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Sample records for include chest pain

  1. Chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez A, Juan Carlos; Saenz M, Oscar; Martinez M, Camilo; Gonzales A Francisco; Nicolas R, Jose; Vergara V, Erika P; Pereira G, Alberto M

    2010-01-01

    In emergency departments, chest pain is one of the leading motives of consultation. We thus consider it important to review aspects such as its classification, causes, and clinical profiles. Initial assessment should include a full clinical history comprising thorough anamnesis and physical examination. Adequate interpretation of auxiliary tests, ordered in accordance with suspected clinical conditions, should lead to accurate diagnosis. We highlight certain symptoms and clinical signs, ECG and X-ray findings, cardiac bio markers, arterial blood gases, and CT-scanning. Scores of severity and prognosis such as TIMI are assessed. Optimal treatment of the clinical conditions leading to chest pain depends on adequate initial approach and assessment.

  2. Chest Pain: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Chest pain: First aid Chest pain: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Causes of chest pain can vary from minor problems, such as indigestion ... 26, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-chest-pain/basics/ART-20056705 . Mayo ...

  3. Chest pain in focal musculoskeletal disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2010-01-01

    overlapping conditions and syndromes of focal disorders, including Tietze syndrome, costochondritis, chest wall syndrome, muscle tenderness, slipping rib, cervical angina, and segmental dysfunction of the cervical and thoracic spine, have been reported to cause pain. For most of these syndromes, evidence......The musculoskeletal system is a recognized source of chest pain. However, despite the apparently benign origin, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain remain under-diagnosed, untreated, and potentially continuously disabled in terms of anxiety, depression, and activities of daily living. Several...... arises mainly from case stories and empiric knowledge. For segmental dysfunction, clinical features of musculoskeletal chest pain have been characterized in a few clinical trials. This article summarizes the most commonly encountered syndromes of focal musculoskeletal disorders in clinical practice....

  4. Non-invasive coronary angiography for patients with acute atypical chest pain discharged after negative screening including maximal negative treadmill stress test. A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonello, L; Armero, S; Jacquier, A; Com, O; Sarran, A; Sbragia, P; Panuel, M; Arques, S; Paganelli, F

    2009-05-01

    Among patients admitted in the emergency department for acute atypical chest pain those with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who are mistakenly discharged home have high mortality. A recent retrospective study has demonstrated that multislice computed tomography (MSCT) coronary angiography could improve triage of these patients. We aimed to prospectively confirm these data on patients with a negative screening including maximal treadmill stress. 30 patients discharged from the emergency department after negative screening for an ACS were included. All patients underwent MSCT angiography of the coronary artery. Patients with coronary atheroma on MSCT had an invasive coronary angiography to confirm these findings. Seven patients (23%) had obstructive coronary artery disease on MSCT. Invasive coronary angiography (ICA) confirmed the diagnosis in all patients. In patients with no previously known coronary artery disease admitted to the emergency department with atypical acute chest pain and discharged after negative screening, including maximal treadmill stress test, MSCT coronary angiography is useful for the diagnosis of obstructive coronary artery disease.

  5. Nonspecific motility disorders, irritable esophagus, and chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krarup, Anne Lund; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Hejazi, Reza A; McCallum, Richard W; Vega, Kenneth J; Frazzoni, Marzio; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Clarke, John O; Achem, Sami R

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents commentaries on whether Starling's law applies to the esophagus; whether erythromycin affects esophageal motility; the relationship between hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter and vigorous achalasia; whether ethnic- and gender-based norms affect diagnosis and treatment of esophageal motor disorders; health care and epidemiology of chest pain; whether normal pH excludes esophageal pain; the role of high-resolution manometry in noncardiac chest pain; whether pH-impedance should be included in the evaluation of noncardiac chest pain; whether there are there alternative therapeutic options to PPI for treating noncardiac chest pain; and the usefulness of psychological treatment and alternative medicine in noncardiac chest pain. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. Radiological diagnosis and therapy of chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutzner, J.; Ernst, H.

    1980-01-01

    The causes and localization of chest pain are numerous. They can derive from infections, traumas, or tumors. Possible sites of origin are: skeletal portions, vertebral column, ribs, and sternum, as well as mediastinum and pleura. In women, occurrence tends to be cyclic and affect the mamma region. Radiological diagnosis includes radiography, nuclear techniques as well as whole body computer-tomography. Radiation therapy is indicated in cases of mediastinal tumor formation. Radiation of painful osteolytic vertebral metastases and rib destructions proves to be an efficient palliative measure. (orig.) [de

  7. Diagnostic Evaluation of Nontraumatic Chest Pain in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Byron; Bryan, Sean; Farrar, Ted; Salud, Chris; Visser, Gary; Decuba, Raymond; Renelus, Deborah; Buckley, Tyler; Dressing, Michael; Peterkin, Nicholas; Coris, Eric

    This article is a clinically relevant review of the existing medical literature relating to the assessment and diagnostic evaluation for athletes complaining of nontraumatic chest pain. The literature was searched using the following databases for the years 1975 forward: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews; CINAHL; PubMed (MEDLINE); and SportDiscus. The general search used the keywords chest pain and athletes. The search was revised to include subject headings and subheadings, including chest pain and prevalence and athletes. Cross-referencing published articles from the databases searched discovered additional articles. No dissertations, theses, or meeting proceedings were reviewed. The authors discuss the scope of this complex problem and the diagnostic dilemma chest pain in athletes can provide. Next, the authors delve into the vast differential and attempt to simplify this process for the sports medicine physician by dividing potential etiologies into cardiac and noncardiac conditions. Life-threatening causes of chest pain in athletes may be cardiac or noncardiac in origin, which highlights the need for the sports medicine physician to consider pathology in multiple organ systems simultaneously. This article emphasizes the importance of ruling out immediately life threatening diagnoses, while acknowledging the most common causes of noncardiac chest pain in young athletes are benign. The authors propose a practical algorithm the sports medicine physician can use as a guide for the assessment and diagnostic work-up of the athlete with chest pain designed to help the physician arrive at the correct diagnosis in a clinically efficient and cost-effective manner.

  8. Approach to chest pain and acute myocardial infarction | Pandie ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Approach to chest pain and acute myocardial infarction. ... Patient history, physical examination, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac biomarkers ... Essential adjunctive therapies include antiplatelet therapy (aspirin, P2Y12 inhibitors), ...

  9. Noncardiac chest pain: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Takahisa; Fass, Ronnie

    2017-07-01

    Noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) has been defined as recurrent chest pain that is indistinguishable from ischemic heart pain after excluding a cardiac cause. NCCP is a common and highly challenging clinical problem in Gastrointestinal practice that requires targeted diagnostic assessment to identify the underlying cause of the symptoms. Treatment is tailored according to the cause of NCCP: gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), esophageal dysmotility or functional chest pain. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current diagnosis and treatment of NCCP. Utilization of new diagnostic techniques such as pH-impedance and high-resolution esophageal manometry, and the introduction of a new definition for functional chest pain have helped to better diagnose the underlying mechanisms of NCCP. A better therapeutic approach toward GERD-related NCCP, the introduction of new interventions for symptoms due to esophageal spastic motor disorders and the expansion of the neuromodulator armamentarium for functional chest pain have changed the treatment landscape of NCCP. GERD is the most common esophageal cause of NCCP, followed by functional chest pain and esophageal dysmotility. The proton pump inhibitor test, upper endoscopy, wireless pH capsule and pH-impedance are used to identify GERD-induced NCCP. High-resolution esophageal manometry is the main tool to identify esophageal motor disorder in non-GERD-related NCCP. Negative diagnostic assessment suggests functional chest pain. Potent antireflux treatment is offered to patients with GERD-related NCCP; medical, endoscopic or surgical interventions are considered in esophageal dysmotility; and neuromodulators are prescribed for functional chest pain. Assessment and treatment of psychological comorbidity should be considered in all NCCP patients.

  10. Examination of musculoskeletal chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunse, Mads Hostrup; Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Vach, Werner

    2010-01-01

    using a standardized examination protocol, (2) to determine inter-observer reliability of single components of the protocol, and (3) to determine the effect of observer experience. Eighty patients were recruited from an emergency cardiology department. Patients were eligible if an obvious cardiac or non......-cardiac diagnosis could not be established at the cardiology department. Four observers (two chiropractors and two chiropractic students) performed general health and manual examination of the spine and chest wall. Percentage agreement, Cohen's Kappa and ICC were calculated for observer pairs (chiropractors.......01 to 0.59. Provided adequate training of observers, the examination protocol can be used in carefully selected patients in clinical settings and should be included in pre- and post-graduate clinical training....

  11. Radiological diagnostic in acute chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawel, Nadine; Bremerich, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Acute chest pain is one of the main symptoms leading to a consultation of the emergency department. Main task of the initial diagnostic is the confirmation or exclusion of a potentially life threatening cause. Conventional chest X-ray and computed tomography are the most significant techniques. Due to limited availability and long examination times magnetic resonance tomography rather plays a limited role in routine clinical workup. In the following paper we will systematically review the radiological diagnostic of the acute life threatening causes of chest pain. Imaging modalities, technical aspects and image interpretation will be discussed. (orig.)

  12. Chest pain in daily practice: occurrence, causes and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, François; Herzig, Lilli; Burnand, Bernard; Bischoff, Thomas; Pécoud, Alain; Junod, Michel; Mühlemann, Nicole; Favrat, Bernard

    2008-06-14

    We assessed the occurrence and aetiology of chest pain in primary care practice. These features differ between primary and emergency care settings, where most previous studies have been performed. 59 GPs in western Switzerland recorded all consecutive cases presenting with chest pain. Clinical characteristics, laboratory tests and other investigations as well as the diagnoses remaining after 12 months of follow-up were systematically registered. Among 24,620 patients examined during a total duration of 300 weeks of observation, 672 (2.7%) presented with chest pain (52% female, mean age 55 +/- 19(SD)). Most cases, 442 (1.8%), presented new symptoms and in 356 (1.4%) it was the reason for consulting. Over 40 ailments were diagnosed: musculoskeletal chest pain (including chest wall syndrome) (49%), cardiovascular (16%), psychogenic (11%), respiratory (10%), digestive (8%), miscellaneous (2%) and without diagnosis (3%). The three most prevalent diseases were: chest wall syndrome (43%), coronary artery disease (12%) and anxiety (7%). Unstable angina (6), myocardial infarction (4) and pulmonary embolism (2) were uncommon (1.8%). Potentially serious conditions including cardiac, respiratory and neoplasic diseases accounted for 20% of cases. A large number of laboratory tests (42%), referral to a specialist (16%) or hospitalisation (5%) were performed. Twentyfive patients died during follow-up, of which twelve were for a reason directly associated with thoracic pain [cancer (7) and cardiac causes (5)]. Thoracic pain was present in 2.7% of primary care consultations. Chest wall syndrome pain was the main aetiology. Cardio - vascular emergencies were uncommon. However chest pain deserves full consideration because of the occurrence of potentially serious conditions.

  13. Psychiatric Characteristics of the Cardiac Outpatients with Chest Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jea-Geun; Choi, Joon Hyouk; Kim, Song-Yi; Kim, Ki-Seok; Joo, Seung-Jae

    2016-03-01

    A cardiologist's evaluation of psychiatric symptoms in patients with chest pain is rare. This study aimed to determine the psychiatric characteristics of patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD) and explore their relationship with the intensity of chest pain. Out of 139 consecutive patients referred to the cardiology outpatient department, 31 with atypical chest pain (heartburn, acid regurgitation, dyspnea, and palpitation) were excluded and 108 were enrolled for the present study. The enrolled patients underwent complete numerical rating scale of chest pain and the symptom checklist for minor psychiatric disorders at the time of first outpatient visit. The non-CAD group consisted of patients with a normal stress test, coronary computed tomography angiogram, or coronary angiogram, and the CAD group included those with an abnormal coronary angiogram. Nineteen patients (17.6%) were diagnosed with CAD. No differences in the psychiatric characteristics were observed between the groups. "Feeling tense", "self-reproach", and "trouble falling asleep" were more frequently observed in the non-CAD (p=0.007; p=0.046; p=0.044) group. In a multiple linear regression analysis with a stepwise selection, somatization without chest pain in the non-CAD group and hypochondriasis in the CAD group were linearly associated with the intensity of chest pain (β=0.108, R(2)=0.092, p=0.004; β= -0.525, R(2)=0.290, p=0.010). No differences in psychiatric characteristics were observed between the groups. The intensity of chest pain was linearly associated with somatization without chest pain in the non-CAD group and inversely linearly associated with hypochondriasis in the CAD group.

  14. Misdiagnosed Chest Pain: Spontaneous Esophageal Rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inci, Sinan; Gundogdu, Fuat; Gungor, Hasan; Arslan, Sakir; Turkyilmaz, Atila; Eroglu, Atila

    2013-01-01

    Chest pain is one of themost common complaints expressed by patients presenting to the emergency department, and any initial evaluation should always consider life-threatening causes. Esophageal rupture is a serious condition with a highmortality rate. If diagnosed, successful therapy depends on the size of the rupture and the time elapsed between rupture and diagnosis.We report on a 41-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department complaining of left-sided chest pain for two hours. PMID:27122690

  15. The Funen Neck and Chest Pain study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejer, René; Hartvigsen, Jan; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the Funen Neck and Chest Pain (FNCP) study and carry out a comprehensive non-response analysis of the quality of the survey. METHODS: The FNCP questionnaire was sent out to 7000 randomly selected individuals aged 20-71 years living in Funen County, Denmark. A full description...

  16. Chest pain: Coronary CT in the ER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Maffei (Erica); S. Seitun (Sara); A.I. Guaricci (Andrea); F. Cademartiri (Filippo)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractCardiac CT has developed into a robust clinical tool during the past 15 years. Of the fields in which the potential of cardiac CT has raised more interest is chest pain in acute settings. In fact, the possibility to exclude with high reliability obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD)

  17. Assessment of chest pain in the emergency room: What is the role of multidetector CT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Charles; Read, Katrina; Kuo, Dick

    2006-01-01

    Chest pain is one of the most frequent complaints for patients seen in the emergency department. The current article describes the clinical stratification of patients who present to the emergency department with chest pain and discusses imaging options and analysis for these patients. It reviews conventional imaging approaches to assessing chest pain including chest radiography and stress testing. The main discussion focuses on the potential utility use of cross-sectional imaging, particularly multidetector CT, in the evaluation of chest pain in the emergency department

  18. The approach to patients with possible cardiac chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsonage, William A; Cullen, Louise; Younger, John F

    2013-07-08

    Chest pain is a common reason for presentation in hospital emergency departments and general practice. Some patients presenting with chest pain to emergency departments and, to a lesser extent, general practice will be found to have a life-threatening cause, but most will not. The challenge is to identify those who do in a safe, timely and cost-effective manner. An acute coronary syndrome cannot be excluded on clinical grounds alone. In patients with ongoing symptoms of chest pain, without an obvious other cause, ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction should be excluded with a 12-lead electrocardiogram at the first available opportunity. Significant recent advances in the clinical approach to patients with acute chest pain, including better understanding of risk stratification, increasingly sensitive cardiac biomarkers and new non-invasive tests for coronary disease, can help clinicians minimise the risk of unexpected short-term adverse cardiac events. An approach that integrates these advances is needed to deliver the best outcomes for patients with chest pain. All hospital emergency departments should adopt such a strategic approach, and general practitioners should be aware of when and how to access these facilities.

  19. Non-Cardiac Chest Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as achalasia. This is particularly important since achalasia is a treatable disorder. A number of studies continue to be done to better understand the mechanism(s) of pain in NCCP. Furthermore, new treatment agents are being investigated. A recent study suggested ...

  20. Ultrasound assisted evaluation of chest pain in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colony, M Deborah; Edwards, Frank; Kellogg, Dylan

    2018-04-01

    Chest pain is a commonly encountered emergency department complaint, with a broad differential including several life-threatening possible conditions. Ultrasound-assisted evaluation can potentially be used to rapidly and accurately arrive at the correct diagnosis. We propose an organized, ultrasound assisted evaluation of the patient with chest pain using a combination of ultrasound, echocardiography and clinical parameters. Basic echo techniques which can be mastered by residents in a short time are used plus standardized clinical questions and examination. Information is kept on a checklist. We hypothesize that this will result in a quicker, more accurate evaluation of chest pain in the ED leading to timely treatment and disposition of the patient, less provider anxiety, a reduction in the number of diagnostic errors, and the removal of false assumptions from the diagnostic process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Chest pain related to crack cocaine smoking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eurman, D.W.; Potash, H.I.; Eyler, W.R.; Beute, G.H.; Paganussi, P.

    1988-01-01

    The chest radiographs of 80 patients coming to emergency room because of chest pain and/or shortness of breath following the smoking of highly potent crack cocaine were retrospectively reviewed. Four showed intrathoracic free air (pneumomediastinum in two, hemopneumothorax in one, and pneumothorax in one). Four other patients showed subsegmental atelectasis or parenchymal infiltrate. Radiographic detection of these abnormalities was of importance in the clinical management of the patients. This spectrum of findings is presented with a discussion of the pathophysiologic mechanisms and other potential complications of this form of drug abuse

  2. Acute chest pain in a patient with a non-strangulated hiatal hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander John Scumpia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute chest pain resulting in spontaneous idiopathic hemomediastinum is a rare, potentially life-threatening occurrence. Acute chest pain is a common chief complaint of patients, accounting for 2.4%–6.0% of adult emergency room visits. The clinician's differential diagnoses for acute chest pain rarely include complications of hiatal hernias. An 83-year-old male presented with acute chest pain and was emergently diagnosed with hemomediastinum secondary to spontaneous gastric mesenteric vessel rupture due to a non-strangulated hiatal hernia after physical exertion.

  3. Development of quality metrics for ambulatory pediatric cardiology: Chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jimmy C; Bansal, Manish; Behera, Sarina K; Boris, Jeffrey R; Cardis, Brian; Hokanson, John S; Kakavand, Bahram; Jedeikin, Roy

    2017-12-01

    As part of the American College of Cardiology Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology Section effort to develop quality metrics (QMs) for ambulatory pediatric practice, the chest pain subcommittee aimed to develop QMs for evaluation of chest pain. A group of 8 pediatric cardiologists formulated candidate QMs in the areas of history, physical examination, and testing. Consensus candidate QMs were submitted to an expert panel for scoring by the RAND-UCLA modified Delphi process. Recommended QMs were then available for open comments from all members. These QMs are intended for use in patients 5-18 years old, referred for initial evaluation of chest pain in an ambulatory pediatric cardiology clinic, with no known history of pediatric or congenital heart disease. A total of 10 candidate QMs were submitted; 2 were rejected by the expert panel, and 5 were removed after the open comment period. The 3 approved QMs included: (1) documentation of family history of cardiomyopathy, early coronary artery disease or sudden death, (2) performance of electrocardiogram in all patients, and (3) performance of an echocardiogram to evaluate coronary arteries in patients with exertional chest pain. Despite practice variation and limited prospective data, 3 QMs were approved, with measurable data points which may be extracted from the medical record. However, further prospective studies are necessary to define practice guidelines and to develop appropriate use criteria in this population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. How do patients with chest pain access Emergency Department care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Severen, Evie; Willemsen, Robert; Vandervoort, Pieter; Sabbe, Marc; Dinant, Geert-Jan; Buntinx, Frank

    2017-12-01

    It is important that patients with symptoms of acute coronary syndrome receive appropriate medical care as soon as possible. Little is known about the preadmission actions that patients with chest pain take before arrival at the Emergency Department (ED). This study aimed to describe the actions of patients with chest pain or pressure after onset of symptoms. What is the first action following onset of symptoms? Who is the first lay or professional person to be contacted? Which steps are taken first? How is the patient transported to the hospital? Consecutive patients, arriving at the ED of two large hospitals in Belgium, were asked additional questions during the initial assessment. Overall, 35% of 412 consecutive patients with chest pain admitted to the ED were diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome. A total of 57% contacted a GP between symptom onset and arrival at the ED. Only 32% of the patients were transported to the ED by ambulance, 16% drove themselves and 52% arrived by other means of transport (by family, neighbour, GP, public transport). In Belgium, the GP is still the first professional to be contacted for most patients. Other patients initially rely on their partner, family or friends when symptoms emerge. Too often, patients with chest pain rely on other transport to get to the ED instead of calling the Emergency Medical Services. This study included only patients who ultimately attended the ED.

  5. An Unusual Cause of Precordial Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevket Ozkaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extraskeletal chondrosarcoma in anterior mediastinum is very rare. A 45-year-old male patient was admitted to the hospital with precordial chest pain. A large and well-shaped mass in the anterior mediastinum was seen radiologically, and there was a clearly compression of the heart by the mass. The lesion was totally resected, and extraskeletal mediastinal chondrosarcoma was histopathologically diagnosed. We aimed to present and discuss the radiologic, clinic, and histopathologic features of unusual presentation of extraskeletal chondrosarcoma in a case.

  6. Esophageal dynamics scintigraphy in noncoronarian chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Lemme, E.M. de.; Souto, F.J.D.; Penas, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    A group of 27 patients with noncoronarian chest pain (NCCP) was submitted to radionuclide transit as part of esophageal disorders investigation. Features were compared with radiological examinations: barium swallow (BS) and bread-barium swallow (BBS). Abnormal radionuclide transit was found in 63% of patients and incoordinating pattern was the most frequent finding. Motor disorders were detected in 18.5% and 33% of patients by BS and BBS respectively. We conclude that radionuclide transit is a sensitive method for investigation of esophageal motor disorders and we recommend it as a screening test in NCCP, since it is a simple and very well tolerated technique. (author)

  7. Psychiatric Characteristics of the Cardiac Outpatients with Chest Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jea-Geun; Choi, Joon Hyouk; Kim, Song-Yi; Kim, Ki-Seok; Joo, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives A cardiologist's evaluation of psychiatric symptoms in patients with chest pain is rare. This study aimed to determine the psychiatric characteristics of patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD) and explore their relationship with the intensity of chest pain. Subjects and Methods Out of 139 consecutive patients referred to the cardiology outpatient department, 31 with atypical chest pain (heartburn, acid regurgitation, dyspnea, and palpitation) were ex...

  8. Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis: a rare cause of chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chest pain is a common presenting symptom with a broad differential. Life-threatening cardiac and pulmonary etiologies of chest pain should be evaluated first. However, it is critical to perform a thorough assessment for other sources of chest pain in order to limit morbidity and mortality from less common causes. We present a rare case of a previously healthy 45 year old man who presented with focal, substernal, reproducible chest pain and Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia who was later found to have primary Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis.

  9. Heartburn or Chest Pain: When Is It Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of cardiovascular imaging in emergency department patients with chest pain: A joint document of the American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria Committee and the American College of ...

  10. Predictors of Adverse Outcomes of Patients with Chest Pain and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chest pain is a common symptom for referring patients to emergency departments (ED). Among those referred, some are admitted to hospitals with a definite or tentative diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome and some are discharged with primary diagnosis of non-cardiac chest pain. This study aimed at ...

  11. Approach to chest pain and acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandie, S; Hellenberg, D; Hellig, F; Ntsekhe, M

    2016-03-01

    Patient history, physical examination, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac biomarkers are key components of an effective chest pain assessment. The first priority is excluding serious chest pain syndromes, namely acute coronary syndromes (ACSs), aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, cardiac tamponade and tension pneumothorax. On history, the mnemonic SOCRATES (Site Onset Character Radiation Association Time Exacerbating/relieving factor and Severity) helps differentiate cardiac from non-cardiac pain. On examination, evaluation of vital signs, evidence of murmurs, rubs, heart failure, tension pneumothoraces and chest infections are important. A 12-lead ECG should be interpreted within 10 minutes of first medical contact, specifically to identify ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). High-sensitivity troponins improve the rapid rule-out of myocardial infarction (MI) and confirmation of non-ST elevation MI (NSTEMI). ACS (STEMI and NSTEMI/unstable anginapectoris (UAP)) result from acute destabilisation of coronary atheroma with resultant complete (STEMI) or subtotal (NSTEMI/UAP) thrombotic coronary occlusion. The management of STEMI patients includes providing urgent reperfusion: primary percutaneous coronary intervention(PPCI) if available, deliverable within 60 - 120 minutes, and fibrinolysis if PPCI is not available. Essential adjunctive therapies include antiplatelet therapy (aspirin, P2Y12 inhibitors), anticoagulation (heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin) and cardiac monitoring.

  12. Non-traumatic thoracic emergencies: acute chest pain: diagnostic strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonomo, Lorenzo; Di Fabio, Francesca; Rita Larici, Anna; Merlino, Biagio; Luigia Storto, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Acute chest pain may represent the initial and/or accompanying symptom in a variety of disease processes that may occur in the cardiovascular system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, or musculoskeletal system. Although clinical history, risk factors, and physical examination are important factors in establishing the etiology of symptoms in patients presenting with acute chest pain, imaging modalities are frequently utilized. Noncardiac causes of acute chest pain are reviewed in this paper with special reference to the most recently published literature and emphasis on acute aortic diseases. Imaging modalities with indication of appropriateness, optimal technique and practical keys for interpretation are discussed. (orig.)

  13. The role of CT in assessing chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capsa, R.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Objective: Thoracic pain represents the common feature of a wide range of diseases of different causes. Usually, chest pain requires a fast workup, in order to eliminate potentially hazardous underlying conditions. The objective of the paper consists of presenting the role of computerized tomography (CT) in assessing the different causes and conditions related to chest pain. Materials and methods: The educational presentation relies on current literature data and mostly on images obtained from patients admitted in the various clinics and departments of our hospital, suffering from chest pain as admittance condition or as a symptom appeared during the hospital stay. Results: There are various radiological and imaging options for assessing a patient with chest pain, with reference to the underlying condition, type of pain onset (acute or chronic), specific indications and contraindications. From all these, CT is considered one of the most useful imaging options, in terms of diagnosis accuracy, fast workup, cost and availability. This paper focuses on the role of CT, presenting the most important diseases and conditions related to potential occurrence of chest pain and the most specific CT signs and findings usually reported in this setting. Furthermore, the presentation separates acute and chronic conditions, presenting the actual imaging protocols employed in this circumstances. Finally, there are considerations regarding CT rule-out protocols used in patients with acute chest pain in emergency conditions. Conclusions: Fast and accurate diagnosis is crucial for patient outcome, often life-saving, but currently there is no single algorithm in the imaging assessment of chest pain, while choosing the best imaging option relies mainly on history, clinical and laboratory data. CT is one of the most important imaging options available in patients with both acute and chronic chest pain. CT rule-out techniques have still to establish their clear role in a

  14. Pleuritic Chest Pain: Sorting Through the Differential Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reamy, Brian V; Williams, Pamela M; Odom, Michael Ryan

    2017-09-01

    Pleuritic chest pain is characterized by sudden and intense sharp, stabbing, or burning pain in the chest when inhaling and exhaling. Pulmonary embolism is the most common serious cause, found in 5% to 21% of patients who present to an emergency department with pleuritic chest pain. A validated clinical decision rule for pulmonary embolism should be employed to guide the use of additional tests such as d-dimer assays, ventilation-perfusion scans, or computed tomography angiography. Myocardial infarction, pericarditis, aortic dissection, pneumonia, and pneumothorax are other serious causes that should be ruled out using history and physical examination, electrocardiography, troponin assays, and chest radiography before another diagnosis is made. Validated clinical decision rules are available to help exclude coronary artery disease. Viruses are common causative agents of pleuritic chest pain. Coxsackieviruses, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza, parainfluenza, mumps, adenovirus, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus are likely pathogens. Treatment is guided by the underlying diagnosis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are appropriate for pain management in those with virally triggered or nonspecific pleuritic chest pain. In patients with persistent symptoms, persons who smoke, and those older than 50 years with pneumonia, it is important to document radiographic resolution with repeat chest radiography six weeks after initial treatment.

  15. Cardiac CT for the assessment of chest pain: Imaging techniques and clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Hans-Christoph; Johnson, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    Immediate and efficient risk stratification and management of patients with acute chest pain in the emergency department is challenging. Traditional management of these patients includes serial ECG, laboratory tests and further on radionuclide perfusion imaging or ECG treadmill testing. Due to the advances of multi-detector CT technology, dedicated coronary CT angiography provides the potential to rapidly and reliably diagnose or exclude acute coronary artery disease. Life-threatening causes of chest pain, such as aortic dissection and pulmonary embolism can simultaneously be assessed with a single scan, sometimes referred to as “triple rule out” scan. With appropriate patient selection, cardiac CT can accurately diagnose heart disease or other sources of chest pain, markedly decrease health care costs, and reliably predict clinical outcomes. This article reviews imaging techniques and clinical results for CT been used to evaluate patients with chest pain entering the emergency department.

  16. Evaluation and Management of Patients with Noncardiac Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Shekhar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Up to a third of patients undergoing coronary angiography for angina-like chest pain are found to have normal coronary arteries and a substantial proportion of these individuals continue to consult and even attend emergency departments. Initially, these patients are usually seen by cardiologists but with accumulating evidence that the pain might have a gastrointestinal origin, it may be more appropriate for them to be cared for by the gastroenterologist once a cardiological cause has been excluded. This review covers the assessment and management of this challenging condition, which includes a combination of education, reassurance, and pharmacotherapy. For the more refractory cases, behavioral treatments, such as cognitive behavioral therapy or hypnotherapy, may have to be considered.

  17. Functional chest pain responds to biofeedback treatment but functional heartburn does not: what is the difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Michael; Shanani, Ram; Taback, Hanna; Abramowich, Dov; Scapa, Eitan; Broide, Efrat

    2012-06-01

    Patients with functional esophageal disorders represent a challenging treatment group. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of biofeedback in the treatment of patients with functional esophageal disorders. In this prospective study, patients with typical/atypical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease underwent upper endoscopy and 24-h pH monitoring. All patients filled out gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptom, Hospital Anxiety and Depression, and Symptom Stress Rating questionnaires. Patients with functional heartburn and those with functional chest pain were offered biofeedback treatment. A global assessment questionnaire was filled out at the end of treatment and then 2.8 (range 1-4) years later. From January 2006 to December 2009, 22 patients with functional esophageal diseases were included in the study. Thirteen had functional heartburn and nine had functional chest pain. Six patients from each group received biofeedback treatment. After treatment for 1-4 years, patients with functional chest pain showed significant improvements in symptoms compared with those who were not treated. Patients with functional heartburn showed no improvement. Patients with functional chest pain had a longer time of esophageal acid exposure than those with functional heartburn. Patients with functional chest pain have different central and intraesophageal factors associated with symptom generation in comparison with patients with functional heartburn. Biofeedback is a useful tool in the treatment of patients with functional chest pain, but not for those with functional heartburn.

  18. Dual-source CT in chest pain diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Thorsten R.C.; Nikolaou, K.; Fink, C.; Rist, C.; Reiser, M.F.; Becker, C.R.; Becker, A.; Knez, A.

    2007-01-01

    With the depiction of pulmonary arteries, coronary arteries, and the aorta, CT angiography of the chest offers a comprehensive diagnostic work-up of unclear chest pain. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of dual-source CT in this patient group. A total of 47 patients suffering from unclear chest pain were examined with a Siemens Somatom Definition. Volume and flow of contrast media (Ultravist, Schering) were adapted to the body weight. The examinations were evaluated with regard to image quality and contrast opacification and to the diagnostic accuracy with reference to the final clinical diagnosis. Adequate contrast opacification was achieved in all examinations. The depiction of the coronary arteries was diagnostic in all cases. The cause of chest pain could be identified in 41 cases. Among the diagnoses were coronary and myocardial pathologies, valvular disease, aortic aneurysms and dissections, pulmonary embolism, and pneumonic consolidation. DSCT angiography of the chest offers a very good image quality even at high heart rates so that a high diagnostic accuracy is achieved in patients with acute chest pain. (orig.) [de

  19. Effects of prehospital nitroglycerin on hemodynamics and chest pain intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelberg, S; Singer, A J; Moldashel, J; Sciammarella, J; Thode, H C; Henry, M

    2000-01-01

    To assess the effects of prehospital nitroglycerin (NTG) on vital signs and chest pain intensity. A retrospective review of advanced life support (ALS) run sheets was performed in a suburban volunteer emergency medical services (EMS) system receiving 8,000 annual ALS calls. All consecutive patients who were administered NTG by EMS were included. Standardized forms were used to collect data on patient demographics, history, and physical exam. Patients assessed their chest pain (CP) before and after NTG on a verbal numeric scale of 0-10 from least to most severe. The presence of syncope, dysrhythmias, or profound hypotension [loss of peripheral pulses, a systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 100 mm Hg in BP] was noted. Results. One thousand six hundred sixty-two patients received NTG over 18 months, their mean age was 66 years, and 48% were female. Indications for NTG included CP (83%), dyspnea (45%), and congestive heart failure (20%). After NTG administration, the CP score decreased from 6.9 to 4.4 (mean difference = 2.6; 95% CI = 2.4 to 2.8). The CP completely resolved in 10% of the patients. Mean decreases in SBPs and diastolic BPs were 11.8 mm Hg (95% CI = 10.7 to 13.0) and 4.0 mm Hg (95% CI = 2.9 to 5.1). The mean pulse rate increased by 2.7 beats/min (95% CI = 0.6 to 4.9). There were 12 patients with adverse events [0.7% (95% CI = 0.4% to 1.3%)], including profound bradycardia and hypotension (1), transient drop in SBP of 100 mm Hg responding to fluids (6), post-NTG SBP <90 mm Hg (4), and syncope (1). There were no deaths in the prehospital setting. Use of prehospital NTG appears safe. While NTG reduces CP, most patients have residual pain.

  20. Torsed pulmonary sequestration presenting as a painful chest mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Ricki; Carver, Terrence W.; Rivard, Douglas C.

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary sequestration is a congenital abnormality that can be divided into intralobar or extralobar types. Both types are characterized by pulmonary tissue that does not communicate with the bronchial tree or pulmonary arteries and typically has its arterial supply arising from the descending aorta. We report a case of an 11-year-old girl with extralobar sequestration who presented with torsion causing abdominal pain and pleuritic chest pain. (orig.)

  1. Costovertebral joint dysfunction: another misdiagnosed cause of atypical chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, J. F.; Jolliet, P.; Junod, A. F.

    1992-01-01

    The diagnostic work-up of atypical chest pain frequently leads to invasive procedures. However, this painful symptomatology can sometimes be of benign origin and respond to simple therapeutic manoeuvres. A number of musculoskeletal conditions such as costovertebral joint dysfunctions should be carefully considered. We report five cases in which patient discomfort and high costs could have been avoided if awareness of these conditions had led to a correct diagnosis upon initial physical examination. PMID:1448407

  2. Picture quiz: a case of sudden severe chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabia, Mustafa Abu; Sullivan, P; Stivaros, Stavros M

    2007-01-01

    An 18-year-old male with no previous medical history presented to hospital with sudden onset of acute epigastric pain radiating to the anterior chest wall and both shoulders. There was no history of recent trauma and he had not been vomiting.

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal chest pain: design of a multi-purpose trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette J; Christensen, Henrik W; Vach, Werner

    2008-01-01

    manipulation of the cervical and thoracic spine, mobilisation, and soft tissue techniques. b) Advice promoting self-management and individual instructions focusing on posture and muscle stretch (advice group). Outcome measures are pain, physical function, overall health, self-perceived treatment effect......BACKGROUND: Acute chest pain is a major health problem all over the western world. Active approaches are directed towards diagnosis and treatment of potentially life threatening conditions, especially acute coronary syndrome/ischemic heart disease. However, according to the literature, chest pain...... may also be due to a variety of extra-cardiac disorders including dysfunction of muscles and joints of the chest wall or the cervical and thoracic part of the spine. The diagnostic approaches and treatment options for this group of patients are scarce and formal clinical studies addressing the effect...

  4. The relevance of accuracy of heartbeat perception in noncardiac and cardiac chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Stefanie; Gerlach, Alexander L; Achenbach, Stephan; Martin, Alexandra

    2015-04-01

    The development and course of noncardiac chest pain are assumed to be influenced by interoceptive processes. It was investigated whether heartbeat perception was enhanced in patients suffering from noncardiac chest pain and to what degree it was associated with self-reported cognitive-perceptual features and chest pain characteristics. A total of 42 patients with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP), 35 patients with cardiac chest pain, and 52 healthy controls were recruited. Heartbeat perception was assessed using the Schandry task and a modified Brener-Kluvitse task. Self-report measures assessed anxiety sensitivity, somatosensory amplification, heart-focused anxiety, and chest pain characteristics. Heartbeat perception was not more accurate in patients with NCCP, compared to patients with cardiac chest pain and healthy controls. However, in patients with NCCP, the error score (Schandry task) was significantly associated with stronger chest pain impairment, and the response bias (Brener-Kluvitse task) was associated with lower chest pain intensity. Against assumptions of current etiological models, heartbeat perception was not enhanced in patients with NCCP. Chest pain characteristics and particularly their appraisal as threatening might be more relevant to NCCP than the perceptional accuracy of cardiac sensations and should be focused in psychological interventions. However, associations with chest pain impairment suggest cardiac interoception to influence the course of NCCP.

  5. Pain in the chest in a user of cocaine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiener, M.D.; Putnam, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    A 21-year-old man presented with pleuritic substernal chest pain of one hour's duration. The pain was exacerbated in a supine position and did not radiate. Questioning revealed that he was a recreational user of cocaine and had inhaled free-based cocaine via a pipe the previous evening and as recently as two hours before admission to the hospital. Physical examination demonstrated an anxious young man with a respiratory rate of 26 breaths per minute and shallow. He was afebrile with normal heart rate and blood pressure. His sternum was tender to palpation, and auscultation revealed precordial crepitus synchronous with systole. His electrocardiogram showed sinus rhythm at a rate of 62 beats per minute. Posteroanterior and lateral roentgenograms of the chest were obtained. A diagnosis of spontaneous pneumomediastinum was made

  6. Chest Pain: The Need to Consider Less Frequent Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Magalhães

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chest pain is one of the most frequent patient’s complaints. The commonest underlying causes are well known, but, sometimes, in some clinical scenarios, it is necessary to consider other diagnoses. We report a case of a 68-year-old Caucasian male, chronically hypertensive, who complained of recurrent episodes of chest pain and fever with elevated acute phase reactants. The first investigation was negative for some of the most likely diagnosis and he quickly improved with anti-inflammatory drugs. Over a few months, his symptoms continued to recur periodically, his hypertension was aggravated, and he developed headaches and lower limbs claudication. After a temporal artery biopsy that was negative for vasculitis, he underwent a positron emission tomography suggestive of Takayasu Arteritis. Takayasu Arteritis is a rare chronic granulomatous vasculitis of the aorta and its first-order branches affecting mostly females up to 50 years old. Chest pain is experienced by >40% of the patients and results from the inflammation of the aorta, pulmonary artery, or coronaries.

  7. The relationship between chest pain during thallium-201 scintigraphy with dipyridamole and myocardial ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeishi, Yasuchika; Tono-oka, Ichiro; Meguro, Mitsuhiko; Hoshi, Hikaru; Masakane, Ikuto; Ikeda, Kozue; Tsuiki, Kai; Yasui, Shoji

    1991-01-01

    Dipyridamole thallium-201 scintigraphy (DP-Tl) and coronary angiography were studied on 74 patients with suspected coronary artery disease. We compared the clinical features, hemodynamic responses, angiographic results and scintigraphic findings of patients who had chest pain during DP-Tl testing ('chest pain' group) with those of patients who did not have chest pain ('no pain' group). Thirty eight (51%) of the 74 patients developed chest pain. Heart rate and rate pressure product during DP infusion of 'chest pain' group were greater than those of the 'no pain' group (p<0.05). Ischemic ST depression was more frequently observed among 'chest pain' patients (p<0.01). There were no differences in angiographic severity of coronary artery disease between 'chest pain' and 'no pain' group. Also, we could find no differences in extent and severity scores of perfusion defects and washout abnormalities between the two groups. However, when patients with myocardial infarction were excluded, the 'chest pain' group had significantly greater extent and severity scores of washout abnormalities than the 'no pain' group (extent score: 38±8 vs 18±5, p<0.05, severity score: 55±15 vs 18±7, p<0.01). Our study indicated that in patients without myocardial infarction, patients with 'chest pain' had more severe ischemia than 'no pain' patients. But in patients with myocardial infarction, myocardial ischemia not accompanied by chest pain might be as severe as that with chest pain. The presence or absence of myocardial infarction might have great influence on results regarding the relation of chest pain to myocardial ischemia. (author)

  8. Chest pain following oesophageal stenting for malignant dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golder, Mark; Tekkis, Paris P.; Kennedy, Colette; Lath, Sadaf; Toye, Rosemary; Steger, Adrian C.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: The palliative use of self-expanding metallic stents has been widely reported to relieve dysphagia in cases of oesophageal carcinoma. Little has been documented on the severity of chest pain following oesophageal stenting. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of pain with oesophageal stenting for malignant dysphagia. METHODS: Fifty-two patients with inoperable oesophageal carcinoma underwent stent placement between 1995-1999. Daily opioid analgesic requirements (mg of morphine equivalent doses) were monitored for 3 days before and 7 days after stenting. The degree of palliation was expressed as a dysphagia score (0-3). Hospital stay, readmission days, stent complications and patient survival time were also recorded. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients (50%) required opioid analgesia for chest pain (median dose: 80 mg morphine/day) within 48 h of the procedure compared to 11 (21.2%) patients before stenting (P = 0.0041). A significant increase was evident in the analgesic consumption following stent deployment (P < 0.001). The dysphagia score improved by a median value of 1 (CI 0.25)P < 0.001, with a re-intervention rate of 11.5%. The median survival time was 40 days post stenting (range 1-120). CONCLUSION: A significant proportion of patients developed chest pain after oesophageal stenting, requiring high dose opioid analgesia. As the origin of the pain is still unknown, pre-emptive analgesia may a play role in reducing stent-related morbidity and possibly in-hospital stay. Golder, M. et al. (2001)

  9. Chest pain following oesophageal stenting for malignant dysphagia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golder, Mark; Tekkis, Paris P.; Kennedy, Colette; Lath, Sadaf; Toye, Rosemary; Steger, Adrian C

    2001-03-01

    AIM: The palliative use of self-expanding metallic stents has been widely reported to relieve dysphagia in cases of oesophageal carcinoma. Little has been documented on the severity of chest pain following oesophageal stenting. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of pain with oesophageal stenting for malignant dysphagia. METHODS: Fifty-two patients with inoperable oesophageal carcinoma underwent stent placement between 1995-1999. Daily opioid analgesic requirements (mg of morphine equivalent doses) were monitored for 3 days before and 7 days after stenting. The degree of palliation was expressed as a dysphagia score (0-3). Hospital stay, readmission days, stent complications and patient survival time were also recorded. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients (50%) required opioid analgesia for chest pain (median dose: 80 mg morphine/day) within 48 h of the procedure compared to 11 (21.2%) patients before stenting (P = 0.0041). A significant increase was evident in the analgesic consumption following stent deployment (P < 0.001). The dysphagia score improved by a median value of 1 (CI 0.25)P < 0.001, with a re-intervention rate of 11.5%. The median survival time was 40 days post stenting (range 1-120). CONCLUSION: A significant proportion of patients developed chest pain after oesophageal stenting, requiring high dose opioid analgesia. As the origin of the pain is still unknown, pre-emptive analgesia may a play role in reducing stent-related morbidity and possibly in-hospital stay. Golder, M. et al. (2001)

  10. Clinical assessment of chest pain and guidelines for imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruettner, J.; Henzler, T.; Sueselbeck, T.; Fink, C.; Borggrefe, M.; Walter, T.

    2012-01-01

    For many emergency facilities, risk assessment of patients with diffuse chest pain still poses a major challenge. In their currently valid recommendations, the international cardiological societies have defined a standardized assessment of the prognostically relevant cardiac risk criteria. Here the classic sequence of basic cardiac diagnostics including case history (cardiac risk factors), physical examination (haemodynamic and respiratory vital parameters), ECG (ST segment analysis) and laboratory risk markers (troponin levels) is paramount. The focus is, on the one hand, on timely indication for percutaneous catheterization, especially in patients at high cardiac risk with or without ST-segment elevation in the ECG, and, on the other hand, on the possibility of safely discharging patients with intermediate or low cardiac risk after non-invasive exclusion of a coronary syndrome. For patients in the intermediate or low risk group, physical or pharmacological stress testing in combination with scintigraphy, echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging is recommended in addition to basic diagnostics. Moreover, the importance of non-invasive coronary imaging, primarily cardiac CT angiography (CCTA), is increasing. Current data show that in intermediate or low risk patients this method is suitable to reliably rule out coronary heart disease. In addition, attention is paid to the major differential diagnoses of acute coronary syndrome, particularly pulmonary embolism and aortic dissection. Here the diagnostic method of choice is thoracic CT, possibly also in combination with CCTA aiming at a triple rule-out.

  11. Clinical assessment of chest pain and guidelines for imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruettner, J., E-mail: joachim.gruettner@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Henzler, T. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Sueselbeck, T. [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Fink, C. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Borggrefe, M.; Walter, T. [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    For many emergency facilities, risk assessment of patients with diffuse chest pain still poses a major challenge. In their currently valid recommendations, the international cardiological societies have defined a standardized assessment of the prognostically relevant cardiac risk criteria. Here the classic sequence of basic cardiac diagnostics including case history (cardiac risk factors), physical examination (haemodynamic and respiratory vital parameters), ECG (ST segment analysis) and laboratory risk markers (troponin levels) is paramount. The focus is, on the one hand, on timely indication for percutaneous catheterization, especially in patients at high cardiac risk with or without ST-segment elevation in the ECG, and, on the other hand, on the possibility of safely discharging patients with intermediate or low cardiac risk after non-invasive exclusion of a coronary syndrome. For patients in the intermediate or low risk group, physical or pharmacological stress testing in combination with scintigraphy, echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging is recommended in addition to basic diagnostics. Moreover, the importance of non-invasive coronary imaging, primarily cardiac CT angiography (CCTA), is increasing. Current data show that in intermediate or low risk patients this method is suitable to reliably rule out coronary heart disease. In addition, attention is paid to the major differential diagnoses of acute coronary syndrome, particularly pulmonary embolism and aortic dissection. Here the diagnostic method of choice is thoracic CT, possibly also in combination with CCTA aiming at a triple rule-out.

  12. Implementation of a chest pain management service improves patient care and reduces length of stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Adam C; O'Dwyer, Kristina M; Cullen, Louise; Brown, Anthony; Denaro, Charles; Parsonage, William

    2014-03-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common complaints in patients presenting to an emergency department. Delays in management due to a lack of readily available objective tests to risk stratify patients with possible acute coronary syndromes can lead to an unnecessarily lengthy admission placing pressure on hospital beds or inappropriate discharge. The need for a co-ordinated system of clinical management based on enhanced communication between departments, timely and appropriate triage, clinical investigation, diagnosis, and treatment was identified. An evidence-based Chest Pain Management Service and clinical pathway were developed and implemented, including the introduction of after-hours exercise stress testing. Between November 2005 and March 2013, 5662 patients were managed according to a Chest Pain Management pathway resulting in a reduction of 5181 admission nights by more timely identification of patients at low risk who could then be discharged. In addition, 1360 days were avoided in high-risk patients who received earlier diagnosis and treatment. The creation of a Chest Pain Management pathway and the extended exercise stress testing service resulted in earlier discharge for low-risk patients; and timely treatment for patients with positive and equivocal exercise stress test results. This service demonstrated a significant saving in overnight admissions.

  13. Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography in the Assessment of Acute Chest Pain in the Emergency Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prazeres, Carlos Eduardo Elias dos; Cury, Roberto Caldeira; Carneiro, Adriano Camargo de Castro [Hospital do Coração - HCor, Associação do Sanatório Sírio, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo, E-mail: rochitte@cardiol.br [Hospital do Coração - HCor, Associação do Sanatório Sírio, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto do Coração - InCor - HCFMUSP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-12-15

    The coronary computed tomography angiography has recently emerged as an accurate diagnostic tool in the evaluation of coronary artery disease, providing diagnostic and prognostic data that correlate directly with the data provided by invasive coronary angiography. The association of recent technological developments has allowed improved temporal resolution and better spatial coverage of the cardiac volume with significant reduction in radiation dose, and with the crucial need for more effective protocols of risk stratification of patients with chest pain in the emergency room, recent evaluation of the computed tomography coronary angiography has been performed in the setting of acute chest pain, as about two thirds of invasive coronary angiographies show no significantly obstructive coronary artery disease. In daily practice, without the use of more efficient technologies, such as coronary angiography by computed tomography, safe and efficient stratification of patients with acute chest pain remains a challenge to the medical team in the emergency room. Recently, several studies, including three randomized trials, showed favorable results with the use of this technology in the emergency department for patients with low to intermediate likelihood of coronary artery disease. In this review, we show data resulting from coronary angiography by computed tomography in risk stratification of patients with chest pain in the emergency room, its diagnostic value, prognosis and cost-effectiveness and a critical analysis of recently published multicenter studies.

  14. Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography in the Assessment of Acute Chest Pain in the Emergency Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prazeres, Carlos Eduardo Elias dos; Cury, Roberto Caldeira; Carneiro, Adriano Camargo de Castro; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The coronary computed tomography angiography has recently emerged as an accurate diagnostic tool in the evaluation of coronary artery disease, providing diagnostic and prognostic data that correlate directly with the data provided by invasive coronary angiography. The association of recent technological developments has allowed improved temporal resolution and better spatial coverage of the cardiac volume with significant reduction in radiation dose, and with the crucial need for more effective protocols of risk stratification of patients with chest pain in the emergency room, recent evaluation of the computed tomography coronary angiography has been performed in the setting of acute chest pain, as about two thirds of invasive coronary angiographies show no significantly obstructive coronary artery disease. In daily practice, without the use of more efficient technologies, such as coronary angiography by computed tomography, safe and efficient stratification of patients with acute chest pain remains a challenge to the medical team in the emergency room. Recently, several studies, including three randomized trials, showed favorable results with the use of this technology in the emergency department for patients with low to intermediate likelihood of coronary artery disease. In this review, we show data resulting from coronary angiography by computed tomography in risk stratification of patients with chest pain in the emergency room, its diagnostic value, prognosis and cost-effectiveness and a critical analysis of recently published multicenter studies

  15. Stress Tests for Chest Pain: When You Need an Imaging Test -- and When You Don't

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Adult , Geriatric Stress Tests for Chest Pain Stress Tests for Chest Pain When you need an ... pain isn’t from heart disease. A cardiac stress test makes the heart work hard so your ...

  16. Man in his 50s with chest pain and dyspnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obayashi, Yuki; Izumi, Chisato; Nakagawa, Yoshihisa

    2018-05-01

    A man in his 50s with sudden-onset chest pain and dyspnoea was transferred to the emergency room. He had a history of aortic valve replacement due to aortic regurgitation with a mechanical valve 6 years previously. Heart rate was 90 bpm, and blood pressure was too low to measure. In the emergency room, he presented with severe dyspnoea and a chest X-ray showed severe lung congestion (figure 1A). ECG showed complete left bundle branch block. His respiratory status rapidly worsened, and he went into cardiopulmonary arrest. After cardiopulmonary resuscitation, transthoracic echocardiography was performed (figure 1B, online supplementary video 1).DC1SP110.1136/heartjnl-2017-312477.supp1Supplementary file 1 heartjnl;104/10/868/F1F1F1Figure 1(A) Chest X-ray. (B) Colour Doppler image from apical five-chamber view. What is the most likely cause of the patient's cardiopulmonary arrest?Myocardial infarction in left main trunkAortic dissectionProsthetic valve thrombosisProsthetic valve embolisationPulmonary embolism. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Another cause of chest pain: Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis in an otherwise healthy adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vacek TP

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Thomas P Vacek, Shahnaz Rehman, Shipeng Yu, Ankush Moza, Ragheb Assaly Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo OH, USAAbstract: Chest pain requires a detailed differential diagnosis with good history-taking skills to differentiate between cardiogenic and noncardiogenic causes. Moreover, when other symptoms such as fever and elevated white blood cell count are involved, it may be necessary to consider causes that include infectious sources. A 53-year-old female with no significant past medical history returned to the hospital with recurrent complaints of chest pain that was constant, substernal, reproducible, and exacerbated with inspiration and expiration. The chest pain was thought to be noncardiogenic, as electrocardiography did not demonstrate changes, and cardiac enzymes were found to be negative for signs of ischemia. The patient's blood cultures were analyzed from a previous admission and were shown to be positive for Staphylococcus aureus. The patient was started empirically on vancomycin, which was later switched to ceftriaxone as the bacteria were more sensitive to this antibiotic. A transthoracic echocardiogram did not demonstrate any vegetation or signs of endocarditis. There was a small right pleural effusion discovered on X-ray. Therefore, computed tomography as well as magnetic resonance imaging of the chest were performed, and showed osteomyelitis of the chest. The patient was continued on intravenous ceftriaxone for a total of 6 weeks. Tests for HIV, hepatitis A, B, and C were all found to be negative. The patient had no history of childhood illness, recurrent infections, or previous trauma to the chest, and had had no recent respiratory infections, pneumonia, or any underlying lung condition. Hence, her condition was thought to be a case of primary sternal osteomyelitis without known cause.Keywords: substernal, pleuritic, myocardial infarction, differential

  18. Chest pain in patients with arterial hypertension, angiographically normal coronary arteries and stiff aorta: the aortic pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakos, Dimitrios A; Tziakas, Dimitrios N; Chalikias, George; Mitrousi, Konstantina; Tsigalou, Christina; Boudoulas, Harisios

    2013-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is often associated with a stiff aorta as a result of collagen accumulation in the aortic wall and may produce chest pain. In the present study, possible interrelationships between aortic function, collagen turnover and exercise-induced chest pain in patients with arterial hypertension and angiographically normal coronary arteries were investigated. Ninety-seven patients with arterial hypertension, angiographically normal coronary arteries and no evidence of myocardial ischemia on nuclear cardiac imaging during exercise test were studied. Of these, 43 developed chest pain during exercise (chest pain group) while 54 did not (no chest pain group). Carotid femoral pulse-wave velocity (PWVc-f) was used to assess the elastic properties of the aorta. Amino-terminal pro-peptides of pro-collagen type I, (PINP, reflecting collagen synthesis), serum telopeptides of collagen type I (CITP, reflecting collagen degradation), pro-metalloproteinase 1 (ProMMP-1), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1, related to collagen turnover) were measured in plasma by immunoassay. The chest pain group had higher PWVc-f, higher and /CITP ratio, and lower proMMP-1/ TIMP-1 ratio compared to the no chest pain group. PWVc-f (t=2.53, p=0.02) and PINP (t=2.42, p=0.02) were independently associated with the presence of chest pain in multiple regression analysis. Patients with arterial hypertension, exercise-induced chest pain and angiographically normal coronary arteries, without evidence of exercise-induced myocardial ischemia, had a stiffer aorta compared to those without chest pain. Alterations in collagen type I turnover that favor collagen accumulation in the aortic wall may contribute to aortic stiffening and chest pain in these patients.

  19. Prognosis with chest pain and normal thallium-201 exercise scintigrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pamelia, F.X.; Gibson, R.S.; Watson, D.D.; Craddock, G.B.; Sirowatka, J.; Beller, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the prognostic value of a normal exercise thallium-201 (TI-201) scintigram by quantitative criteria in a consecutive series of 349 patients with chest pain. Follow- up was obtained in 345 patients (99%) from 8 to 45 months (mean 34 +/- 7). Of these, 60% were men, 26% had typical angina, 21% had chest pain during exercise testing, 29% were unable to achieve 85% or more of maximal predicted heart rate, and in 9% ischemic ST depression (1.0 mm or greater) developed during exercise. At the time of exercise testing, 45% of patients were taking nitrates and 38% were receiving a beta- blocking drug. During the follow-up period, there were 5 cardiac deaths (0.51%/year), of which 2 were sudden, 6 patients had a nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) (0.61%/year). Two of the 5 patients who died and 1 who had MI had angiographically normal coronary arteries. The event rate was significantly higher (p less than 0.01) in patients referred for early catheterization (5 of 53; 9%) compared with the rate for those not undergoing early angiography (6 of 298; 2%). However, the event rate was similar in those who underwent catheterization with angiographically normal coronary arteries and in those who had significant coronary artery disease

  20. Exercise radionuclide ventriculographic responses in hypertensive patients with chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, A.G.; Katz, R.J.; Varghese, P.J.; Leiboff, R.H.; Bren, G.G.; Schlesselman, S.; Varma, V.M.; Reba, R.C.; Ross, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    The effectiveness of exercise-treadmill testing in diagnosing coronary-artery disease in hypertensive patients is limited by a high rate of false positivity. Exercise radionuclide ventriculography, however, relies on different criteria (ejection fraction and wall motion), and we have evaluated this procedure in 37 hypertensive and 109 normotensive patients with chest pain, using coronary arteriography as an indicator of coronary disease. In the hypertensive cohort there was no difference in the ejection fraction at rest between the 17 patients with coronary disease and the 20 without it. Neither group had a significant mean (+/- S.E.M.) change in ejection fraction from rest to exercise (-1.9 +/- 2 and 1.4 +/- 1%, respectively). A wall-motion abnormality developed during exercise in 5 of the 17 hypertensive patients with coronary disease (29%) and in 4 of the 20 without it (20%) (P = not significant). In the normotensive cohort, however, the peak-exercise ejection fractions were significantly different. The 71 patients with coronary disease had a mean decrease of 3.6 +/- 1%, in contrast to the patients without coronary disease, who had an increase of +/- 1% (P < 0.001). An exercise-induced wall-motion abnormality was seen in 35 of the 71 patients with coronary disease (48%), as compared with 3 of the 38 without it (8%) (P < 0.001). We conclude that exercise radionuclide ventriculography is inadequate as a screening test for coronary atherosclerosis in hypertensive patients with chest pain. 28 references, 2 figures, 3 tables

  1. CT coronary angiographic evaluation of suspected anginal chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Alastair J; Newby, David E

    2016-02-15

    Non-invasive imaging plays a critical role in the assessment of patients presenting with suspected angina chest pain. However, wide variations in practice across Europe and North America highlight the lack of consensus in selecting the appropriate first-line test for the investigation of coronary artery disease (CAD). CT coronary angiography (CTCA) has a high negative predictive value for excluding the presence of CAD. As such, it serves as a potential 'gatekeeper' to downstream testing by reducing the rate of inappropriate invasive coronary angiography. Two recent large multicentre randomised control trials have provided insights into whether CTCA can be incorporated into chest pain care pathways to improve risk stratification of CAD. They demonstrate that using CTCA enhances diagnostic certainty and improves the targeting of appropriate invasive investigations and therapeutic interventions. Importantly, reductions in cardiac death and non-fatal myocardial infarction appear to be attained through the more appropriate use of preventative therapy and coronary revascularisation when guided by CTCA. With this increasing portfolio of evidence, CTCA should be considered the non-invasive investigation of choice in the evaluation of patients with suspected angina pectoris due to coronary heart disease. NCT01149590, post-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Editor's Choice-The organization of chest pain units: Position statement of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeys, Marc J; Ahrens, Ingo; Sinnaeve, Peter; Diletti, Roberto; Rossini, Roberta; Goldstein, Patrick; Czerwińska, Kasia; Bueno, Héctor; Lettino, Maddalena; Münzel, Thomas; Zeymer, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    Chest pain units are defined as organizational short stay units with specific management protocols designed to facilitate and optimize the diagnosis of patients presenting with chest pain in the emergency department. The present document is intended to standardize and facilitate the installation of chest pain units nearby to the emergency department or as an integral part of the emergency department. Recommendations on organizational structure, physical and technical requirements and on disease management are presented. More standardized installation and implementation of chest pain units will enhance the quality of chest pain units and improve the quality of care of our chest pain patients.

  3. Experimental human pain models in gastro-esophageal reflux disease and unexplained chest pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asbj(φ)rn Mohr Drewes; Lars Arendt-Nielsen; Peter Funch-Jensen; Hans Gregersen

    2006-01-01

    Methods related to experimental human pain research aim at activating different nociceptors, evoke pain from different organs and activate specific pathways and mechanisms. The different possibilities for using mechanical, electrical, thermal and chemical methods in visceral pain research are discussed with emphasis of combinations (e.g., the multimodal approach). The methods have been used widely in assessment of pain mechanisms in the esophagus and have contributed to our understanding of the symptoms reported in these patients. Hence abnormal activation and plastic changes of central pain pathways seem to play a major role in the symptoms in some patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease and in patients with functional chest pain of esophageal origin. These findings may lead to an alternative approach for treatment in patients that does not respond to conventional medical or surgical therapy.

  4. Experimental human pain models in gastro-esophageal reflux disease and unexplained chest pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Methods related to experimental human pain research aim at activating different nociceptors, evoke pain from different organs and activate specific pathways and mechanisms. The different possibilities for using mechanical, electrical, thermal and chemical methods in visceral pain research are discussed with emphasis of combinations (e.g., the multimodal approach). The methods have been used widely in assessment of pain mechanisms in the esophagus and have contributed to our understanding of the symptoms reported in these patients. Hence abnormal activation and plastic changes of central pain pathways seem to play a major role in the symptoms in some patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease and in patients with functional chest pain of esophageal origin. These findings may lead to an alternative approach for treatment in patients that does not respond to conventional medical or surgical therapy. PMID:16718803

  5. Predictive ability of an early diagnostic guess in patients presenting with chest pain; a longitudinal descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, François; Junod, Michel; Herzig, Lilli; Vaucher, Paul; Burnand, Bernard; Bischoff, Thomas; Pécoud, Alain; Favrat, Bernard

    2010-02-21

    The intuitive early diagnostic guess could play an important role in reaching a final diagnosis. However, no study to date has attempted to quantify the importance of general practitioners' (GPs) ability to correctly appraise the origin of chest pain within the first minutes of an encounter. The validation study was nested in a multicentre cohort study with a one year follow-up and included 626 successive patients who presented with chest pain and were attended by 58 GPs in Western Switzerland. The early diagnostic guess was assessed prior to a patient's history being taken by a GP and was then compared to a diagnosis of chest pain observed over the next year. Using summary measures clustered at the GP's level, the early diagnostic guess was confirmed by further investigation in 51.0% (CI 95%; 49.4% to 52.5%) of patients presenting with chest pain. The early diagnostic guess was more accurate in patients with a life threatening illness (65.4%; CI 95% 64.5% to 66.3%) and in patients who did not feel anxious (62.9%; CI 95% 62.5% to 63.3%). The predictive abilities of an early diagnostic guess were consistent among GPs. The GPs early diagnostic guess was correct in one out of two patients presenting with chest pain. The probability of a correct guess was higher in patients with a life-threatening illness and in patients not feeling anxious about their pain.

  6. Reconstruction of the decision-making process in assessing musculoskeletal chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette J; Vach, Werner; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify the most important determinants from the patient history and clinical examination in diagnosing musculoskeletal chest pain (MSCP) in patients with acute noncardiac chest pain when supported by a structured protocol and to construct a decision tree...

  7. Diagnostic pattern of patients with acute chest pain and symptoms of patients with myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davodian, D.; Lindskou, T. A.; Søvsø, M. B.

    2018-01-01

    diseases, and 90.4% did not have MI. However, most MI-patients presented with chest pain and these had better outcomes than the ones without chest pain. Conflict of interest None Funding The professorship of EFC is supported by a grant administered by Aalborg University from the Danish philanthropic...

  8. Clinical outcomes and cost effectiveness of accelerated diagnostic protocol in a chest pain center compared with routine care of patients with chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Elad; Reuveni, Haim; Shlomo, Nir; Gerber, Yariv; Beigel, Roy; Narodetski, Michael; Eldar, Michael; Or, Jacob; Hod, Hanoch; Shamiss, Arie; Matetzky, Shlomi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare in patients presenting with acute chest pain the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of an accelerated diagnostic protocol utilizing contemporary technology in a chest pain unit versus routine care in an internal medicine department. Hospital and 90-day course were prospectively studied in 585 consecutive low-moderate risk acute chest pain patients, of whom 304 were investigated in a designated chest pain center using a pre-specified accelerated diagnostic protocol, while 281 underwent routine care in an internal medicine ward. Hospitalization was longer in the routine care compared with the accelerated diagnostic protocol group (pdiagnostic protocol patients (98%) vs. 57 (20%) routine care patients underwent non-invasive testing, (pdiagnostic imaging testing was performed in 125 (44%) and 26 (9%) patients in the routine care and accelerated diagnostic protocol patients, respectively (pdiagnostic protocol patients compared with those receiving routine care was associated with a lower incidence of readmissions for chest pain [8 (3%) vs. 24 (9%), pdiagnostic protocol remained a predictor of lower acute coronary syndromes and readmissions after propensity score analysis [OR = 0.28 (CI 95% 0.14-0.59)]. Cost per patient was similar in both groups [($2510 vs. $2703 for the accelerated diagnostic protocol and routine care group, respectively, (p = 0.9)]. An accelerated diagnostic protocol is clinically superior and as cost effective as routine in acute chest pain patients, and may save time and resources.

  9. Elastofibroma dorsi: a forgotten cause of chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Vieira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Elastofibroma dorsi is an uncommon benign tumor, typically located in the subscapularis region. Our goal is to describe the main features of elastofibroma dorsi to increase awareness of its existence and proper management. Material and Methods: We report a case of a 59-year-old woman with bilateral Elastofibroma dorsi and made a brief review of the epidemiological, clinical and radiodiagnostic features of this entity. Results: Imaging features can confidently diagnose this lesion, especially MRI, in addition to physical examination, with no need for biopsy. Conclusions: This entity should be part of the differential diagnosis in patients with chest pain in order to avoid unnecessary medical, radiological or surgical procedures and provide proper management of such lesions.

  10. The association between ethnicity and delay in seeking medical care for chest pain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechkunanukul, Kannikar; Grantham, Hugh; Damarell, Raechel; Clark, Robyn A

    2016-07-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, and chest pain is one of the most common symptoms of ACSs. A rapid response to chest pain by patients and appropriate management by health professionals are vital to improve survival rates.People from different ethnic groups are likely to have different perceptions of chest pain, its severity and the need for urgent treatment. These differences in perception may contribute to differences in response to chests pain and precipitate unique coping strategies. Delay in seeking medical care for chest pain in the general population has been well documented; however, limited studies have focused on delay times within ethnic groups. There is little research to date as to whether ethnicity is associated with the time taken to seek medical care for chest pain. Consequently, addressing this gap in knowledge will play a crucial role in improving the health outcomes of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) patients suffering from chest pain and for developing appropriate clinical practice and public awareness for these populations. The current review aimed to determine if there is an association between ethnicity and delay in seeking medical care for chest pain among CALD populations. Patients from different ethnic minority groups presenting to emergency departments (EDs) with chest pain. The current review will examine studies that evaluate the association between ethnicity and delay in seeking medical care for chest pain among CALD populations. The current review will consider quantitative studies including randomized controlled trials (RCTs), non-RCTs, quasi-experimental, before and after studies, prospective and retrospective cohort studies, case-control studies and analytical cross-sectional studies. The current review will consider studies that measure delay time as the main outcome. The time will be measured as the interval between the time of symptom onset and time to reach an

  11. Long-Term Clinical Impact of Coronary CT Angiography in Patients With Recent Acute-Onset Chest Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Jesper J; Hove, Jens D; Sørgaard, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    . BACKGROUND: The prognostic implications of a coronary CTA-guided treatment strategy have not been compared in a randomized fashion to standard care in patients referred for acute-onset chest pain. METHODS: Patients with acute chest pain but normal electrocardiograms and troponin values were randomized...... to treatment guided by either coronary CTA or standard care (bicycle exercise electrocardiogram or myocardial perfusion imaging). In the coronary CTA-guided group, a functional test was included in cases of nondiagnostic coronary CTA images or coronary stenoses of borderline severity. The primary endpoint...... electrocardiograms and troponin values compared to standard care with a functional test. (Cardiac-CT in the Treatment of Acute Chest Pain [CATCH]; NCT01534000)....

  12. Prevalence of esophageal disorders in patients with recurrent chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manterola, C; Barroso, M S; Losada, H; Muñoz, S; Vial, M

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence of esophageal disorders (ED) associated with recurrent chest pain (RCP) and the utility of esophageal functional tests (EFT) in the study of these patients. The cross-sectional study was conducted at Hospital Clínico de La Frontera, Chile. One hundred and twenty-three patients with RCP were studied using esophageal manometry, edrophonium stimulation and 24-h pH monitoring. The performance of EFT was considered acceptable when they were capable of finding ED. To state the probability that RCP had an esophageal origin, patients were classified according to whether their pain had a probable, possible or unlikely esophageal origin. The prevalence of ED was determined according to diagnoses obtained after applying EFT and a multivariate analysis was performed to examine the association between the esophageal origin of RCP and ED. Rates of correct diagnosis of 65.9%, 56.9% and 31.7% was verified for 24-h pH monitoring, esophageal manometry and edrophonium stimulation, respectively. In 38.2% of patients with RCP, the pain was probably of esophageal origin, in 42.3% there was a possible esophageal origin and in 19.5% an unlikely esophageal origin. A 44.7% prevalence of GERD, 26.8% of GERD with secondary esophageal motor dysfunction and 8.9% of pure esophageal motor dysfunction were verified. The multivariate analysis allowed us to verify the association between the probability of esophageal origin of RCP, the variables RCP duration, esophagitis and dysphagia coexistence (P= 0.037, P= 0.030 and P= 0.024, respectively), and a statistically significant association between ED and dysphagia coexistence (P= 0.028). A high prevalence of ED was identified in patients with RCP.

  13. Positive and Negative Affect Is Related to Experiencing Chest Pain During Exercise-Induced Myocardial Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stébenne, Philippe; Bacon, Simon L; Austin, Anthony; Paine, Nicola J; Arsenault, André; Laurin, Catherine; Meloche, Bernard; Gordon, Jennifer; Dupuis, Jocelyn; Lavoie, Kim L

    2017-05-01

    Silent myocardial ischemia is thought to be associated with worse cardiovascular outcomes due to a lack of perception of pain cues that initiate treatment seeking. Negative affect (NA) has been associated with increased pain reporting and positive affect (PA) with decreased pain reporting, but these psychological factors have not been examined within the context of myocardial ischemia. This study evaluated the associations between PA, NA, and chest pain reporting in patients with and without ischemia during exercise testing. A total of 246 patients referred for myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography exercise stress testing completed the positive and negative affect schedule-expanded version, a measure of PA and NA. Presence of chest pain and myocardial ischemia were evaluated using standardized protocols. Logistic regression analyses revealed that for every 1-point increase in NA, there was a 13% higher chance for ischemic patients (odds ratio [OR] = 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02 to 1.26) and an 11% higher chance in nonischemic patients (OR = 1.11; 95% CI = 1.03 to 1.19) to report chest pain. A significant interaction of PA and NA on chest pain reporting (β = 0.02; 95% CI = 0.002 to 0.031) was also observed; nonischemic patients with high NA and PA reported more chest pain (57%) versus patients with low NA and low PA (13%), with high NA and low PA (17%), and with high PA and low NA (7%). Patients who experience higher NA are more likely to report experiencing chest pain. In patients without ischemia, high NA and PA was also associated with a higher likelihood of reporting chest pain. Results suggest that high levels of PA as well as NA may increase the experience and/or reporting of chest pain.

  14. Anxiety, depression, suicidal ideation, and stressful life events in non-cardiac adolescent chest pain: a comparative study about the hidden part of the iceberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliacik, Kayi; Kanik, Ali; Bolat, Nurullah; Mertek, Hilal; Guven, Baris; Karadas, Ulas; Dogrusoz, Buket; Bakiler, Ali Rahmi

    2017-08-01

    Chest pain in adolescents is rarely associated with cardiac disease. Adolescents with medically unexplained chest pain usually have high levels of anxiety and depression. Psychological stress may trigger non-cardiac chest pain. This study evaluated risk factors that particularly characterise adolescence, such as major stressful events, in a clinical population. The present study was conducted on 100 adolescents with non-cardiac chest pain and 76 control subjects. Stressful life events were assessed by interviewing patients using a 36-item checklist, along with the Children's Depression Inventory and Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for children, in both groups. Certain stressful life events, suicidal thoughts, depression, and anxiety were more commonly observed in adolescents with non-cardiac chest pain compared with the control group. Moreover, binary logistic regression analysis showed that trouble with bullies, school-related problems, and depression may trigger non-cardiac chest pain in adolescents. Non-cardiac chest pain on the surface may point to the underlying psychosocial health problems such as depression, suicidal ideas, or important life events such as academic difficulties or trouble with bullies. The need for a psychosocial evaluation that includes assessment of negative life events and a better management have been discussed in light of the results.

  15. Clinical and Radiologic Predictive Factors of Rib Fractures in Outpatients With Chest Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; McMahon, Colm J; Shah, Samir; Wu, Jim S; Eisenberg, Ronald L; Kung, Justin W

    To identify the clinical and radiologic predictive factors of rib fractures in stable adult outpatients presenting with chest pain and to determine the utility of dedicated rib radiographs in this population of patients. Following Institutional Review Board approval, we performed a retrospective review of 339 consecutive cases in which a frontal chest radiograph and dedicated rib series had been obtained for chest pain in the outpatient setting. The frontal chest radiograph and dedicated rib series were sequentially reviewed in consensus by two fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists blinded to the initial report. The consensus interpretation of the dedicated rib series was used as the gold standard. Multiple variable logistic regression analysis assessed clinical and radiological factors associated with rib fractures. Fisher exact test was used to assess differences in medical treatment between the 2 groups. Of the 339 patients, 53 (15.6%) had at least 1 rib fracture. Only 20 of the 53 (37.7%) patients' fractures could be identified on the frontal chest radiograph. The frontal chest radiograph had a sensitivity of 38% and specificity of 100% when using the rib series as the reference standard. No pneumothorax, new mediastinal widening or pulmonary contusion was identified. Multiple variable logistic regression analysis of clinical factors associated with the presence of rib fractures revealed a significant association of trauma history (odds ratio 5.7 [p rib fractures in this population demonstrated a significant association of pleural effusion with rib fractures (odds ratio 18.9 [p rib fractures received narcotic analgesia in 47.2% of the cases, significantly more than those without rib fractures (21.3%, p rib fractures have a higher association with a history of minor trauma and age ≥40 in the adult population. Radiographic findings associated with rib fractures include pleural effusion. The frontal chest radiograph alone has low sensitivity in

  16. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: an overlooked cause of chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Hackbart Bermudes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC, also known as apical ballooning syndrome, broken heart syndrome, or stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is defined as a transient disturbance of the left ventricle, which is quite often associated with electrocardiographic abnormalities that may mimic acute myocardial infarction. The syndrome is also characterized by a mild alteration of cardiac biomarkers in absence of coronary blood flow obstruction on the coronariography. Clinical presentation is often manifested by angina, dyspnea, syncope, and arrhythmias. Peculiarly, the left ventricle takes the form of “tako-tsubo” (a Japanese word for “octopus trap” on the imaging workup. The authors report the case of a post-menopausal, hypertensive, dyslipidemic and type-II diabetic woman admitted at the emergency service with acute chest pain post physical exertion. Electrocardiogram showed signs of ischemia and myocardial necrosis markers were mildly increased. Echocardiography and ventriculography showed apical and mid-ventricular akinesia, with mild atherosclerotic coronary lesions. Thus diagnostic workup and the outcome followed the diagnostic criteria for TTC. The authors called attention to the potential of overlooking this diagnosis, since this syndrome is still not widely recognized.

  17. Sex differences of troponin test performance in chest pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagman, Anna; Searle, Julia; Vollert, Jörn O; Storchmann, Harald; Büschenfelde, Dirk Meyer Zum; von Recum, Johannes; Vlasny, Daniela; Ale-Abaei, Angela; Koch, Matthias; Müller, Christian; Müller, Reinhold; Somasundaram, Rajan; Möckel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines recommend troponin as the preferred biomarker to diagnose acute myocardial infarction (AMI) irrespective of the patient's sex. Recent reports have shown that sex-specific cut-offs should be considered but studies investigating sex-differences in the diagnostic accuracy of cardiac troponins are sparse. To evaluate whether the diagnostic performance of cardiac troponin at admission (cTn) under routine conditions is influenced by patient's sex. Between 15th of February 2009 and 15th of February 2010, women (n=1648) and men (n=2305) who presented to the emergency department with chest pain (n=3954) were enrolled. The diagnostic performance of the routine, contemporary sensitive cTn assays (TnI; Stratus® CS, Siemens and TnT; Roche Diagnostics) at baseline for the diagnosis of non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) was analyzed. NSTEMI was diagnosed in 7.3% (n=287) of all patients. Men were more likely to be diagnosed with NSTEMI (8.8%; n=202) as compared to women (5.2%; n=85; psex, with a lower sensitivity and NPV in women. The definition and implementation of sex-specific cut-off values for cTn into clinical routine seems to be highly recommendable. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. An Unusual Presentation of Adult Tethered Cord Syndrome Associated with Severe Chest and Upper Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shotaro Kanda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult tethered cord syndrome (ATCS is a rare entity that usually presents with multiple neurological symptoms, including lower extremity pain, backache, lower extremity muscle weakness, and bowel/bladder disturbances. Prompt surgical treatment is often necessary to avoid permanent sequelae. We report a 63-year-old man with sudden-onset severe right chest and upper back pain, followed by urinary retention. His initial workup included computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis, which showed a presacral mass. His symptom-driven neurological workup focused on the cervical and thoracic spine, the results of which were normal. Pelvic radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine showed spina bifida occulta, meningocele, and presacral masses consistent with a teratomatous tumor. His symptoms, except for urinary retention, improved dramatically with surgical treatment. The excised specimen contained a teratomatous lesion plus an organized hematoma. Hematoma formation was suspected as the trigger of his sudden-onset right chest and upper back pain.

  19. Use of resting myocardial scintigraphy during chest pain to exclude diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbirato, Gustavo Borges; Azevedo, Jader Cunha de; Felix, Renata Christian Martins; Correa, Patricia Lavatori; Volschan, Andre; Viegas, Monica; Pimenta, Lucia; Dohmann, Hans Fernando Rocha; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco

    2009-01-01

    Background: Images of myocardial perfusion taken during an episode of chest pain have been used for patients in the emergency department. Objective: To evaluate the operating characteristics of 99m Tc-Tetrofosmin scintigraphy during an episode of chest pain to exclude the diagnosis of cute myocardial infarction. Methods: One hundred and eight patients admitted with chest pain, or up to four hours after the end of symptoms and non diagnostic electrocardiogram, underwent resting scintigraphy and measurement of troponin I concentrations. Patients with a history of myocardial infarction (MI) were not excluded (24 patients). Troponin I concentrations were determined at admission and 6 hours later. Nuclear physicians performed a blind analysis of the images, and myocardial infarction was confirmed whenever troponin I level increase was three times that of the control. Results: Resting perfusion image was abnormal in all 6 patients with MI. Only 1 patient had a normal image and increased troponin levels. Fifty-five patients had positive images without MI, and 46 patients had normal images and troponin levels. The prevalence of the disease was 6.5%. The sensitivity and specificity of the resting images during an episode of chest pain to diagnose MI was 85.7% and 45.5%, respectively. The negative predictive value was 97.7%. Conclusion: Patients undergoing chest pain protocol with SPECT showed an excellent negative predictive value to exclude diagnosis of myocardial infarction. These results suggest that resting perfusion image is an important tool at the chest pain unit. (author)

  20. Resource reduction in pediatric chest pain: Standardized clinical assessment and management plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleeb, Susan F; McLaughlin, Sarah R; Graham, Dionne A; Friedman, Kevin G; Fulton, David R

    2018-01-01

    Using a Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plan (SCAMP) for pediatric patients presenting to clinic with chest pain, we evaluated the cost impact associated with implementation of the care algorithm. Prior to introduction of the SCAMP, we analyzed charges for 406 patients with chest pain, seen in 2009, and predicted 21% reduction of overall charges had the SCAMP methodology been used. The SCAMP recommended an echocardiogram for history, examination, or ECG findings suggestive of a cardiac etiology for chest pain. Resource utilization was reviewed for 1517 patients (7-21 years) enrolled in the SCAMP from July 2010 to April 2014. Compared to the 2009 historic cohort, patients evaluated by the SCAMP had higher rates of exertional chest pain (45% vs 37%) and positive family history (5% vs 1%). The SCAMP cohort had fewer abnormal physical examination findings (1% vs 6%) and abnormal electrocardiograms (3% vs 5%). Echocardiogram use increased in the SCAMP cohort compared to the 2009 historic cohort (45% vs 41%), whereas all other ancillary testing was reduced: exercise stress testing (4% SCAMP vs 28% historic), Holter (4% vs 7%), event monitors (3% vs 10%), and MRI (1% vs 2%). Total charges were reduced by 22% ($822 625) by use of the Chest Pain SCAMP, despite a higher percentage of patients for whom echocardiogram was recommended compared to the historic cohort. The Chest Pain SCAMP effectively streamlines cardiac testing and reduces resource utilization. Further reductions can be made by algorithm refinement regarding echocardiograms for exertional symptoms. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Implementation of a rapid chest pain protocol in the emergency department: A quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Azalea Marie; Leasure, A Renee; Carithers, Cathrin; Burnette, Robert E; Berryman, Michael Scott

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this quality improvement (QI) project is to compare the effectiveness of a rapid 90-min chest pain screening and evaluation protocol to a 120-min screening and evaluation protocol in determining patient readiness for hospital admission or discharge home. The existing chest pain protocol utilized in the emergency department (ED) was revised based on a review of current research changing initial screening and reevaluation times from 120 to 90 min. A prospective comparative study of patients presenting to the ED with chest pain was performed comparing the existing chest pain protocol of 120 min (standard care) with a rapid screening evaluation protocol of 90 min. A total of 128 patients presenting to an ED in Texas with chest pain comprised the sample for this study. There was a significant difference in the number of minutes between the groups for readiness for disposition. The average time from chest pain evaluation to readiness for disposition home, observation, or admission decreased from an average of 191 min in the standard care group to an average of 118 min in the rapid screening group. Use of the rapid screening and evaluation protocol decreased the time to disposition by an average of 73 min, which enhanced ED flow without influencing disposition and patient safety. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  2. Predictive ability of an early diagnostic guess in patients presenting with chest pain; a longitudinal descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bischoff Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intuitive early diagnostic guess could play an important role in reaching a final diagnosis. However, no study to date has attempted to quantify the importance of general practitioners' (GPs ability to correctly appraise the origin of chest pain within the first minutes of an encounter. Methods The validation study was nested in a multicentre cohort study with a one year follow-up and included 626 successive patients who presented with chest pain and were attended by 58 GPs in Western Switzerland. The early diagnostic guess was assessed prior to a patient's history being taken by a GP and was then compared to a diagnosis of chest pain observed over the next year. Results Using summary measures clustered at the GP's level, the early diagnostic guess was confirmed by further investigation in 51.0% (CI 95%; 49.4% to 52.5% of patients presenting with chest pain. The early diagnostic guess was more accurate in patients with a life threatening illness (65.4%; CI 95% 64.5% to 66.3% and in patients who did not feel anxious (62.9%; CI 95% 62.5% to 63.3%. The predictive abilities of an early diagnostic guess were consistent among GPs. Conclusions The GPs early diagnostic guess was correct in one out of two patients presenting with chest pain. The probability of a correct guess was higher in patients with a life-threatening illness and in patients not feeling anxious about their pain.

  3. Obesity Increases the Risk of Chest Wall Pain From Thoracic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, James; Thomas, Jimmy; Shah, Deep; Allen, Pamela K.; Wei, Xiong; Mitchell, Kevin; Gao, Song; Balter, Peter; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is increasingly being used to treat thoracic tumors. We attempted here to identify dose-volume parameters that predict chest wall toxicity (pain and skin reactions) in patients receiving thoracic SBRT. Patients and Methods: We screened a database of patients treated with SBRT between August 2004 and August 2008 to find patients with pulmonary tumors within 2.5 cm of the chest wall. All patients received a total dose of 50 Gy in four daily 12.5-Gy fractions. Toxicity was scored according to the NCI-CTCAE V3.0. Results: Of 360 patients in the database, 265 (268 tumors) had tumors within 30 , or volume of the chest wall receiving 30 Gy. Body mass index (BMI) was also strongly associated with the development of chest pain: patients with BMI ≥29 had almost twice the risk of chronic pain (p = 0.03). Among patients with BMI >29, diabetes mellitus was a significant contributing factor to the development of chest pain. Conclusion: Safe use of SBRT with 50 Gy in four fractions for lesions close to the chest wall requires consideration of the chest wall volume receiving 30 Gy and the patient's BMI and diabetic state.

  4. Chiropractic Treatment vs Self-Management in Patients With Acute Chest Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Patients Without Acute Coronary Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette J; Christensen, Henrik W; Vach, Werner

    2012-01-01

    minimal intervention in patients without acute coronary syndrome but with musculoskeletal chest pain. Results suggest that chiropractic treatment might be useful; but further research in relation to patient selection, standardization of interventions, and identification of potentially active ingredients......OBJECTIVE: The musculoskeletal system is a common but often overlooked cause of chest pain. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the relative effectiveness of 2 treatment approaches for acute musculoskeletal chest pain: (1) chiropractic treatment that included spinal manipulation and (2......) self-management as an example of minimal intervention. METHODS: In a nonblinded, randomized, controlled trial set at an emergency cardiology department and 4 outpatient chiropractic clinics, 115 consecutive patients with acute chest pain and no clear medical diagnosis at initial presentation were...

  5. Inflammation and Rupture of a Congenital Pericardial Cyst Manifesting Itself as an Acute Chest Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aertker, Robert A; Cheong, Benjamin Y C; Lufschanowski, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    We present the case of a 63-year-old woman with a remote history of supraventricular tachycardia and hyperlipidemia, who presented with recurrent episodes of acute-onset chest pain. An electrocardiogram showed no evidence of acute coronary syndrome. A chest radiograph revealed a prominent right-sided heart border. A suspected congenital pericardial cyst was identified on a computed tomographic chest scan, and stranding was noted around the cyst. The patient was treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and the pain initially abated. Another flare-up was treated similarly. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was then performed after symptoms had resolved, and no evidence of the cyst was seen. The suspected cause of the patient's chest pain was acute inflammation of a congenital pericardial cyst with subsequent rupture and resolution of symptoms.

  6. Complex regional pain syndrome with associated chest wall dystonia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwartzman Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS often suffer from an array of associated movement disorders, including dystonia of an affected limb. We present a case of a patient with long standing CRPS after a brachial plexus injury, who after displaying several features of the movement disorder previously, developed painful dystonia of chest wall musculature. Detailed neurologic examination found palpable sustained contractions of the pectoral and intercostal muscles in addition to surface allodynia. Needle electromyography of the intercostal and paraspinal muscles supported the diagnosis of dystonia. In addition, pulmonary function testing showed both restrictive and obstructive features in the absence of a clear cardiopulmonary etiology. Treatment was initiated with intrathecal baclofen and the patient had symptomatic relief and improvement of dystonia. This case illustrates a novel form of the movement disorder associated with CRPS with response to intrathecal baclofen treatment.

  7. Management of non-traumatic chest pain by the French Emergency Medical System: Insights from the DOLORES registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo-Silberman, Stéphane; Assez, Nathalie; Vivien, Benoît; Tazarourte, Karim; Mokni, Tarak; Bounes, Vincent; Greffet, Agnès; Bataille, Vincent; Mulak, Geneviève; Goldstein, Patrick; Ducassé, Jean Louis; Spaulding, Christian; Charpentier, Sandrine

    2015-03-01

    The early recognition of acute coronary syndromes is a priority in health care systems, to reduce revascularization delays. In France, patients are encouraged to call emergency numbers (15, 112), which are routed to a Medical Dispatch Centre where physicians conduct an interview and decide on the appropriate response. However, the effectiveness of this system has not yet been assessed. To describe and analyse the response of emergency physicians receiving calls for chest pain in the French Emergency Medical System. From 16 November to 13 December 2009, calls to the Medical Dispatch Centre for non-traumatic chest pain were included prospectively in a multicentre observational study. Clinical characteristics and triage decisions were collected. A total of 1647 patients were included in the study. An interview was conducted with the patient in only 30.5% of cases, and with relatives, bystanders or physicians in the other cases. A Mobile Intensive Care Unit was dispatched to 854 patients (51.9%) presenting with typical angina chest pains and a high risk of cardiovascular disease. Paramedics were sent to 516 patients (31.3%) and a general practitioner was sent to 169 patients (10.3%). Patients were given medical advice only by telephone in 108 cases (6.6%). Emergency physicians in the Medical Dispatch Centre sent an effecter to the majority of patients who called the Emergency Medical System for chest pain. The response level was based on the characteristics of the chest pain and the patient's risk profile. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute chest pain: The role of MR imaging and MR angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunold, Peter, E-mail: peter.hunold@uk-sh.de [Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); Bischoff, Peter, E-mail: peter.bischoff@uk-sh.de [Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); Barkhausen, Jörg, E-mail: joerg.barkhausen@uk-sh.de [Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); Vogt, Florian M., E-mail: florian.vogt@uk-sh.de [Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    MR imaging (MRI) and MR angiography (MRA) have gained a high level of diagnostic accuracy in cardiovascular disease. MRI in cardiac disease has been established as the non-invasive standard of reference in many pathologies. However, in acute chest pain the situation is somewhat special since many of the patients presenting in the emergency department suffer from potentially life-threatening disease including acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolism, and acute aortic syndrome. Those patients need a fast and definitive evaluation under continuous monitoring of vital parameters. Due to those requirements MRI seems to be less suitable compared to X-ray coronary angiography and multislice computed tomography angiography (CTA). However, MRI allows for a comprehensive assessment of all clinically stable patients providing unique information on the cardiovascular system including ischemia, inflammation and function. Furthermore, MRI and MRA are considered the method of choice in patients with contraindications to CTA and for regular follow-up in known aortic disease. This review addresses specific features of MRI and MRA for different cardiovascular conditions presenting with acute chest pain.

  9. Chest pain control with kinesiology taping after lobectomy for lung cancer: initial results of a randomized placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperatori, Andrea; Grande, Annamaria; Castiglioni, Massimo; Gasperini, Laura; Faini, Agnese; Spampatti, Sebastiano; Nardecchia, Elisa; Terzaghi, Lorena; Dominioni, Lorenzo; Rotolo, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    Kinesiology taping (KT) is a rehabilitative technique performed by the cutaneous application of a special elastic tape. We tested the safety and efficacy of KT in reducing postoperative chest pain after lung lobectomy. One-hundred and seventeen consecutive patients, both genders, age 18-85, undergoing lobectomy for lung cancer between January 2013 and July 2015 were initially considered. Lobectomies were performed by the same surgical team, with thoracotomy or video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) access. Exclusion criteria (n = 25 patients) were: previous KT exposure, recent trauma, pre-existing chest pain, lack of informed consent, >24-h postoperative intensive care unit treatment. After surgery, the 92 eligible patients were randomized to KT experimental group (n = 46) or placebo control group (n = 46). Standard postoperative analgesia was administered in both groups (paracetamol/non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, epidural analgesia including opioids), with supplemental analgesia boluses at patient request. On postoperative day 1 in addition, in experimental group patients a specialized physiotherapist applied KT, with standardized tape length, tension and shape, over three defined skin areas: at the chest access site pain trigger point; over the ipsilateral deltoid/trapezius; lower anterior chest. In control group, usual dressing tape mimicking KT was applied over the same areas, as placebo. Thoracic pain severity score [visual analogue scale (VAS) ranging 0-10] was self-assessed by all patients on postoperative days 1, 2, 5, 8, 9 and 30. The KT group and the control group had similar demographics, lung cancer clinico-pathological features and thoracotomy/VATS ratio. Postoperatively, the two groups also resulted similar in supplemental analgesia, complication rate, mean duration of chest drainage and length of stay. There were no adverse events with KT application. After tape application, KT patients reported overall less thoracic pain than the

  10. 3 for the Price of 1: Teaching Chest Pain Risk Stratification in a Multidisciplinary, Problem-based Learning Workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Burns

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chest pain is a common chief complaint among patients presenting to health systems and often leads to complex and intensive evaluations. While these patients are often cared for by a multidisciplinary team (primary care, emergency medicine, and cardiology, medical students usually learn about the care of these patients in a fragmented, single-specialty paradigm. The present and future care of patients with chest pain is multidisciplinary, and the education of medical students on the subject should be as well. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary, problem-based learning workshop to teach third-year medical students about risk assessment for patients presenting with chest pain, specifically focusing on acute coronary syndromes. Methods: To create an educational experience consistent with multidisciplinary team-based care, we designed a multidisciplinary, problem-based learning workshop to provide medical students with an understanding of how patients with chest pain are cared for in a systems-based manner to improve outcomes. Participants included third-year medical students (n=219 at a single, tertiary care, academic medical center. Knowledge acquisition was tested in a pre-/post-retention test study design. Results: Following the workshop, students achieved a 19.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] [17.3–22.2%] absolute increase in scores on post-testing as compared to pre-testing. In addition, students maintained an 11.1% (95% CI [7.2–15.0%] increase on a retention test vs. the pre-test. Conclusion: A multidisciplinary, problem-based learning workshop is an effective method of producing lasting gains in student knowledge about chest pain risk stratification.

  11. New Guidelines for the Management of Chest Pain: Lessons From a Recent Audit in Tauranga, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Andrew R; Leslie, Stephen J; Sage, Derek K

    2012-01-01

    Background Protocol based care is known to improve the outcomes of patients admitted with recent onset chest pain. The aim of this clinical review was to investigate chest pain management, using newly published guidance from NICE, in the emergency department of a regional hospital in New Zealand. Methods All admissions with chest pain during the period of September-October 2010 were identified retrospectively (n = 599), and a sufficiently powered random sample (n = 120) taken. Relevant data was identified from patient notes, including basic demographics and specific management details. Results One hundred and eighteen patients were analysed (M = 65, F = 53), 99.2% received an ECG on admission, yet only 59.3% of patients had documented evidence of a repeat ECG, with admissions during the day less likely to receive one compared to those admitted overnight (51.5% vs 69.2%, P = 0.04). Younger patients (< 39 years) appeared less likely to receive aspirin than older patients (38.9% vs 80.0%, P = 0.06), 21.3% of patients failed to receive 300 mg aspirin, and 45.6% of patients received oxygen despite normal saturations. Conclusions Despite good performance in a number of areas, this clinical review has highlighted that some standards, such as repeat ECGs, administration of aspirin therapy and appropriate use of oxygen are not being met in all patients with chest pain. A chest pain management pathway is to be implemented for all relevant admissions, to ensure that essential aspects of care are not missed. Timely dissemination and implementation of new clinical guidelines remains a challenge in clinical practice. PMID:28357018

  12. Imaging of non-cardiac, non-traumatic causes of acute chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienzl, Daniela, E-mail: daniela.kienzl@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Prosch, Helmut; Töpker, Michael; Herold, Christian [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2012-12-15

    Non-traumatic chest pain is a common symptom in patients who present in the emergency department. From a clinical point of view, it is important to differentiate cardiac chest pain from non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP). Among the plethora of potential causes of NCCP, life-threatening diseases, such as aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, tension pneumothorax, and esophageal rupture, must be differentiated from non-life threatening causes. The majority of NCCP, however, is reported to be benign in nature. The presentation of pain plays an important role in narrowing the differential diagnosis and initiating further diagnostic management and treatment. As the benign causes tend to recur, and may lead to patient anxiety and great costs, a meticulous evaluation of the patient is necessary to diagnose the underlying disorder or disease.

  13. Estimation of the radiation exposure of a chest pain protocol with ECG-gating in dual-source computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketelsen, Dominik; Luetkhoff, Marie H.; Thomas, Christoph; Werner, Matthias; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Reimann, Anja; Kopp, Andreas F.; Claussen, Claus D.; Heuschmid, Martin; Buchgeister, Markus; Burgstahler, Christof

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate radiation exposure of a chest pain protocol with ECG-gated dual-source computed tomography (DSCT). An Alderson Rando phantom equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters was used for dose measurements. Exposure was performed on a dual-source computed tomography system with a standard protocol for chest pain evaluation (120 kV, 320 mAs/rot) with different simulated heart rates (HRs). The dose of a standard chest CT examination (120 kV, 160 mAs) was also measured. Effective dose of the chest pain protocol was 19.3/21.9 mSv (male/female, HR 60), 17.9/20.4 mSv (male/female, HR 80) and 14.7/16.7 mSv (male/female, HR 100). Effective dose of a standard chest examination was 6.3 mSv (males) and 7.2 mSv (females). Radiation dose of the chest pain protocol increases significantly with a lower heart rate for both males (p = 0.040) and females (p = 0.044). The average radiation dose of a standard chest CT examination is about 36.5% that of a CT examination performed for chest pain. Using DSCT, the evaluated chest pain protocol revealed a higher radiation exposure compared with standard chest CT. Furthermore, HRs markedly influenced the dose exposure when using the ECG-gated chest pain protocol. (orig.)

  14. The effect of Tc99m Sestamibi scans during acute chest pain on clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldey, A.; Cameron, P.; Grigg, L.; Knott, J.; Better, N.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study is to assess whether the increased sensitivity and specificity of Tc99m sestamibi scans, during acute chest pain, will lead to alteration in clinical management and potential cost saving in an Australian population. Consecutive patients who presented with acute chest pain were injected 800 MBq of Tc99m sestamibi during pain (Hot MlBI) and SPECT imaging performed 1-6 hours later. The population was those only with a 'intermediate risk' of myocardial ischaemia The patients included in patients, those in the Emergency Department, and those with a previous history of cardiac disease. 25% of patients required a second, pain free study the following day to differentiate acute ischaemia from prior infarction. A question sheet was filled out by the requesting physician prior to the study indicating the likelihood of cardiac disease and the proposed management if no 'Hot MIBI' scan was available. The treatment that the patient subsequently received was ascertained from the patient's medical record. Of the 28 patients, a prediction whether to or not to proceed to coronary angiography was made in 13 patients prior to the MIBI study being performed. Of the 13, 5 would have had coronary angiography performed. and in all 5, the decision to proceed to coronary angiography was averted by the 'Hot MIBI'. Of note, 3 patients were admitted purely because of an abnormal 'Hot MIBI'. The 'Hot MIBI' was able to reduce coronary care admissions by 83% reduce all admissions by 17%, and avert coronary angiography in 38% of patients. In this intermediate risk category patient, this translates to not only admissions saved but potential cost saving

  15. Use of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) in a cardiac emergency room: chest pain unit

    OpenAIRE

    Soares-Filho, Gastão L. F.; Freire, Rafael C.; Biancha, Karla; Pacheco, Ticiana; Volschan, André; Valença, Alexandre M.; Nardi, Antonio E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients complaining of chest pain who seek a chest pain unit attendance. INTRODUCTION: Patients arriving at a Chest Pain Unit may present psychiatric disorders not identified, isolated or co-morbid to the main illness, which may interfere in the patient prognosis. METHODOLOGY: Patients were assessed by the "Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale" as a screening instrument wile following a systematized protocol to rule out the...

  16. Assessment of chest pain in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using exercise thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, D.; Wainwright, R.; Maisey, M.; Curry, P.; Sowton, E.

    1980-01-01

    Exercise thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy was performed in 23 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Eighteen patients presented with chest pain which was a persistent symptom in 11. Selective coronary arteriography was performed in 16 patients and showed normal coronary arteries in 15 and insignificant luminal irregularities in one patient. Eighteen patients had abnormal scintigrams. Three had an abnormal distribution of tracer entirely attributable to asymmetric septal hypertrophy, whereas 15 had discrete tracer uptake defects which could not be explained solely by myocardial hypertrophy. In this latter group of patients three scintigraphic patterns were identified: (1) in 10 patients defects were seen in scintigrams immediately after exercise but not in delayed images obtained four to six hours later. Eight of these patients had chest pain. (2) Four patients had uptake defects seen in both initial and delayed images. One patient had chest pain. (3) In three patients, one of whom had chest pain, tracer defects were seen only in delayed images and were not apparent in the initial scintigrams. Chest pain occurred in eight out of 10 patients with scintigraphic evidence of myocardial ischaemia but was present in only three out of 13 patients with non-ischaemic scintigrams. The value of exercise thallium-201 myocardial imaging as a diagnostic technique in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy appears limited. Scintigraphic evidence of regional myocardial ischaemia in the absence of significant coronary artery disease, however, contributes to an understanding of the mechanism of angina production in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (author)

  17. Chest CT findings in patients with non-cardiovascular causes of chest pain: Focusing on pulmonary tuberculosis in a tuberculosis endemic country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, So Won; Shim, Sung Shine; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Ryu, Yon Ju

    2015-01-01

    To review the common causes of non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) according to the location and lesion type as seen on chest CT, and to evaluate CT findings in tuberculosis (TB) as a cause of NCCP. In the period 2009 to 2012, patients having NCCP without definitive evidence of acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary thromboembolism, and aortic dissection, were included. In total, 162 patients (60.5% male; 39.5% female), with a mean age of 51 years, were enrolled. CT images were evaluated by location and lesion type, for causes of NCCP. Chest CT revealed that the most common location for the cause of NCCP was the pleura (45.1%), followed by the subpleural lung parenchyma (30.2%). The most common lesion causing NCCP was TB (33.3%), followed by pneumonia (19.1%). Of the 54 TB cases, 40 (74.1%) were stable TB and 14 (25.9%) were active TB; among these 54 patients, NCCP was most commonly the result of fibrotic pleural thickening (55.6%), followed by subpleural stable pulmonary TB (14.8%). Results of chest CT revealed that TB was a major cause of NCCP in a TB endemic area. Among the TB patients, fibrotic pleural thickening in patients with stable TB was the most common cause of NCCP

  18. Chest CT findings in patients with non-cardiovascular causes of chest pain: Focusing on pulmonary tuberculosis in a tuberculosis endemic country

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Won; Shim, Sung Shine; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Ryu, Yon Ju [Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To review the common causes of non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) according to the location and lesion type as seen on chest CT, and to evaluate CT findings in tuberculosis (TB) as a cause of NCCP. In the period 2009 to 2012, patients having NCCP without definitive evidence of acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary thromboembolism, and aortic dissection, were included. In total, 162 patients (60.5% male; 39.5% female), with a mean age of 51 years, were enrolled. CT images were evaluated by location and lesion type, for causes of NCCP. Chest CT revealed that the most common location for the cause of NCCP was the pleura (45.1%), followed by the subpleural lung parenchyma (30.2%). The most common lesion causing NCCP was TB (33.3%), followed by pneumonia (19.1%). Of the 54 TB cases, 40 (74.1%) were stable TB and 14 (25.9%) were active TB; among these 54 patients, NCCP was most commonly the result of fibrotic pleural thickening (55.6%), followed by subpleural stable pulmonary TB (14.8%). Results of chest CT revealed that TB was a major cause of NCCP in a TB endemic area. Among the TB patients, fibrotic pleural thickening in patients with stable TB was the most common cause of NCCP.

  19. CPDX (Chest Pain Diagnostic Program) - A Decision Support System for the Management of Acute Chest Pain (User’s Manual)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-25

    pain: appendicitis; renal colic; perforated duodenal ulcer ; acute cholecystitis; small bowel obstruction; and non-specific abdominal pain, This...psychoneurotic disorder; g) epigastric lesions (cholelithiasis, peptic ulcer , etc.). Musculoskeletal pain and costochrondritis denote muscle, rib, or cartilage...hyperventilation syndrome; f) psychoneurotic disorder; g) epigastric lesions (cholelithiasis, peptic ulcer , etc.). Musculoskeletal pain and the

  20. Diagnostic indicators of non-cardiovascular chest pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) has a high healthcare cost, but insufficient guidelines exist for its diagnostic investigation. The objective of the present work was to identify important diagnostic indicators and their accuracy for specific and non-specific conditions underlying NCCP. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed. In May 2012, six databases were searched. Hand and bibliography searches were also conducted. Studies evaluating a diagnostic test against a reference test in patients with NCCP were included. Exclusion criteria were having diagnostic tests for acute cardiovascular disease. Diagnostic accuracy is given in likelihood ratios (LR): very good (LR+ >10, LR- diagnostic test sensitivity and specificity was performed by applying a hierarchical Bayesian model. Results Out of 6,316 records, 260 were reviewed in full text, and 28 were included: 20 investigating gastroesophageal reflux disorders (GERD), 3 musculoskeletal chest pain, and 5 psychiatric conditions. Study quality was good in 15 studies and moderate in 13. GERD diagnosis was more likely with typical GERD symptoms (LR + 2.70 and 2.75, LR- 0.42 and 0.78) than atypical GERD symptoms (LR + 0.49, LR- 2.71). GERD was also more likely with a positive response to a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) test (LR + 5.48, 7.13, and 8.56; LR- 0.24, 0.25, and 0.28); the posterior mean sensitivity and specificity of six studies were 0.89 (95% credible interval, 0.28 to 1) and 0.88 (95% credible interval, 0.26 to 1), respectively. Panic and anxiety screening scores can identify individuals requiring further testing for anxiety or panic disorders. Clinical findings in musculoskeletal pain either had a fair to moderate LR + and a poor LR- or vice versa. Conclusions In patients with NCCP, thorough clinical evaluation of the patient’s history, symptoms, and clinical findings can indicate the most appropriate diagnostic tests. Treatment response to high-dose PPI

  1. Frequency of chest pain in primary care, diagnostic tests performed and final diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorweg, Beatrijs Bn; Willemsen, Robert Ta; Cleef, Lotte E; Boogaerts, Tom; Buntinx, Frank; Glatz, Jan Fc; Dinant, Geert Jan

    2017-11-01

    Observational study of patients with chest pain in primary care: determination of incidence, referral rate, diagnostic tests and (agreement between) working and final diagnoses. 118 general practitioners (GPs) in the Netherlands and Belgium recorded all patient contacts during  2weeks. Furthermore, patients presenting with chest pain were registered extensively. A follow-up form was filled in after 30 days. 22 294 patient contacts were registered. In 281 (1.26%), chest pain was a reason for consulting the GP (mean age for men 54.4/women 53 years). In this cohort of 281 patients, in 38.1% of patients, acute coronary syndrome (ACS) was suspected at least temporarily during consultation, 40.2% of patients were referred to secondary care and 512 diagnostic tests were performed by GPs and consulted specialists. Musculoskeletal pain was the most frequent working (26.1%) and final diagnoses (33.1%). Potentially life-threatening diseases as final diagnosis (such as myocardial infarction) accounted for 8.4% of all chest pain cases. In 23.1% of cases, a major difference between working and final diagnoses was found, in 0.7% a severe disease was initially missed by the GP. Chest pain was present in 281 patients (1.26% of all consultations). Final diagnoses were mostly non-life-threatening. Nevertheless, in 8.4% of patients with chest pain, life-threatening underlying causes were identified. This seems reflected in the magnitude and wide variety of diagnostic tests performed in these patients by GPs and specialists, in the (safe) overestimation of life-threatening diseases by GPs at initial assessment and in the high referral rate we found. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. The clinical value of chest pain during thallium-201 scintigraphy with dipyridamole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeishi, Yasuchika; Tono-oka, Ichiro; Meguro, Mitsuhiko; Hoshi, Hikaru; Yamaguchi, Yoshiko; Masakane, Ikuto; Tsuiki, Kai; Yasui, Shoji

    1990-01-01

    Sixty patients with suspected coronary artery disease underwent both dipyridamole-loaded thallium-201 scintigraphy and cardiac catheterization. Thirty four patients (57%) developed chest pain during dipyridamole stress testing (the pain group), and the other 26 did not (the no-pain group). Regarding sex, age, history of myocardial infarction, and the presence of coronary artery disease, there was no difference between the pain and no-pain groups. The pain group had significantly increased pulse rate and rate-pressure-product, as compared with the no-pain group. ST depression was more frequently observed in the pain group than the no-pain group. There was no significant difference in the angiographic involvement and the severity of coronary artery disease between the two groups. Nor was there significant difference in dipyridamole-loaded scintigraphic findings, such as defect size, and the extent and degree of decreased washout. However, for patients without a history of myocardial infarction, the pain group had a farther decreased washout than the no-pain group. Chest pain associated with iv injection of dipyridamole may have implications for the occurrence of serious ischemia. (N.K.)

  3. Acute chest pain: a purely clinical problem or a question for radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewe, C.

    2008-01-01

    Acute chest pain represents a very common clinical occurrence and at the same time poses a severe diagnostic dilemma. It can be due to an acute life-threatening event such as acute cardiac infarct, or a relatively harmless condition of pain and illness (e.g. vertebrogenic pain) under the main symptom category of acute chest pain. This often unclear symptomatic, behind which there can always be a life-threatening disease leads to an exaggerated grouping of patients into emergency cases and to an increased number of inpatients for observation. The diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome with no initial ECG changes typical for ischemia is especially problematic. The availability of modern multidetector computed tomography is becoming increasingly more important for radiologists in the diagnosis and clarification of acute chest pain. In this article the clinical difficulties and radiology options for the diagnosis of patients with acute chest pain will be presented and possible future algorithms for diagnosis will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  4. Thallium myocardial scanning in the emergency department evaluation of chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mace, S.E.

    1989-01-01

    Chest pain is a common complaint of patients seen in the emergency department. The causes are legion, and range from the non-life threatening to the potentially catastrophic. Thallium heart scanning was done prospectively in 20 patients with a ''classic'' history for myocardial infarction (eight patients) or atypical chest pain and/or associated symptoms plus an abnormal ECG (12 patients) to discern a subset of patients from whom thallium scintography may be indicated in the emergency department. Although further investigation is needed, our preliminary study suggests that myocardial scanning with thallium can be a safe, fairly rapid, and useful objective parameter in the emergency department detection of suspected myocardial infarction, and in differential diagnosis of chest pain when other data such as the history, physical examination, ECG, or enzymes are inconclusive

  5. Reduce chest pain using modified silicone fluted drain tube for chest drainage after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lung resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Hu, Bin; Miao, Jinbai; Li, Hui

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility, efficacy and safety of a modified silicone fluted drain tube after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lung resection. The prospective randomized study included 50 patients who underwent VATS lung resection between March 2015 and June 2015. Eligible patients were randomized into two groups: experimental group (using the silicone fluted drain tubes for chest drainage) and control group (using standard drain tubes for chest drainage). The volume and characteristics of drainage, postoperative (PO) pain scores and hospital stay were recorded. All patients received standard care during hospital admission. In accordance with the exit criteria, three patients were excluded from study. The remaining 47 patients included in the final analysis were divided into two groups: experiment group (N=24) and control group (N=23). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, sex, height, weight, clinical diagnosis and type of surgical procedure. There was a trend toward less PO pain in experimental group on postoperative day (POD) 1, with a statistically significant difference. Patients in experimental group had a reduced occurrence of fever [temperature (T) >37.4 °C] compared to the control group. The silicone fluted drain tube is feasible and safe and may relieve patient PO pain and reduce occurrence of fever without the added risk of PO complications.

  6. Treatment efficacy for non-cardiovascular chest pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob M Burgstaller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP leads to impaired quality of life and is associated with a high disease burden. Upon ruling out cardiovascular disease, only vague recommendations exist for further treatment. OBJECTIVES: To summarize treatment efficacy for patients presenting with NCCP. METHODS: Systematic review and meta-analysis. In July 2013, Medline, Web of Knowledge, Embase, EBSCOhost, Cochrane Reviews and Trials, and Scopus were searched. Hand and bibliography searches were also conducted. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluating non-surgical treatments in patients with NCCP were included. Exclusion criteria were poor study quality and small sample size (<10 patients per group. RESULTS: Thirty eligible RCT's were included. Most studies assessed PPI efficacy for gastroesophageal reflux disorders (GERD, n = 10. Two RCTs included musculoskeletal chest pain, seven psychotropic drugs, and eleven various psychological interventions. Study quality was high in five RCTs and acceptable in 25. PPI treatment in patients with GERD (5 RCTs, 192 patients was more effective than placebo [pooled OR 11.7 (95% CI 5.5 to 25.0, heterogeneity I2 = 6.1%]. The pooled OR in GERD negative patients (4 RCTs, 156 patients was 0.8 (95% CI 0.2 to 2.8, heterogeneity I2 = 50.4%. In musculoskeletal NCCP (2 RCTs, 229 patients manual therapy was more effective than usual care but not than home exercise [pooled mean difference 0.5 (95% CI -0.3 to 1.3, heterogeneity I2 = 46.2%]. The findings for cognitive behavioral treatment, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants were mixed. Most evidence was available for cognitive behavioral treatment interventions. LIMITATIONS: Only a small number of studies were available. CONCLUSIONS: Timely diagnostic evaluation and treatment of the disease underlying NCCP is important. For patients with suspected GERD, high-dose treatment with PPI is effective. Only limited evidence was available

  7. FLAIL CHEST

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    Anton Crnjac

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Major thoracic trauma is consistent with high mortality rate because of associated injuries of vital thoracic organs and dangerous complications. The flail chest occurs after disruption of the skeletal continuity of chest wall and demands because of its pathophysiological complexity rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment.Conclusions. Basic pathophysiological mechanism of the flail chest is respiratory distress, which is provoked by pulmonary contusions and paradoxical chest wall motion. The treatment should be pointed to improvement and support of respiratory functions and include aggressive pain control, pulmonary physiotherapy and selective mechanical ventilation. Views about operative fixation of the flail chest are still controversial. Neither mortality rate neither long-term disability are improved after operative fixation.

  8. Esophageal Manometry with Provocative Testing in Patients with Noncardiac Angina-Like Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G Paterson

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available In a five year period 238 of 594 esophageal manometric studies performed in the authors’ laboratory were done on patients whose major reason for referral was noncardiac angina-like chest pain. Standard eophageal manometry was performed followed by an acid-antacid perfusion period (Bernstein test and then subcutaneous bethanechol (80 μg/kg to a maximum of 5 mg was adminstered. Baseline manometry was normal in 38% of patients and was diagnostic of ‘nutcracker’ esophagus, nonspecific esophageal motility disorder, diffuse esophageal spasm and isolated hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter in 24%, 19%, 16% and 3% of patients, respectively. Ninety-six of 238 patients (40% experienced reproduction of their presenting angina-like chest pain during acid perfusion. In 80% of these patients there were associated esophageal motor abnormal ilies induced by the acid perfusion. Thirty-six of 212 (17% experienced pain reproduction following the injection of bethanechol; however, 16 of these had already had their presenting chest pain reproduced during the acid perfusion study. In two-thirds of the patients with pain reproduction following bechanechol there was an associated bethanechol-induced esophageal motility disorder. Overall 49% of patients had their pain reproduced during provocative testing. The acid perfusion test reproduced the pain much more frequently than bethanechol simulation. This study reaffirms the value of esophageal manometry and provocative testing in this group of patients.

  9. Development and validation of the Emergency Department Assessment of Chest pain Score and 2 h accelerated diagnostic protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Than, Martin; Flaws, Dylan; Sanders, Sharon; Doust, Jenny; Glasziou, Paul; Kline, Jeffery; Aldous, Sally; Troughton, Richard; Reid, Christopher; Parsonage, William A.; Frampton, Christopher; Greenslade, Jaimi H.; Deely, Joanne M.; Hess, Erik; Sadiq, Amr Bin; Singleton, Rose; Shopland, Rosie; Vercoe, Laura; Woolhouse-Williams, Morgana; Ardagh, Michael; Bossuyt, Patrick; Bannister, Laura; Cullen, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Risk scores and accelerated diagnostic protocols can identify chest pain patients with low risk of major adverse cardiac event who could be discharged early from the ED, saving time and costs. We aimed to derive and validate a chest pain score and accelerated diagnostic protocol (ADP) that could

  10. Diagnostic value of exercise-induced changes in circulating high sensitive troponin T in stable chest pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Mette Rauhe; Nielsen, Olav Wendelboe; Pedersen, Ole Dyg

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the diagnostic value of exercise-induced increase in cardiac Troponin T (cTnT) in stable chest pain subjects.......We investigated the diagnostic value of exercise-induced increase in cardiac Troponin T (cTnT) in stable chest pain subjects....

  11. Association of chest pain and risk of cardiovascular disease with coronary atherosclerosis in patients with inflammatory joint diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eRollefstad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The relation between chest pain and coronary atherosclerosis (CA in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD has not been explored previously. Our aim was to evaluate the associations of the presence of chest pain and the predicted 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD by use of several CVD risk algorithms, with multi-detector computer tomography (MDCT coronary angiography verified CA. Methods: Detailed information concerning chest pain and CVD risk factors was obtained in 335 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and ankylosing spondylitis (AS. In addition, 119 of these patients underwent MDCT coronary angiography.Results: Thirty-one percent of the patients (104/335 reported chest pain. Only 6 patients (1.8% had atypical angina pectoris (pricking pain at rest. In 69 patients without chest pain, two thirds had CA, while in those who reported chest pain (n=50, CA was present in 48.0%. In a logistic regression analysis, chest pain was not associated with CA (dependent variable (p=0.43. About 30% (Nagelkerke R2 of CA was explained by any of the CVD risk calculators: SCORE, Framingham Risk Score or Reynolds Risk Score.Conclusion: The presence of chest pain was surprisingly infrequently reported in patients with IJD who were referred for a CVD risk evaluation. However, when present, chest pain was weakly associated with CA, in contrast to the predicted CVD risk by several risk calculators which was highly associated with the presence of CA. These findings suggest that clinicians treating patients with IJD should be alert of coronary atherosclerotic disease also in absence of chest pain symptoms.

  12. [Chest pain in the emergency department : Differential diagnosis and diagnostic strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhnlein, T

    2017-01-01

    Chest pain as the leading symptom in emergency patients can have numerous causes and requires an immediate and targeted diagnostic and therapeutic strategy. Clinical scoring systems facilitate risk assessment for individual patients. In the emergency department, critical factors for success are defined professional qualification standards for physicians and nursing staff combined with a well-functioning organization of all technical procedures.

  13. Personality : Predictor of neurostimulation outcomes in patients with chest pain and normal coronary arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, J; DeJongste, MJL; Versteegen, GJ; Durenkamp, A; Staal, MJ

    Objectives. To study the impact of personality traits on the effect of neurostimulation in patients with chest pain and normal coronary arteries. Materials and Methods. Using the Dutch personality questionnaire, we retrospectively studied the personality traits in 33 patients treated with

  14. Persistent chest pain following oral dipyridamole for thallium 201 myocardial imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwai, A.H.; Jacobson, A.F.; McIntyre, K.M.; Williams, W.H.; Tow, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    A patient was admitted to the hospital with acute chest pain. After acute myocardial infarction was ruled out, he underwent a stress thallium 201 scintigraphy using oral dipyridamole and developed persistent angina with sedimentation time segement elevation. This complication has not been reported previously. It is recommended that appropriate intervention be available if severe ischemia develops following administration of dipyridamole for diagnostic imaging. (orig.)

  15. BNP was Associated with Ischemic Myocardial Scintigraphy and Death in Patients at Chest Pain Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, Jader Cunha de, E-mail: jadercazevedo@gmail.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Hospital Pró-Cardíaco, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Centro Universitário de Volta Redonda, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Reis, Bruno Cezario Costa; Barreto, Nathalia Monerat P.B. [Centro Universitário de Volta Redonda, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); F, Diogenes S. Junior; Prezotti, Lais S. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Procaci, Victor Rebelo; Octaviano, Vivian Werneck [Centro Universitário de Volta Redonda, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Volschan, Andre [Hospital Pró-Cardíaco, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Hospital Pró-Cardíaco, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    Recent studies have suggested that B-type Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) is an important predictor of ischemia and death in patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome. Increased levels of BNP are seen after episodes of myocardial ischemia and may be related to future adverse events. To determine the prognostic value of BNP for major cardiac events and to evaluate its association with ischemic myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). This study included retrospectively 125 patients admitted to the chest pain unit between 2002 and 2006, who had their BNP levels measured on admission and underwent CPM for risk stratification. BNP values were compared with the results of the MPS. The chi-square test was used for qualitative variables and the Student t test, for quantitative variables. Survival curves were adjusted using the Kaplan-Meier method and analyzed by using Cox regression. The significance level was 5%. The mean age was 63.9 ± 13.8 years, and the male sex represented 51.2% of the sample. Ischemia was found in 44% of the MPS. The mean BNP level was higher in patients with ischemia compared to patients with non-ischemic MPS (188.3 ± 208.7 versus 131.8 ± 88.6; p = 0.003). A BNP level greater than 80 pg/mL was the strongest predictor of ischemia on MPS (sensitivity = 60%, specificity = 70%, accuracy = 66%, PPV = 61%, NPV = 70%), and could predict medium-term mortality (RR = 7.29, 95% CI: 0.90-58.6; p = 0.045) independently of the presence of ischemia. BNP levels are associated with ischemic MPS findings and adverse prognosis in patients presenting with acute chest pain to the emergency room, thus, providing important prognostic information for an unfavorable clinical outcome.

  16. Application of triple rule-out with 64-slice spiral CT in the diagnosis of acute chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Pengyu; Li Kuncheng; Du Xiangyin; Cao Lizhen; Liu Jiabin; Yang Yanhuui; Liang Zhigang; Zhu Xiaolian; Liu Jian

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the performance of triple rule-out with 64-slice spiral CT in the combined examination of pulmonary artery, thoracic aorta and coronary artery for patients with acute chest pain. Methods: Seventy patients who presented with acute chest pain were included in the study. All of the patients underwent retrospective ECG-gated 64-slice computed tomography triple rule-out examination to evaluate the pulmonary arteries, thoracic aorta and coronary arteries. Multi-planar reconstruction (MPR), maximum intensity projection (MIP), curved-planar reconstruction (CPR) and volume rendering (VR) were used to display pulmonary arteries, thoracic aorta and coronary arteries. We evaluated the image quality of coronary artery and the enhancement of the pulmonary artery and thoracic aorta to estimate if the examination can fulfill the clinical demand for the differential diagnosis of acute chest pain. Results: The mean scan time was (8.5±1.0) s, and the dose of contrast medium injected was 100 ml. There were 95.7% (67/70) of patients whose CT values detected in the pulmonary artery and thoracic aorta after enhancement Were ≥200 HU. The image quality of 85.8% (720/839) coronary segments was classified as excellent, 8.6% (72/839) as good, and 5.6% (47/839) as poor. There were 20 eases with coronary stenoses ≥50%, 2 cases with pulmonary embolism, and 2 cases with aortic dissection. Conclusion: The triple rule-out examination with 64-slice spiral CT could depict pulmonary artery, thoracic aorta, and coronary artery in 8 s with good image quality. It has great potential in the etiological diagnosis for the patients with acute chest pain. (authors)

  17. How Effective Is the Use of Metaphor Therapy on Reducing Psychological Symptoms and Pain Discomfort in Patients with Non-Cardiac Chest Pain: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Bahremand

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychological symptoms of non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP including perceptual, emotional, and behavioral problems can effect patient perception of chest pain. This study was conducted to determine the effect of metaphor therapy on mitigating depression, anxiety, stress, and pain discomfort in patients with NCCP. Materials and Methods: This randomized, controlled, trial was conducted on 28 participants, who had visited the emergency department of Kermanshah Imam Ali Heart Hospital because of experiencing NCCP during the June to September 2014. The patients were randomly assigned to metaphor therapy and control groups (n=14 for each group during a four-week period. Our data collection questionnaires included Pain Discomfort Scale (PDS and Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS. Chi-square and MANCOVA tests were run, using SPSS version 20. Results: Twenty patients (71.4% completed the trial period until the final assessment. Our findings showed that metaphor therapy couldn’t lower depression, anxiety, stress, and pain discomfort; In fact, there was not a significant difference between the metaphor therapy and control groups regarding the aforementioned variables (P>0.05. Conclusions: Although the study results did not support the effectiveness of metaphor therapy for NCCP, further studies on the potential role of metaphor therapy in attenuating NCCP symptoms seem to be necessary.

  18. Gender bias revisited: new insights on the differential management of chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karatolios Konstantinos

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chest pain is a common complaint and reason for consultation in primary care. Few data exist from a primary care setting whether male patients are treated differently than female patients. We examined whether there are gender differences in general physicians' (GPs initial assessment and subsequent management of patients with chest pain, and how these differences can be explained Methods We conducted a prospective study with 1212 consecutive chest pain patients. The study was conducted in 74 primary care offices in Germany from October 2005 to July 2006. After a follow up period of 6 months, an independent interdisciplinary reference panel reviewed clinical data of every patient and decided about the etiology of chest pain at the time of patient recruitment (delayed type-reference standard. We adjusted gender differences of six process indicators for different models. Results GPs tended to assume that CHD is the cause of chest pain more often in male patients and referred more men for an exercise test (women 4.1%, men 7.3%, p = 0.02 and to the hospital (women 2.9%, men 6.6%, p Conclusions While observed gender differences can not be explained by differences in age, CHD prevalence, and underlying risk factors, the less typical symptom presentation in women might be an underlying factor. However this does not seem to result in suboptimal management in women but rather in overuse of services for men. We consider our conclusions rather hypothesis generating and larger studies will be necessary to prove our proposed model.

  19. Efficacy of Implementation of a Chest Pain Center at a Community Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alexandra; Chiu, Jason; Lau, Stanley K; Kok, Yih Jen; Wu, Jonathan Y H

    2017-12-01

    Chest pain is the second leading cause for emergency department (ED) visits in the United States; however, Asian-based community hospital in the United States. Additionally, this assessment sought to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a HEART protocol in the first 4 months after its adoption. The facility implemented the CPC, an observation unit, in October 2016. ED physicians risk stratified patients using the HEART score. The guidelines allow ED physicians to stratify patients into 3 categories: to discharge low-risk patients, observe moderate-risk patients in the CPC, and admit high-risk patients. Patients in the CPC received additional diagnostic work-up under the care of ED physicians and cardiologists for less than 24 hours. In addition, CPC patients were followed-up 2 and 30 days after discharge. A total of 172 patients presented at the ED with a chief complaint of chest pain. The majority of the patients were classified into the moderate-risk group (n = 101). Low-risk patients spent significantly less hours in the hospital than the moderate- and high-risk groups, and the high-risk group spent more time in the hospital than the moderate-risk group. The staff followed-up with 74 CPC patients through telephone calls to assess if patients were still experiencing chest pain and if they had followed-up with a cardiologist or primary care physician. The 2- and 30-day survival rates were 100% and 97%, respectively. The data showed a significant reduction in total length of stay for all chest pain patients. This retrospective program evaluation demonstrated some evidence in using HEART score to safely risk stratify chest pain patients to the appropriate level of care. As healthcare moves from a fee-for-service environment to value-based purchasing, hospitals need to devise and implement innovative strategies to provide efficient, beneficial, and safe care for the patients.

  20. Clinical utility of coronary CT angiography with low-dose chest CT in the evaluation of patients with atypical chest pain: a preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Soo Jin; Choo, Ki Seok; Kim, Chang Won

    2008-01-01

    To determine the clinical utility of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) with low-dose chest CT in the evaluation of patients with atypical chest pain. Ninety-six patients (mean age 60.2 years; age range, 41-68 years; 70 males) were referred for CCTA with low-dose chest CT (16-slice MDCT, Siemens) for an evaluation of atypical chest pain. When significant stenoses (lumen diameter reduction > 50%) were detected on CCTA, invasive coronary angiography (CA) was performed as the standard of reference. In all patients, medical chart review or telephone contact with patients was used to evaluate the contribution of CCTA with low-dose chest CT to the final clinical diagnosis, at least 6 months after performing CCTA. Among 96 patients, seven patients (7%) had significant stenoses as detected on CCTA, whereas two patients (2%) had significant stenoses and five patients had insignificant stenoses or no stenosis, as detected on conventional catheter angiography. In 18 (19%) of the 89 patients without significant stenosis detected on CCTA, this protocol provided additional information that suggested or confirmed an alternate clinical diagnosis. In patients with atypical chest pain, CCTA with low-dose chest CT could help to exclude ischemic heart disease and could provide important ancillary information for the final diagnosis

  1. Conditioned pain modulation and situational pain catastrophizing as preoperative predictors of pain following chest wall surgery: a prospective observational cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Grosen

    Full Text Available Variability in patients' postoperative pain experience and response to treatment challenges effective pain management. Variability in pain reflects individual differences in inhibitory pain modulation and psychological sensitivity, which in turn may be clinically relevant for the disposition to acquire pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of conditioned pain modulation and situational pain catastrophizing on postoperative pain and pain persistency.Preoperatively, 42 healthy males undergoing funnel chest surgery completed the Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Beck's Depression Inventory before undergoing a sequential conditioned pain modulation paradigm. Subsequently, the Pain Catastrophizing Scale was introduced and patients were instructed to reference the conditioning pain while answering. Ratings of movement-evoked pain and consumption of morphine equivalents were obtained during postoperative days 2-5. Pain was reevaluated at six months postoperatively.Patients reporting persistent pain at six months follow-up (n = 15 were not significantly different from pain-free patients (n = 16 concerning preoperative conditioned pain modulation response (Z = 1.0, P = 0.3 or level of catastrophizing (Z = 0.4, P = 1.0. In the acute postoperative phase, situational pain catastrophizing predicted movement-evoked pain, independently of anxiety and depression (β = 1.0, P = 0.007 whereas conditioned pain modulation predicted morphine consumption (β = -0.005, P = 0.001.Preoperative conditioned pain modulation and situational pain catastrophizing were not associated with the development of persistent postoperative pain following funnel chest repair. Secondary outcome analyses indicated that conditioned pain modulation predicted morphine consumption and situational pain catastrophizing predicted movement-evoked pain intensity in the acute postoperative phase. These findings may have

  2. Technetium-99m-Sestamibi in the diagnosis of acute chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilleece, T.; Salehi, N.; Better, N.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: A 45-year-old male was admitted to coronary care with a two-day history of recurrent chest pain. Despite maximal medical therapy, pain persisted. Examination and ECG with pain, were normal, suspicion of ischaemia was moderately high but coronary angiography was not immediately available. Technetium-99m-Sestamibi was prepared at the start of the day according to the standard preparation protocol (Du Pont). Coronary Care informed the Nuclear Medicine Department immediately the patient experienced a further episode of chest pain. Technetium-99m-Sestamibi was administered in coronary care, 4.30 minutes after being advised of the onset of further chest pain. Images were acquired 60 minute post-injection; 15 minutes after the patient had been given 200 mL of milk. A triple-headed gamma camera was used to acquire SPECT images over a 1200 arc, 30 frames of 30 seconds using a 64 x 64 matrix. The patient was laying prone with arms raised out of the field of view. Images showed a normal distribution of technetium-99m -Sestamibi throughout the myocardium. Due to ongoing clinical suspicion by the treating physician, coronary angiography was subsequently performed. This showed normal coronary arteries. Medical therapy was ceased and the patient discharged the next day. We concluded that the chest pain at the time of injection was not ischaemic. Previous trials had shown a 95% sensitivity for this method of diagnosing ischaemia. This method permits a novel and simple technique for diagnosing myocardial ischaemia and obviating the need for cardiac catheterization in this group of patients

  3. NICE recommendations for the assessment of stable chest pain: assessing the early economic and service impact in the rapid-access chest pain service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Reza; Raga, Santosh; Abdool, Ali; Disney, Andrew; Wong, Peter; Davis, Gershan K

    2013-05-01

    In 2010, guidelines published by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) suggested a change in the way patients with stable chest pain of suspected cardiac origin were investigated. These guidelines removed exercise treadmill testing from routine use and introduced cardiac CT to regular use. To investigate whether these guidelines had improved our service provision by reducing the number of further investigations required to make a diagnosis, and to see if our costs had increased now that the less expensive exercise treadmill tests were not recommended. Clinic letters were used to assess patients pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease for two six-month cohorts of consecutive patients seen in the rapid access chest pain clinic (January-June 2010 and July-December 2011) using NICE published methodology, and to ascertain which investigations patients had. Using NICE modelled costs, we generated comparative hypothetical costs for each cohort and an average cost per patient. In the January-June 2010 cohort, 435 patients with chest pain were seen, and in July-December 2011, 334 patients were seen. In the pre-NICE guidelines cohort, 23% of patients required two investigations as compared with 11.4% in the post-NICE guidelines cohort, with no patient requiring three investigations as compared with 3% in the original cohort. There was no significant increase in costs per patient in the post-NICE guidance group. Implementing NICE guidance reduced the number of investigations needed per patient, and did not prove more expensive for our department in the short term.

  4. A 26-year-old man with dyspnea and chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Mittal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old smoker male presented with a history of sudden onset dyspnea and right-sided chest pain. Chest radiograph revealed large right-sided pneumothorax which was managed with tube thoracostomy. High-resolution computed tomography thorax revealed multiple lung cysts, and for a definite diagnosis, a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery-guided lung biopsy was performed followed by pleurodesis. This clinicopathologic conference discusses the clinical and radiological differential diagnoses, utility of lung biopsy, and management options for patients with such a clinical presentation.

  5. Severity of exercise-induced ischemia with chest pain and recovery from ischemia after the disappearance of chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akutsu, Yasushi; Shinozuka, Akira; Kodama, Yusuke; Li, Hui-Ling; Yamanaka, Hideyuki; Katagiri, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    The severity of exercise-induced painful ischemia and its recovery after the disappearance of pain are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in severity of ischemia at both exercise and postexercise between painful ischemia and painless ischemia. After injections of technetium-99m tetrofosmin at peak ergometer exercise and thallium-201 at 3 minutes postexercise, dual-isotope single photon emission tomography was performed in 78 patients with angiographically proven ischemic heart disease. The extent of ischemic areas (the number of areas), the depth of ischemia in the ischemic area (the severity score of ischemia) and the extension of ischemia toward long axis of the left ventricle (the number of left ventricular levels with ischemic areas in apical, middle, and basal levels) at both exercise and postexercise were compared on the basis of the presence of pain and a history of diabetes mellitus (DM). The symptoms improved within 3 minutes postexercise in all painful ischemia patients. Of 59 patients with reversible ischemia, except for 4 painful ischemia patients with DM, the extent and depth of ischemia at postexercise were more severe in 14 painful ischemia patients without DM and 13 painless ischemia patients with DM than 28 painless ischemia patients without DM (extent; 2.9±1.7 areas, 3.5±2.8 areas versus 1.4±1.8 areas, P=0.005, depth; 3.8±3.1 scores, 5.8±5.4 scores versus 1.9±3.0 scores, P=0.0084, respectively) despite a comparable severity of ischemia at peak exercise (extent; 5.4±2.6 areas, 6.0±2.4 areas versus 4.3±3.3 areas, depth; 9.3±5.7 scores, 10.7±7.3 scores and 7.5±8.1 scores, all NS). The extension of ischemia toward long-axis of the left ventricle at both peak exercise and postexercise was more severe in the former 2 groups than the latter group (peak exercise; 2.4±0.6 levels, 2.5±0.7 levels versus 1.9 ±0.8 levels, P=0.0263, postexercise: 1.8±0.7 levels, 1.5±0.9 levels versus 0.8±0.8 levels, P=0

  6. Scapulothoracic bursitis as a significant cause of breast and chest wall pain: underrecognized and undertreated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneti, Cristiano; Arentz, Candy; Klimberg, V Suzanne

    2010-10-01

    Pain is one of the most commonly reported breast complaints. Referred pain from inflammation of the shoulder bursa is often overlooked as a cause of breast pain. The objective of this study is to evaluate the role of shoulder bursitis as a cause of breast/chest pain. An IRB-approved retrospective review from July 2005 to September 2009 identified 461 patients presenting with breast/chest pain. Cases identified with a trigger point in the medial aspect of the ipsilateral scapula were treated with a bursitis injection at the point of maximum tenderness. The bursitis injection contains a mixture of local anesthetic and corticosteroid. Presenting complaint, clinical response and associated factors were recorded and treated with descriptive statistics. Average age of the study group was 53.4 ± 12.7 years, and average BMI was 30.4 ± 7.4. One hundred and three patients were diagnosed with shoulder bursitis as the cause of breast pain and received the bursitis injection. Most cases (81/103 or 78.6%) presented with the breast/chest as the site of most significant discomfort, where 8.7% (9/103) had the most severe pain at the shoulder, 3.9% (4/103) at the axilla and 3.9% (4/103) at the medial scapular border. Of the treated patients, 83.5% (86/103) had complete relief of the pain, 12.6% (13/103) had improvement of symptoms with some degree of residual pain, and only 3.9%(4/103) did not respond at all to the treatment. The most commonly associated factor to the diagnosis of bursitis was the history of a previous mastectomy, present in 27.2% (28/103) of the cases. Shoulder bursitis represents a significant cause of breast/chest pain (22.3% or 103/461) and can be successfully treated with a local injection at site of maximum tenderness in the medial scapular border.

  7. Can ECG-gated MDCT be considered an obligatory step to plan and manage a new chest-pain unit?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runza, G.; Alaimo, V.; La Grutta, L.; Galia, M.; Basile, A.; Cademartiri, F.; Krestin, G.P.; Midiri, M.

    2007-01-01

    The recent improvements in multi-detector computed tomography technology and its application in cardiac field allow to consider this non-invasive imaging technique as a promising comprehensive method for detecting significant coronary stenoses in a chest-pain unit. The possibility to use the ECG-synchronisation acquisition protocol, normally limited to the cardiac volume, for the entire thoracic vascular system should have the remarkable potential to reduce invasive and non-invasive procedures actually used to investigate acute chest pain and the number of unnecessary hospital admissions without reducing appropriate admissions in patients with chest pain

  8. Cardiac Hydatid Cyst: An Unusual Cause of Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esref Tuncer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid disease is a parasitic infection caused by larvae of Echinococcus granulosus. Cardiac involvement in hydatid disease is uncommon, constituting only 0.5 - 2% of all cases of hydatidosis. Most patients with cardiac echinococcosis are asymptomatic, and the disease is often latent because a hydatid cyst in the heart grows very slowly. Only approximately 10 % of patients, especially those with large hydatid cysts, have clinical manifestations. Precordial pain is the one of the common symptoms and is most often vague and does not resemble angina pectoris.

  9. Acute chest pain after bench press exercise in a healthy young adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smereck, Janet A; Papafilippaki, Argyro; Sudarshan, Sawali

    2016-01-01

    Bench press exercise, which involves repetitive lifting of weights to full arm extension while lying supine on a narrow bench, has been associated with complications ranging in acuity from simple pectoral muscle strain, to aortic and coronary artery dissection. A 39-year-old man, physically fit and previously asymptomatic, presented with acute chest pain following bench press exercise. Diagnostic evaluation led to the discovery of critical multivessel coronary occlusive disease, and subsequently, highly elevated levels of lipoprotein (a). Judicious use of ancillary testing may identify the presence of "high-risk" conditions in a seemingly "low-risk" patient. Emergency department evaluation of the young adult with acute chest pain must take into consideration an extended spectrum of potential etiologies, so as to best guide appropriate management.

  10. Diagnostic value for coronary artery disease of ST depression and chest pain during dipyridamole loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Yoshihiro; Doi, Yoshinori; Aono, Tadashi; Odawara, Hiroaki; Chikamori, Taishiro; Yamada, Mitsutoshi; Takata, Jun; Ozawa, Toshio; Hamashige, Naohisa.

    1991-01-01

    The diagnostic significance of both ST depression and chest pain during dipyridamole loading was assessed in 437 patients with coronary artery disease (CRD) who have received dipyridamole-loading thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy and coronary arteriography. ST depression and chest pain were induced in 35% and 42%, respectively. ST depression occurred in 23% for one vessel disease, 55% for two-vessel disease, 67% for three-vessel disease, and 11% for non-significant disease. In the absence of myocardial infarction, it occurred in as many as 78% for two-vessel disease and 94% for three-vessel disease. ST depression had a sensitivity of 51% and a specificity of 89%. Chest pain had a lower specificity (77%), whereas the sensitivity remained the same (51%). In 42 (31%) of 134 patients with ST depression, coronary revascularization was necessary in the early stage. With a median follow up of 29 months, 3 patients (2%) died of cardiac events, and 12 (9%) had nonfatal cardiac complications. There was a significant correlation between reversible defects (RD) on myocardial scintigrams and ST depression; RD were seen in 81% of ST depression cases, and ST depression occurred in 51% of 210 RD cases. The more diseased vessels, the more frequently ST depression occurred in accordance with RD on myocardial scintigrams. Both ST depression and chest pain during dipyridamole loading tended to be associated with myocardial ischemia, suggesting the diagnostic value in CRD patients with limited exercise loading. RD on myocardial scintigrams was considered attributable to coronary steal phenomenon for multi-vessel disease and to the difference in the relative increase of the coronary flow for single vessel disease. (N.K.)

  11. Myocardial perfusion abnormality and chest pain in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Michihiro; Kurihara, Tadashi; Murano, Kenichi; Usami, Masahisa

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the role of myocardial ischemia in the development of chest pain in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), exercise stress (Ex) redistribution myocardial single photon emission CT's (SPECT's) with thallium-201 (Tl) were obtained in 27 patients with HCM. In all patients, coronary arteries were normal arteriographically. Patients were classified into NYHA Class I, II and III according to the frequency and severity of the chest pain during daily life. In these 3 groups, age, sex and intraventricular septal thickness measured by echocardiography were not different. Types of myocardial perfusion obtained by myocardial SPECT's were divided into 5: (1) normal perfusion, (2) no perfusion defect with abnormal myocardial Tl washout rate (WOR) during 3 hours (<30%) [Def(-)/WORabn], (3) reversible perfusion defect (RD), (4) fixed defect with abnormal WOR (FD/WORabn), and (5) fixed defect with normal WOR (FD/WORnl). In 14 patients of Class I, 9 patients (64%) showed normal perfusion but the rest showed perfusion abnormality (def(-)/WORabn in 3 and RD in 2). In Class II and III, all patients showed perfusion abnormalities of RD, FD/WORabn or FD/WORnl. As the functional class progressed from Class II to III, the ratio of fixed defect (both WORnl and WORabn) to RD increased, but it was not statistically significant. In 2 patients in whom Ex SPECT's were repeated because of the progression of the chest pain, the severity of the perfusion abnormality also progressed. Perfusion abnormalities were observed most frequently in anterior (35%), then inferior/posterior (20%) and septal wall (18%). The frequency of Ex induced ECG abnormalities (ST-depression or T wave changes) increased as the NYHA Class progressed (Class III vs I p<0.05). These findings suggested the following: chest pain in patients with HCM relates to the myocardial ischemia which may originate in the myocardial small arteries, and when the lesions progress myocardial necrosis may ensue. (author)

  12. [Chronic chest pain after rib fracture: It can cause a disability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiou, S; Ouadnouni, Y; Lakranbi, M; Traibi, A; Antoini, F; Smahi, M

    2018-04-01

    The rib fractures and instability of the chest wall are the main lesions of closed chest trauma. These lesions can be a source of chronic, often disabling with daily discomfort resulting limitation of some activities. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of this phenomenon in order to improve the quality of early care. Through an observational retrospective cohort study on a number of 41 patients supported and monitored for traumatic rib fractures at the Military Hospital of Meknes during the period from October 2010 to March 2016. The circumstances of the accident were dominated by accidents of public roads (86%) and concerned the young adult male. Radiographs have enumerated 165 fracture lines with an average of 4 rib fractures per patient. These were unilateral fractures in 88% of cases, and concerned the means arc in 46% of cases. The rib fracture was undisplaced fracture in 39% of patients, whereas in 2 patients, a flail chest was present. Post-traumatic hemothorax (63% of cases) were the thoracic lesions most commonly associated with rib fractures. The initial management consisted in the use of analgesics systemically in all patients. The retrospective evaluation of pain by the verbal scale was possible in 30 patients. The persistent pain was noted in 60% of cases. This pain was triggered by a simple effort to moderate in 55% of cases, and hard effort in 28% of cases. In 17% of patients, even at rest, the pain occurred intermittently. The impact in terms of disability was mild to moderate in 28% of cases and important in 17%. The neuropathic pain was found in 3 patients. Therapeutically, the first and second levels of analgesics were sufficient to relieve pain. The neuroleptics were required for 2 patients. Our study confirms the persistence of chronic painful, sometimes lasting several years after the initial chest trauma. This pain is responsible of disability triggered most often after exercise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson

  13. Myocardial bridging causing ischemia and recurrent chest pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdou Mohamed

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial bridging is present when a segment of a major epicardial coronary artery runs intramurally through the myocardium. It usually has a benign prognosis, but in some cases myocardial ischemia, infarction and sudden cardiac death have been reported. We are here reporting a case of myocardial bridging which was complicated with recurrent chest pain and transient ST-segment elevation during exercise treadmill test. Case presentation A 40 year-old-man presented with recurrent retrosternal chest pain of 2 months duration. He had history of smoking and was obese, otherwise no physical abnormalities were detected by examination. Electrocardiogram and blood tests were normal apart from impaired glucose tolerance with elevated triglycerides and decreased level of high density lipoprotein cholesterol. While doing exercise treadmill test, the patient developed chest pain and significant ST-segment elevation in almost all precordial leads that persisted for about 15 minutes through recovery. We decided to admit the patient to the coronary care unit for further management and to perform coronary angiogram. Myocardial bridging was observed in the mid segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Medical treatment was decided. At one year follow up, our patient was healthy and had no cardiac complaints. In conclusion, myocardial bridging may predispose to coronary vasospasm that may leads to ischemic complications.

  14. Dual-source computed tomography in patients with acute chest pain: feasibility and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schertler, Thomas; Scheffel, Hans; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Stolzmann, Paul; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Seifert, Burkhardt [University of Zurich, Department of Biostatistics, Zurich (Switzerland); Flohr, Thomas G. [Computed Tomography CTE PA, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and image quality of dual-source computed tomography angiography (DSCTA) in patients with acute chest pain for the assessment of the lung, thoracic aorta, and for pulmonary and coronary arteries. Sixty consecutive patients (32 female, 28 male, mean age 58.1{+-}16.3 years) with acute chest pain underwent contrast-enhanced electrocardiography-gated DSCTA without prior beta-blocker administration. Vessel attenuation of different thoracic vascular territories was measured, and image quality was semi-quantitatively analyzed by two independent readers. Image quality of the thoracic aorta was diagnostic in all 60 patients, image quality of pulmonary arteries was diagnostic in 59, and image quality of coronary arteries was diagnostic in 58 patients. Pairwise intraindividual comparisons of attenuation values were small and ranged between 1{+-}6 HU comparing right and left coronary artery and 56{+-}9 HU comparing the pulmonary trunk and left ventricle. Mean attenuation was 291{+-}65 HU in the ascending aorta, 334{+-}93 HU in the pulmonary trunk, and 285{+-}66 HU and 268{+-}67 HU in the right and left coronary artery, respectively. DSCTA is feasible and provides diagnostic image quality of the thoracic aorta, pulmonary and coronary arteries in patients with acute chest pain. (orig.)

  15. Invasive treatment of NSTEMI patients in German Chest Pain Units - Evidence for a treatment paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frank P; Schmitt, Claus; Hochadel, Matthias; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Darius, Harald; Maier, Lars S; Schmitt, Claus; Heusch, Gerd; Voigtländer, Thomas; Mudra, Harald; Gori, Tommaso; Senges, Jochen; Münzel, Thomas

    2018-03-15

    Patients with non ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) represent the largest fraction of patients with acute coronary syndrome in German Chest Pain units. Recent evidence on early vs. selective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is ambiguous with respect to effects on mortality, myocardial infarction (MI) and recurrent angina. With the present study we sought to investigate the prognostic impact of PCI and its timing in German Chest Pain Unit (CPU) NSTEMI patients. Data from 1549 patients whose leading diagnosis was NSTEMI were retrieved from the German CPU registry for the interval between 3/2010 and 3/2014. Follow-up was available at median of 167days after discharge. The patients were grouped into a higher (Group A) and lower risk group (Group B) according to GRACE score and additional criteria on admission. Group A had higher Killip classes, higher BNP levels, reduced EF and significant more triple vessel disease (pGerman Chest Pain Units. This treatment paradox may worsen prognosis in patients who could derive the largest benefit from early revascularization. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Dual-source computed tomography in patients with acute chest pain: feasibility and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schertler, Thomas; Scheffel, Hans; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Stolzmann, Paul; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem; Seifert, Burkhardt; Flohr, Thomas G.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and image quality of dual-source computed tomography angiography (DSCTA) in patients with acute chest pain for the assessment of the lung, thoracic aorta, and for pulmonary and coronary arteries. Sixty consecutive patients (32 female, 28 male, mean age 58.1±16.3 years) with acute chest pain underwent contrast-enhanced electrocardiography-gated DSCTA without prior beta-blocker administration. Vessel attenuation of different thoracic vascular territories was measured, and image quality was semi-quantitatively analyzed by two independent readers. Image quality of the thoracic aorta was diagnostic in all 60 patients, image quality of pulmonary arteries was diagnostic in 59, and image quality of coronary arteries was diagnostic in 58 patients. Pairwise intraindividual comparisons of attenuation values were small and ranged between 1±6 HU comparing right and left coronary artery and 56±9 HU comparing the pulmonary trunk and left ventricle. Mean attenuation was 291±65 HU in the ascending aorta, 334±93 HU in the pulmonary trunk, and 285±66 HU and 268±67 HU in the right and left coronary artery, respectively. DSCTA is feasible and provides diagnostic image quality of the thoracic aorta, pulmonary and coronary arteries in patients with acute chest pain. (orig.)

  17. Predictors of Adverse Outcomes of Patients with Chest Pain and Primary Diagnosis of Non-Cardiac Pain at the Time of Discharge from Emergency Department: A 30-Days Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Mohammadhossien; Mirzaei, Masoud; Amin, Ahmad; Emami, Mahmoud; Aryanpoor, Reza; Shamsi, Farimah; Sarebanhassanabadi, Mohammadtaghi

    2016-07-01

    Chest pain is a common symptom for referring patients to emergency departments (ED). Among those referred, some are admitted to hospitals with a definite or tentative diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome and some are discharged with primary diagnosis of non-cardiac chest pain. This study aimed at investigating 30 days' adverse outcomes of patients discharged from ED of a major heart center in Iran. Out of 1638 chest pain admissions to the centre during 2010-2011, 962 patients (mean age= 50.9±15.9 years) who were admitted to Afshar Heart Center's ED with chest pain as their chief complaint, and discharged with primary diagnosis of non-cardiac chest pain, were followed for any adverse cardiac events 30 days post discharge. The adverse events were: unstable angina, non-ST-elevated myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), ST elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI), coronary revascularization (percutaneous angioplasty, coronary artery bypass grafting) and death. Adverse cardiac events, including acute coronary syndrome (ACS), revascularization and death were observed in 30 patients (3.1%) including: acute MI n=5 (0.5%, sudden cardiac death inn=1 (0.1%, coronary revascularization in n=8 (0.8%) and hospitalization due to unstable angina/NSTEMI in n=16 (1-7%). Adverse events were seen more frequently in patients with history of hypertension, dyslipidemia and previous coronary artery disease. In univariate analysis, the chance of postdischarge adverse cardiac events was higher in patients with hypertension (OR=9.36, CI=3.24-27.03), previous coronary artery disease (OR= 3.8, CI=1.78-8.0), dyslipidemia (OR=3.5, CI=1.7-7.38) and discharge against medical advice (OR=2.85, CI= 1.37-5.91). The extent of adverse cardiac events in patients with a primary diagnosis of non-cardiac chest pain within 30 days of discharge was significant, mandating nation-wide registries to provide better care for these patients.

  18. Approach to chest pain and acute myocardial infarction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prevalence accounts for 20 40% of the general population, with an incidence .... risk stratification for invasive v. conservative ... The optimal management of STEMI patients includes providing the fastest .... biochemical variables to estimate the short, intermediate and long .... Third universal definition of myocardial infarction.

  19. An empirical assessment of boarding and quality of care: delays in care among chest pain, pneumonia, and cellulitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan W; Chang, Yuchiao; Weissman, Joel S; Griffey, Richard T; Thomas, James; Nergui, Suvd; Hamedani, Azita G; Camargo, Carlos A; Singer, Sara

    2011-12-01

    As hospital crowding has increased, more patients have ended up boarding in the emergency department (ED) awaiting their inpatient beds. To the best of our knowledge, no study has compared the quality of care of boarded and nonboarded patients. This study sought to examine whether being a boarded patient and boarding longer were associated with more delays, medication errors, and adverse events among ED patients admitted with chest pain, pneumonia, or cellulitis. This study was a retrospective cohort design in which data collection was accomplished via medical record review from two urban teaching hospitals. Patients admitted with chest pain, pneumonia, or cellulitis between August 2004 and January 2005 were eligible for inclusion. Our outcomes measures were: 1) delays in administration of home medications, cardiac enzyme tests, partial thromboplastin time (PTT), and antibiotics; 2) medication errors; and 3) adverse events or near misses. Primary independent variables were boarded status, boarding time, and boarded time interval. Multiple logistic regression models controlling for patient, ED, and hospital characteristics were used. A total of 1,431 patient charts were included: 811 with chest pain, 387 with pneumonia, and 233 with cellulitis. Boarding time was associated with an increased odds of home medication delays (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05 to 1.10), as were boarded time intervals of 12, 18, and 24 hours. Boarding time also was associated with lower odds of having a late cardiac enzyme test (AOR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.88 to 0.97). Boarding was associated with home medication delays, but fewer cardiac enzyme test delays. Boarding was not associated with delayed PTT checks, antibiotic administration, medication errors, or adverse events/near misses. These findings likely reflect the inherent resources of the ED and the inpatient units. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  20. Utilizing DMAIC six sigma and evidence-based medicine to streamline diagnosis in chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sameer; Thomas, Kory M

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the difference between the current process flow model for a typical patient workup for chest pain and development of a new process flow model that incorporates DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, control) Six Sigma and evidence-based medicine in a best practices model for diagnosis and treatment. The first stage, DMAIC Six Sigma, is used to highlight areas of variability and unnecessary tests in the current process flow for a patient presenting to the emergency department or physician's clinic with chest pain (also known as angina). The next stage, patient process flow, utilizes DMAIC results in the development of a simulated model that represents real-world variability in the diagnosis and treatment of a patient presenting with angina. The third and final stage is used to analyze the evidence-based output and quantify the factors that drive physician diagnosis accuracy and treatment, as well as review the potential for a broad national evidence-based database. Because of the collective expertise captured within the computer-oriented evidence-based model, the study has introduced an innovative approach to health care delivery by bringing expert-level care to any physician triaging a patient for chest pain anywhere in the world. Similar models can be created for other ailments as well, such as headache, gastrointestinal upset, and back pain. This updated way of looking at diagnosing patients stemming from an evidence-based best practice decision support model may improve workflow processes and cost savings across the health care continuum.

  1. Painful Vaso-occlusive Crisis as a  Prodromal Phase of Acute Chest Syndrome. Is Only One Chest X-ray Enough? A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalambos Neocleous

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The predominant pathophysiological feature of homozygous sickle cell anemia (SCA is the vaso-occlusion. Vaso-occlusion can be associated with painful crises, which are the primary reason for those patients to seek medical care. Vaso-occlusion is responsible for the acute chest syndrome (ACS with large morbidity and mortality or more rarely (and especially in adults for priapism and acute neurological events (strokes. A 10-year-old boy with homozygous SCA was admitted to the Pediatric Emergencies with painful vaso-occlusive crisis and fever. Initially he had normal chest X-ray but, after 24-hour-hospitalization, he developed  ACS with new chest X-ray findings. He was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics, blood transfusions and bronchodilators and after a  six-day treatment, he was significantly improved. The patient was discharged 13 days later with no other therapy at home. The possibility of  ACS development should be still considered, even when a  known patient with SCA presents a  painful vaso-occlusive crisis with an initial normal chest X-ray. Therefore, repeated clinical examination is required and possible changes in  the clinical status could indicate the necessity of a  new radiographic examination. In  this way, early  ACS could be recognized and the catastrophic consequences due to this syndrome could be avoided.

  2. Impact of a pain protocol including hypnosis in major burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Mette M; Davadant, Maryse; Marin, Christian; Wasserfallen, Jean-Blaise; Pinget, Christophe; Maravic, Philippe; Koch, Nathalie; Raffoul, Wassim; Chiolero, René L

    2010-08-01

    Pain is a major issue after burns even when large doses of opioids are prescribed. The study focused on the impact of a pain protocol using hypnosis on pain intensity, anxiety, clinical course, and costs. All patients admitted to the ICU, aged >18 years, with an ICU stay >24h, accepting to try hypnosis, and treated according to standardized pain protocol were included. Pain was scaled on the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) (mean of daily multiple recordings), and basal and procedural opioid doses were recorded. Clinical outcome and economical data were retrieved from hospital charts and information system, respectively. Treated patients were matched with controls for sex, age, and the burned surface area. Forty patients were admitted from 2006 to 2007: 17 met exclusion criteria, leaving 23 patients, who were matched with 23 historical controls. Altogether patients were 36+/-14 years old and burned 27+/-15%BSA. The first hypnosis session was performed after a median of 9 days. The protocol resulted in the early delivery of higher opioid doses/24h (ppatient. A pain protocol including hypnosis reduced pain intensity, improved opioid efficiency, reduced anxiety, improved wound outcome while reducing costs. The protocol guided use of opioids improved patient care without side effects, while hypnosis had significant psychological benefits.

  3. Clinical utility of the HEART score in patients admitted with chest pain to an inner-city hospital in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Soumya; Shah, Mahek; Alhamshari, Yaser; Ram, Pradhum; Puri, Ritika; Lu, Marvin; Balderia, Percy; Imms, John B; Maludum, Obiora; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2017-06-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common presentations to a hospital, and appropriate triaging of these patients can be challenging. The HEART score has been used for such purposes in some countries and only a few validation studies from the USA are available. We aim to determine the utility of the HEART score in patients presenting with chest pain to an inner-city hospital in the USA. We retrospectively screened 417 consecutive patients admitted with chest pain to the observation/telemetry units at Einstein Medical Center Philadelphia. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 299 patients were included in the analysis. Patients were divided into low-risk (0-3) and intermediate-high (≥4)-risk HEART score groups. Baseline characteristics, thrombolysis in myocardial infarction score, need for revascularization during index hospitalization, and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) at 6 weeks and 12 months were recorded. There were 98 and 201 patients in the low-score group and intermediate-high-score group, respectively. Compared with the low-score group, patients in the intermediate-high-risk group had a higher incidence of revascularization during the index hospital stay (16.4 vs. 0%; P=0.001), longer hospital stay, higher MACE at 6 weeks (9.5 vs. 0%) and 12 months (20.4 vs. 3.1%), and higher cardiac readmissions. HEART score of at least 4 independently predicted MACE at 12 months (odds ratio 7.456, 95% confidence interval: 2.175-25.56; P=0.001) after adjusting for other risk factors in regression analysis. HEART score of at least 4 was predictive of worse outcomes in patients with chest pain in an inner-city USA hospital. If validated in multicenter prospective studies, the HEART score could potentially be useful in risk-stratifying patients presenting with chest pain in the USA and could impact clinical decision-making.

  4. Chest pain in rubber chemical workers exposed to carbon disulphide and methaemoglobin formers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, L.C.; Weber, R.P.

    1984-08-01

    A cross sectional prevalence study of chest pain in 94 rubber chemical workers exposed to carbon disulfide (CS2) and methemoglobin forming aromatic amines was carried out. The purpose of the study was to determine whether the prevalence of chest pain or coronary heart disease (CHD), or both, in exposed individuals exceeded that of a group of non-exposed individuals from the same plant. Cardiovascular, smoking, and occupational histories were obtained. Blood pressure, height, weight, serum cholesterol, and fasting blood glucose were measured. Resting electrocardiograms (ECGs) were obtained on all study participants, as were exercise stress tests on selected exposed individuals. Matching eliminated important known risk factors for coronary artery disease. Both chest pain and angina were significantly related to exposure, controlling for age and cigarette smoking. This association was not dependent on duration of exposure as defined by 10 or more years of employment in the department of interest. CHD as defined by angina, a history of myocardial infarction, or a coronary ECG or a combination of these occurred more frequently among exposed workers. The number of abnormal ECGs in the exposed group was twice that in the control group, but the difference was not statistically significant. Age rather than exposure appeared to be the important variable associated with raised blood pressure. Neither biological measures of exposure nor ECGs showed an acute effect of workplace exposures on the myocardium. Possible additive or multiplicative effects of individual chemical agents could not be evaluated. Appropriate modification of medical surveillance of rubber chemical workers with exposure to CS2 and aromatic amines is warranted.

  5. Value of Low Triiodothyronine and Subclinical Myocardial Injury for Clinical Outcomes in Chest Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Min; Ki, Young-Jae; Choi, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Bo-Bae; Shin, Byung Chul; Song, Heesang; Kim, Dong-Min

    2015-11-01

    Low triiodothyronine (T3) levels and subclinical myocardial injury may be associated with adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular (CCV) events in individuals without clinically apparent coronary heart disease (CHD). The aim of this study was to determine the associations of a low T3 level and subclinical myocardial injury with the development of adverse CCV events in individuals without clinically apparent CHD. T3 and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) levels were analyzed in 250 patients with chest pain free of CHD and heart failure. The primary end point was the composite of sudden cardiac death, ischemic stroke, newly developed atrial fibrillation, pericardial effusion and thrombosis. Throughout a mean follow-up of 15.6 months, the primary end point happened in 17 patients (6.8%). Kaplan-Meier analysis disclosed a notably higher overall occurrence rate in patients with hs-cTnT levels ≥0.014 ng/mL and in patients with T3 <60 ng/dL. An exaggerated hazard was observed in patients with combined high hs-cTnT and low T3 levels. After adjustment, the hazard ratio for overall events in patients with high hs-cTnT/low T3 versus normal hs-cTnT/T3 was 11.72 (95% confidence interval, 2.83-48.57; P = 0.001). In patients with chest pain without clinically obvious CHD, high hs-cTnT combined with low T3 was associated with adverse cardiac/CCV events and was an independent predictor of overall events even after adjustment. These data suggest the importance of systemic factors, such as low T3 syndrome, in the development of adverse cardiac/CCV events beyond advancing clinical atherosclerotic coronary disease in patients with chest pain.

  6. Investigation of paramedics' compliance with clinical practice guidelines for the management of chest pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Figgis, Ken

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Acute coronary syndromes remain a leading cause of preventable early deaths. However, previous studies have indicated that paramedics\\' compliance with chest pain protocols is suboptimal and that many patients do not receive the benefits of appropriate prehospital treatment. AIMS: To evaluate paramedics\\' level of compliance with national clinical practice guidelines and to investigate why, in certain circumstances, they may deviate from the clinical guidelines. SETTING: The Health Service Executive Mid-Western Regional Ambulance Service which serves a mixed urban and rural population across three counties in the west of Ireland. METHOD: A retrospective review of completed ambulance Patient Care Report Forms was conducted for all adult patients with non-traumatic chest pain treated between 1 December 2007 and 31 March 2008. During the same study period, paramedics were asked to complete a prospective questionnaire survey investigating the rationale behind their treatment decisions, their estimation of patient risk and their attitudes towards the clinical practice guidelines and training. RESULTS: 382 completed Patient Care Report Forms were identified for patients with chest pain, of whom 84.8% received ECG monitoring, 75.9% were given oxygen, 44.8% were treated with sublingual glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) and 50.8% were treated with aspirin. Only 20.4% of patients had a prehospital 12-lead ECG recorded. 58 completed questionnaires were returned (response rate 15%); 64% of respondents said they had received insufficient training to identify ECG abnormalities. CONCLUSIONS: Prehospital treatment with oxygen, aspirin, sublingual GTN and ECG monitoring remains underused by paramedics, even though only a small number of patients had documented contraindications to their use. The small number of patients who received a prehospital 12-lead ECG is a cause of particular concern and suggests that incomplete patient assessment may contribute to undertreatment

  7. Low incidence of chest wall pain with a risk-adapted lung stereotactic body radiation therapy approach using three or five fractions based on chest wall dosimetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaud P Coroller

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To examine the frequency and potential of dose-volume predictors for chest wall (CW toxicity (pain and/or rib fracture for patients receiving lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT using treatment planning methods to minimize CW dose and a risk-adapted fractionation scheme. METHODS: We reviewed data from 72 treatment plans, from 69 lung SBRT patients with at least one year of follow-up or CW toxicity, who were treated at our center between 2010 and 2013. Treatment plans were optimized to reduce CW dose and patients received a risk-adapted fractionation of 18 Gy×3 fractions (54 Gy total if the CW V30 was less than 30 mL or 10-12 Gy×5 fractions (50-60 Gy total otherwise. The association between CW toxicity and patient characteristics, treatment parameters and dose metrics, including biologically equivalent dose, were analyzed using logistic regression. RESULTS: With a median follow-up of 20 months, 6 (8.3% patients developed CW pain including three (4.2% grade 1, two (2.8% grade 2 and one (1.4% grade 3. Five (6.9% patients developed rib fractures, one of which was symptomatic. No significant associations between CW toxicity and patient and dosimetric variables were identified on univariate nor multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Optimization of treatment plans to reduce CW dose and a risk-adapted fractionation strategy of three or five fractions based on the CW V30 resulted in a low incidence of CW toxicity. Under these conditions, none of the patient characteristics or dose metrics we examined appeared to be predictive of CW pain.

  8. Esophageal Manometry with Provocative Testing in Patients with Noncardiac Angina-Like Chest Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Paterson, William G; Marciano-D’Amore, Delia A; Beck, Ivan T; Da Costa, Laurington R

    1991-01-01

    In a five year period 238 of 594 esophageal manometric studies performed in the authors’ laboratory were done on patients whose major reason for referral was noncardiac angina-like chest pain. Standard eophageal manometry was performed followed by an acid-antacid perfusion period (Bernstein test) and then subcutaneous bethanechol (80 μg/kg to a maximum of 5 mg) was adminstered. Baseline manometry was normal in 38% of patients and was diagnostic of ‘nutcracker’ esophagus, nonspecific esophagea...

  9. Cost-effectiveness of exercise 201Tl myocardial SPECT in patients with chest pain assessed by decision-tree analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosuda, Shigeru; Momiyama, Yukihiko; Ohsuzu, Fumitaka; Kusano, Shoichi; Ichihara, Kiyoshi

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the potential cost-effectiveness of exercise 201 Tl myocardial SPECT in outpatients with angina-like chest pain, we developed a decision-tree model which comprises three 1000-patients groups, i.e., a coronary arteriography (CAG) group, a follow-up group, and a SPECT group, and total cost and cardiac events, including cardiac deaths, were calculated. Variables used for the decision-tree analysis were obtained from references and the data available at out hospital. The sensitivity and specificity of 201 Tl SPECT for diagnosing angina pectoris, and its prevalence were assumed to be 95%, 85%, and 33%, respectively. The mean costs were 84.9 x 10 4 yen/patient in the CAG group, 30.2 x 10 4 yen/patient in the follow-up group, and 71.0 x 10 4 yen/patient in the SPECT group. The numbers of cardiac events and cardiac deaths were 56 and 15, respectively in the CAG group, 264 and 81 in the follow-up group, and 65 and 17 in the SPECT group. SPECT increases cardiac events and cardiac deaths by 0.9% and 0.2%, but it reduces the number of CAG studies by 50.3%, and saves 13.8 x 10 4 yen/patient, as compared to the CAG group. In conclusion, the exercise 201 Tl myocardial SPECT strategy for patients with chest pain has the potential to reduce health care costs in Japan. (author)

  10. Comprehensive cardiovascular ECG-gated MDCT as a standard diagnostic tool in patients with acute chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runza, G.; La Grutta, L.; Alaimo, V.; Evola, S.; Lo Re, F.; Bartolotta, T.V.; Cademartiri, F.; Midiri, M.

    2007-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, and aortic dissection are diseases associated with acute chest pain and may lead to severe morbidity and mortality. These diseases may not be trivial to diagnose in the settings of emergency room. ECG-gated multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), already established for the assessment of pulmonary embolism and aortic dissection, provides reliable information regarding the triage of patients with acute coronary syndrome in the emergency room. MDCT recently appeared to be logistically feasible and a promising comprehensive method for the evaluation of cardiac and non-cardiac chest pain in emergency department patients. The possibility to scan the entire thorax visualizing the thoracic aorta, the pulmonary arteries, and the coronary arteries could provide a new approach to the triage of acute chest pain. The inherent advantage of MDCT with cardiac state-of-the-art capabilities is the rapid investigation of the main sources of acute chest pain with a high negative predictive value. Recent studies also reports an advantage in terms of costs. With current evidence, the selection of patients with acute chest pain candidates to MDCT should remain restricted to avoid unjustified risk of ionizing radiation

  11. Comprehensive cardiovascular ECG-gated MDCT as a standard diagnostic tool in patients with acute chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runza, G. [Department of Radiology, University of Palermo (Italy)], E-mail: grunza@sirm.org; La Grutta, L.; Alaimo, V. [Department of Radiology, University of Palermo (Italy); Evola, S. [Department of Cardiology, University of Palermo (Italy); Lo Re, F.; Bartolotta, T.V. [Department of Radiology, University of Palermo (Italy); Cademartiri, F. [Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Cardiovascular CT Unit, University Hospital, Parma (Italy); Midiri, M. [Department of Radiology, University of Palermo (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    Acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, and aortic dissection are diseases associated with acute chest pain and may lead to severe morbidity and mortality. These diseases may not be trivial to diagnose in the settings of emergency room. ECG-gated multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), already established for the assessment of pulmonary embolism and aortic dissection, provides reliable information regarding the triage of patients with acute coronary syndrome in the emergency room. MDCT recently appeared to be logistically feasible and a promising comprehensive method for the evaluation of cardiac and non-cardiac chest pain in emergency department patients. The possibility to scan the entire thorax visualizing the thoracic aorta, the pulmonary arteries, and the coronary arteries could provide a new approach to the triage of acute chest pain. The inherent advantage of MDCT with cardiac state-of-the-art capabilities is the rapid investigation of the main sources of acute chest pain with a high negative predictive value. Recent studies also reports an advantage in terms of costs. With current evidence, the selection of patients with acute chest pain candidates to MDCT should remain restricted to avoid unjustified risk of ionizing radiation.

  12. Use of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS in a cardiac emergency room: chest pain unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gastão L. F. Soares-Filho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients complaining of chest pain who seek a chest pain unit attendance. INTRODUCTION: Patients arriving at a Chest Pain Unit may present psychiatric disorders not identified, isolated or co-morbid to the main illness, which may interfere in the patient prognosis. METHODOLOGY: Patients were assessed by the "Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale" as a screening instrument wile following a systematized protocol to rule out the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome and other potentially fatal diseases. Patients with 8 or more points in the scale were considered "probable case" of anxiety or depression. RESULTS: According to the protocol, 59 (45.4% of 130 patients studied presented Chest Pain of Determined Cause, and 71 (54.6% presented Chest Pain of Indefinite Cause. In the former group, in which 43 (33.1% had acute coronary syndrome, 33.9% were probable anxiety cases and 30.5% depression cases. In the second group, formed by patients without acute coronary syndrome or any clinical conditions involving greater morbidity and mortality risk, 53.5% were probable anxiety cases and 25.4% depression. CONCLUSION: The high anxiety and depression prevalence observed may indicate the need for early and specialized approach to these disorders. When coronary arterial disease is present, this may decrease complications and shorten hospital stay. When psychiatric disorder appears isolated, is possible to reduce unnecessary repeated visits to emergency room and increase patient's quality of life.

  13. Use of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) in a cardiac emergency room: chest pain unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares-Filho, Gastão L F; Freire, Rafael C; Biancha, Karla; Pacheco, Ticiana; Volschan, André; Valença, Alexandre M; Nardi, Antonio E

    2009-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients complaining of chest pain who seek a chest pain unit attendance. Patients arriving at a Chest Pain Unit may present psychiatric disorders not identified, isolated or co-morbid to the main illness, which may interfere in the patient prognosis. Patients were assessed by the 'Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale' as a screening instrument wile following a systematized protocol to rule out the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome and other potentially fatal diseases. Patients with 8 or more points in the scale were considered 'probable case' of anxiety or depression. According to the protocol, 59 (45.4%) of 130 patients studied presented Chest Pain of Determined Cause, and 71 (54.6%) presented Chest Pain of Indefinite Cause. In the former group, in which 43 (33.1%) had acute coronary syndrome, 33.9% were probable anxiety cases and 30.5% depression cases. In the second group, formed by patients without acute coronary syndrome or any clinical conditions involving greater morbidity and mortality risk, 53.5% were probable anxiety cases and 25.4% depression. The high anxiety and depression prevalence observed may indicate the need for early and specialized approach to these disorders. When coronary arterial disease is present, this may decrease complications and shorten hospital stay. When psychiatric disorder appears isolated, is possible to reduce unnecessary repeated visits to emergency room and increase patient's quality of life.

  14. Nursing patients with acute chest pain: practice guided by the Prince Edward Island conceptual model for nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Janelle F; Murnaghan, Donna A

    2010-01-01

    Current research suggests that pain is a relatively common phenomenon with 60-90% of patients presenting to emergency departments reporting pain (e.g., chest pain, trauma, extremity fractures and migraine headache) that require treatment [Hogan, S.L., 2005. Patient satisfaction with pain management in the emergency department. Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal 27(4), 284-294]. This article explores the use of conceptual theoretical empirical (C-T-E) framework to guide a senior nursing student in a case study of patient with chest pain. The Middle Range Theory of Pain described by Good [Good, M., 1998. A middle-range theory of acute pain management: use in research. Nursing Outlook 46(3), 120-124] and Melzack's [Melzack, R., 1987. The short-form McGill pain questionnaire. Pain, 30, 191-197] short form McGill pain questionnaire were applied along with the Prince Edward Island conceptual model (PEICM) for nursing. Results indicate that the nursing student increased her ability to work in partnership, assess relevant and specific information, and identify a number of strategies to help the patient achieve pain control by using a complement of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. Moreover, the C-T-E approach provided an organized and systematic theoretical approach for the nursing student to assist a patient in pain control.

  15. Respiratory distress and chest pain: a perforated peptic ulcer with an unusual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, David I; Gustafson, Corey

    2011-06-22

    Dyspnea and chest pain are common presenting complaints to the ED, and coupled together can present a challenging diagnostic dilemma in patients in extremis. A thoughtful evaluation is required, giving due diligence to the immediate life threats as well as multiple etiologies which can cause serious morbidity. A perforated peptic ulcer is one such possibility and requires rapid diagnosis and prompt intervention to avoid the associated high risk of morbidity and mortality. We present a case report of a 54 year old man with respiratory distress and chest pain as the initial Emergency Department presentation of a perforated duodenal ulcer. We discuss an unusual presentation of a perforated duodenal ulcer that was recognized in the emergency department and treated promptly. The patient was surgically treated immediately, had a prolonged and complicated post-operative course, but is ultimately doing well. We also provide a brief literature review of the risk factors, imaging choices, and management decision required to treat a perforated ulcer. Perforated ulcers can have highly varied presentations and are occasionally difficult to diagnose in a complicated patient. Knowledge of the risk factors and a thorough history and physical can point to the diagnosis, but timely and appropriate imaging is often required because delays in diagnosis and treatment lead to poor outcomes. Early administration of antibiotics and immediate surgical repair are necessary to limit morbidity and mortality.

  16. Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Chest Pain by Means of Magnetocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, H.; Kim, K.; Kim, J. M.; Lee, Y. H.; Kim, T. E.; Lim, H. K.; Park, Y. K.; Ko, Y. G.; Chung, N.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetocardiography(MCG) has been proposed as a novel and non-invasive diagnostic tool for the detection of cardiac electrical abnormality associated with myocardial ischemia. In our previous study, we have proposed a new classification method of MCG parameters, based on the different populations of the parameters between coronary artery disease(CAD) patients, symptomatic patients and healthy volunteers. We used four parameters, representing the directional changes of the electrical activity in the period of an R-ST-T interval. In patients with chest pain and without ST-segment elevation, who were selected consecutively from all patients admitted to the hospital in 2004, the patients with CAD could be classified with a higher sensitivity than conventional methods, showing that the proposed method can be useful for the diagnosis of CAD with MCG. In this study, we examined the validity of the algorithm with the prior probability distribution in diagnosis of new patients admitted to the hospital in 2005. In the results, presence of CAD could be found with sensitivity and specificity of 81.3% and 71.4%, respectively, in patients with chest pain and non-diagnostic ECG findings

  17. Cardiointegram: detection of coronary artery disease in males with chest pain and a normal resting electrocardiogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teichholz, L.E.; Steinmetz, M.Y.; Escher, D.; Herman, M.V.; Naimi, S.; Mahony, D.V.; Ellestad, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    The cardiointegram is a non-invasive technique for the analysis of the electrical signals of the heart obtained by a transformation of the voltage vs. time format by a series of integrations. This multicenter study compares the results of the cardiointegram with coronary arteriography in 140 male patients with chest pain and a normal resting electrocardiogram. The cardiointegram was determined on two resting complexes of Leads I, II, V4, V5 and V6 and called abnormal if greater than or equal to four of ten complexes were abnormal, i.e., fell outside of a previously determined template of normality. The sensitivity was 73% and specificity was 78% for the diagnosis of occlusive coronary artery disease. When greater than or equal to five of ten abnormal complexes were used as the cut-off for an abnormal test and ''equivocal'' results (four of ten abnormal, n = 18) were excluded from analysis there was a sensitivity of 69% and specificity of 88%. Thirty-seven of 38 patients (97%) with an abnormal cardiointegram and a positive exercise stress test had coronary artery disease. Thus, the cardiointegram appears to be a useful non-invasive test for the detection of coronary artery disease in males with chest pain and a normal resting electrocardiogram in whom the diagnosis of coronary artery disease is being considered

  18. Cost-effectiveness of chiropractic care versus self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Sørensen, Jan; Vach, Werner

    2016-01-01

    suggested that chiropractic care was cost-effective with a probability of 97%, given a threshold value of €30 000 per QALY gained. In both groups, there was an increase in the health-related quality of life, and the mean increases were similar over the 12-month evaluation period. The mean differences......AIMS: To assess whether primary sector healthcare in the form of chiropractic care is cost-effective compared with self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain, that is, a subgroup of patients with non-specific chest pain. METHODS AND RESULTS: 115 adults aged 18-75 years with acute......-dimension questionnaire (EQ-5D) and Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36)) were compared in cost-effectiveness analyses over 12 months from baseline. Mean costs were €2183 lower for the group with chiropractic care, but not statistically significant (95% CI -4410.5 to 43.0). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio...

  19. Prognostic significance of normal quantitative planar thallium-201 stress scintigraphy in patients with chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wackers, F.J.; Russo, D.J.; Russo, D.; Clements, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    The prognostic significance of normal quantitative planar thallium-201 stress scintigraphy was evaluated in patients with a chest pain syndrome. The prevalence of cardiac events during follow-up was related to the pretest (that is, before stress scintigraphy) likelihood of coronary artery disease determined on the basis of symptoms, age, sex and stress electrocardiography. In a consecutive series of 344 patients who had adequate thallium-201 stress scintigrams, 95 had unequivocally normal studies by quantitative analysis. The pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease in the 95 patients had a bimodal distribution. During a mean follow-up period of 22 +/- 3 months, no patient died. Three patients (3%) had a cardiac event: two of these patients (pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease 54 and 94%) had a nonfatal myocardial infarction 8 and 22 months, respectively, after stress scintigraphy, and one patient (pretest likelihood 98%) underwent percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty 16 months after stress scintigraphy for persisting anginal complaints. Three patients were lost to follow-up; all three had a low pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease. It is concluded that patients with chest pain and normal findings on quantitative thallium-201 scintigraphy have an excellent prognosis. Cardiac events are rare (infarction rate 1% per year) and occur in patients with a moderate to high pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease

  20. Internet interventions for chronic pain including headache: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Buhrman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a major health problem and behavioral based treatments have been shown to be effective. However, the availability of these kinds of treatments is scarce and internet-based treatments have been shown to be promising in this area. The objective of the present systematic review is to evaluate internet-based interventions for persons with chronic pain. The specific aims are to do an updated review with a broad inclusion of different chronic pain diagnoses and to assess disability and pain and also measures of catastrophizing, depression and anxiety. A systematic search identified 891 studies and 22 trials were selected as eligible for review. Two of the selected trials included children/youth and five included individuals with chronic headache and/or migraine. The most frequently measured domain reflected in the primary outcomes was interference/disability, followed by catastrophizing. Result across the studies showed a number of beneficial effects. Twelve trials reported significant effects on disability/interference outcomes and pain intensity. Positive effects were also found on psychological variable such as catastrophizing, depression and anxiety. Several studies (n = 12 were assessed to have an unclear level of risk bias. The attrition levels ranged from 4% to 54% where the headache trials had the highest drop-out levels. However, findings suggest that internet-based treatments based on cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT are efficacious measured with different outcome variables. Results are in line with trials in clinical settings. Meta-analytic statistics were calculated for interference/disability, pain intensity, catastrophizing and mood ratings. Results showed that the effect size for interference/disability was Hedge's g = −0.39, for pain intensity Hedge's g = −0.33, for catastrophizing Hedge's g = −0.49 and for mood variables (depression Hedge's g = −0.26.

  1. Flow-mediated dilatation has no independent prognostic effect in patients with chest pain with or without ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulriksen, Line Skjold; Malmqvist, Beata B; Hansen, Are

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the prognostic effect of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in patients with chest pain admitted to a coronary care unit. METHODS: Endothelium-dependent FMD in the brachial artery was examined in 223 patients with acute chest pain. All patients...... underwent a stress test at the time of admittance. On the basis of a positive stress test, a prior myocardial infarction (MI), prior percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary bypass surgery (CABG), 137 patients were categorized as having ischaemic heart disease (IHD). RESULTS: Patients with IHD...

  2. Diagnostic yield of 24-hour esophageal manometry in non-cardiac chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, M; Herregods, T V K; Oors, J M; Smout, A J P M; Bredenoord, A J

    2016-08-01

    In the past, ambulatory 24-h manometry has been shown useful for the evaluation of patients with non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP). With the diagnostic improvements brought by pH-impedance monitoring and high-resolution manometry (HRM), the contribution of ambulatory 24-h manometry to the diagnosis of esophageal hypertensive disorders has become uncertain. Our aim was to assess the additional diagnostic yield of ambulatory manometry to HRM and ambulatory pH-impedance monitoring in this patient population. All patients underwent 24-h ambulatory pressure-pH-impedance monitoring and HRM. Patients had retrosternal pain as a predominant symptom and no explanation after cardiologic and digestive endoscopic evaluations. Diagnostic measurements were analyzed by two independent physicians. Fifty-nine patients met the inclusion criteria; 37.3% of the patients had their symptoms explained by abnormalities on pH-impedance monitoring and 6.8% by ambulatory manometry. Functional chest pain was diagnosed in 52.5% of the patients. High-resolution manometry, using the Chicago Classification v3.0 criteria alone, did not identify any of the four patients with esophageal spasm on ambulatory manometry. However, taking into account other abnormalities, such as simultaneous (rapid) or repetitive contractions, HRM had a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 98.2% for the diagnosis of esophageal spasm. In the work-up of NCCP, ambulatory 24-h manometry has a low additional diagnostic yield. However, it remains the best technique to identify esophageal spasm as the cause of symptoms. This is particularly useful when an unequivocal diagnosis is needed before treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Differences in Presentation, Management and Outcomes in Women and Men Presenting to an Emergency Department With Possible Cardiac Chest Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruane, Lorcan; H Greenslade, Jaimi; Parsonage, William; Hawkins, Tracey; Hammett, Christopher; Lam, Carolyn Sp; Knowlman, Thomas; Doig, Shaela; Cullen, Louise

    2017-12-01

    Research suggests that female patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) experience delays in emergency department (ED) management and are less likely to receive guideline-based treatments and referrals for follow-up testing. Women are often found to have poorer clinical outcomes in comparison to men. This study aimed to assess current sex differences in the presentation, management and outcomes of patients with undifferentiated chest pain presenting to a tertiary ED. Data were analysed from two prospective studies conducted at a single Australian site between 2007 and 2014. Eligible patients were those of 18 years of age or older presenting with at least 5 minutes of chest pain or other symptoms for which the treating physician planned to investigate for possible ACS. Presenting symptoms, ED time measures, follow-up testing and outcomes, including 30-day ACS and mortality, were measured and compared between male and female patients. Of 2349 (60% men) patients presenting with chest pain, 153 men and 51 women were diagnosed with ACS within 30days . Presenting symptoms were similar in men and women with confirmed ACS. Time from symptom onset to ED presentation, time spent in the ED and total time in hospital were similar between the sexes. Male and female patients had similar rates of follow-up provocative testing. After adjustment for clinical factors, the odds of undergoing angiography were 1.8 (95% CI: 1.36-2.40) times higher for men than women. Of those undergoing coronary angiography within 30 days, a smaller proportion of women, compared to men, received revascularisation. Within 30 days, three (0.2%) male and one (0.1%) female patient died. Minimal sex differences were observed in the contemporary emergency management of patients presenting with suspected ACS. Thirty-day outcomes were similarly low in men and women despite lower rates of coronary angiography and revascularisation in women. Further research is required to replicate these results in different

  4. Effect of education on a chest pain mnemonic on door-to-ECG time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Nancy; Bairan, Annette; Newberry, Lorene; Van Brackle, Lewis; Barnett, Gwen

    2011-05-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) continues to contribute to both death and disability in both men and women. The first step in early intervention is an ECG. Atypically presenting patients, especially those who present by self-transport, are more likely to experience delays. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a new chest pain mnemonic (CPM) as a teaching tool for rapid recognition of AMI patients arriving by self-transport in ED triage in an effort to improve door-to-ECG (DTE) time. This study is a longitudinal, quasi-experimental quantitative study. Instruction and evaluation of nurses' knowledge related to identification of AMI before and after instruction on the CPM education (intervention) were coordinated by the emergency clinical nurse specialist. The study sample for the educational intervention included 26 nurses (15% of total population) from 4 emergency departments. Ad hoc queries of the National Registry for Myocardial Infarction database for patients arriving by self-transport to the emergency department were done to examine DTE before and after intervention. The pretests and post-tests of the nurses were analyzed with a paired t test, and the pre- and post-intervention DTE times were analyzed by log-linear modeling. Evaluation of nurses' knowledge before and after CPM education indicated an improvement in DTE time, although it was not statistically significant. There was a significant improvement in DTE time for 2 hospitals that was somewhat negated in the aggregate data. There was a noted trend that showed an advantage in DTE time associated with male patients. Inclusion of tools such as the CPM in education programs for emergency nurses improved rapid recognition of AMI patients presenting via self-transport to the emergency department. Attention to gender differences in patient presentation should be included in future CPM education, and tools to assist nurses in the early recognition of AMI need to be developed. Investigation

  5. Reliability of the CARE rule and the HEART score to rule out an acute coronary syndrome in non-traumatic chest pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumneh, Thomas; Richard-Jourjon, Vanessa; Friou, Emilie; Prunier, Fabrice; Soulie-Chavignon, Caroline; Choukroun, Jacques; Mazet-Guilaumé, Betty; Riou, Jérémie; Penaloza, Andréa; Roy, Pierre-Marie

    2018-03-02

    In patients consulting in the Emergency Department for chest pain, a HEART score ≤ 3 has been shown to rule out an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with a low risk of major adverse cardiac event (MACE) occurrence. A negative CARE rule (≤ 1) that stands for the first four elements of the HEART score may have similar rule-out reliability without troponin assay requirement. We aim to prospectively assess the performance of the CARE rule and of the HEART score to predict MACE in a chest pain population. Prospective two-center non-interventional study. Patients admitted to the ED for non-traumatic chest pain were included, and followed-up at 6 weeks. The main study endpoint was the 6-week rate of MACE (myocardial infarction, coronary angioplasty, coronary bypass, and sudden unexplained death). 641 patients were included, of whom 9.5% presented a MACE at 6 weeks. The CARE rule was negative for 31.2% of patients, and none presented a MACE during follow-up [0, 95% confidence interval: (0.0-1.9)]. The HEART score was ≤ 3 for 63.0% of patients, and none presented a MACE during follow-up [0% (0.0-0.9)]. With an incidence below 2% in the negative group, the CARE rule seemed able to safely rule out a MACE without any biological test for one-third of patients with chest pain and the HEART score for another third with a single troponin assay.

  6. Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy to evaluate patients with chest pain (preliminary study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahfouz, M.; Elhaddad, S.; Elghoneimy, I.; Elmesidy, S.; Haggag, F.; Sbdou, S.; Dayem, K.A.; Ezzeldiy, H.

    1985-01-01

    201 Tl perfusion scintigraphy for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease was carried out in 25 patients of mean age years, presenting with chest pain. Scintiscan were obtained at rest and after exercise and were compared with ECG studies at rest and after exercise. In all patients with previous myocardial infarctions, perfusion defects were present at rest, two of these patients showed abnormal stress scintigraphy consistent with a new ischemic response which was not detected by the stress ECG. In 3 out of the 8 patients with normal ECG, in 2 out of the 4 patients with response suggesting ischemia and in 4 out of the 7 patients with definite ECG proof of ischemia infarction was detected by 201 Tl. In all the previous, resting and exercise ECG failed to show evidence of infarction.1 fig.,2 tab

  7. Diagnostic evaluation of the MRP-8/14 for the emergency assessment of chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Amit N; Bonaca, Marc P; Ruff, Christian T; Jarolim, Petr; Murphy, Sabina; Croce, Kevin; Sabatine, Marc S; Simon, Daniel I; Morrow, David A

    2012-08-01

    Elevated levels of myeloid-related protein (MRP)-8/14 (S100A8/A9) are associated with first cardiovascular events in healthy individuals and worse prognosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The diagnostic utility of MRP-8/14 in patients presenting to the emergency room with symptoms concerning for ACS is uncertain. MRP-8/14 was measured in serial serum and plasma samples in a single center prospective cohort-study of patients presenting to the emergency room with non-traumatic chest pain concerning for ACS. Final diagnosis was adjudicated by an endpoint committee. Of patients with baseline MRP-8/14 results (n = 411), the median concentration in serum was 1.57 μg/ml (25th, 75th: 0.87, 2.68) and in plasma was 0.41 μg/ml (MRP-8/14 was higher in patients presenting with MI (p MRP-8/14 was poor: sensitivity 28% (95% CI 20-38), specificity 82% (78-86), positive predictive value 36% (26-47), and negative predictive value 77% (72-81). The area under the ROC curve for diagnosis of MI with MRP-8/14 was 0.55 (95% CI 0.51-0.60) compared with 0.95 for cTnI. The diagnostic performance was not improved in early-presenters, patients with negative initial cTnI, or using later MRP-8/14 samples. Patients presenting with MI had elevated levels of serum MRP-8/14 compared to patients with non-cardiac chest pain. However, overall diagnostic performance of MRP-8/14 was poor and neither plasma nor serum MRP-8/14 offered diagnostic utility comparable to cardiac troponin.

  8. Exercise tolerance test in patients presenting with chest pain and normal electrocardiogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharieff, S.; Khan, Shah-e-Zaman

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To report the prevalence of abnormal exercise tolerance test (ETT) responses and to assess the risk factors for ischemic heart disease (IHD) in a population referred for the evaluation of chest pain with a normal baseline electrocardiogram (ECG). Design: A prospective study. The study was conducted at the National Institute of cardiovascular Diseases (NICVD), Karachi, Pakistan between 1st January 2000 and 31 December 2000. Subjects and Methods: One thousand one hundred and twenty-seven consecutive adult patients presenting in the outpatient department (OPD) with history of chest pain and having a normal baseline ECG were the subjects of the study after excluding patients with indeterminate or inconclusive test response. All these subjects underwent ETT and were screened for risk factor for IHD. Results: Of the patients studied 56.6% had abnormal ETT response. Male to female ratio of all patients was 4.85:1 Overall mean age was 50.3 +- 8.8 years. 65.9% of diabetic patients had ETT Suggestive of silent myocardial ischemia (p=0.012). Age > 50 year (p= <0.0001), male sex (p=0.015), diabetes mellitus (p=0.0033) and positive family history of IHD (p=0.0014) were the risk factor found in patient with abnormal ETT response. Conclusion: Age of more than 50 years, male gender, diabetes mellitus and positive family history of IHD are the significant risk factors for the development of ischemic heart disease in our population. Silent myocardial ischemic is common in diabetics. (author)

  9. Association between depression and anxiety symptoms and major atherosclerosis risk factors in patients with chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vural, M.; Satiroglu, Oe.; Goeksel, I.; Akbas, B.; Karabay, Oe.

    2007-01-01

    Psychological variables, such as depression and anxiety, are known as independent risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD), suggesting the interaction of psychological and physiological factors in the development of CAD. In the present study, we analyzed the possible association between depressive and anxiety symptoms and major atherosclerotic risk factors in patients with chest pain warranting coronary angiography. The patients without CAD (n=159) and those with CAD (n=155) were evaluated for the severity of depression and anxiety by the symptom scales; high scores indicate severe symptoms. Age, male/female ratio, prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), and depression level were significantly higher in the CAD group. Among a total of 314 patients with chest pain, the mean depression score was higher in patients with DM (16.01±8.12 vs 13.01±9.6, p=0.01) and those with hypercholesterolemia (15.43±9.61 vs 12.53±9.61, p=0.02). The mean anxiety score was also higher in patients with DM (20.81±12.85 vs 16.51±12.09, p=0.008), hypercholesterolemia (20.67±13.11 vs 15.29±11.36, p=0.002), or hypertension (20.74±12.94 vs 14.1±10.8, p=0.001). Thus, DM and hypercholesterolemia are associated with depression and anxiety, while hypertension is only related to anxiety. In contrast, smoking and family history of atherosclerosis are not related to depression and anxiety scores. These results suggest depression and anxiety symptoms may contribute to the development and progression of CAD, especially in patients with DM or hypercholesterolemia. (author)

  10. Chest Pain with Normal Thallium-201 Myocardial Perfusion Image – Is It Really Normal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pang-Yen; Lin, Wen-Yu; Lin, Li-Fan; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Lin, Wei-Shiang; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Yang, Shih-Ping; Liou, Jun-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Background Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion image (MPI) is commonly used to detect coronary artery disease in patients with chest pain. Although a normal thallium-201 MPI result is generally considered to be a good prognosis and further coronary angiogram is not recommended, there are still a few patients who suffer from unexpected acute coronary events. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical prognosis in patients with normal thallium-201 MPI. Methods From January 2006 to August 2012, a total 22,003 patients undergoing thallium-201 MPI in one tertiary center were screened. Of these, 8092 patients had normal results and were investigated retrospectively. During follow-up, 54 patients underwent coronary angiogram because of refractory typical angina pectoris or unexpected acute coronary events. These 54 patients were divided into 2 groups: group I consisted of 26 (48.1%) patients with angiography-proven significant coronary artery stenosis, and group II consisted of 28 (51.9%) patients without significant stenosis. Results Patients in group I had a higher prevalence of prior coronary stenting and electrocardiographic features of ST depression compared with patients in group II. The multivariate analysis demonstrated that both prior coronary stenting and ST depression were risk predictors of unexpected acute coronary events in the patients with normal thallium-201 MPI [odds ratio (OR), 5.93; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-34.06, p = 0.05 and OR, 7.10; 95% CI: 1.28-39.51, p = 0.03,respectively]. Conclusions Although there is a low incidence of unexpected acute coronary events in patients with chest pain and normal thallium-201 MPI, physicians should be aware of the potentials risk in certain patients in this specific population. PMID:27274174

  11. Autogenic training to manage symptomology in women with chest pain and normal coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asbury, Elizabeth A; Kanji, Nasim; Ernst, Edzard; Barbir, Mahmoud; Collins, Peter

    2009-01-01

    To explore autogenic training (AT) as a treatment for psychological morbidity, symptomology, and physiological markers of stress among women with chest pain, a positive exercise test for myocardial ischemia, and normal coronary arteries (cardiac syndrome X). Fifty-three women with cardiac syndrome X (mean +/- SD age, 57.1 +/- 8 years) were randomized to an 8-week AT program or symptom diary control. Symptom severity and frequency, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire (CAQ), and Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Index (QLI), blood pressure, heart rate, electrocardiogram, and plasma catecholamines were measured before and after intervention and at the 8-week follow-up. Women who underwent AT had improved symptom frequency (8.04 +/- 10.08 vs 1.66 +/- 2.19, P < 0.001) compared with control women and reduced symtom severity (2.08 +/- 1.03 vs 1.23 +/- 1.36, P = 0.02) and frequency (6.11 +/- 3.17 vs 1.66 +/- 2.19, P < G 0.001) post-AT compared with baseline within group. Within-group improvements among women who underwent AT include QLI health functioning (17.80 +/- 5.74 vs 19.41 +/- 5.19, P = 0.04) and CAQ fear (1.53 +/- 0.61 vs 1.35 +/- 0.56, P = 0.02) post-AT and QLI health functioning (17.80 +/- 5.74 vs 20.09 +/- 5.47, P = 0.01), CAQ fear (1.53 +/- 0.61 vs 1.30 +/- 0.67, P = 0.002), CAQ total (1.42 +/- 0.54 vs 1.29 +/- 0.475, P = 0.04), Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory trait anxiety (42.95 +/- 11.19 vs 38.68 +/- 11.47, P = 0.01), and QLI quality of life (20.67 +/- 5.37 vs 21.9 +/- 4.89, P = 0.02) at follow-up. An 8-week AT program improves symptom frequency, with near-significant improvements in symptom severity in women with cardiac syndrome X.

  12. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence updates the stable chest pain guideline with radical changes to the diagnostic paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmis, Adam; Roobottom, Carl A

    2017-07-01

    In the 2016 update of the stable chest pain guideline, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has made radical changes to the diagnostic paradigm that it-like other international guidelines-had previously placed at the centre of its recommendations. No longer are quantitative assessments of the disease probability considered necessary to determine the need for diagnostic testing and the choice of test. Instead, the recommendation is for no diagnostic testing if chest pain is judged to be 'non-anginal' and CT coronary angiography (CTCA) in patients with 'typical' or 'atypical' chest pain with additional perfusion imaging only if there is uncertainty about the functional significance of coronary lesions. The new emphasis on anatomical-as opposed to functional-testing is driven in large part by cost-effectiveness analysis and despite inevitable resource implications NICE calculates that annual savings for the population of England will be significant. In making CTCA the default diagnostic testing strategy in its updated chest pain guideline, NICE has responded emphatically to calls from trialists for CTCA to have a greater role in the diagnostic pathway of patients with suspected angina. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Drug-induced chest pain and myocardial infarction. Reports to a national centre and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Ottervanger (Jan Paul); J.H.P. Wilson (Paul); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To analyse reports of drug-induced myocardial infarction and chest pain sent to a national reporting centre. To review which drugs were suspected of exhibiting these adverse events and what mechanisms were involved. Methods: During the 20-year period 1975 through 1994, a

  14. Prognostic value of predischarge dobutamine stress echocardiography in chest pain patients with a negative cardiac troponin T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bholasingh, Radha; Cornel, Jan Hein; Kamp, Otto; van Straalen, Jan P.; Sanders, Gerard T.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Umans, Victor A. W. M.; Visser, Cees A.; de Winter, Robbert J.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We prospectively studied the prognostic value of predischarge dobutamine stress echocardiography (I)SE) in low-risk chest pain patients with a normal or nondiagnostic electrocardiogram (ECG) and a negative serial troponin T. BACKGROUND Noninvasive stress testing is recommended before

  15. Validation of an accelerated high-sensitivity troponin T assay protocol in an Australian cohort with chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsonage, William A; Greenslade, Jaimi H; Hammett, Christopher J; Lamanna, Arvin; Tate, Jillian R; Ungerer, Jacobus P; Chu, Kevin; Than, Martin; Brown, Anthony F T; Cullen, Louise

    2014-02-17

    To validate an accelerated biomarker strategy using a high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) assay for diagnosing acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain; and to validate this strategy in combination with the National Heart Foundation of Australia/Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand risk stratification model. Single-centre, prospective, observational cohort study of 764 adults presenting to a tertiary hospital with symptoms of possible acute coronary syndrome between November 2008 and February 2011. AMI or cardiac death within 24 hours of presentation (primary), and major adverse cardiac events within 30 days (secondary). An elevated hs-cTnT assay result above the 99th percentile at either the 0 h or 2 h time points had sensitivity of 96.4% (95% CI, 87.9%-99.0%), specificity of 82.6% (95% CI, 79.7%-85.2%), negative predictive value of 99.7% (95% CI, 98.8%-99.9%) and positive predictive value of 30.5% (95% CI, 24.2%-37.6%) for diagnosing AMI. Compared with a traditional 6 h cardiac troponin testing strategy, the accelerated strategy led to reclassification of risk in only two patients with adverse cardiac outcomes, with no net effect on appropriate management. In patients presenting with chest pain, an accelerated biomarker strategy using the hs-cTnT assay performed well in the initial diagnosis of AMI. The accelerated strategy was also effective when incorporated into a comprehensive strategy of risk stratification that included clinical and demographic factors. The time saved by this approach could have a major impact on health service delivery. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610000053022.

  16. Sensitive Troponin I Assay in Patients with Chest Pain - Association with Significant Coronary Lesions with or Without Renal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeiro, Alexandre de Matos; Gualandro, Danielle Menosi; Bossa, Aline Siqueira; Zullino, Cindel Nogueira; Biselli, Bruno; Soeiro, Maria Carolina Feres de Almeida; Leal, Tatiana de Carvalho Andreucci Torres; Serrano, Carlos Vicente; Oliveira Junior, Mucio Tavares de

    2018-01-01

    Despite having higher sensitivity as compared to conventional troponins, sensitive troponins have lower specificity, mainly in patients with renal failure. Study aimed at assessing the sensitive troponin I levels in patients with chest pain, and relating them to the existence of significant coronary lesions. Retrospective, single-center, observational. This study included 991 patients divided into two groups: with (N = 681) and without (N = 310) significant coronary lesion. For posterior analysis, the patients were divided into two other groups: with (N = 184) and without (N = 807) chronic renal failure. The commercial ADVIA Centaur® TnI-Ultra assay (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics) was used. The ROC curve analysis was performed to identify the sensitivity and specificity of the best cutoff point of troponin as a discriminator of the probability of significant coronary lesion. The associations were considered significant when p renal failure, the areas under the ROC curve were 0.703 (95% CI: 0.66 - 0.74) and 0.608 (95% CI: 0.52 - 0.70), respectively. The best cutoff points to discriminate the presence of significant coronary lesion were: in the general population, 0.605 ng/dL (sensitivity, 63.4%; specificity, 67%); in patients without renal failure, 0.605 ng/dL (sensitivity, 62.7%; specificity, 71%); and in patients with chronic renal failure, 0.515 ng/dL (sensitivity, 80.6%; specificity, 42%). In patients with chest pain, sensitive troponin I showed a good correlation with significant coronary lesions when its level was greater than 0.605 ng/dL. In patients with chronic renal failure, a significant decrease in specificity was observed in the correlation of troponin levels and severe coronary lesions.

  17. Omega-3 index and prognosis in acute coronary chest pain patients with a low dietary intake of omega-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, Ricardo León; Naesgaard, Patrycja Anna; Nilsen, Stein Tore; Woie, Leik; Aarsland, Torbjørn; Gundersen, Thomas; Nilsen, Dennis W T

    2013-04-01

    The omega-3 index (eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid) content in red blood cell membranes has been suggested as a novel risk marker for cardiac death. Objective. To assess the ability of the omega-3 index to predict all-cause mortality, cardiac death and sudden cardiac death following hospitalization with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), and to include arachidonic acid (AA) in risk assessment. The omega-3 index was measured in 572 consecutive patients (median 63 years and 59% males) admitted with chest pain and suspected ACS in an inland Northern Argentinean city with a dietary habit that was essentially based on red meat and a low intake of fish. Clinical endpoints were collected during a 5-year follow-up period, median 3.6 years, range 1 day to 5.5 years. Stepwise Cox regression analysis was employed to compare the rate of new events in the quartiles of the omega-3 index measured at inclusion. Multivariable analysis was performed. No statistical significant differences in baseline characteristics were noted between quartiles of the omega-3 index. The median of the adjusted omega-3 index was 3.6%. During the follow-up period, 100 (17.5%) patients died. Event rates were similar in all quartiles of the omega-3 index, with no statistical significant differences. AA added no prognostic information. In a population with a low intake of fish and fish oils, the adjusted omega-3 index did not predict fatal events following hospitalization in patients with acute chest pain and suspected ACS.

  18. Discriminative Power of the HEART Score for Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease in Acute Chest Pain Patients Referred for CCTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolff, Adriana Q; Bom, Michiel J; Knol, Remco J J; van de Zant, Friso M; van der Zee, Petrus M; Cornel, Jan H

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the ability of the HEART score to predict the presence of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) determined by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and its ability to predict the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) in patients referred for CCTA after emergency department (ED) presentation. From December 2011 to August 2014, 710 ED patients with chest pain who underwent CCTA within 30 days were included. The HEART score was retrospectively calculated and patients were followed for MACE, comprised of death, myocardial infarction, and revascularization. Association of CAD at CCTA in the different categories of the HEART score was analyzed using χ test. The performance of the HEART score in discriminating between those with and without obstructive CAD was evaluated by receiver operating characteristics. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess MACE-free survival stratified by HEART-score categories. During median follow-up of 826 days (interquartile range: 563-1056), MACE occurred in 46 (6.5%) patients; 3 (0.4%) myocardial infarction, 8 (1.1%) death, and 36 (5.1%) revascularizations. A low HEART score was a significant predictor for MACE-free survival (P = 0.010). CCTA revealed obstructive CAD in 11.7% of patients, with no significant difference between patients with a low and intermediate/high HEART score, respectively 10.7% and 13.2% (P = 0.29). The ability of the HEART score to identify obstructive CAD was poor with an AUC of the receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.53. The HEART score does not adequately identify patients with obstructive CAD at CCTA. It does however predict occurrence of MACE in medium-term follow-up. Excluding patients from additional testing based solely on a low HEART score may lead to suboptimal patient management. CCTA had important implications on patient management and may be a more appropriate tool to further stratify risk in ED chest pain patients.

  19. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Part 1: Impact on patient management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruettner, Joachim; Fink, Christian; Walter, Thomas; Meyer, Mathias; Apfaltrer, Paul; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Saur, Joachim; Sueselbeck, Tim; Traunwieser, Dominik; Takx, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) or “triple-rule-out” CT angiography (TRO-CTA) on patient management in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Materials and methods: 100 patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) underwent coronary CTA or TRO-CTA for the evaluation of chest pain. Patients with a high and low cardiac risk profile were not included in this study. All patients with significant coronary stenosis >50% on coronary CTA underwent invasive coronary catheterization (ICC). Important other pathological findings were recorded. All patients had a 90-day follow-up period for major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Results: Based on a negative coronary CTA 60 of 100 patients were discharged on the same day. None of the discharged patients showed MACE during the 90-day follow-up. Coronary CTA revealed a coronary stenosis >50% in 19 of 100 patients. ICC confirmed significant coronary stenosis in 17/19 patients. Among the 17 true positive patients, 9 underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation, 7 were received intensified medical therapy, and 1 patient underwent coronary artery bypass surgery. A TRO-CTA protocol was performed in 36/100 patients due to elevated D-dimer levels. Pulmonary embolism was present in 5 patients, pleural effusion of unknown etiology in 3 patients, severe right ventricular dysfunction with pericardial effusion in 1 patient, and an incidental bronchial carcinoma was diagnosed in 1 patient. Conclusion: Coronary CTA and TRO-CTA allow a rapid and safe discharge in the majority of patients presenting with acute chest pain and an intermediate risk for ACS while at the same time identifies those with significant coronary artery stenosis

  20. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Part 1: Impact on patient management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruettner, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.gruettner@umm.de [Emergency Department, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Fink, Christian, E-mail: Christian.Fink@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Walter, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.walter@umm.de [Emergency Department, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Meyer, Mathias, E-mail: mr.meyer.mathias@gmail.com [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Apfaltrer, Paul, E-mail: Paul.Apfaltrer@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, Ashley River Tower, 25 Courtenay Drive, Charleston, SC 29425-2260 (United States); Saur, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.saur@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Sueselbeck, Tim, E-mail: tim.sueselbeck@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Traunwieser, Dominik, E-mail: dominik.traunwieser@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Takx, Richard, E-mail: richard.takx@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, Ashley River Tower, 25 Courtenay Drive, Charleston, SC 29425-2260 (United States); and others

    2013-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) or “triple-rule-out” CT angiography (TRO-CTA) on patient management in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Materials and methods: 100 patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) underwent coronary CTA or TRO-CTA for the evaluation of chest pain. Patients with a high and low cardiac risk profile were not included in this study. All patients with significant coronary stenosis >50% on coronary CTA underwent invasive coronary catheterization (ICC). Important other pathological findings were recorded. All patients had a 90-day follow-up period for major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Results: Based on a negative coronary CTA 60 of 100 patients were discharged on the same day. None of the discharged patients showed MACE during the 90-day follow-up. Coronary CTA revealed a coronary stenosis >50% in 19 of 100 patients. ICC confirmed significant coronary stenosis in 17/19 patients. Among the 17 true positive patients, 9 underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation, 7 were received intensified medical therapy, and 1 patient underwent coronary artery bypass surgery. A TRO-CTA protocol was performed in 36/100 patients due to elevated D-dimer levels. Pulmonary embolism was present in 5 patients, pleural effusion of unknown etiology in 3 patients, severe right ventricular dysfunction with pericardial effusion in 1 patient, and an incidental bronchial carcinoma was diagnosed in 1 patient. Conclusion: Coronary CTA and TRO-CTA allow a rapid and safe discharge in the majority of patients presenting with acute chest pain and an intermediate risk for ACS while at the same time identifies those with significant coronary artery stenosis.

  1. Protocol Adherence in Prehospital Medical Care Provided for Patients with Chest Pain and Loss of Consciousness; a Brief Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Mehrara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although many protocols are available in the field of the prehospital medical care (PMC, there is still a notable gap between protocol based directions and applied clinical practice. This study measures the rate of protocol adherence in PMC provided for patients with chest pain and loss of consciousness (LOC.Method: In this cross-sectional study, 10 educated research assistants audited the situation of provided PMC for non-traumatic chest pain and LOC patients, presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary level teaching hospital, compare to national recommendations in these regards.Results: 101 cases with the mean age of 56.7 ± 12.3 years (30-78 were audited (55.4% male. 61 (60.3% patients had chest pain and 40 (39.7% cases had LOC. Protocol adherence rates for cardiac monitoring (62.3%, O2 therapy (32.8%, nitroglycerin administration (60.7%, and aspirin administration (52.5% in prehospital care of patients with chest pain were fair to poor. Protocol adherence rates for correct patient positioning (25%, O2 therapy (75%, cardiac monitoring (25%, pupils examination (25%, bedside glucometery (50%, and assessing for naloxone administration (55% in prehospital care of patients with LOC were fair to poor.Conclusion: There were more than 20% protocol violation regarding prehospital care of chest pain patients regarding cardiac monitoring, O2 therapy, and nitroglycerin and aspirin administration. There were same situation regarding O2 therapy, positioning, cardiac monitoring, pupils examination, bedside glucometery, and assessing for naloxone administration of LOC patients in prehospital setting.

  2. Physical therapy intervention in patients with non-cardiac chest pain following a recent cardiac event: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid T Berg

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the effect of two different physical therapy interventions in patients with stable coronary heart disease and non-cardiac chest pain. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was carried out at a university hospital in Norway. A total of 30 patients with known and stable coronary heart disease and self-reported persistent chest pain reproduced by palpation of intercostal trigger points were participating in the study. The intervention was deep friction massage and heat pack versus heat pack only. The primary outcome was pain intensity after the intervention period and 3 months after the last treatment session, measured by Visual Analogue Scale, 0 to 100. Secondary outcome was health-related quality of life. Results: Treatment with deep friction massage and heat pack gave significant pain reduction compared to heat pack only (–17.6, 95% confidence interval: –30.5, –4.7; p < 0.01, and the reduction was persistent at 3 months’ follow-up (–15.2, 95% confidence interval: –28.5, –1.8; p = 0.03. Health-related quality of life improved in all three domains in patients with no significant difference between groups. Conclusion: Deep friction massage combined with heat pack is an efficient treatment of musculoskeletal chest pain in patients with stable coronary heart disease.

  3. The combined effects of cold therapy and music therapy on pain following chest tube removal among patients with cardiac bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarahmadi, Sajad; Mohammadi, Nooredin; Ardalan, Arash; Najafizadeh, Hassan; Gholami, Mohammad

    2018-05-01

    Chest tube removal is an extremely painful procedure and patients may not respond well to palliative therapies. This study aimed to examine the effect of cold and music therapy individually, as well as a combination of these interventions on reducing pain following chest tube removal. A factorial randomized-controlled clinical trial was performed on 180 patients who underwent cardiac surgery. Patients were randomized into four groups of 45. Group A used ice packs for 20 minutes prior to chest tube removal. Group B was assigned to listen to music for a total length of 30 minutes which started 15 minutes prior to chest tube removal. Group C received a combination of both interventions; and Group D received no interventions. Pain intensity was measured in each group every 15 minutes for a total of 3 readings. Analysis of variance, Tukey and Bonferroni post hoc tests, as well as repeated measures ANOVA were employed for data analysis. Cold therapy and combined method intervention effectively reduced the pain caused by chest tube removal (P < 0.001). Additionally, there were no statistically significant difference in pain intensity scores between groups at 15 minutes following chest tube removal (P = 0.07). Cold and music therapy can be used by nursing staff in clinical practice as a combined approach to provide effective pain control following chest tube removal. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Myocardial perfusion 320-row multidetector computed tomography-guided treatment strategy for the clinical management of patients with recent acute-onset chest pain: Design of the CArdiac cT in the treatment of acute CHest pain (CATCH)-2 randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørgaard, Mathias; Linde, Jesper J; Hove, Jens D; Petersen, Jan R; Jørgensen, Tem B S; Abdulla, Jawdat; Heitmann, Merete; Kragelund, Charlotte; Hansen, Thomas Fritz; Udholm, Patricia M; Pihl, Christian; Kühl, J Tobias; Engstrøm, Thomas; Jensen, Jan Skov; Høfsten, Dan E; Kelbæk, Henning; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2016-09-01

    Patients admitted with chest pain are a diagnostic challenge because the majority does not have coronary artery disease (CAD). Assessment of CAD with coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is safe, cost-effective, and accurate, albeit with a modest specificity. Stress myocardial computed tomography perfusion (CTP) has been shown to increase the specificity when added to CCTA, without lowering the sensitivity. This article describes the design of a randomized controlled trial, CATCH-2, comparing a clinical diagnostic management strategy of CCTA alone against CCTA in combination with CTP. Patients with acute-onset chest pain older than 50 years and with at least one cardiovascular risk factor for CAD are being prospectively enrolled to this study from 6 different clinical sites since October 2013. A total of 600 patients will be included. Patients are randomized 1:1 to clinical management based on CCTA or on CCTA in combination with CTP, determining the need for further testing with invasive coronary angiography including measurement of the fractional flow reserve in vessels with coronary artery lesions. Patients are scanned with a 320-row multidetector computed tomography scanner. Decisions to revascularize the patients are taken by the invasive cardiologist independently of the study allocation. The primary end point is the frequency of revascularization. Secondary end points of clinical outcome are also recorded. The CATCH-2 will determine whether CCTA in combination with CTP is diagnostically superior to CCTA alone in the management of patients with acute-onset chest pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Data from the German Chest Pain Unit Registry: The well known gap between knowledge and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Bergés, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    In-hospital mortality of acute myocardial infarction with ST segment elevation remains high and is influenced by many factors, some of which are modifiable such as time to treatment initiation and modality of treatment. It is well established that reperfusion therapy is the gold-standard in the management of ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction. Despite recent developments and clear, comprehensible guidelines recommendations, it remains difficult to disseminate this knowledge to medical practitioners. The German Chest Pain Unit shows that the best door-to-balloon time is reached when patients contact the Emergency Medical Systems (EMS) directly, rather than when referred by the general practitioner (GP), or are transferred from another hospital, or present as a self-referral. In order to improve mortality in ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction, patients must be able to recognize symptoms and call the EMS as soon as possible, in addition to having an ECG within ten minutes and direct access to reperfusion therapy (PPCI preferred). The German Registry has highlighted the importance of training both patients and doctors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Prognostic value of exercise thallium-201 imaging in patients presenting for evaluation of chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.A.; Boucher, C.A.; Okada, R.D.; Guiney, T.E.; Newell, J.B.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    Accurate prognostic information is important in determining optimal management of patients presenting for evaluation of chest pain. In this study, the ability of exercise thallium-201 myocardial imaging to predict future cardiac events (cardiovascular death or nonfatal myocardial infarction) was correlated with clinical, coronary and left ventricular angiographic and exercise electrocardiographic data in 139 consecutive, nonsurgically managed patients followed-up over a 3 to 5 year period (mean follow-up, 3.7 +/- 0.9), using a logistic regression analysis. Among patients without prior myocardial infarction (100 of 139), the number of myocardial segments with transient thallium-201 defects was the only statistically significant predictor of future cardiac events when all patient variables were evaluated. Among patients with myocardial infarction before evaluation (39 of 139), angiographic ejection fraction was the only significant predictor of future cardiac events when all variables were considered. This study suggests an approach to evaluate the risk of future cardiac events in patients with possible ischemic heart disease

  7. Dor torácica não-cardiogênica Non-cardiac chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Ricardo de Souza Domingues

    2009-09-01

    ão ocupar lugar no cenário do tratamento destes pacientes.CONTEXT: Non-cardiac chest pain or functional chest pain is a syndrome with high prevalence in ocidental world. Findings on 15%-30% of coronary angiograms performed in patients with chest pain are normal. Causes significant impact in quality of life of patients and is associated with increased use of the health care facilities. DATA SOURCES: To this review the following data base were accessed: Medline, the Cochrane Library, LILACS. The limit was the last 5 years publications and were selected relevant original articles, reviews, consensus, guidelines and meta-analysis. RESULTS: Forty-four papers were selected, 28 original articles, 12 reviews, 2 guidelines, 1 consensus and 1 meta-analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Exclusion of cardiac disease is of crucial importance. On the other hand non-cardiac chest pain could be related to gastrointestinal, muscular and respiratory causes and/or psychological disturbances. Treatment aims to attack mechanism generator in order to relieve or to eliminate symptoms. Drugs are the cornerstone of treatment, exception to achalasia patients because those have better response to dilation of the esophagus or surgery, and to those who need intensive pyschological therapy. The most important drugs used are proton pump inhibitors and triciclic antidepressants, the latter, to modulate central signal process (visceral hypersensitivity and autonomic response. Recently, new diagnostic facilities, and also therapeutic modalities, such as esophageal botulin toxin injection and hypnosis are under investigations. In the near future, maybe some of them would take a place in the therapeutic scenario of these patients.

  8. Ejection fraction response to exercise in patients with chest pain and normal coronary arteriograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, R.L.; Lee, K.L.; Cobb, F.; Jones, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    In this study we describe the ejection fraction response to upright exercise using first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography in a group of 60 patients with chest pain, normal coronary ateriograms and normal resting ventricular function. A wide range of resting function (heart rate and ejection fraction) and exercise function (heart rate, ejection fraction, peak work load and estimated peak oxygen uptake) were measured. The ejection fraction response to exercise demonstrated wide variation, ranging from a decrease of 23% to an increase of 24%. Six of 22 clinical and radionuclide angiocardiographic variables (resting ejection fraction, peak work load, age, sex, body surface area and the change in end-diastolic volume index with exercise) were significant univariate predictors of the ejection fraction response to exercise. Multivariable analysis identified resting ejection fraction, the change in end-diastolic volume index with exercise and either sex or peak work load as variables that provided significant independent predictive information. These observations indicate that the ejection fraction response to exercise is a complex response that is influenced by multiple physiologic variables. The wide variation in this population suggests that the ejection fraction response to exercise is not a reliable test for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease because of its low specificity

  9. Enterogastroesophageal reflux detected on 99m-technetium sestamibi cardiac imaging as a cause of chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdogan, Zeynep; Silov, Güler; Özdal, Aysegül; Turhal, Özgül

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with technetium-99m sestamibi ( 99m Tc MIBI) is considered a diagnostic technique that is widely used for the investigation of suspected coronary artery disease. Incidental inspection of an extracardiac activity is indirect, but important marker, which can identify a potentially treatable non-coronary cause for chest pain that may mimic cardiac symptoms. Here, we present an illustrative case in which significant enterogastroesophageal reflux of 99m Tc MIBI occurred during the cardiac imaging following prompt hepatobiliary clearance. Because, there was normal myocardial perfusion on MPI, presence of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) on GER scintigraphy and detection of mild inflammation with pathologically confirmed hyperplastic polyp by endoscopy, in view of the above findings we concluded that the probable cause of chest pain was reflux. (author)

  10. Acute ECG changes and chest pain induced by neck motion in patients with cervical hernia--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler, N; Bilge, M; Eryonucu, B; Cirak, B

    2000-10-01

    We report two cases of acute cervical angina and ECG changes induced by anteflexion of the head. Cervical angina is defined as chest pain that resembles true cardiac angina but originates from cervical discopathy with nerve root compression. In these patients, Prinzmetal's angina, valvular heart disease, congenital heart disease, left ventricular aneurysm, and cardiomyopathy were excluded. After all, the patient's chest pain was reproduced by anteflexion of head, at this time, their ECGs showed nonspecific ST-T changes in the inferior and anterior leads different from the basal ECG. ECG changes returned to normal when the patient's neck moved to the neutral position. To our knowledge, these are the first cases of cervical angina associated with acute ECG changes by neck motion.

  11. Exercise left ventricular performance in patients with chest pain, ischemic-appearing exercise electrocardiograms, and angiographically normal coronary arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.J.; Sands, M.J.; Davies, R.A.; Wackers, F.J.; Alexander, J.; Lachman, A.S.; Williams, B.W.; Zaret, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    Left ventricular performance was evaluated using first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography in 31 patients with chest pain, an ischemic-appearing exercise electrocardiogram, and angiographically normal coronary arteries at rest and during maximal upright bicycle exercise. 201 Tl imaging was done in all patients after treadmill exercise and in selected patients after ergonovine provocation. Resting left ventricular performance was normal in all patients. An abnormal ejection fraction response to exercise was detected in 12 of 31 patients. Regional dysfunction was present during exercise in four patients, all of whom also had abnormal global responses. Three of these 12 patients and two additional patients had exercise-induced 201 Tl perfusion defects. In all nine patients who underwent ergonovine testing, there was no suggestion of coronary arterial spasm. Thus, left ventricular dysfunction during exercise, in the presence of normal resting performance, was found in a substantial number of patients with chest pain, an ischemic-appearing exercise electrocardiogram, and normal coronary arteries

  12. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzler, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.henzler@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Gruettner, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.gruettner@umm.de [Emergency Department, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Meyer, Mathias, E-mail: mr.meyer.mathias@gmail.com [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Rothhaar, Baerbel, E-mail: baerbel.rothhaar@umm.de [Business Development – Medical Controlling, University Medical Center, Mannheim (Germany); Apfaltrer, Paul, E-mail: Paul.Apfaltrer@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Metzger, Franz, E-mail: franz.metzger@umm.de [Business Development – Medical Controlling, University Medical Center, Mannheim (Germany); Borggrefe, Martin, E-mail: martin.borggrefe@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoenberg, Stefan O., E-mail: stefan.schoenberg@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); and others

    2013-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the economic impact of integrating coronary CT angiography (cCTA) or whole chest “triple-rule-out” CTA (TRO-CTA) in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain. Materials and methods: 100 consecutive emergency department patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for ACS underwent cCTA or TRO-CTA (cCTA group). Diagnostic performance, rate and length of hospitalization, hospital costs, hospital reimbursement and hospital profit were analyzed. All findings were compared to those of 100 different patients with acute chest pain that were evaluated with a standard of care (SOC) diagnostic algorithm (SOC group) that did not include cCTA. Diagnostic performance (“safety”) of both algorithms was defined as the absence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) over a 90-day follow-up period. Results: In the cCTA group 60/100 patients were safely discharged at the same day. 19/100 patients were hospitalized due to significant coronary stenosis on cCTA, which was confirmed by invasive coronary catheterization (ICC) in 17/19 patients. Relevant non-coronary disease that led to hospitalization were found in 21 patients of the cCTA group. In the SOC group all patients were hospitalized. 87 of these hospitalized patients underwent ICC for exclusion of coronary artery stenosis. A significant coronary artery stenosis was found in only 25 of these patients. Within the cCTA group no patient suffered from MACE over the 90-day follow-up period. In the SOC group 2 patients were rehospitalized during the 90-day follow-up period due to recurrent chest pain and 1 patient because of a pseudoaneurym of the left femoral artery after ICC. The median hospital costs per patient were significantly lower in the cCTA group than in the SOC group (428.9€ vs. 1575.0€, p < 0.001). The median reimbursement of the cCTA group was less compared to the SOC group (589.8€ vs. 2412.1€, p < 0.001) and patients in the cCTA group gained less profit than

  13. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henzler, Thomas; Gruettner, Joachim; Meyer, Mathias; Rothhaar, Baerbel; Apfaltrer, Paul; Metzger, Franz; Borggrefe, Martin; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Schoenberg, Stefan O.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the economic impact of integrating coronary CT angiography (cCTA) or whole chest “triple-rule-out” CTA (TRO-CTA) in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain. Materials and methods: 100 consecutive emergency department patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for ACS underwent cCTA or TRO-CTA (cCTA group). Diagnostic performance, rate and length of hospitalization, hospital costs, hospital reimbursement and hospital profit were analyzed. All findings were compared to those of 100 different patients with acute chest pain that were evaluated with a standard of care (SOC) diagnostic algorithm (SOC group) that did not include cCTA. Diagnostic performance (“safety”) of both algorithms was defined as the absence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) over a 90-day follow-up period. Results: In the cCTA group 60/100 patients were safely discharged at the same day. 19/100 patients were hospitalized due to significant coronary stenosis on cCTA, which was confirmed by invasive coronary catheterization (ICC) in 17/19 patients. Relevant non-coronary disease that led to hospitalization were found in 21 patients of the cCTA group. In the SOC group all patients were hospitalized. 87 of these hospitalized patients underwent ICC for exclusion of coronary artery stenosis. A significant coronary artery stenosis was found in only 25 of these patients. Within the cCTA group no patient suffered from MACE over the 90-day follow-up period. In the SOC group 2 patients were rehospitalized during the 90-day follow-up period due to recurrent chest pain and 1 patient because of a pseudoaneurym of the left femoral artery after ICC. The median hospital costs per patient were significantly lower in the cCTA group than in the SOC group (428.9€ vs. 1575.0€, p < 0.001). The median reimbursement of the cCTA group was less compared to the SOC group (589.8€ vs. 2412.1€, p < 0.001) and patients in the cCTA group gained less profit than

  14. A giant cardiac hydatid cyst presenting with chest pain and ventricular tachycardia in a pregnant woman undergoing cesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Yaman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyst hydatid disease is an infectious disease caused by development of the larval form of Echinococcus granulosus in humans. Cardiac involvement of this disease is a rare condition, and if present, it is most commonly located in the left ventricle. Interventricular septal involvement is observed only in 4% of these cases. Herein, we report a case of cyst hydatid located at interventricular septum causing chest pain and ventricular tachycardia during cesarean section.

  15. Using the Electronic Medical Record to Reduce Unnecessary Ordering of Coagulation Studies for Patients with Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah S. Hinson

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Our goal was to reduce ordering of coagulation studies in the emergency department (ED that have no added value for patients presenting with chest pain. We hypothesized this could be achieved via implementation of a stopgap measure in the electronic medical record (EMR. Methods: We used a pre and post quasi-experimental study design to evaluate the impact of an EMRbased intervention on coagulation study ordering for patients with chest pain. A simple interactive prompt was incorporated into the EMR of our ED that required clinicians to indicate whether patients were on anticoagulation therapy prior to completion of orders for coagulation studies. Coagulation order frequency was measured via detailed review of randomly sampled encounters during two-month periods before and after intervention. We classified existing orders as clinically indicated or non-value added. Order frequencies were calculated as percentages, and we assessed differences between groups by chi-square analysis. Results: Pre-intervention, 73.8% (76/103 of patients with chest pain had coagulation studies ordered, of which 67.1% (51/76 were non-value added. Post-intervention, 38.5% (40/104 of patients with chest pain had coagulation studies ordered, of which 60% (24/40 were non-value added. There was an absolute reduction of 35.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 22.7%, 48.0% in the total ordering of coagulation studies and 26.4% (95% CI: 13.8%, 39.0% in non-value added order placement. Conclusion: Simple EMR-based interactive prompts can serve as effective deterrents to indiscriminate ordering of diagnostic studies. [West J Emerg Med. 2017;18(2267-269.

  16. Usefulness of technetium-99m tetrofosmin single-photon emission computed tomography for short-term risk stratification in patients with acute chest pain in the emergency room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahito, Michitomo; Kondo, Makoto; Abe, Yoshiteru

    2003-01-01

    High-risk patients with acute coronary syndrome are difficult to distinguish from low-risk patients with chest pain in the emergency room. Technetium-99 m ( 99m Tc) tetrofosmin single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was investigated to exclude high-risk patients with chest pain in the emergency room. 99m Tc-tetrofosmin SPECT was evaluated using a four-point scoring system in 228 patients (144 men, 84 women, mean age 68±12 years) with chest pain. Negative was defined as the myocardial segments with a defect score (DS) of 99m Tc-tetrofosmin; no significance (NS)), 84.9% (NS) and 60.4% (p 99m Tc-tetrofosmin SPECT is a useful method to exclude high-risk patients among patients with chest pain in the emergency room. (author)

  17. Platelet function testing to predict hyporesponsiveness to clopidogrel in patients with chest pain seen in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma RK

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Rakesh K Sharma,1 Stephen W Erickson,1 Rohit Sharma,2 Donald J Voelker,1 Hanumanth K Reddy,1 Harvinder Dod,2 James D Marsh1 1Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, 2Medical Center of South Arkansas, El Dorado, AR, USA Background: A dual antiplatelet regimen has been shown to reduce the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events after percutaneous coronary intervention. However, there is little information available on inhibition of platelet aggregation in patients with a prior coronary stent presenting with chest pain. This study evaluated the prevalence of hyporesponsiveness to clopidogrel and factors associated with this in patients presenting to our emergency department with chest pain who had previously undergone coronary stent placement and were prescribed dual antiplatelet therapy. Methods: Responsiveness to clopidogrel was evaluated in a cohort of 533 consecutive stented patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain. P2Y12 reaction units (PRU and percent P2Y12 inhibition with clopidogrel were measured in all patients. Of 533 patients, 221 (41.6% had PRU ≥ 230. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to determine the relationship between hyporesponsiveness to clopidogrel (defined as PRU ≥ 230 and several potential risk factors, ie, gender, age, race, type 1 or type 2 diabetes, hypertension, smoking, chronic renal failure, and obesity. Results: There was a greater risk of hyporesponsiveness in African Americans than in non-African American patients (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 2.165, in patients with type 2 diabetes than in those without (adjusted OR = 2.109, and in women than in men (adjusted OR = 1.813, as well as a greater risk of hyporesponsiveness with increasing age (adjusted OR = 1.167 per decade. Conclusion: There was a high prevalence of hyporesponsiveness to clopidogrel in patients presenting with chest pain and a prior coronary stent. Non

  18. A Multivariate Model for Prediction of Obstructive Coronary Disease in Patients with Acute Chest Pain: Development and Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Cláudio Lemos Correia

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Currently, there is no validated multivariate model to predict probability of obstructive coronary disease in patients with acute chest pain. Objective: To develop and validate a multivariate model to predict coronary artery disease (CAD based on variables assessed at admission to the coronary care unit (CCU due to acute chest pain. Methods: A total of 470 patients were studied, 370 utilized as the derivation sample and the subsequent 100 patients as the validation sample. As the reference standard, angiography was required to rule in CAD (stenosis ≥ 70%, while either angiography or a negative noninvasive test could be used to rule it out. As predictors, 13 baseline variables related to medical history, 14 characteristics of chest discomfort, and eight variables from physical examination or laboratory tests were tested. Results: The prevalence of CAD was 48%. By logistic regression, six variables remained independent predictors of CAD: age, male gender, relief with nitrate, signs of heart failure, positive electrocardiogram, and troponin. The area under the curve (AUC of this final model was 0.80 (95% confidence interval [95%CI] = 0.75 - 0.84 in the derivation sample and 0.86 (95%CI = 0.79 - 0.93 in the validation sample. Hosmer-Lemeshow's test indicated good calibration in both samples (p = 0.98 and p = 0.23, respectively. Compared with a basic model containing electrocardiogram and troponin, the full model provided an AUC increment of 0.07 in both derivation (p = 0.0002 and validation (p = 0.039 samples. Integrated discrimination improvement was 0.09 in both derivation (p < 0.001 and validation (p < 0.0015 samples. Conclusion: A multivariate model was derived and validated as an accurate tool for estimating the pretest probability of CAD in patients with acute chest pain.

  19. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with chest pain, high troponin levels and absence of coronary artery obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avegliano, G.P.; Costabel, J.P.; Kuschnir, P.; Thierer, J.; Alves de Lima, A.; Sanchez, G.; Ronderos, J.; Huguet, M.; Petit, M.; Frangi, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of myocardial infarction with angiographically normal coronary arteries is approximately 7-10%. The etiological diagnosis is sometimes difficult and is important in terms of clinical practice and prognosis. The goal of our study was to show a series of consecutive patients with an initial diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome with high troponin levels and absence of coronary artery obstruction in which cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) gave a description of the myocardial lesion, orientating towards the etiological diagnosis. From January 2005 to December 2009, 720 consecutive patients with an initial diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome and elevated troponins were included; 64 of these patients did not present angiographically significant coronary artery stenosis. Within 72 ± 24 h after coronary angiography, these patients underwent CMRI using b-SSFP sequences for cine imaging in short-axis, 2-, 3- and 4- chamber views for the evaluation of segmental wall motion, with T2-weighted and delayed enhancement (DE) images of the myocardium with an 'inversion-recovery' sequence. The following diagnoses were made: myocarditis (39 patients); myocardial infarction (12 patients); Tako-Tsubo syndrome (8 patients); apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (2 patients); 3 patients remained without diagnosis. These findings demonstrate the usefulness of CMRI in the clinical scenario of patients with chest pain, inconclusive ECG findings and high troponin levels with angiographically normal coronary arteries. The presence and distribution pattern of DE make it possible to define the etiological diagnosis and interpret the physiopathological process. (authors) [es

  20. Prognostic value of atrial pacing and thallium-201 scintigraphy in patients with stable chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratmann, H.G.; Mark, A.L.; Walter, K.E.; Williams, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    The value of atrial pacing and thallium-201 scintigraphy for assessing risk of subsequent cardiac events was examined in 210 patients with stable chest pain. Follow-up information was complete in 195 patients (mean age 61 years). Over an average follow-up of 19 months, cardiac events occurred in 38 patients--unstable angina in 20, nonfatal acute myocardial infarction in 6 and death from cardiac causes in 12. A history of previous myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, systemic hypertension or peripheral vascular disease at the time of pacing was not associated with an increased frequency of subsequent cardiac events. Six of 38 patients with later cardiac events had a history of congestive heart failure, compared with 8 of 157 without cardiac events (p less than 0.05). Neither pacing-induced angina, ST depression, nor the presence of a fixed perfusion defect was significantly more frequent in patients with cardiac events as a whole compared with patients without such events. Reversible defects and abnormal scans (reversible or fixed defects) were present, respectively, in 19 and 31 of 38 patients with cardiac events, compared with 42 and 79 patients, respectively, of the 157 patients without cardiac events (both p less than 0.01). In patients who developed unstable angina, a reversible defect was seen in 13 and an abnormal scan in 16 (both p less than 0.01 compared with patients without cardiac events). In 12 patients who died from a primary cardiac event, fixed defects were present in 8 and an abnormal scan in 11 (p less than 0.05 and p less than 0.01, respectively, compared with patients without cardiac events)

  1. A functional study of the esophagus in patients with non-cardiac chest pain and dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullo, Roberto; Inviati, Angela; Almasio, Piero Luigi; Di Paola, Valentina; Di Giovanni, Silvia; Scerrino, Gregorio; Gulotta, Gaspare; Bonventre, Sebastiano

    2015-03-01

    Nutcracker esophagus and non-specific motility disorders are the main causes of non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP), with gastroesophageal reflux in 60% of cases. Achalasia and diffuse esophageal spasm are the most frequent anomalies described in patients with dysphagia. The goal of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of esophageal body and lower esophageal sphincter motor abnormalities in patients with dysphagia, NCCP, or both. This study is a retrospective analysis of 716 patients with NCCP and/or dysphagia tested between January 1994 and December 2010. 1023 functional studies were performed, 707 of which were esophageal manometries, 225 esophageal pH-meters, and 44 bilimetries. We divided the patients into three groups: group 1 was composed of patients affected with dysphagia, group 2 with NCCP and group 3 with NCCP and dysphagia. Manometric anomalies were detected in 84.4% of cases (p<0.001). The most frequent esophageal motility alteration was achalasia (36%). The lower esophageal sphincter was normal in 45.9% of patients (p<0.001). In all 3 groups, 80.9%, 98.8%, and 93.8, respectively, of patients showed normal upper esophageal sphincter (p=0.005). Our data differs from those of other studies because they were collected from and analyzed by a single tertiary level referral center by a single examiner. This could have eliminated the variability found in different hands and different experiences. The high percentage of symptomatic patients with non-pathologic esophageal motility pattern suggests an unclear origin of the disease, with possible neuromuscular involvement. As a result, these patients may need more-detailed diagnostic studies.

  2. Psychological traits influence autonomic nervous system recovery following esophageal intubation in health and functional chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, A D; Coen, S J; Kano, M; Worthen, S F; Rossiter, H E; Navqi, H; Scott, S M; Furlong, P L; Aziz, Q

    2013-12-01

    Esophageal intubation is a widely utilized technique for a diverse array of physiological studies, activating a complex physiological response mediated, in part, by the autonomic nervous system (ANS). In order to determine the optimal time period after intubation when physiological observations should be recorded, it is important to know the duration of, and factors that influence, this ANS response, in both health and disease. Fifty healthy subjects (27 males, median age 31.9 years, range 20-53 years) and 20 patients with Rome III defined functional chest pain (nine male, median age of 38.7 years, range 28-59 years) had personality traits and anxiety measured. Subjects had heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), sympathetic (cardiac sympathetic index, CSI), and parasympathetic nervous system (cardiac vagal tone, CVT) parameters measured at baseline and in response to per nasum intubation with an esophageal catheter. CSI/CVT recovery was measured following esophageal intubation. In all subjects, esophageal intubation caused an elevation in HR, BP, CSI, and skin conductance response (SCR; all p < 0.0001) but concomitant CVT and cardiac sensitivity to the baroreflex (CSB) withdrawal (all p < 0.04). Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that longer CVT recovery times were independently associated with higher neuroticism (p < 0.001). Patients had prolonged CSI and CVT recovery times in comparison to healthy subjects (112.5 s vs 46.5 s, p = 0.0001 and 549 s vs 223.5 s, p = 0.0001, respectively). Esophageal intubation activates a flight/flight ANS response. Future studies should allow for at least 10 min of recovery time. Consideration should be given to psychological traits and disease status as these can influence recovery. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The UPBEAT nurse-delivered personalized care intervention for people with coronary heart disease who report current chest pain and depression: a randomised controlled pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Barley

    Full Text Available Depression is common in people with coronary heart disease (CHD and associated with worse outcome. This study explored the acceptability and feasibility of procedures for a trial and for an intervention, including its potential costs, to inform a definitive randomized controlled trial (RCT of a nurse-led personalised care intervention for primary care CHD patients with current chest pain and probable depression.Multi-centre, outcome assessor-blinded, randomized parallel group study. CHD patients reporting chest pain and scoring 8 or more on the HADS were randomized to personalized care (PC or treatment as usual (TAU for 6 months and followed for 1 year. Primary outcome was acceptability and feasibility of procedures; secondary outcomes included mood, chest pain, functional status, well being and psychological process variables.1001 people from 17 General Practice CHD registers in South London consented to be contacted; out of 126 who were potentially eligible, 81 (35% female, mean age = 65 SD11 years were randomized. PC participants (n = 41 identified wide ranging problems to work on with nurse-case managers. Good acceptability and feasibility was indicated by low attrition (9%, high engagement and minimal nurse time used (mean/SD = 78/19 mins assessment, 125/91 mins telephone follow up. Both groups improved on all outcomes. The largest between group difference was in the proportion no longer reporting chest pain (PC 37% vs TAU 18%; mixed effects model OR 2.21 95% CI 0.69, 7.03. Some evidence was seen that self efficacy (mean scale increase of 2.5 vs 0.9 and illness perceptions (mean scale increase of 7.8 vs 2.5 had improved in PC vs TAU participants at 1 year. PC appeared to be more cost effective up to a QALY threshold of approximately £3,000.Trial and intervention procedures appeared to be feasible and acceptable. PC allowed patients to work on unaddressed problems and appears cheaper than TAU.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN21615909.

  4. The Veracity of Troponin Test Requests for Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department with Chest Pain; A Clinical Audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Sabzghabaei

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Troponin test is one of the methods for diagnosing acute coronary syndrome, but the overuse and misuse of this test has increased the costs imposed on the health system and the patients. Objective: The present study was conducted to investigate the veracity of troponin test requests for patients presenting to an emergency department with chest pain and examine the effectiveness of training emergency medicine assistants in reducing unnecessary and inappropriate requests in emergency departments. Methods: This clinical audit was conducted in the emergency department of Imam Hossein Hospital, Tehran, Iran, in 2014. Sampling was carried out using the census method and all the cases presenting to the emergency department for whom a troponin test was requested by the emergency medical assistants were included in the research. First, the veracity of the current troponin test requests was assessed; then, training was given to the personnel, and the veracity of the troponin test requests was once again verified after the training was completed. The rate of veracious troponin requests for the patients was measured based on two factors, including the interval between the patients’ admission and the troponin test request, and the interval between the onset of pain and the troponin test request. The veracity of the troponin test request was compared before and after training using the Phi test and Cramer’s V test in IBM SPSS-21. Results: This study examined a total of 500 patients (250 before training and 250 after, who had a mean age of 57.65±18.15 years, including 51.6% men. Significant differences were observed between the mean time of the patients’ admission and the overall and post-training troponin test results (P=0.000, and also between the mean time of the onset of pain and the overall and post-training troponin test results (P=0.000. The number of positive troponin test results did not differ significantly between the patients

  5. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It may also be useful to help diagnose and ... have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to ...

  6. Diagnostic Value of the Updated Diamond and Forrester Score to Predict Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Acute-Onset Chest Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørgaard, Mathias; Linde, Jesper James; Kofoed, Klaus Fuglsang

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In the recently updated clinical guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology on the management of stable coronary artery disease (CAD), the updated Diamond Forrester score has been included as a pretest probability (PTP) score to select patients for further diagnostic testing. ...... useful tool in risk-stratifying patients with acute-onset chest pain at a low-to-intermediate risk of having CAD. Adding a stress test to PTP does not appear to offer significant diagnostic benefit.......OBJECTIVES: In the recently updated clinical guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology on the management of stable coronary artery disease (CAD), the updated Diamond Forrester score has been included as a pretest probability (PTP) score to select patients for further diagnostic testing. We...... investigated the validity of the new guidelines in a population of patients with acute-onset chest pain. METHODS: We examined 527 consecutive patients with either an exercise-ECG stress test or single-photon emission computed tomography, and subsequently coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). We...

  7. 20 CFR 220.114 - Evaluation of symptoms, including pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Precipitating and aggravating factors; (iv) The type, dosage, effectiveness, and side effects of any medication... alleged functional limitations and restrictions due to pain or other symptoms can reasonably be accepted... a determination as to the intensity, persistence, or functionally limiting effects of the claimant's...

  8. A new score for the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome in acute chest pain with non-diagnostic ECG and normal troponin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubaker, Hamdi; Grissa, Mohamed Habib; Beltaief, Kaouther; Amor, Mohamed Haj; Mdimagh, Zouhaier; Boukhris, Amor; Ben Amor, Mehdi; Dridi, Zohra; Letaief, Mondher; Bouida, Wahid; Boukef, Riadh; Najjar, Fadhel; Nouira, Semir

    2015-10-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) represents a difficult diagnostic challenge in patients with undifferentiated chest pain. There is a need for a valid clinical score to improve diagnostic accuracy. To compare the performance of a model combining the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) score and a score describing chest pain (ACS diagnostic score: ACSD score) with that of both scores alone in the diagnosis of ACS in ED patients with chest pain associated with a non-diagnostic ECG and normal troponin. In this observational cohort study, we enrolled 809 patients admitted to a chest pain unit with normal ECG and normal troponin. They were prospectively evaluated in order to calculate TIMI score, chest pain characteristics score and ACSD score. Diagnosis of ACS was the primary outcome and defined on the basis of 2 cardiologists after reviewing the patient medical records and follow-up data. Mortality and major cardiovascular events were followed for 1 month for patients discharged directly from ED. Discriminative power of scores was evaluated by the area under the ROC curve. ACS was confirmed in 90 patients (11.1%). The area under the ROC curve for ACSD score was 0.85 (95% CI 0.80 to 0.90) compared with 0.74 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.81) for TIMI and 0.79 (95% CI 0.74 to 0.84) for chest pain characteristics score. A threshold value of 9 appeared to optimise sensitivity (92%) and negative predictive value (99%) without excessively compromising specificity (62%) and positive predictive value (23%). The ACSD score showed a good discrimination performance and an excellent negative predictive value which allows safely ruling out ACS in ED patients with undifferentiated chest pain. Our findings should be validated in a larger multicentre study. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Risk of gastrointestinal cancer in patients with unexplained chest/epigastric pain and normal upper endoscopy: a Danish 10-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Estrid Muff; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Gorst-Rasmussen, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Unexplained chest/epigastric pain is a common symptom in the general population. However, it has not previously been studied whether such pain could be a marker of subsequent gastrointestinal cancer. We aimed to estimate the risk of gastrointestinal cancers in a Danish 10-year follow-up study amo...

  10. Case report: patient with Weil’s disease, chest pain, hepatitis b, hepatorenal syndrome, and electrolyte imbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustopa; Susilo, R. S. B.; Arifin; Redhono, D.; Sumandjar, T.

    2018-03-01

    A 48-years-old man was hospitalized due to febrile for 5 days accompanied by headache and left chest pain radiating into the back. Pain calf, abdominal pain and tea color urine has occured since 1 week before admission. Physical examination revealed temperature 38.5° C, conjungtival suffusion, jaundice sclera, irregularheart sound, hepatomegaly, gastrocnemius tenderness, Faine score 23. Laboratory tests showed leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, elevated transaminase enzyme, ureum 181 mg/dl, creatinine 4.3 mg/dl, albumin 2.4 g/dl, sodium 110 mmol/L, potassium 2.3 mmol/L, reactive HbsAg, CKMB 68.06 ng/ml, increased HBV-DNA, negative IgM anti Leptospira. MAT demonstrated 4 positive serovar. Electrocardiography revealed AF rapid ventrikel response. Chest x-ray showed cardiomegaly. Abdominal ultrasound revealed hepatomegaly with chronic parenchimal liver disease, renal insuficiency. Fibroscan showed severe fibrosis. Patient was diagnosed with Weil’s disease and hepatorenal syndrome as complication. Patient was given clavulanate amoxicillin injections. This patient was not dialysis, only fluid balance monitoring and checked ureum-creatinine per 3 days, and there was improvement of ureum-creatinine. Hepatorenal syndrome in Weil’s disease contributed to electrolyte imbalance. In addition, chronic hepatitis B on this patient was treated with tenofovir.

  11. Assessment of coronary flow reserve by sestamibi imaging in patients with typical chest pain and normal coronary arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storto, Giovanni; Sorrentino, Anna R.; Pellegrino, Teresa; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Cuocolo, Alberto; Petretta, Mario

    2007-01-01

    We assessed coronary flow reserve (CFR) by sestamibi imaging in patients with typical chest pain, positive exercise stress test and normal coronary vessels. Thirty-five patients with typical chest pain and normal angiogram and 12 control subjects with atypical chest pain underwent dipyridamole/rest 99m Tc-sestamibi imaging. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was estimated by measuring first transit counts in the pulmonary artery and myocardial counts from SPECT images. Estimated CFR was expressed as the ratio of stress to rest MBF. Rest MBF and CFR were corrected for rate-pressure product (RPP) and expressed as normalised MBF (MBF n ) and normalised CFR (CFR n ). Coronary vascular resistances (CVR) were calculated as the ratio between mean arterial pressure and estimated MBF. At rest, estimated MBF and MBF n were lower in controls than in patients (0.98 ± 0.4 vs 1.30 ± 0.3 counts/pixel/s and 1.14 ± 0.5 vs 1.64 ± 0.6 counts/pixel/s, respectively, both p n was still higher in controls than in patients (2.1 ± 0.5 vs 1.29 ± 0.5, p < 0.0001). At baseline, CVR values were lower (p < 0.01) in patients than in controls. Dipyridamole-induced changes in CVR were greater (p < 0.0001) in controls (-63%) than in patients (-35%). In the overall study population, a significant correlation between dipyridamole-induced changes in CVR and CFR was observed (r = -0.88, p < 0.0001). SPECT might represent a useful non-invasive method for assessing coronary vascular function in patients with angina and a normal coronary angiogram. (orig.)

  12. Technetium-99m sestamibi myocardial tomography based on dipyridamole echocardiography testing in hypertensive patients with chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schillaci, O. [Section of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Experimental Medicine and Pathology, University ``La Sapienza``, Rome (Italy); Moroni, C. [Department of Internal Medicine, University ``La Sapienza``, Rome (Italy); Scopinaro, F. [Section of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Experimental Medicine and Pathology, University ``La Sapienza``, Rome (Italy); Tavolaro, R. [Section of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Experimental Medicine and Pathology, University ``La Sapienza``, Rome (Italy); Danieli, R. [Section of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Experimental Medicine and Pathology, University ``La Sapienza``, Rome (Italy); Bossini, A. [Department of Internal Medicine, University ``La Sapienza``, Rome (Italy); Cassone, R. [Department of Internal Medicine, University ``La Sapienza``, Rome (Italy); Colella, A.C. [Section of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Experimental Medicine and Pathology, University ``La Sapienza``, Rome (Italy)

    1997-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic capability of technetium-99m sestamibi tomography based on dipyridamole echocardiography testing in hypertensives with chest pain, and to compare the scintigraphic results with those of coronary angiography, exercise electrocardiography and dipyridamole echocardiography. Forty subjects with mild to moderate hypertension, chest pain and no previous myocardial infarction were submitted to {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi tomography (at rest and after high-dose dipyridamole echocardiography) and to exercise electrocardiography testing. At coronary angiography 22 patients (group A) had significant epicardial coronary artery disease ({>=}70% stenosis of at least one major vessel) and 18 normal main coronary vessels (group B). Dipyridamole {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi imaging was positive in 21/22 patients of group A and in 5/18 of group B. Dipyridamole echocardiography was positive in 18/22 patients of group A and in 5/18 of group B. Exercise electrocardiography was positive in 15/22 patients of group A and in 11/18 of group B. Four out of five subjects in group B with positive results in all the tests showed a slow run-off of angiographic contrast medium, probably due to small-vessel disease. Significant epicardial coronary artery disease in hypertensives with chest pain is unlikely when dipyridamole {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi tomography is negative. When scintigraphy is positive, either epicardial coronary artery disease or a small-vessel disease condition is possible. The association of scintigraphy with dipyridamole echocardiography testing allows the assessment of contractile function and myocardial perfusion by a single pharmacological stress. (orig./AJ). With 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Clinical evaluation of adenosine and exercise stress 99Tcm-MIBI myocardial imaging in detection of myocardial ischemia in patients with untypical chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Yueqin; He Zuoxiang; Wang Qi; Hu Fenghuan; Yang Weixian; Qiao Shubing; Liu Xiujie

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of adenosine and exercise stress 99 Tc m -methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) myocardial imaging for the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia in patients with untypical chest pain. Methods: Two groups included. Group 1: 67 cases of adenosine 99 Tc m -MIBI myocardial imaging. Group 2: 81 cases of exercise stress 99 Tc m -MIBI myocardial imaging. All of the patients had coronary angiography (CAG). The results of them were compared. Results: 23 out of 67 patients in group 1 had significant coronary stenosis after CAG, 16 showed reversible perfusion abnormalities in adenosine imaging. 41 of 44 patients with normal CAG showed normal adenosine imaging. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of adenosine imaging for coronary artery disease detection were 70%, 93% and 85%, respectively. Group 2: 22 out of 31 patients with significant coronany stenosis after CAG showed reversible perfusion abnormalities, 48 of 50 patients with normal CAG showed normal exercise imaging. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of exercise imaging for coronary artery disease detection were 71%, 96% and 86%, respectively. Conclusion: Reversible perfusion abnormalities found both in adenosine and exercise stress 99 Tc m -MIBI myocardial imaging were the key point for diagnosis of myocardial ischemia in patients with untypical chest pain. (authors)

  14. Spectrum of esophageal motility disorders in patients with motor dysphagia and noncardiac chest pain - A single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinkesh Kumar Bansal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objective: High-resolution esophageal manometry is the most important investigation for the evaluation of patients with dysphagia and noncardiac chest pain (NCCP. Chicago Classification (CC utilizing an algorithmic approach in analyzing high-resolution manometry has been accepted worldwide, and an updated version, CC v3.0, of this classification has been developed by the International high-resolution manometry working Group in 2014. Data on the spectrum of esophageal motility disorders in Indian population are scarce as well as a newer version of CC has not been used to classify. The aim of our study is to evaluate clinical presentation and manometric profile of patients with suspected esophageal motility disorders using CC v3.0. Methodology: In this retrospective study, consecutive patients referred for esophageal manometry at our center from 2010 to 2015 were included in the study. High-resolution esophageal manometry was performed with 22-channel water-perfusion system (MMS, The Netherlands. Newer version of CC (CC v3.0 was used to classify motility disorders. Results: A total of 400 patients were included, with a mean age of 44 years and 67.5% were males. Out of these, 60% (n = 240 patients presented with motor dysphagia while 40% (n = 160 had NCCP. Motility disorder was present in 50.5% (n = 202 of the patients while 49.5% (n = 198 patients had normal manometry. Disorders of esophagogastric junction outflow were the predominant type of disorder, found in 33.75% (n = 135. About 14.25% (n = 57 of the patients had minor disorders of peristalsis while 5% (n = 20 of the patients had other major disorders of peristalsis. Achalasia was the most common motility disorder present in 30% (n = 120 patients. Conclusion: Dysphagia was the most common esophageal symptom followed by NCCP in our series. Achalasia was the most common esophageal motility disorder followed by fragmented peristalsis.

  15. MIBI Tc-99m uptake due to breast cancer recurrence as an incidental finding in a patient with atypical chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saavedra, P.; Cano, R.; Morales, R.; Urquiaga, J.; Negron, S.; Munoz, L.; Aguilar, C.; Mendoza, G.; Lopez, D.; Carlos, I.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is lo report incidental findings of uptake of Tc99m-MIBI in anterior chest in a patient evaluated for a typical chest pain. A retrospective data collection was performed through chart review of the patient, a 67 year-old women, who had atypical chest pain with cardiac risk factors (hypertension, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes) with history of left total mastectomy (1995) without adjuvant chemotherapy and negative follow-up. Myocardial Perfusion imaging with Tc99m-MIBI was normal and showed uptake in anterior left chest in sagital views, described as suspected recurrent breast cancer. Oncological and cardiological evaluation of the patient was done and detected minimal palpable lesion in the surgery scar. Incisional biopsy of the lump in the surgery scar was positive for Infiltrative Ductal Breast Carcinoma. Tc-99m-MIBI is useful for detection of recurrence of breast carcinoma in surgery scar

  16. Relationship Between Physiological Parameters and Acute Coronary Syndrome in Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department With Undifferentiated Chest Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Jaimi H; Beamish, Daniel; Parsonage, William; Hawkins, Tracey; Schluter, Jessica; Dalton, Emily; Parker, Kate; Than, Martin; Hammett, Christopher; Lamanna, Arvin; Cullen, Louise

    2016-01-01

    The investigators of this study sought to examine whether abnormal physiological parameters are associated with increased risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with chest pain. We used prospectively collected data on adult patients presenting with suspected ACS in 2 EDs in Australia and New Zealand. Trained research nurses collected physiological data including temperature, respiratory rate, heart rate, and systolic blood pressure (SBP) on presentation to the ED. The primary endpoint was ACS within 30 days of presentation, as adjudicated by cardiologists using standardized guidelines. The prognostic utility of physiological parameters for ACS was examined using risk ratios. Acute coronary syndrome was diagnosed in 384 of the 1951 patients (20%) recruited. Compared with patients whose SBP was between 100 and 140 mm Hg, patients with an SBP of lower than 100 mm Hg or higher than 140 mm Hg were 1.4 times (95% confidence interval, 1.2-1.7) more likely to have ACS. Similarly, compared with patients whose temperature was between 36.5°C and 37.5°C, patients with temperature of lower than 36.5°C or higher than 37.5°C were 1.4 times (95% confidence interval, 1.1-1.6) more likely to have ACS. Heart rate and respiratory rate were not predictors of ACS. Patients with abnormal temperature or SBP were slightly more likely to have ACS, but such risk was of too small a magnitude to be useful in clinical decision making. Other physiological parameters (heart rate and respiratory rate) had no prognostic value. The use of physiological parameters cannot reliably confirm or rule out ACS.

  17. Physician discretion is safe and may lower stress test utilization in emergency department chest pain unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Anthony M; Arrighi, James A; Siket, Matthew S; Gibbs, Frantz J

    2012-03-01

    Chest pain unit (CPU) observation with defined stress utilization protocols is a common management option for low-risk emergency department patients. We sought to evaluate the safety of a joint emergency medicine and cardiology staffed CPU. Prospective observational trial of consecutive patients admitted to an emergency department CPU was conducted. A standard 6-hour observation protocol was followed by cardiology consultation and stress utilization largely at their discretion. Included patients were at low/intermediate risk by the American Heart Association, had nondiagnostic electrocardiograms, and a normal initial troponin. Excluded patients were those with an acute comorbidity, age >75, and a history of coronary artery disease, or had a coexistent problem restricting 24-hour observation. Primary outcome was 30-day major adverse cardiovascular events-defined as death, nonfatal acute myocardial infarction, revascularization, or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A total of 1063 patients were enrolled over 8 months. The mean age of the patients was 52.8 ± 11.8 years, and 51% (95% confidence interval [CI], 48-54) were female. The mean thrombolysis in myocardial infarction and Diamond & Forrester scores were 0.6% (95% CI, 0.51-0.62) and 33% (95% CI, 31-35), respectively. In all, 51% (95% CI, 48-54) received stress testing (52% nuclear stress, 39% stress echocardiogram, 5% exercise, 4% other). In all, 0.9% patients (n = 10, 95% CI, 0.4-1.5) were diagnosed with a non-ST elevation myocardial infarction and 2.2% (n = 23, 95% CI, 1.3-3) with acute coronary syndrome. There was 1 (95% CI, 0%-0.3%) case of a 30-day major adverse cardiovascular events. The 51% stress test utilization rate was less than the range reported in previous CPU studies (P < 0.05). Joint emergency medicine and cardiology management of patients within a CPU protocol is safe, efficacious, and may safely reduce stress testing rates.

  18. Prognostic utility of the exercise thallium-201 test in ambulatory patients with chest pain: comparison with cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, S.; Lilly, D.R.; Gascho, J.A.; Watson, D.D.; Gibson, R.S.; Oliner, C.A.; Ryan, J.M.; Beller, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the prognostic utility of the exercise thallium-201 stress test in ambulatory patients with chest pain who were also referred for cardiac catheterization. Accordingly, 4 to 8 year (mean +/- 1SD, 4.6 +/- 2.6 years) follow-up data were obtained for all but one of 383 patients who underwent both exercise thallium-201 stress testing and cardiac catheterization from 1978 to 1981. Eighty-three patients had a revascularization procedure performed within 3 months of testing and were excluded from analysis. Of the remaining 299 patients, 210 had no events and 89 had events (41 deaths, nine nonfatal myocardial infarctions, and 39 revascularization procedures greater than or equal to 3 months after testing). When all clinical, exercise, thallium-201, and catheterization variables were analyzed by Cox regression analysis, the number of diseased vessels (when defined as greater than or equal to 50% luminal diameter narrowing) was the single most important predictor of future cardiac events (chi 2 = 38.1) followed by the number of segments demonstrating redistribution on delayed thallium-201 images (chi 2 = 16.3), except in the case of nonfatal myocardial infarction, for which redistribution was the most important predictor of future events. When coronary artery disease was defined as 70% or greater luminal diameter narrowing, the number of diseased vessels significantly (p less than .01) lost its power to predict events (chi 2 = 14.5). Other variables found to independently predict future events included change in heart rate from rest to exercise (chi 2 = 13.0), ST segment depression on exercise (chi 2 = 13.0), occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias on exercise (chi 2 = 5.9), and beta-blocker therapy (chi 2 = 4.3)

  19. Improvement in Detection of Wrong-Patient Errors When Radiologists Include Patient Photographs in Their Interpretation of Portable Chest Radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tridandapani, Srini; Olsen, Kevin; Bhatti, Pamela

    2015-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether facial photographs obtained simultaneously with radiographs improve radiologists' detection rate of wrong-patient errors, when they are explicitly asked to include the photographs in their evaluation. Radiograph-photograph combinations were obtained from 28 patients at the time of portable chest radiography imaging. From these, pairs of radiographs were generated. Each unique pair consisted of one new and one old (comparison) radiograph. Twelve pairs of mismatched radiographs (i.e., pairs containing radiographs of different patients) were also generated. In phase 1 of the study, 5 blinded radiologist observers were asked to interpret 20 pairs of radiographs without the photographs. In phase 2, each radiologist interpreted another 20 pairs of radiographs with the photographs. Radiologist observers were not instructed about the purpose of the photographs but were asked to include the photographs in their review. The detection rate of mismatched errors was recorded along with the interpretation time for each session for each observer. The two-tailed Fisher exact test was used to evaluate differences in mismatch detection rates between the two phases. A p value of error detection rates without (0/20 = 0%) and with (17/18 = 94.4%) photographs were different (p = 0.0001). The average interpretation times for the set of 20 radiographs were 26.45 (SD 8.69) and 20.55 (SD 3.40) min, for phase 1 and phase 2, respectively (two-tailed Student t test, p = 0.1911). When radiologists include simultaneously obtained photographs in their review of portable chest radiographs, there is a significant improvement in the detection of labeling errors. No statistically significant difference in interpretation time was observed. This may lead to improved patient safety without affecting radiologists' throughput.

  20. The effects of topical heat therapy on chest pain in patients with acute coronary syndrome: a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, Ali; Mohammadian, Batol; Basiri Moghadam, Mehdi; Nematollahi, Mahmoud Reza

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the effects of local heat therapy on chest pain in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Chest pain is a very common complaint in patients with acute coronary syndrome. It is managed both pharmacologically and nonpharmacologically. Pharmacological pain management is associated with different side effects. This was a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted in 2013. A convenience sample of 66 patients with acute coronary syndrome was selected from a coronary care unit of a local teaching hospital affiliated to Gonabad University of Medical Sciences, Gonabad, Iran. Patients were randomly assigned to either the experimental or the placebo group. Patients in the experimental and the placebo groups received local heat therapy using a hot pack warmed to 50 and 37 °C, respectively. We assessed chest pain intensity, duration and frequency as well as the need for opioid analgesic therapy both before and after the study. The study instrument consisted of a demographic questionnaire, the McGill Pain Questionnaire, and a data sheet for documenting pain frequency and duration as well as the need for analgesic therapy. The placebo heat therapy did not significantly decrease the intensity, the duration and the frequency of pain episodes. However, pain intensity, duration and frequency in the experimental group decreased significantly after the study. Moreover, the groups differed significantly in terms of the need for opioid analgesic therapy neither before nor after the intervention. Local heat therapy is an effective intervention for preventing and relieving chest pain in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Effective pain management using local heat therapy could help nurses play an important role in providing effective care to patients with acute coronary syndrome and in minimising adverse effects associated with pain medications. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. First Update of the Criteria for Certification of Chest Pain Units in Germany: Facelift or New Model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuckmann, Frank; Rassaf, Tienush

    2016-03-01

    In an effort to provide a systematic and specific standard-of-care for patients with acute chest pain, the German Cardiac Society introduced criteria for certification of specialized chest pain units (CPUs) in 2008, which have been replaced by a recent update published in 2015. We reviewed the development of CPU establishment in Germany during the past 7 years and compared and commented the current update of the certification criteria. As of October 2015, 228 CPUs in Germany have been successfully certified by the German Cardiac Society; 300 CPUs are needed for full coverage closing gaps in rural regions. Current changes of the criteria mainly affect guideline-adherent adaptions of diagnostic work-ups, therapeutic strategies, risk stratification, in-hospital timing and education, and quality measures, whereas the overall structure remained unchanged. Benchmarking by participation within the German CPU registry is encouraged. Even though the history is short, the concept of certified CPUs in Germany is accepted and successful underlined by its recent implementation in national and international guidelines. First registry data demonstrated a high standard of quality-of-care. The current update provides rational adaptions to new guidelines and developments without raising the level for successful certifications. A periodic release of fast-track updates with shorter time frames and an increase of minimum requirements should be considered.

  2. Presenting characteristics and processing times for culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) patients with chest pain in an emergency department: Time, Ethnicity, and Delay (TED) Study II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechkunanukul, Kannikar; Grantham, Hugh; Teubner, David; Hyun, Karice K; Clark, Robyn A

    2016-10-01

    To date there has been limited published data presenting the characteristics and timeliness of the management in an Emergency Department (ED) for culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) patients presenting with chest pain. This study aimed to describe the presenting characteristics and processing times for CALD patients with chest pain compared to the Australian-born population, and current guidelines. This study was a cross sectional analysis of a cohort of patients who presented with chest pain to the metropolitan hospital between 1 July 2012 and 30 June 2014. Of the total study population (n=6640), 1241 (18.7%) were CALD and 5399 (81.3%) were Australian-born. CALD patients were significantly older than Australian-born patients (mean age 62 vs 56years, p<0.001). There were no differences in the proportion of patients who had central chest pain (74.9% vs 75.7%, p=0.526); ambulance utilisation (41.7% vs 41.1%, p=0.697); and time to initial treatment in ED (21 vs 22min, p=0.375). However, CALD patients spent a significantly longer total time in ED (5.4 vs 4.3h, p<0.001). There was no difference in guideline concordance between the two groups with low rates of 12.5% vs 13%, p=0.556. Nonetheless, CALD patients were 22% (95% CI, 0.65, 0.95, p=0.015) less likely to receive the guideline management for chest pain. The initial emergency care was equally provided to all patients in the context of a low rate of concordance with three chest pain related standards from the two guidelines. Nonetheless, CALD patients spent a longer time in ED compared to the Australian-born group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gives detailed pictures of structures within the chest cavity, including the mediastinum , chest wall, pleura, heart and ... helpful to assess the vessels of the chest cavity (arteries and veins). MRA can also demonstrate an ...

  4. Clinical features and prognosis of patients with acute non-specific chest pain in emergency and cardiology departments after the introduction of high-sensitivity troponins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilangkovan, Nivethitha; Mickley, Hans; Diederichsen, Axel

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of clinical, cardiac-related endpoints and mortality among patients presenting to an emergency or cardiology department with non-specific chest pain (NSCP), and who receive testing with a high-sensitivity troponin. A second objective was to identify risk...... factors for the above-noted endpoints during 12 months of follow-up. DESIGN: A prospective multicentre study. SETTING: Emergency and cardiology departments in Southern Denmark. SUBJECTS: The study enrolled 1027 patients who were assessed for acute chest pain in an emergency or cardiology department...

  5. Possibilities for exposure reduction in computed tomography examination of acute chest pain; Moeglichkeiten der Dosisreduktion bei CT-Untersuchungen des akuten Thoraxschmerzes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, H.C. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Electrocardiogram-gated (ECG) computed tomography (CT) investigations can be accompanied by high amounts of radiation exposure. This is particularly true for the investigation of patients with unclear and acute chest pain. The common approach in patients with acute chest pain is standard spiral CT of the chest. The chest pain or triple-rule-out CT protocol is a relatively new ECG-gated protocol of the entire chest. This article reviews and discusses different techniques for the CT investigation of patients with acute chest pain. By applying the appropriate scan technique, the radiation exposure for an ECG-gated protocol must not necessarily be higher than a standard chest CT scan Aortic pathologies are far better depicted by ECG-gated scan protocols and depending on the heart rate coronary artery disease can also be detected at the same time. The use of ECG-triggered scans will not support the diagnostics of the pulmonary arteries. However, in unspecific chest pain an ECG-triggered scan protocol can provide information on the differential diagnosis. (orig.) [German] EKG-getriggerte CT-Untersuchungen koennen mit einer relativ hohen Strahlenexposition einhergehen. Dies gilt im besonderen Masse fuer die Untersuchung des gesamten Thorax bei Patienten mit unklarem akutem Thoraxschmerz. Bisher wurden Untersuchungen bei Patienten mit akutem Thoraxschmerz in Spiraltechnik ohne EKG-Triggerung durchgefuehrt. Das ''Chest-pain-'' oder ''Triple-rule-out''-Protokoll ist ein neues EKG-getriggertes Untersuchungsprotokoll des gesamten Thorax. Im vorliegenden Artikel werden verschiedene Techniken zur CT-Untersuchung von Patienten mit akutem Thoraxschmerz vorgestellt und besprochen. Mit der richtigen Untersuchungstechnik muss die Strahlenexposition fuer ein EKG-getriggertes Untersuchungsprotokoll nicht hoeher sein als eine Standarduntersuchung ohne EKG. Mit einem EKG-getriggerten Untersuchungsprotokoll laesst sich die Aorta in Hinblick auf

  6. Rib fractures induced by coughing: an unusual cause of acute chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maeseneer, M; De Mey, J; Debaere, C; Meysman, M; Osteaux, M

    2000-03-01

    We report three patients with stress fractures of the ribs induced by coughing. Standard radiographs of the chest and ribs did not reveal evidence of rib fractures in any of the patients. Bone scintigraphy, performed 1 to 2 weeks after initial onset of symptoms, showed a focal area of increased uptake along the chest wall in all cases. Thin section angulated helical CT directly visualized the subtle rib fractures. Initial diagnosis of a cough-induced fracture of the rib may be difficult because of the associated underlying disorder, and unnecessary examinations are commonly performed. Identification of a cough-induced fracture of the rib using helical CT may be clinically important to avoid unnecessary concern and additional examinations.

  7. Predictors of image quality of coronary computed tomography in the acute care setting of patients with chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamberg, Fabian; Abbara, Suhny; Schlett, Christopher L.; Cury, Ricardo C.; Truong, Quynh A.; Rogers, Ian S. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology and Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Nagurney, John T. [Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Brady, Thomas J. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology and Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hoffmann, Udo [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology and Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: uhoffmann@partners.org

    2010-04-15

    Objective: We aimed to determine predictors of image quality in consecutive patients who underwent coronary computed tomography (CT) for the evaluation of acute chest pain. Method and materials: We prospectively enrolled patients who presented with chest pain to the emergency department. All subjects underwent contrast-enhanced 64-slice coronary multi-detector CT. Two experienced readers determined overall image quality on a per-patient basis and the prevalence and characteristics of non-evaluable coronary segments on a per-segment basis. Results: Among 378 subjects (143 women, age: 52.9 {+-} 11.8 years), 345 (91%) had acceptable overall image quality, while 33 (9%) had poor image quality or were unreadable. In adjusted analysis, patients with diabetes, hypertension and a higher heart rate during the scan were more likely to have exams graded as poor or unreadable (odds ratio [OR]: 2.94, p = 0.02; OR: 2.62, p = 0.03; OR: 1.43, p = 0.02; respectively). Of 6253 coronary segments, 257 (4%) were non-evaluable, most due to severe calcification in combination with motion (35%). The presence of non-evaluable coronary segments was associated with age (OR: 1.08 annually, 95%-confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-1.12, p < 0.001), baseline heart rate (OR: 1.35 per 10 beats/min, 95%-CI: 1.11-1.67, p = 0.003), diabetes, hypertension, and history of coronary artery disease (OR: 4.43, 95%-CI: 1.93-10.17, p < 0.001; OR: 2.27, 95-CI: 1.01-4.73, p = 0.03; OR: 5.12, 95%-CI: 2.0-13.06, p < 0.001; respectively). Conclusion: Coronary CT permits acceptable image quality in more than 90% of patients with chest pain. Patients with multiple risk factors are more likely to have impaired image quality or non-evaluable coronary segments. These patients may require careful patient preparation and optimization of CT scanning protocols.

  8. Assessment of coronary flow reserve by sestamibi imaging in patients with typical chest pain and normal coronary arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storto, Giovanni; Sorrentino, Anna R.; Pellegrino, Teresa; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages of the National Council of Research, Naples (Italy); Petretta, Mario [University Federico II, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular and Immunological Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2007-08-15

    We assessed coronary flow reserve (CFR) by sestamibi imaging in patients with typical chest pain, positive exercise stress test and normal coronary vessels. Thirty-five patients with typical chest pain and normal angiogram and 12 control subjects with atypical chest pain underwent dipyridamole/rest {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi imaging. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was estimated by measuring first transit counts in the pulmonary artery and myocardial counts from SPECT images. Estimated CFR was expressed as the ratio of stress to rest MBF. Rest MBF and CFR were corrected for rate-pressure product (RPP) and expressed as normalised MBF (MBF{sub n}) and normalised CFR (CFR{sub n}). Coronary vascular resistances (CVR) were calculated as the ratio between mean arterial pressure and estimated MBF. At rest, estimated MBF and MBF{sub n} were lower in controls than in patients (0.98 {+-} 0.4 vs 1.30 {+-} 0.3 counts/pixel/s and 1.14 {+-} 0.5 vs 1.64 {+-} 0.6 counts/pixel/s, respectively, both p < 0.02). Stress MBF was not different between controls and patients (2.34 {+-} 0.8 vs 2.01 {+-} 0.7 counts/pixel/s, p=NS). Estimated CFR was 2.40 {+-} 0.3 in controls and 1.54 {+-} 0.3 in patients (p < 0.0001). After correction for the RPP, CFR{sub n} was still higher in controls than in patients (2.1 {+-} 0.5 vs 1.29 {+-} 0.5, p < 0.0001). At baseline, CVR values were lower (p < 0.01) in patients than in controls. Dipyridamole-induced changes in CVR were greater (p < 0.0001) in controls (-63%) than in patients (-35%). In the overall study population, a significant correlation between dipyridamole-induced changes in CVR and CFR was observed (r = -0.88, p < 0.0001). SPECT might represent a useful non-invasive method for assessing coronary vascular function in patients with angina and a normal coronary angiogram. (orig.)

  9. Comparative effectiveness of coronary CT angiography vs stress cardiac imaging in patients following hospital admission for chest pain work-up: The Prospective First Evaluation in Chest Pain (PERFECT) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uretsky, Seth; Argulian, Edgar; Supariwala, Azhar; Agarwal, Shiv K; El-Hayek, Georges; Chavez, Patricia; Awan, Hira; Jagarlamudi, Ashadevi; Puppala, Siva P; Cohen, Randy; Rozanski, Alan

    2017-08-01

    Because the frequency of cardiac event rates is low among chest pain patients following either performance of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) or stress testing, there is a need to better assess how these tests influence the central management decisions that follow from cardiac testing. The present study was performed to assess the relative impact of CCTA vs stress testing on medical therapies and downstream resource utilization among patients admitted for the work-up of chest pain. The admitted patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either cardiac imaging stress test or CCTA. Primary outcomes were time to discharge, change in medication usage, and frequency of downstream testing, cardiac interventions, and cardiovascular re-hospitalizations. We randomized 411 patients, 205 to stress testing, and 206 to CCTA. There were no differences in time to discharge or initiation of new cardiac medications at discharge. At 1 year follow-up, there was no difference in the number of patients who underwent cardiovascular downstream tests in the CCTA vs stress test patients (21% vs 15%, P = .1) or cardiovascular hospitalizations (14% vs 16%, P = .5). However, there was a higher frequency of invasive angiography in the CCTA group (11% vs 2%, P = .001) and percutaneous coronary interventions (6% vs 0%, P work-up to either CCTA or to stress testing resulted in similar discharge times, change in medical therapies at discharge, frequency of downstream noninvasive testing, and repeat hospitalizations. However, a higher frequency of invasive coronary angiography and revascularization procedures were performed in the CCTA arm. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01604655.).

  10. Reducing the time-lag between onset of chest pain and seeking professional medical help: a theory-based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baxter Susan K

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research suggests that there are a number of factors which can be associated with delay in a patient seeking professional help following chest pain, including demographic and social factors. These factors may have an adverse impact on the efficacy of interventions which to date have had limited success in improving patient action times. Theory-based methods of review are becoming increasingly recognised as important additions to conventional systematic review methods. They can be useful to gain additional insights into the characteristics of effective interventions by uncovering complex underlying mechanisms. Methods This paper describes the further analysis of research papers identified in a conventional systematic review of published evidence. The aim of this work was to investigate the theoretical frameworks underpinning studies exploring the issue of why people having a heart attack delay seeking professional medical help. The study used standard review methods to identify papers meeting the inclusion criterion, and carried out a synthesis of data relating to theoretical underpinnings. Results Thirty six papers from the 53 in the original systematic review referred to a particular theoretical perspective, or contained data which related to theoretical assumptions. The most frequently mentioned theory was the self-regulatory model of illness behaviour. Papers reported the potential significance of aspects of this model including different coping mechanisms, strategies of denial and varying models of treatment seeking. Studies also drew attention to the potential role of belief systems, applied elements of attachment theory, and referred to models of maintaining integrity, ways of knowing, and the influence of gender. Conclusions The review highlights the need to examine an individual’s subjective experience of and response to health threats, and confirms the gap between knowledge and changed behaviour. Interventions face

  11. Rationale and design of a randomized trial comparing initial stress echocardiography versus coronary CT angiography in low-to-intermediate risk emergency department patients with chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levsky, Jeffrey M; Haramati, Linda B; Taub, Cynthia C; Spevack, Daniel M; Menegus, Mark A; Travin, Mark I; Vega, Shayna; Lerer, Rikah; Brown-Manhertz, Durline; Hirschhorn, Esther; Tobin, Jonathan N; Garcia, Mario J

    2014-07-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) has become a major focus of cardiovascular disease investigation to optimize diagnosis and treatment paradigms and decrease healthcare expenditures. Acute chest pain is a highly prevalent reason for evaluation in the Emergency Department (ED) that results in hospital admission for many patients and excess expense. Improvement in noninvasive diagnostic algorithms can potentially reduce unnecessary admissions. To compare the performance of treadmill stress echocardiography (SE) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) in ED chest pain patients with low-to-intermediate risk of significant coronary artery disease. This is a single-center, randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing SE and CTA head-to-head as the initial noninvasive imaging modality. The primary outcome measured is the incidence of hospitalization. The study is powered to detect a reduction in admissions from 28% to 15% with a sample size of 400. Secondary outcomes include length of stay in the ED/hospital and estimated cost of care. Safety outcomes include subsequent visits to the ED and hospitalizations, as well as major adverse cardiovascular events at 30 days and 1 year. Patients who do not meet study criteria or do not consent for randomization are offered entry into an observational registry. This RCT will add to our understanding of the roles of different imaging modalities in triaging patients with suspected angina. It will increase the CER evidence base comparing SE and CTA and provide insight into potential benefits and limitations of appropriate use of treadmill SE in the ED. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Identifying emergency department patients with chest pain who are at low risk for acute coronary syndromes [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markel, David; Kim, Jeremy

    2017-07-21

    Though a minority of patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain have acute coronary syndromes,identifying the patients who may be safely discharged and determining whether further testing is needed remains challenging. From the prehospital care setting to disposition and follow-up, this systematic review addresses the fundamentals of the emergency department evaluation of patients determined to be at low risk for acute coronary syndromes or adverse outcomes. Clinical risk scores are discussed, as well as the evidence and indications for confirmatory testing. The emerging role of new technologies, such as high-sensitivity troponin assays and advanced imaging techniques, are also presented. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice].

  13. [Improvement in health care quality for patients from the thoracic/chest pain unit in a regional hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano Ortega, M A; Romero de Castilla, R J; Rus Mansilla, C; Cortez Quiroga, G A; Bayona Gómez, A J; Duran Torralba, M C

    2011-01-01

    The evaluation of an improvement cycle in patients suffering thoracic/chest pain in hospital emergencies, especially in those who could benefit from the early Bruce Treadmill Test. A multidisciplinary group care protocol was designed, which identified improvement opportunities and gave priority to the fact that «an early Bruce Treadmill Test was carried out on fewer occasions than recommended». Causes were analysed (Ishikawa diagram) and six quality criteria were defined. These criteria were evaluated in a random sample of 30 patients out of the total of 180 who used the ergometer at the Hospital in the first six months of 2007, as well as questionnaire for the doctors. Corrective measures were introduced: circulation, accessibility through intranet and explicit information for new employees (doctors). The second evaluation was carried out during the first six-months of 2008 using another random sample of 30 patients from a total of 120. In the first evaluation, the classification of the risk according to the protocol was very low (100% non-compliance) and patients whose admission to the Chest Pain Unit was recommended and an early Bruce Treadmill Test (74% criteria failure) were referred to cardiology clinics. After implementation of the corrective measures, we obtain a general improvement in all the criteria, but very significant from the previous ones, with non-compliances being reduced to 17% in classification and to the 23% in referrals. The structured cycle has helped resolve the priority problem in the short-term. The adopted measures have mainly been organisational, dependent on the professionals involved, and at a very low cost. Simple but organised methodological approaches should be taken into account before the incorporation of higher cost technologies. Copyright © 2010 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Troponin-positive chest pain with unobstructed coronary arteries: incremental diagnostic value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathik, Bhupesh; Raman, Betty; Mohd Amin, Nor Hanim; Mahadavan, Devan; Rajendran, Sharmalar; McGavigan, Andrew D; Grover, Suchi; Smith, Emma; Mazhar, Jawad; Bridgman, Cameron; Ganesan, Anand N; Selvanayagam, Joseph B

    2016-10-01

    Troponin-positive chest pain patients with unobstructed coronaries represent a clinical dilemma. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging has an increasingly prominent role in the assessment of these patients; however, its utility in addition to expert clinical judgement is unclear. We sought to determine the incremental diagnostic value of CMR and the heterogeneity in diagnoses by experienced cardiologists when presented with blinded clinical and investigative data in this population. A total of 125 consecutive patients presenting to a tertiary centre between 2010 and 2014 with cardiac chest pain, elevated troponin (>29 ng/L), and unobstructed coronaries were enrolled and underwent CMR. A panel of three experienced cardiologists unaware of the CMR diagnosis and blinded to each other's assessment provided a diagnosis based on clinical and investigative findings. A consensus panel diagnosis was defined as two or more cardiologists sharing the same clinical diagnosis. Findings were classified into acute myocarditis, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), or indeterminate. CMR provided a diagnosis in 87% of patients. Consensus panel diagnosis and CMR were concordant in 65/125 (52%) patients. There was an only moderate level of agreement between the three cardiologists (k = 0.47, P < 0.05) and a poor level of agreement between the consensus panel and CMR (k = 0.38, P < 0.05) with the most disagreement seen in patients with AMI diagnosed on CMR. The clinical diagnosis of patients with non-obstructive coronaries and positive troponin remains a challenge. The concordance between CMR and clinical diagnosis is poor. CMR provides a diagnosis in majority of these patients. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Resting 123I-BMIPP scintigraphy for detection of organic coronary stenosis and therapeutic outcome in patients with chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamabe, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Sei; Rin, Kouten; Ando, Makoto; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro; Sakamoto, Takaaki; Ishida, Toshiharu; Itagane, Hiroshi; Mori, Takao

    2000-01-01

    Resting 123 I-BMIPP scintigraphy can detect coronary artery disease based on persistent abnormality of myocardial fatty acid metabolism after transient ischemia. The present study aimed to determine the value of resting 123 I-BMIPP scintigraphy in diagnosing coronary artery disease and predicting the therapeutic outcome in patients with chest pain symptom. Five hospitals participated in this study, and scintigraphic and angiographic studies were performed in 104 patients without myocardial infarction. Twenty of them had non-coronary artery disease (chest pain syndrome), 26 had stable effort angina, 35 had unstable angina with organic coronary lesions, and 23 had vasospastic angina without significant organic stenosis. Overall sensitivity for diagnosing angina pectoris (stable, unstable and vasospastic) was 45%, and overall specificity for excluding non-coronary artery disease was 80%. The incidence of positive 123 I-BMIPP was 54% among patients with organic coronary stenosis (50% in stable angina and 61% in unstable angina with organic stenosis), but it was low (22%) in vasospastic angina without organic stenosis. Patients with advanced coronary stenosis and multi-vessel disease were found to have a higher incidence of positive 123 I-BMIPP. A positive 123 I-BMIPP result was correlated with a higher rate of subsequent intervention therapy (catheter intervention or CABG) than a negative result (48% versus 27%, p=0.03 at one month; and 63% versus 35%, p=0.008 at one year). Resting 123 I-BMIPP scintigraphy was valuable in detecting advanced coronary lesions in angina patients associated with a high incidence of subsequent intervention therapy. (author)

  16. A brief cognitive-behavioral intervention for treating depression and panic disorder in patients with noncardiac chest pain : a 24-week randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, M. H. C. T.; Voshaar, R. C. Oude; Beek, A. M.; van Zijderveld, G. A.; Visser, S.; Speckens, A. E. M.; Batelaan, N.; van Balkom, A. J. L. M.

    BACKGROUND: Most patients with noncardiac chest pain experience anxiety and depressive symptoms. Commonly they are reassured and referred back to primary care, leaving them undiagnosed and untreated. Some small studies have suggested efficacy of 12 cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) sessions. Our

  17. A brief cognitive-behavioral intervention for treating depression and panic disorder in patients with noncardiac chest pain: a 24-week randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, M.H.C.T. van; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Beek, A.M.; Zijderveld, G.A. van; Visser, S.; Speckens, A.E.M.; Batelaan, N.; Balkom, A.J.L.M. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most patients with noncardiac chest pain experience anxiety and depressive symptoms. Commonly they are reassured and referred back to primary care, leaving them undiagnosed and untreated. Some small studies have suggested efficacy of 12 cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) sessions. Our

  18. A brief cognitive-behavioral intervention for treating depression and panic disorder in patients with noncardiac chest pain: a 24-week randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, M.H.C.T.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Beek, A.M.; van Zijderveld, G.A.; Visser, S.; Speckens, A.E.M.; Batelaan, N.M.; van Balkom, A.J.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Most patients with noncardiac chest pain experience anxiety and depressive symptoms. Commonly they are reassured and referred back to primary care, leaving them undiagnosed and untreated. Some small studies have suggested efficacy of 12 cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) sessions. Our aim

  19. A brief cognitive-behavioural intervention for treating depression and panic disorder in patients with noncardiac chest pain: a 24-week randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, M.H.C.T.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Beek, A.M.; van Zijderveld, G.A.; Visser, S.; Speckens, A.E.M.; Batelaan, N.; van Balkom, A.J.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Most patients with noncardiac chest pain experience anxiety and depressive symptoms. Commonly they are reassured and referred back to primary care, leaving them undiagnosed and untreated. Some small studies have suggested efficacy of 12 cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) sessions. Our

  20. Implementation of a Prehospital Triage System for Patients With Chest Pain and Logistics for Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in the Region of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, Rob; Appelman, Yolande; Bronzwaer, Jean G.; Slagboom, Ton; Amoroso, Giovanni; van Exter, Pieternel; Tijssen, G. P. Jan; de Winter, Robbert J.

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to describe the logistics of a prehospital triage system for patients with acute chest pain in the region of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Ambulance electrocardiograms (ECGs) were evaluated immediately in 1 of the percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)-capable centers. Patients accepted for

  1. Pre-test probability risk scores and their use in contemporary management of patients with chest pain: One year stress echo cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, Daniela Cassar; Papachristidis, Alexandros; Roper, Damian; Tsironis, Ioannis; Byrne, Jonathan; Monaghan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare how patients with chest pain would be investigated, based on the two guidelines available for UK cardiologists, on the management of patients with stable chest pain. The UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) guideline which was published in 2010 and the European society of cardiology (ESC) guideline published in 2013. Both guidelines utilise pre-test probability risk scores, to guide the choice of investigation. Design We undertook a large retrospective study to investigate the outcomes of stress echocardiography. Setting A large tertiary centre in the UK in a contemporary clinical practice. Participants Two thirds of the patients in the cohort were referred from our rapid access chest pain clinics. Results We found that the NICE risk score overestimates risk by 20% compared to the ESC Risk score. We also found that based on the NICE guidelines, 44% of the patients presenting with chest pain, in this cohort, would have been investigated invasively, with diagnostic coronary angiography. Using the ESC guidelines, only 0.3% of the patients would be investigated invasively. Conclusion The large discrepancy between the two guidelines can be easily reduced if NICE adopted the ESC risk score. PMID:26673458

  2. [Establishment of Reference Value of Hs-cTnT in Sichuan Region and Its Diagnostic Value in Patients with Chest Pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Du, Xiang-Yang; Huang, Hua-Lan; Wang, Wei-Qing; Nie, Xin; Li, Gui-Xing

    2017-11-01

    To establish the reference value of high sensitive cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) and the efficiency of reference value in the diagnosis of chest pain. Volunteers from eight independent communities in Chengdu,Sichuan were selected with detailed records of physical examination,electrocardiogram,ultrasound examination. The level of hs-cTnT for healthy volunteers was tested to determine ninety-ninth percentile references according to sex and ages. 2 249 patients with chest pain in the emergency department of Western China Hospital from July 2009 to July 2014 were enrolled to measure the efficiency of reference value for diagnosing acute myocardial infarction (AMI). There were 1 305 volunteers included finally. Among them,the mean hs-cTnT level of male was 4.3 (3.2-5.9) ng/L,which was significantly higher than that of female 3.0 (3.0-3.1) ng/L ( P value was less than 0.01. The 99th percentile values of male were 10.8 ng/L,15.4 ng/L and 19.7 ng/L for values of female were 4.6 ng/L,8.9 ng/L,18.8 ng/L,respectively. There was no difference in sensitivity and specificity between the value we figured out and manufactures provided (14.0 ng/L) for thosevalue did not show diversity ( P >0.05) but the specificity and positive predictive value showed significant difference (male: 0.67 vs. 0.56 and 0.83 vs. 0.79, P value of patients<60 yr. should be 14.0 ng/L,while 20.0 ng/L for those patients≥60 yr.

  3. Incremental value of clinical assessment, supine exercise electrocardiography, and biplane exercise radionuclide ventriculography in the prediction of coronary artery disease in men with chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, P.J.; Kelly, M.J.; Harper, R.W.; Federman, J.; Kalff, V.; Anderson, S.T.; Pitt, A.

    1983-01-01

    The incremental value of clinical assessment, exercise electrocardiography (ECG) and biplane radionuclide ventriculography (RVG) in the prediction of coronary artery disease (CAD) was assessed in 105 men without myocardial infarction who were undergoing coronary angiography for investigation of chest pain. Independent clinical assessment of chest pain was made prospectively by 2 physicians. Graded supine bicycle exercise testing was symptom-limited. Right anterior oblique ECG-gated first-pass RVG and left anterior oblique ECG-gated equilibrium RVG were performed at rest and exercise. Regional wall motion abnormalities were defined by agreement of 2 of 3 blinded observers. A combined strongly positive exercise ECG response was defined as greater than or equal to 2 mm ST depression or 1.0 to 1.9 mm ST depression with exercise-induced chest pain. A multivariate logistic regression model for the preexercise prediction of CAD was derived from the clinical data and selected 2 variables: chest pain class and cholesterol level. A second model assessed the incremental value of the exercise test in prediction of CAD and found 2 exercise variables that improved prediction: RVG wall motion abnormalities, and a combined strongly positive ECG response. Applying the derived predictive models, 37 of the 58 patients (64%) with preexercise probabilities of 10 to 90% crossed either below the 10% probability threshold or above the 90% threshold and 28 (48%) also moved across the 5 and 95% thresholds. Supine exercise testing with ECG and biplane RVG together, but neither test alone, effectively adds to clinical prediction of CAD. It is most useful in men with atypical chest pain and when the ECG and RVG results are concordant

  4. Depression masquerading as chest pain in a patient with Wolff Parkinson White syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madabushi, Rajashree; Agarwal, Anil; Gautam, Sujeet K S; Khuba, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Wolff Parkinson White (WPW) syndrome is a condition in which there is an aberrant conduction pathway between the atria and ventricles, resulting in tachycardia. A 42-year-old patient, who was treated for WPW syndrome previously, presented with chronic somatic pain. With her cardiac condition in mind, she was thoroughly worked up for a recurrence of disease. As part of routine screening of all patients at our pain clinic, she was found to have severe depression as per the Patient Health Questionnaire–9 (PHQ–9) criteria. After ruling out sinister causes, she was treated for depression using oral Duloxetine and counselling. This led to resolution of symptoms, and improved her mood and functional capability. This case highlights the use of psychological screening tools and diligent examination in scenarios as confusing as the one presented here. Addressing the psychological aspects of pain and adopting a holistic approach are as important as treatment of the primary pathology. PMID:27738505

  5. Efficacy of gabapentin versus diclofenac in the treatment of chest pain and paresthesia in patients with sternotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyik, Ismail; Gülcüler, Metin; Karabiga, Murat; Ergene, Oktay; Tayyar, Nezih

    2009-10-01

    Chronic post-sternotomy chest pain and paresthesia (PCPP) are frequently seen and reduce the quality of life. We aimed to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of gabapentin compared with diclofenac in the treatment of PCPP and to elucidate the similarities of PCPP to neuropathic pain syndromes. The prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded end-point design of study was used. One hundred and ten patients having PCPP lasting three months or more were randomized to receive 800 mg/daily gabapentin (n=55) and 75 mg/daily diclofenac (n=55) for thirty days. All patients have undergone cardiac surgery and median sternotomy. The perception of pain or paresthesia was evaluated as 0--Normal (no pain or paresthesia), 1--Mild, 2--Moderate, 3--Severe at baseline and after thirty days of treatment. Recurrences were questioned after three months. Statistical analyses were performed using independent samples t, Chi-square, continuity correction, Fisher's exact, Mann Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis tests. In gabapentin group, mean pain and paresthesia scores regressed from 2.12+/- 0.76 to 0.54+/- 0.83 (pparesthesia scores regressed in diclofenac group from 1.93+/- 0.8 to 1.0+/- 1.13 (p<0.001) and from 1.76+/- 0.74 to 1.24+/- 0.96 (p=0.002), respectively. Although, both gabapentin and diclofenac were found to be effective without obvious side effects in the treatment of PCPP (p<0.001), gabapentin was found to be superior to diclofenac (p=0.001 and p<0.001, respectively). Adverse effects were seen in 7% of patients on gabapentin and 4% of patients on diclofenac. Results also showed that symptomatic relief with gabapentin lasts longer than diclofenac (p<0.001). Both gabapentin and diclofenac are effective in the treatment of chronic PCPP, without obvious side effects. However, gabapentin is found to be superior to diclofenac and its effects sustain longer. The results show that there may be some evidence in PCPP as a kind of neuropathic pain.

  6. Acute chest pain: a purely clinical problem or a question for radiology; Der akute Thoraxschmerz, ein rein klinisches Problem oder radiologische Fragestellung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewe, C. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Klinische Abteilung fuer Kardiovaskulaere und Interventionelle Radiologie, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    2008-05-15

    Acute chest pain represents a very common clinical occurrence and at the same time poses a severe diagnostic dilemma. It can be due to an acute life-threatening event such as acute cardiac infarct, or a relatively harmless condition of pain and illness (e.g. vertebrogenic pain) under the main symptom category of acute chest pain. This often unclear symptomatic, behind which there can always be a life-threatening disease leads to an exaggerated grouping of patients into emergency cases and to an increased number of inpatients for observation. The diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome with no initial ECG changes typical for ischemia is especially problematic. The availability of modern multidetector computed tomography is becoming increasingly more important for radiologists in the diagnosis and clarification of acute chest pain. In this article the clinical difficulties and radiology options for the diagnosis of patients with acute chest pain will be presented and possible future algorithms for diagnosis will be discussed. (orig.) [German] Der akute Thoraxschmerz repraesentiert ein sehr haeufiges klinisches Beschwerdebild und gleichzeitig ein grosses diagnostisches Dilemma, koennen sich doch sowohl lebensbedrohliche akute Ereignisse (wie der akute Herzinfarkt) als auch mehr oder weniger harmlose Schmerzzustaende und Erkrankungen (wie vertebrogene Schmerzen) unter dem Leitsymptom 'akuter Thoraxschmerz' praesentieren. Diese oft nicht eindeutige Symptomatik, hinter der immer auch ein lebensbedrohliches Krankheitsbild stecken kann, fuehrt zu einer Uebertriagierung der Patienten in Notaufnahmen und zu einer grossen Anzahl an stationaeren 'Absicherungsaufnahmen'. Besonders die Diagnose eines akuten Koronarsyndroms (AKS) bei initial fehlenden ischaemietypischen EKG-Veraenderungen stellt eine spezielle Problematik dar. Durch die Verfuegbarkeit moderner ultraschneller Multidetektorcomputertomographen (MDCT) spielt der Radiologe in der Diagnostik und

  7. Zero Calcium Score as a Filter for Further Testing in Patients Admitted to the Coronary Care Unit with Chest Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Luis Cláudio Lemos; Esteves, Fábio P; Carvalhal, Manuela; Souza, Thiago Menezes Barbosa de; Sá, Nicole de; Correia, Vitor Calixto de Almeida; Alexandre, Felipe Kalil Beirão; Lopes, Fernanda; Ferreira, Felipe; Noya-Rabelo, Márcia

    2017-06-12

    The accuracy of zero coronary calcium score as a filter in patients with chest pain has been demonstrated at the emergency room and outpatient clinics, populations with low prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD). To test the gatekeeping role of zero calcium score in patients with chest pain admitted to the coronary care unit (CCU), where the pretest probability of CAD is higher than that of other populations. Patients underwent computed tomography for calcium scoring, and obstructive CAD was defined by a minimum 70% stenosis on invasive angiography. In 146 patients studied, the prevalence of CAD was 41%. A zero calcium score was present in 35% of the patients. The sensitivity and specificity of zero calcium score yielded a negative likelihood ratio of 0.16. After logistic regression adjustment for pretest probability, zero calcium score was independently associated with lower odds of CAD (OR = 0.12, 95%CI = 0.04-0.36), increasing the area under the ROC curve of the clinical model from 0.76 to 0.82 (p = 0.006). Zero calcium score provided a net reclassification improvement of 0.20 (p = 0.0018) over the clinical model when using a pretest probability threshold of 10% for discharging without further testing. In patients with pretest probability zero calcium score had a negative predictive value of 95% (95%CI = 83%-99%), with a number needed to test of 2.1 for obtaining one additional discharge. Zero calcium score substantially reduces the pretest probability of obstructive CAD in patients admitted to the CCU with acute chest pain. (Arq Bras Cardiol. 2017; [online].ahead print, PP.0-0). A acurácia do escore de cálcio coronário zero como um filtro nos pacientes com dor torácica aguda tem sido demonstrada na sala de emergência e nos ambulatórios, populações com baixa prevalência de doença arterial coronariana (DAC). Testar o papel do escore de cálcio zero como filtro nos pacientes com dor torácica admitidos numa unidade coronariana intensiva (UCI), na

  8. Association between use of pre-hospital ECG and 30-day mortality: A large cohort study of patients experiencing chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawshani, Nina; Rawshani, Araz; Gelang, Carita; Herlitz, Johan; Bång, Angela; Andersson, Jan-Otto; Gellerstedt, Martin

    2017-12-01

    In the assessment of patients with chest pain, there is support for the use of pre-hospital ECG in the literature and in the care guidelines. Using propensity score methods, we aim to examine whether the mere acquisition of a pre-hospital ECG among patients with chest pain affects the outcome (30-day mortality). The association between pre-hospital ECG and 30-day mortality was studied in the overall cohort (n=13151), as well as in the one-to-one matched cohort with 2524 patients not examined with pre-hospital ECG and 2524 patients examined with pre-hospital ECG. In the overall cohort, 21% (n=2809) did not undergo an ECG tracing in the pre-hospital setting. Among those who had pain during transport, 14% (n=1159) did not undergo a pre-hospital ECG while 32% (n=1135) of those who did not have pain underwent an ECG tracing. In the overall cohort, the OR for 30-day mortality in patients who had a pre-hospital ECG, as compared with those who did not, was 0.63 (95% CI 0.05-0.79; pECG was used. The PH-ECG is underused among patients with chest discomfort and the mere acquisition of a pre-hospital ECG may reduce mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Prognostic value of CT-derived left atrial and left ventricular measures in patients with acute chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takx, Richard A.P. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Groningen/University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging − North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Nance, John W. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Bamberg, Fabian [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Abro, Joseph A. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Carr, Christine M. [Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Litwin, Sheldon E. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); and others

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • LV mass and LA diameter are independent prognostic factor for composite MACE. • LV mass and LA diameter were not significant prognostic factors for MACE in African Americans. • Assessment of LV mass by CT may have a role in the management of patients. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine which left atrial (LA) and left ventricular (LV) parameters are associated with future major adverse cardiac event (MACE) and whether these measurements have independent prognostic value beyond risk factors and computed tomography (CT)-derived coronary artery disease measures. Materials and methods: This retrospective analysis was performed under an IRB waiver and in HIPAA compliance. Subjects underwent coronary CT angiography (CCTA) using a dual-source CT system for acute chest pain evaluation. LV mass, LV ejection fraction (EF), LV end-systolic volume (ESV) and LV end-diastolic volume (EDV), LA ESV and LA diameter, septal wall thickness and cardiac chamber diameters were measured. MACE was defined as cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or late revascularization. The association between cardiac CT measures and the occurrence of MACE was quantified using Cox proportional hazard analysis. Results: 225 subjects (age, 56.2 ± 11.2; 140 males) were analyzed, of whom 42 (18.7%) experienced a MACE during a median follow-up of 13 months. LA diameter (HR:1.07, 95%CI:1.01–1.13 per mm) and LV mass (HR:1.05, 95%CI:1.00–1.10 per g) remained significant prognostic factor of MACE after controlling for Framingham risk score. LA diameter and LV mass were also found to have prognostic value independent of each other. The other morphologic and functional cardiac measures were no significant prognostic factors for MACE. Conclusion: CT-derived LA diameter and LV mass are associated with future MACE in patients undergoing evaluation for chest pain, and portend independent prognostic value beyond traditional risk factors, coronary calcium score, and

  10. Prognostic Value of Coronary Artery Calcium in the PROMISE Study (Prospective Multicenter Imaging Study for Evaluation of Chest Pain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budoff, Matthew J; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Ferencik, Maros; Bittner, Daniel; Lee, Kerry L; Lu, Michael T; Coles, Adrian; Jang, James; Krishnam, Mayil; Douglas, Pamela S; Hoffmann, Udo

    2017-11-21

    Coronary artery calcium (CAC) is an established predictor of future major adverse atherosclerotic cardiovascular events in asymptomatic individuals. However, limited data exist as to how CAC compares with functional testing (FT) in estimating prognosis in symptomatic patients. In the PROMISE trial (Prospective Multicenter Imaging Study for Evaluation of Chest Pain), patients with stable chest pain (or dyspnea) and intermediate pretest probability for obstructive coronary artery disease were randomized to FT (exercise electrocardiography, nuclear stress, or stress echocardiography) or anatomic testing. We evaluated those who underwent CAC testing as part of the anatomic evaluation (n=4209) and compared that with results of FT (n=4602). We stratified CAC and FT results as normal or mildly, moderately, or severely abnormal (for CAC: 0, 1-99 Agatston score [AS], 100-400 AS, and >400 AS, respectively; for FT: normal, mild=late positive treadmill, moderate=early positive treadmill or single-vessel ischemia, and severe=large ischemic region abnormality). The primary end point was all-cause death, myocardial infarction, or unstable angina hospitalization over a median follow-up of 26.1 months. Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and C statistics to determine predictive and discriminatory values. Overall, the distribution of normal or mildly, moderately, or severely abnormal test results was significantly different between FT and CAC (FT: normal, n=3588 [78.0%]; mild, n=432 [9.4%]; moderate, n=217 [4.7%]; severe, n=365 [7.9%]; CAC: normal, n=1457 [34.6%]; mild, n=1340 [31.8%]; moderate, n=772 [18.3%]; severe, n=640 [15.2%]; P 0), whereas fewer than half of events occurred in patients with mildly, moderately, or severely abnormal FT (n=57 of 132, 43%; P fair for both CAC and FT (C statistic, 0.67 versus 0.64). Coronary computed tomographic angiography provided significantly better prognostic information compared with FT and CAC testing (C index

  11. Effect of oxygen therapy on chest pain in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction: results from the randomized SOCCER trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnood, Ardavan; Akbarzadeh, Mahin; Carlsson, Marcus; Sparv, David; Bhiladvala, Pallonji; Mokhtari, Arash; Erlinge, David; Ekelund, Ulf

    2018-04-01

    Oxygen (O 2 ) have been a cornerstone in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. Studies have been inconclusive regarding the cardiovascular and analgesic effects of oxygen in these patients. In the SOCCER trial, we compared the effects of oxygen treatment versus room air in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). There was no difference in myocardial salvage index or infarct size assessed with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. In the present subanalysis, we wanted to evaluate the effect of O 2 on chest pain in patients with STEMI. Normoxic patients with first time STEMI were randomized in the ambulance to standard care with 10 l/min O 2 or room air until the end of the percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The ambulance personnel noted the patients´ chest pain on a visual analog scale (VAS; 1-10) before randomization and after the transport but before the start of the PCI, and also registered the amount of morphine given. 160 patients were randomized to O 2 (n = 85) or room air (n = 75). The O 2 group had a higher median VAS at randomization than the air group (7.0 ± 2.3 vs 6.0 ± 2.9; p = .02) and also received a higher median total dose of morphine (5.0 mg ± 4.4 vs 4.0 mg ± 3.7; p = .02). There was no difference between the O 2 and air groups in VAS at the start of the PCI (4.0 ± 2.4 vs 3.0 ± 2.5; p = .05) or in the median VAS decrease from randomization to the start of the PCI (-2.0 ± 2.2 vs -1.0 ± 2.9; p = .18). Taken together with previously published data, these results do not support a significant analgesic effect of oxygen in patients with STEMI. European Clinical Trials Database (EudraCT): 2011-001452-11. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01423929.

  12. Pharmacological Interventions Including Medical Injections for Neck Pain: An Overview as Part of the ICON§ Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peloso, Paul M; Khan, Mahweesh; Gross, Anita R; Carlesso, Lisa; Santaguida, Lina; Lowcock, Janet; MacDermid, Joy C; Walton, Dave; Goldsmith, Charlie H; Langevin, Pierre; Shi, Qiyun

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To conduct an overview (review-of-reviews) on pharmacological interventions for neck pain. Search Strategy: Computerized databases and grey literature were searched from 2006 to 2012. Selection Criteria: Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCT) in adults with acute to chronic neck pain reporting effects of pharmacological interventions including injections on pain, function/disability, global perceived effect, quality of life and patient satisfaction. Data Collection & Analysis: Two independent authors selected articles, assessed risk of bias and extracted data The GRADE tool was used to evaluate the body of evidence and an external panel provided critical review. Main Results: We found 26 reviews reporting on 47 RCTs. Most pharmacological interventions had low to very low quality methodologic evidence with three exceptions. For chronic neck pain, there was evidence of: a small immediate benefit for eperison hydrochloride (moderate GRADE, 1 trial, 157 participants);no short-term pain relieving benefit for botulinum toxin-A compared to saline (strong GRADE; 5 trial meta-analysis, 258 participants) nor for subacute/chronic whiplash (moderate GRADE; 4 trial meta-analysis, 183 participants) including reduced pain, disability or global perceived effect; andno long-term benefit for medial branch block of facet joints with steroids (moderate GRADE; 1 trial, 120 participants) over placebo to reduce pain or disability; Reviewers' Conclusions: While in general there is a lack of evidence for most pharmacological interventions, current evidence is against botulinum toxin-A for chronic neck pain or subacute/chronic whiplash; against medial branch block with steroids for chronic facet joint pain; but in favour of the muscle relaxant eperison hydrochloride for chronic neck pain. PMID:24155805

  13. The effectiveness of emergency nurse practitioner service in the management of patients presenting to rural hospitals with chest pain: a multisite prospective longitudinal nested cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Tina E; Gardner, Glenn; Jack, Leanne

    2017-06-27

    Health reforms in service improvement have included the use of nurse practitioners. In rural emergency departments, nurse practitioners work to the full scope of their expanded role across all patient acuities including those presenting with undifferentiated chest pain. Currently, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the effectiveness of emergency nurse practitioner service in rural emergency departments. Inquiry into the safety and quality of the service, particularly regarding the management of complex conditions is a priority to ensure that this service improvement model meets health care needs of rural communities. This study used a prospective, longitudinal nested cohort study of rural emergency departments in Queensland, Australia. Sixty-one consecutive adult patients with chest pain who presented between November 2014 and February 2016 were recruited into the study cohort. A nested cohort of 41 participants with suspected or confirmed acute coronary syndrome were identified. The primary outcome was adherence to guidelines and diagnostic accuracy of electrocardiograph interpretation for the nested cohort. Secondary outcomes included service indicators of waiting times, diagnostic accuracy as measured by unplanned representation rates, satisfaction with care, quality-of-life, and functional status. Data were examined and compared for differences for participants managed by emergency nurse practitioners and those managed in the standard model of care. The median waiting time was 8.0 min (IQR 20) and length-of-stay was 100.0 min (IQR 64). Participants were 2.4 times more likely to have an unplanned representation if managed by the standard service model. The majority of participants (91.5%) were highly satisfied with the care that they received, which was maintained at 30-day follow-up measurement. In the evaluation of quality of life and functional status, summary scores for the SF-12 were comparable with previous studies. No differences were

  14. A rapid and simple chemiluminescence method for screening levels of inosine and hypoxanthine in non-traumatic chest pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farthing, Don E; Sica, Domenic; Hindle, Michael; Edinboro, Les; Xi, Lei; Gehr, Todd W B; Gehr, Lynne; Farthing, Christine A; Larus, Terri L; Fakhry, Itaf; Karnes, H Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A rapid and simple chemiluminescence method was developed for detection of inosine and hypoxanthine in human plasma. The method utilized a microplate luminometer with direct injectors to automatically dispense reagents during sample analysis. Enzymatic conversions of inosine to hypoxanthine, followed by hypoxanthine to xanthine to uric acid, generated superoxide anion radicals as a useful metabolic by-product. The free radicals react with Pholasin(®) , a sensitive photoprotein used for chemiluminescence detection, to produce measurable blue-green light. The use of Pholasin(®) and a chemiluminescence signal enhancer, Adjuvant-K™, eliminated the need for plasma clean-up steps prior to analysis. The method used 20 μL of heparinized plasma, with complete analysis of total hypoxanthine levels (inosine is metabolized to hypoxanthine using purine nucleoside phosphorylase) in approximately 3.7 min. The rapid chemiluminescence method demonstrated the capability of differentiating total hypoxanthine levels between healthy individuals, and patients presenting with non-traumatic chest pain and potential acute cardiac ischemia. The results support the potential use of chemiluminescence methodology as a diagnostic tool to rapidly screen for elevated levels of inosine and hypoxanthine in human plasma, potential biomarkers of acute cardiac ischemia. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Nuclear Scan Strategy and Outcomes in Chest Pain Patients Value of Stress Testing with Dipyridamole or Adenosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, Alberto; Mariannini, Yuri; Canuti, Erica; Petrova, Tetyana; Innocenti, Francesca; Zanobetti, Maurizio; Gallini, Chiara; Costanzo, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    To update the prognostic value of scan strategy with pharmacological stress agent in chest pain (CP) patients presenting with normal electrocardiography (ECG) and troponin. Two consecutive nonrandomized series of patients with CP and negative first-line workup inclusive of serial ECG, serial troponin, and echocardiography underwent myocardial perfusion imaging single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in the emergency department. Of 170 patients enrolled, 52 patients underwent dipyridamole-SPECT and 118 adenosine-SPECT. Patients with perfusion defects underwent angiography, whereas the remaining patients were discharged and followed-up. Primary endpoint was the composite of nonfatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, revascularization, and cardiovascular death at follow-up or the presence of coronary stenosis > 50% at angiography. At multivariate analysis, the presence of perfusion defects or hypertension was independent predictor of the primary endpoint. Sensitivity and negative predictive value were higher in patients subjected to adenosine-SPECT (95% and 99%, respectively) versus dipyridamole-SPECT (56% and 89%; yield 70% and 11%, respectively; P < 0.03). Of note, sensitivity, negative, and positive predictive values were high in patients with hypertension (100%, 93%, and 60%, respectively) or nonischemic echocardiography alterations (100%, 100%, and 100%, respectively). In CP patients, presenting with normal ECG and troponin, adenosine-SPECT adds incremental prognostic values to dipyridamole-SPECT. Costly scan strategy is more appropriate and avoids unnecessary angiograms in patients with hypertension or nonischemic echocardiography alterations

  16. Pragmatic approach to chest pain patients discharged with undetectable high-sensitivity troponin T and normal electrocardiogram: the STABS + CT protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Warrick; Girao, Gary

    2017-06-01

    A strategy that discharges chest pain patients with negative high-sensitivity troponin and non-ischaemic electrocardiography changes may still result in 0.44% of patients experiencing myocardial infarction within 30 days. We observed that a pragmatic approach that systematically discharged 25 patients on cardio-protective medications of aspirin, metoprolol and atorvastatin followed with prompt (<10 days) coronary computed tomography angiography resulted in no major adverse cardiac event and adverse drug reaction 30 days post-presentation. The strategy resulted in three patients (12%) ultimately diagnosed with likely unstable angina, which required planned coronary intervention in two patients and medical management in one patient. No unplanned readmissions for chest pains were noted from initial presentation through to 6-month follow up. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  17. Feasibility of an automatic computer-assisted algorithm for the detection of significant coronary artery disease in patients presenting with acute chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ki-Woon; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Shim, Hackjoon; Kim, Young-Jin; Choi, Byoung-Wook; Yang, Woo-In; Shim, Jee-Young; Ha, Jongwon; Chung, Namsik

    2012-01-01

    Automatic computer-assisted detection (auto-CAD) of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in coronary computed tomography angiography (cCTA) has been shown to have relatively high accuracy. However, to date, scarce data are available regarding the performance of auto-CAD in the setting of acute chest pain. This study sought to demonstrate the feasibility of an auto-CAD algorithm for cCTA in patients presenting with acute chest pain. We retrospectively investigated 398 consecutive patients (229 male, mean age 50 ± 21 years) who had acute chest pain and underwent cCTA between Apr 2007 and Jan 2011 in the emergency department (ED). All cCTA data were analyzed using an auto-CAD algorithm for the detection of >50% CAD on cCTA. The accuracy of auto-CAD was compared with the formal radiology report. In 380 of 398 patients (18 were excluded due to failure of data processing), per-patient analysis of auto-CAD revealed the following: sensitivity 94%, specificity 63%, positive predictive value (PPV) 76%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 89%. After the exclusion of 37 cases that were interpreted as invalid by the auto-CAD algorithm, the NPV was further increased up to 97%, considering the false-negative cases in the formal radiology report, and was confirmed by subsequent invasive angiogram during the index visit. We successfully demonstrated the high accuracy of an auto-CAD algorithm, compared with the formal radiology report, for the detection of >50% CAD on cCTA in the setting of acute chest pain. The auto-CAD algorithm can be used to facilitate the decision-making process in the ED.

  18. Subxyphoid pleural drain confers lesser impairment in respiratory muscle strength, oxygenation and lower chest pain after off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancio, Andreia S A; Guizilini, Solange; Bolzan, Douglas W; Dauar, Renato B; Succi, José E; de Paola, Angelo A V; Carvalho, Antonio C de Camargo; Gomes, Walter J

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate respiratory muscle strength, oxygenation and chest pain in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) using internal thoracic artery grafts comparing pleural drain insertion site at the subxyphoid region versus the lateral region. Forty patients were randomized into two groups in accordance with the pleural drain site. Group II (n = 19) -pleural drain exteriorized in the intercostal space; group (SI) (n = 21) chest tube exteriorized at the subxyphoid region. All patients underwent assessment of respiratory muscle strength (inspiratory and expiratory) on the pre, 1, 3 and 5 postoperative days (POD). Arterial blood gas analysis was collected on the pre and POD1. The chest pain sensation was measured 1, 3 and 5 POD. A significant decrease in respiratory muscle strength (inspiratory and expiratory) was seen in both groups until POD5 (P pleural drainage showed less decrease in respiratory muscle strength, better preservation of blood oxygenation and reduced thoracic pain compared to patients with intercostal drain on early OPCAB postoperative.

  19. Introduction of an accelerated diagnostic protocol in the assessment of emergency department patients with possible acute coronary syndrome: the Nambour Short Low-Intermediate Chest pain project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Terry; Ashover, Sarah; Cullen, Louise; Larsen, Peter; Gibson, Jason; Bilesky, Jennifer; Coverdale, Steven; Parsonage, William

    2013-08-01

    Emergency physicians can feel pressured by opposing forces of clinical reality and the need to publish successful key performance indicators in an environment of increasing demands and cost containment. This is particularly relevant to management of patients with undifferentiated chest pain and possible acute coronary syndrome. Unreliability of clinical assessment and high risk of adverse outcomes for all concerned exist, yet national guidelines are at odds with efforts to reduce ED crowding and access block. We report findings from the Nambour Short Low-Intermediate Chest pain risk trial, which safely introduced an accelerated diagnostic protocol with reduced ED length of stay and high patient acceptability. Over a 7-month period, there were no major adverse cardiac events by 30 days in 19% of undifferentiated chest pain presentations with possible acute coronary syndrome discharged after normal sensitive cardiac troponin taken 2 h after presentation and scheduled to return for outpatient exercise stress test. © 2013 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  20. A history of a prior myocardial infarct does not negate the utility of myocardial perfusion imaging in the evaluation of acute chest pain syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Danbing; Jonathan Knott; Leeanne Grigg; Meir Lichtenstein; Nathan Better

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Acute myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) for evaluation of patients with acute chest pain and a non-diagnostic electrocardiogram (ECG) has a high sensitivity and moderate specificity to detect acute ischaemia and predict cardiac events. However, previous studies excluded patients with a history of prior myocardial infarction (MI). The purpose of our study was to assess the utility of acute MPI for evaluating patients with acute chest pain and a non-diagnostic ECG. We aim to study patients both with and without a history of prior MI, including normal and abnormal studies, as well as to assess the independent predictive value of a prior MI history in determining patient outcome. Methods: We studied 367 consecutive patients with (group 1, n--107) and without. (group 2, n=260) a history of prior MI. 800 MBq Tc99m sestamibi was injected while chest pain was present ('HOT' MIBI). SPECT imaging was performed 1-6 hours post injection. Scan results were reported as,normal, ischaemia, infarct or equivocal. For patients with a defect, a 24-hour painfree study ( C OLD' MIBI) was offered to differentiate ischaemia from infarct. Follow-up was at 1 year by review of the patient's medical record. Outcomes were (1) Hard cardiac events (HE), defined as cardiac death and non-fatal MI, and (2) Total cardiac events (TE), defined as HE or revascularisation. Results: For the total study population, 206 had a normal study, with a HE rate 0.97% (2/206), while 161 had an abnormal study, with HE rate 12.4% (20/161). Patients in Group 2 were much more likely to have a normal study than those in Group 1 (p<.001). An equivocal result is seen in 5 patients, with no cardiac events, while 5 patients had a non-cardiac death. These groups were too small for separate analysis. A COLD MIBI was required in 77.6% of group 1, but only 24.2% of group 2 patients (p<0.001). On univariate analysis, acute ischaemia on MIBI scan, history of prior MI, diabetes, Q wave on ECG and age are all predictors

  1. Chest x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain from a chest injury (with a possible rib fracture or lung complication) or from heart problems Coughing ... arteries Evidence of heart failure In the bones: Fractures or other problems of the ribs and spine Osteoporosis

  2. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... evaluate shortness of breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It may also be useful to ... of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about ...

  3. Ranolazine versus placebo in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and persistent chest pain or dyspnea despite optimal medical and revascularization therapy: randomized, double-blind crossover pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shammas NW

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas W Shammas,1 Gail A Shammas,1 Kathleen Keyes,2 Shawna Duske,1 Ryan Kelly,1 Michael Jerin3 1Midwest Cardiovascular Research Foundation, 2Cardiovascular Medicine, Private Corporation, 3St Ambrose University, Davenport, IA, USA Background: Patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM may continue to experience persistent chest pain and/or dyspnea despite pharmacologic therapy and revascularization. We hypothesized that ranolazine would reduce anginal symptoms or dyspnea in optimally treated ICM patients.Methods: In this randomized, double-blind, crossover-design pilot study, 28 patients with ICM (ejection fraction less or equal 40% were included after providing informed consent. A total of 24 patients completed both placebo and ranolazine treatments and were analyzed. All patients were on treatment with a beta blocker, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (or angiotensin receptor blocker, and at least one additional antianginal drug. After randomization, patients received up to 1,000 mg ranolazine orally twice a day, as tolerated, versus placebo. The primary end point was change in angina as assessed by the Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ, or in dyspnea as assessed by the Rose Dyspnea Scale (RDS. Change in the RDS and SAQ score from baseline was compared, for ranolazine and placebo, using the Wilcoxon signed rank test or paired t-test.Results: Patients had the following demographic and clinical variables: mean age of 71.5 years; male (82.1%; prior coronary bypass surgery (67.9%; prior coronary percutaneous intervention (85.7%; prior myocardial infarction (82.1%; diabetes (67.9%; and mean ejection fraction of 33.1%. No statistical difference was seen between baseline RDS score and that after placebo or ranolazine (n=20 (P≥0.05. There was however, an improvement in anginal frequency (8/10 patients (P=0.058, quality of life (8/10 patients (P=0.048, and mean score of all components of the SAQ questionnaire (n=10 (P=0.047 with ranolazine

  4. Comparison of traditional cardiovascular risk models and coronary atherosclerotic plaque as detected by computed tomography for prediction of acute coronary syndrome in patients with acute chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencik, Maros; Schlett, Christopher L; Bamberg, Fabian; Truong, Quynh A; Nichols, John H; Pena, Antonio J; Shapiro, Michael D; Rogers, Ian S; Seneviratne, Sujith; Parry, Blair Alden; Cury, Ricardo C; Brady, Thomas J; Brown, David F; Nagurney, John T; Hoffmann, Udo

    2012-08-01

    The objective was to determine the association of four clinical risk scores and coronary plaque burden as detected by computed tomography (CT) with the outcome of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in patients with acute chest pain. The hypothesis was that the combination of risk scores and plaque burden improved the discriminatory capacity for the diagnosis of ACS. The study was a subanalysis of the Rule Out Myocardial Infarction Using Computer-Assisted Tomography (ROMICAT) trial-a prospective observational cohort study. The authors enrolled patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with a chief complaint of acute chest pain, inconclusive initial evaluation (negative biomarkers, nondiagnostic electrocardiogram [ECG]), and no history of coronary artery disease (CAD). Patients underwent contrast-enhanced 64-multidetector-row cardiac CT and received standard clinical care (serial ECG, cardiac biomarkers, and subsequent diagnostic testing, such as exercise treadmill testing, nuclear stress perfusion imaging, and/or invasive coronary angiography), as deemed clinically appropriate. The clinical providers were blinded to CT results. The chest pain score was calculated and the results were dichotomized to ≥10 (high-risk) and modeling was performed to examine the association of risk scores and coronary plaque burden to the outcome of ACS. Unadjusted models were individually fitted for the coronary plaque burden and for Goldman, Sanchis, TIMI, and chest pain scores. In adjusted analyses, the authors tested whether the association between risk scores and ACS persisted after controlling for the coronary plaque burden. The prognostic discriminatory capacity of the risk scores and plaque burden for ACS was assessed using c-statistics. The differences in area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) and c-statistics were tested by performing the -2 log likelihood ratio test of nested models. A p value capacity for the diagnosis of ACS. Plaque burden was

  5. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to assess the anatomy and function of the heart and its blood flow. Tell your doctor about ... chest cavity, including the mediastinum , chest wall, pleura, heart and vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also ...

  6. High resolution vs conventional esophageal manometry in the assessment of esophageal motor disorders in patients with non-cardiac chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinsiku, O; Yamasaki, T; Brunner, S; Ganocy, S; Fass, R

    2018-06-01

    High-resolution esophageal manometry (HREM) has become a leading tool in the assessment of esophageal motor disorders, replacing conventional manometry. However, there is limited data about the contribution of HREM as compared with conventional manometry to the assessment of esophageal motor disorders in patients with non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP). The aim of the study was to compare the distribution of esophageal motor disorders in patients with NCCP using HREM as compared with conventional manometry and to determine if HREM improved diagnosis of these disorders. In this study, we included 300 consecutive patients with NCCP who underwent either HREM or conventional manometry over a period of 10 years. A total of 150 patients had conventional manometry and the other 150 patients HREM. The Chicago 3.0 classification and the Castell and Spechler classification were used to determine the esophageal motor disorder of NCCP patients undergoing HREM and conventional manometry, respectively. In both HREM and the conventional manometry groups, normal esophageal motility was the most frequent finding (47% and 36%; respectively, P = .054). Hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter was the most common motility disorder identified by conventional manometry (27.3%), while ineffective esophageal motility was the most common esophageal motor disorder identified by HREM (25.3%). There is a discrepancy in the type of esophageal motor disorders identified by HREM as compared with conventional manometry in NCCP patients. Hypotensive motility disorders are the most commonly diagnosed by both manometric techniques. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Impact of 64-slice coronary CT on the management of patients presenting with acute chest pain: results of a prospective two-centre study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiaens, Luc [Departement d' imagerie Cardiovasculaire, Assistance Publique- Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); CHU de Poitiers, Departement de Cardiologie, Poitiers (France); Duchat, Florent; Boudiaf, Mourad; Fargeaudou, Yann; Ledref, Olivier; Soyer, Philippe [Departement d' imagerie Cardiovasculaire, Assistance Publique- Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Tasu, Jean-Pierre [CHU de Poitiers, Departement de Radiologie, Poitiers (France); Sirol, Marc [Departement d' imagerie Cardiovasculaire, Assistance Publique- Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); INSERM UFR U942, Insuffisance Cardiaque et Biomarqueurs, Universite Paris 7 - Denis Diderot, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Universite Paris VII - Denis Diderot, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Radiologie Vasculaire, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France)

    2012-05-15

    Our two-centre prospective study evaluates the usefulness of 64-slice coronary computed tomography (CCT) to rule out significant coronary artery stenosis in patients admitted in emergency departments (ED) for acute coronary syndromes (ACS) with low-to-intermediate risk score. Patients (175) admitted for acute chest pain (ACP), unmodified electrocardiogram and first troponin measurement within normal ranges were included. A second troponin measurement and a 64-slice CCT within 24 h were performed. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE) were recorded during follow-up (6 months {+-} 2). 64-slice CCT was either normal or showed non-significant coronary stenosis in the majority of patients (78%). 64-slice CCT depicted significant stenosis (>50% diameter) in 22% of patient whereas initial clinical and biological evaluation was reassuring. For negative CCTs, elevated troponin at second measurement did not modify the strategy or treatment of patients. No MACEs were noted during follow up. In 12% of patients CCT identified unsuspected non-coronary abnormalities. Our study confirms 64-slice CCT utility to rule out significant coronary artery stenosis in 8/10 patients admitted in ED with ACP or ACS with low-to-intermediate risk score. Early discharge with a negative 64-slice CCT is associated with very low risk of cardiac events at 6 months. (orig.)

  8. Cost and resource utilization associated with use of computed tomography to evaluate chest pain in the emergency department: the Rule Out Myocardial Infarction using Computer Assisted Tomography (ROMICAT) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulten, Edward; Goehler, Alexander; Bittencourt, Marcio Sommer; Bamberg, Fabian; Schlett, Christopher L; Truong, Quynh A; Nichols, John; Nasir, Khurram; Rogers, Ian S; Gazelle, Scott G; Nagurney, John T; Hoffmann, Udo; Blankstein, Ron

    2013-09-01

    Coronary computed tomographic angiography (cCTA) allows rapid, noninvasive exclusion of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). However, concern exists whether implementation of cCTA in the assessment of patients presenting to the emergency department with acute chest pain will lead to increased downstream testing and costs compared with alternative strategies. Our aim was to compare observed actual costs of usual care (UC) with projected costs of a strategy including early cCTA in the evaluation of patients with acute chest pain in the Rule Out Myocardial Infarction Using Computer Assisted Tomography I (ROMICAT I) study. We compared cost and hospital length of stay of UC observed among 368 patients enrolled in the ROMICAT I study with projected costs of management based on cCTA. Costs of UC were determined by an electronic cost accounting system. Notably, UC was not influenced by cCTA results because patients and caregivers were blinded to the cCTA results. Costs after early implementation of cCTA were estimated assuming changes in management based on cCTA findings of the presence and severity of CAD. Sensitivity analysis was used to test the influence of key variables on both outcomes and costs. We determined that in comparison with UC, cCTA-guided triage, whereby patients with no CAD are discharged, could reduce total hospital costs by 23% (Pcost increases such that when the prevalence of ≥ 50% stenosis is >28% to 33%, the use of cCTA becomes more costly than UC. cCTA may be a cost-saving tool in acute chest pain populations that have a prevalence of potentially obstructive CAD cost would be anticipated in populations with higher prevalence of disease.

  9. Chest wall syndrome among primary care patients: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verdon François

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidemiology of chest pain differs strongly between outpatient and emergency settings. In general practice, the most frequent cause is the chest wall pain. However, there is a lack of information about the characteristics of this syndrome. The aims of the study are to describe the clinical aspects of chest wall syndrome (CWS. Methods Prospective, observational, cohort study of patients attending 58 private practices over a five-week period from March to May 2001 with undifferentiated chest pain. During a one-year follow-up, questionnaires including detailed history and physical exam, were filled out at initial consultation, 3 and 12 months. The outcomes were: clinical characteristics associated with the CWS diagnosis and clinical evolution of the syndrome. Results Among 24 620 consultations, we observed 672 cases of chest pain and 300 (44.6% patients had a diagnosis of chest wall syndrome. It affected all ages with a sex ratio of 1:1. History and sensibility to palpation were the keys for diagnosis. Pain was generally moderate, well localised, continuous or intermittent over a number of hours to days or weeks, and amplified by position or movement. The pain however, may be acute. Eighty-eight patients were affected at several painful sites, and 210 patients at a single site, most frequently in the midline or a left-sided site. Pain was a cause of anxiety and cardiac concern, especially when acute. CWS coexisted with coronary disease in 19 and neoplasm in 6. Outcome at one year was favourable even though CWS recurred in half of patients. Conclusion CWS is common and benign, but leads to anxiety and recurred frequently. Because the majority of chest wall pain is left-sided, the possibility of coexistence with coronary disease needs careful consideration.

  10. Chest wall syndrome among primary care patients: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, François; Burnand, Bernard; Herzig, Lilli; Junod, Michel; Pécoud, Alain; Favrat, Bernard

    2007-09-12

    The epidemiology of chest pain differs strongly between outpatient and emergency settings. In general practice, the most frequent cause is the chest wall pain. However, there is a lack of information about the characteristics of this syndrome. The aims of the study are to describe the clinical aspects of chest wall syndrome (CWS). Prospective, observational, cohort study of patients attending 58 private practices over a five-week period from March to May 2001 with undifferentiated chest pain. During a one-year follow-up, questionnaires including detailed history and physical exam, were filled out at initial consultation, 3 and 12 months. The outcomes were: clinical characteristics associated with the CWS diagnosis and clinical evolution of the syndrome. Among 24 620 consultations, we observed 672 cases of chest pain and 300 (44.6%) patients had a diagnosis of chest wall syndrome. It affected all ages with a sex ratio of 1:1. History and sensibility to palpation were the keys for diagnosis. Pain was generally moderate, well localised, continuous or intermittent over a number of hours to days or weeks, and amplified by position or movement. The pain however, may be acute. Eighty-eight patients were affected at several painful sites, and 210 patients at a single site, most frequently in the midline or a left-sided site. Pain was a cause of anxiety and cardiac concern, especially when acute. CWS coexisted with coronary disease in 19 and neoplasm in 6. Outcome at one year was favourable even though CWS recurred in half of patients. CWS is common and benign, but leads to anxiety and recurred frequently. Because the majority of chest wall pain is left-sided, the possibility of coexistence with coronary disease needs careful consideration.

  11. Chest wall syndrome among primary care patients: a cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, François; Burnand, Bernard; Herzig, Lilli; Junod, Michel; Pécoud, Alain; Favrat, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of chest pain differs strongly between outpatient and emergency settings. In general practice, the most frequent cause is the chest wall pain. However, there is a lack of information about the characteristics of this syndrome. The aims of the study are to describe the clinical aspects of chest wall syndrome (CWS). Methods Prospective, observational, cohort study of patients attending 58 private practices over a five-week period from March to May 2001 with undifferentiated chest pain. During a one-year follow-up, questionnaires including detailed history and physical exam, were filled out at initial consultation, 3 and 12 months. The outcomes were: clinical characteristics associated with the CWS diagnosis and clinical evolution of the syndrome. Results Among 24 620 consultations, we observed 672 cases of chest pain and 300 (44.6%) patients had a diagnosis of chest wall syndrome. It affected all ages with a sex ratio of 1:1. History and sensibility to palpation were the keys for diagnosis. Pain was generally moderate, well localised, continuous or intermittent over a number of hours to days or weeks, and amplified by position or movement. The pain however, may be acute. Eighty-eight patients were affected at several painful sites, and 210 patients at a single site, most frequently in the midline or a left-sided site. Pain was a cause of anxiety and cardiac concern, especially when acute. CWS coexisted with coronary disease in 19 and neoplasm in 6. Outcome at one year was favourable even though CWS recurred in half of patients. Conclusion CWS is common and benign, but leads to anxiety and recurred frequently. Because the majority of chest wall pain is left-sided, the possibility of coexistence with coronary disease needs careful consideration. PMID:17850647

  12. Angina (Chest Pain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Live Our Interactive Cardiovascular Library has detailed animations and illustrations to help you learn about conditions, treatments and procedures related to heart disease and stroke. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  13. Depression, anxiety, stress, social interaction and health-related quality of life in men and women with unexplained chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manhem Karin

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unexplained chest pain (UCP is a common reason for emergency hospital admission and generates considerable health-care costs for society. Even though prior research indicates that psychological problems and impaired quality of life are common among UCP patients, there is lack of knowledge comparing UCP patients with a reference group from the general population. The aim of this study was to analyse differences between men and women with UCP and a reference group in terms of psychosocial factors as depression, anxiety, stress, social interaction and health-related quality of life (HRQOL. Methods A self-administered questionnaire about psychosocial factors was completed by 127 men and 104 women with acute UCP admitted consecutively to the Emergency Department (ED or as in-patients on a medical ward. A reference group from the general population, 490 men and 579 women, participants in the INTERGENE study and free of clinical heart disease, were selected. Results The UCP patients were more likely to be immigrants, have a sedentary lifestyle, report stress at work and have symptoms of depression and trait-anxiety compared with the reference group. After adjustment for differences in age, smoking, hypertension and diabetes, these factors were still significantly more common among patients with UCP. In a stepwise multivariate model with mutual adjustment for psychosocial factors, being an immigrant was associated with a more than twofold risk in both sexes. Stress at work was associated with an almost fourfold increase in risk among men, whereas there was no independent impact for women. In contrast, depression only emerged as an independent risk factor in women. Trait-anxiety and a low level of social interaction were not independently associated with risk in either men or women. Patients with UCP were two to five times more likely to have low scores for HRQOL. Conclusion Both men and women with UCP had higher depression scores

  14. Do guidelines on first impression make sense? Implementation of a chest pain guideline in primary care: a systematic evaluation of acceptance and feasibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramer Lena

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most guidelines concentrate on investigations, treatment, and monitoring instead of patient history and clinical examination. We developed a guideline that dealt with the different aetiologies of chest pain by emphasizing the patient's history and physical signs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the guideline's acceptance and feasibility in the context of a practice test. Methods The evaluation study was nested in a diagnostic cross-sectional study with 56 General Practitioners (GPs and 862 consecutively recruited patients with chest pain. The evaluation of the guideline was conducted in a mixed method design on a sub-sample of 17 GPs and 282 patients. Physicians' evaluation of the guideline was assessed via standardized questionnaires and case record forms. Additionally, practice nursing staff and selected patients were asked for their evaluation of specific guideline modules. Quantitative data was analyzed descriptively for frequencies, means, and standard deviations. In addition, two focus groups with a total of 10 GPs were held to gain further insights in the guideline implementation process. The data analysis and interpretation followed the standards of the qualitative content analysis. Results The overall evaluation of the GPs participating in the evaluation study regarding the recommendations made in the chest pain guideline was positive. A total of 14 GPs were convinced that there was a need for this kind of guideline and perceived the guideline recommendations as useful. While the long version was partially criticized for a perceived lack of clarity, the short version of the chest pain guideline and the heart score were especially appreciated by the GPs. However, change of clinical behaviour as consequence of the guideline was inconsistent. While on a concrete patient related level, GPs indicated to have behaved as the guideline recommended, the feedback on a more general level was heterogeneous. Several

  15. Coronary Artery Calcium as an Independent Surrogate Marker in the Risk Assessment of Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and an Intermediate Pretest Likelihood for Coronary Artery Disease Admitted to a German Chest Pain Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuckmann, Frank; Olligs, Jan; Hinrichs, Liane; Koopmann, Matthias; Lichtenberg, Michael; Böse, Dirk; Fischer, Dieter; Eckardt, Lars; Waltenberger, Johannes; Garvey, J Lee

    2016-03-01

    About 10% of patients admitted to a chest pain unit (CPU) exhibit atrial fibrillation (AF). To determine whether calcium scores (CS) are superior over common risk scores for coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients presenting with atypical chest pain, newly diagnosed AF, and intermediate pretest probability for CAD within the CPU. In 73 subjects, CS was related to the following risk scores: Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) score, including a new model of a frequency-normalized approach; Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction score; European Society of Cardiology Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE); Framingham risk score; and Prospective Cardiovascular Münster Study score. Revascularization rates during index stay were assessed. Median CS was 77 (interquartile range, 1-270), with higher values in men and the left anterior descending artery. Only the modified GRACE (ρ = 0.27; P = 0.02) and the SCORE (ρ = 0.39; P risk scores and calcium burden, as well as revascularization rates during index stay, were low. By contrast, the determination of CS may be used as an additional surrogate marker in risk stratification in AF patients with intermediate pretest likelihood for CAD admitted to a CPU. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Age- and sex-based resource utilisation and costs in patients with acute chest pain undergoing cardiac CT angiography. Pooled evidence from ROMICAT II and ACRIN-PA trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamberg, Fabian; Hoffmann, Udo; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Ferencik, Maros; Bittner, Daniel O.; Hallett, Travis R.; Janjua, Sumbal; Schlett, Christopher L.; Nagurney, John T.; Udelson, James E.; Truong, Quynh A.; Woodard, Pamela K.; Hollander, Judd E.; Litt, Harold

    2018-01-01

    To determine resource utilisation according to age and gender-specific subgroups in two large randomized diagnostic trials. We pooled patient-specific data from ACRIN-PA 4005 and ROMICAT II that enrolled subjects with acute chest pain at 14 US sites. Subjects were randomized between a standard work-up and a pathway utilizing cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and followed for the occurrence of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and resource utilisation during index hospitalisation and 1-month follow-up. Study endpoints included diagnostic accuracy of CCTA for the detection of ACS as well as resource utilisation. Among 1240 patients who underwent CCTA, negative predictive value of CCTA to rule out ACS remained very high (≥99.4%). The proportion of patients undergoing additional diagnostic testing and cost increased with age for both sexes (p < 0.001), and was higher in men as compared to women older than 60 years (43.1% vs. 23.4% and $4559 ± 3382 vs. $3179 ± 2562, p < 0.01; respectively). Cost to rule out ACS was higher in men (p < 0.001) and significantly higher for patients older than 60 years ($2860-5935 in men, p < 0.001). CCTA strategy in patients with acute chest pain results in varying resource utilisation according to age and gender-specific subgroups, mandating improved selection for advanced imaging. (orig.)

  17. Age- and sex-based resource utilisation and costs in patients with acute chest pain undergoing cardiac CT angiography. Pooled evidence from ROMICAT II and ACRIN-PA trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamberg, Fabian; Hoffmann, Udo [Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Mayrhofer, Thomas [Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Stralsund University of Applied Science, School of Business Studies, Stralsund (Germany); Ferencik, Maros [Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Oregon Health and Science University, Knight Cardiovascular Institute, Portland, OR (United States); Bittner, Daniel O. [Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuernberg (FAU), University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Medicine 2 - Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany); Hallett, Travis R.; Janjua, Sumbal [Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Schlett, Christopher L. [Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Nagurney, John T. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Udelson, James E. [Tufts Medical Center, Division of Cardiology and the Cardio-Vascular Center, Boston, MA (United States); Truong, Quynh A. [Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Woodard, Pamela K. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Hollander, Judd E. [Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Department of Emergency Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Litt, Harold [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology and Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2018-02-15

    To determine resource utilisation according to age and gender-specific subgroups in two large randomized diagnostic trials. We pooled patient-specific data from ACRIN-PA 4005 and ROMICAT II that enrolled subjects with acute chest pain at 14 US sites. Subjects were randomized between a standard work-up and a pathway utilizing cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and followed for the occurrence of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and resource utilisation during index hospitalisation and 1-month follow-up. Study endpoints included diagnostic accuracy of CCTA for the detection of ACS as well as resource utilisation. Among 1240 patients who underwent CCTA, negative predictive value of CCTA to rule out ACS remained very high (≥99.4%). The proportion of patients undergoing additional diagnostic testing and cost increased with age for both sexes (p < 0.001), and was higher in men as compared to women older than 60 years (43.1% vs. 23.4% and $4559 ± 3382 vs. $3179 ± 2562, p < 0.01; respectively). Cost to rule out ACS was higher in men (p < 0.001) and significantly higher for patients older than 60 years ($2860-5935 in men, p < 0.001). CCTA strategy in patients with acute chest pain results in varying resource utilisation according to age and gender-specific subgroups, mandating improved selection for advanced imaging. (orig.)

  18. Myocardial perfusion assessed by contrast echocardiography and single photon emission computed tomography in the evaluation of patients with acute chest pain and normal electrocardiogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, J. Jr.; Ferreira, S.M.A.; Matias, W. Jr.; Giorgi, M.C.P.; Izaki, M.; Luz, P.L.; Ramires, J.A.F.; Meneghetti, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Aim : Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) in comparison with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for the detection of myocardial ischemia in patients with acute chest pain. Material and Methods : Eighteen patients (pts) with chest pain lasting ≥30 minutes, occurring within 6 hours of emergency room presentation and a normal or no diagnostic electrocardiogram were studied. Pts underwent rest MCE and SPECT. For both exams myocardial perfusion was assessed in the same 7 segments (apical, anterior, inferior, anteroseptal, inferoseptal, lateral and posterior) of left ventricle. A total of 126 segments were analyzed. Images were classified as positive for ischemia if they had a perfusion defect. Coronary angiography was performed if MCE or SPECT images were classified as positive for ischemia or by clinical indication. Otherwise the patients underwent stress SPECT. Significant coronary artery disease (CAD) was defined as ≥70% stenosis in a major coronary artery or its branches. Final diagnosis of an acute coronary event (ACE) was established in the presence of positive findings in MCE or SPECT in addition to significant CAD in the corresponding territory. Kappa statistics were calculated to evaluate the concordance between MCE and SPECT. κ values of ≤0.4, >0.4 and >0.7 indicate fair, good and excellent agreement, respectively. Results: Thirteen out of 18 pts underwent coronary angiography (seven pts had positive findings on SPECT, 2 on MCE, 2 on both exams and 1 had clinical indication). Significant CAD was detected on six. Five pts underwent stress SPECT and no perfusion defect was detected. Therefore, six pts (33.3%) had an ACE and 12 (66.6%) had not. There were no statistical differences between groups according to age, gender, duration of pain, free pain interval, presence of risk factors and antecedents. Concordance between MCE and SPECT for evaluation of perfusion defects showed a ? coefficient of 0

  19. Use of observation followed by outpatient stress testing in chest pain patients with prior coronary artery disease history: An evaluation of prognostic utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Yasser; Schwartz, Melvin H; Pandey, Prasant S; Abdul Latif, Maida S; Matsumura, Martin E

    2015-06-01

    To determine the outcomes of patients with chest pain (CP) and prior history of coronary artery disease (CAD) managed with observation followed by outpatient stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Retrospective analysis of patients with CP managed with observation followed by outpatient stress MPI, comparing cardiovascular (CV) event rates stratified by CAD history. 375 patients were included: 111 with and 264 without a CAD history. All patients underwent outpatient stress MPI within 72 h of observation. MPI identified patients at risk for CV events. However, while patients with negative MPI and without a CAD history had very low rates of short- and long-term CAD events (0.8%, 0.8%, and 1.3% at 30 days, 1 year, and 3 years, respectively), event rates of those with a negative test but a CAD history were significantly higher (2.6%, 5.3%, and 6.6% at 30 days, 1 year and 3 years, respectively; p = 0.044 and p = 0.034 compared to CAD- patients at 1 year and 3 years, respectively). In a multivariable logistic regression model, a positive MPI proved to be an independent predictor of long-term CV events in patients with CP and prior CAD. Observation followed by stress MPI can effectively risk stratify CP patients with prior CAD for CV risk. These patients are at increased risk of CV events even after a low-risk stress MPI study. Patients presenting with CP and managed with a strategy of observation followed by a negative stress MPI warrant close short- and long-term monitoring for recurrent events.

  20. N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide on admission for early risk stratification of patients with chest pain and no ST-segment elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernberg, Tomas; Stridsberg, Mats; Venge, Per; Lindahl, Bertil

    2002-08-07

    The study evaluated the prognostic value of single measurement of N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) obtained on admission in patients with symptoms suggestive of an acute coronary syndrome and no ST-segment elevation. Patients with symptoms suggestive of an acute coronary syndrome and no ST-segment elevation constitute a large and heterogeneous population. Early risk stratification has been based on clinical background factors, electrocardiography (ECG) and biochemical markers of myocardial damage. The neurohormonal activation has, so far, received less attention. The NT-proBNP was analyzed on admission in 755 patients admitted because of chest pain and no ST-segment elevation. Patients were followed concerning death for 40 months (median). The median NT-proBNP level was 400 (111 to 1646) ng/l. Compared to the lowest quartile, patients in the second, third and fourth quartiles had a relative risk of subsequent death of 4.2 (1.6 to 11.1), 10.7 (4.2 to 26.8) and 26.6 (10.8 to 65.5), respectively. When NT-proBNP was added to a Cox regression model including clinical background factors, ECG and troponin T, the NT-proBNP levels were independently associated with prognosis. A single measurement of NT-proBNP on admission will substantially improve the early risk stratification of patients with symptoms suggestive of an acute coronary syndrome and no ST-segment elevation. A combination of clinical background factors, ECG, troponin T and NT-proBNP obtained on admission will provide a highly discerning tool for risk stratification and further clinical decisions.

  1. Should anorectal ultrasonography be included as a diagnostic tool for chronic anal pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. García-Montes

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the efficiency of endorectal ultrasound (ERUS in the study of chronic idiopathic anal pain (CIAP. Material and method: this is a prospective and descriptive study in which 40 patients, 18 men and 22 women with an average of 47 years, were included. They had chronic anal pain of at least 3 months' duration. A complete colonoscopy was performed in all patients, which found no abnormalities to explain clinical symptoms. Patients with anal fissure and internal hemorrhoids of any degree, perianal suppurative processes, and pelvic surgery were excluded from the study. An ALOKA ProSound SSD-4000 ultrasound console attached to a multifrequency radial transductor ASU-67 (7.5 and 10 MHz was used. Results: one patient could not tolerate the examination. In 8 patients (20% of cases alterations were detected during ultrasonography: in 4 patients (10% of the cases; 1 man and 3 women internal anal sphincter (IAS hypertrophy, and in 5 patients (4 women and 1 man a torn sphincter complex. A tear in the upper IAS canal and hypertrophy of the middle anal canal were observed in one patient (1 woman. Conclusions: ERUS is a simple, economic and useful test to study anorectal pathologies. Although in most studied cases no damage to the anal canal or rectal wall was detected, in a considerable number of patients we observed a thickening of the IAS, a probable cause of anal pain. Therefore, we understand that ERUS should be included in the study of CIAP.

  2. Should anorectal ultrasonography be included as a diagnostic tool for chronic anal pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Montes, M J; Argüelles-Arias, Federico; Jiménez-Contreras, S; Sánchez-Gey, S; Pellicer-Bautista, F; Herrerías-Gutiérrez, J M

    2010-01-01

    To assess the efficiency of endorectal ultrasound (ERUS) in the study of chronic idiopathic anal pain (CIAP). This is a prospective and descriptive study in which 40 patients, 18 men and 22 women with an average of 47 years, were included. They had chronic anal pain of at least 3 months duration. A complete colonoscopy was performed in all patients, which found no abnormalities to explain clinical symptoms. Patients with anal fissure and internal hemorrhoids of any degree, perianal suppurative processes, and pelvic surgery were excluded from the study. An ALOKA ProSound SSD-4000 ultrasound console attached to a multifrequency radial transductor ASU-67 (7.5 and 10 MHz) was used. One patient could not tolerate the examination. In 8 patients (20% of cases) alterations were detected during ultrasonography: in 4 patients (10% of the cases; 1 man and 3 women) internal anal sphincter (IAS) hypertrophy, and in 5 patients (4 women and 1 man) a torn sphincter complex. A tear in the upper IAS canal and hypertrophy of the middle anal canal were observed in one patient (1 woman). ERUS is a simple, economic and useful test to study anorectal pathologies. Although in most studied cases no damage to the anal canal or rectal wall was detected, in a considerable number of patients we observed a thickening of the IAS, a probable cause of anal pain. Therefore, we understand that ERUS should be included in the study of CIAP.

  3. Chest Wall Volume Receiving >30 Gy Predicts Risk of Severe Pain and/or Rib Fracture After Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlap, Neal E.; Cai, Jing; Biedermann, Gregory B.; Yang, Wensha; Benedict, Stanley H.; Sheng Ke; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Larner, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the dose-volume parameters that predict the risk of chest wall (CW) pain and/or rib fracture after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From a combined, larger multi-institution experience, 60 consecutive patients treated with three to five fractions of stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary or metastatic peripheral lung lesions were reviewed. CW pain was assessed using the Common Toxicity Criteria for pain. Peripheral lung lesions were defined as those located within 2.5 cm of the CW. A minimal point dose of 20 Gy to the CW was required. The CW volume receiving ≥20, ≥30, ≥40, ≥50, and ≥60 Gy was determined and related to the risk of CW toxicity. Results: Of the 60 patients, 17 experienced Grade 3 CW pain and five rib fractures. The median interval to the onset of severe pain and/or fracture was 7.1 months. The risk of CW toxicity was fitted to the median effective concentration dose-response model. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy best predicted the risk of severe CW pain and/or rib fracture (R 2 = 0.9552). A volume threshold of 30 cm 3 was observed before severe pain and/or rib fracture was reported. A 30% risk of developing severe CW toxicity correlated with a CW volume of 35 cm 3 receiving 30 Gy. Conclusion: The development of CW toxicity is clinically relevant, and the CW should be considered an organ at risk in treatment planning. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy in three to five fractions should be limited to 3 , if possible, to reduce the risk of toxicity without compromising tumor coverage.

  4. Comparison of central and intraesophageal factors between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients and those with GERD-related noncardiac chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, M; Simantov, R; Yair, M; Leitman, M; Blatt, A; Scapa, E; Broide, E

    2012-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) causes a wide range of symptoms. Some patients present with typical symptoms such as heartburn and regurgitation and others with atypical symptoms such as chest pain. The mechanism responsible for the varying clinical presentation of GERD is still not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate differences in central and local intraesophageal factors between patients with typical GERD symptoms and those with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP). Patients presenting with typical and atypical symptoms suspicious of GERD underwent upper endoscopy and 24-hour pH monitoring with four sensors, each positioned at a different esophageal level. All patients completed GERD symptom, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Symptom Stress Rating questionnaires. From January 2006 to December 2009, 50 patients were recruited, 29 with typical symptoms, and 21 with NCCP. Patients with proven GERD and NCCP had higher proximal extension of acid during reflux episodes than patients with typical symptoms. They were found to be older, had a shorter history of symptom onset, worse anxiety scores, and more endoscopic findings compatible with gastritis. Proximal extension of acid during the reflux episodes in patients with GERD presenting with NCCP may play a role in symptom generation. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  5. B-type natriuretic peptide: a novel early blood marker of acute myocardial infarction in patients with chest pain and no ST-segment elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassan, Roberto; Potsch, Alfredo; Maisel, Alan; Tura, Bernardo; Villacorta, Humberto; Nogueira, Mônica Viegas; Campos, Augusta; Gamarski, Roberto; Masetto, Antonio Cláudio; Moutinho, Marco Aurélio

    2005-02-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the diagnostic value of admission B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with acute chest pain and no ST-segment elevation. A prospective study with 631 consecutive patients was conducted in the emergency department. Non-ST elevation AMI was present in 72 patients and their median admission BNP level was significantly higher than in unstable angina and non-acute coronary syndrome patients. Sensitivity of admission BNP for AMI (cut-off value of 100 pg/mL) was significantly higher than creatine kinase-MB (CKMB) and troponin-I on admission (70.8 vs. 45.8 vs. 50.7%, respectively, P<0.0001) and specificity was 68.9%. Simultaneous use of these markers significantly improved sensitivity to 87.3% and the negative predictive value to 97.3%. In multiple logistic regression analysis, admission BNP was a significant independent predictor of AMI, even when CKMB and troponin-I were present in the model. BNP is a useful adjunct to standard cardiac markers in patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain and no ST-segment elevation, particularly if initial CKMB and/or troponin-I are non-diagnostic.

  6. Value of Myocardial Perfusion Assessment With Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography in Patients With Recent Acute-Onset Chest Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørgaard, Mathias H; Linde, Jesper J; Kühl, J Tobias

    2018-01-01

    was the frequency of coronary revascularization among patients referred for invasive coronary angiography (ICA) based on index computed tomography evaluation. Secondary endpoints were invasive procedural complications at index-related ICA, post-index cardiac death, hospital admittance because of recurrence of chest...

  7. Radiological diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis: CT versus chest radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fugeng; Pan Jishu; Chen Qihang; Zhou Cheng; Yu Jingying; Tang Dairong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of CT or Chest radiograph in diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis. Methods: The study population included 21 patients with chest wall tuberculosis confirmed by operation or biopsy. Chest radiograph and plain CT were performed in all eases, while enhanced CT in 9 cases, and all images were reviewed by 2 radiologists. Results: Single soft tissue mass of the chest wall was detected in all cases on CT, but not on chest radiograph(χ 2 =42.000, P 2 =4.421, P<0.05). Conclusion: CT, especially enhanced CT scan is the first choice in the diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis. (authors)

  8. Functional results after chest wall stabilization with a new screwless fixation device

    OpenAIRE

    Wiese, Mark Nikolaj; Kawel-Boehm, Nadine; Moreno de la Santa, Pablo; Al-Shahrabani, Feras; Toffel, Melanie; Rosenthal, Rachel; Schäfer, Juliane; Tamm, Michael; Bremerich, Jens; Lardinois, Didier

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This is the experience with the Stratos system in two surgical centres for the management of two types of rib fractures: flail chest and multiple dislocated rib fractures with significant chest wall deformity. METHODS From January 2009 to May 2012, 94 consecutive patients were included. Selected indications were extended anterolateral flail chest (n = 68) and dislocated painful rib fractures (n = 26). The open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) system consists of flexible titanium ...

  9. Can consistent benchmarking within a standardized pain management concept decrease postoperative pain after total hip arthroplasty? A prospective cohort study including 367 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benditz, Achim; Greimel, Felix; Auer, Patrick; Zeman, Florian; Göttermann, Antje; Grifka, Joachim; Meissner, Winfried; von Kunow, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    The number of total hip replacement surgeries has steadily increased over recent years. Reduction in postoperative pain increases patient satisfaction and enables better mobilization. Thus, pain management needs to be continuously improved. Problems are often caused not only by medical issues but also by organization and hospital structure. The present study shows how the quality of pain management can be increased by implementing a standardized pain concept and simple, consistent, benchmarking. All patients included in the study had undergone total hip arthroplasty (THA). Outcome parameters were analyzed 24 hours after surgery by means of the questionnaires from the German-wide project "Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management" (QUIPS). A pain nurse interviewed patients and continuously assessed outcome quality parameters. A multidisciplinary team of anesthetists, orthopedic surgeons, and nurses implemented a regular procedure of data analysis and internal benchmarking. The health care team was informed of any results, and suggested improvements. Every staff member involved in pain management participated in educational lessons, and a special pain nurse was trained in each ward. From 2014 to 2015, 367 patients were included. The mean maximal pain score 24 hours after surgery was 4.0 (±3.0) on an 11-point numeric rating scale, and patient satisfaction was 9.0 (±1.2). Over time, the maximum pain score decreased (mean 3.0, ±2.0), whereas patient satisfaction significantly increased (mean 9.8, ±0.4; p benchmarking a standardized pain management concept. But regular benchmarking, implementation of feedback mechanisms, and staff education made the pain management concept even more successful. Multidisciplinary teamwork and flexibility in adapting processes seem to be highly important for successful pain management.

  10. Blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Daphne J

    2014-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with a wide range of injuries, many of which are life threatening. This article is a case study demonstrating a variety of traumatic chest injuries, including pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Literature on the diagnosis and treatment was reviewed, including both theoretical and research literature, from a variety of disciplines. The role of the advance practice nurse in trauma is also discussed as it relates to assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with traumatic chest injuries.

  11. Can consistent benchmarking within a standardized pain management concept decrease postoperative pain after total hip arthroplasty? A prospective cohort study including 367 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benditz A

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Achim Benditz,1 Felix Greimel,1 Patrick Auer,2 Florian Zeman,3 Antje Göttermann,4 Joachim Grifka,1 Winfried Meissner,4 Frederik von Kunow1 1Department of Orthopedics, University Medical Center Regensburg, 2Clinic for anesthesia, Asklepios Klinikum Bad Abbach, Bad Abbach, 3Centre for Clinical Studies, University Medical Center Regensburg, Regensburg, 4Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany Background: The number of total hip replacement surgeries has steadily increased over recent years. Reduction in postoperative pain increases patient satisfaction and enables better mobilization. Thus, pain management needs to be continuously improved. Problems are often caused not only by medical issues but also by organization and hospital structure. The present study shows how the quality of pain management can be increased by implementing a standardized pain concept and simple, consistent, benchmarking.Methods: All patients included in the study had undergone total hip arthroplasty (THA. Outcome parameters were analyzed 24 hours after surgery by means of the questionnaires from the German-wide project “Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management” (QUIPS. A pain nurse interviewed patients and continuously assessed outcome quality parameters. A multidisciplinary team of anesthetists, orthopedic surgeons, and nurses implemented a regular procedure of data analysis and internal benchmarking. The health care team was informed of any results, and suggested improvements. Every staff member involved in pain management participated in educational lessons, and a special pain nurse was trained in each ward.Results: From 2014 to 2015, 367 patients were included. The mean maximal pain score 24 hours after surgery was 4.0 (±3.0 on an 11-point numeric rating scale, and patient satisfaction was 9.0 (±1.2. Over time, the maximum pain score decreased (mean 3.0, ±2.0, whereas patient satisfaction

  12. Surgical treatment of chest instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitka, M.; Masek, M.

    2015-01-01

    Fractures of the ribs is the most common thoracic injury after blunt trauma. Chest wall instability (flail chest) is a common occurrence in the presence of multiple ribs fracture. Unilateral or bilateral fractures more ribs anteriorly or posteriorly will produce enough instability that paradoxical respiratory motion results in hypoventilation of an unacceptable degree. Open approach and surgical stabilisation of the chest preserved pulmonary function, improved pain control, minimized posttraumatic deformities and shorter back to work time. (author)

  13. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI Patient Instructions ... Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  14. The HEART score is useful to predict cardiovascular risks and reduces unnecessary cardiac imaging in low-risk patients with acute chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Siping; Huang, Bo; Zou, Yunliang; Guo, Jianbin; Liu, Ziyong; Pi, Dangyu; Qiu, Yunhong; Xiao, Chun

    2018-06-01

    The present study was to investigate whether the HEART score can be used to evaluate cardiovascular risks and reduce unnecessary cardiac imaging in China.Acute coronary syndrome patients with the thrombosis in myocardial infarction risk score risk HEART score group and 2 patients (1.5%) in the high risk HEART score group had cardiovascular events. The sensitivity of HEART score to predict cardiovascular events was 100% and the specificity was 46.7%. The potential unnecessary cardiac testing was 46.3%. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that per one category increase of the HEART score was associated with nearly 1.3-fold risk of cardiovascular events.In the low-risk acute chest pain patients, the HEART score is useful to physicians in evaluating the risk of cardiovascular events within the first 30 days. In addition, the HEART score is also useful in reducing the unnecessary cardiac imaging.

  15. Papel dos testes provocativos esofagianos na investigação de pacientes com dor torácica de origem indeterminada Role of esophageal provocative tests in the investigation of patients with chest pain of undetermined origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz J. Abrahão Jr.

    2005-09-01

    a dor era provável e em 6 dos 14 pacientes (42,8% com exames habitualmente empregados normais ou inconclusivos [ganho diagnóstico de 45% (18/40]. Dois pacientes com testes provocativos negativos apresentaram o índice de sintomas positivo à pHmetria, totalizando 25 (62,5% pacientes com dor esofagiana comprovada. CONCLUSÃO: Os testes provocativos permitiram apontar a dor como de origem esofagiana comprovada em 62,5% dos casos, o que representou um ganho diagnóstico de 45% quando comparados aos exames habitualmente empregados, constituindo ferramenta importante na investigação de pacientes com dor torácica de origem indeterminada.BACKGROUND: Traditional methods employed in esophageal investigation of patients with chest pain of undetermined origin includes upper endoscopy, esophageal manometry and pH monitoring. These methods many times disclose abnormalities that can only be enrolled as the possible cause of chest pain. Provocative tests can reproduce pain in the laboratory, establishing its esophageal origin. OBJECTIVES: Determine the positivity of acid perfusion test, edrophonium and balloon distension in patients with chest pain of undetermined origin and compare with results of traditional exams, establishing the gain for the diagnosis of esophageal pain. RESULTS: Forty patients with chest pain of undetermined origin (normal coronary angiography, 80% female, mean age of 54.7 years were submitted to traditional exams and provocative tests. Upper endoscopy disclosed erosive esophagitis in two (5% and peptic ulcer in one (2.5%, esophageal manometry was abnormal in 60%. pH monitoring was abnormal in 14 (35% with a positive symptom index in 7. Chest pain was considered of proved esophageal origin by traditional exams in 7 (17.5% patients with a positive symptom index and of probable esophageal origin in 19 (47.5% being 8 with gastroesophageal reflux disease and 11 abnormal esophageal motility. In 14 (35% an esophageal origin could not be demonstrated. The acid

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest is performed to: assess abnormal masses, including cancer of the lungs or other tissues, which either cannot be assessed ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and ... tissues, except for lung abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging ...

  17. High-sensitivity troponin assays for the early rule-out or diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in people with acute chest pain: A systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Westwood (Marie); T. van Asselt (Thea); B.L.T. Ramaekers (Bram); P. Whiting (Penny); P. Thokala (Praveen); M.A. Joore (Manuela); N. Armstrong (Nigel); J. Ross (Janine); J.L. Severens (Hans); J. Kleijnen (Jos)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground The primary indication for this assessment is the early rule-out of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in people presenting with acute chest pain and suspected, but not confirmed, non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). Cardiac troponins (cTns) I and T are used

  18. High-sensitivity troponin assays for the early rule-out or diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in people eith acute chest pain: a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Westwood (Marie); T. van Asselt (Thea); B. Ramaekers (Bram); P. Whiting (Penny); P. Tokala (Praveen); M.A. Joore (Manuela); N. Armstrong (Nigel); J. Ross (Janine); J.L. Severens (Hans); J. Kleijnen (Jos)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) can ensure quick and effective treatment but only 20% of adults with emergency admissions for chest pain have an AMI. High-sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn) assays may allow rapid rule-out of AMI and avoidance of

  19. High-sensitivity troponin assays for the early rule-out or diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in people with acute chest pain : a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westwood, Marie; van Asselt, Thea; Ramaekers, Bram; Whiting, Penny; Thokala, Praveen; Joore, Manuela; Armstrong, Nigel; Ross, Janine; Severens, Johan; Kleijnen, Jos

    BACKGROUND: Early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) can ensure quick and effective treatment but only 20% of adults with emergency admissions for chest pain have an AMI. High-sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn) assays may allow rapid rule-out of AMI and avoidance of unnecessary

  20. Integrative therapies for low back pain that include complementary and alternative medicine care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizhakkeveettil, Anupama; Rose, Kevin; Kadar, Gena E

    2014-09-01

    Systematic review of the literature. To evaluate whether an integrated approach that includes different Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapies combined or CAM therapies combined with conventional medical care is more effective for the management of low back pain (LBP) than single modalities alone. LBP is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide, yet its optimal management is still unresolved. The PRISMA Statement guidelines were followed. The Cochrane Back Review Group scale was used to rate the quality of the studies found. Twenty-one studies were found that met the inclusion criteria. The CAM modalities used in the studies included spinal manipulative therapy, acupuncture, exercise therapy, physiotherapy, massage therapy, and a topical ointment. Twenty studies included acupuncture and/or spinal manipulative therapy. Nine high quality studies showed that integrative care was clinically effective for the management of LBP. Spinal manipulative therapy combined with exercise therapy and acupuncture combined with conventional medical care or with exercise therapy appears to be promising approaches to the management of chronic cases of LBP. There is support in the literature for integrated CAM and conventional medical therapy for the management of chronic LBP. Further research into the integrated management of LBP is clearly needed to provide better guidance for patients and clinicians.

  1. Randomized clinical trial of pigtail catheter versus chest tube in injured patients with uncomplicated traumatic pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulvatunyou, N; Erickson, L; Vijayasekaran, A; Gries, L; Joseph, B; Friese, R F; O'Keeffe, T; Tang, A L; Wynne, J L; Rhee, P

    2014-01-01

    Small pigtail catheters appear to work as well as the traditional large-bore chest tubes in patients with traumatic pneumothorax, but it is not known whether the smaller pigtail catheters are associated with less tube-site pain. This study was conducted to compare tube-site pain following pigtail catheter or chest tube insertion in patients with uncomplicated traumatic pneumothorax. This prospective randomized trial compared 14-Fr pigtail catheters and 28-Fr chest tubes in patients with traumatic pneumothorax presenting to a level I trauma centre from July 2010 to February 2012. Patients who required emergency tube placement, those who refused and those who could not respond to pain assessment were excluded. Primary outcomes were tube-site pain, as assessed by a numerical rating scale, and total pain medication use. Secondary outcomes included the success rate of pneumothorax resolution and insertion-related complications. Forty patients were enrolled. Baseline characteristics of 20 patients in the pigtail catheter group were similar to those of 20 patients in the chest tube group. No patient had a flail chest or haemothorax. Pain scores related to chest wall trauma were similar in the two groups. Patients with a pigtail catheter had significantly lower mean(s.d.) tube-site pain scores than those with a chest tube, at baseline after tube insertion (3.2(0.6) versus 7.7(0.6); P pneumothorax, use of a 14-Fr pigtail catheter is associated with reduced pain at the site of insertion, with no other clinically important differences noted compared with chest tubes. NCT01537289 (http://clinicaltrials.gov). © 2013 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Implementing a benchmarking and feedback concept decreases postoperative pain after total knee arthroplasty: A prospective study including 256 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benditz, A; Drescher, J; Greimel, F; Zeman, F; Grifka, J; Meißner, W; Völlner, F

    2016-12-05

    Perioperative pain reduction, particularly during the first two days, is highly important for patients after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Problems are not only caused by medical issues but by organization and hospital structure. The present study shows how the quality of pain management can be increased by implementing a standardized pain concept and simple, consistent benchmarking. All patients included into the study had undergone total knee arthroplasty. Outcome parameters were analyzed by means of a questionnaire on the first postoperative day. A multidisciplinary team implemented a regular procedure of data analyzes and external benchmarking by participating in a nationwide quality improvement project. At the beginning of the study, our hospital ranked 16 th in terms of activity-related pain and 9 th in patient satisfaction among 47 anonymized hospitals participating in the benchmarking project. At the end of the study, we had improved to 1 st activity-related pain and to 2 nd in patient satisfaction. Although benchmarking started and finished with the same standardized pain management concept, results were initially pure. Beside pharmacological treatment, interdisciplinary teamwork and benchmarking with direct feedback mechanisms are also very important for decreasing postoperative pain and for increasing patient satisfaction after TKA.

  3. Heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) as an early diagnostic biomarker in patients with acute chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vupputuri, Anjith; Sekhar, Saritha; Krishnan, Sajitha; Venugopal, K; Natarajan, K U

    2015-01-01

    Heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) is an emerging biomarker, which was found to be sensitive for the early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We prospectively investigated the usefulness of H-FABP determination for the evaluation of acute chest pain in patients arriving at the emergency department. Fifty-four patients presenting with acute ischemic chest pain were evaluated. H-FABP was estimated at admission using latex-enhanced immunoturbidimetric assay. Serial cardiac troponin I (cTnI), creatinine kinase-MB (CK-MB) determination, ischemia workup with stress testing, and/or coronary angiogram (CAG) were performed according to standard protocols. The sensitivity and specificity of H-FABP was 89.7% and 68%, for cTnI it was 62.1% and 100%, and for CK-MB it was 44.8% and 92%, respectively for diagnosis of AMI. The sensitivity of H-FABP was found to be far superior to initial cTnI and CK-MB, for those seen within 6h (100% vs. 46.1%, 33% respectively). On further evaluation of patients with positive H-FABP and negative cTnI, 71.4% of the patients had significant lesion on CAG, indicating ischemic cause of H-FABP elevation. Six patients with normal cTnI and CK-MB with high H-FABP had ST elevation on subsequent ECGs and were taken for primary angioplasty. H-FABP is a highly sensitive biomarker for the early diagnosis of AMI. H-FABP as early marker and cTnI as late marker would be the ideal combination to cover the complete diagnostic window for AMI. Detection of myocardial injury by H-FABP may also be applied in patients with unstable angina. H-FABP can also be used as a marker for early detection of STEMI before the ECG changes become apparent. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ethnic variations in chest pain and angina in men and women: Scottish Ethnicity and Health Linkage Study of 4.65 million people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhopal, Raj S; Bansal, Narinder; Fischbacher, Colin; Brown, Helen; Capewell, Simon

    2012-12-01

    European research on ethnic variations in cardiovascular disease has mostly examined mortality endpoints using country of birth as a proxy for ethnicity. We report on chest pain and angina by ethnic group. Retrospective cohort linking the Census 2001 for Scotland (providing 14 ethnic group categories) and hospital discharge/community and hospital deaths data. Directly age-standardized rates and rate ratios were calculated. Risk ratios were adjusted for age and then highest educational qualification of the individual using Poisson regression. Ratios were multiplied by 100 and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. The reference was the White Scottish population (100). In the results below, the 95% CI excludes 100. There was raised chest pain mortality/hospital discharge risk in Indian men (rate ratio 141.2), Other South Asian women (rate ratio 140.9), and Pakistanis (rate ratio 216.2 in men, 243.0 in women). Rate ratios were lowest in other White British (rate ratio 76.1 in men, 73.7 in women) and Chinese (rate ratio 67.6 in men, 76.7 in women). Adjustment for age and education attenuated, but did not abolish, differences in other White British (risk ratio from 73.5 to 83.5) and Pakistani (risk ratio from 209.0 to 198.2) male populations and increased them in most others, e.g. other South Asian men (from risk ratio of 128.9 to 140.1). Pakistani populations had the highest risk of angina (rate ratio 189.3 in men, 159.7 in women). Other White British (rate ratio 81.4 for men, 78.0 for women), Other White (rate ratio 89.6 men, 85.2 women), and Chinese (rate ratio 60.5 men, 67.4 women) had the lowest risk. Adjustment for education did not greatly alter these patterns. There were important ethnic variations. The results call for replication elsewhere in Europe and targeted prevention programmes and vigilant diagnosis and management by clinicians.

  5. Use of the Theoretical Domains Framework to evaluate factors driving successful implementation of the Accelerated Chest pain Risk Evaluation (ACRE) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoien, Wade; Page, Katie; Parsonage, William; Ashover, Sarah; Milburn, Tanya; Cullen, Louise

    2016-10-12

    The translation of healthcare research into practice is typically challenging and limited in effectiveness. The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) identifies 12 domains of behaviour determinants which can be used to understand the principles of behavioural change, a key factor influencing implementation. The Accelerated Chest pain Risk Evaluation (ACRE) project has successfully translated research into practice, by implementing an intervention to improve the assessment of low to intermediate risk patients presenting to emergency departments (EDs) with chest pain. The aims of this paper are to describe use of the TDF to determine which factors successfully influenced implementation and to describe use of the TDF as a tool to evaluate implementation efforts and which domains are most relevant to successful implementation. A 30-item questionnaire targeting clinicians was developed using the TDF as a guide. Questions encompassed ten of the domains of the TDF: Knowledge; Skills; Social/professional role and identity; Beliefs about capabilities; Optimism; Beliefs about consequences; Intentions; Memory, attention and decision processes; Environmental context and resources; and Social influences. Sixty-three of 176 stakeholders (36 %) responded to the questionnaire. Responses for all scales showed that respondents were highly favourable to all aspects of the implementation. Scales with the highest mean responses were Intentions, Knowledge, and Optimism, suggesting that initial education and awareness strategies around the ACRE project were effective. Scales with the lowest mean responses were Environmental context and resources, and Social influences, perhaps highlighting that implementation planning could have benefitted from further consideration of the factors underlying these scales. The ACRE project was successful, and therefore, a perfect case study for understanding factors which drive implementation success. The overwhelmingly positive response suggests that it

  6. Herniation of unruptured tuberculous lung abscess into chest wall without pleural or bronchial spillage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Magazine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 22-year-old unmarried man presented to the chest outpatient department with a history of productive cough of two-month duration. He also complained of pain and swelling on the anterior aspect of right side of chest of one-month duration. Imaging studies of the thorax, including chest roentgenography and computerized tomography, revealed an unruptured lung abscess which had herniated into the chest wall. Culture of pus aspirated from the chest wall swelling grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis. He was diagnosed to have a tuberculous lung abscess which had extended into the chest wall, without spillage into the pleural cavity or the bronchial tree. Antituberculosis drugs were prescribed, and he responded to the treatment with complete resolution of the lesion.

  7. 20 CFR 416.929 - How we evaluate symptoms, including pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., we consider your symptoms, such as pain, to evaluate whether you have a severe physical or mental... medically determinable severe physical or mental impairment(s), but your impairment(s) does not meet or... functionally limiting effects of your symptoms. We will develop evidence regarding the possibility of a...

  8. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... primarily used to assess abnormal masses such as cancer and determine the size, extent and degree of ... chest is performed to: assess abnormal masses, including cancer of the lungs or other tissues, which either ...

  9. Risk of peptic ulcer, oesophagitis, pancreatitis or gallstone in patients with unexplained chest/epigastric pain and normal upper endoscopy: a 10-year Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, E M; Drewes, A M; Gorst-Rasmussen, Anders

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No studies have examined the risk of upper gastrointestinal diseases among patients with unexplained chest/epigastric pain (UCEP) and a normal upper endoscopy. AIM: To examine the relative risk of peptic ulcer, oesophagitis, pancreatitis or gallstone in UCEP patients. METHODS...... for peptic ulcer, oesophagitis, pancreatitis or gallstone. RESULTS: Compared with controls, the adjusted relative risks among UCEP patients or = 1 year after upper endoscopy were for peptic ulcer 2.0 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.2-18.4] and 1.7 (95% CI 0.9-3.4), for oesophagitis 8.2 (95% CI 1.......2-59.2) and 1.9 (95% CI 0.7-5.0), for pancreatitis 9.2 (95% CI 2.0-41.8) and 3.9 (95% CI 1.4-10.5), and for gallstone 14.1 (95% CI 5.4-37.2) and 3.3 (95% CI 1.9-5.8). CONCLUSIONS: UCEP is positively associated with all study outcomes especially in the first year after upper endoscopy, indicating that peptic...

  10. Socioeconomic assessment and impact of social security on outcome in patients admitted with suspected coronary chest pain in the city of salta, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León de la Fuente, Ricardo A; Naesgaard, Patrycja A; Nilsen, Stein Tore; Woie, Leik; Aarsland, Torbjoern; Staines, Harry; Nilsen, Dennis W T

    2013-01-01

    Low socioeconomic status is associated with increased mortality from coronary heart disease. We assessed total mortality, cardiac death, and sudden cardiac death (SCD) in relation to socioeconomic class and social security in 982 patients consecutively admitted with suspected coronary chest pain, living in the city of Salta, northern Argentina. Patients were divided into three socioeconomic classes based on monthly income, residential area, and insurance coverage. Five-year follow-up data were analyzed accordingly, applying univariate and multivariate analyses. At follow-up, 173 patients (17.6%) had died. In 92 patients (9.4%) death was defined as cardiac, of whom 59 patients (6.0%) were characterized as SCD. In the multivariate analysis, the hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause and cardiac mortality in the highest as compared to the lowest socioeconomic class were 0.42 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.22-0.80), P = 0.008, and 0.39 (95% CI, 0.15-0.99), P = 0.047, respectively. Comparing patients in the upper socioeconomic class to patients without healthcare coverage, HRs were 0.46 (95% CI, 0.23-0.94), P = 0.032, and 0.37 (95% CI, 0.14-1.01), P = 0.054, respectively. In conclusion, survival was mainly tied to socioeconomic inequalities in this population, and the impact of a social security program needs further attention.

  11. Pre-hospital management of patients with chest pain and/or dyspnoea of cardiac origin. A position paper of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association (ACCA) of the ESC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beygui, Farzin; Castren, Maaret; Brunetti, Natale Daniele; Rosell-Ortiz, Fernando; Christ, Michael; Zeymer, Uwe; Huber, Kurt; Folke, Fredrik; Svensson, Leif; Bueno, Hector; Van't Hof, Arnoud; Nikolaou, Nikolaos; Nibbe, Lutz; Charpentier, Sandrine; Swahn, Eva; Tubaro, Marco; Goldstein, Patrick

    2015-08-27

    Chest pain and acute dyspnoea are frequent causes of emergency medical services activation. The pre-hospital management of these conditions is heterogeneous across different regions of the world and Europe, as a consequence of the variety of emergency medical services and absence of specific practical guidelines. This position paper focuses on the practical aspects of the pre-hospital treatment on board and transfer of patients taken in charge by emergency medical services for chest pain and dyspnoea of suspected cardiac aetiology after the initial assessment and diagnostic work-up. The objective of the paper is to provide guidance, based on evidence, where available, or on experts' opinions, for all emergency medical services' health providers involved in the pre-hospital management of acute cardiovascular care. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  12. Evaluation of a novel portable capacitive ECG system in the clinical practice for a fast and simple ECG assessment in patients presenting with chest pain: FIDET (Fast Infarction Diagnosis ECG Trial)

    OpenAIRE

    Rasenack, Eva C. L.; Oehler, Martin; Els?sser, Albrecht; Schilling, Meinhard; Maier, Lars S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Electrocardiogram (ECG) assessment plays a crucial role in patients presenting with chest pain and suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS). In a pilot study, we previously evaluated a capacitive ECG system (cECG) as a novel ECG technique for a fast and simple ECG assessment in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). In a next step, the sensitivity and specificity of this novel ECG technique have to be assessed in patients with ACS. Hypothesis The Fast Infarction D...

  13. Chest radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference in plain chest film diagnosis provides a thorough background in the differential diagnosis of 22 of the most common radiologic patterns of chest disease. Each chapter is introduced with problem cases and a set of questions, followed by a tabular listing of the appropriate differential considerations. The book emphasizes plain films, CT and some MR scans are integrated to demonstrate how these modalities enhance the work of a case

  14. Association of a culturally defined syndrome (nervios) with chest pain and DSM-IV affective disorders in Hispanic patients referred for cardiac stress testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlik, Valory N; Hyman, David J; Wendt, Juliet A; Orengo, Claudia

    2004-01-01

    Hispanics have a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, most notably type 2 diabetes. However, in a large public hospital in Houston, Texas, Hispanic patients referred for cardiac stress testing were significantly more likely to have normal test results than were Whites or non-Hispanic Blacks. We undertook an exploratory study to determine if nervios, a culturally based syndrome that shares similarities with both panic disorder and anginal symptoms, is sufficiently prevalent among Hispanics referred for cardiac testing to be considered as a possible explanation for the high probability of a normal test result. Hispanic patients were recruited consecutively when they presented for a cardiac stress test. A bilingual interviewer administered a brief medical history, the Rose Angina Questionnaire (RAQ), a questionnaire to assess a history of nervios and associated symptoms, and the PRIME-MD, a validated brief questionnaire to diagnose DSM-IV defined affective disorders. The average age of the 114 participants (38 men and 76 women) was 57 years, and the average educational attainment was 7 years. Overall, 50% of participants reported a history of chronic nervios, and 14% reported an acute subtype known as ataque de nervios. Only 2% of patients had DSM-IV defined panic disorder, and 59% of patients had a positive RAQ score (ie, Rose questionnaire angina). The acute subtype, ataque de nervios, but not chronic nervios, was related to an increased probability of having Rose questionnaire angina (P=.006). Adjusted for covariates, a positive history of chronic nervios, but not Rose questionnaire angina, was significantly associated with a normal cardiac test result (OR=2.97, P=.04). Nervios is common among Hispanics with symptoms of cardiac disease. Additional research is needed to understand how nervios symptoms differ from chest pain in Hispanics and the role of nervios in referral for cardiac workup by primary care providers and emergency room personnel.

  15. Superiority of quantitative exercise thallium-201 variables in determining long-term prognosis in ambulatory patients with chest pain: a comparison with cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, S.; Finkelstein, D.M.; Homma, S.; Leavitt, M.; Okada, R.D.; Boucher, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic utility of quantitative exercise thallium-201 imaging and compare it with that of cardiac catheterization in ambulatory patients. Accordingly, long-term (4 to 9 years) follow-up was obtained in 293 patients who underwent both tests for the evaluation of chest pain: 89 had undergone coronary artery bypass graft surgery within 3 months of testing and were excluded from analysis, 119 experienced no cardiac events and 91 had an event (death in 20, nonfatal myocardial infarction in 21 and coronary artery bypass operations performed greater than 3 months after cardiac catheterization in 50). When all variables were analyzed using Cox regression analysis, the quantitatively assessed lung/heart ratio of thallium-201 activity was the most important predictor of a future cardiac event (chi 2 = 40.21). Other significant predictors were the number of diseased vessels (chi 2 = 17.11), patient gender (chi 2 = 9.43) and change in heart rate from rest to exercise (chi 2 = 4.19). Whereas the number of diseased vessels was an important independent predictor of cardiac events, it did not add significantly to the overall ability of the exercise thallium-201 test to predict events. Furthermore, information obtained from thallium-201 imaging alone was marginally superior to that obtained from cardiac catheterization alone (p = 0.04) and significantly superior to that obtained from exercise testing alone (p = 0.02) in determining the occurrence of events. In addition, unlike the exercise thallium-201 test, which could predict the occurrence of all categories of events, catheterization data were not able to predict the occurrence of nonfatal myocardial infarction. The exclusion of bypass surgery and previous myocardial infarction did not alter the results

  16. Guideline-adherence and perspectives in the acute management of unstable angina - Initial results from the German chest pain unit registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuckmann, Frank; Hochadel, Matthias; Darius, Harald; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Münzel, Thomas; Maier, Lars S; Schmitt, Claus; Schumacher, Burghard; Heusch, Gerd; Voigtländer, Thomas; Mudra, Harald; Senges, Jochen

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the current management of unstable angina pectoris (UAP) in certified chest pain units (CPUs) in Germany and focused on the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guideline-adherence in the timing of invasive strategies or choice of conservative treatment options. More specifically, we analyzed differences in clinical outcome with respect to guideline-adherence. Prospective data from 1400 UAP patients were collected. Analyses of high-risk criteria with indication for invasive management and 3-month clinical outcome data were performed. Guideline-adherence was tested for a primarily conservative strategy as well as for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within management was performed in 38.2%. In UAP patients at risk, undertreatment caused by an insufficient consideration of risk criteria was obvious in 78%. Reciprocally, overtreatment in the absence of adequate risk markers was performed in 27%, whereas a guideline-conforming primarily conservative strategy was chosen in 73% of the low-risk patients. Together, the 3-month major adverse coronary and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) were low (3.6%). Nonetheless, guideline-conforming treatment was even associated with significantly lower MACCE rates (1.6% vs. 4.0%, p<0.05). The data suggest an inadequate adherence to ESC guidelines in nearly two thirds of the patients, particularly in those patients at high to intermediate risk with secondary risk factors, emphasizing the need for further attention to consistent risk profiling in the CPU and its certification process. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Chest trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neumología y Cirugía Torácica. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Chest Chest x-ray uses a very small dose ... Radiography? What is a Chest X-ray (Chest Radiography)? The chest x-ray is the most commonly performed diagnostic ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and pain at the site of injection. Similarly, patients are ... If you are anxious, confused or in severe pain, you may find it difficult to lie still ...

  20. Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or pain in your chest Seek immediate medical attention Have someone drive you to urgent care or ... of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Manage Cookies Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  1. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the ... treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray ...

  2. Adenosine-stress dynamic real-time myocardial perfusion CT and adenosine-stress first-pass dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT for the assessment of acute chest pain: Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weininger, Markus [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Ramachandra, Ashok [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Fink, Christian [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Rowe, Garrett W.; Costello, Philip [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Henzler, Thomas [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Recent innovations in CT enable the evolution from mere morphologic imaging to dynamic and functional testing. We describe our initial experience performing myocardial stress perfusion CT in a clinical population with acute chest pain. Methods and materials: Myocardial stress perfusion CT was performed on twenty consecutive patients (15 men, 5 women; mean age 65 ± 8 years) who presented with acute chest pain and were clinically referred for stress/rest SPECT and cardiac MRI. Prior to CT each patient was randomly assigned either to Group A or to Group B in a consecutive order (10 patients per group). Group A underwent adenosine-stress dynamic real-time myocardial perfusion CT using a novel “shuttle” mode on a 2nd generation dual-source CT. Group B underwent adenosine-stress first-pass dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT using the same CT scanner in dual-energy mode. Two experienced observers visually analyzed all CT perfusion studies. CT findings were compared with MRI and SPECT. Results: In Group A 149/170 myocardial segments (88%) could be evaluated. Real-time perfusion CT (versus SPECT) had 86% (84%) sensitivity, 98% (92%) specificity, 94% (88%) positive predictive value, and 96% (92%) negative predictive value in comparison with perfusion MRI for the detection of myocardial perfusion defects. In Group B all myocardial segments were available for analysis. Compared with MRI, dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT (versus SPECT) had 93% (94%) sensitivity, 99% (98%) specificity, 92% (88%) positive predictive value, and 96% (94%) negative predictive value for detecting hypoperfused myocardial segments. Conclusion: Our results suggest the clinical feasibility of myocardial perfusion CT imaging in patients with acute chest pain. Compared to MRI and SPECT both, dynamic real-time perfusion CT and first-pass dual-energy perfusion CT showed good agreement for the detection of myocardial perfusion defects.

  3. Adenosine-stress dynamic real-time myocardial perfusion CT and adenosine-stress first-pass dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT for the assessment of acute chest pain: Initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weininger, Markus; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Ramachandra, Ashok; Fink, Christian; Rowe, Garrett W.; Costello, Philip; Henzler, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recent innovations in CT enable the evolution from mere morphologic imaging to dynamic and functional testing. We describe our initial experience performing myocardial stress perfusion CT in a clinical population with acute chest pain. Methods and materials: Myocardial stress perfusion CT was performed on twenty consecutive patients (15 men, 5 women; mean age 65 ± 8 years) who presented with acute chest pain and were clinically referred for stress/rest SPECT and cardiac MRI. Prior to CT each patient was randomly assigned either to Group A or to Group B in a consecutive order (10 patients per group). Group A underwent adenosine-stress dynamic real-time myocardial perfusion CT using a novel “shuttle” mode on a 2nd generation dual-source CT. Group B underwent adenosine-stress first-pass dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT using the same CT scanner in dual-energy mode. Two experienced observers visually analyzed all CT perfusion studies. CT findings were compared with MRI and SPECT. Results: In Group A 149/170 myocardial segments (88%) could be evaluated. Real-time perfusion CT (versus SPECT) had 86% (84%) sensitivity, 98% (92%) specificity, 94% (88%) positive predictive value, and 96% (92%) negative predictive value in comparison with perfusion MRI for the detection of myocardial perfusion defects. In Group B all myocardial segments were available for analysis. Compared with MRI, dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT (versus SPECT) had 93% (94%) sensitivity, 99% (98%) specificity, 92% (88%) positive predictive value, and 96% (94%) negative predictive value for detecting hypoperfused myocardial segments. Conclusion: Our results suggest the clinical feasibility of myocardial perfusion CT imaging in patients with acute chest pain. Compared to MRI and SPECT both, dynamic real-time perfusion CT and first-pass dual-energy perfusion CT showed good agreement for the detection of myocardial perfusion defects.

  4. Coronary artery dissection following chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj K Agarwala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chest trauma has a high rate of mortality. Coronary dissection causing myocardial infarction (MI following blunt chest trauma is rare. We describe the case of an anterior MI following blunt chest trauma. A 39-year-old male was received in our hospital following a motorcycle accident. The patient was asymptomatic before the accident. The patient underwent craniotomy for evacuation of hematoma. He developed severe chest pain and an electrocardiogram (ECG revealed anterior ST segment elevation following surgery. Acute coronary event was medically managed; subsequently, coronary angiogram was performed that showed dissection in the left anterior coronary artery, which was stented.

  5. Self-reported activity in tortured refugees with long-term sequelae including pain and the impact of foot pain from falanga - a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prip, Karen; Persson, Ann L; Sjölund, Bengt H

    2011-01-01

    , among them pain and mobility problems. All had been subjected to various forms of physical and psychological torture and 71 victims had also suffered falanga. Main outcome measures used were: the Disability Rating Index (DRI; 12 items) to assess self-reported capacity to carry out daily activities......; for falanga victims, a specific foot assessment of sensory function in the feet. Results. All patients perceived clear activity limitations according to the DRI. The falanga victims' feet were categorised according to the type of foot pain: stimulus-independent pain; stimulus-evoked pain; no pain. The two...... of victims who had chronic pain for at least 5 years after torture, all perceived activity limitations, but pain from falanga had a greater overall impact on disability assessed in terms of daily activities....

  6. The single chest tube versus double chest tube application after pulmonary lobectomy: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefei Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Compared with the double chest tube, the single chest tube significantly decreases amount of drainage, duration of chest tube drainage, pain score, the number of patients who need thoracentesis, and cost. Although there is convincing evidence to confirm the results mentioned herein, they still need to be confirmed by large-sample, multicenter, randomized, controlled trials.

  7. Chest radiography after minor chest trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossen, B.; Laursen, N.O.; Just, S.

    The results of chest radiography in 581 patients with blunt minor thoracic trauma were reviewed. Frontal and lateral views of the chest indicated pathology in 72 patients (12.4%). Pneumothorax was present in 16 patients; 4 had hemothorax. The physical examination and the results of chest radiography were not in accordance because in 6(30%) of the 20 patients with hemo/-pneumothorax the physical examination was normal. Consequently there is wide indication for chest radiography after minor blunt chest trauma.

  8. Single chest tube drainage is superior to double chest tube drainage after lobectomy: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dong; Deng, Xu-Feng; Liu, Quan-Xing; Chen, Qian; Min, Jia-Xin; Dai, Ji-Gang

    2016-05-27

    In this meta-analysis, we conducted a pooled analysis of clinical studies comparing the efficacy of single chest tube versus double chest tube after a lobectomy. According to the recommendations of the Cochrane Collaboration, we established a rigorous study protocol. We performed a systematic electronic search of the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library and Web of Science databases to identify articles to include in our meta-analysis. A literature search was performed using relevant keywords. A meta-analysis was performed using RevMan© software. Five studies, published between 2003 and 2014, including 630 patients (314 patients with a single chest tube and 316 patients with a double chest tube), met the selection criteria. From the available data, the patients using a single tube demonstrated significantly decreased postoperative pain [weighted mean difference [WMD] -0.60; 95 % confidence intervals [CIs] -0.68-- 0.52; P tube after a pulmonary lobectomy. However, there were no significant differences in postoperative complications [OR 0.91; 95 % CIs 0.57-1.44; P = 0.67] and re-drainage rates [OR 0.81; 95 % CIs 0.42-1.58; P = 0.54]. Our results showed that a single-drain method is effective, reducing postoperative pain, hospitalization times and duration of drainage in patients who undergo a lobectomy. Moreover, the single-drain method does not increase the occurrence of postoperative complications and re-drainage rates.

  9. Breast Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... result in the development of breast cysts. Breast trauma, prior breast surgery or other factors localized to the breast can lead to breast pain. Breast pain may also start outside the breast — in the chest wall, muscles, joints or heart, for example — and ...

  10. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed x-ray exams and use a very small dose of ... of the inside of the chest. A chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and ...

  11. Pain thresholds, supra-threshold pain and lidocaine sensitivity in patients with erythromelalgia, including the I848Tmutation in NaV 1.7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helås, T; Sagafos, D; Kleggetveit, I P; Quiding, H; Jönsson, B; Segerdahl, M; Zhang, Z; Salter, H; Schmelz, M; Jørum, E

    2017-09-01

    Nociceptive thresholds and supra-threshold pain ratings as well as their reduction upon local injection with lidocaine were compared between healthy subjects and patients with erythromelalgia (EM). Lidocaine (0.25, 0.50, 1.0 or 10 mg/mL) or placebo (saline) was injected intradermally in non-painful areas of the lower arm, in a randomized, double-blind manner, to test the effect on dynamic and static mechanical sensitivity, mechanical pain sensitivity, thermal thresholds and supra-threshold heat pain sensitivity. Heat pain thresholds and pain ratings to supra-threshold heat stimulation did not differ between EM-patients (n = 27) and controls (n = 25), neither did the dose-response curves for lidocaine. Only the subgroup of EM-patients with mutations in sodium channel subunits Na V 1.7, 1.8 or 1.9 (n = 8) had increased lidocaine sensitivity for supra-threshold heat stimuli, contrasting lower sensitivity to strong mechanical stimuli. This pattern was particularly clear in the two patients carrying the Na V 1.7 I848T mutations in whom lidocaine's hyperalgesic effect on mechanical pain sensitivity contrasted more effective heat analgesia. Heat pain thresholds are not sensitized in EM patients, even in those with gain-of-function mutations in Na V 1.7. Differential lidocaine sensitivity was overt only for noxious stimuli in the supra-threshold range suggesting that sensitized supra-threshold encoding is important for the clinical pain phenotype in EM in addition to lower activation threshold. Intracutaneous lidocaine dose-dependently blocked nociceptive sensations, but we did not identify EM patients with particular high lidocaine sensitivity that could have provided valuable therapeutic guidance. Acute pain thresholds and supra-threshold heat pain in controls and patients with erythromelalgia do not differ and have the same lidocaine sensitivity. Acute heat pain thresholds even in EM patients with the Na V 1.7 I848T mutation are normal and only nociceptor

  12. Volume Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT for pulmonary Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT in patients with lesions in close approximation to the chest wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. FitzGerald

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chest wall pain and discomfort has been recognized as a significant late effect of radiation therapy in historical and modern treatment models. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT is becoming an important treatment tool in oncology care for patients with intrathoracic lesions. For lesions in close approximation to the chest wall including lesions requiring motion management, SBRT techniques can deliver high dose to the chest wall. As an unintended target of consequence, there is possibility of generating significant chest wall pain and discomfort as a late effect of therapy. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the potential role of Volume Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT technologies in decreasing chest wall dose in SBRT treatment of pulmonary lesions in close approximation to the chest wall.Ten patients with pulmonary lesions of various sizes and topography in close approximation to the chest wall were selected for retrospective review. All volumes including target, chest wall, ribs, and lung were contoured with maximal intensity projection maps and four-dimensional computer tomography planning. Radiation therapy planning consisted of static techniques including Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy compared to VMAT therapy to a dose of 60Gy in 12Gy fractions. Dose volume histogram to rib, chest wall, and lung were compared between plans with statistical analysis.In all patients dose and volume were improved to ribs and chest wall using VMAT technologies compared to static field techniques. On average, volume receiving 30Gy to the chest wall was improved by 72%;the ribs by 60%. In only one patient did the VMAT treatment technique increase pulmonary volume receiving 20Gy (V20.VMAT technology has potential of limiting radiation dose to sensitive chest wall regions in patients with lesions in close approximation to this structure. This would also have potential value to lesions treated with SBRT in other body regions where targets abut critical

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI ... of the chest. assess disorders of the chest bones (vertebrae, ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft ...

  14. Lessons from a large trauma center: impact of blunt chest trauma in polytrauma patients-still a relevant problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysou, Konstantina; Halat, Gabriel; Hoksch, Beatrix; Schmid, Ralph A; Kocher, Gregor J

    2017-04-20

    Thoracic trauma is the third most common cause of death after abdominal injury and head trauma in polytrauma patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate epidemiological data, treatment and outcome of polytrauma patients with blunt chest trauma in order to help improve management, prevent complications and decrease polytrauma patients' mortality. In this retrospective study we included all polytrauma patients with blunt chest trauma admitted to our tertiary care center emergency department for a 2-year period, from June 2012 until May 2014. Data collection included details of treatment and outcome. Patients with chest trauma and Injury Severity Score (ISS) ≥18 and Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) >2 in more than one body region were included. A total of 110 polytrauma patients with blunt chest injury were evaluated. 82 of them were males and median age was 48.5 years. Car accidents, falls from a height and motorbike accidents were the most common causes (>75%) for blunt chest trauma. Rib fractures, pneumothorax and pulmonary contusion were the most common chest injuries. Most patients (64.5%) sustained a serious chest injury (AIS thorax 3), 19.1% a severe chest injury (AIS thorax 4) and 15.5% a moderate chest injury (AIS thorax 2). 90% of patients with blunt chest trauma were treated conservatively. Chest tube insertion was indicated in 54.5% of patients. The need for chest tube was significantly higher among the AIS thorax 4 group in comparison to the AIS groups 3 and 2 (p < 0.001). Also, admission to the ICU was directly related to the severity of the AIS thorax (p < 0.001). The severity of chest trauma did not correlate with ICU length of stay, intubation days, complications or mortality. Although 84.5% of patients suffered from serious or even severe chest injury, neither in the conservative nor in the surgically treated group a significant impact of injury severity on ICU stay, intubation days, complications or mortality was observed. AIS

  15. Prevalence and Clinical Import of Thoracic Injury Identified by Chest Computed Tomography but Not Chest Radiography in Blunt Trauma: Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdorf, Mark I; Medak, Anthony J; Hendey, Gregory W; Nishijima, Daniel K; Mower, William R; Raja, Ali S; Baumann, Brigitte M; Anglin, Deirdre R; Anderson, Craig L; Lotfipour, Shahram; Reed, Karin E; Zuabi, Nadia; Khan, Nooreen A; Bithell, Chelsey A; Rowther, Armaan A; Villar, Julian; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2015-12-01

    Chest computed tomography (CT) diagnoses more injuries than chest radiography, so-called occult injuries. Wide availability of chest CT has driven substantial increase in emergency department use, although the incidence and clinical significance of chest CT findings have not been fully described. We determine the frequency, severity, and clinical import of occult injury, as determined by changes in management. These data will better inform clinical decisions, need for chest CT, and odds of intervention. Our sample included prospective data (2009 to 2013) on 5,912 patients at 10 Level I trauma center EDs with both chest radiography and chest CT at physician discretion. These patients were 40.6% of 14,553 enrolled in the parent study who had either chest radiography or chest CT. Occult injuries were pneumothorax, hemothorax, sternal or greater than 2 rib fractures, pulmonary contusion, thoracic spine or scapula fracture, and diaphragm or great vessel injury found on chest CT but not on preceding chest radiography. A priori, we categorized thoracic injuries as major (having invasive procedures), minor (observation or inpatient pain control >24 hours), or of no clinical significance. Primary outcome was prevalence and proportion of occult injury with major interventions of chest tube, mechanical ventilation, or surgery. Secondary outcome was minor interventions of admission rate or observation hours because of occult injury. Two thousand forty-eight patients (34.6%) had chest injury on chest radiography or chest CT, whereas 1,454 of these patients (71.0%, 24.6% of all patients) had occult injury. Of these, in 954 patients (46.6% of injured, 16.1% of total), chest CT found injuries not observed on immediately preceding chest radiography. In 500 more patients (24.4% of injured patients, 8.5% of all patients), chest radiography found some injury, but chest CT found occult injury. Chest radiography found all injuries in only 29.0% of injured patients. Two hundred and two

  16. Chest radiography after minor chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossen, B.; Laursen, N.O.; Just, S.

    1987-01-01

    The results of chest radiography in 581 patients with blunt minor thoracic trauma were reviewed. Frontal and lateral views of the chest indicated pathology in 72 patients (12.4%). Pneumothorax was present in 16 patients; 4 had hemothorax. The physical examination and the results of chest radiography were not in accordance because in 6(30%) of the 20 patients with hemo/-pneumothorax the physical examination was normal. Consequently there is wide indication for chest radiography after minor blunt chest trauma. (orig.)

  17. A Comparison of the Updated Diamond-Forrester, CAD Consortium, and CONFIRM History-Based Risk Scores for Predicting Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease in Patients With Stable Chest Pain: The SCOT-HEART Coronary CTA Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Lohendran; Danad, Ibrahim; Gransar, Heidi; Ó Hartaigh, Bríain; Schulman-Marcus, Joshua; Lin, Fay Y; Peña, Jessica M; Hunter, Amanda; Newby, David E; Adamson, Philip D; Min, James K

    2018-04-13

    This study sought to compare the performance of history-based risk scores in predicting obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) among patients with stable chest pain from the SCOT-HEART study. Risk scores for estimating pre-test probability of CAD are derived from referral-based populations with a high prevalence of disease. The generalizability of these scores to lower prevalence populations in the initial patient encounter for chest pain is uncertain. We compared 3 scores among patients with suspected CAD in the coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) randomized arm of the SCOT-HEART study for the outcome of obstructive CAD by coronary CTA: the updated Diamond-Forrester score (UDF), CAD Consortium clinical score (CAD2), and CONFIRM risk score (CRS). We tested calibration with goodness-of-fit, discrimination with area under the receiver-operating curve (AUC), and reclassification with net reclassification improvement (NRI) to identify low-risk patients. In 1,738 patients (58 ± 10 years and 44.0% women), overall calibration was best for UDF, with underestimation by CRS and CAD2. Discrimination by AUC was highest for CAD2 at 0.79 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.77 to 0.81) than for UDF (0.77 [95% CI: 0.74 to 0.79]) or CRS (0.75 [95% CI: 0.73 to 0.77]) (p CAD2 (NRI 0.31, 95% CI: 0.27 to 0.35) followed by CRS (NRI 0.21, 95% CI: 0.17 to 0.25) compared with UDF (p CAD and uniform CAD evaluation by coronary CTA, CAD2 provided the best discrimination and classification, despite overestimation of obstructive CAD as evaluated by coronary CTA. CRS exhibited intermediate performance followed by UDF for discrimination and reclassification. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. A combination of troponin T and 12-lead electrocardiography: a valuable tool for early prediction of long-term mortality in patients with chest pain without ST-segment elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernberg, Tomas; Lindahl, Bertil

    2002-11-01

    Electrocardiography (ECG) obtained on admission and a troponin T (tn-T) level measured early after admission are simple and accessible methods for predicting outcome in patients with suspected unstable angina or myocardial infarction without persistent ST-elevations. However, there are few studies about the combination of these 2 methods as a means of predicting long-term outcome. ECG was obtained on admission, and a tn-T level was analyzed on admission and after 6 hours in 710 consecutive patients admitted because of chest pain and no ST-elevations. Patients were observed for a median time of 40 months for death. ST-segment depressions > or =0.05 mV were present in 266 patients (37%). These patients had a 9.7-fold increased risk of death, compared with patients with normal ECG results. Isolated T-Wave inversions or pathological signs other than ST-T changes were present in 196 patients (28%), who had a 4.5-fold increased risk of death compared with patients who had normal ECG results. At 6 hours after admission, 169 patients (24%) had at least 1 sample of tn-T > or =0.10 microg/L, which resulted in an 3.7-fold increased risk of death. In a multivariate analysis, both ECG on admission and tn-T level came out as independent predictors of outcome. When these methods were combined, patients could be divided into low- (tn-T level or =0.10 microg/L or ST-segment depression), and high-risk groups (tn-T level > or =0.10 microg/L and ST-segment depression). ECG and tn-T level are valuable tools to quickly risk stratify patients with chest pain. The combination of these methods is superior to either one alone.

  19. Diagnostic value of 123I-betamethyl-p-iodophenyl-pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with chest pain. Comparison with rest-stress 99mTc-tetrofosmin SPECT and coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Yuko; Nozaki, Yoichi; Ohkusa, Takanori; Sakurai, Masayuki; Morita, Koichi; Tamaki, Nagara

    2004-01-01

    Basic and clinical studies have indicated that 15-(p-[ 123 I] iodophenyl)-3-(R, S) methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can identify ischemic myocardium without evidence of myocardial infarction by the regional decline of tracer uptake. The present study compared BMIPP SPECT with rest-stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) findings and coronary angiography (CAG) in 150 patients with acute chest pain. Patients with acute chest pain who underwent all of the following tests were selected: MPI at rest-stress, BMIPP SPECT at rest and CAG. Organic coronary artery stenosis (≥75%) was observed in 46 patients, 27 patients had total or subtotal coronary occlusion by spasm in the spasm provocation test on CAG and the remaining 77 patients had no significant coronary artery stenosis or spasm. The sensitivity of BMIPP at rest to detect organic stenosis was significantly higher (54%) than that of rest-MPI (33%, p<0.005), but lower than that of stress-MPI (76%, p=0.05). The sensitivity of BMIPP at rest to detect spasm was significantly higher (63%) than that of both rest-MPI (15%; p<0.001) and stress-MPI (19%; p<0.001). Overall, the sensitivity of BMIPP at rest to detect both organic stenosis and spasm was significantly higher (58%) than that of rest-MPI (26%; p<0.001), despite having no significance with that of stress-MPI (55%). The specificity was not significantly different among the three imaging techniques. Resting BMIPP SPECT is an alternative method to stress MPI for identifying patients with not only organic stenosis but also spasm without the need for a stress examination. (author)

  20. Early detection of myocardial ischaemia in the emergency department by rest or exercise 99mTc tracer myocardial SPET in patients with chest pain and non-diagnostic ECG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, A.; Paladini, B.; Francois, C.; Grifoni, S.; Berni, G.; Gallini, C.; Costanzo, E.; Ferri, P.; Matteini, M.; Pieroni, C.; Migliorini, A.; Antoniucci, D.

    2001-01-01

    Chest pain (CP) represents a frequent reason for presentation at the emergency department (ED). A large proportion of patients have non-diagnostic ECG on presentation, and in many cases several hours have elapsed since onset of symptoms. Acute rest myocardial scintigraphy (rest SPET) has been shown to have a relevant role in the detection of patients at risk for coronary events, but its sensitivity and negative predictive value are optimal only within the first 3 h following onset of symptoms. In those with delayed presentation, exercise SPET alone, as a screening approach, appears more promising, but its feasibility and diagnostic role in the ED are still unresolved. A total of 231 consecutive patients with a recent-onset (<24 h) first episode of CP had a negative first-line work-up including ECG, troponins, creatine kinase-MB and echocardiography. These patients were considered at low risk for short-term coronary events. Patients were studied with rest SPET if they presented <3 h after onset of CP and exercise SPET if they presented after ≥3 h. The end-points of the study were detection of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) by angiography and major coronary events or cardiac death at 6 months. Eighty patients (35%) underwent rest SPET, while 151 (65%) underwent exercise SPET. Two of the 159 patients with negative SPET had evidence of critical CAD at 6-month follow-up (one patient in the rest SPET group and one in the exercise SPET group; P=NS). Of the 72 patients (31%) with a positive scan, 34 (15%) had documented CAD (16 patients in the rest SPET group and 18 in the exercise SPET group; P=NS). Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and predictive value were not statistically different between the two groups. In conclusion, the accuracy of exercise SPET in patients with CP and delayed presentation to the ED is comparable to that of validated rest SPET in patients with early presentation. Owing to the high negative predictive value (99%), exercise SPET is

  1. Long-term pain relief with optimized medical treatment including antioxidants and step-up interventional therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalimar; Midha, Shallu; Hasan, Ajmal; Dhingra, Rajan; Garg, Pramod Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal pain is difficult to treat in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). Medical therapy including antioxidants has been shown to relieve pain of CP in the short-term. Our aim was to study the long-term results of optimized medical and interventional therapy for pain relief in patients with CP with a step-up approach. All consecutive patients with CP were included prospectively in the study. They were treated medically with a well-balanced diet, pancreatic enzymes, and antioxidants (9000 IU beta-carotene, 0.54 g vitamin C, 270 IU vitamin E, 600 µg organic selenium, and 2 g methionine). Endoscopic therapy and/or surgery were offered if medical therapy failed. Pain relief was the primary outcome measure. A total of 313 patients (mean age 26.16 ± 12.17; 244 males) with CP were included; 288 (92%) patients had abdominal pain. The etiology of CP was idiopathic in 224 (71.6%) and alcohol in 82 (26.2%). At 1-year follow-up, significant pain relief was achieved in 84.7% of patients: 52.1% with medical therapy, 16.7% with endoscopic therapy, 7.6% with surgery, and 8.3% spontaneously. The mean pain score decreased from 6.36 ± 1.92 to 1.62 ± 2.10 (P pain free at those follow-up periods. Significant pain relief is achieved in the majority of patients with optimized medical and interventional treatment. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... I’d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most ... far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! ...

  3. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x- ...

  4. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  5. The chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdon, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    Radiographic interpretation of chest films of newborns in respiratory distress remains one of the most difficult aspects of pediatric radiology. Complex pulmonary and cardiac adjustments to extrauterine life are rapidly taking place. The small, fluid-filled fetal lung must rid itself of fluid and fill with air. The high vascular resistance of the fetal pulmonary bed and the open ductus arteriosus allow shunting of blood in both directions. Films taken in this period of time may show lungs that resemble those seen in congestive heart failure or fluid overload. When these findings are observed in infants who may appear dusky or even cyanotic, the result may be the diagnosis of disease in normal infants passing through a stormy transition period. To make things worse, the films are taken as portable surpine films, usually in an isolette in the intensive care unit (ICU). The phase of respiration is difficult, if not impossible, to control, and lateral films are usually not obtained. Many of the infants are on assisted ventilation either by tube or nasal prongs-nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)-and lungs can appear over-inflated or whited out, depending on the pressures used and the phase of the respiratory cycle. Prolonged crying itself can make lungs appear semiopaque; the next breath may show such a dramatic reinflation that it is hard to believe the two films are of the same infant, made only seconds apart. Is the heart large? Or is it the thymus? Are the lungs ''wet''? Is there infection? Is there pulmonary vascular engorgement? Why are these films so hard to interpret? They have no easy answers. The radiologist must realize that the neonatal intensive care personnel, armed though they may be with blood gas values, are no better at interpreting films. If anything, they read into them what they wish to see

  6. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... from the contrast material, including nausea, headache and pain at the site of injection. Similarly, patients are ...

  7. Pain

    OpenAIRE

    H.W. Snyman

    1980-01-01

    The medical profession has always been under pressure to supply public explanations of the diseases with which it deals. On the other hand, it is an old characteristic of the profession to devise comprehensive and unifying theories on all sorts of medical problems. Both these statements apply to pain - one of the most important and clinically striking phenomena and expressions of man since his origin in the mists of time.

  8. Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.W. Snyman

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available The medical profession has always been under pressure to supply public explanations of the diseases with which it deals. On the other hand, it is an old characteristic of the profession to devise comprehensive and unifying theories on all sorts of medical problems. Both these statements apply to pain - one of the most important and clinically striking phenomena and expressions of man since his origin in the mists of time.

  9. ASIC3: A Lactic Acid Sensor for Cardiac Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.C. Immke

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Angina, the prototypic vasoocclusive pain, is a radiating chest pain that occurs when heart muscle gets insufficient blood because of coronary artery disease. Other examples of vasoocclusive pain include the acute pain of heart attack and the intermittent pains that accompany sickle cell anemia and peripheral artery disease. All these conditions cause ischemia � insufficient oxygen delivery for local metabolic demand — and this releases lactic acid as cells switch to anaerobic metabolism. Recent discoveries demonstrate that sensory neurons innervating the heart are richly endowed with an ion channel that is opened by, and perfectly tuned for, the lactic acid released by muscle ischemia[1,2].

  10. Prevalence of pain medication prescriptions in France, Germany, and the UK - a cross-sectional study including 4,270,142 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Louis; Kostev, Karel

    2018-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to analyze the prevalence of pain medication prescriptions in general practices in France, Germany, and the UK. This study included all patients aged ≥18 years followed in 2016 in general practitioner practices in France, Germany and the UK. The primary outcome was the prevalence of patients receiving prescriptions for pain medications in France, Germany, and the UK in 2016. The following drugs were included in the analysis: anti-inflammatory and antirheumatic products, non-steroids and analgesics including opioids, antimigraine preparations, and other analgesics and antipyretics. Demographic variables included age and gender. This study included 4,270,142 patients. The prevalences of pain medication prescriptions were 57.3% in France, 29.6% in Germany, and 21.7% in the UK. Although this prevalence generally remained consistent between age groups in France (54.3%-60.3%), it increased with age in Germany (18-30 years: 23.8%; >70 years: 35.8%) and in the UK (18-30 years: 9.3%; >70 years: 43.8%). Finally, the prevalence of pain medication prescriptions was higher in women than in men in all three countries. Paracetamol was prescribed to 82.3% and 60.1% of patients receiving pain medication in France and the UK, respectively, whereas ibuprofen was prescribed to 46.5% of individuals in Germany. The prevalence of pain medication prescriptions was higher in France than in Germany and the UK. Further research is needed to gain a better understanding of the differences in the prescription patterns between these three European countries.

  11. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a ... posted: How to Obtain and Share ...

  12. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and chest wall and may be used to help evaluate shortness of breath, persistent cough, fever, chest ... or injury. It may also be useful to help diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  14. Chest tube insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... Be careful there are no kinks in your tube. The drainage system should always sit upright and be placed ...

  15. Psychometric properties including reliability, validity and responsiveness of the Majeed pelvic score in patients with chronic sacroiliac joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajada, Stefan; Mohanty, Khitish

    2016-06-01

    The Majeed scoring system is a disease-specific outcome measure that was originally designed to assess pelvic injuries. The aim of this study was to determine the psychometric properties of the Majeed scoring system for chronic sacroiliac joint pain. Internal consistency, content validity, criterion validity, construct validity and responsiveness to change was assessed prospectively for the Majeed scoring system in a cohort of 60 patients diagnosed with sacroiliac joint pain. This diagnosis was confirmed with CT-guided sacroiliac joint anaesthetic block. The overall Majeed score showed acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach alpha = 0.63). Similarly, it showed acceptable floor (0 %) and ceiling (0 %) effects. On the other hand, the domains of pain, work, sitting and sexual intercourse had high (>30 %) floor effects. Significant correlation with the physical component of the Short Form-36 (p = 0.005) and Oswestry disability index (p ≤ 0.001) was found indicating acceptable criterion validity. The overall Majeed score showed acceptable construct validity with all five developed hypotheses showing significance (p ≤ 0.05). The overall Majeed score showed acceptable responsiveness to change with a large (≥0.80) effect size and standardized response mean. Overall the Majeed scoring system demonstrated acceptable psychometric properties for outcome assessment in chronic sacroiliac joint pain. Thus, its use in this condition is adequate. However, some domains demonstrated suboptimal performance indicating that improvement might be achieved with the development of an outcome measure specific for sacroiliac joint dysfunction and degeneration.

  16. 2D.03: IMPROVING DIAGNOSTIC STRATEGY IN PATIENTS WITH LONG-STANDING HYPERTENSION, CHEST PAIN AND NORMAL RESTING ECG: VALUE OF THE EXERCISE HIGH-FREQUENCY QRS VERSUS ST-SEGMENT ANALYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, A; Bianchi, S; Grifoni, C; Trausi, F; Angeli, E; Paolini, D; Catarzi, S; Perrotta, M E; Covelli, A; Renzi, N; Bertolini, P; Mazzucchelli, M

    2015-06-01

    The novel exercise computer-assisted high-frequency QRS-analysis (ex-HF/QRS) has demonstrated improved sensitivity and specificity over the conventional exercise-ST/ECG-segment-analysis (ex-ST/ECG) in the detection of myocardial ischemia. The aim of the present study was to test the implementation in diagnostic value of the ex-HF/QRS in patient with hypertension and chest pain (CP) versus the conventional ex-ST/ECG anlysis alone. Patients with long-standing hypertension, CP, normal ECG, troponin and echocardiography were enrolled. All patients underwent the ex-ST/ECG and ex-HF/QRS. A decrease >/=50% of the signal of ex-HF/QRS intensity recorded in two contiguous leads, at least, was considered as index of ischaemia, as ST-segment depression >/=2 mm or >/=1 mm and CP on ex-ST/ECG. Exclusion criteria were QRS duration >/=120 msec and inability to exercise. The end-point was the composite of coronary stenosis >50% or acute coronary syndrome, revascularization, cardiovascular death at 3-month follow-up. Six-hundred thirty-one patients were enrolled (age 61+/-15 y). The percentage of age-adjusted maximal predicted heart rate was 88+/-10 beat-per-minute and the maximal systolic blood pressure was 169+/-22 mmHg. Twenty-seven patients achieved the end-point. On multivariate analysis, both the ex-ST/ECG and ex-HF/QRS were predictors of the end-point. The ex-HF/QRS showed higher sensitivity (88% vs 50%; p = 0.003), lower specificity (77% vs 97%; p = 0.245) and comparable negative predictive value (99% vs 99%; p = NS) when compared to ex-ST/ECG. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis showed the incremental diagnostic value of the ex-HF/QRS (area: 0.64, 95% Confidence Intervals, CI 0.51-0.77) over conventional ex-ST/ECG (0.60, CI 0.52-0.66) and Chest Pain Score (0.53, CI 0.48-0.59); p = NS on pairwise C-statistic. In patients with long-standing hypertension and CP submitted to risk stratification with exercise tolerance test, the novel ex

  17. Chest computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    are not suitable to study CF lung disease in young children. Chest computed tomography (CT) holds great promise for use as a sensitive surrogate endpoint in CF. A large body of evidence has been produced to validate the use of chest CT as primary endpoint to study CF lung disease. However, before chest CT can...

  18. Chest wall – underappreciated structure in sonography. Part I: Examination methodology and ultrasound anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Smereczyński

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chest wall ultrasound has been awarded little interest in the literature, with chest wall anatomy described only in limited extent. The objective of this study has been to discuss the methodology of chest wall ultrasound and the sonographic anatomy of the region to facilitate professional evaluation of this complex structure. The primarily used transducer is a 7–12 MHz linear one. A 3–5 MHz convex (curvilinear transducer may also be helpful, especially in obese and very muscular patients. Doppler and panoramic imaging options are essential. The indications for chest wall ultrasound include localized pain or lesions found or suspected on imaging with other modalities (conventional radiography, CT, MR or scintigraphy. The investigated pathological condition should be scanned in at least two planes. Sometimes, evaluation during deep breathing permits identification of pathological mobility (e.g. in rib or sternum fractures, slipping rib syndrome. Several structures, closely associated with each other, need to be considered in the evaluation of the chest wall. The skin, which forms a hyperechoic covering, requires a high frequency transducer (20–45 MHz. The subcutaneous fat is characterized by clusters of hypoechoic lobules. Chest muscles have a very complex structure, but their appearance on ultrasound does not differ from the images of muscles located in other anatomical regions. As far as cartilaginous and bony structures of the chest are concerned, the differences in the anatomy of the ribs, sternum, scapula and sternoclavicular joints have been discussed. The rich vascular network which is only fragmentarily accessible for ultrasound assessment has been briefly discussed. A comprehensive evaluation of the chest wall should include the axillary, supraclavicular, apical and parasternal lymph nodes. Their examination requires the use of elastography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

  19. Potential of ultrasound in the pediatric chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinavarat, Panruethai, E-mail: pantrinavarat@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Rama IV Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Riccabona, Michael, E-mail: michael.riccabona@klinikum-graz.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Graz (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    Ultrasound (US) of chest, even with inherent limitations of the US beam and air, has been useful in many pediatric chest conditions. It has extended its role and is now widely used by many subspecialists in medicine. This review article will cover techniques, indications, and applications of chest US in neonates, infants and children, including also different common as well as some rare and modern aspects and applications, such as pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pulmonary lesions, mediastinum, diaphragm, and chest wall. Other related imaging modalities are also briefly discussed.

  20. American College of Chest Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foundation Participate in the e-Community Get Social Career Connection Publications CHEST Journal CHEST SEEK Guidelines & Consensus Statements CHEST Physician CHEST NewsBrief Coding for Chest Medicine Tobacco Dependence Toolkit (3rd Ed.) Mobile Websites and Apps CHEST Journal ...

  1. Rib Radiography versus Chest Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Atsushi

    2018-05-01

     The accurate diagnosis of rib fractures is important in chest trauma. Diagnostic images following chest trauma are usually obtained via chest X-ray, chest computed tomography, or rib radiography. This study evaluated the diagnostic characteristics of rib radiography and chest computed tomography.  Seventy-five rib fracture patients who underwent both chest computed tomography and rib radiography between April 2008 and December 2013 were included. Rib radiographs, centered on the site of pain, were taken from two directions. Chest computed tomography was performed using a 16-row multidetector scanner with 5-mm slice-pitch without overlap, and axial images were visualized in a bone window.  In total, 217 rib fractures were diagnosed in 75 patients. Rib radiography missed 43 rib fractures in 24 patients. The causes were overlap with organs in 15 cases, trivial fractures in 21 cases, and injury outside the imaging range in 7 cases. Left lower rib fractures were often missed due to overlap with the heart, while middle and lower rib fractures were frequently not diagnosed due to overlap with abdominal organs. Computed tomography missed 21 rib fractures in 17 patients. The causes were horizontal fractures in 10 cases, trivial fractures in 9 cases, and insufficient breath holding in 1 case.  In rib radiography, overlap with organs and fractures outside the imaging range were characteristic reasons for missed diagnoses. In chest computed tomography, horizontal rib fractures and insufficient breath holding were often responsible. We should take these challenges into account when diagnosing rib fractures. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Accuracy of chest radiography versus chest computed tomography in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chardoli Mojtaba

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: Thoracic injuries are respon- sible for 25% of deaths of blunt traumas. Chest X-ray (CXR is the first diagnostic method in patients with blunt trauma. The aim of this study was to detect the accuracy of CXR versus chest computed tomograpgy (CT in hemodynami- cally stable patients with blunt chest trauma. Methods: Study was conducted at the emergency department of Sina Hospital from March 2011 to March 2012. Hemodynamically stable patients with at least 16 years of age who had blunt chest trauma were included. All patients underwent the same diagnostic protocol which consisted of physical examination, CXR and CT scan respectively. Results: Two hundreds patients (84% male and 16% female were included with a mean age of (37.9±13.7 years. Chin J Traumatol 2013;16(6:351-354 Rib fracture was the most common finding of CXR (12.5% and CT scan (25.5%. The sensitivity of CXR for hemothorax, thoracolumbar vertebra fractures and rib fractures were 20%, 49% and 49%, respectively. Pneumothorax, foreign body, emphysema, pulmonary contusion, liver hematoma and ster- num fracture were not diagnosed with CXR alone. Conclusion: Applying CT scan as the first-line diag- nostic modality in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma can detect pathologies which may change management and outcome. Key words: Radiography; Thoracic injuries; Tomography, X-ray computed

  3. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicky, S.; Wintermark, M.; Schnyder, P.; Capasso, P.; Denys, A.

    2000-01-01

    In western European countries most blunt chest traumas are associated with motor vehicle and sport-related accidents. In Switzerland, 39 of 10,000 inhabitants were involved and severely injured in road accidents in 1998. Fifty two percent of them suffered from blunt chest trauma. According to the Swiss Federal Office of Statistics, traumas represented in men the fourth major cause of death (4 %) after cardiovascular disease (38 %), cancer (28 %), and respiratory disease (7 %) in 1998. The outcome of chest trauma patients is determined mainly by the severity of the lesions, the prompt appropriate treatment delivered on the scene of the accident, the time needed to transport the patient to a trauma center, and the immediate recognition of the lesions by a trained emergency team. Other determining factors include age as well as coexisting cardiac, pulmonary, and renal diseases. Our purpose was to review the wide spectrum of pathologies related to blunt chest trauma involving the chest wall, pleura, lungs, trachea and bronchi, aorta, aortic arch vessels, and diaphragm. A particular focus on the diagnostic impact of CT is demonstrated. (orig.)

  4. The forgotten view: Chest X-ray - Lateral view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham M. Ittyachen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With CT (computed tomography chest gaining more importance as a diagnostic tool, chest X-ray especially the lateral view is taken less commonly nowadays. Besides CT chest is also proven to be superior to chest X-ray in patients with major blunt trauma. We are presenting a 68-year old male who was partially treated from outside for a left sided pneumonia. He came to our hospital because of persisting chest pain. Chest X-ray, frontal view (postero-anterior was almost normal except for a mild opacity in the left lower zone. CT scan of the chest revealed a fluid collection posteriorly enclosed within enhancing pleura. Chest X-ray, left lateral view showed a corresponding posterior pleural based opacity. We are presenting this case to highlight the importance of the lateral view of the chest X-ray. In selected cases there is still a role for the lateral view. With the three dimensional visualization provided by the CT, the lateral view of the chest may be easier to understand. Consequent to the initial diagnosis by CT further follow up can be done with the chest X-ray. In a limited way this mitigates unnecessary expenditure and more importantly prevents the patient from exposure to harmful radiation in the form of repeated CT.

  5. Chest radiographic findings in Human Immunodeficiency Virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine findings on chest radiographs in HIV positive/AIDS patients at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH) Benin City. All consecutive HIV positive/AIDS patients, managed at the UBTH between 1991 and 2001 were included in the study. Patients had postero-anterior (PA) chest ...

  6. Chest Radiographic Findings in Newly Diagnosed Pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five hundred newly diagnosed cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis were treated with directly observed short-course treatment and 100 of them had chest radiographic examination done. The various chest radiographic patterns in the 100 subjects were studied and included: Fluffy exudative changes 80(80%), fibrosis 70(70%) ...

  7. Nuclear imaging of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahk, Y.W.

    1998-01-01

    This book provides up-to-the minute information on the diagnostic nuclear imaging of chest disorders. The authors have endeavored to integrate and consolidate the many different subspecialities in order to enable a holistic understanding of chest diseases from the nuclear medicine standpoint. Highlights of the book include in addition to the cardiac scan the description of aerosol lung imaging in COPD and other important pulmonary diseases and the updates on breast and lung cancer imaging, as well as imaging of the bony thorax and esophagus. It is required reading not only for nuclear medicine practitioners and researchers but also for all interested radiologists, traumatologists, pulmonologists, oncologists and cardiologists. (orig.)

  8. Correlations between quality indexes of chest compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng-Ling; Yan, Li; Huang, Su-Fang; Bai, Xiang-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a kind of emergency treatment for cardiopulmonary arrest, and chest compression is the most important and necessary part of CPR. The American Heart Association published the new Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care in 2010 and demanded for better performance of chest compression practice, especially in compression depth and rate. The current study was to explore the relationship of quality indexes of chest compression and to identify the key points in chest compression training and practice. Totally 219 healthcare workers accepted chest compression training by using Laerdal ACLS advanced life support resuscitation model. The quality indexes of chest compression, including compression hands placement, compression rate, compression depth, and chest wall recoil as well as self-reported fatigue time were monitored by the Laerdal Computer Skills and Reporting System. The quality of chest compression was related to the gender of the compressor. The indexes in males, including self-reported fatigue time, the accuracy of compression depth and the compression rate, the accuracy of compression rate, were higher than those in females. However, the accuracy of chest recoil was higher in females than in males. The quality indexes of chest compression were correlated with each other. The self-reported fatigue time was related to all the indexes except the compression rate. It is necessary to offer CPR training courses regularly. In clinical practice, it might be better to change the practitioner before fatigue, especially for females or weak practitioners. In training projects, more attention should be paid to the control of compression rate, in order to delay the fatigue, guarantee enough compression depth and improve the quality of chest compression.

  9. Dor torácica no transtorno de pânico: sintoma somático ou manifestação de doença arterial coronariana? Chest pain and panic disorder: physical symptom or coronary heart disease presentation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gastão Luiz Fonseca Soares Filho

    2007-01-01

    myocardial ischemia and its most common clinical manifestation is chest pain. This case report illustrates panic disorder co-occurring with coronary heart disease, discussing how to deal with this complex clinical situation. The diagnosis of panic disorder seldom is made and serious consequences can elapse, including the course of the psychiatric disorder.

  10. [How to do - the chest tube drainage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopp, Michael; Hoffmann, Hans; Dienemann, Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    A chest tube is used to drain the contents of the pleural space to reconstitute the physiologic pressures within the pleural space and to allow the lungs to fully expand. Indications for chest tube placement include pneumothorax, hemothorax, pleural effusion, pleural empyema, and major thoracic surgery. The most appropriate site for chest tube placement is the 4th or 5th intercostal space in the mid- or anterior- axillary line. Attention to technique in placing the chest tube is vital to avoid complications from the procedure. Applying the step-by-step technique presented, placement of a chest tube is a quick and safe procedure. Complications - frequently occurring when the tube is inserted with a steel trocar - include hemothorax, dislocation, lung lacerations, and injury to organs in the thoracic or abdominal cavity." © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Chest Wall tumor: combined management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao Bhaskar, N.

    1997-01-01

    Cancer is relatively rare disease among children and adolescents. The incidence of solid tumors other than CNS is less than 2/100,000. Tumors of the chest wall can arise either from the somatic tissue or ribs. These are rare, so either institutional reviews or multi institutional studies should determine optimal therapeutic management. Of the bony chest wall, Ewing's sarcoma or the family of tumor (peripheral neuro epithelioma, Askin tumor), are the most common. These lesions are lytic and have associated large extra pleural component. This large extra pleural component often necessitates major chest wall resection (3 or more ribs), and when lower ribs are involved, this entails resection of portion of diaphragm. Despite this resection, survival in the early 1970 was 10-20%. Since 1970 multi agent chemotherapy has increased survival rates. of importance, however, is these regimens have caused significant reduction of these extra pleural components so that major chest wall resections have become a rarity. With improved survival and decreased morbidity preoperative chemotherapy followed by surgery is now the accepted modality of treatment. Another major advantage of this regimen is that potential radiation therapy may be obviated. The most common chest wall lesion is rhabdomyosarcoma. In the IRS study of 1620 RMS patients, in 141 (9%) the primary lesion was in the chest wall. these are primarily alveolar histology. when lesions were superficial, wide local excision with supplemental radiation therapy was associated with low morbidity and good overall survival. however, a majority have significant intra- thoracic components. in these circumstances the resectability rate is less than 30% and the survival poor. Other lesions include non rhabdomyosarcomas, eosinophilic granuloma, chondrosarcoma, and osteomyelitis. The management of these lesions varies according to extent, histology, and patient characteristics

  12. Chiropractic treatment including instrument-assisted manipulation for non-specific dizziness and neck pain in community-dwelling older people: a feasibility randomised sham-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Julie C; French, Simon D; Hartvigsen, Jan; Azari, Michael F

    2018-01-01

    Dizziness in older people is a risk factor for falls. Neck pain is associated with dizziness and responds favourably to neck manipulation. However, it is unknown if chiropractic intervention including instrument-assisted manipulation of the neck in older people with neck pain can also improve dizziness. This parallel two-arm pilot trial was conducted in Melbourne, Australia over nine months (October 2015 to June 2016). Participants aged 65-85 years, with self-reported chronic neck pain and dizziness, were recruited from the general public through advertisements in local community newspapers and via Facebook. Participants were randomised using a permuted block method to one of two groups: 1) Activator II™-instrument-assisted cervical and thoracic spine manipulation plus a combination of: light massage; mobilisation; range of motion exercises; and home advice about the application of heat, or 2) Sham-Activator II™-instrument-assisted manipulation (set to zero impulse) plus gentle touch of cervical and thoracic spinal regions. Participants were blinded to group allocation. The interventions were delivered weekly for four weeks. Assessments were conducted one week pre- and post-intervention. Clinical outcomes were assessed blindly and included: dizziness (dizziness handicap inventory [DHI]); neck pain (neck disability index [NDI]); self-reported concerns of falling; mood; physical function; and treatment satisfaction. Feasibility outcomes included recruitment rates, compliance with intervention and outcome assessment, study location, success of blinding, costs and harms. Out of 162 enquiries, 24 participants were screened as eligible and randomised to either the chiropractic ( n  = 13) or sham ( n  = 11) intervention group. Compliance was satisfactory with only two participants lost to follow up; thus, post-intervention data for 12 chiropractic intervention and 10 sham intervention participants were analysed. Blinding was similar between groups. Mild harms

  13. Living conditions, including life style, in primary-care patients with nonacute, nonspecific spinal pain compared with a population-based sample: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odd Lindell

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Odd Lindell, Sven-Erik Johansson, Lars-Erik Strender1Center for Family and Community Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, SwedenBackground: Nonspecific spinal pain (NSP, comprising back and/or neck pain, is one of the leading disorders behind long-term sick-listing, including disability pensions. Early interventions to prevent long-term sick-listing require the identification of patients at risk. The aim of this study was to compare living conditions associated with long-term sick-listing for NSP in patients with nonacute NSP, with a nonpatient population-based sample. Nonacute NSP is pain that leads to full-time sick-listing>3 weeks.Methods: One hundred and twenty-five patients with nonacute NSP, 2000–2004, were included in a randomized controlled trial in Stockholm County with the objective of comparing cognitive–behavioral rehabilitation with traditional primary care. For these patients, a cross-sectional study was carried out with baseline data. Living conditions were compared between the patients and 338 nonpatients by logistic regression. The conditions from univariate analyses were included in a multivariate analysis. The nonsignificant variables were excluded sequentially to yield a model comprising only the significant factors (P <0.05. The results are shown as odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals.Results: In the univariate analyses, 13 of the 18 living conditions had higher odds for the patients with a dominance of physical work strains and Indication of alcohol over-consumption, odds ratio (OR 14.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.2–67.6. Five conditions qualified for the multivariate model: High physical workload, OR 13.7 (CI 5.9–32.2; Hectic work tempo, OR 8.4 (CI 2.5–28.3; Blue-collar job, OR 4.5 (CI 1.8–11.4; Obesity, OR 3.5 (CI 1.2–10.2; and Low education, OR 2.7 (CI 1.1–6.8.Conclusions: As most of the living conditions have previously been

  14. CT of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    There appears to be a limited role for computed tomography in the evaluation of chest trauma. The literature contains few papers specifically addressing the use of CT in the setting of chest trauma. Another series of articles relates anecdotal experiences in this regard. This paucity of reports attests to the remarkable amount of information present on conventional chest radiographs as well as the lack of clear indications for CT in the setting of chest trauma. In this chapter traumatic lesions of various areas of the thorax are discussed. The conventional radiographic findings are briefly described and the potential or proven application of CT is addressed

  15. Clinical Utility of Chest Computed Tomography in Patients with Rib Fractures CT Chest and Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Brandon C; Overbey, Douglas M; Tesfalidet, Feven; Schramm, Kristofer; Stovall, Robert T; French, Andrew; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Burlew, Clay C; Barnett, Carlton; Moore, Ernest E; Pieracci, Fredric M

    2016-12-01

    Chest CT is more sensitive than a chest X-ray (CXR) in diagnosing rib fractures; however, the clinical significance of these fractures remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the added diagnostic use of chest CT performed after CXR in patients with either known or suspected rib fractures secondary to blunt trauma. Retrospective cohort study of blunt trauma patients with rib fractures at a level I trauma center that had both a CXR and a CT chest. The CT finding of ≥ 3 additional fractures in patients with ≤ 3 rib fractures on CXR was considered clinically meaningful. Student's t-test and chi-square analysis were used for comparison. We identified 499 patients with rib fractures: 93 (18.6%) had CXR only, 7 (1.4%) had chest CT only, and 399 (79.9%) had both CXR and chest CT. Among these 399 patients, a total of 1,969 rib fractures were identified: 1,467 (74.5%) were missed by CXR. The median number of additional fractures identified by CT was 3 (range, 4 - 15). Of 212 (53.1%) patients with a clinically meaningful increase in the number of fractures, 68 patients underwent one or more clinical interventions: 36 SICU admissions, 20 pain catheter placements, 23 epidural placements, and 3 SSRF. Additionally, 70 patients had a chest tube placed for retained hemothorax or occult pneumothorax. Overall, 138 patients (34.5%) had a change in clinical management based upon CT chest. The chest X-ray missed ~75% of rib fractures seen on chest CT. Although patients with a clinical meaningful increase in the number of rib fractures were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit, there was no associated improvement in pulmonary outcomes.

  16. Non-Invasive Mechanic Ventilation Using in Flail Chest, Caused By Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Onat

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 75-year-old woman admitted our faculty emergency room with shortness of breath, and chest pain after traffic accident’s second hour. She was diagnosed as bilateral multipl rib fractures, left clavicula fracture, and left flail chest by phsical and radiological examinations. She was transfered to Chest Surgery Depatment’s intensive care unit. The patient was undergone non-invasive mask mechanic ventilation support, because of the decreasing of blood oxygen saturation and increasing of arteriel blood partial carbondioxide pressure. The treatment of non-invasive mechanic ventilation was succesfull for ventilation support. With this report, we would like to attentioned that non-invasive mechanic ventilation for blunt chest trauma patients could be used succesfully and could be used instead of endotracheal invasive mechanic ventilation.

  17. Value of the Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire (GerdQ) in predicting the proton pump inhibitor response in coronary artery disease patients with gastroesophageal reflux-related chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, S; Liu, Y; Chen, Y; Tang, Y; Xu, J; Tang, C

    2016-05-01

    Chest pain experienced by patients with coronary artery disease can be partly due to gastroesophageal reflux-induced chest pain (GERP). Empirical proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy has been recommended as an initial clinical approach for treating GERP. However, PPI use may lead to some health problems. The Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire (GerdQ) may represent a noninvasive and cost-effective approach for avoiding PPI misuse and for identifying the appropriate patients for the PPI trial test. The aim of this pilot study was to prospectively evaluate the association between GerdQ scores and PPI response in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and GERP to determine whether the GerdQ predicts the PPI response in patients with CAD and GERP and to further validate the clinical application value of the GerdQ. A total of 154 consecutive patients with potential GERP were recruited to complete a GerdQ with subsequent PPI therapy. Based on the PPI trial result, patients were divided into a PPI-positive response group and a PPI-negative response group. The difference in the GerdQ scores between the two groups was assessed. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of GerdQ score was drawn according to the PPI response as the gold standard. The ability of GerdQ to predict the PPI response was assessed. A total of 96 patients completed the entire study; 62 patients (64.6%) were assigned to the PPI-positive response group, and 34 patients (35.4%) to the PPI-negative response group. The GerdQ score of the PPI-positive response group (8.11 ± 3.315) was significantly higher than that of the PPI-negative response group (4.41 ± 2.743), and the difference was statistically significant (t = 5.863, P = 0.000). The ROC curve was drawn according to a PPI response assessment result with a score above 2 as the gold standard. The area under curve was 0.806. When the critical value of GerdQ score was 7.5, Youden index was up to 0.514, the diagnostic sensitivity

  18. Serial Sampling of High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T May Not Be Required for Prediction of Acute Myocardial Infarction Diagnosis in Chest Pain Patients with Highly Abnormal Concentrations at Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Hennessen, Matthias; Mueller, Christian; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Biener, Moritz; Vafaie, Mehrshad; deFilippi, Christopher R; Christ, Michael; Ordóñez-Llanos, Jorge; Panteghini, Mauro; Plebani, Mario; Verschuren, Franck; Melki, Dina; French, John K; Christenson, Robert H; Body, Richard; McCord, James; Dinkel, Carina; Katus, Hugo A; Lindahl, Bertil

    2017-02-01

    Guidelines for diagnosing acute myocardial infarction (AMI) recommend adding kinetic changes to the initial cardiac troponin (cTn) blood concentration to improve AMI diagnosis. We hypothesized that kinetic changes may not be required in patients presenting with highly abnormal cTn. Patients presenting with suspected AMI to the emergency department were enrolled in a prospective diagnostic study. We assessed the positive predictive value (PPV) of initial high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) blood concentrations alone and in combination with kinetic changes for AMI. Predefined relative changes (δ change of ≥20%) and absolute changes (Δ change ≥9.2 ng/L) within different time intervals (1 h, 2 h, and 4-14 h after presentation) were assessed. The final diagnosis was adjudicated by 2 independent cardiologists. Among 1282 patients, 213 (16.6%) patients had a final diagnosis of AMI. For AMI prediction, PPVs increased from 48.8% for an initial hs-cTnT >14 ng/L to 87.2% for >60 ng/L, whereas PPVs remained unchanged for higher hs-cTnT concentrations at baseline (87.1% for both >80 ng/L and >100 ng/L). With addition of 20% relative Δ change, PPVs were not further improved in patients with baseline hs-cTnT >80 ng/L using the 1-h (84.0%) and 2-h (88.9%) intervals, and only minimally when extending the interval to 4-14 h (91.2% for >80 ng/L and 90.4% for >100 ng/L, respectively). Similar findings were observed when applying absolute changes. In chest pain patients with highly abnormal hs-cTnT concentrations at presentation, subsequent blood draws may not be required, as they do not provide incremental diagnostic value for prediction of AMI diagnosis. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  19. The UPBEAT Nurse-Delivered Personalized Care Intervention for People with Coronary Heart Disease Who Report Current Chest Pain and Depression: A Randomised Controlled Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barley, E.A.; Walters, P.; Haddad, M.; Phillips, R.; Achilla, E.; McCrone, P.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Mann, A.; Tylee, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Depression is common in people with coronary heart disease (CHD) and associated with worse outcome. This study explored the acceptability and feasibility of procedures for a trial and for an intervention, including its potential costs, to inform a definitive randomized controlled trial

  20. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Johnsen, Karen Kirstine; Thomsen, Henrik

    on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years...

  1. Diagnostic value of chest ultrasound after cardiac surgery: a comparison with chest X-ray and auscultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzani, Antonella; Manca, Tullio; Brusasco, Claudia; Santori, Gregorio; Valentino, Massimo; Nicolini, Francesco; Molardi, Alberto; Gherli, Tiziano; Corradi, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    Chest auscultation and chest x-ray commonly are used to detect postoperative abnormalities and complications in patients admitted to intensive care after cardiac surgery. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether chest ultrasound represents an effective alternative to bedside chest x-ray to identify early postoperative abnormalities. Diagnostic accuracy of chest auscultation and chest ultrasound were compared in identifying individual abnormalities detected by chest x-ray, considered the reference method. Cardiac surgery intensive care unit. One hundred fifty-one consecutive adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. All patients included were studied by chest auscultation, ultrasound, and x-ray upon admission to intensive care after cardiac surgery. Six lung pathologic changes and endotracheal tube malposition were found. There was a highly significant correlation between abnormalities detected by chest ultrasound and x-ray (k = 0.90), but a poor correlation between chest auscultation and x-ray abnormalities (k = 0.15). Chest auscultation may help identify endotracheal tube misplacement and tension pneumothorax but it may miss most major abnormalities. Chest ultrasound represents a valid alternative to chest x-ray to detect most postoperative abnormalities and misplacements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnostic Yield of Recommendations for Chest CT Examination Prompted by Outpatient Chest Radiographic Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, H. Benjamin; Gilman, Matthew D.; Wu, Carol C.; Cushing, Matthew S.; Halpern, Elkan F.; Zhao, Jing; Pandharipande, Pari V.; Shepard, Jo-Anne O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic yield of recommended chest computed tomography (CT) prompted by abnormalities detected on outpatient chest radiographic images. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval; informed consent was waived. Reports of all outpatient chest radiographic examinations performed at a large academic center during 2008 (n = 29 138) were queried to identify studies that included a recommendation for a chest CT imaging. The radiology information system was queried for these patients to determine if a chest CT examination was obtained within 1 year of the index radiographic examination that contained the recommendation. For chest CT examinations obtained within 1 year of the index chest radiographic examination and that met inclusion criteria, chest CT images were reviewed to determine if there was an abnormality that corresponded to the chest radiographic finding that prompted the recommendation. All corresponding abnormalities were categorized as clinically relevant or not clinically relevant, based on whether further work-up or treatment was warranted. Groups were compared by using t test and Fisher exact test with a Bonferroni correction applied for multiple comparisons. Results There were 4.5% (1316 of 29138 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 4.3%, 4.8%]) of outpatient chest radiographic examinations that contained a recommendation for chest CT examination, and increasing patient age (P recommendation for chest CT examination. Of patients within this subset who met inclusion criteria, 65.4% (691 of 1057 [95% CI: 62.4%, 68.2%) underwent a chest CT examination within the year after the index chest radiographic examination. Clinically relevant corresponding abnormalities were present on chest CT images in 41.4% (286 of 691 [95% CI: 37.7%, 45.2%]) of cases, nonclinically relevant corresponding abnormalities in 20.6% (142 of 691 [95% CI: 17.6%, 23.8%]) of cases, and no corresponding abnormalities in 38

  3. Imaging of chest wall infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelli Bouaziz, Mouna; Jelassi, Helmi; Chaabane, Skander; Ladeb, Mohamed Fethi; Ben Miled-Mrad, Khaoula

    2009-01-01

    A wide variety of infections can affect the chest wall including pyogenic, tuberculous, fungal, and some other unusual infections. These potentially life-threatening disorders are frequent especially among immunocompromised patients but often misdiagnosed by physical examination and radiographs. The purpose of this article is to describe the clinical and imaging features of these different chest wall infections according to the different imaging modalities with emphasis on ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The outcome of chest wall infection depends on early diagnosis, severity of the immunosuppression, offending organism, and extent of infection. Because clinical findings and laboratory tests may be not contributive in immunocompromised patients, imaging plays an important role in the early detection and precise assessment of the disease. US, CT, and MRI are all useful: bone destruction is more accurately detected with CT whereas soft tissue involvement are better visualized with US and MRI. CT and US are also used to guide percutaneous biopsy and drainage procedures. MR images are helpful in pre-operative planning of extensive chest wall infections. (orig.)

  4. Thoracic epidural steroid injection for rib fracture pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauchwerger, Jacob J; Candido, Kenneth D; Deer, Timothy R; Frogel, Jonathan K; Iadevaio, Robert; Kirschen, Neil B

    2013-06-01

    Treatment for rib fracture pain can be broadly divided into pharmacologic approaches with oral and/or parenteral medication and interventional approaches utilizing neuraxial analgesia or peripheral nerve blocks to provide pain relief. Both approaches attempt to control nociceptive and neuropathic pain secondary to osseous injury and nerve insult, respectively. Success of treatment is ultimately measured by the ability of the selected modality to decrease pain, chest splinting, and to prevent sequelae of injury, such as pneumonia. Typically, opioids and NSAIDs are the drugs of first choice for acute pain because of ease of administration, immediate onset of action, and rapid titration to effect. In contrast, neuropathic pain medications have a slower onset of action and are more difficult to titrate to therapeutic effect. Interventional approaches include interpleural catheters, intercostal nerve blocks, paravertebral nerve blocks, and thoracic and lumbar epidural catheters. Each intervention has its own inherent advantages, disadvantages, and success rates. Rib fracture pain management practice is founded on the thoracic surgical and anesthesiology literature. Articles addressing rib fracture pain are relatively scarce in the pain medicine literature. As life expectancy increases, and as healthcare system modifications are implemented, pain medicine physicians may be consulted to treat increasing number of patients suffering rib fracture pain and may need to resort to novel therapeutic measures because of financial constraints imposed by those changes. Here we present the first published case series of thoracic epidural steroid injections used for management of rib fracture pain. © 2012 The Authors Pain Practice © 2012 World Institute of Pain.

  5. Long-term Cost-Effectiveness of Diagnostic Tests for Assessing Stable Chest Pain: Modeled Analysis of Anatomical and Functional Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldi, Eduardo G; Stella, Steffan F; Rohde, Luis E; Polanczyk, Carisi A

    2016-05-01

    Several tests exist for diagnosing coronary artery disease, with varying accuracy and cost. We sought to provide cost-effectiveness information to aid physicians and decision-makers in selecting the most appropriate testing strategy. We used the state-transitions (Markov) model from the Brazilian public health system perspective with a lifetime horizon. Diagnostic strategies were based on exercise electrocardiography (Ex-ECG), stress echocardiography (ECHO), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), computed tomography coronary angiography (CTA), or stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (C-MRI) as the initial test. Systematic review provided input data for test accuracy and long-term prognosis. Cost data were derived from the Brazilian public health system. Diagnostic test strategy had a small but measurable impact in quality-adjusted life-years gained. Switching from Ex-ECG to CTA-based strategies improved outcomes at an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 3100 international dollars per quality-adjusted life-year. ECHO-based strategies resulted in cost and effectiveness almost identical to CTA, and SPECT-based strategies were dominated because of their much higher cost. Strategies based on stress C-MRI were most effective, but the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio vs CTA was higher than the proposed willingness-to-pay threshold. Invasive strategies were dominant in the high pretest probability setting. Sensitivity analysis showed that results were sensitive to costs of CTA, ECHO, and C-MRI. Coronary CT is cost-effective for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and should be included in the Brazilian public health system. Stress ECHO has a similar performance and is an acceptable alternative for most patients, but invasive strategies should be reserved for patients at high risk. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Does the quality of chest compressions deteriorate when the chest compression rate is above 120/min?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Hoon; Kim, Kyuseok; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Taeyun; Kang, Changwoo; Park, Chanjong; Kim, Joonghee; Jo, You Hwan; Rhee, Joong Eui; Kim, Dong Hoon

    2014-08-01

    The quality of chest compressions along with defibrillation is the cornerstone of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), which is known to improve the outcome of cardiac arrest. We aimed to investigate the relationship between the compression rate and other CPR quality parameters including compression depth and recoil. A conventional CPR training for lay rescuers was performed 2 weeks before the 'CPR contest'. CPR anytime training kits were distributed to respective participants for self-training on their own in their own time. The participants were tested for two-person CPR in pairs. The quantitative and qualitative data regarding the quality of CPR were collected from a standardised check list and SkillReporter, and compared by the compression rate. A total of 161 teams consisting of 322 students, which includes 116 men and 206 women, participated in the CPR contest. The mean depth and rate for chest compression were 49.0±8.2 mm and 110.2±10.2/min. Significantly deeper chest compression depths were noted at rates over 120/min than those at any other rates (47.0±7.4, 48.8±8.4, 52.3±6.7, p=0.008). Chest compression depth was proportional to chest compression rate (r=0.206, pcompression including chest compression depth and chest recoil by chest compression rate. Further evaluation regarding the upper limit of the chest compression rate is needed to ensure complete full chest wall recoil while maintaining an adequate chest compression depth. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Meteorological Parameters and the Onset of Chest Pain in Subjects with Acute ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: an Eight-Year, Single-Center Study in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En-Zhi Jia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of weather on the occurrence of acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction in Chinese subjects. Methods: Weather and climate data, as well as the occurrence of STEMI, were monitored at 2 am, 8 am, 2 pm, and 8 pm between 2003 and 2010. Generalized additive Poisson models were utilized to plot the numbers of patients with STEMI within 6 hour intervals against climatological variations, after accounting for the effects of the hour and season. Results: The inclusion of meteorological conditions, including observed atmospheric pressure (hPa, hectopascal variations during the previous three hours and temperature (°C, degrees Celsius, significantly affected the occurrence of STEMI, as measured every six hours. Compared with the 50th percentile of atmospheric pressure variations, the RRs (95% CI for the first percentile, 10th percentile, 25th percentile, 75th percentile, 90th percentile, and 99th percentile of atmospheric pressure variation over lag 0 were 1.66 (1.36∼2.03, 1.47 (1.30∼1.67, 1.22 (1.12∼1.33, 1.16 (1.07∼1.25, 1.27 (1.13∼1.43, and 1.16 (0.92∼1.46, respectively. Compared to the 50th percentile of temperature, the RRs (95% CI for the first percentile, 10th percentile, 25th percentile, 75th percentile, 90th percentile, and 99th percentile of temperature over lag 0 were 0.58 (0.40∼0.83, 0.60 (0.46∼0.78, 0.69 (0.57∼0.83, 1.33 (1.14∼1.56, 1.39 (1.13∼1.71, and 1.17 (0.84∼1.63, respectively. Conclusions: Based on the eight-year, single-center study, significant relationships were observed among the occurrence of STEMI and atmospheric pressure variations during the previous three hours and temperature after account for long-term time trends.

  8. Selective chest imaging for blunt trauma patients: The national emergency X-ray utilization studies (NEXUS-chest algorithm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Robert M; Hendey, Gregory W; Mower, William R

    2017-01-01

    Chest imaging plays a prominent role in blunt trauma patient evaluation, but indiscriminate imaging is expensive, may delay care, and unnecessarily exposes patients to potentially harmful ionizing radiation. To improve diagnostic chest imaging utilization, we conducted 3 prospective multicenter studies over 12years to derive and validate decision instruments (DIs) to guide the use of chest x-ray (CXR) and chest computed tomography (CT). The first DI, NEXUS Chest x-ray, consists of seven criteria (Age >60years; rapid deceleration mechanism; chest pain; intoxication; altered mental status; distracting painful injury; and chest wall tenderness) and exhibits a sensitivity of 99.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 98.2-99.4%) and a specificity of 13.3% (95% CI, 12.6%-14.0%) for detecting clinically significant injuries. We developed two NEXUS Chest CT DIs, which are both highly reliable in detecting clinically major injuries (sensitivity of 99.2%; 95% CI 95.4-100%). Designed primarily to focus on detecting major injuries, the NEXUS Chest CT-Major DI consists of six criteria (abnormal CXR; distracting injury; chest wall tenderness; sternal tenderness; thoracic spine tenderness; and scapular tenderness) and exhibits higher specificity (37.9%; 95% CI 35.8-40.1%). Designed to reliability detect both major and minor injuries (sensitivity 95.4%; 95% CI 93.6-96.9%) with resulting lower specificity (25.5%; 95% CI 23.5-27.5%), the NEXUS CT-All rule consists of seven elements (the six NEXUS CT-Major criteria plus rapid deceleration mechanism). The purpose of this review is to synthesize the three DIs into a novel, cohesive summary algorithm with practical implementation recommendations to guide selective chest imaging in adult blunt trauma patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Radionuclide imaging in Chest Pain Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Ricardo; Balestrini, Victor; Hasbani, Victor

    2005-01-01

    The myocardium perfusion has a high predictive value and is a powerful tool for the stratification of the risk. When the myocardium perfusion is used with bio markers, the combination provides a profile of the risk of the patients. This publication demonstrated a significant reduction of attention costs using this diagnosis method and a hospitalization reduction

  10. Angina - when you have chest pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... quit. Your provider can help. Know Your Risk Factors After your symptoms have gone away, write down ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  11. CT of blunt chest trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson, D.; Babyn, P.S.; Palder, S.; Bergmann, K.

    1993-01-01

    While trauma is still the leading cause of death in the pediatric age range, it is surprising how little the CT appearances of pediatric chest injury have been investigated in the literature. We have reviewed the CT findings of blunt chest trauma in 44 children for whom chest CT examinations were requested to investigate the extent of intrathoracic injury. We noted a propensity for pulmonary contusions to be located posteriorly or posteromedially, and for them to be anatomically nonsegmental and crescentic in shape. This is possibly attributable to the relatively compliant anterior chest wall in children. The CT appearances of other major thoracic injuries are described, including pulmonary lacerations, pneumothoraces, malpositioned chest tubes, mediastinal hematomas, aortic injury, tracheobronchial injury, hemopericardium, and spinal injuries with paraspinal fluid collections. Children demonstrating findings incidental to the actual injury yet important to the subsequent therapy are also presented. We conclude that, in the event of clinically significant blunt chest trauma, the single supine chest examination in the trauma room is insufficient to adequately identify the extent of intrathoracic injury. With the exception of concern for aortic injury for which aortography is indicated, a dynamically enhanced CT scan of the thorax should be performed as clinically significant findings may result in altered therapy. (orig.)

  12. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without risking ...

  13. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  14. Learning chest imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrozo Pupo, John C. (ed.) [Magdalena Univ., Santa Maria (Colombia). Respire - Inst. for Respiratory Care

    2013-03-01

    Useful learning tool for practitioners and students. Overview of the imaging techniques used in chest radiology. Aid to the correct interpretation of chest X-ray images. Radiology of the thorax forms an indispensable element of the basic diagnostic process for many conditions and is of key importance in a variety of medical disciplines. This user-friendly book provides an overview of the imaging techniques used in chest radiology and presents numerous instructive case-based images with accompanying explanatory text. A wide range of clinical conditions and circumstances are covered with the aim of enabling the reader to confidently interpret chest images by correctly identifying structures of interest and the causes of abnormalities. This book, which will be an invaluable learning tool, forms part of the Learning Imaging series for medical students, residents, less experienced radiologists, and other medical staff. Learning Imaging is a unique case-based series for those in professional education in general and for physicians in prarticular.

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  17. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... also be useful to help diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

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  20. Chest X-Ray

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  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... sternum) and chest wall soft tissue (muscles and fat). assess for pericardial (thin sac around the heart) ... prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... sternum) and chest wall soft tissue (muscles and fat). assess for pericardial (thin sac around the heart) ... on the child's age, intellectual development and the type of exam. Moderate and conscious sedation can be ...

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    Full Text Available ... detailed pictures of the structures within the chest. It is primarily used to assess abnormal masses such ... and determine the size, extent and degree of its spread to adjacent structures. It’s also used to ...

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    Full Text Available ... etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the chest ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  6. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted ... of the chest cavity (arteries and veins). MRA can also demonstrate an abnormal ballooning out of the ...

  8. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot ... Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI) of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  10. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... heart) and myocardial infarct (scar in the heart muscle due to prior obstruction of blood flow). determine ... ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft tissue (muscles and fat). assess for pericardial (thin sac around ...

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  1. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian; Thomsen, Henrik

    ,3 mAs and SID SID of 180 centimetres using a phantom and lithium fluoride thermo luminescence dosimeter (TLD). Dose to risk organs mamma, thyroid and colon are measured at different collimations with one-centimetre steps. TLD results are used to estimate dose reduction for different collimations...... at the conference. Conclusion: Collimation improvement in basic chest radiography can reduce the radiation to female patients at chest x-ray examinations....

  2. Large pneumothorax in blunt chest trauma: Is a chest drain always necessary in stable patients? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Baig M; Hefny, Ashraf F

    2016-01-01

    Pneumothorax is the most common potentially life-threatening blunt chest injury. The management of pneumothorax depends upon the etiology, its size and hemodynamic stability of the patient. Most clinicians agree that chest drainage is essential for the management of traumatic large pneumothorax. Herein, we present a case of large pneumothorax in blunt chest trauma patient that resolved spontaneously without a chest drain. A 63- year- old man presented to the Emergency Department complaining of left lateral chest pain due to a fall on his chest at home. On examination, he was hemodynamically stable. An urgent chest X-ray showed evidence of left sided pneumothorax. CT scan of the chest showed pneumothorax of more than 30% of the left hemithorax (around 600ml of air) with multiple left ribs fracture. Patient refused tube thoracostomy and was admitted to surgical department for close observation. The patient was managed conservatively without chest tube insertion. A repeat CT scan of the chest has shown complete resolution of the pneumothorax. The clinical spectrum of pneumothorax varies from asymptomatic to life threatening tension pneumothorax. In stable patients, conservative management can be safe and effective for small pneumothorax. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second reported case in the English literature with large pneumothorax which resolved spontaneously without chest drain. Blunt traumatic large pneumothorax in a clinically stable patient can be managed conservatively. Current recommendations for tube placement may need to be reevaluated. This may reduce morbidity associated with chest tube thoracostomy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Reliability and Construct Validity of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised in a Swedish Non-Criminal Sample - A Multimethod Approach including Psychophysiological Correlates of Empathy for Pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Sörman

    Full Text Available Cross-cultural investigation of psychopathy measures is important for clarifying the nomological network surrounding the psychopathy construct. The Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised (PPI-R is one of the most extensively researched self-report measures of psychopathic traits in adults. To date however, it has been examined primarily in North American criminal or student samples. To address this gap in the literature, we examined PPI-R's reliability, construct validity and factor structure in non-criminal individuals (N = 227 in Sweden, using a multimethod approach including psychophysiological correlates of empathy for pain. PPI-R construct validity was investigated in subgroups of participants by exploring its degree of overlap with (i the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV, (ii self-rated empathy and behavioral and physiological responses in an experiment on empathy for pain, and (iii additional self-report measures of alexithymia and trait anxiety. The PPI-R total score was significantly associated with PCL:SV total and factor scores. The PPI-R Coldheartedness scale demonstrated significant negative associations with all empathy subscales and with rated unpleasantness and skin conductance responses in the empathy experiment. The PPI-R higher order Self-Centered Impulsivity and Fearless Dominance dimensions were associated with trait anxiety in opposite directions (positively and negatively, respectively. Overall, the results demonstrated solid reliability (test-retest and internal consistency and promising but somewhat mixed construct validity for the Swedish translation of the PPI-R.

  4. Pediatric chest imaging. Chest imaging in infants and children. 2. rev. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucaya, Javier [Vall d' Hebron Hospitals, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Pediatric Radiology and Inst. of Diagnostic Imaging; Hospital Quiron, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Radiology; Strife, Janet L. (eds.) [Cincinnati Univ. Coll. of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center

    2008-07-01

    Imaging of the pediatric chest continues to evolve rapidly. All chapters in this 2nd edition of Pediatric Chest Imaging have been extensively updated, with additional disease-specific information and numerous new illustrations. The book thus presents the state of the art in the diagnosis of pediatric chest disorders, highlighting the role played by advanced technology. As the conventional features of most of these disorders are extremely well known, special attention is devoted to the technical aspects of the modern imaging modalities, their indications, and the diagnostic information that they supply. Individual chapters focus on chest ultrasound, nuclear medicine imaging, high-resolution chest CT, helical CT, and pediatric cardiac CT and pediatric cardiacMRI. Others are directed towards specific disorders, including congenital malformations of the chest, chest tumors, pulmonary infection, trauma, the lung in systemic diseases, the pediatric airway, foreign bodies, the thymus, and the chest wall. Without exception, the authors of this book are internationally known specialists with great expertise in the field. This book will serve as a handy, superbly illustrated reference for all who routinely image children, as well as for those who need access to information on how best to image them. (orig.)

  5. Post traumatic painful shoulder – a delayed clinical feature of upper lobe lung cancer in a 74 year-old male. - case report -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana-Cristina Arghir

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A 74 year old Caucasian man, presents with a 6 week history of right sided chest pain including traumatic related painful right shoulder. Shoulder minor contusion was diagnosed and partial managed by symptomatic treatment associated to rehabilitation. The pain was initially eased with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID use and finally changed worsening. He has evidence of moderate COPD on spirometry and has been commenced on inhalers. An invasive primitive adenocarcinoma lung cancer was confirmed by chest CT scan and lymphnode biopsy through mediastinoscopy

  6. Computed tomography of chest wall abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezoe, Junpei; Morimoto, Shizuo; Akira, Masanori

    1986-01-01

    Inflammatory lesions of the chest wall become less common because of the improvement of antibiotics and chemotherapeutic agents. Over a 5-year period, 7 patients with chest wall inflammatory diseases underwent chest computed tomography. These were 2 tuberculous pericostal abscesses, 2 empyema necessitatis, 1 spinal caries, and 2 bacterial chest wall abscesses (unknown organisms). Computed tomography (CT) helped in demonstrating the density, border, site, and extent of the lesions. CT images also demonstrated the accompaning abnormalities which included bone changes, pleural calcification, or old tuberculous changes of the lung. CT was very effective to demonstrate the communicating portions from the inside of the bony thorax to the outside of the bony thorax in 2 empyema necessitatis. (author)

  7. Interventional Analgesic Management of Lung Cancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Uri; Elgueta, Maria Francisca; Perez, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the four most prevalent cancers worldwide. Comprehensive patient care includes not only adherence to clinical guidelines to control and when possible cure the disease but also appropriate symptom control. Pain is one of the most prevalent symptoms in patients diagnosed with lung cancer; it can arise from local invasion of chest structures or metastatic disease invading bones, nerves, or other anatomical structures potentially painful. Pain can also be a consequence of therapeutic approaches like surgery, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy. Conventional medical management of cancer pain includes prescription of opioids and coadjuvants at doses sufficient to control the symptoms without causing severe drug effects. When an adequate pharmacological medical management fails to provide satisfactory analgesia or when it causes limiting side effects, interventional cancer pain techniques may be considered. Interventional pain management is devoted to the use of invasive techniques such as joint injections, nerve blocks and/or neurolysis, neuromodulation, and cement augmentation techniques to provide diagnosis and treatment of pain syndromes resistant to conventional medical management. Advantages of interventional approaches include better analgesic outcomes without experiencing drug-related side effects and potential for opioid reduction thus avoiding central side effects. This review will describe various pain syndromes frequently described in lung cancer patients and those interventional techniques potentially indicated for those cases.

  8. MINIMALLY-INVASIVE TUBE THORACOSTOMY MADE EASY WITH A COMBINATION OF THORACIC ULTRASOUND AND SMALL BORE CHEST DRAIN KITS (12F TO 16F USING GUIDEWIRE TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswararao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Minimally-invasive tube thoracostomy made easy with a combination of thoracic ultrasound and small bore chest drain kits (12F to16F using guidewire technique. The present study is aimed at easy and safe insertion of small bore chest drains (12F to 16F using Seldinger technique under ultrasound guidance with least discomfort to the patient. Large bore chest drains of size >20F using blunt dissection technique is painful, difficult to place in thick chest walls and technically more demanding. Placing the drains blindly basing on chest x-ray image may sometimes injure the underlying lung. MATERIALS AND METHODS Present study included 21 cases, of which 12 cases (57.1% were of pleural effusion and 9 cases (42.8% were of pneumothorax. Thoracic ultrasound was utilised by the operator for all pleural effusions and for those cases of pneumothorax who were on ventilator before tube insertion. Small bore chest drains (12F to 16F designed for guidewire technique were used in the present study. RESULTS Complete and sustainable lung expansion was seen in 19 of 21 cases (90.4%. It failed in remaining 2 cases (9.5% who had complex empyemas and hepatic hydrothorax. Pleurodesis was attempted in 6 cases (28.5% using tetracycline injectable form with success rate of 90%. Patient tolerance was good with numeric pain rating score of 1 to 3 (range 0 to 10; 0 = no pain; 5 = moderate pain; 10 = worst possible pain. CONCLUSION Using small bore chest tubes of sizes 12F to 16F designed for guidewire technique of insertion and utilising thoracic ultrasound, while insertion made the procedure easy and safe, less painful and good tolerance from patient’s point of view. Complete and sustainable lung expansion was seen in 90.4% of cases and highly efficacious for spontaneous and iatrogenic pneumothorax and in noncomplex and malignant pleural effusions. The technique is less demanding and thoracic ultrasound knowledge can be easily learnt and a combination of this

  9. Radiology in chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, W.; Kloehn, I.; Wolfart, W.; Freiburg Univ.

    1979-01-01

    In chest trauma, a routine chest film, preferably in the lateral as well as the frontal projection, is the basic part of the work-up. Occasionally valuable additional methods are fluoroscopy, tomography, bronchography, contrast studies of the GI Tract and angiography and angiocardiography. In 679 chest trauma patients, traffic accidents and falls were the main reason for the trauma. There were 248 fractures; then - in order of frequency - hemopneumothorax (76), lung contusion (58), subcutaneous emphysema (33) cardiac (16) and vascular trauma (12) and damage to other organs. While 20-30% mistakes are made in diagnosing rib fractures in acute trauma, there is high accuracy in the diagnosis of the other injuries. Many cases are shown to demonstrate the value of diagnostic radiology. (orig.) [de

  10. Chest sonography. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathis, Gebhard (ed.)

    2008-07-01

    Chest sonography is an established procedure in the stepwise imaging diagnosis of pulmonary and pleural disease. It is the method of choice to distinguish between solid and liquid lesions and allows the investigator to make an unequivocal diagnosis without exposing the patient to costly and stressful procedures. This book presents the state of the art in chest investigation by means of ultrasonography. A number of excellent illustrations and the compact text provide concise and easy-to-assimilate information about the diagnostic procedure. Basic elements such as indications, investigation techniques and image artifacts are detailed in separate chapters. (orig.)

  11. Chest sonography. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathis, Gebhard

    2008-01-01

    Chest sonography is an established procedure in the stepwise imaging diagnosis of pulmonary and pleural disease. It is the method of choice to distinguish between solid and liquid lesions and allows the investigator to make an unequivocal diagnosis without exposing the patient to costly and stressful procedures. This book presents the state of the art in chest investigation by means of ultrasonography. A number of excellent illustrations and the compact text provide concise and easy-to-assimilate information about the diagnostic procedure. Basic elements such as indications, investigation techniques and image artifacts are detailed in separate chapters. (orig.)

  12. ASSOCIATION OF KNEE PAIN WITH A REDUCTION IN THIGH MUSCLE STRENGTH – A CROSS-SECTIONAL ANALYSIS INCLUDING 4553 OSTEOARTHRITIS INITIATIVE PARTICIPANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhdorfer, Anja; Wirth, Wolfgang; Eckstein, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Objective To cross-sectionally determine the quantitative relationship of age-adjusted, sex-specific isometric knee extensor and flexor strength to patient-reported knee pain. Methods Difference of thigh muscle strength by age, and that of age-adjusted strength per unit increase on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) knee pain scale, was estimated from linear regression analysis of 4553 Osteoarthritis Initiative participants (58% women). Strata encompassing the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in knee pain were compared to evaluate a potentially non-linear relationship between WOMAC pain levels and muscle strength. Results In Osteoarthritis Initiative participants without pain, the age-related difference in isometric knee extensor strength was −9.0%/−8.2% (women/men) per decade, and that of flexor strength was −11%/−6.9%. Differences in age-adjusted strength values for each unit of WOMAC pain (1/20) amounted to −1.9%/−1.6% for extensor and −2.5%/−1.7% for flexor strength. Differences in torque/weight for each unit of WOMAC pain ranged from −3.3 to − 2.1%. There was no indication of a non-linear relationship between pain and strength across the range of observed WOMAC values, and similar results were observed in women and men. Conclusion Each increase by 1/20 units in WOMAC pain was associated with a ~2% lower age-adjusted isometric extensor and flexor strength in either sex. As a reduction in muscle strength is known to prospectively increase symptoms in knee osteoarthritis and as pain appears to reduce thigh muscle strength, adequate therapy of pain and muscle strength is required in knee osteoarthritis patients to avoid a vicious circle of self-sustaining clinical deterioration. PMID:27836675

  13. Optimal chest drain size: the rise of the small-bore pleural catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fysh, Edward T H; Smith, Nicola A; Lee, Y C Gary

    2010-12-01

    Drainage of the pleural space is not a modern concept, but the optimal size of chest drains to use remains debated. Conventional teaching advocates blunt dissection and large-bore tubes; but in recent years, small-bore catheters have gained popularity. In the absence of high-quality randomized data, this review summarizes the available literature on the choice of chest drains. The objective data supporting the use of large-bore tubes is scarce in most pleural diseases. Increasing evidence shows that small-bore catheters induce less pain and are of comparable efficacy to large-bore tubes, including in the management of pleural infection, malignant effusion, and pneumothoraces. The onus now is on those who favor large tubes to produce clinical data to justify the more invasive approach. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  14. Sexual pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, Lori A; Stockdale, Colleen K

    2009-12-01

    Sexual pain is an underrecognized and poorly treated constellation of disorders that significantly impact affected women and their partners. Recognized as a form of chronic pain, sexual pain disorders are heterogeneous and include dyspareunia (superficial and deep), vaginismus, vulvodynia, vestibulitis, and noncoital sexual pain disorder. Women too often tolerate pain in the belief that this will meet their partners' needs. This article provides a review of the terminology and definition of the condition, theories on the pathophysiology, diagnostic considerations, and recommendations on the management of female sexual pain.

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Imaging (MRI) - Chest Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... transplant, it will be necessary to perform a blood test to determine whether the kidneys are functioning adequately. ... abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without risking the side effects of conventional ( ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  18. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used to ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR ... Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Sponsored ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI ... cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone and other soft tissue abnormalities of the chest. MRI is also useful ...

  2. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... change into a gown. You may have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to ... You Sponsored by About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ...

  3. Comparison of chest compression quality between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method during CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Sub

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to grasp difference in quality of chest compression accuracy between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method. Participants were progressed 64 people except 6 absentees among 70 people who agreed to participation with completing the CPR curriculum. In the classification of group in participants, the modified chest compression method was called as smartphone group (33 people). The standardized chest compression method was called as traditional group (31 people). The common equipments in both groups were used Manikin for practice and Manikin for evaluation. In the meantime, the smartphone group for application was utilized Android and iOS Operating System (OS) of 2 smartphone products (G, i). The measurement period was conducted from September 25th to 26th, 2012. Data analysis was used SPSS WIN 12.0 program. As a result of research, the proper compression depth (mm) was shown the proper compression depth (p< 0.01) in traditional group (53.77 mm) compared to smartphone group (48.35 mm). Even the proper chest compression (%) was formed suitably (p< 0.05) in traditional group (73.96%) more than smartphone group (60.51%). As for the awareness of chest compression accuracy, the traditional group (3.83 points) had the higher awareness of chest compression accuracy (p< 0.001) than the smartphone group (2.32 points). In the questionnaire that was additionally carried out 1 question only in smartphone group, the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone had the high negative reason in rescuer for occurrence of hand back pain (48.5%) and unstable posture (21.2%).

  4. Pulmonary effects of synthetic marijuana: chest radiography and CT findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Eugene A; Henry, Travis S; Veeraraghavan, Srihari; Staton, Gerald W; Gal, Anthony A

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the first chest radiographic and CT descriptions of organizing pneumonia in response to smoking synthetic marijuana. Chest radiographs showed a diffuse miliary-micronodular pattern. Chest CT images showed diffuse centrilobular nodules and tree-in-bud pattern and a histopathologic pattern of organizing pneumonia with or without patchy acute alveolar damage. This distinct imaging pattern should alert radiologists to include synthetic marijuana abuse in the differential diagnosis.

  5. Operative fixation of chest wall fractures: an underused procedure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J David; Franklin, Glen A; Heffley, Susan; Seligson, David

    2007-06-01

    Chest wall fractures, including injuries to the ribs and sternum, usually heal spontaneously without specific treatment. However, a small subset of patients have fractures that produce overlying bone fragments that may produce severe pain, respiratory compromise, and, if untreated mechanically, result in nonunion. We performed open reduction and internal fixation on seven patients with multiple rib fractures-five in the initial hospitalization and two delayed--as well as 35 sternal fractures (19 immediate fixation and 16 delayed). Operative fixation was accomplished using titanium plates and screws in both groups of patients. All patients with rib fractures did well; there were no major complications or infections, and no plates required removal. Clinical results were excellent. There was one death in the sternal fracture group in a patient who was ventilator-dependent preoperatively and extubated himself in the early postoperative period. Otherwise, the results were excellent, with no complications occurring in this group. Three patients had their plates removed after boney union was achieved. No evidence of infection or nonunion occurred. The excellent results achieved in the subset of patients with severe chest wall deformities treated initially at our institution and those referred from outside suggest that operative fixation is a useful modality that is likely underused.

  6. Phantom Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Because this is yet another version of tangled sensory wires, the result can be pain. A number of other factors are believed to contribute to phantom pain, including damaged nerve endings, scar tissue at the site of the amputation and the physical memory of pre-amputation pain in the affected area. ...

  7. Diagnosis and Treatment of Chest Injury and Emergency Diseases of Chest Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Khadjibaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal of research: to evaluate efficiency of videothoracoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of patients with injuries and emergency diseases ща chest organs.Material and methods: Study wasbased on treatment results analysis of 2111 patients with injuries and chest organs emergency diseases, who were treated at Republican Research Centre of Emergency Medicine in 2001-2014. Chest trauma made up 1396 (66,1% victims. There were 477 (22,6% patients with spontaneous pneumothorax. At the stages of initial diagnosis, the radiologic evaluations, CT investigations and videothoracoscopies were performed. In chest trauma patients the videothoracoscopy underwent in 844 cases, in spontaneous pneu#mothorax this method was employed in 290 patients. Complicated forms of lung echinococcosis were observed in 238 (11,3% patients and complicated forms of lung echinococcosis were evident in 72 patients.Results. Videothoracoscopy and video-assisted interventions allowed to eliminate lungs and pleura pathology in 1206 (57,1% patients, whereas the traditional methods were effective only in 905 cases (42,9%.Conclusions. Investigation methods such as multiplanar radioscopy, radiography, chest CT and videothora-coscopy must be included into algorithm of diagnosis and surgical treatment of chest injuries and emergency diseases of chest organs. At chest trauma the videothoracoscopy allows to avoid broad thoracotomy from 9,4% to 4,7% of cases, to reduce the frequency of repeated interventions from 17,4% to 0,5% and diminish a number of early postsurgery complications from 25,4% to 10,9%. Videothoracoscopy of chest traumas allows to reduce frequency of repeated interventions from 19,8 to 1,7%.

  8. Mitral valve plasty for mitral regurgitation after blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, H; Hamanaka, Y; Hirai, S; Mitsui, N; Kobayashi, T

    2001-06-01

    A 21 year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of chest and back pain after blunt chest trauma. On admission, consciousness was clear and a physical examination showed labored breathing. Her vital signs were stable, but her breathing gradually worsened, and artificial respiration was started. The chest roentgenogram and a subsequent chest computed tomographic scans revealed contusions, hemothorax of the left lung and multiple rib fractures. A transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed normal left ventricular wall motion and mild mitral regurgitation (MR). TTE was carried out repeatedly, and revealed gradually progressive MR and prolapse of the posterior medial leaflet, although there was no congestive heart failure. After her general condition had recovered, surgery was performed. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) revealed torn chordae at the posterior medial leaflet. The leaflet where the chorda was torn was cut and plicated, and posterior mitral annuloplasty was performed using a prosthetic ring. One month later following discharge, the MR had disappeared on TTE.

  9. Multi-detector row computed tomography and blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaglione, Mariano; Pinto, Antonio; Pedrosa, Ivan; Sparano, Amelia; Romano, Luigia

    2008-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries. The clinical presentation of trauma patients varies widely from one individual to another and ranges from minor reports of pain to shock. Knowledge of the mechanism of injury, the time of injury, estimates of motor vehicle accident velocity and deceleration, and evidence of associated injury to other systems are all salient features to provide for an adequate assessment of chest trauma. Multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) scanning and MDCT-angiography are being used more frequently in the diagnosis of patients with chest trauma. The high sensitivity of MDCT has increased the recognized spectrum of injuries. This new technology can be regarded as an extremely valuable adjunct to physical examination to recognize suspected and unsuspected blunt chest trauma

  10. Thoracic Trauma: Which Chest Tube When and Where?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Tamas F

    2017-02-01

    Clinical suspicion of hemo/pneumothorax: when in doubt, drain the chest. Stable chest trauma with hemo/pneumothorax: drain and wait. Unstable patient with dislocated trachea must be approached with drain in hand and scalpel ready. Massive hemo/pneumothorax may be controlled by drainage alone. The surgeon should not hesitate to open the chest if too much blood drains over a short period. The chest drainage procedure does not end with the last stitch; the second half of the match is still ahead. The drained patient is in need of physiotherapy and proper pain relief with an extended pleural space: control the suction system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of timing of chest tube removal on early outcome of patients underwent lung resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Labib Dokhan

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion: Early removal of chest tube may have beneficial effect on control of post-thoracotomy pain, improvement of pulmonary functions and decreasing the risk of complications after lung resection.

  12. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palas, J.; Matos, A.P.; Ramalho, M.; Mascarenhas, V.; Heredia, V.

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  13. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Palas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  14. Sandstorm in the chest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talluri MR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A 32 year old female presented with dry cough and progressive breathlessness of one year duration. There was no history suggestive of collagen vascular disease, lung parenchymal infection or allergic airway disease. Clinical evaluation showed basal fine inspiratory crepitations. Radiographic examination of the chest revealed a black pleura line and lung parenchymal calcification. CT scan of the chest demonstrated nodular calcification of lung parenchyma with a “crazy pavement” pattern, which is suggestive of alveolar calcification. Pulmonary function test showed a severe restrictive defect. On transbronchial lung biopsy calcific spherules suggestive of the alveolar microlithiasis were seen. Diagnosis of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis was made and symptomatic treatment was given, as there is no specific therapy available. The case illustrates an unusual cause of shortness of breath in a young female with striking radiographic features.

  15. Pediatric digital chest imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, R D; Cohen, M; Broderick, N J; Conces, D J

    1990-01-01

    The Philips Computed Radiography system performs well with pediatric portable chest radiographs, handling the throughout of a busy intensive care service 24 hours a day. Images are excellent and routinely provide a conventional (unenhanced) image and an edge-enhanced image. Radiation dose is decreased by the lowered frequency of repeat examinations and the ability of the plates to respond to a much lower dose and still provide an adequate image. The high quality and uniform density of serial PCR portable radiographs greatly enhances diagnostic content of the films. Decreased resolution has not been a problem clinically. Image manipulation and electronic transfer to remote viewing stations appear to be helpful and are currently being evaluated further. The PCR system provides a marked improvement in pediatric portable chest radiology.

  16. Pediatric digital chest imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarver, R.D.; Cohen, M.; Broderick, N.J.; Conces, D.J. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The Philips Computed Radiography system performs well with pediatric portable chest radiographs, handling the throughout of a busy intensive care service 24 hours a day. Images are excellent and routinely provide a conventional (unenhanced) image and an edge-enhanced image. Radiation dose is decreased by the lowered frequency of repeat examinations and the ability of the plates to respond to a much lower dose and still provide an adequate image. The high quality and uniform density of serial PCR portable radiographs greatly enhances diagnostic content of the films. Decreased resolution has not been a problem clinically. Image manipulation and electronic transfer to remote viewing stations appear to be helpful and are currently being evaluated further. The PCR system provides a marked improvement in pediatric portable chest radiology

  17. Trauma of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the typical radiologic findings in chest trauma, and the value of conventional radiography, CT, MRI, and aortography is discussed. Conventional radiography rather than cross-sectional imaging is the mainstay in diagnosing thoracic trauma. During the critical phase with often concomitant shock, pelvic and spinal injuries tailored raiographic views or even upright chest radiographs are impractical. The severely traumatized patient is usually radiographed in the supine position and suboptimal roentgenograms may have to be accepted for several reasons. It is well documented that many abnormalities detected on CT were not apparent on conventional radiographs, but CT is reserved for hemodynamical stable patients. Nevertheless certain situations like aortic rupture require further evaluation by CT and aortography. (orig./MG)

  18. Chest radiographic manifestations of scrub typhus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhilash, Kpp; Mannam, P R; Rajendran, K; John, R A; Ramasami, P

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory system involvement in scrub typhus is seen in 20-72% of patients. In endemic areas, good understanding and familiarity with the various radiologic findings of scrub typhus are essential in identifying pulmonary complications. Patients admitted to a tertiary care center with scrub typhus between October 2012 and September 2013 and had a chest X ray done were included in the analysis. Details and radiographic findings were noted and factors associated with abnormal X-rays were analyzed. The study cohort contained 398 patients. Common presenting complaints included fever (100%), generalized myalgia (83%), headache (65%), dyspnea (54%), cough (24.3%), and altered sensorium (14%). Almost half of the patients (49.4%) had normal chest radiographs. Common radiological pulmonary abnormalities included pleural effusion (14.6%), acute respiratory distress syndrome (14%), airspace opacity (10.5%), reticulonodular opacities (10.3%), peribronchial thickening (5.8%), and pulmonary edema (2%). Cardiomegaly was noted in 3.5% of patients. Breathlessness, presence of an eschar, platelet counts of 2 mg/dL had the highest odds of having an abnormal chest radiograph. Patients with an abnormal chest X-ray had a higher requirement of noninvasive ventilation (odds ratio [OR]: 13.98; 95% confidence interval CI: 5.89-33.16), invasive ventilation (OR: 18.07; 95% CI: 6.42-50.88), inotropes (OR: 8.76; 95% CI: 4.35-17.62), higher involvement of other organ systems, longer duration of hospital stay (3.18 ± 3 vs. 7.27 ± 5.58 days; Pscrub typhus have abnormal chest radiographs. Chest radiography should be included as part of basic evaluation at presentation in patients with scrub typhus, especially in those with breathlessness, eschar, jaundice, and severe thrombocytopenia.

  19. Chest Tube Drainage of the Pleural Space: A Concise Review for Pulmonologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcel, José M

    2018-04-01

    Chest tube insertion is a common procedure usually done for the purpose of draining accumulated air or fluid in the pleural cavity. Small-bore chest tubes (≤14F) are generally recommended as the first-line therapy for spontaneous pneumothorax in non-ventilated patients and pleural effusions in general, with the possible exception of hemothoraces and malignant effusions (for which an immediate pleurodesis is planned). Large-bore chest drains may be useful for very large air leaks, as well as post-ineffective trial with small-bore drains. Chest tube insertion should be guided by imaging, either bedside ultrasonography or, less commonly, computed tomography. The so-called trocar technique must be avoided. Instead, blunt dissection (for tubes >24F) or the Seldinger technique should be used. All chest tubes are connected to a drainage system device: flutter valve, underwater seal, electronic systems or, for indwelling pleural catheters (IPC), vacuum bottles. The classic, three-bottle drainage system requires either (external) wall suction or gravity ("water seal") drainage (the former not being routinely recommended unless the latter is not effective). The optimal timing for tube removal is still a matter of controversy; however, the use of digital drainage systems facilitates informed and prudent decision-making in that area. A drain-clamping test before tube withdrawal is generally not advocated. Pain, drain blockage and accidental dislodgment are common complications of small-bore drains; the most dreaded complications include organ injury, hemothorax, infections, and re-expansion pulmonary edema. IPC represent a first-line palliative therapy of malignant pleural effusions in many centers. The optimal frequency of drainage, for IPC, has not been formally agreed upon or otherwise officially established. Copyright©2018. The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.

  20. Treatment of funnel chest in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor N. Stalmakhovich

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Funnel chest has a relatively high prevalence in the Russian population. Given the high percentage of the unsatisfactory results of thoracoplasty, further research for the development of new treatment methods is needed. Aim. To improve the treatment results for funnel chest in children. Materials and methods. We analyzed the treatment results of 230 children with funnel chest after thoracoplasty. We used 2 surgical techniques: classic thoracoplasty by Nuss (114 children and its modified version by the authors (116 children. The modified technique included two-sided thoracoscopy, partial resection of the deformed rib cartilages, and endoscopic longitudinal transection of the sternal cortical plate, resulting in subcutaneous emphysema along the sternum. Results. The comparison of the 2 surgical techniques showed no significant difference in terms of duration and invasiveness of the procedure. Recurrent episodes of funnel chest were observed in children who had undergone thoracoplasty before 7 years of age, regardless of the technique used. Conclusion. This study revealed that the author’s modified thoracoplasty method was more effective in children > 14 years of age with rigid funnel chest because it allowed the surgeon to decrease the thoracic pressure on the plate and the plate itself on the ribs, facilitating the repositioning of the sternum and preventing the deformation and development of pressure sores on the ribs.

  1. The effectiveness of extracorporeal shockwave therapy in common lower limb conditions: a systematic review including quantification of patient-rated pain reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korakakis, Vasileios; Whiteley, Rodney; Tzavara, Alexander; Malliaropoulos, Nikolaos

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in treating Achilles tendinopathy (AT), greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS), medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), patellar tendinopathy (PT) and proximal hamstring tendinopathy (PHT). Systematic review. Randomised and non-randomised studies assessing ESWT in patients with AT, GTPS, MTSS, PT and PHT were included. Risk of bias and quality of studies were evaluated. Moderate-level evidence suggests (1) no difference between focused ESWT and placebo ESWT at short and mid-term in PT and (2) radial ESWT is superior to conservative treatment at short, mid and long term in PHT. Low-level evidence suggests that ESWT (1) is comparable to eccentric training, but superior to wait-and-see policy at 4 months in mid-portion AT; (2) is superior to eccentric training at 4 months in insertional AT; (3) less effective than corticosteroid injection at short term, but ESWT produced superior results at mid and long term in GTPS; (4) produced comparable results to control treatment at long term in GTPS; and (5) is superior to control conservative treatment at long term in PT. Regarding the rest of the results, there was only very low or no level of evidence. 13 studies showed high risk of bias largely due to methodology, blinding and reporting. Low level of evidence suggests that ESWT may be effective for some lower limb conditions in all phases of the rehabilitation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Pulmonary nodule size evaluation with chest tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsson, Åse A; Fagman, Erika; Vikgren, Jenny; Fisichella, Valeria A; Boijsen, Marianne; Flinck, Agneta; Kheddache, Susanne; Svalkvist, Angelica; Båth, Magnus

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate intra- and interobserver variability, as well as agreement for nodule size measurements on chest tomosynthesis and computed tomographic (CT) images. The Regional Ethical Review Board approved this study, and all participants gave written informed consent. Thirty-six segmented nodules in 20 patients were included in the study. Eight observers measured the left-to-right, inferior-to-superior, and longest nodule diameters on chest tomosynthesis and CT images. Intra- and interobserver repeatability, as well as agreement between measurements on chest tomosynthesis and CT images, were assessed as recommended by Bland and Altman. The difference between the mean manual and the segmented diameter was -2.2 and -2.3 mm for left-to-right and -2.6 and -2.2 mm for the inferior-to-superior diameter for measurements on chest tomosynthesis and CT images, respectively. Intraobserver 95% limits of agreement (LOA) for the longest diameter ranged from a lower limit of -1.1 mm and an upper limit of 1.0 mm to -1.8 and 1.8 mm for chest tomosynthesis and from -0.6 and 0.9 mm to -3.1 and 2.2 mm for axial CT. Interobserver 95% LOA ranged from -1.3 and 1.5 mm to -2.0 and 2.1 mm for chest tomosynthesis and from -1.8 and 1.1 mm to -2.2 and 3.1 mm for axial CT. The 95% LOA concerning the mean of the observers' measurements of the longest diameter at chest tomosynthesis and axial CT were ±2.1 mm (mean measurement error, 0 mm). For the different observers, the 95% LOA between the modalities ranged from -2.2 and 1.6 mm to -3.2 and 2.8 mm. Measurements on chest tomosynthesis and CT images are comparable, because there is no evident bias between the modalities and the repeatability is similar. The LOA between measurements for the two modalities raise concern if measurements from chest tomosynthesis and CT were to be used interchangeably. © RSNA, 2012.

  3. Understanding chest radiographic anatomy with MDCT reformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussmann, A.R. [Department of Radiology, Thoracic Imaging, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Ko, J.P., E-mail: jane.ko@nyumc.or [Department of Radiology, Thoracic Imaging, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Chest radiograph interpretation requires an understanding of the mediastinal reflections and anatomical structures. Computed tomography (CT) improves the learning of three-dimensional (3D) anatomy, and more recently multidetector CT (MDCT) technology has enabled the creation of high-quality reformations in varying projections. Multiplanar reformations (MPRs) of varying thickness in the coronal and sagittal projections can be created for direct correlation with findings on frontal and lateral chest radiographs, respectively. MPRs enable simultaneous visualization of the craniocaudal extent of thoracic structures while providing the anatomic detail that has been previously illustrated using cadaveric specimens. Emphasis will be placed on improving knowledge of mediastinal anatomy and reflections including edges, lines, and stripes that are visible on chest radiographs.

  4. Spiral CT for evaluation of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehnert, W.; Weise, R.

    1997-01-01

    After implementation of spiral CT in our department, we carried out an analysis for determining anew the value of CT as a modality of chest trauma diagnosis in the emergency department. The retrospective study covers a period of 10 months and all emergency patients with chest trauma exmined by spiral CT. The major lesions of varying seriousness covered by this study are: pneumothorax, hematothorax, pulmonary contusion or laceration, mediastinal hematoma, rupture of a vessel, injury of the heart and pericardium. The various fractures are not included in this study. In many cases, spiral CT within relatively short time yields significant diagnostic findings, frequently saving additional angiography. A rigid diagnostic procedure cannot be formulated. Plain-film chest radiography still remains a diagnostic modality of high value. (Orig.) [de

  5. Cardiogenic shock following blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-González Fayna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac contusion, usually caused by blunt chest trauma, has been recognized with increased frequency over the past decades. Traffic accidents are the most frequent cause of cardiac contusions resulting from a direct blow to the chest. Other causes of blunt cardiac injury are numerous and include violent fall impacts, interpersonal aggression, explosions, and various types of high-risk sports. Myocardial contusion is difficult to diagnose; clinical presentation varies greatly, ranging from lack of symptoms to cardiogenic shock and arrhythmia. Although death is rare, cardiac contusion can be fatal. We present a case of cardiac contusion due to blunt chest trauma secondary to a fall impact, which manifested as cardiogenic shock.

  6. Ultrasonic measurements of chest wall thickness and realistic chest phantom for calibration of Pu lung counting facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirotani, Takashi

    1990-01-01

    There are four important problems for the measurements of chest wall thickness using ultrasonic device: (1) selection of optimum position of transducer and the number of measured points on the chest covered with detector, (2) estimation of adipose-to-muscle ratio in the chest wall, especially for dispersed adipose like 'marbled beef', (3) determination of regression equations for the prediction of chest wall thickness, derived from groups of different body shape, i.e. corpulent and lean, and (4) estimation of effective chest wall thickness involved self-absorption layer of lung tissue, which changes with distribution of activity in the lungs. This quantity can not be measured with ultrasonic device. Realistic chest phantom was developed. The phantom contains removable model organs (lungs, liver, kidneys and heart), model trachea and artificial rib cage, and also includes chest plates that can be placed over the chest to simulate wide range adipose-to-muscle ratio in the chest wall. Various soft tissue substitutes were made of polyurethane with different concentrations of additive, and the rib cage were made of epoxy resin with calcium carbonate. The experimental data have shown that the phantom can be used as a standard phantom for the calibration. (author)

  7. Clinical Databases for Chest Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtwright, Andrew M; Gabriel, Peter E

    2018-04-01

    A clinical database is a repository of patient medical and sociodemographic information focused on one or more specific health condition or exposure. Although clinical databases may be used for research purposes, their primary goal is to collect and track patient data for quality improvement, quality assurance, and/or actual clinical management. This article aims to provide an introduction and practical advice on the development of small-scale clinical databases for chest physicians and practice groups. Through example projects, we discuss the pros and cons of available technical platforms, including Microsoft Excel and Access, relational database management systems such as Oracle and PostgreSQL, and Research Electronic Data Capture. We consider approaches to deciding the base unit of data collection, creating consensus around variable definitions, and structuring routine clinical care to complement database aims. We conclude with an overview of regulatory and security considerations for clinical databases. Copyright © 2018 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Chest complication after abdominal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, B. H.; Choi, J. Y.; Hahm, C. K.; Kang, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    In spite of many advances in medicine, anesthetic technique and surgical managements, pulmonary problems are the most frequent postoperative complications, particularly after abdominal surgery. As postoperative pulmonary complications, atelectasis, pleural effusion, pneumonia, chronic bronchitis and lung abscess can be occurred. This study include evaluation of chest films of 2006 patients (927 male, 1079 female), who had been operated abdominal surgery from Jan. 1979 to June, 1980 in the Hanyang university hospital. The results were as follows: 1. 70 cases out of total 2006 cases (3.5%) developed postoperative chest complications, 51 cases (5.5%) in male, 19 cases (1.8%) in female. 2. The complication rate was increased according to the increase of age. The incidence of the postoperative complications over 40 years of age was higher than the overall average complications rate. 3. The most common postoperative pulmonary complication was pleural effusion, next pneumonia, atelectasis and pulmonary edema respectively. 4. The complication rate of the group of upper abdominal surgery is much higher than the group of lower abdominal surgery. 5. Complication rate was increased according to increase of the duration of operation. 6. There were significant correlations between the operation site and side of the complicated hemithorax

  9. A Community-acquired Lung Abscess Attributable to Streptococcus pneumoniae which Extended Directly into the Chest Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Yuki; Tobino, Kazunori; Yasuda, Yuichiro; Sueyasu, Takuto; Nishizawa, Saori; Yoshimine, Kouhei; Munechika, Miyuki; Asaji, Mina; Yamaji, Yoshikazu; Tsuruno, Kosuke; Miyajima, Hiroyuki; Mukasa, Yosuke; Ebi, Noriyuki

    We herein report the case of 75-year-old Japanese female with a community-acquired lung abscess attributable to Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. penumoniae) which extended into the chest wall. The patient was admitted to our hospital with a painful mass on the left anterior chest wall. A contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography scan showed a lung abscess in the left upper lobe which extended into the chest wall. Surgical debridement of the chest wall abscess and percutaneous transthoracic tube drainage of the lung abscess were performed. A culture of the drainage specimen yielded S. pneumoniae. The patient showed a remarkable improvement after the initiation of intravenous antibiotic therapy.

  10. Non-invasive quick diagnosis of cardiovascular problems from visible and invisible abnormal changes with increased cardiac troponin I appearing on cardiovascular representation areas of the eyebrows, left upper lip, etc. of the face & hands: beneficial manual stimulation of hands for acute anginal chest pain, and important factors in safe, effective treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Jones, Marilyn K; Duvvi, Harsha; Shimotsuura, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Motomu; Rodriques, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that there are at least 7 cardiovascular representation areas on the face, including the "Eyebrows", both sides of the "Nose", "Lelt Upper Lip" and the "Outside of the corner of both sides of the mouth," in addition to 2 areas in each hand. When there are cardiovascular problems, some of the heart representation areas of these areas often show the following changes: 1) Most distinctive visible changes such as the initial whitening with or without long white hair, then hair loss and complete disappearance of the hairs of the heart representation area of "Eyebrows" 2) Invisible biochemical changes that happen in heart representation areas at the "Left Upper Lips", 3) "Nose" below eye level as well as 4) "3rd segment of Middle Finger of Hands." Most distinctive visible & invisible changes are found in heart representation areas on the "Eyebrow", located nearest to the midline of face, where the color of the hairs becomes white compared with the rest of the Eyebrow. Then the cardiovascular problem advances, and hair starts disappearing. When there are no hairs at the heart representation areas of the Eyebrow, usually Cardiac Troponin I is increased to a very serious, abnormal high value. Most of the cardiovascular representation areas of the face show, regardless of presence or absence of visible change. When there is a cardiovascular problem, not only simple Bi-Digital O-Ring Test can detect without using any instrument in several minutes but also, corresponding biochemical changes of abnormally increased Cardiac Troponin I level can often be detected non-invasively from these Organ Representation Areas of Face & Hands, although changes in Eyebrows, L-Upper Lip & 3rd segment of middle fingers are clinically the most reliable changes & easy to identify the locations. Manual Stimulation of Hand's heart representation areas often eliminated acute anginal chest pain before medical help became available. Important factors for safe, effective

  11. Clinical assessment compared with chest X-Ray after removal of chest tube to diagnose pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeed, F. A.; Noor, Q. U. H.; Mehmood, U.; Imtiaz, T.; Zafar, U.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical judgment in ruling out pneumothorax during the removal of the chest tube by auscultating the chest before removal and after the extubation of the chest tube in comparison to x ray radiological results. Study Design: Descriptive cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Lahore Pakistan, from August 2015 to March 2016. Material and Methods: A sample size of 100 was calculated. Patients were selected via non probability purposive sampling. Children under 14 years were not included. The patients with mal-positioned chest tube, surgical site infection, air leak and the patients with more than one chest tube on one side were excluded. A proforma was made and filled by one person. Chest tubes were removed by two trained senior registrars according to a protocol devised. It was ensured that there was no air leak present before removal clinically and radiologically. Another chest x-ray was done within 24 hours of extubation to detect any pathology that might have occurred during the process. Any complication in the patient clinically was observed till the x-ray film became available. Two sets of readings were obtained. Set A included auscultation findings and set B included x ray results. Results: Out of 100 patients, 60 (60 percent) were males and 40 (40 percent) females. The ages of the patients ranged between 17-77 years. Mean age of the patient was 43.27 ± 17.05 years. In set A out of 100 (100 percent) no pneumothorax developed clinically. In set B out of 100 patients 99 (99 percent) showed no pneumothorax on chest x ray, only 1 (1 percent) showed pneumothorax which was not significant (less than 15 percent on X ray). However, the patient remained asymptomatic clinically and there was no need of reinsertion of the chest tube. Conclusion: Auscultatory findings in diagnosing a significant pneumothorax are justified. Hence, if the chest tube is removed according to the protocol, clinically by

  12. Chest wall – underappreciated structure in sonography. Part II: Non-cancerous lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Smereczyński

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The chest wall is a vast and complex structure, hence the wide range of pathological conditions that may affect it. The aim of this publication is to discuss the usefulness of ultrasound for the diagnosis of benign lesions involving the thoracic wall. The most commonly encountered conditions include sternal and costal injuries and thoracic lymphadenopathy. Ultrasound is very efficient in identifying the etiology of pain experienced in the anterior chest wall following CPR interventions. Both available literature and the authors’ own experience prompt us to propose ultrasound evaluation as the first step in the diagnostic workup of chest trauma, as it permits far superior visualization of the examined structures compared with conventional radiography. Sonographic evaluation allows correct diagnosis in the case of various costal and chondral defects suspicious for cancer. It also facilitates diagnosis of such conditions as degenerative lesions, subluxation of sternoclavicular joints (SCJs and inflammatory lesions of various etiology and location. US may be used as the diagnostic modality of choice in conditions following thoracoscopy or thoracotomy. It may also visualize the fairly common sternal wound infection, including bone inflammation. Slipping rib syndrome, relatively little known among clinicians, has also been discussed in the study. A whole gamut of benign lesions of thoracic soft tissues, such as enlarged lymph nodes, torn muscles, hematomas, abscesses, fissures, scars or foreign bodies, are all easily identified on ultrasound, just like in other superficially located organs.

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be present in your body due to prior accidents. Foreign bodies near and especially lodged in the ... recorded. If you are anxious, confused or in severe pain, you may find it difficult to lie ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please ... If you are anxious, confused or in severe pain, you may find it difficult to lie still ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Most MRI exams are painless. However, some patients find it uncomfortable to remain still during MR imaging. ... anxious, confused or in severe pain, you may find it difficult to lie still during imaging. A ...

  16. Chest Reconstruction and Chest Dysphoria in Transmasculine Minors and Young Adults: Comparisons of Nonsurgical and Postsurgical Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson-Kennedy, Johanna; Warus, Jonathan; Okonta, Vivian; Belzer, Marvin; Clark, Leslie F

    2018-05-01

    was significantly higher than mean (SD) scores in those who had undergone this procedure (3.3 [3.8]; P < .001). Among the nonsurgical cohort, 64 (94%) perceived chest surgery as very important, and chest dysphoria increased by 0.33 points each month that passed between a youth initiating testosterone therapy and undergoing surgery. Among the postsurgical cohort, the most common complicat