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Sample records for include charged magnetic

  1. Magnetic and charge ordering in nanosized manganites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, T.; Wang, X. P.; Fang, Q. F.; Li, X. G.

    2014-01-01

    Perovskite manganites exhibit a wide range of functional properties, such as colossal magneto-resistance, magnetocaloric effect, multiferroic property, and some interesting physical phenomena including spin, charge, and orbital ordering. Recent advances in science and technology associated with perovskite oxides have resulted in the feature sizes of microelectronic devices down-scaling into nanoscale dimensions. The nanoscale perovskite manganites display novel magnetic and electronic properties that are different from their bulk and film counterparts. Understanding the size effects of perovskite manganites at the nanoscale is of importance not only for the fundamental scientific research but also for developing next generation of electronic and magnetic nanodevices. In this paper, the current understanding and the fundamental issues related to the size effects on the magnetic properties and charge ordering in manganites are reviewed, which covers lattice structure, magnetic and electronic properties in both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic based manganites. In addition to review the literatures, this article identifies the promising avenues for the future research in this area

  2. Detector magnets for charged particle momentum measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Arduini, Gianluigi

    1995-01-01

    Basic formulae related to the momentum measurement of charged particles by tracking devices in magnetic fields and typical detector magnet geometries are briefly revised. From these, guidelines are worked out for the determination of the basic specifications (yoke size, excitation current, conductor type and size, cooling) both for normal and superconducting magnets. The problem of magnetic shielding of components placed near big detector magnets is also considered.

  3. Mikhailov's experiments on detection of magnetic charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akers, D.

    1988-01-01

    In a reanalysis of Mikhailov's experiments, it is argued that observations of magnetic charge g = (1/2)(1/137)(1/3)e on ferromagnetic aerosols are incorrect. Future experiments of the type conducted by Mikhailov must take into an account the component of particle velocity orthogonal to E and H. It is shown that Mikhailov's data are consistent with the existence of a Dirac unit of magnetic charge g = (137/2)e found in meson spectroscopy

  4. Reconfigurable and writable magnetic charge crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Xiao, Zhi-Li; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2017-07-18

    Artificial ices enable the study of geometrical frustration by design and through direct observation. It has, however, proven difficult to achieve tailored long-range ordering of their diverse configurations, limiting both fundamental and applied research directions. An artificial spin structure design is described that produces a magnetic charge ice with tunable long-range ordering of eight different configurations. A technique is also developed to precisely manipulate the local magnetic charge states and demonstrate write-read-erase multi-functionality at room temperature. This globally reconfigurable and locally writable magnetic charge ice provides a setting for designing magnetic monopole defects, tailoring magnetics and controlling the properties of other two-dimensional materials.

  5. Charged particle confinement in magnetic mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bora, D.; John, P.I.; Saxena, Y.C.; Varma, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    The behaviour of single charged particle trapped in a magnetic mirror has been investigated experimentally. The particle injected off axis and trapped in a magnetic mirror, leak out of the mirror with the leakage characterized by multiple decay times. The observed decay times are in good agreement with predictions of a ''wave mechanical like'' model by Varma, over a large range of relevant parameters. (author)

  6. Permanent magnets including undulators and wigglers

    OpenAIRE

    Bahrdt, J.

    2011-01-01

    After a few historic remarks on magnetic materials we introduce the basic definitions related to permanent magnets. The magnetic properties of the most common materials are reviewed and the production processes are described. Measurement techniques for the characterization of macroscopic and microscopic properties of permanent magnets are presented. Field simulation techniques for permanent magnet devices are discussed. Today, permanent magnets are used in many fields. This article concentrat...

  7. Proposal to Search for Magnetically Charged Particles with Magnetic Charge 1e

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Michael K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fryberger, David [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-11-02

    A model for composite elementary Standard Model (SM) particles based upon magnetically bound vorton pairs, we briefly introduce here, predicts the existence of a complete family of magnetically charged particles, as well as their neutral isotopic partners (all counterparts to the SM elementary particles), in which the lowest mass (charged) particle would be an electrically neutral stable lepton, but which carries a magnetic charge equivalent to 1e. This new particle, which we call a magneticon (a counterpart to the electron) would be pair produced at all e+e- colliders at an Ecm above twice its mass. In addition, PP and PPbar colliders should also be able to produce these new particles through the Drell-Yan process. To our knowledge, no monopole search experiment has been sensitive to such a low-charged magnetic monopole above a particle mass of about 5 GeV/c2. Hence, we propose that a search for such a stable particle of magnetic charge 1e should be undertaken. We have taken the ATLAS detector at the LHC as an example in which this search might be done. To this end, we modeled the magnetic fields and muon trigger chambers of this detector. We show results from a simple Monte Carlo simulation program to indicate how these particles might look in the detector and describe how one might search for these new particles in the ATLAS data stream.

  8. Magnetic Generation due to Mass Difference between Charge Carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shi; Dan, JiaKun; Chen, ZiYu; Li, JianFeng

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of spontaneous magnetization due to the "asymmetry in mass" of charge carriers in a system is investigated. Analysis shows that when the masses of positive and negative charge carriers are identical, no magnetization is predicted. However, if the masses of two species are different, spontaneous magnetic field would appear, either due to the equipartition of magnetic energy or due to fluctuations together with a feedback mechanism. The conditions for magnetization to occur are ...

  9. Coupled spin, elastic and charge dynamics in magnetic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamra, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this Thesis, I address the interaction of magnetic degrees of freedom with charge current and elastic dynamics in hybrid systems composed of magnetic and non-magnetic materials. The objective, invariably, is to control and study spin dynamics using charge and elastic degrees of freedom. In

  10. Nuclear resonance apparatus including means for rotating a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, H.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus including magnet apparatus for generating a homogeneous static magnetic field between its magnetic poles, shims of a magnetic substance mounted on the magnetic poles to apply a first gradient magnetic field intensity distribution in a direction orthogonal as to the direction of line of magnetic force of the static magnetic field, gradient magnetic field generating electromagnetic apparatus for generating a second gradient magnetic field having a gradient magnetic field intensity distribution in superimposition with the static magnetic field and for changing the magnetic field gradient of the first gradient magnetic field, an oscillator for generating an oscillating output having a frequency corresponding to the nuclear magnetic resonance condition of an atomic nucleus to be measured, a coil wound around a body to be examined for applying the output of said oscillator as electromagnetic waves upon the body, a receiver for detecting the nuclear magnetic resonance signals received by the coil, a gradient magnetic field controller making a magnetic field line equivalent to the combined gradient magnetic fields and for rotating the line along the section of the body to be examined by controlling said gradient magnetic field generating electromagnetic apparatus and devices for recording the nuclear magnetic resonance signals, for reconstructing the concentration distribution of the specific atomic nuclei in the section of the body, and a display unit for depicting the result of reconstruction

  11. Lexan Linear Shaped Charge Holder with Magnets and Backing Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maples, Matthew W.; Dutton, Maureen L.; Hacker, Scott C.; Dean, Richard J.; Kidd, Nicholas; Long, Chris; Hicks, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    A method was developed for cutting a fabric structural member in an inflatable module, without damaging the internal structure of the module, using linear shaped charge. Lexan and magnets are used in a charge holder to precisely position the linear shaped charge over the desired cut area. Two types of charge holders have been designed, each with its own backing plate. One holder cuts fabric straps in the vertical configuration, and the other charge holder cuts fabric straps in the horizontal configuration.

  12. Parker limit for monopoles with large magnetic charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodges, H.M.; Kolb, E.W.; Turner, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The survival of galactic magnetic fields places a limit on the flux of magnetic monopoles, the so-called ''Parker limit.'' Previous discussions of the Parker limit have assumed that the charge of the monopole is the Dirac value, g/sub Dirac/ = 2π/e. However, if the grand unified group is broken by Wilson lines, as is assumed in some superstring models, the minimum value of the magnetic charge is not the Dirac quantum, but an integer multiple of it. In this brief report we investigate the dependence of the Parker limit on the charge of the magnetic monopole. 10 refs., 1 fig

  13. Multiferroicity of carbon-based charge-transfer magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wei; Gong, Maogang; Chen, Xiaomin; Shastry, Tejas A; Sakidja, Ridwan; Yuan, Guoliang; Hersam, Mark C; Wuttig, Manfred; Ren, Shenqiang

    2015-01-27

    A new type of carbon charge-transfer magnet, consisting of a fullerene acceptor and single-walled carbon nanotube donor, is demonstrated, which exhibits room temperature ferromagnetism and magnetoelectric (ME) coupling. In addition, external stimuli (electric/magnetic/elastic field) and the concentration of a nanocarbon complex enable the tunabilities of the magnetization and ME coupling due to the control of the charge transfer. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. A charged black hole in a uniform magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krori, K.D.; Chaudhury, S.; Dowerah, S.

    1983-01-01

    We present here an investigation of the event horizon of a charged black hole embedded in a uniform magnetic field studying the Gaussian curvature. It is shown that the Gauss-Bonnet theorem holds for this magnetized black hole and for a magnetized Kerr black hole

  15. Fractionally charged particles and one Dirac charge magnetic monopoles: Are they compatible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Rubakov

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous existence of fractional electric charges and one Dirac charge magnetic monopoles implies the existence of a long-ranged force different from electromagnetism. This may be either unconfined colour or/and some new gauge interaction. In the latter case, ordinary matter could (and, if colour is unbroken, should carry new charge. This charge, however small the coupling constant be, could be experimentally observed in interactions of monopoles with matter. An experiment for checking this possibility is suggested.

  16. Magnetically-charged black branes and viscosity/entropy ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hai-Shan [Institute for Advanced Physics & Mathematics,Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310023 (China); George P. & Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy,Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Lü, H. [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University,Beijing 100875 (China); Pope, C.N. [George P. & Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy,Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences,Cambridge University, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 OWA (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-19

    We consider asymptotically-AdS n-dimensional black brane solutions in a theory of gravity coupled to a set of Np-form field strengths, in which the field strengths carry magnetic charges. For appropriately chosen charges, the metrics are isotropic in the (n−2) transverse directions. However, in general the field strength configurations break the full Euclidean symmetry of the (n−2)-dimensional transverse space, and the shear viscosity tensor in the dual theory is no longer isotropic. We study the linearised equations for transverse traceless metric perturbations in these backgrounds, and by employing the Kubo formula we obtain expressions for the ratios η/S of the shear viscosity components divided by the entropy density. We find that the KSS bound on the ratios η/S is generally violated in these solutions. We also extend the discussion by including a dilatonic scalar field in the theory, leading to solutions that are asymptotically Lifshitz with hyperscaling violation.

  17. Electro-magnetic waves within a model for charged solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisyuk, Dmitry; Faber, Manfried; Kobushkin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the model of topological fermions (MTF), where charged fermions are treated as soliton solutions of the field equations. In the region far from the sources we find plane waves solutions with the properties of electro-magnetic waves

  18. Quantisation of monopoles with non-abelian magnetic charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bais, F.A.; Schroers, B.J. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). Inst. voor Theoretische Fysica

    1998-02-16

    Magnetic monopoles in Yang-Mills-Higgs theory with a non-abelian unbroken gauge group are classified by holomorphic charges in addition to the topological charges familiar from the abelian case. As a result the moduli spaces of monopoles of given topological charge are stratified according to the holomorphic charges. Here the physical consequences of the stratification are explored in the case where the gauge group SU(3) is broken to U(2). The description due to Dancer of the moduli space of charge-two monopoles is reviewed and interpreted physically in terms of non-abelian magnetic dipole moments. Semi-classical quantisation leads to dyonic states which are labelled by a magnetic charge and a representation of the subgroup of U(2) which leaves the magnetic charge invariant (centraliser subgroup). A key result of this paper is that these states fall into representations of the semi-direct product U(2) x R{sup 4}. The combination rules (Clebsch-Gordan coefficients) of dyonic states can thus be deduced. Electric-magnetic duality properties of the theory are discussed in the light of our results, and supersymmetric dyonic BPS states which fill the SL(2,Z) orbit of the basic massive W-bosons are found. (orig.). 48 refs.

  19. Two charges on plane in a magnetic field: special trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Escobar-Ruiz, M. A.; Turbiner, A. V.

    2012-01-01

    A classical mechanics of two Coulomb charges on a plane $(e_1, m_1)$ and $(e_2, m_2)$ subject to a constant magnetic field perpendicular to a plane is considered. Special "superintegrable" trajectories (circular and linear) for which the distance between charges remains unchanged are indicated as well as their respectful constants of motion. The number of the independent constants of motion for special trajectories is larger for generic ones. A classification of pairs of charges for which spe...

  20. Magnetic charges in the AdS(4) superalgebra osp(4 vertical bar 2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dibitetto, Giuseppe; Klemm, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the issue of how to include magnetic charges in the AdS(4) superalgebra osp(4 vertical bar 2). It is shown that the usual way of introducing a pseudoscalar central charge on the right hand side of the basic anticommutator does not work, because this breaks SO(2, 3) covariance. We propose

  1. Spin-orbit torques and charge pumping in crystalline magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarelli, Chiara

    In magnetic crystals with an inversion asymmetric unit cell a non-zero global spin-polarization is generated by an electrical current, which acts with a torque on the magnetisation exciting magnetic dynamics. This relativistic non-equilibrium spin phenomenon also has a reciprocal effect in which the excitation of magnons results in the pumping of a charge current. The possibility to manipulate/read magnetism with electrical currents is highly relevant for magnetic memories and other spintronic devices. I will start by reviewing our recent research on spin-orbit torques (SOTs) in crystalline magnets, in particular our very recent measurements of the crystalline SOT at room temperature in half-Heusler NiMnSb thin films. With this experiment we are able to fully characterise magnitude and symmetry of the SOTs. I will then talk about the first demonstration of magnonic charge pumping in crystal magnet GaMnAs. In this effect, which is the reciprocal effect of SOTs, the precessing ferromagnet pumps a charge current. Differently from spin pumping, which is commonly used to electrically detect magnetization dynamics, in charge pumping magnons are converted within the ferromagnet into high-frequency currents via the relativistic spin-orbit interaction, without the need of a secondary spin-charge conversion element, such as heavy metals with large spin Hall angle.

  2. System of coefficients for charged-particle beam linear transformation by a magnetic dipole element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarantin, N.I.

    1979-01-01

    A new technique for consideration of dipole magnet ion-optical effect has been developed to study the problems of commutation and monochromatization of a charged particle beam. In a new form obtained are systematized coefficients of linear transformation (CLT) of the charged particle beam for radial and axial motions in a magnetic dipole element (MDE) including a dipole magnet and two gaps without magnetic field. Given is a method of graphic determination of MDE parameters and main CLT. The new form of coefficients and conditions of the transformations feasibility considerably facilitates the choice and calculation of dipole elements

  3. Magnetic analysis of charged particles in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarantin, N.I.

    1980-01-01

    The article discusses the development of charged-particle magnetic analyzers used in nuclear physics--alpha and beta spectrometers, mass spectrometers and mass separators, spectrometers of elastically and inelastically scattered particles, and monochromators of accelerated particles. The discussion is carried out in terms of the linear theory of magnetic analysis of charged particles and on the basis of the general laws of particle optics. The review describes a new approach to discussion of linear transformations of particle beams in dipole and quadrupole magnets which permits a unique and simplified representation of all linear-transformation coefficients. Graphical procedures are given for determination of the particle-optics action of dipole and quadrupole magnets. The approach and the procedures are extended to analyzers with crossed magnetic and electric fields

  4. Functionalization of magnetic nanowires by charged biopolymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnin, D.; Callegari, V.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    We report on a facile method for the preparation of biocompatible and bioactive magnetic nanowires. The method consists of the direct deposition of polysaccharides by layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly onto a brush of metallic nanowires; obtained by electrodeposition of the metal within the nanopores ...

  5. Transport of Charged Particles in Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, T.; Subedi, P.; Sonsrettee, W.; Blasi, P.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Montgomery, D.; Chuychai, P.; Dmitruk, P.; Wan, M.; Chhiber, R.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic fields permeate the Universe. They are found in planets, stars, galaxies, and the intergalactic medium. The magnetic field found in these astrophysical systems are usually chaotic, disordered, and turbulent. The investigation of the transport of cosmic rays in magnetic turbulence is a subject of considerable interest. One of the important aspects of cosmic ray transport is to understand their diffusive behavior and to calculate the diffusion coefficient in the presence of these turbulent fields. Research has most frequently concentrated on determining the diffusion coefficient in the presence of a mean magnetic field. Here, we will particularly focus on calculating diffusion coefficients of charged particles and magnetic field lines in a fully three-dimensional isotropic turbulent magnetic field with no mean field, which may be pertinent to many astrophysical situations. For charged particles in isotropic turbulence we identify different ranges of particle energy depending upon the ratio of the Larmor radius of the charged particle to the characteristic outer length scale of the turbulence. Different theoretical models are proposed to calculate the diffusion coefficient, each applicable to a distinct range of particle energies. The theoretical ideas are tested against results of detailed numerical experiments using Monte-Carlo simulations of particle propagation in stochastic magnetic fields. We also discuss two different methods of generating random magnetic field to study charged particle propagation using numerical simulation. One method is the usual way of generating random fields with a specified power law in wavenumber space, using Gaussian random variables. Turbulence, however, is non-Gaussian, with variability that comes in bursts called intermittency. We therefore devise a way to generate synthetic intermittent fields which have many properties of realistic turbulence. Possible applications of such synthetically generated intermittent fields are

  6. Electric charge quantization and the muon anomalous magnetic moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, C.A.S. de; Rodrigues da Silva, P.S.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate some proposals to solve the electric charge quantization puzzle that simultaneously explain the recent measured deviation on the muon anomalous magnetic moment. For this we assess extensions of the electro-weak standard model spanning modifications on the scalar sector only. It is interesting to verify that one can have modest extensions which easily account for the solution for both problems

  7. Simulations of space charge neutralization in a magnetized electron cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerity, James [Texas A-M; McIntyre, Peter M. [Texas A-M; Bruhwiler, David Leslie [RadiaSoft, Boulder; Hall, Christopher [RadiaSoft, Boulder; Moens, Vince Jan [Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne; Park, Chong Shik [Fermilab; Stancari, Giulio [Fermilab

    2017-02-02

    Magnetized electron cooling at relativistic energies and Ampere scale current is essential to achieve the proposed ion luminosities in a future electron-ion collider (EIC). Neutralization of the space charge in such a cooler can significantly increase the magnetized dynamic friction and, hence, the cooling rate. The Warp framework is being used to simulate magnetized electron beam dynamics during and after the build-up of neutralizing ions, via ionization of residual gas in the cooler. The design follows previous experiments at Fermilab as a verification case. We also discuss the relevance to EIC designs.

  8. Collisionless distribution function of charged particles ensemble in a tokamak magnetic configuration with magnetic island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podturova, O. I.

    2017-10-01

    The collisionless distribution function of charged particle ensemble in the magnetic field of tokamak with a magnetic island is calculated. The calculation is based on the solution of the kinetic equation with source together with three-dimensional numerical calculations of charged particle trajectories. It is shown that in case of an inhomogeneous source trajectory, motion of trapped particles leads to anisotropization of the initially isotropic distribution of particle ensemble. The absence of contribution from the passing particles decreases the efficiency of spontaneous generation of a non-induction current in the magnetic island in comparison with the bootstrap effect in the system of nested magnetic surfaces.

  9. Charged Particle Diffusion in Isotropic Random Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subedi, P.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Chuychai, P.; Parashar, T. N.; Chhiber, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Sonsrettee, W. [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Panyapiwat Institute of Management, Nonthaburi 11120 (Thailand); Blasi, P. [INAF/Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi, 5—I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Ruffolo, D. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Montgomery, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Dmitruk, P. [Departamento de Física Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Wan, M. [Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055 (China)

    2017-03-10

    The investigation of the diffusive transport of charged particles in a turbulent magnetic field remains a subject of considerable interest. Research has most frequently concentrated on determining the diffusion coefficient in the presence of a mean magnetic field. Here we consider the diffusion of charged particles in fully three-dimensional isotropic turbulent magnetic fields with no mean field, which may be pertinent to many astrophysical situations. We identify different ranges of particle energy depending upon the ratio of Larmor radius to the characteristic outer length scale of turbulence. Two different theoretical models are proposed to calculate the diffusion coefficient, each applicable to a distinct range of particle energies. The theoretical results are compared to those from computer simulations, showing good agreement.

  10. Hierarchical control of a photovoltaic/battery based DC microgrid including electric vehicle wireless charging station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Zhao xia; Fan, Haodong; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the hierarchical control strategy of a photovoltaic/battery based dc microgrid is presented for electric vehicle (EV) wireless charging. Considering irradiance variations, battery charging/discharging requirements, wireless power transmission characteristics, and onboard battery...... charging power change and other factors, the possible operation states are obtained. A hierarchical control strategy is established, which includes central and local controllers. The central controller is responsible for the selection and transfer of operation states and the management of the local...... controllers. Local controllers implement these functions, which include PV maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithm, battery charging/discharging control, voltage control of DC bus for high-frequency inverter, and onboard battery charging control. By optimizing and matching parameters of transmitting...

  11. Surface potential based modeling of charge, current, and capacitances in DGTFET including mobile channel charge and ambipolar behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Prateek; Yadav, Chandan; Agarwal, Amit; Chauhan, Yogesh Singh

    2017-08-01

    We present a surface potential based analytical model for double gate tunnel field effect transistor (DGTFET) for the current, terminal charges, and terminal capacitances. The model accounts for the effect of the mobile charge in the channel and captures the device physics in depletion as well as in the strong inversion regime. The narrowing of the tunnel barrier in the presence of mobile charges in the channel is incorporated via modeling of the inverse decay length, which is constant under channel depletion condition and bias dependent under inversion condition. To capture the ambipolar current behavior in the model, tunneling at the drain junction is also included. The proposed model is validated against TCAD simulation data and it shows close match with the simulation data.

  12. Arnold Diffusion of Charged Particles in ABC Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Alejandro; Peralta-Salas, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    We prove the existence of diffusing solutions in the motion of a charged particle in the presence of ABC magnetic fields. The equations of motion are modeled by a 3DOF Hamiltonian system depending on two parameters. For small values of these parameters, we obtain a normally hyperbolic invariant manifold and we apply the so-called geometric methods for a priori unstable systems developed by A. Delshams, R. de la Llave and T.M. Seara. We characterize explicitly sufficient conditions for the existence of a transition chain of invariant tori having heteroclinic connections, thus obtaining global instability (Arnold diffusion). We also check the obtained conditions in a computer-assisted proof. ABC magnetic fields are the simplest force-free-type solutions of the magnetohydrodynamics equations with periodic boundary conditions, and can be considered as an elementary model for the motion of plasma-charged particles in a tokamak.

  13. The classical equations of motion for a spinning point particle with charge and magnetic moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, E.G.P.; Rowe, G.T.

    1987-01-01

    The classical, special relativistic equations of motion are derived for a spinning point particle interacting with the electromagnetic field through its charge and magnetic moment. Radiation reaction is included. The energy tensors for the particle and for the field are developed as well-defined distributions; consequently no infinities appear. The magnitude of spin and the rest mass are conserved. (orig.)

  14. Wavefunction and energy level formula for two charged particles with magnetic interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Hongyi [CCAST (World Laboratory), PO Box 8730, Beijing 100080 (China); Fu Liang [Special Class for the Gifted Young, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2003-07-25

    We derive the wavefunction and energy level formula for two charged particles with magnetic interaction, i.e., the Hamiltonian includes both two-body Coulomb interaction and a kinetic coupling. It is by virtue of the EPR entangled state representation we can conveniently derive the exact result.

  15. A preon model with hidden electric and magnetic type charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pati, J.C.; Strathdee, J.

    1980-11-01

    The U(1) x U(1) binding forces in an earlier preonic composite model of quarks and leptons are interpreted as arising from hidden electric and magnetic type charges. The preons may possess intrinsic spin zero; the half-integer spins of the composites being contributed by the force field. The quark-lepton gauge symmetry is interpreted as an effective low-energy symmetry arising at the composite level. Some remarks are made regarding the possible composite nature of the graviton. (author)

  16. Numerical periodic orbits of charged grains around magnetic planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Haoran; Gong, Shengping

    2018-04-01

    We apply a numerical searching method to investigate three-dimensional periodic orbits of charged dust particles in planetary magnetospheres. A classic generalized Stormer model of magnetic planets along with the parameters of Saturn is employed. More periodic orbits are found, besides the already known circular periodic orbits in or parallel to the equatorial plane. We divide all these orbits into six categories based on their appearances. By calculating the characteristic multipliers of the orbits, we investigate the stabilities of these periodic orbits.

  17. Fractional dynamics of charged particles in magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronel-Escamilla, A.; Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Alvarado-Méndez, E.; Guerrero-Ramírez, G. V.; Escobar-Jiménez, R. F.

    2016-02-01

    In many physical applications the electrons play a relevant role. For example, when a beam of electrons accelerated to relativistic velocities is used as an active medium to generate Free Electron Lasers (FEL), the electrons are bound to atoms, but move freely in a magnetic field. The relaxation time, longitudinal effects and transverse variations of the optical field are parameters that play an important role in the efficiency of this laser. The electron dynamics in a magnetic field is a means of radiation source for coupling to the electric field. The transverse motion of the electrons leads to either gain or loss energy from or to the field, depending on the position of the particle regarding the phase of the external radiation field. Due to the importance to know with great certainty the displacement of charged particles in a magnetic field, in this work we study the fractional dynamics of charged particles in magnetic fields. Newton’s second law is considered and the order of the fractional differential equation is (0;1]. Based on the Grünwald-Letnikov (GL) definition, the discretization of fractional differential equations is reported to get numerical simulations. Comparison between the numerical solutions obtained on Euler’s numerical method for the classical case and the GL definition in the fractional approach proves the good performance of the numerical scheme applied. Three application examples are shown: constant magnetic field, ramp magnetic field and harmonic magnetic field. In the first example the results obtained show bistability. Dissipative effects are observed in the system and the standard dynamic is recovered when the order of the fractional derivative is 1.

  18. Sea quarks contribution to the nucleon magnetic moment and charge radius at the physical point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sufian, Raza Sabbir; Yang, Yi-Bo; Liang, Jian; Draper, Terrence; Liu, Keh-Fei; χ QCD Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    We report a comprehensive analysis of the light and strange disconnected-sea quarks contribution to the nucleon magnetic moment, charge radius, and the electric and magnetic form factors. The lattice QCD calculation includes ensembles across several lattice volumes and lattice spacings with one of the ensembles at the physical pion mass. We adopt a model-independent extrapolation of the nucleon magnetic moment and the charge radius. We have performed a simultaneous chiral, infinite volume, and continuum extrapolation in a global fit to calculate results in the continuum limit. We find that the combined light and strange disconnected-sea quarks contribution to the nucleon magnetic moment is μM(DI )=-0.022 (11 )(09 ) μN and to the nucleon mean square charge radius is ⟨r2⟩E(DI ) =-0.019 (05 )(05 ) fm2 which is about 1 /3 of the difference between the ⟨rp2⟩E of electron-proton scattering and that of a muonic atom and so cannot be ignored in obtaining the proton charge radius in the lattice QCD calculation. The most important outcome of this lattice QCD calculation is that while the combined light-sea and strange quarks contribution to the nucleon magnetic moment is small at about 1%, a negative 2.5(9)% contribution to the proton mean square charge radius and a relatively larger positive 16.3(6.1)% contribution to the neutron mean square charge radius come from the sea quarks in the nucleon. For the first time, by performing global fits, we also give predictions of the light and strange disconnected-sea quarks contributions to the nucleon electric and magnetic form factors at the physical point and in the continuum and infinite volume limits in the momentum transfer range of 0 ≤Q2≤0.5 GeV2 .

  19. Streaming current magnetic fields in a charged nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Abraham; Taheri, Peyman; Kostiuk, Larry W.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields induced by currents created in pressure driven flows inside a solid-state charged nanopore were modeled by numerically solving a system of steady state continuum partial differential equations, i.e., Poisson, Nernst-Planck, Ampere and Navier-Stokes equations (PNPANS). This analysis was based on non-dimensional transport governing equations that were scaled using Debye length as the characteristic length scale, and applied to a finite length cylindrical nano-channel. The comparison of numerical and analytical studies shows an excellent agreement and verified the magnetic fields density both inside and outside the nanopore. The radially non-uniform currents resulted in highly non-uniform magnetic fields within the nanopore that decay as 1/r outside the nanopore. It is worth noting that for either streaming currents or streaming potential cases, the maximum magnetic field occurred inside the pore in the vicinity of nanopore wall, as opposed to a cylindrical conductor that carries a steady electric current where the maximum magnetic fields occur at the perimeter of conductor. Based on these results, it is suggested and envisaged that non-invasive external magnetic fields readouts generated by streaming/ionic currents may be viewed as secondary electronic signatures of biomolecules to complement and enhance current DNA nanopore sequencing techniques. PMID:27833119

  20. Magnetic properties of nickel halide hydrates including deuteration effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeFotis, G.C., E-mail: gxdefo@wm.edu [Chemistry Department, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA, 23187 United States (United States); Van Dongen, M.J.; Hampton, A.S.; Komatsu, C.H.; Trowell, K.T.; Havas, K.C.; Davis, C.M.; DeSanto, C.L. [Chemistry Department, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA, 23187 United States (United States); Hays, K.; Wagner, M.J. [Chemistry Department, George Washington University, Washington, DC, 20052 United States (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic measurements on variously hydrated nickel chlorides and bromides, including deuterated forms, are reported. Results include locations and sizes of susceptibility maxima, T{sub max} and χ{sub max}, ordering temperatures T{sub c}, Curie constants and Weiss theta in the paramagnetic regime, and primary and secondary exchange interactions from analysis of low temperature data. For the latter a 2D Heisenberg model augmented by interlayer exchange in a mean-field approximation is applied. Magnetization data to 16 kG as a function of temperature show curvature and hysteresis characteristics quite system dependent. For four materials high field magnetization data to 70 kG at 2.00 K are also obtained. Comparison is made with theoretical relations for spin-1 models. Trends are apparent, primarily that T{sub max} of each bromide hydrate is less than for the corresponding chloride, and that for a given halide nD{sub 2}O (n=1 or 2) deuterates exhibit lesser T{sub max} than do nH{sub 2}O hydrates. A monoclinic unit cell determined from powder X-ray diffraction data on NiBr{sub 2}·2D{sub 2}O is different from and slightly larger than that of NiBr{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O. This provides some rationale for the difference in magnetic properties between these. - Highlights: • The magnetism of Ni(II) chloride and bromide dihydrates and monohydrates is studied. • Effects of replacing H{sub 2}O by D{sub 2}O are examined for both hydration states and both halides. • Exchange interactions in bromides are weaker than in corresponding chlorides. • Exchange interactions are weaker in D{sub 2}O than in corresponding H{sub 2}O containing systems. • The unit cell of NiBr{sub 2}·2D{sub 2}O is different from and slightly larger than that of NiBr{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O.

  1. Electric fields, weighting fields, signals and charge diffusion in detectors including resistive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riegler, W.

    2016-01-01

    In this report we discuss static and time dependent electric fields in detector geometries with an arbitrary number of parallel layers of a given permittivity and weak conductivity. We derive the Green's functions i.e. the field of a point charge, as well as the weighting fields for readout pads and readout strips in these geometries. The effect of 'bulk' resistivity on electric fields and signals is investigated. The spreading of charge on thin resistive layers is also discussed in detail, and the conditions for allowing the effect to be described by the diffusion equation is discussed. We apply the results to derive fields and induced signals in Resistive Plate Chambers, MICROMEGAS detectors including resistive layers for charge spreading and discharge protection as well as detectors using resistive charge division readout like the MicroCAT detector. We also discuss in detail how resistive layers affect signal shapes and increase crosstalk between readout electrodes.

  2. Charged point particles with magnetic moment in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, R.; Tiomno, J.

    1978-01-01

    Halbwachs Lagrangean formalism for the theory of charged point particles with spin (g = 2) is generalized and formulated in General Relativity for particles of arbitrary charge and magnetic moment. Equations are obtained, both corresponding to Frenkel's condition S sub(μν) x sup(ν)=0 and to Nakano's condition S sub(μν) P sup(ν)=0. With the later condition the exact equations are highly coupled and non linear. When linearized in the electromagnetic and gravitational fields they coincide with de Groot-Suttorp equations for vanishing gravitational field and with Dixon-Wald equations in the absence of electromagnetic field. The equations corresponding to Frenkel's condition, when linearized in S sub(μν), coincide with Papapetrou's and Frenkel's equations in the corresponding limits [pt

  3. Neutrinos from Cosmic Accelerators including Magnetic Field and Flavor Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Winter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the particle physics ingredients affecting the normalization, shape, and flavor composition of astrophysical neutrinos fluxes, such as different production modes, magnetic field effects on the secondaries (muons, pions, and kaons, and flavor mixing, where we focus on pγ interactions. We also discuss the interplay with neutrino propagation and detection, including the possibility to detect flavor and its application in particle physics, and the use of the Glashow resonance to discriminate pγ from pp interactions in the source. We illustrate the implications on fluxes and flavor composition with two different models: (1 the target photon spectrum is dominated by synchrotron emission of coaccelerated electrons and (2 the target photon spectrum follows the observed photon spectrum of gamma-ray bursts. In the latter case, the multimessenger extrapolation from the gamma-ray fluence to the expected neutrino flux is highlighted.

  4. Sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium of binary mixtures of charged colloids including volume effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Lyklema, J.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium of binary mixtures of charged colloids in the presence of small ions and for non-dilute conditions, by extending the work of Biben and Hansen (1994 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 6 A345). For a monocomponent system, they included a Carnahan-Starling

  5. Apparatus and method for generating a magnetic field by rotation of a charge holding object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Vukovic, Lela [Westchester, IL; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glenn, IL

    2009-10-13

    A device and a method for the production of a magnetic field using a Charge Holding Object that is mechanically rotated. In a preferred embodiment, a Charge Holding Object surrounding a sample rotates and subjects the sample to one or more magnetic fields. The one or more magnetic fields are used by NMR Electronics connected to an NMR Conductor positioned within the Charge Holding Object to perform NMR analysis of the sample.

  6. Relationship of sea level muon charge ratio to primary composition including nuclear target effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goned, A.; Shalaby, M.; Salem, A. M.; Roushdy, M.

    1985-01-01

    The discrepancy between the muon charge ratio observed at low energies and that calculated using pp data is removed by including nuclear target effects. Calculations at high energies show that the primary iron spectrum is expected to change slope from 2 to 2.2 to 2.4 to 2.5 for energies approx. 4 x 10 to the 3 GeV/nucleon if scaling features continue to the highest energies.

  7. Measurement of the charge and current of magnetic monopoles in spin ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramwell, S T; Giblin, S R; Calder, S; Aldus, R; Prabhakaran, D; Fennell, T

    2009-10-15

    The transport of electrically charged quasiparticles (based on electrons or ions) plays a pivotal role in modern technology as well as in determining the essential functions of biological organisms. In contrast, the transport of magnetic charges has barely been explored experimentally, mainly because magnetic charges, in contrast to electric ones, are generally considered at best to be convenient macroscopic parameters, rather than well-defined quasiparticles. However, it was recently proposed that magnetic charges can exist in certain materials in the form of emergent excitations that manifest like point charges, or magnetic monopoles. Here we address the question of whether such magnetic charges and their associated currents-'magnetricity'-can be measured directly in experiment, without recourse to any material-specific theory. By mapping the problem onto Onsager's theory of electrolytes, we show that this is indeed possible, and devise an appropriate method for the measurement of magnetic charges and their dynamics. Using muon spin rotation as a suitable local probe, we apply the method to a real material, the 'spin ice' Dy(2)Ti(2)O(7) (refs 5-8). Our experimental measurements prove that magnetic charges exist in this material, interact via a Coulomb potential, and have measurable currents. We further characterize deviations from Ohm's law, and determine the elementary unit of magnetic charge to be 5 mu(B) A(-1), which is equal to that recently predicted using the microscopic theory of spin ice. Our measurement of magnetic charge and magnetic current establishes an instance of a perfect symmetry between electricity and magnetism.

  8. Development of a boundary magnetic charge method for computing magnetic fields in a system containing saturated magnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, H., E-mail: hkmurata@meijo-u.ac.jp; Ishigami, M.; Shimoyama, H.

    2016-01-11

    In previous research, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) boundary magnetic charge method (BMCM) for high-accuracy field calculations in a static magnetic field, even when there exist great differences between the magnitudes of permeability between neighboring magnetic materials. This method, however, cannot be applied to a system that contains saturated magnetic materials. In the present study, therefore, we have developed a novel method that addresses this issue. According to this new method, we divide the region containing the magnetic material into small-volume elements and divide the boundaries between neighboring small-volume elements into small-surface elements, assigning each element an appropriate initial value of permeability. The magnetic field inside and outside of the magnetic material is calculated using this permeability. The value of the permeability of each element is iteratively updated using μ–H data. The updated value of the permeability after the i-th iteration, μ{sub i}, is compared with that of the previous value, μ{sub i−1}. If the difference between the two values is within a preset range, the iteration process is judged to have converged and the value of μ{sub i} is regarded as the final converged value of the permeability. The magnetic field at an arbitrary point in space and/or inside the body of the magnetic material is calculated from the converged permeability of each element. As a result, we have succeeded in developing a novel BMCM for the calculation of a static magnetic field with high accuracy in a system containing saturated magnetic materials.

  9. Magnetic behavior of cobalt bromide hydrates including a deuterated form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeFotis, G.C., E-mail: gxdefo@wm.edu; Hampton, A.S.; Van Dongen, M.J.; Komatsu, C.H.; DeSanto, C.L.; Davis, C.M.

    2017-04-15

    The magnetic properties of little examined CoBr{sub 2}• 2H{sub 2}O and new CoBr{sub 2}• H{sub 2}O and CoBr{sub 2}• D{sub 2}O are studied. Curie-Weiss fits, χ{sub M}=C/(T-θ), yield θ of −9.9, 9.4 and 10.0 K, respectively, over a 30–80 K linear range for each. Higher temperature data are fit assuming two moderately separated low lying Kramers doublets, with exchange accounted for in a mean-field approximation. Susceptibility maxima appear at 9.5, 15.4 and 15.5 K, with χ{sub max} of 0.163, 0.375 and 0.435 emu/mol, respectively. Antiferromagnetic ordering is estimated to occur at 9.0, 13.7 and 13.8 K, in the same order. The ratio T{sub c}/T{sub max} is 0.95, 0.89 and 0.89, respectively, suggesting little low dimensional magnetic character in singly hydrated systems. Data at lower temperatures for the dihydrate are fit with an antiferromagnetic 3D-Ising model. For singly hydrated systems the large size of χ{sub max} prevents this; weakened interchain antiferromagnetic interactions yield enhanced susceptibility maxima. Magnetization data exhibit field induced transitions near 13.5 kG for the dihydrate, and near 6.5 kG for singly hydrated systems with enhanced hysteresis. These transitions are interpreted as metamagnetic in nature. - Highlights: • CoBr{sub 2}• 2H{sub 2}O has a larger susceptibility maximum at lower temperature than CoCl{sub 2}• 2H{sub 2}O. • Enhanced antiferromagnetic susceptibility maxima occur in CoBr{sub 2}·H{sub 2}O and CoBr{sub 2}• D{sub 2}O. • Metamagnetic transitions occur at much lower fields in monohydrates than dehydrate. • Interchain antiferromagnetic exchange is weaker in monohydrates than dehydrate. • CoBr{sub 2}• H{sub 2}O exhibit spin glass behavior similar to that seen previously in CoCl{sub 2}·H{sub 2}O.

  10. Magnetically coupled resonance wireless charging technology principles and transfer mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiehua; Wan, Jian; Ma, Yinping

    2017-05-01

    With the tenure of Electric-Vehicle rising around the world, the charging methods have been paid more and more attention, the current charging mode mainly has the charging posts and battery swapping station. The construction of the charging pile or battery swapping station not only require lots of manpower, material costs but the bare conductor is also easy to generate electric spark hidden safety problems, still occupies large space. Compared with the wired charging, wireless charging mode is flexible, unlimited space and location factors and charging for vehicle safety and quickly. It complements the traditional charging methods in adaptability and the independent charge deficiencies. So the researching the wireless charging system have an important practical significance and application value. In this paper, wireless charging system designed is divided into three parts: the primary side, secondary side and resonant coupling. The main function of the primary side is to generate high-frequency alternating current, so selecting CLASS-E amplifier inverter structure through the research on full bridge, half-bridge and power amplification circuit. Addition, the wireless charging system is susceptible to outside interference, frequency drift phenomenon. Combined with the wireless energy transmission characteristics, resonant parts adopt resonant coupling energy transmission scheme and the Series-Series coupling compensation structure. For the electric vehicle charging power and voltage requirements, the main circuit is a full bridge inverter and Boost circuit used as the secondary side.

  11. Interactions between charged particles in a magnetic field a theoretical approach to lon stopping in magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Nersisyan, Hrachya; Zwicknagel, Günter

    2007-01-01

    This monograph focusses on the influence of a strong magnetic field on the interactions between charged particles in a many-body system. Two complementary approaches, the binary collision model and the dielectric theory are investigated in both analytical and numerical frameworks. In the binary collision model, the Coulomb interaction between the test and the target particles is screened because of the polarization of the target. In the continuum dielectric theory one considers the interactions between the test particle and its polarization cloud. In the presence of a strong magnetic field, there exists no suitable parameter of smallness. Linearized and perturbative treatments are not more valid and must be replaced by numerical grid or particle methods. Applications include the electron cooling of ion beams in storage rings and the final deceleration of antiprotons and heavy ion beams in traps.

  12. Hamiltonian and Lagrangian dynamics of charged particles including the effects of radiation damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hong; Burby, Joshua; Davidson, Ronald; Fisch, Nathaniel; Chung, Moses

    2015-11-01

    The effects of radiation damping (radiation reaction) on accelerating charged particles in modern high-intensity accelerators and high-intensity laser beams have becoming increasingly important. Especially for electron accelerators and storage rings, radiation damping is an effective mechanism and technique to achieve high beam luminosity. We develop Hamiltonian and Lagrangian descriptions of the classical dynamics of a charged particle including the effects of radiation damping in the general electromagnetic focusing channels encountered in accelerators. The direct connection between the classical Hamiltonian and Lagrangian theories and the more fundamental QED description of the synchrotron radiation process is also addressed. In addition to their theoretical importance, the classical Hamiltonian and Lagrangian theories of the radiation damping also enable us to numerically integrate the dynamics using advanced structure-preserving geometric algorithms. These theoretical developments can also be applied to runaway electrons and positrons generated during the disruption or startup of tokamak discharges. This research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-09CH11466).

  13. Space charge and magnet error simulations for the SNS accumulator ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beebe-Wang, J.; Fedotov, A.V.; Wei, J.; Machida, S.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of space charge forces and magnet errors in the beam of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring are investigated. In this paper, the focus is on the emittance growth and halo/tail formation in the beam due to space charge with and without magnet errors. The beam properties of different particle distributions resulting from various injection painting schemes are investigated. Different working points in the design of SNS accumulator ring lattice are compared. The simulations in close-to-resonance condition in the presence of space charge and magnet errors are presented. (author)

  14. Localized Models of Charged Particle Motion in Martian Crustal Magnetic Cusps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain, D. A.; Poppe, A. R.; Jarvinen, R.; Dong, Y.; Egan, H. L.; Fang, X.

    2017-12-01

    The induced magnetosphere of Mars is punctuated by localized but strong crustal magnetic fields that are observed to play host to a variety of phenomena typically associated with global magnetic fields, such as auroral processes and particle precipitation, field-aligned current systems, and ion outflow. Each of these phenomena occur on the night side, in small-scale magnetic `cusp' regions of vertically aligned field. Cusp regions are not yet capable of being spatially resolved in global scale models that include the ion kinetics necessary for simulating charged particle transport along cusps. Local models are therefore necessary if we are to understand how cusp processes operate at Mars. Here we present the first results of an effort to model the kinetic particle motion and electric fields in Martian cusps. We are adapting both a 1.5D Particle-in-Cell (PIC) model for lunar magnetic cusps regions to the Martian case and a hybrid model framework (used previously for the global Martian plasma interaction and for lunar magnetic anomaly regions) to cusps in 2D. By comparing the models we can asses the importance of electron kinetics in particle transport along cusp field lines. In this first stage of our study we model a moderately strong nightside cusp, with incident hot hydrogen plasma from above, and cold planetary (oxygen) plasma entering the simulation from below. We report on the spatial and temporal distribution of plasma along cusp field lines for this initial case.

  15. Effect of surface bilayer charges on the magnetic field around ionic channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes Soares, Marília Amável [Post-graduation in Computational Sciences, Rio de Janeiro State University (Brazil); Cortez, Celia Martins, E-mail: ccortezs@ime.uerj.br [Post-graduation in Computational Sciences, Rio de Janeiro State University (Brazil); Department of Applied Mathematics, Rio de Janeiro State University (Brazil); Oliveira Cruz, Frederico Alan de [Post-graduation in Computational Sciences, Rio de Janeiro State University (Brazil); Department of Physics, Rural Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Silva, Dilson [Post-graduation in Computational Sciences, Rio de Janeiro State University (Brazil); Department of Applied Mathematics, Rio de Janeiro State University (Brazil)

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present a physic-mathematical model for representing the ion transport through membrane channels, in special Na{sup +} and K{sup +}-channels, and discuss the influence of surface bilayer charges on the magnetic field behavior around the ionic current. The model was composed of a set of equations, including: a nonlinear differential Poisson-Boltzmann equation which usually allows to estimate the surface potentials and electric potential profile across membrane; equations for the ionic flux through channel and the ionic current density based on Armstrong's model for Na{sup +} and K{sup +} permeability and other Physics concepts; and a magnetic field expression derived from the classical Ampère equation. Results from computational simulations using the finite element method suggest that the ionic permeability is strongly dependent of surface bilayer charges, the current density through a K{sup +}-channel is very less sensible to temperature changes than the current density through a Na{sup +}- channel, active Na{sup +}-channels do not directly interfere with the K{sup +}-channels around, and vice-versa, since the magnetic perturbation generated by an active channel is of short-range.

  16. Interaction of a magnet and a point charge: Unrecognized internal electromagnetic momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    2015-05-01

    Whereas nonrelativistic mechanics always connects the total momentum of a system to the motion of the center of mass, relativistic systems, such as interacting electromagnetic charges, can have internal linear momentum in the absence of motion of the system's center of energy. This internal linear momentum of a system is related to the controversial concept of "hidden momentum." We suggest that the term "hidden momentum" be abandoned. Here, we use the relativistic conservation law for the center of energy to give an unambiguous definition of the "internal momentum of a system," and then we exhibit this internal momentum for the system of a magnet (modeled as a circular ring of moving charges) and a distant static point charge. The calculations provide clear illustrations of this system for three cases: (a) the moving charges of the magnet are assumed to continue in their unperturbed motion; (b) the moving charges of the magnet are free to accelerate but have no mutual interactions; and (c) the moving charges of the magnet are free to accelerate and also interact with each other. When the current-carrying charges of the magnet are allowed to interact, the magnet itself will contain internal electromagnetic linear momentum, something that has not been described clearly in the research and teaching literature.

  17. Modeling and characterization of charged particle trajectories in an oscillating magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irawan, Dani; Viridi, Sparisoma; Khotimah, Siti Nurul; Latief, Fourier Dzar Eljabbar; Novitrian

    2015-04-01

    A constant magnetic field has frequently been discussed and has been known that it can cause a charged particle to form interesting trajectories such as cycloid and helix in presence of electric field, but a changing magnetic field is rarely discussed. In this work, modeling and characterization of charged particle trajectories in oscillating magnetic field is reported. The modeling is performed using Euler method with speed corrector. The result shows that there are two types of trajectory patterns that will recur for every 180nT0 (n = 0, 1, 2, ..) in increasing of magnetic field oscillation period, where T0 is about 6.25 × 10-7 s.

  18. Magnetic monopoles and free fractionally charged states at accelerators and in cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kephart, Thomas W.; Leontaris, George K.; Shafi, Qaisar

    2017-10-01

    Unified theories of strong, weak and electromagnetic interactions which have electric charge quantization predict the existence of topologically stable magnetic monopoles. Intermediate scale monopoles are comparable with detection energies of cosmic ray monopoles at IceCube and other cosmic ray experiments. Magnetic monopoles in some models can be significantly lighter and carry two, three or possibly even higher quanta of the Dirac magnetic charge. They could be light enough for their effects to be detected at the LHC either directly or indirectly. An example based on a D-brane inspired SU(3) C × SU(3) L × SU(3) R (trinification) model with the monopole carrying three quanta of Dirac magnetic charge is presented. These theories also predict the existence of color singlet states with fractional electric charge which may be accessible at the LHC.

  19. Effects of the magnetic dipole moment of charged vector mesons in their radiative decay distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, G.L.; Sanchez, G.T.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the effects of anomalous magnetic dipole moments of vector mesons in the decay distribution of photons emitted in two-pseudoscalar decays of charged vector mesons. By choosing a kinematical configuration appropriate to isolate these effects from model-dependent and dominant bremsstrahlung contributions, we show that this method can provide a valid alternative for a measurement of the unknown magnetic dipole moments of charged vector mesons. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  20. Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic beads for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz [Livermore, CA

    2011-01-11

    A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic beads; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic beads. The magnetic beads with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reaction chamber is amplified. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic beads and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.

  1. Charge collection measurements with p-type Magnetic Czochralski silicon single pad detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, C.; Bruzzi, M.; Macchiolo, A.; Scaringella, M.; Petterson, M.K.; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Betancourt, C.; Manna, N.; Creanza, D.; Boscardin, M.; Piemonte, C.; Zorzi, N.; Borrello, L.; Messineo, A.

    2007-01-01

    The charge collected from beta source particles in single pad detectors produced on p-type Magnetic Czochralski (MCz) silicon wafers has been measured before and after irradiation with 26 MeV protons. After a 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence of 1x10 15 cm -2 the collected charge is reduced to 77% at bias voltages below 900 V. This result is compared with previous results from charge collection measurements

  2. Performance and analysis of wireless power charging system from room temperature to HTS magnet via strong resonance coupling method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Y. D.; Lee, S. Y.; Lee, T. W.; Kim, J. S. [Suwon Science College, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, C. Y. [Korea Railroad Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The technology of supplying the electric power by wireless power transfer (WPT) is expected for the next generation power feeding system since it can supply the power to portable devices without any connectors through large air gap. As such a technology based on strongly coupled electromagnetic resonators is possible to deliver the large power and recharge them seamlessly; it has been considered as a noble option to wireless power charging system in the various power applications. Recently, various HTS wires have now been manufactured for demonstrations of transmission cables, motors, MAGLEV, and other electrical power components. However, since the HTS magnets have a lower index n value intrinsically, they are required to be charged from external power system through leads or internal power system. The portable area is limited as well as the cryogen system is bulkier. Thus, we proposed a novel design of wireless power charging system for superconducting HTS magnet (WPC4SM) based on resonance coupling method. As the novel system makes possible a wireless power charging using copper resonance coupled coils, it enables to portable charging conveniently in the superconducting applications. This paper presented the conceptual design and operating characteristics of WPC4SM using different shapes' copper resonance coil. The proposed system consists of four components; RF generator of 370 kHz, copper resonance coupling coils, impedance matching (IM) subsystem and HTS magnet including rectifier system.

  3. Quantum phases for a charged particle and electric/magnetic dipole in an electromagnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholmetskii, Alexander; Yarman, Tolga

    2017-11-01

    We point out that the known quantum phases for an electric/magnetic dipole moving in an electromagnetic field must be composed from more fundamental quantum phases emerging for moving elementary charges. Using this idea, we have found two new fundamental quantum phases, next to the known magnetic and electric Aharonov-Bohm phases, and discuss their general properties and physical meaning.

  4. Effect of magnetic intensity on diameter of charged jets in electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hong-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the electrospinning process, the rotating charged-jet moves between the permanent magnets, as a result Ampere force is generated. Experiment shows that the magnetic field can decrease fiber size and enhance the uniformity of fiber size.

  5. Improvement of permanent magnet machines performance by including magnetic shells into the rotor geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alnaemi, F.; Moses, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    FEM modelling of PM motor was carried out to demonstrate the effects of the addition of various types of ferromagnetic tubes (shell) to a rotor of surface mount permanent magnet motor. An enhancement in magnet operating point towards the high field region is obtained. A shell made of amorphous ribbon offers optimum advantages

  6. Very-low-frequency and low-frequency electric and magnetic fields associated with electric shuttle bus wireless charging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tell, R A; Kavet, Robert; Bailey, J R; Halliwell, John

    2014-01-01

    Tests conducted to date at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC) indicate that wireless charging of the Chattanooga Area Regional Transportation Authority's (CARTA) downtown shuttle bus, currently operating with off-board battery charging technology, offers significant improvements in performance and cost. The system operates at a frequency of 20 kHz and a peak power of 60 kW. Because the system's wireless charging is expected to occur during a nominal 3-min charging period with passengers on-board, the magnetic and electric fields associated with charging were characterised at UTC's Advanced Vehicle Test Facility and compared with established human exposure limits. The two most prominent exposure limits are those published by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) and the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). Both organisations include limits for groups who are trained (workers in specific industries) to be aware of electromagnetic environments and their potential hazards, as well as a lower set of limits for the general public, who are assumed to lack such awareness. None of the magnetic or electric fields measured either within or outside the bus during charging exceeded either the ICNIRP or the IEEE exposure limits for the general public.

  7. Very-low-frequency and low-frequency electric and magnetic fields associated with electric shuttle bus wireless charging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tell, R. A.; Kavet, R.; Bailey, J. R.; Halliwell, J.

    2014-01-01

    Tests conducted to date at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC) indicate that wireless charging of the Chattanooga Area Regional Transportation Authority's (CARTA) downtown shuttle bus, currently operating with off-board battery charging technology, offers significant improvements in performance and cost. The system operates at a frequency of 20 kHz and a peak power of 60 kW. Because the system's wireless charging is expected to occur during a nominal 3-min charging period with passengers on-board, the magnetic and electric fields associated with charging were characterised at UTC's Advanced Vehicle Test Facility and compared with established human exposure limits. The two most prominent exposure limits are those published by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) and the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). Both organisations include limits for groups who are trained (workers in specific industries) to be aware of electromagnetic environments and their potential hazards, as well as a lower set of limits for the general public, who are assumed to lack such awareness. None of the magnetic or electric fields measured either within or outside the bus during charging exceeded either the ICNIRP or the IEEE exposure limits for the general public. (authors)

  8. Magnetic Shielding Design for Coupler of Wireless Electric Vehicle Charging Using Finite Element Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, W. N.; Yang, X. J.; Yao, C.; Ma, D. G.; Tang, H. J.

    2017-10-01

    Inductive power transfer (IPT) is a practical and preferable method for wireless electric vehicle (EV) charging which proved to be safe, convenient and reliable. Due to the air gap between the magnetic coupler, the magnetic field coupling decreases and the magnetic leakage increases significantly compared to traditional transformer, and this may lead to the magnetic flux density around the coupler more than the safety limit for human. So magnetic shielding should be adding to the winding made from litz wire to enhance the magnetic field coupling effect in the working area and reduce magnetic field strength in non-working area. Magnetic shielding can be achieved by adding high-permeability material or high-conductivity material. For high-permeability material its magnetic reluctance is much lower than the surrounding air medium so most of the magnetic line goes through the high-permeability material rather than surrounding air. For high-conductivity material the eddy current in the material can produce reverse magnetic field to achieve magnetic shielding. This paper studies the effect of the two types of shielding material on coupler for wireless EV charging and designs combination shielding made from high-permeability material and high-conductivity material. The investigation of the paper is done with the help of finite element analysis.

  9. The Symmetry of Electromagnetism with Respect to Electric and Magnetic Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripka, Georges

    The possible existence of magnetic charges and the corresponding electromagnetic theory was investigated by Dirac in 1931 and 1948 [49, 9]. The reading of his 1948 paper is certainly recommended. A useful introduction to the electromagnetic properties of magnetic monopoles can be found in Sects. 6.12 and 6.13 of Jacksons Classical Electrodynamics [50]. The Dirac theory of magnetic monopoles, which is briefly sketched in this chapter, will be incorporated into the Landau-Ginzburg model of a dual superconductor, in order to couple electric charges, which ultimately become confined. This will be done in Chap. 3.

  10. 2. The Symmetry of Electromagnetism with Respect to Electric and Magnetic Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripka, Georges

    The possible existence of magnetic charges and the corresponding electromagnetic theory was investigated by Dirac in 1931 and 1948. The reading of his 1948 paper is certainly recommended. A useful introduction to the electromagnetic properties of magnetic monopoles can be found in Sects. 6.12 and 6.13 of Jacksons Classical Electrodynamics. In Chap. 3 we shall adapt the Dirac theory of magnetic monopoles, which is briefly sketched in this chapter, to the Landau-Ginzburg model of a dual superconductor, in order to model the confinement of color-charges.

  11. Influence of electrostatic charging on the magnetic and other physical properties of thin metallic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbeck, K.

    1971-01-01

    Electrical, superconducting and optical properties of thin metal films can be influenced by electrostatic charging. In the same way attempts have been made to change the saturation magnetization of ferromagnetic films, which was measured, e.g., with the torque method. Using the film as one plate of a capacitor torque changes are measured for different voltages. The torque changes are assumed to be caused by magnetization changes due to an altered electron concentration of the metal. The contribution of one unit charge to the magnetic moment was estimated to ca. /sup 1///sub 2/ mu/sub B/.

  12. Detailed magnetic model simulations of the H- injection chicane magnets for the CERN PS Booster Upgrade, including eddy currents and influence on beam dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetto, E; Borburgh, J; Carli, C; Martini, M; Forte, V

    2014-01-01

    The CERN PS Booster will be upgraded with an H- injection system. The chicanemagnets for the injection bump ramp-down in 5 ms and generate eddy currents in the inconel vacuum chamber which perturb the homogeneity of the magnetic field. The multipolar field components are extracted from 3D OPERA simulations and are included in the lattice model. The -beating correction is computed all along the ramp and complete tracking simulations including space-charge are performed to evaluate the impact of these perturbations and correction on beam dynamics.

  13. Charge and spin current oscillations in a tunnel junction induced by magnetic field pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dartora, C.A., E-mail: cadartora@eletrica.ufpr.br [Electrical Engineering Department, Federal University of Parana (UFPR), C.P. 19011 Curitiba, 81.531-970 PR (Brazil); Nobrega, K.Z., E-mail: bzuza1@yahoo.com.br [Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technolgy of Maranhão (IFMA), Av. Marechal Castelo Branco, 789, São Luís, 65.076-091 MA (Brazil); Cabrera, G.G., E-mail: cabrera@ifi.unicamp.br [Instituto de Física ‘Gleb Wataghin’, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), C.P. 6165, Campinas 13.083-970 SP (Brazil)

    2016-08-15

    Usually, charge and spin transport properties in tunnel junctions are studied in the DC bias regime and/or in the adiabatic regime of time-varying magnetic fields. In this letter, the temporal dynamics of charge and spin currents in a tunnel junction induced by pulsed magnetic fields is considered. At low bias voltages, energy and momentum of the conduction electrons are nearly conserved in the tunneling process, leading to the description of the junction as a spin-1/2 fermionic system coupled to time-varying magnetic fields. Under the influence of pulsed magnetic fields, charge and spin current can flow across the tunnel junction, displaying oscillatory behavior, even in the absence of DC bias voltage. A type of spin capacitance function, in close analogy to electric capacitance, is predicted.

  14. Magnetic field effects on charge structure factors of gapped graphene structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, Hamed; Tawoose, Nasrin

    2018-02-01

    We present the behaviors of dynamical and static charge susceptibilities of undoped gapped graphene using the Green's function approach in the context of tight binding model Hamiltonian. Specially, the effects of magnetic field on the plasmon modes of gapped graphene structure are investigated via calculating correlation function of charge density operators. Our results show the increase of magnetic field leads to disappear high frequency plasmon mode for gapped case. We also show that low frequency plasmon mode has not affected by increase of magnetic field and chemical potential. Finally the temperature dependence of static charge structure factor of gapp graphene structure is studied. The effects of both magnetic field and gap parameter on the static structure factor are discusses in details.

  15. Phase space of positron trajectories exiting a charged particle source through a magnetic field point cusp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiester, A.S.; Pacheco, J.L.; Ordonez, C.A.; Weathers, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    A configuration of magnetic fields using properties of cylindrically symmetric permanent magnets is presented as a candidate to produce a high purity charged particle source or trap. Cylindrically symmetric hollow permanent magnets produce magnetic field point cusps on the axis of symmetry. A magnetic field point cusp reflects all particles that lie outside a narrow region of phase space, a region dependent on particle kinetic energies and on the magnetic field intensity. An analysis of the phase space of positron trajectories entering and exiting a magnetic field point cusp is presented and quantified with respect to magnetic field intensity and particle kinetic energy. Preliminary experimental results support the use of point cusps for ion source applications

  16. Spin-charge separation in the t-J model: Magnetic and transport anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, Z.Y.; Sheng, D.N.; Ting, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    A real spin-charge separation scheme is found based on a saddle-point state of the t-J model. In the one-dimensional (1D) case, such a saddle-point reproduces the correct asymptotic correlations at the strong-coupling fixed point of the model. In the two-dimensional (2D) case, the transverse gauge field confining spinon and holon is shown to be gapped at finite doping so that a spin-charge deconfinement is obtained for its first time in 2D. The gap in the gauge fluctuation disappears at half-filling limit, where a long-range antiferromagnetic order is recovered at zero temperature and spinons become confined. The most interesting features of spin dynamics and transport are exhibited at finite doping where exotic residual couplings between spin and charge degrees of freedom lead to systematic anomalies with regard to a Fermi-liquid system. In spin dynamics, a commensurate antiferromagnetic fluctuation with a small, doping-dependent energy scale is found, which is characterized in momentum space by a Gaussian peak at (π/a,π/a) with a doping-dependent width. This commensurate magnetic fluctuation contributes a non-Korringa behavior for the NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate. There also exists a characteristic temperature scale below thich a pseudogap behavior appears in the spin dynamics. Furthermore, an incommensurate magnetic fluctuation is also obtained at a finite energy regime. In the transport, a strong-range phase intereference leads to an effective holon Lagrangian which can give rise to a series of interesting phenomena including linear-T resistivity and a T 2 Hall angle. We discuss the striking similarities of these theoretical features with those found in the high-T c cuprates and give a consistent picture for the latter. Electronic properties like Fermi surface and superconducting pairing in this framework are also discussed

  17. 24 CFR 203.23 - Mortgagor's payments to include other charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... authority for failure to timely pay taxes or assessments shall not be charged by the mortgagee to the mortgagor if the mortgagee had sufficient funds in escrow for the account of the mortgagor to pay such taxes... rents, if any; (2) The estimated amount of all taxes; (3) Special assessments, if any; (4) Flood...

  18. Lorentz invariance from classical particle paths in quantum field theory of electric and magnetic charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, R.A.; Neri, F.; Zwanziger, D.

    1979-01-01

    We establish the Lorentz invariance of the quantum field theory of electric and magnetic charge. This is a priori implausible because the theory is the second-quantized version of a classical field theory which is inconsistent if the minimally coupled charged fields are smooth functions. For our proof we express the generating functional for the gauge-invariant Green's functions of quantum electrodynamics: with or without magnetic charge: as a path integral over the trajectories of classical charged point particles. The electric-electric and electric-magnetic interactions contribute factors exp(JDJ) and exp(JD'K), where J and K are the electric and magnetic currents of classical point particles and D is the usual photon propagator. The propagator D' involves the Dirac string but exp(JD'K) depends on it only through a topological integer linking string and classical particle trajectories. The charge quantization condition e/sub i/g/sub j/ - g/sub i/e/sub j/ = integer then suffices to make the gauge-invariant Green's functions string independent. By implication our formulation shows that if the Green's functions of quantum electrodynamics are expressed as usual as functional integrals over classical charged fields, the smooth field configurations have measure zero and all the support of the Feynman measure lies on the trajectories of classical point particles

  19. Charged particle identification including Pions by pulse-shape discrimination with an NE213 liquid scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamoto, T.; Ishibashi, K.; Matsufuji, N.; Shigyo, N.; Maehata, K.

    1995-01-01

    Particles emitted from spallation reactions induced by protons having GeV energies were measured with an NE213 liquid scintillator, 12.7 cm in diameter and 12.7 cm thick. The pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) was carried out for charged particle identification by the two-gate integration method. Pions having energies up to 60 MeV were clearly discriminated from protons and electrons. On the contrary, pions with higher energies could not be identified since they escaped from the detector. The advantage of PSD for charged particle identification is that there is no requirement for a ΔE detector in the measurements. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  20. Bifurcation of space-charge wave in a plasma waveguide including the wake potential effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae [Department of Physics and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 15588, South Korea and Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    The wake potential effects on the propagation of the space-charge dust ion-acoustic wave are investigated in a cylindrically bounded dusty plasma with the ion flow. The results show that the wake potential would generate the double frequency modes in a cylindrically bounded dusty plasma. It is found that the upper mode of the wave frequency with the root of higher-order is smaller than that with the root of lower-order in intermediate wave number domains. However, the lower mode of the scaled wave frequency with the root of higher-order is found to be greater than that with the root of lower-order. It is found that the influence in the order of the root of the Bessel function on the wave frequency of the space-charge dust-ion-acoustic wave in a cylindrically confined dusty plasma decreases with an increase in the propagation wave number. It is also found that the double frequency modes increase with increasing Mach number due to the ion flow in a cylindrical dusty plasma. In addition, it is found that the upper mode of the group velocity decreases with an increase in the scaled radius of the plasma cylinder. However, it is shown that the lower mode of the scaled group velocity of the space-charge dust ion acoustic wave increases with an increase in the radius of the plasma cylinder. The variation of the space-charge dust-ion-acoustic wave due to the wake potential and geometric effects is also discussed.

  1. Stable SU(5) monopoles with higher magnetic charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, S.; Sato, H.; Tomohiro, S.

    1985-01-01

    Taking into account the electroweak breaking effects, some multiply charged monopoles were shown to be stable by Gardner and Harvey. We give the explicit Ansa$uml: tze for finite-energy, nonsingular solutions of these stable higher-strength monopoles with eg = 1,(3/2),3. We also give the general stability conditions and the detailed behavior of the interaction potentials between two monopoles which produce the stable higher-strength monopoles

  2. Design of focussing and guide structures for charged particle beams using rare earth cobalt permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbach, K.

    1981-06-01

    A number of different methods can be used to describe the magnetic properties of oriented Rare Earth Cobalt (REC) material. It will be shown how these different methods of description lead to different ways to think about, and to execute, the design of magnets that are useful for focusing and guiding charged particle beams. It will also be domonstrated that in some of these magnets, the REC material is used in a somewhat unusual way, requiring magnetics properties of the material that are usually not considered to be of great practical importance

  3. Tunneling of Charged and Magnetized Fermions from a Rotating Dyonic Taub-NUT Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Kausari

    2017-12-01

    We investigate tunneling of charged and magnetized Dirac particles from a rotating dyonic Taub-NUT (TN) black hole (BH) called the Kerr-Newman-KasuyaTub-NUT (KNKTN) BH endowed with electric as well as magnetic charges. We derive the tunneling probability of outgoing charged particles by using the semiclassical WKB approximation to the covariant Dirac equation and obtain the corresponding Hawking temperature. The emission spectrum deviates from the purely thermal spectrum with the leading term exactly the Boltzman factor, if energy conservation and the backreaction of particles to the spacetime are considered. The results provides a quantumcorrected radiation temperature depending on the BH background and the radiation particles energy, angular momentum, and charges. The results are consistent with those already available in literature.

  4. Charged-Lepton-Flavour Violation in the CMSSM in View of the Muon Anomalous Magnetic Moment

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, D F; Gómez, M E; Lola, S; Ellis, John

    2001-01-01

    We use the BNL E821 measurement of g - 2, the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, to normalize, within a supersymmetric GUT framework, constrained MSSM (CMSSM) predictions for processes that violate charged-lepton flavour conservation, including mu to e gamma, mu to e conversion and K^0_L to mu e. We illustrate our analysis with two examples of lepton mass matrix textures motivated by data on neutrino oscillations. We find that mu to e gamma may well occur at a rate within one or two (two or three) orders of magnitude of the present experimental upper limit if g - 2 is within the one- (two-)standard deviation range indicated by E821. We also find that mu to e conversion is likely to occur at rate measurable by MECO, and there is a chance that K^0_L to mu e may be observable in an experiment using an intense proton source.

  5. Charged Tori in Spherical Gravitational and Dipolar Magnetic Fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slaný, P.; Kovář, J.; Stuchlík, Z.; Karas, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 205, č. 1 (2013), 3/1-3/16 ISSN 0067-0049 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC13-00070J Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : accretion * accretion disks * magnetic fields Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 14.137, year: 2013

  6. A Charged Particle in Perpendicular Electric and Magnetic Fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/021/11/1043-1045. Keywords. Relativity, electric and magnetic fields, cycloid, Lorentz transformation. Abstract. Author Affiliations. B A Bhargava1 Adithi Udupa1 P Jayanth Vyasanakere2. BSc III Year, St. Joseph's College, Bengaluru 560 027. Department of Physics, University College ...

  7. Edge effect in charged-particle analyzing magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braams, C.M.

    The manner in which local saturation of pole pieces with sharp edges affects the fall-off of the magnetic induction in the fringing-field region is discussed and measured. Local saturation appears to set in at a field strength well below that at which over-all saturation of the pole pieces becomes

  8. Input-output linearizing tracking control of induction machine with the included magnetic saturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolinar, Drago; Ljusev, Petar; Stumberger, Gorazd

    2003-01-01

    The tracking control design of an induction motor, based on input-output linearisation with magnetic saturation included is addressed. The magnetic saturation is represented by a nonlinear magnetising curve for the iron core and is used in the control, the observer of the state variables, and in ...

  9. Transverse Motion of a Particle with an Oscillating Charge and Variable Mass in a Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisultanov, Z. Z.; Ragimkhanov, G. B.

    2018-03-01

    The problem of motion of a particle with an oscillating electric charge and variable mass in an uniform magnetic field has been solved. Three laws of mass variation have been considered: linear growth, oscillations, and stepwise growth. Analytical expressions for the particle velocity at different time dependences of the particle mass are obtained. It is established that simultaneous consideration of changes in the mass and charge leads to a significant change in the particle trajectory.

  10. Magnetic Field Generation through Angular Momentum Exchange between Circularly Polarized Radiation and Charged Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Shvets, G

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between circularly polarized (CP) radiation and charged particles can lead to generation of magnetic field through an inverse Faraday effect. The spin of the circularly polarized electromagnetic wave can be converted into the angular momentum of the charged particles so long as there is dissipation. We demonstrate this by considering two mechanisms of angular momentum absorption relevant for laser-plasma interactions: electron-ion collisions and ionization. The precise dissipative mechanism, however, plays a role in determining the efficiency of the magnetic field generation.

  11. Magnetic Field Generation through Angular Momentum Exchange between Circularly Polarized Radiation and Charged Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. Shvets; N.J. Fisch; J.-M. Rax

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between circularly polarized (CP) radiation and charged particles can lead to generation of magnetic field through an inverse Faraday effect. The spin of the circularly polarized electromagnetic wave can be converted into the angular momentum of the charged particles so long as there is dissipation. We demonstrate this by considering two mechanisms of angular momentum absorption relevant for laser-plasma interactions: electron-ion collisions and ionization. The precise dissipative mechanism, however, plays a role in determining the efficiency of the magnetic field generation

  12. Magnetically charged black hole in framework of nonlinear electrodynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglov, S. I.

    2018-01-01

    A model of nonlinear electrodynamics is proposed and investigated in general relativity. We consider the magnetic black hole and find a regular solution which gives corrections into the Reissner-Nordström solution. At r →∞ the asymptotic space-time becomes flat. The magnetic mass of the black hole is calculated and the metric function is obtained. At some values of the model parameter there can be one, two or no horizons. Thermodynamics of black holes is studied and we calculate the Hawking temperature and heat capacity of black holes. It is demonstrated that there is a phase transition of second order. At some parameters of the model black holes are thermodynamically stable.

  13. A new force field including charge directionality for TMAO in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usui, Kota; Nagata, Yuki, E-mail: sulpizi@uni-mainz.de, E-mail: nagata@mpip-mainz.mpg.de; Hunger, Johannes; Bonn, Mischa [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Sulpizi, Marialore, E-mail: sulpizi@uni-mainz.de, E-mail: nagata@mpip-mainz.mpg.de [Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Staudingerweg 7, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2016-08-14

    We propose a new force field for trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), which is designed to reproduce the long-lived and highly directional hydrogen bond between the TMAO oxygen (O{sub TMAO}) atom and surrounding water molecules. Based on the data obtained by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we introduce three dummy sites around O{sub TMAO} to mimic the O{sub TMAO} lone pairs and we migrate the negative charge on the O{sub TMAO} to the dummy sites. The force field model developed here improves both structural and dynamical properties of aqueous TMAO solutions. Moreover, it reproduces the experimentally observed dependence of viscosity upon increasing TMAO concentration quantitatively. The simple procedure of the force field construction makes it easy to implement in molecular dynamics simulation packages and makes it compatible with the existing biomolecular force fields. This paves the path for further investigation of protein-TMAO interaction in aqueous solutions.

  14. A new force field including charge directionality for TMAO in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usui, Kota; Nagata, Yuki; Hunger, Johannes; Bonn, Mischa; Sulpizi, Marialore

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new force field for trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), which is designed to reproduce the long-lived and highly directional hydrogen bond between the TMAO oxygen (O TMAO ) atom and surrounding water molecules. Based on the data obtained by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we introduce three dummy sites around O TMAO to mimic the O TMAO lone pairs and we migrate the negative charge on the O TMAO to the dummy sites. The force field model developed here improves both structural and dynamical properties of aqueous TMAO solutions. Moreover, it reproduces the experimentally observed dependence of viscosity upon increasing TMAO concentration quantitatively. The simple procedure of the force field construction makes it easy to implement in molecular dynamics simulation packages and makes it compatible with the existing biomolecular force fields. This paves the path for further investigation of protein-TMAO interaction in aqueous solutions.

  15. Including diverging electrostatic potential in 3D-RISM theory: The charged wall case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyalov, Ivan; Rocchia, Walter

    2018-03-01

    Although three-dimensional site-site molecular integral equations of liquids are a powerful tool of the modern theoretical chemistry, their applications to the problem of characterizing the electrical double layer originating at the solid-liquid interface with a macroscopic substrate are severely limited by the fact that an infinitely extended charged plane generates a divergent electrostatic potential. Such potentials cannot be treated within the standard 3D-Reference Interaction Site Model equation solution framework since it leads to functions that are not Fourier transformable. In this paper, we apply a renormalization procedure to overcome this obstacle. We then check the validity and numerical accuracy of the proposed computational scheme on the prototypical gold (111) surface in contact with water/alkali chloride solution. We observe that despite the proposed method requires, to achieve converged charge densities, a higher spatial resolution than that suited to the estimation of biomolecular solvation with either 3D-RISM or continuum electrostatics approaches, it still is computationally efficient. Introducing the electrostatic potential of an infinite wall, which is periodic in 2 dimensions, we avoid edge effects, permit a robust integration of Poisson's equation, and obtain the 3D electrostatic potential profile for the first time in such calculations. We show that the potential within the electrical double layer presents oscillations which are not grasped by the Debye-Hückel and Gouy-Chapman theories. This electrostatic potential deviates from its average of up to 1-2 V at small distances from the substrate along the lateral directions. Applications of this theoretical development are relevant, for example, for liquid scanning tunneling microscopy imaging.

  16. Mixing of charged and neutral Bose condensates at nonzero temperature and magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haber Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is expected that in the interior of compact stars a proton superconductor coexists with and couples to a neutron superfluid. Starting from a field-theoretical model for two complex scalar fields – one of which is electrically charged – we derive a Ginzburg-Landau potential which includes entrainment between the two fluids and temperature effects from thermal excitations of the two scalar fields and the gauge field. The Ginzburg-Landau description is then used for an analysis of the phase structure in the presence of an external magnetic field. In particular, we study the effect of the superfluid on the flux tube phase by computing the various critical magnetic fields and deriving an approximation for the flux tube interaction. As a result, we point out differences to the naive expectations from an isolated superconductor, for instance the existence of a first-order flux tube onset, resulting in a more complicated phase structure in the region between type-I and type-II superconductivity.

  17. University Students' Explanatory Models of the Interactions between Electric Charges and Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saglam, Murat

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the models that co-existed in students' cognitive structure to explain the interactions between electric charges and uniform magnetic fields. The sample consisted of 129 first-year civil engineering, geology and geophysics students from a large state university in western Turkey. The students answered five…

  18. An algebraic approach for a charged particle in a certain magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setare, Mohammad R; Olfati, Ghafar

    2007-01-01

    The properties of the charged particle in a certain varying magnetic field are outlined. A realization of the creation and annihilation operators for the wavefunctions is studied. It is shown that these operators satisfy the commutation relation of an SU(1,1) group. The closed analytical expressions for the matrix elements of different function ρ and ρ(d/dρ) are evaluated

  19. Heating of charged particles by electrostatic wave propagating perpendicularly to uniform magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Keishiro; Shimojo, Takashi.

    1978-02-01

    Increase in kinetic energy of a charged particle, affected by an electrostatic wave propagating perpendicularly to a uniform magnetic field, is obtained for both the initial and later stages. Detrapping time of the particle from the potential dent of the electrostatic wave and energy increase during trapping of the particle is analytically derived. Numerical simulations are carried out to support theoretical results. (auth.)

  20. Influence of magnetic impurities on charge transport in diffusive-normal-metal/superconductor junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yokoyama, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Golubov, Alexandre Avraamovitch; Inoue, J.; Asano, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Charge transport in the diffusive normal metal (DN)/insulator/s- and d-wave superconductor junctions is studied in the presence of magnetic impurities in DN in the framework of the quasiclassical Usadel equations with the generalized boundary conditions. The cases of s- and d-wave superconducting

  1. Chiral soliton lattice and charged pion condensation in strong magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauner, Tomáš [Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Stavanger,N-4036 Stavanger (Norway); Yamamoto, Naoki [Department of Physics, Keio University,Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2017-04-21

    The Chiral Soliton Lattice (CSL) is a state with a periodic array of topological solitons that spontaneously breaks parity and translational symmetries. Such a state is known to appear in chiral magnets. We show that CSL also appears as a ground state of quantum chromodynamics at nonzero chemical potential in a magnetic field. By analyzing the fluctuations of the CSL, we furthermore demonstrate that in strong but achievable magnetic fields, charged pions undergo Bose-Einstein condensation. Our results, based on a systematic low-energy effective theory, are model-independent and fully analytic.

  2. Ballistic charge carrier transmission through graphene multi-barrier structures in uniform magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubarev, A; Dragoman, D

    2014-01-01

    We investigate charge carrier transport in graphene multi-barrier structures placed in a uniform magnetic field. The transmission coefficient is found analytically by generalizing the transfer matrix method for the case of graphene regions subjected to a uniform magnetic field. The transmission coefficient through the structure can be modulated by varying the gate voltages, the magnetic field and/or the width of the gated regions. Such a configuration could be used in multiple-valued logic circuits, since it has several output states with discrete and easily selectable transmission/current values. (paper)

  3. Compact permanent-magnet analyzers of energy spectra and charge state of particles for high-temperature plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunov, A.A.; Gulin, M.A.; Dolgov, A.N.; Nikolaev, O.V.; Savelov, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    10 3 -10 6 eV charged particle analyzers, incorporating power permanent magnets based on rare earth elements, are described. For electron flux energy spectra recording a focusing magnetic analyzer with 180 deg beam deviation is used, study of energy and charge state of ion fluxes is carried out by means of Thomson analyzer

  4. 26 CFR 48.4216(a)-1 - Charges to be included in sale price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... supplies packing materials, the fair market value of such materials must be included in the tax base when... value of the covering or container. See paragraph (b)(4) of § 48.6416(b)-1 for provisions relating to the claiming of a credit or refund in the case of a price readjustment due to the return or...

  5. 27 CFR 53.91 - Charges to be included in sale price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... fair market value of such materials must be included in the tax base when computing tax liability on... value of the covering or container. See § 53.173(b)(4) for provisions relating to the claiming of a credit or refund in the case of a price readjustment due to the return or repossession of a covering or...

  6. Smarr formula for black holes endowed with both electric and magnetic charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manko, V. S.; García-Compeán, H.

    2018-03-01

    The present paper clarifies how to consistently take into account the contribution of magnetic charges in the generalized Smarr mass formula by using properly Tomimatsu’s representation of Komar integrals. It is shown in particular that in all three examples of dyonic solutions considered by us, the sum of the two electromagnetic terms in Smarr’s formula can be cast into the form \\bar{{\\mathcal Q}}Φ^H_ext , where {{\\mathcal Q}} is the complex charge and Φ^H_ext the complex extension of the electric potential.

  7. Pulse current as a current source with charge-discharge capacitor method for making magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handoko, Djati; Farhad, Hasan; Kurniawan, Budhy; Manaf, Azwar

    2002-01-01

    Have been made and analyzed a high current source instrument with charge-discharge capacitor method. A 0.25 kA pulse current have been produce by this instrument. The instrument has 2 capacitors in parallel configuration with 3300 μF/350 V capacitance. Charge and discharge is controlled by closing/opening SCR and adjustable with timer. Analyze has been done for change of voltage in capacitor comparing with time to reach that. The result showed that both of them have linear relationship. The instrument has been done for making magnet based on Nd-Fe-B and SmCo materials and produced better than electromagnet method

  8. Transverse charge and magnetization densities in the nucleon's chiral periphery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados, Carlos G. [JLAB Newport News, VA (United States); Weiss, Christian [JLAB Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In the light-front description of nucleon structure the electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of frame-independent transverse densities of charge and magnetization. Recent work has studied the transverse densities at peripheral distances b = O(M{pi}{sup -1}), where they are governed by universal chiral dynamics and can be computed in a model-independent manner. Of particular interest is the comparison of the peripheral charge and magnetization densities. We summarize (a) their interpretation as spin-independent and -dependent current matrix elements; (b) the leading-order chiral effective field theory results; (c) their mechanical interpretation in the light-front formulation; (d) the large-N_c limit of QCD and the role of {Delta} intermediate states; (e) the connection with generalized parton distributions and peripheral high-energy scattering processes.

  9. Sensitized charge carrier injection into organic crystals studied by isotope effects in weak magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bube, W.; Michel-Beyerle, M.E.; Haberkorn, R.; Steffens, E.

    1977-01-01

    The magnetic field (H approximately 50 Oe) dependence of the rhodamine sensitized triplet exciton density in anthracene crystals is influenced by isotopic substitution. This confirms the hyperfine interaction as mechanism explaining the change of the spin multiplicity in the initially formed singlet state of the radical pair. The isotope effect occurs in the sensitizing dye ( 14 N/ 15 N) rather than at the molecular site of the injected charge within the crystal. This can be understood in terms of the high hopping frequency of the charge carriers as compared to the time constant of the hyperfine induced singlet-triplet transition. Since the dye molecules adsorb in an oriented fashion, the angular dependence of the magnetic field modulation of the triplet exciton density can be interpreted without assuming any additional interactions. (Auth.)

  10. Logarithmic corrections to entropy of magnetically charged AdS4 black holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imtak Jeon

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Logarithmic terms are quantum corrections to black hole entropy determined completely from classical data, thus providing a strong check for candidate theories of quantum gravity purely from physics in the infrared. We compute these terms in the entropy associated to the horizon of a magnetically charged extremal black hole in AdS×4S7 using the quantum entropy function and discuss the possibility of matching against recently derived microscopic expressions.

  11. Combined centroid-envelope dynamics of intense, magnetically focused charged beams surrounded by conducting walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiuza, K.; Rizzato, F.B.; Pakter, R.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the combined envelope-centroid dynamics of magnetically focused high-intensity charged beams surrounded by conducting walls. Similar to the case where conducting walls are absent, it is shown that the envelope and centroid dynamics decouple from each other. Mismatched envelopes still decay into equilibrium with simultaneous emittance growth, but the centroid keeps oscillating with no appreciable energy loss. Some estimates are performed to analytically obtain characteristics of halo formation seen in the full simulations

  12. Two charges on a plane in a magnetic field: Special trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Ruiz, M. A.; Turbiner, A. V.

    2013-02-01

    The classical mechanics of two Coulomb charges on a plane (e1, m1) and (e2, m2) subject to a constant magnetic field perpendicular to the plane is considered. Special "superintegrable" trajectories (circular and linear) for which the distance between charges remains unchanged are indicated and their constants of motion are presented. The number of the independent constants of motion for the special trajectory is larger than for generic ones and hence they can be called "superintegrable." A classification of pairs of charges for which special trajectories occur is given. The special trajectories are analyzed for three particular cases, namely that of two electrons, an electron-positron pair, and an electron-α-particle pair.

  13. Analysis of Magnetic Field Intensity and Induced Current under Live Working Based on Charge Simulation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Yuanxiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To the problem that safety distance is insufficient for 500 kV substation live working, a magnetic field analysis method for overhead line bus is given based on the charge simulation method. In the method, charge is calculated firstly, and the space field intensity distribution calculation is completed by overlying charge. The space field intensity distribution rule is carried out based on the appropriate analysis, and space field intensity distribution rule of substation is obtained. Then according to the calculation formula of inducing current, the human body induction current under a substation busbar is simulated based on MATLAB. The simulation results have a certain guidance function for actual live working.

  14. NON-AXISYMMETRIC PERPENDICULAR DIFFUSION OF CHARGED PARTICLES AND THEIR TRANSPORT ACROSS TANGENTIAL MAGNETIC DISCONTINUITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, R. D.; Engelbrecht, N. E.; Dunzlaff, P. [Center for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom, 2522 (South Africa); Roux, J. A. le [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 3585 (United States); Ruffolo, D., E-mail: dutoit.strauss@nwu.ac.za [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the transport of charged particles across magnetic discontinuities, focusing specifically on stream interfaces associated with co-rotating interaction regions in the solar wind. We argue that the magnetic field fluctuations perpendicular to the magnetic discontinuity, and usually also perpendicular to the mean magnetic field, are strongly damped in the vicinity of such a magnetic structure, leading to anisotropic perpendicular diffusion. Assuming that perpendicular diffusion arises from drifts in a turbulent magnetic field, we adopt a simplified approach to derive the relevant perpendicular diffusion coefficient. This approach, which we believe gives the correct principal dependences as expected from more elaborate calculations, allows us to investigate transport in different turbulent geometries, such as longitudinal compressional turbulence that may be present near the heliopause. Although highly dependent on the (possibly anisotropic) perpendicular length scales and turbulence levels, we generally find perpendicular diffusion to be strongly damped at magnetic discontinuities, which may in turn provide an explanation for the large particle gradients associated with these structures.

  15. Charge ordering and magnetic frustration in CsFe2F6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shanshan; Xu, Yuanhui; Cui, Yanli; Wang, Jing; Sun, Keju; Yu, Shengxue; Hao, Xianfeng

    2017-08-01

    The structural, electronic and magnetic properties of a charge-ordered iron fluoride material CsFe2+Fe3+F6 have been explored by density functional theory calculations based on the generalized gradient approximation  +  U approach, which was implemented in the VASP code. The material exhibits a 3D pyrochlore-related structure which consists of corner-shared Fe2+F6 and Fe3+F6 octahedra. Our results confirm that CsFe2F6 is a Mott-Hubbard insulator, and bears a magnetically frustrated ground state in which the localized 3d electrons are antiferromagnetically coupled between the homogeneous Fe ions (Fe3+-Fe3+ along the b axis, and Fe2+-Fe2+ along the a axis), while interactions between the heterogeneous Fe ions (Fe3+-Fe2+ along the c axis) are frustrated, consistent with Goodenough-Kanamori superexchange interactions. Although the disproportionation of the total 3d charge is extremely low, explicit evidence is provided on the charge ordering by an order parameter, which is defined as the difference in minority d yz orbital (in the local coordinates) occupations between the Fe3+ and Fe2+ cations. In addition, spin ordering and the spin-orbit coupling effect play an insignificant role in the charge ordering and the preferential occupation of the d yz orbital scenario in CsFe2F6.

  16. Nonlinear waves in viscoelastic magnetized complex astroplasmas with polarized dust-charge variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papari Das

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonextensive nonthermal magnetized viscoelastic astrofluid, compositionally containing nonthermal electrons and ions together with massive polarized dust micro-spherical grains of variable electric charge, is allowed to endure weakly nonlinear perturbation around its equilibrium. The nonextensivity originating from the large-scale non-local effects is included via the Tsallis thermo-statistical distribution laws describing the lighter species. Assuming the equilibrium as a homogeneous hydrostatic one, the dust polarization effects are incorporated via the conventional homogeneous polarization force law. The perturbed fluid model evolves as a unique conjugate pair of coupled extended Korteweg-de Vries (e-KdV equations. A constructed numerical tapestry shows the collective excitations of a new pair of distinct classes of nonlinear mode structures in new parametric space. The first family indicates periodic electrostatic compressive eigenmodes in the form of soliton-chains. Likewise, the second one reveals gravitational rarefactive solitary patterns. Their microphysical multi-parametric dependencies of the eigen-patterns are illustratively analyzed and bolstered. The paper ends up with some promising implications and applications in the astro-cosmo-plasmic context of wave-induced accretive triggering processes responsible for gravitationally bounded (gravito-condensed astro-structure formation, such as stellesimals, planetsimals, etc.

  17. Nonlinear waves in viscoelastic magnetized complex astroplasmas with polarized dust-charge variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Papari; Karmakar, Pralay Kumar

    2018-01-01

    A nonextensive nonthermal magnetized viscoelastic astrofluid, compositionally containing nonthermal electrons and ions together with massive polarized dust micro-spherical grains of variable electric charge, is allowed to endure weakly nonlinear perturbation around its equilibrium. The nonextensivity originating from the large-scale non-local effects is included via the Tsallis thermo-statistical distribution laws describing the lighter species. Assuming the equilibrium as a homogeneous hydrostatic one, the dust polarization effects are incorporated via the conventional homogeneous polarization force law. The perturbed fluid model evolves as a unique conjugate pair of coupled extended Korteweg-de Vries (e-KdV) equations. A constructed numerical tapestry shows the collective excitations of a new pair of distinct classes of nonlinear mode structures in new parametric space. The first family indicates periodic electrostatic compressive eigenmodes in the form of soliton-chains. Likewise, the second one reveals gravitational rarefactive solitary patterns. Their microphysical multi-parametric dependencies of the eigen-patterns are illustratively analyzed and bolstered. The paper ends up with some promising implications and applications in the astro-cosmo-plasmic context of wave-induced accretive triggering processes responsible for gravitationally bounded (gravito-condensed) astro-structure formation, such as stellesimals, planetsimals, etc.

  18. Charge, orbital, and magnetic order in Nd0.5Ca0.5MnO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millange, F.; Brion, S. de; Chouteau, G.

    2000-01-01

    In the manganite Nd 0.5 Ca 0.5 MnO 3 , charge ordering occurs at a much higher temperature than the antiferromagnetic order (T CO =250 K, T N =160 K). The magnetic behavior of the phase T N CO is puzzling: its magnetization and susceptibility are typical of an antiferromagnet while no magnetic order is detected by neutron diffraction. We have undertaken an extensive study of the crystallographic, electric, and magnetic properties of Nd 0.5 Ca 0.5 MnO 3 and established its phase diagram as a function of temperature and magnetic field. The charge disordered paramagnetic phase above T CO presents ferromagnetic correlations. An antiferromagnetic charge exchange phase prevails below T N , with complete charge and orbital ordering. In the intermediate temperature range, charge ordering occurs while orbital ordering sets in progressively, with no magnetic order. Strong magnetic fields destroy the charge ordered phases in a first-order transition towards a ferromagnetic state

  19. Analysis of space-charge effects on the ion beam in a magnetic sector-type mass separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, A.

    1988-01-01

    Profiles of ion beams in a magnetic sector-type mass separator are analysed by comparing with calculated ion trajectories from viewpoint of the space-charge effect; the calculation is based on a new method which takes into account the space-charge effect analytically. In the analysis, the space-charge potential in the ion beam, an axial third order aberration at the ion beam source, the space-charge neutralization and a beam of neutral particles accompanied by the ion beam are discussed. Influences of the space-charge of the primary ions are also shown to be important in the analysis of the secondary electrons. (author)

  20. Sound propagation in narrow tubes including effects of viscothermal and turbulent damping with application to charge air coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsson, Magnus; Åbom, Mats

    2009-02-01

    Charge air coolers (CACs) are used on turbocharged internal combustion engines to enhance the overall gas-exchange performance. The cooling of the charged air results in higher density and thus volumetric efficiency. It is also important for petrol engines that the knock margin increases with reduced charge air temperature. A property that is still not very well investigated is the sound transmission through a CAC. The losses, due to viscous and thermal boundary layers as well as turbulence, in the narrow cooling tubes result in frequency dependent attenuation of the transmitted sound that is significant and dependent on the flow conditions. Normally, the cross-sections of the cooling tubes are neither circular nor rectangular, which is why no analytical solution accounting for a superimposed mean flow exists. The cross-dimensions of the connecting tanks, located on each side of the cooling tubes, are large compared to the diameters of the inlet and outlet ducts. Three-dimensional effects will therefore be important at frequencies significantly lower than the cut-on frequencies of the inlet/outlet ducts. In this study the two-dimensional finite element solution scheme for sound propagation in narrow tubes, including the effect of viscous and thermal boundary layers, originally derived by Astley and Cummings [Wave propagation in catalytic converters: Formulation of the problem and finite element scheme, Journal of Sound and Vibration 188 (5) (1995) 635-657] is used to extract two-ports to represent the cooling tubes. The approximate solutions for sound propagation, accounting for viscothermal and turbulent boundary layers derived by Dokumaci [Sound transmission in narrow pipes with superimposed uniform mean flow and acoustic modelling of automobile catalytic converters, Journal of Sound and Vibration 182 (5) (1995) 799-808] and Howe [The damping of sound by wall turbulent shear layers, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 98 (3) (1995) 1723-1730], are

  1. Improvement of charged particles transport across a transverse magnetic filter field by electrostatic trapping of magnetized electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, B. K.; Hazarika, P.; Chakraborty, M.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2014-01-01

    A study on the transport of charged particles across a magnetic filter field has been carried out in a double plasma device (DPD) and presented in this manuscript. The DPD is virtually divided into two parts viz. source and target regions by a transverse magnetic field (TMF) which is constructed by inserting strontium ferrite magnets into two stainless steel rectangular tubes. Plasma electrons are magnetized but ions are unmagnetized inside the TMF region. Negative voltages are applied to the TMF tubes in order to reduce the loss of electrons towards them. Plasma is produced in the source region by filament discharge method and allowed to flow towards the target region through this negatively biased TMF. It is observed that in the target region, plasma density can be increased and electron temperature decreased with the help of negatively biased TMF. This observation is beneficial for negative ion source development. Plasma diffusion across the negatively biased TMF follows Bohm or anomalous diffusion process when negative bias voltage is very less. At higher negative bias, diffusion coefficient starts deviating from the Bohm diffusion value, associated with enhanced plasma flow in the target region

  2. Improvement of charged particles transport across a transverse magnetic filter field by electrostatic trapping of magnetized electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, B. K., E-mail: bdyt.ds@rediffmail.com; Hazarika, P.; Chakraborty, M. [Centre of Plasma Physics-Institute for Plasma Research, Tepesia-782402, Kamrup, Assam (India); Bandyopadhyay, M., E-mail: mainak@iter-india.org [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar-382025, Gujarat (India)

    2014-07-15

    A study on the transport of charged particles across a magnetic filter field has been carried out in a double plasma device (DPD) and presented in this manuscript. The DPD is virtually divided into two parts viz. source and target regions by a transverse magnetic field (TMF) which is constructed by inserting strontium ferrite magnets into two stainless steel rectangular tubes. Plasma electrons are magnetized but ions are unmagnetized inside the TMF region. Negative voltages are applied to the TMF tubes in order to reduce the loss of electrons towards them. Plasma is produced in the source region by filament discharge method and allowed to flow towards the target region through this negatively biased TMF. It is observed that in the target region, plasma density can be increased and electron temperature decreased with the help of negatively biased TMF. This observation is beneficial for negative ion source development. Plasma diffusion across the negatively biased TMF follows Bohm or anomalous diffusion process when negative bias voltage is very less. At higher negative bias, diffusion coefficient starts deviating from the Bohm diffusion value, associated with enhanced plasma flow in the target region.

  3. Magnetism tuned by the charge states of defects in bulk C-doped SnO2 materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying-Bo; Ling, Z C; Cong, Wei-Yan; Zhang, Peng

    2015-10-21

    To analyze the controversial conclusions on the magnetism of C-doped SnO2 (SnO2:C) bulk materials between theoretical calculations and experimental observations, we propose the critical role of the charge states of defects in the geometric structures and magnetism, and carry out a series of first principle calculations. By changing the charge states, we can influence Bader charge distributions and atomic orbital occupancies in bulk SnO2:C systems, which consequently conduct magnetism. In all charged SnO2:C supercells, C-2px/py/pz electron occupancies are significantly changed by the charge self-regulation, and thus they make the C-2p orbitals spin polarized, which contribute to the dominant magnetic moment of the system. When the concentration of C dopant in the SnO2 supercell increases, the charge redistribution assigns extra electrons averagely to each dopant, and thus effectively modulates the magnetism. These findings provide an experimentally viable way for controlling the magnetism in these systems.

  4. Magnetic Alignment Detection Using Existing Charging Facility in Wireless EV Chargers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yabiao Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless charging is a promising outlet to promote the electric vehicle (EV industry due to its safe and noncontact manner. Wireless EV chargers require the secondary receiver coil to be well aligned with the primary station for efficient charging, which could require more of the driver’s time and attention when parking a vehicle. Therefore, this paper presents a magnetic alignment system to assist the EV driver during parking. The magnetic alignment approach uses the existing coil and frequency tracking control electronics of wireless chargers to detect the distance between the two coils while using 4 small auxiliary coils for direction and fine adjustment, leading to a cost effective detection method for coil alignment in electric vehicle wireless charging (EVWC. The testing results of a prototype show acceptable measurement correctness and the mean error for ten trials in range detection is within 0.25 cm at three different misalignment conditions (10.5, 15, and 20 cm. The positioning accuracy of coil alignment is within 1.2 cm for three different start positions with the auxiliary coils.

  5. Influence of Magnetic Field on Electric Charge Transport in Holomiun Thin Films at Low Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Dudas

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Holmium thin films were prepared by evaporation in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV and high precision electrical resistance measurements were performed on them as well as on holomium bulk sample in the wide temperature range from 4,2 K up to the room temperature. Electric charge transport is profoundly influenced by the magnetic structure at low temperatures and a "knee-like" resistance anomaly was observed near the transportation from paramagnetic state to basal-plane spiral structure in bulk with the Neel temperature TN=128,9 K and below ~ 122 K in thin Ho films in a thickness range from 98 nm to 215 nm. Unexpected resistance minimum at ~ 9 K and a slope´s charge of the R vs. T curve near ~ 170 K was observed in 215 nm thin film. Application of magnetic field parallel to the substrate and thin film plane for temperatures below ~ 150 K caused the decrease of resistence value with increasing magnetic flux density. Increasing suppression of the TN value up to ~ 5 K with increasing flux density value up to 5 T was observed in Ho films. 

  6. Momentum transfer theory of non-conservative charged particle transport in crossed electric and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrhovac, S.B.; Petrovic, Z.Lj.

    1995-01-01

    Momentum - transfer approximation is applied to momentum and energy balance equations describing reacting particle swarms in gases in crossed electric and magnetic fields. Transport coefficients of charged particles undergoing both inelastic and reactive, non-particle-conserving collisions with a gas of neutral molecules are calculated. Momentum - transfer theory (MTT) has been developed mainly by Robson and collaborators. It has been applied to a single reactive gas and mixtures of reactive gases in electric field only. MTT has also been applied in crossed electric and magnetic fields recently and independently of our work but the reactive collisions were not considered. Consider a swarm of electrons of charge e and mass m moving with velocity rvec v through a neutral gas under the influence of an applied electric rvec E and magnetic rvec B field. The collision processes which we shall investigate are limited to elastic, inelastic and reactive collisions of electrons with gas molecules. Here we interpret reactive collisions as collisions which produce change in number of the swarm particles. Reactive collisions involve creation (ionization by electron impact) or loss (electron attachment) of swarm particles. We consider only single ionization in approximation of the mass ratio m/m 0 0 are masses of electrons and neutral particles, respectively. We assume that the stage of evolution of the swarm is the hydrodynamic limit (HDL). In HDL, the space - time dependence of all properties is carried by the number density n of swarm particles

  7. Study on efficiency of different topologies of magnetic coupled resonant wireless charging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, S.; Liu, Z. Z.; Hou, Y. J.; Zeng, H.; Yue, Z. K.; Liang, L. H.

    2017-11-01

    This paper analyses the relationship between the output power, the transmission efficiency and the frequency, load and coupling coefficient of the four kinds of magnetic coupled resonant wireless charging system topologies. Based on mutual inductance principle, four kinds of circuit models are established, and the expressions of output power and transmission efficiency of different structures are calculated. The difference between the two power characteristics and efficiency characteristics is compared by simulating the SS (series-series) and SP (series-parallel) type wireless charging systems. With the same parameters of circuit components, the SS structure is usually suitable for small load resistance. The SP structure can be applied to large load resistors, when the transmission efficiency of the system is required to keep high. If the operating frequency deviates from the system resonance frequency, the SS type system has higher transmission efficiency than the SP type system.

  8. Optimizing charge neutralization for a magnetic sector SIMS instrument in negative mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pivovarov, Alexander L.; Guryanov, Georgiy M. [Corning Incorporated, SP-FR-01-01, Corning, New York 14831 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Successful self-adjusted charge compensation was demonstrated for a CAMECA magnetic-sector secondary ion mass spectrometer applied in negative mode. Operation with the normal-incidence electron gun (NEG) potential positively biased relative to a sample potential enables substantial broadening of the Cs primary-ion-current density range available for analysis of insulators. The decrease of the negative NEG potential by 30 V allows the highest value of primary current density used for the analysis of a silica sample to increase by a factor of more than 6. By applying the improved charge neutralization technique, accurate Na depth profiles for SiO{sub 2} samples were obtained within detection limits of {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} atoms/cm{sup 3}.

  9. Charged-particle magnetic-quadrupole spectrometer for neutron induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haight, R.C.; Grimes, S.M.; Tuckey, B.J.; Anderson, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    A spectrometer has been developed for measuring the charged particle production cross sections and spectra in neutron-induced reactions. The spectrometer consists of a magnetic quadrupole doublet which focuses the charged particles onto a silicon surface barrier detector telescope which is 2 meters or more from the irradiated sample. Collimators, shielding, and the large source-to-detector distance reduce the background enough to use the spectrometer with a 14-MeV neutron source producing 4 . 10 12 n/s. The spectrometer has been used in investigations of proton, deuteron, and alpha particle production by 14-MeV neutrons incident on various materials. Protons with energies as low as 1.1 MeV have been measured. The good resolution of the detectors has also made possible an improved measurement of the neutron- neutron scattering length from the 0 0 proton spectrum from deuteron breakup by 14-MeV neutrons

  10. Charge and current density profiles of a degenerate magnetized free-electron gas near a hard wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kettenis, M.M.; Suttorp, L.G.

    1998-01-01

    The charge and current densities of a completely degenerate free-electron gas in a uniform magnetic field are found to have a damped oscillatory spatial dependence near a wall that is parallel to the magnetic field. For large distances from the wall the behaviour of the associated profile functions

  11. A spin-statistics theorem for composites containing both electric and magnetic charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, J.L.; Sorkin, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    The present paper states and proves an asymptotic spin-statistics theorem for composites consisting of electrically and magnetically charged particles. We work in the framework of a nonrelativistic theory, taking as the classical configuration space a U(1) bundle over the space of physical configurations, and as the quantum hilbert space the homogeneous square integrable functions on that bundle. The theorems are proved using a formalism we develop here for treating 'gauge spaces' - U(1) bundles with connections; in particular, two products related to tensor products of vector bundles prove to be extremely useful in displaying the structure of the gauge spaces that naturally arise in this theory. (orig.)

  12. Effective of the q-deformed pseudoscalar magnetic field on the charge carriers in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eshghi, M., E-mail: eshgi54@gmail.com, E-mail: m.eshghi@semnan.ac.ir [Faculty of Physics, Semnan University, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Imam Hosein Comprehensive University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehraban, H. [Faculty of Physics, Semnan University, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    In this paper, we have obtained exact analytical solutions of the time-independent Dirac-Weyl equation for the charge carriers with q-deformed pseudoscalar magnetic barrier (PMB) in graphene by using the ansatz method. We have also found a solution that describes the left propagating wave function to calculation of the reflection and transmission coefficients using the Riemann’s equation. This allows us to conclude about the Dirac-Weyl equation with PMB and to understand quantum behavior of the Dirac fermions. Finally, some of the numerical results are shown, too.

  13. Adiabatic, chaotic and quasi-adiabatic charged particle motion in two-dimensional magnetic field reversals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buechner, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    For a number of problems in the Plasma Astrophysics it is necessary to know the laws, which govern the non adiabatic charged particle dynamics in strongly curves magnetic field reversals. These are, e.q., the kinetic theory of the microscopic and macroscopicstability of current sheets in collionless plasma, of microturbulence, causing anomalous resistivity and dissipating currents, the problem of spontaneous reconnection, the formation of non Maxwellian distribution functions, particle acceleration and the use of particles as a diagnostic tool ('tracers'). To find such laws we derived from the differential equations of motion discrete mappings. These mappings allow an investigation of the motion after the break down of the adiabaticity of the magnetic moment. (author). 32 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  14. Stochastic analysis of pitch angle scattering of charged particles by transverse magnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemons, Don S.; Liu Kaijun; Winske, Dan; Gary, S. Peter

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a theory of the velocity space scattering of charged particles in a static magnetic field composed of a uniform background field and a sum of transverse, circularly polarized, magnetic waves. When that sum has many terms the autocorrelation time required for particle orbits to become effectively randomized is small compared with the time required for the particle velocity distribution to change significantly. In this regime the deterministic equations of motion can be transformed into stochastic differential equations of motion. The resulting stochastic velocity space scattering is described, in part, by a pitch angle diffusion rate that is a function of initial pitch angle and properties of the wave spectrum. Numerical solutions of the deterministic equations of motion agree with the theory at all pitch angles, for wave energy densities up to and above the energy density of the uniform field, and for different wave spectral shapes.

  15. Tight-binding electronic spectra on graphs with spherical topology: I. The effect of a magnetic charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avishai, Y; Luck, J M

    2008-01-01

    This is the first of two papers devoted to tight-binding electronic spectra on graphs with the topology of the sphere. In this work the one-electron spectrum is investigated as a function of the radial magnetic field produced by a magnetic charge sitting at the centre of the sphere. The latter is an integer multiple of the quantized magnetic charge of the Dirac monopole, that integer defining the gauge sector. An analysis of the spectrum is carried out for the five platonic solids (tetrahedron, cube, octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron), the C 60 fullerene and two families of polyhedra, the diamonds and the prisms. Except for the fullerene, all the spectra are obtained in closed form. They exhibit a rich pattern of degeneracies. The total energy at half-filling is also evaluated in all the examples as a function of the magnetic charge

  16. Geometric Phase of the Gyromotion for Charged Particles in a Time-dependent Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong

    2011-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the gyrophase of a charged particle in a magnetic field which is uniform in space but changes slowly with time. As the magnetic field evolves slowly with time, the changing of the gyrophase is composed of two parts. The rst part is the dynamical phase, which is the time integral of the instantaneous gyrofrequency. The second part, called geometric gyrophase, is more interesting, and it is an example of the geometric phase which has found many important applications in different branches of physics. If the magnetic field returns to the initial value after a loop in the parameter space, then the geometric gyrophase equals the solid angle spanned by the loop in the parameter space. This classical geometric gyrophase is compared with the geometric phase (the Berry phase) of the spin wave function of an electron placed in the same adiabatically changing magnetic field. Even though gyromotion is not the classical counterpart of the quantum spin, the similarities between the geometric phases of the two cases nevertheless reveal the similar geometric nature of the different physics laws governing these two physics phenomena.

  17. Longitudinal injection of charged particles into a static magnetic configuration with mirrors (1964)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, J.P.; Gourdon, C.

    1964-01-01

    The theoretical study of the capture of charged particles injected longitudinally into a modulated magnetic configuration of the type proposed by Sinelnikov is extended by the use of the idea of a limited surface. This makes it possible to define the injection conditions which seem to lead to longer confinement times. The injection proposed is effected in the neighbourhood of a trajectory which is asymptotic to equilibrium trajectory situated in the plane of a mirror. Under these conditions the limiting surface is almost completely closed to the mirrors. The initial magnetic moment is no longer zero but has already the maximum value compatible with a penetration of the first mirror. A very small increase in the magnetic moment is then sufficient to ensure the capture of the particles; this is easily attained with a very low modulation factor. It is shown that capture can occur without modulation by a simple non-adiabatic effect due to the curvature of the field in the neighbourhood of the mirrors. A study is made of the influence on the capture in these conditions of a weak parasitic component of the magnetic field which is perpendicular to the axis of revolution of the main configuration. (authors) [fr

  18. Charge compensation and magnetic properties in Sr and Cu doped La-Fe perovskites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Julián Fernández C.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthorhombic lanthanum orthoferrites La0.8Sr0.2Fe1-yCuyO3-w (y = 0 and 0.10 have been studied using X-rays and neutron powder diffraction (XRPD and NPD, magnetization measurements and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Rietveld refinements on XRPD and NPD data show that they adopt an orthorhombic ABO3 perovskite symmetry with La/Sr and Fe/Cu atoms randomly distributed on crystal A and B sites, respectively. The magnetic structure at room temperature is antiferromagnetic, with the Fe/Cu magnetic moments aligned along the a axis. Magnetization curves versus temperature show that the compounds exhibit an overall antiferromagnetic and a weak ferromagnetic behaviour in the range 5-298 K. 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements indicate that Fe3+ and Fe5+ ions coexist in both compounds, and the relative percentage of Fe5+ is almost the same at 77 and 170 K, rejecting a charge disproportion mechanism.

  19. Magnetism and superconductivity in a quasi-2D anisotropic system doped with charge carriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palistrant, M. E., E-mail: mepalistrant@yandex.ru [Academy of Sciences of Moldova, Institute of Applied Physics (Moldova, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    The theory of multiband superconducting systems with variable density of charge carriers is analyzed. The possibility of emergence of nonphonon high-temperature superconductivity due to the predominance of electron–electron interband interactions over intraband interactions, as well as due to the fact that the thermodynamic and magnetic properties of multiband systems in the superconducting phase differ qualitatively from those of single-band systems, is indicated. Phase transitions in a quasi-2D anisotropic medium upon a change in the carrier concentration, i.e., a transition from the commensurate to the incommensurate state of the spin density wave, are analyzed. Such a transition is observed when the Umklapp processes in the lattice structure are taken into account. These processes facilitate a deviation of wavevector Q of the spin density wave from 2k{sub F}, as well as a displacement of the bandgap relative to the Fermi surface. This leads to the generation of free charge carriers and the possibility of superconductivity. It is shown that superconductivity accompanies the magnetism. The conditions for the coexistence of these two phenomena are determined.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Including Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography for Tumor Localization and Therapy Planning in Malignant Hilar Obstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenninen, E.L.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess image quality and overall accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including two magnetic cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) techniques, for the diagnostics and preoperative work-up of malignant hilar obstructions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-one patients with malignant hilar obstructions (hilar cholangiocarcinoma, n=30; hepatocellular carcinoma, n=1) received MRCP by two techniques (single-shot thick-slab and multisection thin-slice MRCP) and unenhanced and contrast material-enhanced MRI. MR assessment included the evaluation of image quality and visualization of bile ducts (5-point scale), and the classification of tumor status. MR results were subsequently correlated with the results from surgery and pathology. RESULTS: The maximum intensity projections of multisection thin-slice MRCP had significantly more artifacts compared to MRCP in the single-shot thick-slab technique, and overall image quality of single-shot thick-slab MRCP was rated significantly superior compared to multisection thin-slice MRCP (4.4 ± 0.7 and 4.1 ± 0.9, respectively). Moreover, ductal visualization of different parts of the biliary system was rated superior with single-shot thick-slab MRCP. In contrast, the original data from multisection thin slice MRCP facilitated visualization of periductal lesions and adjacent structures. Overall MR accuracy for the assessment of tumor status, periductal infiltration, and lymph node metastases was 90%, 87%, and 66%, respectively. CONCLUSION: For evaluation of malignant hilar obstructions, MRCP by the single-shot thick-slab technique had superior image quality and fewer artifacts; in contrast, besides sole biliary visualization, multisection MRCP depicted complementary adjacent parenchymal and periductal structures. We therefore recommend MRI, with a combination of both MRCP techniques, for the diagnostic work-up and therapy planning of malignant hilar obstructions

  1. Magnetism and structure of graphene nanodots with interiors modified by boron, nitrogen, and charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Michael R.; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2012-08-01

    The properties (geometry, spin, and charge distribution) of a series of flat hexagonal zigzag edged graphene nanodots (GNDs), with interiors modified by centrally located substituent atoms boron and nitrogen and by positive and negative charge, have been calculated using ab initio density functional theory. The doped series X-GND has the stoichiometry C_{6m2-1}XH6m, zigzag size index m = 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and substituent X = B or N. The undoped parents C_{6m2}H6m with m ⩽ 8 have spin paired ground states and the parent m = 10 has a spin polarized singlet ground state with edges that alternate α- and β-spin. The spin on the substituent atom decreases to zero with size index m and magnetization builds on the edges of all the X-GND. This demonstrates translocation of substituent spin and a proximity or directional effect for small m as the edges show different degrees of magnetization. For the largest X-GND (m = 10) the magnetization on edges resembles the calculated triplet S = 1(a) configuration of the parent (four edge spins up and two down) and has a higher apparent symmetry than the C2v point group of X-GND. For charged (m = 10) GNDs the edge magnetization has strength comparable to the parent on two parallel edges and weak on the other four in a perimeter pattern that resembles the triplet S = 1(b) configuration of the undoped parent and not the ground configuration of the isoelectronic X-GND molecule. Many of the results can be interpreted by simple Kekulacute{e} valence bond structures for an unpaired spin on a network where the substituent site group symmetry is not compatible with the perimeter. A deeper understanding is provided by the properties of the Kohn-Sham orbitals. The calculations of the X-doped GNDs reveal limitations in the use of the hex-radical hypothesis of the parent ground state to systems where foreign atoms lower symmetry and perturb the π- and σ-bond manifolds.

  2. A New Circuit Model for Spin-Torque Oscillator Including Perpendicular Torque of Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyein Lim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spin-torque oscillator (STO is a promising new technology for the future RF oscillators, which is based on the spin-transfer torque (STT effect in magnetic multilayered nanostructure. It is expected to provide a larger tunability, smaller size, lower power consumption, and higher level of integration than the semiconductor-based oscillators. In our previous work, a circuit-level model of the giant magnetoresistance (GMR STO was proposed. In this paper, we present a physics-based circuit-level model of the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ-based STO. MTJ-STO model includes the effect of perpendicular torque that has been ignored in the GMR-STO model. The variations of three major characteristics, generation frequency, mean oscillation power, and generation linewidth of an MTJ-STO with respect to the amount of perpendicular torque, are investigated, and the results are applied to our model. The operation of the model was verified by HSPICE simulation, and the results show an excellent agreement with the experimental data. The results also prove that a full circuit-level simulation with MJT-STO devices can be made with our proposed model.

  3. Ovarian adenofibromas and cystadenofibromas - Magnetic resonance imaging findings including diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Mayumi [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan)], e-mail: mayumi@clin.med.tokushima-u.ac.jp; Matsuzaki, Kenji; Harada, Masafumi [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan)

    2013-03-15

    Background: Ovarian adenofibromas (AF) and cystadenofibromas (CAF) belong to the surface epithelial-stromal tumors, and may appear as solid, or solid and cystic masses mimicking ovarian cancers. Purpose: To evaluate the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement for the diagnosis of ovarian AF/CAF. Material and Methods: Magnetic resonance manifestations of 13 cases of ovarian AF/CAF were retrospectively evaluated. DWI was obtained in all 13 lesions, and mean ADC values in 11 lesions were compared with those in solid portions of 27 ovarian cancers. Results: Neither case with AF/CAF revealed high signal intensity on DWI, whereas all ovarian cancers showed high signal intensity on DWI. The ADC values in the solid portions of AF/CAF were significantly higher than those of ovarian cancers (P < 0.001). A cut-off value of 1.20 X 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for AF/CAF had a sensitivity of 82%, specificity of 93%, positive predictive value of 82%, and negative predictive value of 93%. Conclusion: DWI with ADC measurement may be helpful in differentiating AF/CAF from ovarian cancers.

  4. Modeling of the Direct Current Generator Including the Magnetic Saturation and Temperature Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso J. Mercado-Samur

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the inclusion of temperature effect on the field resistance on the direct current generator model DC1A, which is valid to stability studies is proposed. First, the linear generator model is presented, after the effect of magnetic saturation and the change in the resistance value due to temperature produced by the field current are included. The comparison of experimental results and model simulations to validate the model is used. A direct current generator model which is a better representation of the generator is obtained. Visual comparison between simulations and experimental results shows the success of the proposed model, because it presents the lowest error of the compared models. The accuracy of the proposed model is observed via Modified Normalized Sum of Squared Errors index equal to 3.8979%.

  5. Transverse charge and magnetization densities: Improved chiral predictions down to b=1 fms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, Jose Manuel [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hiller Blin, Astrid N. [Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany); Vicente Vacas, Manuel J. [Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Valencia (Spain). Univ. of Valencia (UV), Inst. de Fisica Corpuscular; Weiss, Christian [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2018-03-01

    The transverse charge and magnetization densities provide insight into the nucleon’s inner structure. In the periphery, the isovector components are clearly dominant, and can be computed in a model-independent way by means of a combination of chiral effective field theory (cEFT) and dispersion analysis. With a novel N=D method, we incorporate the pion electromagnetic formfactor data into the cEFT calculation, thus taking into account the pion-rescattering effects and r-meson pole. As a consequence, we are able to reliably compute the densities down to distances b1 fm, therefore achieving a dramatic improvement of the results compared to traditional cEFT calculations, while remaining predictive and having controlled uncertainties.

  6. On correlation between the pion charge radius and the pionic contribution to the muon magnetic moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raszillier, I.

    1977-06-01

    The possible values of the pion charge radius rsub(π) are correlated with those of the pionic contribution asub(μ)(π + π - ) to the muon magnetic moment in terms of the normalization of the pion form factor, its modulus on part of the unitarity cut, and the quality of the chisup(2)-fit to values measured for it in a number of spacelike points. The correlation is expressed as a 3-dimensional set (D) of values (h'(0),||h||sup(2),chi) allowed for the functions h(z) analytic in the unit disk and belonging to a set Ω in the Hilbert space Hsup(2). The set D, which depends through Ω and chi on the information used, has simple convexity properties. Its computation is reduced to a problem of finite-dimensional convex optimization. (author)

  7. High-speed ac motor including the function of a magnetic frequency tripler

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Sotoshi; Takeuchi, A.; Sudani, T.; Bessho, Kazuo

    1986-01-01

    The new electric motor is the magnetic combination of a magnetic frequency multiplier and a AC motor which share the common magnetic yoke. The motor operates near the synchronous speed (10,800 rpm) by applied the single-phase commercial source at 60 Hz. The new machine is called “high-speed hybrid AC motor” because the combination of a motor and a frequency converter. This paper describes the structure and the operating characteristics of the new motor.

  8. Magnetically insulated coaxial vacuum diode with partial space-charge-limited explosive emission from edge-type cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belomyttsev, S. Ya.; Rostov, V. V.; Romanchenko, I. V. [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3 Akademichesky Avenue, 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Shunailov, S. A.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Ulmaskulov, M. R. [Institute of Electrophysics UB RAS, 106 Amundsen Str., 620016 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kolomiets, M. D. [Ural Federal University, 19 Mira Str., 620002 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Mesyats, G. A. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, 53 Lenin Avenue, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Yalandin, M. I. [Institute of Electrophysics UB RAS, 106 Amundsen Str., 620016 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, 53 Lenin Avenue, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-14

    The vacuum current associated with any type of electron emission for arbitrary configuration of the diode depends on the combination of the applied electric field and vacuum space charge (VSC) field created by the current. Such fundamental statement should give very close links between the diode current and the normalized cathode field θ which has been introduced by Forbes in 2008 for planar diodes as a reduction in the cathode surface field: θ = field-with/field-without VSC. This article reports the universal approximation of the type of cos(πθ/2) that is the ratio of the actual current and the fully space-charge-limited current. Also, the theoretical treatment and the experimental method of determination of the dynamic emissive characteristics of the macroscopic explosive emission from edge-type cathodes in the coaxial diode are developed. The experimental results obtained with a picosecond time reference between the cathode voltage and the onset of the high-current electron beam exhibit a good coincidence with the theoretical predictions. The presented methods enable the analysis of a real-time-resolved dynamics associated with the dense, magnetized electron beam formation, acceleration and drift motion, including kinematic effects and the phase-stable excitation of high-power microwave oscillators.

  9. Model of Organic Solar Cell Photocurrent Including the Effect of Charge Accumulation at Interfaces and Non-Uniform Carrier Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torto, Lorenzo; Cester, Andrea; Rizzo, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    We developed an improved model to fit the photocurrent density versus voltage in organic solar cells. The model has been validated by fitting data from P3HT:PCBM solar cells. Our model quantitatively accounts for the band bending near the electrodes caused by charge accumulation in the active layer...

  10. Determination of the point-of-zero, charge of manganese oxides with different methods including an improved salt titration method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, W.F.; Lu, S.J.; Liu, F.; Feng, X.H.; He, J.Z.; Koopal, L.K.

    2008-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are important components in soils and sediments. Points-of-zero charge (PZC) of three synthetic Mn oxides (birnessite, cryptomelane, and todorokite) were determined by using three classical techniques (potentiometric titration or PT, rapid PT or R-PT, and salt titration or ST)

  11. Charge transfer of He2 + with H in a strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Lei; Zou, Shi-Yang; He, Bin; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2015-09-01

    By solving a time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE), we studied the electron capture process in the He2 + +H collision system under a strong magnetic field in a wide projectile energy range. The strong enhancement of the total charge transfer cross section is observed for the projectile energy below 2.0 keV/u. With the projectile energy increasing, the cross sections will reduce a little and then increase again, compared with those in the field-free case. The cross sections to the states with different magnetic quantum numbers are presented and analyzed where the influence due to Zeeman splitting is obviously found, especially in the low projectile energy region. The comparison with other models is made and the tendency of the cross section varying with the projectile energy is found closer to that from other close coupling models. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11104017, 11025417, 11275029, and 11474032), the National Basic Research Programm of China (Grant No. 2013CB922200), and the Foundation for the Development of Science and Technology of the Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant Nos. 2014B09036 and 2013A0102005).

  12. Magnetic field controlled charge density wave coupling in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, J.; Blackburn, E.; Ivashko, O.

    2016-01-01

    The application of magnetic fields to layered cuprates suppresses their high-temperature superconducting behaviour and reveals competing ground states. In widely studied underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x (YBCO), the microscopic nature of field-induced electronic and structural changes at low temperatures...... at B∼15 T. The CDW signal along the a-direction is also enhanced by field, but does not develop an additional pattern of correlations. Magnetic field modifies the coupling between the CuO2 bilayers in the YBCO structure, and causes the sudden appearance of the 3D CDW order. The mirror symmetry...... remains unclear. Here we report an X-ray study of the high-field charge density wave (CDW) in YBCO. For hole dopings ∼ 0.123, we find that a field (B∼10 T) induces additional CDW correlations along the CuO chain (b-direction) only, leading to a three-dimensional (3D) ordered state along this direction...

  13. Design of Static Wireless Charging System for Electric Vehicles with Focus on Magnetic Coupling and Emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batra, Tushar

    the secondary capacitor bigger than its resonant value and making the secondary circuit inductive. On the negative side, the reduced emissions require higher inverter current and bigger primary capacitor to deliver the same output power. At last, two resonant topologies series-series and series-parallel...... are compared in term of the emissions for similar power rating. Series-parallel topology has slight advantage over its series-series counterpart on account of additional inductive secondary current component as advised by the results. At the end, a wireless charging system has been designed and constructed...... summarizes the research findings of the study. Wireless charging system as per state of art design approach consists of four major blocks: primary power electronics, inductors, secondary power electronics including load and resonant circuits (capacitors). The first contribution of this project is addition...

  14. On the stability conditions of flexible current conductor tightened in a magnetic field for charged particle trajectory tracing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozodaev, M.S.

    1974-01-01

    Conditions of equilibrium stability in three-dimensional space for a stretched flexible current conductor, while tracing the trajectories of charged particles moving in a magnetic field, have been determined using variational principles. Formulas suitable for engineering calculations have been obtained that allow to determine the stability regions and to estimate errors in tracing due to the conductor weight and elasticity

  15. The effect of angular divergence and space charge on transmission of an electron beam through a magnetic mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrelin, V. T.; Kandaurov, I. V.; Kurkuchekov, V. V.; Sveshnikov, V. M.; Trunev, Yu A.

    2017-05-01

    An experiment on generation and transmission of an intensive electron beam through a magnetic mirror has been carried out at the GOL-3 magnetic trap. An adapted theory and numerical modelling were used to find a maximal beam current for which no beam electrons are reflected. The effect of space charge and magnetic mirror of the reflection were taken into account. A comparison of the computed limiting current with experimental value allowed us to validate a hypothesis that the appearance of reflected electrons is responsible for electric breakdown in the electron gun.

  16. Controlling Charge and Current Neutralization of an Ion Beam Pulse in a Background Plasma by Application of a Solenoidal Magnetic Field I: Weak Magnetic Field Limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaganovich, I. D., Startsev, E. A., Sefkow, A. B., Davidson, R. C.

    2008-10-10

    Propagation of an intense charged particle beam pulse through a background plasma is a common problem in astrophysics and plasma applications. The plasma can effectively neutralize the charge and current of the beam pulse, and thus provides a convenient medium for beam transport. The application of a small solenoidal magnetic field can drastically change the self-magnetic and self- electric fields of the beam pulse, thus allowing effective control of the beam transport through the background plasma. An analytic model is developed to describe the self-magnetic field of a finite- length ion beam pulse propagating in a cold background plasma in a solenoidal magnetic field. The analytic studies show that the solenoidal magnetic field starts to infuence the self-electric and self-magnetic fields when ωce > ωpeβb, where ωce = eβ/mec is the electron gyrofrequency, ωpe is the electron plasma frequency, and βb = Vb/c is the ion beam velocity relative to the speed of light. This condition typically holds for relatively small magnetic fields (about 100G). Analytical formulas are derived for the effective radial force acting on the beam ions, which can be used to minimize beam pinching. The results of analytic theory have been verified by comparison with the simulation results obtained from two particle-in-cell codes, which show good agreement.

  17. Controlling Charge and Current Neutralization of an Ion Beam Pulse in a Background Plasma by Application of a Solenoidal Magnetic Field I: Weak Magnetic Field Limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Davidson, R. C.

    2008-01-01

    Propagation of an intense charged particle beam pulse through a background plasma is a common problem in astrophysics and plasma applications. The plasma can effectively neutralize the charge and current of the beam pulse, and thus provides a convenient medium for beam transport. The application of a small solenoidal magnetic field can drastically change the self-magnetic and self- electric fields of the beam pulse, thus allowing effective control of the beam transport through the background plasma. An analytic model is developed to describe the self-magnetic field of a finite-length ion beam pulse propagating in a cold background plasma in a solenoidal magnetic field. The analytic studies show that the solenoidal magnetic field starts to influence the self-electric and self-magnetic fields when ω ce ∼> ω pe β b , where ω ce = eB/m e c is the electron gyrofrequency, ω pe is the electron plasma frequency, and β b = V b /c is the ion beam velocity relative to the speed of light. This condition typically holds for relatively small magnetic fields (about 100G). Analytical formulas are derived for the effective radial force acting on the beam ions, which can be used to minimize beam pinching. The results of analytic theory have been verified by comparison with the simulation results obtained from two particle-in-cell codes, which show good agreement

  18. Charge and magnetic moment of the neutrino in the background field method and in the linear RξL gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral-Rosetti, L.G.; Bernabeu, J.; Vidal, J.

    2000-01-01

    We present a computation of the charge and the magnetic moment of the neutrino in the recently developed electro-weak background field method and in the linear R ξ L gauge. First, we deduce a formal Ward-Takahashi identity which implies the immediate cancellation of the neutrino electric charge. This Ward-Takahashi identity is as simple as that for QED. The computation of the (proper and improper) one loop vertex diagrams contributing to the neutrino electric charge is also presented in an arbitrary gauge, checking in this way the Ward-Takahashi identity previously obtained. Finally, the calculation of the magnetic moment of the neutrino, in the minimal extension of the standard model with massive Dirac neutrinos, is presented, showing its gauge parameter and gauge structure independence explicitly. (orig.)

  19. One-loop thermodynamic potential of charged massive particles in a constant homogeneous magnetic field at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinichenko, I. S.; Kazinski, P. O.

    2016-12-01

    The explicit expressions for the high-temperature expansions of the one-loop corrections to the thermodynamic potential coming from charged scalar and Dirac particles and, separately, from antiparticles in a constant homogeneous magnetic field are derived. The explicit expressions for the nonperturbative corrections to the effective action at finite temperature and density are obtained. Thermodynamic properties of a gas of charged scalars in a constant homogeneous magnetic field are analyzed in the one-loop approximation. It turns out that, in this approximation, the system suffers a first-order phase transition from the diamagnetic to the superconducting state at sufficiently high densities. The improvement of the one-loop result by summing the ring diagrams is investigated. This improvement leads to a drastic change in thermodynamic properties of the system. The gas of charged scalars passes to the ferromagnetic state rather than the superconducting one at high densities and sufficiently low temperatures, in the high-temperature regime.

  20. A charged particle interacting with a stationary magnetic monopole: quantum mechanics based on the kinetic momentum operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raković, Milun J

    2011-01-01

    The standard quantum mechanical description of the motion of a charged particle in the field of a stationary magnetic monopole is notorious for the presence of unnatural singularities in the Hamiltonian operator originating in the vector potential A(r) used to describe the magnetic field of the monopole. In this paper, an elementary quantum mechanical formulation of the problem which involves only the physically observable field B(r) is presented. This is achieved by treating as a fundamental observable of the charged particle its kinetic momentum instead of the linear momentum p. An irreducible representation of the fundamental commutation relations involving the operators r-hat. It is shown that the existence of an irreducible representation requires that Dirac’s charge quantization condition is satisfied. Also, it is demonstrated that, from the quantum mechanical perspective, the singularities (appearing when the vector potential is introduced) are in fact properties of coordinate representations of the fundamental commutation relations. (paper)

  1. Beam-energy dependence of charge separation along the magnetic field in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-08-01

    Local parity-odd domains are theorized to form inside a quark-gluon plasma which has been produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The local parity-odd domains manifest themselves as charge separation along the magnetic field axis via the chiral magnetic effect. The experimental observation of charge separation has previously been reported for heavy-ion collisions at the top RHIC energies. In this Letter, we present the results of the beam-energy dependence of the charge correlations in Au+Au collisions at midrapidity for center-of-mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, and 62.4 GeV from the STAR experiment. After background subtraction, the signal gradually reduces with decreased beam energy and tends to vanish by 7.7 GeV. This implies the dominance of hadronic interactions over partonic ones at lower collision energies.

  2. Beam-Energy Dependence of Charge Separation along the Magnetic Field in Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-08-01

    Local parity-odd domains are theorized to form inside a quark-gluon plasma which has been produced in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The local parity-odd domains manifest themselves as charge separation along the magnetic field axis via the chiral magnetic effect. The experimental observation of charge separation has previously been reported for heavy-ion collisions at the top RHIC energies. In this Letter, we present the results of the beam-energy dependence of the charge correlations in Au +Au collisions at midrapidity for center-of-mass energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, and 62.4 GeV from the STAR experiment. After background subtraction, the signal gradually reduces with decreased beam energy and tends to vanish by 7.7 GeV. This implies the dominance of hadronic interactions over partonic ones at lower collision energies.

  3. Design features and initial operation of a linear plasma device for the feasibility study of charge separation in curved magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, K.S.; Kim, Seongcheol; Choi, Dahye; Chung, Kyoung-Jae, E-mail: jkjlsh1@snu.ac.kr; Hwang, Y.S.

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • An innovative divertor concept utilizing direct energy conversion is presented. • A linear plasma device have been designed and operated for study of charge separation. • Preliminary experiments show the possibility of charge separation with cusp magnetic field. • Parametric study considering loss of adiabaticity shows a good agreement with experiments. - Abstract: Mitigation of heat flux impinging on divertor plates is a critical engineering issue even for the fusion reactor adopting innovative super-X divertor. In this work, we are exploring the possibility for resolving this problem by converting a substantial portion of thermal energy of ions into electricity in front of the divertor plates. Since successful energy conversion is followed by the separation of electrons from the plasma, the rigorous investigation for the conditions of efficient charge separation is essential. Considering that the charge separation is affected by intricate relations between plasma density, drift velocity, Larmor radius, and field curvature, we have recently designed and constructed a new linear plasma device at Seoul National University for studying the feasibility of the charge separation by curved magnetic field. The device consists of the driving section including a typical electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source operating at 2.45 GHz wave frequency and the diffusion section where a cylindrical chamber is surrounded by a pair of solenoid coils for generating various curved magnetic field structures. The plasma density in the experimental region is measured to be around the middle of 10{sup 15} m{sup −3} for the optimum ECR field, depending on the gas pressure and microwave power. The preliminary results clearly show that the charged particles in the plasma with a density range of 10{sup 15} m{sup −3} can be separated quite well by an extremely slanted cusp magnetic field. We are planning to increase the microwave power to increase the plasma

  4. Combined effect of magnetic field and charge current on antiferromagnetic domain-wall dynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yamane, Y.; Gomonay, O.; Velkov, H.; Sinova, Jairo

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 6 (2017), s. 1-5, č. článku 064408. ISSN 2469-9950 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37427G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 610115 - SC2 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : spintronics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  5. DFT calculations of the charged states of N@C60 and Fe4 single molecule magnets investigated in tunneling spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossa, Javier; Islam, Fhokrul; Canali, Carlo; Pederson, Mark

    2012-02-01

    For device applications of single molecule magnets (SMMs) in high-density information storage and quantum-state control it is essential that the magnetic properties of the molecules remain stable under the influence of metallic contacts or surface environment. Recent tunneling experiments [1, 2] on N@C60 and Fe4 SMM have shown that these molecules preserve their magnetic characteristics when they are used as the central island of single-electron transistors. Although quantum spin models have been used extensively to study theoretically tunneling spectroscopy of SMMs, it has been shown recently that the orbital degrees of freedom, which is absent in spin models, can significantly affect the tunneling conductance [3]. In this work we present first-principles calculations of the neutral and charged states of N@C60 and Fe4 SMMs, and discuss a strategy to include their properties into a theory of quantum transport. We also present results of the magnetic anisotropy for the different charge states of Fe4 and discuss their relevance for experiments [2] in the sequential tunneling and cotunnelling regimes. [4pt] [1]. N. Roch et al., Phys. Rev. B 83, 081407 (2011). [0pt] [2]. A.S. Zyazin et al., Nano Lett. 10, 3307 (2010). [0pt] [3]. L. Michalak et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 017202 (2010).

  6. Successive coupled charge, magnetic, and structural transitions in Ca0.5Bi0.5FeO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis Romero, Fabio; Hosaka, Yoshiteru; Ichikawa, Noriya; Saito, Takashi; McNally, Graham; Attfield, J. Paul; Shimakawa, Yuichi

    Stoichiometric Ca0.5Bi0.5FeO3 containing high-valent Fe3 . 5 + adopting the perovskite structure was prepared under a high oxygen pressure and shows two successive phase transitions on cooling at 240 K and 200 K. Mössbauer spectroscopy and neutron powder diffraction data indicate that these transitions are associated with charge changes to relieve the instability of Fe3 . 5 +.The first transition is due to charge disproportionation of the iron centers while the second is due to intermetallic charge transfer between A-site Bi and B-site Fe. The transitions can be described as: (Ca0. 5 2 + Bi0. 5 3 +) Fe 3 . 5 +O3 -> (Ca0. 5 2 + Bi0. 5 3 +) (Fe0. 67 (3 . 5 - x) + Fe0. 33 (3 . 5 + 2 x) +) O3 -> (Ca0. 5 2 + Bi0. 25 3 + Bi0. 25 5 +) Fe3+O3 In the intermediate temperature phase, one third of B-sites (Fe(3 . 5 + 2 x) +) do not contribute to the magnetic scattering while the remaining spins couple antiferromagnetically. The lowest temperature magnetic structure is simple G-type antiferromagnetic resulting from a structure containing only Fe3+. Competing intermetallic and disproportionation charge instabilities result in a variety of electronic, magnetic, and structural ground states.

  7. Evaluation of multiple small-angle neutron scattering including magnetic interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šaroun, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 40, s1 (2007), s701-s705 ISSN 0021-8898. [XIII International Conference on Small - Angle Scattering . Kyoto, 09.07.2006-13.07.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : multiple small - angle scattering * neutron scattering * ferromagnets Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.629, year: 2007

  8. Near-horizon Structure of Escape Zones of Electrically Charged Particles around Weakly Magnetized Rotating Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopáček, Ondřej; Karas, Vladimír

    2018-01-01

    An interplay of magnetic fields and gravitation drives accretion and outflows near black holes. However, a specific mechanism is still a matter of debate; it is very likely that different processes dominate under various conditions. In particular, for the acceleration of particles and their collimation in jets, an ordered component of the magnetic field seems to be essential. Here we discuss the role of large-scale magnetic fields in transporting the charged particles and dust grains from the bound orbits in the equatorial plane of a rotating (Kerr) black hole and the resulting acceleration along trajectories escaping the system in a direction parallel to the symmetry axis (perpendicular to the accretion disk). We consider a specific scenario of destabilization of circular geodesics of initially neutral matter by charging (e.g., due to photoionization). Some particles may be set on escaping trajectories and attain relativistic velocity. The case of charged particles differs from charged dust grains by their charge-to-mass ratio, but the acceleration mechanism operates in a similar manner. It appears that the chaotic dynamics controls the outflow and supports the formation of near-horizon escape zones. We employ the technique of recurrence plots to characterize the onset of chaos in the outflowing medium. We investigate the system numerically and construct the basin-boundary plots, which show the location and the extent of the escape zones. The effects of black hole spin and magnetic field strength on the formation and location of escape zones are discussed, and the maximal escape velocity is computed.

  9. Influence of initial velocity on trajectories of a charged particle in uniform crossed electric and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khotimah, Siti Nurul; Viridi, Sparisoma; Widayani

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic and electric fields can cause a charged particle to form interesting trajectories. In general, each trajectory is discussed separately in university physics textbooks for undergraduate students. In this work, a solution of a charged particle moving in a uniform electric field at right angles to a uniform magnetic field (uniform crossed electric and magnetic fields) is reported; it is limited to particle motion in a plane. Specific solutions and their trajectories are obtained only by varying the initial particle velocity. The result shows five basic trajectory patterns, i.e., straight line, sinusoid-like, cycloid, cycloid-like with oscillation, and circle-like. The region of each trajectory is also mapped in the initial velocity space of the particle. This paper is intended for undergraduate students and describes further the trajectories of a charged particle through the regions of electric and magnetic fields influenced by initial condition of the particle, where electromagnetic radiation of an accelerated particle is not considered. (paper)

  10. Electrokinetic motion of a charged colloidal sphere in a spherical cavity with magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tzu H.; Keh, Huan J.

    2011-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects on the translation and rotation of a charged colloidal sphere situated at the center of a spherical cavity filled with an arbitrary electrolyte solution when a constant magnetic field is imposed are analyzed at the quasisteady state. The electric double layers adjacent to the solid surfaces may have an arbitrary thickness relative to the particle and cavity radii. Through the use of a perturbation method to the leading order, the Stokes equations modified with the electric/Lorentz force term are dealt by using a generalized reciprocal theorem. Using the equilibrium double-layer potential distribution in the fluid phase from solving the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation, we obtain explicit formulas for the translational and angular velocities of the colloidal sphere produced by the MHD effects valid for all values of the particle-to-cavity size ratio. For the limiting case of an infinitely large cavity with an uncharged wall, our result reduces to the relevant solution for an unbounded spherical particle available in the literature. The boundary effect on the MHD motion of the spherical particle is a qualitatively and quantitatively sensible function of the parameters a/b and κa, where a and b are the radii of the particle and cavity, respectively, and κ is the reciprocal of the Debye screening length. In general, the proximity of the cavity wall reduces the MHD migration but intensifies the MHD rotation of the particle.

  11. The maximal excess charge for a family of density-matrix-functional theories including Hartree-Fock and Müller theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehle, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    We will give a proof that the maximal excess charge for an atom described by a family of density-matrix-functionals, which includes Hartree-Fock and Müller theories, is bounded by a universal constant. We will use the new technique introduced by Frank et al. [preprint arXiv:1608.05625 (2016)].

  12. Quantum features of a charged particle in ionized plasma controlled by a time-dependent magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Ryeol eChoi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Quantum characteristics of a charged particle traveling under the influence of an external time-dependent magnetic field in ionized plasma are investigated using the invariant operator method. The Hamiltonian that gives the radial part of the classical equation of motion for the charged particle is dependent on time. The corresponding invariant operator that satisfies Liouville-von Neumann equation is constructed using fundamental relations. The exact radial wave functions are derived by taking advantage of the eigenstates of the invariant operator. Quantum properties of the system is studied using these wave functions. Especially, the time behavior of the radial component of the quantized energy is addressed in detail.

  13. A note on linking electrical current, magnetic fields, charges and the pole in a barn paradox in special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGlynn, Enda; Van Kampen, Paul

    2008-01-01

    We point out the connection between the 'pole in a barn paradox' and the phenomenon of alterations in charge in a segment of a current-carrying conductor as perceived by observers in different inertial reference frames. This connection appears to offer a useful pedagogical strategy helping students to appreciate that the issues which underlie the explanation of the paradox can be important and significant in everyday phenomena such as magnetic forces on moving charges and at the very modest speeds associated with electron drift in conductors. (note)

  14. Ordered state of magnetic charge in the pseudo-gap phase of a cuprate superconductor (HgBa2CuO4+δ )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovesey, S. W.; Khalyavin, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    A symmetry-based interpretation of published experimental results demonstrates that the pseudo-gap phase of underdoped HgBa2CuO4+δ (Hg1201) possesses an ordered state of magnetic charge epitomized by Cu magnetic monopoles. Magnetic properties of one-layer Hg1201 and two-layer YBa2Cu3O6+x (YBCO) cuprates have much in common, because their pseudo-gap phases possess the same magnetic space-group, e.g. both underdoped cuprates allow the magneto-electric (Kerr) effect. Differences in their properties stem from different Cu site symmetries, leaving Cu magnetic monopoles forbidden in YBCO. Resonant x-ray Bragg diffraction experiments can complement the wealth of information available from neutron diffraction experiments on five Hg1201 samples on which our findings are based. In the case of Hg1201 emergence of the pseudo-gap phase, with time-reversal violation, is accompanied by a reduction of Cu site symmetry that includes loss of a centre of inversion symmetry. In consequence, parity-odd x-ray absorption events herald the onset of the enigmatic phase, and we predict dependence of corresponding Bragg spots on magneto-electric multipoles, including the monopole, and the azimuthal angle (crystal rotation about the Bragg wavevector).

  15. Efficient wireless power charging of electric vehicle by modifying the magnetic characteristics of the medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Mohammad Hazzaz

    There is a developing enthusiasm for electric vehicle (EV) innovations as a result of their lessened fuel utilization and greenhouse emission especially through wireless power transfer (WPT) due to the convenience and continuous charging. Numerous research initiatives target on wireless power transfer (WPT) system in the attempt to improve the transportation for last few decades. But several problems like less efficiency, high frequency, long distance energy transfer etc. were always been occupied by the wireless power transfer system. Two ideas have been developed in this research to resolve the two main problems of WPT for electric vehicles which are low efficiency due to large distance between the two coils and slow charging time. As the first phase of study, a proper model, including the coils and cores were required. The selected model was a finite element (FE) modeling. Another part of this study was to create a modified cement that will act as a semi-conductive material for covering the transmitting antenna area. A high frequency wide band gap switch will be used for transferring high amount of power in a very short time. More over this research also proves that, if cores could be added with the transmitter coil and receiver coil then the output efficiency dramatically increased comparing with without core model of transmitter and receiver. The wireless charging is not restricted to parking lot, since it's planned to be embedded into parking space concrete or roadway concrete or asphalt. Therefore, it can also be installed at junctions (behind red lights), stop signs or any spot that the vehicle might stop for several moments. This technology will become more feasible, if the charging time decreases. Therefore, a new model of for wireless power transfer has been proposed in this study which has shown significant improvement. Another motive of this study was to improve the conductivity and permeability in such a way that the medium that is on the top of the

  16. TURTLE with MAD input (Trace Unlimited Rays Through Lumped Elements) -- A computer program for simulating charged particle beam transport systems and DECAY TURTLE including decay calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, D.C.

    1999-12-09

    TURTLE is a computer program useful for determining many characteristics of a particle beam once an initial design has been achieved, Charged particle beams are usually designed by adjusting various beam line parameters to obtain desired values of certain elements of a transfer or beam matrix. Such beam line parameters may describe certain magnetic fields and their gradients, lengths and shapes of magnets, spacings between magnetic elements, or the initial beam accepted into the system. For such purposes one typically employs a matrix multiplication and fitting program such as TRANSPORT. TURTLE is designed to be used after TRANSPORT. For convenience of the user, the input formats of the two programs have been made compatible. The use of TURTLE should be restricted to beams with small phase space. The lumped element approximation, described below, precludes the inclusion of the effect of conventional local geometric aberrations (due to large phase space) or fourth and higher order. A reading of the discussion below will indicate clearly the exact uses and limitations of the approach taken in TURTLE.

  17. TURTLE with MAD input (Trace Unlimited Rays Through Lumped Elements) -- A computer program for simulating charged particle beam transport systems and DECAY TURTLE including decay calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, D.C.

    1999-01-01

    TURTLE is a computer program useful for determining many characteristics of a particle beam once an initial design has been achieved, Charged particle beams are usually designed by adjusting various beam line parameters to obtain desired values of certain elements of a transfer or beam matrix. Such beam line parameters may describe certain magnetic fields and their gradients, lengths and shapes of magnets, spacings between magnetic elements, or the initial beam accepted into the system. For such purposes one typically employs a matrix multiplication and fitting program such as TRANSPORT. TURTLE is designed to be used after TRANSPORT. For convenience of the user, the input formats of the two programs have been made compatible. The use of TURTLE should be restricted to beams with small phase space. The lumped element approximation, described below, precludes the inclusion of the effect of conventional local geometric aberrations (due to large phase space) or fourth and higher order. A reading of the discussion below will indicate clearly the exact uses and limitations of the approach taken in TURTLE

  18. Dissipative dust-acoustic shock waves in a varying charge electronegative magnetized dusty plasma with trapped electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacha, Mustapha [Faculty of Physics, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Plasma Physics Group, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Tribeche, Mouloud, E-mail: mouloudtribeche@yahoo.fr, E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz [Faculty of Physics, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Plasma Physics Group, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Algerian Academy of Sciences and Technologies, Algiers (Algeria)

    2016-08-15

    The combined effects of an oblique magnetic field and electron trapping on dissipative dust-acoustic waves are examined in varying charge electronegative dusty plasmas with application to the Halley Comet plasma (∼10{sup 4} km from the nucleus). A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out to derive a modified Korteweg-de Vries-Burger-like equation. Making use of the equilibrium current balance equation, the physically admissible values of the electron trapping parameter are first constrained. We then show that the Burger dissipative term is solely due to the dust charge variation process. It is found that an increase of the magnetic field obliqueness or a decrease of its magnitude renders the shock structure more dispersive.

  19. Can a charged decaying particle serve as an ideal clock in the presence of a magnetic field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierini, Roberto; Turzyński, Krzysztof; Dragan, Andrzej

    2018-02-01

    We investigate a model of a supposedly ideal clock based on the decay rate of a charged particle in circular motion in a constant magnetic field. We show that the time measured by an ideal clock depends on the acceleration. However, the effect becomes visible at an order of magnitude of 1 028 g , therefore confirming the validity of the ideal clock hypothesis for realistic accelerations.

  20. Analytic treatment of the excited instability spectra of the magnetically charged SU(2) Reissner-Nordström black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hod, Shahar [The Ruppin Academic Center, Emeq Hefer 40250 (Israel); The Hadassah Academic College, Jerusalem 91010 (Israel)

    2017-03-14

    The magnetically charged SU(2) Reissner-Nordström black-hole solutions of the coupled nonlinear Einstein-Yang-Mills field equations are known to be characterized by infinite spectra of unstable (imaginary) resonances {ω_n(r_+,r_−)}{sub n=0}{sup n=∞} (here r{sub ±} are the black-hole horizon radii). Based on direct numerical computations of the black-hole instability spectra, it has recently been observed that the excited instability eigenvalues of the magnetically charged black holes exhibit a simple universal behavior. In particular, it was shown that the numerically computed instability eigenvalues of the magnetically charged black holes are characterized by the small frequency universal relation ω{sub n}(r{sub +}−r{sub −})=λ{sub n}, where {λ_n} are dimensionless constants which are independent of the black-hole parameters. In the present paper we study analytically the instability spectra of the magnetically charged SU(2) Reissner-Nordström black holes. In particular, we provide a rigorous analytical proof for the numerically-suggested universal behavior ω{sub n}(r{sub +}−r{sub −})=λ{sub n} in the small frequency ω{sub n}r{sub +}≪(r{sub +}−r{sub −})/r{sub +} regime. Interestingly, it is shown that the excited black-hole resonances are characterized by the simple universal relation ω{sub n+1}/ω{sub n}=e{sup −2π/√3}. Finally, we confirm our analytical results for the black-hole instability spectra with numerical computations.

  1. Studies of the Response of the Prototype CMS Hadron Calorimeter, Including Magnetic Field Effects, to Pion, Electron, and Muon Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Abramov, V.V.; Akchurin, N.; Atanasov, I.; Baiatian, G.; Ball, A.; Banerjee, S.; de Barbaro, P.; Barnes, V.; Bencze, G.; Bodek, A.; Booke, M.; Budd, H.; Cremaldi, L.; Cushman, P.; Dugad, S.R.; Dimitrov, L.; Dyshkant, A.; Elias, J.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Fong, D.; Freeman, J.; Genchev, V.; Goncharov, P.I.; Green, D.; Gurtu, A.; Hagopian, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Korneev, Yu.; Krinitsyn, A.; Krishnaswami, G.; Krishnaswamy, M.R.; Kryshkin, V.; Kunori, S.; Laasanen, A.; Lazic, D.; Levchuk, L.; Litov, L.; Mondal, N.K.; Moulik, T.; Narasimham, V.S.; Nemashkalo, A.; Onel, Y.; Petrov, P.; Petukhov, Yu.; Piperov, S.; Popov, V.; Reidy, J.; Ronzhin, A.; Ruchti, R.; Singh, J.B.; Shen, Q.; Sirunyan, A.; Skuja, A.; Skup, E.; Sorokin, P.; Sudhakar, K.; Summers, D.; Szoncso, F.; Tereshenko, S.I.; Timmermans, C.; Tonwar, S.C.; Turchanovich, L.; Tyukov, V.; Volodko, A.; Yukaev, A.; Zaitchenko, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Korneev, Yu.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the response of a prototype CMS hadron calorimeter module to charged particle beams of pions, muons, and electrons with momenta up to 375 GeV/c. The data were taken at the H2 and H4 beamlines at CERN in 1995 and 1996. The prototype sampling calorimeter used copper absorber plates and scintillator tiles with wavelength shifting fibers for readout. The effects of a magnetic field of up to 3 Tesla on the response of the calorimeter to muons, electrons, and pions are presented, and the effects of an upstream lead tungstate crystal electromagnetic calorimeter on the linearity and energy resolution of the combined calorimetric system to hadrons are evaluated. The results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations and are used to optimize the choice of total absorber depth, sampling frequency, and longitudinal readout segmentation.

  2. Charge transfer and a magnetic crossover in hexagonal BaRu1-xMnxO3 perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Congling; Li, Guobao; Kockelmann, Winfried A.; Lin, Jianhua; Attfield, J. Paul

    2009-09-01

    Charge transfer and cation order degrees of freedom and magnetism have been investigated in hexagonal, 9R -type, BaRu1-xMnxO3 solid solutions for 0≤x≤0.9 . The cell parameters and volume follow a “charge transfer Vegard’s law,” with two linear regions that meet at x=0.5 evidencing a significant Mn4++Ru4+→Mn3++Ru5+ charge transfer. Cation order anomalies at x=1/3 and 2/3 evidence some Mn/Ru clustering within trimer units. The two charge regimes give rise to distinctive magnetic behaviors. Spin freezing near 25 K is observed for samples with x<0.4 , but above x=0.5 a Néel transition increases from 125 to 270 K at x=0.9 . Neutron diffraction reveals an antiferromagnetic structure with a (00(1)/(2)) propagation vector and two-dimensional critical behavior for the x=0.8 material.

  3. Effect of surface charge and agglomerate degree of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles on KB cellular uptake in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yuqing; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Jingguang; Ma, Ming; He, Shiying; Nie, Fang; Gu, Ning

    2009-10-15

    We synthesized three types of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs), which were meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) coated MNPs (DMSA@MNPs, 17.3+/-4.8 nm, negative charge), chitosan (CS) coated MNPs (CS@MNPs, 16.5+/-6.1 nm, positive charge) and magnetic nanoparticles agglomerates, formed by electronic aggregation between DMSA@MNPs and CS (CS-DMSA@MNPs, 85.7+/-72.9 nm, positive charge) respectively. The interactions of these MNPs with Oral Squamous Carcinoma Cell KB were investigated. The results showed that cellular uptakes of MNPs were on the dependence of incubation time, nanoparticles concentration and nanoparticles properties such as surface charge, size, etc. The cellular uptake was enhanced with the increase of incubation time and nanoparticles concentration. Although all MNPs could enter to cells, we observed apparent differences in the magnitude of nanoparticles uptaken. The cellular uptake of CS-DMSA@MNPs by KB cells was the highest and that of DMSA@MNPs was the lowest among the three types of MNPs. The same conclusions were drawn via the reduction of water proton relaxation times T(2)(*), resulting from the different iron load of labeled cells using a 1.5T clinical MR imager. The finding of this study will have implications in the chemical design of nanomaterials for biomedical applications.

  4. Wireless Energy Transfer Using Resonant Magnetic Induction for Electric Vehicle Charging Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Neelima

    The research work for this thesis is based on utilizing resonant magnetic induction for wirelessly charging electric vehicles. The background theory for electromagnetic induction between two conducting loops is given and it is shown that an RLCequivalent circuit can be used to model the loops. An analysis of the equivalent circuit is used to show how two loosely coupled loops can be made to exchange energy efficiently by operating them at a frequency which is the same as the resonant frequency of both. Furthermore, it is shown that the efficiency is the maximum for critical coupling (determined by the quality factors of the loops), and increasing the coupling beyond critical coupling causes double humps to appear in the transmission efficiency versus frequency spectrum. In the experiment, as the loops are brought closer together which increases the coupling between them, doubles humps, as expected from the equivalent circuit analysis is seen. Two models for wireless energy transfer are identified: basic model and array model. The basic model consists of the two loosely coupled loops, the transmitter and the receiver. The array model consists of a 2 x 2 array of the transmitter and three parasites, and the receiver. It is shown that the array model allows more freedom for receiver placement at the cost of degraded transmission efficiency compared to the basic model. Another important part of the thesis is software validation. HFSS-IE and 4NEC2 are the software tools used and the simulation results for wire antennas are compared against references obtained from a textbook and a PhD dissertation. It is shown that the simulations agree well with the references and also with each other.

  5. Passive electromagnetic NDE for mechanical damage inspection by detecting leakage magnetic flux. (I. Reconstruction of magnetic charges from detected field signals)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhenmao; Aoto, Kazumi; Kato, Syoichi

    1999-07-01

    In this report, reconstruction of magnetic charges induced by mechanical damages in a test piece of SUS304 stainless steel is performed as a part of efforts to establish a passive nondestructive testing method on the basis of the inspection of leakage magnetic field. The approach for solving this typical ill-posed inverse problem is selected as a way in the least square method category. Concerning the ill-poseness of the system of equations, an iteration algorithm is adopted to its solving in which the designations of initial profile, the weight coefficients and the total number of iterations are taken as means of regularization. From examples using simulated input data, it is verified that the approach gives good reconstruction results in case of signals with a relative high S/N ratio. For improving the robustness of the proposed method, a Galerkin procedure with base functions chosen as the Daubechies' wavelet is also introduced for discretizing the governing equation. By comparing the reconstruction results of the least square method and those using wavelet discretization, it is found that the wavelet used approach is more feasible in the inversion of noise polluted signals. Reconstruction of 1-D and 2-D magnetic charges with the least square strategy and reconstruction of an 1-D problem with the wavelet used method are carried out from both simulated and measured magnetic field signals which are used as the validation of the proposed inversion strategy. (author)

  6. Passive electromagnetic NDE for mechanical damage inspection by detecting leakage magnetic flux. (I. Reconstruction of magnetic charges from detected field signals)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhenmao; Aoto, Kazumi; Kato, Syoichi [Structure Safety Engineering Group, Oarai Engineering Center, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    In this report, reconstruction of magnetic charges induced by mechanical damages in a test piece of SUS304 stainless steel is performed as a part of efforts to establish a passive nondestructive testing method on the basis of the inspection of leakage magnetic field. The approach for solving this typical ill-posed inverse problem is selected as a way in the least square method category. Concerning the ill-poseness of the system of equations, an iteration algorithm is adopted to its solving in which the designations of initial profile, the weight coefficients and the total number of iterations are taken as means of regularization. From examples using simulated input data, it is verified that the approach gives good reconstruction results in case of signals with a relative high S/N ratio. For improving the robustness of the proposed method, a Galerkin procedure with base functions chosen as the Daubechies' wavelet is also introduced for discretizing the governing equation. By comparing the reconstruction results of the least square method and those using wavelet discretization, it is found that the wavelet used approach is more feasible in the inversion of noise polluted signals. Reconstruction of 1-D and 2-D magnetic charges with the least square strategy and reconstruction of an 1-D problem with the wavelet used method are carried out from both simulated and measured magnetic field signals which are used as the validation of the proposed inversion strategy. (author)

  7. Automatic generation control with thyristor controlled series compensator including superconducting magnetic energy storage units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj Padhan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, an attempt has been made to understand the dynamic performance of Automatic Generation Control (AGC of multi-area multi-units thermal–thermal power system with the consideration of Reheat turbine, Generation Rate Constraint (GRC and Time delay. Initially, the gains of the fuzzy PID controller are optimized using Differential Evolution (DE algorithm. The superiority of DE is demonstrated by comparing the results with Genetic Algorithm (GA. After that performance of Thyristor Controlled Series Compensator (TCSC has been investigated. Further, a TCSC is placed in the tie-line and Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES units are considered in both areas. Finally, sensitivity analysis is performed by varying the system parameters and operating load conditions from their nominal values. It is observed that the optimum gains of the proposed controller need not be reset even if the system is subjected to wide variation in loading condition and system parameters.

  8. New type of crossed-field energy analyser for charged particles: the magnetic-field-immersed Wien filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, S.C.; Read, F.H.

    1989-02-01

    A new type of crossed-field energy filter for charged particles has been developed. It is intended for use with electron or ion beams that move in the direction of a uniform magnetic field and it employs mutually perpendicular transverse electric and magnetic fields. It can be regarded as a form of Wien filter immersed in a longitudinal magnetic field. By introducing an appropriate non-uniformity in either of the transverse fields the device is made stigmatic (double focusing). The new analyser offers the important advantage of an in-line geometry. Its performance is compared with that of the trochoidal and stigmatic Wien filters. The transfer coefficients of the stigmatic Wien filter are also presented.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of charge transfer complex formation between Silver Nitrate and Benzylcyanide in Solvent Ethylene Glycol

    CERN Document Server

    Modarress, H

    2003-01-01

    The formation constant for charge transfer complexes between electron acceptor (AgNo sub 3) and electron donor benzylcyanide (C sub 6 H sub 5 -CH sub 2 -C ident to N) in solvent ethyleneglycol [(CH sub 2 OH) sub 2] has been evaluated by using the nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of aromatic group of benzylcyanide measured against external references, tetramethylsilane, hexamethyldisilane and cyclohexane at 20 sup d ig sup C. The external referencing procedure eliminated the interference of internal reference in the course of complexation. The necessary bulk magnetic susceptibility corrections on the measured chemical shifts have been made. The solution nationalised and their effects on the formation constant have been considered and a new equation has been suggested to obtain the main ionic activity coefficient of AgNO sub 3 from nuclear magnetic resonance results. The mean ionic activity coefficient has been taken into account in the formation constant calculations. The results indicated that the a...

  10. The limiting current in a one-dimensional situation: Transition from a space charge limited to magnetically limited flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Raghwendra; Biswas, Debabrata

    2008-01-01

    For a nonrelativistic electron beam propagating in a cylindrical drift tube, it is shown that the limiting current density does not saturate to the electrostatic one-dimensional (1D) estimate with increasing beam radius. Fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation studies show that beyond a critical aspect ratio, the limiting current density is lower than the 1D electrostatic prediction. The lowering in the limiting current density is found to be due to the transition from the space charge limited to magnetically limited flow. An adaptation of Alfven's single particle trajectory method is used to estimate the magnetically limited current as well as the critical radius beyond which the flow is magnetically limited in a drift tube. The predictions are found to be in close agreement with PIC simulations

  11. Modeling the fields of magneto-optical devices, including fringe field effects and higher order multipole contributions, with application to charged particle optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. G. M. Trines

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A new method for the calculation of the magnetic field of beam guiding elements is presented. The method relates the calculation to measurement data of the magnetic field in a direct way. It can be applied to single beam guiding elements as well as to clusters of elements. The presented description of the magnetic field differs from the classical approach in that it does not rely on power series approximations. It is also both divergence free and curl free, and takes fringe field effects up to any desired order into account. In the field description, pseudodifferential operators described by Bessel functions are used to obtain the various multipole contributions. Magnetic field data on a two-dimensional surface, e.g., a cylindrical surface or median plane, serve as input for the calculation of the three-dimensional magnetic field. A boundary element method is presented to fit the fields to a discrete set of field data, obtained, for instance, from field measurements, on the two-dimensional surface. Relative errors in the field approximation do not exceed the maximal relative errors in the input data. Methods for incorporating the obtained field in both analytical and numerical computation of transfer functions are outlined. Applications include easy calculation of the transfer functions of clusters of beam guiding elements and of generalized field gradients for any multipole contribution up to any order.

  12. Agenesis of the horizontal segment of the left portal vein demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging including phase-contrast magnetic resonance venography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevallier, P.; Oddo, F.; Diaine, B.; Padovani, B.; Baldini, E.; Peten, E.P.

    2000-01-01

    Two cases of agenesis of the horizontal segment of the left portal vein are reported. This very rare vascular anomaly probably corresponds to an embryological variation rather than to an obstruction of the left portal vein. In almost all cases liver ultrasonography is sufficient for identifying such vascular abnormalities. It shows a large aberrant vessel emerging from a right anterior segmental portal branch and running transversely in the quadrate lobe towards the teres ligamentum from which the portal supply to the left lobe arises. It is important to be able to recognize the magnetic resonance imaging features of this vascular variation, as magnetic resonance imaging may be the initial imaging study, and ultrasound may be technically challenging. To our knowledge, we present the first description of these features, including an enhanced gradient-echo T1-weighted sequence, a turbo spin-echo T2-weighted sequence with fat saturation, and a three-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance portography. (orig.)

  13. Analysis of quantum ballistic electron transport in ultrasmall silicon devices including space-charge and geometric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, S. E.; Kumar, A.; Fischetti, M. V.

    2004-05-01

    A two-dimensional device simulation program which self consistently solves the Schrödinger and Poisson equations with current flow is described in detail. Significant approximations adopted in this work are the absence of scattering and a simple six-valley, parabolic band structure for silicon. A modified version of the quantum transmitting boundary method is used to describe open boundary conditions permitting current flow in device solutions far from equilibrium. The continuous energy spectrum of the system is discretized by temporarily imposing two different forms of closed boundary conditions, resulting in energies which sample the density-of-states and establish the wave function normalization conditions. These standing wave solutions ("normal modes") are decomposed into their traveling wave constituents, each of which represents injection from only one of the open boundary contacts ("traveling eigencomponents"). These current-carrying states are occupied by a drifted Fermi distribution associated with their injecting contact and summed to form the electron density in the device. Holes are neglected in this calculation. The Poisson equation is solved on the same finite element computational mesh as the Schrödinger equation; devices of arbitrary geometry can be modeled. Computational performance of the program including characterization of a "Broyden+Newton" algorithm employed in the iteration for self consistency is described. Device results are presented for a narrow silicon resonant tunneling diode (RTD) and many variants of idealized silicon double-gate field effect transistors (DGFETs). The RTD results show two resonant conduction peaks, each of which demonstrates hysteresis. Three 7.5 nm channel length DGFET structures with identical intrinsic device configurations but differing access geometries (straight, taper and "dog bone") are studied and found to have differing current flows owing to quantum-mechanical reflection in their access regions

  14. Account of magnetic field effects of polarized proton target on charged particle trajectories in experiments with magnetic spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telegin, Yu.N.; Ranyuk, Yu.N.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Sporov, E.A.

    1980-01-01

    Some effects of the influence of magnetic field of a polarized proton target (PPT) on trajectories of secondary particles in experiments using magnetic spectrometers are considered. It is shown that these effects can be eliminated by the target shift relatively to the spectrometer rotation axis and variation of the spectrometer installation angle. Numerical calculations of the correction values were performed for emitted particle momenta of 100-800 MeB/s and working intensity of the H 0 magnetic field H 0 =27 kG. The influence of the PPT magnetic field on the functions of angular and energy resolution in the γp→π + n experiment is investigated. The results obtained can be used in experiments with a polarized proton target

  15. Enhanced charge density wave order in La2-xSrxCuO4 at high magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Wen, Jiajia; Jang, Hoyoung; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Matsuzawa, Satoshi; Song, Sanghoon; Chollet, Matthieu; Zhu, Diling; Fujita, Masaki; Rotundu, Costel R.; Sheckelton, John P.; Jiang, Mingde; Kao, Chi-Chang; Lee, Jun-Sik; Lee, Young S.

    There has been much recent interest in the charge density wave (CDW) order in the cuprate superconductors. An intriguing form of the density wave occurs in the La2CuO4-based family where both the charge and spin form ``stripes'' near 1/8 doping. Charge order has been reported in La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) in zero magnetic field near 1/8 doping that was enhanced in moderate DC fields (up to 10 T). In this talk, I will discuss our recent experiment which combines a pulsed magnet with the x-rays from a free electron laser to characterize the CDW in LSCO with x =0.115 in fields up to 24 Tesla. In contrast to the YBCO family, which shows field-induced 3D CDW order, the field-enhanced CDW order in LSCO remains two-dimensional up to 24 T. Further results regarding the field-dependence and zero-field behavior of the CDW will be discussed. Our study provides important information on the interplay between CDW order and high-Tc superconductivity. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, under contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  16. Nontargeted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis to detect hazardous substances including methanol in unrecorded alcohol from Novosibirsk, Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Hausler, Thomas; Okaru,  Alex O.; Neufeld, Maria; Rehm, Jürgen; Kuballa, Thomas; Luy, Burkhard; Lachenmeier, Dirk W.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was applied to the analysis of alcoholic products in the context of health and safety control. A total of 86 samples of unrecorded alcohol were collected in Novosibirsk and nearby cities in Russia. Sampling was based on interviews with alcohol dependent patients, and unrecorded alcohol thus defined included illegally or informally produced alcoholic products (e.g., counterfeit or home-made alcoholic beverages) or surrogate alcohol in the form of c...

  17. Magnetic charge distribution and stray field landscape of asymmetric néel walls in a magnetically patterned exchange bias layer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingsem, Norbert; Ahrend, Florian; Vock, Silvia; Gottlob, Daniel; Krug, Ingo; Doganay, Hatice; Holzinger, Dennis; Neu, Volker; Ehresmann, Arno

    2017-12-01

    The 3D stray field landscape above an exchange bias layer system with engineered domain walls has been fully characterized by quantitative magnetic force microscopy (qMFM) measurements. This method is based on a complete quantification of the MFM tip’s imaging properties and the subtraction of its contribution from the measured MFM data by deconvolution in Fourier space. The magnetically patterned Ir17Mn83/Co70Fe30-exchange-bias-multilayers have been designed to contain asymmetric head-to-head (hh)/tail-to-tail (tt) Néel walls between domains of different magnetic anisotropies for potential use in guided particle transport. In the current application, qMFM reveals the effective magnetic charge profile on the surface of the sample—with high spatial resolution and in an absolute quantitative manner. These data enable to calculate the magnetostatic potential and the full stray field landscape above the sample surface. It has been successfully tested against: (i) micromagnetic simulations of the magnetization structure of a comparable exchange-bias layer system, (ii) measurements of the magnetization profile across the domain boundary with x-ray photoemission electron microscopy, and (iii) direct stray field measurements obtained by scanning Hall probe microscopy at elevated scan heights. This approach results in a quantitative determination of the stray field landscape at close distances to the sample surface, which will be of importance for remote magnetic particle transport applications in lab-on-a-chip devices. Furthermore, the highly resolving and quantitative MFM approach reveals details of the domain transition across the artificially structured phase boundary, which have to be attributed to a continuous change in the materials parameters across this boundary, rather than an abrupt one.

  18. Effect of surface charge on the cellular uptake of fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kralj, Slavko, E-mail: slavko.kralj@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute, Department for Materials Synthesis (Slovenia); Rojnik, Matija [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Pharmacy (Slovenia); Romih, Rok [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Cell Biology (Slovenia); Jagodic, Marko [Institute of Mathematics, Physics and Mechanics (Slovenia); Kos, Janko [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Pharmacy (Slovenia); Makovec, Darko [Jozef Stefan Institute, Department for Materials Synthesis (Slovenia)

    2012-10-15

    We report on the nanoparticle uptake into MCF10A neoT and PC-3 cells using flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, SQUID magnetometry, and transmission electron microscopy. The aim was to evaluate the influence of the nanoparticles' surface charge on the uptake efficiency. The surface of the superparamagnetic, silica-coated, maghemite nanoparticles was modified using amino functionalization for the positive surface charge (CNPs), and carboxyl functionalization for the negative surface charge (ANPs). The CNPs and ANPs exhibited no significant cytotoxicity in concentrations up to 500 {mu}g/cm{sup 3} in 24 h. The CNPs, bound to a plasma membrane, were intensely phagocytosed, while the ANPs entered cells through fluid-phase endocytosis in a lower internalization degree. The ANPs and CNPs were shown to be co-localized with a specific lysosomal marker, thus confirming their presence in lysosomes. We showed that tailoring the surface charge of the nanoparticles has a great impact on their internalization.

  19. Effect of surface charge on the cellular uptake of fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralj, Slavko; Rojnik, Matija; Romih, Rok; Jagodič, Marko; Kos, Janko; Makovec, Darko

    2012-10-01

    We report on the nanoparticle uptake into MCF10A neoT and PC-3 cells using flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, SQUID magnetometry, and transmission electron microscopy. The aim was to evaluate the influence of the nanoparticles' surface charge on the uptake efficiency. The surface of the superparamagnetic, silica-coated, maghemite nanoparticles was modified using amino functionalization for the positive surface charge (CNPs), and carboxyl functionalization for the negative surface charge (ANPs). The CNPs and ANPs exhibited no significant cytotoxicity in concentrations up to 500 μg/cm3 in 24 h. The CNPs, bound to a plasma membrane, were intensely phagocytosed, while the ANPs entered cells through fluid-phase endocytosis in a lower internalization degree. The ANPs and CNPs were shown to be co-localized with a specific lysosomal marker, thus confirming their presence in lysosomes. We showed that tailoring the surface charge of the nanoparticles has a great impact on their internalization.

  20. Use of a magnetic spectrometer to determine the heavy ion effective charge probabilities at 7 MeV/A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabbour, J.

    1982-01-01

    A magnetic spectrometer has been fully equiped with large area gaseous detectors allowing a complete identification of ions and a measurement of their energy. The equilibrium charge state probabilities of ions ranging between Z = 12 and Z = 21 have been measured at 7. and 7.5 MeV/A, showing that the only sizable contributions are those corresponding to nuclei accompanied by zero, one and two electrons. For these nearly fully stripped ions, only a few electron transfer cross sections are involved in the calculation of the equilibrated multicollision process, leading to a fairly good phenomenological description of the experimental results. A comparison of the results with the predictions of the atomic collisions models supports the introduction in the OBK (Oppenheimer, Brinkman, Kramers) capture cross section of a scaling factor ranging from .3 to .7 depending on the charge of the projectile [fr

  1. Observation of Charge Asymmetry Dependence of Pion Elliptic Flow and the Possible Chiral Magnetic Wave in Heavy-Ion Collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cervantes, M C; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, J H; Chen, X; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, H Z; Huang, B; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, C; Li, N; Li, Z M; Li, X; Li, X; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, L; Ma, R; Ma, Y G; Ma, G L; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; Meehan, K; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V; Olvitt, D L; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peterson, A; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, S; Raniwala, R; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Sharma, M K; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B J; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Z; Sun, Y; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Szelezniak, M A; Tang, Z; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A N; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbaek, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, F; Wang, Y; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Y; Wang, G; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, Y F; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Q H; Xu, H; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Yang, S; Yang, Q; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, X P; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J; Zhang, Z; Zhang, S; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J L; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2015-06-26

    We present measurements of π(-) and π(+) elliptic flow, v(2), at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at √[s(NN)]=200, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 11.5, and 7.7 GeV, as a function of event-by-event charge asymmetry, A(ch), based on data from the STAR experiment at RHIC. We find that π(-) (π(+)) elliptic flow linearly increases (decreases) with charge asymmetry for most centrality bins at √[s(NN)]=27  GeV and higher. At √[s(NN)]=200  GeV, the slope of the difference of v(2) between π(-) and π(+) as a function of A(ch) exhibits a centrality dependence, which is qualitatively similar to calculations that incorporate a chiral magnetic wave effect. Similar centrality dependence is also observed at lower energies.

  2. Observation of Charge Asymmetry Dependence of Pion Elliptic Flow and the Possible Chiral Magnetic Wave in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Z. M.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B. J.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    We present measurements of π- and π+ elliptic flow, v2, at midrapidity in Au +Au collisions at √{sNN }=200 , 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 11.5, and 7.7 GeV, as a function of event-by-event charge asymmetry, Ach, based on data from the STAR experiment at RHIC. We find that π- (π+) elliptic flow linearly increases (decreases) with charge asymmetry for most centrality bins at √{sNN }=27 GeV and higher. At √{sNN }=200 GeV , the slope of the difference of v2 between π- and π+ as a function of Ach exhibits a centrality dependence, which is qualitatively similar to calculations that incorporate a chiral magnetic wave effect. Similar centrality dependence is also observed at lower energies.

  3. Magnetic phase diagram of the charge ordered manganite Pr.sub.0.8./sub.Na.sub.0.2./sub.MnO.sub.3./sub..

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejtmánek, Jiří; Jirák, Zdeněk; Šebek, Josef; Strejc, Aleš; Hervieu, M.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 11 (2001), s. 7413-7415 ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/99/0413; GA AV ČR IAA1010004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : charge ordered manganite * magnetic phase Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.128, year: 2001

  4. Discrete allowed and forbidden states in the classical mechanical domain in the charged particle motion in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, R.K.; Punithavelu, A.M.; Banerjee, S.B.

    1994-01-01

    The properties of the motion of charged particles injected almost parallel to the magnetic field are studied by measuring the electron current as a function of the cathode voltage (electron energy), as electrons from the gun traverse a distance L to the detector. The plate current is found to exhibit oscillatory behaviour in contradistinction with the behaviour expected according to the standard classical mechanical paradigm, with the peaks fitting a relation obtained from a quantum like theory predicting such a behaviour. (author). 4 refs, 1 fig, 1 tab

  5. Negatively Charged and Dark Excitons in CsPbBr3 Perovskite Nanocrystals Revealed by High Magnetic Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canneson, Damien; Shornikova, Elena V; Yakovlev, Dmitri R; Rogge, Tobias; Mitioglu, Anatolie A; Ballottin, Mariana V; Christianen, Peter C M; Lhuillier, Emmanuel; Bayer, Manfred; Biadala, Louis

    2017-10-11

    The optical properties of colloidal cesium lead halide perovskite (CsPbBr 3 ) nanocrystals are examined by time-resolved and polarization-resolved spectroscopy in high magnetic fields up to 30 T. We unambiguously show that at cryogenic temperatures the emission is dominated by recombination of negatively charged excitons with radiative decay time of 300 ps. The additional long-lived emission, which decay time shortens from 40 down to 8 ns and in which the decay time shortens and relative amplitude increases in high magnetic fields, evidences the presence of a dark exciton. We evaluate g-factors of the bright exciton g X = +2.4, the electron g e = +2.18, and the hole g h = -0.22.

  6. Longitudinal transport coefficients of a magnetized plasma consisting of hydrogen and a single impurity element in arbitrarily populated charge states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claassen, H.A.; Gerhauser, H.; El-Sharif, R.N.

    1991-01-01

    The coefficients determining the transport processes along the magnetic field in a magnetized plasma consisting of electrons, protons/deuterons and impurity ions in various charge states have been calculated on the basis of Grad's 21 moment approximation. Assuming a single impurity element, the determinants appearing in the transport coefficients are evaluated analytically for arbitrary ratios m z /m + between the impurity and hydrogen masses. The general formulae are then simplified for the important case m z /m + ≥ 1 and compared with existing data given by V.M. Zhdanov et al. and Yu.L. Igitkhanov et al. Whereas with minor modifications the proton/deuteron and electron coefficients agree well, there are remarkable differences in the impurity ion transport coefficients, which are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Approximate energies and thermal properties of a position-dependent mass charged particle under external magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshghi, M; Mehraban, H; Ikhdair, S M

    2017-01-01

    We solve the Schrödinger equation with a position-dependent mass (PDM) charged particle interacted via the superposition of the Morse-plus-Coulomb potentials and is under the influence of external magnetic and Aharonov–Bohm (AB) flux fields. The nonrelativistic bound state energies together with their wave functions are calculated for two spatially-dependent mass distribution functions. We also study the thermal quantities of such a system. Further, the canonical formalism is used to compute various thermodynamic variables for second choosing mass by using the Gibbs formalism. We give plots for energy states as a function of various physical parameters. The behavior of the internal energy, specific heat, and entropy as functions of temperature and mass density parameter in the inverse-square mass case for different values of magnetic field are shown. (paper)

  8. Effect of external magnetic field and variable dust electrical charge on the shape and propagation of solitons in the two nonthermal ions dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghalambor Dezfuly, S.; Dorranian, D.

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, the effect of dust electrical charge, nonthermal ions, and external magnetic field on the shape and propagation of solitons in dusty plasma with two nonthermal ions is studied theoretically. Using the reductive perturbation theory, the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation for propagation of dust acoustic waves is extracted. Results show that external magnetic field does not affect the amplitude of solitary wave but width of solitons are effectively depend on the magnitude of external magnetic field. With increasing the charge of dust particles the amplitude of solution will increase while their width will decrease. Increasing the nonthermal ions lead to opposite effect.

  9. Charge orders in organic charge-transfer salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Ryui; Tocchio, Luca F.; Valentí, Roser; Becca, Federico

    2017-10-01

    Motivated by recent experimental suggestions of charge-order-driven ferroelectricity in organic charge-transfer salts, such as κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu[N(CN)2]Cl, we investigate magnetic and charge-ordered phases that emerge in an extended two-orbital Hubbard model on the anisotropic triangular lattice at 3/4 filling. This model takes into account the presence of two organic BEDT-TTF molecules, which form a dimer on each site of the lattice, and includes short-range intramolecular and intermolecular interactions and hoppings. By using variational wave functions and quantum Monte Carlo techniques, we find two polar states with charge disproportionation inside the dimer, hinting to ferroelectricity. These charge-ordered insulating phases are stabilized in the strongly correlated limit and their actual charge pattern is determined by the relative strength of intradimer to interdimer couplings. Our results suggest that ferroelectricity is not driven by magnetism, since these polar phases can be stabilized also without antiferromagnetic order and provide a possible microscopic explanation of the experimental observations. In addition, a conventional dimer-Mott state (with uniform density and antiferromagnetic order) and a nonpolar charge-ordered state (with charge-rich and charge-poor dimers forming a checkerboard pattern) can be stabilized in the strong-coupling regime. Finally, when electron–electron interactions are weak, metallic states appear, with either uniform charge distribution or a peculiar 12-site periodicity that generates honeycomb-like charge order.

  10. Breaking of the first adiabatic invariants of charged particles in time-dependent magnetic fields: Computer simulations and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovsky, J.E.; Hansen, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanics of the first adiabatic invariant μ of nonrelativistic charged particles in time-dependent magnetic inductions B(t) are studied by means of computer simulations and analytic theory. Linear-ramp magnetic-induction profiles B=B 0 +(ΔB/Δt)t are utilized, as well as hyperbolic-tangent ramps and sine half-wave ramps. The change in μ that results from an induction change ΔB that occurs over a time Δt is quantified for all values of ΔB and Δt, as well as for all values of the particle position. It is found that the cases fall into two categories with very different μ behavior: cases in which the change in the magnetic induction occurs over a time Δt that is exactly equal to an integer number of gyroperiods (textbook case) or cases in which the change in the induction occurs over a time Δt that is not equal to an integer number of gyroperiods (more general case). In both categories μ is an adiabatic invariant, although the conservation of μ is much poorer in the latter category. It is pointed out that, in addition to the well-known constraints on ΔB and Δt, there is a constraint on the particle's initial position in the magnetic field if the change in the adiabatic invariant is to be kept small

  11. Spin and Charge Transport in 2D Materials and Magnetic Insulator/Metal Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amamou, Walid

    Spintronic devices are very promising for future information storage, logic operations and computation and have the potential to replace current CMOS technology approaching the scaling limit. In particular, the generation and manipulation of spin current enables the integration of storage and logic within the same circuit for more powerful computing architectures. In this thesis, we examine the manipulation of spins in 2D materials such as graphene and metal/magnetic insulator heterostructures. In particular, we investigate the feasibility for achieving magnetization switching of a nanomagnet using graphene as a nonmagnetic channel material for All Spin Logic Device applications. Using in-situ MBE deposition of nanomagnet on graphene spin valve, we demonstrate the presence of an interfacial spin dephasing at the interface between the graphene and the nanomagnet. By introducing a Cu spacer between the nanomagnet and graphene, we demonstrate that this interfacial effect is related to an exchange interaction between the spin current and the disordered magnetic moment of the nanomagnet in the first monolayer. In addition to the newly discovered interfacial spin relaxation effect, the extracted contact resistance area product of the nanomagnet/graphene interface is relatively high on the order of 1Omicrom2. In practice, reducing the contact resistance will be as important as eliminating the interfacial relaxation in order to achieve magnetization switching. Furthermore, we examine spin manipulation in a nonmagnetic Pt using an internal magnetic exchange field produced by the adjacent magnetic insulator CoFe2O4 grown by MBE. Here, we report the observation of a strong magnetic proximity effect of Pt deposited on top of a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) inverse spinel material Cobalt Ferrite (CFO, CoFe 2O4). The CFO was grown by MBE and its magnetization was characterized by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (VSM) demonstrating the strong out of plane magnetic

  12. The use of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of suspected appendicitis in pregnancy: shortened length of stay without increase in hospital charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Annabelle L; Schuster, Kevin M; Kaplan, Lewis J; Maung, Adrian A; Lui, Felix Y; Davis, Kimberly A

    2014-07-01

    Making an accurate diagnosis of appendicitis in pregnancy is critical for maternal and fetal outcomes. To determine whether magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in pregnant patients with suspected appendicitis improves outcomes, minimizes length of stay (LOS), and lowers hospital charges. Retrospective review at a university tertiary referral center of all pregnant patients seen with abdominal pain and suspected appendicitis who were followed up through delivery during an 11-year period. Time to operation, LOS, complications, nontherapeutic exploration, fetal outcomes, and hospital charges. Seventy-nine patients were included in this study, 34 of whom had pathology-confirmed appendicitis. Thirty-one patients underwent MR imaging. A trend toward fewer operations (odds ratio [OR], 0.45; 95% CI, 0.18-1.16; P = .07) was observed in the MR imaging group. Seven nontherapeutic explorations were performed in the non-MR imaging group and 1 nontherapeutic exploration in the MR imaging group (OR, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.08-2.32; P = .13). Patients in the MR imaging group were more frequently discharged from the emergency department (OR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.13-0.94; P = .04) and had shorter LOS (33.7 vs 64.8 hours, P appendicitis were similar between groups. No patient discharged without operation returned with appendicitis in either group. On multivariable analysis, the receipt of MR imaging (P appendicitis. One fetal loss occurred in the non-MR imaging group. Magnetic resonance imaging in pregnant patients with suspected appendicitis does not affect clinical outcomes or hospital charges. It allows safe discharge from the emergency department and improves resource use.

  13. Charge pumping by magnetization dynamics in magnetic and semimagnetic tunnel junctions with interfacial Rashba or bulk extrinsic spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouzi, Farzad; Fabian, Jaroslav; Nagaosa, Naoto; Nikolić, Branislav K.

    2012-02-01

    We develop a time-dependent nonequilibrium Green function (NEGF) approach to the problem of spin pumping by precessing magnetization in one of the ferromagnetic layers within F|I|F magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) or F|I|N semi-MTJs in the presence of intrinsic Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) at the F|I interface or the extrinsic SOC in the bulk of F layers of finite thickness (F, ferromagnet; N, normal metal; I, insulating barrier). To express the time-averaged pumped charge current, or the corresponding dc voltage signal in an open circuit, we construct a novel solution to double-time-Fourier-transformed NEGF equations. The two energy arguments of NEGFs in this representation are connected by the Floquet theorem describing multiphoton emission and absorption processes. Within this fully quantum-mechanical treatment of the conduction electrons, we find that (i) only in the presence of the interfacial Rashba SOC, the nonzero dc pumping voltage Vpump in F|I|N junctions can emerge at the adiabatic level (i.e., proportional to the microwave frequency), which could explain recent experiments on microwave-driven semi-MTJs [T. Moriyama , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.067602 100, 067602 (2008)]; (ii) a unique signature of this charge pumping phenomenon, where the Rashba SOC within the precessing F layer participates in the pumping process, is a Vpump that changes sign as the function of the precession cone angle; (iii) unlike conventional spin pumping in MTJs in the absence of any SOC, where one emitted or absorbed microwave photon is sufficient to match the exact solution in the frame rotating with the magnetization, the presence of the Rashba SOC requires taking into account up to 10 photons in order to reach the asymptotic value of pumped charge current; (iv) the disorder within F|I|F MTJs can enhance Vpump in the quasiballistic transport regime; and (v) the extrinsic SOC in F|I|F MTJs causes spin relaxation and eventually the decay of Vpump

  14. Tempered Lévy walk of charged particles in turbulent magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibatov, R T; Uchaikin, V V; Byzykchi, A N

    2017-01-01

    Recently, various diffusion regimes of ions and electrons in interplanetary magnetic field have been recognized from the data collected by different spacecrafts. Particularly for protons, superdiffusion and normal diffusion parallel to the mean magnetic field were declared, simulation also predicts transient superdiffusive behavior. We interpret parallel motion in terms of the one-dimensional tempered Lévy walk process and show that this representation is consistent with the experimental and simulated results. (paper)

  15. Charged Particle Dynamics in the Magnetic Field of a Long Straight Current-Carrying Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, A.; Fatuzzo, M.; Toepker, T.

    2015-01-01

    By describing the motion of a charged particle in the well-known nonuniform field of a current-carrying long straight wire, a variety of teaching/learning opportunities are described: 1) Brief review of a standard problem; 2) Vector analysis; 3) Dimensionless variables; 4) Coupled differential equations; 5) Numerical solutions.

  16. Consistency evaluation between EGSnrc and Geant4 charged particle transport in an equilibrium magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. M.; Bednarz, B.

    2013-02-01

    Following the proposal by several groups to integrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with radiation therapy, much attention has been afforded to examining the impact of strong (on the order of a Tesla) transverse magnetic fields on photon dose distributions. The effect of the magnetic field on dose distributions must be considered in order to take full advantage of the benefits of real-time intra-fraction imaging. In this investigation, we compared the handling of particle transport in magnetic fields between two Monte Carlo codes, EGSnrc and Geant4, to analyze various aspects of their electromagnetic transport algorithms; both codes are well-benchmarked for medical physics applications in the absence of magnetic fields. A water-air-water slab phantom and a water-lung-water slab phantom were used to highlight dose perturbations near high- and low-density interfaces. We have implemented a method of calculating the Lorentz force in EGSnrc based on theoretical models in literature, and show very good consistency between the two Monte Carlo codes. This investigation further demonstrates the importance of accurate dosimetry for MRI-guided radiation therapy (MRIgRT), and facilitates the integration of a ViewRay MRIgRT system in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Radiation Oncology Department.

  17. Magnetic field effects and self-assembled n-type nanostructures to increase charge collection in organic photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Austin Roberts

    Photovoltaics, the direct conversion of light energy to electrical energy, offers access to perhaps the best source of clean renewable energy: the sun. The cost to produce electrical energy using photovoltaics could be dramatically reduced by fabricating photovoltaic devices (solar cells) out of carbon-based (organic) semiconducting materials. This dissertation describes two new approaches for increasing the efficiency in organic photovoltaic systems. The first approach uses magnetic fields to inhibit the recombination of electrons and holes and increase charge collection. Many magnetic field effects in room-temperature organic semiconductor devices can be understood by the magnetoeffects by the interconversion of singlets and triplets (MIST) model. According to the MIST model, magnetic fields split the degeneracy of triplet electron-hole spin states via the Zeeman effect. This splitting alters inter-system crossing between loosely bound singlets and triplets, which can change the overall recombination rate of electron-hole pairs. The organic magnetoresistance in polymer-based organic photovoltaic devices was measured to be positive and on the order of a few percent. In addition, the magnitude of the organic magnetoresistance decreased with increasing bias and with increasing concentration of electron-accepting fullerenes. This behavior is consistent with the MIST model. The MIST model was then extended to describe magnetic field effects in photocurrents produced by organic photovoltaic devices. Single-layer polymer devices showed an increase in photocurrent of ˜6--9% with the application of relatively weak magnetic fields (˜30 mT) due to a reduction in the recombination rate of non-geminate electron-hole pairs. However, in bulk-heterojunction devices the magnetic field effect on photocurrent was significantly diminished with just a few percent by weight of fullerenes. These results are shown to be consistent with the robust MIST model: electron

  18. Femtosecond switching of magnetism via strongly correlated spin-charge quantum excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianqi; Patz, Aaron; Mouchliadis, Leonidas; Yan, Jiaqiang; Lograsso, Thomas A; Perakis, Ilias E; Wang, Jigang

    2013-04-04

    The technological demand to push the gigahertz (10(9) hertz) switching speed limit of today's magnetic memory and logic devices into the terahertz (10(12) hertz) regime underlies the entire field of spin-electronics and integrated multi-functional devices. This challenge is met by all-optical magnetic switching based on coherent spin manipulation. By analogy to femtosecond chemistry and photosynthetic dynamics--in which photoproducts of chemical and biochemical reactions can be influenced by creating suitable superpositions of molecular states--femtosecond-laser-excited coherence between electronic states can switch magnetic order by 'suddenly' breaking the delicate balance between competing phases of correlated materials: for example, manganites exhibiting colossal magneto-resistance suitable for applications. Here we show femtosecond (10(-15) seconds) photo-induced switching from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic ordering in Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3, by observing the establishment (within about 120 femtoseconds) of a huge temperature-dependent magnetization with photo-excitation threshold behaviour absent in the optical reflectivity. The development of ferromagnetic correlations during the femtosecond laser pulse reveals an initial quantum coherent regime of magnetism, distinguished from the picosecond (10(-12) seconds) lattice-heating regime characterized by phase separation without threshold behaviour. Our simulations reproduce the nonlinear femtosecond spin generation and underpin fast quantum spin-flip fluctuations correlated with coherent superpositions of electronic states to initiate local ferromagnetic correlations. These results merge two fields, femtosecond magnetism in metals and band insulators, and non-equilibrium phase transitions of strongly correlated electrons, in which local interactions exceeding the kinetic energy produce a complex balance of competing orders.

  19. First principles study of the magnetic properties and charge transfer of Ni-doped BiFeO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan; Sun, Zhenghao; Wei, Ren; Huang, Yuxin; Wang, Lili; Leng, Jing; Xiang, Peng; Lan, Min

    2018-03-01

    We present a first-principles study of electronic structures and magnetic properties in Ni-doped BiFeO3 using the density functional theory + U methods. The BiNixFe1-xO3 (x = 0.125, 0.25, 0.5) multiferroic ceramics represent ferromagnetic properties due to the ferrimagnetic order in Ni-O-Fe, and the magnetic moment rises with increase in Ni doping concentration agreeing well with experimental results. Ni atoms prefer to occupy the diagonal positions in the quasi-plane Ni-O-Fe eight-membered ring. Charge transfer from Bi 6s state to Ni 3d state through O 2p orbital lead to the 2+ oxidation state of Ni, indicating high Néel temperatures of BiNixFe1-xO3, and the electronic state of the system can be described as Bi4+xBi3+1-xNi2+xFe3+1-xO3. The spin polarization of Bi 6s state and O 2p state near the Fermi level contributes to the total magnetic moment. A spin-polarized acceptor level of about 0.4 eV constituted by Bi 6s state and O 2p state is found, which is responsible for the increase in leakage current of Ni-doped BiFeO3.

  20. Magnetic properties of (Nd ,Ca )(Ba ,La ) C o2O5 +δ tuned by the site-selected charge doping, oxygen disorder, and hydrostatic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietosa, J.; Kolesnik, S.; Puzniak, R.; Wisniewski, A.; Poudel, B.; Dabrowski, B.

    2017-11-01

    Comprehensive study of magnetic properties of the layer-ordered perovskites N d1 -xC axB a1 -yL ayC o2O5 +δ is presented as a function of the site-selected charge doping [ c =(x -y )/2 +δ -0.5 ,x ≤0.2 and y ≤0.1 ,0.07 0 ) and electron (c 0.5 , has a larger effect on antiferromagnetic phase than the charge doping. The temperature of metal-insulator transition TMIT was found practically unchanged by either charge doping or disorder. The application of hydrostatic pressure slightly suppressed TC and increased TN by stabilization of the antiferromagnetic phase with the largest observed value of d TN/d P =5.75 K /kbar . Complex magnetic behavior affected by hydrostatic pressure was accounted for by ferro- and antiferromagnetic interactions resulting from the charge separation and spin transitions.

  1. Classical electrodynamics from image charges to the photon mass and magnetic monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Lacava, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This book proposes intriguing arguments that will enable students to achieve a deeper understanding of electromagnetism, while also presenting a number of classical methods for solving difficult problems. Two chapters are devoted to relativistic electrodynamics, covering all aspects needed for a full comprehension of the nature of electric and magnetic fields and, subsequently, electrodynamics. Each of the two final chapters examines a selected experimental issue, introducing students to the work involved in actually proving a law or theory. Classical books on electricity and magnetism are mentioned in many references, helping to familiarize students with books that they will encounter in their further studies. Various problems are presented, together with their worked-out solutions. The book is based on notes from special lectures delivered by the author to students during the second year of a BSc course in Physics, but the subject matter may also be of interest to senior physicists, as many of the themes co...

  2. Anelastic spectroscopy measurements of nanoscale charge and magnetic structures in cuprates and manganites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero, F.; Paolone, A.; Castellano, C.; Cantelli, R.

    2004-01-01

    Many perovskites and perovskite related materials exhibit electronic phase separation phenomena at nanometer scales, which are thought to concur to important electric and magnetic properties, like high-T c superconductivity or colossal magnetoresistence (CMR). Recent and new anelastic spectroscopy experiments are presented, which supply information on the dynamics of such inhomogeneities in the superconductors of the La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 (LSCO) family and on the magnetic perovskite La 1-x Ca x MnO 3 . In La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 , a relaxation process at liquid He temperatures is identified as due to the motion of the hole stripes, acting as walls between antiferromagnetic (AF) domains. Another process is identified as the depinning of these stripes from defects in the disordered phase. In La 1-x Ca x MnO 3 a glassy dynamic response below the ferromagnetic (FM) transition is attributed to the insulating nanodomains coexisting with the ferromagnetic background

  3. Shot noise of charge current in a quantum dot responded by rotating and oscillating magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hong-Kang, E-mail: zhaohonk@yahoo.com; Zou, Wei-Ke [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Chen, Qiao [Department of Maths and Physics, Hunan Institute of Engineering, Xiangtan 411104 (China)

    2014-09-07

    We have investigated the shot noise and Fano factor of the dynamic spin-polarized quantum dot under the perturbations of a rotating magnetic field (RMF), and an oscillating magnetic field (OMF) by employing the non-equilibrium Green's function approach. The shot noise is enhanced from sub-Poissonian to super-Poissonian due to the application of RMF and OMF, and it is controlled sensitively by the tilt angle θ of RMF. The magnitude of shot noise increases as the photon energy ℏω of OMF increases, and its valley eventually is reversed to peaks as the photon energy is large enough. Double-peak structure of Fano factor is exhibited as the frequency of OMF increases to cover a large regime. The Zeeman energy μ{sub 0}B{sub 0} acts as an effective gate bias to exhibit resonant behavior, and novel peak emerges associated with the applied OMF.

  4. Superconductor spintronics: modeling spin and charge accumulation in out-of-equilibrium NIS junctions subjected to Zeeman magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevallier, D.; Trif, M.; Dutreix, C.; Guigou, M.; Quay, C. H. L.; Aprili, M.; Bena, C.

    2018-01-01

    We study the spin and charge accumulation in a superconductor when a normal-superconductor tunnel junction is subjected to a Zeeman magnetic field and taken out of equilibrium by applying either a DC or AC voltage bias. We focus on a configuration which allows one to measure non-locally the spin-accumulation using a second ferromagnetic electrode. Our main result is that, in the presence of an AC bias, the time average of the detected non-local signal is frequency dependent, and the frequency at which the saturation occurs is directly related to the inverse of the spin-relaxation time. For a DC bias we also address the effect of the spin accumulation in the normal leads and we investigate the out-of-equilibrium spin susceptibility of the SC, which we show to deviate drastically from its equilibrium value.

  5. Magnetic dipole self-organization of charge carriers in high-temperature superconductors and kinetics of phase transformation

    CERN Document Server

    Voronov, A V; Shuvalov, V V

    2001-01-01

    The phenomenological model, describing the magnetic dipole self-organization of charge carriers (formation of so-called stripe-structures and energy gap in the states spectrum), is designed for interpreting the data on the nonstationary nonlinear spectroscopy of the high-temperature superconductors. It is shown that after fast heating of the superconducting sample the kinetics of the subsequent phase transition depends on the initial temperature T. The destruction of the stripe-structures at low overheating T* < T < T sub m approx = (1.4-1.5)T*, whereby T sub c and T* approx = T sub c are the temperatures of transition into the superconducting state and formation of the stripe-structures occurs slowly (the times above 10 sup - sup 9 s) in spite of practically instantaneous disappearance of the superconductivity

  6. Optimal fuzzy logic-based PID controller for load-frequency control including superconducting magnetic energy storage units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pothiya, Saravuth; Ngamroo, Issarachai

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a new optimal fuzzy logic-based-proportional-integral-derivative (FLPID) controller for load frequency control (LFC) including superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) units. Conventionally, the membership functions and control rules of fuzzy logic control are obtained by trial and error method or experiences of designers. To overcome this problem, the multiple tabu search (MTS) algorithm is applied to simultaneously tune PID gains, membership functions and control rules of FLPID controller to minimize frequency deviations of the system against load disturbances. The MTS algorithm introduces additional techniques for improvement of search process such as initialization, adaptive search, multiple searches, crossover and restarting process. Simulation results explicitly show that the performance of the optimum FLPID controller is superior to the conventional PID controller and the non-optimum FLPID controller in terms of the overshoot, settling time and robustness against variations of system parameters

  7. Magnetic properties of the charge density wave compounds RTe3, R=Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er & Tm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru, N.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2009-12-14

    The antiferromagnetic transition is investigated in the rare-earth (R) tritelluride RTe{sub 3} family of charge density wave (CDW) compounds via specific heat, magnetization and resistivity measurements. Observation of the opening of a superzone gap in the resistivity of DyTe{sub 3} indicates that additional nesting of the reconstructed Fermi surface in the CDW state plays an important role in determining the magnetic structure.

  8. Improved charge neutralization method for depth profiling of bulk insulators using O2+ primary beam on a magnetic sector SIMS instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivovarov, A.L.; Stevie, F.A.; Griffis, D.P.

    2004-01-01

    Use of electrons for charge neutralization during positive secondary ion SIMS analysis of insulators has typically been achieved using coincident primary ion and electron beams. The normal incidence electron gun on CAMECA magnetic sector SIMS instruments can effectively eliminate sample charging during analysis of thin insulating films if the electron energy is sufficient to penetrate the film. However, positive secondary ion SIMS bulk insulator analysis using this instrument can be difficult, especially if high sputtering rates are required. A neutralization method has been developed utilizing electron beam impact of a region adjacent to the sputtered area. Prior to analysis, the surface of the sample is coated with gold which provides a conductive surface layer and which has a high secondary and backscattered electron yield. Results have been obtained showing excellent neutralization for a variety of bulk insulators including glass, silica, alumina, and lithium niobate. Sputtering rates exceeding 2 nm/s have been achieved in bulk silica. The technique should be applicable to minerals and possibly for other materials in cases where the analyzed area cannot be directly irradiated with an electron beam

  9. Efficient energy transfer and increase of energy density of magnetically charged flywheels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinterdorfer, T.

    2014-01-01

    Flywheel Energy Storage Systems represent an ecologically and economically sustainable technology for decentralized energy storage. Compared to other storage technologies such as e.g. chemical accumulators, they offer longer life cycles without performance degradation over time and usage and need almost no systematic maintenance. Further, they are made of environmentally friendly materials. By means of the driving torque of an electric motor, the flywheel is accelerated and thus electrical energy is transformed to kinetic energy. The stored energy can be transfered back by the load torque of a generator when needed. Modern flywheel energy storage applications use magnetic bearings to minimize selfdischarge. To avoid bearing forces due to rotor eccentricity an unbalance control strategy is used. However, this leads to an off-centered run of the electric machines rotor which in turn generates undesirable forces. A force-compensating operation of the electric machine will minimize the influence on the magnetic bearings in the planned control scheme, thus increasing their efficiency. Different concepts will be developed and compared to each other by means of simulations. Validation of the simulation models is carried out on a specially constructed test setup under defined conditions. In addition, the electrical machine will be integrated into the concept of redundancy of the flywheel. A bearingless operation increases the reliability and enables a safe shutdown of the application in case of malfunction of the magnetic bearings. High strength composite materials are used to achieve high speeds. Based on existing results from past research activities, a disc-shaped rotor is optimized first. To increase material utilization and to maximize energy density a topology optimization is performed. Evolutionary and gradient based optimization algorithms are used. Thereby the unused strength potential of the material is exploited in order to increase the economic efficiency of

  10. Specific heat studies on the charge and magnetic ordering in manganites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H.D.; Huang, H.L.; Ho, P.L.; Huang, W.L.; Huang, C.W.; Mollah, S.; Liu, S.J.; Lin, J.-Y.

    2003-01-01

    Specific heat (C) studies with a wide range of temperatures (T=80-300 K) on polycrystalline manganites Pr 1-x Ca x MnO 3 (113-PCMO) with x=0.3-0.4, La 1-y Ca y MnO 3 (113-LCMO) with y=0.3 and 0.5, and La 2-2z Sr 1+2z Mn 2 O 7 (327-LSMO) with z=0.3 and 0.5 are reported. Clear anomalies in C are identified which are associated with charge ordering (CO), antiferromagnetic (AFM) and ferromagnetic (FM) transitions. The anomalies in 113-PCMO and 113-LSMO are bigger than those of 327-LSMO. The possible explanations are discussed on the basis of dimensionality effects

  11. Pumping charge with ac magnetic fluxes and the dynamical breakdown of Onsager symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludovico, María Florencia; Arrachea, Liliana

    2013-03-01

    We study the transport properties of setups with one and two mesoscopic rings threaded by ac magnetic fluxes of the form Φ(t)=Φdc+Φaccos(Ω0t+δ) and connected to two different particle reservoirs. We analyze the conditions to generate a pumped dc current in the adiabatic regime. We also study the symmetry properties of the induced dc current as a function of the static component of the flux Φdc with and without a dc bias voltage applied at the reservoirs. We analyze, in particular, the validity of the Onsager-Casimir relations for different configurations of the setups.

  12. High-order integration scheme for relativistic charged particle motion in magnetized plasmas with volume preserving properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Akinobu; Furukawa, Masaru

    2017-11-01

    A numerical algorithm for solving full gyro orbit of relativistic charged particle motion in magnetized plasmas is presented. The algorithm developed here achieves the following features simultaneously. (1) The time advancement is explicit, and (2) the integration is performed with respect to the observation time in a laboratory frame. (3) It is suitable for accurate long time integration with its volume preserving properties in the phase space. (4) The algorithm can properly treat the E × B drift velocity in electromagnetic fields for large relativistic factors, and (5) can be extended to arbitrary high orders with the aid of symmetric composition methods. Because our algorithm is formulated in the Lorentz covariant form, explicit conservation of the Minkowski norm is not assumed. Nevertheless, no secular growth of the numerical errors in the norm does occur, and its influence can be minimized up to the levels of round-off errors when a high-order scheme is applied. Numerical results are compared with explicit and implicit Runge-Kutta methods. The numerical accuracy and the computational efficiency are discussed for long time integration in toroidal magnetic field configuration.

  13. Development of a magnetic beam guiding system for tumor-specific radiotherapy using heavy, charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberer, T.

    1994-06-01

    An active, magnetic beam guiding system was developed and tested for the purpose of enhanced and tumor-specific irradiation of irregularly shaped target volumina. Combining intensity-controlled wobbling in rapidly changing magnetic fields with the heavy-ion synchrotron's capacity of fast energy variation achieved a new technique allowing good range modulation. This technique allows the calculated dose distribution to be exactly matched to target contours, and at the same time guarantees best possible quality of the radiation beam, since there is no need for use of mechanical beam shaping members. The components of the scanning system and a specifically designed instrumentation and control concept for this configuration were integrated into the synchrotron's control system, so that there is now a system available offering free selection of beam characteristics combined with energy variation along with the pulsed operation of the accelerator. The system was tested at the biophysical measuring unit of the GSI implementing an elaborated irradiation method at this unit equipped with tools for physico-technical irradiation planning and performance. Methods were designed and tested for optimizing the beam path within a given contour, the optimization taking into account the effects of transmission functions of the scanner components on the results of radiation treatments. (orig.) [de

  14. Charge-dependent flow and the search for the chiral magnetic wave in Pb-Pb collisions at sNN=2.76 TeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaraz, J. R. M.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Benacek, P.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; De Cataldo, G.; De Conti, C.; De Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erdemir, I.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, V.; González-zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Grachov, O. A.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamon, J. C.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Horak, D.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacazio, N.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Mohisin Khan, M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein-bösing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, S.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Rocca, P.; Ladron De Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Lutz, T. H.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Mcdonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Munzer, R. H.; Murakami, H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Naik, B.; Nair, R.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Natal Da Luz, H.; Nattrass, C.; Navarro, S. R.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, R.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Papcun, P.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pimentel, L. O. D. L.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Rami, F.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Revol, J.-p.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sarkar, D.; Sarma, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Šefčík, M.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Senyukov, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; De Souza, R. D.; Sozzi, F.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-stassinaki, M.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stankus, P.; Stefanek, G.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto De Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; Van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Villatoro Tello, A.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; Von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weiser, D. F.; Westerhoff, U.; Whitehead, A. M.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yang, H.; Yano, S.; Yasar, C.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-k.; Yoon, J. H.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, C.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2016-01-01

    We report on measurements of a charge-dependent flow using a novel three-particle correlator with ALICE in Pb-Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and discuss the implications for observation of local parity violation and the chiral magnetic wave (CMW) in heavy-ion collisions.

  15. Carboxyl and negative charge-functionalized superparamagnetic nanochains with amorphous carbon shell and magnetic core: synthesis and their application in removal of heavy metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Chen, Qian-Wang; Chen, Jian; Yu, Bin-Xing; Hu, Xian-Yi

    2011-11-01

    This communication describes carboxyl-functionalized nanochains with amorphous carbon shell (18 nm) and magnetic core using ferrocene as a single reactant under the induction of an external magnetic field (0.40 T), which shows a superparamagnetic behavior and magnetization saturation of 38.6 emu g(-1). Because of mesoporous structure (3.8 nm) and surface negative charge (-35.18 mV), the nanochains can be used as adsorbent for removing the heavy metal ions (90%) from aqueous solution.

  16. Transition between vortex rings and MAP solutions for electrically charged magnetic solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Khai-Ming; Soltanian, Amin; Teh, Rosy [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

    2014-03-05

    We consider the bifurcation and transition of axially symmetric monopole-antimonopole pair (MAP) and vortex ring solutions in the presence of electric charge for the SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs field theory. Here we investigate the properties of MAP/vortex ring solutions with n = 3,η = 0.65, for different Higgs field strength λ. For λ < 4.93, there is only one fundamental branch of vortex ring solution, but at the critical value of λ{sub b} = 4.93, branching happens and 2 sets of new solutions appeared. The new branch with less energy is a full MAP solution while the branch with higher energy contains MAP at the beginning and separation between poles of MAP on the z-axis reduces gradually and at another critical value of λ{sub t} = 14.852, they merge together at z = 0. Beyond this point the solutions change to the vortex ring solutions and a transitions between MAP and vortex ring solutions happens at this branch.

  17. Fast-charging compact seed source for magnetic flux compression generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, M; Kristiansen, M; Neuber, A

    2008-12-01

    Flux compression generators (FCGs) are some of the most attractive sources of single-use compact pulsed power available today due to their high energy density output and mobility. Driving FCGs requires some seed energy, which is typically provided by applying a high seed current, usually in the kiloampere range for midsized helical FCGs. This initial current is supplied by a high-current seed source that is capable of driving an inductive load. High-current seed sources have typically been comprised of discharging large capacitors using spark gaps and overvoltage triggering mechanisms to provide the prime power for FCGs. This paper will discuss a recent design of a self-contained (battery powered with full charge time less than 40 s), single-use compact seed source (CSS) using solid-state components for the switching scheme. The CSS developed is a system (0.005 m(3) volume and weighing 3.9 kg) capable of delivering over 360 J ( approximately 12 kA) into a 5.20 muH load with a trigger energy of microjoules at the TTL triggering level. The newly designed solid-state switching scheme of the CSS incorporates off-the-shelf high-voltage semiconductor components that minimize system cost and size as necessary for a single-use application. A detailed evaluation of the CSS is presented primarily focusing on the switching mechanics and experimental characterization of the solid-state components used in the system.

  18. Phase separation, effects of magnetic field and high pressure on charge ordering in γ-Na0.5CoO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H.X.; Shi, Y.G.; Nie, C.J.; Wu, D.; Yang, L.X.; Dong, C.; Yu, H.C.; Zhang, H.R.; Jin, C.Q.; Li, J.Q.

    2005-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations reveal the presence of complex superstructures and remarkable phase separation in association with Na-ordering phenomenon in γ-Na 0.5 CoO 2 . Resistivity and magnetization measurements indicate that three phase transitions at the temperatures of 25, 53 and 90 K, respectively, appear commonly in γ-Na 0.5 CoO 2 samples. Under a high pressure up to 10 kbar, the low-temperature transport properties show certain changes below the charge order transition; under an applied magnetic field of 7 T, phase transitions at around 25 and 53 K, proposed fundamentally in connection with alternations of magnetic structure and charge ordering maintain almost unchanged

  19. Modeling the fields of magneto-optical devices, including fringe field effects and higher order multipole contributions, with application to charged particle optics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trines, Rmgm; van Eijndhoven, S. J. L.; Botman, J. I. M.; Schep, T. J.; Hagedoorn, H. L.

    2001-01-01

    A new method for the calculation of the magnetic field of beam guiding elements is presented. The method relates the calculation to measurement data of the magnetic field in a direct way. It can be applied to single beam guiding elements as well as to clusters of elements. The presented description

  20. Observation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in pPb collisions and its implication for the search for the chiral magnetic effect

    CERN Document Server

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Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Tongguang; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Mesic, Benjamin; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Susa, Tatjana; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Tsiakkouri, Demetra; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Mohammed, Yasser; Salama, Elsayed; Kadastik, Mario; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Davignon, Olivier; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Miné, Philippe; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sabes, David; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Zhukov, Valery; Albert, Andreas; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hamer, Matthias; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Flügge, Günter; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Gunnellini, Paolo; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baur, Sebastian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kudella, Simon; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Filipovic, Nicolas; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Bahinipati, Seema; Choudhury, Somnath; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Kole, Gouranga; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Behnamian, Hadi; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; De Nardo, Guglielmo; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Lee, Ari; Kim, Hyunchul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Lee, Haneol; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Carpinteyro, Severiano; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Calpas, Betty; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Chtchipounov, Leonid; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Sulimov, Valentin; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Markin, Oleg; Tarkovskii, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kaminskiy, Alexandre; Kodolova, Olga; Korotkikh, Vladimir; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Vardanyan, Irina; Blinov, Vladimir; Skovpen, Yuri; Shtol, Dmitry; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Barrio Luna, Mar; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Suárez Andrés, Ignacio; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; Curras, Esteban; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Roeck, Albert; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Duggan, Daniel; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Fartoukh, Stephane; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kieseler, Jan; Kirschenmann, Henning; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krammer, Manfred; 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    2017-03-24

    Charge-dependent azimuthal particle correlations with respect to the second-order event plane in pPb and PbPb collisions at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy of 5.02 TeV have been studied with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The measurement is performed with a three-particle correlation technique, using two particles with the same or opposite charge within the pseudorapidity range $| \\eta | < $ 2.4, and a third particle measured in the hadron forward calorimeters (4.4 $ < | \\eta | < $ 5). The observed differences between the same and opposite sign correlations, as functions of multiplicity and $\\eta$ gap between the two charged particles, are of similar magnitude in pPb and PbPb collisions at the same multiplicities. These results pose a challenge for the interpretation of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in heavy ion collisions in terms of the chiral magnetic effect.

  1. Coupling between Spin and Charge Order Driven by Magnetic Field in Triangular Ising System LuFe2O4+δ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ding

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of the magnetic-field effect on spin correlations in the charge ordered triangular Ising system LuFe2O4+δ through single crystal neutron diffraction. In the absence of a magnetic field, the strong diffuse neutron scattering observed below the Neel temperature (TN = 240 K indicates that LuFe2O4+δ shows short-range, two-dimensional (2D correlations in the FeO5 triangular layers, characterized by the development of a magnetic scattering rod along the 1/3 1/3 L direction, persisting down to 5 K. We also found that on top of the 2D correlations, a long range ferromagnetic component associated with the propagation vector k1 = 0 sets in at around 240 K. On the other hand, an external magnetic field applied along the c-axis effectively favours a three-dimensional (3D spin correlation between the FeO5 bilayers evidenced by the increase of the intensity of satellite reflections with propagation vector k2 = (1/3, 1/3, 3/2. This magnetic modulation is identical to the charge ordered superstructure, highlighting the field-promoted coupling between the spin and charge degrees of freedom. Formation of the 3D spin correlations suppresses both the rod-type diffuse scattering and the k1 component. Simple symmetry-based arguments provide a natural explanation of the observed phenomenon and put forward a possible charge redistribution in the applied magnetic field.

  2. TWO-DIMENSIONAL STELLAR EVOLUTION CODE INCLUDING ARBITRARY MAGNETIC FIELDS. II. PRECISION IMPROVEMENT AND INCLUSION OF TURBULENCE AND ROTATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Linghuai; Sofia, Sabatino; Basu, Sarbani; Demarque, Pierre; Ventura, Paolo; Penza, Valentina; Bi Shaolan

    2009-01-01

    In the second paper of this series we pursue two objectives. First, in order to make the code more sensitive to small effects, we remove many approximations made in Paper I. Second, we include turbulence and rotation in the two-dimensional framework. The stellar equilibrium is described by means of a set of five differential equations, with the introduction of a new dependent variable, namely the perturbation to the radial gravity, that is found when the nonradial effects are considered in the solution of the Poisson equation. Following the scheme of the first paper, we write the equations in such a way that the two-dimensional effects can be easily disentangled. The key concept introduced in this series is the equipotential surface. We use the underlying cause-effect relation to develop a recurrence relation to calculate the equipotential surface functions for uniform rotation, differential rotation, rotation-like toroidal magnetic fields, and turbulence. We also develop a more precise code to numerically solve the two-dimensional stellar structure and evolution equations based on the equipotential surface calculations. We have shown that with this formulation we can achieve the precision required by observations by appropriately selecting the convergence criterion. Several examples are presented to show that the method works well. Since we are interested in modeling the effects of a dynamo-type field on the detailed envelope structure and global properties of the Sun, the code has been optimized for short timescales phenomena (down to 1 yr). The time dependence of the code has so far been tested exclusively to address such problems.

  3. Constraints on the chiral magnetic effect using charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in pPb and PbPb collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Sirunyan, Albert M; CMS Collaboration; Adam, Wolfgang; Ambrogi, Federico; Asilar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Grossmann, Johannes; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krammer, Natascha; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Madlener, Thomas; Mikulec, Ivan; Pree, Elias; Rad, Navid; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Spanring, Markus; Spitzbart, Daniel; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wittmann, Johannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Zarucki, Mateusz; Chekhovsky, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; De Wolf, Eddi A; Di Croce, Davide; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; De Bruyn, Isabelle; De Clercq, Jarne; Deroover, Kevin; Flouris, Giannis; Lontkovskyi, Denys; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Python, Quentin; Skovpen, Kirill; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Beghin, Diego; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Dorney, Brian; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Starling, Elizabeth; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Roskas, Christos; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Tytgat, Michael; Verbeke, Willem; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caputo, Claudio; Caudron, Adrien; David, Pieter; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Komm, Matthias; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Saggio, Alessia; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Zobec, Joze; Beliy, Nikita; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Coelho, Eduardo; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Melo De Almeida, Miqueias; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Sanchez Rosas, Luis Junior; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Thiel, Mauricio; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Misheva, Milena; Rodozov, Mircho; Shopova, Mariana; Sultanov, Georgi; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Gao, Xuyang; Yuan, Li; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liao, Hongbo; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Yazgan, Efe; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Sijing; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Courbon, Benoit; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; 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Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Finco, Linda; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Viret, Sébastien; Khvedelidze, Arsen; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Feld, Lutz; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Zhukov, Valery; Albert, Andreas; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hamer, Matthias; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Flügge, Günter; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bermúdez Martínez, Armando; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Botta, Valeria; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gunnellini, Paolo; Guthoff, Moritz; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Lenz, Teresa; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; 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Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Russo, Lorenzo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Strom, Derek; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; Brianza, Luca; Brivio, Francesco; Ciriolo, Vincenzo; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; 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Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Ressegotti, Martina; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Cecchi, Claudia; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Manoni, Elisa; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Mariani, Valentina; Menichelli, Mauro; Rossi, Alessandro; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiga, Daniele; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, Tommaso; Borrello, Laura; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fedi, Giacomo; Giannini, Leonardo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Manca, Elisabetta; Mandorli, Giulio; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Daci, Nadir; Del Re, Daniele; Di Marco, Emanuele; 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Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Rabadán-Trejo, Raúl Iraq; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pyskir, Andrzej; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Galinhas, Bruno; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Seixas, Joao; Strong, Giles; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stepennov, Anton; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Aushev, Tagir; Bylinkin, Alexander; Chistov, Ruslan; Danilov, Mikhail; Parygin, Pavel; Philippov, Dmitry; Polikarpov, Sergey; Tarkovskii, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kaminskiy, Alexandre; Kodolova, Olga; Korotkikh, Vladimir; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Vardanyan, Irina; Blinov, Vladimir; Skovpen, Yuri; Shtol, Dmitry; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Mandrik, Petr; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Barrio Luna, Mar; Cerrada, Marcos; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Moran, Dermot; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Álvarez Fernández, Adrian; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Cuevas, Javier; Erice, Carlos; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Vischia, Pietro; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chazin Quero, Barbara; Curras, Esteban; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Akgun, Bora; Auffray, Etiennette; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bianco, Michele; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Yi; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Roeck, Albert; Deelen, Nikkie; Dobson, Marc; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Everaerts, Pieter; Fallavollita, Francesco; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gilbert, Andrew; Gill, Karl; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jafari, Abideh; Janot, Patrick; Karacheban, Olena; Kieseler, Jan; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kortelainen, Matti J; Krammer, Manfred; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Meijers, Frans; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuel; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Rabady, Dinyar; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Selvaggi, Michele; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Stakia, Anna; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Verweij, Marta; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Caminada, Lea; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Wiederkehr, Stephan Albert; Backhaus, Malte; Bäni, Lukas; Berger, Pirmin; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dorfer, Christian; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Klijnsma, Thomas; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Reichmann, Michael; Sanz Becerra, Diego Alejandro; Schönenberger, Myriam; Shchutska, Lesya; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Vesterbacka Olsson, Minna Leonora; Wallny, Rainer; Zhu, De Hua; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; De Cosa, Annapaola; Del Burgo, Riccardo; Donato, Silvio; Galloni, Camilla; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Schweiger, Korbinian; Seitz, Claudia; Takahashi, Yuta; Zucchetta, Alberto; Candelise, Vieri; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Steen, Arnaud; Tsai, Jui-fa; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Boran, Fatma; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Bilin, Bugra; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Tekten, Sevgi; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Nazlim Agaras, Merve; Atay, Serhat; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Davignon, Olivier; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Auzinger, Georg; Bainbridge, Robert; Borg, Johan; Breeze, Shane; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Di Maria, Riccardo; Elwood, Adam; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; Lane, Rebecca; Laner, Christian; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Matsushita, Takashi; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Palladino, Vito; Pesaresi, Mark; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Scott, Edward; Seez, Christopher; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wardle, Nicholas; Winterbottom, Daniel; Wright, Jack; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Zahid, Sema; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Smith, Caleb; Bartek, Rachel; Dominguez, Aaron; Buccilli, Andrew; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; West, Christopher; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Cutts, David; Garabedian, Alex; Hadley, Mary; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Hogan, Julie Managan; Kwok, Ka Hei Martin; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Lee, Jangbae; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Pazzini, Jacopo; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Yu, David; Band, Reyer; Brainerd, Christopher; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Shalhout, Shalhout; Shi, Mengyao; Smith, John; Stolp, Dustin; Tos, Kyle; Tripathi, Mani; Wang, Zhangqier; Bachtis, Michail; Bravo, Cameron; Cousins, Robert; Dasgupta, Abhigyan; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Mccoll, Nickolas; Regnard, Simon; Saltzberg, David; Schnaible, Christian; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Bouvier, Elvire; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Ghiasi Shirazi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Si, Weinan; Wang, Long; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Gerosa, Raffaele; Gilbert, Dylan; Hashemi, Bobak; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Kole, Gouranga; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Masciovecchio, Mario; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Amin, Nick; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Ovcharova, Ana; Qu, Huilin; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Bendavid, Joshua; Bornheim, Adolf; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Newman, Harvey B; Nguyen, Thong; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhang, Zhicai; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Mudholkar, Tanmay; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Weinberg, Marc; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Quach, Dan; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Alyari, Maral; Apollinari, Giorgio; Apresyan, Artur; Apyan, Aram; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Canepa, Anadi; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cremonesi, Matteo; Duarte, Javier; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Freeman, Jim; Gecse, Zoltan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Magini, Nicolo; Marraffino, John Michael; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Schneider, Basil; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strait, James; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Joshi, Bhargav Madhusudan; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kotov, Khristian; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Shi, Kun; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Joshi, Yagya Raj; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Kolberg, Ted; Martinez, German; Perry, Thomas; Prosper, Harrison; Saha, Anirban; Santra, Arka; Sharma, Varun; Yohay, Rachel; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Cavanaugh, Richard; Chen, Xuan; Evdokimov, Olga; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hangal, Dhanush Anil; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Kamin, Jason; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Tonjes, Marguerite; Trauger, Hallie; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Castle, James; Khalil, Sadia; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Royon, Christophe; Sanders, Stephen; Schmitz, Erich; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Feng, Yongbin; Ferraioli, Charles; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunkle, Joshua; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonwar, Suresh C; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Azzolini, Virginia; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Demiragli, Zeynep; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hsu, Dylan; Hu, Miao; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Tatar, Kaya; Velicanu, Dragos; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Hansen, Peter; Hiltbrand, Joshua; Kalafut, Sean; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Turkewitz, Jared; Wadud, Mohammad Abrar; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Nguyen, Duong; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Charaf, Otman; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Loukas, Nikitas; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Ji, Weifeng; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Higginbotham, Samuel; Lange, David; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Mei, Kelvin; Ojalvo, Isabel; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Malik, Sudhir; Norberg, Scarlet; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Das, Souvik; Folgueras, Santiago; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Peng, Cheng-Chieh; Qiu, Hao; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Sun, Jian; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Cheng, Tongguang; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Freed, Sarah; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Kilpatrick, Matthew; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Shi, Wei; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Zhang, Aobo; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Ciesielski, Robert; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Montalvo, Roy; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Delannoy, Andrés G; Foerster, Mark; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; 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Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2018-04-24

    Charge-dependent azimuthal correlations of same- and opposite-sign pairs with respect to the second- and third-order event planes have been measured in pPb collisions at sNN=8.16TeV and PbPb collisions at 5.02 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The measurement is motivated by the search for the charge separation phenomenon predicted by the chiral magnetic effect (CME) in heavy ion collisions. Three- and two-particle azimuthal correlators are extracted as functions of the pseudorapidity difference, the transverse momentum (pT) difference, and the pT average of same- and opposite-charge pairs in various event multiplicity ranges. The data suggest that the charge-dependent three-particle correlators with respect to the second- and third-order event planes share a common origin, predominantly arising from charge-dependent two-particle azimuthal correlations coupled with an anisotropic flow. The CME is expected to lead to a v2-independent three-particle correlation when the magnetic field is fixed. Using an ...

  4. Constraints on the chiral magnetic effect using charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in p Pb and PbPb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

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T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Leontsinis, S.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Mcdermott, K.; Mirman, N.; Patterson, J. R.; Quach, D.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Tan, S. M.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Wittich, P.; Zientek, M.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Alyari, M.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Apyan, A.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Canepa, A.; Cerati, G. B.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cremonesi, M.; Duarte, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Freeman, J.; Gecse, Z.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, M.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Magini, N.; Marraffino, J. 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M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Cavanaugh, R.; Chen, X.; Evdokimov, O.; Gerber, C. E.; Hangal, D. A.; Hofman, D. J.; Jung, K.; Kamin, J.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trauger, H.; Varelas, N.; Wang, H.; Wu, Z.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Boren, S.; Bowen, J.; Castle, J.; Khalil, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Royon, C.; Sanders, S.; Schmitz, E.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Feng, Y.; Ferraioli, C.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Jeng, G. Y.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kunkle, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonwar, S. C.; Abercrombie, D.; Allen, B.; Azzolini, V.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; D'Alfonso, M.; Demiragli, Z.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hsu, D.; Hu, M.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Maier, B.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Tatar, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Evans, A.; Hansen, P.; Hiltbrand, J.; Kalafut, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Turkewitz, J.; Wadud, M. A.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Claes, D. R.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Kravchenko, I.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Nguyen, D.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Charaf, O.; Hahn, K. A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Loukas, N.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Higginbotham, S.; Lange, D.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Mei, K.; Ojalvo, I.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Malik, S.; Norberg, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Das, S.; Folgueras, S.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Khatiwada, A.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Peng, C. C.; Qiu, H.; Schulte, J. F.; Sun, J.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Cheng, T.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Freed, S.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Kilpatrick, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Shi, W.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Zhang, A.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. t.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Ciesielski, R.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Agapitos, A.; Chou, J. P.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Montalvo, R.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Delannoy, A. G.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; De Guio, F.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Gurpinar, E.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Mengke, T.; Muthumuni, S.; Peltola, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Padeken, K.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Hirosky, R.; Joyce, M.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Poudyal, N.; Sturdy, J.; Thapa, P.; Zaleski, S.; Brodski, M.; Buchanan, J.; Caillol, C.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Hussain, U.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2018-04-01

    Charge-dependent azimuthal correlations of same- and opposite-sign pairs with respect to the second- and third-order event planes have been measured in p Pb collisions at √{s NN}=8.16 TeV and PbPb collisions at 5.02 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The measurement is motivated by the search for the charge separation phenomenon predicted by the chiral magnetic effect (CME) in heavy ion collisions. Three- and two-particle azimuthal correlators are extracted as functions of the pseudorapidity difference, the transverse momentum (pT) difference, and the pT average of same- and opposite-charge pairs in various event multiplicity ranges. The data suggest that the charge-dependent three-particle correlators with respect to the second- and third-order event planes share a common origin, predominantly arising from charge-dependent two-particle azimuthal correlations coupled with an anisotropic flow. The CME is expected to lead to a v2-independent three-particle correlation when the magnetic field is fixed. Using an event shape engineering technique, upper limits on the v2-independent fraction of the three-particle correlator are estimated to be 13% for p Pb and 7% for PbPb collisions at 95% confidence level. The results of this analysis, both the dominance of two-particle correlations as a source of the three-particle results and the similarities seen between PbPb and p Pb , provide stringent constraints on the origin of charge-dependent three-particle azimuthal correlations and challenge their interpretation as arising from a chiral magnetic effect in heavy ion collisions.

  5. Constraints on the chiral magnetic effect using charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in pPb and PbPb collisions at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirunyan, Albert M; et al.

    2017-08-04

    Charge-dependent azimuthal correlations of same- and opposite-sign pairs with respect to the second- and third-order event planes have been measured in pPb collisions at sqrt(s[NN]) = 8.16 TeV and PbPb collisions at 5.02TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The measurement is motivated by the search for the charge separation phenomenon predicted by the chiral magnetic effect (CME) in heavy ion collisions. Three- and two-particle azimuthal correlators are extracted as functions of the pseudorapidity difference, the transverse momentum (pt) difference, and the pt average of same- and opposite-charge pairs in various event multiplicity ranges. The data suggest that the charge-dependent three-particle correlators with respect to the second- and third-order event planes share a common origin, predominantly arising from charge-dependent two-particle azimuthal correlations coupled with an anisotropic flow. The CME is expected to lead to a v[2]-independent three-particle correlation when the magnetic field is fixed. Using an event shape engineering technique, upper limits on the v[2]-independent fraction of the three-particle correlator are estimated to be 6.6% for pPb and 3.8% for PbPb collisions at 95% confidence level. The results of this analysis, both the dominance of two-particle correlations as a source of the three-particle results and the similarities seen between PbPb and pPb, provide stringent constraints on the origin of charge-dependent three-particle azimuthal correlations and challenge their interpretation as arising from a chiral magnetic effect in heavy ion collisions.

  6. Thickness dependence and dimensionality effects on charge and magnetic orderings in La1 /3Sr2 /3FeO3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K.; Hirata, Y.; Horio, M.; Yokoyama, Y.; Takubo, K.; Minohara, M.; Kumigashira, H.; Yamasaki, Y.; Nakao, H.; Murakami, Y.; Fujimori, A.; Wadati, H.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the thickness effects on charge and magnetic orderings in Fe perovskite oxide La1 /3Sr2 /3FeO3 /SrTiO3 thin films by hard x-ray and resonant soft x-ray scattering (RSXS) with changing thin-film thickness systematically. We found that the correlation lengths of the magnetic ordering along the in-plane and out-of-plane directions are comparable and proportional to the thickness, and show stronger thickness dependence than those of charge ordering. The magnetic ordered states disappear when the correlation length of magnetic ordering decreases to that of charge ordering through the intrinsic thickness effects. Surface-sensitive grazing-incident RSXS revealed that the orderings exist even in the surface region, which indicates that the observed orderings are not affected by surface effects like oxygen vacancies. Critical thickness is in 5-15 nm, which corresponds to 4-11 antiferromagnetic ordering period. This critical value seems to be common to other ferromagnetic oxide thin films.

  7. Dust-acoustic shock waves in a charge varying electronegative magnetized dusty plasma with nonthermal ions: Application to Halley Comet plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Bacha, Mustapha [Plasma Physics Group (PPG), Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Faculty of Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B. P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria)

    2013-10-15

    Weak dust-acoustic waves (DAWs) are addressed in a nonthermal charge varying electronegative magnetized dusty plasmas with application to the Halley Comet. A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out to derive a Korteweg-de Vries-Burger equation. The positive ion nonthermality, the obliqueness, and magnitude of the magnetic field are found to modify the dispersive and dissipative properties of the DA shock structure. Our results may aid to explain and interpret the nonlinear oscillations that may occur in the Halley Comet Plasma.

  8. Variational Symplectic Integrator for Long-Time Simulations of the Guiding-Center Motion of Charged Particles in General Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, H.; Guan, X.

    2008-01-01

    A variational symplectic integrator for the guiding-center motion of charged particles in general magnetic fields is developed for long-time simulation studies of magnetized plasmas. Instead of discretizing the differential equations of the guiding-center motion, the action of the guiding-center motion is discretized and minimized to obtain the iteration rules for advancing the dynamics. The variational symplectic integrator conserves exactly a discrete Lagrangian symplectic structure, and has better numerical properties over long integration time, compared with standard integrators, such as the standard and variable time-step fourth order Runge-Kutta methods.

  9. In-gas-cell laser ionization spectroscopy in the vicinity of {sup 100}Sn: Magnetic moments and mean-square charge radii of N=50–54 Ag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrer, R., E-mail: Rafael.Ferrer@fys.kuleuven.be [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Bree, N.; Cocolios, T.E.; Darby, I.G.; De Witte, H.; Dexters, W.; Diriken, J.; Elseviers, J. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Franchoo, S. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire (IPN) d' Orsay, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Huyse, M. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Kesteloot, N. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); SCK-CEN, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie – Centre d' Etude de l' énergie Nucléaire, Mol B-2400 (Belgium); Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Pauwels, D.; Radulov, D.; Roger, T. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Savajols, H. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 55027, 14076 Caen (France); Van Duppen, P.; Venhart, M. [KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-01-20

    In-gas-cell laser ionization spectroscopy studies on the neutron deficient {sup 97–101}Ag isotopes have been performed with the LISOL setup. Magnetic dipole moments and mean-square charge radii have been determined for the first time with the exception of {sup 101}Ag, which was found in good agreement with previous experimental values. The reported results allow tentatively assigning the spin of {sup 97,99}Ag to 9/2 and confirming the presence of an isomeric state in these two isotopes, whose collapsed hyperfine structure suggests a spin of 1/2 . The effect of the N=50 shell closure is not only manifested in the magnetic moments but also in the evolution of the mean-square charge radii of the isotopes investigated, in accordance with the spherical droplet model predictions.

  10. Darwin-Lagrangian analysis for the interaction of a point charge and a magnet: considerations related to the controversy regarding the Aharonov-Bohm and Aharonov-Casher phase shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, Timothy H

    2006-01-01

    The classical electromagnetic interaction of a point charge and a magnet is discussed by first calculating the interaction of a point charge with a simple model magnetic moment and then suggesting a multiparticle limit. The Darwin-Lagrangian is used to analyse the electromagnetic behaviour of the model magnetic moment (composed of two oppositely charged particles of different masses in an initially circular Coulomb orbit) interacting with a passing point charge. Considerations of force, energy, momentum and centre of energy are treated through second order in 1/c. The changing magnetic moment is found to put a force back on a passing charge; this force is of order 1/c 2 and depends upon the magnitude of the magnetic moment. The limit of a many-particle magnet arranged as a toroid is discussed. It is suggested that in the multiparticle limit, the electric fields of the passing charge are screened out of the body of the magnet while the magnetic fields of the passing charge penetrate into the body of the magnet. This is consistent with our understanding of the penetration of electromagnetic velocity fields into ohmic conductors. The proposed multiparticle limit is consistent with the conservation laws for energy and momentum, as well as constant motion of the centre of energy, and Newton's third law for the net Lorentz forces on the magnet and on the point charge. The work corresponds to a classical electromagnetic analysis of the interaction which is basic to understanding the controversy over the Aharonov-Bohm and Aharonov-Casher phase shifts and represents a refutation of the suggestions of Aharonov, Pearle and Vaidman

  11. Experimental root mean square charge radii, isotope shifts, ground state magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments of 1≤A≤ 239 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antony, M.S.; Britz, J.

    1986-01-01

    A compilation of experimental root-mean square radii, isotope shifts, ground-state magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments of nuclei 1≤A≤239 is presented. Shell, sub-subshell closures and changes in nuclear deformations discernible from data are displayed graphically. The nuclear charge distribution, for 1≤A≤ 239 nuclei deduced from Coulomb displacement energies is shown for comparison

  12. A family of mixed-metal cyanide cubes with alternating octahedral and tetrahedral corners exhibiting a variety of magnetic behaviors including single molecule magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelter, Eric J; Karadas, Ferdi; Avendano, Carolina; Prosvirin, Andrey V; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Dunbar, Kim R

    2007-07-04

    A series of structurally related pseudocubic metal cyanide clusters of Re(II) and 3d metal ions [{MX}4{Re(triphos)(CN)3}4] (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn; X = Cl, I, -OCH3) have been prepared, and their magnetic and electrochemical properties have been probed to evaluate the effect of changing the identity of the 3d metal ion. Electrochemistry of the clusters reveals several rhenium-based oxidation and reduction processes, some of which result in cluster fragmentation. The richest electrochemistry was observed for the iron congener, which exists as the Re(I)/Fe(III) cluster at the resting potential and exhibits six clear one-electron reversible redox couples and two, closely spaced one-electron quasi-reversible processes. The [{MnIICl}4{ReII(triphos)(CN)3}4] complex exhibits single molecule magnetism with a fast tunneling relaxation process observed at H = 0 determined by micro-SQUID magnetization measurements. A comparative evaluation of the magnetic properties across the series reveals that the compounds exhibit antiferromagnetic coupling between the metal ions, except for [{NiIICl}4{ReII(triphos)(CN)3}4] that shows ferromagnetic behavior. Despite the large ground-state spin value of [{NiIICl}4{ReII(triphos)(CN)3}4] (S = 6), only manganese congeners exhibit SMM behavior to 1.8 K.

  13. First-principles investigation of A-B intersite charge transfer and correlated electrical and magnetic properties in BiCu3Fe4O12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongping; Lv, Shuhui; Liu, Xiaojuan; Meng, Jian

    2011-05-01

    First-principles calculations using the augmented plane wave plus local orbitals method, as implemented in the WIEN2K code, have been carried out to study the A-B intersite charge transfer and the correlated electrical and magnetic properties of the perovskite BiCu(3)Fe(4)O(12), especially as regards the charge transfer. The results indicate that the charge transfer between A-site Cu and B-site Fe is by way of O 2p orbitals, and during this process orbital hybridization plays an important role. More importantly, the charge transfer is of 3d(9) + 4d(5)L(0.75) →3d(9)L + 4d(5) type (here L denotes an oxygen hole or a ligand hole). During this process, the magnetic interaction experiences a transition from Cu-Fe ferrimagnetic coupling to G-type antiferromagnetic coupling within B-site Fe with paramagnetic Cu(3+). As to electrical property, it undergoes a metal to insulator transition. All our calculated results are consistent with the available experimental results. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Search for magnetic monopoles and stable particles with high electric charges in 8 TeV $pp$ collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Mora, Jennifer; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghazlane, Hamid; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Mori, Daniel; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morton, Alexander; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Noordeh, Emil; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sosebee, Mark; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Velz, Thomas; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Qi; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2016-03-18

    A search for highly ionizing particles produced in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV center-of-mass energy is performed by the ATLAS collaboration at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The dataset used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 7.0 fb$^{-1}$. A customized trigger significantly increases the sensitivity, permitting a search for such particles with charges and energies beyond what was previously accessible. No event is found in the signal region, leading to production cross-section upper limits in the mass range 200--2500 GeV for magnetic monopoles with magnetic charge in the range $0.5g_{D}<|g|<2.0g_{D}$, where $g_{D}$ is the Dirac charge, and for stable particles with electric charge in the range $10<|z|<60$. Model-dependent limits are presented in given pair-production scenarios, and model-independent limits are presented in fiducial regions of particle energy and pseudorapidity.

  15. Charging machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medlin, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    A charging machine for loading fuel slugs into the process tubes of a nuclear reactor includes a tubular housing connected to the process tube, a charging trough connected to the other end of the tubular housing, a device for loading the charging trough with a group of fuel slugs, means for equalizing the coolant pressure in the charging trough with the pressure in the process tubes, means for pushing the group of fuel slugs into the process tube and a latch and a seal engaging the last object in the group of fuel slugs to prevent the fuel slugs from being ejected from the process tube when the pusher is removed and to prevent pressure liquid from entering the charging machine. 3 claims, 11 drawing figures

  16. New experimental constrains on chiral magnetic effect using charge-dependent azimuthal correlation in pPb and PbPb collisions at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zhoudunming

    2018-01-01

    Studies of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations for the same- and oppositesign particle pairs are presented in PbPb collisions at 5 TeV and pPb collisions at 5 and 8.16 TeV, with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The azimuthal correlations are evaluated with respect to the second- and also higher-order event planes, as a function of particle pseudorapidity and transverse momentum, and event multiplicity. By employing an event-shape engineering technique, the dependence of correlations on azimuthal anisotropy flow is investigated. Results presented provide new insights to the origin of observed charge-dependent azimuthal correlations, and have important implications to the search for the chiral magnetic effect in heavy ion collisions.

  17. An alternative approach to exact wave functions for time-dependent coupled oscillator model of charged particle in variable magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menouar, Salah; Maamache, Mustapha; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2010-01-01

    The quantum states of time-dependent coupled oscillator model for charged particles subjected to variable magnetic field are investigated using the invariant operator methods. To do this, we have taken advantage of an alternative method, so-called unitary transformation approach, available in the framework of quantum mechanics, as well as a generalized canonical transformation method in the classical regime. The transformed quantum Hamiltonian is obtained using suitable unitary operators and is represented in terms of two independent harmonic oscillators which have the same frequencies as that of the classically transformed one. Starting from the wave functions in the transformed system, we have derived the full wave functions in the original system with the help of the unitary operators. One can easily take a complete description of how the charged particle behaves under the given Hamiltonian by taking advantage of these analytical wave functions.

  18. New experimental constrains on chiral magnetic effect using charge-dependent azimuthal correlation in pPb and PbPb collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Zhoudunming

    2017-01-01

    Studies of charge-dependent azimuthal correlations for the same- and opposite-sign particle pairs are presented in PbPb collisions at 5 TeV and pPb collisions at 5 and 8.16 TeV, with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The azimuthal correlations are evaluated with respect to the second- and also higher-order event planes, as a function of particle pseudorapidity and transverse momentum, and event multiplicity. By employing an event-shape engineering technique, the dependence of correlations on azimuthal anisotropy flow is investigated. Results presented provide new insights to the origin of observed charge-dependent azimuthal correlations, and have important implications to the search for the chiral magnetic effect in heavy ion collisions.

  19. Klystron - Space-charge limited flow, guns, Perveance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isagawa, S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper treats Thermionic emission, Cathode as an e - emitter, Space-charge limited effect and 3/2 power law, Perveance, Beam spread due to space charge, Pierce guns, Magnetically immersed guns, Method of gun design including simulations, and Examples, mainly treating E3786, which attendees will operate above 1 MW-CW in a practical exercise course at KEK. (author). 74 refs

  20. Charge-dependent flow and the search for the chiral magnetic wave in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Millan Almaraz, Jesus Roberto; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Balasubramanian, Supraja; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belyaev, Vladimir; Benacek, Pavel; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Bossu, Francesco; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Cerkala, Jakub; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Drozhzhova, Tatiana; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Endress, Eric; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erdemir, Irem; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Fleck, Martin Gabriel; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fronze, Gabriele Gaetano; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez, Victor; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Grachov, Oleg Anatolievich; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Gronefeld, Julius Maximilian; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hamon, Julien Charles; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Horak, David; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Inaba, Motoi; Incani, Elisa; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacazio, Nicolo; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jadlovsky, Jan; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jakubowska, Monika Joanna; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyungtaik; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Daehyeok; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Klewin, Sebastian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kopcik, Michal; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Lokesh, Kumar; Kumar, Shyam; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Ladron De Guevara, Pedro; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Seongjoo; Lehas, Fatiha; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leon Vargas, Hermes; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lutz, Tyler Harrison; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Mcdonald, Daniel; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Minervini, Lazzaro Manlio; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murakami, Hikari; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Nattrass, Christine; Rosado Navarro, Sebastian; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Ranjit; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nellen, Lukas; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okatan, Ali; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Papcun, Peter; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Pei, Hua; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Ozelin De Lima Pimentel, Lais; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Read, Kenneth Francis; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-Lucian; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sarkar, Debojit; Sarma, Pranjal; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schuster, Tim Robin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Sefcik, Michal; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Senyukov, Serhiy; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shadura, Oksana; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Mona; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Soegaard, Carsten; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Zixuan; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Derradi De Souza, Rafael; Sozzi, Federica; Spacek, Michal; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stankus, Paul; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Suljic, Miljenko; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Szabo, Alexander; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Tabassam, Uzma; Takahashi, Jun; Tambave, Ganesh Jagannath; Tanaka, Naoto; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-Gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Trogolo, Stefano; Trombetta, Giuseppe; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Veldhoen, Misha; Velure, Arild; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yasar, Cigdem; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaborowska, Anna; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correia Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zyzak, Maksym

    2016-04-08

    We report on measurements of a charge-dependent flow using a novel three-particle correlator with ALICE in Pb–Pb collisions at the LHC, and discuss the implications for observation of local parity violation and the Chiral Magnetic Wave (CMW) in heavy-ion collisions. Charge-dependent flow is reported for different collision centralities as a function of the event charge asymmetry. While our results are in qualitative agreement with expectations based on the CMW, the nonzero signal observed in higher harmonics correlations indicates a possible significant background contribution. We also present results on a differential correlator, where the flow of positive and negative charges is reported as a function of the mean charge of the particles and their pseudorapidity separation. We argue that this differential correlator is better suited to distinguish the differences in positive and negative charges expected due to the CMW and the background effects, such as local charge conservation coupled with strong radial...

  1. CHARGE syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Chitra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CHARGE syndrome was initially defined as a non-random association of anomalies (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear anomalies/deafness. In 1998, an expert group defined the major (the classical 4C's: Choanal atresia, Coloboma, Characteristic ears and Cranial nerve anomalies and minor criteria of CHARGE syndrome. Individuals with all four major characteristics or three major and three minor characteristics are highly likely to have CHARGE syndrome. However, there have been individuals genetically identified with CHARGE syndrome without the classical choanal atresia and coloboma. The reported incidence of CHARGE syndrome ranges from 0.1–1.2/10,000 and depends on professional recognition. Coloboma mainly affects the retina. Major and minor congenital heart defects (the commonest cyanotic heart defect is tetralogy of Fallot occur in 75–80% of patients. Choanal atresia may be membranous or bony; bilateral or unilateral. Mental retardation is variable with intelligence quotients (IQ ranging from normal to profound retardation. Under-development of the external genitalia is a common finding in males but it is less apparent in females. Ear abnormalities include a classical finding of unusually shaped ears and hearing loss (conductive and/or nerve deafness that ranges from mild to severe deafness. Multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions are common. A behavioral phenotype for CHARGE syndrome is emerging. Mutations in the CHD7 gene (member of the chromodomain helicase DNA protein family are detected in over 75% of patients with CHARGE syndrome. Children with CHARGE syndrome require intensive medical management as well as numerous surgical interventions. They also need multidisciplinary follow up. Some of the hidden issues of CHARGE syndrome are often forgotten, one being the feeding adaptation of these children, which needs an early aggressive approach from a feeding team. As the child

  2. Nonequilibrium green function approach to elastic and inelastic spin-charge transport in topological insulator-based heterostructures and magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouzi, Farzad

    Current and future technological needs increasingly motivate the intensive scientific research of the properties of materials at the nano-scale. One of the most important domains in this respect at present concerns nano-electronics and its diverse applications. The great interest in this domain arises from the potential reduction of the size of the circuit components, maintaining their quality and functionality, and aiming at greater efficiency, economy, and storage characteristics for the corresponding physical devices. The aim of this thesis is to present a contribution to the analysis of the electronic charge and spin transport phenomena that occur at the quantum level in nano-structures. This thesis spans the areas of quantum transport theory through time-dependent systems, electron-boson interacting systems and systems of interest to spintronics. A common thread in the thesis is to develop the theoretical foundations and computational algorithms to numerically simulate such systems. In order to optimize the numerical calculations I resort to different techniques (such as graph theory in finding inverse of a sparse matrix, adaptive grids for integrations and programming languages (e.g., MATLAB and C++) and distributed computing tools (MPI, CUDA). Outline of the Thesis: After giving an introduction to the topics covered in this thesis in Chapter 1, I present the theoretical foundations to the field of non-equilibrium quantum statistics in Chapter 2. The applications of this formalism and the results are covered in the subsequent chapters as follows: Spin and charge quantum pumping in time-dependent systems: Covered in Chapters 3, 4 and 5, this topics was initially motivated by experiments on measuring voltage signal from a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) exposed to a microwave radiation in ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) condition. In Chapter 3 we found a possible explanation for the finite voltage signal measured from a tunnel junction consisting of only a single

  3. Drift motion of a charged particle in the crossed axial magnetic and radial electric fields, and the electric field of a rotating potential wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliseev, Yu.N.; Stepanov, K.N.

    1983-01-01

    In the drift motion approximation solution of the problem is obtained on the motion of a nonrelativistic charged particle in the crossed axial magnetic and radial electric fields, and the electric field of a rotating potential wave under cherenkov and modified cyclotron resonances. The static radial electric field potential is supposed to be close to the parabolic one. The drift motion equations and their integrals are preseOted. The experimentally obtained effect of plasma ionic component division in the crossed fields under the excitation of ion cyclotron oscillations is explained with the help of the theory developed in the paper

  4. VERB-4D simulations of Earths inner magnetosphere: Ring-current-to-radiation-belt electrons including adiabatic effects in a realistic magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerman, Adam; Shprits, Yuri; Drozdov, Alexander; Aseeve, Nikita

    2016-04-01

    The Versatile Electron Radiation Belt 4D (VERB-4D) code models the dynamics of ring-current to radiation-belt electrons in Earth's magnetosphere. The code has been developed further to include a realistic magnetic field model, which allows one to model MLT-dependent adiabatic effects, in addition to other processes. Initial results are presented for storm- and non-storm time periods, demonstrating the role which adiabatic variations play on the observed electron dynamics.

  5. The influence of ligand charge and length on the assembly of Brome mosaic virus derived virus-like particles with magnetic core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieloch, Adam A.; Krecisz, Monika; Rybka, Jakub D.; Strugała, Aleksander; Krupiński, Michał; Urbanowicz, Anna; Kozak, Maciej; Skalski, Bohdan; Figlerowicz, Marek; Giersig, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) have sparked a great interest in the field of nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine. The introduction of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPIONs) as a core, provides potential use of VLPs in the hyperthermia therapy, MRI contrast agents and magnetically-powered delivery agents. Magnetite NPs also provide a significant improvement in terms of VLPs stability. Moreover employing viral structural proteins as self-assembling units has opened a new paths for targeted therapy, drug delivery systems, vaccines design, and many more. In many cases, the self-assembly of a virus strongly depends on electrostatic interactions between positively charged groups of the capsid proteins and negatively charged nucleic acid. This phenomenon imposes the negative net charge as a key requirement for the core nanoparticle. In our experiments, Brome mosaic virus (BMV) capsid proteins isolated from infected plants Hordeum vulgare were used. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4) with 15 nm in diameter were synthesized by thermal decomposition and functionalized with COOH-PEG-PL polymer or dihexadecylphosphate (DHP) in order to provide water solubility and negative charge required for the assembly. Nanoparticles were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Zeta Potential, Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometry. TEM and DLS study were conducted to verify VLPs creation. This study demonstrates that the increase of negative surface charge is not a sufficient factor determining successful assembly. Additional steric interactions provided by longer ligands are crucial for the assembly of BMV SPION VLPs and may enhance the colloidal stability.

  6. The influence of ligand charge and length on the assembly of Brome mosaic virus derived virus-like particles with magnetic core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam A. Mieloch

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Virus-like particles (VLPs have sparked a great interest in the field of nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine. The introduction of superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPIONs as a core, provides potential use of VLPs in the hyperthermia therapy, MRI contrast agents and magnetically-powered delivery agents. Magnetite NPs also provide a significant improvement in terms of VLPs stability. Moreover employing viral structural proteins as self-assembling units has opened a new paths for targeted therapy, drug delivery systems, vaccines design, and many more. In many cases, the self-assembly of a virus strongly depends on electrostatic interactions between positively charged groups of the capsid proteins and negatively charged nucleic acid. This phenomenon imposes the negative net charge as a key requirement for the core nanoparticle. In our experiments, Brome mosaic virus (BMV capsid proteins isolated from infected plants Hordeum vulgare were used. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 with 15 nm in diameter were synthesized by thermal decomposition and functionalized with COOH-PEG-PL polymer or dihexadecylphosphate (DHP in order to provide water solubility and negative charge required for the assembly. Nanoparticles were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS, Zeta Potential, Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID magnetometry. TEM and DLS study were conducted to verify VLPs creation. This study demonstrates that the increase of negative surface charge is not a sufficient factor determining successful assembly. Additional steric interactions provided by longer ligands are crucial for the assembly of BMV SPION VLPs and may enhance the colloidal stability.

  7. Study Modules for Calculus-Based General Physics. [Includes Modules 35-37: Reflection and Refraction; Electric Fields and Potentials from Continuous Charge Distributions; and Maxwell's Predictions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Robert G., Ed.; And Others

    This is part of a series of 42 Calculus Based Physics (CBP) modules totaling about 1,000 pages. The modules include study guides, practice tests, and mastery tests for a full-year individualized course in calculus-based physics based on the Personalized System of Instruction (PSI). The units are not intended to be used without outside materials;…

  8. Shell effect in the mean square charge radii and magnetic moments of bismuth isotopes near N =126

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzakh, A. E.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Molkanov, P. L.; Moroz, F. V.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Panteleev, V. N.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2018-01-01

    Isotope shift relative to 209Bi and hyperfine splitting for Bi,213211 have been measured by in-source laser spectroscopy at the 306.77-nm atomic transition. The pronounced shell effect both in radii and magnetic moments in Bi isotopes at N =126 has been observed. The isotopic trend of magnetic moment for 9 /2- ground states of even-N Bi isotopes has been qualitatively explained by the change in the first-order core-polarization correction. The possible influence of the octupole degree of freedom on the magnetic moment behavior at N >126 has been discussed.

  9. Enhancement of Faraday effect in one-dimensional magneto-optical photonic crystal including a magnetic layer with wavelength dependent off-diagonal elements of dielectric constant tensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inui, Chie; Ozaki, Shinsuke; Kura, Hiroaki; Sato, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    Optical and magneto-optical properties of one-dimensional magneto-optical photonic crystal (1-D MPC) prepared by the sol-gel dip-coating method, including a magnetic defect layer composed of mixture of CoFe 2 O 4 and SiO 2 , are investigated from both the experimental and theoretical standpoints. The resonant transmission of light was observed around 570 nm in the photonic band gap. The Faraday rotation angle θ F showed two maxima at 490 and 640 nm, and the wavelength dependence of θ F above 760 nm was similar to that of the CoFe 2 O 4 +SiO 2 single-layer film. The two maxima of θ F are attributed to the enhanced Faraday rotation of nonmagnetic TiO 2 layers in the cavity structure and that in magnetic CoFe 2 O 4 +SiO 2 layer through the light localization in MPC. The maximum value of θ F due to the magnetic CoFe 2 O 4 +SiO 2 layer in the MPC was 22-times larger than that in the single-layer film. The simulation study of MPC with CoFe 2 O 4 +SiO 2 magnetic defect layer, based on the matrix approach method, showed that the resonant light transmission was accompanied by the localization of electric field, and large enhancement of θ F appeared at different wavelengths so as to agree with the experimental features. This can be explained in terms of the wavelength dependent off-diagonal components of the dielectric constant tensor in addition to the large extinction coefficient in the CoFe 2 O 4 +SiO 2 magnetic defect layer. - Highlights: → 1-D magnetic photonic crystal (MPC) prepared by sol-gel method. → Enhancement of Faraday rotation due to the magnetic defect layer of CoFe 2 O 4 . → Shift of wavelength of Faraday rotation maximum from resonant light transmission.

  10. Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    A magnet pole piece for an NMR imaging magnet is made of a plurality of magnetic wires with one end of each wire held in a non-magnetic spacer, the other ends of the wires being brought to a pinch, and connected to a magnetic core. The wires may be embedded in a synthetic resin and the magnetisation and uniformity thereof can be varied by adjusting the density of the wires at the spacer which forms the pole piece. (author)

  11. Charged BPS vortices and reversal of the magnetic flux in a Maxwell-Higgs type model without the Chern-Simons term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantanhede, Carlisson M. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT/UNESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Casana, Rodolfo; Ferreira Junior, Manoel M. [Universidade Federal do Maranhao (UFMA), MA (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Hora, Eduardo da [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), PB (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Since the seminal works by Abrikosov [1] and Nielsen-Olesen [2] showing the existence of uncharged vortex, such nonperturbative solutions have been a theoretical issue of enduring interest. Already, the electrically charged vortices are obtained only in abelian models endowed with the Chern-Simons term [3,4]. This remains valid even in the context of highly nonlinear models, such as the Born-Infield electrodynamics. In this work, we demonstrated the existence of electrically charged BPS vortices in a Maxwell-Higgs model without the Chern- Simons term but endowed with a CPT-even and parity-odd Lorentz-violating (LV) structure. The LV term belonging to the CPT-even electrodynamics of the Standard Model Extension [5] plays a similar role that of the Chern-Simons term, mixing the electric and magnetic sectors. Besides the LV coefficients provide a very rich set of vortex configurations exhibiting electric's field inversion also are responsible by controlling the characteristic length of the vortex and by the flipping of the magnetic flux. [1] A. Abrikosov, Sov. Phys. JETP 32, 1442 (1957). [2] H. Nielsen, P. Olesen, Nucl. Phys. B 61, 45 (1973). [3] R. Jackiw and E. J. Weinberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 2234 (1990). [4] C.K. Lee, K.M. Lee, H. Min, Phys. Lett. B 252, 79 (1990) [5] D. Colladay and V. A. Kostelecky, Phys. Rev. D 55, 6760 (1997); Phys. Rev. D 58, 116002 (1998). (author)

  12. Charge transport simulations of NaCl in an external magnetic field: the quest for the Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouhat, F.; Bonella, S.; Pierleoni, C.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we set the stage for molecular dynamics studies of the transport properties of molten salts in the presence of external electric and magnetic fields by introducing an original propagator to integrate the equations of motion. Using this algorithm, we compute, within linear response theory, transport properties of molten sodium chloride focusing, in particular, on the conductivity tensor at different intensities of the magnetic field. Finally, in view of full non-equilibrium calculations on the system in which an electric field is also applied, an adapted thermalisation mechanism, which extends to these systems Nosé-Hoover thermostatting, is derived.

  13. Dust-acoustic solitary waves and double layers in a magnetized dusty plasma with nonthermal ions and dust charge variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Taibany, W.F.; Sabry, R.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of nonthermal ions and variable dust charge on small-amplitude nonlinear dust-acoustic (DA) waves is investigated. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive solitons exist and depend on the nonthermal parameter a. Using a reductive perturbation theory, a Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation is derived. At critical value of a, a c , a modified ZK equation with third- and fourth-order nonlinearities, is obtained. Depending on a, the solution of the evolution equation reveals whether there is coexistence of both compressive and rarefactive solitary waves or double layers (DLs) with the possibility of their two kinds. In addition, for certain plasma parameters, the solitary wave disappears and a DL is expected. The variation of dust charge number, wave velocity, and soliton amplitude and its width against system parameters is investigated for the DA solitary waves. It is shown that the incorporation of both the adiabatic dust-charge variation and the nonthermal distributed ions modifies significantly the nature of DA solitary waves and DA DLs. The findings of this investigation may be useful in understanding the ion acceleration mechanisms close to the Moon and also enhances our knowledge on pickup ions around unmagnetized bodies, such as comets, Mars, and Venus

  14. A new type of coil structure called pan-shaped coil of wireless charging system based on magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Z. K.; Liu, Z. Z.; Hou, Y. J.; Zeng, H.; Liang, L. H.; Cui, S.

    2017-11-01

    The problem that misalignment between the transmitting coil and the receiving coil significantly impairs the transmission power and efficiency of the system has been attached more and more attention. In order to improve the uniformity of the magnetic field between the two coils to solve this problem, a new type of coil called pan-shaped coil is proposed. Three-dimension simulation models of the planar-core coil and the pan-shaped coil are established using Ansoft Maxwell software. The coupling coefficient between the transmitting coil and the receiving coil is obtained by simulating the magnetic field with the receiving coil misalignment or not. And the maximum percentage difference strength along the radial direction which is defined as the magnetic field uniformity factor is calculated. According to the simulation results of the two kinds of coil structures, it is found that the new type of coil structure can obviously improve the uniformity of the magnetic field, coupling coefficient and power transmission properties between the transmitting coil and the receiving coil.

  15. The Trajectory Method and the Description of Charged Particles Dynamics in the Current Sheet Magnetic Field Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasunov, Y.; Schwarzbauer, G.; Khodachenko, M. L.; Alexeev, I. I.; Belenkaya, E. S.; Gubchenko, V. M.

    2017-12-01

    The current sheets (CSs) in space plasma appear as fundamental objects which play an important role in structuring and dynamical evolution of the global magnetic environments of astrophysical and space objects. The physical nature of the current sheet consists in specific motion of the current-creating particles which has a strong non-linear character. By this, the self-consistent description of dynamics of the current-creating particles in CS is one of the key challenging tasks of the space plasma physics. The collisionless specifics of the typical space plasma flow, e.g. that of the solar wind (or the Earth magnetosphere), justifies a one-particle approach to the analysis of the dynamics of the current-creating particles in a CS. It consists in consideration of a single particle motion in an inhomogeneous magnetic field, based on the analysis of equation of motion in Cartesian coordinates. By this, particle dynamics, defined by the equation of motion, can be expressed in terms of angular variables (pitch-angle and the gyrating phase), which are specifically connected to each other along the particle trajectory in a local coordinate system related to the magnetic field. The analysis of the angular variables enables finding of easy and comprehensive solutions for a number of elementary problems which constitute the background for more complex natural cases in space physics. This approach also allows obtaining of a set of the self-consistent CS-type solutions for different geometries of the magnetic field.

  16. Coupling of electric charge and magnetic field via electronic phase separation in (La,Pr,Ca)MnO3/Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 multiferroic heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ming; Wang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    The electric-field-tunable non-volatile resistivity and ferromagnetism switching in the (La0.5Pr0.5)0.67Ca0.33MnO3 films grown on (111)-oriented 0.7Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.3PbTiO3 ferroelectric single-crystal substrates have been investigated. By combining the 180° ferroelectric domain switching and in situ X-ray diffraction and resistivity measurements, we identify that this voltage control of order parameters stems from the domain switching-induced accumulation/depletion of charge carriers at the interface rather than induced lattice strain effect. In particular, the polarization-induced charge effect (i.e., ferroelectric field effect) is strongly dependent on the magnetic field. This, together with the charge-modulated magnetoresistance and magnetization, reveals the strong correlation between the electric charge and the magnetic field. Further, we found that this coupling is essentially driven by the electronic phase separation, the relative strength of which could be determined by recording charge-tunability of resistivity [ (Δρ/ρ)c h arg e ] under various magnetic fields. These findings present a potential strategy for elucidating essential physics of perovskite manganites and delivering prototype electronic devices for non-volatile information storage.

  17. Electrically Charged Matter in Permanent Rotation around Magnetized Black Holes: A Toy Model for Self-gravitating Fluid Tori

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trova, Audrey; Karas, Vladimír; Slaný, P.; Kovář, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 226, č. 1 (2016), 12/1-12/16 ISSN 0067-0049 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37086G Grant - others:COST(XE) LD15061; COST(XE) MP1304 Program:LD Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : gravitation * magnetic fields * numerical methods Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 8.955, year: 2016

  18. Longitudinal conductivity and transverse charge redistribution in coupled quantum wells subject to in-plane magnetic fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolorenč, Jindřich; Smrčka, Ludvík; Středa, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 12, - (2002), s. 311-314 ISSN 1386-9477 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/01/0754; GA ČR GA202/01/0764 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : double - layer two-dimensional electron system * magnetotransort * Hall effect Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.107, year: 2002

  19. The time-dependent coupled oscillator model for the motion of a charged particle in the presence of a time-varying magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menouar, Salah; Maamache, Mustapha; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of the time-dependent coupled oscillator model for the motion of a charged particle subjected to a time-dependent external magnetic field is investigated. We use the canonical transformation approach for the classical treatment of the system, whereas the unitary transformation approach is used in managing the system in the framework of quantum mechanics. For both approaches, the original system is transformed into a much more simple system that is the sum of two independent harmonic oscillators with time-dependent frequencies. We therefore easily identify the wavefunctions in the transformed system with the help of an invariant operator of the system. The full wavefunctions in the original system are derived from the inverse unitary transformation of the wavefunctions associated with the transformed system.

  20. Synthesis and magnetic and charge-transport properties of the correlated 4d post-perovskite CaRhO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaura, Kazunari; Shirako, Yuichi; Kojitani, Hiroshi; Arai, Masao; Young, David P; Akaogi, Masaki; Nakashima, Mamoru; Katsumata, Tetsuhiro; Inaguma, Yoshiyuki; Takayama-Muromachi, Eiji

    2009-02-25

    A high-quality polycrystalline sample of the correlated 4d post-perovskite CaRhO(3) (Rh(4+): 4d(5), S(el) = 1/2) was attained under a moderate pressure of 6 GPa. Since the post-perovskite is quenchable at ambient pressure/temperature, it can be a valuable analogue of the post-perovskite MgSiO(3) (stable higher than 120 GPa and unstable at ambient pressure), which is a significant key material in earth science. The sample was subjected for measurements of charge-transport and magnetic properties. The data clearly indicate it goes into an antiferromagnetically ordered state below approximately 90 K in an unusual way, in striking contrast to what was observed for the perovskite phase. The post-perovskite CaRhO(3) offers future opportunities for correlated electrons science as well as earth science.

  1. Effect of minimum strength of mirror magnetic field (Bmin) on production of highly charged heavy ions from RIKEN liquid-He-free super conducting electron-cyclotron resonance ion source (RAMSES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Hideyuki; Imanaka, Masashi; Lee, S.-M.Sang-Moo; Higurashi, Yoshihide; Nakagawa, Takahide; Kidera, Masanori; Kageyama, Tadashi; Kase, Masayuki; Yano, Yasushige; Aihara, Toshimitsu

    2002-01-01

    We measured the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions (O, Ar and Kr ions) as a function of the minimum strength of mirror magnetic field (B min ) of the RIKEN liquid-He-free super conducting electron-cyclotron resonance ion source. In this experiment, we found that the optimum value of B min exists to maximize the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions and the value was almost the same (∼0.49 T) for various charge state heavy ions

  2. The Britannica Guide to Electricity and Magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Gregersen, Erik

    2010-01-01

    From our television sets to the magnets that dot our refrigerators, electricity and magnetism are ever-present in our everyday lives. Even aside from our modern technology, electrical charges can be found throughout nature?the most significant example being Earth's magnetic field. This incisive volume includes extensive discussions of electrical and magnetic fields, as well as biographies of the physicists whose work has led to our greater understanding of them.

  3. On the theory of stationary charged particle ensembles in strongly non-homogeneous azimuthally symmetric magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auluck, S.K.H.

    1982-01-01

    A method of treating problems involving strongly nonadiabatic particle orbits in a magnetic field is described for the case when the system is long-lived on the collisional time scale. A canonical distribution P=Z -1 exp-β(H+Ωpsub(theta)) results from maximization of entropy subject to conservation of the Hamiltonian H and canonical angular momentum psub(theta) for an azimuthally symmetric system. By taking the MIGMA problem as an example, the method of determining the constants β,Ω,Z from the average energy, average angular momentum and the total number of particles is illustrated. Associated physical effects are discussed. (author)

  4. Feeble magnetic fields generated by thermal charge fluctuations in extended metallic conductors: Implications for electric-dipole moment experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamoreaux, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    A simple formulation for calculating the magnetic field external to an extended nonpermeable conducting body due to thermal current fluctuations within the body is developed, and is applied to a recent experimental search for the atomic electric-dipole moment (EDM) of 199 Hg. It is shown that the thermal fluctuation field is only slightly smaller in magnitude than other noise sources in that experiment. The formulation is extended to permeable bodies, and the implications for general EDM experiments are discussed. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  5. Tracking efficiency and charge sharing of 3D silicon sensors at different angles in a 1.4T magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Gjersdal, H; Slaviec, T; Sandaker, H; Tsung, J; Bolle, E; Da Via, C; Wermes, N; Borri, M; Grinstein, S; Nordahl, P; Hugging, F; Dorholt, O; Rohne, O; La Rosa, A; Sjobaek, K; Tsybychev, D; Mastroberardino, A; Fazio, S; Su, D; Young, C; Hasi, J; Grenier, P; Hansson, P; Jackson, P; Kenney, C; Kocian, M

    2011-01-01

    A 3D silicon sensor fabricated at Stanford with electrodes penetrating throughout the entire silicon wafer and with active edges was tested in a 1.4 T magnetic field with a 180 GeV/c pion beam at the CERN SPS in May 2009. The device under test was bump-bonded to the ATLAS pixel FE-I3 readout electronics chip. Three readout electrodes were used to cover the 400 pm long pixel side, this resulting in a p-n inter-electrode distance of similar to 71 mu m. Its behavior was confronted with a planar sensor of the type presently installed in the ATLAS inner tracker. Time over threshold, charge sharing and tracking efficiency data were collected at zero and 15 angles with and without magnetic field. The latest is the angular configuration expected for the modules of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL) currently under study for the LHC phase 1 upgrade expected in 2014. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Control of magnetism by electrical charge doping or redox reactions in a surface-oxidized Co thin film with a solid-state capacitor structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, T.; Koyama, T.; Chiba, D.

    2018-03-01

    We have investigated the electric field (EF) effect on magnetism in a Co thin film with a naturally oxidized surface. The EF was applied to the oxidized Co surface through a gate insulator layer made of HfO2, which was formed using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The efficiency of the EF effect on the magnetic anisotropy in the sample with the HfO2 layer deposited at the appropriate temperature for the ALD process was relatively large compared to the previously reported values with an unoxidized Co film. The coercivity promptly and reversibly followed the variation in gate voltage. The modulation of the channel resistance was at most ˜0.02%. In contrast, a dramatic change in the magnetic properties including the large change in the saturation magnetic moment and a much larger EF-induced modulation of the channel resistance (˜10%) were observed in the sample with a HfO2 layer deposited at a temperature far below the appropriate temperature range. The response of these properties to the gate voltage was very slow, suggesting that a redox reaction dominated the EF effect on the magnetism in this sample. The frequency response for the capacitive properties was examined to discuss the difference in the mechanism of the EF effect observed here.

  7. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  8. (1)H-NMR and charge transport in metallic polypyrrole at ultra-low temperatures and high magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugeshwar Singh, K; Clark, W G; Ramesh, K P; Menon, Reghu

    2008-11-19

    The temperature dependence of conductivity, proton spin relaxation time (T(1)) and magnetoconductance (MC) in metallic polypyrrole (PPy) doped with PF(6)(-) have been carried out at mK temperatures and high magnetic fields. At T50 K-relaxation is due to the dipolar interaction modulated by the reorientation of the symmetric PF(6) groups following the Bloembergen, Purcell and Pound (BPP) model. The data analysis shows that the Korringa ratio is enhanced by an order of magnitude. The positive and negative MC at TmK is due to the contributions from weak localization and Coulomb-correlated hopping transport, respectively. The role of EEI is observed to be consistent in conductivity, T(1) and MC data, especially at T<1 K.

  9. Ferroelectric ferrimagnetic LiFe2F6 : Charge-ordering-mediated magnetoelectricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ling-Fang; Xu, Qiao-Ru; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Liang, Yan-Ping; Dong, Shuai

    2017-12-01

    Trirutile-type LiFe2F6 is a charge-ordered material with an Fe2 +/Fe3 + configuration. Here, its physical properties, including magnetism, electronic structure, phase transition, and charge ordering, are studied theoretically. On one hand, the charge ordering leads to improper ferroelectricity with a large polarization. On the other hand, its magnetic ground state can be tuned from the antiferromagnetic to ferrimagnetic by moderate compressive strain. Thus, LiFe2F6 can be a rare multiferroic with both large magnetization and polarization. Most importantly, since the charge ordering is the common ingredient for both ferroelectricity and magnetization, the net magnetization may be fully switched by flipping the polarization, rendering intrinsically strong magnetoelectric effects and desirable functions.

  10. Magnetic resonance arthrography including ABER view in diagnosing partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff: Accuracy, and inter- and intra-observer agreements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Joon-Yong; Jee, Won-Hee; Chun, Ho Jong; Ahn, Myeong Im (Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea)), e-mail: whjee@catholic.ac.kr; Kim, Yang-Soo (Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea))

    2010-03-15

    Background: Partial-thickness tear of the rotator cuff is a common cause of shoulder pain. Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography has been described as a useful measure to diagnose rotator cuff abnormalities. Purpose: To determine the reliability and accuracy of MR arthrography with abduction and external rotation (ABER) view for the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Material and Methods: Among patients who underwent MR arthrographies, 22 patients (12 men, 10 women; mean age 45 years) who had either partial-thickness tear or normal tendon on arthroscopy were included. MR images were independently scored by two observers for partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Interobserver and intraobserver agreements for detection of partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff were calculated by using kappa coefficients. The differences in areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were assessed with a univariate Z-score test. Differences in sensitivity and specificity for interpretations based on different imaging series were tested for significance using the McNemar statistic. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each reader on MR imaging without ABER view were 83%, 90%, and 86%, and 83%, 80%, and 82%, respectively, whereas on overall interpretation including ABER view, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each reader were 92%, 70%, and 82%, and 92%, 80%, and 86%, respectively. Including ABER view, interobserver agreement for partial-thickness tear increased from kappa=0.55 to kappa=0.68. Likewise, intraobserver agreements increased from kappa=0.79 and 0.53 to kappa=0.81 and 0.70 for each reader, respectively. The areas under the ROC curves for each reader were 0.96 and 0.90, which were not significantly different. Conclusion: Including ABER view in routine sequences of MR arthrography increases the sensitivity, and inter- and intraobserver agreements for detecting partial-thickness tear of rotator cuff

  11. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  12. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  13. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  14. Mechanical design of ISABELLE magnet cryostats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassner, D.

    1977-01-01

    It has been proposed to construct an intersecting storage ring accelerator, ISABELLE, at BNL, consisting of two concentric rings of magnets containing counter-rotating beams of charged particles. Each ring contains 216 dipole magnets and 138 quadrupoles. All magnets are superconducting and operate at a temperature of 4.3 K. A description of the design of the cryostats, including the internal supports, heat shield superinsulation system and the vacuum vessel is given. Details of fabrication techniques are also included

  15. Luminescence and charge trapping in Cs.sub.2./sub.HfCl.sub.6./sub. single crystals: optical and magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Robert; Babin, Vladimir; Mihóková, Eva; Buryi, Maksym; Laguta, Valentyn; Nitsch, Karel; Nikl, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 22 (2017), s. 12375-12382 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409; GA ČR GA17-09933S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Cs2HfCl6 * single crystal * luminescence * temperature dependence * EPR spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 4.536, year: 2016

  16. Basal electric and magnetic fields of celestial bodies come from positive-negative charge separation caused by gravitation of quasi-Casimir pressure in weak interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    falling and till reach the equilibrium of stable spatial charge distribution, which is just the cause of the geomagnetic field and the geo-electric field (the observational value on the earth surface is about 120 V/m downward equivalent to 500000 Coulomb negative charges in the earth surface). All celestial bodies are gravitation sources and attract the molecules and ions in space to its circumference by the gravitation of own and other celestial bodies, e.g., all planets in the solar system have their own atmospheres. Therefore, the origin mechanism of geo-electric and geomagnetic fields caused by gravitation is very universal, at least it is appli-cable to all the planets in the solar system. For planets, the joint result of the gravitations of the planets and the sun makes the negative charges and dipolar charges distributed in the surfaces of the celestial bodies. The quicker the rotation is, the larger the angular momentum U is, then larger the accompanying current and magnetic moment P, it accord a experiential law found by subsistent observational data of all celestial bodies in solar system: P = -G 1/2 U cos θ / c (1), θ is the angle between the net ν 0 flux direction (mark by CMB) and the rotational axis of celestial body (Chen Shao-Guang, Chinese Science Bulletin, 26,233,1981). Uranian and Neptunian P predicted with Eq.(1) in 1981 are about -3.4•1028 Gs•cm3 and 1.9•1028 Gs•cm3 respectively (use new rotate speed measured by Voyager 2). The P measured by Voyager 2 in 1986 and 1989 are about -1.9 •1028 Gs•cm3 and 1.5•1028 Gs•cm3 respectively (the contribution of quadrupole P is converted into the contribution of dipole P alone). The neutron star pos-sesses much high density and rotational speed because of the conservation of the mass and the angular momentum during the course of the formation, then has strong gravity and largerU. From Eq.(1) there is a larger P and extremely strong surface magnetic field in neutron star. The origin mechanism of

  17. Linear shaped charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, David; Stofleth, Jerome H.; Saul, Venner W.

    2017-07-11

    Linear shaped charges are described herein. In a general embodiment, the linear shaped charge has an explosive with an elongated arrowhead-shaped profile. The linear shaped charge also has and an elongated v-shaped liner that is inset into a recess of the explosive. Another linear shaped charge includes an explosive that is shaped as a star-shaped prism. Liners are inset into crevices of the explosive, where the explosive acts as a tamper.

  18. Reducing loss in lateral charged-particle equilibrium due to air cavities present in x-ray irradiated media by using longitudinal magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, Shahid A.; Li, X. Allen; Ramahi, Shada W.; Chu, James C.; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2001-01-01

    The underdosing of lesions distal to air cavities, such as those found in upper respiratory passages, occurs due to the loss in lateral charged-particle equilibrium (CPE). The degree of underdosing worsens for smaller field sizes, resulting in more frequent recurrence of the cancer treated. Higher photon energies further aggravate the outcome by producing longer second build-up regions beyond the cavity. Besides underdosing, the larger lateral spread of secondary electron fluence in the air cavity produces diffuse dose distributions at the tissue-air interface for shaped or intensity modulated fields. These disequilibrium effects create undesirable deviations from the intended treatment. The clinical concern is further intensified by the failure of traditional treatment planning systems to even account for such defects. In this work, the use of longitudinal magnetic fields on the order of 0.5 T is proposed for alleviating lateral electronic disequilibrium due to the presence of air cavities in the irradiated volume. The magnetic field enforces lateral CPE by restricting the lateral range of electrons in the air cavity. The problem is studied in a simple water-air-water slab geometry using EGS4 Monte Carlo simulations for 6 MV photons. Electronic disequilibrium is evaluated for beams of various sizes, shapes and intensity distributions constructed by linear superposition of the dose distributions for 0.5x0.5 cm 2 beamlets. Comparison is also made with 60 Co irradiation. The results indicate that the lateral confinement of secondary electrons in the air cavity by sub-MRI strength longitudinal fields is effective in reducing deterioration of dose distributions near tissue-air interfaces. This can potentially reduce recurrence rates of cancers such as the larynx carcinoma

  19. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  20. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  3. Probing electronic phase transitions with phonons via inelastic neutron scattering: superconductivity in borocarbides, charge and magnetic order in manganites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, F.

    2007-01-01

    wave vector of the short-range charge and orbital order present above T C . In an neutron powder diffraction measurement at the Hahn-Meitner Institut in Berlin, we investigated the temperature dependence of the anisotropic Debye-Waller factors of the oxygen atoms in La 0.7 Sr 0.3 MnO 3 . According to the present point of view, the sudden increase of the Debye-Waller factors at T C should be proportional to the strength of the colossal magnetoresistance effect. However, we found experimental values for La 0.7 Sr 0.3 MnO 3 , which are in close vicinity or even bigger than values of compounds with a much stronger magnetoresistance effect. (orig.)

  4. Probing electronic phase transitions with phonons via inelastic neutron scattering: superconductivity in borocarbides, charge and magnetic order in manganites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, F.

    2007-11-02

    the intrinsic phonon linewidth near the order wave vector of the short-range charge and orbital order present above T{sub C}. In an neutron powder diffraction measurement at the Hahn-Meitner Institut in Berlin, we investigated the temperature dependence of the anisotropic Debye-Waller factors of the oxygen atoms in La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}. According to the present point of view, the sudden increase of the Debye-Waller factors at T{sub C} should be proportional to the strength of the colossal magnetoresistance effect. However, we found experimental values for La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}, which are in close vicinity or even bigger than values of compounds with a much stronger magnetoresistance effect. (orig.)

  5. submitter Simulation of a quench event in the upgraded High-Luminosity LHC Main dipole circuit including the 11 T Nb$_{3}$Sn dipole magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez Navarro, Alejandro Manuel; Verweij, Arjan P; Bortot, Lorenzo; Mentink, Matthias; Prioli, Marco; Auchmann, Bernhard; Izquierdo Bermudez, Susana; Ravaioli, Emmanuele; Yammine, Samer

    2018-01-01

    To achieve the goal of increased luminosity, two out of eight main dipole circuits of the accelerator will be reconfigured in the coming LHC upgrade by replacing one standard 14.3-m long, Nb-Ti-based, 8.3 T dipole magnet by two 5.3-m long, Nb$_{3}$Sn-based, 11.2 T magnets (MBH). The modified dipole circuits will contain 153 Nb-Ti magnets and two MBH magnets. The latter will be connected to an additional trim power converter to compensate for the differences in the magnetic transfer functions. These modifications imply a number of challenges from the point of view of the circuit integrity, operation, and quench protection. In order to assess the circuit performance under different scenarios and to validate the circuit quench protection strategy, reliable and accurate numerical transient simulations have to be performed. We present the field/circuit coupling simulation of the reconfigured main dipole magnet chain following the introduction of the MBH magnets. 2-D distributed LEDET models of the MBH's have been ...

  6. Organic and molecular magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blundell, S J; Pratt, F L

    2004-01-01

    Historically most materials in magnetic applications are based on inorganic materials. Recently, however, organic and molecular materials have begun to show increasing promise. Purely organic ferromagnets, based upon nitronyl nitroxide radicals, show long range magnetic order at very low temperatures in the region of 1 K, while sulfur based radicals show weak ferromagnetism at temperatures up to 36 K. It is also possible to prepare molecule based magnets in which transition metal ions are used to provide the magnetic moment, but organic groups mediate the interactions. This strategy has produced magnetic materials with a large variety of structures, including chains, layered systems and three-dimensional networks, some of which show ordering at room temperature and some of which have very high coercivity. Even if long range magnetic order is not achieved, the spin crossover effect may be observed, which has important applications. Further magnetic materials may be obtained by constructing charge transfer salts, which can produce metallic molecular magnets. Another development is single-molecule magnets, formed by preparing small magnetic clusters. These materials can show macroscopic quantum tunnelling of the magnetization and may have uses as memory devices or in quantum computation applications. (topical review)

  7. Comparison of different magnetic resonance cholangiography techniques in living liver donors including Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Kinner

    Full Text Available Preoperative evaluation of potential living liver donors (PLLDs includes the assessment of the biliary anatomy to avoid postoperative complications. Aim of this study was to compare T2-weighted (T2w and Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted (T1w magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC techniques in the evaluation of PLLDs.30 PLLDs underwent MRC on a 1.5 T Magnetom Avanto (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany using (A 2D T2w HASTE (Half Fourier Acquisition Single Shot Turbo Spin Echo fat saturated (fs in axial plane, (B 2D T2w HASTE fs thick slices in coronal plane, (C free breathing 3D T2w TSE (turbo spin echo RESTORE (high-resolution navigator corrected plus (D maximum intensity projections (MIPs, (E T2w SPACE (sampling perfection with application optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolutions plus (F MIPs and (G T2w TSE BLADE as well as Gd-EOB-DTPA T1w images without (G and with (H inversion recovery. Contrast enhanced CT cholangiography served as reference imaging modality. Two independent reviewers evaluated the biliary tract anatomy on a 5-point scale subjectively and objectively. Data sets were compared using a Mann-Whitney-U-test. Kappa values were also calculated.Source images and maximum intensity projections of 3D T2w TSE sequences (RESTORE and SPACE proved to be best for subjective and objective evaluation directly followed by 2D HASTE sequences. Interobserver variabilities were good to excellent (k = 0.622-0.804.3D T2w sequences are essential for preoperative biliary tract evaluation in potential living liver donors. Furthermore, our results underline the value of different MRCP sequence types for the evaluation of the biliary anatomy in PLLDs including Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced T1w MRC.

  8. Dye-Sensitized Molecular Charge Transfer Complexes: Magnetic and Conduction Properties in the Photoexcited States of Ni(dmit2 Salts Containing Photosensitive Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoma Yamamoto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Photosensitive dyes often induce charge transfer (CT between adjacent chemical species and themselves under irradiation of appropriate wavelengths. Because of the reversibility and selectivity of such CT, it is considered to be interesting to utilize such dyes as optically controllable trigger components for conduction and magnetism in the photoexcited states of organic materials. Based on this idea, such a type of new salts, i.e., γ- and δ-DiCC[Ni(dmit2] in addition to DiCC2[Ni(dmit2]3 have been prepared, characterized and their physical and structural properties have been examined both under dark and irradiated conditions (dmit2− = 1,3-dithiole-2-thione-4,5-dithiolate, DiCC+ = 3,3′-Dihexyloxacarbocyanine monocation. Among them, under UV (254–450 nm irradiation, δ-DiCC[Ni(dmit2] exhibited photoconductivity being six times as high as its dark conductivity at room temperature. The electron spin resonance (ESR spectra have demonstrated that there are photoexcited spins on both DiCC and [Ni(dmit2] species as a result of the CT transition between them, serving as localized spins (DiCC and carriers ([Ni(dmit2], respectively. The results obtained in this work have indicated that the strategy mentioned above is effective in developing organic photoresponsive semiconductors with paramagnetism.

  9. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  10. Magnetic and electrical studies on La{sub 0.4}Sm{sub 0.1}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} charge ordered manganite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krichene, A., E-mail: akramkri@hotmail.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Université de Sfax, B. P. 1171, 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Solanki, P.S. [Department of Physics, Saurashtra University, Rajkot 360005 (India); Venkateshwarlu, D. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452017 (India); Rayaprol, S. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Mumbai Centre, B.A.R.C. Campus, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ganesan, V. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452017 (India); Boujelben, W. [Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Université de Sfax, B. P. 1171, 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Kuberkar, D.G. [Department of Physics, Saurashtra University, Rajkot 360005 (India)

    2015-05-01

    We have reported in this work the effect of the partial substitution of lanthanum by samarium on the structural, electrical and magnetic properties of La{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3}. The magnetic study indicated that substitution promotes charge ordering and weakens ferromagnetism. Below T{sub C}=123 K, the compound La{sub 0.4}Sm{sub 0.1}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} is a mixture of ferromagnetic and charge ordered antiferromagnetic domains. Between T{sub C} and T{sub CO}=215 K, the structure is paramagnetic with the presence of antiferromagnetic domains. The fractions of the coexisting magnetic phases are highly dependent on the applied magnetic field value. Resistivity measurements reveal the presence of an insulating-metal transition at T{sub ρ}=123 K. The equality between T{sub C} and T{sub ρ} indicates the presence of a correlation between magnetization and resistivity. For only 1 T applied field, we have reported a colossal value of magnetoresistance reaching 73% around T{sub C}. The origin of this high value is attributed to phase separation phenomenon. - Highlights: • Sm doping enhances charge ordering and weakens ferromagnetism in La{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3.} • Colossal magnetoresistance (73%) is recorded at 123 K for only 1 T applied field. • Phase separation is responsible for the magnetic and the magnetoresistive behavior.

  11. Challenges to the chiral magnetic wave using charge-dependent azimuthal anisotropies in pPb and PbPb collisions at $ \\sqrt{\\smash[b]{s_{_{\\mathrm{NN}}}}} = $ 5.02 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirunyan, Albert M; et al.

    2017-08-29

    Charge-dependent anisotropy Fourier coefficients ($v_n$) of particle azimuthal distributions are measured in pPb and PbPb collisions at $ \\sqrt{\\smash[b]{s_{_{\\mathrm{NN}}}}} = $ 5.02 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The normalized difference in the second-order anisotropy coefficients ($v_2$) between positively and negatively charged particles is found to depend linearly on the observed event charge asymmetry with comparable slopes for both pPb and PbPb collisions over a wide range of charged particle multiplicity. In PbPb, the third-order anisotropy coefficient, $v_3$, shows a similar linear dependence with the same slope as seen for $v_2$. The observed similarities between the $v_2$ slopes for pPb and PbPb, as well as the similar slopes for $v_2$ and $v_3$ in PbPb, are compatible with expectations based on local charge conservation in the decay of clusters or resonances, and constitute a challenge to the hypothesis that the observed charge asymmetry dependence of $v_2$ in heavy ion collisions arises from a chiral magnetic wave.

  12. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  13. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    MAGNET During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bough...

  14. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

    The magnet is fully stopped and at room temperature. The maintenance works and consolidation activities on the magnet sub-systems are progressing. To consolidate the cryogenic installation, two redundant helium compressors will be installed as ‘hot spares’, to avoid the risk of a magnet downtime in case of a major failure of a compressor unit during operation. The screw compressors, their motors, the mechanical couplings and the concrete blocks are already available and stored at P5. The metallic structure used to access the existing compressors in SH5 will be modified to allow the installation of the two redundant ones. The plan is to finish the installation and commissioning of the hot spare compressors before the summer 2014. In the meantime, a bypass on the high-pressure helium piping will be installed for the connection of a helium drier unit later during the Long Shutdown 1, keeping this installation out of the schedule critical path. A proposal is now being prepared for the con...

  15. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  16. Circuit for Full Charging of Series Lithium-Ion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, William E.; Saunders, David L.

    2007-01-01

    An advanced charger has been proposed for a battery that comprises several lithium-ion cells in series. The proposal is directed toward charging the cells in as nearly an optimum manner as possible despite unit-to-unit differences among the nominally identical cells. The particular aspect of the charging problem that motivated the proposal can be summarized as follows: During bulk charging (charging all the cells in series at the same current), the voltages of individual cells increase at different rates. Once one of the cells reaches full charge, bulk charging must be stopped, leaving other cells less than fully charged. To make it possible to bring all cells up to full charge once bulk charging has been completed, the proposed charger would include a number of top-off chargers one for each cell. The top-off chargers would all be powered from the same DC source, but their outputs would be DC-isolated from each other and AC-coupled to their respective cells by means of transformers, as described below. Each top-off charger would include a flyback transformer, an electronic switch, and an output diode. For suppression of undesired electromagnetic emissions, each top-off charger would also include (1) a resistor and capacitor configured to act as a snubber and (2) an inductor and capacitor configured as a filter. The magnetic characteristics of the flyback transformer and the duration of its output pulses determine the energy delivered to the lithium-ion cell. It would be necessary to equip the cell with a precise voltage monitor to determine when the cell reaches full charge. In response to a full-charge reading by this voltage monitor, the electronic switch would be held in the off state. Other cells would continue to be charged similarly by their top-off chargers until their voltage monitors read full charge.

  17. Dynamics of charges and solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Manuel; Ferrández, Ángel; Garay, Óscar J.

    2018-02-01

    We first show that trajectories traced by charges moving in rotational magnetic fields are, basically, the non-parallel geodesics of surfaces of revolution with coincident axis. Thus, people living in a surface of revolution are not able to sense the magnetic Hall effect induced by the surrounding magnetic field and perceive charges as influenced, exclusively, by the gravity action on the surface of revolution. Secondly, the extended Hasimoto transformations are introduced and then used to identify trajectories of charges moving through a Killing rotational magnetic field in terms of non-circular elastic curves. As a consequence, we see that in this case charges evolve along trajectories which are obtained as extended Hasimoto transforms of solitons of the filament equation.

  18. Possible coexistence of double-Q magnetic order and chequerboard charge order in the re-entrant tetragonal phase of Ba0.76K0.24Fe2As2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jianqiang; Cho, Chang-woo; Shen, Junying; Tam, Pok Man; Kao, I.-Hsuan; Lee, Mang Hei Gordon; Adelmann, Peter; Wolf, Thomas; Lortz, Rolf

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the re-entrant tetragonal phase in the iron-based superconductor Ba0 .76K0.24Fe2As2 by DC magnetization and thermoelectrical measurements. The reversible magnetization confirms by a thermodynamic method that the spin alignment in the re-entrant C4 phase is out-of-plane, in agreement with an itinerant double-Q magnetic order [Allred et al., Nat. Phys. 12, 493 (2016)]. The Nernst coefficient shows the typical unusually large negative value in the stripe-type spin density wave (SDW) state owing to the Fermi surface reconstruction associated with SDW and nematic order. At the transition into the re-entrant C4 tetragonal phase it hardly changes, which could indicate that instead of a complete vanishing of the associated charge order, the spin reorientation could trigger a redistribution of the charges to form a secondary charge order, e.g. in form of a chequerboard-like pattern that no longer breaks the rotational C4 symmetry.

  19. Estimation of torque on mechanical heart valves due to magnetic resonance imaging including an estimation of the significance of the Lenz effect using a computational model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Neil M. [44 Ardgowan Street, Greenock PA16 8EL (United Kingdom). E-mail: neil.robertson at physics.org; Diaz-Gomez, Manuel [Plaza Alcalde Horacio Hermoso, 2, 3-A 41013 Seville (Spain). E-mail: manolo-diaz at latinmail.com; Condon, Barrie [Department of Clinical Physics, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow G51 4TF (United Kingdom). E-mail: barrie.condon at udcf.gla.ac.uk

    2000-12-01

    Mitral and aortic valve replacement is a procedure which is common in cardiac surgery. Some of these replacement valves are mechanical and contain moving metal parts. Should the patient in whom such a valve has been implanted be involved in magnetic resonance imaging, there is a possible dangerous interaction between the moving metal parts and the static magnetic field due to the Lenz effect. Mathematical models of two relatively common forms of single-leaflet valves have been derived and the magnitude of the torque which opposes the motion of the valve leaflet has been calculated for a valve disc of solid metal. In addition, a differential model of a ring-strengthener valve type has been considered to determine the likely significance of the Lenz effect in the context of the human heart. For common magnetic field strengths at present, i.e. 1 to 2 T, the effect is not particularly significant. However, there is a marked increase in back pressure as static magnetic field strength increases. There are concerns that, since field strengths in the range 3 to 4 T are increasingly being used, the Lenz effect could become significant. At 5 to 10 T the malfunction of the mechanical heart valve could cause the heart to behave as though it is diseased. For unhealthy or old patients this could possibly prove fatal. (author)

  20. 12 CFR 226.4 - Finance charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finance charge. 226.4 Section 226.4 Banks and... LENDING (REGULATION Z) General § 226.4 Finance charge. (a) Definition. The finance charge is the cost of...) Charges by third parties. The finance charge includes fees and amounts charged by someone other than the...

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The magnet subsystems resumed operation early this spring. The vacuum pumping was restarted mid March, and the cryogenic power plant was restarted on March 30th. Three and a half weeks later, the magnet was at 4.5 K. The vacuum pumping system is performing well. One of the newly installed vacuum gauges had to be replaced at the end of the cool-down phase, as the values indicated were not coherent with the other pressure measurements. The correction had to be implemented quickly to be sure no helium leak could be at the origin of this anomaly. The pressure measurements have been stable and coherent since the change. The cryogenics worked well, and the cool-down went quite smoothly, without any particular difficulty. The automated start of the turbines had to be fine-tuned to get a smooth transition, as it was observed that the cooling power delivered by the turbines was slightly higher than needed, causing the cold box to stop automatically. This had no consequence as the cold box safety system acts to keep ...

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bought. Th...

  3. Space-Charge Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Chauvin, N.

    2013-12-16

    First, this chapter introduces the expressions for the electric and magnetic space-charge internal fields and forces induced by high-intensity beams. Then, the root-mean-square equation with space charge is derived and discussed. In the third section, the one-dimensional Child-Langmuir law, which gives the maximum current density that can be extracted from an ion source, is exposed. Space-charge compensation can occur in the low-energy beam transport lines (located after the ion source). This phenomenon, which counteracts the spacecharge defocusing effect, is explained and its main parameters are presented. The fifth section presents an overview of the principal methods to perform beam dynamics numerical simulations. An example of a particles-in-cells code, SolMaxP, which takes into account space-charge compensation, is given. Finally, beam dynamics simulation results obtained with this code in the case of the IFMIF injector are presented.

  4. Fractional charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saminadayar, L.

    2001-01-01

    20 years ago fractional charges were imagined to explain values of conductivity in some materials. Recent experiments have proved the existence of charges whose value is the third of the electron charge. This article presents the experimental facts that have led theorists to predict the existence of fractional charges from the motion of quasi-particles in a linear chain of poly-acetylene to the quantum Hall effect. According to the latest theories, fractional charges are neither bosons nor fermions but anyons, they are submitted to an exclusive principle that is less stringent than that for fermions. (A.C.)

  5. Signatures of electron-magnon interaction in charge and spin currents through magnetic tunnel junctions: A nonequilibrium many-body perturbation theory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouzi, Farzad; Nikolić, Branislav K.

    2014-07-01

    We develop a numerically exact scheme for resumming certain classes of Feynman diagrams in the self-consistent perturbative expansion for the electron and magnon self-energies in the nonequilibrium Green function formalism applied to a coupled electron-magnon (e-m) system driven out of equilibrium by the applied finite bias voltage. Our scheme operates with the electronic and magnonic GFs and the corresponding self-energies viewed as matrices in the Keldysh space, rather than conventionally extracting their retarded and lesser components, which greatly simplifies translation of diagrams into compact mathematical expressions and their computational implementation. This is employed to understand the effect of inelastic e-m scattering on charge and spin current vs bias voltage Vb in F/I/F (F-ferromagnet; I-insulating barrier) magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), which are modeled on a quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) tight-binding lattice for the electronic subsystem and quasi-1D Heisenberg model for the magnonic subsystem. For this purpose, we evaluate the Fock diagram for the electronic self-energy and the electron-hole polarization bubble diagram for the magnonic self-energy. The respective electronic and magnonic GF lines within these diagrams are the fully interacting ones, thereby requiring to solve the ensuing coupled system of nonlinear integral equations self-consistently. Despite using the quasi-1D model and treating e-m interaction in many-body fashion only within a small active region consisting of few lattice sites around the F/I interface, our analysis captures essential features of the so-called zero-bias anomaly observed [V. Drewello, J. Schmalhorst, A. Thomas, and G. Reiss, Phys. Rev. B 77, 014440 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevB.77.014440] in both MgO- and AlOx-based realistic 3D MTJs where the second derivative d2I /dVb2 (i.e., inelastic electron tunneling spectrum) of charge current exhibits sharp peaks of opposite sign on either side Vb=0. We show that this

  6. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    The first phase of the commissioning ended in August by a triggered fast dump at 3T. All parameters were nominal, and the temperature recovery down to 4.5K was carried out in two days by the cryogenics. In September, series of ramps were achieved up to 3 and finally 3.8T, while checking thoroughly the detectors in the forward region, measuring any movement of and around the HF. After the incident of the LHC accelerator on September 19th, corrective actions could be undertaken in the forward region. When all these displacements were fully characterized and repetitive, with no sign of increments in displacement at each field ramp, it was possible to start the CRAFT, Cosmic Run at Four Tesla (which was in fact at 3.8T). The magnet was ramped up to 18.16kA and the 3 week run went smoothly, with only 4 interruptions: due to the VIP visits on 21st October during the LHC inauguration day; a water leak on the cooling demineralized water circuit, about 1 l/min, that triggered a stop of the cooling pumps, and resulte...

  7. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The cooling down to the nominal temperature of 4.5 K was achieved at the beginning of August, in conjunction with the completion of the installation work of the connection between the power lines and the coil current leads. The temperature gradient on the first exchanger of the cold box is now kept within the nominal range. A leak of lubricant on a gasket of the helium compressor station installed at the surface was observed and several corrective actions were necessary to bring the situation back to normal. The compressor had to be refilled with lubricant and a regeneration of the filters and adsorbers was necessary. The coil cool down was resumed successfully, and the cryogenics is running since then with all parameters being nominal. Preliminary tests of the 20kA coil power supply were done earlier at full current through the discharge lines into the dump resistors, and with the powering busbars from USC5 to UXC5 without the magnet connected. On Monday evening August 25th, at 8pm, the final commissionin...

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance work and consolidation activities on the magnet cryogenics and its power distribution are progressing according to the schedules. The manufacturing of the two new helium compressor frame units has started. The frame units support the valves, all the sensors and the compressors with their motors. This activity is subcontracted. The final installation and the commissioning at CERN are scheduled for March–April 2014. The overhauls of existing cryogenics equipment (compressors, motors) are in progress. The reassembly of the components shall start in early 2014. The helium drier, to be installed on the high-pressure helium piping, has been ordered and will be delivered in the first trimester of 2014. The power distribution for the helium compressors in SH5 on the 3.3kV network is progressing. The 3.3kV switches, between each compressor and its hot spare compressor, are being installed, together with the power cables for the new compressors. The 3.3kV electrical switchboards in SE5 will ...

  9. Magnetic and charge ordering properties of Bi0.6−xEuxCa0.4MnO3 (0.0≤x≤0.6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Kamlesh; Singh, M.P.; Razavi, F.S.; Varma, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    We have studied structure, magnetic and transport properties of polycrystalline Bi 0.6−x Eu x Ca 0.4 MnO 3 (x=0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6) perovskite manganites. Magnetic measurements show that the charge-ordering temperature (T CO ) decreases with increasing x up to x=0.4 and then slightly increases with further increasing x up to x=0.6. Further, the antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering temperature (T N ) decreases with increasing x. At T N a transition to metamagnetic glass like state is also seen. Eu doping also leads to enhancement in the magnetic moment and a concomitant decrease in resistivity up to x=0.2 and then an increase in resistivity up to x=0.5. We propose that the local lattice distortion induced by the size mismatch between the A-site cations and 6s 2 character of Bi 3+ lone pair electron are responsible for the observed variation in physical properties. - Highlights: ► We have studied structure, magnetic and transport properties of Bi 0.6−x Eu x Ca 0.4 MnO 3 (0.0≤x≤0.6). ► Substitution of Eu at Bi-site induces a strong interplay between the magnetic and charge-ordering properties. ► T CO decreases with increasing x up to x=0.4 and then slightly increases with further increasing x up to x=0.6. ► The antiferromagnetic ordering temperature (T N ) decreases with increasing x. ► The A-site cations size mismatch and 6s 2 character of Bi 3+ lone pair electron explain variation in physical properties.

  10. Report on the second consultants' meeting of nuclear reaction data centers Kiev, USSR, 11-16 April 1977. Including the thirteenth four-center meeting and the third meeting on charged particle nuclear data compilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1977-10-01

    This second ''NRDC meeting'' combined the 13th ''four centers meeting'' (consultants' meeting of the four neutron nuclear data centers) with the third ''CPND meeting'' (consultants' meeting on charged particle nuclear data compilation). In Part I of the meeting, the neutron data centers held a special session on neutron data matters, in particular on the jointly operated neutron data index CINDA, whereas all items of more general interest, in particular the data exchange system EXFOR, were treated in Part II of the meeting

  11. Charge gradient microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelofs, Andreas; Hong, Seungbum

    2018-02-06

    A method for rapid imaging of a material specimen includes positioning a tip to contact the material specimen, and applying a force to a surface of the material specimen via the tip. In addition, the method includes moving the tip across the surface of the material specimen while removing electrical charge therefrom, generating a signal produced by contact between the tip and the surface, and detecting, based on the data, the removed electrical charge induced through the tip during movement of the tip across the surface. The method further includes measuring the detected electrical charge.

  12. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. III. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaya, S; Maeda, H; Funaki, M; Fukui, H

    2008-12-14

    The relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors in hydrogen halides is performed using the second-order regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component (SORA-NESC) method with the inclusion of the perturbation terms from the metric operator. This computational scheme is denoted as SORA-Met. The SORA-Met calculation yields anisotropies, Delta sigma = sigma(parallel) - sigma(perpendicular), for the halogen nuclei in hydrogen halides that are too small. In the NESC theory, the small component of the spinor is combined to the large component via the operator sigma x piU/2c, in which pi = p + A, U is a nonunitary transformation operator, and c approximately = 137.036 a.u. is the velocity of light. The operator U depends on the vector potential A (i.e., the magnetic perturbations in the system) with the leading order c(-2) and the magnetic perturbation terms of U contribute to the Hamiltonian and metric operators of the system in the leading order c(-4). It is shown that the small Delta sigma for halogen nuclei found in our previous studies is related to the neglect of the U(0,1) perturbation operator of U, which is independent of the external magnetic field and of the first order with respect to the nuclear magnetic dipole moment. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model is also discussed.

  13. Charge ordering in a parent compound of iron-based superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wei-Guo

    Charge order in a parent undoped magnetic metal is rare, in contrast with many other well-known charge-ordered systems such as doped cuprates, doped manganites, intrinsically mixed-valent magnetite, nonmagnetic transition-metal dichalcogenides, insulating RNiO3, etc. Here we present a unique bi-stripy charge order in metallic FeTe, based on the spin-fermion model that provides a unified picture for magnetic correlations in iron-based superconductors (FeSCs) and its extension to include intersite Coulomb interaction Vij. The charge order has unusually the same-usually half-period as the spin order, in agreement with recent STM/STS measurements on stoichiometric FeTe films. The results suggest that FeSCs belong to the intermediate regime of JH (Hund's rule coupling) versus U (Hubbard interaction) where Vij-driven charge fluctuations, so far much neglected, are essential.

  14. Charge preamplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaminade, R.; Passerieux, J.P.

    1961-01-01

    We describe a charge preamplifier having the following properties: - large open loop gain giving both stable gain and large input charge transfer; - stable input grid current with aging and without any adjustment; - fairly fast rise; - nearly optimum noise performance; - industrial material. (authors)

  15. Characterization of the Embryogenic Tissue of the Norway Spruce Including a Transition Layer between the Tissue and the Culture Medium by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kořínek, R.; Mikulka, J.; Hřib, J.; Hudec, J.; Havel, L.; Bartušek, K.

    2017-02-01

    The paper describes the visualization of the cells (ESEs) and mucilage (ECMSN) in an embryogenic tissue via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) relaxometry measurement combined with the subsequent multi-parametric segmentation. The computed relaxometry maps T1 and T2 show a thin layer (transition layer) between the culture medium and the embryogenic tissue. The ESEs, mucilage, and transition layer differ in their relaxation times T1 and T2; thus, these times can be used to characterize the individual parts within the embryogenic tissue. The observed mean values of the relaxation times T1 and T2 of the ESEs, mucilage, and transition layer are as follows: 1469 ± 324 and 53 ± 10 ms, 1784 ± 124 and 74 ± 8 ms, 929 ± 164 and 32 ± 4.7 ms, respectively. The multi-parametric segmentation exploiting the T1 and T2 relaxation times as a classifier shows the distribution of the ESEs and mucilage within the embryogenic tissue. The discussed T1 and T2 indicators can be utilized to characterize both the growth-related changes in an embryogenic tissue and the effect of biotic/abiotic stresses, thus potentially becoming a distinctive indicator of the state of any examined embryogenic tissue.

  16. Water Quality Protection Charges

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — The Water Quality Protection Charge (WQPC) is a line item on your property tax bill. WQPC funds many of the County's clean water initiatives including: • Restoration...

  17. DART: a simulation code for charged particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.C.; Barr, W.L.; Moir, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a recently modified verion of the 2-D DART code designed to simulate the behavior of a beam of charged particles whose paths are affected by electric and magnetic fields. This code was originally used to design laboratory-scale and full-scale beam direct converters. Since then, its utility has been expanded to allow more general applications. The simulation technique includes space charge, secondary electron effects, and neutral gas ionization. Calculations of electrode placement and energy conversion efficiency are described. Basic operation procedures are given including sample input files and output. 7 refs., 18 figs

  18. Method and apparatus for charged particle propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1996-11-26

    A method and apparatus are provided for propagating charged particles from a vacuum to a higher pressure region. A generator includes an evacuated chamber having a gun for discharging a beam of charged particles such as an electron beam or ion beam. The beam is discharged through a beam exit in the chamber into a higher pressure region. A plasma interface is disposed at the beam exit and includes a plasma channel for bounding a plasma maintainable between a cathode and an anode disposed at opposite ends thereof. The plasma channel is coaxially aligned with the beam exit for propagating the beam from the chamber, through the plasma, and into the higher pressure region. The plasma is effective for pumping down the beam exit for preventing pressure increase in the chamber and provides magnetic focusing of the beam discharged into the higher pressure region 24. 7 figs.

  19. Dispersion relation for space-charge waves in a warm plasma-filled elliptical waveguide in an infinite axial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli-Arani, A.; Safari, S.

    2015-04-01

    A perfectly conducting elliptical cylinder filled with a warm plasma and immersed in an infinite axial magnetic field is considered. Using Maxwell's equations and dielectric tensor, a Mathieu differential equation for axial component of electric field is obtained. Considering the boundary conditions, dispersion relation for waves in a plasma of warm electrons and immobile ions, which fills an elliptical waveguide and it is under the action of infinite axial magnetic field are calculated. Furthermore, dispersion relation and scalar potential in the quasi-static approximation in a cold magnetized plasma elliptical waveguide is calculated. The obtained results are graphically presented.

  20. Formation of space-charge bunches in a multivelocity-electron-beam-based microwave oscillator with a cathode unshielded from the magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinin, Yu. A.; Starodubov, A. V.; Fokin, A. S., E-mail: alexander1989fokin@mail.ru [Saratov State University (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The influence of the magnitude and configuration of the magnetic field on the parameters of electron bunches formed in a multivelocity electron beam is analyzed. It is shown that the use of a cathode unshielded from the magnetic field and a nonuniform magnetic field increasing along the drift space enables the formation of compact electron bunches. The ratio between the current density in such bunches and the beam current density at the entrance to the drift space reaches 10{sup 6}, which results in a substantial broadening of the output microwave spectrum due to an increase in the amplitudes of the higher harmonics of the fundamental frequency.

  1. Charge imbalance: its relaxation, diffusion and oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pethick, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    In this article, the authors use a model for charge density based on two charge components: the normal quasiparticle component and the superfluid/condensate component. Based on the quasiparticle Boltzmann equation, this two-component model, when used in nonequilibrium contexts, is fruitful in describing a variety of charge-imbalance phenomena in superconductors. The authors discuss various methods of generating charge-imbalances, charge-imbalance relaxation processes (such as phonons, impurity scattering and magnetic impurities) and applications of the two-component model of charge imbalance to spatially inhomogeneous conditions

  2. The universal relation between thermopower and magnetic susceptibility for a charge ordered manganite: Bi1-xSrxMnO3 (0.5≤x≤0.8)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Hoon; Kim, Jun Sung; Park, Tae Hoi; Park, Seung Joo; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Bog G; Park, Yung Woo

    2007-01-01

    The relation between the thermoelectric power (S) and magnetic susceptibility (χ) for Bi 1-x Sr x MnO 3 (0.5≤x≤0.8) has been established empirically. A simple linear equation for the relation between the two transport coefficients is deduced from the experimental data. From this relation, we extract the Peltier heat and S for this material. They are composed of two terms: one has a magnetic origin and the other originates from the configuration entropy. The universality of this relation is found by applying the relation to other magnetically interacting systems including colossal magnetoresistance materials and high T C cuprate

  3. Magnetism and Pressure-Induced Superconductivity of Checkerboard-Type Charge-Ordered Molecular Conductor β-(meso-DMBEDT-TTF2X (X = PF6 and AsF6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Nishio

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The metallic state of the molecular conductor β-(meso-DMBEDT-TTF2X (DMBEDT-TTF = 2-(5,6-dihydro-1,3-dithiolo[4,5-b][1,4]dithiin-2-ylidene-5,6-dihydro-5,6-dimethyl-1,3-dithiolo[4,5-b][1,4]dithiin, X = PF6, AsF6 is transformed into the checkerboard-type charge-ordered state at around 75–80 K with accompanying metal-insulator (MI transition on the anisotropic triangular lattice. With lowering temperatures, the magnetic susceptibility decreases gradually and reveals a sudden drop at the MI transition. By applying pressure, the charge-ordered state is suppressed and superconductivity appears in β-(meso-DMBEDT-TTF2AsF6 as well as in the reported β-(meso-DMBEDT-TTF2PF6. The charge-ordered spin-gapped state and the pressure-induced superconducting state are discussed through the paired-electron crystal (PEC model, where the spin-bonded electron pairs stay and become mobile in the crystal, namely the valence-bond solid (VBS and the resonant valence bonded (RVB state in the quarter-filled band structure.

  4. Magnetic Levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Thomas D.; Hull, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the principles of magnetic levitation presented in the physics classroom and applied to transportation systems. Topics discussed include three classroom demonstrations to illustrate magnetic levitation, the concept of eddy currents, lift and drag forces on a moving magnet, magnetic levitation vehicles, levitation with permanent magnets…

  5. Predictive value of diffusion-weighted imaging without and with including contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in image analysis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noij, Daniel P., E-mail: d.noij@vumc.nl [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland (Netherlands); Pouwels, Petra J.W., E-mail: pjw.pouwels@vumc.nl [Department of Physics and Medical Technology, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland (Netherlands); Ljumanovic, Redina, E-mail: rljumanovic@adventh.org [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland (Netherlands); Knol, Dirk L., E-mail: dirklknol@gmail.com [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland (Netherlands); Doornaert, Patricia, E-mail: p.doornaert@vumc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland (Netherlands); Bree, Remco de, E-mail: r.debree@vumc.nl [Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland (Netherlands); Castelijns, Jonas A., E-mail: j.castelijns@vumc.nl [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland (Netherlands); Graaf, Pim de, E-mail: p.degraaf@vumc.nl [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Primary tumor volume and lymph node ADC1000 are predictors of survival. • CE-T1WI does not improve the prognostic capacity of DWI. • Using CE-T1WI for ROI placement results in lower interobserver agreement. - Abstract: Objectives: To assess disease-free survival (DFS) in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with (chemo)radiotherapy ([C]RT). Methods: Pretreatment MR-images of 78 patients were retrospectively studied. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were calculated with two sets of two b-values: 0–750 s/mm{sup 2} (ADC{sub 750}) and 0–1000 s/mm{sup 2} (ADC{sub 1000}). One observer assessed tumor volume on T1-WI. Two independent observers assessed ADC-values of primary tumor and largest lymph node in two sessions (i.e. without and with including CE-T1WI in image analysis). Interobserver and intersession agreement were assessed with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) separately for ADC{sub 750} and ADC{sub 1000}. Lesion volumes and ADC-values were related to DFS using Cox regression analysis. Results: Median follow-up was 18 months. Interobserver ICC was better without than with CE-T1WI (primary tumor: 0.92 and 0.75–0.83, respectively; lymph node: 0.81–0.83 and 0.61–0.64, respectively). Intersession ICC ranged from 0.84 to 0.89. With CE-T1WI, mean ADC-values of primary tumor and lymph node were higher at both b-values than without CE-T1WI (P < 0.001). Tumor volume (sensitivity: 73%; specificity: 57%) and lymph node ADC{sub 1000} (sensitivity: 71–79%; specificity: 77–79%) were independent significant predictors of DFS without and with including CE-T1WI (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Pretreatment primary tumor volume and lymph node ADC{sub 1000} were significant independent predictors of DFS in HNSCC treated with (C)RT. DFS could be predicted from ADC-values acquired without and with including CE-T1WI in image analysis. The inclusion of CE-T1WI did not result in significant improvements in the predictive value of

  6. Modelling of the charge carrier mobility in disordered linear polymer materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Toman, Petr; Menšík, Miroslav; Bartkowiak, W.; Pfleger, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 11 (2017), s. 7760-7771 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-05095S Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200501204 Program:M Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : charge carrier mobility * conjugated polymer * charge transport modelling Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  7. The path of charged particles is affected when

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The path of charged particles is affected when they enter a magnetic field. This change of path largely depends on the angle between the applied magnetic field and the direction of motion of the charged particle (and its velocity) entering the magnetic field. This is demonstrated by means of a simple, low-cost experiment.

  8. Extremely high magnetic-field sensitivity of charge transport in the Mn/SiO2/p-Si hybrid structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, N. V.; Tarasov, A. S.; Smolyakov, D. A.; Gustaitsev, A. O.; Rautskii, M. V.; Lukyanenko, A. V.; Volochaev, M. N.; Varnakov, S. N.; Yakovlev, I. A.; Ovchinnikov, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    We report on abrupt changes in dc resistance and impedance of a diode with the Schottky barrier based on the Mn/SiO2/p-Si structure in a magnetic field. It was observed that at low temperatures the dc and ac resistances of the device change by a factor of more than 106 with an increase in a magnetic field to 200 mT. The strong effect of the magnetic field is observed only above the threshold forward bias across the diode. The ratios between ac and dc magnetoresistances can be tuned from almost zero to 108% by varying the bias. To explain the diversity of magnetotransport phenomena observed in the Mn/SiO2/p-Si structure, it is necessary to attract several mechanisms, which possibly work in different regions of the structure. The anomalously strong magnetotransport effects are attributed to the magnetic-field-dependent impact ionization in the bulk of a Si substrate. At the same time, the conditions for this process are specified by structure composition, which, in turn, affects the current through each structure region. The effect of magnetic field attributed to suppression of impact ionization via two mechanisms leads to an increase in the carrier energy required for initiation of impact ionization. The first mechanism is related to displacement of acceptor levels toward higher energies relative to the top of the valence band and the other mechanism is associated with the Lorentz forces affecting carrier trajectories between scatterings events. The estimated contributions of these two mechanisms are similar. The proposed structure is a good candidate for application in CMOS technology-compatible magnetic- and electric-field sensors and switching devices.

  9. Charged particle beam current monitoring tutorial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webber, R.C.

    1994-10-01

    A tutorial presentation is made on topics related to the measurement of charged particle beam currents. The fundamental physics of electricity and magnetism pertinent to the problem is reviewed. The physics is presented with a stress on its interpretation from an electrical circuit theory point of view. The operation of devices including video pulse current transformers, direct current transformers, and gigahertz bandwidth wall current style transformers is described. Design examples are given for each of these types of devices. Sensitivity, frequency response, and physical environment are typical parameters which influence the design of these instruments in any particular application. Practical engineering considerations, potential pitfalls, and performance limitations are discussed

  10. Charge-ordering, magnetic and electric-transport properties of Bi0.6-xEuxCa0.4MnO3 (0.0≤x≤0.6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadava, Kamlesh; Varma, G.D.; Singh, M.P.; Razavi, F.S.

    2012-01-01

    We have studied structure, magnetic and transport properties of polycrystalline Bi 0.6-x Eu x Ca 0.4 MnO 3 (x=0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6) perovskite manganites. Magnetic measurements show that the charge-ordering temperature (T CO ) decreases with increasing x up to x=0.4 and then slightly increases with further increasing x up to x=0.6. Further, the antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering temperature (T N ) decreases with increasing x. At T N a transition to metamagnetic glass like state is also seen. Eu doping also leads to enhancement in the magnetic moment and a concomitant decrease in resistivity up to x=0.2 and then an increase in resistivity up to x=0.5. We propose that the local lattice distortion induced by the size mismatch between the A-site cations and 6s 2 character of Bi 3+ lone pair electron are responsible for the observed variation in physical properties. (author)

  11. Charge-dependent flow and the search for the chiral magnetic wave in Pb-Pb collisions at root s(NN)=2.76 TeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adam, J.; Adamová, Dagmar; Benáček, Pavel; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Brož, M.; Contreras, J. G.; Eyyubova, G.; Ferencei, Jozef; Horák, D.; Křížek, Filip; Kučera, Vít; Mareš, Jiří A.; Petráček, V.; Pospíšil, Jan; Schulc, M.; Špaček, M.; Šumbera, Michal; Vajzer, Michal; Vaňát, Tomáš; Závada, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 4 (2016), č. článku 044903. ISSN 2469-9985 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : ALICE collaboration * heavy ion collisions * charge-dependent Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders; BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics (FZU-D) Impact factor: 3.820, year: 2016

  12. Fractional Charge Definitions and Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldhaber, A.S.

    2004-06-04

    Fractional charge is known through theoretical and experimental discoveries of isolable objects carrying fractions of familiar charge units--electric charge Q, spin S, and the difference of baryon and lepton numbers B-L. With a few simple assumptions all these effects may be described using a generalized version of charge renormalization for locally conserved charges, in which medium correlations yield familiar adiabatic, continuous renormalization, or sometimes nonadiabatic, discrete renormalization. Fractional charges may be carried by fundamental particles or fundamental solitons. Either picture works for the simplest fractional-quantum-Hall-effect quasiholes, though the particle description is far more general. The only known fundamental solitons in three or fewer space dimensions d are the kink (d = 1), the vortex (d = 2), and the magnetic monopole (d = 3). Further, for a charge not intrinsically coupled to the topological charge of a soliton, only the kink and the monopole may carry fractional values. The same reasoning enforces fractional values of B-L for electrically charged elementary particles.

  13. Measuring momentum for charged particle tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher; Fraser, Andrew Mcleod; Schultz, Larry Joe; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Klimenko, Alexei Vasilievich; Sossong, Michael James; Blanpied, Gary

    2010-11-23

    Methods, apparatus and systems for detecting charged particles and obtaining tomography of a volume by measuring charged particles including measuring the momentum of a charged particle passing through a charged particle detector. Sets of position sensitive detectors measure scattering of the charged particle. The position sensitive detectors having sufficient mass to cause the charged particle passing through the position sensitive detectors to scatter in the position sensitive detectors. A controller can be adapted and arranged to receive scattering measurements of the charged particle from the charged particle detector, determine at least one trajectory of the charged particle from the measured scattering; and determine at least one momentum measurement of the charged particle from the at least one trajectory. The charged particle can be a cosmic ray-produced charged particle, such as a cosmic ray-produced muon. The position sensitive detectors can be drift cells, such as gas-filled drift tubes.

  14. IONIZATION AND DUST CHARGING IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivlev, A. V.; Caselli, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstr. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Akimkin, V. V., E-mail: ivlev@mpe.mpg.de [Institute of Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Pyatnitskaya Street 48, 119017 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-10

    Ionization–recombination balance in dense interstellar and circumstellar environments is a key factor for a variety of important physical processes, such as chemical reactions, dust charging and coagulation, coupling of the gas with magnetic field, and development of instabilities in protoplanetary disks. We determine a critical gas density above which the recombination of electrons and ions on the grain surface dominates over the gas-phase recombination. For this regime, we present a self-consistent analytical model, which allows us to calculate exactly the abundances of charged species in dusty gas, without making assumptions on the grain charge distribution. To demonstrate the importance of the proposed approach, we check whether the conventional approximation of low grain charges is valid for typical protoplanetary disks, and discuss the implications for dust coagulation and development of the “dead zone” in the disk. The presented model is applicable for arbitrary grain-size distributions and, for given dust properties and conditions of the disk, has only one free parameter—the effective mass of the ions, shown to have a small effect on the results. The model can be easily included in numerical simulations following the dust evolution in dense molecular clouds and protoplanetary disks.

  15. Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffner, Francis K [Richland, WA; Kintner-Meyer, Michael C. W. [Richland, WA; Hammerstrom, Donald J [West Richland, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2012-05-22

    Battery charging control methods, electric vehicle charging methods, battery charging apparatuses and rechargeable battery systems. According to one aspect, a battery charging control method includes accessing information regarding a presence of at least one of a surplus and a deficiency of electrical energy upon an electrical power distribution system at a plurality of different moments in time, and using the information, controlling an adjustment of an amount of the electrical energy provided from the electrical power distribution system to a rechargeable battery to charge the rechargeable battery.

  16. Topological insulator homojunctions including magnetic layers: the example of n-p type (n-QLs Bi.sub.2./sub.Se.sub.3./sub./Mn-Bi.sub.2./sub.Se.sub.3./sub.) heterostructures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vališka, M.; Warmuth, J.; Michiardi, M.; Vondráček, Martin; Ngankeu, A.S.; Holý, V.; Sechovský, V.; Springholz, G.; Bianchi, M.; Wiebe, J.; Hofmann, P.; Honolka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 108, č. 26 (2016), 1-4, č. článku 262402. ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA MŠk LO1409; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-30062S Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) Fellowship J. E. Purkyně Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : topological insulator * Mn-Bi2Se 3 * homojunction * ARPES Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.411, year: 2016

  17. Interaction mechanisms and biological effects of static magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems are described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving, ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecules structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary is also presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields. There is convincing experimental evidence for magnetoreception mechanisms in several classes of lower organisms, including bacteria and marine organisms. However, in more highly evolved species of animals, there is no evidence that the interactions of static magnetic fields with flux densities up to 2 Tesla (1 Tesla [T] = 10{sup 4} Gauss) produce either behavioral or physiolocical alterations. These results, based on controlled studies with laboratory animals, are consistent with the outcome of recent epidemiological surveys on human populations exposed occupationally to static magnetic fields.

  18. Motion model for a charged particle in a plasma during the interaction of an electromagnetic pulse elliptically polarized propagating in the direction of a static and homogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez R, F.; Ondarza R, R.

    2004-01-01

    An analytic model is presented for the description of the motion of a charged particle in the interaction of an elliptically electromagnetic pulse polarized propagating along a static and homogeneous external magnetic field in a plasma starting from the force equation. The method allows to express the solution in terms of the invariant phase, obtaining differential equations for the trajectory of the accelerated particle by means of an electromagnetic pulse of arbitrary and modulated width by an encircling Gaussian. The numerical solutions reported in this work can find varied applications, for example in the physics of the interaction laser-plasma, in the acceleration of particles, in hot plasma and in radioactive effects. (Author)

  19. Model of the motion of a charged particle into a plasma during the interaction of an electromagnetic pulse elliptically polarized propagating in the direction of a static and homogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez R, F.; Ondarza R, R.

    2004-01-01

    An analytical model for the description of the movement of a charged particle in the interaction of an electromagnetic pulse elliptically polarized propagating along of a static and homogeneous external magnetic field in a plasma starting from the force equation is presented. The method allows to express the solution in terms of the invariant phase, obtaining differential equations for the trajectory of the accelerated particle by means of an electromagnetic pulse of arbitrary amplitude and modulated by an encircling Gaussian. The numerical solutions reported in this work can find varied applications, for example in the physics of the interaction laser-plasma, in the acceleration of particles, in hot plasma and in radiative effects. (Author)

  20. Electrodynamics as a theory of interacting complex charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akeyo Omolo, Joseph

    2003-04-01

    In this paper, we formulate a general theory of electrodynamics which incorporates both electric and magnetic charges. The mathematical origin of a second vector potential and magnetic charge is established. Electrodynamics is then reformulated in complex form as a theory of complex charges moving in a complex force field. This provides the framework for complex charged particle interactions as a generalization of Schwinger's theory of dyon-dyon interactions. The concept of duality transformation relating electric and magnetic charge spaces is developed within the general framework of electrodynamics in complex form. (author)

  1. Magnetically controlled space charge capacitance at La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3}/Sr{sub x}La{sub 1-x}TiO{sub 3} interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Rainer; Garcia-Barriocanal, Javier; Leon, Carlos; Santamaria, Jacobo [Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Dpto. Fisica Aplicada III, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, GFMC (Spain); Unidad Asociada ' ' Laboratorio de Heteroestructuras con Aplicacion en Espintronica' ' , UCM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Varela, Maria [Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Dpto. Fisica Aplicada III, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, GFMC (Spain); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Instituto Pluridisciplinar, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Hernandez, Mar [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid - Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (ICMM-CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2016-08-15

    This work reports on magnetocapacitance (MC) effects in epitaxial heterostructures of nominally 15 unit cells (u.c.) LaMnO{sub 3} (LMO) and 2 u.c. SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) with an alternating layer-repetition rate of 8: (LMO{sub 15}/STO{sub 2}){sub 8}. Epitaxial multilayer growth at high temperatures (900 C) activates a selective inter-diffusion of La{sup 3+} and Sr{sup 2+} cations across the interfaces, which gives rise to Sr p-doping of the LMO and La n-doping of the STO layers. MC effects at the buried La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3}/Sr{sub x}La{sub 1-x}TiO{sub 3} (LSMO/SLTO) interfaces are probed by frequency, temperature and magnetic field dependent AC impedance spectroscopy. The technique is shown to be appropriate to account for the separate analysis of different resistance and capacitance contributions at the buried interfaces. As a result of the La/Sr inter-diffusion process, Schottky barriers are formed at the LSMO/SLTO interfaces, which give rise to massive MC of up to ∼ -200% in the out-of-plane film direction. The capacitance of the manganite-titanate LSMO/SLTO interfaces may be coupled indirectly to the resistance of the LSMO layers, because the Schottky space-charge layers and their capacitance can be modulated by varying the concentration of highly mobile charge carriers in the LSMO with a magnetic field. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZALIZNYAK, I.A.; LEE, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern science

  3. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern

  4. Improving Charging-Breeding Simulations with Space-Charge Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilek, Ryan; Kwiatkowski, Ania; Steinbrügge, René

    2016-09-01

    Rare-isotope-beam facilities use Highly Charged Ions (HCI) for accelerators accelerating heavy ions and to improve measurement precision and resolving power of certain experiments. An Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) is able to create HCI through successive electron impact, charge breeding trapped ions into higher charge states. CBSIM was created to calculate successive charge breeding with an EBIT. It was augmented by transferring it into an object-oriented programming language, including additional elements, improving ion-ion collision factors, and exploring the overlap of the electron beam with the ions. The calculation is enhanced with the effects of residual background gas by computing the space charge due to charge breeding. The program assimilates background species, ionizes and charge breeds them alongside the element being studied, and allows them to interact with the desired species through charge exchange, giving fairer overview of realistic charge breeding. Calculations of charge breeding will be shown for realistic experimental conditions. We reexamined the implementation of ionization energies, cross sections, and ion-ion interactions when charge breeding.

  5. The charge-flipping algorithm in crystallography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palatinus, Lukáš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 69, Jan (2013), s. 1-16 ISSN 2052-5192 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : charge-flipping algorithm * dual-space methods * structure solution Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  6. 15 CFR 2004.10 - Other charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Other charges. 2004.10 Section 2004.10... TRADE REPRESENTATIVE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Costs § 2004.10 Other charges. USTR may apply other charges, including the following: (a) Special charges. USTR shall recover the full...

  7. Nature of the magnetic order in the charge-ordered cuprate La1.48Nd0.4Sr0.12CuO4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Niels Bech; Rønnow, H.M.; Mesot, J.

    2007-01-01

    Using polarized neutron scattering we establish that the magnetic order in La1.48Nd0.4Sr0.12CuO4 is either (i) one dimensionally modulated and collinear, consistent with the stripe model or (ii) two dimensionally modulated with a novel noncollinear structure. The measurements rule out a number of...... of alternative models characterized by 2D electronic order or 1D helical spin order. The low-energy spin excitations are found to be primarily transversely polarized relative to the stripe ordered state, consistent with conventional spin waves....

  8. Soliton model for elementary electric charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chepilko, N.M.; Kobushkin, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    The existence and topological stability of three-dimensional solitons in Klein-Gordon field electrodynamics are proved. The central-symmetric solution to field equations, which can be interpreted as soliton model of elementary electric charge with zero spin, is constructed. The electrostatic soliton rotation is shown to result in the charge having its own magnetic-dipole field. 9 refs.; 2 figs

  9. Relativistic bound state approach to fundamental forces including gravitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morsch H.P.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To describe the structure of particle bound states of nature, a relativistic bound state formalism is presented, which requires a Lagrangian including scalar coupling of two boson fields. The underlying mechanisms are quite complex and require an interplay of overlapping boson fields and fermion-antifermion production. This gives rise to two potentials, a boson-exchange potential and one identified with the long sought confinement potential in hadrons. With minimal requirements, two elementary massless fermions (quantons - with and without charge - and one gauge boson, hadrons and leptons but also atoms and gravitational systems are described by bound states with electric and magnetic coupling between the charges and spins of quantons. No need is found for colour, Higgs-coupling and supersymmetry.

  10. Biological interactions and human health effects of static magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-09-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems will be described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecular structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary will also be presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields studied in the laboratory and in natural settings. One aspect of magnetic field effects that merits special concern is their influence on implanted medical electronic devices such as cardiac pacemakers. Several extensive studies have demonstrated closure of the reed switch in pacemakers exposed to relatively weak static magnetic fields, thereby causing them to revert to an asynchronous mode of operation that is potentially hazardous. Recommendations for human exposure limits are provided

  11. Charged particle beams

    CERN Document Server

    Humphries, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    Detailed enough for a text and sufficiently comprehensive for a reference, this volume addresses topics vital to understanding high-power accelerators and high-brightness-charged particle beams. Subjects include stochastic cooling, high-brightness injectors, and the free electron laser. Humphries provides students with the critical skills necessary for the problem-solving insights unique to collective physics problems. 1990 edition.

  12. Electrically Tunable Magnetism in Magnetic Topological Insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2015-07-14

    The external controllability of the magnetic properties in topological insulators would be important both for fundamental and practical interests. Here we predict the electric-field control of ferromagnetism in a thin film of insulating magnetic topological insulators. The decrease of band inversion by the application of electric fields results in a reduction of magnetic susceptibility, and hence in the modification of magnetism. Remarkably, the electric field could even induce the magnetic quantum phase transition from ferromagnetism to paramagnetism. We further propose a transistor device in which the dissipationless charge transport of chiral edge states is controlled by an electric field. In particular, the field-controlled ferromagnetism in a magnetic topological insulator can be used for voltage based writing of magnetic random access memories in magnetic tunnel junctions. The simultaneous electrical control of magnetic order and chiral edge transport in such devices may lead to electronic and spintronic applications for topological insulators.

  13. Magnetics Processing

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetics Processing Lab equipped to perform testing of magnetometers, integrate them into aircraft systems, and perform data analysis, including noise reduction...

  14. Nonlinear waves in electron–positron–ion plasmas including charge ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-01-04

    Jan 4, 2017 ... The introduction of the Poisson equation increased the Mach number required to generate the waveforms but the driving electric field E0 was reduced. The results are compared with satellite observations. Keywords. Nonlinear waves; low frequency; ion-acoustic waves. PACS Nos 52.35.Qz; 52.35.Fp; 52.35 ...

  15. Nonlinear waves in electron–positron–ion plasmas including charge ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-01-04

    Jan 4, 2017 ... Recently, it has been suggested that the nonlinear study of wave propagation can be helpful to under- stand nonlinear structures similar to the broadband electrostatic noise (BEN) observed in the Earth's mag- netosphere by numerous satellites (spacecrafts) such as. Geotail [8], Polar [9],Viking [10], FAST ...

  16. Nonlinear waves in electron–positron–ion plasmas including charge ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effects of the driving electric field, ion temperature, positron density, ion drift, Mach number and propagation angle are investigated. It is shown that depending on the driving electric field, ion temperature, positron density, ion drift, Mach number and propagation angle, the numerical solutions exhibit waveforms that are ...

  17. Nonlinear waves in electron–positron–ion plasmas including charge ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This set of equations is numerically solved for the electric field. The effects of the driving electric field, ion temperature, positron density, ion drift, Mach number and propagation angle are investigated. It is shown that depending on the driving electric field, ion temperature, positron density, ion drift, Mach number and ...

  18. Track structure for low energy ions including charge exchange processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, S.; Nikjoo, H.

    2002-01-01

    The model and development is described of a new generation of Monte Carlo track structure codes. The code LEAHIST simulates full slowing down of low-energy proton history tracks in the range 1 keV-1 MeV and the code LEAHIST simulates low-energy alpha particle history tracks in the range 1 keV-8 MeV in water. All primary ion interactions are followed down to 1 keV and all electrons to 1 eV. Tracks of secondary electrons ejected by ions were traced using the electron code KURBUC. Microdosimetric parameters derived by analysis of generated tracks are presented. (author)

  19. Magnetic monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preskill, J

    1984-01-01

    This article offers a review of the physics of the magnetic monopole, which, although as yet unseen, offers sound theoretical reasons to believe that it must exist. Several theories are presented and equations are given. The idea that magnetic monopoles, stable particles carrying magnetic charges, ought to exist has, according to the authors, proved to be very durable. One theory presented demonstrates the consistency of magnetic monopoles with quantum electrodynamics. Another theory demonstrates the necessity of monopoles in grand unified gauge theories. The authors believe it is reasonable to expect the monopole to be an extremely heavy stable elementary particle. The stability of the classical monopole solution given is ensured by a topological principle explained

  20. Magnetic Structure of Erbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibbs, D.; Bohr, Jakob; Axe, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    We present a synchrotron x-ray scattering study of the magnetic phases of erbium. In addition to the magnetic scattering located at the fundamental wave vector τm we also observe scattering from magnetoelastically induced charge modulations at the fundamental wave vector, at twice the fundamental......, and at positions split symmetrically about the fundamental. As the temperature is lowered below 52 K the charge and magnetic scattering display a sequence of lock-in transitions to rational wave vectors. A spin-slip description of the magnetic structure is presented which explains the wave vectors...

  1. Magnetic Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Harland, Derek; Palmer, Sam; Saemann, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Recently a Nahm transform has been discovered for magnetic bags, which are conjectured to arise in the large n limit of magnetic monopoles with charge n. We interpret these ideas using string theory and present some partial proofs of this conjecture. We then extend the notion of bags and their Nahm transform to higher gauge theories and arbitrary domains. Bags in four dimensions conjecturally describe the large n limit of n self-dual strings. We show that the corresponding Basu-Harvey equatio...

  2. Using the History of Electricity and Magnetism To Enhance Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnie, Anna

    2001-01-01

    Explains the properties of charged objects, the nature of an electric charge, and interactions between electricity and magnetism. Suggests that the development of modern ideas about electricity and magnetism were not a linear progression. (Contains 34 references.) (Author/YDS)

  3. Magnetic quadrupole and solenoidal spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, H.; Schapira, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    General optical properties of magnetic quadrupole spectrometers are reviewed, together with experimental purposes for nuclear physics: background reduction, magnetic rigidity filtering for extreme forward angles measurements, light charged particle discrimination, ionic charge state separation, time of flight mass spectrometry and fast collection of radioactive nuclear reaction products. Possibility of alternative devices such as superconducting quadrupoles or solenoid spectrometers are discussed. (Auth.)

  4. CHARGE Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semanti Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here a case of 17-year-old boy from Kolkata presenting with obesity, bilateral gynecomastia, mental retardation, and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. The patient weighed 70 kg and was of 153 cm height. Facial asymmetry (unilateral facial palsy, gynecomastia, decreased pubic and axillary hair, small penis, decreased right testicular volume, non-palpable left testis, and right-sided congenital inguinal hernia was present. The patient also had disc coloboma, convergent squint, microcornea, microphthalmia, pseudohypertelorism, low set ears, short neck, and choanalatresia. He had h/o VSD repaired with patch. Laboratory examination revealed haemoglobin 9.9 mg/dl, urea 24 mg/dl, creatinine 0.68 mg/dl. IGF1 77.80 ng/ml (decreased for age, GH <0.05 ng/ml, testosterone 0.25 ng/ml, FSH-0.95 ΅IU/ml, LH 0.60 ΅IU/ml. ACTH, 8:00 A.M cortisol, FT3, FT4, TSH, estradiol, DHEA-S, lipid profile, and LFT was within normal limits. Prolactin was elevated at 38.50 ng/ml. The patient′s karyotype was 46XY. Echocardiography revealed ventricularseptal defect closed with patch, grade 1 aortic regurgitation, and ejection fraction 67%. Ultrasound testis showed small right testis within scrotal sac and undescended left testis within left inguinal canal. CT scan paranasal sinuses revealed choanalatresia and deviation of nasal septum to the right. Sonomammography revealed bilateral proliferation of fibroglandular elements predominantly in subareoalar region of breasts. MRI of brain and pituitary region revealed markedly atrophic pituitary gland parenchyma with preserved infundibulum and hypothalamus and widened suprasellar cistern. The CHARGE association is an increasingly recognized non-random pattern of congenital anomalies comprising of coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, ear abnormalities, and/or deafness. [1] These anomalies have a higher probability of occurring together. In this report, we have

  5. First principle calculations of charge ordering in manganites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldomir, D.; Pardo, V.; Castro, J.; Iglesias, M.; Arias, J.E.; Rivas, J.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations were performed on the compound La 0.5 Ca 0.5 MnO 3 to study the relationship between the magnetic ordering, the charge ordering and the geometry of the compound. Charge ordering is intimately related to the magnetic ordering. An antiferromagnetic ordering induces charge disproportionation via a Jahn-Teller distortion. A full disproportionation in Mn 3+ /Mn 4+ occurs for the experimental geometry and allows to predict the experimentally found antiferromagnetic insulating state

  6. Beam dynamics performances and applications of a low-energy electron-beam magnetic bunch compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokop, C. R.; Piot, P.; Carlsten, B. E.; Church, M.

    2013-08-01

    Many front-end applications of electron linear accelerators rely on the production of temporally compressed bunches. The shortening of electron bunches is often realized with magnetic bunch compressors located in high-energy sections of accelerators. Magnetic compression is subject to collective effects including space charge and self interaction via coherent synchrotron radiation. In this paper we explore the application of magnetic compression to low-energy (~40MeV), high-charge (nC) electron bunches with low normalized transverse emittances (<5@mm).

  7. MAGNETIC WOVEN FABRICS - PHYSICAL AND MAGNETIC PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GROSU Marian C

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A coated material is a composite structure that consists of at least two components: base material and coating layer. The purpose of coating is to provide special properties to base material, with potential to be applied in EMI shielding and diverse smart technical fields. This paper reports the results of a study about some physical and magnetic properties of coated woven fabrics made from cotton yarns with fineness of 17 metric count. For this aim, a plain woven fabric was coated with a solution hard magnetic polymer based. As hard magnetic powder, barium hexaferrite (BaFe12O19 was selected. The plain woven fabric used as base has been coated with five solutions having different amounts of hard magnetic powder (15% - 45% in order to obtain five different magnetic woven fabrics. A comparison of physical properties regarding weight (g/m2, thickness (mm, degree of charging (% and magnetic properties of magnetic woven samples were presented. Saturation magnetizing (emu/g, residual magnetizing (emu/g and coercive force (kA/m of pure hard magnetic powder and woven fabrics have been studied as hysteresis characteristics. The magnetic properties of the woven fabrics depend on the mass percentage of magnetic powder from coating solution. Also, the residual magnetism and coercive field of woven fabrics represents only a part of bulk barium hexafferite residual magnetism and coercive field.

  8. Lodestone: Nature's own permanent magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, P.

    1976-01-01

    Magnetic hysteresis and microstructural details are presented which explain why the class of magnetic iron ores defined as proto-lodestones, can behave as permanent magnets, i.e. lodestones. Certain of these proto-lodestones which are not permanent magnets can be made into permanent magnets by charging in a field greater than 1000 oersted. This fact, other experimental observations, and field evidence from antiquity and the middle ages, which seems to indicate that lodestones are found as localized patches within massive ore bodies, suggests that lightning might be responsible for the charging of lodestones. The large remanent magnetization, high values of coercive force, and good time stability for the remanent magnetization are all characteristics of proto-lodestone iron ores which behave magnetically as fine scale ( 10 micrometer) intergrowths when subjected to magnetic hysteresis analysis. The magnetic results are easily understood by analysis of the complex proto lodestone microstructural patterns observable at the micrometer scale and less.

  9. Universal features underlying the magnetism in diluted magnetic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriotis, Antonis N.; Menon, Madhu

    2018-04-01

    Investigation of a diverse variety of wide band gap semiconductors and metal oxides that exhibit magnetism on substitutional doping has revealed the existence of universal features that relate the magnetic moment of the dopant to a number of physical properties inherent to the dopants and the hosts. The investigated materials consist of ZnO, GaN, GaP, TiO2, SnO2, Sn3N4, MoS2, ZnS and CdS doped with 3d-transition metal atoms. The primary physical properties contributing to magnetism include the orbital hybridization and charge distribution, the d-band filling, d-band center, crystal field splitting, electron pairing energy and electronegativity. These features specify the strength of the spin-polarization induced by the dopants on their first nearest neighboring anions which in turn specify the long range magnetic coupling among the dopants through successively induced spin polarizations (SSP) on neighboring dopants. The proposed local SSP process for the establishment of the magnetic coupling among the TM-dopants appears as a competitor to other classical processes (superexchange, double exchange, etc). Furthermore, these properties can be used as a set of descriptors suitable for developing statistical predictive theories for a much larger class of magnetic materials.

  10. Universal features underlying the magnetism in diluted magnetic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriotis, Antonis N; Menon, Madhu

    2018-04-04

    Investigation of a diverse variety of wide band gap semiconductors and metal oxides that exhibit magnetism on substitutional doping has revealed the existence of universal features that relate the magnetic moment of the dopant to a number of physical properties inherent to the dopants and the hosts. The investigated materials consist of ZnO, GaN, GaP, TiO 2 , SnO 2 , Sn 3 N 4 , MoS 2 , ZnS and CdS doped with 3d-transition metal atoms. The primary physical properties contributing to magnetism include the orbital hybridization and charge distribution, the d-band filling, d-band center, crystal field splitting, electron pairing energy and electronegativity. These features specify the strength of the spin-polarization induced by the dopants on their first nearest neighboring anions which in turn specify the long range magnetic coupling among the dopants through successively induced spin polarizations (SSP) on neighboring dopants. The proposed local SSP process for the establishment of the magnetic coupling among the TM-dopants appears as a competitor to other classical processes (superexchange, double exchange, etc). Furthermore, these properties can be used as a set of descriptors suitable for developing statistical predictive theories for a much larger class of magnetic materials.

  11. Magnetic Field Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnetic Field Calculator will calculate the total magnetic field, including components (declination, inclination, horizontal intensity, northerly intensity,...

  12. Enhancing the magnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlburg, Jakob; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Stingaciu, Marian

    with a similar magnetic performance. There are several different ways of enhancing magnetic properties of 3d magnetic compounds. This includes, size control, core-shell particles or mixing hard and soft magnetic materials together to achieve an exchange coupling between the compounds and enhancing the magnetic...... energy product. In order to control the particle size, a hydrothermal synthesis is preferred. This followed by reduction or the oxides into either core shell particles, or a mixture of magnetic oxides and a metallic phase....

  13. Workplace Charging. Charging Up University Campuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giles, Carrie [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Ryder, Carrie [ICF International, Fairfax, VA (United States); Lommele, Stephen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This case study features the experiences of university partners in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Workplace Charging Challenge with the installation and management of plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging stations.

  14. EBQ code: transport of space-charge beams in axially symmetric devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, A.C.

    1982-11-01

    Such general-purpose space charge codes as EGUN, BATES, WOLF, and TRANSPORT do not gracefully accommodate the simulation of relativistic space-charged beams propagating a long distance in axially symmetric devices where a high degree of cancellation has occurred between the self-magnetic and self-electric forces of the beam. The EBQ code was written specifically to follow high current beam particles where space charge is important in long distance flight in axially symmetric machines possessing external electric and magnetic field. EBQ simultaneously tracks all trajectories so as to allow procedures for charge deposition based on inter-ray separations. The orbits are treated in Cartesian geometry (position and momentum) with z as the independent variable. Poisson's equation is solved in cylindrical geometry on an orthogonal rectangular mesh. EBQ can also handle problems involving multiple ion species where the space charge from each must be included. Such problems arise in the design of ion sources where different charge and mass states are present

  15. 12 CFR 560.33 - Late charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Late charges. 560.33 Section 560.33 Banks and... Investment Powers for Federal Savings Associations § 560.33 Late charges. A Federal savings association may include in a home loan contract a provision authorizing the imposition of a late charge with respect to...

  16. The LHCb magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The LHCb magnet consists of two huge 27 tonne coils mounted inside a 1450 tonne iron yoke. As charged particles pass through the magnet's field their trajectories will be bent according to their momentum, allowing their momentum to be measured as they pass through the detector walls. LHCb will study bottom quarks, which will be produced close to the two colliding proton beams.

  17. Radiocarbon detection by ion charge exchange mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotchkis, Michael; Wei, Tao

    2007-01-01

    A method for detection of radiocarbon at low levels is described and the results of tests are presented. We refer to this method as ion charge exchange mass spectrometry (ICE-MS). The ICE-MS instrument is a two stage mass spectrometer. In the first stage, molecular interferences which would otherwise affect radiocarbon detection at mass 14 are eliminated by producing high charge state ions directly in the ion source (charge state ≥2). 14 N interference is eliminated in the second stage by converting the beam to negative ions in a charge exchange cell. The beam is mass-analysed at each stage. We have built a test apparatus consisting of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a pair of analysing magnets with a charge exchange cell in between, followed by an electrostatic analyser to improve the signal to background ratio. With this apparatus we have measured charge exchange probabilities for (C n+ → C - ) from 4.5 to 40.5 keV (n = 1-3). We have studied the sources of background including assessment of limits for nitrogen interference by searching for negative ions from charge exchange of 14 N ions. Our system has been used to detect 14 C in enriched samples of CO 2 gas with 14 C/ 12 C isotopic ratio down to the 10 -9 level. Combined with a measured sample consumption rate of 4 ng/s, this corresponds to a capability to detect transient signals containing only a few μBq of 14 C activity, such as may be obtained from chromatographic separation. The method will require further development to match the sensitivity of AMS with a gas ion source; however, even in its present state its sensitivity is well suited to tracer studies in biomedical research and drug development

  18. Interface-Induced Phenomena in Magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Frances; Hoffmann, Axel; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Beach, Geoffrey S D; Fullerton, Eric E; Leighton, Chris; MacDonald, Allan H; Ralph, Daniel C; Arena, Dario A; Dürr, Hermann A; Fischer, Peter; Grollier, Julie; Heremans, Joseph P; Jungwirth, Tomas; Kimel, Alexey V; Koopmans, Bert; Krivorotov, Ilya N; May, Steven J; Petford-Long, Amanda K; Rondinelli, James M; Samarth, Nitin; Schuller, Ivan K; Slavin, Andrei N; Stiles, Mark D; Tchernyshyov, Oleg; Thiaville, André; Zink, Barry L

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews static and dynamic interfacial effects in magnetism, focusing on interfacially-driven magnetic effects and phenomena associated with spin-orbit coupling and intrinsic symmetry breaking at interfaces. It provides a historical background and literature survey, but focuses on recent progress, identifying the most exciting new scientific results and pointing to promising future research directions. It starts with an introduction and overview of how basic magnetic properties are affected by interfaces, then turns to a discussion of charge and spin transport through and near interfaces and how these can be used to control the properties of the magnetic layer. Important concepts include spin accumulation, spin currents, spin transfer torque, and spin pumping. An overview is provided to the current state of knowledge and existing review literature on interfacial effects such as exchange bias, exchange spring magnets, spin Hall effect, oxide heterostructures, and topological insulators. The article highlights recent discoveries of interface-induced magnetism and non-collinear spin textures, non-linear dynamics including spin torque transfer and magnetization reversal induced by interfaces, and interfacial effects in ultrafast magnetization processes.

  19. Design of Smart Charging Infrastructure Hardware and Firmware Design of the Various Current Multiplexing Charging System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Ching-Yen; Chu, Peter; Gadh, Rajit

    2013-10-07

    Currently, when Electric Vehicles (EVs) are charging, they only have the option to charge at a selected current or not charge. When during the day there is a power shortage, the charging infrastructure should have the options to either shut off the power to the charging stations or to lower the power to the EVs in order to satisfy the needs of the grid. There is a need for technology that controls the current being disbursed to these electric vehicles. This paper proposes a design for a smart charging infrastructure capable of providing power to several EVs from one circuit by multiplexing power and providing charge control. The smart charging infrastructure includes the server and the smart charging station. With this smart charging infrastructure, the shortage of energy in a local grid could be solved by our EV management system

  20. Plasma horizons of a charged black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanni, R.S.

    1977-01-01

    The most promising way of detecting black holes seems to be through electromagnetic radiation emitted by nearby charged particles. The nature of this radiation depends strongly on the local electromagnetic field, which varies with the charge of the black hole. It has often been purported that a black hole with significant charge will not be observed, because, the dominance of the Coulomb interaction forces its neutralization through selective accretion. This paper shows that it is possible to balance the electric attraction of particles whose charge is opposite that of the black hole with magnetic forces and (assuming an axisymmetric, stationary solution) covariantly define the regions in which this is possible. A Kerr-Newman hole in an asymptotically uniform magnetic field and a current ring centered about a Reissner-Nordstroem hole are used as examples, because of their relevance to processes through which black holes may be observed. (Auth.)

  1. Pulsed magnet systems for high energy physics beam lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praeg, W.F.

    1975-01-01

    During the past years pulsed magnet systems have been developed at Argonne National Laboratory to transport beam bursts of charged high energy particles of the Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) facility. The particular features of the switching circuits, the power supplies and the magnets are described. Included are septum, quadrupole, beam shutter and bending magnets with energies ranging from 25 J to 100 kJ. The degree to which magnet current must be repeated and held constant (flattopped) during beam spill varies from +-5 percent for a beam shutter magnet to +-0.005 percent for a bending magnet; the duration of flattop ranges from a few μs to many ms. (U.S.)

  2. High Voltage Charge Pump

    KAUST Repository

    Emira, Ahmed A.

    2014-10-09

    Various embodiments of a high voltage charge pump are described. One embodiment is a charge pump circuit that comprises a plurality of switching stages each including a clock input, a clock input inverse, a clock output, and a clock output inverse. The circuit further comprises a plurality of pumping capacitors, wherein one or more pumping capacitors are coupled to a corresponding switching stage. The circuit also comprises a maximum selection circuit coupled to a last switching stage among the plurality of switching stages, the maximum selection circuit configured to filter noise on the output clock and the output clock inverse of the last switching stage, the maximum selection circuit further configured to generate a DC output voltage based on the output clock and the output clock inverse of the last switching stage.

  3. Magnetic Monopoles in AdS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutcliffe, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Applications to holographic theories have led to some recent interest in magnetic monopoles in four-dimensional Anti-de Sitter (AdS) spacetime. Some analytic and numerical results are discussed for monopoles in AdS, including the symmetries of minimal energy monopoles (which are often Platonic), a connection to Skyrmions, and the emergence of a hexagonal lattice in the large charge limit.

  4. Magnetic signature of charge ordering in Li[Mn sub 1 sub . sub 9 sub 6 Li sub 0 sub . sub 0 sub 4]O sub 4 and Li sub 0 sub . sub 2 [Mn sub 1 sub . sub 9 sub 6 Li sub 0 sub . sub 0 sub 4]O sub 4

    CERN Document Server

    Verhoeven, V W J; Mulder, F M

    2002-01-01

    The stoichiometric compound LiMn sub 2 O sub 4 is known to show charge ordering with well-defined Mn sup 3 sup + and Mn sup 4 sup + sites just below room temperature (RT). Above RT the electrons are hopping rapidly between sites. For lithium-ion batteries the material Li[Mn sub 1 sub . sub 9 sub 6 Li sub 0 sub . sub 0 sub 4]O sub 4 is technologically relevant. Due to the small amount of Li on the Mn site, the low-T regular ordering of the Mn charge appears to be destroyed completely, as is evidenced by neutron diffraction in the magnetically ordered state. However, the charges are still fixed in an irregular fashion, as can also be deduced from sup 7 Li nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. In the lithium-extracted compound Li sub 0 sub . sub 2 [Mn sub 1 sub . sub 9 sub 6 Li sub 0 sub . sub 0 sub 4]O sub 4 , predominantly Mn sup 4 sup + is present. Neutron diffraction in the magnetically ordered state shows a well-defined antiferromagnetic ordering, with doubling of the unit cell in three directions. Clear...

  5. CORE: Frustrated Magnets, Charge Fractionalization and QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, M.

    2004-10-11

    I explain how to use a simple method to extract the physics of lattice Hamiltonian systems which are not easily analyzed by exact or other numerical methods. I will then use this method to establish the relationship between QCD and a special class of generalized, highly frustrated anti-ferromagnets.

  6. Planetary Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E. P.

    2007-01-01

    The chapter on Planetary Magnetism by Connerney describes the magnetic fields of the planets, from Mercury to Neptune, including the large satellites (Moon, Ganymede) that have or once had active dynamos. The chapter describes the spacecraft missions and observations that, along with select remote observations, form the basis of our knowledge of planetary magnetic fields. Connerney describes the methods of analysis used to characterize planetary magnetic fields, and the models used to represent the main field (due to dynamo action in the planet's interior) and/or remnant magnetic fields locked in the planet's crust, where appropriate. These observations provide valuable insights into dynamo generation of magnetic fields, the structure and composition of planetary interiors, and the evolution of planets.

  7. Interferometric methods for mapping static electric and magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pozzi, Giulio; Beleggia, Marco; Kasama, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    The mapping of static electric and magnetic fields using electron probes with a resolution and sensitivity that are sufficient to reveal nanoscale features in materials requires the use of phase-sensitive methods such as the shadow technique, coherent Foucault imaging and the Transport of Intensity...... on theoretical models that form the basis of the quantitative interpretation of electron holographic data. We review the application of electron holography to a variety of samples (including electric fields associated with p–n junctions in semiconductors, quantized magnetic flux in superconductors......) the model-independent determination of the locations and magnitudes of field sources (electric charges and magnetic dipoles) directly from electron holographic data....

  8. Search for fractional charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    A search was made for fractional charges of the form Z plus two-thirds e, where Z is an integer. It was assumed that the charges exist in natural form bound with other fractional charges in neutral molecules. It was further assumed that these neutral molecules are present in air. Two concentration schemes were employed. One sample was derived from the waste gases from a xenon distillation plant. This assumes that high mass, low vapor pressure components of air are concentrated along with the xenon. The second sample involved ionizing air, allowing a brief recombination period, and then collecting residual ions on the surface of titanium discs. Both samples were analyzed at the University of Rochester in a system using a tandem Van de Graff to accelerate particles through an essentially electrostatic beam handling system. The detector system employed both a Time of Flight and an energy-sensitive gas ionization detector. In the most sensitive mode of analysis, a gas absorber was inserted in the beam path to block the intense background. The presence of an absorber limited the search to highly penetrating particles. Effectively, this limited the search to particles with low Z and masses greater than roughly fifty GeV. The final sensitivities attained were on the order of 1 x 10 -20 for the ionized air sample and 1 x 10 -21 for the gas sample. A discussion of the caveats that could reduce the actual level of sensitivity is included

  9. Outline of an aberration correct optical channel without space charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruck, H.

    1978-01-01

    A beam transport line is described which guides a particle bunch from a storage ring to the target, located at the center of the ring, for heavy ion fusion. The device was conceived to prevent spectral analysis and coma aberration, owing to the deflecting sector, and also chromatic and spherical aberrations. Space charge is not considered here. The device includes the following elements: (1) extraction from the storage ring, (2) adaptation to (3) the deflecting magnet sector, (4) collimator lens, and (5) 10m drift space to the target plane

  10. Cancellation of the centrifugal space-charge force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.P.

    1990-01-01

    The transverse dynamics of high-energy electrons confined in curved geometry are examined, including the effects of space-charge-induced fields. Attention is restricted to the centrifugal-space-charge force, which is the result of noncancellation of beam-induced transverse electric and magnetic fields in the curved geometry. This force is shown to be nearly cancelled in the evaluation of the horizontal tune and chromaticity by another, often overlooked term in the equation of motion. The additional term is the consequence of oscillations of the kinetic energy, which accompany betatron oscillations in the beam-induced electric potential. In curved geometry this term is of first order in the amplitude of the radial oscillation. A highly simplified system model is employed so that physical effects appear in as clear a form as possible. We assume azimuthal and median plane symmetry, static fields, and ultrarelativistic particle velocity (1/γ 2 ->0). (author) 9 refs

  11. DART: A simulation code for charged particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.C.; Barr, W.L.; Moir, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a recently modified version of the 2-D code, DART, which can simulate the behavior of a beam of charged particles whose trajectories are determined by electric and magnetic fields. This code was originally used to design laboratory-scale and full-scale beam direct converters. Since then, its utility has been expanded to allow more general applications. The simulation includes space charge, secondary electrons, and the ionization of neutral gas. A beam can contain up to nine superimposed beamlets of different energy and species. The calculation of energy conversion efficiency and the method of specifying the electrode geometry are described. Basic procedures for using the code are given, and sample input and output fields are shown. 7 refs., 18 figs

  12. Engineering magnetism at functional oxides interfaces: manganites and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Di; Lu, Nianpeng; Chen, Xuegang; Shen, Shengchun; Yu, Pu

    2017-11-08

    The family of transition metal oxides (TMOs) is a large class of magnetic materials that has been intensively studied due to the rich physics involved as well as the promising potential applications in next generation electronic devices. In TMOs, the spin, charge, orbital and lattice are strongly coupled, and significant advances have been achieved to engineer the magnetism by different routes that manipulate these degrees of freedom. The family of manganites is a model system of strongly correlated magnetic TMOs. In this review, using manganites thin films and the heterostructures in conjunction with other TMOs as model systems, we review the recent progress of engineering magnetism in TMOs. We first discuss the role of the lattice that includes the epitaxial strain and the interface structural coupling. Then we look into the role of charge, focusing on the interface charge modulation. Having demonstrated the static effects, we continue to review the research on dynamical control of magnetism by electric field. Next, we review recent advances in heterostructures comprised of high T c cuprate superconductors and manganites. Following that, we discuss the emergent magnetic phenomena at interfaces between 3d TMOs and 5d TMOs with strong spin-orbit coupling. Finally, we provide our outlook for prospective future directions.

  13. Gravity and Extreme Magnetism SMEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism SMEX mission will be the first mission to catalogue the X-ray polarisation of many astrophysical objects including black-holes and pulsars. This first of its kind mission is enabled by the novel use of a time projection chamber as an X-ray polarimeter. The detector has been developed over the last 5 years, with the current effort charged toward a demonstration of it's technical readiness to be at level 6 prior to the preliminary design review. This talk will describe the design GEMS polarimeter and the results to date from the engineering test unit.

  14. Superconducting and semiconducting magnetic charge transfer salts: (BEDT-TTF)AFe(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}.C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CN (A=H{sub 2}O, K, NH{sub 4})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurmoo, M.; Graham, A.W.; Day, P. [Royal Institution of Great Britain, London (United Kingdom); Coles, S.J.; Hursthouse, M.B. [Univ. College of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Caulfield, J.L.; Singleton, J.; Pratt, F.L.; Hayes, W. [Clarendon Lab., Oxford (United Kingdom); Ducasse, L.; Guinneau, P. [Universite Bordeaux, Talence (France)

    1995-12-13

    We have shown that the hexagonal layer motif [AM{sup III}(C{sub 2} O{sub 4}){sub 3}]{sup n-} containing bridging oxalate groups, which has been shown to form a wide variety of compounds with electronically inactive counter-cations having unusual cooperative magnetic properties, can also stabilize lattices containing the organic {pi}-donor BEDT-TTF. In the compounds whose structures we describe here, (BEDT-TTF){sub 4}AFe(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}.C{sub 6}H{sub 5} CN (A = H{sub 2}O, K, NH{sub 4}), the lattice is stabilized by C{sub 6} H{sub 5}CN molecules included in the hexagonal cavities. The packing of the BEDT-TTF in the A = K, NH{sub 4} phases is of a type not previously observed with spin-paired (BEDT-TTF){sub 2}{sup 2+} separated by closed shell (BEDT-TTF){sup 0}, while that in the superconductor is of {Beta}{double_prime} type. Both the superconducting A = H{sub 2}O and semiconducting A = K, NH{sub 4} phases contain high spin 3d{sup 5} Fe{sup III} with only very weak exchange interaction between them. Additional low temperature and high magnetic field experiments (e.g., of Schubnikov-de Haas oscillatory magnetoresistance) will be needed to delineate the Fermi surface in the superconductor. 36 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Rapid Charged Geosynchronous Debris Perturbation Modeling of Electrodynamic Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Joseph; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2018-04-01

    Charged space objects experience small perturbative torques and forces from their interaction with Earth's magnetic field. These small perturbations can change the orbits of lightweight, uncontrolled debris objects dramatically even over short periods. This paper investigates the effects of the isolated Lorentz force, the effects of including or neglecting this and other electromagnetic perturbations in a full propagation, and then analyzes for which objects electromagnetic effects have the most impact. It is found that electromagnetic forces have a negligible impact on their own. However, if the center of charge is not collocated with the center of mass, electromagnetic torques are produced which do impact the attitude, and thus the position by affecting the direction and magnitude of the solar radiation pressure force. The objects for which electrostatic torques have the most influence are charged above the kilovolt level, have a difference between their center of mass and center of charge, have highly attitude-dependent cross-sectional area, and are not spinning stably about an axis of maximum inertia. Fully coupled numerical simulation illustrate the impact of electromagnetic disturbances through the solar radiation pressure coupling.

  16. Point charges optimally placed to represent the multipole expansion of charge distributions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramu Anandakrishnan

    Full Text Available We propose an approach for approximating electrostatic charge distributions with a small number of point charges to optimally represent the original charge distribution. By construction, the proposed optimal point charge approximation (OPCA retains many of the useful properties of point multipole expansion, including the same far-field asymptotic behavior of the approximate potential. A general framework for numerically computing OPCA, for any given number of approximating charges, is described. We then derive a 2-charge practical point charge approximation, PPCA, which approximates the 2-charge OPCA via closed form analytical expressions, and test the PPCA on a set of charge distributions relevant to biomolecular modeling. We measure the accuracy of the new approximations as the RMS error in the electrostatic potential relative to that produced by the original charge distribution, at a distance 2x the extent of the charge distribution--the mid-field. The error for the 2-charge PPCA is found to be on average 23% smaller than that of optimally placed point dipole approximation, and comparable to that of the point quadrupole approximation. The standard deviation in RMS error for the 2-charge PPCA is 53% lower than that of the optimal point dipole approximation, and comparable to that of the point quadrupole approximation. We also calculate the 3-charge OPCA for representing the gas phase quantum mechanical charge distribution of a water molecule. The electrostatic potential calculated by the 3-charge OPCA for water, in the mid-field (2.8 Å from the oxygen atom, is on average 33.3% more accurate than the potential due to the point multipole expansion up to the octupole order. Compared to a 3 point charge approximation in which the charges are placed on the atom centers, the 3-charge OPCA is seven times more accurate, by RMS error. The maximum error at the oxygen-Na distance (2.23 Å is half that of the point multipole expansion up to the octupole

  17. Enhancing the magnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlburg, Jakob; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Stingaciu, Marian

    ways of enhancing magnetic properties of 3d magnetic compounds. This includes, size control, core-shell particles or mixing hard and soft magnetic materials together to achieve an exchange coupling between the compounds and enhancing the magnetic energy product. In order to control the particle size......, a hydrothermal synthesis is preferred. This followed by reduction or the oxides into either core shell particles, or a mixture of magnetic oxides and a metallic phase....

  18. Lorentz force perturbations of a charged ballistic missile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, M. E.

    It has been suggested that systematic targeting errors could arise from an uncompensated Lorentz force acting on a charged vehicle traveling through the earth's magnetic field. Lorentz force trajectory deflections from an elliptic reference orbit are determined. Since the amplitude of the Lorentz force depends on the electrostatic charge, several charging mechanisms are considered. It is shown that negligible deflections are caused by environmental charging in space and during reentry. The largest trajectory deflections could occur if the vehicle was intentionally charged, for example to deflect an electron beam.

  19. magnetic horn

    CERN Multimedia

    Neutrinos and antineutrinos are ideal for probing the weak force because it is effectively the only force they feel. How were they made? Protons fired into a metal target produce a tangle of secondary particles. A magnetic horn like this one, invented by Simon Van der Meer, selected pions and focused them into a sharp beam. Pions decay into muons and neutrinos or antineutrinos. The muons were stopped in a wall of 3000 tons of iron and 1000 tons of concrete, leaving the neutrinos or antineutrinos to reach the Gargamelle bubble chamber. A simple change of magnetic field direction on the horn flipped between focusing positively- or negatively-charged pion beams, and so between neutrinos and antineutrinos.

  20. Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction for an arbitrarily moving charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekhitarian, V.M.

    2015-01-01

    Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction for an arbitrarily moving charge is generalized and the expression for the force, acting on a charge in an alternating magnetic field is obtained. It is shown that on charge, besides Lorentz force perpendicular to the velocity of the particle, the Faraday force acts the parallel to the particle velocity and proportional to it. The equations of motion of the charged particle and magnetic moment, in time-varying magnetic field are derived. The problems of induction acceleration of charged particles (betatron) and induction heating of medium (plasma, plasma betatron) are considered

  1. Development of high field magnets at the National Research Institute for Metals. Kinzoku zairyo gijutsu kenkyusho ni okeru kojikai magnet gun no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiyoshi, T.; Inoue, K.; Maeda, H. (National Research Inst. for Metals, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1993-06-20

    Sinece 1988, the Scince and Technology Agency has initiated the superconductor multicore project, which has a purpose of the versatile study on the high temperature superconducting materials of the oxide series. The National Research Institute for Metals is in charge of 5 cores out of them, and in the performance evaluation core which is one of them, the development of each kind of the high field magnets is being advanced for evaluating the characteristics under the high magnetic field. As the magnets, including the 40T class hybrid magnet which generates the steady state magnetic field of 40T, the superconducting magnet of 20T with a large diameter which generates the magnetic field over 20T with a superconductor, the condenser bank system for the pulse magnet to generate the pulse magnetic field up to 80T, and the ultra-precise magnet system which generates the magnetic field with a high uniformity will be consolidated. Keeping pace with a removal of the National Research Institute for Metals to Tsukuba, the construction of the strong magnetic field station is being advanced in the Sakura area. These several kinds of magnets are scheduled to be used in turn for the international joint study. 33 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. LHCb experiment magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The leading members of the LHCb magnet project, from left to right: Pierre-Ange Giudici, who organized and supervised the industrial production of the coils; Marcello Losasso, who performed the 3D calculations to optimise the magnetic field; Olivier Jamet, responsible for the 3D design; Jean Renaud, in charge of the magnet assembly, and Wilfried Flegel, project leader. The LHCb detector will investigate matter-antimatter differences in B mesons at the LHC. The coils of the detector's huge dipole magnet are seen here in April 2004.

  3. CSMC and CSIC charging tests successfully completed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, H.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. H. Tsuji, Head of the JAERI Superconducting Magnet Laboratory in Naka, Japan reports on the completion of all charging tests of the Central Solenoid Model Coil and the Insert Coil on 18 August 2000. A brief history of the development, fabrication and testing of the model coils is given

  4. Electric charges in superconducting mesoscopic samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yampolskii, S. V.; Baelus, P.; Peeters, F. M.; Koláček, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 2 (2002), s. 303-306 ISSN 0011-4626 Grant - others:GA-(XX) FWO-VI; GA-(BE) IUAP-VI; GA-(BE) GOA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : mesoscopic superconductor * Meissner state * vortex charge Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.311, year: 2002

  5. Time Delay and the Dyon Charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Bernard

    1983-09-01

    The scattering of fermions from a magnetic monopole is analyzed in a theory with CP nonconservation. The dyon charge that arises can be understood as a Friedel sum rule from the theory of alloys, as the data for a Riemann-Hilbert problem in the theory of integral equations, and as a consequence of specifying Wigner's R matrix at the monopole core.

  6. a Search for Fractionally Charged Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Richard Gerard

    An ion-source and a charge spectrometer have been built which make it possible to search in solid stable matter for particles with non-integral charge. The ion -source uses a beam of magnetically analyzed 30 keV Ar('+) ions to sputter the sample in an ultra high vacuum environment. The charge spectrometer comprises a 3 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator followed by a 0.2% resolution electrostatic analysis system and a (DELTA)E-E detector system. The entire apparatus has been constructed to be independent of mass over a mass range of 0.2 GeV/c('2) to 250 GeV/c('2). It is assumed that the fractionally charged particle is able to bind an electron. A search has been carried out in samples of niobium and tungsten for fractionally charged particles (FCP) with fractional charge modulo 1/3. In particular, we have looked for Z = N + 1/3 ; N = 0,1... and Z = N + 2/3; N = 0,1. Upper limits have been obtained for the FCP concentration per target atom. These upper limits vary between 1 x 10(' -16) and 3 x 10('--9) depending on the material searched and the charge state examined. Some interesting events have been seen. These are FCP candidates, but they can also be explained as improbable integrally charged events.

  7. Repulsion between oppositely charged planar macroions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YongSeok Jho

    Full Text Available The repulsive interaction between oppositely charged macroions is investigated using Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations of an unrestricted primitive model, including the effect of inhomogeneous surface charge and its density, the depth of surface charge, the cation size, and the dielectric permittivity of solvent and macroions, and their contrast. The origin of the repulsion is a combination of osmotic pressure and ionic screening resulting from excess salt between the macroions. The excess charge over-reduces the electrostatic attraction between macroions and raises the entropic repulsion. The magnitude of the repulsion increases when the dielectric constant of the solvent is lowered (below that of water and/or the surface charge density is increased, in good agreement with experiment. Smaller size of surface charge and the cation, their discreteness and mobility are other factors that enhance the repulsion and charge inversion phenomenons.

  8. Spacecraft charging - Progress in the study of dielectrics and plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P. A., Jr.; Coakley, P.

    1992-01-01

    The progress in spacecraft charging is reviewed with particular attention given to the interactions of plasma and penetrating radiation with dielectrics. Topics discussed include the charging environments, elementary charging theory, the anomalies attributed to charging or discharging phenomena, and spacecraft engineering.

  9. Colour and magnetic monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrigan, E.; Olive, D.

    1976-01-01

    If the exact gauge symmetry of nature consists of the U(1)sub(EM) generated by the electric charge operator Q and the colour group K, with Q a colour singlet, then, if g is a possible magnetic charge, exp(4πigQ) must equal an element of the colour group. For colour singlet particles this reduces to Dirac's condition eg = n/2. In general, possible monopoles correspond to points of intersection of the colour and electromagnetic groups. If the colour group is semi-simple and compact, there can at most be a finite number p of such points (p = N if K = SU(N)). The existence of non-trivial (not equal to unity) solutions to our condition means that there must be fractionally charged (with p the fraction) coloured particles and magnetic monopoles emanating colour magnetic flux as well as electromagnetic flux. (Auth.)

  10. Magnetic Storms in October 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasyuk, M. I.; Solar Extreme Events in 2003 Collaboration SEE-2003; Kuznetsov, S. N.; Lazutin, L. L.; Avdyushin, S. I.; Alexeev, I. I.; Ammosov, P. P.; Antonova, A. E.; Baishev, D. G.; Belenkaya, E. S.; Beletsky, A. B.; Belov, A. V.; Benghin, V. V.; Bobrovnikov, S. Yu.; Bondarenko, V. A.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Veselovsky, I. S.; Vyushkova, T. Yu.; Gavrilieva, G. A.; Gaidash, S. P.; Ginzburg, E. A.; Denisov, Yu. I.; Dmitriev, A. V.; Zherebtsov, G. A.; Zelenyi, L. M.; Ivanov-Kholodny, G. S.; Kalegaev, V. V.; Kanonidi, Kh. D.; Kleimenova, N. G.; Kozyreva, O. V.; Kolomiitsev, O. P.; Krasheninnikov, I. A.; Krivolutsky, A. A.; Kropotkin, A. P.; Kuminov, A. A.; Leshchenko, L. N.; Mar'in, B. V.; Mitrikas, V. G.; Mikhalev, A. V.; Mullayarov, V. A.; Muravieva, E. A.; Myagkova, I. N.; Petrov, V. M.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Podorolsky, A. N.; Pudovkin, M. I.; Samsonov, S. N.; Sakharov, Ya. A.; Svidsky, P. M.; Sokolov, V. D.; Soloviev, S. I.; Sosnovets, E. N.; Starkov, G. V.; Starostin, L. I.; Tverskaya, L. V.; Teltsov, M. V.; Troshichev, O. A.; Tsetlin, V. V.; Yushkov, B. Yu.

    2004-09-01

    Preliminary results of an analysis of satellite and ground-based measurements during extremely strong magnetic storms at the end of October 2003 are presented, including some numerical modeling. The geosynchronous satellites Ekspress-A2 and Ekspress-A3, and the low-altitude polar satellites Coronas-F and Meteor-3M carried out measurements of charged particles (electrons, protons, and ions) of solar and magnetospheric origin in a wide energy range. Disturbances of the geomagnetic field caused by extremely high activity on the Sun were studied at more than twenty magnetic stations from Lovozero (Murmansk region) to Tixie (Sakha-Yakutia). Unique data on the dynamics of the ionosphere, riometric absorption, geomagnetic pulsations, and aurora observations at mid-latitudes are obtained.

  11. The dielectric response to the magnetic field of electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Shouvik; Mukhopadhyay, Sourabh; Datta, Prasanta Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Light-matter interaction in transparent dielectrics is revisited, including the magnetic force on bound charges in the Lorentz oscillator model. The parameter ranges of incident radiation and the medium on which the magnetic field of the electromagnetic radiation will have a significant effect are traced using Floquet theory. The analysis reveals that the threshold intensity for a significant response of the magnetic field of the radiation at the second harmonic of the incident radiation can be reduced to {10}12 {{W}}{{cm}}-2 for off resonant and even lower for resonant interaction. This phenomenon has already been observed indirectly in experiments [1, 2]. Induced magnetizing current due to the magnetic force is shown to originate from a modified dielectric response, which may be useful in future magneto-optic devices, solar energy harvesting, and studying the ultrafast dynamics in doped dielectrics.

  12. Control of hole localization in magnetic semiconductors by axial strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raebiger, Hannes; Bae, Soungmin; Echeverría-Arrondo, Carlos; Ayuela, Andrés

    2018-02-01

    Mn and Fe-doped GaN are widely studied prototype systems for hole-mediated magnetic semiconductors. The nature of the hole states around the Mn and Fe impurities, however, remains under debate. Our self-interaction corrected density-functional calculations show that the charge neutral Mn 0 and positively charged Fe+ impurities have symmetry-broken d5+h ground states, in which the hole is trapped by one of the surrounding N atoms in a small polaron state. We further show that both systems also have a variety of other d5+h configurations, including symmetric, delocalized states, which may be stabilized by axial strain. This finding opens a pathway to promote long-range hole-mediated magnetic interactions by strain engineering and clarifies why highly strained thin-films samples often exhibit anomalous magnetic properties.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ... or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ... or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web ...

  15. On the quantum field theory of charges and monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calucci, G.; Jengo, R.; Vallon, M.T.

    1981-11-01

    A treatment of the interaction between charges and monopoles is presented, in terms of functional integration over closed paths. The Lorentz covariance is preserved in all the steps of the procedure and the symmetry between electric charges and magnetic poles in the interaction is clearly displayed. Some instances of application are discussed. (author)

  16. Charged superstring attached two different D-branes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi, J.; Pourhassan, B.; Banijamali, A.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we generalized the charged open string attached both ends to the same branes to the case where charged open superstring is stretched between two different D-branes. These branes involve constant background two-dimensions magnetic field. We focus our attention to type II superstring and consider the interaction between branes. We obtain relation between string charge and the separation of two D-branes. Further more we find the modified normal ordering constant and mode expansions of superstring

  17. Spacecraft Charging Technology, 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The third Spacecraft Charging Technology Conference proceedings contain 66 papers on the geosynchronous plasma environment, spacecraft modeling, charged particle environment interactions with spacecraft, spacecraft materials characterization, and satellite design and testing. The proceedings is a compilation of the state of the art of spacecraft charging and environmental interaction phenomena.

  18. Exploring Demand Charge Savings from Commercial Solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darghouth, Naim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Barbose, Galen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mills, Andrew [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wiser, Ryan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gagnon, Pieter [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bird, Lori [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-07-31

    Commercial retail electricity rates commonly include a demand charge component, based on some measure of the customer’s peak demand. Customer-sited solar PV can potentially reduce demand charges, but the magnitude of these savings can be difficult to predict, given variations in demand charge designs, customer loads, and PV generation profiles. Moreover, depending on the circumstances, demand charges from solar may or may not align well with associated utility cost savings. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are collaborating in a series of studies to understand how solar PV can reduce demand charge levels for a variety of customer types and demand charges designs. Previous work focused on residential customs with solar. This study, instead, focuses on commercial customers and seeks to understand the extent and conditions under which rooftop can solar reduce commercial demand charges. To answer these questions, we simulate demand charge savings for a broad range of commercial customer types, demand charge designs, locations, and PV system characteristics. This particular analysis does not include storage, but a subsequent analysis in this series will evaluate demand charge savings for commercial customers with solar and storage.

  19. Magnetic monopole search experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental searches for the elusive magnetic monopole have extended over 50 years -- ever since Dirac showed that the existence of isolated magnetic charges could account for the observation of quantized electric charge. Early searches for Dirac's monopole were hampered since there was no indication of the expected monopole mass, velocity, or origin in the theory. Consequently, numerous experiments searched more or less blindly for relativistic low mass monopoles in the cosmic rays and in particle collisions at high energy accelerators. In this paper, the author reviews briefly the monopole properties which are relevant for their detection and summarize current experimental efforts using induction, ionization/excitation, and catalysis techniques

  20. No contact terms for the magnetic field in Lorentz- and CPT-violating electrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Schober

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In a Lorentz- and CPT-violating modification of electrodynamics, the fields of a moving charge are known to have unusual singularities. This raises the question of whether the singular behavior may include δ-function contact terms, similar to those that appear in the fields of idealized dipoles. However, by calculating the magnetic field of an infinite straight wire in this theory, we demonstrate that there are no such contact terms in the magnetic field of a moving point charge.

  1. Magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestel, L.; Arizona Univ., Tucson)

    1985-01-01

    The role of the Galactic magnetic field in the early stages of star formation is examined. The dynamical and observational consequences of the anisotropic collapse of cool gas clouds permeated by the local Galactic magnetic field are discussed. Magneto-gravitational equilibria of such clouds with subcritical mass-flux ratios, especially in the thin disk approximation, are addressed. Magnetic braking of both subcritical and supercritical masses is considered, and the consequences of flux leakage during the molecular cloud phase are discussed, including the effect on field topology

  2. Charged particle detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, R.D.

    1975-01-01

    A device for detecting the emission of charged particles from a specimen is described. The specimen is placed within an accumulator means which statically accumulates any charged particles emitted from the specimen. The accumulator means is pivotally positioned between a first capacitor plate having a positive electrical charge and a second capacitor plate having a negative electrical charge. The accumulator means is attracted to one capacitor plate and repelled from the other capacitor plate by an amount proportional to the amount and intensity of charged particles emitted by the specimen. (auth)

  3. Space Charge Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrario, M.; Palumbo, L.

    2014-12-19

    The space charge forces are those generated directly by the charge distribution, with the inclusion of the image charges and currents due to the interaction of the beam with a perfectly conducting smooth pipe. Space charge forces are responsible for several unwanted phenomena related to beam dynamics, such as energy loss, shift of the synchronous phase and frequency , shift of the betatron frequencies, and instabilities. We will discuss in this lecture the main feature of space charge effects in high-energy storage rings as well as in low-energy linacs and transport lines.

  4. Theoretical study of charge exchange, ionization and electron loss processes, relevant to controlled thermonuclear research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janev, R.

    1981-03-01

    The following processes have been studied: a) Single and double charge exchange in low, medium and high energy collisions of atoms with multiply charged ions; b) Excitation and ionization processes in low, medium and high energy collisions between multiply charged ions and atoms; c) Ion-ion recombination and ion-pair formation collision processes between hydrogen and alkali atoms (ions); d) Resonant and Auger processes in slow collisions of atomic particles with solid surfaces (including surfaces covered by a sub-monoatomic layer). Processes a) and b) are important for the ''impurity problem'' of magnetically confined tokamak plasmas, whereas processes c) and d) for the production and transport of intense neutral beams for plasma heating

  5. Charging transient in polyvinyl formal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    tally influences all the transport phenomena and their effects at the electrodes. The different facts, including the weak polar structure of polymer, the power-law dependence of current on field, the observed value of 'n' and the thermal activation of current over a certain temperature range indicate that a space charge due to ...

  6. Modern charge-density analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gatti, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Focusing on developments from the past 10-15 years, this volume presents an objective overview of the research in charge density analysis. The most promising methodologies are included, in addition to powerful interpretative tools and a survey of important areas of research.

  7. Batteries not included

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.

    2001-01-01

    This article traces the development of clockwork wind-up battery chargers that can be used to recharge mobile phones, laptop computers, torches or radio batteries from the pioneering research of the British inventor Trevor Baylis to the marketing of the wind-up gadgets by Freeplay Energy who turned the idea into a commercial product. The amount of cranking needed to power wind-up devices is discussed along with a hand-cranked charger for mobile phones, upgrading the phone charger's mechanism, and drawbacks of the charger. Details are given of another invention using a hand-cranked generator with a supercapacitor as a storage device which has a very much higher capacity for storing electrical charge

  8. Dirac's Conception of the Magnetic Monopole, and its Modern Avatars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the insulating rod, we recover the charged spheres that we started with. Each of these has a net electric charge. (one is positive, the other negative), and can be called an 'electric monopole'. On the other hand, when we cut a bar magnet in two, we end up not with two magnetic monopoles, but with two smaller bar magnets, ...

  9. Acceleration of low energy charged particles by gravitational waves