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Sample records for include chronic kidney

  1. About Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advocacy Donate A to Z Health Guide About Chronic Kidney Disease Tweet Share Print Email Chronic kidney disease (CKD) ... Learn about Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) What is chronic kidney disease (CKD)? Chronic kidney disease includes conditions that damage ...

  2. Diet - chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002442.htm Diet - chronic kidney disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... make changes to your diet when you have chronic kidney disease (CKD). These changes may include limiting fluids, eating ...

  3. Chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidney failure - chronic; Renal failure - chronic; Chronic renal insufficiency; Chronic kidney failure; Chronic renal failure ... that you do not have symptoms until your kidneys have almost ... end-stage renal disease (ESRD). At this stage, the kidneys are ...

  4. Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged and ... don't have any symptoms until their kidney disease is very advanced. Blood and urine tests are ...

  5. Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Failure Small Text Medium Text Large Text Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Failure YESTERDAY One third of diabetic ...

  6. Cardiorenal metabolic syndrome in the African diaspora: rationale for including chronic kidney disease in the metabolic syndrome definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Janice P; Greene, Eddie L; Nicholas, Susanne B; Agodoa, Lawrence; Norris, Keith C

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is more likely to progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in African Americans while the reasons for this are unclear. The metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for the development of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and has been recently linked to incident CKD. Historically, fewer African Americans meet criteria for the definition of metabolic syndrome, despite having higher rates of cardiovascular mortality than Caucasians. The presence of microalbuminuria portends increased cardiovascular risks and has been shown to cluster with the metabolic syndrome. We recently reported that proteinuria is a predictor of CKD progression in African American hypertensives with metabolic syndrome. In this review we explore the potential value of including CKD markers--microalbuminuria/proteinuria or low glomerular filtration rate (GFR)-in refining the cluster of factors defined as metabolic syndrome, ie, "cardiorenal metabolic syndrome."

  7. Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation on Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) . This recommendation ...

  8. Chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romagnani, Paola; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Glassock, Richard; Levin, Adeera; Jager, Kitty J.; Tonelli, Marcello; Massy, Ziad; Wanner, Christoph; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is defined by persistent urine abnormalities, structural abnormalities or impaired excretory renal function suggestive of a loss of functional nephrons. The majority of patients with CKD are at risk of accelerated cardiovascular disease and death. For those who progress

  9. Paediatric chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    presence of markers of kidney damage. • Markers of kidney disease include any of the following: • proteinuria (urine dipstick ≥2+ or urine protein:creatinine ratio 5 × the upper limit of normal). • urine sediment abnormalities. • electrolyte and other abnormalities caused by tubular disorders. • histological abnormalities.

  10. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... artérielle Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in ... as they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic kidney ...

  11. NAFLD and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuccilli, Morgan; Chonchol, Michel

    2016-04-14

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and it is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence linking NAFLD to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is emerging as a popular area of scientific interest. The rise in simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation as well as the significant cost associated with the presence of chronic kidney disease in the NAFLD population make this entity a worthwhile target for screening and therapeutic intervention. While several cross-sectional and case control studies have been published to substantiate these theories, very little data exists on the underlying cause of NAFLD and CKD. In this review, we will discuss the most recent publications on the diagnosis of NAFLD as well new evidence regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD and CKD as an inflammatory disorder. These mechanisms include the role of obesity, the renin-angiotensin system, and dysregulation of fructose metabolism and lipogenesis in the development of both disorders. Further investigation of these pathways may lead to novel therapies that aim to target the NAFLD and CKD. However, more prospective studies that include information on both renal and liver histology will be necessary in order to understand the relationship between these diseases.

  12. NAFLD and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Marcuccilli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and it is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence linking NAFLD to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD is emerging as a popular area of scientific interest. The rise in simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation as well as the significant cost associated with the presence of chronic kidney disease in the NAFLD population make this entity a worthwhile target for screening and therapeutic intervention. While several cross-sectional and case control studies have been published to substantiate these theories, very little data exists on the underlying cause of NAFLD and CKD. In this review, we will discuss the most recent publications on the diagnosis of NAFLD as well new evidence regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD and CKD as an inflammatory disorder. These mechanisms include the role of obesity, the renin-angiotensin system, and dysregulation of fructose metabolism and lipogenesis in the development of both disorders. Further investigation of these pathways may lead to novel therapies that aim to target the NAFLD and CKD. However, more prospective studies that include information on both renal and liver histology will be necessary in order to understand the relationship between these diseases.

  13. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Immunosuppressant medicines Anxiety, depression and mental health Kidney rejection Lifestyle changes Donate a kidney Being a living ... Healthy kidneys take the waste out of your blood. One type of waste is called creatinine. If you have ...

  14. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy and Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sairam, Krish; Scoffone, Cesare M; Alken, Peter

    2012-01-01

    by glomerular filtration rate, including chronic kidney disease stages 0/I/II-greater than 60, stage III-30 to 59 and stages IV/V-less than 30 ml/minute/1.73 m(2). Patient characteristics, operative characteristics, outcomes and morbidity were assessed. RESULTS: Estimated glomerular filtration rate data were...... available on 5,644 patients, including 4,436 with chronic kidney disease stages 0/I/II, 994 with stage III and 214 with stages IV/V. A clinically significant minority of patients with nephrolithiasis presented with severe chronic kidney disease. A greater number of patients with stages IV/V previously...... underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy, ureteroscopy or nephrostomy and had positive urine cultures than less severely affected patients, consistent with the higher incidence of staghorn stones in these patients. Patients with chronic kidney disease stages IV/V had statistically significantly worse...

  15. Metformin in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James

    2014-01-01

    Metformin has traditionally been regarded as contraindicated in chronic kidney disease (CKD), though guidelines in recent years have been relaxed to permit therapy if the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is > 30 mL/min. The main problem is the perceived risk of lactic acidosis (LA). Epidemiological...... reduction, including weight loss, which are beneficial to patients. The risk of death and cardiovascular disease is reduced by about a third in non-CKD patients. Since metformin intoxication undoubtedly causes LA, and metformin is renally excreted, inappropriate dosage of metformin will increase the risk...

  16. Chronic kidney disease and anticoagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sciascia, Savino; Radin, Massimo; Schreiber, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Anticoagulation in patients with impaired kidney function can be challenging since drugs' pharmacokinetics and bioavailability are altered in this setting. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) treated with conventional anticoagulant agents [vitamin K antagonist (VKA), low-molecular weight...... are eliminated via the kidneys pose additional challenges. More recently, two classes of direct oral anticoagulant agents (DOACs) have been investigated for the prevention and management of venous thromboembolic events: the direct factor Xa inhibitors rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban, and the direct thrombin...

  17. Chronic Kidney Disease: What Does It Mean for Me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cysts Solitary Kidney Your Kidneys & How They Work Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) View or Print All Sections ​​What Is Chronic Kidney Disease? Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means your kidneys are ...

  18. Paediatric chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (oliguria) (<1.0 mL/kg/hour). • Serum calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase and plasma parathyroid hormone should be determined to assess bone mineral disease and secondary hyperparathyroidism. • Renal ultrasound is necessary to demonstrate kidney size (small shrunken kidneys are characteristic of CKD) and.

  19. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changes, vitamins, minerals, and medications to help with growth and to prevent bone disease. Sometimes unhealthy kidneys have problems producing a hormone that helps make red blood cells, the cells ...

  20. SECRETED KLOTHO AND CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ming Chang; Kuro-o, Makoto; Moe, Orson W.

    2013-01-01

    Soluble Klotho (sKl) in the circulation can be generated directly by alterative splicing of the Klotho transcript or the extracellular domain of membrane Klotho can be released from membrane-anchored Klotho on the cell surface. Unlike membrane Klotho which functions as a coreceptor for fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), sKl, acts as hormonal factor and plays important roles in anti-aging, anti-oxidation, modulation of ion transport, and Wnt signaling. Emerging evidence reveals that Klotho deficiency is an early biomarker for chronic kidney diseases as well as a pathogenic factor. Klotho deficiency is associated with progression and chronic complications in chronic kidney disease including vascular calcification, cardiac hypertrophy, and secondary hyperparathyroidism. In multiple experimental models, replacement of sKl, or manipulated up-regulation of endogenous Klotho protect the kidney from renal insults, preserve kidney function, and suppress renal fibrosis, in chronic kidney disease. Klotho is a highly promising candidate on the horizon as an early biomarker, and as a novel therapeutic agent for chronic kidney disease. PMID:22396167

  1. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease after preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes van Balen, Veronica Agatha; Spaan, Julia Jeltje; Cornelis, Tom; Spaanderman, Marc Erich August

    2017-06-01

    Preeclampsia (PE), an endothelial disease that affects kidney function during pregnancy, is correlated to an increased future risk of cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. The Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) 2012 guideline emphasizes the combined role of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and albuminuria in determining the frequency of monitoring of kidney function. In this study we evaluated the prevalence of CKD in women with a history of PE. We investigated how many seemingly healthy women required monitoring of kidney function according to the KDIGO guideline. We included 775 primiparous women with a history of PE. They were at least 4 months postpartum, and had no pre-existing hypertension, diabetes or kidney disease. We estimated GFR by the CKD-Epidemiology equation and urinary albumin loss by albumin creatinine ratio in a 24-h urine collection. Most women, 669 (86.3 %), had a normal GFR and absent albuminuria. Based on the KDIGO guideline, 13.7 % would require at least yearly monitoring of kidney function. Only 1.4 % were classified to be at high risk for kidney function deterioration. Monitoring of kidney function seems relevant for about one in seven women with a history of PE, mainly due to albuminuria. Albuminuria should be evaluated postpartum to identify those women that need further monitoring of kidney function.

  2. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  3. Hypertension in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrahian, Seyed Mehrdad; Falkner, Bonita

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension, a global public health problem, is currently the leading factor in the global burden of disease. It is the major modifiable risk factor for heart disease, stroke and kidney failure. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is both a common cause of hypertension and CKD is also a complication of uncontrolled hypertension. The interaction between hypertension and CKD is complex and increases the risk of adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular outcomes. This is particularly significant in the setting of resistant hypertension commonly seen in patient with CKD. The pathophysiology of CKD associated hypertension is multi-factorial with different mechanisms contributing to hypertension. These pathogenic mechanisms include sodium dysregulation, increased sympathetic nervous system and alterations in renin angiotensin aldosterone system activity. Standardized blood pressure (BP) measurement is essential in establishing the diagnosis and management of hypertension in CKD. Use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring provides an additional assessment of diurnal variation in BP commonly seen in CKD patients. The optimal BP target in the treatment of hypertension in general and CKD population remains a matter of debate and controversial despite recent guidelines and clinical trial data. Medical therapy of patients with CKD associated hypertension can be difficult and challenging. Additional evaluation by a hypertension specialist may be required in the setting of treatment resistant hypertension by excluding pseudo-resistance and treatable secondary causes. Treatment with a combination of antihypertensive drugs, including appropriate diuretic choice, based on estimated glomerular filtration rate, is a key component of hypertension management in CKD patients. In addition to drug treatment non-pharmacological approaches including life style modification, most important of which is dietary salt restriction, should be included in the management of hypertension in CKD patients.

  4. Src family kinases in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Zhuang, Shougang

    2017-09-01

    Src family kinases (SFKs) belong to nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinases and have been implicated in the regulation of numerous cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and invasion, and angiogenesis. The role and mechanisms of SFKs in tumorgenesis have been extensively investigated, and some SFK inhibitors are currently under clinical trials for tumor treatment. Recent studies have also demonstrated the importance of SFKs in regulating the development of various fibrosis-related chronic diseases (e.g., idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, liver fibrosis, renal fibrosis, and systemic sclerosis). In this article, we summarize the roles of SFKs in various chronic kidney diseases, including glomerulonephritis, diabetic nephropathy, human immunodeficiency virus-associated nephropathy, autosomal dominant form of polycystic kidney disease, and obesity-associated kidney disease, and discuss the mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Sexuality and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Advocacy Donate A to Z Health Guide Sexuality and Kidney Disease Tweet Share Print Email Can ... It's something everyone needs. Many people think that sexuality refers only to sexual intercourse. But sexuality includes ...

  6. Kidney Stones and the Risk for Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rule, Andrew D.; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Melton, L. Joseph; Li, Xujian; Weaver, Amy L.; Lieske, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Kidney stones lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD) in people with rare hereditary disorders (e.g., primary hyperoxaluria, cystinuria), but it is unknown whether kidney stones are an important risk factor for CKD in the general population.

  7. Chronic Kidney Disease in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koratala, Abhilash; Bhattacharya, Deepti; Kazory, Amir

    2017-09-01

    With the increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) worldwide, the number of pregnant women with various degrees of renal dysfunction is expected to increase. There is a bidirectional relation between CKD and pregnancy in which renal dysfunction negatively affects pregnancy outcomes, and the pregnancy can have a deleterious impact on various aspects of kidney disease. It has been shown that even mild renal dysfunction can increase considerably the risk of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Moreover, data suggest that a history of recovery from acute kidney injury is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition to kidney dysfunction, maternal hypertension and proteinuria predispose women to negative outcomes and are important factors to consider in preconception counseling and the process of risk stratification. In this review, we provide an overview of the physiologic renal changes during pregnancy as well as available data regarding CKD and pregnancy outcomes. We also highlight the important management strategies in women with certain selected renal conditions that are seen commonly during the childbearing years. We call for future research on underexplored areas such as the concept of renal functional reserve to develop a potential clinical tool for prognostication and risk stratification of women at higher risk for complications during pregnancy.

  8. Growth and nutrition in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furth, Susan L

    2005-10-01

    Growth failure remains an important problem for children with kidney disease secondary to medical kidney disease or urologic disorders. In children with chronic kidney disease, growth remains suboptimal even with energy intake above 80% of the recommend daily allowance. Adults who had chronic kidney disease as children frequently report dissatisfaction with final adult height. Additionally, growth failure in children with end-stage renal disease is associated with adverse clinical outcomes, including more frequent hospitalizations and increased mortality. This review describes the prevalence and morbidity associated with growth retardation in US children with chronic kidney disease. Additionally, available strategies to optimize growth and nutrition and current controversies in nutritional management and assessment of nutritional status in children with chronic kidney disease are discussed.

  9. Relationship between ultrasonographically determined kidney volume and progression of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegar Zubović, Sandra; Kristić, Spomenka; Sefić Pašić, Irmina

    2016-08-01

    Aim To investigate a correlation between calculated creatinine clearance as a measure of kidney's functional abilities and ultrasonographically determined kidney volume, which represents actual size of the kidney, in fact residual renal mass in chronic kidney disease, in order to determine possibilities of ultrasound as a diagnostic method in diagnosing and follow up of chronic renal disease. Methods Prospective study included 150 patients with registered demographic and anthropometric data, and also with relevant laboratory tests of renal function. Longitudinal diameter, thickness and width of the kidney and renal volume calculated according to the Dinkel's formula were measured by ultrasound. A correlation between the measured volume of the kidneys and calculated creatinine clearance was done by the Spearman method, with statistical significance of pkidney volume was found (pkidneys' volume showed a linear decrease with the progression of chronic kidney disease: the kidney volume in the control healthy group was 171.7 ± 32.6 mL (95.22- 229.59 mL), and in the subjects classified in stage IV it was 74.7 ± 24.6 mL (43.22-165.65 mL). Conclusion Calculated volume of kidney well correlated with creatinine clearance as a measure of functional ability of the kidneys and with the stage of chronic renal disease. It can be used in clinical practice for monitoring of chronic kidney disease in conjunction with other clinical and laboratory parameters. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  10. Stage effect of chronic kidney disease in erectile function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Márcio Rodrigues; Ponciano, Viviane Campos; Costa, Théo Rodrigues; Gomes, Caio Pereira; de Oliveira, Enio Chaves

    2018-01-01

    The study aims to assess the influence of the stage of chronic kidney disease and glomerular filtration rate on prevalence and degree of erectile dysfunction. This transversal study, conducted from May 2013 to December 2015, included patients with chronic kidney disease in conservative treatment, stages III/IV/V. Erectile dysfunction was evaluated by the International Index of Erectile Function. Data classically associated with erectile dysfunction were obtained by medical record review. Erectile dysfunction, degree of erectile dysfunction, and other main variables associated with erectile dysfunction were compared between patients with chronic kidney disease on conservative treatment stages III versus IV/V using the Chi-square test. The relationship between score of the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction and glomerular filtration rate was established by Pearson correlation coefficient. Two hundred and forty five patients with chronic kidney disease in con-servative treatment participated of the study. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction in patients with chronic kidney disease in stages IV/V was greater than in stage III. Glomerular filtration rate positively correlated with score of the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction. The study suggests that chronic kidney disease progression (glomerular filtration rate decrease and advance in chronic kidney disease stages) worsen erectile function. Hypothetically, diagnosis and treatment of erectile dysfunction may be anticipated with the analysis of chronic kidney disease progression. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  11. Stage effect of chronic kidney disease in erectile function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Rodrigues Costa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose The study aims to assess the influence of the stage of chronic kidney disease and glomerular filtration rate on prevalence and degree of erectile dysfunction. Materials and Methods This transversal study, conducted from May 2013 to December 2015, included patients with chronic kidney disease in conservative treatment, stages III/IV/V. Erectile dysfunction was evaluated by the International Index of Erectile Function. Data classically associated with erectile dysfunction were obtained by medical record review. Erectile dysfunction, degree of erectile dysfunction, and other main variables associated with erectile dysfunction were compared between patients with chronic kidney disease on conservative treatment stages III versus IV/V using the Chi-square test. The relationship between score of the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction and glomerular filtration rate was established by Pearson correlation coefficient. Results Two hundred and forty five patients with chronic kidney disease in conservative treatment participated of the study. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction in patients with chronic kidney disease in stages IV/V was greater than in stage III. Glomerular filtration rate positively correlated with score of the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction. Conclusions The study suggests that chronic kidney disease progression (glomerular filtration rate decrease and advance in chronic kidney disease stages worsen erectile function. Hypothetically, diagnosis and treatment of erectile dysfunction may be anticipated with the analysis of chronic kidney disease progression.

  12. Nutrition for Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults Nutrition for Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults Why is nutrition important for someone with advanced chronic kidney disease? A person may prevent or delay some health ...

  13. The Kidney-Vascular-Bone Axis in the Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Michael E; Hruska, Keith A

    2016-03-01

    The last 25 years have been characterized by dramatic improvements in short-term patient and allograft survival after kidney transplantation. Long-term patient and allograft survival remains limited by cardiovascular disease and chronic allograft injury, among other factors. Cardiovascular disease remains a significant contributor to mortality in native chronic kidney disease as well as cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease more than doubles that of the general population. The chronic kidney disease (CKD)-mineral bone disorder (MBD) is a syndrome recently coined to embody the biochemical, skeletal, and cardiovascular pathophysiology that results from disrupting the complex systems biology between the kidney, skeleton, and cardiovascular system in native and transplant kidney disease. The CKD-MBD is a unique kidney disease-specific syndrome containing novel cardiovascular risk factors, with an impact reaching far beyond traditional notions of renal osteodystrophy and hyperparathyroidism. This overview reviews current knowledge of the pathophysiology of the CKD-MBD, including emerging concepts surrounding the importance of circulating pathogenic factors released from the injured kidney that directly cause cardiovascular disease in native and transplant chronic kidney disease, with potential application to mechanisms of chronic allograft injury and vasculopathy.

  14. Dyslipidemia in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saland, Jeffrey M; Pierce, Christopher B; Mitsnefes, Mark M; Flynn, Joseph T; Goebel, Jens; Kupferman, Juan C; Warady, Bradley A; Furth, Susan L

    2010-12-01

    Dyslipidemia, a known risk factor for atherosclerosis, is frequent among both adults and children with chronic kidney disease. Here, we describe the prevalence and pattern of dyslipidemia from a cross-sectional analysis of 391 children aged 1-16 years, enrolled in the multicenter Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) study, with a median glomerular filtration rate (GFR), measured by the plasma disappearance of iohexol, of 43 ml/min per 1.73 m2. Multivariate analysis was applied to adjust for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), GFR, and the urinary protein/creatinine ratio. Proteinuria was in the nephrotic range in 44 and the BMI exceeded the 95th percentile in 57 patients of this cohort. Baseline lipid analysis found a high prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia in 126, increased non-HDL-C in 62, and reduced HDL-C in 83. Overall, 177 children had dyslipidemia, of whom 79 had combined dyslipidemia. Lower GFR was associated with higher triglycerides, lower HDL-C, and higher non-HDL-C. Nephrotic-range proteinuria was significantly associated with dyslipidemia and combined dyslipidemia. Compared with children with a GFR>50, children with a GFRchildren with moderate chronic kidney disease, dyslipidemia is common and is associated with lower GFR, nephrotic proteinuria, and non-renal factors including age and obesity.

  15. Genetic loci influencing kidney function and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, John C; Zhang, Weihua; Lord, Graham M; van der Harst, Pim; Lawlor, Debbie A; Sehmi, Joban S; Gale, Daniel P; Wass, Mark N; Ahmadi, Kourosh R; Bakker, Stephan J L; Beckmann, Jacqui; Bilo, Henk J G; Bochud, Murielle; Brown, Morris J; Caulfield, Mark J; Connell, John M C; Cook, H Terence; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Davey Smith, George; de Silva, Ranil; Deng, Guohong; Devuyst, Olivier; Dikkeschei, Lambert D; Dimkovic, Nada; Dockrell, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna; Ebrahim, Shah; Eggermann, Thomas; Farrall, Martin; Ferrucci, Luigi; Floege, Jurgen; Forouhi, Nita G; Gansevoort, Ron T; Han, Xijin; Hedblad, Bo; Homan van der Heide, Jaap J; Hepkema, Bouke G; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria; Hypponen, Elina; Johnson, Toby; de Jong, Paul E; Kleefstra, Nanne; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lapsley, Marta; Li, Yun; Loos, Ruth J F; Luan, Jian'an; Luttropp, Karin; Maréchal, Céline; Melander, Olle; Munroe, Patricia B; Nordfors, Louise; Parsa, Afshin; Peltonen, Leena; Penninx, Brenda W; Perucha, Esperanza; Pouta, Anneli; Prokopenko, Inga; Roderick, Paul J; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh J; Sanna, Serena; Schalling, Martin; Schlessinger, David; Schlieper, Georg; Seelen, Marc A J; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sjögren, Marketa; Smit, Johannes H; Snieder, Harold; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D; Stenvinkel, Peter; Sternberg, Michael J E; Swaminathan, Ramasamyiyer; Tanaka, Toshiko; Ubink-Veltmaat, Lielith J; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallace, Chris; Waterworth, Dawn; Zerres, Klaus; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J; Maxwell, Patrick H; McCarthy, Mark I; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Mooser, Vincent; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Lightstone, Liz; Scott, James; Navis, Gerjan; Elliott, Paul; Kooner, Jaspal S

    2010-05-01

    Using genome-wide association, we identify common variants at 2p12-p13, 6q26, 17q23 and 19q13 associated with serum creatinine, a marker of kidney function (P = 10(-10) to 10(-15)). Of these, rs10206899 (near NAT8, 2p12-p13) and rs4805834 (near SLC7A9, 19q13) were also associated with chronic kidney disease (P = 5.0 x 10(-5) and P = 3.6 x 10(-4), respectively). Our findings provide insight into metabolic, solute and drug-transport pathways underlying susceptibility to chronic kidney disease.

  16. Diagnostic approach to chronic kidney disease | Naiker | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be considered to be present if a patient has a glomerular filtration rate 3 months. These include proteinuria, haematuria and radiological abnormalities. Regardless of the stage of CKD, the approach is mainly similar.

  17. Hormones and arterial stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, Ozkan; Kircelli, Fatih; Voroneanu, Luminita; Covic, Adrian; Ok, Ercan

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the major cause of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Arterial stiffness is an important contributor to the occurrence and progression of cardiovascular disease. Various risk factors, including altered hormone levels, have been suggested to be associated with arterial stiffness. Based on the background that chronic kidney disease predisposes individuals to a wide range of hormonal changes, we herein review the available data on the association between arterial stiffness and hormones in patients with chronic kidney disease and summarize the data for the general population.

  18. [ANEMIA IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukmir, L; Fišić, M; Diminić-Lisica, I; Ljubotina, A

    2016-12-01

    Renal anemia develops secondary to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its incidence increases with the progression of CKD. The aim is to inform family physicians about the latest developments and ways of approaching the issue, in accordance with national guidelines. The PubMed and Cochrane systematic reviews databases were searched for the 1996-2015 period using the following key words: anemia, chronic renal failure, erythropoietin, and primary health care. In addition, all relevant articles and textbooks available were manually searched to suggest the following conclusions. The use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) slows down the progression of CKD, reduces the need for blood transfusions and improves the patient quality of life. Target hemoglobin (Hb) concentration to be permanently maintained is 110-120 g/L. Higher Hb levels are associated with higher mortality and major cardiovascular events in dialysis patients. Target hemoglobin level should be strictly individualized depending on CKD stage (both non-dialyzed and dialyzed population), age, other risks, initial and maintenance treatment. Early recognition and appropriate correction of anemia using ESA is of utmost importance in CKD patients. Systematic primary and secondary prevention measures along with education and professional implementation of national guidelines in daily work of family practitioners can improve medical care of patients with CKD.

  19. Chronic kidney disease in HIV patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, S.; Rasyid, H.; Kasim, H.; Katu, S.

    2018-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a health problem in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) population. Prediction of CKD in HIV patients needsto have done. This study aimis to identify the prevalence of CKD in HIV patients.Thisis a cross-sectional studyofmale and female, age 18-60 years old, diagnosedHIVat Wahidin Sudirohusodo & Hasanuddin University Hospital Makassar. Diagnosed as CKD if estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) HIV patients included in the analyses. Distribution of CKD, showed 3 (3.5%) subjects with eGFRHIV populations in Makassar is still quite low.

  20. Contribution of stone size to chronic kidney disease in kidney stone formers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Farrokhlagha; Etemadi, Samira Motedayen; Lessan-Pezeshki, Mahbob; Mahdavi-Mazdeh, Mitra; Ayati, Mohsen; Mir, Alireza; Yazdi, Hadi Rokni

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether stone burden correlates with the degree of chronic kidney disease in kidney stone formers. A total of 97 extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy candidates aged 18 years and older were included. Size, number and location of the kidney stones, along with cumulative stone size, defined as the sum of diameters of all stones) were determined. Estimated glomerular filtration rate was determined using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration cystatin C/creatinine equation, and chronic kidney disease was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate chronic kidney disease. The relationship persisted even after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, C-reactive protein, fasting plasma glucose, thyroid stimulating hormone, presence of microalbuminuria, history of renal calculi, history of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, number and location of the stones (odds ratio 1.24, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.52). The same was not observed for individuals with a cumulative stone size ≥ 20 mm. In kidney stone formers with a cumulative stone size up to 20 mm, estimated glomerular filtration rate linearly declines with increasing cumulative stone size. Additionally, cumulative stone size is an independent predictor of chronic kidney disease in this group of patients. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  1. When Your Child Has a Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search English Español When Your Child Has a Chronic Kidney Disease KidsHealth / For Parents / When Your Child Has a Chronic Kidney Disease What's in this article? Treating Kidney Diseases Dialysis ...

  2. End Stage and Chronic Kidney Disease: Associations with Renal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, Paul

    2012-01-01

    There is a well known association between end stage renal disease and the development of kidney cancer in the native kidney of patients requiring renal replacement therapy. There is now emerging evidence that lesser degrees of renal insufficiency (chronic kidney disease, CKD) are also associated with an increased likelihood of cancer in general and kidney cancer in particular. Nephropathological changes are commonly observed in the non-tumor bearing portions of kidney resected at the time of partial and radical nephrectomy (RN). In addition, patients with renal cancer are more likely to have CKD at the time of diagnosis and treatment than the general population. The exact mechanism by which renal insufficiency transforms normal kidney cells into tumor cells is not known. Possible mechanisms include uremic immune inhibition or increased exposure to circulating toxins not adequately cleared by the kidneys. Surgeons managing kidney tumors must have an increased awareness of their patient’s renal functional status as they plan their resection. Kidney sparing approaches, including partial nephrectomy (PN) or active surveillance in older and morbidly ill patients, can prevent CKD or delay the further decline in renal function which is well documented with RN. Despite emerging evidence that PN provides equivalent local tumor control to RN while at the same time preventing CKD, this operation remains under utilized in the United States and abroad. Increased awareness of the bi directional relationship between kidney function and kidney cancer is essential in the contemporary management of kidney cancer.

  3. Clinical aspects of chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical course of chronic kidney disease. Although patients with kidney disease may present with symptoms such as oedema (nephritic or nephrotic syndrome) and changes in urine composition, histological and functional renal decompensation can often not be diagnosed owing to a lack of symptoms. Undetected loss.

  4. Genetic loci influencing kidney function and chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chambers, John C.; Zhang, Weihua; Lord, Graham M.; van der Harst, Pim; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Sehmi, Joban S.; Gale, Daniel P.; Wass, Mark N.; Ahmadi, Kourosh R.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Beckmann, Jacqui; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Bochud, Murielle; Brown, Morris J.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Connell, John M. C.; Cook, H. Terence; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Smith, George Davey; de Silva, Ranil; Deng, Guohong; Devuyst, Olivier; Dikkeschei, Lambert D.; Dimkovic, Nada; Dockrell, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna; Ebrahim, Shah; Eggermann, Thomas; Farrall, Martin; Ferrucci, Luigi; Floege, Jurgen; Forouhi, Nita G.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Han, Xijin; Hedblad, Bo; van der Heide, Jaap J. Homan; Hepkema, Bouke G.; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria; Hypponen, Elina; Johnson, Toby; de Jong, Paul E.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lapsley, Marta; Li, Yun; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Luan, Jian'an; Luttropp, Karin; Marechal, Celine; Melander, Olle; Munroe, Patricia B.; Nordfors, Louise; Parsa, Afshin; Peltonen, Leena; Penninx, Brenda W.; Perucha, Esperanza; Pouta, Anneli; Prokopenko, Inga; Roderick, Paul J.; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sanna, Serena; Schalling, Martin; Schlessinger, David; Schlieper, Georg; Seelen, Marc A. J.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sjogren, Marketa; Smit, Johannes H.; Snieder, Harold; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D.; Stenvinkel, Peter; Sternberg, Michael J. E.; Swaminathan, Ramasamyiyer; Tanaka, Toshiko; Ubink-Veltmaat, Lielith J.; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallace, Chris; Waterworth, Dawn; Zerres, Klaus; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Maxwell, Patrick H.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Mooser, Vincent; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Lightstone, Liz; Scott, James; Navis, Gerjan; Elliott, Paul; Kooner, Jaspal S.

    Using genome-wide association, we identify common variants at 2p12-p13, 6q26, 17q23 and 19q13 associated with serum creatinine, a marker of kidney function (P = 10(-10) to 10(-15)). Of these, rs10206899 (near NAT8, 2p12-p13) and rs4805834 (near SLC7A9, 19q13) were also associated with chronic kidney

  5. Genetic loci influencing kidney function and chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chambers, John C.; Zhang, Weihua; Lord, Graham M.; van der Harst, Pim; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Sehmi, Joban S.; Gale, Daniel P.; Wass, Mark N.; Ahmadi, Kourosh R.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Beckmann, Jacqui; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Bochud, Murielle; Brown, Morris J.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Connell, John M. C.; Cook, H. Terence; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Davey Smith, George; de Silva, Ranil; Deng, Guohong; Devuyst, Olivier; Dikkeschei, Lambert D.; Dimkovic, Nada; Dockrell, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna; Ebrahim, Shah; Eggermann, Thomas; Farrall, Martin; Ferrucci, Luigi; Floege, Jurgen; Forouhi, Nita G.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Han, Xijin; Hedblad, Bo; Homan van der Heide, Jaap J.; Hepkema, Bouke G.; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria; Hypponen, Elina; Johnson, Toby; de Jong, Paul E.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lapsley, Marta; Li, Yun; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Luan, Jian'an; Luttropp, Karin; Maréchal, Céline; Melander, Olle; Munroe, Patricia B.; Nordfors, Louise; Parsa, Afshin; Peltonen, Leena; Penninx, Brenda W.; Perucha, Esperanza; Pouta, Anneli; Prokopenko, Inga; Roderick, Paul J.; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sanna, Serena; Schalling, Martin; Schlessinger, David; Schlieper, Georg; Seelen, Marc A. J.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sjögren, Marketa; Smit, Johannes H.; Snieder, Harold; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D.; Stenvinkel, Peter; Sternberg, Michael J. E.; Swaminathan, Ramasamyiyer; Tanaka, Toshiko; Ubink-Veltmaat, Lielith J.; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallace, Chris; Waterworth, Dawn; Zerres, Klaus; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Maxwell, Patrick H.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Mooser, Vincent; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Lightstone, Liz; Scott, James; Navis, Gerjan; Elliott, Paul; Kooner, Jaspal S.

    2010-01-01

    Using genome-wide association, we identify common variants at 2p12-p13, 6q26, 17q23 and 19q13 associated with serum creatinine, a marker of kidney function (P = 10(-10) to 10(-15)). Of these, rs10206899 (near NAT8, 2p12-p13) and rs4805834 (near SLC7A9, 19q13) were also associated with chronic kidney

  6. Chronic Kidney Disease and Lipid Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubovic, Sandra Vegar; Kristic, Spomenka; Prevljak, Sabina; Pasic, Irmina Sefic

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) represents a serious public health problem due to the increase in incidence and prevalence of this disease worldwide. Given the significant morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the population of patients with CKD, and the fact that dyslipidemia itself is a risk factor for CVD, increases the importance of lipid metabolism study in patients with CKD. Evaluate the lipid status of patients with chronic kidney disease. A one-year prospective study included 150 adult patients who were in various stages of chronic renal failure (stage I to IV). Estimate of creatinine clearance was performed using Cockroft-Goult formula. The classification of patients according to stages of chronic renal insufficiency was performed in accordance with the criteria of Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI). Of the total number of patients (N=150) there was 71 males and 79 females. The mean age of patients was 55.43 years. Average values of serum cholesterol were highest in patients with stage II renal disease and the lowest in patients classified as stage IV (5.76±1.60 mmol/L vs. 5.07±1.88 mmol/L). Analysis of the average value of triglycerides in blood show a slight increase through the stages of CKD in a manner that patients classified into stage I have low serum triglyceride levels (1.73±1.17 mmol/L (range 0.61 to 5.5 mmol/L), and patients classified in stage III the highest value 2.13±1.11 mmol/L (range 0.62 to 4.66 mmol/L). Average cholesterol levels does not statistically significantly change with progression of chronic renal disease. There is an almost linear increase in average triglyceride levels in chronic renal disease. Triglyceride levels in serum begins to increase in the early stage of chronic renal disease and reach the peak in stage IV.

  7. Chronic kidney disease in children (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Karimdzhanov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents modern concepts of chronic kidney disease in children as a condition that develops due to the irreversible decrease in renal homeostatic functions in any severe progressive kidney disease, data on epidemiological prevalence, etiological factors, diagnostic methods, stages and clinical course of chronic kidney disease in children. Moreover, it was indicated that early detection and timely treatment of chronic kidney disease in children is an important background for preventing or postponing its adverse outcome. In addition, a high degree of disability and a significant decrease in the quality of life of patients, the complexity and high cost of therapy for patients with terminal chronic renal failure were shown, ma­king it very important to prevent its development in patients with nephropathies. We outlined the main principles of pathogenetic therapy based on the analysis of domestic and foreign guidelines for the treatment of chronic kidney disease in children. The schemes of treatment for protein-energy insufficiency, arterial hypertension, anemia, correction of mi­neral metabolism disorders are given. We discussed the question of reducing the level of azotemia with various drugs, and the development of new drugs to initiate early treatment and to prevent the development of severe forms of chronic kidney disease in children. The search for necessary literature sources was performed in Scopus, MedLine, The Cochrane Library, CyberLeninka, RINC databases.

  8. Role of ultrasonographic chronic kidney disease score in the assessment of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaprak, Mustafa; Çakır, Özgür; Turan, Mehmet Nuri; Dayanan, Ramazan; Akın, Selçuk; Değirmen, Elif; Yıldırım, Mustafa; Turgut, Faruk

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is an inexpensive, noninvasive and easy imaging procedure to comment on the kidney disease. Data are limited about the relation between estimated glomerular filtration rate (e-GFR) and all 3 renal US parameters, including kidney length, parenchymal thickness and parenchymal echogenicity, in chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study, we aimed to investigate the association between e-GFR and ultrasonographic CKD score calculated via these ultrasonographic parameters. One hundred and twenty patients with stage 1-5 CKD were enrolled in this study. The glomerular filtration rate was estimated by the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation. US was performed by the same radiologist who was blinded to patients' histories and laboratory results. US parameters including kidney length, parenchymal thickness and parenchymal echogenicity were obtained from both kidneys. All 3 parameters were scored for each kidney, separately. The sum of the average scores of these parameters was used to calculate ultrasonographic CKD score. The mean age of patients was 63.34 ± 14.19 years. Mean kidney length, parenchymal thickness, ultrasonographic CKD score and median parenchymal echogenicity were found as 96.2 ± 12.3, 10.97 ± 2.59 mm, 6.28 ± 2.52 and 1.0 (0-3.5), respectively. e-GFR was positively correlated with kidney length (r = 0.343, p < 0.001), parenchymal thickness (r = 0.37, p < 0.001) and negatively correlated with CKD score (r = -0.587, p < 0.001) and parenchymal echogenicity (r = -0.683, p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis for distinction of e-GFR lower than 60 mL/min showed that the ultrasonographic CKD score higher than 4.75 was the best parameter with the sensitivity of 81% and positive predictivity of 92% (AUC, 0.829; 95% CI, 0.74-0.92; p < 0.001). We found correlation between e-GFR and ultrasonographic CKD score via using all ultrasonographic parameters. Also, our study showed

  9. Chronic kidney disease in neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Bong Mo; Oh, Dong-Jin; Choi, Moon Hee; Choi, Hye Min

    2018-03-01

    It was believed that neurogenic bladder (NB) might be a risk factor of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, data are limited regarding the real incidence or risk of CKD in NB. In addition, serum creatinine (sCr), a classical marker of renal function, is not reliable in NB patients because they present muscle wasting due to disuse or denervation. The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of CKD in NB patients using serum Cystatin-C. Secondly, we aimed to identify the risk factors for CKD development in NB. This was a cross-sectional study in a public hospital, a specialized center for patients who were victims of industrial accidents. Serum Cystatin-C was checked at the regular laboratory test in the structured NB programme of the hospital, and 313 patients were included in the study. The overall prevalence of CKD, defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) bladder volume, recurrent urinary tract infection, and proteinuria were significantly associated with CKD in the multivariable analysis. Chronic kidney disease prevalence was more than three times higher in NB patients than in the general population despite recent progress in the medical care of NB. Co-morbid diabetes, small bladder volume, recurrent urinary tract infection, and proteinuria seem to be the risk factors for CKD development in NB. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  10. Allopurinol Against Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golmohammadi, Sima; Almasi, Afshin; Manouchehri, M; Omrani, Hamid Reza; Zandkarimi, Mohammad Reza

    2017-07-01

    Hyperuricemia is common in approximately 50% of patients with kidney failure due to decreased uric acid excretion, and it has been recently known as an independent factor in the progression of renal insufficiency. Allopurinol inhibits the production of uric acid. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of allopurinol on chronic kidney disease progression. In a clinical trial, patients with stages 3 and 4 of chronic kidney disease were divided into two groups to receive allopurinol, 100 mg, daily and placebo for 12 months. Patients' kidney function and serum uric acid levels were assessed at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months after initial administration. Subgroups of patients with severe and mild glomerular filtration rate (GFR) impairment (GFR, 15 mL/min/1.73 m2 to 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 to 60 mL/min/1.73 m2, respectively), were compared between the groups. Serum uric acid levels decreased significantly during after 12 months of allopurinol administration (P = .004). In patients with severe GFR impairment, serum creatinine levels did not decrease significantly and there was no significant increase in GFR, but in those with mild GFR impairment, serum creatinine levels decreased and GFR increase significantly (P chronic kidney disease progression and could be administered with other effective medications for controlling the kidney disease.

  11. αKlotho and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyra, J.A.; Hu, M.C.

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-Klotho (αKlotho) protein is encoded by the gene, Klotho, and functions as a coreceptor for endocrine fibroblast growth factor-23. The extracellular domain of αKlotho is cleaved by secretases and released into the circulation where it is called soluble αKlotho. Soluble αKlotho in the circulation starts to decline in chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 2 and urinary αKlotho in even earlier CKD stage 1. Therefore soluble αKlotho is an early and sensitive marker of decline in kidney function. Preclinical data from numerous animal experiments support αKlotho deficiency as a pathogenic factor for CKD progression and extrarenal CKD complications including cardiac and vascular disease, hyperparathyroidism, and disturbed mineral metabolism. αKlotho deficiency induces cell senescence and renders cells susceptible to apoptosis induced by a variety of cellular insults including oxidative stress. αKlotho deficiency also leads to defective autophagy and angiogenesis and promotes fibrosis in the kidney and heart. Most importantly, prevention of αKlotho decline, upregulation of endogenous αKlotho production, or direct supplementation of soluble αKlotho are all associated with attenuation of renal fibrosis, retardation of CKD progression, improvement of mineral metabolism, amelioration of cardiac function and morphometry, and alleviation of vascular calcification in CKD. Therefore in rodents, αKlotho is not only a diagnostic and prognostic marker for CKD but the enhancement of endogenous or supplement of exogenous αKlotho are promising therapeutic strategies to prevent, retard, and decrease the comorbidity burden of CKD. PMID:27125746

  12. Hereditary Causes of Kidney Stones and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsson, Vidar O.; Goldfarb, David S.; Lieske, John C.; Beara-Lasic, Lada; Anglani, Franca; Milliner, Dawn S.; Palsson, Runolfur

    2013-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC) and primary hyperoxaluria (PH) are rare but important causes of severe kidney stone disease and/or chronic kidney disease in children. Recurrent kidney stone disease and nephrocalcinosis, particularly in pre-pubertal children, should alert the physician to the possibility of an inborn error of metabolism as the underlying cause. Unfortunately, the lack of recognition and knowledge of the five disorders has frequently resulted in an unacceptable delay in diagnosis and treatment, sometimes with grave consequences. A high index of suspicion coupled with early diagnosis may reduce or even prevent the serious long-term complications of these diseases. In this paper, we review the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and outcome of patients with APRT deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, FHHNC and PH with emphasis on childhood manifestations. PMID:23334384

  13. Vitamin D therapy for chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhan, Ishir; Thadhani, Ravi

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin D has played a central role in the nephrologist's armamentarium, with active vitamin D analogues enjoying broad use for treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Increasing data are now coming to light about the broader biological actions of vitamin D, including wide-ranging effects in several endocrine pathways, cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, and even the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). As additional agents are emerging to help with control of metabolic bone disease, these nontraditional pathways of vitamin D action will become increasingly important to consider when formulating a treatment plan. Although the only approved use for vitamin D analogues in CKD is the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism, well-conducted clinical trials may soon broaden the scope of this therapy. This article reviews the role of vitamin D therapy in CKD and looks to the answers that future research may bring.

  14. Stroke and cerebrovascular diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Kazunori; Ninomiya, Toshiharu

    2014-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease, defined as a reduced glomerular filtration rate or increased urinary albumin excretion, is recognised as a rapidly growing global health burden, and increasing evidence suggests that it contributes to the risk and severity of cerebrovascular diseases. In particular, chronic kidney disease is an established risk factor for stroke and is also strongly associated with subclinical cerebrovascular abnormalities and cognitive impairment, partly because it shares several traditional and non-traditional risk factors, and sometimes uraemia-related and dialysis-related factors, with cerebrovascular diseases. The effect of chronic kidney disease on incident stroke differs among regions and races and is greater in Asian than in non-Asian people. Chronic kidney disease seems to be predictive of severe neurological deficits and poor vital and functional outcomes after both ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes, which is partly due to the limitations of pharmacotherapies, including limited use and effects of novel oral anticoagulants, other antithrombotic treatments, and reperfusion treatment for hyperacute ischaemic stroke. In view of the strong two-way association between stroke and kidney disease, the pathophysiological interactions between the brain and kidney should be the subject of intensive study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Children with Chronic Kidney Disease: Tips for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donate A to Z Health Guide Children With Chronic Kidney Disease: Tips for Parents Print Email If your child has been diagnosed with chronic kidney disease, you are no doubt feeling distressed and bewildered. ...

  16. Cholesterol Crystal Embolism and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuezhu; Bayliss, George; Zhuang, Shougang

    2017-05-24

    Renal disease caused by cholesterol crystal embolism (CCE) occurs when cholesterol crystals become lodged in small renal arteries after small pieces of atheromatous plaques break off from the aorta or renal arteries and shower the downstream vascular bed. CCE is a multisystemic disease but kidneys are particularly vulnerable to atheroembolic disease, which can cause an acute, subacute, or chronic decline in renal function. This life-threatening disease may be underdiagnosed and overlooked as a cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among patients with advanced atherosclerosis. CCE can result from vascular surgery, angiography, or administration of anticoagulants. Atheroembolic renal disease has various clinical features that resemble those found in other kidney disorders and systemic diseases. It is commonly misdiagnosed in clinic, but confirmed by characteristic renal biopsy findings. Therapeutic options are limited, and prognosis is considered to be poor. Expanding knowledge of atheroembolic renal disease due to CCE opens perspectives for recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of this cause of progressive renal insufficiency.

  17. Direct renin inhibition in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Frederik; Rossing, Peter; Parving, Hans-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    that renin inhibition could hold potential for improved treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease, with diabetic nephropathy as an obvious group of patients to investigate, as the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is enhanced in these patients and as there is an unmet need...... early as a beneficial effect was unlikely and there was an increased frequency of side effects. Also in non-diabetic kidney disease a few intervention studies have been carried out, but there is no ongoing hard outcome study. In this review we provide the current evidence for renin inhibition in chronic...... kidney disease by reporting of the studies published so far as well as perspective on the future possibilites....

  18. Epidemiology of chronic kidney disease in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harambat, Jérôme; van Stralen, Karlijn J.; Kim, Jon Jin; Tizard, E. Jane

    2012-01-01

    In the past 30 years there have been major improvements in the care of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, most of the available epidemiological data stem from end-stage renal disease (ESRD) registries and information on the earlier stages of pediatric CKD is still limited. The

  19. Continuation of lithium after a diagnosis of chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, L V; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Andersen, P K

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether continued lithium or anticonvulsant treatment after a first diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) was associated with progression to irreversible end-stage kidney disease. METHODS: Nationwide cohort study including all individuals in Denmark in a period from...... 1995 to 2012 with a diagnosis of CKD and (i) a history of lithium treatment (N = 754, among whom 238 patients had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder) or (ii) a history of anticonvulsant treatment (N = 5.004, among whom 199 patients had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder). End-stage CKD was defined as chronic...

  20. Mechanisms by Which Dehydration May Lead to Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncal-Jimenez, C; Lanaspa, M A; Jensen, T; Sanchez-Lozada, L G; Johnson, R J

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration, a condition that characterizes excessive loss of body water, is well known to be associated with acute renal dysfunction; however, it has largely been considered reversible and to be associated with no long-term effects on the kidney. Recently, an epidemic of chronic kidney disease has emerged in Central America in which the major risk factor seems to be recurrent heat-associated dehydration. This has led to studies investigating whether recurrent dehydration may lead to permanent kidney damage. Three major potential mechanisms have been identified, including the effects of vasopressin on the kidney, the activation of the aldose reductase-fructokinase pathway, and the effects of chronic hyperuricemia. The discovery of these pathways has also led to the recognition that mild dehydration may be a risk factor in progression of all types of chronic kidney diseases. Furthermore, there is some evidence that increasing hydration, particularly with water, may actually prevent CKD. Thus, a whole new area of investigation is developing that focuses on the role of water and osmolarity and their influence on kidney function and health. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Belarbia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients as well as its effects on the progression of CKD, we conducted a prospective, longitudinal study including 180 patients with chronic renal failure followed at the outpatient service of Nephrology at the Saloul′s University Hospital of Sousse (Tunisia over six months. Our study population consisted of 101 men and 79 women. Chronic glomerulonephritis (36.6% was the most frequent nephropathy. The mean serum creatinine was 249 ± 200 mmol/L and the mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR was 55.8 ± 49.2 mL/min. Cardiovascular (CV impairment was found in 27.2% of the patients. The prevalence of MS was 42.2%. Women had significantly more abdominal obesity than men. Subjects with MS were significantly older and predominantly females who had higher blood pressure and body mass index (BMI. CV complications were more frequent among the MS subjects than among the controls. Glycemia, triglycerides, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c were significantly higher in the group of CKD patients with MS. However, the occurrence of MS was not influenced by the nature of nephropathy, the degree of the CKD and the use of renin-angiotensin blockers or statins. In multivariate analysis, predictors of occurrence of MS in our series included older age, female gender and higher BMI and LDL-c levels. The prevalence of MS in patients with CKD is higher than the general population. These patients should receive special multidisciplinary care to limit CV complications.

  2. Metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belarbia, Anis; Nouira, Safa; Sahtout, Wissal; Guedri, Yosra; Achour, Abdellatif

    2015-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients as well as its effects on the progression of CKD, we conducted a prospective, longitudinal study including 180 patients with chronic renal failure followed at the outpatient service of Nephrology at the Saloul's University Hospital of Sousse (Tunisia) over six months. Our study population consisted of 101 men and 79 women. Chronic glomerulonephritis (36.6%) was the most frequent nephropathy. The mean serum creatinine was 249 ± 200 mmol/L and the mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 55.8 ± 49.2 mL/min. Cardiovascular (CV) impairment was found in 27.2% of the patients. The prevalence of MS was 42.2%. Women had significantly more abdominal obesity than men. Subjects with MS were significantly older and predominantly females who had higher blood pressure and body mass index (BMI). CV complications were more frequent among the MS subjects than among the controls. Glycemia, triglycerides, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c) were significantly higher in the group of CKD patients with MS. However, the occurrence of MS was not influenced by the nature of nephropathy, the degree of the CKD and the use of renin-angiotensin blockers or statins. In multivariate analysis, predictors of occurrence of MS in our series included older age, female gender and higher BMI and LDL-c levels. The prevalence of MS in patients with CKD is higher than the general population. These patients should receive special multidisciplinary care to limit CV complications.

  3. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease among patients undergoing transradial percutaneous coronary interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad A; Quinlan, Amy; Heck-Kanellidis, Jennifer; Calderon, Dawn; Patel, Tejas; Gandhi, Bhavika; Patel, Shrinil; Hetavi, Mahida; Costanzo, Eric J; Cosentino, James; Patel, Chirag; Dewan, Asa; Kuo, Yen-Hong; Salman, Loay; Vachharajani, Tushar J

    2018-03-01

    While transradial approach to conduct percutaneous coronary interventions offers multiple advantages, the procedure can cause radial artery damage and occlusion. Because radial artery is the preferred site for the creation of an arteriovenous fistula to provide dialysis, patients with chronic kidney disease are particularly dependent on radial artery for their long-term survival. In this retrospective study, we investigated the prevalence of chronic kidney disease in patients undergoing coronary interventions via radial artery. Stage of chronic kidney disease was based on estimated glomerular filtration rate and National Kidney Foundation - Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines. A total of 497 patients undergoing transradial percutaneous coronary interventions were included. Over 70.4% (350/497) of the patients had chronic kidney disease. Stage II chronic kidney disease was observed in 243 (69%) patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate = 76.0 ± 8.4 mL/min). Stage III was observed in 93 (27%) patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate = 49 ± 7.5 mL/min). Stage IV chronic kidney disease was observed in 5 (1%) patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate = 25.6 ± 4.3 mL/min) and Stage V chronic kidney disease was observed in 9 (3%) patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate = 9.3 ± 3.5 mL/min). Overall, 107 of 350 patients (30%) had advanced chronic kidney disease, that is, stage III-V chronic kidney disease. Importantly, 14 of the 107 (13%) patients had either stage IV or V chronic kidney disease. This study finds that nearly one-third of the patients undergoing transradial percutaneous coronary interventions have advanced chronic kidney disease. Because many of these patients may require dialysis, the use of radial artery to conduct percutaneous coronary interventions must be carefully considered in chronic kidney disease population.

  4. [Chronic kidney failure and carotid atherosclerosis in diabetic patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumen, Amal; Bouziane, Amal; Meftah, Azzelarab; Errahali, Yassine; Eljadi, Hamza; Elmoussaoui, Souad; Belmejdoub, Ghizlaine

    2016-09-01

    Chronic kidney failure is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular disease. Its association with carotid atherosclerosis remains controversial. The purpose of our study was to assess the factors associated with carotid atherosclerosis specially the components of chronic kidney disease. In a cross-sectional study, we enrolled type 1 or type 2 diabetic patients from the endocrinology an diabetology department of the military hospital of Rabat assigned in two groups according to the presence or absence of carotid atherosclerosis. Kidney function was assessed based on albuminuria and the estimated glomerular filtration rate calculated using the "modification of diet in renal disease" equation. A multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent factors associated with carotid atherosclerosis. One hundred and six diabetic patients were enrolled including 96 type 2 diabetic patients. Age (Pdiabetes duration (P=0.04), hypertension (P=0.002), peripheral arterial disease (Pfailure (P=0.001) were significantly associated with carotid atherosclerosis. After adjusting for age, hypertension, diabetes duration and peripheral arterial disease, chronic kidney failure was an independent factor associated with carotid atherosclerosis (OR: 5.46; 95%IC: 1.29-23.01; P=0.021). Our data suggest that chronic kidney failure is associated with carotid atherosclerosis in diabetic patients independently of the common cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Phosphorus Regulation in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suki, Wadi N; Moore, Linda W

    2016-01-01

    Serum phosphorus levels stay relatively constant through the influence of multiple factors-such as parathyroid hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23, and vitamin D-on the kidney, bone, and digestive system. Whereas normal serum phosphorus ranges between 3 mg/dL to 4.5 mg/dL, large cross-sectional studies have shown that even people with normal kidney function are sometimes found to have levels ranging between 1.6 mg/dL and 6.2 mg/dL. While this may partially be due to diet and the factors mentioned above, total understanding of these atypical ranges of serum phosphorus remains uncertain. Risks for bone disease are high in people aged 50 and older, and this group comprises a large proportion of people who also have chronic kidney disease. Consuming diets low in calcium and high in phosphorus, especially foods with phosphate additives, further exacerbates bone turnover. Existing bone disease increases the risk for high serum phosphorus, and higher serum phosphorus has been associated with increased adverse events and cardiovascular-related mortality both in people with chronic kidney disease and in those with no evidence of disease. Once kidney function has deteriorated to end-stage disease (Stage 5), maintaining normal serum phosphorus requires dietary restrictions, phosphate-binding medications, and dialysis. Even so, normal serum phosphorus remains elusive in many patients with Stage 5 kidney disease, and researchers are testing novel targets that may inhibit intestinal transport of phosphorus to achieve better phosphate control. Protecting and monitoring bone health should also aid in controlling serum phosphorus as kidney disease advances.

  6. Prevalence and correlates of chronic kidney disease among civil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-01-31

    Jan 31, 2014 ... Introduction: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a public health problem with rising incidence and prevalence ... Conclusion: The prevalence of CKD among Nigerian civil servants was fairly high and was associated with advancing ... including Nigeria, hypertension (HTN) and diabetes mellitus.

  7. Epidemiology of chronic kidney disease in northern region of Senegal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an emerging worldwide epidemic but few data are available in African populations. We aimed to assess prevalence of CKD in adult populations of Saint-Louis (northern Senegal). Methods: In a population-based survey between January and May 2012, we included 1,037 adults ...

  8. Bicarbonate therapy for prevention of chronic kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łoniewski, Igor; Wesson, Donald E

    2014-03-01

    Kidney injury in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is likely multifactorial, but recent data support that a component is mediated by mechanisms used by the kidney to increase acidification in response to an acid challenge to systemic acid-base status. If so, systemic alkalization might attenuate this acid-induced component of kidney injury. An acid challenge to systemic acid-base status increases nephron acidification through increased production of endothelin, aldosterone, and angiotensin II, each of which can contribute to kidney inflammation and fibrosis that characterizes CKD. Systemic alkalization that ameliorates an acid challenge might attenuate the contributions of angiotensin II, endothelin, and aldosterone to kidney injury. Some small clinical studies support the efficacy of alkalization in attenuating kidney injury and slowing glomerular filtration rate decline in CKD. This review focuses on the potential that orally administered NaHCO₃ prevents CKD progression and additionally addresses its mechanism of action, side effects, possible complications, dosage, interaction, galenic form description, and contraindications. Current National Kidney Foundation guidelines recommend oral alkali, including NaHCO₃(-), in CKD patients with serum HCO₃(-) <22 mmol/l. Although oral alkali can be provided by other medications and by base-inducing dietary constituents, oral NaHCO₃ will be the focus of this review because of its relative safety and apparent efficacy, and its comparatively low cost.

  9. Dietary management of chronic kidney disease: protein restriction and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goraya, Nimrit; Wesson, Donald E

    2012-11-01

    More kidney protective strategies are needed to reduce the burden of complete kidney failure from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Clinicians sometimes use protein restriction as kidney protection despite its demonstrated lack of effectiveness in the only large-scale study. Small-scale studies support that dietary acid reduction is kidney-protective, including when done with base-inducing foods like fruits and vegetables. We review these studies in light of current kidney-protective recommendations. Animal models of CKD show that acid-inducing dietary protein exacerbates and base-inducing protein ameliorates nephropathy progression, and that increased intake of acid-inducing but not base-inducing dietary protein exacerbates progression. Clinical studies show that dietary acid reduction with Na-based alkali reduces kidney injury and slows nephropathy progression in patients with CKD and reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR); base-inducing fruits and vegetables reduce kidney injury in patients with reduced GFR; and base-inducing fruits and vegetables improve metabolic acidosis in CKD. Protein type rather than amount might more importantly affect nephropathy progression. Base-inducing foods might be another way to reduce dietary acid, a strategy shown in small studies to slow nephropathy progression. Further studies will determine if CKD patients should be given base-inducing food as part of their management.

  10. Growth in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, Halima S; Mahan, John D

    2011-09-01

    Poor growth is a common sequela of CKD in childhood. It not only affects the psychosocial development of a child but also has significant effects even in the adult life. The multifactorial etiology and severe consequences of growth failure in CKD warrant evaluation of all the modifiable and nonmodifiable causes. Treatment strategies must be directed toward the specific factors for each child with CKD. Among the various metabolic, nutritional, and hormonal disturbances complicating CKD, disordered growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 axis are important contributors toward poor growth in children with CKD. CKD is recognized as a state of GH resistance rather than GH deficiency, with multiple mechanisms contributing to this GH resistance. Recombinant GH (rGH) therapy can be used in this population to accelerate growth velocity. Although its use has been shown to be effective and safe in children with CKD, there continues to be some uncertainty and reluctance among practitioners and families regarding its usage, thereby resulting in a surprisingly low use in children with CKD. This review focuses on the pathogenesis of growth failure, its effect, and management strategies in children with CKD. Copyright © 2011 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional genomics in renal transplantation and chronic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilflingseder, J.

    2010-01-01

    For the past decade, the development of genomic technology has revolutionized modern biological research. Functional genomic analyses enable biologists to study genetic events on a genome wide scale. Examples of applications are gene discovery, biomarker determination, disease classification, and drug target identification. Global expression profiles performed with microarrays enable a better understanding of molecular signature of human disease, including acute and chronic kidney disease. About 10 % of the population in western industrialized nations suffers from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Treatment of end stage renal disease, the final stage of CKD is performed by either hemo- or peritoneal dialysis or renal transplantation. The preferred treatment is renal transplantation, because of the higher quality of life. But the pathophysiology of the disease on a molecular level is not well enough understood and early biomarkers for acute and chronic kidney disease are missing. In my studies I focused on genomics of allograft biopsies, prevention of delayed graft function after renal transplantation, anemia after renal transplantation, biocompatibility of hemodialysis membranes and peritoneal dialysis fluids and cardiovascular diseases and bone disorders in CKD patients. Gene expression profiles, pathway analysis and protein-protein interaction networks were used to elucidate the underlying pathophysiological mechanism of the disease or phenomena, identifying early biomarkers or predictors of disease state and potentially drug targets. In summery my PhD thesis represents the application of functional genomic analyses in chronic kidney disease and renal transplantation. The results provide a deeper view into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of kidney disease. Nevertheless, future multicenter collaborative studies, meta-analyses of existing data, incorporation of functional genomics into large-scale prospective clinical trials are needed and will give biomedical

  12. Better recovery of kidney function in patients with de novo chronic kidney disease after partial nephrectomy compared with those with pre-existing chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Toshio; Kondo, Tsunenori; Iizuka, Junpei; Omae, Kenji; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Hashimoto, Yasunobu; Yoshida, Kazuhiko; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2014-06-01

    We compared kidney functional recovery between patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease, those with de novo chronic kidney disease and those with normal kidney function, after partial nephrectomy. A total of 311 patients who underwent partial nephrectomy at Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan, between January 2004 and July 2011 with sufficient kidney functional data participated in the study. Patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease (group1: 78 patients) were defined as those with estimated glomerular filtration rate under 60 mL/min/m(2) before partial nephrectomy. Patients with de novo chronic kidney disease (group 2: 49) were defined as those with estimated glomerular filtration rate over 60 mL/min/m(2) before surgery and who developed estimated glomerular filtration rate under 60 mL/min/m(2) 3 months after partial nephrectomy. Normal patients (group 3: 184) were defined as those with estimated glomerular filtration rate over 60 mL/min/m(2) both before and after partial nephrectomy. Group 1 was associated with older age and higher comorbidity, including hypertension and diabetes mellitus, compared with other groups. R.E.N.A.L. score was not significantly different between the groups. Although the percent change of estimated glomerular filtration rate between the preoperative period and 3 months after partial nephrectomy in group 2 was significantly decreased compared with that in other groups (group 1: -6.8%, group 2: -18%, group 3: -7.3%), the renal functional recovery between 3 and 12 months after partial nephrectomy in group 2 was better than that in other groups (group 1: -0.5%, group 2: 5.6%, group 3: -0.4%). Patients with de novo chronic kidney disease had better kidney functional recovery than the other two groups, which might suggest that they were surgically assaulted and developed chronic kidney disease in the early postoperative period, and were essentially different from those with pre-existing chronic kidney

  13. Chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular risk : epidemiology, mechanisms, and prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gansevoort, Ron T.; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Heerspink, Hiddo J. Lambers; Mann, Johannes F.; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Wen, Chi Pang

    2013-01-01

    Since the first description of the association between chronic kidney disease and heart disease, many epidemiological studies have confirmed and extended this finding. As chronic kidney disease progresses, kidney-specific risk factors for cardiovascular events and disease come into play. As a

  14. Gut microbiota in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigarran Guldris, Secundino; González Parra, Emilio; Cases Amenós, Aleix

    The intestinal microflora maintains a symbiotic relationship with the host under normal conditions, but its imbalance has recently been associated with several diseases. In chronic kidney disease (CKD), dysbiotic intestinal microflora has been reported with an increase in pathogenic flora compared to symbiotic flora. An enhanced permeability of the intestinal barrier, allowing the passage of endotoxins and other bacterial products to the blood, has also been shown in CKD. By fermenting undigested products that reach the colon, the intestinal microflora produce indoles, phenols and amines, among others, that are absorbed by the host, accumulate in CKD and have harmful effects on the body. These gut-derived uraemic toxins and the increased permeability of the intestinal barrier in CKD have been associated with increased inflammation and oxidative stress and have been involved in various CKD-related complications, including cardiovascular disease, anaemia, mineral metabolism disorders or the progression of CKD. The use of prebiotics, probiotics or synbiotics, among other approaches, could improve the dysbiosis and/or the increased permeability of the intestinal barrier in CKD. This article describes the situation of the intestinal microflora in CKD, the alteration of the intestinal barrier and its clinical consequences, the harmful effects of intestinal flora-derived uraemic toxins, and possible therapeutic options to improve this dysbiosis and reduce CKD-related complications. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Renal oxygenation and hemodynamics in acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhleen; Ricksten, Sven-Erik; Bragadottir, Gudrun; Redfors, Bengt; Nordquist, Lina

    2013-01-01

    Summary 1. Acute kidney injury (AKI) puts a major burden on health systems that may arise from multiple initiating insults, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, cardiovascular surgery, radio-contrast administration as well as sepsis. Similarly, the incidence and prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) continues to increase with significant morbidity and mortality. Moreover, an increasing number of AKI patients survive to develop CKD and end-stage kidney disease (ESRD). 2. Although the mechanisms for development of AKI and progression of CKD remain poorly understood, initial impairment of oxygen balance is likely to constitute a common pathway, causing renal tissue hypoxia and ATP starvation that will in turn induce extracellular matrix production, collagen deposition and fibrosis. Thus, possible future strategies for one or both conditions may involve dopamine, loop-diuretics, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors and atrial natriuretic peptide, substances that target kidney oxygen consumption and regulators of renal oxygenation such as nitric oxide and heme oxygenase-1. PMID:23360244

  16. Diet in chronic kidney disease in a Mediterranean African country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun, Khawla; Chaker, Hanen; Mahfoudh, Hichem; Makhlouf, Nouha; Jarraya, Faical; Hachicha, Jamil

    2017-01-23

    Mediterranean diet is characterized by low to moderate consumption of animal protein and high consumption of fruits, vegetables, bread, beans, nuts, seeds and other cereals. It has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. However, it is not suitable for chronic kidney disease because of high potassium intake. Tunisia is an emerging Mediterranean country with limited resources, a high prevalence of chronic hemodialysis treatment and high dialysis expenditures. In order to limit dialysis cost, primary and secondary prevention of chronic renal disease are of paramount importance. In addition to drugs, secondary prevention includes diet measures (e.g. salt diet, protein diet). The aims of diet practice in chronic kidney disease are to slow chronic renal failure progression and to prevent its complications like hyperphosphatemia and hyperkaliemiae. A few decades ago, a Tunisian diet was exclusively Mediterranean, and protein consumption was not excessive. However, today, protein consumption is more comparable to western countries. Salt consumption is also excessive. Some Tunisian diets still include food with high potassium intake, which are not suitable for patients with chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the role of the dietician is extremely important to help calculate and create a dietary regimen tailored to each of our patients. Advice about diets should be adapted to both the patient and population habits to improve adherence rate. As such, the purpose of this article is to provide our own experience regarding medical nutrition therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease in Tunisia, with some changes in food habits. Prevention is far better than treatment. In this perspective, dietary measures must be at the core of our intervention.

  17. Inclusion of methods for early detection of chronic kidney disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background The burden and magnitude of chronic kidney disease (CKD) are enormous. The incidence and prevalence of chronic kidney disease are rising all over the world. Thus, there is the urgent and pressing need for methods of early detection of CKD, to be included in guidelines for management of noncommunicable ...

  18. How to preserve residual renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease and on dialysis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krediet, Raymond T.

    2006-01-01

    A review is given on various aspects of GFR in patients with chronic kidney disease and in dialysis patients. These include the measurement of GFR, measures to preserve GFR in chronic kidney disease and dialysis, the importance of residual GFR in dialysis patients and factors that influence GFR in

  19. Inflammatory Factors and Exercise in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Dungey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease frequently present with chronic elevations in markers of inflammation, a condition that appears to be exacerbated by disease progression and onset of haemodialysis. Systemic inflammation is interlinked with malnutrition and muscle protein wasting and is implicated in a number of morbidities including cardiovascular disease: the most common cause of mortality in this population. Research in the general population and other chronic disease cohorts suggests that an increase in habitual activity levels over a prolonged period may help redress basal increases in systemic inflammation. Furthermore, those populations with the highest baseline levels of systemic inflammation appear to have the greatest improvements from training. On the whole, the activity levels of the chronic kidney disease population reflect a sedentary lifestyle, indicating the potential for increasing physical activity and observing health benefits. This review explores the current literature investigating exercise and inflammatory factors in the chronic kidney disease population and then attempts to explain the contradictory findings and suggests where future research is required.

  20. Male Sexual Dysfunction and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edey, Matthew M.

    2017-01-01

    Male sexual dysfunction is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), particularly in end-stage renal disease. Historically, this cause of considerable morbidity has been under-reported and under-recognized. The ideal approach to diagnosis and management remains unclear due to a paucity of good quality data, but an understanding of the pathophysiology is necessary in order to address the burden of this important complication of CKD. This paper will review the endocrine dysfunction that occurs in renal disease, particularly the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis, discuss the causes of erectile dysfunction, infertility, and altered body image and libido in these patients and suggest appropriate treatment interventions. PMID:28382300

  1. Chronic kidney disease screening methods and its implication for Malaysia: an in depth review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almualm, Yasmin; Zaman Huri, Hasniza

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease has become a public health problem, imposing heath, social and human cost on societies worldwide. Chronic Kidney Disease remains asymptomatic till late stage when intervention cannot stop the progression of the disease. Therefore, there is an urgent need to detect the disease early. Despite the high prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia, screening is still lacking behind. This review discusses the strengths and limitations of current screening methods for Chronic Kidney Disease from a Malaysian point of view. Diabetic Kidney Disease was chosen as focal point as Diabetes is the leading cause of Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia. Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia includes a urine test for albuminuria and a blood test for serum creatinine. Recent literature indicates that albuminuria is not always present in Diabetic Kidney Disease patients and serum creatinine is only raised after substantial kidney damage has occurred.  Recently, cystatin C was proposed as a potential marker for kidney disease but this has not been studied thoroughly in Malaysia.  Glomerular Filtration Rate is the best method for measuring kidney function and is widely estimated using the Modification of Diet for Renal Disease equation. Another equation, the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration Creatinine equation was introduced in 2009. The new equation retained the precision and accuracy of the Modification of Diet for Renal Disease equation at GFR 60ml/min/1.73m2. In Asian countries, adding an ethnic coefficient to the equation enhanced its performance. In Malaysia, a multi-ethnic Asian population, the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation should be validated and the Glomerular Filtration Rate should be reported whenever serum creatinine is ordered. Reporting estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate will help diagnose patients who would have been otherwise missed if only albuminuria and serum creatinine are measured.

  2. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE RAAS blockade and diastolic heart failure in chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, Casper F. M.; Navis, Gerjan

    New data from Ahmed et al. show that discharge prescriptions for renin-angiotensin-aldosterone inhibitor therapy are associated with a significant reduction in all-cause mortality in elderly patients with diastolic heart failure and chronic kidney disease (CKD). These observational data support the

  3. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-05-06

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD.

  4. Chronic kidney disease in disadvantaged populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Garcia-Garcia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The increased burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD in disadvantaged populations is due to both global factors and population-specific issues. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to care contribute to health care disparities and exacerbate the negative effects of genetic or biological predisposition. Provision of appropriate renal care to these populations requires a two-pronged approach: expanding the reach of dialysis through development of low-cost alternatives that can be practiced in remote locations, and implementation and evaluation of cost-effective prevention strategies. Kidney transplantation should be promoted by expansion of deceased donor transplant programs and use of inexpensive, generic immunosuppressive drugs. The message of World Kidney Day 2015 is that a concerted attack against the diseases that lead to end-stage renal disease, by increasing community outreach, better education, improved economic opportunity, and access to preventive medicine for those at highest risk, could end the unacceptable relationship between CKD and disadvantage in these communities.

  5. Aging and physiological changes of the kidneys including changes in glomerular filtration rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Carlos G; Oreopoulos, Dimitrios G

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the structural changes in the kidney associated with aging, physiological changes in renal function are also found in older adults, such as decreased glomerular filtration rate, vascular dysautonomia, altered tubular handling of creatinine, reduction in sodium reabsorption and potassium secretion, and diminished renal reserve. These alterations make aged individuals susceptible to the development of clinical conditions in response to usual stimuli that would otherwise be compensated for in younger individuals, including acute kidney injury, volume depletion and overload, disorders of serum sodium and potassium concentration, and toxic reactions to water-soluble drugs excreted by the kidneys. Additionally, the preservation with aging of a normal urinalysis, normal serum urea and creatinine values, erythropoietin synthesis, and normal phosphorus, calcium and magnesium tubular handling distinguishes decreased GFR due to normal aging from that due to chronic kidney disease. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Recent Developments in Epigenetics of Acute and Chronic Kidney Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Marpadga A.; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-01-01

    The growing epidemic of obesity and diabetes, the aging population as well as prevalence of drug abuse has led to significant increases in the rates of the closely associated acute and chronic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, evidence shows that parental behavior and diet can affect the phenotype of subsequent generations via epigenetic transmission mechanisms. These data suggest a strong influence of the environment on disease susceptibility and that, apart from genetic susceptibility, epigenetic mechanisms need to be evaluated to gain critical new information about kidney diseases. Epigenetics is the study of processes that control gene expression and phenotype without alterations in the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications, including cytosine DNA methylation and covalent post translational modifications of histones in chromatin are part of the epigenome, the interface between the stable genome and the variable environment. This dynamic epigenetic layer responds to external environmental cues to influence the expression of genes associated with disease states. The field of epigenetics has seen remarkable growth in the past few years with significant advances in basic biology, contributions to human disease, as well as epigenomics technologies. Further understanding of how the renal cell epigenome is altered by metabolic and other stimuli can yield novel new insights into the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. In this review, we have discussed the current knowledge on the role of epigenetic mechanisms (primarily DNA me and histone modifications) in acute and chronic kidney diseases, and their translational potential to identify much needed new therapies. PMID:25993323

  7. Recent developments in epigenetics of acute and chronic kidney diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Marpadga A; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-08-01

    The growing epidemic of obesity and diabetes, the aging population as well as prevalence of drug abuse has led to significant increases in the rates of the closely associated acute and chronic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, evidence shows that parental behavior and diet can affect the phenotype of subsequent generations via epigenetic transmission mechanisms. These data suggest a strong influence of the environment on disease susceptibility and that, apart from genetic susceptibility, epigenetic mechanisms need to be evaluated to gain critical new information about kidney diseases. Epigenetics is the study of processes that control gene expression and phenotype without alterations in the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications, including cytosine DNA methylation and covalent post-translational modifications of histones in chromatin, are part of the epigenome, the interface between the stable genome and the variable environment. This dynamic epigenetic layer responds to external environmental cues to influence the expression of genes associated with disease states. The field of epigenetics has seen remarkable growth in the past few years with significant advances in basic biology, contributions to human disease, as well as epigenomics technologies. Further understanding of how the renal cell epigenome is altered by metabolic and other stimuli can yield novel new insights into the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. In this review, we have discussed the current knowledge on the role of epigenetic mechanisms (primarily DNAme and histone modifications) in acute and chronic kidney diseases, and their translational potential to identify much needed new therapies.

  8. The Cerebrovascular-Chronic Kidney Disease Connection: Perspectives and Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wei Ling; Huisa, Branko N; Fisher, Mark

    2017-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an independent risk factor for the development of cerebrovascular disease, particularly small vessel disease which can manifest in a variety of phenotypes ranging from lacunes to microbleeds. Small vessel disease likely contributes to cognitive dysfunction in the CKD population. Non-traditional risk factors for vascular injury in uremia include loss of calcification inhibitors, hyperphosphatemia, increased blood pressure variability, elastinolysis, platelet dysfunction, and chronic inflammation. In this review, we discuss the putative pathways by which these mechanisms may promote cerebrovascular disease and thus increase risk of future stroke in CKD patients.

  9. Human Kidney Tubule-Specific Gene Expression Based Dissection of Chronic Kidney Disease Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Pazit Beckerman; Chengxiang Qiu; Jihwan Park; Nora Ledo; Yi-An Ko; Ae-Seo Deok Park; Sang-Youb Han; Peter Choi; Matthew Palmer; Katalin Susztak

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has diverse phenotypic manifestations including structural (such as fibrosis) and functional (such as glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria) alterations. Gene expression profiling has recently gained popularity as an important new tool for precision medicine approaches. Here we used unbiased and directed approaches to understand how gene expression captures different CKD manifestations in patients with diabetic and hypertensive CKD. Transcriptome data from ni...

  10. Dietary sodium in chronic kidney disease: a comprehensive approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Julie A; Cavanaugh, Kerri L

    2010-01-01

    Despite existing guidelines, dietary sodium intake among people worldwide often exceeds recommended limits. Research evidence is growing in both animal and human studies showing indirect and direct adverse consequences of high dietary sodium on the kidney. In patients with kidney disease, dietary sodium may have important effects on proteinuria, efficacy of antiproteinuric pharmacologic therapy, hypertension control, maintaining an optimal volume status, and immunosuppressant therapy. Dietary sodium intake is an important consideration in patients with all stages of chronic kidney disease, including those receiving dialysis therapy or those who have received a kidney transplant. We review in detail the dietary sodium recommendations suggested by various organizations for patients with kidney disease. Potential barriers to successfully translating current sodium intake guidelines into practice include poor knowledge about the sodium content of food among both patients and providers, complex labeling information, patient preferences related to taste, and limited support for modifications in public policy. Finally, we offer existing and potential solutions that may assist providers in educating and empowering patients to effectively manage their dietary sodium intake.

  11. Original Research Risk factors for chronic kidney disease among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    data in Nigeria have reported that kidney diseases account for six to 12 percent of medical ... Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and often goes undetected and undiagnosed until the disease is well advanced and kidney failure is imminent. .... urinary tract infection and history of cancer compared with the controls.

  12. Metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney, and cardiovascular diseases: role of adipokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, Manfredi; Canale, Maria Paola; Rodia, Giuseppe; Di Daniele, Nicola; Lauro, Davide; Scuteri, Angelo; Cardillo, Carmine

    2011-03-07

    Obesity is a chronic disease, whose incidence is alarmingly growing. It is associated with metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular complications. These complications are clustered in the metabolic syndrome (MetS) leading to high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity predisposes to diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephrosclerosis, and focal and segmental glomerular sclerosis and represents an independent risk factor for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Albuminuria is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Microalbuminuria has been described as early manifestation of MetS-associated kidney damage and diabetic nephropathy. Obesity and MetS affect renal physiology and metabolism through mechanisms which include altered levels of adipokines such as leptin and adiponectin, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Secretory products of adipose tissue also deeply and negatively influence endothelial function. A better understanding of these interactions will help in designing more effective treatments aimed to protect both renal and cardiovascular systems.

  13. Metabolic Syndrome, Chronic Kidney, and Cardiovascular Diseases: Role of Adipokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfredi Tesauro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a chronic disease, whose incidence is alarmingly growing. It is associated with metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular complications. These complications are clustered in the metabolic syndrome (MetS leading to high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity predisposes to diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephrosclerosis, and focal and segmental glomerular sclerosis and represents an independent risk factor for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Albuminuria is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs. Microalbuminuria has been described as early manifestation of MetS-associated kidney damage and diabetic nephropathy. Obesity and MetS affect renal physiology and metabolism through mechanisms which include altered levels of adipokines such as leptin and adiponectin, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Secretory products of adipose tissue also deeply and negatively influence endothelial function. A better understanding of these interactions will help in designing more effective treatments aimed to protect both renal and cardiovascular systems.

  14. Use of sevelamer in chronic kidney disease: beyond phosphorus control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Osorio, Laura; Zambrano, Diana Pazmiño; Gracia-Iguacel, Carolina; Rojas-Rivera, Jorge; Ortiz, Alberto; Egido, Jesus; González Parra, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Sevelamer is a non-calcium phosphate binder used in advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and in dialysis for hyperphosphataemia control. Several experimental, observational studies and clinical trials have shown that sevelamer has pleiotropic effects, beyond hyperphosphataemia control, including actions on inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid profile and atherogenesis, vascular calcification, endothelial dysfunction and the reduction of several uremic toxins. This is the biological basis for its global effect on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. This review focuses on these pleiotropic actions of sevelamer and their impact on cardiovascular health, with the experience published after more than ten years of clinical expertise. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  15. Prevalence estimates of chronic kidney disease in Canada: results of a nationally representative survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Paul; Vasa, Priya; Brenner, Darren; Iglar, Karl; McFarlane, Phil; Morrison, Howard; Badawi, Alaa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney disease is an important risk factor for death and cardiovascular-related morbidity, but estimates to date of its prevalence in Canada have generally been extrapolated from the prevalence of end-stage renal disease. We used direct measures of kidney function collected from a nationally representative survey population to estimate the prevalence of chronic kidney disease among Canadian adults. Methods: We examined data for 3689 adult participants of cycle 1 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2007–2009) for the presence of chronic kidney disease. We also calculated the age-standardized prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors by chronic kidney disease group. We cross-tabulated the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) with albuminuria status. Results: The prevalence of chronic kidney disease during the period 2007–2009 was 12.5%, representing about 3 million Canadian adults. The estimated prevalence of stage 3–5 disease was 3.1% (0.73 million adults) and albuminuria 10.3% (2.4 million adults). The prevalence of diabetes, hypertension and hypertriglyceridemia were all significantly higher among adults with chronic kidney disease than among those without it. The prevalence of albuminuria was high, even among those whose eGFR was 90 mL/min per 1.73 m2 or greater (10.1%) and those without diabetes or hypertension (9.3%). Awareness of kidney dysfunction among adults with stage 3–5 chronic kidney disease was low (12.0%). Interpretation: The prevalence of kidney dysfunction was substantial in the survey population, including individuals without hypertension or diabetes, conditions most likely to prompt screening for kidney dysfunction. These findings highlight the potential for missed opportunities for early intervention and secondary prevention of chronic kidney disease. PMID:23649413

  16. Comparison of clinical outcomes of coronary artery stent implantation in patients with end-stage chronic kidney disease including hemodialysis for three everolimus eluting (EES) stent designs: Bioresorbable polymer-EES, platinum chromium-EES, and cobalt chrome-EES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takao; Hatada, Katsuharu; Kishi, Syohei; Fuse, Koichi; Fujita, Satoshi; Ikeda, Yoshio; Takahashi, Minoru; Matsubara, Taku; Okabe, Masaaki; Aizawa, Yoshifusa

    2017-11-22

    New-generation bioresorbable polymer-everolimus eluting stents (BP-EES) are available. This study aimed to compare the clinical outcomes for BP-EES compared to more established stent designs, namely the platinum chromium-EES (PtCr-EES) and cobalt chrome-EES(CoCr-EES) in patients with the end-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) including hemodialysis (HD). One-hundred-forty-one consecutive stents (BP-EES [n = 44], PtCr-EES [n = 45], and CoCr-EES [n = 52]) were implanted in 104 patients with CKD. All patients underwent a follow-up coronary angiography at 12 months after implantation. End-stage CKD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <30 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , or the need for HD. The following outcome variables were compared among the three stent groups after implantation and the 12-month follow-up: target lesion revascularization (TLR), stent thrombosis (ST), and major adverse cardiac event (MACE). Minimal stent diameter (MSD) and %diameter-stenosis (%DS) were measured using quantitative coronary angiography. The overall rate of TLR and MACE was 14.6% and 30.8%, respectively, with no incidence of ST. Immediately after implantation, the MSD (P = 0.22) and %DS (P = 0.42) were equivalent among the three groups. However, at the 12-month follow-up, a tendency towards higher TLR was observed for the BP-EES group (22.7%) compared with the PtCr-EES (8.8%) and CoCr-EES (9.6%) groups (P = 0.07). Late loss in lumen diameter was also significantly greater for the BP-EES (0.51 ± 0.64 mm) group than either the PtCr-EES (0.20 ± 0.61 mm) and CoCr-EES (0.25 ± 0.70 mm) groups (P = 0.03). BP-EES might increase the risk of in-stent restenosis in patients with end-stage of CKD or the need for HD. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Exploring sleep disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease

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    Nigam G

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaurav Nigam,1 Macario Camacho,2 Edward T Chang,2 Muhammad Riaz3 1Division of Sleep Medicine, Clay County Hospital, Flora, IL, 2Division of Otolaryngology, Sleep Surgery and Sleep Medicine, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI, 3Division of Sleep Medicine, Astria Health Center, Grandview, WA, USA Abstract: Kidney disorders have been associated with a variety of sleep-related disorders. Therefore, researchers are placing greater emphasis on finding the role of chronic kidney disease (CKD in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome. Unfortunately, the presence of other sleep-related disorders with CKDs and non-CKDs has not been investigated with the same clinical rigor. Recent studies have revealed that myriad of sleep disorders are associated with CKDs. Furthermore, there are a few non-CKD-related disorders that are associated with sleep disorders. In this narrative review, we provide a balanced view of the spectrum of sleep disorders (as identified in International Classification of Sleep disorders-3 related to different types of renal disorders prominently including but not exclusively limited to CKD. Keywords: kidney disease, sleep disorders, obstructive sleep apnea, parasomnias, restless legs syndrome, chronic kidney disease, insomnia

  18. Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease in a Nigerian Family Practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global public health problem, with a greater burden and prohibitive cost of care particularly in developing countries. This study determined the prevalence of chronic kidney disease and identified its associated risk factors in patients attending the Family Practice Clinic, Wesley ...

  19. Correlates and management of anaemia of chronic kidney disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anaemia is a common complication of chronic kidney disease. There is paucity of published local and regional data regarding its associated factors and management. Objective: To assess the correlates and management of anaemia in chronic kidney disease. Design: Cross sectional descriptive study

  20. Frailty in elderly people with chronic kidney disease

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    Maria Eugenia Portilla Franco

    2016-11-01

    Frailty can be reversed, which is why a study of frailty in patients with chronic kidney disease is of particular interest. This article aims to describe the association between ageing, frailty and chronic kidney disease in light of the most recent and relevant scientific publications.

  1. Cardiovascular risk factors in childhood chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Midhat Elmacı

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are the principal cause of morbidityand mortality among child and adults with chronicrenal disease. Recent data demonstrate a high incidenceand prevalence of traditional and uremia related cardiovascularrisk factors in children. This review summarizesthe current literature on cardiovascular risk factors, mortalityand morbidity in children with chronic kidney disease.Key words: Child, chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular

  2. Treatment and Prevention of Common Complications of Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Sheikh Salahuddin Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a worldwide public health problem with an increasing incidence and prevalence. Outcomes of CKD include not only complications of decreased kidney function and cardiovascular disease but also kidney failure causing increased morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, CKD is often undetected and undertreated because of its insidious onset, variable progression, and length of time to overt kidney failure. Diabetes is now the leading cause of CKD requiring renal replacement therapy in many parts of the world, and its prevalence is increasing disproportionately in the developing countries. This review article outlines the current recommendations from various clinical guidelines and research studies for treatment, prevention and delaying the progression of both CKD and its common complications such as hypertension, anemia, renal osteodystrophy, electrolyte and acid-base imbalance, and hyperlipidemia. Recommendations for nutrition in CKD and measures adopted for early diabetic kidney disease to prevent further progression have also been reviewed. There is strong evidence that early detection and management of CKD can prevent or reduce disease progression, decrease complications and improve outcomes. Evidence supports that achieving optimal glucose control, blood pressure, reduction in albuminuria with a multifactorial intervention slows the progression of CKD. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-II receptor antagonists are most effective because of their unique ability to decrease proteinuria, a factor important for the progression of CKD.

  3. Determinants of renal shape in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazato, Takashi; Ikehira, Hiroo; Imasawa, Toshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    The determinants of renal shape are not well established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the renal shape, as measured by ultrasound, and the clinical characteristics in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. The study included 121 CKD patients who had undergone kidney biopsy. The renal shape was defined by: (1) the renal shape index: renal length/(renal width + renal thickness) and (2) the renal width/length. IgA nephritis patients (excluding patients with diabetes), comprised the largest subgroup (n = 49) and were analyzed separately. The correlation analyses and two-sample Student's t test results showed that age, eGFR, BMI, cortex volume fraction measured by MRI (cortex volume/renal volume), percentage of global sclerosis, weight, sex, hypertension and diabetes were significantly correlated with the renal shape in both kidneys. In a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis, old age and high BMI were independently associated with plump kidney. As for the left renal shape index, low cortex volume fraction was also independently associated with plump kidney. In the IgA nephritis patient subgroup, the cortex volume fraction was the most significant factor contributing to the left renal shape index (r = 0.50, p renal shape than renal function in CKD patients. The left renal cortex volume fraction was also an independent determinant and a more important factor in IgA nephritis patients.

  4. Hypoxia — a Leading Factor of Chronic Kidney Disease Progression

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    O.Yu. Lysianska

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent data indicate the involvement of hypoxia in the formation of kidney fibrosis and progression of chronic renal disease. One of the main factors in the chain of damage in the tissue oxygen deficiency is a hypoxia-induced factor. Understanding the process of kidney damage during hypoxia can complement the concept of nephroprotection in patients with chronic kidney disease, will provide an opportunity to improve the guidelines on the management of this group of patients.

  5. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Toyoda, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease, defined by a decreased glomerular filtration rate or albuminuria, is recognized as a major global health burden, mainly because it is an established risk factor for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The magnitude of the effect of chronic kidney disease on incident stroke seems to be higher in persons of Asian ethnicity. Since the kidney and brain share unique susceptibilities to vascular injury due to similar anatomical and functional features of small arter...

  6. Vascular Stiffness in Children With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savant, Jonathan D; Betoko, Aisha; Meyers, Kevin E C; Mitsnefes, Mark; Flynn, Joseph T; Townsend, Raymond R; Greenbaum, Larry A; Dart, Allison; Warady, Bradley; Furth, Susan L

    2017-05-01

    Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is a measure of arterial stiffness associated with cardiovascular events in the general population and in adults with chronic kidney disease. However, few data exist regarding cfPWV in children with chronic kidney disease. We compared observed cfPWV assessed via applanation tonometry in children enrolled in the CKiD cohort study (Chronic Kidney Disease in Children) to normative data in healthy children and examined risk factors associated with elevated cfPWV. cfPWV Z score for height/gender and age/gender was calculated from and compared with published pediatric norms. Multivariable linear regression was used to assess the relationship between cfPWV and age, gender, race, body mass index, diagnosis, urine protein-creatinine ratio, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, number of antihypertensive medications, uric acid, and serum low-density lipoprotein. Of the 95 participants with measured cfPWV, 60% were male, 19% were black, 46% had glomerular cause of chronic kidney disease, 22% had urine protein-creatinine ratio 0.5 to 2.0 mg/mg and 9% had >2.0 mg/mg, mean age was 15.1 years, average mean arterial pressure was 80 mm Hg, and median glomerular filtration rate was 63 mL/min per 1.73 m 2 Mean cfPWV was 5.0 m/s (SD, 0.8 m/s); mean cfPWV Z score by height/gender norms was -0.1 (SD, 1.1). cfPWV increased significantly with age, mean arterial pressure, and black race in multivariable analysis; no other variables, including glomerular filtration rate, were independently associated with cfPWV. In this pediatric cohort with mild kidney dysfunction, arterial stiffness was comparable to that of normal children. Future research is needed to examine the impact of chronic kidney disease progression on arterial stiffness and associated cardiovascular parameters in children. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Does treating obesity stabilize chronic kidney disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atray Naveen K

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a growing health issue in the Western world. Obesity, as part of the metabolic syndrome adds to the morbidity and mortality. The incidence of diabetes and hypertension, two primary etiological factors for chronic renal failure, is significantly higher with obesity. We report a case with morbid obesity whose renal function was stabilized with aggressive management of his obesity. Case report A 43-year old morbidly obese Caucasian male was referred for evaluation of his chronic renal failure. He had been hypertensive with well controlled blood pressure with a body mass index of 46 and a baseline serum creatinine of 4.3 mg/dl (estimated glomerular filtration rate of 16 ml/min. He had failed all conservative attempts at weight reduction and hence was referred for a gastric by-pass surgery. Following the bariatric surgery he had approximately 90 lbs. weight loss over 8-months and his serum creatinine stabilized to 4.0 mg/dl. Conclusion Obesity appears to be an independent risk factor for renal failure. Targeting obesity is beneficial not only for better control of hypertension and diabetes, but also possibly helps stabilization of chronic kidney failure.

  8. Evidence-based guidelines for the management of hypertension in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, Janis M

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is common in children with chronic kidney disease and early evidence suggests that it is a modifiable risk factor for renal and cardiovascular outcomes. Recommendations for blood pressure management in children with chronic kidney disease can be found in various clinical practice guidelines including the 4th Task Force Report, the European Society of Hypertension pediatric recommendations, and the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI) and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines for the management of blood pressure in chronic kidney disease. Unfortunately, as pediatric trial evidence is limited, there are discrepancies in the recommendations that may lead to inconsistent clinical care and practice variation. This article reviews the strength of evidence behind each of the clinical practice guideline recommendations regarding blood pressure assessment, treatment targets, and first-line antihypertensive medications. The benefits and cautions of use of clinical practice guidelines are described with emphasis on the importance of reading beyond the summary statements.

  9. Cerebral small vessel disease and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease, defined by a decreased glomerular filtration rate or albuminuria, is recognized as a major global health burden, mainly because it is an established risk factor for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The magnitude of the effect of chronic kidney disease on incident stroke seems to be higher in persons of Asian ethnicity. Since the kidney and brain share unique susceptibilities to vascular injury due to similar anatomical and functional features of small artery diseases, kidney impairment can be predictive of the presence and severity of cerebral small vessel diseases. Chronic kidney disease has been reported to be associated with silent brain infarcts, cerebral white matter lesions, and cerebral microbleeds, independently of vascular risk factors. In addition, chronic kidney disease affects cognitive function, partly via the high prevalence of cerebral small vessel diseases. Retinal artery disease also has an independent relationship with chronic kidney disease and cognitive impairment. Stroke experts are no longer allowed to be ignorant of chronic kidney disease. Close liaison between neurologists and nephrologists can improve the management of cerebral small vessel diseases in kidney patients.

  10. Thyroid Disorders and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mohamedali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones play a very important role regulating metabolism, development, protein synthesis, and influencing other hormone functions. The two main hormones produced by the thyroid are triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4. These hormones can also have significant impact on kidney disease so it is important to consider the physiological association of thyroid dysfunction in relation to chronic kidney disease (CKD. CKD has been known to affect the pituitary-thyroid axis and the peripheral metabolism of thyroid hormones. Low T3 levels are the most common laboratory finding followed by subclinical hypothyroidism in CKD patients. Hyperthyroidism is usually not associated with CKD but has been known to accelerate it. One of the most important links between thyroid disorders and CKD is uremia. Patients who are appropriately treated for thyroid disease have a less chance of developing renal dysfunction. Clinicians need to be very careful in treating patients with low T3 levels who also have an elevation in TSH, as this can lead to a negative nitrogen balance. Thus, clinicians should be well educated on the role of thyroid hormones in relation to CKD so that proper treatment can be delivered to the patient.

  11. Phosphorus and Nutrition in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio González-Parra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with renal impairment progressively lose the ability to excrete phosphorus. Decreased glomerular filtration of phosphorus is initially compensated by decreased tubular reabsorption, regulated by PTH and FGF23, maintaining normal serum phosphorus concentrations. There is a close relationship between protein and phosphorus intake. In chronic renal disease, a low dietary protein content slows the progression of kidney disease, especially in patients with proteinuria and decreases the supply of phosphorus, which has been directly related with progression of kidney disease and with patient survival. However, not all animal proteins and vegetables have the same proportion of phosphorus in their composition. Adequate labeling of food requires showing the phosphorus-to-protein ratio. The diet in patients with advanced-stage CKD has been controversial, because a diet with too low protein content can favor malnutrition and increase morbidity and mortality. Phosphorus binders lower serum phosphorus and also FGF23 levels, without decreasing diet protein content. But the interaction between intestinal dysbacteriosis in dialysis patients, phosphate binder efficacy, and patient tolerance to the binder could reduce their efficiency.

  12. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  13. Next Step in Chronic Kidney Disease Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.D. Ivanov

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers are the basis of renoprotection therapy in chronic kidney disease. Parallel to decrease of glomerular filtration rate, there is an increase in the activity of the sympathetic nervous system, and the number of functio­ning nephrons reduces, which requires a change of treatment regimen. Reducing the risk of cardiovascular events on the background of increased hypertension probably dictates the need for a priority administration of sympatholytics, calcium channel blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers withdrawal. ARAMONEL formula: ARAMONEL — AR(BA(CEIMO(xonidineNE(bivololL(ercandipine is changed to MNELD — M(oxonidineNE(bivololL(ercandipineD(iuretic that is used by us in recent years. Combined use of torsemide and xipamide is allowed. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers withdrawal requires evidence, which may be obtained in STOP-ACEi trial.

  14. Skin manifestations of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Mendez, J C; Vazquez-Martinez, O; Ocampo-Candiani, J

    2015-10-01

    Skin manifestations associated with chronic kidney disease are very common. Most of these conditions present in the end stages and may affect the patient's quality of life. Knowledge of these entities can contribute to establishing an accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Severe renal pruritus is associated with increased mortality and a poor prognosis. Nail exploration can provide clues about albumin and urea levels. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a preventable disease associated with gadolinium contrast. Comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus and secondary hyperparathyroidism, can lead to acquired perforating dermatosis and calciphylaxis, respectively. Effective and innovative treatments are available for all of these conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  15. Dermatological Disorders in Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Aparna Shah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dermatological conditions are common complications of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD affecting all most all patients. Present study aimed to evaluate the dermatological conditions and their association with age, sex and severity of CKD - without and with maintenance hemodialysis (MHD. Methods: It is a cross sectional and comparative study. Eighty-three patients with established CKD, without MHD (n=35 and with MHD (n= 48, attending nephrology unit, Bir Hospital and Shree Birendra Hospital from June 2008 to May 2009 were examined for dermatological disorders. Results: The mean age of patients were 46+15.6 years with male to female ratio of 1.8:1. Comparison of CKD without MHD and with MHD showed no statistical difference of age, sex, duration of treatment, blood urea and haemoglobin and significant difference of serum creatinine (5.3 + 3.0 mg/dl vs 9.1 + 4.5 mg/dl, p<0.001 respectively. Dermatological conditions were found in 100% CKD patients with pallor 91.5%, xerosis 75.9%, pigmentary changes 65%, pruritus 60.2%, skin infection 36.9%, vascular changes 16.8%, mucosal changes 67.4%, hair changes 59%, non -specific nail changes 81.9% and specific nail changes14.4%,. Specific (23.2% vs. 8.4%, p<0.03 and non- specific (91.4% vs 75%, p < 0.05 nail changes and hair abnormalities (74.3% vs. 47.9%, p<0.01 were significantly higher in CKD without MHD. Conclusions: Dermatological conditions are present in all CKD patients with or without MHD. A further prospective study is necessary to find out pathophysiology and beneficial effect of dialysis and transplantation in these conditions. Key words: chronic kidney disease, dermatological disorder, maintenance hemodialysis.

  16. Chronic kidney disease and bleeding risk in patients at high cardiovascular risk: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocak, G; Rookmaaker, M B; Algra, A; de Borst, G J; Doevendans, P A; Kappelle, L J; Verhaar, M C; Visseren, F L

    2018-01-01

    Essentials The association between chronic kidney disease and bleeding is unknown. We followed 10 347 subjects at high cardiovascular risk for bleeding events. Chronic kidney disease was associated with a 1.5-fold increased bleeding risk. Especially albuminuria rather than decreased kidney function was associated with bleeding events. Background There are indications that patients with chronic kidney disease have an increased bleeding risk. Objectives To investigate the association between chronic kidney disease and bleeding in patients at high cardiovascular risk. Methods We included 10 347 subjects referred to the University Medical Center Utrecht (the Netherlands) from September 1996 to February 2015 for an outpatient visit with classic risk factors for arterial disease or with symptomatic arterial disease (Second Manifestation of Arterial disease [SMART] cohort). Patients were staged according to the KDIGO guidelines, on the basis of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria, and were followed for the occurrence of major hemorrhagic events until March 2015. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for bleeding were calculated with Cox proportional hazards analyses. Results The incidence rate for bleeding in subjects with chronic kidney disease was 8.0 per 1000 person-years and that for subjects without chronic kidney disease was 3.5 per 1000 person-years. Patients with chronic kidney disease (n = 2443) had a 1.5-fold (95% CI 1.2-1.9) increased risk of bleeding as compared with subjects without chronic kidney disease (n = 7904) after adjustment. Subjects with an eGFR of Chronic kidney disease is a risk factor for bleeding in patients with classic risk factors for arterial disease or with symptomatic arterial disease, especially in the presence of albuminuria. © 2017 University Medical Center Utrecht. Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis © 2017 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  17. Chronic kidney disease among children in Guatemala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Cerón

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the distribution of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD in Guatemala, estimate incidence and prevalence of pediatric end-stage renal disease (ESRD, and estimate time to progress to ESRD. METHODS: This study analyzed the registry of the only pediatric nephrology center in Guatemala, from 2004-2013. Incidence and prevalence were calculated for annual periods. Moran's index for spatial autocorrelation was used to determine significance of geographic distribution of incidence. Time to progress to ESRD and associated risk factors were calculated with multivariate Cox regression. RESULTS: Of 1 545 patients from birth to less than 20 years of age, 432 had chronic renal failure (CRF. Prevalence and incidence of ESRD were 4.9 and 4.6 per million age-related population, respectively. Incidence was higher for the Pacific coast and Guatemala City. The cause of CRF was undetermined in 43% of patients. Average time to progress to ESRD was 21.9 months; factors associated with progression were: older age, diagnosis of glomerulopathies, and advanced-stage CKD at consultation. CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence and incidence of ESRD in Guatemala are lower than in other countries. This may reflect poor access to diagnosis. Areas with higher incidence and large proportion of CKD of undetermined cause are compatible with other studies from the geographic subregion. Findings on progression to ESRD may reflect delayed referral.

  18. Renal resistive index and mortality in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Clarisse; Thomas, George; Schold, Jesse D; Arrigain, Susana; Gornik, Heather L; Nally, Joseph V; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2015-08-01

    Renal resistive index (RRI) measured by Doppler ultrasonography is associated with cardiovascular events and mortality in hypertensive, diabetic, and elderly patients. We studied the factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70) and its associations with mortality in chronic kidney disease patients without renal artery stenosis. We included 1962 patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 59 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) who also had RRI measured (January 1, 2005, to October 2011) from an existing chronic kidney disease registry. Participants with renal artery stenosis (60%-99% or renal artery occlusion) were excluded. Multivariable logistic regression model was used to study factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70), and its association with mortality was studied using Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazards model. Hypertension was prevalent in >90% of the patients. In the multivariable logistic regression, older age, female sex, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, higher systolic blood pressure, and the use of β blockers were associated with higher odds of having RRI≥0.70. During a median follow-up of 2.2 years, 428 patients died. After adjusting for covariates, RRI≥0.70 was associated with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.65; Pchronic kidney disease. Noncardiovascular/non-malignancy-related deaths were higher in those with RRI≥0.70. RRI≥0.70 is associated with higher mortality in hypertensive chronic kidney disease patients without clinically significant renal artery stenosis after accounting for other significant risk factors. Its evaluation may allow early identification of those who are at risk thereby potentially preventing or delaying adverse outcomes. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Reproductive Endocrinology in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients: New Approaches to Old Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onder, Songul; Akbar, Sana; Schmidt, Rebecca J

    2016-11-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common yet underreported problem among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This article will review sexual dysfunction in both genders, pregnancy outcomes, and best practices for successful full-term pregnancy in patients with CKD, including those with dialysis dependence and kidney transplants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Definition and classification of chronic kidney disease : A position statement from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, Andrew S.; Eckardt, Kai Uwe; Tsukamoto, Yusuke; Levin, Adeera; Coresh, Josef; Rossert, Jerome; de Zeeuw, Dick; Hostetter, Thomas H.; Lameire, Norbert; Eknoyan, Garabed

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem, with adverse outcomes of kidney failure, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and premature death. A simple definition and classification of kidney disease is necessary for international development and implementation of clinical practice

  1. Subclinical cerebral abnormalities in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hiroshi; Takashima, Yuki; Hashimoto, Manabu; Uchino, Akira; Yuzuriha, Takefumi

    2013-01-01

    Impaired kidney function or chronic kidney disease (CKD), as measured by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), is associated with incident stroke risk. However, few studies have examined the relationship between CKD and subclinical cerebral abnormalities. We examined 675 elderly subjects (mean age 69.9 years), who were living independently at home without apparent dementia, using magnetic resonance imaging. Serum creatinine values, measured by the enzymatic method, were used for the Japanese equation of eGFR. Subclinical lacunar infarction, deep white matter lesions, and periventricular hyperintensities were detected in 88 (13.0%), 240 (35.6%) and 158 (23.4%) of the 675 participants, respectively. In the forward stepwise method of logistic analysis, age (OR 2.081/10, 95% CI 1.541-2.810), hypertension (OR 3.656, 95% CI 2.184-6.119), diabetes mellitus (OR 1.961, 95% CI 1.007-3.820), alcohol intake (OR 2.130, 95% CI 1.283-3.535), and eGFR <45 ml/min/1.73 m(2) were significant factors concerning subclinical lacunar infarction. CKD defined as eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) was not significantly associated with subclinical lacunar infarction. Decreased eGFR was not a significant factor associated with white matter lesions (WMLs). Age (OR 2.781/10, 95% CI 2.252-3.435), hypertension (OR 1.746, 95% CI 1.231-2.477), diabetes mellitus (OR 1.854, 95% CI 1.070-3.213), but not eGFR were significant factors concerning WMLs. The present study showed that community-dwelling elderly subjects with late stage 3 CKD were at high risk for prevalent subclinical lacunar infarction. The identification of CKD-specific modifiable risk factors for SBI and WMLs is of increased importance for prevention of subclinical brain ischemic lesions. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. [DIAGNOSTIC APPROACH TO PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vučak, J; VučK, E; Balint, I

    2016-12-01

    According to consensus definition, chronic kidney disease (CKD) includes urinary excretion of albumin >30 mg/day and/ or reduction in kidney function defined as a decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 for a period longer than three months, in the presence of kidney tissue damage verified by imaging or histologic methods. In developed world, the first cause of CKD is diabetes, followed by arterial hypertension, and the less frequent causes are inflammatory disease (glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis) and congenital condition (polycystic kidney disease). Currently, there is valid classification under the acronym CGA, where C stands for the cause, G for glomerular filtration rate (GFR category) and A for the level of albuminuria category. In early stages, patients usually have no symptoms but there are changes in creatinine values, estimated GFR (eGFR) reduction and presence of albuminuria, especially in patients at risk. Determining the grade of renal impairment is important because of different approaches to treatment, monitoring, expected complications, and patient education. Due to improved diagnostic methods and population aging, CKD is diagnosed ever more increasingly. Family physicians should be familiar with the basic principles of screening and diagnosis of CKD to provide them with appropriate care in collaboration with secondary and tertiary health care.

  3. Vitamin D deficiency aggravates chronic kidney disease progression after ischemic acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Garcia Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Despite a significant improvement in the management of chronic kidney disease (CKD, its incidence and prevalence has been increasing over the years. Progressive renal fibrosis is present in CKD and involves the participation of several cytokines, including Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1. Besides cardiovascular diseases and infections, several studies show that Vitamin D status has been considered as a non-traditional risk factor for the progression of CKD. Given the importance of vitamin D in the maintenance of essential physiological functions, we studied the events involved in the chronic kidney disease progression in rats submitted to ischemia/reperfusion injury under vitamin D deficiency (VDD.Rats were randomized into four groups: Control; VDD; ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI; and VDD+IRI. At the 62 day after sham or IRI surgery, we measured inulin clearance, biochemical variables and hemodynamic parameters. In kidney tissue, we performed immunoblotting to quantify expression of Klotho, TGF-β, and vitamin D receptor (VDR; gene expression to evaluate renin, angiotensinogen, and angiotensin-converting enzyme; and immunohistochemical staining for ED1 (macrophages, type IV collagen, fibronectin, vimentin, and α-smooth mucle actin. Histomorphometric studies were performed to evaluate fractional interstitial area.IRI animals presented renal hypertrophy, increased levels of mean blood pressure and plasma PTH. Furthermore, expansion of the interstitial area, increased infiltration of ED1 cells, increased expression of collagen IV, fibronectin, vimentin and α-actin, and reduced expression of Klotho protein were observed. VDD deficiency contributed to increased levels of plasma PTH as well as for important chronic tubulointerstitial changes (fibrosis, inflammatory infiltration, tubular dilation and atrophy, increased expression of TGF-β1 and decreased expression of VDR and Klotho protein observed in VDD+IRI animals.Through inflammatory

  4. The definition, classification, and prognosis of chronic kidney disease: a KDIGO Controversies Conference report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levey, Andrew S; de Jong, Paul E; Coresh, Josef; El Nahas, Meguid; Astor, Brad C; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Gansevoort, Ron T; Kasiske, Bertram L; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe

    2011-07-01

    The definition and classification for chronic kidney disease was proposed by the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-KDOQI) in 2002 and endorsed by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) in 2004. This framework promoted increased attention to chronic kidney disease in clinical practice, research and public health, but has also generated debate. It was the position of KDIGO and KDOQI that the definition and classification should reflect patient prognosis and that an analysis of outcomes would answer key questions underlying the debate. KDIGO initiated a collaborative meta-analysis and sponsored a Controversies Conference in October 2009 to examine the relationship of estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and albuminuria to mortality and kidney outcomes. On the basis of analyses in 45 cohorts that included 1,555,332 participants from general, high-risk, and kidney disease populations, conference attendees agreed to retain the current definition for chronic kidney disease of a GFR 30 mg/g, and to modify the classification by adding albuminuria stage, subdivision of stage 3, and emphasizing clinical diagnosis. Prognosis could then be assigned based on the clinical diagnosis, stage, and other key factors relevant to specific outcomes. KDIGO has now convened a workgroup to develop a global clinical practice guideline for the definition, classification, and prognosis of chronic kidney disease.

  5. Exploring sleep disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Gaurav; Camacho, Macario; Chang, Edward T; Riaz, Muhammad

    2018-01-01

    Kidney disorders have been associated with a variety of sleep-related disorders. Therefore, researchers are placing greater emphasis on finding the role of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome. Unfortunately, the presence of other sleep-related disorders with CKDs and non-CKDs has not been investigated with the same clinical rigor. Recent studies have revealed that myriad of sleep disorders are associated with CKDs. Furthermore, there are a few non-CKD-related disorders that are associated with sleep disorders. In this narrative review, we provide a balanced view of the spectrum of sleep disorders (as identified in International Classification of Sleep disorders-3) related to different types of renal disorders prominently including but not exclusively limited to CKD.

  6. Chronic Kidney Disease, Basal Insulin Glargine, and Health Outcomes in People with Dysglycemia: The ORIGIN Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papademetriou, Vasilios; Nylen, Eric S; Doumas, Michael; Probstfield, Jeff; Mann, Johannes F E; Gilbert, Richard E; Gerstein, Hertzel C

    2017-12-01

    Early stages of chronic kidney disease are associated with an increased cardiovascular risk in patients with established type 2 diabetes and macrovascular disease. The role of early stages of chronic kidney disease on macrovascular outcomes in prediabetes and early type 2 diabetes mellitus is not known. In the Outcome Reduction with an Initial Glargine Intervention (ORIGIN) trial, the introduction of insulin had no effect on cardiovascular outcomes compared with standard therapy. In this post hoc analysis of ORIGIN, we compared cardiovascular outcomes in subjects without to those with mild (Stages 1-2) or moderate chronic kidney disease (Stage 3). Τwo co-primary composite cardiovascular outcomes were assessed. The first was the composite end point of nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or death from cardiovascular causes; and the second was a composite of any of these events plus a revascularization procedure, or hospitalization for heart failure. Several secondary outcomes were prespecified, including microvascular outcomes, incident diabetes, hypoglycemia, weight, and cancers. Complete renal function data were available in 12,174 of 12,537 ORIGIN participants. A total of 8114 (67%) had no chronic kidney disease, while 4060 (33%) had chronic kidney disease stage 1-3. When compared with nonchronic kidney disease participants, the risk of developing the composite primary outcome (nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, or cardiovascular death) in those with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease was 87% higher; hazard ratio (HR) 1.87; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.71-2.04 (P chronic kidney disease 1-3 was also associated with a greater than twofold higher risk for both all-cause mortality (HR 2.17; 95% CI, 1.98-2.38; P chronic kidney disease had significantly higher risk for nonfatal myocardial infarction (50%), nonfatal stroke (68%), any stroke (84%), the above composite primary end point plus revascularization or heart failure requiring

  7. Chronic Kidney Disease in an Adult with Propionic Acidemia

    OpenAIRE

    Vernon, H. J.; Bagnasco, S.; Hamosh, A.; Sperati, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    We report an adult male with classic propionic acidemia (PA) who developed chronic kidney disease in the third decade of his life. This diagnosis was recognized by an increasing serum creatinine and confirmed by reduced glomerular filtration on a 99mTc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) scan. Histopathology of the kidney showed moderate glomerulo- and tubulointerstitial fibrosis with very segmental mesangial IgA deposits. This is the second reported case of kidney disease in an individual...

  8. Dietary protein intake and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Gang Jee; Obi, Yoshitsugu; Tortorici, Amanda R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2017-01-01

    High-protein intake may lead to increased intraglomerular pressure and glomerular hyperfiltration. This can cause damage to glomerular structure leading to or aggravating chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hence, a low-protein diet (LPD) of 0.6-0.8 g/kg/day is often recommended for the management of CKD. We reviewed the effect of protein intake on incidence and progression of CKD and the role of LPD in the CKD management. Actual dietary protein consumption in CKD patients remains substantially higher than the recommendations for LPD. Notwithstanding the inconclusive results of the 'Modification of Diet in Renal Disease' (MDRD) study, the largest randomized controlled trial to examine protein restriction in CKD, several prior and subsequent studies and meta-analyses appear to support the role of LPD on retarding progression of CKD and delaying initiation of maintenance dialysis therapy. LPD can also be used to control metabolic derangements in CKD. Supplemented LPD with essential amino acids or their ketoanalogs may be used for incremental transition to dialysis especially on nondialysis days. The LPD management in lieu of dialysis therapy can reduce costs, enhance psychological adaptation, and preserve residual renal function upon transition to dialysis. Adherence and adequate protein and energy intake should be ensured to avoid protein-energy wasting. A balanced and individualized dietary approach based on LPD should be elaborated with periodic dietitian counseling and surveillance to optimize management of CKD, to assure adequate protein and energy intake, and to avoid or correct protein-energy wasting.

  9. End Stage and Chronic Kidney Disease:Associations with Renal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eRusso

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a well known association between end stage renal disease and the development of kidney cancer in the native kidney of patients requiring renal replacement therapy. There is now emerging evidence that lesser degrees of renal insufficiency (chronic kidney disease, CKD are also associated with an increased likelihood of cancer in general and kidney cancer in particular. Nephro pathological changes are commonly observed in the non tumor bearing portions of kidney resected at the time of partial and radical nephrectomy. In addition, patients with renal cancer are more likely to have CKD at the time of diagnosis and treatment than the general population. The exact mechanism by which renal insufficiency transforms normal kidney cells into tumor cells is not known. Possible mechanisms include uremic immune inhibition or increased exposure to circulating toxins not adequately cleared by the kidneys. Surgeons managing kidney tumors must have an increased awareness of their patient’s renal functional status as they plan their resection. Kidney sparing approaches, including partial nephrectomy or active surveillance in older and morbidly ill patients, can prevent CKD or delay the further decline in renal function which is well documented with radical nephrectomy. Despite emerging evidence that partial nephrectomy provides equivalent local tumor control to radical nephrectomy while at the same time preventing CKD, this operation remains under utilized in the United States and abroad. Increased awareness of the bi directional relationship between kidney function and kidney cancer is essential in the contemporary management of kidney cancer.

  10. Chronic kidney disease in Nigeria: primary care physicians must ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic Kidney disease (CKD) is one of the world's major public health problems and the prevalence of Kidney failure is rising steadily. ... Only thirty percent (30%) of the doctors tested for proteinuria in thirty nine percent (39%) of those they were treating for Diabetes Mellitus and only thirty five percent (35%) of the doctors ...

  11. Stroke and bleeding in atrial fibrillation with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Kamper, Anne-Lise

    2012-01-01

    Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions....

  12. Prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivera Stojceva-Taneva

    2016-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Our study showed that chronic kidney disease is frequent in the Republic of Macedonia and is associated with older age and diabetes. Diabetes had a significantly stronger association with CKD at younger age.

  13. Patient activation with knowledge, self-management and confidence in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michelle L; Zimmerman, Lani; Welch, Janet L; Hertzog, Melody; Pozehl, Bunny; Plumb, Troy

    2016-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a growing health problem on a global scale. The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease presents an urgent need to better understand the knowledge, confidence and engagement in self-managing the disease. This study examined group differences in patient activation and health-related quality of life, knowledge, self-management and confidence with managing chronic disease across all five stages of chronic kidney disease. The study employed a descriptive correlational design. Participants were recruited from five primary care, three nephrology clinics and one dialysis centre in two Midwestern cities in the United States. The convenience sample included 85 adults with hypertension, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease, including kidney failure, who spoke English. Seven measurements were used to collect data via telephone interviews with participants not receiving haemodialysis, and face-to-face interviews with those receiving haemodialysis at the beginning of their treatment session. Analyses indicated that half the participants were female (50.58%), the mean age was 63.21 years (SD = 13.11), and participants with chronic kidney disease stage 3 were the most activated. Post hoc differences were significant in patient activation and blood pressure self-management and anxiety across chronic kidney disease stages, excluding stage 5. Engaging patients in the self-management of their health care and enhancing patients' ability to self-manage their blood pressure may work to preserve kidney health. Healthcare providers should collaborate with patients to develop strategies that will maintain patients' health-related quality of life, like reducing anxiety as kidney disease progress. © 2015 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  14. Impaired vascular reactivity in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetzner, Fabian; Scholze, Alexandra; Wittstock, Antje

    2008-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) show increased cardiovascular morbidity. We hypothesized that vascular properties which can be routinely evaluated noninvasively are related to different stages of CKD and their clinical and biochemical characteristics.......Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) show increased cardiovascular morbidity. We hypothesized that vascular properties which can be routinely evaluated noninvasively are related to different stages of CKD and their clinical and biochemical characteristics....

  15. Potential Deleterious Effects of Vasopressin in Chronic Kidney Disease and Particularly Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, E.; Boertien, W. E.; Zietse, R.; Gansevoort, R. T.

    2011-01-01

    The antidiuretic hormone vasopressin is crucial for regulating free water clearance in normal physiology. However, it has also been hypothesized that vasopressin has deleterious effects on the kidney. Vasopressin is elevated in animals and patients with chronic kidney disease. Suppression of

  16. [Chronic kidney disease in 5 708 people receiving physical examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guo; Chen, Zhiheng; Zhang, Hao; Gong, Ni; Wang, Yan

    2014-04-01

    To investigate chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its risk factors in people receiving physical examination. This retrospective study included people over 20 years old who had physical examination in the Health Management Center of Third Xiangya Hospital from Janurary 2008 to June 2011. CKD and its risk factors as well as questionnaire were recorded. The risk factors were analyzed by multivariate logistic analysis. CKD was defined by kidney damage (microalbuminuria≥30 mg/L) and/or hematuria and/or reduced kidney function [evaluate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)physical examination reports were included. The detection rate of albuminuria, reduced renal function and hematuria was 25.0%, 1.7% and 1.1%. The detection rate of CKD was 25.6%, and detection rate of CKD stage 1-5 was 17.8%, 6.7%, 1.1%, 0 and 0, respectively. Multivariate logistic analysis indicated that diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, male, age, and smoking were the risk factors for CKD. Increasing physical activity was the protective factor against CKD. High prevalence of CKD in people receiving physical examination is found in Changsha, especially stage 1 and 2 CKD. Physical examination is important to screen CKD. Stopping smoking, control of blood glucose, blood pressure, blood lipids and increasing physical activity may help reduce the prevalence of CKD.

  17. Acid-Base and Electrolyte Disorders in Patients with and without Chronic Kidney Disease: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhondup, Tsering; Qian, Qi

    2017-12-01

    Kidneys play a pivotal role in the maintenance and regulation of acid-base and electrolyte homeostasis, which is the prerequisite for numerous metabolic processes and organ functions in the human body. Chronic kidney diseases compromise the regulatory functions, resulting in alterations in electrolyte and acid-base balance that can be life-threatening. In this review, we discuss the renal regulations of electrolyte and acid-base balance and several common disorders including metabolic acidosis, alkalosis, dysnatremia, dyskalemia, and dysmagnesemia. Common disorders in chronic kidney disease are also discussed. The most recent and relevant advances on pathophysiology, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and management of these conditions have been incorporated.

  18. Chronic kidney disease in an adult with propionic acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, H J; Bagnasco, S; Hamosh, A; Sperati, C J

    2014-01-01

    We report an adult male with classic propionic acidemia (PA) who developed chronic kidney disease in the third decade of his life. This diagnosis was recognized by an increasing serum creatinine and confirmed by reduced glomerular filtration on a (99m)Tc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) scan. Histopathology of the kidney showed moderate glomerulo- and tubulointerstitial fibrosis with very segmental mesangial IgA deposits. This is the second reported case of kidney disease in an individual with propionic acidemia possibly indicating that chronic kidney disease may be a late-stage complication of propionic acidemia. Additionally, this is the first description of the histopathology of kidney disease in an individual with propionic acidemia. As more cases emerge, the clinical course and spectrum of renal pathology in this disorder will be better defined.

  19. Association of variants at UMOD with chronic kidney disease and kidney stones-role of age and comorbid diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gudbjartsson, D.F.; Holm, H.; Indridason, O.S.; Thorleifsson, G.; Edvardsson, V.; Sulem, P.; Vegt, F. de; D'Ancona, F.C.H.; Heijer, M. den; Wetzels, J.F.M.; Franzson, L.; Rafnar, T.; Kristjansson, K.; Bjornsdottir, U.S.; Eyjolfsson, G.I.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Kong, A.; Palsson, R.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Stefansson, K.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem that is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. To search for sequence variants that associate with CKD, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) that included a total of 3,203 Icelandic cases and 38,782

  20. Diagnostic approach to chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The following are indications for a kidney biopsy: • Patients with CKD whose kidneys are normal or near normal in size, where the diagnosis cannot be made by other means. • Patients with a definite diagnosis, where the histology is essential for appropriate management and prognosis, e.g. lupus nephritis, vasculitis. Yes.

  1. Risk factors for chronic kidney disease among patients at Olabisi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk factors for chronic kidney disease among patients at Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital in Sagamu, Nigeria: A retrospective cohort study. ... Sixty-four percent of the cases had history of chronic use of analgesic compared with 10.3% of the controls (p < 0.001). Conclusions: CKD is mostly found among men ...

  2. Chronic kidney disease and 10-year risk of cardiovascular death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzmann, Martin J; Carlsson, Axel C; Hammar, Niklas; Ivert, Torbjörn; Walldius, Göran; Jungner, Ingmar; Wändell, Per; Ärnlöv, Johan

    2016-07-01

    In recent clinical guidelines, individuals with chronic kidney disease are considered to have a similar 10-year absolute risk of cardiovascular death as individuals with diabetes or established cardiovascular disease. There is limited evidence to support this claim. We investigated the 10-year risk for cardiovascular death in individuals with moderate or severe chronic kidney disease (glomerular filtration rate of 30-60 or disease. The inclusion criteria, exposure, study outcome and follow-up period adhered strictly to the definitions of the European Society of Cardiology guidelines. The absolute 10-year risk of cardiovascular death was 3.9% and 14.0% in individuals with moderate and severe chronic kidney disease, respectively, but was substantially lower in women and in younger individuals. The risk in individuals with prevalent diabetes and cardiovascular disease was approximately two and three times higher compared to the risk estimate for moderate chronic kidney disease (hazard ratio (HR) 4.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.8-4.5 and HR 6.2, 95% CI 5.7-6.7 vs. HR 2.3 95% CI 2.0-2.6, respectively) while the risk for individuals with severe chronic kidney disease appeared more congruent to that of diabetes and cardiovascular disease (HR 5.5, 95% CI 3.3-8.9). Although moderate chronic kidney disease is an independent predictor for an increased 10-year risk of cardiovascular death, only those with severe chronic kidney disease had similar risk to those with diabetes or cardiovascular disease. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  3. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Guillermina Miranda-Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN. Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30–300 mg/day, including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR or a mildly decreased GFR (60–89 mL/min/1.73 m2, with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is 300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β, producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS. The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase. The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health.

  4. Central Blood Pressure and Chronic Kidney Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie L. Cohen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension, diabetes, and proteinuria are well-recognized risk factors for progressive kidney function loss. However, despite excellent antihypertensive and antidiabetic drug therapies, which also often lower urinary protein excretion, there remains a significant reservoir of patients with chronic kidney disease who are at high risk for progression to end-stage kidney disease. This has led to the search for less traditional cardiovascular risk factors that will help stratify patients at risk for more rapid kidney disease progression. Among these are noninvasive estimates of vascular structure and function. Arterial stiffness, manifested by the pulse wave velocity in the aorta, has been established in a number of studies as a significant risk factor for kidney disease progression and cardiovascular endpoints. Much less well studied in chronic kidney disease are measures of central arterial pressures. In this paper we cover the physiology behind the generation of the central pulse wave contour and the studies available using these approaches and conclude with some speculations on the rationale for why measurements of central pressure may be informative for the study of chronic kidney disease progression.

  5. Comorbidities as risk factors of chronic kidney disease in HIV-infected persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Marchewka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Significant survival prolongation in HIV-infected patients due to effective antiretroviral therapy is connected with increasing prevalence of chronic non-infective diseases in this population, among them chronic kidney disease. The pathogenesis of kidney disease in the setting of HIV includes conditions specific for HIV infection: direct effect of the virus, stage of immunodeficiency and drug toxicity. Chronic comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, are additional significant risk factors of kidney disease. In HIV-infected individuals some distinct features of these conditions are observed, which are partly related to the virus and antiretroviral therapy. The article summarizes the effect of comorbidities on kidney function in HIV-infected persons.

  6. Insights from the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copelovitch, Lawrence; Warady, Bradley A; Furth, Susan L

    2011-08-01

    Over the last 5 years, the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) prospective cohort study has enrolled close to 600 children ages 1 to 16 years with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD). The main purpose of this interim report is to review the initial cross-sectional data and conclusions derived from the clinical studies conducted within CKiD in the context of findings from other pediatric CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) registry and cohort studies. In particular, special emphasis was placed on studying four aspects of chronic kidney disease in children, including the identification of risk factors related to disease progression, the impact of CKD on neurocognition and quality of life (QoL), the cardiovascular morbidity associated with CKD, and identifying the causes and effects of growth failure in the context of mild to moderate kidney failure.

  7. Multiparametric Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging in Assessment of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Perlman, Alan; Kalache, Safa; Berman, Nathaniel; Seshan, Surya; Salvatore, Steven; Smith, Lindsey; Wehrli, Natasha; Waldron, Levi; Kodali, Hanish; Chevalier, James

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the value of multiparametric quantitative ultrasound imaging in assessing chronic kidney disease (CKD) using kidney biopsy pathologic findings as reference standards. We prospectively measured multiparametric quantitative ultrasound markers with grayscale, spectral Doppler, and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in 25 patients with CKD before kidney biopsy and 10 healthy volunteers. Based on all pathologic (glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy, arteriosclerosis, and edema) scores, the patients with CKD were classified into mild (no grade 3 and quantitative ultrasound parameters included kidney length, cortical thickness, pixel intensity, parenchymal shear wave velocity, intrarenal artery peak systolic velocity (PSV), end-diastolic velocity (EDV), and resistive index. We tested the difference in quantitative ultrasound parameters among mild CKD, moderate to severe CKD, and healthy controls using analysis of variance, analyzed correlations of quantitative ultrasound parameters with pathologic scores and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using Pearson correlation coefficients, and examined the diagnostic performance of quantitative ultrasound parameters in determining moderate CKD and an estimated GFR of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. There were significant differences in cortical thickness, pixel intensity, PSV, and EDV among the 3 groups (all P quantitative ultrasound parameters, the top areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for PSV and EDV were 0.88 and 0.97, respectively, for determining pathologic moderate to severe CKD, and 0.76 and 0.86 for estimated GFR of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . Moderate to good correlations were found for PSV, EDV, and pixel intensity with pathologic scores and estimated GFR. The PSV, EDV, and pixel intensity are valuable in determining moderate to severe CKD. The value of shear wave velocity in

  8. Pregnancy across the spectrum of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladunewich, Michelle A; Melamad, Nir; Bramham, Kate

    2016-05-01

    Management of the pregnant woman with chronic kidney disease is difficult for both nephrologists and obstetricians. Prepregnancy counselling with respect to risk stratification, optimization of maternal health prior to pregnancy, as well as management of the many potential pregnancy-associated complications in this complex patient population remains challenging due to the paucity of large, well-designed clinical studies. Furthermore, the heterogeneity of disease and the relative infrequency of pregnancy, particularly in more advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, leaves many clinicians feeling ill prepared to manage these pregnancies. As such, counselling is imprecise and management varies substantially across centers. All pregnancies in women with chronic kidney disease can benefit from a collaborative multidisciplinary approach with a team that consists of nephrologists experienced in the management of kidney disease in pregnancy, maternal-fetal medicine specialists, high-risk pregnancy nursing staff, dieticians, and pharmacists. Further access to skilled neonatologists and neonatal intensive care unit support is essential given the risks for preterm delivery in this patient population. The goal of this paper is to highlight some of the data that currently exist in the literature, provide management strategies for the practicing nephrologist at all stages of chronic kidney disease, and explore some of the knowledge gaps where future multinational collaborative research efforts should concentrate to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with kidney disease across the globe. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease: an integrated clinical syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Kimmel, Paul L

    2012-09-01

    The previous conventional wisdom that survivors of acute kidney injury (AKI) tend to do well and fully recover renal function appears to be flawed. AKI can cause end-stage renal disease (ESRD) directly, and increase the risk of developing incident chronic kidney disease (CKD) and worsening of underlying CKD. In addition, severity, duration, and frequency of AKI appear to be important predictors of poor patient outcomes. CKD is an important risk factor for the development and ascertainment of AKI. Experimental data support the clinical observations and the bidirectional nature of the relationships between AKI and CKD. Reductions in renal mass and nephron number, vascular insufficiency, cell cycle disruption, and maladaptive repair mechanisms appear to be important modulators of progression in patients with and without coexistent CKD. Distinction between AKI and CKD may be artificial. Consideration should be given to the integrated clinical syndrome of diminished GFR, with acute and chronic stages, where spectrum of disease state and outcome is determined by host factors, including the balance of adaptive and maladaptive repair mechanisms over time. Physicians must provide long-term follow-up to patients with first episodes of AKI, even if they presented with normal renal function.

  10. Nutrition and growth in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Lesley; Mak, Robert H

    2011-09-27

    Poor growth in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a marker of disease severity and of quality of care. Causes are multifactorial, and include malnutrition, cachexia, hematological factors, endocrine problems and metabolic abnormalities. In this Review, we focus on the impact of inadequate nutrition on growth disturbances in children with CKD, and discuss all aspects of the epidemiology, causes and potential treatments. Regional variations in resources may be a factor that contributes to the observed differences. Successful nutritional management requires a multidisciplinary team that includes not only doctors but also skilled nurses and dieticians. Extremes of body mass index, representing undernutrition and overnutrition, are associated with poor outcomes and should be avoided when designing therapeutic strategies for optimizing nutrition and growth in children with CKD. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of cachexia and wasting in patients with CKD could lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  11. Predialysis chronic kidney disease correlates with increased risk of pyogenic liver abscess: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2017-10-01

    The incidence of pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan appears to be much higher than that in western countries. However, little is known about the incidence of pyogenic liver abscess among patients with predialysis chronic kidney disease. The objective of this study was to assess the association between predialysis chronic kidney disease and the risk of pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan. This population-based, retrospective, cohort study was conducted to analyse the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 81118 subjects aged 20-84 years with newly diagnosed chronic kidney disease as the predialysis chronic kidney disease group since 2000-2010, and 81118 randomly selected subjects without chronic kidney disease as the nonchronic kidney disease group. The predialysis chronic kidney disease group and the nonchronic kidney disease group were matched with sex, age and comorbidities. The incidence of pyogenic liver abscess at the end of 2013 was calculated in both groups. Subjects who currently received dialysis therapy before the endpoint were excluded from the study. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to assess the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the risk of pyogenic liver abscess associated with predialysis chronic kidney disease and other comorbidities including alcohol-related disease, biliary stone, chronic liver disease and diabetes mellitus. The overall incidence of pyogenic liver abscess was 1·65-fold higher in the predialysis chronic kidney disease group than that in the nonchronic kidney disease group (1·38 vs. 0·83 per 1000 person-years, 95% CI 1·59, 1·71). After adjustment for covariables, the adjusted HR of pyogenic liver abscess was 1·51(95% CI 1·30, 1·76) for the predialysis chronic kidney disease group, comparing with the nonchronic kidney disease group. In addition, the adjusted HR would increase to 3·31 (95% CI 2·61, 4·19) for subjects with predialysis chronic

  12. Exploring sleep disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nigam, Gaurav; Camacho, Macario; Chang, Edward T; Riaz, Muhammad

    2018-01-01

    Kidney disorders have been associated with a variety of sleep-related disorders. Therefore, researchers are placing greater emphasis on finding the role of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the development of obstructive sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome. Unfortunately, the presence of other sleep-related disorders with CKDs and non-CKDs has not been investigated with the same clinical rigor. Recent studies have revealed that myriad of sleep disorders are associated with CKDs. Furthermore,...

  13. Exploring sleep disorders in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nigam G; Camacho M; Chang ET; Riaz M

    2018-01-01

    Gaurav Nigam,1 Macario Camacho,2 Edward T Chang,2 Muhammad Riaz3 1Division of Sleep Medicine, Clay County Hospital, Flora, IL, 2Division of Otolaryngology, Sleep Surgery and Sleep Medicine, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI, 3Division of Sleep Medicine, Astria Health Center, Grandview, WA, USA Abstract: Kidney disorders have been associated with a variety of sleep-related disorders. Therefore, researchers are placing greater emphasis on finding the role of chronic kidney disease (CKD)...

  14. Close pathological correlations between chronic kidney disease and reproductive organ-associated abnormalities in female cotton rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichii, Osamu; Nakamura, Teppei; Irie, Takao; Kouguchi, Hirokazu; Sotozaki, Kozue; Horino, Taro; Sunden, Yuji; Elewa, Yaser Hosny Ali; Kon, Yasuhiro

    2018-03-01

    population has led to a concomitant age-related increase in chronic kidney disease. Moreover, the global prevalence of patients with chronic kidney disease is gradually increasing, which poses a serious public health problem. The limited number of spontaneous chronic kidney disease animal models, which resemble chronic kidney disease pathogenesis in elderly individuals, is a major limitation in the development of experimental and curative medicines for chronic kidney disease. This pathological study clarified that sex-related factors, including hormones, and abnormalities of the female reproductive system, such as pyometra, are closely associated with chronic kidney disease development by using cotton rats ( Sigmodon hispidus). Further, ovariectomy inhibited the phenotypes of the female reproductive system, immunological abnormalities, and chronic kidney disease. Thus, this laboratory rodent serves as a novel and useful spontaneous chronic kidney disease model to elucidate the candidate disease factors and the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease both in human and experimental medicine.

  15. Treatment of Chronic Kidney Diseases with Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shougang eZhuang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs induce deacetylation of both histone and non-histone proteins and play a critical role in the modulation of physiological and pathological gene expression. Pharmacological inhibition of HDAC has been reported to attenuate progression of renal fibrogenesis in obstructed kidney and reduce cyst formation in polycystic kidney disease. HDAC inhibitors (HDACis are also able to ameliorate renal lesions in diabetes nephropathy, lupus nephritis, aristolochic acid nephropathy and transplant nephropathy. The beneficial effects of HDACis are associated with their anti-fibrosis, anti-inflammation, and immmunosuppressant effects. In this review, we summarize recent advances on the treatment of various chronic kidney diseases with HDACis in preclinical models.

  16. Chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in agricultural communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaguer, Miguel; Herrera, Raúl; Orantes, Carlos M

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, Central America, Egypt, India and Sri Lanka have reported a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in agricultural communities, predominantly among male farmworkers. This essay examines the disease's case definitions, epidemiology (disease burden, demographics, associated risk factors) and causal hypotheses, by reviewing published findings from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Sri Lanka, Egypt and India. The range of confirmed chronic kidney disease prevalence was 17.9%-21.1%. Prevalence of reduced glomerular filtration (homemade alcohol use and family history of chronic kidney disease. There is no strong evidence for a single cause, and multiple environmental, occupational and social factors are probably involved. Further etiological research is needed, plus interventions to reduce preventable risk factors.

  17. The path to chronic kidney disease following acute kidney injury: a neonatal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Swasti; Ng, Kar Hui; Mammen, Cherry

    2017-02-01

    The risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized critically ill neonatal populations without primary renal disease continues to be high, in both term and premature infants. Observational studies have revealed high rates of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in survivors of neonatal AKI. Proposed mechanisms underlying the progression of CKD following AKI include nephron loss and hyperfiltration, vascular insufficiency and maladaptive repair mechanisms. Other factors, including prematurity and low birth weight, have an independent relationship with the development of CKD, but they may also be positive effect modifiers in the relationship of AKI and CKD. The large degree of heterogeneity in the literature on AKI in the neonatal population, including the use of various AKI definitions and CKD outcomes, has hampered the medical community's ability to properly assess the relationship of AKI and CKD in this vulnerable population. Larger prospective cohort studies with control groups which utilize recently proposed neonatal AKI definitions and standardized CKD definitions are much needed to properly quantify the risk of CKD following an episode of AKI. Until there is further evidence to guide us, we recommend that all neonates with an identified episode of AKI should have an appropriate longitudinal follow-up in order to identify CKD at its earliest stages.

  18. The experiences of close persons caring for people with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on conservative kidney management: contested discourses of ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Joe; Myers, Jason; Smith, Glenn; Higgs, Paul; Burns, Aine; Hopkins, Katherine; Jones, Louise

    2014-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease stage 5 is a global health challenge in the context of population ageing across the world. The range of treatment options available to patients at all ages has increased and includes transplantation and dialysis. However, these options are often seen as inappropriate for older frailer patients who are now offered the option of conservative kidney management, which is presented as a non-invasive alternative to dialysis, involving symptom management and addressing psychosocial needs. In this study, we conducted qualitative interviews with 26 close persons caring for someone with chronic kidney disease stage 5 in the United Kingdom to investigate how conservative kidney management interacted with implicit ideas of ageing, in both the experience of conservative kidney management and the understanding of the prognosis and future care of the kidney disease. Our findings highlighted participant confusion about the nature of conservative kidney management, which stems from an initial lack of clarity about how conservative kidney management differed from conventional treatments for chronic kidney disease stage 5. In particular, some respondents were not aware of the implicit palliative nature of the intervention or indeed the inevitable end-of-life issues. Although these findings can be situated within the context of communication failure, we would further argue that they also bring to the surface tensions in the discourses surrounding ageing and old age, drawing on the use of a 'natural' and a 'normal' paradigm of ageing. In the context of chronic kidney disease stage 5, more patients are being dialysed at older ages, but conservative kidney management is being advanced as a better option than dialysis in terms of quality of life and experience. However, in doing so, conservative kidney management implicitly draws on a notion of older age that echoes natural ageing rather than advocate a more interventionist approach. The role of discourses of ageing

  19. Patient satisfaction with a chronic kidney disease risk assessment service in community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheewala, Pankti A; Peterson, Gregory M; Zaidi, Syed Tabish R; Jose, Matthew D; Castelino, Ronald L

    2018-04-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important determinant of the feasibility and sustainability of community pharmacy screening services. However, few studies have evaluated this, with no such study performed for a chronic kidney disease risk assessment service. The aim was to determine patient satisfaction with a chronic kidney disease risk assessment service performed in community pharmacies. Community pharmacies in the state of Tasmania, Australia. An anonymous nine-item satisfaction survey, with Likert-type scales, was developed following a literature review of existing surveys. Reliability of the nine-item scale was determined using Cronbach's alpha. Patients were asked an additional question on willingness to pay, with choices of amount from $5 to $25. The satisfaction survey was mailed to 389 patients who participated in the chronic kidney disease risk assessment study. Patient level of satisfaction with and willingness to pay for the chronic kidney disease service. Responses from 143 participants were included in the final analysis. Cronbach's alpha for the nine-item satisfaction scale was 0.87. The majority of participants agreed that the time required to undergo the risk assessment process was justified (90.2%); overall, they were satisfied with the chronic kidney disease risk assessment service (90.0%) and they felt comfortable with the pharmacist referring their results to their doctor (88.9%). Of 136 participants who answered the question on willingness to pay, 62.9% indicated that they would pay for the chronic kidney disease service. Of these, 29.2, 25.8 and 19.1% were willing to pay $20, $10 and $5, respectively. Patient satisfaction with the community pharmacy-based chronic kidney disease risk assessment was high. These findings provide support for the implementation of the service within community pharmacy practice.

  20. Ameliorating Adriamycin-Induced Chronic Kidney Disease in Rats by Orally Administrated Cardiotoxin from Naja naja atra Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Hui Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies reported the oral administration of Naja naja atra venom (NNAV reduced adriamycin-induced chronic kidney damage. This study investigated the effects of intragastric administrated cardiotoxin from Naja naja atra venom on chronic kidney disease in rats. Wistar rats were injected with adriamycin (ADR; 6 mg/kg body weight via the tail vein to induce chronic kidney disease. The cardiotoxin was administrated daily by intragastric injection at doses of 45, 90, and 180 μg/kg body weight until the end of the protocol. The rats were placed in metabolic cages for 24 hours to collect urine, for determination of proteinuria, once a week. After 6 weeks, the rats were sacrificed to determine serum profiles relevant to chronic kidney disease, including albumin, total cholesterol, phosphorus, blood urea nitrogen, and serum creatinine. Kidney histology was examined with hematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid-Schiff, and Masson’s trichrome staining. The levels of kidney podocin were analyzed by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. We found that cardiotoxin reduced proteinuria and can improve biological parameters in the adriamycin-induced kidney disease model. Cardiotoxin also reduced adriamycin-induced kidney pathology, suggesting that cardiotoxin is an active component of NNAV for ameliorating adriamycin-induced kidney damage and may have a potential therapeutic value on chronic kidney disease.

  1. Nutrition in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... keep bones strong. When the kidneys don’t work normally, a child’s growth may slow down. The child’s health care team will work with the child’s caretakers to make sure the child gets the ...

  2. Sodium glucose transporter-2 inhibition has no renoprotective effects on non-diabetic chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiuyue; Steiger, Stefanie; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-04-01

    Sodium glucose transporter (SGLT)-2 inhibition has renoprotective effects in diabetic kidney disease. Whether similar effects can be achieved also in non-diabetic kidney disease is speculative. Chronic kidney disease was induced in C57BL/6N mice by feeding an oxalate-rich diet for 14 days, known to induce nephrocalcinosis-related tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis without directly affecting the glomerular compartment. Empagliflozin treatment started from day 0 of oxalate feeding had no effect on the decline of glomerular filtration rate, crystal deposition, blood urea nitrogen or serum creatinine levels on day 7 and 14. Tissue morphometry of tubular injury and kidney mRNA levels of kidney injury molecule-1 or tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 were comparable between empagliflozin- and vehicle-treated mice with oxalate nephropathy on day 7 and 14. Similarly, empagliflozin did not affect markers of interstitial fibrosis, including silver, alpha smooth muscle actin ( α SMA) and collagen 1 staining, and mRNA levels of fibronectin-1, collagen 1 α 1, fibroblast-specific protein-1, and transforming growth factor (TGF)- β 2 on day 7 and 14. Thus, the specific renoprotective mechanisms-of-action of SGLT2 inhibition in diabetic kidney disease do not apply to chronic oxalosis, a non-diabetic form of chronic kidney disease. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  3. New Pathogenic Concepts and Therapeutic Approaches to Oxidative Stress in Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Osorio-Alonso, Horacio

    2016-01-01

    In chronic kidney disease inflammatory processes and stimulation of immune cells result in overproduction of free radicals. In combination with a reduced antioxidant capacity this causes oxidative stress. This review focuses on current pathogenic concepts of oxidative stress for the decline...... of kidney function and development of cardiovascular complications. We discuss the impact of mitochondrial alterations and dysfunction, a pathogenic role for hyperuricemia, and disturbances of vitamin D metabolism and signal transduction. Recent antioxidant therapy options including the use of vitamin D...

  4. The German Chronic Kidney Disease (GCKD) study: design and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Bärthlein, Barbara; Baid-Agrawal, Seema; Beck, Andreas; Busch, Martin; Eitner, Frank; Ekici, Arif B; Floege, Jürgen; Gefeller, Olaf; Haller, Hermann; Hilge, Robert; Hilgers, Karl F; Kielstein, Jan T; Krane, Vera; Köttgen, Anna; Kronenberg, Florian; Oefner, Peter; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Reis, André; Schmid, Matthias; Schaeffner, Elke; Schultheiss, Ulla T; Seuchter, Susanne A; Sitter, Thomas; Sommerer, Claudia; Walz, Gerd; Wanner, Christoph; Wolf, Gunter; Zeier, Martin; Titze, Stephanie

    2012-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly recognized as a global health problem. The conditions leading to CKD, the health impact of CKD and the prognosis differ markedly between affected individuals. In particular, renal failure and cardiovascular mortality are competing risks for CKD patients. Opportunities for targeted intervention are very limited so far and require an improved understanding of the natural course of CKD, of the risk factors associated with various clinical end points and co-morbidities as well as of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. The German Chronic Kidney Disease (GCKD) study is a prospective observational national cohort study. It aims to enrol a total of 5000 patients with CKD of various aetiologies, who are under nephrological care, and to follow them for up to 10 years. At the time of enrolment, male and female patients have an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 30-60 mL/min×1.73 m2 or overt proteinuria in the presence of an eGFR>60 mL/min×1.73 m2. Standardized collection of biomaterials, including DNA, serum, plasma and urine will allow identification and validation of biomarkers associated with CKD, CKD progression and related complications using hypothesis-driven and hypothesis-free approaches. Patient recruitment and follow-up is organized through a network of academic nephrology centres collaborating with practising nephrologists throughout the country. The GCKD study will establish one of the largest cohorts to date of CKD patients not requiring renal replacement therapy. Similarities in its design with other observational CKD studies, including cohorts that have already been established in the USA and Japan, will allow comparative and joint analyses to identify important ethnic and geographic differences and to enhance opportunities for identification of relevant risk factors and markers.

  5. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Among Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Noha A; Hassanein, Safaa M; Leil, Marwa M; NasrAllah, Mohamed M

    2015-11-01

    To explore and compare complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practice among subsets of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal allograft recipients. Cross-sectional survey questionnaire. Three outpatient nephrology clinics and dialysis centers in Egypt. A total of 1005 subjects were included in the study (560 predialyis patients with CKD 3-4, 245 patients on hemodialysis, and 200 transplant recipients). Face to face interview with CKD patients. The survey inquired about epidemiological data, types, sources, and patterns of CAM used as well as the effect of CAM use on the patients' interaction with modern medicine and clinical caregivers. (1) Prevalence and types of CAM used by CKD patients; (2) Associations and correlates of CAM use including epidemiological features, impact of CAM use on adherence to conventional treatment and interaction of the users with modern medical systems; (3) Differences in CAM practice between subsets of CKD patients viz. hemodialysis patients, CKD 3-4, and transplant recipients. Overall, 522 patients (52%) were using CAM (64% of predialyis patients, 33% of dialysis patients, and 40.5% of transplant recipients, P transplant recipients were more likely to report P Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chronic kidney disease in children with unilateral renal tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Denis A; Ceccanti, Silvia; Frediani, Simone; Schiavetti, Amalia; Cozzi, Francesco

    2012-05-01

    In patients who have undergone nephrectomy lower stage chronic kidney disease may develop, which is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and overall mortality. We investigated whether the prevalence of lower stage chronic kidney disease is related to the amount of renal parenchyma excised in children with unilateral renal tumor. A total of 15 patients treated with nephrectomy and 10 treated with nephron sparing surgery were enrolled at a single academic center. The Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines were used to classify patients by chronic kidney disease stage based on estimated glomerular filtration rate values. The Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study equation and Schwartz equation were used in patients older and younger than 17 years, respectively. At a mean followup of more than 12 years 8 patients who had undergone nephrectomy and 1 treated with bilateral nephron sparing surgery presented with stage II chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate 60 to 89 ml/min/1.73 m(2)). Sequential measurements from diagnosis to 12 to 17 years postoperatively showed that stage II chronic kidney disease in patients who had undergone nephrectomy manifested as a negligible postoperative increase in mean ± SD estimated glomerular filtration rate (75.7 ± 25.5 vs 79.4 ± 3.9 ml/min/1.73 m(2), p = 0.6). Five of the 8 patients presented with stage II chronic kidney disease even before nephrectomy. The other 7 patients who had undergone nephrectomy and those treated with nephron sparing surgery presented with a significant postoperative increase in mean ± SD estimated glomerular filtration rate (81.1 ± 24 vs 102.3 ± 3 ml/min/1.73 m(2), p = 0.02, and 88.7 ± 2 vs 107.4 ± 14 ml/min/1.73 m(2), p = 0.005, respectively). A subset of children with unilateral renal tumor presents before and/or after nephrectomy, and not after nephron sparing surgery, with stage II chronic kidney disease, probably due to a reduced renal

  7. Urine Glycoprotein Profile Reveals Novel Markers for Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Vivekanandan-Giri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a significant public health problem, and progression to end-stage renal disease leads to dramatic increases in morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms underlying progression of disease are poorly defined, and current noninvasive markers incompletely correlate with disease progression. Therefore, there is a great need for discovering novel markers for CKD. We utilized a glycoproteomic profiling approach to test the hypothesis that the urinary glycoproteome profile from subjects with CKD would be distinct from healthy controls. N-linked glycoproteins were isolated and enriched from the urine of healthy controls and subjects with CKD. This strategy identified several differentially expressed proteins in CKD, including a diverse array of proteins with endopeptidase inhibitor activity, protein binding functions, and acute-phase/immune-stress response activity supporting the proposal that inflammation may play a central role in CKD. Additionally, several of these proteins have been previously linked to kidney disease implicating a mechanistic role in disease pathogenesis. Collectively, our observations suggest that the human urinary glycoproteome may serve as a discovery source for novel mechanism-based biomarkers of CKD.

  8. CT of the kidney in chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Kanji

    1988-01-01

    The transverse size of the kidneys was measured by CT, and CT findings of the kidneys were studied in 94 patients with chronic renal failure under hemodialysis (HD), 58 patients with chronic renal failure not under hemodialysis (CRF) and 100 controls. The transverse size of the kidneys decreased according to the deterioration of renal function. The ratio of the maximal renal transverse size to the minimal vertebral size, which the author proposed as a new criterion for renal atrophy, was 1.8 in controls, 1.2 in CRF and 0.8 in HD. A kidney smaller than the vertebral body indicated chronic renal failure. Characteristic CT features in CRF were mild renal atrophy and cystic changes (41.4 %). In HD, renal atrophy was more advanced, the occurrence of cystic changes was more frequent (64.9 %), and there were frequent renal (68.1 %) and aortic calcifications. Furthermore acquired cystic disease of the kidney (ACD) was observed (27.7 %) only in HD. In this study no renal neoplasm was found in ACD. However, several complications in HD, one perirenal hematoma and six hydronephroses, were observed. (author)

  9. Motivational Interviewing to Engage Patients in Chronic Kidney Disease Management

    OpenAIRE

    Martino, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) must manage numerous medical treatments and lifestyle changes that strain their treatment adherence. An important strategy to improve adherence is to activate the patients’ motivation to manage their CKD. This article describes an approach for enhancing patients’ motivation for change, called motivational interviewing (MI), a treatment that is increasingly being used in health care settings to counsel patients with chronic diseases. Its basic princip...

  10. Inflammation and nutrition in children with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Juan; Cheung, Wai W; Mak, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and nutritional imbalance are important comorbid conditions that correlate with poor clinical outcomes in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Nutritional disorders such as cachexia/protein energy wasting, obesity and growth retardation negatively impact the quality of life and disease progression in children with CKD. Inadequate nutrition has been associated with growth disturbances in children with CKD. On the other hand, over-nutrition and obesity are associated...

  11. Personalizing Longitudinal Care Coordination for Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Theresa A; Kasthurirathne, Suranga N; Norton, Jenna M; Narva, Andrew S

    2017-01-01

    Chronic care coordination efforts often focus on the needs of the healthcare team and not on the individual needs of each patient. However, developing a personalized care plan for patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) requires individual patient engagement with the health care team. We describe the development of a CKD e-care plan that focuses on patient specific needs and life goals, and can be personalized according to provider needs.

  12. Diet in chronic kidney disease in a Mediterranean African country

    OpenAIRE

    Kammoun, Khawla; Chaker, Hanen; Mahfoudh, Hichem; Makhlouf, Nouha; Jarraya, Faical; Hachicha, Jamil

    2017-01-01

    Background Mediterranean diet is characterized by low to moderate consumption of animal protein and high consumption of fruits, vegetables, bread, beans, nuts, seeds and other cereals. It has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. However, it is not suitable for chronic kidney disease because of high potassium intake. Discussion Tunisia is an emerging Mediterranean country with limited resources, a high prevalence of chronic hemodialysis treatment and high dialysis expen...

  13. At Risk for Kidney Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Causes of Chronic Kidney Disease Diabetes and high blood pressure are the most ... blood vessels in your kidneys. Other causes of kidney disease Other causes of kidney disease include a genetic ...

  14. Planning for Emergencies: A Guide for People with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planning for Emergencies A Guide for People with Chronic Kidney Disease Contents Planning for Emergencies .................................................................. 3 How can I ... Planning for Emergencies: A Guide for People With Chronic Kidney Disease ■ Planning for Emergencies: A Guide for Dialysis Facilities ■ ...

  15. Continuation of lithium after a diagnosis of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessing, L V; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Andersen, P K; Gerds, T A; Licht, R W

    2017-12-01

    To investigate whether continued lithium or anticonvulsant treatment after a first diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) was associated with progression to irreversible end-stage kidney disease. Nationwide cohort study including all individuals in Denmark in a period from 1995 to 2012 with a diagnosis of CKD and (i) a history of lithium treatment (N = 754, among whom 238 patients had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder) or (ii) a history of anticonvulsant treatment (N = 5.004, among whom 199 patients had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder). End-stage CKD was defined as chronic dialysis or renal transplantation. Continuing lithium (HR = 0.58 (95% CI: 0.37-0.90) and continuing anticonvulsants (HR = 0.53 (95% CI: 0.44-0.64) were associated with decreased rates of end-stage CKD. In the subcohorts of patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, continuing lithium was associated with decreased end-stage CKD (HR = 0.40 (95% CI: 0.17-0.98), whereas continuing anticonvulsants was not (HR = 0.70 (95% CI: 0.21-2.37). There were no interactions of continuing lithium and anticonvulsants. After an initial diagnosis of CKD, patients who are selected by their physicians to continue lithium treatment may not necessarily have an increased risk of developing end-stage CKD. Shifting to an anticonvulsant per se may not be associated with an advantage; however, this requires further investigation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Rescue therapy with Tanshinone IIA hinders transition of acute kidney injury to chronic kidney disease via targeting GSK3β

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chunming; Zhu, Wei; Yan, Xiang; Shao, Qiuyuan; Xu, Biao; Zhang, Miao; Gong, Rujun

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains challenging for clinical practice and poses a risk of developing progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) with no definitive treatment available yet. Tanshinone IIA, an active ingredient of Chinese herbal Salvia miltiorrhiza, has been widely used in Asia for the remarkable organoprotective activities. Its effect on established AKI, however, remains unknown. In mice with folic acid-induced AKI, delayed treatment with Tanshinone IIA, commenced early or late after injury, diminished renal expression of kidney injury markers, reduced apoptosis and improved kidney dysfunction, concomitant with mitigated histologic signs of AKI to CKD transition, including interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy, and with an ameliorated inflammatory infiltration in tubulointerstitium and a favored M2-skewed macrophage polarization. Mechanistically, Tanshinone IIA blunted glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3β overactivity and hyperactivation of its downstream mitogen-activated protein kinases that are centrally implicated in renal fibrogenesis and inflammation. Inhibition of GSK3β is likely a key mechanism mediating the therapeutic activity of Tanshinone IIA, because sodium nitroprusside, a GSK3β activator, largely offset its renoprotective effect. In confirmatory studies, rescue treatment with Tanshinone IIA likewise ameliorated ischemia/reperfusion-induced kidney destruction in mice. Our data suggest that Tanshinone IIA represents a valuable treatment that improves post-AKI kidney salvage via targeting GSK3β. PMID:27857162

  17. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponťuch, Peter

    The number of type 2 diabetic patients is increasing world-wide and a prediction of prevalence of chronic kidney disease up to 2025 in European diabetic population is alarming. Albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate are cardinal biochemical parameters in diagnostics of diabetic nephropathy. Following diagnostic methods are also used: renal ultrasonography, ophthalmoscopy and in not clarified cases renal biopsy. Long-term optimal glycemic control, efficient antihypertensive treatment by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, or angiotensin receptor blocker and recommended protein intake is a cornerstone of therapy. The research is presently focused on new pathophysiological mechanisms, as analysis of genome, microRNA, kidney injury biomarkers and proteomes.Key words: chronic kidney disease - type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  18. Endocrine Abnormalities in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczera, Piotr; Adamczak, Marcin; Wiecek, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease the alterations of the endocrine system may arise from several causes. The kidney is the site of degradation as well as synthesis of many different hormones. Moreover, a number of concomitant pathological conditions such as inflammation, metabolic acidosis and malnutrition may participate in the pathogenesis of endocrine abnormalities in this group of patients. The most pronounced endocrine abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease are the deficiencies of: calcitriol, testosterone, insulin-like growth factor and, erythropoietin (EPO). Additionally accumulation of several hormones, such as: prolactin, growth hormone and insulin frequently also occur. The clinical consequences of the abovementioned endocrine abnormalities are among others: anemia, infertility and bone diseases.

  19. Dyslipidemia in patients with chronic kidney disease: etiology and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikolasevic I

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ivana Mikolasevic,1,2 Marta Žutelija,3 Vojko Mavrinac,1 Lidija Orlic 2 1Department of Gastroenterology, 2Department of Nephrology, Dialysis and Kidney Transplantation, UHC Rijeka, 3School of Medicine, Rijeka, Croatia Abstract: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, including those with end-stage renal disease, treated with dialysis, or renal transplant recipients have an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD morbidity and mortality. Dyslipidemia, often present in this patient population, is an important risk factor for CVD development. Specific quantitative and qualitative changes are seen at different stages of renal impairment and are associated with the degree of glomerular filtration rate declining. Patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD have low high-density lipoproteins (HDL, normal or low total cholesterol (TC and low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol, increased triglycerides as well as increased apolipoprotein B (apoB, lipoprotein(a (Lp (a, intermediate- and very-low-density lipoprotein (IDL, VLDL; “remnant particles”, and small dense LDL particles. In patients with nephrotic syndrome lipid profile is more atherogenic with increased TC, LDL, and triglycerides. Lipid profile in hemodialysis (HD patients is usually similar to that in non-dialysis-dependent CKD patients. Patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD have more altered dyslipidemia compared to HD patients, which is more atherogenic in nature. These differences may be attributed to PD per se but may also be associated with the selection of dialytic modality. In renal transplant recipients, TC, LDL, VLDL, and triglycerides are elevated, whereas HDL is significantly reduced. Many factors can influence post-transplant dyslipidemia including immunosuppressive agents. This patient population is obviously at high risk; hence, prompt diagnosis and management are required to improve their clinical outcomes. Various studies have shown statins to be effective in the

  20. Human Kidney Tubule-Specific Gene Expression Based Dissection of Chronic Kidney Disease Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckerman, Pazit; Qiu, Chengxiang; Park, Jihwan; Ledo, Nora; Ko, Yi-An; Park, Ae-Seo Deok; Han, Sang-Youb; Choi, Peter; Palmer, Matthew; Susztak, Katalin

    2017-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has diverse phenotypic manifestations including structural (such as fibrosis) and functional (such as glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria) alterations. Gene expression profiling has recently gained popularity as an important new tool for precision medicine approaches. Here we used unbiased and directed approaches to understand how gene expression captures different CKD manifestations in patients with diabetic and hypertensive CKD. Transcriptome data from ninety-five microdissected human kidney samples with a range of demographics, functional and structural changes were used for the primary analysis. Data obtained from 41 samples were available for validation. Using the unbiased Weighted Gene Co-Expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) we identified 16 co-expressed gene modules. We found that modules that strongly correlated with eGFR primarily encoded genes with metabolic functions. Gene groups that mainly encoded T-cell receptor and collagen pathways, showed the strongest correlation with fibrosis level, suggesting that these two phenotypic manifestations might have different underlying mechanisms. Linear regression models were then used to identify genes whose expression showed significant correlation with either structural (fibrosis) or functional (eGFR) manifestation and mostly corroborated the WGCNA findings. We concluded that gene expression is a very sensitive sensor of fibrosis, as the expression of 1654 genes correlated with fibrosis even after adjusting to eGFR and other clinical parameters. The association between GFR and gene expression was mostly mediated by fibrosis. In conclusion, our transcriptome-based CKD trait dissection analysis suggests that the association between gene expression and renal function is mediated by structural changes and that there may be differences in pathways that lead to decline in kidney function and the development of fibrosis, respectively. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by

  1. Longitudinal assessment of myocardial function in childhood chronic kidney disease, during dialysis, and following kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumman, Rawan K; Ramroop, Ronand; Chanchlani, Rahul; Ghany, Mikaeel; Hebert, Diane; Harvey, Elizabeth A; Parekh, Rulan S; Mertens, Luc; Grattan, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Childhood chronic kidney disease (CKD) and dialysis are associated with increased long-term cardiovascular risk. We examined subclinical alterations in myocardial mechanics longitudinally in children with CKD, during dialysis, and following renal transplantation. Forty-eight children with CKD (stage III or higher) who received kidney transplants from 2008 to 2014 were included in a retrospective study and compared to 192 age- and sex-matched healthy children. Measurements of cardiac systolic and diastolic function were performed, and global longitudinal strain (GLS) and circumferential strain (GCS) were measured by speckle-tracking echocardiography at CKD, during dialysis, and 1 year following kidney transplantation. Mixed-effects modeling examined changes in GLS and GCS over different disease stages. Children with CKD had a mean age of 10 ± 5 years and 67% were male. Eighteen children received preemptive transplantation. Children with CKD had increased left ventricular mass, lower GLS, and impaired diastolic function (lower E/A ratio and E' velocities) than healthy children. Changes in left ventricular diastolic parameters persisted during dialysis and after renal transplantation. Dialysis was associated with reduced GLS compared to CKD (β = 1.6, 95% confidence interval 0.2-3.0); however, this was not significant after adjustment for systolic blood pressure and CKD duration. Post-transplantation GLS levels were similar to those at CKD assessment. GCS was unchanged during dialysis but significantly improved following transplantation. There are differences in diastolic parameters in childhood CKD that persist during dialysis and after transplantation. Systolic parameters are preserved, with significant improvement in systolic myocardial deformation following transplantation. The impact of persistent diastolic changes on long-term outcomes requires further investigation.

  2. Chronic Kidney Disease in Police Forces Households in Khartoum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: In the Police Forces Hypertension, Diabetes, Renal Insufficiency and Thyroid Derangement (HyDRIT) pilot study we explored the prevalence, risk factors, awareness, treatment adequacy and complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and other non-communicable diseases among adult Police Forces ...

  3. Chronic kidney disease in sub-Saharan Africa: Hypothesis for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diseases are now considerably the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in ... is an underrated cause of poverty and hampers the economic growth of ... health problem is chronic kidney disease (CKD),[4] which recently has an increased prevalence in sub-. Saharan Africa.[5] CKD is defined according to the presence or ...

  4. Effect of chronic kidney disease on serum resistin level | Dan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... between two groups was statistically significant. Conclusion: Our study is probably the first study in India comparing serum resistin levels of CKD patients vis-à-vis control subjects. Further cellular research may be needed to explore this relation. Key words: Chronic kidney disease, HOMA-IR, insulin resistance, resistin ...

  5. a potential cause of cardiovascular diseases in chronic kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) has been identified as one of the risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Although FGF-23 is necessary for the maintenance of phosphate balance, it has been implicated in the pathogenesis of left ventricular ...

  6. Lipid profile in sickle cell disease patients with chronic kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Dyslipidaemia is reported to occur in patients with sickle cell disease as well as patients with chronic kidney disease irrespective of the haemoglobin genotype. This study aimed at evaluating lipid profile in subjects with sickle cell anaemia (HbSS), sickle cell trait (HbAS) and normal haemoglobin genotype ...

  7. The epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in chronic kidney diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harskamp, Laura R.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Goor, van Harry; Meijer, Esther

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway has a critical role in renal development, tissue repair and electrolyte handling. Numerous studies have reported an association between dysregulation of this pathway and the initiation and progression of various chronic kidney diseases such as

  8. Cell-based therapies for chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Koppen, A.N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314088350

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) may lead to end-stage renal failure, requiring renal replacement strategies. Development of new therapies to reduce progression of CKD is therefore a major global public health target. The aim of this thesis was to investigate whether cell-based therapies have the

  9. Elevated potassium levels in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Reimar W; Nicolaisen, Sia K; Hasvold, Pål

    2018-01-01

    Background: Data on the true burden of hyperkalemia (HK) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a real-world setting are scarce. Methods: The incidence rate of HK [first blood test with an elevated blood potassium level level >5.0 mmol/L] in primary or hospital care was assessed...

  10. Paediatric chronic kidney disease | van Biljon | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Doctors use various guidelines on paediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) for managing their patients according to the availability of resources. As with adolescent and adult patients, CKD in children can also progress to end-stage renal failure – the time course being influenced by several modifiable factors. Decline in ...

  11. Adherence of adult Chronic Kidney Disease patients with regard to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) has become a major health problem as a result of complicated interrelationships with diabetes mellitus, hypertension and other associated diseases. Effective management of CKD depends on patient's adherence to their dialysis plan, medications, dietary and fluid restrictions.

  12. Natural History of Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease in Stages ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often continue to progress spontaneously towards end stage renal disease (ESRD). In this report we studied the natural history of progression of CKD in a cohort of patients with stage 4 and 5 CKD. Methods: We retrospectively studied a cohort of patients in stage 4 ...

  13. Recent important strategies in the management of chronic kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is considerably higher in low- and middle-income countries, which are less able than the developed world to cope with treating advanced renal failure owing to financial constraints. Prevention, early diagnosis and implementation of existing knowledge can improve outcomes.

  14. Chronic kidney disease screening: Results of the 2013 World ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is on the rise globally due to the increase in prevalence of common risk factors. Screening for CKD risk factors is important for early detection and institution of measures to retard its progression. This study aimed to determine the markers of CKD and its risk factors in a selected ...

  15. Chronic kidney disease in rheumatoid arthritis at Kenyatta National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of chronic kidney disease among patients with rheumatoid arthritis on follow up at the rheumatology outpatient clinic at Kenyatta National Hospital. Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional study. Setting: Rheumatology outpatient clinic at the Kenyatta National Hospital, a public national ...

  16. Clinical Course of Acute Pancreatitis in Chronic Kidney Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the clinical course, etiology and complications of acute pancreatitis among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients in a tertiary care renal center in Karachi. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the clinical course of CKD patients who presented to our emergency room with ...

  17. Left ventricular hypertrophy among chronic kidney disease patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The presence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is associated with worsening cardiovascular outcomes. There is a dearth of data on LVH in Ghanaian CKD patients. Methods: This was a cross sectional study carried out at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital ...

  18. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease | Motsoaledi | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 105, No 4 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease. A Motsoaledi. Abstract. No abstract ...

  19. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease | Meyers | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 105, No 3 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease. AM Meyers. Abstract. No abstract.

  20. Chronic kidney disease: sonographic/clinical findings at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Kidney disease arises from various causes which can lead to death, especially if it progresses to chronic renal disease. Some of these patients can be managed by the use of conservative management, drugs, dialysis or renal transplantation depending on several factors. Amongst several investigative methods ...

  1. Prevention of chronic kidney disease : The next step forward!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, PE; Gansevoort, RT

    The incidence of end stage renal disease in patients who have not experienced a classic primary renal disease is dramatically increasing. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in these patients is due to diabetes, mostly type 2, hypertension and generalised atherosclerosis. As these patients are frequently

  2. Reducing major risk factors for chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luyckx, Valerie A.; Tuttle, Katherine R.; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Gharbi, Mohammed Benghanem; Heerspink, Hiddo J. L.; Johnson, David W.; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Massy, Ziad A.; Moe, Orson; Nelson, Robert G.; Sola, Laura; Wheeler, David C.; White, Sarah L.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global public health concern and a key determinant of poor health outcomes. While the burden of CKD is reasonably well defined in developed countries, increasing evidence indicates that the CKD burden may be even greater in developing countries. Diabetes,

  3. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease | Meyers | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 107, No 9 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease. A.M. Meyers. Abstract. No Abstract ...

  4. Clinical aspects of chronic kidney disease | van Rensburg | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Any patient seeking any form of medical advice at any clinic or hospital, or from a doctor or other healthcare worker, should have their blood pressure recorded and a urine dipstick test done. The most useful indication of a diagnosis of any stage of chronic kidney disease, is the presence of either hypertension, urinary ...

  5. Hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease: complexities within the commonplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Michael M; McMahon, Lawrence P; Smith, Edward R; Williams, David S; Holt, Stephen G

    2012-08-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and usually caused by associated metabolic abnormalities, in particular, hypocalcaemia and hyperphosphataemia. Nevertheless, other causes of hyperparathyroidism can exist concurrently with CKD, challenging diagnostic interpretation and therapeutic intervention. We present four cases of hyperparathyroidism in patients with CKD that highlight some of these dilemmas.

  6. Proteinuria, but Not eGFR, Predicts Stroke Risk in Chronic Kidney Disease: Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandsmark, Danielle K; Messé, Steven R; Zhang, Xiaoming; Roy, Jason; Nessel, Lisa; Lee Hamm, Lotuce; He, Jiang; Horwitz, Edward J; Jaar, Bernard G; Kallem, Radhakrishna R; Kusek, John W; Mohler, Emile R; Porter, Anna; Seliger, Stephen L; Sozio, Stephen M; Townsend, Raymond R; Feldman, Harold I; Kasner, Scott E

    2015-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. However, the impact of chronic kidney disease on cerebrovascular disease is less well understood. We hypothesized that renal function severity would be predictive of stroke risk, independent of other vascular risk factors. The study population included 3939 subjects enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study, a prospective observational cohort. Stroke events were reported by participants and adjudicated by 2 vascular neurologists. Cox proportional hazard models were used to compare measures of baseline renal function with stroke events. Multivariable analysis was performed to adjust for key covariates. In 3939 subjects, 143 new stroke events (0.62 events per 100 person-years) occurred over a mean follow-up of 6.4 years. Stroke risk was increased in subjects who had worse baseline measurements of renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate and total proteinuria or albuminuria). When adjusted for variables known to influence stroke risk, total proteinuria or albuminuria, but not estimated glomerular filtration rate, were associated with an increased risk of stroke. Treatment with blockers of the renin-angiotensin system did not decrease stroke risk in individuals with albuminuria. Proteinuria and albuminuria are better predictors of stroke risk in patients with chronic kidney disease than estimated glomerular filtration rate. The impact of therapies targeting proteinuria/albuminuria in individuals with chronic kidney disease on stroke prevention warrants further investigation. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Chronic kidney disease in Asia: Protocol for a collaborative overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, Thaminda; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Perkovic, Vlado; Woodward, Mark; Stirnadel-Farrant, Heide; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Seong, Hooi Lai; Monaghan, Helen; Jha, Vivekanand

    2017-06-01

    The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is growing rapidly around the world. However, there is limited information on the overall regional prevalence of CKD, as well as the prognostic implications and treatment patterns in Asian region. We have established the Asian Renal Collaboration (ARC) with the goal of consolidating region-wide data regarding CKD. This collaborative project will synthesize data and perform meta-analyses of observational studies conducted in Asia. Studies will be identified through a systematic literature search including abstracts, proceedings of meetings, electronic databases such as MEDLINE and EMBASE. Personal enquiry among collaborators and experts in the region will identify additional studies, or other data sources such as registries. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies that describe the prevalence of CKD and its complications will be included, as will longitudinal studies that describe important clinical outcomes for people with CKD. Individual participant data will be sought, where possible, from each of the studies included in the collaboration for baseline parameters and subsequent outcomes, in order to maximize flexibility and consistency of data analyses. This study is an initiative offering a unique opportunity to obtain information about the prevalence and manifestations of CKD in Asia, as well as its risk factors. The ARC will also provide insights into important outcomes including progression of CKD, CKD complications, cardiovascular disease and death. These findings will improve our understanding of kidney disease in Asia, and thus help inform service provision, preventive care and further research across the region. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  8. Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease in Korea: the Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey 2011-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji In; Baek, Hyunjeong; Jung, Hae Hyuk

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a leading public health problem related to poor quality of life and premature death. As a resource for evidence-informed health policy-making, we evaluated the prevalence of chronic kidney disease using the data of non-institutionalized adults aged ≥ 20 years (n = 15,319) from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2011-2013. Chronic kidney disease was defined as a urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥ 30 mg/g or an estimated glomerular filtration rate Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration equation. The total prevalence estimate of chronic kidney disease for adults aged ≥ 20 years in Korea was 8.2%. By disease stage, the prevalence of chronic kidney disease was as follows: stage 1, 3.0%; stage 2, 2.7%; stage 3a, 1.9%; stage 3b, 0.4%; and stages 4-5, 0.2%. When grouped into three risk categories according to the 2012 Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines, the proportions for the moderately increased risk, high risk, and very high risk categories were 6.5%, 1.2%, and 0.5%, respectively. Factors including older age, diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, body mass indexes of ≥ 25 kg/m(2) and chronic kidney disease. Based on this comprehensive analysis, evidence-based screening strategies for chronic kidney disease in the Korean population should be developed to optimize prevention and early intervention of chronic kidney disease and its associated risk factors.

  9. Ectopic Kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for a Child with Kidney Disease Nutrition for Chronic Kidney Disease in Children Growth Failure in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease Ectopic Kidney Medullary Sponge Kidney Kidney Dysplasia Ectopic ...

  10. A modified elliptical formula to estimate kidney collagen content in a model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Jake A; Zhu, Janice; Duan, Bin; Li, Jingsong; Zhou, Ping; Paka, Latha; Yamin, Michael A; Goldberg, Itzhak D; Narayan, Prakash

    2018-01-01

    The extent of scarring or renal interstitial collagen deposition in chronic kidney disease (CKD) can only be ascertained by highly invasive, painful and sometimes risky, tissue biopsy. Interestingly, while CKD-related abnormalities in kidney size can often be visualized using ultrasound, not only does the ellipsoid formula used today underestimate true renal size, but the calculated renal size does not inform tubulointerstitial collagen content. We used coronal kidney sections from healthy mice and mice with kidney disease to develop a new formula for estimating renal parenchymal area. While treating the kidney as an ellipse with the major axis (a) the polar distance, this technique involves extending the minor axis (b) into the renal pelvis to obtain a new minor axis, be. The calculated renal parenchymal area is remarkably similar to the true or measured area. Biochemically determined kidney collagen content revealed a strong and positive correlation with the calculated renal parenchymal area. Picrosirius red staining for tubulointerstitial collagen also correlated with calculated renal parenchymal area. The extent of renal scarring, i.e. kidney interstitial collagen content, can now be computed by making just two axial measurements which can easily be accomplished via noninvasive imaging of this organ.

  11. Vegetarian Diet in Chronic Kidney Disease—A Friend or Foe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gluba-Brzózka

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Healthy diet is highly important, especially in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Proper nutrition provides the energy to perform everyday activities, prevents infection, builds muscle, and helps to prevent kidney disease from getting worse. However, what does a proper diet mean for a CKD patient? Nutrition requirements differ depending on the level of kidney function and the presence of co-morbid conditions, including hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The diet of CKD patients should help to slow the rate of progression of kidney failure, reduce uremic toxicity, decrease proteinuria, maintain good nutritional status, and lower the risk of kidney disease-related secondary complications (cardiovascular disease, bone disease, and hypertension. It has been suggested that plant proteins may exert beneficial effects on blood pressure, proteinuria, and glomerular filtration rate, as well as results in milder renal tissue damage when compared to animal proteins. The National Kidney Foundation recommends vegetarianism, or part-time vegetarian diet as being beneficial to CKD patients. Their recommendations are supported by the results of studies demonstrating that a plant-based diet may hamper the development or progression of some complications of chronic kidney disease, such as heart disease, protein loss in urine, and the progression of kidney damage. However, there are sparse reports suggesting that a vegan diet is not appropriate for CKD patients and those undergoing dialysis due to the difficulty in consuming enough protein and in maintaining proper potassium and phosphorus levels. Therefore, this review will focus on the problem as to whether vegetarian diet and its modifications are suitable for chronic kidney disease patients.

  12. Vegetarian Diet in Chronic Kidney Disease-A Friend or Foe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluba-Brzózka, Anna; Franczyk, Beata; Rysz, Jacek

    2017-04-10

    Healthy diet is highly important, especially in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Proper nutrition provides the energy to perform everyday activities, prevents infection, builds muscle, and helps to prevent kidney disease from getting worse. However, what does a proper diet mean for a CKD patient? Nutrition requirements differ depending on the level of kidney function and the presence of co-morbid conditions, including hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The diet of CKD patients should help to slow the rate of progression of kidney failure, reduce uremic toxicity, decrease proteinuria, maintain good nutritional status, and lower the risk of kidney disease-related secondary complications (cardiovascular disease, bone disease, and hypertension). It has been suggested that plant proteins may exert beneficial effects on blood pressure, proteinuria, and glomerular filtration rate, as well as results in milder renal tissue damage when compared to animal proteins. The National Kidney Foundation recommends vegetarianism, or part-time vegetarian diet as being beneficial to CKD patients. Their recommendations are supported by the results of studies demonstrating that a plant-based diet may hamper the development or progression of some complications of chronic kidney disease, such as heart disease, protein loss in urine, and the progression of kidney damage. However, there are sparse reports suggesting that a vegan diet is not appropriate for CKD patients and those undergoing dialysis due to the difficulty in consuming enough protein and in maintaining proper potassium and phosphorus levels. Therefore, this review will focus on the problem as to whether vegetarian diet and its modifications are suitable for chronic kidney disease patients.

  13. Vegetarian Diet in Chronic Kidney Disease—A Friend or Foe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluba-Brzózka, Anna; Franczyk, Beata; Rysz, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Healthy diet is highly important, especially in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Proper nutrition provides the energy to perform everyday activities, prevents infection, builds muscle, and helps to prevent kidney disease from getting worse. However, what does a proper diet mean for a CKD patient? Nutrition requirements differ depending on the level of kidney function and the presence of co-morbid conditions, including hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The diet of CKD patients should help to slow the rate of progression of kidney failure, reduce uremic toxicity, decrease proteinuria, maintain good nutritional status, and lower the risk of kidney disease-related secondary complications (cardiovascular disease, bone disease, and hypertension). It has been suggested that plant proteins may exert beneficial effects on blood pressure, proteinuria, and glomerular filtration rate, as well as results in milder renal tissue damage when compared to animal proteins. The National Kidney Foundation recommends vegetarianism, or part-time vegetarian diet as being beneficial to CKD patients. Their recommendations are supported by the results of studies demonstrating that a plant-based diet may hamper the development or progression of some complications of chronic kidney disease, such as heart disease, protein loss in urine, and the progression of kidney damage. However, there are sparse reports suggesting that a vegan diet is not appropriate for CKD patients and those undergoing dialysis due to the difficulty in consuming enough protein and in maintaining proper potassium and phosphorus levels. Therefore, this review will focus on the problem as to whether vegetarian diet and its modifications are suitable for chronic kidney disease patients. PMID:28394274

  14. Cardioprotective Effects of ω-3 PUFAs in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Mi Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence rate of chronic kidney disease (CKD is increasing worldwide, and cardiovascular disease (CVD is a main cause of death in patients with CKD. The high incidence of CVD in CKD patients is related to chronic inflammation, dyslipidemia, malnutrition, atherosclerosis, and vascular calcification. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs have been shown to reduce the risk of CVD. In this paper, we review the beneficial effects of ω-3 PUFAs on CVD and the possible cardioprotective mechanisms of ω-3 PUFAs in CKD patients by determining the effect of ω-3 PUFAs in the general population. ω-3 PUFAs have several cardioprotective benefits, such as reducing inflammation, decreasing oxidative stress, inhibiting platelet activity, exerting antiarrhythmic effects, and improving triglyceride levels, in the general population and patients with CKD. Modifications of erythrocyte membrane fatty acid content, including an increased ω-3 index and decreased oleic acid, after ω-3 PUFAs supplementation are important changes related to CVD risk reduction in the general population and patients with CKD. Further basic and clinical studies are essential to confirm the effects of ω-3 PUFAs on vitamin D activation, vascular calcification prevention, cardiovascular events, and mortality in CKD patients.

  15. Musculoskeletal pain in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, Francisco; Gonzales, Boris; Bayo, Miguel Ángel; Luna, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) is a very common symptom in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and is associated with a significant deterioration in quality of life. To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics associated with CMP in patients with advanced CKD not on dialysis, and to analyse their relation with other uraemic symptoms and their prognosis significance. Cross-sectional study to analyse the uraemic symptoms of an unselected cohort of patients with CKD stage 4-5 pre-dialysis. In order to characterise patients with CMP, demographic and anthropometric data were collected, as well as data on comorbidities and kidney function. In addition, inflammatory parameters, uric parameters, bone mineral metabolism including 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-OHCC), creatine kinase and drugs of potential interest including allopurinol, statins and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents were recorded. The study group consisted of 1169 patients (mean age 65±15 years, 54% male). A total of 38% of patients complained of CMP, and this symptom was more prevalent in women than in men (49 vs. 28%; P<.0001). Muscle weakness, pruritus, muscle cramps, ecchymosis, insomnia, oedema and dyspnoea were the most common symptoms associated with CMP. There were no significant associations between serum levels of creatine kinase, 25-OHCC, treatment with allopurinol, statins or erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and CMP. The female gender, elderly age, obesity, comorbidity (mainly diabetes, heart failure or COPD), and elevated levels of inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein and non-neutrophilic leukocytes) were the best determinants of CMP. While patients with CMP showed a worse survival rate, a multivariate analysis adjusted for demographic data ruled out the independent association of CMP with mortality. CMP is highly prevalent in patients with advanced CKD and is associated with other common symptoms of chronic uraemia. As with the general population, elderly age, the

  16. Dietary Treatment of Metabolic Acidosis in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siener, Roswitha

    2018-04-20

    Chronic kidney disease and reduced glomerular filtration rate are risk factors for the development of chronic metabolic acidosis. The prevention or correction of chronic metabolic acidosis has been found to slow progression of chronic kidney disease. Dietary composition can strongly affect acid⁻base balance. Major determinants of net endogenous acid production are the generation of large amounts of hydrogen ions, mostly by animal-derived protein, which is counterbalanced by the metabolism of base-producing foods like fruits and vegetables. Alkali therapy of chronic metabolic acidosis can be achieved by providing an alkali-rich diet or oral administration of alkali salts. The primary goal of dietary treatment should be to increase the proportion of fruits and vegetables and to reduce the daily protein intake to 0.8⁻1.0 g per kg body weight. Diet modifications should begin early, i.e., even in patients with moderate kidney impairment, because usual dietary habits of many developed societies contribute an increased proportion of acid equivalents due to the high intake of protein from animal sources.

  17. Dietary Treatment of Metabolic Acidosis in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roswitha Siener

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease and reduced glomerular filtration rate are risk factors for the development of chronic metabolic acidosis. The prevention or correction of chronic metabolic acidosis has been found to slow progression of chronic kidney disease. Dietary composition can strongly affect acid–base balance. Major determinants of net endogenous acid production are the generation of large amounts of hydrogen ions, mostly by animal-derived protein, which is counterbalanced by the metabolism of base-producing foods like fruits and vegetables. Alkali therapy of chronic metabolic acidosis can be achieved by providing an alkali-rich diet or oral administration of alkali salts. The primary goal of dietary treatment should be to increase the proportion of fruits and vegetables and to reduce the daily protein intake to 0.8–1.0 g per kg body weight. Diet modifications should begin early, i.e., even in patients with moderate kidney impairment, because usual dietary habits of many developed societies contribute an increased proportion of acid equivalents due to the high intake of protein from animal sources.

  18. An Update on Coronary Artery Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Afsar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the improvements in diagnostic tools and medical applications, cardiovascular diseases (CVD, especially coronary artery disease (CAD, remain the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. The main factors for the heightened risk in this population, beside advanced age and a high proportion of diabetes and hypertension, are malnutrition, chronic inflammation, accelerated atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, coronary artery calcification, left ventricular structural and functional abnormalities, and bone mineral disorders. Chronic kidney disease is now recognized as an independent risk factor for CAD. In community-based studies, decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR and proteinuria were both found to be independently associated with CAD. This paper will discuss classical and recent epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical aspects of CAD in CKD patients.

  19. Pathophysiology and therapeutics of premature ageing in chronic kidney disease, with a focus on glycative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Yosuke; Jao, Tzu-Ming; Inagi, Reiko

    2017-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major concern in public health. The pathology of CKD includes premature ageing in the kidney and vessels, which results in a high risk of cardiovascular events and end-stage renal disease. Many factors are involved in premature ageing in CKD, including hormonal imbalance, glycative stress, nitrogenous metabolites, and oxidative stress. Of these, the most important role in premature ageing in CKD is played by glycative stress, namely a massive and unfavourable glycation state, since the kidney is responsible for the clearance of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). In an animal model, overexpression of glyoxalase I (GLO-1), a detoxifier of AGEs, has been found to alleviate premature ageing in the kidney and vessels. Both lifestyle changes and drug therapy have shown promise in overcoming premature ageing. Promising drug therapies include a GLO-1 activator and an absorbent against glycotoxin and nitrogenous metabolites. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Primary Care of the Patient with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Meghan M; Ryan, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is defined by reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate, increased proteinuria, or both. CKD affects more than 10% of US adults, or 20 million people, and the numbers are rising as the population ages. However, CKD remains underdiagnosed. Diabetes and hypertension are the most common causes of CKD. Although end-stage renal disease is a feared complication of CKD, patients with CKD have a much greater risk of dying of cardiovascular (CV) disease than progressing to kidney failure. Special effort should be made to address modifiable CV risk factors in patients with CKD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of leptin in reverse epidemiology in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Tepel, Martin

    2007-01-01

    , indicating leptin resistance. In healthy subjects increased leptin concentration constitutes a biomarker for increased cardiovascular risk. On the other hand, a recent prospective long-term study in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy showed that reduced serum leptin......Leptin is mainly produced by adipocytes and metabolized in the kidney. Leptin is taken up into the central nervous system by a saturable transport system, and controls appetite in rodents and in healthy subjects. Leptin acts on peripheral tissue and increases the inflammatory response...

  2. Dialysis strategies to improve growth in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, Michel; Fothergill, Helen; Seuge, Laure; Zaloszyc, Ariane

    2011-01-01

    Despite major advances in the understanding and management of uremic growth failure, 35% to 50% of children with chronic kidney disease still grow up to become adults of small stature. The final adult height achieved is correlated with the height deficit recorded at the time of kidney transplantation. A degree of catch-up growth does occur after kidney transplantation in childhood, but it is often limited. Growth retardation in children with chronic kidney disease causes significant difficulties in their daily lives, often limiting psychosocial integration. Additionally, growth retardation is associated with a greater number of hospital admissions and an increased risk of mortality. Growth failure is the common endpoint of a variety of pathologies, including growth hormone resistance. In children on chronic dialysis, linear growth may be improved by ensuring that optimal clinical care is provided. This includes maximizing nutritional support (e.g., tube feeding in cases of anorexia) so as to prevent malnutrition. Further management options include the administration of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) treatment and the use of more frequent and intensive dialysis sessions, such as daily on-line hemodiafiltration, which combines increased dialysis convective flow with ultrapure dialysate, to limit cachexia. Copyright © 2011 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Developments in renal pharmacogenomics and applications in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padullés A

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ariadna Padullés,1 Inés Rama,2 Inés Llaudó,2 Núria Lloberas2 1Pharmacy Department, 2Nephrology Department, IDIBELL-Hospital Universitari Bellvitge, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD has shown an increasing prevalence in the last century. CKD encompasses a poor prognosis related to a remarkable number of comorbidities, and many patients suffer from this disease progression. Once the factors linked with CKD evolution are distinguished, it will be possible to provide and enhance a more intensive treatment to high-risk patients. In this review, we focus on the emerging markers that might be predictive or related to CKD progression physiopathology as well as those related to a different pattern of response to treatment, such as inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin system (including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers; the vitamin D receptor agonist; salt sensitivity hypertension; and progressive kidney-disease markers with identified genetic polymorphisms. Candidate-gene association studies and genome-wide association studies have analyzed the genetic basis for common renal diseases, including CKD and related factors such as diabetes and hypertension. This review will, in brief, consider genotype-based pharmacotherapy, risk prediction, drug target recognition, and personalized treatments, and will mainly focus on findings in CKD patients. An improved understanding will smooth the progress of switching from classical clinical medicine to gene-based medicine. Keywords: angiotensin-converting enzyme, diabetes, hypertension, renal treatment, gene polymorphisms, biomarkers

  4. Patient education for phosphorus management in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalantar-Zadeh K

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kamyar Kalantar-ZadehHarold Simmons Center for Kidney Disease Research and Epidemiology, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of California Irvine’s School of Medicine, Irvine, CA, USAObjectives: This review explores the challenges and solutions in educating patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD to lower serum phosphorus while avoiding protein insufficiency and hypercalcemia.Methods: A literature search including terms “hyperphosphatemia,” “patient education,” “food fatigue,” “hypercalcemia,” and “phosphorus–protein ratio” was undertaken using PubMed.Results: Hyperphosphatemia is a strong predictor of mortality in advanced CKD and is remediated via diet, phosphorus binders, and dialysis. Dietary counseling should encourage the consumption of foods with the least amount of inorganic or absorbable phosphorus, low phosphorus-to-protein ratios, and adequate protein content, and discourage excessive calcium intake in high-risk patients. Emerging educational initiatives include food labeling using a “traffic light” scheme, motivational interviewing techniques, and the Phosphate Education Program – whereby patients no longer have to memorize the phosphorus content of each individual food component, but only a “phosphorus unit” value for a limited number of food groups. Phosphorus binders are associated with a clear survival advantage in CKD patients, overcome the limitations associated with dietary phosphorus restriction, and permit a more flexible approach to achieving normalization of phosphorus levels.Conclusion: Patient education on phosphorus and calcium management can improve concordance and adherence and empower patients to collaborate actively for optimal control of mineral metabolism.Keywords: hyperphosphatemia, renal diet, phosphorus binders, educational programs, food fatigue, concordance

  5. Iron status and chronic kidney disease predict restless legs syndrome in an older hospital population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, Colin

    2011-03-01

    Iron deficiency is important in the pathogenesis of restless legs syndrome (RLS), and serum ferritin measurement, using a cutoff of 45-50ng\\/ml, is widely recommended as the optimal screening test for iron deficiency in RLS. Serum ferritin often increases with inflammation, and a higher cutoff may be better in those with acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, including those with chronic kidney disease (CKD).

  6. Chronic kidney disease-related physical frailty and cognitive impairment: a systemic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhiyuan; Ruan, Qingwei; Yu, Zhuowei; Sun, Zhongquan

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this review was to assess chronic kidney disease-related frailty and cognitive impairment, as well as their probable causes, mechanisms and the interventions. Studies from 1990 to 2015 were reviewed to evaluate the relationship between chronic kidney disease and physical frailty and cognitive impairment. Of the 1694 studies from the initial search, longitudinal studies (n = 22) with the keywords "Cognitive and CKD" and longitudinal or cross-sectional studies (n = 5) with the keywords "Frailty and CKD" were included in final analysis. By pooling current research, we show clear evidence for a relationship between chronic kidney disease and frailty and cognitive impairment in major studies. Vascular disease is likely an important mediator, particularly for cognitive impairment. However, non-vascular factors also play an important role. Many of the other mechanisms that contribute to impaired cognitive function and increased frailty in CKD remain to be elucidated. In limited studies, medication therapy did not obtain the ideal effect. There are limited data on treatment strategies, but addressing the vascular disease risk factors earlier in life might decrease the subsequent burden of frailty and cognitive impairment in this population. Multidimensional interventions, which address both microvascular health and other factors, may have substantial benefits for both the cognitive impairments and physical frailty in this vulnerable population. Chronic kidney disease is a potential cause of frailty and cognitive impairment. Vascular and non-vascular factors are the possible causes. The mechanism of chronic kidney disease-induced physical frailty and cognitive impairment suggests that multidimensional interventions may be effective therapeutic strategies in the early stage of chronic kidney disease. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 529-544. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  7. Unravelling current sexual care in chronic kidney disease; perspective of social workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ek, Gaby F.; Keurhorst, Dirry; Krouwel, Esmée M.; Nicolai, Melianthe P.j.; Den Ouden, Marjolein E.m.; Elzevier, Henk W.; Putter, Hein; Pelger, Rob C.m.; den Oudsten, B.L.

    2018-01-01

    Background Fifty to eighty percent of patients suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience a form of sexual dysfunction (SD), even after renal transplantation. Despite this, inquiring about SD is often not included in the daily practice of renal care providers. Objectives This paper

  8. Living with Chronic Kidney Disease : The role of illness perceptions, treatment perceptions and social support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, D.L.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) patients, particularly patients on dialysis, often experience difficulties with participating in daily activities, including paid work. Restrictions on the quantity or quality of activities, may impede people’ perceived autonomy and self-esteem. This thesis addressed the

  9. Albuminuria: : all you need to predict outcomes in chronic kidney disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gansevoort, Ron T; Nauta, Ferdau L; Bakker, Stephan J L

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Screening for chronic kidney disease frequently starts with assessment of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). In current approaches, further evaluation will only include measurement of albuminuria in case of eGFR less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m. We will review whether this

  10. Albuminuria : all you need to predict outcomes in chronic kidney disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gansevoort, Ron T.; Nauta, Ferdau L.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Screening for chronic kidney disease frequently starts with assessment of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). In current approaches, further evaluation will only include measurement of albuminuria in case of eGFR less than 60 ml/min/1.73m(2). We will review whether this

  11. Estimated glomerular filtration rate, chronic kidney disease and antiretroviral drug use in HIV-positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole; Reiss, Peter

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in HIV-positive persons might be caused by both HIV and traditional or non-HIV-related factors. Our objective was to investigate long-term exposure to specific antiretroviral drugs and CKD. DESIGN:: A cohort study including 6843 HIV-positive persons...

  12. Urine liver fatty acid binding protein and chronic kidney disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khatir, Dinah S; Bendtsen, Mette D; Birn, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    , regarding progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In a prospective study design a cohort of 74 stage 3-4 CKD patients (age 61 ± 13 years) were included. Glomerular filtration ratio (GFR, 51Cr-EDTA-clearance), 24-hour ambulatory BP, 24-hour urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UAC) and urinary L...

  13. Pregnancy in a 24 year old Nigerian woman with chronic kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is increasing incidence and prevalence of chronic kidney disease worldwide. The developing countries including Nigeria are facing greater challenges because of the prevailing poverty and high burden of infectious diseases. There are various prevalent co-morbid conditions that influence and are influenced by the ...

  14. Chronic kidney disease in patients admitted to the medical ward of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic kidney disease in patients admitted to the medical ward of Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital in southwestern Uganda: Prevalence and associated factors. ... We collected socio-demographic and clinical data including presenting symptoms, history of diabetes, hypertension, and use of nephrotoxic medication.

  15. The relation between chronic kidney disease and cerebral microbleeds: difference between patients with and without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Wi-Sun; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Chi Kyung; Kim, Beom Joon; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2012-10-01

    Cerebral microbleeds are an important radiologic marker of bleeding-prone brain and have been reported to be associated with the increased risk of intracerebral haemorrhage. We sought to examine the association of chronic kidney disease with cerebral microbleeds, and determine whether the association differs between patients with and without diabetes. A total of 909 patients with ischemic stroke who were consecutively admitted to our hospital were included in this study. We collected demographic, clinical, and laboratory data (including serum creatinine levels) and documented the presence and numbers of microbleeds. Kidney function was estimated by using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula. We categorized estimated glomerular filtration rates into moderate to severe, mild, and normal (90 ml/min/1·73 m(2), respectively). Cerebral microbleeds is most frequent in the moderate-to-severe chronic kidney disease group (45·6%). In patients without diabetes, mild and moderate-to-severe chronic kidney disease was found to be independently associated with the presence of cerebral microbleeds (adjusted odds ratio, 1·68; 95% confidence interval, 1·04-2·71 and adjusted odds ratio, 3·74; 95% confidence interval, 1·87-7·47) compared with normal kidney function. In patients with diabetes, however, this relationship was not found. Furthermore, ordinal logistic regression analysis revealed that an increased serum creatinine level and a reduced kidney function were associated with the number of cerebral microbleeds. We found that chronic kidney disease is independently associated with cerebral microbleeds in patients without diabetes but not in patients with diabetes. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  16. Practical Approach to Detection and Management of Chronic Kidney Disease for the Primary Care Clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassalotti, Joseph A; Centor, Robert; Turner, Barbara J; Greer, Raquel C; Choi, Michael; Sequist, Thomas D

    2016-02-01

    A panel of internists and nephrologists developed this practical approach for the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative to guide assessment and care of chronic kidney disease (CKD) by primary care clinicians. Chronic kidney disease is defined as a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) kidney damage for at least 3 months. In clinical practice the most common tests for CKD include GFR estimated from the serum creatinine concentration (eGFR) and albuminuria from the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Assessment of eGFR and albuminuria should be performed for persons with diabetes and/or hypertension but is not recommended for the general population. Management of CKD includes reducing the patient's risk of CKD progression and risk of associated complications, such as acute kidney injury and cardiovascular disease, anemia, and metabolic acidosis, as well as mineral and bone disorder. Prevention of CKD progression requires blood pressure kidney injury. The ultimate goal of CKD management is to prevent disease progression, minimize complications, and promote quality of life. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Chronic kidney disease: an inherent risk factor for acute kidney injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhleen; Rifkin, Dena E; Blantz, Roland C

    2010-09-01

    Epidemiologic evidence suggests that chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a risk factor for acute kidney injury (AKI) due to the prevalence of CKD in patients who have episodes of AKI. However, the high burden of comorbidities such as age, diabetes, peripheral vascular, cardiovascular, and liver disease accompanying CKD, and the difficulties of defining AKI in the setting of CKD make these observations difficult to interpret. These comorbidities not only could alter the course of AKI but also may be the driving force behind the epidemiologic association between CKD and AKI because of systemic changes and/or increased exposure to potential nephrotoxic risks. Here, we contend that studies suggesting that CKD is a risk factor for AKI may suffer from residual confounding and reflect an overall susceptibility to illness rather than biologic susceptibility of the kidney parenchyma to injury. In support of our argument, we discuss the clinical evidence from epidemiologic studies, and the knowledge obtained from animal models on the pathophysiology of AKI and CKD, demonstrating a preconditioning influence of the previously impaired kidneys against subsequent injury. We conclude that, under careful analysis, factors apart from the inherent pathophysiology of the diseased kidney may be responsible for the increased frequency of AKI in CKD patients, and the impact of CKD on the risk and severity of AKI needs further investigation. Moreover, certain elements in the pathophysiology of a previously injured kidney may, surprisingly, bear out to be protective against AKI.

  18. Effect of family empowerment model on quality of life in children with chronic kidney diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazavi, Zohreh; Minooei, Marzieh Sadat; Abdeyazdan, Zahra; Gheissari, Alaleh

    2014-07-01

    Quality of life is a concept, which in recent years is considered as a measure for health in chronic diseases such as kidney diseases. Complications of chronic diseases can affect the quality of life in children and their families over time. Therefore, empowerment programs are necessary to improve their quality of life. This study aimed to investigate the impact of the family empowerment model on the quality of life in children with chronic kidney diseases. This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 64 children with chronic kidney diseases and their families. The research tools included the questionnaire of demographic characteristics and the quality of life questionnaire 4(th) edition. After data collection in the first phase, the family empowerment model was implemented in the intervention group and the test was repeated after 1 month. For comparison of data between the two groups and within each group, independent t-test and paired t-test were used, respectively. Independent t-test showed that the mean score of quality of life was not significantly different in the two groups before intervention. However, after intervention, the differences were significant. Paired t-test showed a significant difference in the quality of life before and after intervention in the study group. The findings showed that family empowerment model was effective in increasing the quality of life of children with chronic kidney diseases. Thus, we suggest this model to be used in inpatient and outpatient children's health care.

  19. Cochlear sensitivity in children with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renda, Rahime; Renda, Levent; Selçuk, Ömer Tarık; Eyigör, Hülya; Yılmaz, Mustafa Deniz; Osma, Üstün

    2015-12-01

    Auditory system abnormalities commonly occur in patients with chronic renal disease and end-stage renal disease undergoing hemodialysis. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between cochlear sensitivity and hemodialysis in dialytic and non-dialytic chronic kidney disease patients. The study included children aged 6-18 years that were divided into 3 groups: 36 non-dialytic patients with chronic kidney disease, 16 end-stage renal disease patients undergoing hemodialysis, and 30 healthy controls. Blood urea nitrogen, serum cystatin C levels, duration of chronic kidney disease, and the duration of hemodialysis were compared between the chronic kidney disease patients and end-stage renal disease patients undergoing hemodialysis. Hearing health was measured via tympanometry, pure-tone audiometry and distortion product otoacoustic emissions testing. Distortion product otoacoustic emission amplitudes and signal-to-noise ratios were significantly lower at all frequencies tested in the non-dialytic and dialytic groups than in the control group (pchronic renal disease-both dialytic and non-dialytic-should be monitored to prevent any further deterioration by avoiding potential ototoxic agents, even if their hearing thresholds are within normal limits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cadmium, diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, Joshua R.; Prozialeck, Walter C.

    2009-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies suggest a positive association between exposure to the environmental pollutant cadmium (Cd) and the incidence and severity of diabetes. In this review, we examine the literature suggesting a relationship between Cd exposure, elevated blood glucose levels, and the development of diabetes. In addition we review human and animal studies indicating that Cd potentiates or exacerbates diabetic nephropathy. We also review the various possible cellular mechanisms by which Cd may alter blood glucose levels. In addition, we present some novel findings from our own laboratories showing that Cd elevates fasting blood glucose levels in an animal model of subchronic Cd exposure before overt signs of renal dysfunction are evident. These studies also show that Cd reduces insulin levels and has direct cytotoxic effects on the pancreas. Together, these findings indicate that Cd may be a factor in the development of some types of diabetes and they raise the possibility that Cd and diabetes-related hyperglycemia may act synergistically to damage the kidney.

  1. Biophysical approach to chronic kidney disease management in older patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Foletti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD and its clinical progression are a critical issue in an aging population. Therefore, strategies aimed at preventing and managing the decline of renal function are warranted. Recent evidence has provided encouraging results for the improvement of renal function achieved through an integrated biophysical approach, but prospective studies on the clinical efficacy of this strategy are still lacking. This was an open-label prospective pilot study to investigate the effect of electromagnetic information transfer through the aqueous system on kidney function of older patients affected by stage 1 or 2 CKD. Patients received biophysical therapy every 3 months over a 1-year period. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR values were calculated using the CKD–Epidemiology Collaboration formula, and were recorded at baseline and at the end of treatment. Overall, 58 patients (mean age 74.8 ± 3.7 years were included in the study. At baseline, mean eGFR was 64.6 ± 15.5 mL/min, and it significantly increased to 69.9 ± 15.8 mL/min after 1 year (+5.2 ± 10 mL/min, p<0.0002. The same trend was observed among men (+5.7 ± 10.2 mL/min, p<0.0064 and women (+4.7 ± 9.9 mL/min, p<0.014. When results were analyzed by sex, no difference was found between the 2 groups. Although further and larger prospective studies are needed, our findings suggest that an integrated biophysical approach may be feasible in the management of older patients with early-stage CKD, to reduce and prevent the decline of renal function due to aging or comorbidities.

  2. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in Peruvian primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Añazco, Percy; Taype-Rondan, Alvaro; Lazo-Porras, María; Alberto Quintanilla, E; Ortiz-Soriano, Victor Manuel; Hernandez, Adrian V

    2017-07-19

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. There are few studies in Latin America, especially in primary care settings. Our objective was to determine the prevalence, stages, and associated factors of CKD in primary care setting. We did a retrospective secondary analysis of a database from the Diabetes and Hypertension Primary Care Center of the Peruvian Social Security System (EsSalud) in Lima, Peru. We defined CKD as the presence of eGFR 30 mg/day in 24 h, according to Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO). Factors associated with CKD were evaluated with Poisson Regression models; these factors included age, gender, type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2), hypertension (HTN), body mass index (BMI), and uric acid. Associations were described as crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). We evaluated 1211 patients (women [59%], mean age 65.8 years [SD: 12.7]). Prevalence of CKD was 18%. Using the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), the prevalence was 9.3% (95% CI 5.3 - 13.3) in patients without HTN or DM2; 20.2% (95% CI 17.6 - 22.8) in patients with HTN, and 23.9% (95% CI 19.4 - 28.4) in patients with DM2. The most common stages were 1 and 2 with 41.5% and 48%, respectively. Factors associated with CKD in the adjusted analysis were: age in years (PR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.01 - 1.04), DM2 (PR = 3.37, 95% CI 1.09 - 10.39), HTN plus DM2 (PR = 3.90, 95% CI 1.54 - 9.88), and uric acid from 5 to DM2, older age and hyperuricemia have higher prevalence of CKD.

  3. Appetite-regulating hormones in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oner-Iyidogan, Yildiz; Gurdol, Figen; Kocak, Hikmet; Oner, Pernur; Cetinalp-Demircan, Pinar; Caliskan, Yasar; Kocak, Taner; Turkmen, Aydin

    2011-07-01

    Inflammation and loss of appetite is the most common problem in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). This comparative cross-sectional study aimed to characterize the changes in circulating levels of ghrelin, obestatin, leptin, all of which have an effect on food intake, and proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in patients with CKD who were undergoing different treatments. Study participants included 36 patients who had undergone hemodialysis (body mass index [BMI]: 22.3 ± 4.17 kg/m(2)); 41 who had undergone peritoneal dialysis (BMI: 23.5 ± 3.10 kg/m(2)), 30 with early stage CKD (BMI: 24.4 ± 3.32 kg/m(2)), and 31 healthy subjects (24.3 ± 2.14 kg/m(2)). The patients with CKD were kept under a standard diet with restricted salt, potassium, and protein intake. Levels of leptin, acylated ghrelin, obestatin, TNF-α, and IL-6 were measured by commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Total nitrite/nitrate was analyzed using colorimetric assay kit. Significantly high leptin levels, accompanied by low acylated ghrelin levels, were observed in patients with CKD. Maintenance dialysis did not affect these levels. TNF-α and IL-6 levels were significantly higher in CKD patients than in healthy subjects, the highest being in dialysis patients. Obestatin levels were relatively low in patients who had undergone hemodialysis. Low acyl-ghrelin levels, accompanied with high levels of TNF-α and IL-6 may be involved in the loss of appetite and poor nutritional status in CKD patients. Copyright © 2011 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Glibenclamide improves kidney and heart structure and function in the adenine-diet model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Vishal; Gobe, Glenda; Brown, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    The development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and associated cardiovascular disease involves free radical damage and inflammation. Addition of adenine to the diet induces inflammation followed by CKD and cardiovascular disease. NOD-like receptor protein-3 (NLRP-3) is pro-inflammatory in the kidney; glibenclamide inhibits production of NLRP-3. Male Wistar rats were fed either control rat food or adenine (0.25%) in this food for 16 weeks. Glibenclamide (10 mg/kg/day) was administered to two groups with and without adenine for the final 8 weeks. Kidney function (blood urea nitrogen/BUN, plasma creatinine/PCr, plasma uric acid, proteinuria), kidney structure (fibrosis, inflammation), cardiovascular parameters (blood pressure, left ventricular stiffness, vascular responses and echocardiography) and protein expression of markers for oxidative stress (HO-1), and inflammation (TNF-α, NLRP-3) were assessed. In adenine-fed rats, glibenclamide decreased BUN (controls: 6±0.6; adenine: 56.6±5.4; adenine+glibenclamide: 19.4±2.7 mmol/L), PCr (controls: 42±2.8; adenine: 268±23; adenine+glibenclamide: 81±10 μmol/L), proteinuria (controls: 150±7.4; adenine: 303±19; adenine+glibenclamide: 220±13 μmol/L) (all pchronic inflammatory cells, fibrosis, tubular damage and expression of HO-1, TNF-α and NLRP-3 in the kidney. Glibenclamide did not alter plasma uric acid concentrations (controls: 38±1; adenine: 63±4; adenine+glibenclamide: 69±14 μmol/L). Cardiovascular changes included decreased systolic blood pressure and improved vascular responses although cardiac fibrosis, left ventricular stiffness and hypertrophy were not reduced. Glibenclamide improved kidney structure and function in CKD and decreased some cardiovascular parameters. Inflammatory markers and cell populations were attenuated by glibenclamide in kidneys. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Milk alkali syndrome in an infant with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari JA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Jameela A Kari, Sherif M El DesokyDepartment of Pediatrics and Pediatric Nephrology Unit, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaAbstract: We report a case of milk alkali syndrome in a 15-month-old infant who had chronic kidney disease. His kidney function worsened, with creatinine raised from 1.11 mg/dL (98 µmol/L to 3.98 mg/dL (350.3 µmol/L, normal 0.4–1.0 mg/dL (35–91 µmol. He had hypercalcemia, serum calcium level 3.11 (normal 2.1–2.6 mmol/L, and metabolic alkalosis, HCO3 48.7 (normal 21–26 mmol/L. His kidney function returned to its base level and his calcium and bicarbonate levels normalized with adjustment of calcium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate doses. We report this case to highlight an unusual complication and to review the literature on milk alkali syndrome which is rare in children.Keywords: milk alkali syndrome, infants, chronic kidney disease

  6. Indian chronic kidney disease study: Design and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek; Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Gang, Sishir; John, Oommen; Modi, Gopesh K; Ojha, Jai Prakash; Pandey, Rajendra; Parameswaran, Sreejith; Prasad, Narayan; Sahay, Manisha; Varughese, Santosh; Baid-Agarwal, Seema; Jha, Vivekanand

    2017-04-01

    The rate and factors that influence progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in developing countries like India are unknown. A pan-country prospective, observational cohort study is needed to address these knowledge gaps. The Indian Chronic Kidney Disease (ICKD) study will be a cohort study of approximately 5000 patients with mild to moderate CKD presenting to centres that represent different geographical regions in India. Time to 50% decline in baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate, need of renal replacement therapy or any new cardiovascular disease (CVD) event or death from CVD are the primary end points. This study will provide the opportunity to determine risk factors for CKD progression and development of CVD in Indian subjects and perform international comparisons to determine ethnic and geographical differences. A bio-repository will provide a chance to discover biomarkers and explore genetic risk factors. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  7. Sexual and gonadal dysfunction in chronic kidney disease: Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Rathi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual and gonadal dysfunction/infertility are quite common in patients with chronic kidney disease. Forty percent of male and 55% of female dialysis patients do not achieve orgasm. The pathophysiology of gonadal dysfunction is multifactorial. It is usually a combination of psychological, physiological, and other comorbid factors. Erectile dysfunction in males is mainly due to arterial factors, venous leakage, psychological factors, neurogenic factors, endocrine factors, and drugs. Sexual dysfunction in females is mainly due to hormonal factors and manifests mainly as menstrual irregularities, amenorrhea, lack of vaginal lubrication, and failure to conceive. Treatment of gonadal dysfunction in chronic kidney disease is multipronged and an exact understanding of underlying pathology is essential in proper management of these patients.

  8. Bone marrow cytological evaluation in dogs with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Borin-Crivellenti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Since anemia is indicated as an important compromising factor for the quality of life of dogs with chronic kidney disease (CKD, bone marrow cytological analysis may provide more information on the hematological profile these dogs and, therefore, allow clinicians to not only choose the most adequate treatment but also monitor the response to therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility with sternal bone marrow puncture in chronic kidney disease (CKD using only local anesthesia and check if the cytological analysis is helpful to determine the hematological status. We found that erythroid hypoplasia occurred only in terminal CKD patients, and that the bone marrows of dogs with CKD stages 2 and 3 were quantitatively similar to those of elderly dogs. All dogs tolerated the bone marrow puncture using only local anesthesia with lidocaine and bone marrow cytological evaluation may be a useful tool for hematopoietic evaluation of anemic dogs with CKD.

  9. Patient education for phosphorus management in chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This review explores the challenges and solutions in educating patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to lower serum phosphorus while avoiding protein insufficiency and hypercalcemia. Methods: A literature search including terms “hyperphosphatemia,” “patient education,” “food fatigue,” “hypercalcemia,” and “phosphorus–protein ratio” was undertaken using PubMed. Results: Hyperphosphatemia is a strong predictor of mortality in advanced CKD and is remediated via diet, phosphorus binders, and dialysis. Dietary counseling should encourage the consumption of foods with the least amount of inorganic or absorbable phosphorus, low phosphorus-to-protein ratios, and adequate protein content, and discourage excessive calcium intake in high-risk patients. Emerging educational initiatives include food labeling using a “traffic light” scheme, motivational interviewing techniques, and the Phosphate Education Program – whereby patients no longer have to memorize the phosphorus content of each individual food component, but only a “phosphorus unit” value for a limited number of food groups. Phosphorus binders are associated with a clear survival advantage in CKD patients, overcome the limitations associated with dietary phosphorus restriction, and permit a more flexible approach to achieving normalization of phosphorus levels. Conclusion: Patient education on phosphorus and calcium management can improve concordance and adherence and empower patients to collaborate actively for optimal control of mineral metabolism. PMID:23667310

  10. ECG abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafi, S.; Saleem, M.; Anjum, R.; Abdullah, W.; Shafi, T.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are common in CKD patients. However, there is variation in literature regarding frequency of ECG abnormalities in CKD patients and limited information in local population. Methods: The study design was cross-sectional in nature. All patients between ages of 20-80 years with CKD not previously on renal replacement therapy who were admitted to nephrology ward at a tertiary care facility over a 6-month period were included. All patients underwent 12 lead electrocardiograms (ECG). ECG abnormalities were defined based on accepted standard criteria. Results: Total number of patients included in the study was 124. Mean age of all patients was 49.9+-13.8 years, 106 (84.8%) had hypertension, 84 (70%) had diabetes mellitus, and 35 (29.9%) had known cardiovascular disease. Mean serum creatinine was 7.2+-3.4 mg/dl, mean eGFR was 10.6+-9.2 ml/min/1.73 m/sup 2/. Overall 78.4% of all CKD patients have one or more ECG abnormality. Left ventricular hypertrophy (40%), Q waves (27.2%), ST segment elevation or depression (23.4%), prolonged QRS duration (19.2%), tachycardia (17.6%) and left and right atrial enlargement (17.6%) were the most common abnormalities. Conclusion: ECG abnormalities are common in hospitalized CKD patients in local population. All hospitalized CKD patients should undergo ECG to screen for cardiovascular disease. (author)

  11. Sleep disorders in pediatric chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabouli, Stella; Papadimitriou, Eleni; Printza, Nikoleta; Dotis, John; Papachristou, Fotios

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of sleep disorders during childhood has been estimated to range from 25 to 43 %. The aim of this review is to determine the prevalence of sleep disorders and possible associations with chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related factors and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in children with CKD. An electronic systematic literature search for sleep disorders in children with CKD in Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library Databases identified seven relevant articles for review, all of which reported an increased prevalence of sleep disorders in children with CKD. Five studies included children with CKD undergoing dialysis, and two studies included only non-dialysis patients. In all studies the presence of sleep disturbances was assessed by questionnaires; only one study compared the results of a validated questionnaire with laboratory-based polysomnography. The prevalence of any sleep disorder ranged from 77 to 85 % in dialysis patients, to 32-50 % in transplanted patients and 40-50 % in non-dialysis patients. The most commonly studied disorder was restless legs syndrome, which presented at a prevalence of 10-35 %. Three studies showed significant associations between presence of sleep disorders and HRQOL. We found consistent evidence of an increased prevalence of sleep disturbances in children with CKD, and these seemed to play a critical role in HRQOL.

  12. Plant phosphates, phytate and pathological calcifications in chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Manuel Buades Fuster; Pilar Sanchís Cortés; Joan Perelló Bestard; Félix Grases Freixedas

    2017-01-01

    Phytate, or myo-inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakis dihydrogen phosphate (InsP6), is a naturally occurring phosphorus compound that is present in many foods, mainly legumes, whole grains and nuts. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have cardiovascular disease mortality up to 30 times higher than the general population. Vascular calcifications (VCs) directly contribute to overall morbidity and mortality, especially in CKD. In part, this high mortality is due to elevated levels of phosphorus i...

  13. Depressed cardiac autonomic modulation in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Carlos Alberto de; Brito Junior, Helio Lima de; Bastos, Marcus Gomes; Oliveira, Felipe Gomes de; Casali, Thais Gomes; Bignoto, Tiago Costa; Fernandes, Natalia Maria da Silva; Beraldo, Antonio Fernando de Castro Alves; Paula, Rogério Baumgratz de

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: A dysfunctional autonomic nervous system (ANS) has also been recognized as an important mechanism contributing to the poor outcome in CKD patients, with several studies reporting a reduction in heart rate variability (HRV). Objective: Evaluate the sympathovagal balance in patients with chronic kidney disease on conservative treatment. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, patients with CKD stages 3, 4 and 5 not yet on dialysis (CKD group) and age-matched healthy subjects (CON...

  14. Exercise as an Adjunct Therapy In Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkman, Danielle L.; Edwards, David G.; Lennon-Edwards, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity levels are low in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Evidence indicates that a sedentary lifestyle contributes to increased morbidity and mortality risk; thus, increasing physical activity is an undeniable aspect of a healthy lifestyle. Despite the myriad of health benefits associated with exercise, as well as clinical guidelines in its favor, exercise is still not prescribed as part of routine care in the CKD patient population. This article briefly discusses the b...

  15. The evolving world of chronic kidney disease mineral bone disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Bellasi, A.; Galassi, A.; Cozzolino, M.; Di Iorio, B.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease – mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. In vitro and animal models suggest that phosphorous, calcium, parathyroid hormone, and vitamin D abnormalities, mediate the cardiovascular and bone diseases that characterise CKD-MBD and increase the risk of death. Currently, mineral abnormalities are corrected through phosphorous restriction, phosphate binders, calcimimetics and vitamin D administration. Nonetheless, data in...

  16. Important causes of chronic kidney disease in South Africa | Moosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In hypertensive patients without chronic kidney disease (CKD) the goal is to keep blood pressure (BP) at ≤140/90 mmHg. When CKD is present, especially where there is proteinuria of ≥0.5 g/day, the goal is a BP of ≤130/80 mmHg. Lifestyle measures are mandatory, especially limitation of salt intake, ingestion of ...

  17. Make Precision Medicine Work for Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Ling; Zou, Lu-Xi; Chen, Mao-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine is based on accurate diagnosis and tailored intervention through the use of omics and clinical data together with epidemiology and environmental exposures. Precision medicine should be achieved with minimum adverse events and maximum efficacy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this review, the breakthroughs of omics in CKD and the application of systems biology are reviewed. The potential role of transforming growth factor-β1 in the targeted intervention of r...

  18. Assessment of diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dariusz Włodarek; Dominika Głąbska; Jadwiga Rojek-Trębicka

    2014-01-01

    [b]introduction and objective[/b]. Nutrition is important in the therapy of predialysis patients. The aim of the presented single-centre descriptive study was to assess the diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients with no previous dietary intervention, in comparison with recommendations, as well as the analysis of the energy, protein and phosphate intake in correlation with chosen laboratory measurements. [b]materials and methods.[/b] The research was carried out in 31...

  19. Ambulatory blood pressure patterns in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Joshua; Ng, Derek; Flynn, Joseph T; Mitsnefes, Mark; Poffenbarger, Tim; Warady, Bradley A; Furth, Susan

    2012-07-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring (ABPM) is the best method of detecting abnormal BP in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), whose hypertension may be missed with casual BP measurements. We report ABPM findings in 332 children 1 year after entry in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children cohort study. All of the subjects underwent casual and ambulatory BP measurement. BP was categorized based on casual and ABPM results into normal (42%), white-coat (4%), masked (35%), and ambulatory (14%) hypertension. Only half of the subjects had a normal ABPM. BP load was elevated (>25%) in 52% (n = 172), whereas mean BP was elevated in 32% (n = 105). In multivariate analysis, those using an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor were 89% more likely to have a normal ABPM than those who did not report using an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (odds ratio, 1.89 [95% CI, 1.17-3.04]). For every 20% faster decline in annualized glomerular filtration rate change, the odds of an abnormal ABPM increased 26% (odds ratio, 1.26 [95% CI, 0.97-1.64]). A 2.25-fold increase in urine protein:creatinine ratio annualized change was associated with a 39% higher odds of an abnormal ABPM (odds ratio, 1.39 [95% CI, 1.06-1.82]). Abnormalities on ABPM are common in children with chronic kidney disease and are strongly associated with known risk factors for end-stage renal disease. Individuals on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were less likely to have abnormal ABPM, suggesting a possible therapeutic intervention. ABPM should be used to monitor risk and guide therapy in children with chronic kidney disease.

  20. Linking acute kidney injury to chronic kidney disease: the missing links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaballo, Mohammed A; Elsayed, Mohamed E; Stack, Austin G

    2017-08-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is considered to be a major public health problem around the globe, and it is associated with major adverse clinical outcomes and significant health care costs. There is growing evidence suggesting that AKI is associated with the subsequent development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). While recovery of kidney function occurs in the majority of patients surviving an AKI episode, a large number of patients do not recover completely. Similarly, CKD is a well-known risk factor for the development of AKI. Recent studies suggest that both AKI and CKD are not separate disease entities but are in fact components of a far more closely interconnected disease continuum. However, the true nature of this relationship is complex and poorly understood. This review explores potential relationships between AKI and CKD, and seeks to uncover a number of "missing links" in this tentative emerging relationship.

  1. New oral anticoagulants in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmar Vega, Lara; de Francisco, A L M; Bada da Silva, Jairo; Galván Espinoza, Luis; Fernández Fresnedo, Gema

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) develop bleeding and thrombotic tendencies, so the indication of anticoagulation at the onset of atrial fibrillation (AF) is complex. AF is the most common chronic cardiac arrhythmia, and thromboembolism and ischemic stroke in particular are major complications. In recent years, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed, and they have shown superiority over the classical AVK in preventing stroke, systemic embolism and bleeding risk, constituting an effective alternative to those resources. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Renal Tissue Oxygenation in Essential Hypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menno Pruijm

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal studies suggest that renal tissue hypoxia plays an important role in the development of renal damage in hypertension and renal diseases, yet human data were scarce due to the lack of noninvasive methods. Over the last decade, blood oxygenation level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI, detecting deoxyhemoglobin in hypoxic renal tissue, has become a powerful tool to assess kidney oxygenation noninvasively in humans. This paper provides an overview of BOLD-MRI studies performed in patients suffering from essential hypertension or chronic kidney disease (CKD. In line with animal studies, acute changes in cortical and medullary oxygenation have been observed after the administration of medication (furosemide, blockers of the renin-angiotensin system or alterations in sodium intake in these patient groups, underlining the important role of renal sodium handling in kidney oxygenation. In contrast, no BOLD-MRI studies have convincingly demonstrated that renal oxygenation is chronically reduced in essential hypertension or in CKD or chronically altered after long-term medication intake. More studies are required to clarify this discrepancy and to further unravel the role of renal oxygenation in the development and progression of essential hypertension and CKD in humans.

  3. Depressive Symptoms in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogon, Amy J; Matheson, Matthew B; Flynn, Joseph T; Gerson, Arlene C; Warady, Bradley A; Furth, Susan L; Hooper, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    To assess depression in children with chronic kidney disease and to determine associations with patient characteristics, intellectual and educational levels, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Subjects aged 6-17 years from the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children cohort study completed the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI), Wechsler Abbreviated Scales of Intelligence, Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-II-Abbreviated, and the Pediatric Inventory of Quality of Life Core Scales 4.0. Regression analyses determined associations of CDI score and depression status with subject characteristics, intellectual and educational levels, and HRQoL. A joint linear mixed model and Weibull model were used to determine the effects of CDI score on longitudinal changes in glomerular filtration rate and time to renal replacement therapy. A total of 344 subjects completed the CDI. Eighteen (5%) had elevated depressive symptoms, and another 7 (2%) were being treated for depression. In adjusted analyses, maternal education beyond high school was associated with 5% lower CDI scores (estimate, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.99). Depression status was associated with lower IQ (99 vs 88; P = .053), lower achievement (95 vs 77.5; P Children with depression had lower psychoeducational skills and worse HRQoL. Identifying and treating depression should be evaluated as a means of improving the academic performance and HRQoL of children with chronic kidney disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The definition, classification, and prognosis of chronic kidney disease : a KDIGO Controversies Conference report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, Andrew S.; de Jong, Paul E.; Coresh, Josef; El Nahas, Meguid; Astor, Brad C.; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Kasiske, Bertram L.; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe

    The definition and classification for chronic kidney disease was proposed by the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-KDOQI) in 2002 and endorsed by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) in 2004. This framework promoted increased attention to

  5. Neurocognitive Outcomes in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease: Current Findings and Contemporary Endeavors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Arlene C.; Butler, Robert; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Wentz, Alicia; Shinnar, Shlomo; Lande, Marc B.; Mendley, Susan R.; Warady, Bradley A.; Furth, Susan L.; Hooper, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    Given the rise in chronic kidney disease (CKD) in both children and adults, CKD has recently been targeted as a public health priority. Childhood onset kidney disease is generally a noncurable and progressive condition that leads to kidney failure by early adulthood. Fortunately, improved identification of kidney problems allows for early…

  6. K/DOQI clinical practice guidelines for chronic kidney disease: Evaluation, classification, and stratification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, Andrew S.; Coresh, Josef; Bolton, Kline; Culleton, Bruce; Harvey, Kathy Schiro; Ikizler, T. Alp; Johnson, Cynda Ann; Kausz, Annamaria; Kimmel, Paul L.; Kusek, John; Levin, Adeera; Minaker, Kenneth L.; Nelson, Robert; Rennke, Helmut; Steffes, Michael; Witten, Beth; Hogg, Ronald J.; Furth, Susan; Lemley, Kevin V.; Portman, Ronald J.; Schwartz, George; Lau, Joseph; Balk, Ethan; Perrone, Ronald D.; Karim, Tauqeer; Rayan, Lara; Al-Massry, Inas; Chew, Priscilla; Astor, Brad C.; De Vine, Deirdre; Eknoyan, Garabed; Levin, Nathan; Burrows-Hudson, Sally; Keane, William; Kliger, Alan; Latos, Derrick; Mapes, Donna; Oberley, Edith; Willis, Kerry; Bailie, George; Becker, Gavin; Burrowes, Jerrilynn; Churchill, David; Collins, Allan; Couser, William; de Zeeuw, Dick; Garber, Alan; Golper, Thomas; Gotch, Frank; Gotto, Antonio; Greer, Joel W.; Grimm Jr., Richard; Hannah, Ramon G.; Acosta, Jaime Herrera; Hogg, Ronald; Hunsicker, Lawrence; Klag, Michael; Klahr, Saulo; Lewis, Caya; Lowrie, Edmund; Matas, Arthur; McCulloch, Sally; Michael, Maureen; Nally, Joseph V.; Newmann, John M.; Nissenson, Allen; Norris, Keith; Owen Jr., William; Patel, Thakor G.; Payne, Glenda; Rivera-Mizzoni, Rosa A.; Smith, David; Star, Robert; Steinman, Theodore; Valderrabano, Fernando; Walls, John; Wauters, Jean-Pierre; Wenger, Nanette; Briggs, Josephine

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic kidney disease as a public health problem. Chronic kidney disease is a worldwide public health problem. In the United States, there is a rising incidence and prevalence of kidney failure, with poor outcomes and high cost. There is an even higher prevalence of earlier stages of

  7. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of kidneys in patients with chronic kidney disease: initial study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Xueqin; Fang, Wenqiang; Ling, Huawei; Chai, Weimin; Chen, Kemin

    2010-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Seventy-two healthy volunteers and 43 patients underwent coronal echo-planar DW MR imaging of the kidneys with a single breath-hold time of 16 s. The patients were grouped according to five stages as indicated by the K/DOQI CKD (kidney disease outcome quality initiative). The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the kidneys was calculated with high b values (b = 500 s/mm 2 ). The ADC values were compared between patients and healthy volunteers, and among different stages. For statistical analysis, Student's t tests, ANOVA, Pearson's correlation tests, and Spearman's correlation tests were used. No difference between the cortex and medulla could be observed on DW images of all volunteers. Patients with CKD had significantly lower renal ADC (t = -4.383, P = 0.000) than volunteers. The ADC values of kidneys were significantly lower than normal at most stages of CKD, except CKD1. There was a negative correlation between the ADCs and serum creatinine (sCr) level (P = 0.000) amongst the patients. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is feasible in the assessment of renal function, especially in the detection of early stage renal failure of CKD. (orig.)

  8. Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness Among Individuals with Clinical Markers of Kidney Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Laura C.; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Jordan, Regina; Burrows, Nilka Ríos; Hedgeman, Elizabeth; Yee, Jerry; Saran, Rajiv; Powe, Neil R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Awareness of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among providers and patients is low. Whether clinical cues prompt recognition of CKD is unknown. We examined whether markers of kidney disease that should trigger CKD recognition among providers are associated with higher individual CKD awareness. Design, setting, participants, & measurements CKD awareness was assessed in 1852 adults with an estimated GFR kidneys?” Participants were grouped by distribution of the following abnormal markers of CKD: hyperkalemia, acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, elevated blood urea nitrogen, anemia, albuminuria, and uncontrolled hypertension. Odds of CKD awareness associated with each abnormal marker and groupings of markers were estimated by multivariable logistic regression. Results Among individuals with kidney disease, only those with albuminuria had greater odds of CKD awareness (adjusted odds ratio, 4.0, P disease. Conclusions Although individuals who manifest many markers of kidney dysfunction are more likely to be aware of their CKD, their CKD awareness remains low. A better understanding of mechanisms of awareness is required to facilitate earlier detection of CKD and implement therapy to minimize associated complications. PMID:21784832

  9. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of kidneys in patients with chronic kidney disease: initial study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xueqin; Fang, Wenqiang; Ling, Huawei; Chai, Weimin; Chen, Kemin [Ruijin Hospital Shanghai, Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China)

    2010-04-15

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Seventy-two healthy volunteers and 43 patients underwent coronal echo-planar DW MR imaging of the kidneys with a single breath-hold time of 16 s. The patients were grouped according to five stages as indicated by the K/DOQI CKD (kidney disease outcome quality initiative). The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the kidneys was calculated with high b values (b = 500 s/mm{sup 2}). The ADC values were compared between patients and healthy volunteers, and among different stages. For statistical analysis, Student's t tests, ANOVA, Pearson's correlation tests, and Spearman's correlation tests were used. No difference between the cortex and medulla could be observed on DW images of all volunteers. Patients with CKD had significantly lower renal ADC (t = -4.383, P = 0.000) than volunteers. The ADC values of kidneys were significantly lower than normal at most stages of CKD, except CKD1. There was a negative correlation between the ADCs and serum creatinine (sCr) level (P = 0.000) amongst the patients. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is feasible in the assessment of renal function, especially in the detection of early stage renal failure of CKD. (orig.)

  10. Nonsteroidal Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Finerenone Protects Against Acute Kidney Injury-Mediated Chronic Kidney Disease: Role of Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattenist, Lionel; Lechner, Sebastian M; Messaoudi, Smail; Le Mercier, Alan; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Prince, Sonia; Bobadilla, Norma A; Kolkhof, Peter; Jaisser, Frédéric; Barrera-Chimal, Jonatan

    2017-05-01

    Acute kidney injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion (IR) is a frequent complication in hospitalized patients. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism has shown to be helpful against renal IR consequences; however, the potential benefit of novel nonsteroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists such as finerenone has to be further explored. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of finerenone to prevent the acute and chronic consequences of ischemic acute kidney injury. For the acute study (24 hours), 18 rats were divided into sham, bilateral renal ischemia of 25 minutes, and rats that received 3 doses of finerenone at 48, 24, and 1 hour before the ischemia. For the chronic study (4 months), 23 rats were divided into sham, rats that underwent 45 minutes of bilateral ischemia, and rats treated with finerenone at days 2 and 1 and 1 hour before IR. We found that after 24 hours of reperfusion, the untreated IR rats presented kidney dysfunction and tubular injury. Kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase associated to lipolacin mRNA levels were increased. In contrast, the rats treated with finerenone displayed normal kidney function and significantly lesser tubular injury and kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase associated to lipolacin levels. After 4 months, the IR rats developed chronic kidney disease, evidenced by kidney dysfunction, increased proteinuria and renal vascular resistance, tubular dilation, extensive tubule-interstitial fibrosis, and an increase in kidney transforming growth factor-β and collagen-I mRNA. The transition from acute kidney injury to chronic kidney disease was fully prevented by finerenone. Altogether, our data show that in the rat, finerenone is able to prevent acute kidney injury induced by IR and the chronic and progressive deterioration of kidney function and structure. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. DIFFERENCES IN ILLNESS REPRESENTATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagels, Agneta A; Söderquist, Birgitta Klang; Heiwe, Susanne

    2015-09-01

    To explore the impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on individual illness representations, including symptoms and causal attributions. Fifty-four patients responded to the Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) and a further seven patients undertook cognitive interviews regarding the IPQ-R. All respondents had CKD stage 2-5, not undergoing renal replacement therapy. Those in earlier CKD stages and those with fewer symptoms perceived a significantly different understanding of their condition than those in more advanced disease stages or with more symptoms. Behavioural and psychological attributions were commonly referred to as contributing causes to CKD. These attributions were associated to negative illness representations. An uncertainty assessing symptoms attributed to CKD was indicated, especially in earlier disease stages. Illness representations differ with CKD stages and symptom burden. The patients in earlier disease stages or with fewer symptoms did not hold as strong beliefs about their illness as being a threat as those in advanced stages or with more symptoms. Self-blame emerged as a common causal attribution. Patients did not always relate symptoms to CKD, therefore this study identifies a gap in patients' disease knowledge, especially in earlier stages of the condition. © 2015 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  12. Multidisciplinary strategies in the management of early chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ramírez, Héctor R; Cortés-Sanabria, Laura; Rojas-Campos, Enrique; Hernández-Herrera, Aurora; Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso M

    2013-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide epidemic especially in developing countries, with clear deficiencies in identification and treatment. Better care of CKD requires more than only economic resources, utilization of health research in policy-making and health systems changes that produce better outcomes. A multidisciplinary approach may facilitate and improve management of patients from early CKD in the primary health-care setting. This approach is a strategy for improving comprehensive care, initiating and maintaining healthy behaviors, promoting teamwork, eliminating barriers to achieve goals and improving the processes of care. A multidisciplinary intervention may include educational processes guided by health professional, use of self-help groups and the development of a CKD management plan. The complex and fragmented care management of patients with CKD, associated with poor outcome, enhances the importance of implementing a multidisciplinary approach in the management of this disease from the early stages. Multidisciplinary strategies should focus on the needs of patients (to increase their empowerment) and should be adapted to the resources and health systems prevailing in each country; its systematic implementation can help to improve patient care and slow the progression of CKD. Copyright © 2013 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Anemia management in cancer patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deak, Andras T; Troppan, Katharina; Rosenkranz, Alexander R

    2016-12-01

    Anemia is a common complication of cancer and chronic kidney disease (CKD) associated with decreased physical performance as well as poor prognosis for life expectancy. Renal and cancer-induced anemia share common features regarding pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies. It is typically treated with iron substitution, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) and in refractory cases with red blood cell transfusions. However, studies of the past few years unveiled numerous setbacks in the use of ESAs. These included a higher risk of cerebrovascular events and increased mortality without the improvement of cardiovascular outcomes in patients with CKD. Moreover, particularly negative results were observed in patients with previous cancer history under ESA therapy. These unfavorable findings have forced the clinicians to reevaluate the management of renal anemia. This led to decrease of ESA usage, while iron substitution and alternative therapeutic options gained more significance. Iron supplementation is also accompanied with certain risks ranging from gastrointestinal complications to severe allergic reactions and increased rate of infections. Furthermore, the evaluation of the long-term safety of excessive iron therapy is still lacking, especially in CKD patients with cancer. In the absence of these clinical studies, this review aims to summarize the currently available therapeutic strategies in anemia management of CKD patients with concomitant cancer. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Sleep-disordered breathing in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Reshma; Sharma, Neha; Al-Mokali, Khamisa; Sayal, Priya; Al-Saleh, Suhail; Narang, Indra; Harvey, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    The aim of our study was to ascertain the prevalence and type of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in paediatric patients with severe chronic kidney disease (CKD) based on the results of polysomnograms (PSGs). Overnight PSGs were conducted on children with CKD stages 3-5 (dialysis dependent). Data were collected on patient demographics from the medical records. Study participants and/or their caregivers completed the paediatric modification of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale Score, the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ) and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory at the time of the PSG. Nineteen children were included in the study, of whom seven were on dialysis. The median (interquartile range) age at the time of the PSG was 13.5 (5.4-16.5) years, and eight (42%) of the children were male. There was a 37% (n = 7) prevalence of SDB in this cohort based on the PSG results. Central sleep apnea and obstructive sleep apnea were found in three children each. The PSQ scores did not correlate with the obstructive apnea-hypopnea index. There was a high prevalence of SDB in this cohort of children with CKD. The PSG and validated sleep questionnaires yielded discordant results, reinforcing the limitations of diagnosing SDB in the CKD population based solely on sleep questionnaires.

  15. Metformin in chronic kidney disease: time for a rethink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaf, James

    2014-06-01

    Metformin has traditionally been regarded as contraindicated in chronic kidney disease (CKD), though guidelines in recent years have been relaxed to permit therapy if the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is > 30 mL/min. The main problem is the perceived risk of lactic acidosis (LA). Epidemiological evidence suggests that this fear is disproportionate. Lactic acidosis is a rare complication to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with an incidence of 6/100,000 patient-years. The risk is not increased in metformin-treated patients. Metformin possesses a number of clinical effects independent of glucose reduction, including weight loss, which are beneficial to patients. The risk of death and cardiovascular disease is reduced by about a third in non-CKD patients. Since metformin intoxication undoubtedly causes LA, and metformin is renally excreted, inappropriate dosage of metformin will increase the risk of LA. It is suggested that introduction of metformin therapy to more advanced stages of CKD may bring therapeutic benefits that outweigh the possible risks. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  16. BMP-7 Signaling and its Critical Roles in Kidney Development, the Responses to Renal Injury, and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Scott R; Austin, Paul F; Guo, Qiusha; Moore, Katelynn H

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant health problem that most commonly results from congenital abnormalities in children and chronic renal injury in adults. The therapeutic potential of BMP-7 was first recognized nearly two decades ago with studies demonstrating its requirement for kidney development and ability to inhibit the pathogenesis of renal injury in models of CKD. Since this time, our understanding of CKD has advanced considerably and treatment strategies have evolved with the identification of many additional signaling pathways, cell types, and pathologic processes that contribute to disease progression. The purpose of this review is to revisit the seminal studies that initially established the importance of BMP-7, highlight recent advances in BMP-7 research, and then integrate this knowledge with current research paradigms. We will provide an overview of the evolutionarily conserved roles of BMP proteins and the features that allow BMP signaling pathways to function as critical signaling nodes for controlling biological processes, including those related to CKD. We will discuss the multifaceted functions of BMP-7 during kidney development and the potential for alterations in BMP-7 signaling to result in congenital abnormalities and pediatric kidney disease. We will summarize the renal protective effects of recombinant BMP-7 in experimental models of CKD and then propose a model to describe the potential physiological role of endogenous BMP-7 in the innate repair mechanisms of the kidneys that respond to renal injury. Finally, we will highlight emerging clinical approaches for applying our knowledge of BMP-7 toward improving the treatment of patients with CKD. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Protein and energy intake in advanced chronic kidney disease: how much is too much?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikizler, T Alp

    2007-01-01

    Uremic wasting is strongly associated with increased risk of death and hospitalization events in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Recent evidence indicates that patients with advanced chronic kidney disease are prone to uremic wasting due to several factors, which include the dialysis procedure and certain comorbid conditions, especially chronic inflammation and insulin resistance or deficiency. While the catabolic effects of dialysis can be readily avoided with intradialytic nutritional supplementation, there are no established alternative strategies to avoid the catabolic consequences of comorbid conditions other than treatment of their primary etiology. To this end, there is no indication that simply increasing dietary protein and energy intake above the required levels based on level of kidney disease is beneficial in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. However, aside from the potential adverse effects such as uremic toxin production, dietary protein and energy intake in excess of actual needs might be beneficial in maintenance dialysis patients as it may lead to weight gain over time. Clearly, the role of obesity in advanced uremia needs to be examined in detail prior to making any clinically applicable recommendations, both in terms of ''low'' and ''high'' dietary protein and energy intake.

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced ultrasound for characterization of kidney lesions in patients with and without chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Emily Hueywen; Chong, Wui Kheong; Kasoji, Sandeep Kumar; Fielding, Julia Rose; Altun, Ersan; Mullin, Lee B; Kim, Jung In; Fine, Jason Peter; Dayton, Paul Alexander; Rathmell, Wendy Kimryn

    2017-08-09

    Patients with chronic kidney disease are at increased risk of cystic kidney disease that requires imaging monitoring in many cases. However, these same patients often have contraindications to contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. This study evaluates the accuracy of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), which is safe for patients with chronic kidney disease, for the characterization of kidney lesions in patients with and without chronic kidney disease. We performed CEUS on 44 patients, both with and without chronic kidney disease, with indeterminate or suspicious kidney lesions (both cystic and solid). Two masked radiologists categorized lesions using CEUS images according to contrast-enhanced ultrasound adapted criteria. CEUS designation was compared to histology or follow-up imaging in cases without available tissue in all patients and the subset with chronic kidney disease to determine sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy. Across all patients, CEUS had a sensitivity of 96% (95% CI: 84%, 99%) and specificity of 50% (95% CI: 32%, 68%) for detecting malignancy. Among patients with chronic kidney disease, CEUS sensitivity was 90% (95% CI: 56%, 98%), and specificity was 55% (95% CI: 36%, 73%). CEUS has high sensitivity for identifying malignancy of kidney lesions. However, because specificity is low, modifications to the classification scheme for contrast-enhanced ultrasound could be considered as a way to improve contrast-enhanced ultrasound specificity and thus overall performance. Due to its sensitivity, among patients with chronic kidney disease or other contrast contraindications, CEUS has potential as an imaging test to rule out malignancy. This trial was registered in clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01751529 .

  19. Prevalence and characteristics of chronic kidney disease among Danish adults with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kristina H; Ryom, Lene; Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With improved prognosis of CF, comorbidities including chronic kidney disease (CKD) are becoming increasingly important. Identification of those at highest CKD risk is hence a priority. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, adults with CF attending the Copenhagen CF Centre...... median duration of chronic pulmonary infection (28.3 (20.0-35.8) vs. 20.0 (9.9-34.7) years; p=0.008) and with longer intravenous aminoglycosides use (606 (IQR, 455-917) vs. 273 (IQR, 91-826) days, p=0.005). CONCLUSIONS: The CKD prevalence is high and related to age, diabetes, chronic infection...

  20. Chronic kidney disease: identification and management in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Simon Ds; Blakeman, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important and common noncommunicable condition globally. In national and international guidelines, CKD is defined and staged according to measures of kidney function that allow for a degree of risk stratification using commonly available markers. It is often asymptomatic in its early stages, and early detection is important to reduce future risk. The risk of cardiovascular outcomes is greater than the risk of progression to end-stage kidney disease for most people with CKD. CKD also predisposes to acute kidney injury - a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although only a small proportion of people with CKD progress to end-stage kidney disease, renal replacement therapy (dialysis or transplantation) represents major costs for health care systems and burden for patients. Efforts in primary care to reduce the risks of cardiovascular disease, acute kidney injury, and progression are therefore required. Monitoring renal function is an important task, and primary care clinicians are well placed to oversee this aspect of care along with the management of modifiable risk factors, particularly blood pressure and proteinuria. Good primary care judgment is also essential in making decisions about referral for specialist nephrology opinion. As CKD commonly occurs alongside other conditions, consideration of comorbidities and patient wishes is important, and primary care clinicians have a key role in coordinating care while adopting a holistic, patient-centered approach and providing continuity. This review aims to summarize the vital role that primary care plays in predialysis CKD care and to outline the main considerations in its identification, monitoring, and clinical management in this context.

  1. Hospital specific factors affect quality of blood pressure treatment in chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuilen, A.D. van; Blankestijn, P.J.; Buren, M. van; Dam, M.A. ten; Kaasjager, K.A.; Ligtenberg, G.; Sijpkens, Y.W.; Sluiter, H.E.; Ven, P.J. van der; Vervoort, G.M.M.; Vleming, L.; Bots, M.L.; Wetzels, J.F.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood pressure (BP) is the most important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) disease and progression of kidney dysfunction in patients with chronic kidney disease. Despite extensive antihypertensive treatment possibilities, adequate control is notoriously hard to achieve.

  2. Asian leadership in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Gavin J

    2009-01-01

    Asian Pacific countries include those with the highest incidence of renal failure in the world, the richest and poorest economies and unparalleled diversity of economy, culture and geography. From this come many challenges, but also a strong basis for the introduction of strategies to combat renal diseases. With a rapidly developing scientific community, Asia needs to accept the challenge of becoming a global leader in nephrology in the near future.

  3. Adenosine contribution to normal renal physiology and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzún, Carlos; Garrido, Wallys; Alarcón, Sebastián; Yáñez, Alejandro; Sobrevia, Luis; Quezada, Claudia; San Martín, Rody

    2017-06-01

    Adenosine is a nucleoside that is particularly interesting to many scientific and clinical communities as it has important physiological and pathophysiological roles in the kidney. The distribution of adenosine receptors has only recently been elucidated; therefore it is likely that more biological roles of this nucleoside will be unveiled in the near future. Since the discovery of the involvement of adenosine in renal vasoconstriction and regulation of local renin production, further evidence has shown that adenosine signaling is also involved in the tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism, sodium reabsorption and the adaptive response to acute insults, such as ischemia. However, the most interesting finding was the increased adenosine levels in chronic kidney diseases such as diabetic nephropathy and also in non-diabetic animal models of renal fibrosis. When adenosine is chronically increased its signaling via the adenosine receptors may change, switching to a state that induces renal damage and produces phenotypic changes in resident cells. This review discusses the physiological and pathophysiological roles of adenosine and pays special attention to the mechanisms associated with switching homeostatic nucleoside levels to increased adenosine production in kidneys affected by CKD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Intermittent hemodialysis in dogs with chronic kidney disease stage III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Melchert

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Intermittent hemodialysis (IHD is a form of renal replacement that is used in veterinary medicine for cases involving drug removal, electrolyte imbalance, acute kidney injury, and chronic kidney disease (CKD. The aim of the present study was to verify the efficacy of IHD in dogs with CKD staged at grade III and to evaluate the effect of IHD on quality of life. Twelve dogs with CKD at stage III met the inclusion criteria and were divided equally into two groups. The control group (n=6 received only clinical treatment and intravenous fluid therapy, and the hemodialysis group (n=6 received clinical and IHD treatments. Blood samples were collected before and after treatments in both groups. We evaluated complications and clinical parameters of IHD every 30 minutes. Hemodialysis decreased serum urea, creatinine, and phosphorus. Despite the evident removal of nitrogen compounds, dialysis treatment did not increase survival time in these patients. The results of this study do not support the early use of dialysis in dogs with chronic kidney disease stage III.

  5. Management of Chronic Kidney Disease Patients in the Intensive Care Unit: Mixing Acute and Chronic Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Silvia; Samoni, Sara; Villa, Gianluca; Ronco, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at high risk for developing critical illness and for admission to intensive care units (ICU). 'Critically ill CKD patients' frequently develop an acute worsening of renal function (i.e. acute-on-chronic, AoC) that contributes to long-term kidney dysfunction, potentially leading to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). An integrated multidisciplinary effort is thus necessary to adequately manage the multi-organ damage of those kidney patients and contemporaneously reduce the progression of kidney dysfunction when they are critically ill. The aim of this review is to describe (1) the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of AoC kidney dysfunction and its role in the progression toward ESKD; (2) the most common clinical presentations of critical illness among CKD/ESKD patients; and (3) the continuum of care for CKD/ESKD patients from maintenance hemodialysis/peritoneal dialysis to acute renal replacement therapy performed in ICU and, vice-versa, for AoC patients who develop ESKD. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Extracellular microRNA signature in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Jagdeesan; Ramezani, Ali; Hubal, Monica; Knoblach, Susan; Shrivastav, Shashi; Karandish, Sara; Scott, Richard; Maxwell, Nirmal; Ozturk, Savas; Beddhu, Srinivasan; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Raj, Dominic S

    2017-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs that regulate posttranscriptional gene expression. In this study we characterized the circulating and urinary miRNA pattern associated with reduced glomerular filtration rate, using Affymetrix GeneChip miR 4.0 in 28 patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Top miRNA discoveries from the human studies were validated in an Alb/TGFβ mouse model of CKD, and in rat renal proximal tubular cells (NRK52E) exposed to TGFβ1. Plasma and urinary levels of procollagen III N-terminal propeptide and collagen IV were elevated in patients with decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Expression of 384 urinary and 266 circulatory miRNAs were significantly different between CKD patients with eGFR ≥30 vs. kidney fibrosis, and specific urinary and plasma miRNA profile may have diagnostic and prognostic utility in CKD. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Pubertal development in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffner, Dieter; Zivicnjak, Miroslav

    2017-06-01

    Impairment of pubertal growth and sexual maturation resulting in reduced adult height is an significant complication in children suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Delayed puberty and reduced pubertal growth are most pronounced in children with pre-existing severe stunting before puberty, requiring long-term dialysis treatment, and in transplanted children with poor graft function and high glucocorticoid exposure. In pre-dialysis patients, therapeutic measures to improve pubertal growth are limited and mainly based on the preservation of renal function and the use of growth hormone treatment. In patients with end-stage CKD, early kidney transplantation with steroid withdrawal within 6 months of renal transplantation allows for normal pubertal development in the majority of patients. This review focuses on the underlying pathophysiology and strategies for improving height and development in these patients.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of terbutaline in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiansen, Anders; Eggert, Sarah; Pedersen, Erland

    2013-11-01

    In healthy individuals upwards of 90 % of an injected dose of terbutaline is excreted in the urine. The purpose of this study is to determine the pharmacokinetic properties of terbutaline in patients with severe renal impairment as defined by a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) below 30 mL/min. Ten patients were included in the study. GFR was measured with Cr-EDTA clearance. They were given an intravenous injection of 0.500 mg of terbutaline. Blood samples were collected at intervals for 60 h and urine samples were collected for 96 h. The concentration of terbutaline in the blood and in the urine was used to calculate pharmacokinetic parameters. In patients with normal renal function the total clearance of terbutaline is 2.23-3 mL/min/kg. In our population the total clearance of terbutaline was found to be 1.72 (SD: 0.49) mL/min/kg of which approximately 15 % (0.25 mL/min/kg) was renal clearance. We calculated a distribution volume at steady state of 0.74 (SD: 0.22) L/kg with a terminal half-life of 7.93 (SD: 4.06) hours. The mean residence time (MRT) was 8.35 (SD: 4.93) hours. In healthy individuals the excretion of terbutaline is foremost renal but this study shows that severe renal impairment does not lower the total clearance of terbutaline to a degree that might be expected from the Cr-EDTA clearance. However, more research is needed to determine if dosage adjustment is warranted in patients with CKD.

  9. Use of Calcium Channel Blockers is Associated with Mortality in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik G. Haider

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The use of antihypertensive medicines has been shown to reduce proteinuria, morbidity, and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. A specific recommendation for a class of antihypertensive drugs is not available in this population, despite the pharmacodynamic differences. We have therefore analysed the association between antihypertensive medicines and survival of patients with chronic kidney disease. Methods: Out of 2687 consecutive patients undergoing kidney biopsy a cohort of 606 subjects with retrievable medical therapy was included into the analysis. Kidney function was assessed by glomerular filtration rate (GFR estimation at the time point of kidney biopsy. Main outcome variable was death. Results: Overall 114 (18.7% patients died. In univariate regression analysis the use of alpha-blockers and calcium channel antagonists, progression of disease, diabetes mellitus (DM type 1 and 2, arterial hypertension, coronary heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, male sex and age were associated with mortality (all pConclusion: The use of calcium channel blockers but not of other antihypertensive medicines is associated with mortality in primarily GN patients with CKD.

  10. The challenge of controlling phosphorus in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannata-Andía, Jorge B; Martin, Kevin J

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenesis and management of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorders (CKD-MBD) has experienced major changes, but the control of serum phosphorus at all stages of CKD still seems to be a key factor to improve clinical outcomes. High serum phosphorus is the most important uremia-related, non-traditional risk factor associated with vascular calcification in CKD patients and in the general population. Phosphorus may also be one of the key elements linking vascular calcification with low bone turnover. The main hormones and factors that contribute to the kidney regulation of phosphorus and calcium include parathyroid hormone, FGF-23, klotho and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D). Serum phosphorus did not start rising until CKD 3b in contrast with the earlier changes observed with fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), Klotho, calcitriol and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Despite FGF-23 and PTH having synergic effects regarding phosphorus removal, they have opposite effects on 1,25(OH)2D3. At the same stages of CKD in which phosphorus retention appears to occur, calcium retention also occurs. As phosphorus accumulation is associated with poor outcomes, an important question without a clear answer is at which level-range should serum phosphorus be maintained at different stages of CKD to improve clinical outcomes. There are four main strategies to manage phosphate homeostasis; phosphorus dietary intake, administration of phosphate binder agents, effective control of hyperparathyroidism and to ensure in the CKD 5D setting, an adequate scheme of dialysis. Despite all the available strategies, and the introduction of new phosphate binder agents in the market, controlling serum phosphorus remains challenging, and hyperphosphatemia continues to be extremely common in CKD 5 patients. Furthermore, despite phosphate binding agents having proved to be effective in reducing serum phosphorus, their ultimate effects on clinical outcomes remain controversial. Thus, we still

  11. [Risk factors for cardiovascular system damage in chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutyrina, I M; Rudenko, T E; Savel'eva, S A; Shvetsov, M Iu; Vasil'eva, M P

    2013-01-01

    To study the prevalence of and risk factors (RF) associated with cardiovascular system damage in patients with predialysis diabetic and nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD). The investigation enrolled 317 patients with CKD of various etiologies. In Group 1 (165 patients with CKD: 54% of men, 46% of women; mean age 46 +/- 15 years), the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was 37.2 ml/min; the serum creatinine level was 2.9 mg/dl. Group 2 included 152 (41%) patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) (41% of men and 59% of women; mean age 57.3 +/- 7.1 years). The duration of DM averaged 10.4 +/- 7.1 years. All the patients underwent physical examination; the levels of glycated hemoglobin and adipose tissue hormones, urinary albumin excretion were additionally determined in the diabetic patients. Echocardiography was performed in 172 patients. The influence of populationwide and renal failure-associated RFs on the cardiovascular system was evaluated in CKD. Clinical and instrumental examinations of 165 patients with Stages II-IV nondiabetic CKD revealed atherosclerosis of the aorta and the vessels of the heart, brain, kidney, and lower extremities in 60 (37%), 35 (24%), 30 (18%), 23 (14%), and 8 (5%), respectively. As atherosclerotic vascular lesion progressed, the incidence of cardiovascular events (CVE) increased. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) was diagnosed in 37.3% of the patients with nondiabetic CKD. Along with traditional cardiovascular RFs (age, smoking, gender, arterial hypertension), the renal dysfunction-related factors (anemia, diminished glomerular filtration rate, elevated creatitine levels, and abnormal phosphorus and calcium metabolism) are of importance. An association was found between LVH, atherosclerotic vascular lesion, and heart valve calcification. According to EchoCG data, 36% of the patients with type 2 DM were diagnosed as having LVH. The RFs of the latter were albuminuria, obesity, and abnormal carbohydrate and purine metabolisms. There

  12. Thyroid function and cardiovascular events in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Baris; Yilmaz, Mahmut Ilker; Siriopol, Dimitrie; Unal, Hilmi Umut; Saglam, Mutlu; Karaman, Murat; Gezer, Mustafa; Sonmez, Alper; Eyileten, Tayfun; Aydin, Ibrahim; Hamcan, Salih; Oguz, Yusuf; Covic, Adrian; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2017-04-01

    Abnormalities of thyroid function are commonly seen in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. They are associated with adverse clinical conditions such as atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation and abnormal blood pressure variability. We investigated the association between thyroid disorders and endothelial function, assessed by flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), and cardiovascular events (CVE) in CKD patients. This observational cohort study included 305 CKD (stages 1-5) patients. Routine biochemistry, including free T3, free T4 and thyroid stimulating hormone, fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) and FMD, CIMT were measured. We divided patients into four groups according to thyroid hormone status: euthyroidism, subclinical hyperthyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism, and euthyroid sick syndrome. Fatal and composite CVE were recorded for a median 29 months. Patients with subclinical hypothyroidism had a higher prevalence of hypertension and diabetes and also were more likely to have higher values of systolic CIMT, phosphorus, intact parathormone (iPTH), FGF-23, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance and lower levels of FMD than euthyroid patients. In the unadjusted survival analysis, subclinical hypothyroidism and euthyroid sick syndrome were associated with an increased risk for the outcome as compared with euthyroidism [hazard ratio 30.63 (95 % confidence interval 12.27-76.48) and 12.17 (3.70-39.98), respectively]. The effects of subclinical hypothyroidism and euthyroid sick syndrome were maintained even in fully adjusted models. We demonstrated that subclinical hypothyroidism and euthyroid sick syndrome are associated with increased CVE in CKD patients. Further studies are needed to explore these issues.

  13. Chronic kidney disease management program in Shahreza, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahimi, Hamid; Aghighi, Mohammad; Aghayani, Katayon; Rahimi Foroushani, Abbas

    2014-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a public health problem that needs an integrated program to be detected, monitored, and controlled. This study reports the results of a CKD program designed and implemented in Shahreza, Iran. After initial evaluation of CKD in Shahreza, a CKD management program was developed in the Ministry of Health and the pilot project was started in February 2011 in Shahreza rural areas. The patients at risk, including those with diabetes mellitus and hypertension, were tested with serum creatinine and urine albumin-creatinine ratio. The CKD management program included training, screening, monitoring, and controlling of weight, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, lipids, and vitamin D. This pilot program was organized in the rural population aged over 30 years who were suffering from hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or both, and resulted in the discovery of cases in various stages of CKD. The prevalence of CKD in this high-risk group was 21.5%. Persistent albuminuria and a glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) were 13% and 11%, respectively. The rate of CKD stages 1, 2, 3a, 3b, 4, and 5 were 2.75%, 6.82%, 10.08%, 0.92%, 0.31%, and 0.17% respectively. After 1 year of the program implemented, incidence rate of CKD was 24% and improvement rate was 21%. In diabetic patients, the mean of hemoglobin A1c decreased from 8.5 ± 1.9% to 7.5% ± 1.8%. Integration of CKD programs in primary health care is possible and results in improvement in management of CKD patients.

  14. Refusal of dialysis amongst patients of chronic kidney disease (CKD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anees, M.; Khan, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the refusal of dialysis amongst patients of chronic kidney disease presenting for the first time for dialysis in uremic condition. Study Design: Cross sectional Study. Place and Duration of the Study: Outpatient department of Nephrology, Mayo Hospital, Lahore from 1 st Jan 2012 to 31 st December 2012. Patients and Methods: Patients of CKD due to any cause presenting with uremia for the first time for dialysis were included in the study. History and physical examination was done and demographic data was collected in pre designed form. Patients were offered for dialysis while explaining to them the advantages of getting and disadvantages of not getting dialysis. Patient's response on the offer was recorded and the reason for the refusal were noted. Results: According to the criteria 150 patients were included in the study. Most of the patients were male 92 (61.3%) and illiterate 78 (52.0%). Major cause of CKD was diabetes mellitus 58 (38.7%) followed by hypertension 38 (25.3%). Mean age of the patients was 42.59 ± 13.72 year and income of themost of the patients 126 (84%) was less than US$100/-month. Most of the patients 126 (77.0%) were asked about the need of dialysis in less than three months, 61 (41.3%) offered for the first time and amongst them 85 (54.0%) were offered dialysis already. Majority of the patients 101 (67.3%) refused dialysis when it was offered to them for the first time. Major reason of the refusal was fear of dialysis procedure in 76 (76%) patients followed by treatment by spiritual 14 (14%) and alternative ways and others 11 (11 %). Middle age persons refused dialysis significantly. (author)

  15. Nutritional Status of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease in Iran: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Abdollahi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a progressive condition that affects many aspects of patient’s life with adverse outcomes of kidney failure, cardiovascular disease (CVD, and premature death. Malnutrition is a relatively common problem in these patients that may be the result of inadequate intake, increased catabolism, or loss of nutrients in the dialysis. The aim of this study was to review the nutritional status and requirements of CKD patients in Iran using previous studies. Methods: Search engines including PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Science Direct, Google scholar, Magiran, and scientific information database (SID were applied with keywords such as chronic kidney disease, malnutrition, renal disease, end stage renal disease, nutritional deficiency, malnutrition, quality of life, vitamin deficiency, wasting, and Iran to find related articles published up to 2016. Results: The persistence of malnutrition increases susceptibility to infectious and cardiovascular diseases, delays wound healing, and finally increases morbidity and mortality. Conclusion: Considering the importance of nutritional status in patients with chronic kidney disease, it is necessary to design and development of more effective strategies to optimize nutritional status of these patients.

  16. Growth hormone for children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson, Elisabeth M; Willis, Narelle S; Craig, Jonathan C

    2012-02-15

    Growth retardation is a common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children and is of concern to families. Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) treatment has been used to help short children with CKD attain a height more in keeping with their age group. However there are concerns about the long-term benefits of rhGH in significantly improving adult height as well as concerns about potential adverse effects (deterioration in native kidney function, increased acute rejection in kidney transplant recipients, benign intracranial hypertension). To evaluate the benefits and harms of rhGH treatment in children with CKD. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were identified from the Cochrane Renal Group's Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 12, 2011), MEDLINE (from 1966), EMBASE (from 1980), article reference lists and through contact with local and international experts in the field.Date of last search: December 29, 2011 RCTs were included if they were carried out in children aged zero to 18 years, diagnosed with CKD, who were pre-dialysis, on dialysis or post-transplant; if they compared rhGH treatment with placebo/no treatment or two doses of rhGH treatments; and if they included height outcomes. Two authors independently assessed studies for risk of bias and extracted data from eligible studies. Data was pooled using a random effects model with calculation of mean difference (MD) for continuous outcomes with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Sixteen studies (enrolling 809 children) were identified. Risk of bias assessment indicated that study quality was poor or poorly reported with only four and five studies respectively reporting adequate allocation concealment or blinding of study participants and investigators. Treatment with rhGH (28 IU/m²/wk) compared with placebo or no specific therapy resulted in a significant increase in height standard deviation score (HSDS) at one year (8 studies, 391 children: MD

  17. Aging and the Kidneys: Anatomy, Physiology and Consequences for Defining Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassock, Richard J; Rule, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    The varied functions of the kidneys are influenced by the complex process of aging. The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) steadily declines with normal aging, and the progress of this process can be influenced by superimposed diseases. Microscopically, nephron numbers decrease as global glomerulosclerosis becomes more evident. The precise mechanisms underlying nephron loss with aging are not well understood, but derangements in podocyte biology appear to be involved. Classifications of chronic kidney disease (CKD) incorporate GFR values and attendant risk of adverse events. Arbitrary and fixed thresholds of GFR for defining CKD have led to an overdiagnosis of CKD in the elderly. An age-sensitive definition of CKD could offer a solution to this problem and more meaningfully capture the prognostic implications of CKD. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Nutritional management and growth in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Lesley; Jones, Helen

    2013-04-01

    Despite continuing improvements in our understanding of the causes of poor growth in chronic kidney disease, many unanswered questions remain: why do some patients maintain a good appetite whereas others have profound anorexia at a similar level of renal function? Why do some, but not all, patients respond to increased nutritional intake? Is feed delivery by gastrostomy superior to oral and nasogastric routes? Do children who are no longer in the 'infancy' stage of growth benefit from enteral feeding? Do patients with protein energy wasting benefit from increased nutritional input? How do we prevent obesity, which is becoming so prevalent in the developed world? This review will address these issues.

  19. Make Precision Medicine Work for Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ling; Zou, Lu-Xi; Chen, Mao-Jie

    2017-01-01

    Precision medicine is based on accurate diagnosis and tailored intervention through the use of omics and clinical data together with epidemiology and environmental exposures. Precision medicine should be achieved with minimum adverse events and maximum efficacy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this review, the breakthroughs of omics in CKD and the application of systems biology are reviewed. The potential role of transforming growth factor-β1 in the targeted intervention of renal fibrosis is discussed as an example of how to make precision medicine work for CKD. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Nutritional management of stage 5 chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasticci, Franca; Fantuzzi, Anna Laura; Pegoraro, Marisa; McCann, Margaret; Bedogni, Giorgio

    2012-03-01

    Nutrition is a critical issue in the management of patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD). Malnutrition is common among these patients and affects their survival and quality of life. A basic knowledge of the nutritional management of stage 5 CKD is essential for all members of the nephrology team to improve patient care. This paper demonstrates that the needs of haemodialysis patients are more complex than those receiving peritoneal dialysis. © 2011 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  1. Psychosocial Interventions for Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms in Individuals with Chronic Kidney Disease: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela C. Pascoe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Depressive and anxiety symptoms are common amongst individuals with chronic kidney disease and are known to affect quality of life adversely. Psychosocial interventions have been shown to decrease depressive and anxiety symptoms in various chronic diseases, but few studies have examined their efficacy in people with chronic kidney disease and no meta-analysis has been published. Thus, the aim of the present systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of psychosocial interventions on depressive and anxiety symptoms as well as quality of life in individuals diagnosed with chronic kidney disease and/or their carers.Methods: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we included published randomized controlled trials comparing psychosocial interventions versus usual care for impacting depressive and anxiety symptoms and quality of life.Results: Eight studies were included in the systematic review and six of these were subjected to meta-analysis. Psychosocial interventions were associated with a medium effect size for reduction in depressive symptoms and a small effect size for improved quality of life in the in individuals with chronic-kidney-disease and their carers. Some evidence suggested a reduction in anxiety.Conclusion: Psychosocial interventions appear to reduce depressive symptoms and improve quality of life in patients with chronic-kidney-disease and their carers and to have some beneficial impact on anxiety. However, the small number of identified studies indicates a need for further research in this field.

  2. Quality of life in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotis, John; Pavlaki, Antigoni; Printza, Nikoleta; Stabouli, Stella; Antoniou, Stamatia; Gkogka, Chrysa; Kontodimopoulos, Nikolaos; Papachristou, Fotios

    2016-12-01

    Progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD), irrespective of the underlying etiology, affects the quality of life (QoL) of children due to the need for regular follow-up visits, a strict medication program and diet intake. The Greek version of the KIDSCREEN-52 multidimensional questionnaire was used in children with CKD, renal transplantation (RT) and in a control group (CG) of healthy children. Fifty-five patients between 8 and 18 years, with CKD (n = 25), RT (n = 16) and with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on peritoneal dialysis (PD) (n = 14) were included. Each group of studied children was compared with the CG (n = 55), the validation sample (VS) (n = 1200) and the parent proxy scores. Physical well-being of all studied children was significantly lower compared to CG (p = 0.004). In contrast, all studied children between 8 and 11 years showed better social acceptance compared to VS (p = 0.0001). When QoL of children with CKD was compared with parent proxy QoL, conflicting opinions were observed in several dimensions, such as self-perception (p = 0.023), autonomy (p = 0.012), school environment (p = 0.012) and financial resources (p = 0.03). QoL and mainly the dimension of physical well-being, may be affected dramatically in children with CKD unrelated to disease stage. In early school years children with CKD seem to feel higher social acceptance than the healthy controls, exhibiting better score in this dimension. Optimal care requires attention not only to medical management, but also to an assessment of QoL factors, that may help promote pediatric patient's health.

  3. Cardiovascular calcifications in chronic kidney disease: Potential therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bover, Jordi; Ureña-Torres, Pablo; Górriz, José Luis; Lloret, María Jesús; da Silva, Iara; Ruiz-García, César; Chang, Pamela; Rodríguez, Mariano; Ballarín, José

    Cardiovascular (CV) calcification is a highly prevalent condition at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is directly associated with increased CV and global morbidity and mortality. In the first part of this review, we have shown that CV calcifications represent an important part of the CKD-MBD complex and are a superior predictor of clinical outcomes in our patients. However, it is also necessary to demonstrate that CV calcification is a modifiable risk factor including the possibility of decreasing (or at least not aggravating) its progression with iatrogenic manoeuvres. Although, strictly speaking, only circumstantial evidence is available, it is known that certain drugs may modify the progression of CV calcifications, even though a direct causal link with improved survival has not been demonstrated. For example, non-calcium-based phosphate binders demonstrated the ability to attenuate the progression of CV calcification compared with the liberal use of calcium-based phosphate binders in several randomised clinical trials. Moreover, although only in experimental conditions, selective activators of the vitamin D receptor seem to have a wider therapeutic margin against CV calcification. Finally, calcimimetics seem to attenuate the progression of CV calcification in dialysis patients. While new therapeutic strategies are being developed (i.e. vitamin K, SNF472, etc.), we suggest that the evaluation of CV calcifications could be a diagnostic tool used by nephrologists to personalise their therapeutic decisions. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Progression of autosomal dominant kidney disease: measurement of the stage transitions of chronic kidney disease

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    Christopher M Blanchette

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is a progressive genetic disorder characterized by the development of numerous kidney cysts that result in kidney failure. Little is known regarding the key patient characteristics and utilization of healthcare resources for ADPKD patients along the continuum of disease progression. This observational study was designed to describe the characteristics of ADPKD patients and compare them with those of patients with other chronic kidney diseases. Methods: This retrospective cohort study involved patients with a claim for ADPKD or PKD unspecified from 1/1/2000–2/28/2013 and ≥6 months of previous continuous enrollment (baseline within a large database of administrative claims in the USA. A random sample of chronic kidney disease (CKD patients served as comparators. For a subset of ADPKD patients who had only a diagnosis code of unspecified PKD, abstraction of medical records was undertaken to estimate the proportion of patients who had medical chart-confirmed ADPKD. In patients with linked electronic laboratory data, the estimated glomerular filtration rate was calculated via serum creatinine values to determine CKD stage at baseline and during follow-up. Proportions of patients transitioning to another stage and the mean age at transition were calculated. Results: ADPKD patients were, in general, younger and had fewer physician visits, but had more specific comorbidities at observation start compared with CKD patients. ADPKD patients had a longer time in the milder stages and longer duration before recorded transition to a more severe stage compared with CKD patients. Patients with ADPKD at risk of rapid progression had a shorter time-to-end-stage renal disease than patients with CKD and ADPKD patients not at risk, but stage duration was similar between ADPKD patients at risk and those not at risk. Conclusions: These results suggest that distribution of patients by age at transition

  5. Preliminary Study on the Kidney Elasticity Quantification in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease Using Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification

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    Zheng, Xiao Zhi; Yang, Bin; Fu, Ning Hua

    2015-01-01

    Virtual touch tissue quantification (VTTQ) provides numerical measurements (shear wave velocity (SWV) values) of tissue stiffness. The purpose of this study was to describe the SWV values of the kidney by VTTQ and to examine the clinical usefulness of this procedure in the evaluation of elasticity changes in the kidneys of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Sixty-five patients with CKD and seventy healthy participants were included in this study. A total of 270 kidneys were examined by VTTQ. The kidney elasticity was expressed as shear wave velocity. The SWV values, blood serum creatinine (Scr)/BUN and pathological findings were analyzed and compared between patients with CKD and healthy participants. In patients with CKD and healthy participants, the SWV values both gradually decreased from the renal cortex to the medulla and renal sinus The SWV value of the renal cortex in patients with CKD was less than that of healthy participants (P < 0.05), and the SWV value of the renal cortex in patients with renal insufficiency was significantly less than in those with normal renal function (2.46 ± 0.15 vs. 3.45 ± 0.26 m/s, P < 0.05). The best cutoff value for predicting renal insufficiency (Scr > 1.24 mg/dL or/and BUN > 21 mg/DL) was a SWV value of the renal cortex of less than 1.92 m/s with a sensitivity of 84.4% (95% CI: 67.2-94.7%) and a specificity of 96.8% (95% CI: 83.3-99.9%) (P < 0.001). VTTQ can sensitively detect the elasticity changes in patients with CKD, and it can effectively predict renal insufficiency. This technology provides a valuable tool for the assessment of CKD

  6. Relation of aortic valve calcium to chronic kidney disease (from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerraty, Marie A; Chai, Boyang; Hsu, Jesse Y; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Gao, Yanlin; Yang, Wei; Keane, Martin G; Budoff, Matthew J; Mohler, Emile R

    2015-05-01

    Although subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at markedly increased risk for cardiovascular mortality, the relation between CKD and aortic valve calcification has not been fully elucidated. Also, few data are available on the relation of aortic valve calcification and earlier stages of CKD. We sought to assess the relation of aortic valve calcium (AVC) with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors, and markers of bone metabolism in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. All patients who underwent aortic valve scanning in the CRIC study were included. The relation between AVC and eGFR, traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors, and markers of calcium metabolism were analyzed using both unadjusted and adjusted regression models. A total of 1,964 CRIC participants underwent computed tomography for AVC quantification. Decreased renal function was independently associated with increased levels of AVC (eGFR 47.11, 44.17, and 39 ml/min/1.73 m2, respectively, pAVC risk factors. Adjusted regression models identified several traditional and novel risk factors for AVC in patients with CKD. There was a difference in AVC risk factors between black and nonblack patients. In conclusion, our study shows that eGFR is associated in a dose-dependent manner with AVC in patients with CKD, and this association is independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7.  Association between hepatitis B virus and chronic kidney disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizi, Fabrizio; Donato, Francesca M; Messa, Piergiorgio

     Background. Hepatitis B virus infection and chronic kidney disease are prevalent and remain a major public health problem worldwide. It remains unclear how infection with hepatitis B virus impacts on the development and progression of chronic kidney disease. To evaluate the effect of infection with HBV on the risk of chronic kidney disease in the general population. We conducted a systematic review of the published medical literature to determine if hepatitis B infection is associated with increased likelihood of chronic kidney disease. We used the random effects model of DerSimonian and Laird to generate a summary estimate of the relative risk for chronic kidney disease (defined by reduced glomerular filtration rate and/or detectable proteinuria) with hepatitis B virus across the published studies. Meta-regression and stratified analysis were also conducted. We identified 16 studies (n = 394,664 patients) and separate meta-analyses were performed according to the outcome. The subset of longitudinal studies addressing ESRD (n = 2; n = 91,656) gave a pooled aHR 3.87 (95% CI, 1.48; 6.25, P chronic kidney disease (including end-stage renal disease). No relationship occurred between HBV positive status and prevalent chronic disease (n = 7, n = 109,889 unique patients); adjusted odds ratio, were 1.07 (95% CI, 0.89; 1.25) and 0.93 (95% CI, 0.76; 1.10), respectively. HBV infection is possibly associated with a risk of developing reduced glomerular filtration rate in the general population; no link between HBV sero-positive status and frequency of chronic kidney disease or proteinuria was noted in cross-sectional surveys.

  8. Serum Beta Hydroxybutyrate Concentrations in Cats with Chronic Kidney Disease, Hyperthyroidism, or Hepatic Lipidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gorman, L.; Sharkey, L.C.; Armstrong, P.J.; Little, K.; Rendahl, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ketones, including beta hydroxybutyrate (BHB), are produced in conditions of negative energy balance and decreased glucose utilization. Serum BHB concentrations in cats are poorly characterized in diseases other than diabetes mellitus. Hypothesis Serum BHB concentrations will be increased in cats with chronic kidney disease (CKD), hyperthyroidism (HT), or hepatic lipidosis (HL). Animals Twenty?eight client?owned cats with CKD, 34 cats with HT, and 15 cats with HL; 43 healthy cats. ...

  9. Biomarkers for Chronic Kidney Disease Associated with High Salt Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Hosohata

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available High salt intake has been related to the development to chronic kidney disease (CKD as well as hypertension. In its early stages, symptoms of CKD are usually not apparent, especially those that are induced in a “silent” manner in normotensive individuals, thereby providing a need for some kind of urinary biomarker to detect injury at an early stage. Because traditional renal biomarkers such as serum creatinine are insensitive, it is difficult to detect kidney injury induced by a high-salt diet, especially in normotensive individuals. Recently, several new biomarkers for damage of renal tubular epithelia such as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL and kidney injury molecule-1 (Kim-1 have been identified. Previously, we found a novel renal biomarker, urinary vanin-1, in several animal models with renal tubular injury. However, there are few studies about early biomarkers of the progression to CKD associated with a high-salt diet. This review presents some new insights about these novel biomarkers for CKD in normotensives and hypertensives under a high salt intake. Interestingly, our recent reports using spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY fed a high-salt diet revealed that urinary vanin-1 and NGAL are earlier biomarkers of renal tubular damage in SHR and WKY, whereas urinary Kim-1 is only useful as a biomarker of salt-induced renal injury in SHR. Clinical studies will be needed to clarify these findings.

  10. Insulin Resistance in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Tser Liao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome and its components are associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD development. Insulin resistance (IR plays a central role in the metabolic syndrome and is associated with increased risk for CKD in nondiabetic patients. IR is common in patients with mild-to-moderate stage CKD, even when the glomerular filtration rate is within the normal range. IR, along with oxidative stress and inflammation, also promotes kidney disease. In patients with end stage renal disease, IR is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease and is linked to protein energy wasting and malnutrition. Systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, elevated serum adipokines and fetuin-A, metabolic acidosis, vitamin D deficiency, depressed serum erythropoietin, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and suppressors of cytokine signaling all cause IR by suppressing insulin receptor-PI3K-Akt pathways in CKD. In addition to adequate renal replacement therapy and correction of uremia-associated factors, thiazolidinedione, ghrelin, protein restriction, and keto-acid supplementation are therapeutic options. Weight control, reduced daily prednisolone dosage, and the use of cyclosporin decrease the risk of developing new-onset diabetes after kidney transplantation. Improved understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying IR in CKD may lead to more effective therapeutic strategies to reduce uremia-associated morbidity and mortality.

  11. Chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Shivanthan, Mitrakrishnan Chrishan; Selvarajah, Mathu

    2016-07-01

    In the last two decades, chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDu) has emerged as a significant contributor to the burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in rural Sri Lanka. It is characterized by the absence of identified causes for CKD. The prevalence of CKDu is 15.1-22.9% in some Sri Lankan districts, and previous research has found an association with farming occupations. A systematic literature review in Pubmed, Embase, Scopus, and Lilacs databases identified 46 eligible peer-reviewed articles and one conference abstract. Geographical mapping indicates a relationship between CKDu and agricultural irrigation water sources. Health mapping studies, human biological studies, and environment-based studies have explored possible causative agents. Most studies focused on likely causative agents related to agricultural practices, geographical distribution based on the prevalence and incidence of CKDu, and contaminants identified in drinking water. Nonetheless, the link between agrochemicals or heavy metals and CKDu remains to be established. No definitive cause for CKDu has been identified. Evidence to date suggests that the disease is related to one or more environmental agents, however pinpointing a definite cause for CKDu is challenging. It is plausible that CKDu is multifactorial. No specific guidelines or recommendations exist for treatment of CKDu, and standard management protocols for CKD apply. Changes in agricultural practices, provision of safe drinking water, and occupational safety precautions are recommended by the World Health Organization.

  12. [Posibility of term pregnancy in patients with chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco-Nasser, Abdel

    2015-12-01

    Pregnancy is a physiological process that brings many changes to the mother's body, undergoing a process of adaptation to complications avoid, however, in the context of chronic kidney disease, these become manifest most frequently maternal and fetal impact on morbidity and mortality. A review of the subject is presented, emphasizing aspects that must be present at the time of a patient with this condition, accompanied by one of our cases treated with the sole purpose of gaining a better understanding of the issue and how to address it based on problems at the time of evaluation initial. The case of patient pregnant with chronic kidney disease in stage advanced that required start of replacement therapy in renal function due to uremia and retention fluid in malaise their 20 weeks of gestation, referred late for your attention. However, it was possible to improve you overall condition in all respects, allowing take up to 38 weeks with abdominal delivery via scheduled electively, with favorable results for the newborn exceed the statistics described in these patients.

  13. Assessment of diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włodarek, Dariusz; Głąbska, Dominika; Rojek-Trębicka, Jadwiga

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition is important in the therapy of predialysis patients. The aim of the presented single-centre descriptive study was to assess the diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients with no previous dietary intervention, in comparison with recommendations, as well as the analysis of the energy, protein and phosphate intake in correlation with chosen laboratory measurements. The research was carried out in 31 female predialysis patients with CKD of different etiology, aged 29-79 years (GFR: 19.4±9.7 ml/min/1.73 m2). Main outcome measures were self-reported data from three-day dietary recall. Nutrients content and energy value of diet were compared with guidelines for chronic kidney disease patients or, in case of nutrients when they are not settled, with the recommendations for healthy women. All patients had a lower energy intake than the recommended level. At the same time, 35.8% of patients were characterised by improper protein intake--too low or too high. The majority of patients had low intake of most of vitamins and minerals. The total, animal and plant protein were positively correlated with the energy value of diet and with amount of most of the nutrients. Values of GFR were positively correlated with animal protein intake, while phosphate and creatinine in blood were negatively correlated with total and animal protein intake. The study highlights that diet of CKD predialysis patients with no previous dietary intervention is not properly balanced.

  14. Chronic Kidney Disease, Fluid Overload and Diuretics: A Complicated Triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Yusra Habib; Sarriff, Azmi; Adnan, Azreen Syazril; Khan, Amer Hayat; Mallhi, Tauqeer Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Despite promising role of diuretics to manage fluid overload among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, their use is associated with adverse renal outcomes. Current study aimed to determine the extent of renal deterioration with diuretic therapy. A total 312 non-dialysis dependent CKD (NDD-CKD) patients were prospectively followed-up for one year. Fluid overload was assessed via bioimpedance spectroscopy. Estimated GFR (eGFR) was calculated from serum creatinine values by using Chronic Kidney Disease- Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Out of 312 patients, 64 (20.5%) were hypovolemic while euvolemia and hypervolemia were observed in 113 (36.1%) and 135 (43.4%) patients. Overall 144 patients were using diuretics among which 98 (72.6%) were hypervolemic, 35 (30.9%) euvolemic and 11 (17.2%) were hypovolemic. The mean decline in estimated GFR of entire cohort was -2.5 ± 1.4 ml/min/1.73m2 at the end of follow up. The use of diuretics was significantly associated with decline in eGFR. A total of 36 (11.5%) patients initiated renal replacement therapy (RRT) and need of RRT was more profound among diuretic users. The use of diuretics was associated with adverse renal outcomes indicated by decline in eGFR and increasing risk of RRT initiation in our cohort of NDD-CKD patients. Therefore, it is cautiously suggested to carefully prescribe diuretics by keeping in view benefit versus harm for each patient.

  15. Parathyroid hormone and growth in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Simon

    2011-02-01

    Growth failure is common in children with chronic kidney disease, and successful treatment is a major challenge in the management of these children. The aetiology is multi-factorial with "chronic kidney disease-metabolic bone disorder" being a key component that is particularly difficult to manage. Parathyroid hormone is at the centre of this mineral imbalance, consequent skeletal disease and, ultimately, growth failure. When other aetiologies are treated, good growth can be achieved throughout the course of the disease when parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels are in the normal range or slightly elevated. A direct correlation between PTH levels and growth has not been convincingly established, and the direct effect of PTH on growth has not been adequately described; furthermore, direct actions of PTH on the growth plate are unproven. The effects of PTH on growth stem from the pivotal role that PTH plays in the development of renal osteodystrophy. In severe secondary hyperparathyroidism, the growth plate is altered and growth is affected. At the other end of the spectrum, with an over-suppressed parathyroid gland, the rate of bone turnover and remodelling is markedly diminished, and some data suggest this is associated with poor growth. Most of the data available suggests that avoiding the development of significant bone disease through the strict control of PTH levels permits good growth. Absolute optimal ranges for PTH that maximise growth or minimise growth failure are not yet established.

  16. Hypoxia: The Force that Drives Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiangwei; Colgan, Sean P; Shelley, Carl Simon

    2016-01-01

    In the United States the prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) reached epidemic proportions in 2012 with over 600,000 patients being treated. The rates of ESRD among the elderly are disproportionally high. Consequently, as life expectancy increases and the baby-boom generation reaches retirement age, the already heavy burden imposed by ESRD on the US health care system is set to increase dramatically. ESRD represents the terminal stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD). A large body of evidence indicating that CKD is driven by renal tissue hypoxia has led to the development of therapeutic strategies that increase kidney oxygenation and the contention that chronic hypoxia is the final common pathway to end-stage renal failure. Numerous studies have demonstrated that one of the most potent means by which hypoxic conditions within the kidney produce CKD is by inducing a sustained inflammatory attack by infiltrating leukocytes. Indispensable to this attack is the acquisition by leukocytes of an adhesive phenotype. It was thought that this process resulted exclusively from leukocytes responding to cytokines released from ischemic renal endothelium. However, recently it has been demonstrated that leukocytes also become activated independent of the hypoxic response of endothelial cells. It was found that this endothelium-independent mechanism involves leukocytes directly sensing hypoxia and responding by transcriptional induction of the genes that encode the β2-integrin family of adhesion molecules. This induction likely maintains the long-term inflammation by which hypoxia drives the pathogenesis of CKD. Consequently, targeting these transcriptional mechanisms would appear to represent a promising new therapeutic strategy. PMID:26847481

  17. Etiology and Outcome of Chronic Kidney Disease in Iranian Children

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    Neamatollah Ataei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Considering the significant geographical and ethnical differences in pattern of incidence, etiology and outcome of chronic kidney disease (CKD, the present study aimed to assess the etiology and outcome of CKD in Iranian children. Materials and Methods In a cross-sectional study etiology and outcome of 372 children aged 3 months to 18 years with CKD was studied during the period 1991 –2014. Children (186 boys, 186 girls with Stage 3 to 5 CKDs, defined as a glomerular filtration rate below 60 ml/min per 1.73 m2body surface area, were identified. Results Etiology was congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract in 125 (33.60%, cystic/ hereditary/ congenital diseases in 91 (24.46%, glomerulopathy in 73(19.62%, and cause unknown in 71 (19.09% patients. Forty-eight (13.22% were on conservative treatment, 174(47.93% had end-stage renal disease (ESRD with chronic hemodialysis, 24 (6.61% were on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Sixty-eight (18.74% underwent on renal transplant which was successful in 52 (14.33% patients but was associated with abnormal renal function in 16(4.41% children. Finally, 49 (13.50% patients died. Conclusion A large number of children developed CKD secondary to congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. Planning for screening, early detection and instituting timely treatment of preventable causes could lead to a lower incidence of CKD in this group of children.

  18. Dyslipidemia in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Report of the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saland, Jeffrey M; Pierce, Christopher B; Mitsnefes, Mark M; Flynn, Joseph T.; Goebel, Jens; Kupferman, Juan C.; Warady, Bradley A; Furth, Susan L

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe the prevalence and pattern of dyslipidemia in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods 391 children aged 1–16 yrs underwent measurement of serum triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). GFR by plasma disappearance of iohexol and urine protein/creatinine ratio (Up/c) were concomitantly measured. Multivariate analysis adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), GFR, and Up/c. Results The median GFR and age were 43 ml/min/1.73m2 and 12 years. Proteinuria was nephrotic range (Up/c > 2) in 12% and BMI exceeded the 95th percentile in 15%. 32% of the cohort had TG > 130 mg/dL. 21% had HDL-C 160 mg/dL. Lower GFR was associated with higher TG, lower HDL-C and higher non-HDL-C. Overall, 45% of the cohort had dyslipidemia, defined as one or more abnormal lipid measure; 45% of those had combined dyslipidemia. Nephrotic range proteinuria was associated with dyslipidemia and combined dyslipidemia to an equal and large degree: odds ratio (OR) of 4.16 (95% CI: 1.96, 8.79). Compared to children with GFR > 50 ml/min/1.73m2, children with GFR dyslipidemia and an OR of 8.58 (95% CI: 3.70, 19.88) for combined dyslipidemia. Conclusions Among children with moderate CKD, dyslipidemia is common and is associated with lower GFR, nephrotic proteinuria, and non-renal factors including age and obesity. PMID:20736985

  19. Vitamin D, Phosphate and Fibroblast Growth Factor 23: A role in the pathogenesis and management of Chronic Kidney Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease Mineral and Bone Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Damasiewicz, Matthew John

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is defined by the presence of proteinuria or decreased kidney function, with a prevalence of 10-15% in the adult population. CKD can progress to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) and is associated with progressive abnormalities of bone and mineral metabolism, defined as CKD mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). The use of vitamin D in CKD, the optimal level for initiating treatment and the use of current and novel biomarkers in the management of ...

  20. Antihyperglycemic Medication Use Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Heart Failure, Diabetes Mellitus, and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Priyesh A; Liang, Li; Khazanie, Prateeti; Hammill, Bradley G; Fonarow, Gregg C; Yancy, Clyde W; Bhatt, Deepak L; Curtis, Lesley H; Hernandez, Adrian F

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus, heart failure (HF), and chronic kidney disease are common comorbidities, but overall use and safety of antihyperglycemic medications (AHMs) among patients with these comorbidities are poorly understood. Using Get With the Guidelines-Heart Failure and linked Medicare Part D data, we assessed AHM use within 90 days of hospital discharge among HF patients with diabetes mellitus discharged from Get With the Guidelines-Heart Failure hospitals between January 1, 2006, and October 1, 2011. We further summarized use by renal function and assessed renal contraindicated AHM use for patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate chronic kidney disease is complex, and these patients are commonly treated with renal contraindicated AHMs, including over 6% receiving a thiazolidinedione, despite known concerns regarding HF. More research regarding safety and efficacy of various AHMs among HF patients is needed. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. [Toward a new model of pharmacy management comprehensive care of patients with chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muros-Ortega, M; Ramos, R; Molina, M

    2014-07-01

    The treatment of chronic kidney disease represents 2.5% of the National Healthcare System budget. Given the panorama of economic crisis, actions aimed at containing the costs in this kind of pathologies should be implemented. Centralization of the management of the medications used for the treatment of chronic kidney disease and its complications aims at reducing the pharmaceutical expenditure. The new contracts of public healthcare administrations with companies of dialysis centers establish a single price by which the contractor takes care of the integral management of the patients, including the dialysis therapy and pharmacological treatment. Drug management at dialysis centers will be handled by specialized pharmacists by means of the creation of pharmacy departments or drug warehouse. these measures aim at improving healthcare of the patient in hemodialysis program, with health benefits at a lower healthcare cost. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  2. Social support of adults and elderly with chronic kidney disease on dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Márcia da Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the instrumental and emotional social support of patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis. Method: descriptive cross-sectional study. The sample was sized for convenience and included 103 participants under treatment in a Renal Replacement Therapy Unit. Data were collected through individual interviews, using the Social Support Scale. Results: the mean scores of the emotional and instrumental social support were 3.92 (± 0.78 and 3.81 (± 0.69 respectively, an indication of good support received. The most frequent sources of instrumental and emotional social support mentioned by participants were partners, spouse, companion or boyfriend and friends. Conclusion: patients with chronic kidney disease have high social support, both instrumental and emotional, and the main support comes from the family.

  3. Patient Engagement and Patient-Centred Care in the Management of Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease and Chronic Kidney Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Allan Bear

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this article is to review the current status of patient-centred care (PCC and patient engagement (PE in the management of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD, to identify some of the barriers that exist to the achievement of PCC and PE, and to describe how these barriers can be overcome. Sources of information: The review is based on the professional experience of one of the authors (RB as a Nephrologist and health care consultant, on the MBA thesis of one of the authors (SS and on a review of pertinent internet-based information and published literature. Findings: Evidence exists that, currently, the care of patients with advanced CKD and ESRD is not fully patient-centred or fully supportive of PE. A number of barriers exist, including: conflict with other priorities; lack of training and fear of change; the unequal balance of power between patients and providers; physician culture and behaviour; the fee-for-service model of physician compensation; slow implementation of electronic health records; and, fear of accountability. These barriers can be overcome by committed leadership and the development of an information-based implementation plan. Established Renal Agencies in Canada appear interested in facilitating this work by collaborating in the development of a toolkit of recommended educational resources and preferred implementation practices for use by ESRD Programs. Limitations: A limitation of this review is the absence of a substantial pre-existing literature on this topic. Implications: Receiving care that is patient-centred and that promotes PE benefits patients with serious chronic diseases such as advanced CKD and ESRD. Considerable work is required by ESRD Programs to ensure that such care is provided. Canadian Renal Agencies can play an important role by ensuring that ESRD Programs have access to essential educational material and proven implementation

  4. The self-management experience of patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazian, Shayan; Crnosija, Natalie; Weinger, Katie; Jacobson, Alan M; Park, Joonho; Tanenbaum, Molly L; Gonzalez, Jeffrey S; Mattana, Joseph; Hammock, Amy C

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore views related to the self-management of type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. We conducted three semi-structured focus groups in participants with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Interviews were transcribed, coded, and analyzed using thematic analysis. Credibility was supported through triangulation of data sources and the use of multiple investigators from different disciplines. Twenty-three adults participated. Three major themes were identified: emotional reactions to health state, the impact of family dynamics on self-management, and the burden of self-management regimens. Family dynamics were found to be a barrier and support to self-management, while complicated self-management regimens were found to be a barrier. Additionally, participants expressed several emotional reactions related to their CKD status, including regret related to having developed CKD and distress related both to their treatment regimens and the future possibility of dialysis. This exploratory study of patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease describes barriers and supports to self-management and emotional reactions to chronic kidney disease status. Future research should confirm these findings in a larger population and should include family members and/or health care providers to help further define problems with self-management in patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Echocardiographic study of cardiac dysfunction in patients of chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arshi, S.; Butt, G.U.D.; Mian, F.A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to see echocardiographic findings of cardiac dysfunction in patients of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on hemodialysis. Study Design: Comparative cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of nephrology, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences. Islamabad from September 2014 to February 2015. Patients and Methods: One hundred patients of either gender were included in this study. Fifty patients of chronic kidney disease stage V on hemodialysis were taken for echocardiography and fifty were normal. Echocardiography was done for cardiac dysfunction. Systolic function was measured by ejection fraction (EF) and fractional shortening (FS). Diastolic function was measured by E/A ratio. Results: Out of 100 patients included in the study, 50 patients were on hemodialysis and 50 were control. Left ventricular end systolic and end diastolic volumes were higher in patients on hemodialysis than controls as well as left atrial enlargement and inter ventricular septum which was statistically significant. Ejection fraction, although normal and fractional shortening decreased in patients on hemodialysis (p<0.05). Diastolic dysfunction was present in 36 patients on hemodialysis, while absent in the control group. Conclusion: Patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis have higher prevalence of cardiac dysfunction. (author)

  6. Iron deficiency across chronic kidney disease stages: Is there a reverse gender pattern?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabel Aoun

    Full Text Available In non-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients, looking for iron deficiency is highly variable in practice and there is a great variability regarding the cutoffs used to treat iron deficiency. The aim of this study is to investigate the degree of iron deficiency in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients on erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. We included all non-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients that applied to the Lebanese Ministry of Public Health for erythropoiesis-stimulating agents' coverage during a 5-month period. Iron requirement was assessed based on two guidelines' target-to-treat cutoffs: 1-ferritin <100 ng/ml and/or TSAT < 20% (KDOQI 2006, 2- ferritin ≤500 ng/ml and TSAT ≤30% (KDIGO 2012. A total of 238 CKD patients were included over 5 months. All patients had a ferritin level in their record and 64% had an available TSAT. Median age was 71.0 (59.8-79.3 years and 61.8% were female. All had an eGFR<60 ml/min. The proportion of patients found to require iron therapy ranged between 48 and 78% with a trend towards higher values when using KDIGO-based criteria. Using ANCOVA test, inverse normal transformations of ferritin and TSAT showed a reverse pattern between men and women with women being more iron deficient in the early stage. Iron deficiency is highly prevalent in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients on erythropoiesis-stimulating agents' therapy. These findings reflect a lack in effective iron supplementation when managing anemia in pre-dialysis patients, especially in men at advanced stages. Renal societies should spread awareness about iron deficiency screening in those patients.

  7. Effect of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists on proteinuria and progression of chronic kidney disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Currie, G. (Gemma); Taylor, A.H.M. (Alison H. M.); Fujita, T. (Toshiro); Ohtsu, H. (Hiroshi); Lindhardt, M. (Morten); K. Rossing; Boesby, L. (Lene); Edwards, N.C. (Nicola C.); Ferro, C.J. (Charles J.); J. Townend (Jonathan); A.H. van den Meiracker (Anton); Saklayen, M.G. (Mohammad G.); Oveisi, S. (Sonia); Jardine, A.G. (Alan G.); C. Delles (Christian); Preiss, D.J. (David J.); Mark, P.B. (Patrick B.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Hypertension and proteinuria are critically involved in the progression of chronic kidney disease. Despite treatment with renin angiotensin system inhibition, kidney function declines in many patients. Aldosterone excess is a risk factor for progression of kidney disease.

  8. Growth in children with chronic kidney disease: a report from the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodig, Nancy M; McDermott, Kelly C; Schneider, Michael F; Hotchkiss, Hilary M; Yadin, Ora; Seikaly, Mouin G; Furth, Susan L; Warady, Bradley A

    2014-10-01

    Growth failure is common among children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We examined the relationship of growth parameters with glomerular filtration rate (GFR), CKD diagnosis, sex and laboratory results in children with CKD. Baseline data from 799 children (median age 11.0 years, median GFR 49.9 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) participating in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children Study were examined. Growth was quantified by age-sex-specific height, weight, body mass index (BMI-age), and height-age-sex-specific BMI (BMI-height-age) standard deviation scores (SDS). Median height and weight SDS were -0.55 [interquartile range (IQR) -1.35 to 0.19] and 0.03 (IQR -0.82 to 0.97), respectively. Girls with non-glomerular CKD were the shortest (median height SDS -0.83; IQR -1.62 to -0.02). Compared to those with a serum bicarbonate (CO2) level of ≥ 22 mEq/L, children with CO2 of children with a height SDS of ≤-1.88 were prescribed growth hormone therapy. Forty-six percent of children with glomerular CKD were overweight or obese (BMI-height-age ≥ 85th percentile). Growth outcomes in a contemporary cohort of children with CKD remain suboptimal. Interventions targeting metabolic acidosis and overcoming barriers to recombinant human growth hormone usage may improve growth in this population.

  9. Clinical Guidance on Screening Chronic Kidney Disease in Type 2 Diabetic Patients for Family Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Esmaeil Managheb

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of diabetes is increasing in developing countries as well as Iran. Half of the patients are not aware of their disease so screening of diabetes is necessary. Lifestyle changes in society, high-saturated fat diet and decreased physical activity are the factors that influence the growing rate of diabetes in Iran.1 The need for addressing type 2 diabetes has been clarified for family physicians.2 Diabetes is a common disease that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It has an asymptomatic stage that may be present for up to several years before diagnosis.3 Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney disease.4 In a study among patients over 45 years with type 2 diabetes, these results were reported: 22% suffered from retinopathy, 7% had impaired vision, 6% had kidney diseases, 9% had clinical symptoms, and 19.1% were at risk for foot ulcers.5 Early treatment of type 2 diabetes can reduce or delay complications.6 Optimal glycemia and BP are important in the prevention of diabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD.4 Therapeutic goals in patients with complications, such as CKD, include maintaining renal function and stopping the trend of renal deterioration.5 Progression of diabetic nephropathy can be slowed through the use of some medications.4 How to screen and manage chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes is shown in Figure 1.

  10. Effect of Redox Modulating NRF2 Activators on Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Bo-hyun Choi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is featured by a progressive decline of kidney function and is mainly caused by chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension. CKD is a complex disease due to cardiovascular complications and high morbidity; however, there is no single treatment to improve kidney function in CKD patients. Since biological markers representing oxidative stress are significantly elevated in CKD patients, oxidative stress is receiving attention as a contributing factor to CKD pathology. Nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (NRF2 is a predominant transcription factor that regulates the expression of a wide array of genes encoding antioxidant proteins, thiol molecules and their generating enzymes, detoxifying enzymes, and stress response proteins, all of which can counteract inflammatory and oxidative damages. There is considerable experimental evidence suggesting that NRF2 signaling plays a protective role in renal injuries that are caused by various pathologic conditions. In addition, impaired NRF2 activity and consequent target gene repression have been observed in CKD animals. Therefore, a pharmacological intervention activating NRF2 signaling can be beneficial in protecting against kidney dysfunction in CKD. This review article provides an overview of the role of NRF2 in experimental CKD models and describes current findings on the renoprotective effects of naturally occurring NRF2 activators, including sulforaphane, resveratrol, curcumin, and cinnamic aldehyde. These experimental results, coupled with recent clinical experiences with a synthetic triterpenoid, bardoxolone methyl, have brought a light of hope for ameliorating CKD progression by preventing oxidative stress and maintaining cellular redox homeostasis.

  11. International Network of Chronic Kidney Disease cohort studies (iNET-CKD): a global network of chronic kidney disease cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienemann, Thomas; Fujii, Naohiko; Orlandi, Paula; Nessel, Lisa; Furth, Susan L; Hoy, Wendy E; Matsuo, Seiichi; Mayer, Gert; Methven, Shona; Schaefer, Franz; Schaeffner, Elke S; Solá, Laura; Stengel, Bénédicte; Wanner, Christoph; Zhang, Luxia; Levin, Adeera; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Feldman, Harold I

    2016-09-02

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global health burden, yet it is still underrepresented within public health agendas in many countries. Studies focusing on the natural history of CKD are challenging to design and conduct, because of the long time-course of disease progression, a wide variation in etiologies, and a large amount of clinical variability among individuals with CKD. With the difference in health-related behaviors, healthcare delivery, genetics, and environmental exposures, this variability is greater across countries than within one locale and may not be captured effectively in a single study. Studies were invited to join the network. Prerequisites for membership included: 1) observational designs with a priori hypotheses and defined study objectives, patient-level information, prospective data acquisition and collection of bio-samples, all focused on predialysis CKD patients; 2) target sample sizes of 1,000 patients for adult cohorts and 300 for pediatric cohorts; and 3) minimum follow-up of three years. Participating studies were surveyed regarding design, data, and biosample resources. Twelve prospective cohort studies and two registries covering 21 countries were included. Participants age ranges from >2 to >70 years at inclusion, CKD severity ranges from stage 2 to stage 5. Patient data and biosamples (not available in the registry studies) are measured yearly or biennially. Many studies included multiple ethnicities; cohort size ranges from 400 to more than 13,000 participants. Studies' areas of emphasis all include but are not limited to renal outcomes, such as progression to ESRD and death. iNET-CKD (International Network of CKD cohort studies) was established, to promote collaborative research, foster exchange of expertise, and create opportunities for research training. Participating studies have many commonalities that will facilitate comparative research; however, we also observed substantial differences. The diversity we observed across

  12. Epidemiology of chronic kidney disease in children in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peco-Antic, Amira; Bogdanovic, Radovan; Paripovic, Dusan; Paripovic, Aleksandra; Kocev, Nikola; Golubovic, Emilija; Milosevic, Biljana

    2012-05-01

    The epidemiological information from well-defined populations regarding childhood chronic kidney disease (CKD), particularly those concerning non-terminal stages, are scanty. The epidemiology of CKD in children is often based on renal replacement therapy (RRT) data, which means that a considerable number of children in earlier stages of CKD are missed as they will reach end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in adulthood. Here, we report the basic epidemiological data on childhood CKD in Serbia, gathered over the 10-year period of activity of the Serbian Pediatric Registry of Chronic Kidney Disease. Since 2000-09, data on incidence, prevalence, aetiology, treatment modalities and outcome of children aged 0-18 years, with CKD Stages 2-4 and CKD Stage 5, were collected by reporting index cases from paediatric centres. Three hundred and thirty-six children were registered (211 boys, 125 girls, male/female ratio 1.7). The median age at registration was 9.0 years [interquartile range (IQR) 3-13]. Median follow-up was 4.0 years (IQR, 1-9). The median glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at the time of the registration was 39.6 mL/min/1.73m(2) (IQR, 13.8-65.4). Median annual incidence of CKD 2-5 stages was 14.3 per million age-related population (p.m.a.r.p.), while those of CKD 2-4 or CKD 5 were 9.1 and 5.7 p.m.a.r.p., respectively. The median prevalence of CKD 2-5 was 96.1 p.m.a.r.p., 52.8 p.m.a.r.p. in CKD 2-4 and 62.2 p.m.a.r.p. in CKD 5. The main causes of CKD were congenital anomalies of kidney and urinary tract and hereditary nephropathies. Kidney survival was the worst in children with glomerular diseases and in those with advanced CKD. Haemodialysis was the most common first modality of RRT. Mortality rate was 4.5%, mainly due to cardiovascular and infectious complications. Epidemiology of paediatric CKD in Serbia is similar to that reported from developed European countries. The knowledge of the epidemiology of earlier stages of CKD is essential for both institution of

  13. The renal arterial resistive index and stage of chronic kidney disease in patients with renal allograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Stine O; Thiesson, Helle C; Poulsen, Lene N

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the optimal threshold value of renal arterial resistive index as assessed by Doppler ultrasonography determining chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher in patients with renal allograft.......The study investigated the optimal threshold value of renal arterial resistive index as assessed by Doppler ultrasonography determining chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher in patients with renal allograft....

  14. Low serum leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Rattensperger, Dirk; Zidek, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Leptin, secreted from adipose tissue, regulates food intake, energy expenditure, and immune function. It is unknown whether leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy.......Leptin, secreted from adipose tissue, regulates food intake, energy expenditure, and immune function. It is unknown whether leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy....

  15. The challenges of chronic kidney disease in Nigeria and the way ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD), is a worldwidehealth problem with a great burden and high cost of care mostly in developing countries like Nigeria. Chronic kidney disease is increasingworldwide at an annual incidence of 8%1. Amid rapid urbanization and adoption of western lifestyles, increasing rates of ...

  16. An audit of chronic kidney disease risk factors in type 2 diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An audit of chronic kidney disease risk factors in type 2 diabetic patients in a tertiary hospital in Southern Nigeria. ... highly prevalent in type 2 diabetics in this study. Measures aimed at reducing these risks should be instituted to delay the onset and progression of CKD. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, ...

  17. Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder in the Elderly Peritoneal Dialysis Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James Goya

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper was to review the literature concerning the treatment of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) in the elderly peritoneal dialysis (PD) patient. ♦ RESULTS: Chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder is a major problem in the elderly PD patient...

  18. [USE OF STATINS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE TO PREVENT CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavidić, T; Lodeta, B; Lovrinić, Đ

    2016-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the leading public health issues due to frequent and serious complications. Once the function of kidneys is disrupted, regardless of etiology, there are numerous factors that can speed up decrease of glomerular filtration rate, including hypertension, proteinuria and dyslipidemia. Statins are widely used in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases in general population. Clinical advantages of statins in CKD patients are not as clear. The aim of this paper is to present lipid status in CKD patients and indications for statin therapy with the aim to reduce cardiovascular risk in this group of patients. CKD is a well-known independent risk factor in cardiovascular events, but professional associations issuing guidelines differ in the approach to treatment of dyslipidemia. The results of some studies indicate that treatment with statins may slow down the rate of kidney function reduction in patients with mild to moderate kidney damage, whereas other studies deny this effect. Furthermore, CKD patients have a higher risk of side effects, in part due to the reduced kidney excretion, polypharmacy, and numerous other comorbidities. Family physician has the role of providing preventive measures, with focus on appropriate treatment of patients with hypertension or diabetes, as the most common cause of CKD, and timely detection of CKD in initial stage.

  19. Risk Factors for Heart Failure in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: The CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiang; Shlipak, Michael; Anderson, Amanda; Roy, Jason A; Feldman, Harold I; Kallem, Radhakrishna Reddy; Kanthety, Radhika; Kusek, John W; Ojo, Akinlolu; Rahman, Mahboob; Ricardo, Ana C; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Wolf, Myles; Zhang, Xiaoming; Raj, Dominic; Hamm, Lee

    2017-05-17

    Heart failure is common in patients with chronic kidney disease. We studied risk factors for incident heart failure among 3557 participants in the CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study. Kidney function was assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using serum creatinine, cystatin C, or both, and 24-hour urine albumin excretion. During an average of 6.3 years of follow-up, 452 participants developed incident heart failure. After adjustment for age, sex, race, and clinical site, hazard ratio (95% CI) for heart failure associated with 1 SD lower creatinine-based eGFR was 1.67 (1.49, 1.89), 1 SD lower cystatin C-based-eGFR was 2.43 (2.10, 2.80), and 1 SD higher log-albuminuria was 1.65 (1.53, 1.78), all P kidney function measures were simultaneously included in the model, lower cystatin C-based eGFR and higher log-albuminuria remained significantly and directly associated with incidence of heart failure. After adjusting for eGFR, albuminuria, and other traditional cardiovascular risk factors, anemia (1.37, 95% CI 1.09, 1.72, P =0.006), insulin resistance (1.16, 95% CI 1.04, 1.28, P =0.006), hemoglobin A1c (1.27, 95% CI 1.14, 1.41, P chronic kidney disease. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  20. Chronic Kidney Disease is a New Target of Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kohzuki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic heart failure is increasingly prevalent worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The Cochrane review demonstrated that cardiac rehabilitation (CR resulted in improvements in QOL and a reduction in long-term mortality. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is another worldwide public health problem. This review focuses on the importance and efficacy of rehabilitation for CKD patients as a new target of CR. Patients with CKD on hemodialysis (HD have a high mortality rate, with cardiovascular diseases, such as chronic heart failure. A new systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials reported that exercise-based renal rehabilitation improved aerobic capacity, muscular functioning, cardiovascular function, walking capacity, and QOL in CKD patients with HD. Moreover, exercise training may have renal protective effects, not only in some animal models of pre-HD CKD, but also in pre-HD CKD patients. Exercise therapy could be an effective clinical strategy in improving renal function, lowering the need for renal replacement therapy, such as HD, and reducing renal transplant risk in pre-HD CKD patients. This led the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan to extend renal rehabilitation partial coverage to stage 4 pre-HD CKD patients for the first time in the world in 2016.

  1. Sympathetic Overactivity in Chronic Kidney Disease: Consequences and Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasdeep Kaur

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD is increasing worldwide, with more than 26 million people suffering from CKD in the United States alone. More patients with CKD die of cardiovascular complications than progress to dialysis. Over 80% of CKD patients have hypertension, which is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Another common, perhaps underappreciated, feature of CKD is an overactive sympathetic nervous system. This elevation in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA not only contributes to hypertension but also plays a detrimental role in the progression of CKD independent of any increase in blood pressure. Indeed, high SNA is associated with poor prognosis and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality independent of its effect on blood pressure. This brief review will discuss some of the consequences of sympathetic overactivity and highlight some of the potential pathways contributing to chronically elevated SNA in CKD. Mechanisms leading to chronic sympathoexcitation in CKD are complex, multifactorial and to date, not completely understood. Identification of the mechanisms and/or signals leading to sympathetic overactivity in CKD are crucial for development of effective therapeutic targets to reduce the increased cardiovascular risk in this patient group.

  2. OCULAR MANIFESTATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE- A HOSPITALBASED STUDY

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    Shobha Ponmudy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic kidney disease affects every organ system including the eye. The aim of the study is to conduct a thorough ocular examination and to study the occurrence of various ocular manifestations exhibited by patients with chronic kidney disease and to analyse the findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS 100 patients from Department of Nephrology, Stanley Medical College diagnosed with chronic kidney disease were examined for ocular manifestations at the Department of Ophthalmology, Stanley Medical College. This is a cross-sectional, descriptive, non-interventional, hospital-based study. The period of study was from August 2010 to October 2011. RESULTS The commonest cause of CKD was hypertension in 47 pts. (52.2% followed by both diabetes and hypertension in 30 patients. Patients with only diabetes were 6 patients (6.7% and with other causes were 7 patients (7.8%.10% of patients were legally blind with visual acuity <6/60. In this study, 65 patients belonged to less than 50 years. 49.3% of the presenile patients had cataract. A reduced Schirmer’s value was noted in 54 eyes of the 200 eyes. The incidence of ocular surface disease in the study was 27%. 92 eyes out of 200 eyes studied showed hypertensive retinopathy. Higher grades of hypertensive retinopathy was more in advanced stages of CKD, i.e. 24 eyes in stage IV and 23 eyes in stage V. 51 eyes out of 40 diabetics showed diabetic retinopathy changes of which a majority of 25 eyes belonged to stage V disease. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in CKD patients is significantly more when compared to diabetic patients without CKD. CONCLUSION Study demonstrates that routine ocular evaluation is necessary in all patients with chronic kidney disease irrespective of the presence of ocular symptoms. It also highlights the occurrence of a variety of treatable ocular manifestations, which can become vision threatening if not taken care of at the earliest.

  3. Update on uncertain etiology of chronic kidney disease in Sri Lanka's north-central dry zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanigasuriya, Kamani

    2014-04-01

    This manuscript updates a review previously published in a local journal in 2012, about a new form of chronic kidney disease that has emerged over the past two decades in the north-central dry zone of Sri Lanka, where the underlying causes remain undetermined. Disease burden is higher in this area, particularly North Central Province, and affects a rural and disadvantaged population involved in rice-paddy farming. Over the last decade several studies have been carried out to estimate prevalence and identify determinants of this chronic kidney disease of uncertain etiology. Summarize the available evidence on prevalence, clinical profile and risk factors of chronic kidney disease of uncertain etiology in the north-central region of Sri Lanka. PubMed search located 16 manuscripts published in peer-reviewed journals. Three peer-reviewed abstracts of presentations at national scientific conferences were also included in the review. Disease prevalence was 5.1%-16.9% with more severe disease seen in men than in women. Patients with mild to moderate stages of disease were asymptomatic or had nonspecific symptoms; urinary sediments were bland; 24-hour urine protein excretion was urine, and mycotoxins detected in foods were below maximum statutory limits. Calcium-bicarbonate-type water with high levels of fluoride was predominant in endemic regions. Significantly high levels of cadmium in urine of cases compared to controls, as well as the disease's dose-related response to these levels, has drawn attention to this element as a possible contributing factor. Familial clustering of patients is suggestive of a polygenic inheritance pattern comparable to that associated with diseases of multifactorial etiology. Available data suggest that chronic kidney disease of uncertain etiology is an environmentally acquired disease, but to date no definitive causal factor has been identified. Geographic distribution and research findings suggest a multifactorial etiology.

  4. A Meta-Analysis on Prehypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that there is an association between prehypertension and an increased risk of end-stage renal disease. However, there is conflicting evidence regarding the relationship between prehypertension and chronic kidney disease (CKD. This meta-analysis aimed to demonstrate the association between prehypertension and the incidence of CKD and identify the impacts of gender and ethnic differences.MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library (from inception through March 2016 and article reference lists were searched for relevant studies regarding blood pressure and CKD. Blood pressure (BP measurements were classified as follows: optimal BP (less than 120/80 mmHg, prehypertension (120-139/80-89 mmHg and hypertension (over 140/90 mmHg. CKD was defined by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR<60 ml/min/1.73 m2 or proteinuria. Two investigators independently extracted the data and assessed the quality of studies enrolled in this meta-analysis using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS. We performed the meta-analysis using Stata/SE 12.0 (StataCorp LP. The random-effect models were used in the heterogeneous analyses.After retrieving data from 4,537 potentially relevant articles, we identified 7 cohort studies including 261,264 subjects, according to the predefined selection criteria. Five studies were conducted in Mongolians from East Asia, and the other two studies were performed in Indo-Europeans from Austria and Iran. The participants ranged in age from 20 to 89 years, and the proportion of females ranged from 27.2% to 63.8%. The follow-up period ranged from 2 to 11 years. Compared with the optimal BP values, prehypertension showed an increased risk of CKD (pooled RR = 1.28; 95% CI = 1.13-1.44; P = 0.000; I2 = 77.9%. In the sex-stratified analysis, we found a similar trend in women (pooled RR = 1.29; 95% CI = 1.01-1.63; P = 0.039; I2 = 76.1% but not in men. This effect was observed only in Mongolians from East Asia (pooled RR = 1.37; 95

  5. Metabolic syndrome and its components associated with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Maleki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is limited information on the relationship between metabolic syndrome (MetS and chronic kidney disease (CKD in the Iranian population, a group that has a high prevalence of CKD and obesity. The aim of present study was to determine the relationship between MetS and CKD in West of Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 800 subjects aged more than 35 years admitted from 2011 to 2013 were enrolled in the study. MetS was defined based on the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, and CKD was defined from the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative practice guidelines. Waist circumference and body mass index were calculated, as well, blood samples were taken and lipid profile, plasma glucose levels, and serum creatinine were measured. Data were analyzed with SPSS version 17 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA. Results: CKD was seen in 14.8% patients with MetS and 8.3% individuals without MetS. MetS was associated with an increased odds ratio (OR for a glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 (OR: 1.91; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22-2.99; P = 0.004. Individuals with 2, 3, 4, and 5 components of the MetS had an increased OR for CKD: 2.19 (95% CI: 0.95-3.62, 2.65 (95% CI: 1.03-4.71, 2.86 (95% CI: 1.08-5.53, and 5.03 (95% CI: 1.80-8.57, respectively, compared with individuals with none of the components. Conclusion: We found a high prevalence of CKD in patients with MetS compared with the subject without MetS. Our observations raised major clinical and public health concerns in Iran, where both the MetS and kidney diseases are becoming common.

  6. New Targets for End-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakoura Niki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe forms of chronic kidney disease can lead to a critical, end-stage condition, requiring renal replacement therapy, which may involve a form of dialysis or renal transplantation. Identification and characterization of novel markers and/or targets of therapy that could be applied in these critically ill patients remains the focus of the current research in the field of critical care medicine and has been the objective of our studies for some years past. To this end, we used models of renal vascular disease, Ang II, L-NAME or mice overexpressing renin, treated with AT1 antagonists at different stages of progression, to create cohorts of animals during progression, reversal or escape from therapy. Transcriptomic analysis and comparisons were performed and genes were selected according to the following criteria: a not previously described in the kidney, b highly upregulated during progression and returning to the normal levels during reversal, and c producing proteins that are either circulating or membrane receptors.

  7. Protein-Energy Wasting and Mortality in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezio Gianetta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein-energy wasting (PEW is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and is associated with an increased death risk from cardiovascular diseases. However, while even minor renal dysfunction is an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular prognosis, PEW becomes clinically manifest at an advanced stage, early before or during the dialytic stage. Mechanisms causing loss of muscle protein and fat are complex and not always associated with anorexia, but are linked to several abnormalities that stimulate protein degradation and/or decrease protein synthesis. In addition, data from experimental CKD indicate that uremia specifically blunts the regenerative potential in skeletal muscle, by acting on muscle stem cells. In this discussion recent findings regarding the mechanisms responsible for malnutrition and the increase in cardiovascular risk in CKD patients are discussed. During the course of CKD, the loss of kidney excretory and metabolic functions proceed together with the activation of pathways of endothelial damage, inflammation, acidosis, alterations in insulin signaling and anorexia which are likely to orchestrate net protein catabolism and the PEW syndrome.

  8. Vitamin D and immune function in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Chih; Zheng, Cai-Mei; Lu, Chien-Lin; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Shyu, Jia-Fwu; Wu, Chia-Chao; Lu, Kuo-Cheng

    2015-10-23

    The common causes of death in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are cardiovascular events and infectious disease. These patients are also predisposed to the development of vitamin D deficiency, which leads to an increased risk of immune dysfunction. Many extra-renal cells possess the capability to produce local active 1,25(OH)2D in an intracrine or paracrine fashion, even without kidney function. Vitamin D affects both the innate and adaptive immune systems. In innate immunity, vitamin D promotes production of cathelicidin and β-defensin 2 and enhances the capacity for autophagy via toll-like receptor activation as well as affects complement concentrations. In adaptive immunity, vitamin D suppresses the maturation of dendritic cells and weakens antigen presentation. Vitamin D also increases T helper (Th) 2 cytokine production and the efficiency of Treg lymphocytes but suppresses the secretion of Th1 and Th17 cytokines. In addition, vitamin D can decrease autoimmune disease activity. Vitamin D has been shown to play an important role in maintaining normal immune function and crosstalk between the innate and adaptive immune systems. Vitamin D deficiency may also contribute to deterioration of immune function and infectious disorders in CKD patients. However, it needs more evidence to support the requirements for vitamin D supplementation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. [DIET CHARACTERISTICS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bašić-Marković, N; Šutić, I; Popović, B; Marković, R; Vučak, J

    2016-12-01

    Because of the increasing number of patients, chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a significant public health problem. As kidney function decreases, it is necessary to introduce certain dietary modifications. The aim was to investigate what is the appropriate approach to diet of CKD patients, which could contribute to slowing down progression of the disease. Dietary recommendations are individual for each patient, but also vary in the same patient depending on the stage of disease progression because special attention must be paid to appropriate intake of macronutrients (protein, carbohydrates and fats), micronutrients (sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, selenium, various vitamins), and water. In newly diagnosed patients, it is necessary to assess their nutritional status and energy requirements. It has been shown that protein-energy malnutrition, muscle loss and cachexia are strong predictors of mortality in CKD. Comparing different dietary approaches in everyday life of patients suffering from CKD, it was found that the most effective diet is Mediterranean food style. Studies confirm that Mediterranean diet has a preventive effect on renal function and reduces progression of the disease. Preventive measures, correct identification and early intervention can increase survival of patients and improve their quality of life. Mediterranean diet tailored to individual stages of CKD has been confirmed as the best choice in CKD patients.

  10. Role of Vitamin D in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tejas; Singh, Ajay K.

    2009-01-01

    Decline in renal function is directly related to cardiovascular mortality. However, traditional risk factors do not fully account for the high mortality in these patients. Activated vitamin D, a hormone produced by the proximal convoluted tubule of the kidney, appears to have beneficial effects beyond suppressing parathyroid hormone. However, activated vitamin D can also cause hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Newer agents such as vitamin D receptor activators (VDRAs, e.g., paricalcitol) suppress PTH with reduced risk of hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia. Recent evidence from animal and preliminary human studies supports an association between VDRAs and reduced risk of CVD deaths, irrespective of PTH levels. New pathways of vitamin D regulation have also been discovered, namely the roles of fibroblast growth factor-23 and klotho. Although tremendous work has been done to advance our understanding of the effects of vitamin D in health and CKD, more investigations and randomized trials need to be performed to elucidate the mechanistic underpinnings of this effect. PMID:19371802

  11. Systemic Redox Imbalance in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review

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    Konstantina P. Poulianiti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD experience imbalance between oxygen reactive species (ROS production and antioxidant defenses leading to cell and tissue damage. However, it remains unclear at which stage of renal insufficiency the redox imbalance becomes more profound. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an update on recent advances in our understanding of how the redox status changes in the progression of renal disease from predialysis stages 1 to 4 to end stage 5 and whether the various treatments and dialysis modalities influence the redox balance. A systematic review was conducted searching PubMed and Scopus by using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. In total, thirty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Even from an early stage, imbalance in redox status is evident and as the kidney function worsens it becomes more profound. Hemodialysis therapy per se seems to negatively influence the redox status by the elevation of lipid peroxidation markers, protein carbonylation, and impairing erythrocyte antioxidant defense. However, other dialysis modalities do not so far appear to confer advantages. Supplementation with antioxidants might assist and should be considered as an early intervention to halt premature atherogenesis development at an early stage of CKD.

  12. Framingham risk score with cardiovascular events in chronic kidney disease.

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    Szu-Chia Chen

    Full Text Available The Framingham Risk Score (FRS was developed to predict coronary heart disease in various populations, and it tended to under-estimate the risk in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients. Our objectives were to determine whether FRS was associated with cardiovascular events, and to evaluate the role of new risk markers and echocardiographic parameters when they were added to a FRS model. This study enrolled 439 CKD patients. The FRS is used to identify individuals categorically as "low" (4.7 cm, left ventricular hypertrophy or left ventricular ejection fraction<50% to the FRS model significantly improves the predictive values for cardiovascular events. In CKD patients, "high" risk categorized by FRS predicts cardiovascular events. Novel biomarkers and echocardiographic parameters provide additional predictive values for cardiovascular events. Future study is needed to assess whether risk assessment enhanced by using these biomarkers and echocardiographic parameters might contribute to more effective prediction and better care for patients.

  13. Exercise as an Adjunct Therapy In Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Danielle L; Edwards, David G; Lennon-Edwards, Shannon

    Physical activity levels are low in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Evidence indicates that a sedentary lifestyle contributes to increased morbidity and mortality risk; thus, increasing physical activity is an undeniable aspect of a healthy lifestyle. Despite the myriad of health benefits associated with exercise, as well as clinical guidelines in its favor, exercise is still not prescribed as part of routine care in the CKD patient population. This article briefly discusses the benefits of regular exercise implemented across all stages of CKD on independent predictors of survival such as cardiorespiratory fitness, cardiovascular health and protein-energy wasting. Health care providers of the multidisciplinary nephrology team play a pivotal role in the encouragement and implementation of increasing physical activity levels. In order to increase physical activity counseling and enhance healthcare providers' confidence in prescribing exercise for CKD patients, general recommendations for physical activity in these patients are provided.

  14. The Evolving World of Chronic Kidney Disease Mineral Bone Disorder

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    Antonio Bellasi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease – mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. In vitro and animal models suggest that phosphorous, calcium, parathyroid hormone, and vitamin D abnormalities, mediate the cardiovascular and bone diseases that characterise CKD-MBD and increase the risk of death. Currently, mineral abnormalities are corrected through phosphorous restriction, phosphate binders, calcimimetics and vitamin D administration. Nonetheless, data in humans that support the use of these compounds are still scarce, mainly based on observational studies. Thus, a considerable number of doubts and questions still challenge clinicians dealing with CKD patients and mineral metabolism imbalances. We herein critically review clinical evidence that support the use of different drugs in CKD-MBD.

  15. Hepcidin: an important iron metabolism regulator in chronic kidney disease

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    Sandra Azevedo Antunes

    Full Text Available Abstract Anemia is a common complication and its impact on morbimortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD is well known. The discovery of hepcidin and its functions has contributed to a better understanding of iron metabolism disorders in CKD anemia. Hepcidin is a peptide mainly produced by hepatocytes and, through a connection with ferroportin, it regulates iron absorption in the duodenum and its release of stock cells. High hepcidin concentrations described in patients with CKD, especially in more advanced stages are attributed to decreased renal excretion and increased production. The elevation of hepcidin has been associated with infection, inflammation, atherosclerosis, insulin resistance and oxidative stress. Some strategies were tested to reduce the effects of hepcidin in patients with CKD, however more studies are necessary to assess the impact of its modulation in the management of anemia in this population.

  16. Update on current management of chronic kidney disease in patients with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, Nina E; Naicker, Saraladevi

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of HIV-associated chronic kidney disease (CKD) varies geographically and depends on the definition of CKD used, ranging from 4.7% to 38% globally. The incidence, however, has decreased with the use of effective combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). A wide variety of histological patterns are seen in HIV-associated kidney diseases that include glomerular and tubulointerstitial pathology. In resource-rich settings, there has been a plateau in the incidence of end-stage renal disease secondary to HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). However, the prevalence of end-stage renal disease in HIV-positive individuals has risen, mainly due to increased longevity on cART. There is a disparity in the occurrence of HIVAN among HIV-positive individuals such that there is an 18- to 50-fold increased risk of developing kidney disease among HIV-positive individuals of African descent aged between 20 and 64 years and who have a poorer prognosis compared with their European descent counterparts, suggesting that genetic factors play a vital role. Other risk factors include male sex, low CD4 counts, and high viral load. Improvement in renal function has been observed after initiation of cART in patients with HIV-associated CKD. Treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker is recommended, when clinically indicated in patients with confirmed or suspected HIVAN or clinically significant albuminuria. Other standard management approaches for patients with CKD are recommended. These include addressing other cardiovascular risk factors (appropriate use of statins and aspirin, weight loss, cessation of smoking), avoidance of nephrotoxins, and management of serum bicarbonate and uric acid, anemia, calcium, and phosphate abnormalities. Early diagnosis of kidney disease by screening of HIV-positive individuals for the presence of kidney disease is critical for the optimal management of these patients. Screening for the presence of kidney

  17. AMBULATORY BLOOD PRESSURE PATTERNS IN CHILDREN WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Joshua; Ng, Derek; Flynn, Joseph T.; Mitsnefes, Mark; Poffenbarger, Tim; Warady, Bradley A.; Furth, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is the best method of detecting abnormal blood pressure (BP) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), whose hypertension may be missed with office BP measurements. We report ABPM findings in 332 children 1 year after entry in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) cohort study. All subjects underwent casual and ambulatory BP measurement. BP was categorized based on casual and ABPM results into normal, white coat, masked, and ambulatory hypertension. Only half of the subjects had a normal ABPM. BP load was elevated (>25%) in 52% (n= 172) while mean BP was elevated in 32% (n= 105). In multivariate analysis, those using an ACE inhibitor (ACEi) were 89% more likely to have a normal ABPM than those who did not report using an ACEi (OR: 1.89, 95%CI: 1.17, 3.04). For every 20% faster decline in annualized GFR change, the odds of an abnormal ABPM increased 26% (OR: 1.26, 95%CI: 0.97, 1.64; p= 0.081). A 2.25 fold increase in urine protein:creatinine ratio annualized change was associated with a 39% higher odds of an abnormal ABPM (OR: 1.39, 95%CI: 1.06, 1.82; p= 0.019). Abnormalities on ABPM are common in children with CKD, and are strongly associated with known risk factors for end stage renal disease. Individuals on ACEi were less likely to have abnormal ABPM, suggesting a possible therapeutic intervention. ABPM should be used to monitor risk and guide therapy in children with CKD. PMID:22585950

  18. Assessment of diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients

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    Dariusz Włodarek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]introduction and objective[/b]. Nutrition is important in the therapy of predialysis patients. The aim of the presented single-centre descriptive study was to assess the diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients with no previous dietary intervention, in comparison with recommendations, as well as the analysis of the energy, protein and phosphate intake in correlation with chosen laboratory measurements. [b]materials and methods.[/b] The research was carried out in 31 female predialysis patients with CKD of different etiology, aged 29–79 years (GFR: 19.4±9.7ml/min/1.73m [sup]2[/sup] . Main outcome measures were self-reported data from three-day dietary recall. Nutrients content and energy value of diet were compared with guidelines for chronic kidney disease patients or, in case of nutrients when they are not settled, with the recommendations for healthy women. [b]results[/b]. All patients had a lower energy intake than the recommended level. At the same time, 35.8% of patients were characterised by improper protein intake – too low or too high. The majority of patients had low intake of most of vitamins and minerals. The total, animal and plant protein were positively correlated with the energy value of diet and with amount of most of the nutrients. Values of GFR were positively correlated with animal protein intake, while phosphate and creatinine in blood were negatively correlated with total and animal protein intake. [b]conclusions[/b]. The study highlights that diet of CKD predialysis patients with no previous dietary intervention is not properly balanced.

  19. Cardiovascular Disease and Chronic Inflammation in End Stage Kidney Disease

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    Sofia Zyga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD is one of the most severe diseases worldwide. In patients affected by CKD, a progressive destruction of the nephrons is observed not only in structuralbut also in functional level. Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease of large and medium-sized arteries. It is characterized by the deposition of lipids and fibrous elements and is a common complication of the uremic syndrome because of the coexistence of a wide range of risk factors. High blood pressure, anaemia, insulin resistance, inflammation, high oxidative stress are some of the most common factors that cause cardiovascular disease and atherogenesis in patients suffering from End Stage Kidney Disease (ESRD. At the same time, the inflammatory process constitutes a common element in the apparition and development of CKD. A wide range of possible causes can justify the development of inflammation under uremic conditions. Such causes are oxidative stress, oxidation, coexistentpathological conditions as well as factors that are due to renal clearance techniques. Patients in ESRD and coronary disease usually show increased acute phase products. Pre-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF-a, and acute phase reactants, such as CRP and fibrinogen, are closely related. The treatment of chronic inflammation in CKD is of high importance for the development ofthe disease as well as for the treatment of cardiovascular morbidity.Conclusions: The treatment factors focus on the use of renin-angiotensic system inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid, statins and anti-oxidant treatment in order to prevent the action of inflammatorycytokines that have the ability to activate the mechanisms of inflammation.

  20. Assessment of dietary intake of children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Wun Fung; Betoko, Aisha; Savant, Jonathan D; Abraham, Alison G; Greenbaum, Larry A; Warady, Bradley; Moxey-Mims, Marva M; Furth, Susan L

    2017-03-01

    Our aim was to characterize the nutrient intake of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) relative to recommended intake levels. We conducted a cross-sectional study of dietary intake assessed by Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) in The North American Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) prospective cohort study. Nutrient intake was analyzed to estimate the daily consumption levels of various nutrients and compared with national guidelines for intake. There were 658 FFQs available for analysis; 69.9 % of respondents were boys, with a median age [Interquartile range (IQR)] of 11 years (8-15). Median daily sodium, potassium, and phosphorus intake was 3089 mg (2294-4243), 2384 mg (1804-3076), and 1206 mg (894-1612) respectively. Sodium and phosphorus consumptions were higher than recommended in all age groups. Caloric intake decreased with dropping glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (p = 0.003). The median daily caloric intakes were 1307 kcal in male children 2-3 years old, 1875 kcal in children 4-8 years old, 1923 kcal in those 9-13 years old, and 2427 kcal in those 14-18 years old. Respective levels for girls were 1467 kcal, 1736 kcal, 1803 kcal, and 2281 kcal. Median protein intake exceeded recommended levels in all age groups, particularly among younger participants. Younger children were more likely than older children to exceed the recommended intakes for phosphorus (p Children in the CKiD cohort consumed more sodium, phosphorus, protein, and calories than recommended. The gap between actual consumption and recommendations indicates a need for improved nutritional counseling and monitoring.

  1. Oral health in patients with chronic kidney disease - emphasis on periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Nylund, Karita

    2017-01-01

    ORAL HEALTH IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE - EMPHASIS ON PERIODONTITIS Background: Periodontitis is a common bacteria-induced chronic inflammatory disease with mild symptoms. It leads to destruction of the periodontium and finally to tooth loss in a susceptible patient. Periodontitis is associated with many systemic diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) through low-grade systemic inflammation. However, no causality c...

  2. [Wasting in chronic kidney disease: Refeeding techniques and artificial nutrition practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasian, Céline; Azar, Raymond; Fouque, Denis

    2016-12-01

    Protein energy wasting (PEW) is an independent factor associated with morbi-mortality in chronic kidney disease. Wasting is particularly common in chronic diseases of organs such as kidney disease with a major impact at the stage of dialysis. It covers 20 to 70% of patients diagnosed with chronic kidney disease according to the degree of evolution of the disease and the diagnostic method used patients. Mechanisms of PEW are based mainly on anorexia and metabolic abnormalities caused by kidney disease. Nutritional treatment differs depending on the stage of the kidney disease acute or chronic treated whether or not by dialysis. Nutritional monitoring should be regular, individualized and collaborative to detect a risk of PEW or treat installed PEW. Refeeding techniques should allow all the nutritional needs. Their indications depend on the clinic, biochemical assessment and nutrient intake. Copyright © 2016 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Update on current management of chronic kidney disease in patients with HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana NE

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nina E Diana, Saraladevi Naicker Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa Abstract: The prevalence of HIV-associated chronic kidney disease (CKD varies geographically and depends on the definition of CKD used, ranging from 4.7% to 38% globally. The incidence, however, has decreased with the use of effective combined antiretroviral therapy (cART. A wide variety of histological patterns are seen in HIV-associated kidney diseases that include glomerular and tubulointerstitial pathology. In resource-rich settings, there has been a plateau in the incidence of end-stage renal disease secondary to HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN. However, the prevalence of end-stage renal disease in HIV-positive individuals has risen, mainly due to increased longevity on cART. There is a disparity in the occurrence of HIVAN among HIV-positive individuals such that there is an 18- to 50-fold increased risk of developing kidney disease among HIV-positive individuals of African descent aged between 20 and 64 years and who have a poorer prognosis compared with their European descent counterparts, suggesting that genetic factors play a vital role. Other risk factors include male sex, low CD4 counts, and high viral load. Improvement in renal function has been observed after initiation of cART in patients with HIV-associated CKD. Treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker is recommended, when clinically indicated in patients with confirmed or suspected HIVAN or clinically significant albuminuria. Other standard management approaches for patients with CKD are recommended. These include addressing other cardiovascular risk factors (appropriate use of statins and aspirin, weight loss, cessation of smoking, avoidance of nephrotoxins, and management of serum bicarbonate and uric acid, anemia, calcium, and phosphate abnormalities. Early diagnosis of kidney

  4. Anemia and risk for cognitive decline in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurella Tamura, Manjula; Vittinghoff, Eric; Yang, Jingrong; Go, Alan S; Seliger, Stephen L; Kusek, John W; Lash, James; Cohen, Debbie L; Simon, James; Batuman, Vecihi; Ordonez, Juan; Makos, Gail; Yaffe, Kristine

    2016-01-28

    Anemia is common among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) but its health consequences are poorly defined. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between anemia and cognitive decline in older adults with CKD. We studied a subgroup of 762 adults age ≥55 years with CKD participating in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. Anemia was defined according to the World Health Organization criteria (hemoglobin anemia and baseline cognitive impairment on each test, defined as a cognitive score more than one standard deviation from the mean, and mixed effects models to determine the relation between anemia and change in cognitive function during follow-up after adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics. Of 762 participants with mean estimated glomerular filtration rate of 42.7 ± 16.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2), 349 (46 %) had anemia. Anemia was not independently associated with baseline cognitive impairment on any test after adjustment for demographic and clinical characteristics. Over a median 2.9 (IQR 2.6-3.0) years of follow-up, there was no independent association between anemia and change in cognitive function on any of the six cognitive tests. Among older adults with CKD, anemia was not independently associated with baseline cognitive function or decline.

  5. Quality of chronic kidney disease management in primary care: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gelder, Vincent A; Scherpbier-De Haan, Nynke D; De Grauw, Wim J C; Vervoort, Gerald M M; Van Weel, Chris; Biermans, Marion C J; Braspenning, Jozé C C; Wetzels, Jack F M

    2016-01-01

    Early detection and appropriate management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in primary care are essential to reduce morbidity and mortality. To assess the quality of care (QoC) of CKD in primary healthcare in relation to patient and practice characteristics in order to tailor improvement strategies. Retrospective study using data between 2008 and 2011 from 47 general practices (207 469 patients of whom 162 562 were adults). CKD management of patients under the care of their general practitioner (GP) was qualified using indicators derived from the Dutch interdisciplinary CKD guideline for primary care and nephrology and included (1) monitoring of renal function, albuminuria, blood pressure, and glucose, (2) monitoring of metabolic parameters, and alongside the guideline: (3) recognition of CKD. The outcome indicator was (4) achieving blood pressure targets. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was applied to identify associated patient and practice characteristics. Kidney function or albuminuria data were available for 59 728 adult patients; 9288 patients had CKD, of whom 8794 were under GP care. Monitoring of disease progression was complete in 42% of CKD patients, monitoring of metabolic parameters in 2%, and blood pressure target was reached in 43.1%. GPs documented CKD in 31.4% of CKD patients. High QoC was strongly associated with diabetes, and to a lesser extent with hypertension and male sex. Room for improvement was found in all aspects of CKD management. As QoC was higher in patients who received structured diabetes care, future CKD care may profit from more structured primary care management, e.g. according to the chronic care model. Quality of care for chronic kidney disease patients in primary care can be improved. In comparison with guideline advice, adequate monitoring of disease progression was observed in 42%, of metabolic parameters in 2%, correct recognition of impaired renal function in 31%, and reaching blood pressure targets in 43% of chronic

  6. Anti-TNFα therapy for chronic inflammatory disease in kidney transplant recipients: Clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrouste, Cyril; Anglicheau, Dany; Kamar, Nassim; Bachelier, Claire; Rivalan, Joseph; Pereira, Bruno; Caillard, Sophie; Aniort, Julien; Gatault, Philippe; Soubrier, Martin; Sayegh, Johnny; Colosio, Charlotte; Buisson, Anthony; Thervet, Eric; Bouvier, Nicolas; Heng, Anne Elisabeth

    2016-10-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) therapy has improved the prognosis of many chronic inflammatory diseases. It appears to be well-tolerated by liver-transplant patients. However, their use and their safety in kidney-transplant patients have yet to be determined.In this retrospective study, we identified 16 adult kidney-transplant patients aged 46.5 years (34-51.8) who received anti-TNFα therapy from 7 kidney transplantation centers. The indications for this treatment included: chronic inflammatory bowel disease (n = 8), inflammatory arthritis (n = 5), AA amyloidosis (n = 1), psoriasis (n = 1), and microscopic polyangiitis (n = 1).Anti-TNFα therapies resulted in a clinical response in 13/16 patients (81%). Estimated glomerular filtration rates (MDRD-4) were similar on day 0 and at 24 months (M24) after anti-TNFα treatment had been initiated (41 [12-55] and 40 [21-53] mL/min/1.73 m, respectively). Two allograft losses were observed. The 1st case was due to antibody-mediated rejection (M18), while the 2nd was the result of AA amyloidosis recurrence (M20). There were several complications: 8 patients (50%) developed 23 serious infections (18 bacterial, 4 viral, and 1 fungal) and 4 developed cancer. Five patients died (infection n = 2, cardiac AA amyloidosis n = 1, intraalveolar hemorrhage following microscopic polyangiitis n = 1, and acute respiratory distress syndrome n = 1). On univariate analysis, recipient age associated with death (P = 0.009) and infection development (P = 0.06).Using anti-TNFα therapies, remission can be achieved in chronic inflammatory diseases in kidney-transplant patients. However, concommitant anti-TNFα and immunosuppresive therapies must be used with caution due to the high risk of infection, particularly after the age of 50.

  7. Clinical characteristics of chronic kidney disease of nontraditional causes in Salvadoran farming communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Raúl; Orantes, Carlos M; Almaguer, Miguel; Alfonso, Pedro; Bayarre, Héctor D; Leiva, Irma M; Smith, Magaly J; Cubias, Ricardo A; Torres, Carlos G; Almendárez, Walter O; Cubias, Francisco R; Morales, Fabrizio E; Magaña, Salvador; Amaya, Juan C; Perdomo, Edgard; Ventura, Mercedes C; Villatoro, Juan F; Vela, Xavier F; Zelaya, Susana M; Granados, Delmy V; Vela, Eduardo; Orellana, Patricia; Hevia, Reynaldo; Fuentes, E Jackeline; Mañalich, Reinaldo; Bacallao, Raymed; Ugarte, Mario; Arias, María I; Chávez, Jackelin; Flores, Nelson E; Aparicio, Claudia E

    2014-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a serious health problem in El Salvador. Since the 1990s, there has been an increase in cases unassociated with traditional risk factors. It is the second leading cause of death in men aged >18 years. In 2009, it was the first cause of in-hospital death for men and the fifth for women. The disease has not been thoroughly studied. Characterize clinical manifestations (including extrarenal) and pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease of nontraditional causes in Salvadoran farming communities. A descriptive clinical study was carried out in 46 participants (36 men, 10 women), identified through chronic kidney disease population screening of 5018 persons. Inclusion criteria were age 18-59 years; chronic kidney disease at stages 2, 3a and 3b, or at 3a and 3b with diabetes or hypertension and without proteinuria; normal fundoscopic exam; no structural abnormalities on renal ultrasound; and HIV-negative. Examinations included social determinants; psychological assessment; clinical exam of organs and systems; hematological and biochemical parameters in blood and urine; urine sediment analysis; markers of renal damage; glomerular and tubular function; and liver, pancreas and lung functions. Renal, prostate and gynecological ultrasound; and Doppler echocardiography and peripheral vascular and renal Doppler ultrasound were performed. Patient distribution by chronic kidney disease stages: 2 (32.6%), 3a (23.9%), 3b (43.5%). Poverty was the leading social determinant observed. Risk factor prevalence: agrochemical exposure (95.7%), agricultural work (78.3%), male sex (78.3%), profuse sweating during work (76.3%), malaria (43.5%), NSAID use (41.3%), hypertension (36.9%), diabetes (4.3%). General symptoms: arthralgia (54.3%), asthenia (52.2%), cramps (45.7%), fainting (30.4). Renal symptoms: nycturia (65.2%), dysuria (39.1%), foamy urine (63%). Markers of renal damage: macroalbuminuria (80.4%), ß2 microglobulin (78.2%), NGAL (26.1%). Renal function

  8. High-normal albuminuria and incident chronic kidney disease in a male nondiabetic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashitani, Aki; Ueno, Toshinori; Nakashima, Ayumu; Doi, Shigehiro; Yamane, Kiminori; Masaki, Takao

    2017-12-26

    High-normal albuminuria is an important risk factor for incident chronic kidney disease in diabetic populations, in contrast to an uncertain association in nondiabetic populations. This study aimed to reveal the relationship between high-normal albuminuria and incident chronic kidney disease in a Japanese nondiabetic population. A 10-year follow-up retrospective cohort study was performed involving 1378 Japanese men (mean age 44 ± 5.3 years) without chronic kidney disease and diabetes mellitus. Chronic kidney disease was diagnosed as either estimated glomerular filtration rate chronic kidney disease over the 10-year follow-up period. Median annual estimated glomerular filtration rate decline showed a deterioration with increasing quartiles of baseline albumin-to-creatinine ratio (P = 0.004). Participants who had a baseline albumin-to-creatinine ratio in the highest quartile (5.9-28.9 mg/g) were more likely to develop micro- or macroalbuminuria (odds ratio: 16.23, 95% confidence interval 6.56-54.03), chronic kidney disease (odds ratio: 2.48, 95% confidence interval 1.64-3.82), and hypertension (odds ratio 2.06, 95% confidence interval 1.30-3.31), but not diabetes mellitus compared with those who had an albumin-to-creatinine ratio in the lowest quartile (1.3-3.6 mg/g) after adjustment for potential confounders. High-normal albuminuria was associated with incident chronic kidney disease in this Japanese nondiabetic male population.

  9. [Management of high blood pressure in patients with chronic kidney disease : Summary of recent guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougardy, J M; Leeman, M

    Chronic kidney disease and high blood pressure are two common diseases that mutually maintain during their evolution. In the advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, most pat ients are hypertensive and show signs of vascular disease (coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular or peripheral). Almost one third of the patients with advanced chronic kidney disease exhibit resistant hypertension that requires complex therapeutic management. In chronic kidney disease, antihypertensive treatment is conditioned by comorbidities, but also by proteinuria, which is an independent cardiovascular risk factor in addition to the rate of glomerular filtration rate. The treatment of high blood pressure is a cornerstone of the management of the chronic kidney disease. It limits the risk of cardiovascular events (eg. myocardial infarction, stroke), but also slows the progression of chronic kidney disease. Various recommendations have been recently published on the subject in order to offer assistance to the therapeutic management of hypertension in the patient suffering from chronic kidney disease. The purpose of this article is to highlight these main key elements.

  10. Resistant starch alters gut microbiome and metabolomics profiles concurrent with amelioration of chronic kidney disease in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients and animals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit profound alterations in the gut environment including shifts in microbial composition, increased fecal pH, and increased blood levels of gut microbe-derived metabolites (xeno-metabolites). The fermentable dietary fiber—high amylose maize...

  11. Internet interventions for chronic pain including headache: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Buhrman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a major health problem and behavioral based treatments have been shown to be effective. However, the availability of these kinds of treatments is scarce and internet-based treatments have been shown to be promising in this area. The objective of the present systematic review is to evaluate internet-based interventions for persons with chronic pain. The specific aims are to do an updated review with a broad inclusion of different chronic pain diagnoses and to assess disability and pain and also measures of catastrophizing, depression and anxiety. A systematic search identified 891 studies and 22 trials were selected as eligible for review. Two of the selected trials included children/youth and five included individuals with chronic headache and/or migraine. The most frequently measured domain reflected in the primary outcomes was interference/disability, followed by catastrophizing. Result across the studies showed a number of beneficial effects. Twelve trials reported significant effects on disability/interference outcomes and pain intensity. Positive effects were also found on psychological variable such as catastrophizing, depression and anxiety. Several studies (n = 12 were assessed to have an unclear level of risk bias. The attrition levels ranged from 4% to 54% where the headache trials had the highest drop-out levels. However, findings suggest that internet-based treatments based on cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT are efficacious measured with different outcome variables. Results are in line with trials in clinical settings. Meta-analytic statistics were calculated for interference/disability, pain intensity, catastrophizing and mood ratings. Results showed that the effect size for interference/disability was Hedge's g = −0.39, for pain intensity Hedge's g = −0.33, for catastrophizing Hedge's g = −0.49 and for mood variables (depression Hedge's g = −0.26.

  12. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Transplant—Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Tang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a complex medical condition that is associated with several comorbidities and requires comprehensive medical management. Given the chronic nature of the condition, its frequent association with psychosocial distress, and its very significant symptom burden, the subjective patient experience is key toward understanding the true impact of CKD on the patients’ life. Patient-reported outcome measures are important tools that can be used to support patient-centered care and patient engagement during the complex management of patients with CKD. The routine collection and use of patient-reported outcomes (PROs in clinical practice may improve quality of care and outcomes, and may provide useful data to understand the disease from both an individual and a population perspective. Many tools used to measure PROs focus on assessing health-related quality of life, which is significantly impaired among patients with CKD. Health-related quality of life, in addition to being an important outcome itself, is associated with clinical outcomes such as health care use and mortality. In Part 1 of this review, we provide an overview of PROs and implications of their use in the context of CKD. In Part 2, we will review the selection of appropriate measures and the relevant domains of interest for patients with CKD.

  13. COMPLICATIONS AND OUTCOMES OF PREGNANCY IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Nikol'skaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy in women with kidney disorders, even with preserved renal function, is associated with higher than in the population rates of obstetric and perinatal complications, such as eclampsia, preterm delivery, surgical deliveries and intensive care for newborns.This article presents our own data on complications and outcomes of pregnancies in 156 women with various stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD. From these, 87 patients had CKD stage I, 29 with CKD stage II and 40 with CKD stages III, IV, V. For the first time in Russia, the authors summarize their unique experience in management of pregnancy with CKD, underline a high probability (27,5% of its primary detection during pregnancy, discuss the algorithms of assessment, prevention and treatment of various gestational complications in CKD (pre-eclampsia, urinary tract infections, feto-placental insufficiency, anemia, acute renal damage, as well as the influence of pregnancy on renal function at long-term post-delivery. A direct correlation between the CKD stage, frequency of pre-eclampsia, feto-placental insufficiency, preterm deliveries, surgical deliveries by caesarean section and babies’ status at birth is demonstrated.Based on their ample clinical material, they confirmprobability of favorable pregnancy outcomes in CKD patients with stable renal function without severe arterial hypertension during pregnancy: for a baby in 87%, for the mother in 90% (maintenance of the same CKD stage. The risk of persistent deterioration of renal function during pregnancy and puerperium in women with CKD is higher in CKD stage IV, as well as in the case of early development of pre-eclampsia; it also correlates with severity of the latter.The probability of a favorable obstetric and nephrological outcome is higher when the pregnancy is planned and intensively co-managed by an obstetrician/gynaecologist and a nephrologist from early weeks of gestation onwards.

  14. The alteration in peripheral neutrophils of patients with chronic kidney disease

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    Yevgenyevna Muravlyova Larissa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings have demonstrated the impaired functions of neutrophils of patients with chronic renal failure. The purpose of our research was to study oxidative modified proteins, as well as the histone spectrum in neutrophils drawn from patients with chronic kidney disease, and to estimate the ability of neutrophils to form spontaneous neutrophil extracellular traps. In this work, we have assumed that metabolic alteration in neutrophils may develop at early stages of chronic kidney disease. Materials and methods: Neutrophils obtained from patients with various stages of chronic kidney disease and degrees of chronic renal failure were used. As control, blood samples obtained from 32 healthy individuals was employed. In the examined neutrophils, advanced oxidation protein products, protein reactive carbonyl derivatives, as well as nucleosomal histones were detected. The ability of neutrophils to form spontaneous neutrophil extracellular traps was estimated. Our results have demonstrated an increase of nucleosomal histones in neutrophils of all patients with chronic kidney disease. Moreover, our work fixes the rate of growth of intracellular advanced oxidation protein products and the decreasing of protein reactive carbonyl derivatives in neutrophils from patients with chronic kidney disease. Furthermore, we demonstrate the presence of the neutrophils with altered oxidative status and the decomposition of the histone spectrum in the circulation of patients with chronic kidney disease.

  15. Prognostic significance of urinary NGAL in chronic kidney disease

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    Patel ML

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Munna Lal Patel,1 Rekha Sachan,2 Ravi Misra,3 Ritul Kamal,4 Radhey Shyam,5 Pushpalata Sachan6 1Department of Medicine, King George Medical University, Lucknow, India; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, King George Medical University, Lucknow, India; 3Department of Internal Medicine, King George Medical University, Lucknow, India; 4Epidemiology Division, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR, Lucknow, India; 5Department of Geriatric Intensive Care Unit, King George Medical University, Lucknow, India; 6Department of Physiology, Career Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a worldwide public health problem. Recently urinary NGAL (uNGAL has been proven to be a useful (potentially ideal biomarker for early detection of CKD. The aim of the present study was to examine the correlation of uNGAL with severity of renal impairment in CKD and to evaluate its prognostic value in these subjects. Methods: This was a prospective study carried out over a period of 24 months in subjects with CKD due to primary chronic glomerulonephritis. New cases of CKD stage II, III, IV aged between 18 and 65 years were enrolled as per KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines 2012. A total of 90 subjects completed the study up to the end-point. The primary follow-up end-point was 18 months, or decreased glomerular filtration rate of less than 15 mL/min. Secondary follow-up end-point was the number of subjects who expired during this period. Results: Multiple regression model of estimated glomerular filtration rate showed significant associations with log uNGAL (β=0.38, P<0.001, Ca×PO4 (β=0.60, P<0.001, hemoglobin (β=0.37, P<0.001, urine protein (β=0.34, P<0.001, serum albumin (β=0.48, P<0.001, and systolic blood pressure (β=0.76, P<0.001. Receiver operator curve for uNGAL considering the progression of CKD showed area under the curve

  16. Use of Herbal Supplements in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Am J Kidney Dis. 2014 Mar 16. Content courtesy of Judy Kirk MS, RDN, CSR, CDN If ... prevention and treatment of kidney disease. The Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance Charity Seal provides the ...

  17. [Retrospective analysis of influence of differential protein intake on renal prognosis for progressive chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wendi; Yin, Daoxin; Cui, Wenying; Liu, Wenhu

    2014-01-28

    To explore retrospectively the influence of differential protein intake on renal prognosis for progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD). A total of 159 chronic kidney disease patients at stages 2, 3 and 4 were enrolled and a questionnaire survey was conducted from January 2009 to July 2012. They were followed monthly and their clinical data collected, including primary disease, blood pressure, body mass index and adverse events. Laboratory tests were performed every 3 months, including biochemical parameters, protein-energy malnutrition (PEM), diet reviews and daily protein intake (DPI). A simplified MDRD formula was employed to evaluate the level of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). According to the level of DPI, they were divided into 3 groups of very low protein diet (VLPD): DPI ≤ 0.6 g · kg(-1) · d(-1), low-protein diet (LPD): DPI >0.6-protein diet (NPD): DPI ≥ 0.8 · g · kg(-1) · d(-1). Among them, 4 cases (2.50%) progressed to uremia stage and received renal replacement therapy, 2(1.25%) experienced rapid decline in renal function, 9(5.66%) were hospitalized from cardio-cerebral diseases and the 2-year kidney survival rate was 97.5%. At the end of study, among 9 patients of PEM, 2 subjects had a serum level of albumin under 32 g/L and another 7 with a BMI 0.05). Within a certain range, differential protein intake may not significantly affect the prognosis of kidney for progressive CKD patients.

  18. Effect of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists on proteinuria and progression of chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Currie, Gemma; Taylor, Alison H M; Fujita, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypertension and proteinuria are critically involved in the progression of chronic kidney disease. Despite treatment with renin angiotensin system inhibition, kidney function declines in many patients. Aldosterone excess is a risk factor for progression of kidney disease. Hyperkalaemia...... is a concern with the use of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. We aimed to determine whether the renal protective benefits of mineralocorticoid antagonists outweigh the risk of hyperkalaemia associated with this treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease. METHODS: We conducted a meta......-analysis investigating renoprotective effects and risk of hyperkalaemia in trials of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in chronic kidney disease. Trials were identified from MEDLINE (1966-2014), EMBASE (1947-2014) and the Cochrane Clinical Trials Database. Unpublished summary data were obtained from investigators...

  19. Quality of life and stressors in patients with chronic kidney disease depending on treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sanchis, Sonia; Bernal, M Consuelo; Montagud, José V; Abad, Anna; Crespo, Josep; Pallardó, Luis M

    2015-04-28

    This study evaluated health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in a Spanish sample of chronic kidney disease patients (n = 90) undergoing different renal replacement therapies, considering the influence of treatment stressors, mood, anxiety and quality of sleep. While all patients had worse physical functioning than controls (p Regression models including sleep, anxiety and depression were estimated for subscales of HRQOL. In TX patients, low depressive scores related to an optimal QLI in almost all subscales, while in HD patients they explained part of the variability in psychological well-being, interpersonal functioning and personal fulfillment. HD condition results in a QLI more distant to the standards of controls.

  20. Chiral amino acid metabolomics for novel biomarker screening in the prognosis of chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Tomonori; Hamase, Kenji; Miyoshi, Yurika; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Yasuda, Keiko; Mita, Masashi; Rakugi, Hiromi; Hayashi, Terumasa; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    D-Amino acids, the enantiomers of L-amino acids, are increasingly recognized as novel biomarkers. Although the amounts of D-amino acids are usually very trace in human, some of them have sporadically been detected in blood from patients with kidney diseases. This study examined whether multiple chiral amino acids would be associated with kidney functions, comorbidities, and prognosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) by enantioselective analyses of all chiral amino acids with a micro-two-dimens...

  1. Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease: Preventing Harm or Harming the Healthy?

    OpenAIRE

    Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B.; Kengne, Andre P.

    2012-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD)—the gradual loss of kidney function—is increasingly common worldwide. In the US, for example, about 26 million adults have CKD, and millions more are at risk of developing the condition. Throughout life, small structures called nephrons inside the kidneys filter waste products and excess water from the blood to make urine. If the nephrons stop working because of injury or disease, the rate of blood filtration decreases, and dangerous am...

  2. Renal function trajectory is more important than chronic kidney disease stage for managing patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosansky, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Management of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) emphasizes a current level of function as calculated from the modification of diet in renal disease glomerulofiltration rate equations (eGFR) and proteinuria for staging of CKD. Change in a patient's eGFR over time (renal function trajectory) is an additional and potentially more important consideration in deciding which patients will progress to the point where they will require renal replacement therapy (RRT). Many patients with CKD 3-5 have stable renal function for years. Proteinuria/albuminuria is a primary determinant of renal trajectory which may be slowed by medications that decrease proteinuria and/or aggressively lower blood pressure. A renal trajectory of >3 ml/min/1.73 m(2)/year may relate to a need for closer renal follow-up and increased morbidity and mortality. Additional CKD population-based studies need to examine the relationship of renal trajectory to: baseline renal function; acute kidney injury episodes; age, race, sex and primary etiologies of renal disease; blood pressure control and therapies; dietary protein intake; blood glucose control in diabetics and the competitive risk of death versus the requirement for renal replacement therapy. In the elderly CKD 4 population with significant comorbidities and slow decline in renal function, the likelihood of death prior to the need for RRT should be considered before placing AV access for dialysis. Prediction models of renal progression must account for the competitive risk of death as well as stable or improved renal function to be clinically useful. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Morphological and immunohistochemical (Troponin C evaluation of cardiac lesions in dogs with chronic kidney disease

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    Mariana Sequeira D’Avila

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. D’Avila M.S., França T.N., Peixoto P.V., Peixoto T.C., Santos A. M., Costa S.Z.R., Santos R.S., Gonçalves T. & Nogueira V.A. [Morphological and immunohistochemical (Troponin C evaluation of cardiac lesions in dogs with chronic kidney disease.] Avaliações morfológica e imuno-histoquímica (Troponina C de lesões cardíacas em cães com doença renal crônica. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 38(Supl.2:128-138, 2016. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Medicina Veterinária, Área de Concentração em Patologia Animal, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rodovia BR-465 Km 7, Seropédica, RJ 23890-000, Brasil. E-mail: mariana_davila@hotmail.com This study had the objective (1 to verify the correlation between chronic kidney disease (CKD and heart failure as well to evaluate the real extent of these changes and (2 to determine the reliability of the immunohistochemistry test using the human anti-troponin C antibody in detection of heart failure in dogs. Fragments of heart and kidneys paraffin embedded of 22 dogs (11 males and 11 females with previous diagnosis of chronic kidney disease were used. The animals were from Department of Veterinary Pathology of the Federal Rural University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ and Federal University of Bahia (UFBA, from different breeds and they had between 11 months and 18 years old. The macroscopic examination revealed, in the heart of five dogs, moderate to accentuated thickening of left ventricular wall. It was also found endocardiosis in different degrees. Extrarenal uremic lesions included ulcerative glossitis and stomatitis, pneumopathies and uremic gastropathy, stomach mucosal ulceration and mineralization in the pharynx, larynx and subpleural up to intercostal muscles. Chronic renal lesions were characterized by marked decrease in volume, firm texture, irregular surface and changes in cortico-medullary relationship. Microscopic evaluation revealed, in the kidneys of all dogs

  4. Uric acid and chronic kidney disease: which is chasing which?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard J.; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Jalal, Diana; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Kang, Duk-Hee; Ritz, Eberhard

    2013-01-01

    Serum uric acid is commonly elevated in subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but was historically viewed as an issue of limited interest. Recently, uric acid has been resurrected as a potential contributory risk factor in the development and progression of CKD. Most studies documented that an elevated serum uric acid level independently predicts the development of CKD. Raising the uric acid level in rats can induce glomerular hypertension and renal disease as noted by the development of arteriolosclerosis, glomerular injury and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Pilot studies suggest that lowering plasma uric acid concentrations may slow the progression of renal disease in subjects with CKD. While further clinical trials are necessary, uric acid is emerging as a potentially modifiable risk factor for CKD. Gout was considered a cause of CKD in the mid-nineteenth century [1], and, prior to the availability of therapies to lower the uric acid level, the development of end-stage renal disease was common in gouty patients. In their large series of gouty subjects Talbott and Terplan found that nearly 100% had variable degrees of CKD at autopsy (arteriolosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis) [2]. Additional studies showed that during life impaired renal function occurred in half of these subjects [3]. As many of these subjects had urate crystals in their tubules and interstitium, especially in the outer renal medulla, the disease became known as gouty nephropathy. The identity of this condition fell in question as the presence of these crystals may occur in subjects without renal disease; furthermore, the focal location of the crystals could not explain the diffuse renal scarring present. In addition, many subjects with gout also had coexistent conditions such as hypertension and vascular disease, leading some experts to suggest that the renal injury in gout was secondary to these latter conditions rather than to uric acid per se [4]. Indeed, gout was

  5. Evaluation of arterial stiffness in nondiabetic chronic kidney disease patients

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    Bodanapu Mastanvalli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a growing problem worldwide. Clinical and epidemiologic studies have shown that structural and functional changes that occur in major arteries are a major contributing factor to the high mortality in uremic patients. Recent studies have shown a stepwise increase of the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV from CKD Stage 1 to Stage 5. We evaluated the cfPWV and augmentation index (AIx, as indirect markers of arterial stiffness in patients with nondiabetic CKD and compared the values with normal population; we also evaluated the relationship between various stages of CKD and arterial stiffness markers. This cross-sectional study was carried out in the Department of Nephrology for a duration of two years from January 15, 2012, to January 14, 2014. Fifty patients with nondiabetic CKD were studied along with 50 healthy volunteers who did not have CKD, who served as controls. Assessment of arterial stiffness (blood pressure, PWV, heart rate, aortic augmentation pressure, and AIx was performed using the PeriScope device. PWV positively correlated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean aortic arterial pressure, serum creatinine, and serum uric acid and negatively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate. Arterial stiffness increased as CKD stage increased and was higher in nondiabetic CKD group than in the general population. Arterial stiffness progressed gradually from CKD Stage 2 to 5, and then abruptly, in dialysis patients. Measures to decrease the arterial stiffness and its influence on decreasing cardiovascular events need further evaluation.

  6. Uric acid stones increase the risk of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ching-Chia; Chien, Tsu-Ming; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Huang, Chun-Nung; Chou, Yii-Her

    2018-02-28

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical characteristics of uric acid stones and their potential risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD). A total of 401 patients (196 with uric acid stone and 205 without) were enrolled from our database of patients with urolithiasis. We analyzed the clinical demographic features, stone location, urine chemistries, and renal function. There was a significant difference (p uric acid group. Patients with uric acid stones had much lower pH of urine (p uric acid level (p = 0.002). Notably, those with uric acid stones had worse eGFR than those with non-uric acid stones. Multivariate analysis confirmed that age over 60 years (ORs = 9.19; 95% CI 3.5-24.3), female sex (ORs = 4.01; 95% CI 1.8-9.0), hyperuricemia (ORs = 8.47; 95% CI 1.6-43.5), and uric acid stone (OR = 2.86; 95% CI 1.2-6.7) were the independent predictors of poor prognoses in CKD. Therefore, an association exists between uric acid stones and higher prevalence of CKD. Patients with uric acid stones may need close monitoring of renal function during follow-up.

  7. Vaccine administration in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Mastrolia, Maria Vincenza; Prada, Elisabetta; Pietrasanta, Carlo; Principi, Nicola

    2014-11-20

    Pediatric patients with severe chronic kidney disease (CKD) on conservative treatment, on dialysis, and those with renal transplantation are at a higher risk for infectious diseases as the result of impaired immune responses against infectious agents. Infections in these patients can have drastic consequences for disease morbidity and mortality. Immunization is a crucial preventive strategy for disease management in this pediatric population. However, vaccination coverage among children with CKD remains low due to safety concerns and doubts about vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy. In this study, we reviewed why children with CKD are at higher risk of infections, the importance of vaccinations among these children, barriers to vaccinations, and recommend the best vaccination schedules. Overall, vaccines have acceptable immunogenicity, efficacy, and safety profiles in children with CKD. However, in some cases, the protective antibody levels induced by vaccines and the benefits and risks of booster vaccine doses must be individually managed. Furthermore, close contacts and household members of these children should complete age-appropriate vaccination schedules to increase the child's indirect protection.

  8. Plant phosphates, phytate and pathological calcifications in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Buades Fuster

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytate, or myo-inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakis dihydrogen phosphate (InsP6, is a naturally occurring phosphorus compound that is present in many foods, mainly legumes, whole grains and nuts. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD have cardiovascular disease mortality up to 30 times higher than the general population. Vascular calcifications (VCs directly contribute to overall morbidity and mortality, especially in CKD. In part, this high mortality is due to elevated levels of phosphorus in the blood. Therefore, control of dietary phosphorus is essential. Dietary phosphorus can be classified according to its structure in organic phosphorus (plant and animal and inorganic (preservatives and additives. Plant-phosphorus (legumes and nuts, mainly associated with InsP6, is less absorbable by the human gastrointestinal tract as the bioavailability of phosphorous from plant-derived foods is very low. Recent data indicate that restriction of foods containing plant phosphates may compromise the adequate supply of nutrients that have a beneficial effect in preventing cardiovascular events, such as InsP6 or fibre found in legumes and nuts. Experimental studies in animals and observational studies in humans suggest that InsP6 can prevent lithiasis and VCs and protect from osteoporosis. In conclusion, we need prospective studies to elucidate the potential benefits and risks of phytate (InsP6 through the diet and as an intravenous drug in patients on haemodialysis.

  9. Assessment of nutritional status in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglialonga, F; Felice Civitillo, C; Groppali, E; Edefonti, A

    2010-06-01

    The achievement of a normal nutritional status, that is a normal body composition and a normal pattern of growth, is a cornerstone in the management of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Protein-energy wasting (PEW) which indicates the state of decreased body protein mass and fuel reserves (body protein and fat mass), is a common condition in this population, and a source of morbidity and mortality. For the diagnosis of this condition, a lot of methods have been proposed, but due to the clinical characteristics of children with CKD, the intrinsic limits of the available indices and some methodological issues concerning published pediatric studies, none of these parameters could be considered as the gold standard. Given these limitations, a general consensus exists according to which only the combination of more indices integrated in a multidisciplinary approach can give the idea of the individual nutritional status. Among these indices, recent guidelines recommend dietary intake (by means of 3-day diary or 24-hour recall), anthropometric parameters (weight, height, height velocity, body mass index, head circumference) and, only for adolescent on hemodialysis, normalized protein catabolic rate as the most accurate ones. Other methods, such as mid-arm anthropometry, bioimpedance analysis, biochemical indices, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry could certainly help in the nutritional evaluation, taking into account the advantages and drawbacks of each method.

  10. The increasing financial impact of chronic kidney disease in australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Patrick S; Kingsley, Michael I; Morton, R Hugh; Scanlan, Aaron T; Dalbo, Vincent J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine and compare current and projected expenditure associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), renal replacement therapy (RRT), and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Australia. Data published by Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, and World Bank were used to compare CKD-, RRT-, and CVD-related expenditure and prevalence rates. Prevalence and expenditure predictions were made using a linear regression model. Direct statistical comparisons of rates of annual increase utilised indicator variables in combined regressions. Statistical significance was set at P Dollar amounts were adjusted for inflation prior to analysis. Between 2012 and 2020, prevalence, per-patient expenditure, and total disease expenditure associated with CKD and RRT are estimated to increase significantly more rapidly than CVD. RRT prevalence is estimated to increase by 29%, compared to 7% in CVD. Average annual RRT per-patient expenditure is estimated to increase by 16%, compared to 8% in CVD. Total CKD- and RRT-related expenditure had been estimated to increase by 37%, compared to 14% in CVD. Per-patient, CKD produces a considerably greater financial impact on Australia's healthcare system, compared to CVD. Research focusing on novel preventative/therapeutic interventions is warranted.

  11. Chronic kidney disease in patients with ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Yuuko; Takahashi, Wakoh; Takizawa, Shunya; Kawada, Shiaki; Takagi, Shigeharu

    2012-10-01

    To examine the significance of renal dysfunction in patients who have sustained ischemic stroke, we examined the relationship between the renal function evaluated in terms of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the subtype of brain infarction (BI) in patients with ischemic stroke. A total of 639 patients with BI were enrolled in this study, with 314 subjects without stroke or transient ischemic attack registered as age-matched controls. eGFR was calculated according to the equation 194 × Cr(-1.094) × Age(-0.287) (-0.739 if female), where Cr is serum creatinine concentration, and was classified into four stages: stage I, eGFR ≥ 90 mL/min/1.73 m(2); stage II, eGFR 60 ~ 89 mL/min/1.73 m(2); stage III, eGFR 30 ~ 59 mL/min/1.73 m(2); and stage IV, eGFR stroke is frequently associated with renal dysfunction. Chronic kidney disease might be independent risk factor for infarction, especially for cardiogenic and atherosclerotic types. Copyright © 2012 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Early chronic kidney disease: diagnosis, management and models of care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Olivier J.; O'Donoghue, Donal J.; Ritchie, James; Kanavos, Panos G.; Narva, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a prevalent condition in many countries, and it is estimated that over $1 trillion is spent globally on end-stage renal disease (ESRD) care. There is a clear clinical and economic rationale for designing timely and appropriate health system responses to limit progression from CKD to ESRD. This article reviews the gaps in our knowledge about which early CKD interventions are appropriate, the optimal time to intervene, and what model of care to adopt. The available diagnostic tests exhibit key limitations. Clinical care may improve if early-stage (1–3) CKD with risk for progression towards ESRD is differentiated from early CKD that is unlikely to advance. It is possible that CKD should be re-conceptualized as a part of primary care. Additional research is needed to better understand the risk factors for CKD progression. Systems modelling can be used to evaluate the impact of different care models on CKD outcomes and costs. The US Indian Health Service experience has demonstrated that an integrated, system-wide approach, even in an underfunded system, can produce significant benefits. PMID:26055354

  13. Chronic kidney disease: mineral and bone disorder in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesseling-Perry, Katherine; Salusky, Isidro B

    2013-03-01

    Childhood and adolescence are crucial times for the development of a healthy skeletal and cardiovascular system. Disordered mineral and bone metabolism accompany chronic kidney disease (CKD) and present significant obstacles to optimal bone strength, final adult height, and cardiovascular health. Early increases in bone and plasma fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) are associated with early defects in skeletal mineralization. Later in the course of CKD, secondary hyperparathyroidism--caused by a combination of declining calcitriol values and phosphate retention--results in high-turnover renal osteodystrophy whereas increased levels of both phosphate and FGF23 contribute to cardiovascular disease. Treatment of hyperphosphatemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism improves high-turnover bone disease but fails to correct defects in skeletal mineralization. Because overtreatment may result in adynamic bone disease, growth failure, hypercalcemia, and progression of cardiovascular calcifications, therapy therefore must be titrated carefully to maintain optimal serum biochemical parameters according to stage of CKD. Newer therapeutic agents and new treatment paradigms may suppress serum PTH levels effectively while limiting intestinal calcium absorption and skeletal FGF23 stimulation and may provide future therapeutic alternatives for children with CKD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Fibroblast growth factor 23 in chronic kidney disease in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okarska-Napierała, Magdalena; Skrzypczyk, Piotr; Pańczyk-Tomaszewska, Małgorzata

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular risk in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is many times higher compared to their healthy peers, and discovered in year 2000 fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) may be one of the factors responsible. FGF23 together with its cofactor, α-Klotho protein, plays a pivotal role in calcium-phosphorus metabolism in patients with CKD by decreasing secretion of active metabolite of vitamin D and antagonizing phosphate resorption in renal tubules. Studies conducted in recent years revealed that FGF23 directly binds to its receptor on cardiomyocytes and promotes left ventricular hypertrophy. Clinical trials in children with CKD, similarly to adult studies, suggest a key role of this protein in development of calciumphosphorus disturbances. Single studies in small patient groups suggest also a significance of FGF23 in pathogenesis of cardiovascular alterations in this population. Further clinical trials investigating role of FGF23 in development of cardiovascular damage in larger groups of children are necessary, which may open new therapeutic options for these patients in future. © 2016 MEDPRESS.

  15. Nutritional assessment in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aditi; Mantan, Mukta; Sethi, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Growth failure is a major problem in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the onset of the condition in infancy is more likely to have an adverse impact on growth than its development in later childhood. This study was aimed to assess nutritional intake and anthropometry of children presenting with CKD in a developing country. In this cross-sectional observational study, children (1-18 years) with CKD visiting the outpatient services were enrolled. The age of onset, cause of CKD, and anthropometry were recorded. Dietary intakes from three 24 h dietary recall (2 mid-week and 1 weekend day) were recorded. A blood sample was taken from all subjects for biochemical parameters. A total of 45 children (forty males and five females) with CKD underwent nutritional assessment. The median age at assessment was 108 months (13-167). Twenty-seven (60%) subjects had CKD stage 1, 2, or 3 while the remaining 40% had CKD stage 4 or 5. Of the 45 children, 27 (60%) had moderate to severe malnutrition at assessment. The mean weight and height (standard deviation scores) were -2.77 ± 2.07 and -2.30 ± 1.38, respectively. The prevalence of growth retardation was much higher in late stages of CKD; the difference was statistically significant (P children with CKD, especially in higher stages of CKD. An appropriate dietary assessment and nutritional counseling should be planned for all patients with CKD to prevent complications associated with malnutrition and anemia.

  16. Growth hormone treatment in short children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehls, O; Wühl, E; Tönshoff, B; Schaefer, F; Nissel, R; Haffner, D

    2008-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has been used for treatment of impaired growth in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) for nearly 17 years. Controlled and open-label studies have shown that GH is highly effective in improving growth velocity and adult height. The growth response is negatively correlated with age and height at start and time spent on dialysis treatment; it is positively correlated with dose and duration of treatment and the primary renal disease (renal hypodysplasia). In children with renal transplants, corticosteroid treatment is an additional factor negatively influencing spontaneous growth rates. However, GH treatment is able to compensate corticosteroid-induced growth failure. GH treatment improved final height by 0.5-1.7 standard deviation score (SDS) in various studies, whereas the control group lost about 0.5 SDS in comparable time intervals. These variable results are explained in part by the factors mentioned above. The adverse events are comparable to those in non-CKD children treated with GH. GH treatment is safe and highly effective in improving growth and final height of short children with all stages of CKD. The highest treatment success is obtained if treatment is started at an early age and with relatively well-preserved residual renal function and continued until final height.

  17. [Nutritional status of patients with chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunori, Giuliano

    2012-01-01

    The population of patients with chronic kidney disease is aging, and approximately 50% of those starting renal replacement therapy are older than 65 years. Aging poses challenges to maintaining the nutritional status of these patients. As patients get older, purchasing and preparing food may become difficult if the patient is not supported by relatives or social workers. In addition, appetite may decrease as a result of depression. Furthermore, intercurrent illnesses may become more frequent, leading to changes in nutrient requirements. Mobility and cognitive function often decline in elderly patients and the combination of these factors may result in malnutrition. Since malnutrition has been demonstrated to impact on survival in dialysis patients of all ages, appropriate attention to nutritional status and its management is essential in the elderly patient, both in the predialysis phase and on dialysis. This article reviews the issues associated with the maintenance of good nutrition in elderly patients and describes the potential causes of malnutrition. It also reviews the nutrient requirements of older dialysis patients (which differ somewhat from those of younger patients) as well as the assessment of their nutritional status. Finally, recommendations for the management of nutrition in the elderly patient are discussed.

  18. Taste genetics and gastrointestinal symptoms experienced in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, K J

    2015-07-01

    It is unknown what causes uraemic symptoms in renal disease. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are known to have increased levels of urea, sodium, potassium and phosphate in their saliva compared with those without renal disease. The present cross-sectional study investigated associations between known genetic traits of taste and self-reported upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms experienced in CKD patients with the changes in saliva composition found in renal failure. Fifty-six CKD patients (35 males, 21 females, age 67±14 years), with stages 4 and 5 renal failure, selected from a tertiary hospital renal outpatient clinic participated in this study. Subjects answered a questionnaire to assess upper GI symptoms and tested for the genetic taste recognition thresholds of thiourea, phenylthiocarbamide and sodium benzoate. Saliva samples were collected to determine biochemical composition. Possible associations between genetic taste variations, saliva composition and upper GI symptoms were investigated. Of the 56 patients enroled, 29 (52%) reported major upper GI uraemic symptoms, whereas 27 (48%) had no symptoms or only minor complaints of dry mouth. There was a strong association between the symptomatic burden a patient experienced and the genetic ability to taste thiourea (Ptaste changes (Pgenetic ability to taste thiourea. This study provides evidence that the genetic ability to taste thiourea as bitter, in combination with the increase in active compounds found in CKD patient's saliva, impacts on the uraemic upper GI symptoms experienced.

  19. Congestive heart failure in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poskurica Mileta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disorders are the most frequent cause of death (46-60% among patients with advanced chronic renal failure (CRF, and on dialysis treatment. Uremic cardiomyopathy is the basic pathophysiologic substrate, whereas ischemic heart disease (IHD and anemia are the most important contributing factors. Associated with well-know risk factors and specific disorders for terminal kidney failure and dialysis, the aforementioned factors instigate congestive heart failure (CHF. Suspected CHF is based on the anamnesis, clinical examination and ECG, while it is confirmed and defined more precisely on the basis of echocardiography and radiology examination. Biohumoral data (BNP, NT-proBNP are not sufficiently reliable because of specific volemic fluctuation and reduced natural clearance. Therapy approach is similar to the one for the general population: ACEI, ARBs, β-blockers, inotropic drugs and diuretics. Hypervolemia and most of the related symptoms can be kept under control effectively by the isolated or ultrafiltation, in conjunction with dialysis, during the standard bicarbonate hemodialysis or hemodiafiltration. In the same respect peritoneal dialysis is efficient for the control of hypervolemia symptoms, mainly during the first years of its application and in case of the lower NYHA class (II°/III°. In general, heart support therapy, surgical interventions of the myocardium and valve replacement are rarely used in patients on dialysis, whereas revascularization procedures are beneficial for associated IHD. In selected cases the application of cardiac resynchronization and/or implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator are advisable.

  20. Tooth loss strongly associates with malnutrition in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, E; Swede, H; Fares, G; Himmelfarb, J

    2014-07-01

    In chronic kidney disease (CKD), inadequate nutritional intake, inflammation, and increased oxidative stress have been the major contributing factors in malnutrition pathogenesis. However, there is still a paucity of evidence assessing the magnitude of the effect of tooth loss on malnutrition in CKD populations. The authors hypothesize that among patients with CKD, tooth loss may affect nutritional status, using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1988 to 1994 (NHANES III). Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was estimated based on cystatin C levels using the relevant equation. Urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (albuminuria) was calculated in milligrams per gram with a cutoff point of 30 mg/g. CKD was defined based on estimated GFR protein and caloric intake (P = 0.02 and 0.01, respectively). Serum albumin reached a frequency peak in the fully edentulous group without dentures (group 4, 19.2%). In the same group, individuals had lower protein (30.1%) and caloric intake (30.2%) (P = 0.01 and 0.02, respectively). Furthermore, logistic regression analysis confirmed the significant role of tooth loss on serum albumin and protein and energy intake in this population even after adjusting for confounding variables. Tooth loss independently predicts low energy and protein intake, as well as serum albumin levels, biomarkers of malnutrition in CKD.

  1. Causes of chronic kidney disease in Egyptian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham Safouh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are very few published reports on the causes of chronic kidney disease (CKD in Egyptian children. We reviewed the records of 1018 (males 56.7%, age ranged from 1 to 19 years Egyptian patients suffering from CKD and followed-up at the pediatric nephrology units (outpatient clinics and dialysis units of 11 universities over a period of two years. The mean of the estimated glomerular filtration rate was 12.5 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . Children with CKD stage I and stage II comprised 4.4% of the studied group, while those with stage III, IV and V comprised 19.7%, 18.3% and 57.6%, respectively. The most common single cause of CKD was obstructive uropathy (21.7%, followed by primary glomerulonephritis (15.3%, reflux/urinary tract infection (14.6%, aplasia/hypoplasia (9.8% and familial/metabolic diseases (6.8%; unknown causes accounted for 20.6% of the cases. Of the 587 patients who had reached end-stage renal disease, 93.5% was treated with hemodialysis and only 6.5% were treated with peritoneal dialysis.

  2. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in adults with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P C Emem-Chioma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD and other non- communicable diseases continues to rise globally, and recent studies suggest that metabolic syndrome (MS may add to this burden by contributing to the development of CKD. Given that reports on the prevalence of CKD in patients with MS in this environment are scanty, this study was undertaken with the sole aim of determining the prevalence of CKD in subjects with MS as defined by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF and the National Cholesterol Education Project Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III. A total of 240 consenting adults (18-70 years attending the general out- patient clinic of the General Hospital Okrika for various ailments were studied. Subjects were screened for MS as per the above- mentioned criteria. Estimated GFR (eGFR was determined with Modification of Diet for Renal Disease (MDRD formula and CKD was defined as eGFR less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 . Data was analyzed using SPSS version 12.0 and Epi info version 4.06d; P 0.05. CKD was more common in subjects with MS compared with those without, although the difference was not statistically significant. The prevalence of CKD in subjects with MS in our study population did not differ significantly when the different MS definitions were employed.

  3. K/DOQI Clinical Practice Guidelines on Hypertension and Antihypertensive Agents in Chronic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, Andrew S.; Rocco, Michael V.; Anderson, Sharon; Andreoli, Sharon P.; Bailie, George R.; Bakris, George L.; Callahan, Mary Beth; Greene, Jane H.; Johnson, Cynda Ann; Lash, James P.; McCullough, Peter A.; Miller III, Edgar R.; Nally, Joseph V.; Pirsch, John D.; Portman, Ronald J.; Sevick, Mary Ann; Sica, Domenic; Wesson, Donald E.; Agodoa, Lawrence; Bolton, Kline; Cutler, Jeffrey A.; Hostetter, Tom; Lau, Joseph; Uhlig, Katrin; Chew, Priscilla; Kausz, Annamaria; Kupelnick, Bruce; Raman, Gowri; Sarnak, Mark; Wang, Chenchen; Astor, Brad C.; Eknoyan, Garabed; Levin, Adeera; Levin, Nathan; Bailie, George; Becker, Bryan; Becker, Gavin; Burrowes, Jerrilynn; Carrera, Fernando; Churchill, David; Collins, Allan; Crooks, Peter W.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Golper, Thomas; Gotch, Frank; Gotto, Antonio; Greenwood, Roger; Greer, Joel W.; Grimm Jr., Richard; Haley, William E.; Hogg, Ronald; Hull, Alan R.; Hunsicker, Lawrence; Klag, Michael; Klahr, Saulo; Lameire, Norbert; Locatelli, Francesco; McCulloch, Sally; Michael, Maureen; Newmann, John M.; Nissenson, Allen; Norris, Keith; Obrador, Gregorio; Owen Jr., William; Patel, Thakor G.; Payne, Glenda; Ronco, Claudio; Rivera-Mizzoni, Rosa A.; Schoolwerth, Anton C.; Star, Robert; Steffes, Michael; Steinman, Theodore; Wauters, John-Pierre; Wenger, Nanette; Briggs, Josephine; Burrows-Hudson, Sally; Latos, Derrick; Mapes, Donna; Oberley, Edith; Pereira, Brian J.G.; Willis, Kerry; Gucciardo, Anthony; Fingerhut, Donna; Klette, Margaret; Schachne, Elicia

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: CHRONIC KIDNEY disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health issue. In the United States, there is a rising incidence and prevalence of kidney failure (Fig 1), with poor outcomes and high cost. The prevalence of earlier stages of CKD is approximately 100 times greater than the prevalence

  4. Limited salt consumption reduces the incidence of chronic kidney disease: a modeling study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, Marieke A H; Over, Eelco A B; Navis, Gerjan; Joles, Jaap A; Hoorn, Ewout J; Gansevoort, Ron T; Boshuizen, Hendriek C

    2018-01-01

    In addition to blood pressure and cardiovascular disease, high-salt intake has been associated with renal diseases. The aim of this study is to estimate the potential health impact of salt reduction on chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) in the Netherlands.

  5. Range and Heterogeneity of Outcomes in Randomized Trials of Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chong, Lauren S. H.; Sautenet, Benedicte; Tong, Allison; Hanson, Camilla S.; Samuel, Susan; Zappitelli, Michael; Dart, Allison; Furth, Susan; Eddy, Allison A.; Groothoff, Jaap; Webb, Nicholas J. A.; Yap, Hui-Kim; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Sinha, Aditi; Alexander, Stephen I.; Goldstein, Stuart L.; Gipson, Debbie S.; Raman, Gayathri; Craig, Jonathan C.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the range and heterogeneity of outcomes reported in randomized controlled trials of interventions for children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The Cochrane Kidney and Transplant Specialized Register was searched to March 2016. Randomized trials involving children across all stages of

  6. Low serum leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Rattensperger, Dirk; Zidek, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Leptin, secreted from adipose tissue, regulates food intake, energy expenditure, and immune function. It is unknown whether leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy....

  7. Oral Magnesium Supplementation in Chronic Kidney Disease Stages 3 and 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bressendorff, Iain; Hansen, Ditte; Schou, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence suggests that increases in both serum and intracellular magnesium (Mg) can slow or even prevent the development of vascular calcification seen in CKD. Serum calcification...

  8. N-acetylcysteine improves arterial vascular reactivity in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittstock, Antje; Burkert, Magdalena; Zidek, Walter

    2009-01-01

    Patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease show increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality that are partly related to impaired arterial vascular reactivity. We investigated whether intravenous administration of the antioxidant acetylcysteine improves arterial vascular reactivity...

  9. Impairment of endogenous melatonin rhythm is related to the degree of chronic kidney disease (CREAM study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, B.C.P.; van der Putten, K.; van Someren, E.J.W.; Wielders, J.P.M.; ter Wee, P.M.; Nagtegaal, J.E.; Gaillard, C.A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background. The nocturnal endogenous melatonin rise, which is associated with the onset of sleep propensity, is absent in haemodialysis patients. Information on melatonin rhythms in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is limited. Clear relationships exist between melatonin, core body temperature and

  10. Prediction of Chronic Kidney Disease Stage 3 by CKD273, a Urinary Proteomic Biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Pontillo

    2017-11-01

    Discussion: In conclusion, while accounting for baseline eGFR, albuminuria, and covariables, CKD273 adds to the prediction of stage 3 chronic kidney disease, at which point intervention remains an achievable therapeutic target.

  11. Associations between lower urinary tract dysfunction and health-related quality of life in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öborn, Helena; Wettergren, Lena; Herthelius, Maria; Forinder, Ulla

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of children with lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). We investigated LUTD and other possible predictors of impaired HRQoL in children with conservatively treated moderate-to-severe CKD or with a kidney transplant. All 64 children with CKD or a kidney transplant treated at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, between June 2011 and December 2012 were approached and 59 children aged 8-18 were enrolled in the study. Lower urinary tract function was evaluated with voiding history, frequency and volume chart, uroflowmetry and postvoid ultrasound measurements. Self-reported HRQoL was assessed with validated generic instruments. The HRQoL of the study cohort was as good as the general paediatric population, apart from the physical and psychological well-being dimensions, and was no different to children with other chronic conditions. Urinary incontinence, but not LUTD in general, was associated with impaired HRQoL, as was having a kidney transplant and being female in some dimensions. LUTD was common in children with CKD or a kidney transplant but did not affect their general HRQoL. Predictors of impaired HRQoL included incontinence, having had a kidney transplant and being female. ©2016 The Authors. Acta Paediatrica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  12. Periodontal treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, S; Figueredo, C M; Lemos, C; Bregman, R; Fischer, R G

    2017-04-01

    This pilot cohort study evaluated the effect of periodontal treatment on renal function, metabolic markers and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) in patients with pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) presenting chronic periodontitis. Twenty-six patients with CKD and severe chronic periodontitis were selected. Periodontal parameters included plaque index, bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), triglycerides, total cholesterol, albumin and ADMA levels were evaluated at baseline, 90 and 180 d after periodontal therapy. eGFR was evaluated by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. All periodontal clinical parameters significantly improved (p periodontal therapy. There was a significant improvement on the median values (25%; 75% percentiles) of eGFR from 34.6 (27; 44.7) mL/min/1.73 m 2 on baseline to 37.6 (29.7; 57) mL/min/1.73 m 2 on day 90, and to 37.6 (28.6; 56) mL/min/1.73 m 2 (p periodontal treatment. No significant differences were observed at the median values of metabolic markers comparing baseline and 180 d after periodontal treatment. The results point to a link of kidney disease with endothelium dysfunction and periodontitis, suggesting that periodontal treatment may be beneficial to the course of CKD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The link between phenotype and fatty acid metabolism in advanced chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dan-Qian; Chen, Hua; Chen, Lin; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Wang, Ming; Li, Xiang-Ri; Zhao, Ying-Yong

    2017-07-01

    The kidney plays a central role in elimination of metabolic waste products and regulation of low-molecular weight metabolites via glomerular filtration, tubular secretion and reabsorption. Disruption of these processes results in profound changes in the biochemical milieu of the body fluids, which contribute to complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD) by inducing cytotoxicity and inflammation. Insight into the changes of the composition of metabolites and dysregulation of target genes and proteins enhances the understanding of the pathophysiology of CKD and its complications, and the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Chronic interstitial nephropathy is a common cause of CKD. The present study was designed to determine the effect of chronic interstitial nephropathy on the composition of serum metabolites and regulation of oxidative, inflammatory, fibrotic and cytoprotective pathways. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to the CKD and control groups ( n  = 8/group). CKD was induced by administration of adenine (200 mg/kg body weight/day) by oral gavage for 3 weeks. The control group was treated with the vehicle alone. The animals were then observed for an additional 3 weeks, at which point they were sacrificed and kidney and serum samples were collected. Serum metabolomic and lipidomic analyses were performed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight high-definition mass spectrometry. Kidney tissues were processed for histological and molecular biochemical analyses. CKD rats exhibited increased plasma urea and creatinine concentrations, renal interstitial fibrosis, tubular damage and up-regulation of pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant and pro-fibrotic pathways. Comparison of serum from CKD and control rats revealed significant differences in concentrations of amino acids and lipids including 33 metabolites and 35 lipid species. This was associated with marked abnormalities of fatty acid oxidation, and

  14. Urological disorders in chronic kidney disease in children cohort: clinical characteristics and estimation of glomerular filtration rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Jennifer L; Jerry-Fluker, Judith V; Ng, Derek K; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Schwartz, George J; Dharnidharka, Vikas R; Warady, Bradley A; Furth, Susan L

    2011-10-01

    Urological disorders are the most common cause of pediatric chronic kidney disease. We determined the characteristics of children with urological disorders and assessed the agreement between the newly developed bedside glomerular filtration rate estimating formula with measured glomerular filtration rate in 586 patients in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children study. The Chronic Kidney Disease in Children study is a prospective, observational cohort of children recruited from 48 sites in the United States and Canada. Eligibility requirements include age 1 to 16 years and estimated glomerular filtration rate by original Schwartz formula 30 to 90 ml/min/1.73 m(2). Baseline demographics, clinical variables and glomerular filtration rate were assessed. Bland-Altman analysis was conducted to assess agreement between estimated and measured glomerular filtration rates. Of the 586 participants with at least 1 glomerular filtration rate measurement 348 (59%) had an underlying urological diagnosis (obstructive uropathy in 118, aplastic/hypoplastic/dysplastic kidneys in 104, reflux in 87 and other condition in 39). Among these patients median age was 9 years, duration of chronic kidney disease was 7 years and age at first visit with a urologist was less than 1 year. Of the patients 67% were male, 67% were white and 21% had a low birth weight. Median height was in the 24th percentile. Median glomerular filtration rate as measured by iohexol plasma disappearance was 44.8 ml/min/1.73 m(2). Median glomerular filtration rate as estimated by the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children bedside equation was 44.3 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (bias = -0.5, 95% CI -1.7 to 0.7, p = 0.44). Underlying urological causes of chronic kidney disease were present in 59% of study participants. These children were diagnosed early in life, and many had low birth weight and growth delay. There is good agreement between the newly developed Chronic Kidney Disease in Children estimating equations and measured

  15. Effect of oral alkali supplementation on progression of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggl, Martina; Sliber, Christopher; Sunder-Plassmann, Gere

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is a frequent but asymptomatic complication in chronic kidney disease (CKD). In early stages of CKD acidosis is limited to the renal tissue and progresses to reduced serum bicarbonate levels. Reduced renal tissue pH and increased ammoniagenesis are the key mechanisms of the kidney to enhance acid excretion to the urine. The expressed protein patterns in the proximal tubular epithelial cells change remarkably, the proximal convoluted tubule develops hypertrophy, and an intra-renal enhanced renin-angiotensin-system leads to interstitial fibrosis. Since nephrons are numerically reduced in CKD each remaining functional unit has to progressively increase these mechanisms to keep up the equilibrium. The adverse effects of chronic metabolic acidosis include aside from acceleration of progression of kidney disease, the development or exacerbation of bone disease, increased degradation of muscle with muscle wasting, enhanced protein degradation and inflammation. Genome wide association studies demonstrated that tubular acid-base transporters are involved in the development of arterial hypertension. Several retrospective analyses have indicated that low serum bicarbonate predicts death in cohorts with CKD and cardiovascular disease. All studies confirmed a U-shaped association of mortality and serum bicarbonate, indicating that both, acidosis and alkalosis are associated with increased mortality. Randomized controlled trials showed that base substitution, either by modification of the diet or by simply adding alkalizing agents, might halt the decline of kidney function in subjects with CKD. In 2012 a meta-analysis concluded that alkali therapy might provide a long-term favorable effect on renal function in patients with CKD.

  16. Micronutrient Intakes and Incidence of Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study

    OpenAIRE

    Farhadnejad, Hossein; Asghari, Golaleh; Mirmiran, Parvin; Yuzbashian, Emad; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between micronutrient intakes and the 3.6-year incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in adults. This cohort study was conducted, within the framework of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study, on 1692 subjects, aged ≥30 years, without CKD at the baseline. Dietary intakes were collected using a valid and reliable food-frequency questionnaire. Anthropometrics and biochemical measurements were taken. Chronic kidney disease was defined as ...

  17. Cognitive Impairment and Structural Neuroimaging Abnormalities Among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hai-Chen Pi; Yu-Feng Xu; Rong Xu; Zhi-Kai Yang; Zhen Qu; Yu-Qing Chen; Gui-Ling Liu; Jie Dong

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Cognitive impairment and abnormal structural neuroimaging is common in chronic kidney disease patients. We aimed to explore its association with dialysis modality and the relationship between cognitive impairment and abnormal structural neuroimaging. Methods: Sixty peritoneal dialysis patients and 30 hemodialysis and 30 non-dialyzed stage 3-5 chronic kidney disease patients without history of stroke were enrolled for the study. Participants were matched for age, gender, educa...

  18. Hepatitis C virus viremia increases the incidence of chronic kidney disease in HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars; Grint, Daniel; Lundgren, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have reported on an association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody status and the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the role of HCV viremia and genotype are not well defined.......Several studies have reported on an association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody status and the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the role of HCV viremia and genotype are not well defined....

  19. Prediction of Chronic Kidney Disease Stage 3 by CKD273, a Urinary Proteomic Biomarker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontillo, Claudia; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Schanstra, Joost P

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: CKD273 is a urinary biomarker, which in advanced chronic kidney disease predicts further deterioration. We investigated whether CKD273 can also predict a decline of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to ... threshold (P = 0.086). Discussion: In conclusion, while accounting for baseline eGFR, albuminuria, and covariables, CKD273 adds to the prediction of stage 3 chronic kidney disease, at which point intervention remains an achievable therapeutic target....

  20. Salivary Creatinine Estimation as an Alternative to Serum Creatinine in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatapathy, Ramesh; Govindarajan, Vasupradha; Oza, Nirima; Parameswaran, Sreejith; Pennagaram Dhanasekaran, Balamurali; Prashad, Karthikshree V.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Sampling blood for serum analysis is an invasive procedure. A noninvasive alternative would be beneficial to patients and health care professionals. Aim. To correlate serum and salivary creatinine levels and evaluate the role of saliva as a noninvasive alternative to serum for creatinine estimation in chronic kidney disease patients. Study Design. Case-control study. Methods. Blood and saliva samples were collected from 37 healthy individuals and 105 chronic kidney disease patients...

  1. Changes in Pre- and Post-Exercise Gene Expression among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn K Coletta

    Full Text Available Decreased insulin sensitivity blunts the normal increase in gene expression from skeletal muscle after exercise. In addition, chronic inflammation decreases insulin sensitivity. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is an inflammatory state. How CKD and, subsequently, kidney transplantation affects skeletal muscle gene expression after exercise are unknown.Study cohort: non-diabetic male/female 4/1, age 52±2 years, with end-stage CKD who underwent successful kidney transplantation. The following were measured both pre-transplant and post-transplant and compared to normals: Inflammatory markers, euglycemic insulin clamp studies determine insulin sensitivity, and skeletal muscle biopsies performed before and within 30 minutes after an acute exercise protocol. Microarray analyses were performed on the skeletal muscle using the 4x44K Whole Human Genome Microarrays. Since nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT plays an important role in T cell activation and calcineurin inhibitors are mainstay immunosuppression, calcineurin/NFAT pathway gene expression was compared at rest and after exercise. Log transformation was performed to prevent skewing of data and regression analyses comparing measures pre- and post-transplant performed.Markers of inflammation significantly improved post-transplantation. Insulin infusion raised glucose disposal slightly lower post-transplant compared to pre-transplant, but not significantly, thus concluding differences in insulin sensitivity were similar. The overall pattern of gene expression in response to exercise was reduced both pre-and post-transplant compared to healthy volunteers. Although significant changes were observed among NFAT/Calcineurin gene at rest and after exercise in normal cohort, there were no significant differences comparing NFAT/calcineurin pathway gene expression pre- and post-transplant.Despite an improvement in serum inflammatory markers, no significant differences in glucose disposal were observed post

  2. Effect of renal denervation on kidney function in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Dagmara; Marusic, Petra; Duval, Jacqueline; Sata, Yusuke; Head, Geoffrey A; Denton, Kate M; Burrows, Sally; Walton, Antony S; Esler, Murray D; Schlaich, Markus P

    2017-04-01

    Renal denervation (RDN) can reduce blood pressure (BP) and slow the decline of renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD) up to one year. Whether this effect is maintained beyond 12months and whether the magnitude of BP reduction affects estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is unknown. We examined eGFR in 46 CKD patients (baseline eGFR ≤60mL/min/1.73m 2 ) on a yearly basis from 60months before to 3, 6, 12 and 24months after RDN. Ambulatory BP was measured before and after RDN. Linear mixed models analysis demonstrated a significant progressive decline in eGFR from months 60 to 12months (-15.47±1.98mL/min/1.73m 2 , Prenal function irrespective of BP lowering effects in CKD. RDN-induced inhibition of sympathetic outflow to the renal vascular bed may account for improved eGFR via alterations of intrarenal and glomerular hemodynamics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [End stage of chronic kidney disease and metabolic acidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaboch, J; Opatrná, S; Matoušovic, K; Schück, O

    2012-01-01

    Renal function disorder is inevitably associated with metabolic acidosis. An adult produces approximately 1 mmol of acids/kg of body weight every day (3 mmol/kg in children), derived from metabolization of proteins from food. Development of metabolic acidosis in patients with kidney disease is based on accumulation of acids and insufficient production of bicarbonates; alkaline loss represents a marginal issue here limited to patients with type II renal tubular acidosis only. The prevalence of this disorder increases with declining glomerular filtration (GFR) from 2% in patients with GFR 1.0-1.5 ml/s/1.73 m2 to 39% in patients with GFR ammoniac production in residual nephrons. This is an adaptive mechanism aimed at maintaining sufficient elimination of acids despite reduced volume of functional tissue. However, an increased ammoniac production simultaneously becomes a stimulus for activation of the complement via an alternative route and is thus one of the factors contributing, through this induced inflammation, to progression of tubular interstitial fibrosis that subsequently leads to further GFR reduction. Metabolic acidosis has a number of severe adverse effects on the organism, e.g. deterioration of kidney bone disease through stimulation of bone resorption and inhibition of bone formation, inhibition of vitamin D formation, increased muscle catabolism, reduced albumin production, glucose metabolism disorder, increased insulin resistance, reduced production of thyroid hormones, increased accumulation of β2-microglobulin etc. Non-interventional studies suggest that alkali supplementation may slow down progression of chronic nephropathies. However, this approach, safe and inexpensive, has not been widely implemented in clinical practice yet. With respect to dialyzed patients, abnormal levels of bicarbonates are associated with increased mortality. Both metabolic acidosis and alkalosis, rather regularly seen in a considerable number of patients, have a negative

  4. Cerebral Palsy and Intellectual Disability in the Children of Women With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiyama, Fumika; Makino, Yasuo; Hirasawa, Kyoko; Nagata, Satoru; Matsui, Hideo

    2017-08-01

    This study examined the risk of adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes, especially cerebral palsy and intellectual disability, in pregnant women with and without chronic kidney disease and their children. In total, 156 pregnancies involving 139 women with chronic kidney disease who were treated at our center between 2001 and 2010 were identified. We also selected 3067 women without chronic kidney disease who delivered their infants without suffering any medical complications during the same period as control groups. Long-term neonatal prognosis was assessed based on the frequencies of cerebral palsy and/or intellectual disability. The pregnant women had the following types of chronic kidney disease: immunoglobulin A nephropathy (n = 54), glomerulonephritis (n = 17), chronic renal failure (n = 16), nephrotic syndrome (n = 12), nephritis (n = 11), diabetic nephropathy (n = 10), congenital malformations and deformations (n = 10), purpura nephritis (n = 7), and others (n = 19). Of the children who were born to mothers with chronic kidney disease, one developed cerebral palsy, and another developed cerebral palsy with intellectual disability. Seven of the children who were born to mothers without chronic kidney disease developed cerebral palsy. The posterior probability of these conditions was 0.01900 and 0.002610 in the children born to mothers with and without chronic kidney disease, respectively. A primiparous mother (odds ratio [OR]: 4.07, 95% confidence interval [CI]): 2.78 to 5.95), preeclampsia (OR: 6.44, 95% CI: 3.92 to 10.59), grade 1 to 4 intraventricular hemorrhaging (OR: 7.71, 95% CI: 2.05 to 28.92), and an Apgar score of less than 7 at five minutes (OR: 0.51, 95% CI: 0.27 to 0.96) were found to influence the risk of cerebral palsy and/or intellectual disability in children born to women with chronic kidney disease. We found that the incidence of cerebral palsy and/or intellectual disability is 7.2-fold higher in children born to women

  5. Design and methods of the NiCK study: neurocognitive assessment and magnetic resonance imaging analysis of children and young adults with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Erum A; Laney, Nina; Kim, Ji Young; Ruebner, Rebecca L; Detre, John A; Liu, Hua-Shan; Davatzikos, Christos; Erus, Guray; Doshi, Jimit J; Schultz, Robert T; Herrington, John D; Jawad, Abbas F; Moodalbail, Divya G; Gur, Ruben C; Port, Allison M; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Hooper, Stephen R; Furth, Susan L

    2015-04-30

    Chronic kidney disease is strongly linked to neurocognitive deficits in adults and children, but the pathophysiologic processes leading to these deficits remain poorly understood. The NiCK study (Neurocognitive Assessment and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Analysis of Children and Young Adults with Chronic Kidney Disease) seeks to address critical gaps in our understanding of the biological basis for neurologic abnormalities in chronic kidney disease. In this report, we describe the objectives, design, and methods of the NiCK study. The NiCK Study is a cross-sectional cohort study in which neurocognitive and neuroimaging phenotyping is performed in children and young adults, aged 8 to 25 years, with chronic kidney disease compared to healthy controls. Assessments include (1) comprehensive neurocognitive testing (using traditional and computerized methods); (2) detailed clinical phenotyping; and (3) multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess brain structure (using T1-weighted MRI, T2-weighted MRI, and diffusion tensor imaging), functional connectivity (using functional MRI), and blood flow (using arterial spin labeled MRI). Primary analyses will examine group differences in neurocognitive testing and neuroimaging between subjects with chronic kidney disease and healthy controls. Mechanisms responsible for neurocognitive dysfunction resulting from kidney disease will be explored by examining associations between neurocognitive testing and regional changes in brain structure, functional connectivity, or blood flow. In addition, the neurologic impact of kidney disease comorbidities such as anemia and hypertension will be explored. We highlight aspects of our analytical approach that illustrate the challenges and opportunities posed by data of this scope. The NiCK study provides a unique opportunity to address key questions about the biological basis of neurocognitive deficits in chronic kidney disease. Understanding these mechanisms could have great public

  6. Medical nutrition therapy in chronic kidney disease; from dialysis to transplant: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Leal-Escobar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease has direct implications in nutritional status, causing anorexia and muscular catabolism. These situations are frequent in kidney renal replacement therapy in which nutritional disorders and inflammatory mechanisms associated with therapy often lead to the development of protein-energy wasting. Nutrition therapy has shown an adequate therapeutic strategy to prevent and treat metabolic alterations, reducing surgical and nutritional complication risks in kidney transplantation patients. The current case reports nutritional intervention on a continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patient who was subsequently prescribed to automatic peritoneal dialysis and, finally, kidney transplant from a living donor.

  7. A trial of darbepoetin alfa in type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeffer, Marc A; Burdmann, Emmanuel A; Chen, Chao-Yin

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anemia is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and renal events among patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Although darbepoetin alfa can effectively increase hemoglobin levels, its effect on clinical outcomes in these patients has not been adequately...... tested. METHODS: In this study involving 4038 patients with diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and anemia, we randomly assigned 2012 patients to darbepoetin alfa to achieve a hemoglobin level of approximately 13 g per deciliter and 2026 patients to placebo, with rescue darbepoetin alfa when the hemoglobin...... assigned to darbepoetin alfa and 496 patients assigned to placebo (Pchronic kidney disease...

  8. Short Stature in Chronic Kidney Disease Treated with Growth Hormone and an Aromatase Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan R. Mendley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe an alternative strategy for management of severe growth failure in a 14-year-old child who presented with advanced chronic kidney disease close to puberty. The patient was initially treated with growth hormone for a year until kidney transplantation, followed immediately by a year-long course of an aromatase inhibitor, anastrozole, to prevent epiphyseal fusion and prolong the period of linear growth. Outcome was excellent, with successful transplant and anticipated complete correction of height deficit. This strategy may be appropriate for children with chronic kidney disease and short stature who are in puberty.

  9. Hemoglobin target in children with chronic kidney disease: valuable new information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Motoshi

    2017-01-01

    The international guideline from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes suggests a hemoglobin target of 11 to 12 g/dl for children with chronic kidney disease. However, information to support this proposal is very limited in the pediatric population. Because of controversy, the unmet need is the establishment of an appropriate target hemoglobin level in children with chronic kidney disease. Here, Rheault and colleagues provide valuable new information, reporting the association of hemoglobin levels with cardiovascular morbidity in pediatric hemodialysis patients. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Biomarkers of cardio-renal damage in chronic kidney disease: one size cannot fit all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolignano, Davide; Coppolino, Giuseppe

    2014-04-17

    Biomarkers are useful tools for diagnosis and risk assessment of acute kidney injury and acute heart failure, particularly in ICU patients. Most biomarkers are produced or cleared by the kidney, so the presence of chronic kidney disease may affect their clinical reliability, particularly if the putative diagnosis of acute kidney injury or acute heart failure is based on a single measurement/single threshold approach. Better alternatives, such as establishing different diagnostic cutoff values per different chronic kidney disease strata or evaluating the diagnostic performance of a delta value (change from baseline levels) instead of a single threshold, should be carefully considered in critically ill patients with renal impairment and other co-morbidities.

  11. [The role of immune factors in the progression of chronic kidney diseases in HIV infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushchuk, N D; Gadzhikulieva, M M; Balmasova, I P; Volgina, G V; Gultyaev, M M

    2016-01-01

    To determine the significance of immune factors in the pathogenesis of kidney injuries in HIV infection, by investigating the cellular and cytokine components of an immune response. Thirty HIV-infected patients (mean age 31.7±6.2 years) with chronic kidney disease (CKD) were examined. A comparison group consisted of 10 HIV-infected patients without signs of kidney injury. A control group included 24 healthy individuals to analyze immune status and 15 people to estimate the normal values of the cytokine composition. The cellular composition of lymphocytes on a typical immunogram was determined on a flow cytofluorometer; the serum concentrations of cytokines were measured on a multichannel photometer. The HIV-infected patients with kidney injury displayed significant reductions in the absolute (0.2·109/l and 0.4·109/l, respectively; р=0.015) and relative (14.75 and 22%, respectively; р=0.005) counts of CD3+/CD4+ cells and in the immunoregulatory index (0.2 and 0.4, respectively; р=0.014) as compared to those in HIV-infected patients without kidney disease (р≤0.05) with a rise in the number of cytotoxic T cells (CD3+/CD8+). The HIV-infected patients showed a preponderance of immunosuppressive cytokine compositions, as indicated by the high levels of transforming growth factor-β (a more than 50-fold increase) and by a statistically significant rise in the level of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) (with CD4+ lymphocyte counts more or less than 200 cells/µl - 19.0 and 24.2 pg/ml, respectively; p=0.017; with HIV RNA levels more and less than 100,000 copies/ml - 24.4 and 19.7 pg/ml, respectively; p=0.012). The HIV-infected patients with CKD developed kidney injury in the presence of a more pronounced decrease in blood T helper lymphocyte subpopulation levels with a predominance of proinflammatory and immunosuppressive responses. TNF-α in combination with immunosuppression and high viral loads was established to play a leading role in the development of kidney

  12. Nutrition Prescription to Achieve Positive Outcomes in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Ash

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD, management of diet is important in prevention of disease progression and symptom management, however evidence on nutrition prescription is limited. Recent international CKD guidelines and literature was reviewed to address the following question “What is the appropriate nutrition prescription to achieve positive outcomes in adult patients with chronic kidney disease?” Databases included in the search were Medline and CINAHL using EBSCOhost search engine, Embase and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews published from 2000 to 2009. International guidelines pertaining to nutrition prescription in CKD were also reviewed from 2000 to 2013. Three hundred and eleven papers and eight guidelines were reviewed by three reviewers. Evidence was graded as per the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia criteria. The evidence from thirty six papers was tabulated under the following headings: protein, weight loss, enteral support, vitamin D, sodium, fat, fibre, oral nutrition supplements, nutrition counselling, including protein and phosphate, nutrients in peritoneal dialysis solution and intradialytic parenteral nutrition, and was compared to international guidelines. While more evidence based studies are warranted, the customary nutrition prescription remains satisfactory with the exception of Vitamin D and phosphate. In these two areas, additional research is urgently needed given the potential of adverse outcomes for the CKD patient.

  13. The relationship between health-promoting behaviors and resilience in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li-Ching; Chang, Hong-Jer; Liu, Yueh-Min; Hsieh, Hsiang-Li; Lo, Lan; Lin, Mei-Yu; Lu, Kuo-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional research study explored differences in health-promoting behavior and resilience among three groups of chronic kidney disease patients (high-risk, early chronic kidney disease; early CKD and pre-end stage renal disease; pre-ESRD) treated at the Nephrology outpatient clinic in northern Taiwan. A total of 150 CKD outpatients were interviewed using structured questionnaires including a CKD Health to Promote Lifestyle Scale, and resilience scale. We found that the pre-ESRD group had lower resilience than either high-risk or early CKD groups. Factors affecting pre-ESRD resilience were gender, occupational status, diabetes and health-promoting behaviors. Factors affecting resilience of the high-risk group included level of education and health-promoting behaviors while factors affecting resilience in the early CKD group involved whether they are employed and health promoting behaviors. A significant positive correlation was found between health promoting behavior and resilience in all study subjects. Multiple regression analysis found that factors which could effectively predict resilience in patients at high-risk for CKD were gender, whether the patient had a job, nutrition, self-actualization, and stress level, accounting for 69.7% of the variance. Therefore, nursing education should focus on health promotion advocacy throughout the life of not only patients but also their families.

  14. The Relationship between Health-Promoting Behaviors and Resilience in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li-Ching; Chang, Hong-Jer; Liu, Yueh-Min; Hsieh, Hsiang-Li; Lo, Lan; Lin, Mei-Yu; Lu, Kuo-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional research study explored differences in health-promoting behavior and resilience among three groups of chronic kidney disease patients (high-risk, early chronic kidney disease; early CKD and pre-end stage renal disease; pre-ESRD) treated at the Nephrology outpatient clinic in northern Taiwan. A total of 150 CKD outpatients were interviewed using structured questionnaires including a CKD Health to Promote Lifestyle Scale, and resilience scale. We found that the pre-ESRD group had lower resilience than either high-risk or early CKD groups. Factors affecting pre-ESRD resilience were gender, occupational status, diabetes and health-promoting behaviors. Factors affecting resilience of the high-risk group included level of education and health-promoting behaviors while factors affecting resilience in the early CKD group involved whether they are employed and health promoting behaviors. A significant positive correlation was found between health promoting behavior and resilience in all study subjects. Multiple regression analysis found that factors which could effectively predict resilience in patients at high-risk for CKD were gender, whether the patient had a job, nutrition, self-actualization, and stress level, accounting for 69.7% of the variance. Therefore, nursing education should focus on health promotion advocacy throughout the life of not only patients but also their families. PMID:23589703

  15. The Relationship between Health-Promoting Behaviors and Resilience in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ching Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional research study explored differences in health-promoting behavior and resilience among three groups of chronic kidney disease patients (high-risk, early chronic kidney disease; early CKD and pre-end stage renal disease; pre-ESRD treated at the Nephrology outpatient clinic in northern Taiwan. A total of 150 CKD outpatients were interviewed using structured questionnaires including a CKD Health to Promote Lifestyle Scale, and resilience scale. We found that the pre-ESRD group had lower resilience than either high-risk or early CKD groups. Factors affecting pre-ESRD resilience were gender, occupational status, diabetes and health-promoting behaviors. Factors affecting resilience of the high-risk group included level of education and health-promoting behaviors while factors affecting resilience in the early CKD group involved whether they are employed and health promoting behaviors. A significant positive correlation was found between health promoting behavior and resilience in all study subjects. Multiple regression analysis found that factors which could effectively predict resilience in patients at high-risk for CKD were gender, whether the patient had a job, nutrition, self-actualization, and stress level, accounting for 69.7% of the variance. Therefore, nursing education should focus on health promotion advocacy throughout the life of not only patients but also their families.

  16. Rapid cortical bone loss in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickolas, Thomas L; Stein, Emily M; Dworakowski, Elzbieta; Nishiyama, Kyle K; Komandah-Kosseh, Mafo; Zhang, Chiyuan A; McMahon, Donald J; Liu, Xiaowei S; Boutroy, Stephanie; Cremers, Serge; Shane, Elizabeth

    2013-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients may have high rates of bone loss and fractures, but microarchitectural and biochemical mechanisms of bone loss in CKD patients have not been fully described. In this longitudinal study of 53 patients with CKD Stages 2 to 5D, we used dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT), and biochemical markers of bone metabolism to elucidate effects of CKD on the skeleton. Median follow-up was 1.5 years (range 0.9 to 4.3 years); bone changes were annualized and compared with baseline. By DXA, there were significant declines in areal bone mineral density (BMD) of the total hip and ultradistal radius: -1.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] -2.1 to -0.6) and -2.4% (95% CI -4.0 to -0.9), respectively. By HRpQCT at the distal radius, there were significant declines in cortical area, density, and thickness and increases in porosity: -2.9% (95% CI -3.7 to -2.2), -1.3% (95% CI -1.6 to -0.6), -2.8% (95% CI -3.6 to -1.9), and +4.2% (95% CI 2.0 to 6.4), respectively. Radius trabecular area increased significantly: +0.4% (95% CI 0.2 to 0.6), without significant changes in trabecular density or microarchitecture. Elevated time-averaged levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and bone turnover markers predicted cortical deterioration. Higher levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D predicted decreases in trabecular network heterogeneity. These data suggest that significant cortical loss occurs with CKD, which is mediated by hyperparathyroidism and elevated turnover. Future investigations are required to determine whether these cortical losses can be attenuated by treatments that reduce PTH levels and remodeling rates. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  17. Plant phosphates, phytate and pathological calcifications in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buades Fuster, Juan Manuel; Sanchís Cortés, Pilar; Perelló Bestard, Joan; Grases Freixedas, Félix

    Phytate, or myo-inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakis dihydrogen phosphate (InsP6), is a naturally occurring phosphorus compound that is present in many foods, mainly legumes, whole grains and nuts. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have cardiovascular disease mortality up to 30times higher than the general population. Vascular calcifications (VCs) directly contribute to overall morbidity and mortality, especially in CKD. In part, this high mortality is due to elevated levels of phosphorus in the blood. Therefore, control of dietary phosphorus is essential. Dietary phosphorus can be classified according to its structure in organic phosphorus (plant and animal) and inorganic (preservatives and additives). Plant-phosphorus (legumes and nuts), mainly associated with InsP6, is less absorbable by the human gastrointestinal tract as the bioavailability of phosphorous from plant-derived foods is very low. Recent data indicate that restriction of foods containing plant phosphates may compromise the adequate supply of nutrients that have a beneficial effect in preventing cardiovascular events, such as InsP6 or fibre found in legumes and nuts. Experimental studies in animals and observational studies in humans suggest that InsP6 can prevent lithiasis and VCs and protect from osteoporosis. In conclusion, we need prospective studies to elucidate the potential benefits and risks of phytate (InsP6) through the diet and as an intravenous drug in patients on haemodialysis. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. The role of dietary phosphate restriction in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Grahame J; Malik, Avya; Lambert, Kelly

    2017-10-24

    Patients with progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) develop positive phosphate balance that is associated with increased cardiovascular risk and mortality. Modification of dietary phosphate is a commonly used strategy to improve outcomes but is complicated by the need for adequate dietary protein. Surprisingly, the evidence for patient-level benefits from phosphate restriction is tenuous, and the justification for using any phosphate binder for pre-dialysis patients is questionable. We review the evidence for dietary phosphate modification and the possible role of a smart phone application (app.) that provides information on phosphate, sodium, potassium and nutrients in over 50,000 Australian foods. We performed a pilot study of healthy participants assigned to dietetic advice and standard diet sheets, or dietetic advice, diet sheets and use of the smart phone app. Following baseline studies, 25 participants commenced the sodium and phosphate restricted diet. After two weeks, both groups showed non-significant trends to reduction in urinary phosphate and sodium. App. users referred to information on the app. more frequently than the control group participants referred to written instructions, found referring to the app. more convenient, felt they learned more new information, were more motivated to maintain the diet and were more likely to recommend their information source to family or friends (all pphosphate balance remains an important goal of CKD management, although diets incorporating very low phosphate and protein contents may worsen patient outcomes. For selected patients, a smart phone app. may improve dietary acceptance and compliance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Relationship between Plasma Leptin Level and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Shankar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Leptin is an adipose tissue-derived hormone shown to be related to several metabolic, inflammatory, and hemostatic factors related to chronic kidney disease. Recent animal studies have reported that infusion of recombinant leptin into normal rats for 3 weeks fosters the development of glomerulosclerosis. However, few studies have examined the association between leptin and CKD in humans. Therefore, we examined the association between plasma leptin levels and CKD in a representative sample of US adults. Methods. We examined the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey participants >20 years of age (n=5820, 53.6% women. Plasma leptin levels were categorized into quartiles (≤4.3 Fg/L, 4.4–8.7 Fg/L, 8.8–16.9 Fg/L, >16.9 Fg/L. CKD was defined as a glomerular filtration rate of <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 estimated from serum creatinine. Results. Higher plasma leptin levels were associated with CKD after adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, smoking, alcohol intake, body mass index (BMI, diabetes, hypertension, and serum cholesterol. Compared to quartile 1 of leptin (referent, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval of CKD associated with quartile 4 was 3.31 (1.41 to 7.78; P-trend = 0.0135. Subgroup analyses examining the relation between leptin and CKD by gender, BMI categories, diabetes, and hypertension status also showed a consistent positive association. Conclusion. Higher plasma leptin levels are associated with CKD in a representative sample of US adults.

  20. Erythrocyte caspase-3 levels in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak-Jonkisz, D; Purzyc, L; Szcepańska, M; Makulska, I

    2013-02-01

    In chronic kidney disease (CKD), a number of intra- and extracellular factors, e.g., uremic toxins, mechanic, oxidative or osmotic stress - induce changes (rearrangements) in the structure of cytoplasmatic membrane, while also simultaneously deregulating blood cell metabolism and, in consequence, contributing to preliminary ageing and suicidal death of red blood cells (RBCs).The aim of the reported study was an evaluation of caspase-3 and lactate dehydrogenase activities and of ATP concentrations in erythrocytes as cellular responses to CKD progress. Conservatively treated sixty (60) CKD children were enrolled into the study and divided, according to CKD progression (stage I-IV). The control group consisted of twenty-five (25) healthy children. The activity of caspase-3 (Casp-3) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were spectrophotometrically assayed in haemolysed erythrocytes. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP(e)) concentrations were measured by means of a luciferin-luciferase kit. A gradual increase of LDH and ATP levels was observed in transition from CKD stage I to stage III. In Group IV, the levels of those parameters were statistically significantly lower than in the control group. The activity of Casp-3 in Group I was comparable to that in healthy children. The highest activity of Casp-3 was observed in Group III. 1. The activity of caspase-3 in RBCs of CKD children grows with progression of the disease. 2. The lower LDH activities and the ATP concentration drop below the values characteristic for the control group, as observed in stage IV of CKD, indicate a compromised energy balance. Copyright © 2012 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Management of the kidney transplant patient with chronic hepatitis C infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ignatius Y S; Walzer, Natasha; Aggarwal, Nidhi; Tzvetanov, Ivo; Cotler, Scott; Benedetti, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Chronic Hepatitis C (HCV) infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease. Renal transplantation confers a survival advantage in HCV-infected patients. Renal transplant candidates with serologic evidence of HCV infection should undergo a liver biopsy to assess for fibrosis and cirrhosis. Patients with Metavir fibrosis score ≤3 and compensated cirrhosis should be evaluated for interferon-based therapy. Achievement of sustained virological response (SVR) may reduce the risks for both posttransplantation hepatic and extrahepatic complications such as de novo or recurrent glomerulonephritis associated with HCV. Patients who cannot achieve SVR and have no live kidney donor may be considered for HCV-positive kidneys. Interferon should be avoided after kidney transplant except for treatment of life-threatening liver injury, such as fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis. Early detection, prevention, and treatment of complications due to chronic HCV infection may improve the outcomes of kidney transplant recipients with chronic HCV infection.

  2. Serum uric acid to creatinine ratio: A predictor of incident chronic kidney disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with preserved kidney function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liubao; Huang, Liji; Wu, Haidi; Lou, Qinglin; Bian, Rongwen

    2017-05-01

    Serum uric acid has shown to be a predictor of renal disease progression in most but not all studies. This study aims to test whether renal function-normalized serum uric acid is superior to serum uric acid as the predictor of incident chronic kidney disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. In this study, 1339 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate ⩾60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 and normouricemia were included. Renal function-normalized serum uric acid was calculated using serum uric acid/creatinine. Cox regression analysis was used to estimate the association between serum uric acid, renal function-normalized serum uric acid and incident chronic kidney disease. In total, 74 (5.53%) patients developed to chronic kidney disease 3 or greater during a median follow-up of 4 years, with older ages, longer diabetes duration and lower estimated glomerular filtration rate at baseline. The decline rate of estimated glomerular filtration rate was positively correlated with serum uric acid/creatinine ( r = 0.219, p type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

  3. Nintedanib, a triple tyrosine kinase inhibitor, attenuates renal fibrosis in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Li; Qi, Hualin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Yi; Jiang, Wei; Xu, Liuqing; Liu, Na; Zhuang, Shougang

    2017-08-15

    Nintedanib (BIBF1120) is a triple kinase inhibitor of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), and Src family kinase, which has recently been approved by FDA to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Whether it affects renal fibrosis remains unknown. Here, we demonstrated that administration of nintedanib immediately or 3 days after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) injury and with folic acid (FA) injection attenuated renal fibrosis and inhibited activation of renal interstitial fibroblasts. Delayed administration of nintedanib also partially reversed established renal fibrosis. Treatment with nintedanib blocked UUO-induced phosphorylation of PDGFRβ, FGFR1, FGFR2, VEGFR2, and several Src family kinases including Src, Lck, Lyn as well as activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and Smad-3 in the kidney. Furthermore, nintedanib inhibited UUO-elicited renal proinflammatory cytokine expression and macrophage infiltration. These data indicate that nintedanib is a potent anti-fibrotic agent in the kidney and may hold therapeutic potential as a treatment of chronic fibrotic kidney disease. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  4. The Chronic Kidney Disease Water Intake Trial: Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William F. Clark

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: In observational studies, drinking more water associates with a slower rate of kidney function decline; whether the same is true in a randomized controlled trial is unknown. Objective: To examine the 1-year effect of a higher vs usual water intake on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR in patients with chronic kidney disease. Design: Parallel-group randomized controlled trial. Setting: Nine centers in Ontario, Canada. Enrollment and randomization occurred between May 2013 and May 2016; follow-up for the primary outcome will continue until June 2017. Participants: Adults (n = 631 with stage 3 chronic kidney disease (eGFR 30-60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 and microalbuminuria. Intervention: The high water intake group was coached to increase their oral water intake by 1.0 to 1.5 L/day (depending on sex and weight, over and above usual consumed beverages, for a period of 1 year. The control group was coached to maintain their usual water intake during this time. Measures: Participants provided 24-hour urine samples at baseline and at 6 and 12 months after randomization; urine samples were analyzed for volume, creatinine, osmolality, and the albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Blood samples were obtained at baseline and at 3- to 6-month intervals after randomization, and analyzed for creatinine, copeptin, osmolality, and electrolytes. Other measures collected included health-related quality of life, blood pressure, body mass index, and diet. Primary outcome: The between-group change in eGFR from baseline (prerandomization to 12 months after randomization. Secondary outcomes: Change in plasma copeptin concentration, 24-hour urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio, measured creatinine clearance, estimated 5-year risk of kidney failure (using the 4-variable Kidney Failure Risk Equation, and health-related quality of life. Planned analysis: The primary analysis will follow an intention-to-treat approach. The between-group change in eGFR will be compared using

  5. Excretory urography and renal scintigraphy for chronic obstructed kidney: does nonopacity mean nonsalvageability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaipetch, Alisa; Namwongprom, Sirianong; Ekmahachai, Molrudee; Lojanapiwat, Bannakij

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to ascertain whether nonopacified kidney on excretory urography (also known as intravenous urography [IVU]) indicates nonsalvageability. We retrospectively reviewed 45 adult patients with chronic unilateral urinary tract obstruction, in whom IVU revealed nonopacified kidney on one side but normal excretion on the contralateral side. Affected kidneys with split glomerular filtration rate (GFR) IVU and renal scintigraphy findings, with respect to the duration of delayed filming on IVU, were analysed for significance. The results of IVU and renal scintigraphy findings for 34 (75.6%) nonopacified kidneys matched, representing nonsalvageable kidneys. Sensitivity and specificity of differential renal function were 76% and 100%, respectively, when the cutoff point for non-function was set at IVU with 2-hour and > 2-hour delayed films (p = 0.96). Although most nonopacified kidneys on IVU were nonsalvageable, a quarter of them were found to be salvageable on renal scintigraphy. Besides split GFR, differential function at cutoff point IVU.

  6. Microbiota metabolites: Pivotal players of cardiovascular damage in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosola, Carmela; Rocchetti, Maria Teresa; Cupisti, Adamasco; Gesualdo, Loreto

    2018-04-01

    In chronic kidney disease (CKD), cardiovascular (CV) damage is present in parallel which leads to an increased risk of CV disease. Both traditional and non-traditional risk factors contribute to CV damage in CKD. The systemic role of the microbiota as a central player in the pathophysiology of many organs is progressively emerging in the literature: the microbiota is indeed involved in a complex, bi-directional network between many organs, including the kidney and heart connection, although many of these relationships still need to be elucidated through in-depth mechanistic studies. The aim of this review is to provide evidence that microbiota metabolites influence non-traditional risk factors, such as inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in CKD-associated CV damage. Here, we report our current understanding and hypotheses on the gut-kidney and gut-heart axes and provide details on the potential mechanisms mediated by microbial metabolites. More specifically, we summarize some novel hypotheses linking the microbiota to blood pressure regulation and hypertension. We also emphasise the idea that the nutritional management of CKD should be redesigned and include the new findings from research on the intrinsic plasticity of the microbiota and its metabolites in response to food intake. The need is felt to integrate the classical salt and protein restriction approach for CKD patients with foods that enhance intestinal wellness. Finally, we discuss the new perspectives, especially the importance of taking care of the microbiota in order to prevent the risk of developing CKD and hypertension, as well as the still not tested but very promising CKD innovative treatments, such as postbiotic supplementation and bacteriotherapy. This interesting area of research offers potential complementary approaches to the management of CKD and CV damage assuming that the causal mechanisms underlying the gut-kidney and gut-heart axes are clarified. This will pave the way to the design

  7. Peri-operative kidney injury and long-term chronic kidney disease following orthotopic heart transplantation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskote, Aparna; Burch, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Significant advances in cardiac intensive care including extracorporeal life support have enabled children with complex congenital heart disease and end-stage heart failure to be supported while awaiting transplantation. With an increasing number of survivors after heart transplantation in children, the complications from long-term immunosuppression, including renal insufficiency, are becoming more apparent. Severe renal dysfunction after heart transplant is defined by a serum creatinine level >2.5 mg/dL (221 μmol/L), and/or need for dialysis or renal transplant. The degree of renal dysfunction is variable and is progressive over time. About 3-10 % of heart transplant recipients will go on to develop severe renal dysfunction within the first 10 years post-transplantation. Multiple risk factors for chronic kidney disease post-transplant have been identified, which include pre-transplant worsening renal function, recipient demographics and morbidity, peri-transplant haemodynamics and long-term exposure to calcineurin inhibitors. Renal insufficiency increases the risk of post-transplant morbidity and mortality. Hence, screening for renal dysfunction pre-, peri- and post-transplantation is important. Early and timely detection of renal insufficiency may help minimize renal insults, and allow prompt implementation of renoprotective strategies. Close monitoring and pre-emptive management of renal dysfunction is an integral aspect of peri-transplant and subsequent post-transplant long-term care.

  8. Prediction of differential creatinine clearance in chronically obstructed kidneys by non-contrast helical computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Cheuk Fan; Chan, L.W.; Cheng, C.W.; Yu, S.C.H.; Wong, W.S.; Wong, K.T.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: We investigate the use of non-contrast helical computerized tomography (NCHCT) in the measurement of differential renal parenchymal volume as a surrogate for differential creatinine clearance (Cr Cl) for unilateral chronically obstructed kidney. Materials And Methods: Patients with unilateral chronically obstructed kidneys with normal contralateral kidneys were enrolled. Ultrasonography (USG) of the kidneys was first done with the cortical thickness of the site with the most renal substance in the upper pole, mid-kidney, and lower pole of both kidneys were measured, and the mean cortical thickness of each kidney was calculated. NCHCT was subsequently performed for each patient. The CT images were individually reviewed with the area of renal parenchyma measured for each kidney. Then the volume of the slices was summated to give the renal parenchymal volume of both the obstructed and normal kidneys. Finally, a percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) was inserted to the obstructed kidney, and Cr Cl of both the obstructed kidney (PCN urine) and the normal side (voided urine) were measured two 2 after the relief of obstruction. Results: From March 1999 to February 2001, thirty patients were enrolled into the study. Ninety percent of them had ureteral calculi. The differential Cr Cl of the obstructed kidney (%CrCl) was defined as the percentage of Cr Cl of the obstructed kidney as of the total Cr Cl, measured 2 weeks after relief of obstruction. The differential renal parenchymal volume of the obstructed kidney (%CTvol) was the percentage of renal parenchymal volume as of the total parenchymal volume. The differential USG cortical thickness of the obstructed kidney (%USGcort) was the percentage of mean cortical thickness as of the total mean cortical thickness. The Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) between %CTvol and %CrCl and that between %USGcort and %CrCl were 0.756 and 0.543 respectively. The regression line was %CrCl = (1.00) x %CTvol - 14.27. The %CTvol

  9. Interventions for chronic kidney disease in people with sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Noemi BA; Fortin, Patricia M; Bull, Katherine R; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Estcourt, Lise J

    2017-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease (SCD) is one of the commonest severe monogenic disorders in the world, due to the inheritance of two abnormal haemoglobin (beta-globin) genes. SCD can cause severe pain, significant end-organ damage, pulmonary complications, and premature death. Kidney disease is a frequent and potentially severe complication in people with SCD. Chronic kidney disease is defined as abnormalities of kidney structure or function, present for more than three months. Sickle cell nephropathy refers to the spectrum of kidney complications in SCD. Glomerular damage is a cause of microalbuminuria and can develop at an early age in children with SCD, and increases in prevalence in adulthood. In people with sickle cell nephropathy, outcomes are poor as a result of the progression to proteinuria and chronic kidney insufficiency. Up to 12% of people who develop sickle cell nephropathy will develop end-stage renal disease. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of any intervention in preventing or reducing kidney complications or chronic kidney disease in people with SCD (including red blood cell transfusions, hydroxyurea and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI)), either alone or in combination with each other. Search methods We searched for relevant trials in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980), and ongoing trial databases; all searches current to 05 April 2016. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register: 13 April 2017. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials comparing interventions to prevent or reduce kidney complications or chronic kidney disease in people with SCD. There were no restrictions by outcomes examined, language or publication status. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. Main results We included two trials with 215 participants

  10. Polycystic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cysts - kidneys; Kidney - polycystic; Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease; ADPKD ... kidneys may be needed. Treatments for end-stage kidney disease may include dialysis or a kidney transplant .

  11. Mockup design of personal health diary app for patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiu-Wen; Wang, Yu-Jen; Jing, Ling-Fang; Chang, Polun

    2014-01-01

    Health self-management is important in the care of patients with chronic kidney disease. It is possible to improve the efficiency of patient self-management through the use of mobile technology and related software. This study is divided into three stages: 1. analysis of need: through observation, interview and content analysis of the chronic kidney disease health management manual; 2. design of system prototype: establish interface and system function; 3. prototype evaluation: evaluate whether the prototype designed by this study meets user needs. The system prototype includes: daily record, laboratory examination results, trend graphs, information search, sharing, communications and settings. Prototyping is done with Pencil Project for interface design and linking. The prototype is then exported in PDF format for mock-up simulation. Evaluation results: overall score was 4.01±0.60 leaning towards "agree", the highest score was ease of use (4.25±0.6), followed by easy to learn (4.15±0.68), acceptance (4.01±0.61), reliability (3.87±0.6) and functionality (3.83±0.49). The results show positive attitude towards the system.

  12. Table showing dietary phosphorus/protein ratio for the Spanish population. Usefulness in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barril-Cuadrado, Guillermina; Puchulu, M Bernardita; Sánchez-Tomero, José A

    2013-01-01

    The K/DOQI guidelines recommend the use of phosphorus/protein food ratios for proper control of dietary phosphorus. Evidence exists from tables with phosphorus to protein ratios for common foods. No such table exists for common foods consumed by the Spanish population with ratio estimations. To estimate the phosphorus to protein ratio in foods commonly used by the Spanish population and to establish its usefulness in the selection of foods for patients with chronic kidney disease. Tables with the phosphorus to protein ratio were prepared from two data sources concerning Spanish food composition. We evaluated chemical composition per 100g of raw food. The tables do not include phosphorus additives. No foods with high ratio of phosphorus to protein were eliminated in order to allow comparisons between different foods from each group. Shown in the tables. The dietary prescription for patients with chronic kidney disease should take into consideration not only the absolute phosphorus value of food consumed, but also the phosphorus to protein ratio of each food and the total amount of phosphorus in the diet. The more "natural" a diet is, the more likely that the patient will reach an acceptable phosphorus to protein ratio of less than 16mg/g, which does not increase mortality. There is clearly a need for an educational program on nutrition and phosphorus sources in which food ratio tables could be a useful tool for the multidisciplinary teams caring for renal patients.

  13. Secondhand smoke exposure is associated with proteinuria in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoloja, Abiodun; Jerry-Fluker, Judith; Ng, Derek K; Abraham, Alison G; Furth, Susan; Warady, Bradley A; Mitsnefes, Mark

    2013-08-01

    In adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD), cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk for CKD progression and transplant failure. In children, secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure has been associated with elevated blood pressure. There are no studies on the prevalence and effect of SHS exposure in CKD. Subjects were enrolled in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) Study, an observational cohort of 366 children aged 1 to 16 years with CKD. Secondhand smoke exposure was obtained via questionnaire. SHS exposure was also determined based on urine cotinine (Ucot) measurements (1 ng/mL ≤ Ucot < 75 ng/mL). The cross-sectional association of SHS exposure with proteinuria was assessed. Using Ucot, 22 % of subjects were exposed to SHS. SHS exposure was significantly associated with lower maternal education and African American race, and a greater prevalence of nephrotic range proteinuria and left ventricular hypertrophy. In a multivariate model (including sex, age, race, maternal education, income level, private insurance status, abnormal birth history and CKD diagnosis), the prevalence odds of nephrotic range proteinuria was 2.64, (95 % confidence interval 1.08, 6.42) higher in children exposed to SHS compared to those unexposed. In our cohort of children with CKD, SHS exposure was common (22 %) and independently associated with nephrotic range proteinuria. Exposure to SHS may be an important factor to consider in CKD progression.

  14. Effect of elevated blood pressure on quality of life in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Cynthia; Gerson, Arlene; Hooper, Stephen R; Matheson, Matthew; Lande, Marc; Kupferman, Juan; Furth, Susan; Warady, Bradley; Flynn, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    Although hypertension is known to have an adverse impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in adults, little is known about the effects of hypertension and use of antihypertensive medications on HRQoL in hypertensive children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Cross-sectional and longitudinal assessment of impact of elevated blood pressure (BP) and antihypertensive medication use on HRQoL scores obtained in children enrolled in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) Study. Blood pressure was measured both manually and by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. HRQoL was assessed with the PedsQL survey. The study sample included 551 participants with sufficient data for cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. Cross-sectional analysis of presence of prehypertension or hypertension and impact on HRQoL found mild associations between elevated BP and HRQoL scores with overall PedsQL parent and child scores averaging 79 vs. 76.5 and 83 vs. 78.5, respectively. However, no associations persisted under longitudinal multivariate analysis. Despite apparent small effects of elevated BP on HRQoL at baseline, no association was found between the presence of elevated BP and HRQoL over time in children with mild-to-moderate CKD. In addition, antihypertensive medication use did not appear to have an impact on HRQoL in this population.

  15. Plasma Nitration of High-Density and Low-Density Lipoproteins in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients Receiving Kidney Transplants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Bakillah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Functional abnormalities of high-density lipoprotein (HDL could contribute to cardiovascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients. We measured a validated marker of HDL dysfunction, nitrated apolipoprotein A-I, in kidney transplant recipients to test the hypothesis that a functioning kidney transplant reduces serum nitrated apoA-I concentrations. Methods. Concentrations of nitrated apoA-I and apoB were measured using indirect sandwich ELISA assays on sera collected from each transplant subject before transplantation and at 1, 3, and 12 months after transplantation. Patients were excluded if they have history of diabetes, treatment with lipid-lowering medications or HIV protease inhibitors, prednisone dose > 15 mg/day, nephrotic range proteinuria, serum creatinine > 1.5 mg/dL, or active inflammatory disease. Sera from 18 transplanted patients were analyzed. Four subjects were excluded due to insufficient data. Twelve and eight patients had creatinine < 1.5 mg/dL at 3 and 12 months after transplantation, respectively. Results. Nitrated apoA-I was significantly reduced at 12 months after transplantation (p=0.039. The decrease in apoA-I nitration was associated with significant reduction in myeloperoxidase (MPO activity (p=0.047. In contrast to apoA-I, nitrated apoB was not affected after kidney transplantation. Conclusions. Patients with well-functioning grafts had significant reduction in nitrated apoA-I 12 months after kidney transplantation. Further studies are needed in a large cohort to determine if nitrated apoA-I can be used as a valuable marker for cardiovascular risk stratification in chronic kidney disease.

  16. Organochlorine pesticide level in patients with chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology and its association with renal function

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Rishila; Siddarth, Manushi; Singh, Neeru; Tyagi, Vipin; Kare, Pawan Kumar; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Kalra, Om Prakash; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Background Involvement of agrochemicals have been suggested in the development of chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDu). The association between CKDu and blood level of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in CKDu patients has been examined in the present study. Methods All the recruited study subjects (n = 300) were divided in three groups, namely, healthy control (n = 100), patients with chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (n = 100), and patients with chronic kidney disease o...

  17. Perceptions of prognostic risks in chronic kidney disease: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Helen H L; Tangri, Navdeep; Djurdjev, Ognjenka; Barrett, Brendan J; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Madore, François; Rigatto, Claudio; Muirhead, Norman; Sood, Manish M; Clase, Catherine M; Levin, Adeera

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the clinical trajectories of chronic kidney disease (CKD) to discern personalized care remains a complex challenge in nephrology. Understanding the appropriate risk thresholds and time frame associated with predicting risks of key outcomes (kidney failure, cardiovascular (CV) events, and death) is critical in facilitating decision-making. As part of an exploratory research and practice support needs assessment, we aimed to determine the importance of the time frames for predicting key outcomes, and to assess the perceived demand for risk prediction tools among Canadian nephrologists. A web-based survey was developed by a pan-Canadian expert panel of practitioners. Upon pre-test for clarity and ease of completion, the final survey was nationally deployed to Canadian nephrologists. Anonymous responses were gathered over a 4-month period. The results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. One hundred eleven nephrologists responded to our survey. The majority of the respondents described prediction of events over time frames of 1-5 years as being "extremely important" or "very important" to decision-making on a 5-point Likert scale. To plan for arteriovenous fistula referral, the respondents deemed thresholds which would predict probability of kidney failure between >30 and >50 % at 1 year, as useful, while many commented that the rate of progression should be included for decision-making. Over 80 % of the respondents were not satisfied with their current ability to predict the progression to kidney failure, CV events, and death. Most of them indicated that they would value and use validated risk scores for decision-making. Our national survey of nephrologists shows that the risk prediction for major adverse clinical outcomes is valuable in CKD at multiple time frames and risk thresholds. Further research is required in developing relevant and meaningful risk prediction models for clinical decision-making in patient-centered CKD care.

  18. Thyroid hormone levels and incident chronic kidney disease in euthyroid individuals: the Kangbuk Samsung Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiyi; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Cho, Juhee; Lee, Won-Young; Rhee, Eun-Jung; Kwon, Min-Jung; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto; Rampal, Sanjay; Han, Won Kon; Shin, Hocheol; Guallar, Eliseo

    2014-10-01

    Overt and subclinical hypothyroidism are associated with higher levels of serum creatinine and with increased risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The prospective association between thyroid hormones and kidney function in euthyroid individuals,however, is largely unexplored. We conducted a prospective cohort study in 104 633 South Korean men and women who were free of CKD and proteinuria at baseline and had normal thyroid hormone levels and no history of thyroid disease or cancer. At each annual or biennial follow-up visit, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (FT3) and free thyroxin (FT4) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. The study outcome was incident CKD, defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)<60 ml/min/1.73 m2 based on the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration creatinine equation. After a median follow-up of 3.5 years, 1032 participants developed incident CKD.There was a positive association between high-normal levels of TSH and increased risk of incident CKD. In fully-adjusted models including baseline eGFR, the hazard ratio comparing the highest vs the lowest quintiles of TSH was 1.26 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02 to 1.55; P for linear trend=0.03]. In spline models, FT3 levels below 3 pg/ml were also associated with increased risk of incident CKD. There was no association between FT4 levels and CKD. In a large cohort of euthyroid men and women, high levels of TSH and low levels of FT3, even within the normal range, were modestly associated with an increased risk of incident CKD.

  19. Are Urinary Tubular Injury Markers Useful in Chronic Kidney Disease? A Systematic Review and Meta Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Le-Ting; Lv, Lin-Li; Pan, Ming-Ming; Cao, Yu-Han; Liu, Hong; Feng, Ye; Ni, Hai-Feng; Liu, Bi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Adverse outcome of chronic kidney disease, such as end stage renal disease, is a significant burden on personal health and healthcare costs. Urinary tubular injury markers, such as NGAL, KIM-1 and NAG, could provide useful prognostic value for the early identification of high-risk patients. However, discrepancies between recent large prospective studies have resulted in controversy regarding the potential clinical value of these markers. Therefore, we conducted the first meta-analysis to provide a more persuasive argument to this debate. In the current meta-analysis, based on ten prospective studies involving 29366 participants, we evaluated the role of urinary tubular injury markers (NGAL, KIM-1 and NAG) in predicting clinical outcomes including CKD stage 3, end stage renal disease and mortality. The prognostic values of these biomarkers were estimated using relative risks and 95% confidence interval in adjusted models. All risk estimates were normalized to those of 1 standard deviation increase in log-scale concentrations to minimize heterogeneity. Fixed-effects models were adopted to combine risk estimates. The quality of the research and between-study heterogeneity were evaluated. The level of research evidence was identified according to the GRADE profiler. uNGAL was identified as an independent risk predictor of ESRD (pooled adjusted relative risk: 1.40[1.21 to 1.61], pchronic kidney disease. A borderline significance of uKIM-1 in predicting CKD stage 3 independently in the community-based population was observed (pooled adjusted relative risk: 1.13[1.00 to 1.27], p = 0.057). Only the prognostic value of uNGAL for ESRD was supported by a grade B level of evidence. The concentration of uNGAL can be used in practice as an independent predictor of end stage renal disease among patients with chronic kidney disease, but it may be not useful in predicting disease progression to CKD stage 3 among community-based population.

  20. Prevalence and variation of Chronic Kidney Disease in the Irish health system: initial findings from the National Kidney Disease Surveillance Programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stack, Austin G

    2014-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a major non-communicable chronic disease that is associated with adverse clinical and economic outcomes. Passive surveillance systems are likely to improve efforts for prevention of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and inform national service planning. This study was conducted to determine the overall prevalence of CKD in the Irish health system, assess period trends and explore patterns of variation as part of a novel surveillance initiative.

  1. Rhein reverses Klotho repression via promoter demethylation and protects against kidney and bone injuries in mice with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Liu, Lin; Lin, Wenjun; Yin, Shasha; Duan, Aiping; Liu, Zhihong; Cao, Wangsen

    2017-01-01

    Rhein is an anthraquinone compound isolated from the medicinal plant rhubarb and mainly used in the clinical treatment of diabetic nephropathy. Rhein exhibits various renoprotective functions, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully determined. However, its renoprotective properties recapitulate the role of Klotho, a renal-specific antiaging protein critical for maintaining kidney homeostasis. Here we explored the connections between rhein renoprotection and Klotho in a mouse model of adenine-induced chronic kidney disease. In addition to being an impressive Klotho upregulator, rhein remarkably reversed renal Klotho deficiency in adenine-treated mice. This effect was associated with significant improvement in disturbed serum biochemistry, profibrogenic protein expression, and kidney and bone damage. Further investigation of the molecular basis of Klotho loss revealed that these kidneys displayed marked inductions of DNA methyltransferase DNMT1/DNMT3a and Klotho promoter hypermethylation, whereas rhein treatment effectively corrected these alterations. The renal protective effects of rhein were largely abolished when Klotho was knocked-down by RNA interferences, suggesting that rhein reversal of Klotho deficiency is essential for its renoprotective actions. Thus, our study clarifies how rhein regulation of Klotho expression contributes to its renoprotection and brings new insights into Klotho-targeted strategy for the treatment of kidney diseases of various etiologies. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Suppression of kidney pathological function using roentgenoendovascular occlusion in patients with chronic renal insufficiency before or after kidney transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabkin, I.Kh.; Matevosov, A.L.; Gotman, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    The carried out investigations on REO efficiency in treatment of refractory hypertension in patients with chronic insufficiency(CRI) and renal ischemia of vascular origin manifested necessity of separation of diagnostic and tretment stages, anesthesiologic supply is important for efficient REO of renal arteries. It is shown that REO of renal arteries in patients with CRI before and after kidney transplantation is relatively safe and sufficiently reliable method of treating renin-dependent arterial hypertension

  3. Glycaemic changes in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De'Marziani, Guillermo; Soler Pujol, Gervasio; Obregón, Liliana Miriam; Morales, Elisa Mabel; Gonzalez, Claudio Daniel; Gonzalez Paganti, Luciana; Cacciagiú, Leonardo; Lopez, Graciela; Schreier, Laura; Elbert, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    In Argentina, there have been no studies aimed at establishing the prevalence of dysglycaemia (impaired fasting glucose [IFG], impaired glucose tolerance [IGT] and diabetes mellitus [DM]) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Our group decided to conduct an observational study to evaluate the frequency with oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in CKD patients with no previous data for dysglycaemia in their medical records. OGTT was performed in 254 patients (60.62% male) with stage 3, 4 and 5 CKD under conservative treatment, haemodialysis or transplantation. Results for DM were found in 10 patients according to fasting glucose alone (3.94%; 95% CI: 1.35-6.53%), 11 patients with exclusively the second hour criterion (4.33%; 95% CI: 1.63-7.03%), 15 with both criteria (5.91%; 95% CI: 2.81-9.00%) and 36 patients with at least one criteria (14.17%; 95% CI: 9.69-18.66%). In a multivariate analysis, DM was associated with waist circumference (OR=1.033 per cm; 95% CI, 1.005 to 1.062; P=.019) and with conservative treatment vs. replacement therapy (OR=0.41; 95% CI: 0.19-0.92; P=.028). IGT was evident in 24.6% and 20.3 on conservative vs. replacement therapy, with no statistically significant difference. IFG (ADA criteria) was 19.75 vs. 9.24% in conservative vs. replacement therapy, with a statistically significant difference. OGTT is suggested for all CKD patients since it is able to detect the full range of unknown dysglycaemias, which avoids underdiagnoses and favours performing treatments to prevent progression in DM risk groups (IFG and/or IGT). It also aids in the selection of the most appropriate medication for transplantation or treatment initiation in new cases of undiagnosed DM to decrease morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Hepcidin: an important iron metabolism regulator in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Sandra Azevedo; Canziani, Maria Eugênia Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is a common complication and its impact on morbimortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is well known. The discovery of hepcidin and its functions has contributed to a better understanding of iron metabolism disorders in CKD anemia. Hepcidin is a peptide mainly produced by hepatocytes and, through a connection with ferroportin, it regulates iron absorption in the duodenum and its release of stock cells. High hepcidin concentrations described in patients with CKD, especially in more advanced stages are attributed to decreased renal excretion and increased production. The elevation of hepcidin has been associated with infection, inflammation, atherosclerosis, insulin resistance and oxidative stress. Some strategies were tested to reduce the effects of hepcidin in patients with CKD, however more studies are necessary to assess the impact of its modulation in the management of anemia in this population. Resumo Anemia é uma complicação frequente e seu impacto na morbimortalidade é bem conhecido em pacientes com doença renal crônica (DRC). A descoberta da hepcidina e de suas funções contribuíram para melhor compreensão dos distúrbios do metabolismo de ferro na anemia da DRC. Hepcidina é um peptídeo produzido principalmente pelos hepatócitos, e através de sua ligação com a ferroportina, regula a absorção de ferro no duodeno e sua liberação das células de estoque. Altas concentrações de hepcidina descritas em pacientes com DRC, principalmente em estádios mais avançados, são atribuídas à diminuição da excreção renal e ao aumento de sua produção. Elevação de hepcidina tem sido associada à ocorrência de infecção, inflamação, aterosclerose, resistência à insulina e estresse oxidativo. Algumas estratégias foram testadas para diminuir os efeitos da hepcidina em pacientes com DRC, entretanto, serão necessários mais estudos para avaliar o impacto de sua modulação no manejo da anemia nessa população.

  5. Inflammation and premature aging in advanced chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooman, Jeroen P; Dekker, Marijke J; Usvyat, Len A; Kotanko, Peter; van der Sande, Frank M; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Shiels, Paul G; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Systemic inflammation in end-stage renal disease is an established risk factor for mortality and a catalyst for other complications, which are related to a premature aging phenotype, including muscle wasting, vascular calcification, and other forms of premature vascular disease, depression, osteoporosis, and frailty. Uremic inflammation is also mechanistically related to mechanisms involved in the aging process, such as telomere shortening, mitochondrial dysfunction, and altered nutrient sensing, which can have a direct effect on cellular and tissue function. In addition to uremia-specific causes, such as abnormalities in the phosphate-Klotho axis, there are remarkable similarities between the pathophysiology of uremic inflammation and so-called "inflammaging" in the general population. Potentially relevant, but still somewhat unexplored in this respect, are abnormal or misplaced protein structures, as well as abnormalities in tissue homeostasis, which evoke danger signals through damage-associated molecular patterns, as well as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Systemic inflammation, in combination with the loss of kidney function, can impair the resilience of the body to external and internal stressors by reduced functional and structural tissue reserves, and by impairing normal organ crosstalk, thus providing an explanation for the greatly increased risk of homeostatic breakdown in this population. In this review, the relationship between uremic inflammation and a premature aging phenotype, as well as potential causes and consequences, are discussed. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Chronic partial ureteral obstruction and the developing kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevalier, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Although congenital urinary tract obstruction is a common disorder, its pathophysiology remains poorly understood and clinical practice is controversial. Animal models have been used to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for obstructive nephropathy, and the models reveal that renal growth and function are impaired in proportion to the severity and duration of obstruction. Ureteral obstruction in the neonatal rat or mouse leads to activation of the renin-angiotensin system, renal infiltration by macrophages, and tubular apoptosis. Nephrons are lost by glomerular sclerosis and the formation of atubular glomeruli, and progressive injury leads to tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Recovery following release of obstruction depends on the timing, severity, and duration of obstruction. Growth factors and cytokines are produced by the hydronephrotic kidney, including MCP-1 and TGF-β1, which are excreted in urine and can serve as biomarkers of renal injury. Because MRI can be used to monitor renal morphology, blood flow, and filtration rate, its use might supplant current imaging modalities (ultrasonography and diuretic renography), which have significant drawbacks. Combined use of MRI and new urinary biomarkers should improve our understanding of human congenital obstructive nephropathy and should lead to new approaches to evaluation and management of this challenging group of patients. (orig.)

  7. Investigating relations between environmental toxins in Northern Irish soils and streams and Chronic Kidney Disease prevalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Chloe E.; McKinley, Jennifer M.; Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Fogarty, Damian; Atkinson, Peter M.; Palmer, Sherry

    2016-01-01

    The unknown aetiology of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) has attracted recent attention as a result of the increasing global prevalence and recent reviews of occupational and environmental exposure to nephrotoxins. The main focus of this research is to examine the potential relationship between environmental exposure to known nephrotoxins including arsenic, cadmium and lead and the potential health risk associated with the progressive dysfunction of the kidneys in renal impaired patients with CKD across Northern Ireland. In addition to these known nephrotoxins, co-abundance with several essential elements has been found to play a role as protecting mechanisms while others increase the uptake of nephrotoxic elements as a result of similar absorption mechanisms within the body. Key elements protecting the body from toxicity include selenium and zinc, whereas those which have been attributed to enhance the uptake of arsenic, cadmium and lead include iron and calcium. The compositional nature of the soil and stream geochemical data is explored to aid in the analysis of interactions between elements. Two approaches, one data-driven and the other knowledge-driven, are explored to investigate the associations between co-abundant elements. The bioaccessibility of these elements, which is the portion of the relevant toxin absorbed within the body, is also investigated to identify areas across Northern Ireland with an increased environmental hazard and potential health risk. The study uses a combination of datasets from the United Kingdom Renal Registry (UKRR) unknown aetiology subset, the soil and stream geochemical dataset from the Tellus Survey (GSNI) with the addition of a bioaccessibility subset. Findings suggest a relationship between the presence of elevated arsenic in stream waters and impaired renal function of the kidneys. Interactions between essential elements and potentially toxic elements could explain the regional variation of CKD of uncertain aetiology across

  8. Towards a symptom cluster model in chronic kidney disease: A structural equation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutary, Hayfa; Douglas, Clint; Bonner, Ann

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to test a symptom cluster model in chronic kidney disease patients based on the Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms, accounting for the relationships between influencing factors, symptom experience and consequences for quality of life. The evaluation of symptom clusters is a new field of scientific inquiry directed towards more focused symptom management. Yet, little is known about relationships between symptom clusters, predictors and the synergistic effect of multiple symptoms on outcomes. Cross-sectional. Data were collected from 436 patients with advanced stages of chronic kidney disease during July 2013-February 2014 using validated measures of symptom burden and quality of life. Analysis involved structural equation modelling. The final model demonstrated good fit with the data and provided strong evidence for the predicted relationships. Psychological distress, stage of chronic kidney disease and age explained most of the variance in symptom experience. Symptom clusters had a strong negative effect on quality of life, with fatigue, sexual symptoms and restless legs being the strongest predictors. Overall, the model explained more than half of the deterioration in quality of life. However, a reciprocal path between quality of life and symptom experience was not found. Interventions targeting symptom clusters could greatly improve quality of life in patients with chronic kidney disease. The symptom cluster model presented has important clinical and heuristic implications, serving as a framework to encourage and guide new lines of intervention research to reduce symptom burden in chronic kidney disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. [Frequency of chronic kidney disease among ambulatory patients with type 2 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel R, Pablo; Parra L, Ximena; Ardiles A, Leopoldo

    2012-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is the main cause of chronic kidney disease in developed countries. To study the prevalence of chronic kidney disease among adults with diabetes mellitus attended at a public primary health care clinic in southern Chile. One hundred patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged more than 15 years participated in this cross sectional study. Chronic kidney disease was defined as the presence of a urine albumin/creatinine ratio over 30 mg/g or an estimated glomerular filtration rate of less than 60 mL/min/1,73 m², detected in at least two opportunities, separated at least by three months. Thirty four percent of participants had chronic kidney disease (17% stage 1 or 2 and 17% stage 3). Thirty percent of participants had an abnormal urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. Halfof the patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate below 60 mL/min/1,73 m², had a normal urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. The rates of chronic kidney disease in this group of diabetic patients are very similar to those reported elsewhere.

  10. Parathyroid cell resistance to fibroblast growth factor 23 in secondary hyperparathyroidism of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galitzer, H; Ben-Dov, I Z; Silver, Justin; Naveh-Many, Tally

    2010-02-01

    Although fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) acting through its receptor Klotho-FGFR1c decreases parathyroid hormone expression, this hormone is increased in chronic kidney disease despite an elevated serum FGF23. We measured possible factors that might contribute to the resistance of parathyroid glands to FGF23 in rats with the dietary adenine-induced model of chronic kidney disease. Quantitative immunohistochemical and reverse transcription-PCR analysis using laser capture microscopy showed that both Klotho and FGFR1 protein and mRNA levels were decreased in histological sections of the parathyroid glands. Recombinant FGF23 failed to decrease serum parathyroid hormone levels or activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway in the glands of rats with advanced experimental chronic kidney disease. In parathyroid gland organ culture, the addition of FGF23 decreased parathyroid hormone secretion and mRNA levels in control animals or rats with early but not advanced chronic kidney disease. Our results show that because of a downregulation of the Klotho-FGFR1c receptor complex, an increase of circulating FGF23 does not decrease parathyroid hormone levels in established chronic kidney disease. This in vivo resistance is sustained in parathyroid organ culture in vitro.

  11. Self-management interventions for adults with chronic kidney disease: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Maoliosa; Kahlon, Bhavneet Kaur; Beanlands, Heather; Straus, Sharon; Ronksley, Paul; Herrington, Gwen; Tong, Allison; Grill, Allan; Waldvogel, Blair; Large, Chantel A; Large, Claire L; Harwood, Lori; Novak, Marta; James, Matthew T; Elliott, Meghan; Fernandez, Nicolas; Brimble, Scott; Samuel, Susan; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2018-03-22

    To systematically identify and describe self-management interventions for adult patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Community-based. Adults with CKD stages 1-5 (not requiring kidney replacement therapy). Self-management strategies for adults with CKD. Using a scoping review, electronic databases and grey literature were searched in October 2016 to identify self-management interventions for adults with CKD stages 1-5 (not requiring kidney replacement therapy). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), non-RCTs, qualitative and mixed method studies were included and study selection and data extraction were independently performed by two reviewers. Outcomes included behaviours, cognitions, physiological measures, symptoms, health status and healthcare. Fifty studies (19 RCTs, 7 quasi-experimental, 5 observational, 13 pre-post intervention, 1 mixed method and 5 qualitative) reporting 45 interventions were included. The most common intervention topic was diet/nutrition and interventions were regularly delivered face to face. Interventions were administered by a variety of providers, with nursing professionals the most common health professional group. Cognitions (ie, changes in general CKD knowledge, perceived self-management and motivation) were the most frequently reported outcome domain that showed improvement. Less than 1% of the interventions were co-developed with patients and 20% were based on a theory or framework. There was a wide range of self-management interventions with considerable variability in outcomes for adults with CKD. Major gaps in the literature include lack of patient engagement in the design of the interventions, with the majority of interventions not applying a behavioural change theory to inform their development. This work highlights the need to involve patients to co-developed and evaluate a self-management intervention based on sound theories and clinical evidence. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the

  12. Evolving therapies for hepatitis C virus in chronic kidney disease: the beginning of a new era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Craig E; Nader, Claudia

    2017-03-01

    The current review highlights recent advances in treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection using new classes of agents, direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), with a focus on the evidence for their use in the setting of chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 4-5, hemodialysis, and kidney transplantation. DAA agents target-specific proteins involved in the hepatitis C virus life cycle and interrupt viral replication. Sustained virologic response, a marker of viral eradication, occurs in more than 90% of patients treated with DAA agents in the general population. Emerging data demonstrate similar sustained virologic response rates for specific DAA-based regimens in patients with CKD stages 4-5, hemodialysis patients, and kidney-transplant recipients. High sustained virologic response rates are seen with DAA agents in CKD populations. A thoughtful approach to the timing of treatment is required to facilitate timely access to kidney transplantation.

  13. Eleven reasons to control the protein intake of patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouque, Denis; Aparicio, Michel

    2007-07-01

    For many years patients with chronic kidney disease have been advised to control the protein content of their diet. This advice has been given on the basis of a number of reported metabolic effects of lowering protein intake, such as lowering serum urea nitrogen levels, improving phosphocalcic metabolism and insulin resistance and, more recently, ameliorating proteinuria (independent of antiproteinuric medications). The effects on the progression of kidney disease, although spectacular in experimental studies, have been less convincing in humans. It is possible that flawed design of clinical trials is responsible for this discrepancy. In this Review, we comment on experimental findings that indicate that limiting protein intake protects the kidney and ameliorates uremic symptoms, outline how the body adapts to a reduction in protein intake, and describe the metabolic benefits to the patient. We then review the evidence from randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses that pertains to the effects of low-protein diets in adults with chronic kidney disease.

  14. The modified proteins in erythrocytes and regulation of erythrocytes volume in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravlyova, L E; Molotov-Luchanskiy, V B; Bakirova, R Y; Kolesnikova, Y A; Nurgaliyeva, A S; Klyuyev, D A

    2015-11-01

    The role of oxidatively modified proteins in progression of chronic kidney disease has been discussed. We have got the results demonstrating the alteration of band 3 protein activity in erythrocytes of patients with chronic kidney disease. We presumed that it might be associated with oxidative damage of intracellular proteins. The purpose of the research was to study the modified proteins (protein reactive carbonyl derivatives, membrane-bounded hemoglobin) in erythrocytes, as well as the regulation of erythrocyte volume in patients with chronic kidney disease. 132 patients with various stages of chronic kidney disease and degree of chronic renal failure were divided into four groups. We enrolled 32 healthy subjects. In erythrocytes modified proteins (protein reactive carbonyl derivatives, membrane-bounded hemoglobin) concentrations and activity of Cl-/HCО3--exchanger have been estimated. the results demonstrated the strong disorder of Cl-/HCО3--exchanger activity in erythrocytes of patients. These data suggested the existence of erythrocytes subpopulations with different activity of Cl-/HCО3--exchangers in bloodstream of patients with chronic kidney disease depending on initial clinical form of the disease. In erythrocytes of all patients, the membrane-bounded hemoglobin concentration and reactive carbonyl derivatives of proteins were significantly higher than in control samples. We have assumed that in erythrocytes oxidized hemoglobin interacts with band 3 protein present on erythrocyte membrane. The membrane-bounded hemoglobin increase leads to increased stiffness of the erythrocyte membranes and affects the volume of erythrocytes. We hypothesized that erythrocytes with changed ability to regulate their volume and high concentration of modified proteins contributed to chronic kidney disease progression.

  15. Calcium Regulation and Bone Mineral Metabolism in Elderly Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickram Tejwani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The elderly chronic kidney disease (CKD population is growing. Both aging and CKD can disrupt calcium (Ca2+ homeostasis and cause alterations of multiple Ca2+-regulatory mechanisms, including parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, fibroblast growth factor-23/Klotho, calcium-sensing receptor and Ca2+-phosphate product. These alterations can be deleterious to bone mineral metabolism and soft tissue health, leading to metabolic bone disease and vascular calcification and aging, termed CKD-mineral and bone disorder (MBD. CKD-MBD is associated with morbid clinical outcomes, including fracture, cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. In this paper, we comprehensively review Ca2+ regulation and bone mineral metabolism, with a special emphasis on elderly CKD patients. We also present the current treatment-guidelines and management options for CKD-MBD.

  16. Definition, identification and treatment of resistant hypertension in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Yelena R; Bomback, Andrew S

    2014-07-01

    Resistant hypertension, the inability to achieve goal blood pressure despite the use of three or more appropriately dosed antihypertensive drugs (including a diuretic), remains a common clinical problem, especially in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). While the exact prevalence and prognosis of resistant hypertension in CKD patients remain unknown, resistant hypertension likely contributes significantly to increased cardiovascular risk and progression of kidney disease in this population. We review the identification and evaluation of patients with resistant hypertension, including the importance of 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in the identification of 'white-coat', 'masked' and 'non-dipper' hypertension, the latter of which has particular clinical and therapeutic importance in patients with resistant hypertension and CKD. We then discuss treatment strategies for resistant hypertension that target the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying resistance to treatment, including persistent volume excess, incomplete renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade and inadequate nocturnal blood pressure control. Finally, we propose a treatment algorithm for evaluation and treatment of resistant hypertension in patients with CKD. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  17. Growth impairment in children with pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasaki, Yuko; Ishikura, Kenji; Uemura, Osamu; Ito, Shuichi; Wada, Naohiro; Hattori, Motoshi; Ohashi, Yasuo; Tanaka, Ryojiro; Nakanishi, Koichi; Kaneko, Tetsuji; Honda, Masataka

    2015-12-01

    Growth impairment is a major complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children. However, no cohort studies have examined the growth of Asian children with pre-dialysis CKD. We sent cross-sectional surveys to 113 Japanese medical institutions that were treating 447 children with CKD stages 3-5 in 2010 and 2011. Of 447 children included in our survey conducted in 2010, height and CKD stage were evaluable for 297 children in 2011, and height standard deviation score (height SDS) was calculated in these children. Height SDS decreased with increasing CKD stage (P kidney and urinary tract (P growth impairment included CKD stages 4 and 5 (relative to stage 3), being small-for-date, and asphyxia at birth. Among children with a height SDS ≤-2.0, growth hormone was used in 19.5, 31.0, and 25.0 % of children with CKD stages 3, 4, and 5, respectively. This prospective cohort study revealed marked growth impairment in Japanese children with CKD stages 3-5 relative to healthy children. CKD-related risk factors for growth impairment included advanced CKD (stages 4 and 5), being small-for-date, and asphyxia at birth. Growth hormone was infrequently used in this cohort of children with pre-dialysis CKD.

  18. Glycaemic, blood pressure and lipid goal attainment and chronic kidney disease stage of type 2 diabetic patients treated in primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcillo, Antonella; Pivin, Edward; Lalubin, Fabrice; Pitteloud, Nelly; Burnier, Michel; Zanchi, Anne

    2017-07-11

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease and diabetes is rising in Europe. These patients are at high cardiovascular and renal risk and need a challenging multifactorial therapeutic approach. The goal of this cross-sectional study was to examine the treatment and attainments of goals related to cardiovascular risk factors within chronic kidney disease stages in type 2 diabetic patients followed up by primary care physicians in Switzerland. Each participating physician entered into a web database the anonymised data of up to 15 consecutive diabetic patients attending her/his office between December 2013 and June 2014. Diabetes, hypertension and lipid lowering therapies were analysed, as well as glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c) levels and goal attainments by KDIGO chronic kidney disease stage 1 to 4. A total of 1359 patients (mean age 66.5±12.4 years) were included by 109 primary care physicians. Chronic kidney disease stages 0-2, 3a, 3 b and 4 were present in 77.6%, 13.9%, 6.1%, and 2.4%, respectively. Average HbA1c was independent of chronic kidney disease stage and close to 7%; more than half of the patients reached the HbA1c goal. Eighty-four percent of patients were hypertensive and only 18.2% reached the then current Swiss or American Diabetes Association 2013 blood pressure goals. Despite loosening of blood pressure goals in 2015, only half of the patients reached them and most needed multiple therapies. Increased body mass index and advanced chronic kidney disease stage decreased the chance of reaching blood pressure goals. Lipid lowering therapy was prescribed in 62.1% of cases, with average LDL-c levels similar across chronic kidney disease stages. Only 42% of patients reached the LDL-c goal of primary prevention and 32% reached primary care physicians in Switzerland. Goal attainments for HbA1c and LDL-c were not influenced by chronic kidney disease stages, in contrast to blood pressure. Reaching

  19. Traditional medicine practices among community members with chronic kidney disease in northern Tanzania: an ethnomedical survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanifer, John W; Lunyera, Joseph; Boyd, David; Karia, Francis; Maro, Venance; Omolo, Justin; Patel, Uptal D

    2015-10-23

    In sub-Saharan Africa, chronic kidney disease (CKD) is being recognized as a non-communicable disease (NCD) with high morbidity and mortality. In countries like Tanzania, people access many sources, including traditional medicines, to meet their healthcare needs for NCDs, but little is known about traditional medicine practices among people with CKD. Therefore, we sought to characterize these practices among community members with CKD in northern Tanzania. Between December 2013 and June 2014, we administered a previously-developed survey to a random sample of adult community-members from the Kilimanjaro Region; the survey was designed to measure traditional medicine practices such as types, frequencies, reasons, and modes. Participants were also tested for CKD, diabetes, hypertension, and HIV as part of the CKD-AFRiKA study. To identify traditional medicines used in the local treatment of kidney disease, we reviewed the qualitative sessions which had previously been conducted with key informants. We enrolled 481 adults of whom 57 (11.9 %) had CKD. The prevalence of traditional medicine use among adults with CKD was 70.3 % (95 % CI 50.0-84.9 %), and among those at risk for CKD (n = 147; 30.6 %), it was 49.0 % (95 % CI 33.1-65.0 %). Among adults with CKD, the prevalence of concurrent use of traditional medicine and biomedicine was 33.2 % (11.4-65.6 %). Symptomatic ailments (66.7 %; 95 % CI 17.3-54.3), malaria/febrile illnesses (64.0 %; 95 % CI 44.1-79.9), and chronic diseases (49.6 %; 95 % CI 28.6-70.6) were the most prevalent uses for traditional medicines. We identified five plant-based traditional medicines used for the treatment of kidney disease: Aloe vera, Commifora africana, Cymbopogon citrullus, Persea americana, and Zanthoxylum chalybeum. The prevalence of traditional medicine use is high among adults with and at risk for CKD in northern Tanzania where they use them for a variety of conditions including other NCDs. Additionally, many of these same people

  20. Dietary intake of patients with chronic kidney disease entering the LORD trial: adjusting for underreporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassett, Robert G; Robertson, Iain K; Geraghty, Dominic P; Ball, Madeleine J; Coombes, Jeff S

    2007-07-01

    The study objective was to determine the dietary intake of patients with chronic kidney disease before and after filtering for suspected underreporters and to investigate the impact of underreporting on the interpretation of diet data. This was a cross-sectional study. The study included outpatients from hospitals and clinics in Northern Tasmania, Australia. Data from 113 patients enrolled in the Lipid Lowering and Onset of Renal Disease trial were used in this study. Patients with serum creatinine greater than 120 mmol/L were included, and those taking lipid-lowering medication were excluded. Patients completed a 4-day self-report diet diary, and FoodWorks software was used to determine their daily intake of energy, macronutrients, and specific micronutrients. Diet diaries were assessed for likely underreporting using the Goldberg cutoff approach with a ratio of energy intake to estimated resting energy expenditure of 1.27. Nutrient intakes were compared with current National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines, World Health Organization recommendations, recommended daily allowances, and daily values adjusted for energy intake. Demographics of the patients were as follows: male/female, 71/42; age (mean +/- standard deviation), 60 +/- 15 years; body mass index, 28.6 +/- 6.0 kg/m(2), and serum creatinine, 223.4 +/- 110.0 mmol/L. According to the criteria, 80 patients (70.8%) were underreporting their energy intake. Underreporters were more likely to be female and younger, and have a higher body mass index and elevated serum creatinine. In all patients, daily energy intake (89.6 +/- 32.4 kJ/kg) was lower than recommended (125-145 kJ/kg); however, this was not the case for valid reporters (128.3 +/- 23.7 kJ/kg). Protein intake was higher (0.9 +/- 0.3 g/kg) than recommended (0.75 g/kg) in all patients and even higher (1.2 +/- 0.3 g/kg) in valid reporters. Mean calcium, zinc, and dietary fiber intakes were all below recommendations

  1. Progression of Tubulointerstitial Fibrosis and the Chronic Kidney Disease Phenotype – Role of Risk Factors and Epigenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy D. Hewitson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the kidney has capacity to repair after mild injury, ongoing or severe damage results in scarring (fibrosis and an associated progressive loss of kidney function. However, despite its universal significance, evidence highlights a population based heterogeneity in the trajectory of chronic kidney disease (CKD in these patients. To explain the heterogeneity of the CKD phenotype requires an understanding of the relevant risk factors for fibrosis. These factors include both the extrinsic nature of injury, and intrinsic factors such as age, gender, genetics, and perpetual activation of fibroblasts through priming. In many cases an additional level of regulation is provided by epigenetic mechanisms which integrate the various pro-fibrotic and anti-fibrotic triggers in fibrogenesis. In this review we therefore examine the various molecular and structural changes of fibrosis, and how they are influenced by extrinsic and intrinsic factors. Our aim is to provide a unifying hypothesis to help explain the transition from acute to CKD.

  2. Dehydration as a Cause of Chronic Kidney Disease: Role of Fructokinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    inducing obesity and metabolic syndrome NIDDK RO1 DK108859-01 (Lanaspa) 04/01/2016-3/30/2021 0.6 calendar $279,325Targeting...of Unknown Etiology , Heat Stress Nephropathy 17 Introduction Historically the development of a pre-renal state was thought to be fully...reversible without any permanent kidney damage. However, the identification of an epidemic of chronic kidney disease (CKD) of unknown etiology in Central

  3. Does significant renal ablation truly and invariably lead to hyperfiltration and progressive chronic kidney disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Andrew; Sam, Ramin

    2017-06-01

    It is generally believed that significant renal ablation leads to hyperfiltration and eventually progressively worsening chronic kidney disease. The data behind this belief have not been scrutinized intensively. More importantly, the above belief leads many physicians to manage patients differently than they otherwise would manage. Here, we examine the data behind whether hyperfiltration occurs when patients lose kidney mass (by excision or by disease) and whether the hyperfiltration is uniformly injurious.

  4. Short Stature in Chronic Kidney Disease Treated with Growth Hormone and an Aromatase Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Susan R. Mendley; Fotios Spyropoulos; Debra R. Counts

    2015-01-01

    We describe an alternative strategy for management of severe growth failure in a 14-year-old child who presented with advanced chronic kidney disease close to puberty. The patient was initially treated with growth hormone for a year until kidney transplantation, followed immediately by a year-long course of an aromatase inhibitor, anastrozole, to prevent epiphyseal fusion and prolong the period of linear growth. Outcome was excellent, with successful transplant and anticipated complete correc...

  5. Nutritional Status of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease in Iran: A Narrative Review

    OpenAIRE

    Shima Abdollahi; Elham Razmpoosh; Omid Toupchian; Amin Salehi-Abargouei

    2018-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a progressive condition that affects many aspects of patient’s life with adverse outcomes of kidney failure, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and premature death. Malnutrition is a relatively common problem in these patients that may be the result of inadequate intake, increased catabolism, or loss of nutrients in the dialysis. The aim of this study was to review the nutritional status and requirements of CKD patients in Iran using previous studi...

  6. Urinary endotrophin predicts disease progression in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Daniel Guldager Kring; Fenton, Anthony; Jesky, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is the central pathogenic process in progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Collagen type VI (COL VI) is upregulated in renal fibrosis. Endotrophin is released from COL VI and promotes pleiotropic pro-fibrotic effects. Kidney disease severity varies considerably and accurate...... information regarding CKD progression may improve clinical decisions. We tested the hypothesis that urinary endotrophin derived during COL VI deposition in fibrotic human kidneys is a marker for progression of CKD in the Renal Impairment in Secondary Care (RIISC) cohort, a prospective observational study...... of 499 CKD patients. Endotrophin localised to areas of increased COL VI deposition in fibrotic kidneys but was not present in histologically normal kidneys. The third and fourth quartiles of urinary endotrophin:creatinine ratio (ECR) were independently associated with one-year disease progression after...

  7. Screening for chronic kidney disease among the elderly in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirović S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of elderly with chronic kidney disease (CKD is constantly increasing worldwide, and irregular screening of CKD leads to disease discovering usually in advanced stages. The aim of the study was to examine the presence of CKD biomarkers in the elderly primary care patients, and to analyze whether the presence of diabetes and hypertension in elderly increases the risk for microalbuminuria and reduction of glomerular filtration rate (GFR. Cross-sectional study included 90 patients older than 65 years of age who are registered in the Family medicine teaching centre of Health centre Bijeljina. Patients were divided into three groups: first consisted of 30 patients who had neither hypertension nor diabetes nor other chronic disease, second of 30 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and third of 30 patients with arterial hypertension. Data on patients were obtained by interview, analysis of medical records and physical examinations. Serum and urine creatinine, proteinuria, microalbuminuria (MAU, turbidimetry, and urinary sediment were analyzed. Biomarkers of chronic kidney disease (GFR <60 mL / min / 1.73m2, proteinuria and mikroalbuminurija ¬MAU were found in 20 (22.2% patients. Among them, 14 had normal GFR and MAU (12 or MAU and proteinuria (2, whereas 6 had GFR <60 mL / min / 1.73m2 of which 3 had proteinuria and / or MAU. The group with diabetes had significantly more MAU compared to the other two groups, while the groups with diabetes and hypertension had slightly more proteinuria and erythrocyturia than control group. Hypertension and diabetes in the elderly may result in development of CKD biomarkers, so prevention and regular screening of CKD in the patients with these two diseases are necessary.

  8. Iron Status and Inflammation in Early Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Łukaszyk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: One of the most common causes of anemia of chronic disease (ACD is chronic kidney disease. The main pathomechanism responsible for ACD is subclinical inflammation. The key element involved in iron metabolism is hepcidin, however, studies on new indices of iron status are in progress.The aim of the study was to assess the iron status in patients in early stages of chronic kidney disease, iron correlation with inflammation parameters and novel biomarkers of iron metabolism. Methods: The study included 69 patients. Standard laboratory measurements were used to measure the iron status, complete blood count, fibrinogen, prothrombin index, C-reactive protein concentration (CRP, creatinine, urea, uric acid. Commercially available kits were used to measure high-sensitivity CRP, interleukin 6 (IL-6, hepcidin-25, hemojuvelin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR, growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15 and zonulin. Results: Absolute iron deficiency was present in 17% of the patients, functional iron deficiency was present in 12% of the patients. Functional iron deficiency was associated with significantly higher serum levels of fibrinogen, ferritin, transferrin saturation, total iron binding capacity, hepcidin and older age relative to patients with absolute iron deficiency. In comparison with patients without iron deficiency, patients with functional iron deficiency were older, with lower prothrombin index, higher fibrinogen, CRP, hsCRP, sTfR, GDF-15, urea and lower eGFR. Hepcidin was predicted by markers of inflammation:ferritin, fibrinogen and IL-6. Conclusion: Inflammation is correlated with iron status. Novel biomarkers of iron metabolism might be useful to distinguish iron deficiency anemia connected with inflammation and absolute iron deficiency.

  9. Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for PKD Race, Ethnicity, & Kidney Disease Renal Artery Stenosis Renal Tubular Acidosis Simple Kidney Cysts ... sodium. Related Conditions & Diseases Chronic Kidney Disease Kidney Disease in Children Simple Kidney Cysts Kidney Stones Urinary Tract Infections ...

  10. Improvement in estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navaravong, Leenhapong; Barakat, Michel; Burgon, Nathan; Mahnkopf, Christian; Koopmann, Matthias; Ranjan, Ravi; Kholmovski, Eugene; Marrouche, Nassir; Akoum, Nazem

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and atrial fibrillation (AF) often coexist. We studied the association of CKD with atrial fibrosis and the effect of AF ablation on kidney function. AF patients who had a pre- and postablation serum creatinine and who completed a late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; LGE-MRI) prior to ablation were included. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated and CKD was staged using the National Kidney Foundation guidelines. Patients with eGFR disease. Atrial fibrosis was not significant different between included CKD stages: 15.8 ± 8.8%, 16.6 ± 12.1%, 17.1 ± 10.4%, and 16.5 ± 8.4% for CKD stage 1, 2, 3A, and 3B, respectively (P = 0.476). At a median of 115 days following ablation, eGFR increased significantly in CKD stage 2 (74 ± 9 to 80 ± 23; P = 0.04), 3A (53 ± 5 to 69 ± 24; P chronic kidney disease. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Combination of ACE inhibitor with nicorandil provides further protection in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Takeshi; Tamura, Yoshifuru; Taniguchi, Kei; Higaki, Masato; Ueda, Shuko; Shima, Tomoko; Nagura, Michito; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Johnson, Richard J; Uchida, Shunya

    2014-12-15

    An inhibition in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is one of the most widely used therapies to treat chronic kidney disease. However, its effect is occasionally not sufficient and additional treatments may be required. Recently, we reported that nicorandil exhibited renoprotective effects in a mouse model of diabetic nephropathy. Here we examined if nicorandil can provide an additive protection on enalapril in chronic kidney disease. Single treatment with either enalapril or nicorandil significantly ameliorated glomerular and tubulointerstitial injury in the rat remnant kidney while the combination of these two compounds provided additive effects. In addition, an increase in oxidative stress in remnant kidney was also blocked by either enalapril or nicorandil while the combination of the drugs was more potent. A mechanism was likely due for nicorandil to preventing manganase superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and sirtuin (Sirt)3 from being reduced in injured kidneys. A study with cultured podocytes indicated that the antioxidative effect could be mediated through sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) in the mitochondrial KATP channel since blocking SUR with glibenclamide reduced MnSOD and Sirt3 expression in podocytes. In conclusion, nicorandil may synergize with enalapril to provide superior protection in chronic kidney disease. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Chronic Kidney Disease and Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Positive Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achhra, Amit C; Nugent, Melinda; Mocroft, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has emerged as an important health concern in HIV-positive individuals. Preventing long-term kidney toxicity from an antiretroviral therapy is therefore critical. Selected antiretroviral agents, especially tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and some ritonavir...... require an intervention. Tenofovir alafenamide (TAF), a TDF alternative, promises to be safer in terms of TDF-associated kidney and bone toxicity. While the short-term data on TAF does indicate lower eGFR decline and lower risk of proteinuria (vs. TDF), long-term data on renal safety of TAF are still...

  13. Complex radionuclide evaluation of structural and functional kidneys disorders of children with chronic obstructive pyelonephritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundyin, V.Yu.

    2015-01-01

    Children's chronic obstructive pyelonephritis (COPN) is the most important and difficult among microbes-inflammatory kidney's deceases. Kidney's COPN functional disorders are evaluated generally by clinical and laboratory criteria which not always have high informativity. Scintigraphic kidney's examinations with nephrotropic radiopharmaceuticals (NRP) are more informative. Conclusion. The most informative are 99m Tc-EC and 99m Tc-DTPA for initial examinations, 99m Tc-DTPA and 99m Tc-pyrophosphate for monitoring examinations

  14. Primary health care decision making in pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Crofts, Sandra Joan; Roden, Janet

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This qualitative descriptive study explored the primary health care decisions of a group of 12 Australians in Stages 3B to 5 with chronic kidney disease in the preservation of kidney health. Methods Questioning within the qualitative interviews focused on gaining an understanding of the participants' perceptions of their kidney health and the decisions made as a consequence of their interaction within the Australian primary health care system. Results Participants were dependent on their General Practitioner to recognise their symptoms, make the correct diagnosis and authorise the correct referral for specialist nephrology care. Three pathways in this process were identified: 'easy'; 'difficult' and 'protracted'. Clinician failure to correctly attribute symptoms to chronic kidney disease influenced the 'difficult' pathway, while failure to adequately communicate kidney health status influenced the 'protracted' pathway. Use of the language of 'recovery', 'stability' and 'protection' held meaning to the participants in gaining an understanding of their kidney health. Discussion Identifying pathways to diagnosis and referral can raise awareness of the challenges kidney health consumers face in their participation within the primary health care arena. Using consumer meaningful language improves the capacity of these consumers to engage in their own primary health care agenda.

  15. Incidence of acute kidney injury among patients with chronic kidney disease: a single-center retrospective database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Yutaka; Horino, Taro; Kataoka, Hiromi; Matsumoto, Tatsuki; Ode, Kazu; Shimamura, Yoshiko; Ogata, Koji; Inoue, Kosuke; Taniguchi, Yoshinori; Terada, Yoshio; Okuhara, Yoshiyasu

    2017-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious complication among hospitalized individuals and is closely associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). This retrospective cohort study evaluated the incidences of AKI according to CKD stage at Kochi Medical School hospital during 1981-2011. AKI was defined and staged according to the kidney disease improving global outcomes criteria, using serum creatinine levels. We analyzed data from 122,653 Japanese patients (57,105 men, 46.6 %). The incidence of AKI was 7.8 % (95 % confidence interval 7.7-8.0 %). Compared to non-AKI patients, patients with stage 1-2 AKI were more likely to be men. Patients with stage 1-2 AKI were significantly older than non-AKI or stage 3 AKI patients. The incidences of AKI were 6.7, 5.9, 10.4, 18.4, 30.0, and 48.8 % among individuals with estimated glomerular filtration rates of ≥90, 60-89, 45-59, 30-44, 15-29, and kidney function, and the proportions among outpatients exhibited step-wise increases with milder pre-existing reduced kidney function. CKD was a risk factor for AKI, and the incidence of AKI was positively associated with pre-existing reduced kidney function (CKD stage). We also found that the prevalence of AKI at early-stage CKD among outpatients was higher than expected. We suggest that outpatients should be monitored for AKI, given its unexpected incidence in that population.

  16. Uric acid lowering therapies for preventing or delaying the progression of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Anna L; Singer, Richard F; Walters, Giles D

    2017-10-30

    Non-randomised data have shown a link between hyperuricaemia and the progression or development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). If this is correct, urate lowering therapy might form an important part of chronic kidney disease care, reducing risks for cardiovascular outcomes and end-stage kidney disease. This review aims to study the benefits and harms of uric acid lowering therapy on the progression of CKD and other cardiovascular endpoints. We searched the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant Specialised Register to 20 July 2017 through contact with the Information Specialist using search terms relevant to this review. Studies contained in the Specialised Register are identified through search strategies specifically designed for CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE; handsearching conference proceedings; and searching the International Clinical Trials Register (ICTRP) Search Portal and ClinicalTrials.gov. All randomised controlled trials testing primary urate lowering therapy in patients with or without CKD. Two authors independently assessed study quality and extracted data. Statistical analyses were performed using a random effects model and results expressed as risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous outcomes or mean difference (MD) for continuous outcomes, or standardised mean difference (SMD) if different scales were used. Twelve studies (1187 participants) were included in the review. Risk of bias was unclear for the majority of domains in each study.Uric acid lowering therapy may make little or no difference in death at six months (2 studies, 498 participants: RR 1.66, 95% CI 0.61 to 4.48) or two years (2 studies, 220 participants): RR 0.13, 95% CI 0.02 to 1.06) (low certainty evidence). Uric acid lowering therapy may make little of no difference (low certainty evidence) in the incidence of ESKD at one or two years. Kidney function may be improved by uric acid lowering therapy at one year with a reduction in serum creatinine (2 studies, 83

  17. Morning Blood Pressure Surge as a Predictor of Development of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turak, Osman; Afsar, Baris; Siriopol, Dimitrie; Ozcan, Firat; Cagli, Kumral; Yayla, Cagri; Oksuz, Fatih; Mendi, Mehmet Ali; Kario, Kazuomi; Covic, Adrian; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-05-01

    Blood pressure (BP) usually increases upon awakening--a physiological mechanism called morning BP surge (MBPS). BP values above the MBPS threshold are associated with target organ damage, including left ventricular hypertrophy and proteinuria. Despite these data, there have been no studies that have investigated the association between elevated MBPS and the development of incident chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study, patients with essential hypertension were included and underwent ambulatory BP measurements and MBPS. Patients were followed for a median of 3.33 years. In total, 622 patients were enrolled. The mean age of patients was 57.6±12.4 years, 54.0% were men, 16.7% had diabetes, and 10.6% had prevalent cardiovascular disease. During follow-up, 32 patients developed CKD. Higher MBPS, analyzed both as continuous and categorical variables, was associated with incident CKD in all models. Elevated MBPS is associated with kidney function deterioration and the development of CKD. Studies are needed to further examine underlying mechanisms regarding MBPS and these renal outcomes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Excisional wound healing is delayed in a murine model of chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil K Seth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately 15% of the United States population suffers from chronic kidney disease (CKD, often demonstrating an associated impairment in wound healing. This study outlines the development of a surgical murine model of CKD in order to investigate the mechanisms underlying this impairment. METHODS: CKD was induced in mice by partial cauterization of one kidney cortex and contralateral nephrectomy, modifying a previously published technique. After a minimum of 6-weeks, splinted, dorsal excisional wounds were created to permit assessment of wound healing parameters. Wounds were harvested on postoperative days (POD 0, 3, 7, and 14 for histological, immunofluorescent, and quantitative PCR (qPCR. RESULTS: CKD mice exhibited deranged blood chemistry and hematology profiles, including profound uremia and anemia. Significant decreases in re-epithelialization and granulation tissue deposition rates were found in uremic mice wounds relative to controls. On immunofluorescent analysis, uremic mice demonstrated significant reductions in cellular proliferation (BrdU and angiogenesis (CD31, with a concurrent increase in inflammation (CD45 as compared to controls. CKD mice also displayed differential expression of wound healing-related genes (VEGF, IL-1β, eNOS, iNOS on qPCR. CONCLUSIONS: These findings represent the first reported investigation of cutaneous healing in a CKD animal model. Ongoing studies of this significantly delayed wound healing phenotype include the establishment of renal failure model in diabetic strains to study the combined effects of CKD and diabetes.

  19. Fetal programming of chronic kidney disease: the role of maternal smoking, mitochondrial dysfunction, and epigenetic modfification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangenberg, Stephanie; Chen, Hui; Wong, Muh Geot; Pollock, Carol A; Saad, Sonia

    2015-06-01

    The role of an adverse in utero environment in the programming of chronic kidney disease in the adult offspring is increasingly recognized. The cellular and molecular mechanisms linking the in utero environment and future disease susceptibility remain unknown. Maternal smoking is a common modifiable adverse in utero exposure, potentially associated with both mitochondrial dysfunction and epigenetic modification in the offspring. While studies are emerging that point toward a key role of mitochondrial dysfunction in acute and chronic kidney disease, it may have its origin in early development, becoming clinically apparent when secondary insults occur. Aberrant epigenetic programming may add an additional layer of complexity to orchestrate fibrogenesis in the kidney and susceptibility to chronic kidney disease in later life. In this review, we explore the evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction and epigenetic modification through aberrant DNA methylation as key mechanistic aspects of fetal programming of chronic kidney disease and discuss their potential use in diagnostics and targets for therapy. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Screening Fabry's disease in chronic kidney disease patients not on dialysis: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeniçerioğlu, Yavuz; Akdam, Hakan; Dursun, Belda; Alp, Alper; Sağlam Eyiler, Funda; Akın, Davut; Gün, Yelda; Hüddam, Bülent; Batmazoğlu, Mehmet; Gibyeli Genek, Dilek; Pirinççi, Serhat; Ersoy, İsmail Rıfkı; Üzüm, Atilla; Soypaçacı, Zeki; Tanrısev, Mehmet; Çolak, Hülya; Demiral Sezer, Sibel; Bozkurt, Gökay; Akyıldız, Utku Oğan; Akyüz Ünsal, Ayşe İpek; Ünübol, Mustafa; Uslu, Meltem; Eryılmaz, Ufuk; Günel, Ceren; Meteoğlu, İbrahim; Yavaşoğlu, İrfan; Ünsal, Alparslan; Akar, Harun; Okyay, Pınar

    2017-11-01

    Fabry's disease is an X-linked inherited, rare, progressive, lysosomal storage disorder, affecting multiple organs due to the deficient activity of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A) enzyme. The prevalence has been reported to be 0.15-1% in hemodialysis patients; however, the information on the prevalence in chronic kidney disease not on dialysis is lacking. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of Fabry's disease in chronic kidney disease. The patients older than 18 years, enclosing KDIGO 2012 chronic kidney disease definitions, not on dialysis, were enrolled. Dried blood spots on Guthrie papers were used to analyze α-Gal A enzyme and genetic analysis was performed in individuals with enzyme activity ≤1.2 μmol/L/h. A total of 1453 chronic kidney disease patients not on dialysis from seven clinics in Turkey were screened. The mean age of the study population was 59.3 ± 15.9 years. 45.6% of patients were female. The creatinine clearance of 77.3% of patients was below 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , 8.4% had proteinuria, and 2.5% had isolated microscopic hematuria. The mean value of patients' α-Gal A enzyme was detected as 2.93 ± 1.92 μmol/L/h. 152 patients had low levels of α-Gal A enzyme activity (≤1.2 μmol/L/h). In mutation analysis, A143T and D313Y variants were disclosed in three male patients. The prevalence of Fabry's disease in chronic kidney disease not on dialysis was found to be 0.2% (0.4% in male, 0.0% in female). Fabry's disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic kidney disease with unknown etiology even in the absence of symptoms and signs suggestive of Fabry's disease.