of superconductors. In an effort to include first-year physics students in the world of modern physics, a topic as engaging as superconductivity should not be missed. It is an opportunity to inspire students to study physics through the myriad of possible applications that high temperature superconductors hold for the future.

  19. Bringing Polar Science to the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruccoli, A.; Madsen, J. M.; Porter, M.

    2004-12-01

    The NSF sponsored IceCube (OPP-0236449) and Teachers Experiencing Antarctica and the Arctic (TEA) projects have developed a model for engaging K-12 teachers in a variety of scientific disciplines using polar science as a unifying theme. An intensive workshop, Science in the Ice, provided teachers with background content knowledge and seed ideas for activities aligned with national teaching standards. These activities were used to support the introduction of authentic science investigations related to current polar research in the classroom. The pilot workshop, sponsored by the NSF supported Math-Science Partnership SCALE (0227016), demonstrated the viability of this approach for involving a continuum of teachers from novice to master in a meaningful professional development model that can lead to sustainable classroom changes. This model for teacher professional development is based on the premise that the most robust educational outreach efforts involve teachers that are prepared, supported, and connected to a network of researchers and educators. This network can also serve to both stimulate interest in polar research and as a vehicle for delivering classroom materials related to the International Polar Year. An overview of Science in the Ice will be provided to show how the natural fascination with extreme environments can be used to introduce on-going research to the classroom from multiple disciplines---glaciology, geology, and astrophysics---with a common thread of polar science. The case for involving teachers now to fully capitalize on the potential of the International Polar Year, by providing professional development opportunities including field experiences with researchers, will be made.

  20. A Review of Classroom Management Studies of Teachers’ Teaching and Students’ Learning about Classroom Rules

    OpenAIRE

    笹屋, 孝允

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviewed classroom management studies of teachers ’ teaching and students ’ learning about classroom rules since 1990s. Teachers decide classroom rules and teach them to students in class in the beginning time of the school year. Classroom rules divide students into students in primary adjustment and students in secondary adjustment. Misbehavior of Students in secondary adjustment provides opportunities to learn classroom rules, to negotiate modification of classroom rules with a t...

  1. Classroom Teachers: Interacting with Stutterers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindzola, Rebekah H.

    1986-01-01

    Stuttering has the potential of being an educationally, socially, and vocationally handicapping condition. This article provides information to allow teachers to recognize stutterers and to provide an appropriate classroom environment. (MT)

  2. Concussion Management in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Danielle M; Caperell, Kerry S

    2016-12-01

    There is a new emphasis on the team approach to pediatric concussion management, particularly in the classroom. However, it is expected that educators are unfamiliar with the "Returning to Learning" recommendations. The authors' primary objective was to assess and improve high school educators' knowledge regarding concussions and management interventions using an online education tool. A total of 247 high school educators completed a 12 question pretest to assess core knowledge of concussions and classroom management followed by a 20-minute online literature-based education module. Participants then completed an identical posttest. The improvement in core knowledge was statistically significant (P classroom management also showed a statistically significant increase in scores (P classroom management as well as the significant improvement after an online educational module. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Rap Music in the Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Edward

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the background of rap music, its definition, its themes and messages, and rap as a blend of language and music. Offers ideas for its use in the classroom as a way to motivate and instruct students. (SR)

  4. Behavior Modification in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Mryon; Whitman, Joan

    1971-01-01

    This article presents the theoretical rationale for behavior modification, principally through its comparison with traditional psychotherapies, and suggests some behavior modification techniques for the classroom management of maladaptive behavior. (Author)

  5. Don Quixote in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Robert

    1976-01-01

    Article states that learning, like all aspects of human development, results from interaction with others. The role of the teacher in establishing communication in the classroom and providing an example of openness and involvement is emphasized. (RW)

  6. Relating Teacher PCK and Teacher Practice Using Classroom Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barendsen, Erik; Henze, Ineke

    2017-09-01

    Science teachers' pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) has been researched in many studies, yet little empirical evidence has been found to determine how this knowledge actually informs teachers' actions in the classroom. To complement previous quantitative studies, there is a need for more qualitative studies to investigate the relationship between teacher knowledge (as formulated by the teacher) and classroom practice, especially in the context of an educational innovation. In this study we explored a possible way to investigate this relationship in an in-depth and systematic fashion. To this end, we conducted a case study with a chemistry teacher in the context of the implementation of a context-based science curriculum in The Netherlands. The teacher's PCK was captured using the Content Representation form by Loughran, Mulhall, and Berry. We used an observation table to monitor classroom interactions in such a way that the observations could be related to specific elements of teachers' PCK. Thus, we were able to give a detailed characterization of the correspondences and differences between the teacher's personal PCK and classroom practice. Such an elaborate description turned out to be a useful basis for discussing mechanisms explaining the relationship between teachers' knowledge and teachers' actions.

  7. Beginning Continuous Fluid Motion in the Music Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westervelt, Todd G.

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on how to include movement education into the music classroom. Discusses the techniques developed by three movement specialists: (1) Edwin Gordon's Continuous Fluid Motion (CFM); (2) Rudolf von Laban's effort/flow elements; and (3) Phyllis Weikart's taxonomy of movement. Includes a bibliography of resources. (CMK)

  8. Remote Control: A Spatial-History of Correspondence Schooling in New South Wales, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symes, Colin

    2012-01-01

    In large continental landmasses such as Australia, forms of education, including correspondence schooling, emerged in the early twentieth century that allowed children in remote regions to access education. To make such schooling possible, other "technologies" of state provision were mobilised such as the postal system, rail network, and…

  9. Communicative Competence in Audio Classrooms: A Position Paper for the CADE 1991 Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, Liz

    Classroom practitioners need to move their attention away from the technological and logistical competencies required for audio conferencing (AC) to the required communicative competencies in order to advance their skills in handling the psychodynamics of audio virtual classrooms which include audio alone and audio with graphics. While the…

  10. Integrating Technology in Today's Undergraduate Classrooms: A Look at Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Kimberly C.; Salmun, Haydee

    2016-01-01

    The authors present the findings of a small-scale study of student opinions drawn from an anonymous and voluntary survey in an undergraduate science classroom. The survey questions focused on the use of basic tools in a college classroom. The tools included in the survey were PowerPoint, overhead projectors/chalkboards, personal response units,…

  11. Communicative Use of Newspaper Texts in Classroom Reading: The Read-Ask-and-Tell Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajnryb, Ruth

    1988-01-01

    Describes a method of using newspaper articles in the English-language classroom called Read-Ask-and-Tell. The place of authentic materials in the classroom, including some of the pitfalls, are discussed. The Reading, Asking, and Telling components are outlined, and activities for consolidation and reinforcement of skills are suggested. Appendices…

  12. Explaining Technology Integration in K-12 Classrooms: A Multilevel Path Analysis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Ritzhaupt, Albert D.; Dawson, Kara; Barron, Ann E.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to design and test a model of classroom technology integration in the context of K-12 schools. The proposed multilevel path analysis model includes teacher, contextual, and school related variables on a teacher's use of technology and confidence and comfort using technology as mediators of classroom technology…

  13. Educational Technology and the Restructuring Movement: Lessons from Research on Computers in Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Diane; And Others

    This paper presents findings from a recently completed study of the use of computers in primary classrooms as one source of evidence concerning the role technology can play in school restructuring efforts. The sites for the study were selected by Apple Computer, Inc. in the spring of 1988 and included 43 classrooms in 10 schools in 6 large, mostly…

  14. The Caterpillar Game: A SW-PBIS Aligned Classroom Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floress, Margaret T.; Jacoby, Amber L.

    2017-01-01

    The Caterpillar Game is a classroom management system that is aligned with School-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports standards. A single-case, multiple-baseline design was used to evaluate the effects of the Caterpillar Game on disruptive student behavior and teacher praise. Three classrooms were included in the study (preschool,…

  15. Comparing Interaction and Use of Space in Traditional and Innovative Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurzynski-Weiss, Laura; Long, Avizia Y.; Solon, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Despite myriad changes to language teaching methods over time, university-level classroom spaces have largely remained the same--until now. Recent innovations in classroom space design center on technological advances, include movable furniture and coffee-shop style rooms, and are believed to facilitate language learning in several ways.…

  16. Meeting Students Where They Are: Advancing a Theory and Practice of Archives in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidy, Christina; Hannah, Mark; Sura, Tom

    2011-01-01

    This article uses theories of technical communication and archives to advance a pedagogy that includes archival production in the technical communication classroom. By developing and maintaining local classroom archives, students directly engage in valuable processes of appraisal, selection, collaboration, and retention. The anticipated outcomes…

  17. Teaching about Love and Practicing Feminist Pedagogy in a College Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei-Hui, You

    2014-01-01

    Being a feminist teacher, working on gender equity education, including teaching, reading, writing, and doing research on this topic, has become a commitment for me. I have frequently reflected my teaching practices and occasionally found new teaching strategies in the classroom. I always try to bring new topics or issues into the classroom in…

  18. The Relationship between Critical Thinking Abilities and Classroom Management Skills of High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirdag, Seyithan

    2015-01-01

    High school teachers experience difficulties while providing effective teaching approaches in their classrooms. Some of the difficulties are associated with the lack of classroom management skills and critical thinking abilities. This quantitative study includes non-random selection of the participants and aims to examine critical thinking…

  19. The Physical Placement of Classroom Technology and Its Influences on Educational Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondeur, J.; De Bruyne, E.; Van Den Driessche, M.; McKenney, S.; Zandvliet, D.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain deeper insights into how technology restructures the classroom as a spatial setting and how the positioning of these technologies can be associated with educational practices. The research includes a photographic and schematic representation of 115 classrooms in 12 primary schools in Belgium, resulting in a…

  20. The physical placement of classroom technology and its influences on educational practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tondeur, J.; de Bruyne, E.; van den Driessche, M.; McKenney, Susan; Zandvliet, D.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain deeper insights into how technology restructures the classroom as a spatial setting and how the positioning of these technologies can be associated with educational practices. The research includes a photographic and schematic representation of 115 classrooms in

  1. The physical placement of classroom technology and its influences on educational practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tondeur, Jo; De Bruyne, Ellen; Van den Driessche, Maarten; McKenney, Susan; Zandvliet, David

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain deeper insights into how technology restructures the classroom as a spatial setting and how the positioning of these technologies can be associated with educational practices. The research includes a photographic and schematic representation of 115 classrooms

  2. Predicting Academic Success from Academic Motivation and Learning Approaches in Classroom Teaching Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Baris

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to determine whether learning approaches and academic motivation together predict academic success of classroom teaching students. The sample of the study included 536 students (386 female, 150 male) studying at the Classroom Teaching Division of Canakkale 18 Mart University. Our research was designed as a prediction study. Data was…

  3. Planning and Enacting Mathematical Tasks of High Cognitive Demand in the Primary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgius, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    This study offers an examination of two primary-grades teachers as they learn to transfer knowledge from professional development into their classrooms. I engaged in planning sessions with each teacher to help plan tasks of high cognitive demand, including anticipating and planning for classroom discourse that would occur around the task. A…

  4. Establishing Content Validity of the Quality Indicators for Classrooms Serving Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Cynthia E.; Vasquez, Eleazar, III.; Marino, Matthew T.; Wienke, Wilfred; Donehower, Claire; Gourwitz, Jillian; Rosenberg, Michael S.; Duerr, Sunny R.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide content validation for quality indicators included in an observation instrument developed to evaluate classrooms serving students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A panel of 103 subject-matter experts consisting of a mixture of field personnel (n = 64; 59 classroom teachers, five school administrators)…

  5. Peer-Assisted Learning and Interactions in Inclusive Music Classrooms: Benefits, Research, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellison, Judith; Brown, Laura; Draper, Ellary

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary music classrooms include a beautiful mosaic of individual children from diverse backgrounds, children who vary considerably in their capabilities, interests, and levels of motivation. Some of the variations we observe are related to social skills and knowledge. The effects of appropriate classroom behavior and positive social…

  6. "Ganchulinas" and "Rainbowli" Colors: Young Multilingual Children Play with Language in Head Start Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Ysaaca

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this ethnographic case study was to study the language development of 4-year-old emergent bilinguals in a bilingual (Spanish/English) Head Start classroom with flexible language practices. Data were collected throughout the 10-month school year by visiting the classroom 2-3 times per week. Data include: field notes (observations and…

  7. Developing a "Conjecturing Atmosphere" in the Classroom through Task Design and Enactment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jodie

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased emphasis on algebraic reasoning in primary school classrooms. This includes introducing students to the mathematical practices of making conjectures, justifying and generalising. Drawing on findings from a classroom-based study, this paper explores one teacher's journey in shifting her task design and…

  8. Sense of Classroom Community and Team Development Process in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem Aydin, Irem; Gumus, Salih

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether there is a relationship between Turkish online learners' sense of classroom community, perceptions of success in team development process and their preferences of studying in teams. A survey instrument included the Sense of Classroom Community Scale, Tuckman's Teamwork Questionnaire and some other…

  9. The role of classroom acoustics on vocal intensity regulation and speakers’ comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelegrin Garcia, David

    investigated the relationships between the classroom acoustic condition and teachers’ voice, focusing on their vocal intensity, and between the classroom acoustic condition and the sensation of acoustic comfort for a speaker. In the presence of low background noise levels, teachers were found to adjust...... with and without self-reported voice problems reacted identically to variations in noise, whereas they reacted differently to the voice support of the classrooms where they taught, suggesting that teachers with voice problems are more sensitive to the working environment than their healthy colleagues. The acoustic...... conditions that conveyed the highest comfort for a speaker were derived from laboratory experiments in virtual classrooms and corresponded to values of the reverberation time between 0.45 and 0.55 s, calculated from the decay between -5 and -35 dB of the backward integrated energy curve of an impulse...

  10. The Web@classroom project: portables computers and wireless technology in the classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Jose Luis; Carvalho, Jose Luis; Blasquez, F.; Luengo, R.; Casas, G. L.; Younie, S.; Bryn, H.; Savage, T.; Brendan, T.; Arnedillo, I. S.

    2010-01-01

    The study was carried out in four European schools (pupils age 9 to13 years old) within four countries (Portugal, Spain, UK and Ireland). The adopted methodology was based in action-research procedures and it included multiple methods and techniques: systematic classroom observation of teachers and pupil work and learning activities; documentary evidence (teachers working sheets, schemes of work) interviews (with selected pupils); questionnaires to all pupils and staff at intervals. This meth...

  11. Folksong in the Classroom. A Network of Teachers of History, Literature, Music, and the Humanities, A Newsletter. Volume XII, Fall-Spring 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, John W., Ed.; Seidman, Laurence, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    "Folksong in the Classroom" is a newsletter of a network of teachers of history, literature, music, and the humanities. Each issue contains songs, background information, classroom activities, and ideas for teachers to use in integrating folksongs into their teaching. Three issues of "Folksong in the Classroom" are included in…

  12. Shifting more than the goal posts: developing classroom norms of inquiry-based learning in mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makar, Katie; Fielding-Wells, Jill

    2018-03-01

    The 3-year study described in this paper aims to create new knowledge about inquiry norms in primary mathematics classrooms. Mathematical inquiry addresses complex problems that contain ambiguities, yet classroom environments often do not adopt norms that promote curiosity, risk-taking and negotiation needed to productively engage with complex problems. Little is known about how teachers and students initiate, develop and maintain norms of mathematical inquiry in primary classrooms. The research question guiding this study is, "How do classroom norms develop that facilitate student learning in primary classrooms which practice mathematical inquiry?" The project will (1) analyse a video archive of inquiry lessons to identify signature practices that enhance productive classroom norms of mathematical inquiry and facilitate learning, (2) engage expert inquiry teachers to collaborate to identify and design strategies for assisting teachers to develop and sustain norms over time that are conducive to mathematical inquiry and (3) support and study teachers new to mathematical inquiry adopting these practices in their classrooms. Anticipated outcomes include identification and illustration of classroom norms of mathematical inquiry, signature practices linked to these norms and case studies of primary teachers' progressive development of classroom norms of mathematical inquiry and how they facilitate learning.

  13. Effects of Physical Classroom Environment on the Literacy Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis of Teaching Writing Skill

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Zafar Iqbal; Mehmood Ul Hassan; Muhammad Qasim Ali

    2015-01-01

    Physical classroom environment plays a fundamental role in the academic success or failure of students and serves as a means to build the necessary basic skills for literacy development among students in a deliberate and intensive way. Physical classroom environment includes: a broad range of educational facilities, including: reading and writing materials, various types of equipment, physical settings, and instructional components. Many students come to classroom with exposure to literacy. S...

  14. Black holes in the gravity/gauge theory correspondence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, J.P.

    2002-06-01

    The AdS/CFT correspondence provides a microscopic description of black hole thermodynamics. In this thesis, I study the relation between the classical physics of black holes and this microscopic description. I first consider the gauge theory's holographic encoding of non-trivial global causal structure, by studying various probes of the black hole. I study the charged black hole, so that the thermal scale is separated from the horizon scale, to demonstrate which relates to the field theory scale size. I find that, when probing the horizon, both Wilson loops and the duals of static supergravity probes have a scale size determined by the horizon, but the field theory scale size is divergent for a time-dependent probe. I also use the bulk black hole geometry to study the physics of the boundary theory. If we consider a dynamical boundary, a braneworld cosmology is induced from the bulk. However, the presence of matter on the brane introduces unconventional quadratic terms in the FRW equations of this braneworld. I find that bulk black holes induce identical unconventional terms on a matterless brane, therefore providing an alternative description of the same cosmology. A new conjecture relating classical and thermodynamic stability of black branes has emerged from the AdS/CFT correspondence. I make progress in proving this for the case of Schwarzschild black holes in a finite cavity. I also extend the conjecture to the supergravity backgrounds of the direct product form Schwarzschild-AdS x Sphere, which are relevant to my study of the AdS/CFT correspondence. (author)

  15. Alternating multivariate trigonometric functions and corresponding Fourier transforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimyk, A U; Patera, J

    2008-01-01

    We define and study multivariate sine and cosine functions, symmetric with respect to the alternating group A n , which is a subgroup of the permutation (symmetric) group S n . These functions are eigenfunctions of the Laplace operator. They determine Fourier-type transforms. There exist three types of such transforms: expansions into corresponding sine-Fourier and cosine-Fourier series, integral sine-Fourier and cosine-Fourier transforms, and multivariate finite sine and cosine transforms. In all these transforms, alternating multivariate sine and cosine functions are used as a kernel

  16. AdS/CFT correspondence in operator formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashima, Seiji

    2018-02-01

    In this paper we study the AdS/CFT correspondence in the operator formalism without assuming the GKPW relation. We explicitly show that the low energy spectrum of the large N limit of CFT, which is realized by a strong coupling gauge theory, is identical to the spectrum of the free gravitational theory in the global AdS spacetime under some assumptions which are expected to be valid. Thus, two theories are equivalent for the low energy region under the assumptions. Using this equivalence, the bulk local field is constructed and the GKPW relation is derived.

  17. Non-linear Calibration Leads to Improved Correspondence between Uncertainties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2007-01-01

    the analysis, the calculation of uncertainties of calibrations must correspond to the uncertainty of unknowns that was determined by many repetitions. Thus, by introducing an average value of the law-of-propagation of errors (LPE) and maintaining the fundamentals of statistics, as manifested by the central...... that the uncertainty of the detector dominates the contributions to the uncertainty budget, and it was proposed that a full analysis of the instrument ought to be performed for every single analyte before measurement. Following this investigation, the homoscedasticy or heteroscedasticy may be identified by residuals...

  18. THREE-VARIABLE ALTERNATING TRIGONOMETRIC FUNCTIONS AND CORRESPONDING FOURIER TRANSFORMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Bezubik

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The common trigonometric functions admit generalizations to any higher dimension, the symmetric, antisymmetric and alternating ones. In this paper, we restrict ourselves to three dimensional generalization only, focusing on alternating case in detail. Many specific properties of this new class of special functions useful in applications are studied. Such are the orthogonalities, both the continuous one and the discrete one on the 3D lattice of any density, corresponding discrete and continuous Fourier transforms, and others. Rapidly increasing precision of the interpolation with increasing density of the 3D lattice is shown in an example.

  19. Modelling Trends in Ordered Correspondence Analysis Using Orthogonal Polynomials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Rosaria; Beh, Eric J; Kroonenberg, Pieter M

    2016-06-01

    The core of the paper consists of the treatment of two special decompositions for correspondence analysis of two-way ordered contingency tables: the bivariate moment decomposition and the hybrid decomposition, both using orthogonal polynomials rather than the commonly used singular vectors. To this end, we will detail and explain the basic characteristics of a particular set of orthogonal polynomials, called Emerson polynomials. It is shown that such polynomials, when used as bases for the row and/or column spaces, can enhance the interpretations via linear, quadratic and higher-order moments of the ordered categories. To aid such interpretations, we propose a new type of graphical display-the polynomial biplot.

  20. Classroom HVAC: Improving ventilation and saving energy -- field study plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apte, Michael G.; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2004-10-14

    The primary goals of this research effort are to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a very practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms (CRs) with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research is motivated by the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many CRs are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in CRs. This document provides a summary of the detailed plans developed for the field study that will take place in 2005 to evaluate the energy and IAQ performance of a new classroom HVAC technology. The field study will include measurements of HVAC energy use, ventilation rates, and IEQ conditions in 10 classrooms with the new HVAC technology and in six control classrooms with a standard HVAC system. Energy use and many IEQ parameters will be monitored continuously, while other IEQ measurements will be will be performed seasonally. Continuously monitored data will be remotely accessed via a LonWorks network. Instrument calibration plans that vary with the type of instrumentation used are established. Statistical tests will be employed to compare energy use and IEQ conditions with the new and standard HVAC systems. Strengths of this study plan include the collection of real time data for a full school year, the use of high quality instrumentation, the incorporation of many quality control measures, and the extensive collaborations with industry that limit costs to the sponsors.

  1. The Arnol'd cat: failure of the correspondence principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, J.; Mantica, G.; Ristow, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    The classical Hamiltonian H=p 2 /2m+ε(q 2 /2)Σδ[s-(t/T)] has an integrable mapping of the plane, [q n+1 , p n+1 ]=[q n +p n , q n +2p n ], as its equations of motion. But then by introducing periodic boundary conditions via (mod 1) applied to both q and p variables, the equations of motion become the Arnol'd cat map, [q n+1 , p n+1 ]=[q n +p n , q n +2p n ], (mod 1), revealing it to be one of the simplest fully chaotic systems which can be derived from a Hamiltonian and analyzed. Consequently, we here quantize the Arnol'd cat and examine its quantum motion for signs of chaos using algorithmic complexity as the litmus. Our analysis reveals that the quantum cat is not chaotic in the deep quantum domain nor does it become chaotic in the classical limit as required by the correspondence principle. We therefore conclude that the correspondence principle, as defined herein, fails for the quantum Arnol'd cat. (orig.)

  2. Facial Performance Transfer via Deformable Models and Parametric Correspondence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asthana, Akshay; de la Hunty, Miles; Dhall, Abhinav; Goecke, Roland

    2012-09-01

    The issue of transferring facial performance from one person's face to another's has been an area of interest for the movie industry and the computer graphics community for quite some time. In recent years, deformable face models, such as the Active Appearance Model (AAM), have made it possible to track and synthesize faces in real time. Not surprisingly, deformable face model-based approaches for facial performance transfer have gained tremendous interest in the computer vision and graphics community. In this paper, we focus on the problem of real-time facial performance transfer using the AAM framework. We propose a novel approach of learning the mapping between the parameters of two completely independent AAMs, using them to facilitate the facial performance transfer in a more realistic manner than previous approaches. The main advantage of modeling this parametric correspondence is that it allows a "meaningful" transfer of both the nonrigid shape and texture across faces irrespective of the speakers' gender, shape, and size of the faces, and illumination conditions. We explore linear and nonlinear methods for modeling the parametric correspondence between the AAMs and show that the sparse linear regression method performs the best. Moreover, we show the utility of the proposed framework for a cross-language facial performance transfer that is an area of interest for the movie dubbing industry.

  3. The female figure in 19th century scientific correspondence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Mangianti

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

    The scientific correspondence are in the archives of astronomic and meteorological observatories and in many

    scientific institutes is very useful to know the character of the people involved, to understand the development

    of their research, doubts and certainty during their careers. This correspondence sometimes contains intimate

    family detils which enhance our knowledge of these people.



  4. Extremal black hole/CFT correspondence in (gauged) supergravities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, David D. K.; Cvetic, M.; Lue, H.; Pope, C. N.

    2009-01-01

    We extend the investigation of the recently proposed Kerr/conformal field theory correspondence to large classes of rotating black hole solutions in gauged and ungauged supergravities. The correspondence, proposed originally for four-dimensional Kerr black holes, asserts that the quantum states in the near-horizon region of an extremal rotating black hole are holographically dual to a two-dimensional chiral theory whose Virasoro algebra arises as an asymptotic symmetry of the near-horizon geometry. In fact, in dimension D there are [(D-1)/2] commuting Virasoro algebras. We consider a general canonical class of near-horizon geometries in arbitrary dimension D, and show that in any such metric the [(D-1)/2] central charges each imply, via the Cardy formula, a microscopic entropy that agrees with the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of the associated extremal black hole. In the remainder of the paper we show for most of the known rotating black hole solutions of gauged supergravity, and for the ungauged supergravity solutions with four charges in D=4 and three charges in D=5, that their extremal near-horizon geometries indeed lie within the canonical form. This establishes that, in all these examples, the microscopic entropies of the dual conformal field theories agree with the Bekenstein-Hawking entropies of the extremal rotating black holes.

  5. A meta-analysis of the effects of classroom management strategies and classroom management programs on students’ academic, behavioral, emotional, and motivational outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korpershoek, Hanke; Harms, Truus; de Boer, Hester; van Kuijk, Mechteld; Doolaard, Simone

    This meta-analysis examined which classroom management strategies and programs enhanced students’ academic, behavioral, social-emotional, and motivational outcomes in primary education. The analysis included 54 random and nonrandom controlled intervention studies published in the past decade

  6. Association between substandard classroom ventilation rates and students' academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverinen-Shaughnessy, U; Moschandreas, D J; Shaughnessy, R J

    2011-04-01

    This study focuses on the relationship between classroom ventilation rates and academic achievement. One hundred elementary schools of two school districts in the southwest United States were included in the study. Ventilation rates were estimated from fifth-grade classrooms (one per school) using CO(2) concentrations measured during occupied school days. In addition, standardized test scores and background data related to students in the classrooms studied were obtained from the districts. Of 100 classrooms, 87 had ventilation rates below recommended guidelines based on ASHRAE Standard 62 as of 2004. There is a linear association between classroom ventilation rates and students' academic achievement within the range of 0.9-7.1 l/s per person. For every unit (1 l/s per person) increase in the ventilation rate within that range, the proportion of students passing standardized test (i.e., scoring satisfactory or above) is expected to increase by 2.9% (95%CI 0.9-4.8%) for math and 2.7% (0.5-4.9%) for reading. The linear relationship observed may level off or change direction with higher ventilation rates, but given the limited number of observations, we were unable to test this hypothesis. A larger sample size is needed for estimating the effect of classroom ventilation rates higher than 7.1 l/s per person on academic achievement. The results of this study suggest that increasing the ventilation rates toward recommended guideline ventilation rates in classrooms should translate into improved academic achievement of students. More studies are needed to fully understand the relationships between ventilation rate, other indoor environmental quality parameters, and their effects on students' health and achievement. Achieving the recommended guidelines and pursuing better understanding of the underlying relationships would ultimately support both sustainable and productive school environments for students and personnel. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Emotional Experiences of Students in the Classroom A Multimethod Qualitative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Wondimu; van der Werf, Margaretha; Minnaert, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we report on a multimethod qualitative study designed to explore the emotional experiences of students in the classroom setting. The purpose of the study was threefold: (1) to explore the correspondence among nonverbal expressions, subjective feelings, and physiological reactivity

  8. Bringing Seismology's Grand Challenges to the Undergraduate Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, M. H.; Taber, J.; Hubenthal, M.

    2011-12-01

    The "Seismological Grand Challenges in Understanding Earth's Dynamic Systems," a community-written long-range science plan for the next decade, poses 10 questions to guide fundamental seismological research. Written in an approachable fashion suitable for policymakers, the broad questions and supporting discussion contained in this document offer an ideal framework for the development of undergraduate curricular materials. Leveraging this document, we have created a collection of inquiry-based classroom modules that utilize authentic data to modernize seismological instruction in 100 and 200 level undergraduate courses. The modules not only introduce undergraduates to the broad questions that the seismological community seeks to answer in the future but also showcase the numerous areas where modern seismological research is actively contributing to our understanding of fundamental Earth processes. To date 6 in-depth explorations that correspond to the Grand Challenges document have been developed. The specific topics for each exploration were selected to showcase modern seismological research while also covering topics commonly included in the curriculum of these introductory classes. Examples of activities that have been created and their corresponding Grand Challenge include: -A guided inquiry that introduces students to episodic tremor and slip and compares the GPS and seismic signatures of ETS with those produced from standard tectonic earthquakes (Grand Challenge "How do faults slip?"). - A laboratory exercise where students engage in b-value mapping of volcanic earthquakes to assess potential eruption hazards (How do magmas ascend and erupt?). - A module that introduce students to glacial earthquakes in Greenland and compares their frequency and spatial distribution to tectonic earthquakes (How do processes in the ocean and atmosphere interact with the solid Earth?). What is the relationship between stress and strain in the lithosphere? - An activity that

  9. Thinking through children's literature in the classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes-Torres, Agustín; Soler-Pardo, Betlem

    2014-01-01

    This book is the result of understanding literature as a central part of children's education. Fiction and nonfiction literary works constitute a source to open young minds and to help them understand how and why people - themselves included - live as they do, or to question through critical lenses whether they could live otherwise. By integrating philological, cultural, and pedagogical inquiries, Thinking through Children's Literature in the Classroom approaches the use of literature as a crucial factor to motivate students not only to improve their literacy skills, but also to develop their

  10. Language in use intermediate : classroom book

    CERN Document Server

    Doff, Adrian

    1995-01-01

    ach of the four levels comprises about 80 hours of class work, with additional time for the self-study work. The Teacher's Book contains all the pages from the Classroom Book, with interleaved teaching notes including optional activities to cater for different abilities. There is a video to accompany the Beginner, Pre-intermediate and Intermediate levels. Each video contains eight stimulating and entertaining short programmes, as well as a booklet of photocopiable activities. Free test material is available in booklet and web format for Beginner and Pre-intermediate levels. Visit www.cambridge.org/elt/liu or contact your local Cambridge University Press representative.

  11. Out of Classroom Instruction in the Flipped Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantafyllou, Evangelia; Timcenko, Olga

    2015-01-01

    This article presents experiences and student perceptions on the introduction of the flipped classroom model in two consecutive semesters at Media Technology department of Aalborg University, Copenhagen, Denmark. We introduced the flipped instruction model to a statistics course and a mathematics...... workshop. We collected data by two online survey studies, which show support for student perceptions that out-of-classroom instruction with online resources enhances learning, by providing visual and in depth explanations, and can engage the learner. However, students stated that they miss just......-in-time explanations when learning with online resources and they questioned the quality and validity of some of them. Based on these findings and our own experience, we discuss requirements for resources and activities in flipped classrooms in order for the student to engage and learn. Finally, we present a framework...

  12. Non-linear Calibration Leads to Improved Correspondence between Uncertainties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2007-01-01

    Although calibrations are routine procedures of instrumental analysis and quality assurance, the working curve is rarely applied in the determination of the uncertainty budget, most likely owing to the difficulties associated with the calculation of uncertainties. The present work provides...... limit theorem, an excellent correspondence was obtained between predicted uncertainties and measured uncertainties. In order to validate the method, experiments were applied of flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) for the analysis of Co and Pt, and experiments of electrothermal atomic absorption...... that the uncertainty of the detector dominates the contributions to the uncertainty budget, and it was proposed that a full analysis of the instrument ought to be performed for every single analyte before measurement. Following this investigation, the homoscedasticy or heteroscedasticy may be identified by residuals...

  13. Discrete physics: Practice, representation and rules of correspondence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyes, H.P.

    1988-07-01

    We make a brief historical review of some aspects of modern physics which we find most significant in our own endeavor. We discuss the ''Yukawa Vertices'' of elementary particle theory as used in laboratory practice, second quantized field theory, analytic S-Matrix theory and in our own approach. We review the conserved quantum numbers in the Standard Model of quarks and leptons. This concludes our presentation of the ''E-frame.'' We try to develop a self-consistent representation of our theory. We have already claimed that this approach provides a discrete reconciliation between the formal (representational) aspects of quantum mechanics and relativity. Also discussed are rules of correspondence connecting the formalism to the practice of physics by using the counter paradigm and event-based coordinates to construct relativistic quantum mechanics in a new way. 31 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Discrete physics: Practice, representation and rules of correspondence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyes, H.P.

    1988-07-01

    We make a brief historical review of some aspects of modern physics which we find most significant in our own endeavor. We discuss the ''Yukawa Vertices'' of elementary particle theory as used in laboratory practice, second quantized field theory, analytic S-Matrix theory and in our own approach. We review the conserved quantum numbers in the Standard Model of quarks and leptons. This concludes our presentation of the ''E-frame.'' We try to develop a self-consistent representation of our theory. We have already claimed that this approach provides a discrete reconciliation between the formal (representational) aspects of quantum mechanics and relativity. Also discussed are rules of correspondence connecting the formalism to the practice of physics by using the counter paradigm and event-based coordinates to construct relativistic quantum mechanics in a new way. 31 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  15. DLP system and the secret of personal correspondence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavrinskaya T.V.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available according to the authors, every day a number of threats to information security increases, and this requires an increase in resources (systems of information protection of organizations and enterprises. There are many information security tools with different functionality, but the main mean of preventing information leakage is the Date Loss Prevention (DLP system. If you need to establish control over the leak of confidential information there appear a number of questions of conformity of decisions with the legislation and regulations. This article describes the issue of compliance functionality of a DLP system the provisions and requirements of the legislation in the sphere of protection of family and personal secrets, as well as compliance with the Constitutional right of citizens to privacy of correspondence.

  16. The correspondence between Miodrag Vasiljević and Bulgarian Musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Jelena L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Serbian ethnomusicologist and music pedagogue Miodrag A. Vasiljević corresponded with colleagues from neighboring Bulgaria between 1934 and 1962. This exchange of letters went through three phases. The first phase was linked with his stay in Skopje until the breakout of World War II; during the second phase - in the course of the 1940's - he was active in the Department for Folk Music at Radio Belgrade and he founded his method of music teaching on traditional Serbian music; in the third phase (the 1950's and beginning of 1960's Vasiljević aimed at a closer cooperation with Bulgarian musicians. All the phases are characterized by his pronounced interest in the folk music heritage of Balkan peoples. At the beginning that interest was focused on popularizing art music that was based on folk music. Later, he enthusiastically carried out his reforms of music teaching in Serbia, as well as improvements of methods in Serbian ethnomusicology.

  17. Plethystic vertex operators and boson-fermion correspondences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauser, Bertfried; Jarvis, Peter D; King, Ronald C

    2016-01-01

    We study the algebraic properties of plethystic vertex operators, introduced in (2010 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43 405202), underlying the structure of symmetric functions associated with certain generalized universal character rings of subgroups of the general linear group, defined to stabilize tensors of Young symmetry type characterized by a partition of arbitrary shape π . Here we establish an extension of the well-known boson-fermion correspondence involving Schur functions and their associated (Bernstein) vertex operators: for each π , the modes generated by the plethystic vertex operators and their suitably constructed duals, satisfy the anticommutation relations of a complex Clifford algebra. The combinatorial manipulations underlying the results involve exchange identities exploiting the Hopf-algebraic structure of certain symmetric function series and their plethysms. (paper)

  18. Fair Value and the Missing Correspondence Between Accounting and Auditing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov Jeppesen, Kim; Liempd, Dennis van

    . The second turning point is from historical cost to fair values, which changes the ontological premises of accounting thought in the direction of ontological subjectivity. This has profound consequences for auditing, which so far has failed to develop new epistemic criteria to deal with fair value accounting’s......The paper outlines the history of accounting and auditing thought, demonstrating how auditing has had an isomorphic relationship with accounting throughout most of its history. We focus this history on two turning points. The first is the turn from reporting the truth to reporting in accordance...... with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, which occurred in the 1960s as a result of the politicization of accounting standard setting. We argue that auditing adapted to this change by establishing a conceptual framework based on checking the correspondence between assertions and established criteria...

  19. Adaptive differential correspondence imaging based on sorting technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Wu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We develop an adaptive differential correspondence imaging (CI method using a sorting technique. Different from the conventional CI schemes, the bucket detector signals (BDS are first processed by a differential technique, and then sorted in a descending (or ascending order. Subsequently, according to the front and last several frames of the sorted BDS, the positive and negative subsets (PNS are created by selecting the relative frames from the reference detector signals. Finally, the object image is recovered from the PNS. Besides, an adaptive method based on two-step iteration is designed to select the optimum number of frames. To verify the proposed method, a single-detector computational ghost imaging (GI setup is constructed. We experimentally and numerically compare the performance of the proposed method with different GI algorithms. The results show that our method can improve the reconstruction quality and reduce the computation cost by using fewer measurement data.

  20. Unraveling mulitple translatorship through an e-mail correspondence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to shed light on questions of “multiple translatorship” and particularly on translation collaboration processes. The empirical material consists of more than three hundred e-mails exchanged between two co-translators who translated Claudio Magris’s novel Alla cieca (2005......) into Danish. The theoretical framework presents a double perspective through which the e-mail correspondence is studied: on the one hand, as an ethnographic “thick description” (focusing on translation as an event), with the aim of uncovering who the agents involved are, how they interact, and what...... their impact is on the final product; and on the other, as a “think-aloud correspondence” (focusing on translation as a cognitive act), with the aim of shedding light on the two translators’ strategies of problem solving and decision-making....

  1. Correspondence between Andreev reflection and Klein tunneling in bipolar graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beenakker, C. W. J.; Akhmerov, A. R.; Recher, P.; Tworzydło, J.

    2008-02-01

    The Andreev reflection at a superconductor and the Klein tunneling through an n-p junction in graphene are two processes that couple electrons to holes—the former through the superconducting pair potential Δ and the latter through the electrostatic potential U . We derive that the energy spectra in the two systems are identical at low energies ɛ≪Δ and for an antisymmetric potential profile U(-x,y)=-U(x,y) . This correspondence implies that bipolar junctions in graphene may have zero density of states at the Fermi level and carry a current in equilibrium, analogous to the superconducting Josephson junctions. It also implies that nonelectronic systems with the same band structure as graphene, such as honeycomb-lattice photonic crystals, can exhibit pseudosuperconducting behavior.

  2. Correspondance François Truffaut-Fernand Deligny

    OpenAIRE

    Bastide, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Bernard Bastide présente la correspondance qu’ont entretenue le cinéaste François Truffaut et le psychiatre Fernand Deligny (1913-1996) qui s’étaient connus par le truchement d’André Bazin. Le tournage des Quatre cents coups comme celui de l’Enfant sauvage s’éclairent ainsi des échanges que le cinéaste eut avec le psychiatre qui avait publié en 1955 une étude la Caméra, outil pédagogique, où le cinéma est envisagé comme un médiateur entre les autistes et « le monde des autres ». Deligny, tour...

  3. USING THE FACTORIAL CORRESPONDENCES FOR ANALYZING TOURIST FLOWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamer Ainur M. AIVAZ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyze the distribution of each flow of non-residents tourists, coming from 33 countries, on the six main categories of touristic destinations in Romania, in 2015, and assumes that there are differences or similarities between the tourists origin country and the touristic destinations that they chose. The performances recorded in Romania regarding the attraction of foreign tourists were relatively modest during the past three decades, from various reasons, starting with a poor access infrastructure and finishing with a deficient and, sometimes inadequate activity of tourism promotion. The statistical method used is the factorial correspondences analysis. The data processing, the indicators significance testing and the graph representations were performed using SPSS statistical software. We consider that the usage of this method allows the indirect knowledge of the tourist preferences and the results may be useful in developing a strategy for tourism promotion, customized for each country that sends tourists.

  4. FACTORIAL CORRESPONDENCES ANALYSIS – A TOOL IN TOURISM MOTIVATION RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Danut I. JUGANARU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at analyzing the distribution of tourist flows in 2014, from 25 European countries, on three main categories of trip purposes, and assumes that there are differences or similarities between the tourists’ countries of residence and their trip purposes. "Purpose'' is a multidimensional concept used in marketing research, most often for understanding consumer behavior, and for identifying market segments or customer target groups, reunited in terms of similar characteristics. Being aware that the decision of choice/ purchase is based on purposes, their knowledge proves useful in designing strategies to increase the satisfaction level provided to the customer. The statistical method used in this paper is the factorial correspondences analysis. In our opinion, the identification, by this method, of the existence of differences or similarities between the tourists’ countries of residence and their trip purposes can represent a useful step in studying the tourism market and the choice/ reformulation of strategies.

  5. Coherence and correspondence in the psychological analysis of numerical predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav Ganzach

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerical predictions are of central interest for both coherence-based approaches to judgment and decisions --- the Heuristic and Biases (HB program in particular --- and to correspondence-based approaches --- Social Judgment Theory (SJT. In this paper I examine the way these two approaches study numerical predictions by reviewing papers that use Cue Probability Learning (CPL, the central experimental paradigm for studying numerical predictions in the SJT tradition, while attempting to look for heuristics and biases. The theme underlying this review is that both bias-prone heuristics and adaptive heuristics govern subjects' predictions in CPL. When they have little experience to guide them, subjects fall prey to relying on bias-prone natural heuristics, such as representativeness and anchoring and adjustment, which are the only prediction strategies available to them. But, as they acquire experience with the prediction task, these heuristics are abandoned and replaced by ecologically valid heuristics.

  6. Fair Value and the Missing Correspondence between Accounting and Auditing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liempd, Dennis van; Jeppesen, Kim Klarskov

    with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, which occurred in the 1960s as a result of the politicization of accounting standard setting. We argue that auditing adapted to this change by establishing a conceptual framework based on checking the correspondence between assertions and established criteria......The paper outlines the history of accounting and auditing thought, demonstrating how auditing has had an isomorphic relationship with accounting throughout most of its history. We focus this history on two turning points. The first is the turn from reporting the truth to reporting in accordance....... The second turning point is from historical cost to fair values, which changes the ontological premises of accounting thought in the direction of ontological subjectivity. This has profound consequences for auditing, which so far has failed to develop new epistemic criteria to deal with fair value accounting’s...

  7. Translating Politeness in Bilingual English-Spanish Business Correspondence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro; Fuertes Olivera, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    which pragmatic information types are needed when translating business letters. The analysis focuses on a Spanish-English business dictionary and its treatment of politeness in special sections dealing with business correspondence. The findings show that the treatment is insufficient, because users......Politeness is an important element in interlingual business communication. Translators uae bilingual dictionaries as tools helping them in business discourse across cultures, but dictionaries do not contain the relevant pragmatic information. The functions of dictionaries are used to determine......' business-language competence does not enable them to express the right level of politeness. Bilingual dictionaries should offer a systematic treatment of cultural and genre-specific means of expressing politeness in contrastive, informative texts showing the specific uses of politeness in business...

  8. Impaired acquisition of novel grapheme-color correspondences in synesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eBrang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Grapheme-color synesthesia is a neurological phenomenon in which letters and numbers (graphemes consistently evoke particular colors (e.g. A may be experienced as red. These sensations are thought to arise through the cross-activation of grapheme processing regions in the fusiform gyrus and color area V4, supported by anatomical and functional imaging. However, the developmental onset of grapheme-color synesthesia remains elusive as research in this area has largely relied on self-report of these experiences in children. One possible account suggests that synesthesia is present at or near birth and initially binds basic shapes and forms to colors, which are later refined to grapheme-color associations through experience. Consistent with this view, studies show that similarly shaped letters and numbers tend to elicit similar colors in synesthesia and that some synesthetes consciously associate basic shapes with colors; research additionally suggests that synesthetic colors can emerge for newly learned characters with repeated presentation. This model further predicts that the initial shape-color correspondences in synesthesia may persist as implicit associations, driving the acquisition of colors for novel characters. To examine the presence of latent color associations for novel characters, synesthetes and controls were trained on pre-defined associations between colors and complex shapes, on the assumption that the prescribed shape-color correspondences would on average differ from implicit synesthetic associations. Results revealed synesthetes were less accurate than controls to learn novel shape-color associations, consistent with our suggestion that implicit form-color associations conflicted with the learned pairings.

  9. Neuroanatomic and clinical correspondences: acupuncture and vagus nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Marco Antonio Helio; Dorsher, Peter T

    2014-04-01

    The use of surgically implanted electronic devices for vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is expanding in contemporary allopathic medical practice as a treatment option for selected clinical conditions, such as epilepsy, depression, tremor, and pain conditions, that are unresponsive to standard pharmacologic interventions. Although VNS device surgeries are considered minimally invasive, they are costly and have surgical and device-related risks; they can also cause serious adverse effects from excessive vagus nerve stimulation. For millennia, acupuncturists have treated those same clinical conditions by piquering acupoints that are located proximate to the sternocleidomastoid muscle site where the VNS device is implanted on the vagus nerve. The hypothesis of this study is that these acupuncture points produce clinical benefits through stimulation of the vagus nerve and/or its branches in the head and neck region. By using reference anatomic and acupuncture texts, classical and extraordinary acupoints in the head and neck region were identified that are anatomically proximate to vagus nerve pathways there, where the VNS electrode is surgically implanted. The clinical indications of these acupuncture points, as described in the acupuncture reference texts, were examined for similarities to those of VNS. This analysis demonstrated marked correspondences of the indications for those lateral head and neck acupoints to the clinical effects (beneficial and adverse) documented for the VNS device in the medical literature. This clinical correspondence, in conjunction with the anatomic proximity of the acupoints to the vagus nerve in the lateral neck, strongly suggests that vagus nerve (and hence the autonomic nervous system) stimulation is fundamental in producing the clinical effects of the acupoints. By having anatomic access to the vagus nerve and parasympathetic chain that permits electrical stimulation of those nerves in clinical practice, acupuncture may offer a less

  10. Streaming Seismograms into Earth-Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammon, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    Seismograms are the fundamental observations upon which seismology is based; they are central to any course in seismology and important for any discussion of earthquake-related phenomena based on seismic observations. Advances in the collection and distribution of seismic data have made the use of research-quality seismograms in any network capable classroom feasible. The development of large, deep seismogram archives place an unprecedented quantity of high-quality data within reach of the modern classroom environment. I describe and discuss several computer tools and classroom activities that I use in introductory (general education) and advanced undergraduate courses that present near real-time research-quality seismic observations in the classroom. The Earth Motion Monitor Application (EMMA), is a MacOS application that presents a visually clear seismogram display that can be projected in classrooms with internet access. Seismic signals from thousands of station are available from the IRIS data center and the bandwidth can be tailored to the particular type of signal of interest (large event, low frequencies; small event, high frequencies). In introductory classes for non-science students, the near realtime display routinely shows magnitude 4.0-5.0 earthquake-generated signals, demonstrating to students the frequency of earthquake occurrence. Over the next few minutes as the waves travel through and across the planet, their arrival on the seismogram display provides some basic data for a qualitative estimate of the event's general location. When a major or great earthquake occurs, a broad-band display of signals from nearby stations can dramatically and dynamically illuminate the frequent activity associated with the aftershock sequence. Routine use of the display (while continuing the traditional classroom activities) provides students with a significant dose of seismogram study. Students generally find all the signals, including variations in seismic

  11. Student performance in a flipped classroom dental anatomy course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutinan, S; Riedy, C A; Park, S E

    2017-11-09

    The purpose of this study was to assess dental student learning in a dental anatomy module between traditional lecture and flipped classroom cohorts. Two cohorts of predoctoral dental students (N = 70 within each cohort) participated in a dental anatomy module within an Introduction to the Dental Patient (IDP) course ([traditional/lecture cohort: academic year (AY) 2012, 2013] and [flipped classroom cohort: AY 2014, 2015]). For the dental anatomy module, both cohorts were evaluated on pre-clinical tooth waxing exercises immediately after each of five lectures and tooth identification after all lectures were given. Additionally, the cohorts' performance on the overall IDP course examination was compared. The flipped classroom cohort had statistically significant higher waxing scores (dental anatomy module) than students in the traditional classroom. There was no statistically significant difference for tooth identification scores and the overall IDP course examination between the traditional vs flipped approach cohorts. This is due to the latter two assessments conducted at the end of the course gave all students enough time to review the lecture content prior to the assessment resulting in similar scores for both cohorts. The flipped classroom cohort promoted students' individual learning and resulted in improved students' performance on immediate evaluation but not on the end of the course evaluation. Redesign of courses to include a new pedagogical approach should be carefully implemented and evaluated for student's educational success. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Bringing Classroom-Based Assessment into the EFL classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Finch

    2012-01-01

      This paper describes how English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers can bring reliable, valid, user-friendly assessment into their classrooms, and thus improve the quality of learning that occurs there. Based on the experience of the author as a an EFL teacher and teacher-trainer, it is suggested that the promotion and development of autonomy, intrinsic motivation, and self-esteem that takes place in a Classroom-Based Assessment (CBA) environment facilitates an holistic approach to langu...

  13. Does a Teacher's Classroom Observation Rating Vary across Multiple Classrooms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xiaoxuan; Li, Hongli; Leroux, Audrey J.

    2018-01-01

    Classroom observations have been increasingly used for teacher evaluations, and it is important to examine the measurement quality and the use of observation ratings. When a teacher is observed in multiple classrooms, his or her observation ratings may vary across classrooms. In that case, using ratings from one classroom per teacher may not be…

  14. Classroom interventions for children with ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Yvonne; Gaastra, Geraldina F.; Tucha, Lara I.; Tucha, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    In a typical classroom, children are instructed to remain seated, perform independent seatwork and follow teachers’ instructions. Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may find these classroom demands particularly difficult to adhere to because, by definition, children with

  15. Have You Considered Gamifying Your Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Graham

    2018-01-01

    New classroom practices can be brought into the classroom that engage students through their enjoyment of games, while building their confidence and bolstering their understanding that mistakes are valuable stops along the journey to understanding.

  16. Teacher classroom practices and Mathematics performance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Mathematics teacher questionnaire, administered as part of the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2011, comprised questions pertaining to the classroom practices of Teacher Clarity, Classroom Discussion, Feedback, Formative Assessment, Problem Solving and Metacognitive Strategies, ...

  17. Explore Mediterranean in classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balesevic, Ivana

    2017-04-01

    I am a science teacher at a primary school and my students are very interested in science. Through this year I will work with my students, organizing several workshops and or results will be presented on poster. I will work with several groups (4-6) students 8th grade. In this poster all activities will be presented, showing how science is easy to learn even in a classroom. 1. Workshop > Chemical characteristic of sea water Using school laboratory each group of students will analyze the physical and chemical characteristic of sea water and they have to explain the results to younger student's 5th and 6th grade. The final result will be presented on poster. 2. Workshop> Meet the Mediterranean life During this workshop students will work in different groups. The aim of the workshop is to meet lots of species that we can find in Mediterranean using movies, phone applications, internet explorer, science books and school collections of invertebrates … 3. Workshop>Stop the pollution Several groups of students have to debate about causes of pollution and possibilities for prevention. At the end of workshop we will organize a quiz. Student's answers and suggestions will be shown on the poster. 4. Workshop> How we see the Mediterranean During this workshop students will make models of Mediterranean in 2d and 3d perspective, using different materials. They can show on models parts of Mediterranean area, country, sea... After making models students need to visit 5th and 6th grade classes, to show them and explain the final results. Few models will be presented on poster

  18. Nurturing creativity in the classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufman, James C

    2010-01-01

    Nurturing Creativity in the Classroom is a groundbreaking collection of essays by leading scholars, who examine and respond to the tension that many educators face in valuing student creativity but believing that they cannot support it given the curricular constraints of the classroom. Is it possible for teachers to nurture creative development and expression without drifting into curricular chaos? Do curricular constraints necessarily lead to choosing conformity over creativity? This book combines the perspectives of top educators and psychologists to generate practical advice for considering and addressing the challenges of supporting creativity within the classroom. It is unique in its balance of practical recommendations for nurturing creativity and thoughtful appreciation of curricular constraints. This approach helps ensure that the insights and advice found in this collection will take root in educators’ practice, rather than being construed as yet another demand placed on their overflowing plate of ...

  19. Google Tools in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albee, E. M.; Koons, P. O.; Schauffler, M.; Zhu, Y.; Segee, B. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Maine Learning Technology Initiative provides every seventh and eighth grade student in the state with MacBook laptop computers. Limitless education possibilities exist with the inclusion of Google Tools and laptops as learning tools in our modern classrooms. Google Applications allow students to create documents, spreadsheets, charts, graphs, forms, and presentations and easily allows the sharing of information with their fellow classmates and teachers. These applications invite the use of inquiry and critical thinking skills, collaboration among peers, and subject integration to teach students crucial concepts. The benefits for teachers extend into the realm of using Google sites to easily create a teacher website and blog to upload classroom information and create a communication connection for parents and students as well as collaborations between the teachers and University researchers and educators. Google Applications further enhances the possibilities for learning, sharing a wealth of information, and enhancing communication inside and outside of the classroom.

  20. Revisiting Technology in the Classroom: Critical Reflections of a Multiculturalist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, James Francisco

    2011-01-01

    In this article the author's review of the literature uncovers six potentially negative effects of technology in the classroom. These include: 1) Limiting pedagogy in teaching for cultural competence; 2) Reinforcing the Digital Divide; 3) Constraining the potential for holistic, humanistic education; 4) Privileging one style of communication while…

  1. Teaching "Islam and Human Rights" in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muedini, Fait A.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses my approach to teaching a course on Islam and human rights. I begin by examining the attention Islam has received in the media and classroom. Then, I discuss how I structure lectures on Islam and human rights, the various readings associated with the lectures, as well as common themes discussed in class that include but are…

  2. Defining Writing Ability for Classroom Writing Assessment in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jyi-yeon

    2009-01-01

    Given that nowadays writing skill is included in main standardised tests worldwide as well as nationwide, as writing assessment is employed as a part of performance assessment in classroom testing at high school level in Korea, English teachers are first expected to establish the construct of writing ability explicitly prior to devising other…

  3. Interrogating Your Wisdom of Practice to Improve Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Philip

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a heuristic for language teachers to articulate and explore their fundamental theories of and philosophical stances towards language, language learning, and language teaching. It includes tools with which teachers can interrogate those theories, weighing them up against their actual classroom practices. Through presenting…

  4. English Language Classroom Practices: Bangladeshi Primary School Children's Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Prithvi Narayan

    2013-01-01

    English language teaching (ELT) has been investigated from various angles including how English language teachers perceive what happens in an ELT classroom. How primary school English language learners perceive their experiences of ELT is rarely reported in the published literature, particularly from developing countries such as Bangladesh. This…

  5. Specifications for Supplementary Classroom Units, Stressed Skin Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Robert B.; And Others

    Complete outline specifications are given for the construction of supplementary classroom units using stressed skin panels. Sections included are--(1) concrete and related work, (2) masonry, (3) structural and miscellaneous metal, (4) curtain walls and metal windows, (5) carpentry and related work, (6) roofing, sheet metal, and related work, (7)…

  6. Promoting Creativity in the Middle Grades Language Arts Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Katherine E.; Bintz, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Middle level educators around the country aim to create a classroom environment and a way of teaching that is developmentally responsive, challenging, empowering, and equitable for every student. One way to ensure this is to include instruction that promotes creativity. This article offers guiding principles and shares instructional lessons that…

  7. A New Learning Approach: Flipped Classroom and Its Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Gürkan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present opinions of undergraduate students towards Flipped Classroom (FC) practices and to determine their different aspects then traditional learning approaches. The case study approach is preferred to conduct the study. In this context, 34 volunteered students were included in the study group by purposive sampling…

  8. Ethical Values in the Classroom: How College Students Responded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbarger, Michele; DeVaney, Sharon A.

    2005-01-01

    It is important to understand the ethical values of college students because they will be the leaders of the future. As part of an undergraduate honors project, a survey was developed that consisted of eight cases depicting ethical dilemmas in the classroom. Each case included a choice of four actions ranging from most ethical to least ethical.…

  9. Technology Integration in Elementary Classrooms: Teaching Practices of Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how and why student teachers integrated technology to enhance instruction in elementary classrooms. The participants were 31 student teachers who completed an assignment of eight weeks. Multiple data sets including observation notes of 347 lessons were obtained from three key groups for data triangulation. Results reveal that…

  10. Implementing Concepts of Pharmaceutical Engineering into High School Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Howard; Hirsch, Linda S.; Simon, Laurent; Burr-Alexander, Levelle; Dave, Rajesh

    2009-01-01

    The Research Experience for Teachers was designed to help high school science teachers develop skills and knowledge in research, science and engineering with a focus on the area of pharmaceutical particulate and composite systems. The experience included time for the development of instructional modules for classroom teaching. Results of the…

  11. Unit Operation Experiment Linking Classroom with Industrial Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Tracy J.; Richmond, Peyton C.; LeBlanc, Weldon

    2013-01-01

    An industrial-type distillation column, including appropriate pumps, heat exchangers, and automation, was used as a unit operations experiment to provide a link between classroom teaching and real-world applications. Students were presented with an open-ended experiment where they defined the testing parameters to solve a generalized problem. The…

  12. Predicting and Curbing Classroom Incivility in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, Cynthia R.; Bartels, Lynn K.; Bucy, Jayne

    2009-01-01

    This research examines predictors of uncivil classroom behavior. Uncivil behaviors are disrespectful and disruptive and may include carrying on conversations with others during class, leaving class early, talking on cell phones, etc. Data from a survey of undergraduate students revealed that students who possessed a consumerism orientation,…

  13. Student-Driven Classroom Technologies: Transmedia Navigation and Tranformative Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Leila A.; Knezek, Gerald A.; Wakefield, Jenny S.

    2013-01-01

    This research paper explores middle school student attitudes towards learning with technology and proposes a design-based approach to formulating instruction that includes innovative classroom technology use with computers and communications technologies placed in the hands of students. The intent of this research is to advance practice and theory…

  14. A CAD (Classroom Assessment Design) of a Computer Programming Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawi, Nazir S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a CAD (classroom assessment design) of an entry-level undergraduate computer programming course "Computer Programming I". CAD has been the product of a long experience in teaching computer programming courses including teaching "Computer Programming I" 22 times. Each semester, CAD is evaluated and modified…

  15. An Evaluation of CHAMPS: A Classroom Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnear, Holly J.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation was designed to examine the impact of Conversation, Help, Activity, Movement, Participation, Success (CHAMPS), a classroom management program in elementary schools in a district in North Carolina. The participants included principals and teachers who attended a 2-day training course and implemented the CHAMPS program at their…

  16. Using Flip Camcorders for Active Classroom Metacognitive Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargis, Jace; Marotta, Sebastian M.

    2011-01-01

    A Center for Teaching and Learning provided Flip camcorders to a group of 10 new faculty members, who were asked to use this teaching tool in their classroom instruction. The classes included mathematics, political science, computer engineering, psychology, business, music and dance. The qualitative results indicate that all faculty members and…

  17. CNN Newsroom Classroom Guides. April 1-29, 1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable News Network, Atlanta, GA.

    These classroom guides for the daily CNN (Cable News Network) Newsroom broadcasts for the month of April provide program rundowns, suggestions for class activities and discussion, student handouts, and a list of related news terms. Topics covered by the guides include: (1) peace in the Middle East, Tom Bradley, and minority superheroes (April 1);…

  18. Fingerprint Ridge Count: A Polygenic Trait Useful in Classroom Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Gordon; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes the use of the polygenic trait of total fingerprint ridge count in the classroom as a laboratory investigation. Presents information on background of topic, fingerprint patterns which are classified into three major groups, ridge count, the inheritance model, and activities. Includes an example data sheet format for fingerprints. (RT)

  19. P4D: philosophy and democracy in the classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Rob Bartels; Dr. J. Onstenk

    2012-01-01

    The journal was a forum for the work of both theorists and practitioners of philosophical practice with children, and published such work in all forms, including philosophical argument and reflection, classroom transcripts, curricula, empirical research, and reports from the field. The journal also

  20. Differentiating Instruction for Disabled Students in Inclusive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Alicia; Mehta-Parekh, Heeral; Reid, D. Kim

    2005-01-01

    Differentiating instruction, a comprehensive approach to teaching, enables the successful inclusion of all students, including the disabled, in general-education classrooms. As inclusive educators, we argue that disability is an enacted, interactional process and not an empirical, stable fact or condition. We recommend planning responsive lessons…

  1. Thinking Spatially: GIS in the High School Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibrandi, Marsha

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the Geographic Information System (GIS) which can display information from a database in a geo-referenced map, the speed with which it can correlate many layers of information, the varied angles it can provide, and other images that it can rotate and transform. States benefits for the classroom including interdisciplinary applications…

  2. Transactional Analysis in the Classroom, Staffroom and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Giles

    2015-01-01

    The author considers the application of transactional analysis (TA) in the field of education. Initially, the focus is on the use of TA in reducing conflict in the classroom and staffroom before offering observations about its broader relevance to contemporary UK schooling. Concepts covered include the egostate model of personality, functional…

  3. Comparative History in the Classroom: A Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneeshaw, Stephen

    1988-01-01

    Offers ideas for using comparative history in the classroom. Includes suggestions for using guided design, role playing, and an approach for a series of sequenced writing exercises. Uses the 1920s and 1970s for comparison, focusing on Teapot Dome and Watergate. (LS)

  4. Student-Focused Strategies for the Modern Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannay, Maureen; Kitahara, Robert; Fretwell, Cherie

    2010-01-01

    As the method we use to measure the effectiveness of educational institutions changes to focus more on learning outcomes rather than learning processes, teaching styles may need to adapt to facilitate this approach to evaluation. This paper proposes several strategies to build a more student-focused classroom including the…

  5. Using Fungi (the Almost-Forgotten Organisms) in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrazo, Gerry M., Jr.; Hounshell, Paul B.

    1979-01-01

    Ideas are given for including fungi in classroom activities for high school biology students. A discussion on the science of taxonomy leads into a discussion on the position of fungi in the five kingdom classification scheme of organisms. Suggestions are given for observing their growth and development. (SA)

  6. The Book Trailer Project: Media Production within an Integrated Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festa, Karen

    2017-01-01

    A special education co-teacher in an integrated elementary classroom describes key aspects of media literacy pedagogy for all students, including opportunities for critical analysis and creative media production. After elementary school students learned about author's craft, purpose, theme/message, three types of writing, and target audience, they…

  7. Enhancing Higher Education Student Attendance through Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shammari, Zaid N.

    2016-01-01

    The findings of three consecutive studies about effective classroom management techniques designed to enhance higher education student attendance and the resulting correlation between student attendance and student achievement are reported here. The consecutive studies included a pilot study, culminating study, and replication study. The…

  8. Classroom Seating Considerations for 21st Century Students and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Eugene J.; Kenyon, Melaine C.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative, cross-sectional research study explored students' perceptions of five different seating styles within typical classrooms in an urban public higher education institution. The five seating styles included: modern mobile chairs, tablet arm chairs, fixed tiered seating with tablet arms, rectangle tables with standard chairs, and…

  9. Flipped Instruction in a High School Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Jonathan; Puzio, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a quasi-experimental study examining the effectiveness of flipped instruction in a 9th grade biology classroom. This study included four sections of freshmen-level biology taught by the first author at a private secondary school in the Pacific Northwest. Using a block randomized design, two sections were flipped and two…

  10. Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon: A Classroom Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijman, Jan; Hill, A. David

    1991-01-01

    Presents a classroom project dealing with tropical deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. Addresses environmental consequences and economic, social, and political causes. Involves both lectures and individual research and reports by student groups on deforestation causes. Includes a note-playing activity in which students make recommendations for…

  11. Correspondents and the Cold War. How foreign correspondents acted during the chancellery of Helmut Schmidt (1974-1982 in Germany and abroad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Birkner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the role of foreign correspondents during the Cold War. More specifically, it focuses on the case study of the relationship between former German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt and foreign correspondents in Germanyand abroad. A synthesis of historical research and qualitative analysis of documentsand interviews provides a behind-the-scenes look at media diplomacy during the 70s andearly 80s. From the perspective of system theory and the concept of mediatization, mediaand politics are understood as separate but equal social systems that interact with eachother. This case study is based on documents from the private archives of Helmut Schmidtand from the annals of his party, the German Social Democrats, as well as interviews conducted with Schmidt and former journalist and correspondent Gerd Ruge. Analysis of theinterviews and the private and secret correspondence of Schmidt with journalists affordsan inside view into the role foreign correspondents played during the Cold War when communicationacross the Iron Curtain was especially challenging. Our conclusions show howimportant foreign correspondents are in international relations, while also demonstrating that aspects of international diplomacy, though involving journalists, were not necessarily included in media coverage. This study helps to clarify the complex interactions between media and politics. On the basis of our explorative research, a model is proffered of possible relations and interactions between politicians and foreign correspondents. As sources of information and means of communication, foreign correspondents exert a strong influence on the fates of nations and governments, before and behind the scenes. Esta proposta aborda o papel dos correspondentes estrangeiros durante a Guerra Fria. Mais especificamente, centra-se no estudo de caso da relação entre o ex-chanceler alemão Helmut Schmidt e os correspondentes estrangeiros na Alemanha e no exterior. A s

  12. The attitudes of classroom teacher candidates towards physical education lesson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gönül Tekkurşun Demir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: It is aimed to determine the attitudes of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th grade classroom teacher candidates towards the physical education lesson according to various variables. Material and Methods: For the current study, the screening method, one of the quantitative research models, was used. The research consists of 2nd, 3rd, and 4th grade, totally164 university students, 106 (%64,6 females, 58 (%35,4 males, attending Uşak University, Classroom Teaching Program in 2016-2017 academic year. The first-grade students were not included in this research, because the physical education and play teaching lessons are given to classroom student candidates in the second-grade at Uşak University, Classroom Teaching Program. “Personal information form" and “Physical Education Lesson Attitude Scale for Classroom Teacher Candidates" were used as data collection tools. Before analysis, the data were evaluated using the values of Skewness and Skewness (normal distribution of the data and Levene (equality of variance tests. In the analysis of the data; frequency, arithmetic mean, standard deviation; t-test, ANOVA and Pearson Correlation test were used. Results: When examined the total score of the teacher candidates obtained from Physical Education Lesson Attitude Scale for Classroom Teacher Candidates and age variable by the Pearson Moment Correlation analysis, it was found that there was a statistically significant negative relationship between the received scores at low level. It was determined that the attitudes of the classroom teacher candidates towards the physical education lessons did not show any significant difference according to the gender variable, but there was a significant difference when examined their class levels. While no significant difference was found in the attitudes of the classroom teacher candidates, who played and did not play sports in their past life, towards physical education lessons, no significant difference was found

  13. Reading and Quality Discipline in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    Time spent on disciplining children in the classroom is time taken away from achieving the objectives of instruction. The classroom teacher needs to have appropriate guidelines to use in teaching as well as specific workable procedures which help students to achieve. This paper discusses various methods of classroom discipline. The paper first…

  14. Routines Are the Foundation of Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Robin Rawlings; Allanson, Patricia Bolton; Notar, Charles E.

    2017-01-01

    Classroom management is the key to learning. Routines are the foundation of classroom management. Students require structure in their lives. Routines provide that in all of their life from the time they awake until the time they go to bed. Routines in a school and in the classroom provide the environment for learning to take place. The paper is…

  15. Organizing and Managing a Whole Language Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, James F.

    1992-01-01

    Presents definitions of "whole language" and classroom organization/management. Describes several plans for organizing and managing a whole-language classroom. Presents a detailed example demonstrating how to organize and manage a whole-language primary classroom using a "modified blocked" approach. (SR)

  16. Maximizing Learning Potential in the Communicative Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaravadivelu, B.

    1993-01-01

    A classroom observational study is presented to assess whether a macrostrategies framework will help communicative language teaching teachers to maximize learner potential in the classroom. Analysis of two classroom episodes revealed that one episode was evidently more communicative than the other. (seven references) (VWL)

  17. The Flipped Classroom: A Twist on Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Stacy M. P.; Ralph, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional classroom has utilized the "I Do", "We Do", "You Do" as a strategy for teaching for years. The flipped classroom truly flips that strategy. The teacher uses "You Do", "We Do", "I Do" instead. Homework, inquiry, and investigation happen in the classroom. At home students…

  18. Diverse Perspectives on a Flipped Biostatistics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Todd A.; Andridge, Rebecca R.; Sainani, Kirstin L.; Stangle, Dalene K.; Neely, Megan L.

    2016-01-01

    "Flipping" the classroom refers to a pedagogical approach in which students are first exposed to didactic content outside the classroom and then actively use class time to apply their newly attained knowledge. The idea of the flipped classroom is not new, but has grown in popularity in recent years as the necessary technology has…

  19. Mother Tongue in the EFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Amirabbas

    2012-01-01

    The use of students' mother tongue (MT/L1) in the second/foreign language classroom has been debated in language teaching theory and practice for many decades. Most language teaching methods advocate the use of the target language (TL) in the classroom. However, recent research has elevated the role of L1 in the classroom. This paper illustrates…

  20. From Tourists to Citizens in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiberg, H. Jerome

    1996-01-01

    Too often, classroom-management systems built on trust and support in primary grades are replaced by compliance and obedience systems in higher grades. Consistency Management and Cooperative Discipline is a research-based, classroom-tested Texas program that combines instructional effectiveness (through consistent classroom organization) with…

  1. Pre-Service Teachers and Classroom Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Anthony M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the classroom practices of five pre-service teachers from three secondary schools in a large southeastern state. Through classroom observations, survey responses, reviews of refection logs, and focus-group interview responses, we centered on the issue of developing classroom authority as a means to effective classroom…

  2. Exploring alternative assessment strategies in science classrooms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The knowledge children bring to the classroom or construct in the classroom may find expression in a variety of activities and is often not measurable with the traditional assessment instruments used in science classrooms. Different approaches to assessment are required to accommodate the various ways in which learners ...

  3. Research Agenda: Language Learning beyond the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinders, Hayo; Benson, Phil

    2017-01-01

    Most language learning research is carried out either in classrooms or among classroom learners. As Richards (2015) points out, however, there are two dimensions to successful learning: what happens inside classrooms and what happens outside them. Rapid development of online media, communications technologies and opportunities for travel has also…

  4. Understanding Mathematics Classroom Teaching: Hermeneutics Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiong

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand meaning of mathematics classroom teaching, this paper uses narrative to present the meaning through hermeneutics inquiry from the author's research experiences. There are two threads in the research experience: research on classroom teaching and students' understanding in classroom teaching. The narrative provides not only a…

  5. The impact of classroom organization in grade 4 on student achievement in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncanson, Edward Francis

    While qualitative studies of teacher perceptions of classroom organization have been performed, quantitative studies linked to standards-based assessments are noticeably absent. Two questions guided the research: What is the impact of classroom layout in grade 4 on student achievement in science? How does space use change in a classroom when the furniture is reorganized? The study was conducted in five classrooms in two rural, elementary schools. In two classrooms, teachers placed a large science materials table in the center of the room to make science activities a focal point for students. Two classrooms, that were used as controls, continued to operate using their established organization. The organization of the fifth classroom had included a large table in the center of the room for a number of years. This room was also used as a control. Data were collected in three ways. Quantitative data were collected from the New York State Grade-4 Science Program Evaluation Test. Qualitative data were collected using the Classroom Spatial Utilization and Migration Form and by creating a classroom map. The data were presented in quantitative, narrative, and graphic forms. Data from the New York State Grade-4 Science Program Evaluation Test were analyzed using a matrix published by the New York State Education Department and by using SPSS software. Classroom spatial utilization and migration patterns were visually evaluated. The guiding hypothesis that placing a large table in the center of the room would result in improved student performance was not totally supported by the data. Student density was correlated to student achievement. Specifically, classroom space per student was positively correlated to the inquiry science skills of classifying, manipulating materials, measuring, recording data, using non-standard measurement, and making predictions. Classroom arrangement was not as important as open space per student. This research is important because classrooms that

  6. Pervasive technology in the classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel; Majgaard, Gunver

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses learning potentials of pervasive technology when used in the classroom setting. Explicitly this paper uses the research and development project “Octopus” as its point of departure and as the foundation for reflections on how learning takes place in intelligent contexts. We...... learning not only from the individual pupils point of view, but also as to how the Octopus can focus or align the entire classroom towards learning – exploring this observation we will touch on the value of social micro domains as places of articulation and on the importance of a close connection between...

  7. Influence of Giulio Grablovitz in Spain: instruments and scientific correspondence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Batlló

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available


    It is known that Giulio Grablovitz founded and operated a «geodynamic» station on Ischia Island from 1885 up to his death. But it is almost unknown that one of the instruments he designed, the horizontal pendulum, was installed at Ebre Observatory in Spain. Records from this instrument and correspondence between Grablovitz and the Ebre observatory are still preserved. These documents show how the research work done by Grablovitz was introduced and diffused in Spain. Also, they give us some new information on the construction of the seismic instruments designed by Grablovitz. The present paper deals with the analysis of the preserved materials, assesses the introduction of Grablovitz research in Spain and shows the importance of the use of manuscript sources


  8. Two-Way Regularized Fuzzy Clustering of Multiple Correspondence Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunmee; Choi, Ji Yeh; Hwang, Heungsun

    2017-01-01

    Multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) is a useful tool for investigating the interrelationships among dummy-coded categorical variables. MCA has been combined with clustering methods to examine whether there exist heterogeneous subclusters of a population, which exhibit cluster-level heterogeneity. These combined approaches aim to classify either observations only (one-way clustering of MCA) or both observations and variable categories (two-way clustering of MCA). The latter approach is favored because its solutions are easier to interpret by providing explicitly which subgroup of observations is associated with which subset of variable categories. Nonetheless, the two-way approach has been built on hard classification that assumes observations and/or variable categories to belong to only one cluster. To relax this assumption, we propose two-way fuzzy clustering of MCA. Specifically, we combine MCA with fuzzy k-means simultaneously to classify a subgroup of observations and a subset of variable categories into a common cluster, while allowing both observations and variable categories to belong partially to multiple clusters. Importantly, we adopt regularized fuzzy k-means, thereby enabling us to decide the degree of fuzziness in cluster memberships automatically. We evaluate the performance of the proposed approach through the analysis of simulated and real data, in comparison with existing two-way clustering approaches.

  9. Exploring the tensor networks/AdS correspondence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Arpan [Department of Physics and Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics, Fudan University,220 Handan Road, 200433 Shanghai (China); Centre For High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science,560012 Bangalore (India); Gao, Zhe-Shen [Department of Physics and Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics, Fudan University,220 Handan Road, 200433 Shanghai (China); Hung, Ling-Yan [Department of Physics and Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics, Fudan University,220 Handan Road, 200433 Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics and Department of Physics, Fudan University,220 Handan Road, 200433 Shanghai (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University,Nanjing, 210093 (China); Liu, Si-Nong [Department of Physics and Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics, Fudan University,220 Handan Road, 200433 Shanghai (China)

    2016-08-11

    In this paper we study the recently proposed tensor networks/AdS correspondence. We found that the Coxeter group is a useful tool to describe tensor networks in a negatively curved space. Studying generic tensor network populated by perfect tensors, we find that the physical wave function generically do not admit any connected correlation functions of local operators. To remedy the problem, we assume that wavefunctions admitting such semi-classical gravitational interpretation are composed of tensors close to, but not exactly perfect tensors. Computing corrections to the connected two point correlation functions, we find that the leading contribution is given by structures related to geodesics connecting the operators inserted at the boundary physical dofs. Such considerations admit generalizations at least to three point functions. This is highly suggestive of the emergence of the analogues of Witten diagrams in the tensor network. The perturbations alone however do not give the right entanglement spectrum. Using the Coxeter construction, we also constructed the tensor network counterpart of the BTZ black hole, by orbifolding the discrete lattice on which the network resides. We found that the construction naturally reproduces some of the salient features of the BTZ black hole, such as the appearance of RT surfaces that could wrap the horizon, depending on the size of the entanglement region A.

  10. Dental Pulp: Correspondences and Contradictions between Clinical and Histological Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Levente Giuroiu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental pulp represents a specialized connective tissue enclosed by dentin and enamel, the most highly mineralized tissues of the body. Consequently, the direct examination as well as pathological evaluation of dental pulp is difficult. Within this anatomical context, our study aimed to evaluate the correlation between dental pulp lesions and clinical diagnosis. Pulpectomies were performed for 54 patients with acute and chronic irreversible pulpitides and for 5 patients (control group with orthodontic extractions. The morphological features were semiquantitatively assessed by specific score values. The clinical and morphological correspondence was noted for 35 cases (68.62%, whereas inconsistency was recorded for 16 cases (31.38%. The results of the statistical analysis revealed the correlations between clinically and pathologically diagnosed acute/chronic pulpitides. No significant differences were established between the score values for inflammatory infiltrate intensity, collagen depositions, calcifications and necrosis, and acute, respectively chronic pulpitides. We also obtained significant differences between acute pulpitides and inflammatory infiltrate and calcifications and between chronic pulpitides and inflammatory infiltrate, collagen deposition, and calcifications. On the basis of the predominant pathological aspects, namely, acute and chronic pulpitis, we consider that the classification schemes can be simplified by adequately reducing the number of clinical entities.

  11. Awareness towards Peace Journalism among Foreign Correspondents in Africa

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    Ylva Rodny-Gumede

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Much has been said about the news media’s role in instigating war, conflict and violence. Less attention has been paid to the news media’s role in mitigating conflict. Criticism has been directed towards the ways in which journalists and war correspondents cover conflict with an emphasis on violence, suffering, polarization of the views of main stakeholders, and over-simplification of the underlying causes of conflict. The growing literature and scholarship around Peace Journalism stands as a response to this. In the context of the African continent, further critique has been levelled against frames and narratives of war, conflict and violence grounded in Western epistemologies and dominant discourses of African conflicts and stakeholders. Based on data collected from interviews with a selected group of journalists working on—and covering—the African continent, the article assesses awareness towards alternative narratives and news frames, as well as attitudes towards alternative practices and models for journalism. Particular attention is paid to ideas and responses regarding Peace Journalism as an alternative model for reporting.

  12. Dental Pulp: Correspondences and Contradictions between Clinical and Histological Diagnosis

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    Giuroiu, Cristian Levente; Căruntu, Irina-Draga; Lozneanu, Ludmila; Melian, Anca; Vataman, Maria; Andrian, Sorin

    2015-01-01

    Dental pulp represents a specialized connective tissue enclosed by dentin and enamel, the most highly mineralized tissues of the body. Consequently, the direct examination as well as pathological evaluation of dental pulp is difficult. Within this anatomical context, our study aimed to evaluate the correlation between dental pulp lesions and clinical diagnosis. Pulpectomies were performed for 54 patients with acute and chronic irreversible pulpitides and for 5 patients (control group) with orthodontic extractions. The morphological features were semiquantitatively assessed by specific score values. The clinical and morphological correspondence was noted for 35 cases (68.62%), whereas inconsistency was recorded for 16 cases (31.38%). The results of the statistical analysis revealed the correlations between clinically and pathologically diagnosed acute/chronic pulpitides. No significant differences were established between the score values for inflammatory infiltrate intensity, collagen depositions, calcifications and necrosis, and acute, respectively chronic pulpitides. We also obtained significant differences between acute pulpitides and inflammatory infiltrate and calcifications and between chronic pulpitides and inflammatory infiltrate, collagen deposition, and calcifications. On the basis of the predominant pathological aspects, namely, acute and chronic pulpitis, we consider that the classification schemes can be simplified by adequately reducing the number of clinical entities. PMID:26078972

  13. A composition algorithm based on crossmodal taste-music correspondences

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    Bruno eMesz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available While there is broad consensus about the structural similarities between language and music, comparably less attention has been devoted to semantic correspondences between these two ubiquitous manifestations of human culture. We have investigated the relations between music and a narrow and bounded domain of semantics: the words and concepts referring to taste sensations. In a recent work, we found that taste words were consistently mapped to musical parameters. Bitter is associated with low-pitched and continuous music (legato, salty is characterized by silences between notes (staccato, sour is high pitched, dissonant and fast and sweet is consonant, slow and soft (Mesz2011. Here we extended these ideas, in a synergistic dialog between music and science, investigating whether music can be algorithmically generated from taste-words. We developed and implemented an algorithm that exploits a large corpus of classic and popular songs. New musical pieces were produced by choosing fragments from the corpus and modifying them to minimize their distance to the region in musical space that characterizes each taste. In order to test the capability of the produced music to elicit significant associations with the different tastes, musical pieces were produced and judged by a group of non musicians. Results showed that participants could decode well above chance the taste-word of the composition. We also discuss how our findings can be expressed in a performance bridging music and cognitive science.

  14. Exact correspondence between walk in nucleotide and protein sequence spaces.

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    Dmitry N Ivankov

    Full Text Available In the course of evolution, genes traverse the nucleotide sequence space, which translates to a trajectory of changes in the protein sequence in protein sequence space. The correspondence between regions of the nucleotide and protein sequence spaces is understood in general but not in detail. One of the unexplored questions is how many sequences a protein can reach with a certain number of nucleotide substitutions in its gene sequence. Here I propose an algorithm to calculate the volume of protein sequence space accessible to a given protein sequence as a function of the number of nucleotide substitutions made in the protein-coding sequence. The algorithm utilizes the power of the dynamic programming approach, and makes all calculations within a couple of seconds on a desktop computer. I apply the algorithm to green fluorescence protein, and get the number of sequences four times higher than estimated before. However, taking into account the astronomically huge size of the protein sequence space, the previous estimate can be considered as acceptable as an order of magnitude estimation. The proposed algorithm has practical applications in the study of evolutionary trajectories in sequence space.

  15. On the Correspondence Between Newtonian and Functional Mechanics

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    Piskovskiy, E. V.; Volovich, I. V.

    2011-01-01

    The world view underlying traditional science is based on reductionism and determinism when there is an empty space (vacuum) and material points which move along the Newtonian trajectories. This approach may be called "mechanistic" or "Newtonian". Quantum mechanics, in its Copenhagen interpretation, also adopts this world view. However this world view is not satisfactory by at least two reasons. First, there is uncertainty in the derivation of the position and velocity of the material point and second, it can not solve the time irreversibility problem. Moreover, the Newtonian approach is not well suited for applications of mathematics and physics to life science. Recently a new approach to classical mechanics was proposed in which the basic notion is not the trajectory but a probability distribution. In this functional mechanics approach one deals with the mean trajectories and one has corrections to the Newtonian equation of motion. In this note we consider correspondence between the Newtonian trajectories for an anharmonic oscillator and the averaged trajectories in the functional mechanics and compute the dependence of the characteristic time from the dispersion.

  16. The Kerr/CFT correspondence and its extensions.

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    Compère, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    We present a first-principles derivation of the main results of the Kerr/CFT correspondence and its extensions using only tools from gravity and quantum field theory. Firstly, we review properties of extremal black holes with in particular the construction of an asymptotic Virasoro symmetry in the near-horizon limit. The entropy of extremal spinning or charged black holes is shown to match with a chiral half of Cardy's formula. Secondly, we show how a thermal 2-dimensional conformal field theory (CFT) is relevant to reproduce the dynamics of near-superradiant probes around near-extremal black holes in the semi-classical limit. Thirdly, we review the hidden conformal symmetries of asymptotically-flat black holes away from extremality and present how the non-extremal entropy can be matched with Cardy's formula. We follow an effective field theory approach and consider the Kerr-Newman black hole and its generalizations in various supergravity theories. The interpretation of these results by deformed dual conformal field theories is discussed and contrasted with properties of standard 2-dimensional CFTs. We conclude with a list of open problems.

  17. Object-Image Correspondence for Algebraic Curves under Projections

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    Joseph M. Burdis

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel algorithm for deciding whether a given planar curve is an image of a given spatial curve, obtained by a central or a parallel projection with unknown parameters. The motivation comes from the problem of establishing a correspondence between an object and an image, taken by a camera with unknown position and parameters. A straightforward approach to this problem consists of setting up a system of conditions on the projection parameters and then checking whether or not this system has a solution. The computational advantage of the algorithm presented here, in comparison to algorithms based on the straightforward approach, lies in a significant reduction of a number of real parameters that need to be eliminated in order to establish existence or non-existence of a projection that maps a given spatial curve to a given planar curve. Our algorithm is based on projection criteria that reduce the projection problem to a certain modification of the equivalence problem of planar curves under affine and projective transformations. To solve the latter problem we make an algebraic adaptation of signature construction that has been used to solve the equivalence problems for smooth curves. We introduce a notion of a classifying set of rational differential invariants and produce explicit formulas for such invariants for the actions of the projective and the affine groups on the plane.

  18. The Kerr/CFT Correspondence and its Extensions

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    Geoffrey Compère

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a first-principles derivation of the main results of the Kerr/CFT correspondence and its extensions using only tools from gravity and quantum field theory, filling a few gaps in the literature when necessary. Firstly, we review properties of extremal black holes that imply, according to semi-classical quantization rules, that their near-horizon quantum states form a centrally-extended representation of the one-dimensional conformal group. This motivates the conjecture that the extremal Kerr and Reissner–Nordström black holes are dual to the chiral limit of a two-dimensional CFT. We also motivate the existence of an SL (2,ℤ family of two-dimensional CFTs, which describe in their chiral limit the extremal Kerr–Newman black hole. We present generalizations in anti-de Sitter spacetime and discuss other matter-coupling and higher-derivative corrections. Secondly, we show how a near-chiral limit of these CFTs reproduces the dynamics of near-superradiant probes around near-extremal black holes in the semi-classical limit. Thirdly, we review how the hidden conformal symmetries of asymptotically-flat black holes away from extremality, combined with their properties at extremality, allow for a microscopic accounting of the entropy of non-extremal asymptotically-flat rotating or charged black holes. We conclude with a list of open problems.

  19. Theory of electromagnetic insertion devices and the corresponding synchrotron radiation

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    Muhammad Shumail

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Permanent magnet insertion devices (IDs, which are the main radiation generating devices in synchrotron light sources and free-electron lasers, use a time-invariant but space-periodic magnetic field to wiggle relativistic electrons for short-wavelength radiation generation. Recently, a high power microwave based undulator has also been successfully demonstrated at SLAC which promises the advantage of dynamic tunability of radiation spectrum and polarization. Such IDs employ transverse elecromagnetic fields which are periodic in both space and time to undulate the electrons. In this paper we develop a detailed theory of the principle of electromagnetic IDs from first principles for both linear and circular polarization modes. The electromagnetic equivalent definitions of undulator period (λ_{u} and undulator deflection parameter (K are derived. In the inertial frame where the average momentum of the electron is zero, we obtain the figure-8-like trajectory for the linear polarization mode and the circular trajectory for the circular polarization mode. The corresponding radiation spectra and the intensity of harmonics is also calculated.

  20. The correspondence between Winkler and Monakow during World War I.

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    Koehler, Peter J; Jagella, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    The correspondence (1907-1930) between two leading European neurologists, Cornelis Winkler (1855-1941) and Constantin von Monakow (1853-1930), has been preserved in Amsterdam and Zurich. For this paper, letters exchanged during World War I were studied. Professional as well as personal issues were discussed. An international neurology meeting in Berne in September 1914 had to be cancelled due to the war. They hoped that (neuro)scientists would remain politically neutral, continue scientific cooperation, and even be able to influence the course of the war. Winkler and Monakow tried to continue their work on the International Brain Atlas. Although living in neutral countries (The Netherlands and Switzerland), they observed that their practice and scientific work suffered from war conditions. While Winkler continued his activities as a neurologist, Monakow, affected emotionally, experienced a change in scientific interest toward psychoneurology. He used his diaschisis concept, originally an explanation for transient phenomena in stroke, as a metaphor for the social and cultural effects of the war. He directly related cultural development and brain science, bringing in his own emotions, which resulted in the first of several publications on the relations between biology, brain science, and culture.