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Sample records for include cassini galileo

  1. Jovian atmospheric dynamics: an update after Galileo and Cassini

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasavada, Ashwin R; Showman, Adam P

    2005-01-01

    The Galileo and Cassini spacecrafts have greatly enhanced the observational record of Jupiter's tropospheric dynamics, particularly through returning high spatial resolution, multi-spectral and global imaging data with episodic coverage over periods of months to years. These data, along with those from Earth-based telescopes, have revealed the stability of Jupiter's zonal jets, captured the evolution of vortices and equatorial waves, and mapped the distributions of lightning and moist convection. Because no observations of Jupiter's interior exist, a forward modelling approach has been used to relate observations at cloud level to models of shallow or deep jet structure, shallow or deep jet forcing and energy transfer between turbulence, vortices and jets. A range of observed phenomena can be reproduced in shallow models, though the Galileo probe winds and jet stability arguments hint at the presence of deep jets. Many deep models, however, fail to reproduce Jupiter-like non-zonal features (e.g. vortices). Jupiter's dynamics likely include both deep and shallow processes, requiring an integrated approach to future modelling-an important goal for the post-Galileo and Cassini era

  2. RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses and Cassini test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, C. Edward; Klee, Paul M.

    1997-01-01

    Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Similar comparisons are made for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995. Also presented are test results from small scale thermoelectric modules and full scale converters performed for the Cassini program. The Cassini mission to Saturn is scheduled for an October 1997 launch. Small scale module test results on thermoelectric couples from the qualification and flight production runs are shown. These tests have exceeded 19,000 hours are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. Test results are presented for full scale units both ETGs (E-6, E-7) and RTGs (F-2, F-5) along with mission power predictions. F-5, fueled in 1985, served as a spare for the Galileo and Ulysses missions and plays the same role in the Cassini program. It has successfully completed all acceptance testing. The ten years storage between thermal vacuum tests is the longest ever experienced by an RTG. The data from this test are unique in providing the effects of long term low temperature storage on power output. All ETG and RTG test results to date indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of at least five percent are predicted

  3. RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses and Cassini test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-01-01

    Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Similar comparisons are made for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995. Also presented are test results from small scale thermoelectric modules and full scale converters performed for the Cassini program. The Cassini mission to Saturn is scheduled for an October 1997 launch. Small scale module test results on thermoelectric couples from the qualification and flight production runs are shown. These tests have exceeded 19,000 hours are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. Test results are presented for full scale units both ETGs (E-6, E-7) and RTGs (F-2, F-5) along with mission power predictions. F-5, fueled in 1985, served as a spare for the Galileo and Ulysses missions and plays the same role in the Cassini program. It has successfully completed all acceptance testing. The ten years storage between thermal vacuum tests is the longest ever experienced by an RTG. The data from this test are unique in providing the effects of long term low temperature storage on power output. All ETG and RTG test results to date indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of at least five percent are predicted. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  4. Cassini RTG acceptance test results and RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-01-01

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, mass properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents the thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F-2, F-6, and F-7. F-5 is the backup RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at the Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on these tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also shown. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over 5% are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission

  5. Cassini RTG acceptance test results and RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-01-01

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents The thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F-2, F-6, and F-7. F-5 is tile back-up RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at die Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on than tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also showing. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over five percent are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission

  6. Analysis of Hot Ions Detected during Equatorial Orbits of the Cassini Spacecraft at Saturn using the Convected Kappa Distribution Function and a Comparison to Voyager and Galileo Measurements at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Carbary, J. F.; Hill, M. E.; Dialynas, K.; Mauk, B.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    An extensive analysis of Cassini INCA and CHEMS measurements of 5-149 keV ions acquired during all equatorial orbits has been completed using a 3-D convected kappa distribution model. The computed plasma azimuthal speed, expressed as a fraction of the local corotation speed, decreases sharply with increasing distance from Saturn. The oxygen ion profile follows the hydrogen ion trend. For both species, the polar convection speed is the smallest of the 3 velocity components, and is centered about zero, but the radial speed has a significant radially outward component. Further, the radial component is enhanced in the pre-dawn sector. The hydrogen and oxygen temperatures increase with decreasing distance to Saturn. The calculated pattern of convection is consistent with an empirical model of plasma convection that includes outward radial transport and escape of plasma in a dawnside boundary layer of plasma entrained by the dawn magnetosheath flow. When the model convection pattern is scaled to the sub-solar magnetopause distance and to the sizes of Jupiter and Saturn, the pattern agrees with that derived from analysis of hot ions detected by the LECP detector on Voyager and the EPD instrument on Galileo. This and previous analysis of hot ion distributions has shown that the convected kappa distribution, with isotropy assumed in the plasma rest frame, has well described hot ion observed fluxes within a limited range of ion energies and has produced meaningful and ordered physical plasma parameters including plasma bulk velocity vectors, kappa distribution temperature profiles, and the general magnetospheric convection pattern at Jupiter and Saturn.

  7. Galileo positioning technology

    CERN Document Server

    Lohan, Elena; Sand, Stephan; Hurskainen, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    This book covers multi-band Galileo receivers (especially E1-E5 bands of Galileo) and addresses all receiver building blocks, from the antenna and front end, through details of the baseband receiver processing blocks, up to the navigation processing, including the Galileo message structure and Position, Velocity, Time (PVT) computation. Moreover, hybridization solutions with communications systems for improved localization are discussed and an open-source GNSS receiver platform (available for download) developed at Tampere University of Technology (TUT) is addressed in detail. • Takes a holistic approach to GALILEO and related systems, such as EGNOS and hybrid solutions on mobile phones; • Provides an invaluable reference to Binary Offset Carrier modulations and related families, which are some of the trademarks of GALILEO; • Includes a detailed survey of GALILEO receiver research in Europe and existing software-defined radio (SDR) GALILEO receiver implementations; • Addresses the multiple challen...

  8. The Cassini-Huygens mission

    CERN Document Server

    The joint NASA-ESA Cassini-Huygens mission promises to return four (and possibly more) years of unparalleled scientific data from the solar system’s most exotic planet, the ringed, gas giant, Saturn. Larger than Galileo with a much greater communication bandwidth, Cassini can accomplish in a single flyby what Galileo returned in a series of passes. Cassini explores the Saturn environment in three dimensions, using gravity assists to climb out of the equatorial plane to look down on the rings from above, to image the aurora and to study polar magnetospheric processes such as field-aligned currents. Since the radiation belt particle fluxes are much more benign than those at Jupiter, Cassini can more safely explore the inner regions of the magnetosphere. The spacecraft approaches the planet closer than Galileo could, and explores the inner moons and the rings much more thoroughly than was possible at Jupiter. This book is the second volume, in a three volume set, that describes the Cassini/Huygens mission. Thi...

  9. Health Physics Innovations Developed During Cassini for Future Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Rodney E.; Rutherford, Theresa M.; Marmaro, George M.

    1999-01-01

    The long history of space flight includes missions that used Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power devices, starting with the Transit 4A Spacecraft (1961), continuing through the Apollo, Pioneer, Viking, Voyager, Galileo, Ulysses, Mars Pathfinder, and most recently, Cassini (1997). All Major Radiological Source (MRS) missions were processed at Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Station (KSC/CCAS) Launch Site in full compliance with program and regulatory requirements. The cumulative experience gained supporting these past missions has led to significant innovations which will be useful for benchmarking future MRS mission ground processing. Innovations developed during ground support for the Cassini mission include official declaration of sealed-source classifications, utilization of a mobile analytical laboratory, employment of a computerized dosimetry record management system, and cross-utilization of personnel from related disciplines.

  10. Cassini VESPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, A.

    2017-09-01

    NASA's Cassini Mission has gathered thirteen years of data exploring Saturn and its moons, rings, magnetosphere, and atmosphere. As the mission comes to a close, scientists need to ensure that the information they have assembled during this extraordinary mission is easily accessible to new researchers. Each of Cassini's twelve instruments can take observations in different modes and with different sensors. The instrument teams store their data in disparate systems and formats, and process them to different levels. Creating a single, intuitive interface for new scientists to search across all of this data is a daunting task. The VESPA (Virtual European Solar and Planetary Access) framework offers a potential solution for this challenge. VESPA provides a standard data model, access protocol, and registration service so that any team can turn their dataset into a service provider. The Cassini archive team has created a prototype with VESPA to evaluate whether the framework is a solution for this flagship mission. The resulting system allows users to query data from any Cassini instrument in one place, along with data from other missions, other agencies, ground-based observations, and laboratory results. This poster will describe the Cassini experience setting up the VESPA server, importing various types of Cassini data, and gathering feedback from the science community.

  11. Becoming Galileo in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavicchi, Elizabeth

    2011-04-01

    Galileo's contributions are so familiar as to be taken for granted, obscuring the exploratory process by which his discoveries arose. The wonder that Galileo experienced comes alive for undergraduates and teachers that I teach, when they find themselves taking Galileo's role by means of their own explorations. These classroom journeys include: sighting through picture frames to understand perspective, watching the night sky, experimenting with lenses and motion, and responding to Galileo's story. In teaching, I use critical exploration, the research pedagogy developed by Eleanor Duckworth that arose historically from both the clinical interviewing of Jean Piaget and B"arbel Inhelder and the Elementary Science Study of the 1960s. During critical explorations, the teacher supports students' investigations by posing provocative experiences while interactively following students' emergent understandings. In the context of Galileo, students learned to observe carefully, trust their observations, notice things they had never noticed before, and extend their understanding in the midst of pervasive confusion. Personal investment moved students to question assumptions that they had never critically evaluated. By becoming Galileo in today's classroom, we found the ordinary world no less intriguing and unsettling to explore, as the historical world of protagonists in Galileo's Dialogue.

  12. Cassini at Saturn Huygens results

    CERN Document Server

    Harland, David M

    2007-01-01

    "Cassini At Saturn - Huygens Results" will bring the story of the Cassini-Huygens mission and their joint exploration of the Saturnian system right up to date. Cassini is due to enter orbit around Saturn on the 1 July 2004 and the author will have 8 months of scientific data available for review, including the most spectacular images of Saturn, its rings and satellites ever obtained by a space mission. As the Cassini spacecraft approached its destination in spring 2004, the quality of the images already being returned by the spacecraft clearly demonstrate the spectacular nature of the close-range views that will be obtained. The book will contain a 16-page colour section, comprising a carefully chosen selection of the most stunning images to be released during the spacecraft's initial period of operation. The Huygens craft will be released by Cassini in December 2004 and is due to parachute through the clouds of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, in January 2005.

  13. NASA 3D Models: Cassini

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cassini spacecraft from SPACE rendering package, built by Michael Oberle under NASA contract at JPL. Includes orbiter only, Huygens probe detached. Accurate except...

  14. Titan after Cassini Huygens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, P. M.; Lunine, J.; Lebreton, J.; Coustenis, A.; Matson, D.; Reh, K.; Erd, C.

    2008-12-01

    architecture inherently provides the optimal balance between science, risk, and cost using three guiding principles: Achieve science well beyond the high bar set by Cassini Huygens. The TSSM orbiter, lander, and balloon have been configured with instruments and operational concept that go well beyond Cassini-Huygens capabilities, thus ensuring dramatic remote observation and in situ science discoveries. Build upon successful design and operational experience and lessons learned. ESA has successful experience in designing and landing probes on Titan (Huygens), as does NASA in implementing an orbiter at Saturn (Cassini). Long life design rules and extensive operational experience in the Saturn system have been applied to form the TSSM concept. Lessons learned from Galileo, Cassini, New Horizons, and MRO have been applied to reduce risk and lower cost. Development by ESA of the montgolfiere combines prior experience with Earth and planetary balloon systems to enable innovative science and unprecedented mobility for surface exploration. Strong international partnership. TSSM represents a collaborative effort between NASA and ESA that is structured to provide the best possible mission at a reasonable cost to NASA and to ESA. This NASA-ESA partnership leverages resources to maximize science return, distribute risk, and ensure technical readiness.

  15. Galileo Earth/Moon News Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) video release (Part 2 of 2) is a continuation of a press conference held at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Dec. 1, 1992, 7 days prior to the Galileo Earth-2 flyby. The video begins following presentations given by William J. O'Neil (Galileo Project Manager), Torrence Johnson (Galileo Project Scientist), Dr. Joseph Veverka (Galileo Imaging Team, Cornell University) and during a question and answer period given for the benefit of scientific journalists. Subjects include overall Galileo spacecraft health, verification of the Gaspra images timeframe, and the condition of certain scientific spacecraft instruments. Part 1 of this video can be retrieved by using Report No. NONP-NASA-VT-2000001077.

  16. The New Galileo Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    ave been developed to get as much data as possible from the Galileo spacecraft even without the high gain antenna. These methods include extensive data compression, a new packetized telemetry format, new error-correcting codes, new modulation, new ground receivers, and antenna arraying. (abstract only).

  17. Characterization of Cassini GPHS fueled clad production girth welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco-Ferreira, E.A.; Moyer, M.W.; Reimus, M.A.H.; Placr, A.; Howard, B.D.

    2000-01-01

    Fueled clads for radioisotope power systems are produced by encapsulating 238 PuO 2 in iridium alloy cups, which are joined at their equators by gas tungsten arc welding. Cracking problems at the girth weld tie-in area during production of the Galileo/Ulysses GPHS capsules led to the development of a first-generation ultrasonic test for girth weld inspection at the Savannah River Plant. A second-generation test and equipment with significantly improved sensitivity and accuracy were jointly developed by the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and Westinghouse Savannah River Company for use during the production of Cassini GPHS capsules by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The test consisted of Lamb wave ultrasonic scanning of the entire girth weld from each end of the capsule combined with a time-of-flight evaluation to aid in characterizing nonrelevant indications. Tangential radiography was also used as a supplementary test for further evaluation of reflector geometry. Each of the 317 fueled GP HS capsules, which were girth welded for the Cassini Program, was subjected to a series of nondestructive tests that included visual, dimensional, helium leak rate, and ultrasonic testing. Thirty-three capsules were rejected prior to ultrasonic testing. Of the 44 capsules rejected by the standard ultrasonic test, 22 were upgraded to flight quality through supplementary testing for an overall process acceptance rate of 82.6%. No confirmed instances of weld cracking were found

  18. The trials of Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingerich, Owen

    2009-12-01

    There are so many books about Galileo, author Dan Hofstadter remarks, so why another? Given that 2009 marks the 400th anniversary of the first astronomical use of the telescope, where Galileo's role was paramount, the answer may seem obvious. But that is not where the strength of Hofstadter's book lies. In The Earth Moves: Galileo and the Roman Inquisition, he instead advances the clock to 1633, towards the end of the Italian scientist's career and the year of the infamous trial that resulted after Galileo's Dialogue on the Two Great World Systems was published in 1632.

  19. [Galileo and his telescope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strebel, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    Galileo's publication of observations made with his newly reinvented telescope provoked a fierce debate. In April 1610 Martinus Horky, a young Bohemian astronomer, had an opportunity to make his own observations with Galileo's telescope in the presence of Antonio Magini and other astronomers. Horky and the other witnesses denied the adequacy of Galileo's telescope and therefore the bona fides of his discoveries. Kepler conjectured Horky as well as all his witnesses to be myopic. But Kepler's objection could not stop the publication of Horky's Peregrinatio contra nuncium sidereum (Modena, 1610), the first printed refutation of Galileo's Sidereus nuncius. In his treatise, Horky adresses four questions: 1) Do the four newly observed heavenly bodies actually exist? Horky denies their existence on various grounds: a) God, as every astronomer teaches, has created only seven moveable heavenly bodies and astronomical knowledge originates in God, too. b) Heavenly bodies are either stars or planets. Galileo's moveable heavenly bodies fit into neither category. c) If they do exist, why have they not already been observed by other scholars? Horky concludes that there are no such heavenly bodies. 2) What are these phenomena? They are purely artefactual, and produced by Galileo's telescope. 3) How are they like? Galileo's "stars" are so small as to be almost invisible. Galileo claims that he has measured their distances from each other. This however is impossible due to their diminutive size and other observational problems. Hence, Galileo's claim is a further proof that he is a fraud. 4) Why are they? For Galileo they are a chance to earn money but for astronomers like Horky they are a reason to offer thanks and honour to God. Horky's treatise was favourably received by the enemies of Galileo. But Kepler's critique was devastating. After calling on Kepler in Prague, Horky had to revoke the contents of his book.

  20. Simulation Facilities and Test Beds for Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlarmann, Bernhard Kl.; Leonard, Arian

    2002-01-01

    Galileo is the European satellite navigation system, financed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Commission (EC). The Galileo System, currently under definition phase, will offer seamless global coverage, providing state-of-the-art positioning and timing services. Galileo services will include a standard service targeted at mass market users, an augmented integrity service, providing integrity warnings when fault occur and Public Regulated Services (ensuring a continuity of service for the public users). Other services are under consideration (SAR and integrated communications). Galileo will be interoperable with GPS, and will be complemented by local elements that will enhance the services for specific local users. In the frame of the Galileo definition phase, several system design and simulation facilities and test beds have been defined and developed for the coming phases of the project, respectively they are currently under development. These are mainly the following tools: Galileo Mission Analysis Simulator to design the Space Segment, especially to support constellation design, deployment and replacement. Galileo Service Volume Simulator to analyse the global performance requirements based on a coverage analysis for different service levels and degrades modes. Galileo System Simulation Facility is a sophisticated end-to-end simulation tool to assess the navigation performances for a complete variety of users under different operating conditions and different modes. Galileo Signal Validation Facility to evaluate signal and message structures for Galileo. Galileo System Test Bed (Version 1) to assess and refine the Orbit Determination &Time Synchronisation and Integrity algorithms, through experiments relying on GPS space infrastructure. This paper presents an overview on the so called "G-Facilities" and describes the use of the different system design tools during the project life cycle in order to design the system with respect to

  1. Intel Galileo essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Grimmett, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This book is for anyone who has ever been curious about using the Intel Galileo to create electronics projects. Some programming background is useful, but if you know how to use a personal computer, with the aid of the step-by-step instructions in this book, you can construct complex electronics projects that use the Intel Galileo.

  2. Development and Use of the Galileo and Ulysses Power Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Gary L; Hemler, Richard J; Schock, Alfred

    1994-10-01

    Paper presented at the 45th Congress of the International Astronautical Federation, October 1994. The Galileo mission to Jupiter and the Ulysses mission to explore the polar regions of the Sun required a new power source: the general-purpose heat source radioisotope thermoelectric generator (GPHS-RTG), the most powerful RTG yet flow. Four flight-qualified GPHS-RTGs were fabricated with one that is being used on Ulysses, two that are being used on Galileo and one that was a common spare (and is now available for the Cassini mission to Saturn). In addition, and Engineering Unit and a Qualification Unit were fabricated to qualify the design for space through rigorous ground tests. This paper summarizes the ground testing and performance predictions showing that the GPHS-RTGs have met and will continue to meet or exceed the performance requirements of the ongoing Galileo and Ulysses missions. There are two copies in the file.

  3. From Galileo to Newton

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Alfred Rupert

    1982-01-01

    The near century (1630–1720) that separates the important astronomical findings of Galileo Galilei (1564–1642) and the vastly influential mathematical work of Sir Isaac Newton (1642–1727) represents a pivotal stage of transition in the history of science. Tracing the revolution in physics initiated by Galileo and culminating in Newton's achievements, this book surveys the work of Huygens, Leeuwenhoek, Boyle, Descartes, and others. 35 illustrations.

  4. Music in Galileo's Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrobelli, P.

    2011-06-01

    Claudio Monteverdi appears as the key personality of the music in Galileo's time. His revolution in format and function of the musical language-from an essentially edonistic creation of purely sonorous images to a musical language consciously "expressive" of the content of the words on which it is based-is similar in character to the influential innovations in scientific thinking operated by Galileo.

  5. Galileo and the Interpretation of the Bible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, William E.

    Galileo's understanding of the relationship between science and the Bible has frequently been celebrated as anticipating a modern distinction between the essentially religious nature of scripture and the claims of the natural sciences. Galileo's reference to the remarks of Cardinal Baronius, that the Bible teaches one how to go to heaven and not how the heavens go, has been seem as emblematic of his commitment to the distinction between the Book of Nature and the Book of Scripture. This essay argues that, contrary to the common view, Galileo shares with the theologians of the Inquisition the same fundamental principles of biblical interpretation: principles which include traditional scriptural hermeneutics enunciated by Augustine and Aquinas, as well as those characteristic of Counter-Reformation Catholicism. Although Galileo argues that one should not begin with biblical passages in order to discover truths about nature, he does think that the Bible contains scientific truths and that it is the function of wise interpreters to discover these truths. The dispute with the theologians of the Inquisition occurred because they thought that it was obviously true scientifically that the earth did not move and, on the basis of this view, they read the Bible as revealing the same thing. They reached this conclusion because, like Galileo, they thought that the Bible contained truths about nature. Of course, what these theologians accepted as scientifically true, Galileo denied.

  6. The Saturn System Through the Eyes of Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James

    2017-01-01

    More than 400 years ago, Galileo Galilei trained his homemade telescope on the night sky and observed that Saturn had two objects closely related to the planet extending on either side. At the time, in 1610, Galileo declared them to be moons. A few decades later, Saturn moon science accelerated at a dizzying pace. Christiaan Huygens first observed Saturn's largest moon Titan in 1655 and was the first to describe the extended moon-like features at Saturn as a disk of material sounding the planet. From 1671 to 1674, Giovanni Cassini discovered the moons lapetus, Rhea, Dione and Tethys. In 1675, Cassini discovered the gap in Saturn's rings that we now know as the Cassini Division. In the space age, before the Cassini-Huygens mission, we had only hints of the discoveries awaiting us at Saturn. Pioneer 11 and Voyagers 1 and 2 conducted flybys decades ago. But these quick encounters didn't allow time for more extensive research. NASA and the European Space Agency created a partnership to orbit a Saturn orbiter (Cassini) and a lander (Huygens) on Titan. Like its namesakes, the Cassini-Huygens mission not only discovered previously unknown moons, but it also helped us understand the science behind their formation, their interactions with the rings, and how truly diverse they are. The Cassini-Huygens mission revolutionized what we know about the Saturn system. The rings of Saturn, the moons, and the planet itself offer irresistible and inexhaustible subjects for intense study, and Cassini-Huygens did not disappoint. The Saturnian system proved to be a rich ground for science exploration and discoveries, and Cassini has been nothing short of a discovery machine. At the time Cassini plunged into Saturn at the end of its mission, it had observed the planet for a little less than half of a Saturn year. But it also orbited the gas giant 293 times, forever changing our understanding of the Saturn system and yielding tremendous insight for understanding the entire Solar System.

  7. La paradoja de Galileo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sellés García, Manuel

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the conceptions about indivisibles displayed in Galileo’s Discorsi, and explores their application to the study of uniformement accelerated motions. I suggest to reconsider the holistic velocity concept that has been attributed to Galileo and to interpret it as an infinite collection of velocity degrees. I also suggest to interpret the moment of velocity as the measurement of acceleration. This can contribute to fill the gap between the conceptions of Galileo and Newton.

    Este artículo aborda las concepciones acerca de los indivisibles que Galileo expuso en los Discorsi y explora su aplicación al estudio de los movimientos uniformemente acelerados. Propone reconsiderar el concepto de velocidad «total» atribuido a Galileo interpretándolo, no como una superficie, sino como una colección infinita de grados de velocidad. Asimismo se sugiere interpretar el momento de la velocidad como la medida de la aceleración, lo que contribuye a tender un puente entre las concepciones de Galileo y de Newton.

  8. CASSINI SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the complete set of Cassini SPICE data files (kernel files''), which can be accessed using SPICE software. The SPICE data contains geometric...

  9. Home automation with Intel Galileo

    CERN Document Server

    Dundar, Onur

    2015-01-01

    This book is for anyone who wants to learn Intel Galileo for home automation and cross-platform software development. No knowledge of programming with Intel Galileo is assumed, but knowledge of the C programming language is essential.

  10. GPHS RTGs in Support of the Cassini RTG Program. Final Technical Report, January 11, 1991 - April 30, 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-01

    As noted in the historical summary, this program encountered a number of changes in direction, schedule, and scope over the period 11 January 1991 to 31 December 1998. The report provides a comprehensive summary of all the varied aspects of the program over its seven and a quarter years, and highlights those aspects that provide information beneficial to future radioisotope programs. In addition to summarizing the scope of the Cassini GPHS RTG Program provided as background, the introduction includes a discussion of the scope of the final report and offers reference sources for information on those topics not covered. Much of the design heritage of the GPHS RTG comes from the Multi Hundred Watt (MHW) RTGs used on the Lincoln Experimental Satellites (LES) 8/9 and Voyager spacecraft. The design utilized for the Cassini program was developed, in large part, under the GPHS RTG program which produced the Galileo and Ulysses RTGs. Reports from those programs included detailed documentation of the design, development, and testing of converter components and full converters that were identical to, or similar to, components used in the Cassini program.

  11. GPHS-RTGs in support of the Cassini RTG Program. Final technical report, January 11, 1991--April 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    As noted in the historical summary, this program encountered a number of changes in direction, schedule, and scope over the period 11 January 1991 to 31 December 1998. The report provides a comprehensive summary of all the varied aspects of the program over its seven and a quarter years, and highlights those aspects that provide information beneficial to future radioisotope programs. In addition to summarizing the scope of the Cassini GPHS-RTG Program provided as background, the introduction includes a discussion of the scope of the final report and offers reference sources for information on those topics not covered. Much of the design heritage of the GPHS-RTG comes from the Multi-Hundred Watt (MHW) RTGs used on the Lincoln Experimental Satellites (LES) 8/9 and Voyager spacecraft. The design utilized for the Cassini program was developed, in large part, under the GPHS-RTG program which produced the Galileo and Ulysses RTGs. Reports from those programs included detailed documentation of the design, development, and testing of converter components and full converters that were identical to, or similar to, components used in the Cassini program. Where such information is available in previous reports, it is not repeated here.

  12. GPHS-RTGs in support of the Cassini RTG Program. Final technical report, January 11, 1991 - April 30, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-08-01

    As noted in the historical summary, this program encountered a number of changes in direction, schedule, and scope over the period 11 January 1991 to 31 December 1998. The report provides a comprehensive summary of all the varied aspects of the program over its seven and a quarter years, and highlights those aspects that provide information beneficial to future radioisotope programs. In addition to summarizing the scope of the Cassini GPHS-RTG Program provided as background, the introduction includes a discussion of the scope of the final report and offers reference sources for information on those topics not covered. Much of the design heritage of the GPHS-RTG comes from the Multi-Hundred Watt (MHW) RTGs used on the Lincoln Experimental Satellites (LES) 8/9 and Voyager spacecraft. The design utilized for the Cassini program was developed, in large part, under the GPHS-RTG program which produced the Galileo and Ulysses RTGs. Reports from those programs included detailed documentation of the design, development, and testing of converter components and full converters that were identical to, or similar to, components used in the Cassini program. Where such information is available in previous reports, it is not repeated here

  13. The Cambridge companion to Galileo

    CERN Document Server

    1998-01-01

    This collection of essays is unparalleled in the depth of its coverage of all facets of Galileo's work. A particular feature of the volume is the treatment of Galileo's relationship with the Church. It will be of particular interest to philosophers, historians of science, cultural historians and those in religious studies. New readers and nonspecialists will find this the most convenient, accessible guide to Galileo available. Advanced students and specialists will find a conspectus of recent developments in the interpretation of Galileo.

  14. Popular perceptions of Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Dava

    2010-01-01

    Among the most persistent popular misperceptions of Galileo is the image of an irreligious scientist who opposed the Catholic Church and was therefore convicted of heresy-was even excommunicated, according to some accounts, and denied Christian burial. In fact, Galileo considered himself a good Catholic. He accepted the Bible as the true word of God on matters pertaining to salvation, but insisted Scripture did not teach astronomy. Emboldened by his discovery of the Medicean Moons, he took a stand on Biblical exegesis that has since become the official Church position.

  15. Star Messenger: Galileo at the Millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R. E.

    1999-05-01

    Smith College has recently established the Louise B. and Edmund J. Kahn Liberal Arts Institute to foster interdisciplinary scholarship among the faculty. In the 1999-2000 academic year, the Kahn Institute is sponsoring a project entitled "Star Messenger: Galileo at the Millennium." The project will explore the impact of the astronomical discoveries of Galileo and his contemporaries on the Renaissance world-view and also use Galileo's experience as a lens for examining scientific and cultural developments at the symbolic juncture represented by the year 2000. Seven faculty fellows and 10-12 student fellows will participate in a year-long colloquium pursuing these themes, aided by the participation of some five Visiting Fellows. The inaugural public event will be a symposium on the historical Galileo, with presentation by three noted scholars, each of whom will return to campus for a second meeting with the Kahn colloquium. Additional events will include an exhibit of prints, artifacts, and rare books related to Galileo and his time, an early music concert featuring music composed by Galileo's father, and a series of other events sponsored by diverse departments and programs, all related to the broad themes of the Galileo project. The culminating events will be the premiere of a new music theater work, which will encapsulate the insights of the colloquium about human reactions to novel insights about the world, and a symposium presenting the research results of faculty and student fellows. The symposium will feature a capstone lecture by an visionary scholar projecting the implication of historical and contemporary trends into the future.

  16. CASSINI S INMS LEVEL 1A EXTRACTED DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) level 1A data set includes all mass samples for the entire Cassini mission. The data set includes mass spectra...

  17. CASSINI V/E/J/S/SS RPWS RAW COMPLETE TLM PACKETS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) raw complete data set includes all RPWS telemetry data for the entire Cassini mission. This data set includes raw...

  18. CASSINI V/E/J/S/SS RPWS EDITED WAVEFORM FULL RES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) edited full resolution data set includes all waveform data for the entire Cassini mission. This data set includes...

  19. Galileo SSI Observations of Volcanic Activity at Tvashtar Catena, Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, M. P.; Keszthely, L. P.; Radebaugh, J.; Davies, A. G.; Turtle, E. P.; Geissler, P.; Klaasen, K. P.; McEwen, A. S.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: We report on the analysis of the Galileo SSI's observations of the volcanic activity at Tvashtar Catena, Io as discussed by Milazzo et al. Galileo's Solid State Imager (SSI) observed Tvashtar Catena (63 deg N, 120 deg W) four times between November 1999 and October 2001, providing a unique look at the distinctive high latitude volcanism on Io. The November 1999 observation spatially resolved, for the first time, an active extraterrestrial fissure eruption. The brightness temperature of the lavas at the November 1999 fissure eruption was 1300 K. The second observation (orbit I27, February 2000) showed a large (approx. 500 sq km) region with many, small spots of hot, active lava. The third observation was taken in conjunction with a Cassini observation in December 2000 and showed a Pele-like plume deposition ring, while the Cassini images revealed a 400 km high Pele-type plume above the Catena. The final Galileo SSI observation of Tvashtar was acquired in October 2001, and all obvious (to SSI) activity had ceased, although data from Galileo's Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) indicated that there was still significant thermal emission from the Tvashtar region. We have concentrated on analyzing the style of eruption during orbit I27 (February 2000). Comparison with a lava flow cooling model indicates that the behavior of the Tvashtar eruption during I27 does not match that of "simple" advancing lava flows. Instead, it may be an active lava lake or a complex set of lava flows with episodic, overlapping (in time and space) eruptions.

  20. In the Footsteps of Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, John; van der Veen, W.; Moody, T.; O'Dea, T.

    2008-05-01

    This workshop links the goals of IYA to needs in science education. Lack of understanding of how science is practiced exists at all levels of society and is perpetuated by the way science is presented in classrooms and informal settings, often illustrated by the scientific method as a rigid multi-step process. This workshop presents an alternative to misleading scientific method lessons by highlighting some of Galileo's work. Looking through his telescope at four moons orbiting the planet Jupiter, Galileo gave priority to evidence over popular belief, completely changing the existing world view. We have adapted an activity developed by UC Berkeley's Lawrence Hall of Science in which students simulate observations of Jupiter's moons over several nights. The activity emphasizes the nature of science in regard to observations, evidence, predictions, models, hypotheses, and theories. A direct link is made between Galileo's work and the Five Essential Features of Inquiry as outlined in the National Science Education Standards. Participants will "observe” the Galilean moons of Jupiter, record data, make predictions, and analyze and model the data to determine orbital periods and distances for each moon. Extensions of this activity will be presented, including comparisons of the Jupiter system to the Earth-Moon system. Participants will also learn about Slooh, a robotic telescope that can be used by students to obtain their own images of Jupiter and its moons. As one way to have a multitude of learners in a variety of settings participate in IYA, this activity will be made available to many audiences for presentation in the fall of 2009. Participants in this workshop will discuss adaptations suitable for different groups and mechanisms for encouraging and enabling the presentation of this activity. Participants will receive a preliminary version of the adapted Jupiter activity and the BSCS publication: "Why Does Inquiry Matter?"

  1. Galileo. Decisive innovator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharratt, Michael; Knight, David

    In this entertaining and authoritative biography Michael Sharratt examines the flair, imagination, hard-headedness, clarity, combativeness, and penetration of Galileo Galilei. To follow his career as he exploited unforeseen opportunities to unseat established ways of comprehending nature is to understand a crucial stage of the Scientific Revolution. Galileo was a path-breaker for the newly-invented telescope, the decoder of nature's mathematical language, and a quite brilliant populariser of science. Even his reluctant excursion into theology has at last been officially and handsomely recognised by the Church's `rehabilitation' f the Inquisition's most famous victim, fully discussed in the last chapter. This book makes his lasting contributions accessible to non-scientists and his mistakes are not overlooked. This is not a mythical story, but the biography of an innovator - one of the greatest ever known.

  2. Galileo as a Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiene, G.; Basso, C.

    2011-06-01

    The clinical history of Galileo, as it turns out from hundred letters he wrote and received, is so informative as to make it possible to delineate the natural history of his body. It is well known that he suffered from recurrent episodes of fever (terzana) since 1606, when he was in Florence as guest of Cristina Lorena for education of the future granduke Cosimo II. By reading signs and symptoms he reported several times, it is clear that he had various diseases (rheumatism, haemorroids, kidney stones, arrhythmias). When in December 1632, at the age of 68, Galileo delayed his journey to Rome claiming sickness, Pope Urban VIII committed 3 physicians to examine him. They reported that Galileo was affected by "pulsus intermittens" (most probably atrial fibrillation), large hernia at risk of rupture, dizziness, diffuse pain, hypochondriacal melancholy as a consequence of the "declining age". It was in February 1637 that he started to have eye disease with lacrimation and progressive loss of sight, which in 10 months led to loose at first the right eye and then also the left one. According to the consultation, asked at distance to Giovanni Trullio on February 1538 in Rome, the diagnosis of blindness due to bilateral uveitis came out. Keeping with the current medicine, the illnes might have been explained in the setting of an immune rheumatic disease (Reiter's syndrome). The cause of Galileo's death, which occurred on 8 January 1642 at the age of 78, is not known since it was not submitted to autopsy. We can speculate cardiac death due to pneumonia complicating congestive heart failure.

  3. Cassini RTG's -- Small scale module tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft, scheduled for a 1997 launch to Saturn, will be powered by three GPHS RTGs (General Purpose Heat Source Radioisotope thermoelectric Generators). The RTGs are the same type as those powering the Galileo and Ulysses spacecraft. Three new converters (F-6, F-7, and F-8) are to be built and one converter (F-2) remaining from the GPHS program will be used. F-6 and F-7 are to be fueled and F-8 serves as a spare converter. In addition, the back-up RTG (F-5) from the Ulysses launch, which is still fueled, will serve as the Cassini back-up RTG. The new RTGs will have a lower fuel loading than in the past and will provide a minimum of 276 watts each at B.O.M. (beginning of mission). The mission length is 10.75 years, at which time these RTGs will provide a minimum of 216 watts and a possible extension to 16 years when the power will be 199 watts. This paper discusses tests performed to date to confirm the successful re-establishment of the unicouple production at Martin Marietta. This production line, shut down 10 years ago, has been restarted and over 1,500 unicouples have been produced to date. Confirmation will be primarily obtained by the performance of three small scale converters in comparison with previously tested modules from the Multi Hundred Watt (MHW) (Voyager) and GPHS (Galileo, Ulysses) programs. Test results to date have shown excellent agreement with the data base

  4. CASSINI V/E/J/S/SS RPWS EDITED WIDEBAND FULL RES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) edited full resolution data set includes all wideband waveform data for the entire Cassini mission. This data set...

  5. Galileo's contribution to modern orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastifer, James R; Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H; Gustafson, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Galileo Galilei (1564-1642), world-renowned Italian mathematician, astronomer, physicist and philosopher, made many contributions to science. The objective of this study is to demonstrate that Galileo's discovery of scaling principles permitted others to define and advance orthopaedic research and clinical sciences. The science and scaling principles of Galileo Galilei were extensively analyzed by reviewing his 1638 original work Discorsi e Demostrazioni Matematiche Intorno a Due Nuove Scienze. Works about Galileo's science were reviewed for the concept of the scaling principles and with the idea of shedding light on how his work influenced modern orthopaedics. Galileo strictly adhered to the Copernican heliocentric theory with the sun at the center of the universe, which caused him aggravation and made him the target of inquisition rage at the end of his prodigious life. With his attention away from the cosmos, Galileo--through the voices of Salviati, Sagredo and Simplicio in the Discourses on Two New Sciences--defined how scaling was important to the movement and function of objects. Galileo introduced important advances in scaling laws, which contributed to the development of the field of biomechanics. This discipline, in many ways, has defined modern clinical and research orthopaedics. Galileo, by introducing the principles of scaling, permitted their application to human physical capacity, to bone and tissue response after injury, and to clinical treatment of injuries. Galileo in this way made important contributions to the practice of modern orthopaedics.

  6. GNSS global navigation satellite systems : GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, and more

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann-Wellenhof, Bernhard; Wasle, Elmar

    2008-01-01

    This book is an extension to the acclaimed scientific bestseller "GPS - Theory and Practice". It covers Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and includes the Russian GLONASS, the European system Galileo, and additional systems.

  7. Galileo and the Problems of Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Wallace Edd

    Galileo's science of motion changed natural philosophy. His results initiated a broad human awakening to the intricate new world of physical order found in the midst of familiar operations of nature. His thinking was always based squarely on the academic traditions of the spiritual old world. He advanced physics by new standards of judgment drawn from mechanics and geometry, and disciplined observation of the world. My study first determines the order of composition of the earliest essays on motion and physics, ca. 1588 -1592, from internal evidence, and bibliographic evidence. There are clear signs of a Platonist critique of Aristotle, supported by Archimedes, in the Ten Section Version of On Motion, written ca. 1588, and probably the earliest of his treatises on motion or physics. He expanded upon his opening Platonic -Archimedean position by investigating the ideas of scholastic critics of Aristotle, including the Doctores Parisienses, found in his readings of the Jesuit Professors at the Collegio Romano. Their influences surfaced clearly in Galileo's Memoranda on Motion and the Dialogue on Motion, and in On Motion, which followed, ca. 1590-1592. At the end of his sojourn in Pisa, Galileo opened the road to the new physics by solving an important problem in the mechanics of Pappus, concerning motion along inclined planes. My study investigates why Galileo gave up attempts to establish a ratio between speed and weight, and why he began to seek the ratios of time and distance and speed, by 1602. It also reconstructs Galileo's development of the 1604 principle, seeking to outline its invention, elaboration, and abandonment. Then, I try to show that we have a record of Galileo's moment of recognition of the direct relation between the time of fall and the accumulated speed of motion--that great affinity between time and motion and the key to the new science of motion established before 1610. Evidence also ties the discovery of the time affinity directly to Galileo

  8. The Galileo Ground Segment Integrity Algorithms: Design and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Hernández Medel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Galileo, the European Global Navigation Satellite System, will provide to its users highly accurate global positioning services and their associated integrity information. The element in charge of the computation of integrity messages within the Galileo Ground Mission Segment is the integrity processing facility (IPF, which is developed by GMV Aerospace and Defence. The main objective of this paper is twofold: to present the integrity algorithms implemented in the IPF and to show the achieved performance with the IPF software prototype, including aspects such as: implementation of the Galileo overbounding concept, impact of safety requirements on the algorithm design including the threat models for the so-called feared events, and finally the achieved performance with real GPS and simulated Galileo scenarios.

  9. BOOK REVIEW: Galileo's Muse: Renaissance Mathematics and the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Mark; Sterken, Christiaan

    2013-12-01

    Galileo's Muse is a book that focuses on the life and thought of Galileo Galilei. The Prologue consists of a first chapter on Galileo the humanist and deals with Galileo's influence on his student Vincenzo Viviani (who wrote a biography of Galileo). This introductory chapter is followed by a very nice chapter that describes the classical legacy: Pythagoreanism and Platonism, Euclid and Archimedes, and Plutarch and Ptolemy. The author explicates the distinction between Greek and Roman contributions to the classical legacy, an explanation that is crucial for understanding Galileo and Renaissance mathematics. The following eleven chapters of this book arranged in a kind of quadrivium, viz., Poetry, Painting, Music, Architecture present arguments to support the author's thesis that the driver for Galileo's genius was not Renaissance science as is generally accepted but Renaissance arts brought forth by poets, painters, musicians, and architects. These four sets of chapters describe the underlying mathematics in poetry, visual arts, music and architecture. Likewise, Peterson stresses the impact of the philosophical overtones present in geometry, but absent in algebra and its equations. Basically, the author writes about Galileo, while trying to ignore the Copernican controversy, which he sees as distracting attention from Galileo's scientific legacy. As such, his story deviates from the standard myth on Galileo. But the book also looks at other eminent characters, such as Galileo's father Vincenzo (who cultivated music and music theory), the painter Piero della Francesca (who featured elaborate perspectives in his work), Dante Alighieri (author of the Divina Commedia), Filippo Brunelleschi (who engineered the dome of the Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence, Johannes Kepler (a strong supporter of Galileo's Copernicanism), etc. This book is very well documented: it offers, for each chapter, a wide selection of excellent biographical notes, and includes a fine

  10. Galileo a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, Stillman

    2001-01-01

    In a startling reinterpretation of the evidence, Stillman Drake advances the hypothesis that Galileo's trial and condemnation by the Inquisition was caused not by his defiance of the Church, but by the hostility of contemporary philosophers. Galileo's own beautifully lucid arguments are used to show how his scientific method was utterly divorced from the Aristotelian approach to physics in that it was based on a search not for causes but for laws. Galileo's method was of overwhelming significance for the development of modern physics, and led to a final parting of the ways between science and

  11. Galileo's Trajectory with Mild Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groetsch, C. W.

    2012-01-01

    An aspect of Galileo's classical trajectory that persists in a simple resistance model is noted. The resistive model provides a case study for the classroom analysis of limiting behaviour of an implicitly defined function. (Contains 1 note.)

  12. Managing Cassini Safe Mode Attitude at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft was launched on October 15, 1997 and arrived at Saturn on June 30, 2004. It has performed detailed observations and remote sensing of Saturn, its rings, and its satellites since that time. In the event safe mode interrupts normal orbital operations, Cassini has flight software fault protection algorithms to detect, isolate, and recover to a thermally safe and commandable attitude and then wait for further instructions from the ground. But the Saturn environment is complex, and safety hazards change depending on where Cassini is in its orbital trajectory around Saturn. Selecting an appropriate safe mode attitude that insures safe operation in the Saturn environment, including keeping the star tracker field of view clear of bright bodies, while maintaining a quiescent, commandable attitude, is a significant challenge. This paper discusses the Cassini safe table management strategy and the key criteria that must be considered, especially during low altitude flybys of Titan, in deciding what spacecraft attitude should be used in the event of safe mode.

  13. Galileo and the Interpretation of the Bible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, William E.

    1999-01-01

    Argues that, contrary to the common view, Galileo and the theologians of the Inquisition share the same fundamental principles of biblical interpretation. Contends that Galileo and these theologians thought that the Bible contained truths about nature, but Galileo denied what the theologians accepted as scientifically true. Contains 93 references.…

  14. CASSINI E/J/S/SW MIMI LEMMS SENSOR UNCALIBRATED DATA V1.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument(MIMI) Low Energy Magnetospheric Measurement System (LEMMS) uncalibrated data set includes all data collected from the...

  15. CASSINI E/J/S/SW MIMI LEMMS SENSOR UNCALIBRATED DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument(MIMI) Low Energy Magnetospheric Measurement System (LEMMS) uncalibrated data set includes all data collected from the...

  16. Survey of Galileo Plasma Observations in Jupiter's Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagenal, Fran; Wilson, Robert J.; Siler, Scott; Paterson, William R.; Kurth, William S.

    2016-01-01

    The plasma science (PLS) Instrument on the Galileo spacecraft (orbiting Jupiter from December 1995 to September 2003) measured properties of the ions that were trapped in the magnetic field. The PLS data provide a survey of the plasma properties between approx. 5 and 30 Jupiter radii [R(sub J)] in the equatorial region. We present plasma properties derived via two analysis methods: numerical moments and forward modeling. We find that the density decreases with radial distance by nearly 5 orders of magnitude from approx. 2 to 3000 cm(exp.-3) at 6R(sub j) to approx. 0.05cm(sub -3) at 30 R(sub j). The density profile did not show major changes from orbit to orbit, suggesting that the plasma production and transport remained constant within about a factor of 2. The radial profile of ion temperature increased with distance which implied that contrary to the concept of adiabatic cooling on expansion, the plasma heats up as it expands out from Io's orbit (where TI is approx.60-80 eV) at approx. 6R(sub j) to a few keV at 30R(sub j).There does not seem to be a long-term, systematic variation in ion temperature with either local time or longitude. This latter finding differs from earlier analysis of Galileo PLS data from a selection of orbits. Further examination of all data from all Galileo orbits suggests that System Ill variations are transitory on timescales of weeks, consistent with the modeling of Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph observations. The plasma flow is dominated by azimuthal flow that is between 80% and 100% of corotation out to 25 R(sub j).

  17. Radio Telescopes Will Add to Cassini-Huygens Discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    poorly understood. Predictions of where the Huygens probe will land range from nearly 250 miles east to nearly 125 miles west of the point where its parachute first deploys, depending on which wind model is used. What actually happens to the probe as it makes its parachute descent through Titan's atmosphere will give scientists their best-ever opportunity to learn about Titan's winds. During its descent, Huygens will transmit data from its onboard sensors to Cassini, the "mother ship" that brought it to Titan. Cassini will then relay the data back to Earth. However, the large radio telescopes will be able to receive the faint (10-watt) signal from Huygens directly, even at a distance of nearly 750 million miles. This will not be done to duplicate the data collection, but to generate new data about Huygens' position and motions through direct measurement. Measurements of the Doppler shift in the frequency of Huygens' radio signal made from the Cassini spacecraft, in an experiment led by Mike Bird of the University of Bonn, will largely give information about the speed of Titan's east-west winds. A team led by scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA, will measure the Doppler shift in the probe's signal relative to Earth. These additional Doppler measurements from the Earth-based radio telescopes will provide important data needed to learn about the north-south winds. "Adding the ground-based telescopes to the experiment will not only help confirm the data we get from the Cassini orbiter but also will allow us to get a much more complete picture of the winds on Titan," said William Folkner, a JPL scientist. The VLBA The VLBA CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for VLBA gallery) Another team, led by scientists from the Joint Institute for Very Long Baseline Interferometry in Europe (JIVE), in Dwingeloo, The Netherlands, will use a world-wide network of radio telescopes, including the NRAO telescopes, to track the probe's trajectory with unprecedented

  18. GALILEO Precise Orbit and Clock Determinaiton using GPS and GALILEO Combined Processing Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongzheng; Tang, Geshi; Song, Baiyan; Liu, Huicui; Han, Chao; Ge, Maorong

    2014-05-01

    The GALILEO system-still in its development phase-will be Europe's GNSS, and the in-orbit validation (IOV) phase has begun with launch of two IOV satellites, IOV-1 (E11) and IOV-2 (E12). High precise data processing is the precondition for upgrading navigation precision, monitoring and assessment of GNSS Open services, and expanding the application region for satellite navigation system. BACC is doing the work about operation and maintenance the iGMAS (international GNSS Monitoring and Assessment Service) Analysis Center (BAC), and producing the precision products to the users with equivalent accuracy to well-known institutes, such as IGS and CODE including precise satellite orbit and clock, tracking station coordinate and receiver clock, Zenith Total Delay (ZTD), Earth Orientation Parameter (EOP) parameters, global and statistical integrity and Ionospheric map, and this study just focuses on the combined orbit and clock. For GALILEO in the initial deployment phase, in order to take advantage of GPS observation and mature models to do joint orbit determination in a unified time and space frame to improve the orbit of other systems, and use the GPS orbit and clock from joint solution as the external check, we adopt combined orbit determination of GPS and GALILEO fixing firstly the coordinate of station, receiver clock and tropospheric parameters using GPS precise ephemeris and clock, and seting inter-system bias (ISB) between GPS and GALILEO as a parameter to be estimated. The observation data from a network of multi-GNSS capable receivers from the MGEX tracking network and a regional multi-GNSS network operated by China from day 321 to 334 in 2013, and the satellite force models and GFZ standard observation modeling except Yaw-control model are used in three day solution. For impact analysis, we compare the GPS orbit and clock to IGS final orbit and clock products to evaluate the accuracy, and the accuracy of GALILEO orbit and clock and can be validated by checking

  19. Exploration of the Saturn System by the Cassini Mission: Observations with the Cassini Infrared Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mian M.

    2014-01-01

    Outline: Introduction to the Cassini mission, and Cassini mission Objectives; Cassini spacecraft, instruments, launch, and orbit insertion; Saturn, Rings, and Satellite, Titan; Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS); and Infrared observations of Saturn and titan.

  20. Cassini Mission Sequence Subsystem (MSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alland, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes my work with the Cassini Mission Sequence Subsystem (MSS) team during the summer of 2011. It gives some background on the motivation for this project and describes the expected benefit to the Cassini program. It then introduces the two tasks that I worked on - an automatic system auditing tool and a series of corrections to the Cassini Sequence Generator (SEQ_GEN) - and the specific objectives these tasks were to accomplish. Next, it details the approach I took to meet these objectives and the results of this approach, followed by a discussion of how the outcome of the project compares with my initial expectations. The paper concludes with a summary of my experience working on this project, lists what the next steps are, and acknowledges the help of my Cassini colleagues.

  1. Titan from Cassini-Huygens

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Robert H; Waite, J. Hunter

    2010-01-01

    This book reviews our current knowledge of Saturn's largest moon Titan featuring the latest results obtained by the Cassini-Huygens mission. A global author team addresses Titan’s origin and evolution, internal structure, surface geology, the atmosphere and ionosphere as well as magnetospheric interactions. The book closes with an outlook beyond the Cassini-Huygens mission. Colorfully illustrated, this book will serve as a reference to researchers as well as an introduction for students.

  2. Cassini Tour Atlas Automated Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazier, Kevin R.; Roumeliotis, Chris; Lange, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    During the Cassini spacecraft s cruise phase and nominal mission, the Cassini Science Planning Team developed and maintained an online database of geometric and timing information called the Cassini Tour Atlas. The Tour Atlas consisted of several hundreds of megabytes of EVENTS mission planning software outputs, tables, plots, and images used by mission scientists for observation planning. Each time the nominal mission trajectory was altered or tweaked, a new Tour Atlas had to be regenerated manually. In the early phases of Cassini s Equinox Mission planning, an a priori estimate suggested that mission tour designers would develop approximately 30 candidate tours within a short period of time. So that Cassini scientists could properly analyze the science opportunities in each candidate tour quickly and thoroughly so that the optimal series of orbits for science return could be selected, a separate Tour Atlas was required for each trajectory. The task of manually generating the number of trajectory analyses in the allotted time would have been impossible, so the entire task was automated using code written in five different programming languages. This software automates the generation of the Cassini Tour Atlas database. It performs with one UNIX command what previously took a day or two of human labor.

  3. Cassini-Huygens Science Highlights: Surprises in the Saturn System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Linda; Altobelli, Nicolas; Edgington, Scott

    2014-05-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission has greatly enhanced our understanding of the Saturn system. Fundamental discoveries have altered our views of Saturn, its retinue of icy moons including Titan, the dynamic rings, and the system's complex magnetosphere. Launched in 1997, the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft spent seven years traveling to Saturn, arriving in July 2004, roughly two years after the northern winter solstice. Cassini has orbited Saturn for 9.5 years, delivering the Huygens probe to its Titan landing in 2005, crossing northern equinox in August 2009, and completing its Prime and Equinox Missions. It is now three years into its 7-year Solstice mission, returning science in a previously unobserved seasonal phase between equinox and solstice. As it watches the approach of northern summer, long-dark regions throughout the system become sunlit, allowing Cassini's science instruments to probe as-yet unsolved mysteries. Key Cassini-Huygens discoveries include icy jets of material streaming from tiny Enceladus' south pole, lakes of liquid hydrocarbons and methane rain on giant Titan, three-dimensional structures in Saturn's rings, and curtain-like aurorae flickering over Saturn's poles. The Huygens probe sent back amazing images of Titan's surface, and made detailed measurements of the atmospheric composition, structure and winds. Key Cassini-Huygens science highlights will be presented. The Solstice Mission continues to provide new science. First, the Cassini spacecraft observes seasonally and temporally dependent processes on Saturn, Titan, Enceladus and other icy satellites, and within the rings and magnetosphere. Second, it addresses new questions that have arisen during the mission thus far, for example providing qualitatively new measurements of Enceladus and Titan that could not be accommodated in the earlier mission phases. Third, it will conduct a close-in mission at Saturn yielding fundamental knowledge about the interior of Saturn. This grand finale of the

  4. Recreating Galileo's 1609 Discovery of Lunar Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Needham, Paul S.; Wright, Ernest T.; Gingerich, Owen

    2014-11-01

    The question of exactly which lunar features persuaded Galileo that there were mountains on the moon has not yet been definitively answered; Galileo was famously more interested in the concepts rather than the topographic mapping in his drawings and the eventual engravings. Since the pioneering work of Ewen Whitaker on trying to identify which specific lunar-terminator features were those that Galileo identified as mountains on the moon in his 1609 observations reported in his Sidereus Nuncius (Venice, 1610), and since the important work on the sequence of Galileo's observations by Owen Gingerich (see "The Mystery of the Missing 2" in Galilaeana IX, 2010, in which he concludes that "the Florentine bifolium sheet [with Galileo's watercolor images] is Galileo's source for the reworked lunar diagrams in Sidereus Nuncius"), there have been advances in lunar topographical measurements that should advance the discussion. In particular, one of us (E.T.W.) at the Scientific Visualization Studio of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center has used laser-topography from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter to recreate what Galileo would have seen over a sequence of dates in late November and early December 1609, and provided animations both at native resolution and at the degraded resolution that Galileo would have observed with his telescope. The Japanese Kaguya spacecraft also provides modern laser-mapped topographical maps.

  5. Internet of Things with Intel Galileo

    CERN Document Server

    de Sousa, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    This book employs an incremental, step-by-step approach to get you familiarized with everything from the basic terms, board components, and development environments to developing real projects. Each project will demonstrate how to use specific board components and tools. Both Galileo and Galileo Gen 2 are covered in this book.

  6. CASSINI V/E/J/S/SS RPWS SUMMARY KEY PARAMETER 60S V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) calibrated summary key parameter data set includes reduced temporal and spectral resolution spectral information...

  7. GALILEO ORBITER AT JUPITER CALIBRATED MAG HIGH RES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains high time resolution magnetic field vectors acquired by the Galileo magnetometer (MAG). It includes both satellite flyby and non-flyby data....

  8. GALILEO EARTH PWS EDITED EARTH 1 WAVEFORM RECEIVER V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — added ARCHIVE_STATUS, ,This data set includes wideband waveform measurements from the Galileo plasma wave receiver obtained during the first Earth encounter. These...

  9. Galileo and Music: A Family Affair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabris, D.

    2011-06-01

    According to Viviani, Galileo's first biographer, the scientist was an excellent keyboard and lute player. In turn Vincenzo Galilei, father of the illustrious scientist, had been one of the most influential music theorist of his age and also a great composer and virtuoso of the lute. Galileo and his brother Michelangelo, born in 1575, inherited Vincenzo's duel skills, both in theory and practical music: Galileo's correspondences show indeed his competence in the music and in the lute playing; Michelagnolo, after being educated in part in Galileo's house in Padua, transferred to Germany in Munich, where he became a court lute player. Nevertheless, Galileo helped for the rest of his life not only his brother but also his nephews, as documented in dozen of family letters quite important to establish the central role of the music in Galileo's everyday life, a fact almost ignored by most modern biographers. The importance of music in Galileo's output and life has been first outlined by the historian of sciences Stillman Drake and by the musicologist Claude Palisca. After their studies starting in the 1960s there is a great belief that Vincenzo influenced his son Galileo, directing him towards experimentation. The aim of this paper, following the reconstruction of Galileo's soundscape proposed by Pierluigi Petrobelli, is to reexamine the surviving historical accounts on the musical passion and talent of Galileo and his family in the several houses where they performed music (in Florence, Padua, Munich, etc.) in particular on the lute, the instrument that was an important experimental tool for the scientist.

  10. Integrating the GalileoScope into Successful Outreach Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Peter D.; Slater, S.; Goldstein, J.; Harvey, J.; Garcia, A.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2004, the Gemini Observatory’s week-long Journey Through the Universe (JTtU) program has successfully shared the excitement of scientific research with teachers, students and the public on Hawaii’s Big Island. Based on the national JTtU program started in 1999, the Hawai‘i version reaches an average of 7,000 students annually and each year features a different theme shared with a diverse set of learners. In 2010, the theme includes the integration of the GalileoScope-produced as a keystone project for the International Year of Astronomy. In preparation, a pilot teacher workshop (held in October 2009) introduced local island teachers to the GalileoScope and a 128-page educator’s activity resource book coordinated by the University of Wyoming. Response from this initial teacher’s workshop has been strong and evaluations plus follow-up actions by participating teachers illustrate that the integration of the GalileoScope has been successful based upon this diverse sample. Integrating GalileoScopes into Chilean schools in 2010 is also underway at Gemini South. This program will solicit informal proposals from educators who wish to use the telescopes in classrooms and a Spanish version of the teacher resource book is planned. The authors conclude that integration of the GalileoScope into an existing outreach program is an effective way to keep content fresh, relevant and engaging for both educators and students. This initiative is funded by Gemini Observatory outreach program. The Gemini Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (US), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (UK), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva

  11. Performance Analysis of Several GPS/Galileo Precise Point Positioning Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Akram; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2015-06-19

    This paper examines the performance of several precise point positioning (PPP) models, which combine dual-frequency GPS/Galileo observations in the un-differenced and between-satellite single-difference (BSSD) modes. These include the traditional un-differenced model, the decoupled clock model, the semi-decoupled clock model, and the between-satellite single-difference model. We take advantage of the IGS-MGEX network products to correct for the satellite differential code biases and the orbital and satellite clock errors. Natural Resources Canada's GPSPace PPP software is modified to handle the various GPS/Galileo PPP models. A total of six data sets of GPS and Galileo observations at six IGS stations are processed to examine the performance of the various PPP models. It is shown that the traditional un-differenced GPS/Galileo PPP model, the GPS decoupled clock model, and the semi-decoupled clock GPS/Galileo PPP model improve the convergence time by about 25% in comparison with the un-differenced GPS-only model. In addition, the semi-decoupled GPS/Galileo PPP model improves the solution precision by about 25% compared to the traditional un-differenced GPS/Galileo PPP model. Moreover, the BSSD GPS/Galileo PPP model improves the solution convergence time by about 50%, in comparison with the un-differenced GPS PPP model, regardless of the type of BSSD combination used. As well, the BSSD model improves the precision of the estimated parameters by about 50% and 25% when the loose and the tight combinations are used, respectively, in comparison with the un-differenced GPS-only model. Comparable results are obtained through the tight combination when either a GPS or a Galileo satellite is selected as a reference.

  12. “Initial Services”, la nuova fase del programma Galileo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Lisi

    2017-03-01

    infrastructures and secure services for public authorities. The Declaration of Galileo Initial Services means that the Galileo satellites and ground infrastructure are now operationally ready. These signals will be highly accurate but not available all the time. In the coming years, new satellites will be launched to enlarge the Galileo constellation, which will gradually improve Galileo availability worldwide. The constellation is expected to be completed by 2020 when Galileo will reach full operational capacity.

  13. GALILEO NIMS EXPERIMENT DATA RECORDS: JUPITER OPERATIONS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NIMS Experiment Data Record (EDR) files contain raw data from the Galileo Orbiter Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (CARLSONETAL1992). This raw data requires...

  14. GALILEO CRUISE POSITION DATA (RTN COORDINATES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains the Galileo spacecraft trajectory during the interplanetary cruise. The data have been derived from SPICE kernels at a 1 minute sample rate....

  15. The Galileo affair: teaching AT 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley Brooke, John

    1990-07-01

    Aspects of the Galileo affair are identified that can be of particular value in teaching AT 17. Some common myths are exposed as a corrective to popular images of intrinsic conflict between science and religion.

  16. GALILEO MAGNETOMETER CRUISE DATA (IRC COORDINATES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains data acquired by the Galileo Magnetometer during the Interplanetary Cruise to Jupiter. The data are at varying resolution depending on the...

  17. GGSP: Realisation and maintenance of the Galileo Terrestrial Reference Frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ggsp Prototype Team; Gendt, G.; Altamimi, Z.; Dach, R.; Söhne, W.; Springer, T.; GGSP Prototype Team

    2011-01-01

    The realisation and maintenance of a Galileo Terrestrial Reference Frame (GTRF) is the main function of the Galileo Geodetic Service Provider (GGSP). The GTRF shall be compatible with the latest International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) within a precision level of 3 cm (2 sigma). The connection to the ITRF is realized and validated by stations of the International GNSS Service (IGS) and by geodetic local ties to stations equipped with other geodetic techniques. It is demonstrated that this GTRF can be maintained by including the Galileo Signal-in-Space data, once Galileo reaches its operational stage.The GGSP will also provide additional products, such as Earth Rotation Parameters, satellites orbits, clock corrections for satellites and stations, which will be offered to the Galileo user community to have most precise access to the GTRF and will be used to monitor the accuracy of the corresponding Galileo Mission Segment.The GGSP was built up in time, and for a final demonstration the full system was operated for an interval of 6 months. During that time also microwave data from the two active GIOVE satellites were used.The GGSP Consortium followed the most up to date IGS standards of weekly processing during seven monthly campaigns (November 2006 to June 2008) and a continuous processing from September 2008 to February 2009 delivering several versions of the GTRF. The latest GTRF solution (GTRF09v01) has an RMS position difference with respect to the ITRF2005 computed over the 71 common stations of 1.1 and 2.9 mm in the horizontal and vertical components, respectively. The RMS velocity differences are 0.3 and 0.6 mm/y, respectively. The GGSP GPS satellite orbits and clock corrections agree with the IGS Final products at a level of 5-11 mm and 0.02-0.03 ns, respectively.The quality of the GIOVE orbits is at a level of 20-30 cm. The Hydrogen-Maser on board of GIOVE-B is nearly one order of magnitude better than the GPS satellite clocks.

  18. Cassini at Saturn: The Final Two Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, L.; Edgington, S.; Altobelli, N.

    2015-10-01

    After 11 years in orbit, the Cassini-Huygens Mission to Saturn, a collaboration of NASA, ESA, and ASI, continues to wow the imagination and reveal unprecedented findings. Every year Cassini produces answers to questions raised by the Voyager flybys, while at the same time posing new questions that can only be answered with a long duration mission using a flagship-class spacecraft. Here we sample a few of Cassini's discoveries from the past year and give an overview of Cassini's final two years.

  19. What does Cassini ENA observations tell us about gas around Europa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Pontus; Mauk, Barry; Westlake, Joseph; Smith, Todd; Mitchell, Donald

    2015-04-01

    From about December 2000 to January 2001 the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA) imaged Jupiter in Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA) from a distance of about 137-250 Jovian planetary radii (RJ) over an energy range from about 10 to 300 keV. A forward model is employed to derive column densities and assumes a neutral gas-plasma model and an energetic ion distribution based on Galileo in-situ measurements. We demonstrate that Jupiter observations by INCA are consistent with a column density peaking around Europa's orbit in the range from 2x1012 cm-2 to 7x1012 cm-2, assuming H2, and are consistent with the upper limits reported from the Cassini/UVIS observations. Most of the INCA observations are consistent with a roughly azimuthally symmetric gas distribution, but some appear consistent with an asymmetric gas distribution centred on Europa, which would directly imply that Europa is the source of the gas. Although our neutral gas model assumes a Europa source, we explore other explanations of the INCA observations including: (1) ENAs are produced by charge exchange between energetic ions and neutral hydrogen originating from charge-exchanged protons in the Io plasma torus. However, estimated densities by Cheng (1986) are about one order of magnitude too low to explain the INCA observations; (2) ENAs are produced by charge exchange between energetic ions and plasma ions such as O+ and S+ originating from Io. However, that would require O+ plasma densities higher than expected to compensate for the low charge-exchange cross section between protons and O+; (3) We re-examine the INCA Point-Spread Function (PSF) to determine if the ENA emissions in the vicinity of Europa's orbit could be explained by internal scattering of ENAs originating from Jupiter's high-latitude upper atmosphere. However, the PSF was well constrained by using Jupiter from distances where it could be considered a point source.

  20. CASSINI E/J/S/SW MIMI CHEMS SENSOR UNCALIBRATED DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument(MIMI) Charge Energy Mass Spectrometer (CHEMS) uncalibrated data set includes all data collected from the MIMI Data...

  1. CASSINI E/J/S/SW MIMI CHEMS SENSOR UNCALIBRATED DATA V1.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument(MIMI) Charge Energy Mass Spectrometer (CHEMS) uncalibrated data set includes all data collected from the MIMI Data...

  2. CASSINI E/J/S/SW MIMI INCA SENSOR UNCALIBRATED DATA V1.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument(MIMI) Imaging Neutral Camera (INCA) uncalibrated data set includes all data collected from the MIMI Data Processing...

  3. CASSINI E/J/S/SW MIMI INCA SENSOR UNCALIBRATED DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument(MIMI) Imaging Neutral Camera (INCA) uncalibrated data set includes all data collected from the MIMI Data Processing...

  4. CASSINI SS/S RPWS DERIVED LANGMUIR PROBE SWEEP V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) Langmuir Probe Sweep data set includes all thermal plasma information derived from Langmuir Probe voltage sweeps...

  5. Galileo's Medicean Moons (IAU S269)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Cesare; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Coradini, Marcello; Lazzarin, Monica

    2010-11-01

    Preface; 1. Galileo's telescopic observations: the marvel and meaning of discovery George V. Coyne, S. J.; 2. Popular perceptions of Galileo Dava Sobel; 3. The slow growth of humility Tobias Owen and Scott Bolton; 4. A new physics to support the Copernican system. Gleanings from Galileo's works Giulio Peruzzi; 5. The telescope in the making, the Galileo first telescopic observations Alberto Righini; 6. The appearance of the Medicean Moons in 17th century charts and books. How long did it take? Michael Mendillo; 7. Navigation, world mapping and astrometry with Galileo's moons Kaare Aksnes; 8. Modern exploration of Galileo's new worlds Torrence V. Johnson; 9. Medicean Moons sailing through plasma seas: challenges in establishing magnetic properties Margaret G. Kivelson, Xianzhe Jia and Krishan K. Khurana; 10. Aurora on Jupiter: a magnetic connection with the Sun and the Medicean Moons Supriya Chakrabarti and Marina Galand; 11. Io's escaping atmosphere: continuing the legacy of surprise Nicholas M. Schneider; 12. The Jovian Rings Wing-Huen Ip; 13. The Juno mission Scott J. Bolton and the Juno Science Team; 14. Seeking Europa's ocean Robert T. Pappalardo; 15. Europa lander mission: a challenge to find traces of alien life Lev Zelenyi, Oleg Korablev, Elena Vorobyova, Maxim Martynov, Efraim L. Akim and Alexander Zakahrov; 16. Atmospheric moons Galileo would have loved Sushil K. Atreya; 17. The study of Mercury Louise M. Prockter and Peter D. Bedini; 18. Jupiter and the other giants: a comparative study Thérèse Encrenaz; 19. Spectroscopic and spectrometric differentiation between abiotic and biogenic material on icy worlds Kevin P. Hand, Chris McKay and Carl Pilcher; 20. Other worlds, other civilizations? Guy Consolmagno, S. J.; 21. Concluding remarks Roger M. Bonnet; Posters; Author index; Object index.

  6. Galileo's mistake a new look at the epic confrontation between galileo and the church

    CERN Document Server

    Rowland, Wade

    2011-01-01

    The modern understanding of the notorious 1633 trial of Galileo is that of Science and Reason persecuted by Ignorance and Superstition-of Galileo as a lonely, courageous freethinker oppressed by a reactionary and anti-intellectual institution fearful of losing its power and influence. But is this an accurate picture? In his provocative reexamination of one of the turning points in the history of science and thought, Wade Rowland contends that the dispute concerned an infinitely more profound question: What is truth and how can we know it? Rowland demonstrates that Galileo's mistak

  7. Galileo's Instruments of Credit Telescopes, Images, Secrecy

    CERN Document Server

    Biagioli, Mario

    2006-01-01

    In six short years, Galileo Galilei went from being a somewhat obscure mathematics professor running a student boarding house in Padua to a star in the court of Florence to the recipient of dangerous attention from the Inquisition for his support of Copernicanism. In that brief period, Galileo made a series of astronomical discoveries that reshaped the debate over the physical nature of the heavens: he deeply modified the practices and status of astronomy with the introduction of the telescope and pictorial evidence, proposed a radical reconfiguration of the relationship between theology and a

  8. Artists's Conception of Cassini Saturn Orbit Insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This is an artists concept of Cassini during the Saturn Orbit Insertion (SOI) maneuver, just after the main engine has begun firing. The spacecraft is moving out of the plane of the page and to the right (firing to reduce its spacecraft velocity with respect to Saturn) and has just crossed the ring plane.The SOI maneuver, which is approximately 90 minutes long, will allow Cassini to be captured by Saturn's gravity into a five-month orbit.Cassini's close proximity to the planet after the maneuver offers a unique opportunity to observe Saturn and its rings at extremely high resolution.

  9. The Italian involvement in Cassini radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirchio, F.; Pernice, B.; Borgarelli, L.; Dionisio, C.

    1991-12-01

    The Radio Frequency Electronic Subsystem (RFES) of the Cassini radar is described. The requirements of the Cassini radar are summarized. The design parameters taken into consideration in developing the RFES are described. The RFES interfaces with the High Gain Antenna (HGA) for signal transmission and reception. The operational parameters of the Cassini radar are presented. The front end electronics (FEE), microwave receiver (MR), high power amplifier (HPA), frequency generator (FG), digital chip generator (DCG), Chirp Up Converter and Amplifier (CUCA) and power supply of the RFES are described.

  10. Galileo Galilei: Father of Modern Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 8. Galileo Galilei: Father of Modern Science. C S Yogananda. Article-in-a-Box Volume 6 Issue 8 August 2001 pp 3-5. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/08/0003-0005 ...

  11. Galileo, Gauss, and the Green Monster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, Dan; Teague, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Galileo dropped cannonballs from the leaning tower of Pisa to demonstrate something about falling bodies. Gauss was a giant of mathematics and physics who made unparalleled contributions to both fields. More contemporary (and not a person), the Green Monster is the left-field wall at the home of the Boston Red Sox, Fenway Park. Measuring 37 feet…

  12. Precision Pointing Reconstruction and Geometric Metadata Generation for Cassini Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Robert S.; Showalter, Mark R.; Gordon, Mitchell K.

    2014-11-01

    Analysis of optical remote sensing (ORS) data from the Cassini spacecraft is a complicated and labor-intensive process. First, small errors in Cassini’s pointing information (up to ~40 pixels for the Imaging Science Subsystem Narrow Angle Camera) must be corrected so that the line of sight vector for each pixel is known. This process involves matching the image contents with known features such as stars, ring edges, or moon limbs. Second, metadata for each pixel must be computed. Depending on the object under observation, this metadata may include lighting geometry, moon or planet latitude and longitude, and/or ring radius and longitude. Both steps require mastering the SPICE toolkit, a highly capable piece of software with a steep learning curve. Only after these steps are completed can the actual scientific investigation begin.We are embarking on a three-year project to perform these steps for all 300,000+ Cassini ISS images as well as images taken by the VIMS, UVIS, and CIRS instruments. The result will be a series of SPICE kernels that include accurate pointing information and a series of backplanes that include precomputed metadata for each pixel. All data will be made public through the PDS Rings Node (http://www.pds-rings.seti.org). We expect this project to dramatically decrease the time required for scientists to analyze Cassini data. In this poster we discuss the project, our current status, and our plans for the next three years.

  13. Great experiments in physics firsthand accounts from Galileo to Einstein

    CERN Document Server

    1959-01-01

    From Galileo's famous experiments in accelerated motion to Einstein's revolutionary theory of relativity, the experiments recorded here trace the evolution of modern physics from its beginnings to the mid-20th century. Brought together for the first time in one volume are important source readings on 25 epochal discoveries that changed man's understanding of the physical world. The accounts, written by the physicists who made them, include:Issac Newton: The Laws of MotionHenry Cavendish: The Law of GravitationAugustin Fresnel: The Diffraction of LightHans Christian Oersted: ElecromagnetismH

  14. On the development of the power sources for the Ulysses and Galileo missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, G.L.; Whitmore, C.W.; Amos, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    The development of the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) to be used on the Ulysses and Galileo missions is described. This RTG, designed to provide a minimum of 285 We at the beginning of the mission, builds upon the successful thermoelectric technology developed for the RTGs now in operation on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. A total of four flight RTGs, one ground qualification RTG, and one engineering unit have been built and tested for the Galileo and Ulysses missions. The tests have included measurements of functional performance, vibration response, magnetic signature, mass properties, nuclear radiation, and vacuum performance. The RTGs are fully flight qualified for both missions and are ready for launch

  15. Hemispherical Resonator Gyro: an IRU for Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litty, Edward C.; Gresham, Lennor L.; Toole, Patrick A.; Beisecker, Debra A.

    1996-10-01

    The JPL Inertial Reference Unit (IRU) is the single most sophisticated assembly on the Cassini spacecraft. At the core of the IRU is the state-of-the-art, Litton Hemispherical Resonator Gyro (HRG). Launched in October 1997, Cassini's trajectory utilizes gravity assist maneuvers around Venus (two), Earth, and Jupiter over a seven year period, arriving at Saturn in June 2004. Its tour of the Saturnian system will last an additional four years. Although the Stellar Reference Unit (SRU) provides the ultimate reference for the spacecraft Attitude and Articulation Control System (AACS) and can be used to control the spacecraft under benign conditions, the Cassini IRU is essential during maneuvers and fault recovery operations, and for precision attitude stabilization during science data acquisition. Therefore, IRU reliability over the long Cassini mission is a critical concern. Following an extensive evaluation of possible alternatives, the Hemispherical Resonator Gyro (HRG) based IRU developed by Litton Guidance and Control Systems, was chosen for the Cassini mission. The HRG is an attitude rate sensor that has no physical wear-out mechanisms. Based on a principle first described by G. H. Bryan (1890) in his paper, 'On Beats in the Vibrations of a Revolving Cylinder or Bell', the HRG is created by vibrating a quartz resonator. This paper discusses the theory and modifications required to the design of the standard Space Inertial Reference Unit to adapt it to meet the requirements of the Cassini mission and the AACS interface. The Cassini mission is the first use of an IRU for a deep space planetary mission that does not use a spun-mass sensor.

  16. The Cassini-Huygens visit to Saturn an historic mission to the ringed planet

    CERN Document Server

    Meltzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cassini-Huygens was the most ambitious and successful space journey ever launched to the outer Solar System. This book examines all aspects of the journey: its conception and planning; the lengthy political processes needed to make it a reality; the engineering and development required to build the spacecraft; its 2.2-billion mile journey from Earth to the Ringed Planet; and the amazing discoveries from the mission. The author traces how the visions of a few brilliant scientists matured, gained popularity, and eventually became a reality. Innovative technical leaps were necessary to assemble such a multifaceted spacecraft and reliably operate it while it orbited a planet so far from our own. The Cassini-Huygens spacecraft design evolved from other deep space efforts, most notably the Galileo mission to Jupiter, enabling the voluminous, paradigm-shifting scientific data collected by the spacecraft.  Some of these discoveries are absolute gems. A small satellite that scientists once thought of as a dead pi...

  17. CASSINI V/E/J/S/SS RPWS CALIBRATED LOW RATE FULL RES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) calibrated full resolution data set includes all spectral information calibrated in units of spectral density for...

  18. Galileo spacecraft power management and distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detwiler, R. C.; Smith, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    The Galileo PMAD (power management and distribution system) is described, and the design drivers that established the final as-built hardware are discussed. The spacecraft is powered by two general-purpose heat-source-radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Power bus regulation is provided by a shunt regulator. Galileo PMAD distributes a 570-W beginning of mission (BOM) power source to a user complement of some 137 load elements. Extensive use of pyrotechnics requires two pyro switching subassemblies. They initiate 148 squibs which operate the 47 pyro devices on the spacecraft. Detection and correction of faults in the Galileo PMAD is an autonomous feature dictated by requirements for long life and reliability in the absence of ground-based support. Volatile computer memories in the spacecraft command and data system and attitude control system require a continuous source of backup power during all anticipated power bus fault scenarios. Power for the Jupiter Probe is conditioned, isolated, and controlled by a Probe interface subassembly. Flight performance of the spacecraft and the PMAD has been successful to date, with no major anomalies.

  19. CASSINI ORBITER MAG CALIBRATED FULL RES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains calibrated full time resolution Cassini magnetometer data, for the entire Cassini mission. These data are provided in RTN coordinates for...

  20. Meteorology of Jupiter's Equatorial Hot Spots and Plumes from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, David Sanghun; Showman, Adam P.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.

    2013-01-01

    We present an updated analysis of Jupiter's equatorial meteorology from Cassini observations. For two months preceding the spacecraft's closest approach, the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) onboard regularly imaged the atmosphere. We created time-lapse movies from this period in order to analyze the dynamics of equatorial hot spots and their interactions with adjacent latitudes. Hot spots are relatively cloud-free regions that emit strongly at 5 lm; improved knowledge of these features is crucial for fully understanding Galileo probe measurements taken during its descent through one. Hot spots are quasistable, rectangular dark areas on visible-wavelength images, with defined eastern edges that sharply contrast with surrounding clouds, but diffuse western edges serving as nebulous boundaries with adjacent equatorial plumes. Hot spots exhibit significant variations in size and shape over timescales of days and weeks. Some of these changes correspond with passing vortex systems from adjacent latitudes interacting with hot spots. Strong anticyclonic gyres present to the south and southeast of the dark areas appear to circulate into hot spots. Impressive, bright white plumes occupy spaces in between hot spots. Compact cirrus-like 'scooter' clouds flow rapidly through the plumes before disappearing within the dark areas. These clouds travel at 150-200 m/s, much faster than the 100 m/s hot spot and plume drift speed. This raises the possibility that the scooter clouds may be more illustrative of the actual jet stream speed at these latitudes. Most previously published zonal wind profiles represent the drift speed of the hot spots at their latitude from pattern matching of the entire longitudinal image strip. If a downward branch of an equatorially-trapped Rossby wave controls the overall appearance of hot spots, however, the westward phase velocity of the wave leads to underestimates of the true jet stream speed.

  1. Galileo: The Added Value for Integrity in Harsh Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Borio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A global navigation satellite system (GNSS-based navigation is a challenging task in a signal-degraded environments where GNSS signals are distorted by multipath and attenuated by fading effects: the navigation solution may be inaccurate or unavailable. A possible approach to improve accuracy and availability is the joint use of measurements from different GNSSs and quality check algorithms; this approach is investigated here using live GPS and Galileo signals. A modified receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM algorithm, including geometry and separability checks, is proposed to detect and exclude erroneous measurements: the multi-constellation approach provides redundant measurements, and RAIM exploits them to exclude distorted observations. The synergy between combined GPS/Galileo navigation and RAIM is analyzed using live data; the performance is compared to the accuracy and availability of a GPS-only solution. The tests performed demonstrate that the methods developed are effective techniques for GNSS-based navigation in signal-degraded environments. The joint use of the multi-constellation approach and of modified RAIM algorithms improves the performance of the navigation system in terms of both accuracy and availability.

  2. DMD-based multi-object spectrograph on Galileo telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamkotsian, Frederic; Spano, Paolo; Lanzoni, Patrick; Bon, William; Riva, Marco; Nicastro, Luciano; Molinari, Emilio; Di Marcantonio, Paolo; Zerbi, Filippo; Valenziano, Luca

    2013-03-01

    Next-generation infrared astronomical instrumentation for ground-based and space telescopes could be based on MOEMS programmable slit masks for multi-object spectroscopy (MOS). This astronomical technique is used extensively to investigate the formation and evolution of galaxies. We propose to develop a 2048x1080 DMD-based MOS instrument to be mounted on the Galileo telescope and called BATMAN. A two-arm instrument has been designed for providing in parallel imaging and spectroscopic capabilities. The two arms with F/4 on the DMD are mounted on a common bench, and an upper bench supports the detectors thanks to two independent hexapods. Very good optical quality on the DMD and the detectors will be reached. ROBIN, a BATMAN demonstrator, has been designed, realized and integrated. It permits to determine the instrument integration procedure, including optics and mechanics integration, alignment procedure and optical quality. First images have been obtained and measured. A DMD pattern manager has been developed in order to generate any slit mask according to the list of objects to be observed; spectra have been generated and measured. Observation strategies will be studied and demonstrated for the scientific optimization strategy over the whole FOV. BATMAN on the sky is of prime importance for characterizing the actual performance of this new family of MOS instruments, as well as investigating the operational procedures on astronomical objects. This instrument will be placed on the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo at the beginning of next year, in 2014.

  3. A new analysis of Galileo dust data near Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soja, R. H.; Hamilton, D. P.; Altobelli, N.

    2015-05-01

    The Galileo Dust Detection System (DDS) detected a population of micron-sized grains in and amongst the orbits of Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. Previous studies, using roughly 50% of the data now available, concluded that the dominant sources for the impacts were magnetospherically captured interplanetary particles largely on retrograde orbits (Colwell et al., 1998b; Thiessenhusen et al., 2000) and impact-generated ejecta from the Galilean satellites (Krüger et al., 1999b; Krivov et al., 2002a). Here we revisit the problem with the full data set and broaden our consideration to include four additional source populations: debris from the outer satellites, interplanetary and interstellar grains and particles accelerated outwards from Io and the jovian rings. We develop a model of detectable orbits at each Galileo position and we find that about 10% of the impact data require non-circular orbits with eccentricities greater than 0.1. In addition, ~3% of impacts require orbital solutions with eccentricities in excess of 0.7. Using the spatial distribution of particles, we are able to exclude, as dominant sources, all the additional source populations except for outer satellite particles. A study of DDS directional information demonstrates that none of the six standard sources fit the data well and thus a combination of sources is necessary. There are insufficient data to uniquely identify the relative strengths of the various contributions. However, we find an excess of large particles that is consistent with retrograde trajectories.

  4. A dialogue in paradise: John Milton's visit with Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Hugh

    2001-03-01

    According to his 1644 speech, ``Areopagitica,'' the English poet John Milton visited Galileo in his villa in Arcetri in 1638 while Galileo was under house arrest for offending the Church authorities. This article explores the influences Galileo may have had on Milton's writing as a result of the presumed meeting between the two, and discusses some similarities between Galileo's Starry Messenger (1610) and Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems (1632) and Milton's Paradise Lost (1667). Teachers and students of physics, astronomy, and li!!terature can benefit from studying connections such as these between science and the arts.

  5. Cassini: The Journey and the Legacy

    KAUST Repository

    Porco, Carolyn

    2018-01-15

    An international mission to explore, in depth, the Saturnian system ヨthe planet Saturn and its magnetosphere, glorious rings, and many moons- begun over 27 years ago. After seven years of development, the Cassini spacecraft was launched in 1997, spent seven years trekking to Saturn, and finally entered Saturn orbit in the summer of 2004. In the course of its 13 years orbiting this ring world, Cassini returned over 450 thousand images, 635GB of data, and invaluable insights on the solar systemメs most splendid and scientifically rich planetary system. In this lecture, Carolyn Porco, the leader of the imaging science team on NASA\\'s Cassini mission, will delight her audience with a retrospective look at what has been learned from this profoundly successful mission and what its final legacy is likely to be.

  6. Time Dissemination and Common View Time Transfer with Galileo: How Accurate Will It Be?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Furthner, J

    2004-01-01

    .... In this paper, we assess the average accuracy of user synchronization to the Galileo system time using a prospective Galileo error budget and simulations of the Galileo satellite constellation...

  7. Galileo: Power, Pride, and Profit. The Relative Influence of Realist, Ideational, and Liberal Factors on the Galileo Satellite Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-31

    pointed out that NATO 70 Ralph Braibanti, Jason Y. Kim and Damon Wells, “GPS-Galileo Negotiations...scale.7 The Director of Galileo Industries at the time, Mike Healey (reaffirming a view also reported in November 2001)8 said, “The cost and financing...Vision.” Space Policy 22 (2006): 92-99. Braibanti, Ralph, Jason Y. Kim and Damon Wells. “GPS-Galileo Negotiations: Commercial Issues at Stake

  8. Three levels of understanding physical relativity: Galileo's relativity, Up-to-date Galileo's relativity and Einstein's relativity: A historical survey

    OpenAIRE

    Rothenstein, Bernhard; Nafornita, Corina

    2004-01-01

    We present a way of teaching Einstein's special relativity. It starts with Galileo's relativity, the learners know from previous lectures. The lecture underlines that we can have three transformation equations for the space-time coordinates of the same event, which lead to absolute clock readings, time intervals and lengths (Galileo's relativity), to absolute clock readings but to relative time intervals and lengths (up-to-date Galileo transformations) and to relative clock readings time inte...

  9. Early Observations of Sunspots: Scheiner and Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanovas, J.

    There had been occasional observations of spots on the Sun since antiquity. Kepler observed a sunspot in 1607 but he interpreted it as a Mercury's transit. One year after the introduction of the telescope astronomers identified spots on the Sun. J. Fabricius was the first to print a book on sunspots at the end of 1611, but this book had little diffusion. Fabricius rightly thought that the spots belonged to the Sun. The Jesuit C. Scheiner independently observed sunspots on the Sun and he announced his discovery at the end of 1611 in three letters under the pseudonym Apelles. Scheiner failed to observe the returning of the spots and hence did not recognize the solar rotation. Therefore he preferred to see the spots as caused by little bodies orbiting the Sun. Based on Scheiner's observations, Kepler concluded that the spots were on the solar surface like dross floating on melted metal. When Scheiner's letters reached Italy, Galileo claimed to have observed sunspots much earlier, but if this had been the case, he had not published anything on sunspots. Galileo replied to Apelles' letters affirming that the spots were on the surface of the Sun, like clouds. A bitter and long fight followed between Galileo and Scheiner on the priority of discovery. Techniques for solar observation progressed quickly. The solar image was observed projected on a white paper for measurement of sunspots positions. Scheiner later perfected this method installing the telescope on an equatorial mounting. Scheiner made over 2000 solar observations and determined the orientation of the solar axis of rotation. His methods and results were presented in his monumental work Rosa Ursina.

  10. Galileo observations of volcanic plumes on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, P.E.; McMillan, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Io's volcanic plumes erupt in a dazzling variety of sizes, shapes, colors and opacities. In general, the plumes fall into two classes, representing distinct source gas temperatures. Most of the Galileo imaging observations were of the smaller, more numerous Prometheus-type plumes that are produced when hot flows of silicate lava impinge on volatile surface ices of SO2. Few detections were made of the giant, Pele-type plumes that vent high temperature, sulfur-rich gases from the interior of Io; this was partly because of the insensitivity of Galileo's camera to ultraviolet wavelengths. Both gas and dust spout from plumes of each class. Favorably located gas plumes were detected during eclipse, when Io was in Jupiter's shadow. Dense dust columns were imaged in daylight above several Prometheus-type eruptions, reaching heights typically less than 100 km. Comparisons between eclipse observations, sunlit images, and the record of surface changes show that these optically thick dust columns are much smaller in stature than the corresponding gas plumes but are adequate to produce the observed surface deposits. Mie scattering calculations suggest that these conspicuous dust plumes are made up of coarse grained “ash” particles with radii on the order of 100 nm, and total masses on the order of 106 kg per plume. Long exposure images of Thor in sunlight show a faint outer envelope apparently populated by particles small enough to be carried along with the gas flow, perhaps formed by condensation of sulfurous “snowflakes” as suggested by the plasma instrumentation aboard Galileo as it flew through Thor's plume [Frank, L.A., Paterson, W.R., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. (Space Phys.) 107, doi:10.1029/2002JA009240. 31-1]. If so, the total mass of these fine, nearly invisible particles may be comparable to the mass of the gas, and could account for much of Io's rapid resurfacing.

  11. From Galileo to the Z0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    On 3 May an audience of some of the world's leading physicists gathered in a small theatre on the Italian Riviera greeted Herwig Schopper's announcement of the observation at CERN of a first Z 0 candidate with spontaneous applause. The occasion was an international nuclear physics symposium, one of six meetings under the general title of 'Science for Peace' organized with remarkable flair by Nino Zichichi and a scientific committee of Nobel Laureates and heads of research establishments, as part of linked Alfred Nobel and Galileo commemorations at San Remo and in Rome

  12. A statistical characterization of the Galileo-to-GPS inter-system bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, Ciro; Borio, Daniele

    2016-11-01

    Global navigation satellite system operates using independent time scales and thus inter-system time offsets have to be determined to enable multi-constellation navigation solutions. GPS/Galileo inter-system bias and drift are evaluated here using different types of receivers: two mass market and two professional receivers. Moreover, three different approaches are considered for the inter-system bias determination: in the first one, the broadcast Galileo to GPS time offset is used to align GPS and Galileo time scales. In the second, the inter-system bias is included in the multi-constellation navigation solution and is estimated using the measurements available. Finally, an enhanced algorithm using constraints on the inter-system bias time evolution is proposed. The inter-system bias estimates obtained with the different approaches are analysed and their stability is experimentally evaluated using the Allan deviation. The impact of the inter-system bias on the position velocity time solution is also considered and the performance of the approaches analysed is evaluated in terms of standard deviation and mean errors for both horizontal and vertical components. From the experiments, it emerges that the inter-system bias is very stable and that the use of constraints, modelling the GPS/Galileo inter-system bias behaviour, significantly improves the performance of multi-constellation navigation.

  13. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 1, Reference design document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    The Galileo mission uses nuclear power sources called Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to provide the spacecraft's primary electrical power. Because these generators contain nuclear material, a Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is required. A preliminary SAR and an updated SAR were previously issued that provided an evolving status report on the safety analysis. As a result of the Challenger accident, the launch dates for both Galileo and Ulysses missions were later rescheduled for November 1989 and October 1990, respectively. The decision was made by agreement between the DOE and the NASA to have a revised safety evaluation and report (FSAR) prepared on the basis of these revised vehicle accidents and environments. The results of this latest revised safety evaluation are presented in this document (Galileo FSAR). Volume I, this document, provides the background design information required to understand the analyses presented in Volumes II and III. It contains descriptions of the RTGs, the Galileo spacecraft, the Space Shuttle, the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS), the trajectory and flight characteristics including flight contingency modes, and the launch site. There are two appendices in Volume I which provide detailed material properties for the RTG.

  14. PDOP values for simulated GPS/Galileo positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cederholm, Jens Peter

    2005-01-01

    The paper illustrates satellite coverage and PDOP values for a simulated combined GPS/Galileo system. The designed GPS satellite constellation and the planned Galileo satellite constellation are presented. The combined system is simulated and the number of visible satellites and PDOP values...

  15. PDOP values for simulated GPS/Galileo positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cederholm, Jens Peter

    2005-01-01

    The paper illustrates satellite coverage and PDOP values for a simulated combined GPS/Galileo system. The designed GPS satellite constellation and the planned Galileo satellite constellation are presented. The combined system is simulated and the number of visible satellites and PDOP values are e...

  16. A reassessment of Galileo radiation exposures in the Jupiter magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwell, W.; Townsend, L.; Miller, T.; Campbell, C.

    2005-01-01

    Earlier particle experiments in the 1970's on Pioneer-10 and -11 and Voyager-1 and -2 provided Jupiter flyby particle data, which were used by Divine and Garrett to develop the first Jupiter trapped radiation environment model. This model was used to establish a baseline radiation effects design limit for the Galileo onboard electronics. Recently, Garrett et al. have developed an updated Galileo Interim Radiation Environment (GIRE) model based on Galileo electron data. In this paper, we have used the GIRE model to reassess the computed radiation exposures and dose effects for Galileo. The 34-orbit 'as flown' Galileo trajectory data and the updated GIRE model were used to compute the electron and proton spectra for each of the 34 orbits. The total ionisation doses of electrons and protons have been computed based on a parametric shielding configuration, and these results are compared with previously published results. Published by Oxford Univ. Press. All right reserved. (authors)

  17. Modernization of the Cassini Ground System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razo, Gus; Fujii, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    The Cassini Spacecraft and its ground system have been operational for over 16 years. Modernization presents several challenges due to the personnel, processes, and tools already invested and embedded into the current ground system structure. Every mission's ground system has its own unique complexities and challenges, involving various organizational units. As any mission from its inception to its execution, schedules are always tight. This forces GDS engineers to implement a working ground system that is not necessarily fully optimized. Ground system challenges increase as technology evolves and cyber threats become more sophisticated. Cassini's main challenges were due to its ground system existing before many security requirements were levied on the multi-mission tools and networks. This caused a domino effect on Cassini GDS tools that relied on outdated technological features. In the aerospace industry reliable and established technology is preferred over innovative yet less proven technology. Loss of data for a spacecraft mission can be catastrophic; therefore, there is a reluctance to make changes and updates to the ground system. Nevertheless, all missions and associated teams face the need to modernize their processes and tools. Systems development methods from well-known system analysis and design principles can be applied to many missions' ground systems. Modernization should always be considered, but should be done in such a way that it does not affect flexibility nor interfere with established practices. Cassini has accomplished a secure and efficient ground data system through periodic updates. The obstacles faced while performing the modernization of the Cassini ground system will be outlined, as well as the advantages and challenges that were encountered.

  18. Galileo's Lute and the Law of Falling Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mark

    2008-05-01

    Galileo's Lute and the Law of Falling Bodies is an excerpt from Galileo 1610. Galileo 1610 is a dramatic, musical and intellectual odyssey back to the life and times of Galileo Galilei, the famous 17th century Italian scientist and philosopher. It commemorates the 400th anniversary of Galileo's discoveries with his telescope in 1610. Dressed in authentic Renaissance attire as Galileo, the author-- a cantorial soloist and amateur astronomer-- tells the fascinating story of "The Father of Modern Science,” drawing from the actual correspondence and writings of Galileo, as well as those of his many biographers. Through his dialogue with the audience on a wide range of discoveries and opinions, "Galileo” shares his wisdom and his life experiences with pathos, wit and humor, lacing his narration with entertaining lute songs from the late Renaissance period, some of which were actually composed by Galileo's father, Vincenzo. Bridging the past to the present, the author breathes life into "Galileo” as he once again frolics and struggles among us. In bringing forth some of life's great issues, we learn something about our own inquisitive nature, as well as that of science and music. The author has appeared as Galileo for over a decade on radio, at community theatres and libraries, public schools, colleges and universities throughout the country. He has performed for civic organizations, astronomy association conventions, marketing and outreach programs as well as private events and parties. Galileo 1610 is suitable for a variety of educational and entertainment programs, for both children and adults. All presentations are tailored to fit the interest, experience and size of the audience.

  19. Galileo and the equations of motion

    CERN Document Server

    Boccaletti, Dino

    2016-01-01

    This book is intended as a historical and critical study on the origin of the equations of motion as established in Newton's Principia. The central question that it aims to answer is whether it is indeed correct to ascribe to Galileo the inertia principle and the law of falling bodies. In order to accomplish this task, the study begins by considering theories on the motion of bodies from classical antiquity, and especially those of Aristotle. The theories developed during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance are then reviewed, with careful analysis of the contributions of, for example, the Merton and Parisian Schools and Galileo’s immediate predecessors, Tartaglia and Benedetti. Finally, Galileo’s work is examined in detail, starting from the early writings.  Excerpts from individual works are presented, to allow the texts to speak for themselves, and then commented upon. The book provides historical evidence both for Galileo's dependence on his forerunners and for the major breakthroughs that he achieved...

  20. The final Galileo SSI observations of Io: Orbits G28-I33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, E.P.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; McEwen, A.S.; Radebaugh, J.; Milazzo, M.; Simonelli, D.P.; Geissler, P.; Williams, D.A.; Perry, J.; Jaeger, W.L.; Klaasen, K.P.; Breneman, H.H.; Denk, T.; Phillips, C.B.

    2004-01-01

    We present the observations of Io acquired by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) experiment during the Galileo Millennium Mission (GMM) and the strategy we used to plan the exploration of Io. Despite Galileo's tight restrictions on data volume and downlink capability and several spacecraft and camera anomalies due to the intense radiation close to Jupiter, there were many successful SSI observations during GMM. Four giant, high-latitude plumes, including the largest plume ever observed on Io, were documented over a period of eight months; only faint evidence of such plumes had been seen since the Voyager 2 encounter, despite monitoring by Galileo during the previous five years. Moreover, the source of one of the plumes was Tvashtar Catena, demonstrating that a single site can exhibit remarkably diverse eruption styles - from a curtain of lava fountains, to extensive surface flows, and finally a ??? 400 km high plume - over a relatively short period of time (??? 13 months between orbits 125 and G29). Despite this substantial activity, no evidence of any truly new volcanic center was seen during the six years of Galileo observations. The recent observations also revealed details of mass wasting processes acting on Io. Slumping and landsliding dominate and occur in close proximity to each other, demonstrating spatial variation in material properties over distances of several kilometers. However, despite the ubiquitous evidence for mass wasting, the rate of volcanic resurfacing seems to dominate; the floors of paterae in proximity to mountains are generally free of debris. Finally, the highest resolution observations obtained during Galileo's final encounters with Io provided further evidence for a wide diversity of surface processes at work on Io. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cassini UVIS Observations Show Active Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, L.; Colwell, J. E.; UVIS Team

    2004-12-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) is part of the remote sensing payload of the NASA/ESA Cassini spacecraft. This spectrograph includes channels for extreme UV and far UV spectroscopic imaging, high speed photometry of stellar occultations, solar EUV occultation, and a hydrogen/deuterium absorption cell. We report our initial results from UVIS observations of Saturn's rings. Dynamic interactions between neutrals, ions, rings, moons and meteoroids produce a highly structured and time variable Saturn system Oxygen in the Saturn system dominates the magnetosphere. Observed fluctuations indicate close interactions with plasma sources. Stochastic events in the E ring may be the ultimate source. The spectral signature of water ice is seen on Phoebe and in Saturn's rings. Water ice is mixed non-uniformly with darker constituents. The high structure of the UV ring reflectance argues that collisional transport dominates ballistic transport in darkening the rings. Our preliminary results support the idea that rings are recycled fragments of moons: the current processes are more important than history and initial conditions. The spectra along the UVIS SOI radial scan indicate varying amounts of water ice. In the A ring, the ice fraction increases outward to a maximum at the outer edge. This large-scale variation is consistent with initially pure ice that has suffered meteoritic bombardment over the age of the Solar system (Cuzzi and Estrada 1998). We also see variations over scales of 1000 - 3000 km, which cannot be explained by this mechanism. Ballistic transport of spectrally neutral extrinsic pollutants from meteoroids striking the rings has a typical throw distance of 6000 km (Durisen et al 1989), too long to explain this finer structure. We propose a class of smaller renewal events, in which a small moon residing within the rings is shattered by an external impactor (Colwell and Esposito 1993, Barbara and Esposito 2002, Esposito and Colwell 2003). The

  2. Imaging of volcanic activity on Jupiter's moon Io by Galileo during the Galileo Europa Mission and the Galileo Millennium Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszthelyi, L.; McEwen, A.S.; Phillips, C.B.; Milazzo, M.; Geissler, P.; Turtle, E.P.; Radebaugh, J.; Williams, D.A.; Simonelli, D.P.; Breneman, H.H.; Klaasen, K.P.; Levanas, G.; Denk, T.; Alexander, D.D.A.; Capraro, K.; Chang, S.-H.; Chen, A.C.; Clark, J.; Conner, D.L.; Culver, A.; Handley, T.H.; Jensen, D.N.; Knight, D.D.; LaVoie, S.K.; McAuley, M.; Mego, V.; Montoya, O.; Mortensen, H.B.; Noland, S.J.; Patel, R.R.; Pauro, T.M.; Stanley, C.L.; Steinwand, D.J.; Thaller, T.F.; Woncik, P.J.; Yagi, G.M.; Yoshimizu, J.R.; Alvarez, Del; Castillo, E.M.; Belton, M.J.S.; Beyer, R.; Branston, D.; Fishburn, M.B.; Mueller, B.; Ragan, R.; Samarasinha, N.; Anger, C.D.; Cunningham, C.; Little, B.; Arriola, S.; Carr, M.H.; Asphaug, E.; Moore, J.; Morrison, D.; Rages, K.; Banfield, D.; Bell, M.; Burns, J.A.; Carcich, B.; Clark, B.; Currier, N.; Dauber, I.; Gierasch, P.J.; Helfenstein, P.; Mann, M.; Othman, O.; Rossier, L.; Solomon, N.; Sullivan, R.; Thomas, P.C.; Veverka, J.; Becker, T.; Edwards, K.; Gaddis, L.; Kirk, R.; Lee, E.; Rosanova, T.; Sucharski, R.M.; Beebe, R.F.; Simon, A.; Bender, K.; Chuang, F.; Fagents, S.; Figueredo, P.; Greeley, R.; Homan, K.; Kadel, S.; Kerr, J.; Klemaszewski, J.; Lo, E.; Schwarz, W.; Williams, K.; Bierhaus, E.; Brooks, S.; Chapman, C.R.; Merline, B.; Keller, J.; Schenk, P.; Tamblyn, P.; Bouchez, A.; Dyundian, U.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Showman, A.; Spitale, J.; Stewart, S.; Vasavada, A.; Cunningham, W.F.; Johnson, T.V.; Jones, T.J.; Kaufman, J.M.; Magee, K.P.; Meredith, M.K.; Orton, G.S.; Senske, D.A.; West, A.; Winther, D.; Collins, G.; Fripp, W.J.; Head, J. W.; Pappalardo, R.; Pratt, S.; Procter, L.; Spaun, N.; Colvin, T.; Davies, M.; DeJong, E.M.; Hall, J.; Suzuki, S.; Gorjian, Z.; Giese, B.; Koehler, U.; Neukum, G.; Oberst, J.; Roatsch, T.; Tost, W.; Schuster, P.; Wagner, R.; Dieter, N.; Durda, D.; Greenberg, R.J.; Hoppa, G.; Jaeger, W.; Plassman, J.; Tufts, R.; Fanale, F.P.; Gran,

    2001-01-01

    The Solid-State Imaging (SSI) instrument provided the first high- and medium-resolution views of Io as the Galileo spacecraft closed in on the volcanic body in late 1999 and early 2000. While each volcanic center has many unique features, the majority can be placed into one of two broad categories. The "Promethean" eruptions, typified by the volcanic center Prometheus, are characterized by long-lived steady eruptions producing a compound flow field emplaced in an insulating manner over a period of years to decades. In contrast, "Pillanian" eruptions are characterized by large pyroclastic deposits and short-lived but high effusion rate eruptions from fissures feeding open-channel or open-sheet flows. Both types of eruptions commonly have ???100-km-tall, bright, SO2-rich plumes forming near the flow fronts and smaller deposits of red material that mark the vent for the silicate lavas. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. The Galileo Tape Recorder Rewind Operation Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael R.; Levanas, Greg C.

    1997-01-01

    On October 11, 1995, the Galileo spacecraft executed a sequence to record three approach images of Jupiter on the spacecraft's tape recorder, rewind the tape, and play back the images at the appropriate data rate consistent with the downlink performance. The recording of the images was performed and the spacecraft computer commanded the tape recorder to rewind the tape to the beginning of the first image. The rewind command was started at the proper time but the tape never got to the beginning of the image data. The analyses and tests that followed allowed a conclusive determination of the failure mechanism and indicated a strategy that could be used to prevent the untimely demise of the mission.

  4. Questions of Modern Cosmology Galileo's Legacy

    CERN Document Server

    D'Onofrio, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Are we living in the "golden age" of cosmology? Are we close to understanding the nature of the unknown ingredients of the currently most accepted cosmological model and the physics of the early Universe? Or are we instead approaching a paradigm shift? What is dark matter and does it exist? How is it distributed around galaxies and clusters? Is the scientific community open to alternative ideas that may prompt a new scientific revolution - as the Copernican revolution did in Galileo's time? Do other types of supernovae exist that can be of interest for cosmology? Why have quasars never been effectively used as standard candles? Can you tell us about the scientific adventure of COBE? How does the extraction of the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropy depend on the subtraction of the various astrophysical foregrounds? These, among many others, are the astrophysical, philosophical and sociological questions surrounding modern cosmology and the scientific community that Mauro D'Onofrio and Carlo Burigana pose t...

  5. Matematikken bag satellitnavigation. GPS - GLONASS - GALILEO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Johan P.

    2012-01-01

    affyringspositionen. Det kostede 12 milliarder US dollars og er nu tilgængeligt for alle. USSR og Kina har tilsvarende militære systemer GLONASS og COMPASS. GALILEO er et nyt europæisk system under udvikling af EU og European Space Agency (20 mia. Euro) med et kommercielt sigte, der forventes at tages i drift i...... tusinde del sekund resulterer i en positionsfejl på 300 km. Modtagerens billige ur synkroniseres matematisk ved at indføre urets fejlvisning F som en variable og måle i forhold til fire satelitter og dermed opstille 4 ligninger for de 4 variable x,y,z og F. Vi giver en matematisk behandling af ovennævnte...

  6. The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem: Science Today and in Cassini's Final Three Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) instrument was designed for long-range, high resolution imaging of Saturn and its system of rings and moons. It consists of two cameras, a Narrow Angle Camera (NAC, 2000 mm focal length) and a Wide Angle Camera (WAC, 200 mm focal length). The NAC has sensitivity from 200 nm to 1100 nm. The WAC is sensitive from 350 nm to 1100 nm. Among the mission highlights thus far for ISS have been discoveries of particulate plumes from Enceladus, details of surface topography along the 'tiger stripes', the discovery of an equatorial ridge on Iapetus, detailed images of small inner moons and distant moons Phoebe and Hyperion, features in Saturn's rings including perturbed edges near embedded moons, 'propellers', ephemeral clumps, and evidence for impacts in the rings and free-oscillation modes in Saturn's interior. The camera documented the aftermath of a methane/ethane 'rain' storm on Titan as well as seasonal behavior in the detached haze and visible airglow generated by magnetospheric plasma. The cameras documented the formation and evolution of a giant storm on Saturn, lightning from storms on Saturn, and determined that eddies are powering Saturn's zonal jets. In the F-ring and Proximal orbits ISS will obtain even better resolution on the rings, planet and inner moons.

  7. Cassini-VIMS at Jupiter: Solar occultation measurements using Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formisano, V.; D'Aversa, E.; Bellucci, G.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, Christophe; Chamberlain, M.C.; Hansen, G.; Hibbits, K.; Showalter, M.; Filacchione, G.

    2003-01-01

    We report unusual and somewhat unexpected observations of the jovian satellite Io, showing strong methane absorption bands. These observations were made by the Cassini VIMS experiment during the Jupiter flyby of December/January 2000/2001. The explanation is straightforward: Entering or exiting from Jupiter's shadow during an eclipse, Io is illuminated by solar light which has transited the atmosphere of Jupiter. This light, therefore becomes imprinted with the spectral signature of Jupiter's upper atmosphere, which includes strong atmospheric methane absorption bands. Intercepting solar light refracted by the jovian atmosphere, Io essentially becomes a "miffor" for solar occultation events of Jupiter. The thickness of the layer where refracted solar light is observed is so large (more than 3000 km at Io's orbit), that we can foresee a nearly continuous multi-year period of similar events at Saturn, utilizing the large and bright ring system. During Cassini's 4-year nominal mission, this probing tecnique should reveal information of Saturn's atmosphere over a large range of southern latitudes and times. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. CASSINI SATURN CIRS SPECTRAL CUBES RECORDS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set comprises uncalibrated and calibrated data from the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument. The basic data is comprised of...

  9. Cassini Information Management System in Distributed Operations Collaboration and Cassini Science Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Equils, Douglas J.

    2008-01-01

    Launched on October 15, 1997, the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft began its ambitious journey to the Saturnian system with a complex suite of 12 scientific instruments, and another 6 instruments aboard the European Space Agencies Huygens Probe. Over the next 6 1/2 years, Cassini would continue its relatively simplistic cruise phase operations, flying past Venus, Earth, and Jupiter. However, following Saturn Orbit Insertion (SOI), Cassini would become involved in a complex series of tasks that required detailed resource management, distributed operations collaboration, and a data base for capturing science objectives. Collectively, these needs were met through a web-based software tool designed to help with the Cassini uplink process and ultimately used to generate more robust sequences for spacecraft operations. In 2001, in conjunction with the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and later Venustar Software and Engineering Inc., the Cassini Information Management System (CIMS) was released which enabled the Cassini spacecraft and science planning teams to perform complex information management and team collaboration between scientists and engineers in 17 countries. Originally tailored to help manage the science planning uplink process, CIMS has been actively evolving since its inception to meet the changing and growing needs of the Cassini uplink team and effectively reduce mission risk through a series of resource management validation algorithms. These algorithms have been implemented in the web-based software tool to identify potential sequence conflicts early in the science planning process. CIMS mitigates these sequence conflicts through identification of timing incongruities, pointing inconsistencies, flight rule violations, data volume issues, and by assisting in Deep Space Network (DSN) coverage analysis. In preparation for extended mission operations, CIMS has also evolved further to assist in the planning and coordination of the dual playback redundancy of

  10. GALILEO PROBE NET FLUX RADIOMETER DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Galileo Probe Net Flux Radiometer (NFR) measured net and upward radiation fluxes in Jupiter's atmosphere between about 0.44 bars and 14 bars, using five spectral...

  11. GALILEO ORBITER V POS VENUS TRAJECTORY V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Galileo Orbiter 60 second sampled trajectory data from the Venus flyby in Venus Solar Orbital (VSO) coordinates. These data cover the interval 1990-02-09 00:00 to...

  12. GALILEO JUPITER PLASMA RESAMPLED BROWSE SPECTRA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains spin averaged count rates from selected ion and electron channels from the Plasma Science experiment (PLS) onboard the Galileo spacecraft...

  13. GALILEO ORBITER JUPITER RAW MAGNETOMETER DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains raw magnetic field data acquired by the Galileo Orbiter magnetometer at Jupiter. The data set covers the time period from 1995-11-06T00:21:30...

  14. GALILEO JUPITER PLASMA RAW PACKETIZED TELEMETRY V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains instrument packet files (IPFs) from the Plasma Science experiment (PLS) onboard the Galileo spacecraft during the Jupiter orbital operations...

  15. The architecture of the Cassini division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, M.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Sotin, Christophe; Clark, R.N.; Brown, R.H.; French, R.G.; Marouf, E.A.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini Division in Saturn's rings contains a series of eight named gaps, three of which contain dense ringlets. Observations of stellar occultations by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft have yielded 40 accurate and precise measurements of the radial position of the edges of all of these gaps and ringlets. These data reveal suggestive patterns in the shapes of many of the gap edges: the outer edges of the five gaps without ringlets are circular to within 1 km, while the inner edges of six of the gaps are eccentric, with apsidal precession rates consistent with those expected for eccentric orbits near each edge. Intriguingly, the pattern speeds of these eccentric inner gap edges, together with that of the eccentric Huygens Ringlet, form a series with a characteristic spacing of 006 day-1. The two gaps with non-eccentric inner edges lie near first-order inner Lindblad resonances (ILRs) with moons. One such edge is close to the 5:4 ILR with Prometheus, and the radial excursions of this edge do appear to have an m = 5 component aligned with that moon. The other resonantly confined edge is the outer edge of the B ring, which lies near the 2:1 Mimas ILR. Detailed investigation of the B-ring-edge data confirm the presence of an m = 2 perturbation on the B-ring edge, but also show that during the course of the Cassini Mission, this pattern has drifted backward relative to Mimas. Comparisons with earlier occultation measurements going back to Voyager suggest the possibility that the m = 2 pattern is actually librating relative to Mimas with a libration frequency L 006 day-1 (or possibly 012 day -1). In addition to the m = 2 pattern, the B-ring edge also has an m = 1 component that rotates around the planet at a rate close to the expected apsidal precession rate (?? ?? ?? B ??? 5.??06 day -1). Thus, the pattern speeds of the eccentric edges in the Cassini Division can be generated from various combinations of the pattern speeds

  16. The stars of Galileo Galilei and the universal knowledge of Athanasius Kircher

    CERN Document Server

    Buonanno, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In this fascinating book, the author traces the careers, ideas, discoveries, and inventions of two renowned scientists, Athanasius Kircher and Galileo Galilei, one a Jesuit, the other a sincere man of faith whose relations with the Jesuits deteriorated badly. The Author documents Kircher’s often intuitive work in many areas, including translating the hieroglyphs, developing sundials, and inventing the magic lantern, and explains how Kircher was a forerunner of Darwin in suggesting that animal species evolve. Galileo’s work on scales, telescopes, and sun spots is mapped and discussed, and care is taken to place his discoveries within their cultural environment. While Galileo is without doubt the “winner” in the comparison with Kircher, the latter achieved extraordinary insights by unconventional means. For all Galileo’s fine work, the author believes that scientists do need to regain the power of dreaming, vindicating Kirchner’s view.

  17. Selenide isotope generator for the Galileo Mission: SIG/Galileo hermetic receptable test program final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedel, S.

    1979-06-01

    The purpose of the receptacle test program was to test various types of hermetically sealed electrical receptacles and to select one model as the spaceflight hardware item for SIG/Galileo thermoelectric generators. The design goal of the program was to qualify a hermetic seal integrity of less than or equal to 1 x 10/sup -9/ std cc He/sec -atm at 400/sup 0/F (204/sup 0/C) and verify a reliability of 0.95 at a 50% confidence level for a flight mission in excess of 7 years.

  18. Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy of Saturn and Titan from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Brasunas, J. C.; Carlson, R. C.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Mamoutkine, A. A.; Nixon, A.; Pearl, J. C.; Romani, P. N.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; hide

    2009-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft completed its nominal mission at Saturn in 2008 and began its extended mission. Cassini carries the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS); a Fourier transform spectrometer that measures the composition, thermal structure and dynamics of the atmospheres of Saturn and Titan, and also the temperatures of other moons and the rings.

  19. Galileo and 400 Years of Telescopic Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Grego, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Imagine yourself living 400 years ago, right before the telescope was first used by Galileo to look up into the skies and find unforeseen wonders. You probably believed, with most of the known world, that Earth was at the center of the magnificent parade of planets and stars above you, and the Sun’s purpose in journeying across the sky was to give Earth daylight and warmth. Suddenly, though, your world is turned upside down. The Church, all powerful in its doctrines and teachings of the times, continues to support theories that don’t fit the facts presented by scientists. Scientists in their quest for truth must hide their findings or risk the harsh penalties imposed by the Church. We have gone from a comforting Earth-centered universe to a tiny floating spec in a gigantic cosmos, barely a comma in a lengthy treatise. And we have gone there in a blink of an eye. We may have lost our central position in the universe, but Grego and Mannion show us how much we have gained in understanding the universe around...

  20. Update on VLBA Astrometry of Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dayton L.; Folkner, William M.; Jacobson, Robert A.; Jacobs, Christopher S.; Romney, Jon; Dhawan, Vivek; Fomalont, Edward B.

    2015-01-01

    The NRAO Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) has been used to measure positions of the Cassini spacecraft 2-3 times per year during the decade since it arrived at Saturn. Combining these measurements with fits for Cassini's orbit about Saturn from Doppler tracking by the NASA Deep Space Network provides accurate positions for the Saturn system barycenter in the inertial International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) at each observing epoch. These positions in turn help to improve our knowledge of Saturn's orbit and thus the planetary ephemeris on which future interplanetary spacecraft navigation, pulsar timing, and studies of solar system dynamics depend. This observational program will continue to the end of Cassini's mission in 2017, thereby covering as large a fraction of Saturn's orbital period as possible. A multi-year period of accurate astrometry also increases the range of times over which ephemeris improvements can be extrapolated. Our current residuals with respect to JPL's DE430 ephemeris are approximately 0.2 mas in right ascension and 0.3 mas in declination. The primary error sources are residual troposphere delay calibration errors and uncertainties in the ICRF positions of some of our phase reference sources. The reference source position uncertainties are being reduced by continuing VLBI observations. Similar VLBI techniques will be applied to the Juno spacecraft when it begins orbiting Jupiter in 2016, thereby improving the orbit for this planet as well. This work has been carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Support from the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program is gratefully acknowledged. The VLBA is a facility of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, which is operated by Associated Universities, Inc, under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  1. Looking Forward to Cassini's Proximal Orbits: the Innermost Radiation Belt of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Kollmann, P.; Paranicas, C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Hedman, M. M.; Edgington, S. G.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Johnson, R. E.; Sturner, S. J.; Cassini Proximal Hazard Working Group

    2013-10-01

    The Cassini mission to Saturn will conclude with over twenty flybys of the equatorial gap region between Saturn's upper atmosphere and the inner D ring. This region at 62,000 - 65,000 kilometers from the center of Saturn is of comparable width to the inner Van Allen radiation belt of Earth and could contain Saturn's innermost belt of presently uncertain intensity and impact on the Cassini spacecraft. As first proposed by Cooper [BAAS 40(3), 460, 2008] this innermost belt could be populated to potentially very high intensities by protons and electrons from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay. The primary neutron source at high energies above 10 MeV would be from galactic cosmic ray interactions with the main rings of Saturn, but more recent work suggests a secondary source at lower energies from similar interactions with Saturn's upper atmosphere. At keV energies a third source from magnetospheric energetic neutral atom interactions with the exospheric gas extending through the gap region could be effective as observed earlier by Cassini. A fourth source includes eV - keV ions from low-energy neutral atom ejection out of the ring atmosphere. Ions from the ring ionosphere were also observed by Cassini. Since trapping lifetimes of keV - GeV protons due to radial diffusion in the gap region are projected to be extremely long, correspondingly high intensities could arise unless there was sufficient exospheric gas and ring material to reduce lifetimes far below the diffusion limit. Limits from new modeling are presented for the potential range of trapped particle intensities at MeV - GeV energies. Apart from the potential radiation and other hazards, this first exploration of the gap region will provide a fascinating conclusion to the Cassini mission.

  2. Implementation and verification of an advancement to the Galileo system search and rescue service signal simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mo; Wu, Qiongzhi; Liu, Shaobo

    2009-12-01

    Based on the Sino-European cooperation in the Galileo satellite navigation system Search And Rescue(SAR) service, a multi-channel distress beacon signal simulator is presented here. The mathematic model and spectrum analysis of current 406 MHz distress beacons signals is presented which includes Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRB) for Maritime, Personal Locator Beacons (PLB) for land (road and rail), and Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT) for aeronautical applications. Based on Software Defined Radio (SDR) and digital IF techniques, the design of a SAR Signal Simulator (SAR-SS) is proposed, which can generate no less than 20 distress signals simultaneously. The Doppler shift and space propagation effect such as ionosphere delay, free space attenuation and etc, are simulated in SAR-SS, which provided a significant test and evaluation capability for SAR/Galileo project. The performance of SAR-SS is more accurate and stabile than the Cospas-Sarsat(C-S) requirement. SAR-SS will be a significant instrument for the Galileo system search and rescue project ground test.

  3. Qualification of GPHS-RTG for the Galileo and Ulysses missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockfield, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    The General Purpose Heat Source - Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG)- was designed and built by General Electric under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Special Nuclear Projects, to power both the Galileo and Ulysses spacecraft. Separate STS launches of these two spacecraft were planned for May, l986, but have now been delayed. Galileo will carry two RTGs, providing over 5l0 watts of electrical power at the end of a 4.2 year mission, and Ulysses' single RTG will provide over 250 watts of electrical power at the end of a 4.7 year mission. These power levels and mission durations may differ for delayed launch schedules. To ensure that the GPHS-RTG is qualified for the Galileo and Ulysses missions, a formal program, consisting of extensive analyses, inspections, demonstrations, and tests, was conducted. Requirements for qualification included such categories as electrical performance, life characteristics, dynamic capability, thermal characteristics, active cooling system performance, magnetic properties, nuclear criticality, gas management provisions, electrostatic cleanliness, mass properties, neutron emission rate, and micrometeoroid survivability. This paper addresses selected topics from this list and presents data to show that anticipated performance will meet or exceed design requirements as specified for a May, l986 launch

  4. Cassini's Test Methodology for Flight Software Verification and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Eric; Brown, Jay

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft was launched on 15 October 1997 on a Titan IV-B launch vehicle. The spacecraft is comprised of various subsystems, including the Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem (AACS). The AACS Flight Software (FSW) and its development has been an ongoing effort, from the design, development and finally operations. As planned, major modifications to certain FSW functions were designed, tested, verified and uploaded during the cruise phase of the mission. Each flight software upload involved extensive verification testing. A standardized FSW testing methodology was used to verify the integrity of the flight software. This paper summarizes the flight software testing methodology used for verifying FSW from pre-launch through the prime mission, with an emphasis on flight experience testing during the first 2.5 years of the prime mission (July 2004 through January 2007).

  5. Surface changes on Io during the Galileo mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Paul; McEwen, Alfred; Phillips, Cynthia; Keszthelyi, Laszlo; Spencer, John

    2004-05-01

    A careful survey of Galileo SSI global monitoring images revealed more than 80 apparent surface changes that took place on Io during the 5 year period of observation, ranging from giant plume deposits to subtle changes in the color or albedo of patera surfaces. Explosive volcanic activity was discovered at four previously unrecognized centers: an unnamed patera to the south of Karei that produced a Pele-sized red ring, a patera to the west of Zal that produced a small circular bright deposit, a large orange ring detected near the north pole of Io, and a small bright ring near Io's south pole. Only a handful of Io's many active volcanoes produced large scale explosive eruptions, and several of these erupted repeatedly, leaving at least 83% of Io's surface unaltered throughout the Galileo mission. Most of the hot spots detected from SSI, NIMS and ground-based thermal observations caused no noticeable surface changes greater than 10 km in extent over the five year period. Surface changes were found at every location where active plumes were identified, including Acala which was never seen in sunlight and was only detected through auroral emissions during eclipse. Two types of plumes are distinguished on the basis of the size and color of their deposits, confirming post-Voyager suggestions by McEwen and Soderblom [Icarus 55 (1983) 191]. Smaller plumes produce near-circular rings typically 150-200 km in radius that are white or yellow in color unless contaminated with silicates, and frequently coat their surroundings with frosts of fine-grained SO 2. The larger plumes are much less numerous, limited to a half dozen examples, and produce oval, orange or red, sulfur-rich rings with maximum radii in the north-south direction that are typically in the range from 500 to 550 km. Both types of plumes can be either episodic or quasi-continuous over a five year period. Repeated eruptions of the smaller SO 2-rich plumes likely contribute significantly to Io's resurfacing rate

  6. Cassini ISS Observation of Saturn from Grand Finale Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blalock, J. J.; Sayanagi, K. M.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Dyudina, U.; Ewald, S. P.; McCabe, R. M.; Garland, J.; Gunnarson, J.; Gallego, A.

    2017-12-01

    We present images captured during Cassini's Grand Finale orbits, and their preliminary analyses. During the final 22 orbits of the mission, the spacecraft is in orbits that have 6.5 day period at an inclination of 62 degrees, apoapsis altitude of about 1,272,000 km, and periapsis altitudes of about 2,500 km. Images captured during periapsis passes show Saturn's atmosphere at unprecedented spatial resolution. We present preliminary analyses of these images, including the final images captured before the end of the mission when the spacecraft enters Saturn's atmosphere on September 15th, 2017. Prominent features captured during the final orbits include the north polar vortex and other vortices as well as very detailed views of the "popcorn clouds" that reside between the Hexagon and the north pole. In the cloud field between zonal jets, clouds either resemble linear streaks suggestive of cirrus-like clouds or round shapes suggestive of vortices or cumulus anvil. The presence of linear streaks that follow lines of constant latitudes suggests that meridional mixing is inhibited at those latitudes. The size of vortices may reflect latitudinal variation in the atmospheric deformation radius. We also compare the new images to those captured earlier in the Cassini mission to characterize the temporal evolution such as changes in the zonal jet speeds, and prevalence and colors of vortices. A particular focus of our interest is the long-term change in the color of the hexagon, the evolution of the wind speeds in the jetstream that blows eastward at the boundary of the hexagon, and the morphology of the north polar vortex. Our work has been supported by NASA PATM NNX14AK07G, NSF AAG 1212216, and NASA NESSF NNX15AQ70H.

  7. The Galileo PPS expert monitoring and diagnostic prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Khosrow

    1989-01-01

    The Galileo PPS Expert Monitoring Module (EMM) is a prototype system implemented on the SUN workstation that will demonstrate a knowledge-based approach to monitoring and diagnosis for the Galileo spacecraft Power/Pyro subsystems. The prototype will simulate an analysis module functioning within the SFOC Engineering Analysis Subsystem Environment (EASE). This document describes the implementation of a prototype EMM for the Galileo spacecraft Power Pyro Subsystem. Section 2 of this document provides an overview of the issues in monitoring and diagnosis and comparison between traditional and knowledge-based solutions to this problem. Section 3 describes various tradeoffs which must be considered when designing a knowledge-based approach to monitoring and diagnosis, and section 4 discusses how these issues were resolved in constructing the prototype. Section 5 presents conclusions and recommendations for constructing a full-scale demonstration of the EMM. A Glossary provides definitions of terms used in this text.

  8. GalileoMobile, sharing astronomy with students and teachers around the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez-Herrera, S.; GalileoMobile Team

    2017-03-01

    GalileoMobile is a non-profit itinerant science outreach initiative that brings Astronomy closer to young people in areas with little or no access to outreach programs. We perform astronomy-related activities in schools and communities we visit and encourage follow-up activities through teacher training workshops and the donation of telescopes and other educational resources. GalileoMobile is an unprecedented initiative promoting science knowledge and the interaction beyond borders through Astronomy while raising awareness for the diversity of human cultures, conveying the message of unity under the same sky. We take advantage of the local astronomical culture of the visited communities to establish a dialogue between different ways of understanding the world and to share different types of knowledge (historic, scientific, anthropological...), encouraging a process of mutual learning. GalileoMobile is composed of 15 volunteer team members and more than 40 collaborators from different countries. Since its creation in 2008, we have organised expeditions in Chile, Bolivia and Peru (2009), Bolivia (2012), India (2012) and Uganda (2013), Brazil and Bolivia (2014), Colombia (2014) and extended actions in Portugal (2012, 2013), Nepal (2013), Guatemala (2013), Dominican Republic (2013), the United States (2013) and Haiti (2014). Our initiative for 2015, Constellation (www.constellationproject.org), aimed to establish a South American network of schools committed to the long-term organisation of astronomical outreach activities amongst their pupils and local communities. This project was supported by the Cosmic Light Project of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) and partially funded by the Office for Astronomy Development. In total, we have reached over 15,000 students; 1,400 teachers and 6,000 people in different communities over the past eight years. Our efforts and activities have been shared with the public in over 80 conferences and talks, including a TEDx talk

  9. Galileo and Ulysses missions safety analysis and launch readiness status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cork, M.J.; Turi, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft will explore the Jupiter system and Ulysses will fly by Jupiter en route to a polar orbit of the sun. Both spacecraft are powered by general purpose heat source radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). As a result of the Challenger accident and subsequent mission reprogramming, the Galileo and Ulysses missions' safety analysis had to be repeated. In addition to presenting an overview of the safety analysis status for the missions, this paper presents a brief review of the missions' objectives and design approaches, RTG design characteristics and development history, and a description of the safety analysis process. (author)

  10. Galileo Declassified: IOV Spacecraft Metadata and Its Impact on Precise Orbit Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilssner, Florian; Schönemann, Erik; Springer, Tim; Flohrer, Claudia; Enderle, Werner

    2017-04-01

    In December 2016, shortly after the declaration of Galileo Initial Services, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) disclosed Galileo spacecraft metadata relevant to precise orbit determination (POD), such as antenna phase center parameters, dimensions of the solar panels and the main body, specularity and reflectivity coefficients for the surface materials, yaw attitude steering law, and signal group delays. The metadata relates to the first four operational Galileo satellites, known as the In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites, and is publicly available through the European GNSS Service Center (GSC) web site. One of the dataset's major benefits is that it includes nearly all information about the satellites' surface properties needed to develop a physically meaningful analytical solar radiation pressure (SRP) macro model, or "box-wing" (BW) model. Such a BW model for the IOV spacecraft has now been generated for use in NAPEOS, the European Space Operation Centre's (ESOC's) main geodetic software package for POD. The model represents the satellite as a simple six-sided box with two attached panels, or "wings", and allows for the a priori computation of the direct and indirect (Earth albedo) SRP force. Further valuable parameters of the metadata set are the IOV navigation antenna (NAVANT) phase center offsets (PCOs) and variations (PCVs) inferred from pre-launch anechoic chamber measurements. In this work, we report on the validation of the Galileo IOV metadata and its impact on POD, an activity ESOC has been deeply committed to since the launch of the first Galileo experimental satellite, GIOVE-A, in 2005. We first reanalyze the full history of Galileo tracking data the global International GNSS Service (IGS) network has collected since 2012. We generate orbit and clock solutions based on the widely used Empirical CODE Orbit Model (ECOM) with and without the IOV a priori BW model. For the satellite antennas, we apply the new as well as the standard IGS-recommended phase

  11. ARAC's operational support of the Cassini launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, John C.; Baskett, Ronald L.

    1999-01-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was the U.S. Department of Energy atmospheric modeling resource used for the contingency of potential radiological releases during the launch of the Cassini mission. The ARAC Center at LLNL forecasted detailed weather conditions and delivered consequence assessments for potential accident scenarios to NASA before and during launch operations. A key aspect of ARAC's support was to acquire a variety of meteorological data for use in both forecast and real-time model calculations. ARAC acquired electronically two types of real-time observed meteorological data: 1) the full set of on-site towers and profilers via the Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS), and 2) routine regional airport observations (delivered to the ARAC Center from the Air Force Weather Agency). We also used two forecasted data sources: 1) the U.S. Air Force 45th Weather Squadron at CCAS forecasted soundings for launch time, and 2) the Navy Operational Regional Atmospheric Prediction System (NORAPS) prognostic model which ARAC ran over the Cape. The NORAPS runs produced detailed 24-hr forecasts of 3-D wind fields. ARAC used default radiological accident source terms involving the potential destruction of Cassini's Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) during 3 phases: 1) before the launch, 2) during the first 5 sec after ignition, and 3) from 5 to 143 sec after ignition. ARAC successfully developed and delivered dose and deposition plots at 24 hours, 3 hours, and 30 minutes before each of the launch windows.

  12. Cassini’s Discoveries at Saturn and the Proposed Cassini Solstice Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Spilker, L. J.; Mitchell, R. T.; Cuzzi, J.; Gombosi, T. I.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Lunine, J. I.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding of the Saturn system has been greatly enhanced by the Cassini-Huygens mission. Fundamental discoveries have altered our views of Saturn, Titan and the other icy satellites, the rings, and magnetosphere of the system. Key discoveries include: water-rich plumes emanating from the south pole of Enceladus; hints of possible activity on Dione and of rings around Rhea; a methane hydrological cycle on Titan complete with fluvial erosion, lakes, and seas of liquid methane and ethane; non-axisymmetric ring microstructure in all moderate optical depth rings; south polar vortices on Saturn; and a unique magnetosphere that shares characteristics with both Earth’s and Jupiter’s magnetospheres. These new discoveries are directly relevant to current Solar System science goals including: planet and satellite formation processes, formation of gas giants, the nature of organic material, the history of volatiles, habitable zones and processes for life, processes that shape planetary bodies, and evolution of exoplanets. The proposed 7-year Cassini Solstice Mission would address new questions that have arisen during the Cassini Prime and Equinox Missions, and would observe seasonal and temporal change in the Saturn system to prepare for future missions to Saturn, Titan, and Enceladus. The proposed Cassini Solstice Mission would provide new science in three ways. First, it would observe seasonally and temporally dependent processes on Saturn, Titan and other icy satellites, and within the rings and magnetosphere, in a hitherto unobserved seasonal phase from equinox to solstice. Second, it would address new questions that have arisen during the mission thus far, providing qualitatively new measurements (e.g. of Enceladus and Titan) which could not be accommodated in the earlier mission phases. Tthird, it would conduct a close-in mission phase at Saturn that would provide unique science including comparison to the Juno observations at Jupiter.

  13. CASSINI S INMS TELEMETRY PACKET DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) Packet data set contains all telemetry packets as received from the instrument. One standard product data type...

  14. CASSINI SCALAR MAGNETOMETER CALIB DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains magnetic-field data acquired during the cruise and tour phases of the Cassini mission to Saturn. Data collection began on 16 August (day 228),...

  15. CASSINI MAGNETOMETER RAW DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains magnetic-field data acquired during the cruise and tour phases of the Cassini mission to Saturn. The data set begins with data collected on 16...

  16. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V6.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  17. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V9.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  18. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V10.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  19. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V14.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  20. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  1. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V5.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  2. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V11.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  3. Distributed Operations for the Cassini/Huygens Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, P.; Sarrel, M.

    1998-01-01

    The cassini project employs a concept known as distributed operations which allows independent instrument operations from diverse locations, provides full empowerment of all participants and maximizes use of limited resources.

  4. Galileo as an intellectual heretic and why that matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    What was physics like before Galileo? Five centuries ago physics was taught in universities all over Europe as part of a broader field of knowledge known as natural philosophy. It was neither quantitative, nor experimental, but mostly an a-priori, logical type of inquiry about principles concerning notions such as space, time, and motion, from which deductions could be made about the natural world. Galileo changed all that. He claimed that inquiry about nature should be experimental, and that reasoning in natural philosophy should be mathematical. It was a bold enough move. But Galileo's intellectual heresy was the discovery that knowledge of the natural world could only be achieved by relaxing the requirement that principles be known with absolute certainty. He demonstrated that a new mathematical physics could be built upon principles based on experiment. Thus the new physics could be extended recklessly by starting from less than certain foundations. Galileo's startling insight was that scientific truth need not be localized but can be diffused throughout the structure of science.

  5. Galileo and the Pendulum: Latching on to Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machamer, Peter; Hepburn, Brian

    Galileo changed the very concepts or categories by which natural philosophy could deal with matter and motion. Central to these changes was his introduction of time as a fundamental concept. He worked with the pendulum and with the inclined plane to discover his new concept of motion. Both of these showed him that acceleration and time were important for making motion intelligible.

  6. Reconstruction of Galileo Galilei's Experiment: The Inclined Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straulino, S.

    2008-01-01

    In the "Third Day" of the "Discourses and Mathematical Demonstrations Concerning Two New Sciences" Galileo Galilei describes the famous experiment of the inclined plane and uses it to bring an experimental confirmation to the laws of uniformly accelerated motion. We describe a reconstruction of the experiment and how the results can be used for…

  7. [In 2009, International Year of Astronomy: Galileo, Mutis and Duperier].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González de Posada, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    In commemoration of International Year of Astronomy (2009, proclaimed by the United Nations (UN) 62nd General Assembly) Galileo's revolutions, named, respectively, astronomic, philosophical, mathematical and theological are considered first. And complementarily the Spanish contributions of the doctor Jose Celestino Mutis and Arturo Duperier to the astrophysics are remembered, in their respective anniversary.

  8. Jupiter radiation measurements from enhanced Galileo/EPD data for NASA's PDS archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, P.; Smith, D.; Vandegriff, J. D.; Paranicas, C.; Lee-Payne, Z. H.

    2017-12-01

    The Galileo mission included the first orbiter around Jupiter. Its Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) provided an excellent survey of the radiation in this planetary magnetosphere. EPD measured electrons and various ion species in the energy range of tens of keV to tens of MeV. This data set is unique since the orbit was close to the equatorial plane, covered distances from Jupiter to its magnetopause, and included several close flybys at moons. The ongoing Juno mission in comparison only skims the equatorial plane and does not include moon flybys. Even though the Galileo mission ended in 2003, the EPD data archived through NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) is sparse and not well calibrated. The bulk of the PDS data is from a low time resolution mode (from Galileo's "real time" mode), and is only provided as count rates. Only the 14 directionally resolved channels are provided in the PDS, but there would be also 35 additional omnidirectional channels available. Data in the higher time resolution "record mode" is archived but has not been adequately corrected. We present a preliminary version of fully cleaned, calibrated, and corrected EPD data that can be used without specialized instrument knowledge. Archive products for both the updated data and also the initial raw data (all channels and resolutions) are being prepared for delivery to the PDS. Major issues with the data from the Low Energy Magnetospheric Measurements System (EPD/LEMMS) were that some channels were saturated or contaminated. We correct for this using dead times and background values determined in flight. The raw measurements of electrons in the MeV range are not resolved in energy. We ran a forward model considering the instrument response to calculate electron MeV range spectra, which have many applications. From the Composition Measurement System (EPS/CMS), we have also extracted event data, which will also be included in our PDS delivery and can be used to derive high-resolution energy spectra

  9. The four hundred years of planetary science since Galileo and Kepler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Joseph A

    2010-07-29

    For 350 years after Galileo's discoveries, ground-based telescopes and theoretical modelling furnished everything we knew about the Sun's planetary retinue. Over the past five decades, however, spacecraft visits to many targets transformed these early notions, revealing the diversity of Solar System bodies and displaying active planetary processes at work. Violent events have punctuated the histories of many planets and satellites, changing them substantially since their birth. Contemporary knowledge has finally allowed testable models of the Solar System's origin to be developed and potential abodes for extraterrestrial life to be explored. Future planetary research should involve focused studies of selected targets, including exoplanets.

  10. Exploring inner structure of Titan's dunes from Cassini Radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P.; Heggy, E.; Farr, T. G.

    2013-12-01

    Linear dunes discovered in the equatorial regions of Titan by the Cassini-Huygens mission are morphologically very similar to many terrestrial linear dune fields. These features have been compared with terrestrial longitudinal dune fields like the ones in Namib desert in western Africa. This comparison is based on the overall parallel orientation of Titan's dunes to the predominant wind direction on Titan, their superposition on other geomorphological features and the way they wrap around topographic obstacles. Studying the internal layering of dunes has strong implications in understanding the hypothesis for their origin and evolution. In Titan's case, although the morphology of the dunes has been studied from Cassini Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, it has not been possible to investigate their internal structure in detail as of yet. Since no radar sounding data is available for studying Titan's subsurface yet, we have developed another technique to examine the inner layering of the dunes. In this study, we utilize multiple complementary radar datasets, including radar imaging data for Titan's and Earth's dunes and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR)/radar sounding data for terrestrial dunes. Based on dielectric mixing models, we suggest that the Cassini Ku-band microwaves should be able to penetrate up to ~ 3 m through Titan's dunes, indicating that the returned radar backscatter signal would include contributions from both surface and shallow subsurface echoes. This implies that the shallow subsurface properties can be retrieved from the observed radar backscatter (σ0). In our analysis, the variation of the radar backscatter as a function of dune height is used to provide an insight into the layering in Titan's dunes. We compare the variation of radar backscatter with elevation over individual dunes on Titan and analogous terrestrial dunes in three sites (Great Sand Sea, Siwa dunes and Qattaniya dunes) in the Egyptian Sahara. We observe a strong, positive

  11. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 2: Book 1, Accident model document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-12-15

    The Accident Model Document (AMD) is the second volume of the three volume Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Galileo outer planetary space science mission. This mission employs Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) as the prime electrical power sources for the spacecraft. Galileo will be launched into Earth orbit using the Space Shuttle and will use the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) booster to place the spacecraft into an Earth escape trajectory. The RTG's employ silicon-germanium thermoelectric couples to produce electricity from the heat energy that results from the decay of the radioisotope fuel, Plutonium-238, used in the RTG heat source. The heat source configuration used in the RTG's is termed General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS), and the RTG's are designated GPHS-RTGs. The use of radioactive material in these missions necessitates evaluations of the radiological risks that may be encountered by launch complex personnel as well as by the Earth's general population resulting from postulated malfunctions or failures occurring in the mission operations. The FSAR presents the results of a rigorous safety assessment, including substantial analyses and testing, of the launch and deployment of the RTGs for the Galileo mission. This AMD is a summary of the potential accident and failure sequences which might result in fuel release, the analysis and testing methods employed, and the predicted source terms. Each source term consists of a quantity of fuel released, the location of release and the physical characteristics of the fuel released. Each source term has an associated probability of occurrence. 27 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Adding "Missed" Science to Cassini's Ops Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Mou; Burton, Marcia E.; Edgington, Scott; Pitesky, Jo E.; Steadman, Kimberly B.; Ray, Trina L.; Evans, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenal success of the Cassini Mission at Saturn is largely due to flagship instruments, in a target rich environment, for a long period of time, executing almost error free complex mission operations. A smooth transition from cruise operations through the prime science mission and extended science (Equinox) mission culminating in the currently executing Solstice mission has folded in necessary procedural alterations due to improved understanding of the spacecraft, instruments, uplink and planning systems as well as additional science objectives. These have come with the maturation of the mission along with management of workforce reductions. One important set of operational changes has been initiated due to scientific findings highlighting "missed" science opportunities. This is the case for the Titan Meteorology Campaigns and Saturn Storm Watch Campaigns. These observations involve long term monitoring of the atmospheres of Titan and Saturn while the spacecraft and science teams are focused on other high priority targets of opportunity (like Enceladus). Our objective in this paper is to emphasize how a non-invasive strategy to get additional remarkable science was conceived and implemented in a mission with an already well defined operational plan. To illustrate this we will detail Titan Meteorology Campaign and Saturn Storm Watch Campaign integration and implementation strategies as well as the scientific goals and achievements of both.

  13. The interior structure of Enceladus from Cassini gravity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iess, Luciano

    2015-04-01

    The Cassini spacecraft flew by the small Saturnian moon Enceladus in three close flybys (April 28, 2010, November 30, 2010 and May 2, 2012, to carry out measurements of the satellite's gravity field [1]. One of the main motivations was the search for a hemispherical asymmetry in the gravity field, the gravitational counterpart of the striking North-South asymmetry shown by optical imaging and other Cassini instruments in the geological features of the moon. The estimation of Enceladus' gravity field by Cassini was especially complex because of the small surface gravity (0.11 m/s2), the short duration of the gravitational interaction (only a few minutes) and the small, nearly impulsive, neutral particles drag occurring when the spacecraft crossed the south polar plume during the first and the third flyby. Including the non-gravitational acceleration due to the plume in the dynamical model was crucial to obtain a reliable solution for the gravity field. In order to maximize the sensitivity to the hemispherical asymmetry, controlled by the spherical harmonic coefficient J3, the closest approaches occurred at the low altitudes (respectively 100, 48 and 70 km), and at high latitudes in both hemispheres (89°S, 62°N, and 72°S). Enceladus' gravity field is dominated by large quadrupole terms not far from those expected for a body in a relaxed shape. Although the deviations from the hydrostaticity are weak (J2/C22=3.55±0.05), the straightforward application of the Radau-Darwin approximation yields a value of the moment of inertia factor (MOIF=C/MR2) that is incompatible (0.34) with the differentiated interior structure suggested by cryovolcanism and the large heat flow. The other remarkable feature of the gravity field is the small but still statistically significant value of J3 (106 x J3 = -115.3±22.9). A differentiated interior structure (corresponding to a smaller MOIF) may be reconciled with the gravity measurement by assuming that the rocky core has retained some

  14. The GalileoMobile starts its South American voyage - Astronomy education goes on tour through the Andes Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    Today marks the beginning of the GalileoMobile Project, a two-month expedition to bring the wonder and excitement of astronomy to young people in Chile, Bolivia and Peru. Supported by ESO and partners, a group of astronomers and educators will travel through a region of the Andes Mountains aboard the GalileoMobile, offering astronomical activities, such as workshops for students and star parties for the general public. Professional filmmakers on the trip will produce a multilingual documentary capturing the thrill of discovery through science, culture and travel. The GalileoMobile is a Special Project of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009), which is a global celebration commemorating the first use of a telescope to view the Universe by the Italian astronomer Galileo four hundred years ago. The project will promote basic science education through astronomy by visiting schools and communities that have limited access to outreach programmes. The GalileoMobile will provide these underserved groups with hands-on activities and educational material from international partners. The van is fully equipped to offer unique sky-observing opportunities for young students and other locals, with star parties at night and solar observations during the day. The team will use various tools including IYA2009's handy Galileoscopes, which will be donated to the schools after the visits. By stimulating curiosity, critical thinking and a sense of wonder and discovery for the Universe and our planet, the GalileoMobile Project aims to encourage interest in astronomy and science, and exchange culturally different visions of the cosmos. Spearheading the initiative is a group of enthusiastic Latin American and European PhD students from the European Southern Observatory, the Max Planck Society, the University Observatory Munich, and the Stockholm University Observatory. This itinerant educational programme is intended to reach about 20 000 people during eight weeks in October

  15. Final Cassini RADAR Observation of Titan's Magic Island Region and Ligeia Mare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofgartner, J. D.; Hayes, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Stiles, B. W.; Malaska, M. J.; Wall, S. D.

    2017-12-01

    Cassini arrived in the Saturn system shortly after the Oct. 2002 northern winter solstice and the mission will end shortly after the May 2017 northern summer solstice. A main objective of the Cassini Solstice mission is to study seasonal and temporal changes and at Titan this includes changes of the hydrocarbon lakes/seas. Titan's Magic Islands are transient bright features in the north polar sea, Ligeia Mare that were observed to be temporal changes in Cassini RADAR images. The Magic Islands were discovered in a July 2013 image as anomalously bright features that were not present in four previous observations from Feb. 2007 - May 2013. The region of the Magic Islands was again anomalously bright in an Aug. 2014 image and the total areal extent of the anomalously bright region had increased by more than a factor of three. The transient features were not, however, observed in a Jan. 2015 image. Thus in seven observations spanning much of the Cassini mission the bright features were observed to appear, increase in extent, and then disappear. They are referred to as Titan's Magic Islands because of their appearing/disappearing behavior and resemblance in appearance to islands. These transient bright features are not actually islands. The transients were concluded to be most consistent with waves, floating solids, suspended solids, and bubbles. Tides, sea level changes, and seafloor changes are unlikely to be the primary cause of these temporal changes. Whether these temporal changes are also seasonal changes was unclear. The final Cassini RADAR imaging observation of Titan in Apr. 2017 included the region of the Magic Islands. The transient bright features were not present during this observation. The geometry of the observation was such that, had the transients been present, their brightness may have ruled out some of the remaining hypotheses. Their absence however, is less constraining but consistent with their transient nature. Waves, floating solids, suspended

  16. CASSINI ORBITER MAG CALIBRATED SUMMARY 1 MINUTE AVERAGE V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains calibrated 1 minute averaged Cassini magnetometer data, for the entire Cassini mission. These data are provided in Kronographic (KRTP, KSO,...

  17. CASSINI ORBITER MAG CALIBRATED SUMMARY 1 SEC AVERAGES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains calibrated 1 second averaged Cassini magnetometer data, for the entire Cassini mission. These data are provided in Kronographic (KRTP, KSO,...

  18. Positioning performance improvements with European multiple-frequency satellite navigation - Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shengyue

    2008-10-01

    The rapid development of Global Positioning System has demonstrated the advantages of satellite based navigation systems. In near future, there will be a number of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) available, i.e. modernized GPS, Galileo, restored GLONASS, BeiDou and many other regional GNSS augmentation systems. Undoubtedly, the new GNSS systems will significantly improve navigation performance over current GPS, with a better satellite coverage and multiple satellite signal bands. In this dissertation, the positioning performance improvement of new GNSS has been investigated based on both theoretical analysis and numerical study. First of all, the navigation performance of new GNSS systems has been analyzed, particularly for urban applications. The study has demonstrated that Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) performance can be significantly improved with multiple satellite constellations, although the position accuracy improvement is limited. Based on a three-dimensional urban building model in Hong Kong streets, it is found that positioning availability is still very low in high-rising urban areas, even with three GNSS systems. On the other hand, the discontinuity of navigation solutions is significantly reduced with the combined constellations. Therefore, it is possible to use cheap DR systems to bridge the gaps of GNSS positioning, with high accuracy. Secondly, the ambiguity resolution performance has been investigated with Galileo multiple frequency band signals. The ambiguity resolution performance of three different algorithms is compared, including CAR, ILS and improved CAR methods (a new method proposed in this study). For short baselines, with four frequency Galileo data, it is highly possible to achieve reliable single epoch ambiguity resolution, when the carrier phase noise level is reasonably low (i.e. less than 6mm). For long baselines (up to 800 km), the integer ambiguity can be determined within 1 min on average. Ambiguity

  19. Cassini UVIS Auroral Observations in 2016 and 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Wayne R.; Esposito, Larry W.; Jouchoux, Alain; Radioti, Aikaterini; Grodent, Denis; Gustin, Jacques; Gerard, Jean-Claude; Lamy, Laurent; Badman, Sarah; Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Cassini UVIS Team, Cassini VIMS Team, Cassini ISS Team, HST Saturn Auroral Team

    2017-10-01

    In 2016 and 2017, the Cassini Saturn orbiter executed a final series of high-inclination, low-periapsis orbits ideal for studies of Saturn's polar regions. The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) obtained an extensive set of auroral images, some at the highest spatial resolution obtained during Cassini's long orbital mission (2004-2017). In some cases, two or three spacecraft slews at right angles to the long slit of the spectrograph were required to cover the entire auroral region to form auroral images. We will present selected images from this set showing narrow arcs of emission, more diffuse auroral emissions, multiple auroral arcs in a single image, discrete spots of emission, small scale vortices, large-scale spiral forms, and parallel linear features that appear to cross in places like twisted wires. Some shorter features are transverse to the main auroral arcs, like barbs on a wire. UVIS observations were in some cases simultaneous with auroral observations from the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), and the Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) that will also be presented.

  20. Unified derivation of the Galileo and the Lorentz transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardelis, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    By using the principle of relativity together with the general assumptions of space-time homogeneity and space isotropy underlying the principle of inertia, a most general transformation is constructed connecting any two inertial frames. The Galileo and the Lorentz transformations are then deduced by constraining these general inertial transformations through the corresponding two physical principles: the (classical) principle of acceleration invariance and the (relativistic) principle that all interactions propagate with the same finite and invariant speed. (author)

  1. "Life of Galileo" Théâtre de Carouge

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Special offer for CERN personnel CERN personnel and their spouses have until Tuesday, 18 March 2008 to buy tickets for « Vie de Galilée » ("Life of Galileo") at the Théâtre de Carouge at the special discount rate of 28 CHF (instead of 35 CHF). This play, by the German dramatist Bertolt Brecht, is directed by Manfred Karge and recounts the life of the father of modern physics in fifteen tableaux. The wily, impassioned teacher Galileo is about to substantiate Copernicus’ theory that the Earth is not a static object but revolves around the sun, a discovery that revolutionised mankind’s view of itself and the world. When hauled before the Inquisition, he recants. "Life of Galileo" is the first major dramatic work after the invention of the atom bomb to address the issues of freedom of thought and ethics in the context of scientific discoveries. Special performances on 3, 10, 15 and 22 April will be followed by organised debat...

  2. Automation of Cassini Support Imaging Uplink Command Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly-Hollins, Lisa; Breneman, Herbert H.; Brooks, Robert

    2010-01-01

    "Support imaging" is imagery requested by other Cassini science teams to aid in the interpretation of their data. The generation of the spacecraft command sequences for these images is performed by the Cassini Instrument Operations Team. The process initially established for doing this was very labor-intensive, tedious and prone to human error. Team management recognized this process as one that could easily benefit from automation. Team members were tasked to document the existing manual process, develop a plan and strategy to automate the process, implement the plan and strategy, test and validate the new automated process, and deliver the new software tools and documentation to Flight Operations for use during the Cassini extended mission. In addition to the goals of higher efficiency and lower risk in the processing of support imaging requests, an effort was made to maximize adaptability of the process to accommodate uplink procedure changes and the potential addition of new capabilities outside the scope of the initial effort.

  3. Cassini RADAR Observations at Titan : Results at the End of the Nominal Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph

    This talk will review some recent results of the Cassini RADAR investigations at Titan. In particular, the first half of 2008 includes three low-latitude flybys with SAR observations of Xanadu, the Huygens Landing site, and in particular three areas that may be associated with cryovolcanic features - Tortola Facula, Hotei Arcus, and Tui Regio. In addition to providing SAR coverage (which will include further mapping of dunes in the Shangri-La dark areas as well as the features above), these new flybys will permit refinement of the apparently dynamic Titan rotational state, as well as expanding our topographic knowledge.

  4. A new Icimauna Martins & Galileo, 1991, from the Bolivian orocline (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae, Hemilophini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Silva, Antonio; Perger, Robert

    2017-04-07

    The Neotropical longhorned beetle tribe Hemilophini has been reviewed by Martins & Galileo (2014a, b) and currently contains 542 species (Monné 2017). Some of the most conspicuous longhorned beetle taxa are found in this tribe, for example species with a pair of cephalic horns (Phoebe Audinet-Serville, 1835), or others that strongly resemble to noxious Lycidae (Coleoptera) (e.g. Apeba Martins & Galileo, 1991, Calocosmus Chevrolat, 1862, or Lycidola Thomson, 1864) (see Lingafelter 2013; Martins & Galileo 2014a, b).

  5. A survey of Galileo plasma wave instrument observations of Jovian whistler-mode chorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Menietti

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A survey of plasma wave observations at Jupiter obtained by the plasma wave instrument on board the Galileo spacecraft is presented. The observations indicate that chorus emissions are observed commonly in the Jovian magnetosphere near the magnetic equator in the approximate radial range 6includes almost all local times but not equally sampled in radial distance due to the spacecraft trajectory. The data suggest that chorus emissions are somewhat more intense on the dayside, but this may be a result of insufficient nightside observations. The orbit of Galileo is also restricted to ±3° of the Jovigraphic equator, but the tilt of the magnetic field permits coverage of a range of magnetic latitudes of −13°<λmag<+13°. The similarities of chorus emissions to terrestrial observations are a good reason to speculate that Jovian chorus emission may play a significant role in the stochastic acceleration of electrons in the radial range 6–10 RJ as recent studies indicate. These electrons may then be transported inward by radial diffusion where they are additionally accelerated to form the synchrotron radiation belt source.

  6. A survey of Galileo plasma wave instrument observations of Jovian whistler-mode chorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Menietti

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A survey of plasma wave observations at Jupiter obtained by the plasma wave instrument on board the Galileo spacecraft is presented. The observations indicate that chorus emissions are observed commonly in the Jovian magnetosphere near the magnetic equator in the approximate radial range 6<r<10 RJ. The survey includes almost all local times but not equally sampled in radial distance due to the spacecraft trajectory. The data suggest that chorus emissions are somewhat more intense on the dayside, but this may be a result of insufficient nightside observations. The orbit of Galileo is also restricted to ±3° of the Jovigraphic equator, but the tilt of the magnetic field permits coverage of a range of magnetic latitudes of −13°<λmag<+13°. The similarities of chorus emissions to terrestrial observations are a good reason to speculate that Jovian chorus emission may play a significant role in the stochastic acceleration of electrons in the radial range 6–10 RJ as recent studies indicate. These electrons may then be transported inward by radial diffusion where they are additionally accelerated to form the synchrotron radiation belt source.

  7. Preliminary Results from the Cassini RADAR Ring Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Richard D.; Janssen, Michael A.; Zhang, Zhimeng; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Anderson, Yanhua; Hamilton, Gary; Elachi, Charles; Cassini RADAR Science Team

    2017-10-01

    In its last year of operation, the Cassini spacecraft executed a series of short highly inclined orbits that brought it close to Saturn’s rings. The Cassini RADAR instrument collected active and passive data of the rings in five separate observations. These observations provided a unique opportunity to obtain backscatter measurements and relatively high-resolution brightness temperature measurements from the rings. Such measurements were never before possible from the spacecraft or the Earth due to high range. Preliminary examination of the active data shows major ring structural features such as the Cassini Division, the Encke Gap, and the Keeler Gap. This presentation will show preliminary processing results from the radar rings scans and discuss the calibration and processing issues. These ring scan measurements provide a 1-D profile of backscatter obtained at 2.2 cm wavelength that complements similar passive profiles obtained at optical, infrared, and microwave wavelengths. Such measurements can further constrain and inform models of the ring particle composition and structure, and the local vertical structure of the rings. This work is supported by the NASA Cassini Program at JPL - CalTech.

  8. Thermal mapping of Saturn's main rings by Cassini CIRS: Temperature variations with changing viewing geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, L.; Altobelli, N.; Pilorz, S.; Leyrat, C.; Ferrari, C.; Edgington, S.; Wallis, B.; Pearl, J.; Flasar, F.

    2007-08-01

    After three years in orbit around Saturn, the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) has acquired an broad set of thermal measurements of Saturn's main rings (A, B, C and Cassini Division) for a number of different viewing geometries, most of which are not available from Earth. These thermal measurements include information on physical temperature as well as filling factor. Thermal mapping of both the lit and unlit faces of the rings is being performed within a multidimensional observation space that includes solar phase angle, spacecraft elevation, solar elevation and local hour angle. The largest temperature variations on the lit face of the rings are driven by variations in phase angle while differences in temperature with changing spacecraft elevation are a secondary effect. Ring temperatures decrease with increasing phase angle suggesting a population of slowly rotating ring particles [1]. The largest ring temperatures are measured at zero degrees phase angle. The lit A and B rings both show temperature decreases with decreasing solar elevation while temperature changes in the C ring and Cassini Division are more muted. Variations in the geometrical filling factor are driven primarily by changes in spacecraft elevation. For the least optically thick region of the C ring, the filling factor variations are almost exclusively driven by spacecraft elevation. Our preliminary evaluation of the data set acquired to date will be presented. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA, and at CEA Saclay supported by the "Programme National de Planetologie". References [1] L. Spilker et al., PSS, 54, 1167 (2006).

  9. Europa's Interaction with Jupiter's Magnetosphere: Galileo Plasma Observations Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, S. V.; Rymer, A. M.; Westlake, J. H.; Paterson, W. R.; Collinson, G.

    2017-12-01

    The Galileo spacecraft was active at Jupiter from December 1995 to September 2003, carrying the Galileo Plasma Science Instrument (PLS), an electrostatic analyzer with three spherical-segment plates which directed energy selected particles into one of seven electron sensors or seven ion channels with field-of-views which combined to cover 80% of the 4pi-sr unit sphere (Frank et al., 1992). While Galileo accomplished most of its primary scientific objectives, the mission did not reach its full potential due to a failed high-gain antenna deployment which severely limited the available bandwidth for data transmission. Consequently, the PLS was limited by bandwidth availability, and only collected data with high temporal and energy resolution for short periods of time (e.g. review by Bagenal et al., 2016). The electron sensors were also negatively affected by the gaseous environment around Jupiter, which is suspected to have deposited a layer of contaminants on the detectors, raising the threshold energy required to pass through the aperture and effectively preventing the measurement of electrons below 1keV (Frank et al., 2002). As a result, data from the PLS is challenging to process and interpret. Ion plasma moments have been computed (and published on the PDS) in the magnetosphere, but moon flybys were excluded (Bagenal et al., 2016). In anticipation of future in-situ exploration of the Europa plasma environment, we present analysis of full-resolution plasma data acquired by the PLS during the nine Europa flybys and compare our results with existing data in order to further inform designs currently being worked for the Europa Clipper and JUICE missions.

  10. Bruno, Galileo, Einstein: The Value of Myths in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    Usually, historical myths are portrayed as something to be avoided in a physics classroom. Instead, I will discuss the positive function of myths and how they can be used to improve physics education. First, on the basis of historical research from primary sources and significant new findings about the Catholic Inquisition, I will discuss how to use the inspirational story of Giordano Bruno when discussing cosmology. Next, I will discuss the recurring story about Galileo and the Leaning Tower of Pisa. Finally, I will discuss how neglected stories about the young Albert Einstein can help to inspire students.

  11. Galileo spacecraft inertial sensors in-flight calibration design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshahi, M. H.; Lai, J. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The successful navigation of Galileo depends on accurate trajectory correction maneuvers (TCM's) performed during the mission. A set of Inertial Sensor (INS) units, comprised of gyros and accelerometers, mounted on the spacecraft, are utilized to control and monitor the performance of the TCM's. To provide the optimum performance, in-flight calibrations of INS are planned. These calibrations will take place on a regular basis. In this paper, a mathematical description is given of the data reduction technique used in analyzing a typical set of calibration data. The design of the calibration and the inertial sensor error models, necessary for the above analysis, are delineated in detail.

  12. Galileo spacecraft solid-state imaging system view of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Galileo spacecraft solid-state imaging system view of Antarctica was taken during its first encounter with the Earth. This color picture of Antarctica is part of a mosaic of pictures covering the entire polar continent showing the Ross Ice Shelf and its border with the sea and mountains poking through the ice near the McMurdo Station. From top to bottom, the frame looks across about half of Antarctica. View provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) with alternate number P-37297.

  13. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 2, Book 2: Accident model document: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-12-15

    This section of the Accident Model Document (AMD) presents the appendices which describe the various analyses that have been conducted for use in the Galileo Final Safety Analysis Report II, Volume II. Included in these appendices are the approaches, techniques, conditions and assumptions used in the development of the analytical models plus the detailed results of the analyses. Also included in these appendices are summaries of the accidents and their associated probabilities and environment models taken from the Shuttle Data Book (NSTS-08116), plus summaries of the several segments of the recent GPHS safety test program. The information presented in these appendices is used in Section 3.0 of the AMD to develop the Failure/Abort Sequence Trees (FASTs) and to determine the fuel releases (source terms) resulting from the potential Space Shuttle/IUS accidents throughout the missions.

  14. Cassini RADAR at Titan : Results in 2013/2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Cassini RadarTeam

    2014-05-01

    Since the last EGU meeting, several Cassini flybys of Titan have featured significant RADAR observations. These include T91 and T92 (May/July 2013) with SAR and altimetry observations of Ligeia Mare. The latter have placed tight constraints on surface roughness (Zebker et al., in press), showing that wind-driven waves were not present. A remarkable altimetry analysis by Mastrogiuseppe et al. (submitted) detects a bottom echo from the bed of Ligeia, only possible if the liquid is exceptionally radar-transparent. This opens the way to wider radar bathymetry analyses of the northern seas. SAR coverage, augmented by some distant HiSAR observations, has now allowed construction of a more-or-less complete map of the northern polar region. This map now defines the extent of the northern lakes and seas, permitting oceanographic studies. T95 (October 2013) made SAR observations of the impact crater Selk (previously observed by VIMS and RADAR). As well as a closer view of this rather polygonal crater, the observation shows dramatic change in the dune orientation around the crater and its ejecta blanket. The T98 encounter is due to occur in February 2014, and will feature the last prime SAR observation of Ontario Lacus, giving a good baseline for change detection against prior observations. Additionally, close-approach observations (mandated to avoid solar heating constraints on other instruments) will give high-resolution altimetry data on the Shangri-La dunes. Preliminary results may be available in time for the meeting, at which this solicted talk will review analyses of these and other observations.

  15. Learning from the Starry Message: Using Galileo's "Sidereus Nuncius" in Introductory Astronomy Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    Every introductory astronomy class encounters Galileo during the course as the first man to systematically study the sky with a telescope. Every Astronomy 101 student meets Galileo as one of the major catalysts behind the shift from the Ptolemaic to the Copernican system and as one of the great minds behind the scientific method. But most of the…

  16. Artist concept of Galileo with inertial upper stage (IUS) in low Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Artist concept shows Galileo with inertial upper stage (IUS) boosted into low Earth orbit by Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, (visible in the bottom right) during STS-34 mission. Galileo will be boosted out of Earth orbit by the solid rocket IUS.

  17. POD improvements of GALILEO satellites through the measurement of their non-gravitational accelerations by means of an onboard accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peron, Roberto; Lucchesi, David M.; Santoli, Francesco; Iafolla, Valerio; Fiorenza, Emiliano; Lefevre, Carlo; Lucente, Marco; Magnafico, Carmelo; Kalarus, Maciej; Zielinski, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    Research Centre (SRC) of the Polish Academy of Sciences (PAS) of Warsaw. The GALAC main objective is to provide the characteristics and performance of an onboard accelerometer able to improve the POD with respect to the current best results obtained through the modeling of the NGPs. The starting point of our activities has been the ISA accelerometer developed for the ESA BepiColombo mission to Mercury. We will present our results of a preparatory work for GALAC concerning a first characterization of the main NGPs acting on the GALILEO spacecraft of second generation, including their (main) spectral content. Such results are used to preliminary fix the accelerometer measurement band, its sensitivity and physical characteristics in order to fit with the GALILEO spacecraft environment.

  18. Galileo's Religion Versus the Church's Science? Rethinking the History of Science and Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D. B.

    Galileo's conflict with the Catholic Church is well recognized as a key episode in the history of physics and in the history of science and religion. This paper applies a new, historiographical approach to that specific episode. It advocates eliminating the science and religion. The Church concluded that the plainest facts of human experience agreed perfectly with an omniscient God's revealed word to proclaim the earth at rest. Supported by the Bible, Galileo, God-like, linked the elegance of mathematics to truths about nature. The Church, in effect, resisted Galileo's claim to be able to think like God, instead listening to God himself - and paying close attention to what man himself observed. We can thus see that the phrase ``Galileo's religion versus the Church's science'' is as meaningful (or meaningless) as the usual designation ``Galileo's science versus the Church's religion.''

  19. Cassini Scientist for a Day: a tactile experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canas, L.; Altobelli, N.

    2012-09-01

    In September 2011, the Cassini spacecraft took images of three targets and a challenge was launched to all students: to choose the one target they thought would provide the best science and to write an essay explaining their reasons (more information on the "Cassini Scientist for a Day" essay contest official webpage in: http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/education/scientistforaday10thedition/, run by NASA/JPL) The three targets presented were: Hyperion, Rhea and Titan, and Saturn. The idea behind "Cassini Scientist for a Day: a tactile experience" was to transform each of these images into schematic tactile images, highlighting relevant features apprehended through a tactile key, accompanied by a small text in Braille with some additional information. This initial approach would allow reach a broader community of students, more specifically those with visual impairment disabilities. Through proper implementation and careful study cases the adapted images associated with an explanatory key provide more resources in tactile astronomy. As the 2012 edition approaches a new set of targeted objet images will be once again transformed and adapted to visually impaired students and will aim to reach more students into participate in this international competition and to engage them in a quest to expand their knowledge in the amazing Cassini discoveries and the wonders of Saturn and its moons. As the winning essays will be published on the Cassini website and contest winners invited to participate in a dedicated teleconference with Cassini scientists from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, this initiative presents a great chance to all visually impaired students and teachers to participate in an exciting experience. These initiatives must be complemented with further information to strengthen the learning experience. However they stand as a good starting point to tackle further astronomical concepts in the classroom, especially this field that sometimes lacks the resources. Although

  20. Multi-GNSS phase delay estimation and PPP ambiguity resolution: GPS, BDS, GLONASS, Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingxing; Li, Xin; Yuan, Yongqiang; Zhang, Keke; Zhang, Xiaohong; Wickert, Jens

    2017-10-01

    This paper focuses on the precise point positioning (PPP) ambiguity resolution (AR) using the observations acquired from four systems: GPS, BDS, GLONASS, and Galileo (GCRE). A GCRE four-system uncalibrated phase delay (UPD) estimation model and multi-GNSS undifferenced PPP AR method were developed in order to utilize the observations from all systems. For UPD estimation, the GCRE-combined PPP solutions of the globally distributed MGEX and IGS stations are performed to obtain four-system float ambiguities and then UPDs of GCRE satellites can be precisely estimated from these ambiguities. The quality of UPD products in terms of temporal stability and residual distributions is investigated for GPS, BDS, GLONASS, and Galileo satellites, respectively. The BDS satellite-induced code biases were corrected for GEO, IGSO, and MEO satellites before the UPD estimation. The UPD results of global and regional networks were also evaluated for Galileo and BDS, respectively. As a result of the frequency-division multiple-access strategy of GLONASS, the UPD estimation was performed using a network of homogeneous receivers including three commonly used GNSS receivers (TRIMBLE NETR9, JAVAD TRE_G3TH DELTA, and LEICA). Data recorded from 140 MGEX and IGS stations for a 30-day period in January in 2017 were used to validate the proposed GCRE UPD estimation and multi-GNSS dual-frequency PPP AR. Our results show that GCRE four-system PPP AR enables the fastest time to first fix (TTFF) solutions and the highest accuracy for all three coordinate components compared to the single and dual system. An average TTFF of 9.21 min with 7{°} cutoff elevation angle can be achieved for GCRE PPP AR, which is much shorter than that of GPS (18.07 min), GR (12.10 min), GE (15.36 min) and GC (13.21 min). With observations length of 10 min, the positioning accuracy of the GCRE fixed solution is 1.84, 1.11, and 1.53 cm, while the GPS-only result is 2.25, 1.29, and 9.73 cm for the east, north, and vertical

  1. Mysteries Of The Farside Of The Moon: What Galileo Couldn't See

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Carlé M.

    When Galileo first turned his improved spyglass to view the Moon from Padua, he was astounded at what he saw: ``And it is like the face of the Earth itself … which is marked here and there with chains of mountains and depths of valleys'' (Galilei, 1610). His remarks about his new discoveries captured the joy which ultimately drives every planetary explorer: ``I render infinite thanks to God for being so kind as to make me alone the first observer of marvels kept hidden in obscurity for all previous centuries'' (Galilei, 1610). Four centuries later his intellectual heirs have expanded human understanding of our place in the universe with an elegant symmetry. The Apollo and Luna programs demonstrated that the origin and history of the Earth and the Moon are intimately linked. Two decades later the Galileo spacecraft swung by the Moon to obtain a gravity-assist from Earth in order to complete its exploration journey to Jupiter and the Galilean satellites. The Galileo spacecraft was the first to return to the Moon with modern sensors, and its brief passage provided dramatic evidence that the farside of the Moon held secrets unimagined from study of the nearside. Subsequent missions, Clementine and Lunar Prospector, provided the first global assessment of lunar topography and composition, and placed the farside in context. There are few of the extensive plains of basaltic lava on the farside of the Moon. This fact is clearly a product of the earliest history of the Moon (the first 500 My), the details of which are being investigated from clues that remain on the Moon today. The dominant feature on the lunar farside is the enormous South Pole-Aitken Basin, which extends from the south pole to the crater Aitken, just 15° south of the equator. This basin includes the deepest area on the Moon and appears as a slightly darker circular region encompassing the lower half of the lunar farside. The composition of the interior is uniquely enriched with iron-bearing minerals

  2. AN ATLAS OF BRIGHT STAR SPECTRA IN THE NEAR-INFRARED FROM CASSINI-VIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Paul N.; Tuthill, Peter G.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Sloan, G. C.; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the Cassini Atlas Of Stellar Spectra (CAOSS), comprised of near-infrared, low-resolution spectra of bright stars recovered from space-based observations by the Cassini spacecraft. The 65 stellar targets in the atlas are predominately M, K, and S giants. However, it also contains spectra of other bright nearby stars including carbon stars and main-sequence stars from A to F. The spectra presented are free of all spectral contamination caused by the Earth's atmosphere, including the detrimental telluric molecular bands which put parts of the near-infrared spectrum out of reach of terrestrial observations. With a single instrument, a spectro-photometric data set is recovered that spans the near-infrared from 0.8 to 5.1 μm with spectral resolution ranging from R = 53.5 to R = 325. Spectra have been calibrated into absolute flux units after careful characterization of the instrumental spectral efficiency. Spectral energy distributions for most stars match closely with literature values. All final data products have been made available online

  3. AN ATLAS OF BRIGHT STAR SPECTRA IN THE NEAR-INFRARED FROM CASSINI-VIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Paul N.; Tuthill, Peter G. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Nicholson, Philip D. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Sloan, G. C. [Cornell Center for Astrophyics and Planetary Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hedman, Matthew M., E-mail: p.stewart@physics.usyd.edu.au [Department of Physics, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We present the Cassini Atlas Of Stellar Spectra (CAOSS), comprised of near-infrared, low-resolution spectra of bright stars recovered from space-based observations by the Cassini spacecraft. The 65 stellar targets in the atlas are predominately M, K, and S giants. However, it also contains spectra of other bright nearby stars including carbon stars and main-sequence stars from A to F. The spectra presented are free of all spectral contamination caused by the Earth's atmosphere, including the detrimental telluric molecular bands which put parts of the near-infrared spectrum out of reach of terrestrial observations. With a single instrument, a spectro-photometric data set is recovered that spans the near-infrared from 0.8 to 5.1 μm with spectral resolution ranging from R = 53.5 to R = 325. Spectra have been calibrated into absolute flux units after careful characterization of the instrumental spectral efficiency. Spectral energy distributions for most stars match closely with literature values. All final data products have been made available online.

  4. Ongoing Analysis of Jupiter's Equatorial Hotspots and Plumes from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, D. S.; Showmwn, A. P.; Vasavada, A. R.; Simon-Miller, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present updated results from our ongoing analysis of Cassini observations of Jupiter's equatorial meteorology. For two months preceding the spacecraft's closest approach of the planet, the ISS instrument onboard Cassini regularly imaged the atmosphere of Jupiter. We created time-lapse movies from this period that show the complex activity and interactions of the equatorial atmosphere. During this period, hot spots exhibited significant variations in size and shape over timescales of days and weeks. Some of these changes appear to be a result of interactions with passing vortex systems in adjacent latitudes. Strong anticyclonic gyres to the southeast of the dark areas converge with flow from the west and appear to circulate into a hot spot at its southwestern corner.

  5. Measurements of C02 Distribution in Saturn's Atmosphere by Cassini-Infrared Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M. M.; LeClair, A.; Woodard, E.; Young, M.; Stanbro, M.; Flasar, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Fourier transform infrared spectrometer aboard the Cassini spacecraft, inserted in Saturn s orbit in July 2004, has been providing high resolution/high sensitivity infrared (IR) spectra of the Saturnian system. The measurements cover the spectral range of 10-1400/cm with variable spectral resolutions of 0.53 to 15/cm, exhibiting spectral features of a series of trace gases including CO2 and H2O. The observed spectra may be analyzed for retrieval of global P/T and gas density profiles of Saturn. The infrared measurements of Saturn by ISO(SWS) have indicated unexpected large abundances of CO2 in Saturn's atmosphere. The rigorous photochemical models of Saturn's atmosphere that have been developed indicate exogenic oxygen influx of icy dust grains that lead to the production of CO2. The distribution of CO2 in Saturn's atmosphere needs to be confirmed, and the nature of exogenic sources remains to be investigated. This paper presents comprehensive measurements of the CO2 distribution in Saturn's atmosphere by Cassini IR observations.

  6. iPhone App for Cassini's Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI) Browse Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, H. Y.; Kusterer, M. B.; Mitchell, D. G.; Steele, R. J.; Vandegriff, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    We have created a mobile app on the iOS platform to view the years of browse plots from data collected by the MIMI instruments on Cassini. The focus of the app is to bring the browsing capabilities of the MIMI database to the touchscreen technologies that exist on mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets. Among the data products within the MIMI suite that are viewable through the app include the Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) images and movies of Saturn taken with the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA), and spectrograms and line plots from the LEMMS and CHEMS particle detectors. The release of this app also coincides with access to a number of MIMI data products previously not available to the public. We will unveil the features of the app and provide a working demo. The CassiniMIMI app will be available for free from Apple's iTunes Store. A sneak preview of some selection screens and a representative plot are shown in the separate image file.

  7. Implications for Particle Rotation and Vertical Mixing from Cassini CIRS Thermal Measurements of Saturn's Main Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, L. J.; Pilorz, S.; Pearl, J.; Altobelli, N.; Wallis, B.; Brooks, S.; Ferrari, C.; Showalter, M.; Flasar, M.

    2006-12-01

    The Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) obtained spatially resolved thermal infrared scans of Saturn's main rings (A, B and C, and Cassini Division) for both the lit and unlit faces of the rings over a variety of phase angles. The scans show ring temperatures decreasing with increasing solar phase angle. The largest ring temperatures are at a phase angle of zero degrees. These temperature differences with phase suggest that Saturn's main rings include a population of ring particles that spin slowly, possibly with a spin period greater than a few hours, given their low thermal inertia. For the B and A rings, the temperature is correlated with optical depth when viewed from the lit face, and anti- correlated when viewed from the unlit face. On the unlit face of the B ring, not only do the lowest temperatures correlate with the largest optical depths, but these temperatures are the same at both low and high phase angles, suggesting that little sunlight is penetrating these regions. The temperature differential from the lit to the unlit side of the rings is a strong, nearly linear, function of optical depth. This is consistent with the expectation that little sunlight penetrates to the dark side of the densest rings, but also suggests that little vertical mixing of ring particles is taking place in the A and B rings. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA and at CEA Saclay supported by the "Programme National de Planetologie".

  8. BATMAN: a DMD-based multi-object spectrograph on Galileo telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamkotsian, Frederic; Spano, Paolo; Lanzoni, Patrick; Ramarijaona, Harald; Moschetti, Manuele; Riva, Marco; Bon, William; Nicastro, Luciano; Molinari, Emilio; Cosentino, Rosario; Ghedina, Adriano; Gonzalez, Manuel; Di Marcantonio, Paolo; Coretti, Igor; Cirami, Roberto; Zerbi, Filippo; Valenziano, Luca

    2014-07-01

    Next-generation infrared astronomical instrumentation for ground-based and space telescopes could be based on MOEMS programmable slit masks for multi-object spectroscopy (MOS). This astronomical technique is used extensively to investigate the formation and evolution of galaxies. We are developing a 2048x1080 Digital-Micromirror-Device-based (DMD) MOS instrument to be mounted on the Galileo telescope and called BATMAN. A two-arm instrument has been designed for providing in parallel imaging and spectroscopic capabilities. The field of view (FOV) is 6.8 arcmin x 3.6 arcmin with a plate scale of 0.2 arcsec per micromirror. The wavelength range is in the visible and the spectral resolution is R=560 for 1 arcsec object (typical slit size). The two arms will have 2k x 4k CCD detectors. ROBIN, a BATMAN demonstrator, has been designed, realized and integrated. It permits to determine the instrument integration procedure, including optics and mechanics integration, alignment procedure and optical quality. First images and spectra have been obtained and measured: typical spot diameters are within 1.5 detector pixels, and spectra generated by one micro-mirror slits are displayed with this optical quality over the whole visible wavelength range. Observation strategies are studied and demonstrated for the scientific optimization strategy over the whole FOV. BATMAN on the sky is of prime importance for characterizing the actual performance of this new family of MOS instruments, as well as investigating the operational procedures on astronomical objects. This instrument will be placed on the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo mid-2015.

  9. Cassini at Saturn Proximal Orbits - Attitude Control Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    The Cassini mission at Saturn will come to an end in the spring and summer of 2017 with a series of 22 orbits that will dip inside the rings of Saturn. These are called proximal orbits and will conclude with spacecraft disposal into the atmosphere of the ringed world on September 15, 2017. These unique orbits that cross the ring plane only a few thousand kilometers above the cloud tops of the planet present new attitude control challenges for the Cassini operations team. Crossing the ring plane so close to the inner edge of the rings means that the Cassini orientation during the crossing will be tailored to protect the sensitive electronics bus of the spacecraft. This orientation will put the sun sensors at some extra risk so this paper discusses how the team prepares for dust hazards. Periapsis is so close to the planet that spacecraft controllability with RCS thrusters needs to be evaluated because of the predicted atmospheric torque near closest approach to Saturn. Radiation during the ring plane crossings will likely trigger single event transients in some attitude control sensors. This paper discusses how the attitude control team deals with radiation hazards. The angular size and unique geometry of the rings and Saturn near periapsis means that star identification will be interrupted and this paper discusses how the safe mode attitude is selected to best deal with these large bright bodies during the proximal orbits.

  10. Cassini UVIS Observations of Saturn during the Grand Finale Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, W. R.; Esposito, L. W.; West, R. A.; Jouchoux, A.; Radioti, A.; Grodent, D. C.; Gerard, J. C. M. C.; Gustin, J.; Lamy, L.; Badman, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    In 2016 and 2017, the Cassini Saturn orbiter executed a final series of high inclination, low-periapsis orbits ideal for studies of Saturn's polar regions. The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) obtained an extensive set of auroral images, some at the highest spatial resolution obtained during Cassini's long orbital mission (2004-2017). In some cases, two or three spacecraft slews at right angles to the long slit of the spectrograph were required to cover the entire auroral region to form auroral images. We will present selected images from this set showing narrow arcs of emission, more diffuse auroral emissions, multiple auroral arcs in a single image, discrete spots of emission, small scale vortices, large-scale spiral forms, and parallel linear features that appear to cross in places like twisted wires. Some shorter features are transverse to the main auroral arcs, like barbs on a wire. UVIS observations were in some cases simultaneous with auroral observations from the Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) that will also be presented. UVIS polar images also contain spectral information suitable for studies of the auroral electron energy distribution. The long wavelength part of the UVIS polar images contains a signal from reflected sunlight containing absorption signatures of acetylene and other Saturn hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbon spatial distribution will also be examined.

  11. Avoiding Human Error in Mission Operations: Cassini Flight Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Operating spacecraft is a never-ending challenge and the risk of human error is ever- present. Many missions have been significantly affected by human error on the part of ground controllers. The Cassini mission at Saturn has not been immune to human error, but Cassini operations engineers use tools and follow processes that find and correct most human errors before they reach the spacecraft. What is needed are skilled engineers with good technical knowledge, good interpersonal communications, quality ground software, regular peer reviews, up-to-date procedures, as well as careful attention to detail and the discipline to test and verify all commands that will be sent to the spacecraft. Two areas of special concern are changes to flight software and response to in-flight anomalies. The Cassini team has a lot of practical experience in all these areas and they have found that well-trained engineers with good tools who follow clear procedures can catch most errors before they get into command sequences to be sent to the spacecraft. Finally, having a robust and fault-tolerant spacecraft that allows ground controllers excellent visibility of its condition is the most important way to ensure human error does not compromise the mission.

  12. Probing Small Lakes on Titan Using the Cassini RADAR Altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Poggiali, V.; Hayes, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Seu, R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Mitri, G.; Mitchell, K. L.; Janssen, M. A.; Casarano, D.; Notarnicola, C.; Le Gall, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    The T126 Cassini's final flyby of Titan has offered a unique opportunity to observe an area in the Northern Polar terrain, where several small - medium size (10 - 50 km) hydrocarbon lakes are present and have been previously imaged by Cassini. The successful observation allowed the radar to operate at the closest approach over several small lakes, using its altimetry mode for the investigation of depth and liquid composition. Herein we present the result of a dedicate processing previously applied to altimetric data acquired over Ligeia Mare where the radar revealed the bathymetry and composition of the sea [1,2]. We show that, the optimal geometry condition met during the T126 fly-by allowed the radar to probe Titan's lakes revealing that such small liquid bodies can exceed one-hundred meters of depth. [1] M. Mastrogiuseppe et al. (2014, Mar.). The bathymetry of a Titan Sea. Geophysical Research Letters. [Online]. 41 (5), pp. 1432-1437. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2013GL058618 [2] M.Mastrogiuseppe et al. (2016, Oct). Radar Sounding Using the Cassini Altimeter: Waveform Modeling and Monte Carlo Approach for Data Inversion of Observations of Titan's Seas, IEEE Transactions On Geoscience And Remote Sensing, Vol. 54, No. 10, doi: 10.1109/TGRS.2016.2563426.

  13. Five years of Cassini CIRS Thermal Observations of Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Linda J.; Altobelli, N.; Flandes, J. A.; Morishima, R.; Leyrat, C.; Pilorz, S.; Ferrari, C.; Edgington, S.; Brooks, S.

    2009-09-01

    An extensive set of thermal measurements of Saturn's main rings (A, B, C and Cassini division) has been returned by the Cassini Composite Infrared spectrometer over the past five years. Data on the lit and unlit rings have been acquired over a variety of solar phase angles, spacecraft elevations and local hour angles. The solar elevation angle has varied from 24 degrees at the start of the mission through zero at equinox. Phase angle and solar elevation angle are two of the strongest determinants of ring temperature; the lit face of the main rings cooled by over 30 K with approaching equinox. Thermal phase curves of the main rings exhibit a nonlinear variation in temperature with phase angle, with pronounced surges at phase angles less than 50 degrees. The larger optical depth regions, such as regions in the A and B rings, also show slight changes in this surge with changing solar elevation. This effect may be related to interparticle shadowing within the rings. The temperature of the main rings decreases as the solar elevation angle declines. The temperature in the optically thin C ring and Cassini division decreases by only a few degrees over a broad range of solar elevation, decreasing more rapidly at smaller solar elevation. Detailed thermal modeling is under way to fit these data. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2009 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  14. CASSINI JUPITER CIRS TIME-SEQUENTIAL DATA RECORDS V2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set comprises uncalibrated and calibrated data from the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument. The basic data is comprised of...

  15. CASSINI SATURN CIRS TIME-SEQUENTIAL DATA RECORDS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set comprises uncalibrated and calibrated data from the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument. The basic data is comprised of...

  16. CASSINI SATURN CIRS TIME-SEQUENTIAL DATA RECORDS V2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set comprises uncalibrated and calibrated data from the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument. The basic data is comprised of...

  17. CASSINI SATURN CIRS TIME-SEQUENTIAL DATA V3.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set comprises uncalibrated and calibrated data from the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument. The basic data is comprised of...

  18. CASSINI SATURN CIRS TIME-SEQUENTIAL DATA RECORDS V3.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set comprises uncalibrated and calibrated data from the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument. The basic data is comprised of...

  19. Il dito di Galileo le dieci grandi idee della scienza

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Domande e risposte per dieci idee che hanno plasmato il mondo di oggi. Possiamo rintracciare l'origine e il divenire del cosmo? Perché spazio e tempo formano una cosa sola? Che cosa significa l'evoluzione del vivente? Perché il DNA è così importante? Perché il mondo ha bisogno di energia? E com'è che l'aumento dell'entropia scandisce il cambiamento dell'intero universo? Cosa sono gli atomi e cosa c'è di più piccolo di essi? Perché la simmetria della natura e dell'arte cattura il nostro senso della bellezza? Cosa sono quegli elusivi quanti alla base della fisica contemporanea? Siamo sicuri che l'aritmetica non ci inganni? Peter Atkins offre una guida chiara e completa all'impresa scientifica, seguendo la via indicata dal dito di Galileo.

  20. Selenide isotope generator for the Galileo Mission. Program final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    This final report for the Selenide Isotope Generator for the Galileo Mission (SIG/GM) documents the work performed by Teledyne Energy Systems (TES) under US Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC01-78ET33009 (formerly ET-78-C-01-2865) during the period April 10, 1978 to June 30, 1979. Because of technical difficulties with the thermoelectric converter being developed by the 3M Company under separate DOE contract, a Stop Work Order, dated January 29, 1979, was issued by DOE. The TES effort up to the receipt of the Stop Work Order as well as limited technical activities up to the contract conclusion on June 30, 1979 are reported.

  1. Status of the Galileo interim radiation electron model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, H. B.; Jun, I.; Ratliff, J. M.; Evans, R. W.; Clough, G. A.; McEntire, R. W.

    2003-04-01

    Measurements of the high energy, omni-directional electron environment by the Galileo spacecraft Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) were used to develop a new model of Jupiter's trapped electron radiation in the jovian equatorial plane for the range 8 to 16 Jupiter radii (1 jovian radius = 71,400 km). 10-minute averages of these data formed an extensive database of observations of the jovian radiation belts between Jupiter orbit insertion (JOI) in 1995 and 2002. These data were then averaged to provide a differential flux spectrum at 0.174, 0.304, 0.527, 1.5, 2.0, 11.0, and 31 MeV in the jovian equatorial plane as a function of radial distance. This omni-directional, equatorial model was combined with the original Divine model of jovian electron radiation to yield estimates of the out-of-plane radiation environment. That model, referred to here as the Galileo Interim Radiation Electron (or GIRE) model, was then used to calculate the Europa mission dose for an average and a 1-sigma worst-case situation. The prediction of the GIRE model is about a factor of 2 lower than the Divine model estimate over the range of 100 to 1000 mils (2.54 to 25.4 mm) of aluminum shielding, but exceeds the Divine model by about 50% for thicker shielding. The model, the steps leading to its creation, and relevant issues and concerns are discussed. While work remains to be done, the GIRE model clearly represents a significant step forward in the study of the jovian radiation environment, and it is a useful and valuable tool for estimating that environment for future space missions.

  2. GEO-6 project for Galileo data scientific utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buresova, Dalia; Lastovicka, Jan; Boska, Josef; Sauli, Petra; Kouba, Daniel; Mosna, Zbysek

    The future GNSS Galileo system offer a number of benefits (e.g. availability of better accuracy positioning, new frequencies bands allowing the implementation of specific techniques, provable time-stamp and location data using SIS authorisation, integrity, better support ad-hoc algorithms for data analysis and other service guarantee for liability and regulated applications) are widely spread among different disciplines. Also applications which are less interesting from the commercial and market point of view could successfully contribute to the numerous social benefits and support the innovation in the international research. The aim of the GEO-6 project "Scientific research Using GNSS" is to propose and broaden scientific utilization of future GNSS Galileo system data in research. It is a joint project of seven institutions from six countries led by the Atos Origin Company from Spain. The core of the project consists from six projects in five priority areas: PA-1 Remote sensing of the ocean using GNSS reflections, PA-2a Investigating GNSS ionospheric data assimilation, PA-2b 3-D gravity wave detection and determination (both PA-2a and PA-2b are ionospheric topics), PA-3 Demonstration of capability for operational forecasting of atmospheric delays, PA-4 GNSS seismometer, PA-5 Spacecraft formation flying using global navigation satellite systems. Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Prague, Czech Republic is responsible for the project PA-2b, where we developed and tested (to the extent allowed by available data) an algorithm and computer code for the 3-D detection of gravity waves and determination of their characteristics. The main drivers of the GEO-6 project are: high levels of accuracy even with the support of local elements, sharing of solutions and results for the worldwide scientific community. The paper will present basic description of the project with more details concerning Czech participation in it.

  3. Irregular Saturnian Moon Lightcurves from Cassini-ISS Observations: Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denk, Tilmann; Mottola, S.

    2013-10-01

    Cassini ISS-NAC observations of the irregular moons of Saturn revealed various physical information on these objects. 16 synodic rotational periods: Hati (S43): 5.45 h; Mundilfari (S25): 6.74 h; Suttungr (S23): ~7.4 h; Kari (S45): 7.70 h; Siarnaq (S29): 10.14 h; Tarvos (S21): 10.66 h; Ymir (S19, sidereal period): 11.92220 h ± 0.1 s; Skathi (S27): ~12 h; Hyrrokkin (S44): 12.76 h; Ijiraq (S22): 13.03 h; Albiorix (S26): 13.32 h; Bestla (S39): 14.64 h; Bebhionn (S37): ~15.8 h; Kiviuq (S24): 21.82 h; Thrymr (S30): ~27 h; Erriapus (S28): ~28 h. The average period for the prograde-orbiting moons is ~16 h, for the retrograde moons ~11½ h (includes Phoebe's 9.2735 h from Bauer et al., AJ, 2004). Phase-angle dependent behavior of lightcurves: The phase angles of the observations range from 2° to 105°. The lightcurves which were obtained at low phase (<40°) show the 2-maxima/ 2-minima pattern expected for this kind of objects. At higher phases, more complicated lightcurves emerge, giving rough indications on shapes. Ymir pole and shape: For satellite Ymir, a convex-hull shape model and the pole-axis orientation have been derived. Ymir's north pole points toward λ = 230°±180°, β = -85°±10°, or RA = 100°±20°, Dec = -70°±10°. This is anti-parallel to the rotation axes of the major planets, indicating that Ymir not just orbits, but also rotates in a retrograde sense. The shape of Ymir resembles a triangular prism with edge lengths of ~20, ~24, and ~25 km. The ratio between the longest 25 km) and shortest axis (pole axis, ~15 km) is ~1.7. Erriapus seasons: The pole direction of object Erriapus has probably a low ecliptic latitude. This gives this moon seasons similar to the Uranian regular moons with periods where the sun stands very high in the sky over many years, and with years-long periods of permanent night. Hati density: The rotational frequency of the fastest rotator (Hati) is close to the frequency where the object would lose material from the surface if

  4. Constraints on Saturn's Tropospheric General Circulation from Cassini ISS Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelGenio, Anthony D.; Barbara, John M.

    2013-01-01

    An automated cloud tracking algorithm is applied to Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem high-resolution apoapsis images of Saturn from 2005 and 2007 and moderate resolution images from 2011 and 2012 to define the near-global distribution of zonal winds and eddy momentum fluxes at the middle troposphere cloud level and in the upper troposphere haze. Improvements in the tracking algorithm combined with the greater feature contrast in the northern hemisphere during the approach to spring equinox allow for better rejection of erroneous wind vectors, a more objective assessment at any latitude of the quality of the mean zonal wind, and a population of winds comparable in size to that available for the much higher contrast atmosphere of Jupiter. Zonal winds at cloud level changed little between 2005 and 2007 at all latitudes sampled. Upper troposphere zonal winds derived from methane band images are approx. 10 m/s weaker than cloud level winds in the cores of eastward jets and approx. 5 m/s stronger on either side of the jet core, i.e., eastward jets appear to broaden with increasing altitude. In westward jet regions winds are approximately the same at both altitudes. Lateral eddy momentum fluxes are directed into eastward jet cores, including the strong equatorial jet, and away from westward jet cores and weaken with increasing altitude on the flanks of the eastward jets, consistent with the upward broadening of these jets. The conversion rate of eddy to mean zonal kinetic energy at the visible cloud level is larger in eastward jet regions (5.2x10(exp -5) sq m/s) and smaller in westward jet regions (1.6x10(exp -5) sqm/s) than the global mean value (4.1x10(ep -5) sq m/s). Overall the results are consistent with theories that suggest that the jets and the overturning meridional circulation at cloud level on Saturn are maintained at least in part by eddies due to instabilities of the large-scale flow near and/or below the cloud level.

  5. Peter Paul Rubens, Galileo Galilei und die Schlacht am Weißen Berg

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konečný, Lubomír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 52 (2005), s. 85-91 ISSN 0391-9064 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80330511 Keywords : Peter Paul Rubens * Galileo Galilei * moon Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage

  6. GALILEO ORBITER EARTH POS EARTH2 FLYBY TRAJ V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Galileo Orbiter 60 second sampled trajectory data from the Earth-2 flyby in GSE and GSM coordinates. These data cover the interval 1992-11-03 to 1992-12-20.

  7. GALILEO ORBITER EARTH POS EARTH1 FLYBY TRAJ V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Galileo Orbiter 60 second sampled trajectory data from the Earth-1 flyby in GSE and GSM coordinates. These data cover the interval 1990-11-05 to 1990-12-31.

  8. GALILEO ORBITER A POS GASPRA FLYBY TRAJ V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Galileo Orbiter 60 second sampled trajectory data from the Gaspra flyby in Gaspra-centric Solar Ecliptic (GaSE) and RTN coordinates. These data cover the interval...

  9. GALILEO ORBITER A POS IDA FLYBY TRAJ V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Galileo Orbiter 60 second sampled trajectory data from the Ida flyby in Ida-centric Solar Ecliptic (ISE) and RTN coordinates. These data cover the interval...

  10. Experimental Galileo System Time (E-GST): One Year of Real-Time Experiment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cordara, Franco; Costa, Roberto; Lorini, Luca; Orgiazzi, Diego; Pettiti, Valerio; Sesia, Ilaria; Tavella, Patrizia; Elia, Paola; Mascarello, Marco; Falcone, Marco; Hahn, Joerg

    2004-01-01

    ...). The aim is testing the Galileo algorithms in a mixed configuration where the space segment is given by the existing GPS constellation, while the ground segment is an experimental setup as close...

  11. Euroliidu Galileo süsteem astub kandadele USA GPS-ile / Heiki Suurkask

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Suurkask, Heiki, 1972-

    2005-01-01

    Euroopa Liidu uue navigatsioonisüsteemi Galileo esimene satelliit saadeti eile kosmosesse. Satelliit GIOVE-A kujutab endast esimest ülekandemajakat, millega saab hakata looma kuni 30 satelliidist koosnevat globaalset navigatsioonivõrgustikku

  12. GALILEO ORBITER ASTEROID AND EARTH 2 SOLID STATE IMAGING 2 R

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set has been generated by NASA's Galileo Project in order to distribute the images acquired by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) camera to the scientists and...

  13. GALILEO ORBITAL OPERATIONS SOLID STATE IMAGING RAW EDR V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set has been generated by NASA's Galileo Project in order to distribute the images acquired by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) camera to the scientists and...

  14. GALILEO JUPITER RDR FULL RESOLUTION PLASMA DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains raw data from the Plasma Science instrument (PLS) on the Galileo spacecraft for all Jupiter orbits. These data have been reformatted into...

  15. Titan's Topography and Shape at the End of the Cassini Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlies, P.; Hayes, A. G.; Birch, S. P. D.; Lorenz, R.; Stiles, B. W.; Kirk, R.; Poggiali, V.; Zebker, H.; Iess, L.

    2017-12-01

    With the conclusion of the Cassini mission, we present an updated topographic map of Titan, including all the available altimetry, SARtopo, and stereophotogrammetry topographic data sets available from the mission. We use radial basis functions to interpolate the sparse data set, which covers only ˜9% of Titan's global area. The most notable updates to the topography include higher coverage of the poles of Titan, improved fits to the global shape, and a finer resolution of the global interpolation. We also present a statistical analysis of the error in the derived products and perform a global minimization on a profile-by-profile basis to account for observed biases in the input data set. We find a greater flattening of Titan than measured, additional topographic rises in Titan's southern hemisphere and better constrain the possible locations of past and present liquids on Titan's surface.

  16. The Cassini-Huygens Mission to Saturn and Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Matson, D. L.

    2008-09-01

    The Cassini-Huygens exploration of Saturn has completed its prime mission and is now entering a two-year phase called the Equinox Mission. During its four-year tour of Saturn, the Cassini Orbiter found intricate dynamical structures hidden below the haze of Saturn's atmosphere, a previously unseen inner radiation belt, unexpected "channel" structures in the B-ring where opacity changes dramatically over just a few kilometers, an active Enceladus with plumes that are the source of the E-ring and the engine supplying particles to the Saturnian magnetosphere, and a methane hydrologic cycle on Titan that is a remarkable analog of the Earth's. The epic descent of the Huygens probe to a landing on Titan's surface in 2005 provided vistas of dendritic channels presumably carved by methane in ice hills, and key data on nitrogen and noble gases that bespeak an active past in which ammonia was converted to the molecular nitrogen we see today. Cassini's two year Equinox mission will allow for key scientific objectives to be pursued that follow from discoveries made during the prime mission. For example, the source of the Enceladus plumes may be either liquid water or warm ice, given what is known at present. Liquid water has important implications for the potential for life under Enceladus' surface, since both water and organic molecules are present in the plumes. Seven flybys will provide an opportunity to address this problem. For Titan, being able to observe the northern hemisphere lakes in sunlight affords the possibility of detecting ethane in the lakes, as has recently been done in the south, and of observing changes as the seasons proceed. An opportunity to see the rings at low solar incidence angle will allow the three-dimensional structure to be inferred. Seasonal and solar cycle changes in the Saturnian aurora are expected and will be tracked.

  17. The Cassini Solstice Mission: Streamlining Operations by Sequencing with PIEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermey, Nancy; Alonge, Eleanor K.; Magee, Kari; Heventhal, William

    2014-01-01

    The Cassini Solstice Mission (CSM) is the second extended mission phase of the highly successful Cassini/Huygens mission to Saturn. Conducted at a much-reduced funding level, operations for the CSM have been streamlined and simplified significantly. Integration of the science timeline, which involves allocating observation time in a balanced manner to each of the five different science disciplines (with representatives from the twelve different science instruments), has long been a labor-intensive endeavor. Lessons learned from the prime mission (2004-2008) and first extended mission (Equinox mission, 2008-2010) were utilized to design a new process involving PIEs (Pre-Integrated Events) to ensure the highest priority observations for each discipline could be accomplished despite reduced work force and overall simplification of processes. Discipline-level PIE lists were managed by the Science Planning team and graphically mapped to aid timeline deconfliction meetings prior to assigning discrete segments of time to the various disciplines. Periapse segments are generally discipline-focused, with the exception of a handful of PIEs. In addition to all PIEs being documented in a spreadsheet, allocated out-of-discipline PIEs were entered into the Cassini Information Management System (CIMS) well in advance of timeline integration. The disciplines were then free to work the rest of the timeline internally, without the need for frequent interaction, debate, and negotiation with representatives from other disciplines. As a result, the number of integration meetings has been cut back extensively, freeing up workforce. The sequence implementation process was streamlined as well, combining two previous processes (and teams) into one. The new Sequence Implementation Process (SIP) schedules 22 weeks to build each 10-week-long sequence, and only 3 sequence processes overlap. This differs significantly from prime mission during which 5-week-long sequences were built in 24 weeks

  18. Revisiting the Photochemical Processes on Titan: Insight from Cassini Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Zhang, X.; Kammer, J. A.; Liang, M. C.; Yung, Y. L.

    2012-10-01

    The recent measurements from the nadir-view and limb-view soundings of Cassini/CIRS (Vinatier et al., 2010) and the stellar occultations from Cassini/UVIS (Kammer et al., 2010, Koskinen et al., 2011) revealed the complete vertical profiles of minor species (mainly C2H2 and C2H4) from 100 to 1000 km in the atmosphere of Titan. In this study, we introduce a new eddy diffusivity profile and revise the rate coefficients for the chemistry of hydrocarbons, especially for C2H4. Our new results are in better agreement with the new Cassini measurements than the previous 1D chemistry-diffusion models (e.g., Yung et al., 1984; Lavvas et al., 2008 a, b; Krasnopolsky, 2010). An inversion technique is developed to retrieve the vertical profile of eddy diffusivity. We use the abundance of C2H2 as a proxy to retrieve the eddy diffusivity profile and verify it though the chemistry-diffusion modeling of other tracers. We found that the new eddy profile features a turnover near the altitude of detached haze layer ( 550 km), which might lead to the formation of the detached haze layer through a potential positive feedback process. Secondly, the same retrieval method is applied to the chemistry of C2H4. The result suggests a revision of rate coefficients for the three body reactions of C2H4 so as to keep the simulated profile close to the observation. The revised rate coefficients will also be used and tested for the hydrocarbon chemistry on giant planets.

  19. Cassini revisited by the Cassini-Huygens probe: dynamical and photometric study of the rings with the ISS images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deau, Estelle

    2007-12-01

    In the Solar system, the planetary rings represent a fantastic opportunity of studying a majority of phenomena taking place in the thin discs. One can find discs at all redshifts and on all scales of the Universe. Planetary discs are very different: among the Jovian rings, one finds a halo of fine and diffuse dust; the rings of Uranus are very compact, like radially confined strings and the system of rings of Neptune consists of azimuthally stable arcs. However our interest goes on Saturn which has the most complex and widest system of rings known to date: 484 000 km and a vertical extension which increases with the distance to Saturn (typically less than 1 km to 10 000 km). The interest of such a matter organization around Saturn plus its many moons (more than one forty including 8 of a size of several hundreds kilometers) gave birth to the exploration mission CASSINI, supposed to allow the development and the refinement of models set up at the flybies of the two interplanetary probes VOYAGER. The CASSINI Mission began its nominal tour on January, 15 2005 after the orbital insertion the 1 July 2004 and the dropping of HUYGENS probe on january, 14 2005 on Titan's surface. The purpose of this thesis consists to revisit two subjects unsolved of long date in the photometric and dynamic behaviours of the Saturn's rings. In a first part, we try to solve the problem of accretion of matter within the Roche limit by studying the F ring. This ring, since its discovery in 1979 by Pioneer 11, is involved in a most various dynamic theories to explain its complex multi-radial structure and its variable azimuthal structure. We showed that the multi-radial structure of this ring can be understood by the existence of a spiral which is rolled up around a central area, bright, eccentric and inclined: the core. The lifespan of this spiral is not the same one as the core, suggesting that the processes which create the spiral are periodic. Moreover, we showed that the

  20. Galileo Measurements of the Jovian Electron Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, H. B.; Jun, I.; Ratliff, J. M.; Evans, R. W.; Clough, G. A.; McEntire, R. W.

    2003-12-01

    The Galileo spacecraft Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) has been used to map Jupiter's trapped electron radiation in the jovian equatorial plane for the range 8 to 16 Jupiter radii (1 jovian radius = 71,400 km). The electron count rates from the instrument were averaged into 10-minute intervals over the energy range 0.2 MeV to 11 MeV to form an extensive database of observations of the jovian radiation belts between Jupiter orbit insertion (JOI) in 1995 and end of mission in 2003. These data were then used to provide differential flux estimates in the jovian equatorial plane as a function of radial distance (organized by magnetic L-shell position). These estimates provide the basis for an omni-directional, equatorial model of the jovian electron radiation environment. The comparison of these results with the original Divine model of jovian electron radiation and their implications for missions to Jupiter will be discussed. In particular, it was found that the electron dose predictions for a representative mission to Europa were about a factor of 2 lower than the Divine model estimates over the range of 100 to 1000 mils (2.54 to 25.4 mm) of aluminum shielding, but exceeded the Divine model by about 50% for thicker shielding for the assumed Europa orbiter trajectories. The findings are a significant step forward in understanding jovian electron radiation and represent a valuable tool for estimating the radiation environment to which jovian science and engineering hardware will be exposed.

  1. BATMAN: a DMD-based MOS demonstrator on Galileo Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamkotsian, Frédéric; Spanò, Paolo; Bon, William; Riva, Marco; Lanzoni, Patrick; Nicastro, Luciano; Molinari, Emilio; Cosentino, Rosario; Ghedina, Adriano; Gonzalez, Manuel; Di Marcantonio, Paolo; Coretti, Igor; Cirami, Roberto; Manetta, Marco; Zerbi, Filippo; Tresoldi, Daniela; Valenziano, Luca

    2012-09-01

    Multi-Object Spectrographs (MOS) are the major instruments for studying primary galaxies and remote and faint objects. Current object selection systems are limited and/or difficult to implement in next generation MOS for space and groundbased telescopes. A promising solution is the use of MOEMS devices such as micromirror arrays which allow the remote control of the multi-slit configuration in real time. We are developing a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) - based spectrograph demonstrator called BATMAN. We want to access the largest FOV with the highest contrast. The selected component is a DMD chip from Texas Instruments in 2048 x 1080 mirrors format, with a pitch of 13.68μm. Our optical design is an all-reflective spectrograph design with F/4 on the DMD component. This demonstrator permits the study of key parameters such as throughput, contrast and ability to remove unwanted sources in the FOV (background, spoiler sources), PSF effect, new observational modes. This study will be conducted in the visible with possible extension in the IR. A breadboard on an optical bench, ROBIN, has been developed for a preliminary determination of these parameters. The demonstrator on the sky is then of prime importance for characterizing the actual performance of this new family of instruments, as well as investigating the operational procedures on astronomical objects. BATMAN will be placed on the Nasmyth focus of Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) during next year.

  2. Galileo infrared imaging spectrometry measurements at the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccord, Thomas B.; Soderblom, Larry A.; Carlson, Robert W.; Fanale, Fraser P.; Lopes-Gautier, Rosaly; Ocampo, Adriano; Forsythe, Jennifer; Campbell, Bruce; Granahan, James C.; Smythe, W. D.

    1994-01-01

    Imaging spectrometer observations were made of the surface of the Moon during the December 1990 flyby of the Earth-Moon system by the Galileo spacecraft. This article documents this data set and presents analyses of some of the data. The near infrared mapping spectrometer (NIMS) investigation obtained 17 separate mosaics of the Moon in 408 spectral channels between about 0.7 and 5.2 micrometers. The instrument was originally designed to operate in orbit about Jupiter and therefore saturates at many spectral channels for most measurement situations at 1 AU. However, sufficient measurements were made of the Moon to verify the proper operation of the instrument and to demonstrate its capabilities. Analysis of these data show that the NIMS worked as expected and produced measurements consistent with previous ground-based telescopic studies. These are the first imaging spectrometer measurements of this type from space for the Moon, and they illustrate several major points concerning this type of observation and about the NIMS capabilities specifically. Of major importance are the difference between framing and scanning instruments and the effects of the spacecraft and the scan platform on the performance of such and experiment. The science return of subsequent NIMS and other investigation measurements will be significantly enhanced by the experience and results gained.

  3. Optimal Earth's reentry disposal of the Galileo constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armellin, Roberto; San-Juan, Juan F.

    2018-02-01

    Nowadays there is international consensus that space activities must be managed to minimize debris generation and risk. The paper presents a method for the end-of-life (EoL) disposal of spacecraft in Medium Earth Orbit (MEO). The problem is formulated as a multiobjective optimisation one, which is solved with an evolutionary algorithm. An impulsive manoeuvre is optimised to reenter the spacecraft in Earth's atmosphere within 100 years. Pareto optimal solutions are obtained using the manoeuvre Δv and the time-to-reentry as objective functions to be minimised. To explore at the best the search space a semi-analytical orbit propagator, which can propagate an orbit for 100 years in few seconds, is adopted. An in-depth analysis of the results is carried out to understand the conditions leading to a fast reentry with minimum propellant. For this aim a new way of representing the disposal solutions is introduced. With a single 2D plot we are able to fully describe the time evolution of all the relevant orbital parameters as well as identify the conditions that enables the eccentricity build-up. The EoL disposal of the Galileo constellation is used as test case.

  4. Landform Degradation and Slope Processes on Io: The Galileo View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Sullivan, Robert J.; Chuang, Frank C.; Head, James W., III; McEwen, Alfred S.; Milazzo, Moses P.; Nixon, Brian E.; Pappalardo, Robert T.; Schenk, Paul M.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; hide

    2001-01-01

    The Galileo mission has revealed remarkable evidence of mass movement and landform degradation on Io. We recognize four major slope types observed on a number of intermediate resolution (250 m/pixel) images and several additional textures on very high resolution (10 m/pixel) images. Slopes and scarps on Io often show evidence of erosion, seen in the simplest form as alcove-carving slumps and slides at all scales. Many of the mass movement deposits on Io are probably mostly the consequence of block release and brittle slope failure. Sputtering plays no significant role. Sapping as envisioned by McCauley et al. remains viable. We speculate that alcove-lined canyons seen in one observation and lobed deposits seen along the bases of scarps in several locations may reflect the plastic deformation and 'glacial' flow of interstitial volatiles (e.g., SO2) heated by locally high geothermal energy to mobilize the volatile. The appearance of some slopes and near-slope surface textures seen in very high resolution images is consistent with erosion from sublimation-degradation. However, a suitable volatile (e.g., H2S) that can sublimate fast enough to alter Io's youthful surface has not been identified. Disaggregation from chemical decomposition of solid S2O and other polysulfur oxides may conceivably operate on Io. This mechanism could degrade landforms in a manner that resembles degradation from sublimation, and at a rate that can compete with resurfacing.

  5. Cassini radar and radiometry observations of Saturn's airless icy satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, A. A.; West, R.; Janssen, M. A.; Leyrat, C.; Bonnefoy, L.; Lellouch, E.

    2017-12-01

    The Cassini Radar is a multimode microwave sensor operating in the Ku-band, at a wavelength of 2.2 cm. While it was initially designed to examine the surface of Titan through the veil of its optically-opaque atmosphere, it is occasionally used to observe airless Saturn's moons from long ranges (>50 000 km) and, less frequently, during targeted flybys. In its active mode, the instrument measures the surface reflectivity in the backscattering direction. In its passive mode - or radiometry mode - it records the microwave thermal emission from the near-surface (typically few meters). Doing so, it provides insights into the degree of purity and maturity of the water-ice regolith of the investigated objects. In particular, it can reveal hemispheric dichotomies or regional anomalies and satellite-to-satellite variabilities which give clues into what is common and what is specific to the history of each satellite and to the processes that have shaped their surface/subsurface. In this paper, we will give an overview of the Cassini radar/radiometry observations of Saturnian icy moons, most of which have not been published yet. Now that the mission has come to an end, we will describe how the radio investigation of these objects can be pursued from Earth-based radiotelescopes.

  6. Cassini Thruster Calibration Algorithm Using Reaction Wheel Biasing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Farheen

    2012-01-01

    Thrust force estimates for the reaction control thrusters on-board Cassini spacecraft are presented in this paper. Cassini consists of two thruster branches (A and B) each with eight thrusters. The four Z-thrusters control the X and Y-axes, while the four Y-thrusters control the Z-axis. It is important to track the thrust force estimates in order to detect any thruster degradation and for supporting various activities in spacecraft operations (Titan flyby, spacecraft maneuvers). The Euler equation, which describes the rotational motion of the spacecraft during a reaction wheel bias event, is used to develop the algorithm. The thrust estimates are obtained from the pseudo inverse solution using flight telemetry during the bias. Results show that the A-branch Z3A and Z4A thrusters exhibited degraded thrust in November 2008. Due to the degraded thrust performance of Z3A and Z4A, A-branch usage was discontinued and prime branch was swapped to B-branch in March 2009. The thrust estimates from the B-branch do not show any degradation to date. The algorithm is used to trend the B-branch thrust force estimates as the mission continues.

  7. GPHS-RTGs in support of the Cassini RTG Program. Addendum to the final technical report, May 1--December 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    This Addendum to the Cassini GPHS-RTG Program Final Technical Progress Report describes activities performed during the period 1 May 1998 through 31 December 1998, including effort reflecting contract modification M058. These activities include Earth Gravity Assist (EGA) reentry and related analyses which are detailed in Part A, and effort related to the installation of CAGO equipment within Lockheed Martin`s Building 100 facility in Valley Forge, PA, which is detailed in Part B.

  8. GPHS-RTGs in support of the Cassini RTG Program. Addendum to the final technical report, May 1-December 31, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    This Addendum to the Cassini GPHS-RTG Program Final Technical Progress Report describes activities performed during the period 1 May 1998 through 31 December 1998, including effort reflecting contract modification M058. These activities include Earth Gravity Assist (EGA) reentry and related analyses which are detailed in Part A, and effort related to the installation of CAGO equipment within Lockheed Martin's Building 100 facility in Valley Forge, PA, which is detailed in Part B

  9. A close look at Saturn's rings with Cassini VIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, P.D.; Hedman, M.M.; Clark, R.N.; Showalter, M.R.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Cuzzi, J.N.; Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Hansen, G.B.; Sicardy, B.; Drossart, P.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Coradini, A.

    2008-01-01

    Soon after the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft entered orbit about Saturn on 1 July 2004, its Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer obtained two continuous spectral scans across the rings, covering the wavelength range 0.35-5.1 ??m, at a spatial resolution of 15-25 km. The first scan covers the outer C and inner B rings, while the second covers the Cassini Division and the entire A ring. Comparisons of the VIMS radial reflectance profile at 1.08 ??m with similar profiles at a wavelength of 0.45 ??m assembled from Voyager images show very little change in ring structure over the intervening 24 years, with the exception of a few features already known to be noncircular. A model for single-scattering by a classical, many-particle-thick slab of material with normal optical depths derived from the Voyager photopolarimeter stellar occultation is found to provide an excellent fit to the observed VIMS reflectance profiles for the C ring and Cassini Division, and an acceptable fit for the inner B ring. The A ring deviates significantly from such a model, consistent with previous suggestions that this region may be closer to a monolayer. An additional complication here is the azimuthally-variable average optical depth associated with "self-gravity wakes" in this region and the fact that much of the A ring may be a mixture of almost opaque wakes and relatively transparent interwake zones. Consistently with previous studies, we find that the near-infrared spectra of all main ring regions are dominated by water ice, with a typical regolith grain radius of 5-20 ??m, while the steep decrease in visual reflectance shortward of 0.6 ??m is suggestive of an organic contaminant, perhaps tholin-like. Although no materials other than H2O ice have been identified with any certainty in the VIMS spectra of the rings, significant radial variations are seen in the strength of the water-ice absorption bands. Across the boundary between the C and B rings, over a radial range of ???7000 km, the

  10. Saturns Thermal Emission at 2.2-cm Wavelength as Imaged by the Cassini RADAR Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, M. A.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Allison, M. D.; Gulkis, S.; Laraia, A. L.; Baines, K. H.; Edgington, S. G.; Anderson, Y. Z.; Kelleher, K.; Oyafuso, F. A.

    2013-01-01

    We present well-calibrated, high-resolution maps of Saturn's thermal emission at 2.2-cm wavelength obtained by the Cassini RADAR radiometer through the Prime and Equinox Cassini missions, a period covering approximately 6 years. The absolute brightness temperature calibration of 2% achieved is more than twice better than for all previous microwave observations reported for Saturn, and the spatial resolution and sensitivity achieved each represent nearly an order of magnitude improvement. The brightness temperature of Saturn in the microwave region depends on the distribution of ammonia, which our radiative transfer modeling shows is the only significant source of absorption in Saturn's atmosphere at 2.2-cm wavelength. At this wavelength the thermal emission comes from just below and within the ammonia cloud-forming region, and yields information about atmospheric circulations and ammonia cloud-forming processes. The maps are presented as residuals compared to a fully saturated model atmosphere in hydrostatic equilibrium. Bright regions in these maps are readily interpreted as due to depletion of ammonia vapor in, and, for very bright regions, below the ammonia saturation region. Features seen include the following: a narrow equatorial band near full saturation surrounded by bands out to about 10deg planetographic latitude that demonstrate highly variable ammonia depletion in longitude; narrow bands of depletion at -35deg latitude; occasional large oval features with depleted ammonia around -45deg latitude; and the 2010-2011 storm, with extensive saturated and depleted areas as it stretched halfway around the planet in the northern hemisphere. Comparison of the maps over time indicates a high degree of stability outside a few latitudes that contain active regions.

  11. Tiger Stripes and Cassini ISS High-Resolution Imaging of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, Paul; Denk, T.; Giese, B.; McEwen, A. S.; Neukum, G.; Perry, J.; Porco, C. C.; Thomas, P. C.; Turtle, E.; Verbiscer, A.; Veverka, J.

    2008-09-01

    Deciphering the mechanisms of Enceladus’ plumes is one of the most important and challenging tasks for planetary science. Cassini has provided a wealth of data by remote and in-situ data collection, but fundamental details of the vents and their context remain elusive. Three flybys of Enceladus by Cassini in 2008, on August 11 (altitude: 50km), October 9 (30km), and October 31 (200 km) are designed to further our knowledge of Enceladus’ geology and geophysics. Anticipated data include images as good as 7 m/pixel of parts of the geologically active South Polar Terrain (SPT). We targeted six different known eruption sites (Spitale and Porco 2007, Nature 449, 695-697) along Cairo Sulcus, Baghdad Suclus, and Damascus Sulcus, as well as non-active portions of the the "tiger stripes" and bright grooved terrain in between. On each of the three flybys we also plan contiguous ISS broadband multi-spectral mosaics of the entire SPT region so that we can search for volcanically and tectonically driven temporal changes and construct detailed digital terrain maps. Previous images of the tiger stripes and other rift systems on Enceladus resolve geomorphic structures on hundred meter scales or larger. Within those resolution limits, tiger stripes are morphologically distinguished most strongly from comparably sized young looking rifts elsewhere on Enceladus by their prominent upturned flanks, the muted appearance of their surface relief, and their relative absence of distinct cliff faces, probably of solid ice along scarps. The anticipated new high-resolution images will provide critical structural details needed to identify the extent to which unique attributes of tiger stripes are caused by mantling by plume fallout, tectonic deformation, seismic disruption, or perhaps thermal processes. Here, we present a first analysis of the August 11 close flyby images.

  12. Precise orbit determination and point positioning using GPS, Glonass, Galileo and BeiDou

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tegedor J.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available State of the art Precise Point Positioning (PPP is currently based on dual-frequency processing of GPS and Glonass navigation systems. The International GNSS Service (IGS is routinely providing the most accurate orbit and clock products for these constellations, allowing point positioning at centimeter-level accuracy. At the same time, the GNSS landscape is evolving rapidly, with the deployment of new constellations, such as Galileo and BeiDou. The BeiDou constellation currently consists of 14 operational satellites, and the 4 Galileo In-Orbit Validation (IOV satellites are transmitting initial Galileo signals. This paper focuses on the integration of Galileo and BeiDou in PPP, together with GPS and Glonass. Satellite orbits and clocks for all constellations are generated using a network adjustment with observation data collected by the IGS Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX, as well as from Fugro proprietary reference station network. The orbit processing strategy is described, and orbit accuracy for Galileo and BeiDou is assessed via orbit overlaps, for different arc lengths. Kinematic post-processed multi-GNSS positioning results are presented. The benefits of multiconstellation PPP are discussed in terms of enhanced availability and positioning accuracy.

  13. The dark side of the Scientific Revolution. The Biblical interpretation in Galileo Galilei and Isaac Newton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Fiorentino

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This contribution investigates a hidden and surely singular – but far from marginal – aspect of the Scientific Revolution of the 17th century, in other words the interpretation of the Holy Scriptures. First of all, this work analyzes the situation immediately before the advent of the fathers of the 17th Century Scientific Revolution like Galileo Galilei and Isaac Newton, starting from the Council of Trent. This reconstruction aims to throw light on the particular way that Galileo and Newton intended to approach the interpretation of the Holy Scriptures with respect to the main tendencies of the Catholic Reformation of biblical hermeneutics. Their way is important both in itself and in relation to the Scientific Revolution. In itself because Galileo and Newton elaborate original theories that are not entirely in agreement with the predominant views and that are decidedly no less interesting than their pure scientific theories. In relation to the Scientific Revolution because the interpretation of the Holy Scriptures is addressed in an original fashion by both Galileo and Newton, also with the intent of facilitating the spread and approval of their own scientific theories in their respective socio-cultural environments. The primacy of nature is not manifested only in contrast to and outside the book of Scriptures, but conditions the Book of Scriptures, locating it within a precise cultural perspective and religious sense that are by no means contrary to Galileo and Newton’s views.

  14. Maneuver Performance Assessment of the Cassini Spacecraft Through Execution-Error Modeling and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Sean

    2014-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has executed nearly 300 maneuvers since 1997, providing ample data for execution-error model updates. With maneuvers through 2017, opportunities remain to improve on the models and remove biases identified in maneuver executions. This manuscript focuses on how execution-error models can be used to judge maneuver performance, while providing a means for detecting performance degradation. Additionally, this paper describes Cassini's execution-error model updates in August 2012. An assessment of Cassini's maneuver performance through OTM-368 on January 5, 2014 is also presented.

  15. DMD-based MOS demonstrator on Galileo Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamkotsian, Frederic; Spanò, Paolo; Martin, Laurent; Riva, Marco; Lanzoni, Patrick; Zerbi, Filippo; Valenziano, Luca; Nicastro, Luciano

    2010-07-01

    Multi-Object Spectrographs (MOS) are the major instruments for studying primary galaxies and remote and faint objects. Current object selection systems are limited and/or difficult to implement in next generation MOS for space and ground-based telescopes. A promising solution is the use of MOEMS devices such as micromirror arrays which allow the remote control of the multi-slit configuration in real time. We are developing a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) - based spectrograph demonstrator. We want to access the largest FOV with the highest contrast. The selected component is a DMD chip from Texas Instruments in 2048 x 1080 mirrors format, with a pitch of 13.68μm. Such component has been also studied by our team for application in EUCLID-NIS. Our optical design is an all-reflective spectrograph design with F/4 on the DMD component. This demonstrator permits the study of key parameters such as throughput, contrast and ability to remove unwanted sources in the FOV (background, spoiler sources), PSF effect, spectrum stability on the detector. This study will be conducted in the visible with possible extension in the IR. A breadboard on an optical bench has been developed for a preliminary determination of these parameters. The demonstrator on the sky is then of prime importance for characterizing the actual performance of this new family of instruments, as well as investigating the operational procedures on astronomical objects. This demonstrator will be studied in order to be placed on the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo during next year.

  16. Tidal Control of Jet Eruptions Observed by Cassini ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurford, T. A.; Helfenstein, P.; Spitale, J. N.

    2012-01-01

    Observations by Cassini's Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) of Enceladus' south polar region at high phase angles has revealed jets of material venting into space. Observations by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) have also shown that the south polar region is anomalously warm with hotspots associated with geological features called the Tiger Stripes. The Tiger Stripes are large rifts near the south pole of Enceladus, which are typically about 130 km in length, 2 km wide, with a trough 500 m deep, and are l1anked on each side by 100m tall ridges. Preliminary triangulation of jets as viewed at different times and with different viewing geometries in Cassini ISS images taken between 2005 and 2007 have constrained the locations of eight major eruptions of material and found all of them associated with the south polar fractures unofficially the 'Tiger Stripes', and found four of them coincident with the hotspots reported in 2006 by CIRS. While published ISS observations of jet activity suggest that individual eruption sites stay active on the timescale of years, any shorter temporal variability (on timescales of an orbital period, or 1.3 Earth days, for example) is more difficult to establish because of the spotty temporal coverage and the difficulty of visually isolating one jet from the forest of many seen in a typical image. Consequently, it is not known whether individual jets are continuously active, randomly active, or if they erupt on a predictable, periodic schedule. One mechanism that may control the timing of eruptions is diurnal tidal stress, which oscillates between compression/tension as well as right and left lateral shear at any given location throughout Enceladus' orbit and may allow the cracks to open and close regularly. We examine the stresses on the Tiger Stripe regions to see how well diurnal tidal stress caused by Enceladus' orbital eccentricity may possibly correlate with and thus control the observed eruptions. We then identify

  17. The Attraction of Gravity (Jean Dominique Cassini Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iess, Luciano

    2017-04-01

    The motion of planetary bodies, their interior structure, their shape, and ultimately their landscape, are all determined, more or less directly, by gravity. It is therefore not surprising that by measuring the orbital motion and the gravity field of planets and satellites we have been able to gather crucial information on the interior structure and evolution of those bodies, and at the same time to put the laws of gravity to the test. Planetary geodesy is now a fully developed discipline that uses methods and observable quantities adopted also in other fields, such as space navigation and telecommunications. Thanks to this winning synergy between science and engineering, we can now measure spacecraft velocities to 10-6 m/s and accelerations to 10-9 m/s2 over time scales as short as 1000 s, everywhere in the solar system. The past ten years have seen outstanding results in the scientific exploration of the deep space, with gravity investigations contributing to the success of many missions. Thanks to gravity measurements, MESSENGER was able to unveil the main features of Mercury's interior structure. GRAIL, the first planetary mission entirely devoted to gravity, recovered the structure of the lunar gravity anomalies to a spatial resolution and accuracy unmatched even for the Earth. The discovery and characterization of habitable environments in the Saturnian system, on Enceladus and Titan, were possible also by the radio science investigations of the mission Cassini. Thanks to a carefully designed orbit, with a pericenter just 3000 km above the cloud level, the spacecraft Juno is now carrying out precise gravity measurements at Jupiter to unveil the interior structure of the planet and the depth of its winds. With Cassini providing similar information at Saturn in the Grand Finale orbits, just before the final plunge into the planet, we will soon be able to reveal how similar or different the two gas giants are. But the interior structure of many planetary bodies

  18. Cassini/Huygens Investigations of Titan's Methane Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, C. A.; Penteado, P.

    2008-12-01

    In Titan's atmosphere, the second most abundant constituent, methane, exists as a gas, liquid and solid, and cycles between the atmosphere and surface. Similar to Earth's hydrological cycle, Titan sports clouds, rain, and lakes. Yet, Titan's cycle differs dramatically from its terrestrial counterpart, and reveals the workings of weather in an atmosphere that is ten times thicker than Earth's atmosphere, that is two orders of magnitude less illuminated, and that involves a different condensable. Measurements of Titan's troposphere, where the methane cycle plays out, are limited largely to spectral images of Titan's clouds, several temperature profiles by Voyager, Huygens and Cassini, recent Keck spectra of the surface methane humidity, and one vertical profile of Titan's methane abundance, measured on a summer afternoon in Titan's tropical atmosphere by the Huygens probe. The salient features of Titan's methane cycle are distinctly alien: clouds have predominated the northern and southern polar atmospheres; the one humidity profile precisely matches the profile (of cartoonish simplicity) used in pre-Cassini models, and surface features correlate with latitude. Data of Titan's troposphere are analyzed with thermodynamic and radiative transfer calculations, and synthesized with other studies of Titan's stratosphere and surface, to investigate the workings of Titan's methane cycle. At the end of Cassini's nominal mission, we find that Titan's weather, climate and surface-to-atmosphere exchange of volatiles vastly differs from the manifestation of these processes on Earth, largely as a result of different basic characteristics of these planetary bodies. The talk ends with a comparison between Titan and Earth's tropospheres, their fundamental properties, the energetics of their condensible cycles, their weather and climates. References: Griffith C.A. et al. Titan's Tropical Storms in an Evolving Atmosphere. Ap.J. In Press (2008). Griffith C.A. Storms, Polar Deposits, and

  19. Lava lakes on Io: Observations of Io's volcanic activity from Galileo NIMS during the 2001 fly-bys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, R.M.C.; Kamp, L.W.; Smythe, W.D.; Mouginis-Mark, P.; Kargel, J.; Radebaugh, J.; Turtle, E.P.; Perry, J.; Williams, D.A.; Carlson, R.W.; Doute, S.

    2004-01-01

    Galileo's Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) obtained its final observations of Io during the spacecraft's fly-bys in August (I31) and October 2001 (I32). We present a summary of the observations and results from these last two fly-bys, focusing on the distribution of thermal emission from Io's many volcanic regions that give insights into the eruption styles of individual hot spots. We include a compilation of hot spot data obtained from Galileo, Voyager, and ground-based observations. At least 152 active volcanic centers are now known on Io, 104 of which were discovered or confirmed by Galileo observations, including 23 from the I31 and I32 Io fly-by observations presented here. We modify the classification scheme of Keszthelyi et al. (2001, J. Geophys. Res. 106 (E12) 33 025-33 052) of Io eruption styles to include three primary types: promethean (lava flow fields emplaced as compound pahoehoe flows with small plumes 200 km high plumes and rapidly-emplaced flow fields), and a new style we call "lokian" that includes all eruptions confined within paterae with or without associated plume eruptions). Thermal maps of active paterae from NIMS data reveal hot edges that are characteristic of lava lakes. Comparisons with terrestrial analogs show that Io's lava lakes have thermal properties consistent with relatively inactive lava lakes. The majority of activity on Io, based on locations and longevity of hot spots, appears to be of this third type. This finding has implications for how Io is being resurfaced as our results imply that eruptions of lava are predominantly confined within paterae, thus making it unlikely that resurfacing is done primarily by extensive lava flows. Our conclusion is consistent with the findings of Geissler et al. (2004, Icarus, this issue) that plume eruptions and deposits, rather than the eruption of copious amounts of effusive lavas, are responsible for Io's high resurfacing rates. The origin and longevity of islands within ionian

  20. New insights about the structure and variability of Saturn's electron radiation belts from Cassini's Ring-Grazing and Proximal orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussos, E.; Kollmann, P.; Krupp, N.; Paranicas, C.; Dialynas, K.; Sergis, N.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    During 2008, Cassini performed a unique series of orbits with a period of about 7 days which allowed us to monitor the evolution of Saturn's radiation belts across time scales shorter than the 28-day solar rotation and to identify the role of Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) as a key driver of dynamics for the belts' MeV electron population. Cassini's "Grand Finale" included a new set of such short-period orbits (6.5 to 7.2 days long), executed continuously between November 20, 2016 until September 15, 2017. While the 2008 observations were typically limited up to the L-shell of the G-ring, the Grand Finale orbits probed the radiation belts deeper and for a longer duration, covering the sparsely sampled regions outside the F- and A-rings and the previously unexplored particle trapping region inside the main rings. Observations with Cassini's MIMI/LEMMS instrument reveal that the electron belt intensities are persistently asymmetric in local time all the way down to the exterior edge of the main rings. The strength of this asymmetry appears to correlate with the appearence of transient belt components and changes in the intensity of the main belts which may be triggered by solar-wind or magnetospheric driven storms. The intensity of transient components in the electron belts, that may also appear in the small gap between the A- and the F-rings, evolve over several weeks, indicating that convection may occasionally dominate diffusive electron transport, the time scales of which are longer. Detection of MeV electrons inside the main rings during the Proximal orbits is ambiguous, but if electrons are present, all the LEMMS channels that may contain their signal indicate that their distribution would be very stable in time and unaffected by convective fields that drive electron transport outside the main rings.

  1. Electrical interferences observed in the Cassini CIRS spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cheong; Albright, Shane; Gorius, Nicolas; Brasunas, John; Jennings, Don; Flasar, F. Michael; Carlson, Ronald; Guandique, Ever; Nixon, Conor

    2015-06-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) carried onboard the Cassini spacecraft has now operated successfully for 17 years, following launch in 1997. Following insertion into Saturnian orbit in July 2004, the instrument has taken data nearly continuously, returning over 100 million interferograms (spectra) to date. Although of generally high quality, and resulting in more than 100 peer-reviewed scientific articles, the spectra are afflicted with several types of instrumental electrical (non-random) noise artifacts. These noise artifacts require either mitigation strategies (prevention), removal from the observed data, or else awareness of the affected spectral areas which must be excluded from scientific analysis. The sources and nature of these varied noise types were not readily identified until after launch. The purpose of this article is to inform users of the noise in the CIRS dataset and to serve as a `lesson-learned' guide for designers of future instruments.

  2. How Cassini can constrain tidal dissipation in Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Jing; Fuller, Jim; Quataert, Eliot

    2018-02-01

    Tidal dissipation inside giant planets is important for the orbital evolution of their natural satellites. It is conventionally treated by parametrized equilibrium tidal theory, in which the tidal torque declines rapidly with distance, and orbital expansion was faster in the past. However, some Saturnian satellites are currently migrating outward faster than predicted by equilibrium tidal theory. Resonance locking between satellites and internal oscillations of Saturn naturally matches the observed migration rates. Here, we show that the resonance locking theory predicts dynamical tidal perturbations to Saturn's gravitational field in addition to those produced by equilibrium tidal bulges. We show that these perturbations can likely be detected during Cassini's proximal orbits if migration of satellites results from resonant gravity modes, but will likely be undetectable if migration results from inertial wave attractors or dissipation of the equilibrium tide. Additionally, we show that the detection of gravity modes would place constraints on the size of the hypothetical stably stratified region in Saturn.

  3. Cassini discovers a kinematic spiral ring around Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnoz, S; Porco, C C; Déau, E; Brahic, A; Spitale, J N; Bacques, G; Baillie, K

    2005-11-25

    Since the time of the Voyager flybys of Saturn in 1980-1981, Saturn's eccentric F ring has been known to be accompanied on either side by faint strands of material. New Cassini observations show that these strands, initially interpreted as concentric ring segments, are in fact connected and form a single one-arm trailing spiral winding at least three times around Saturn. The spiral rotates around Saturn with the orbital motion of its constituent particles. This structure is likely the result of differential orbital motion stretching an initial cloud of particles scattered from the dense core of the F ring. Different scenarios of formation, implying ringlet-satellite interactions, are explored. A recently discovered moon candidate, S/2004 S6, is on an orbit that crosses the F-ring core at the intersection of the spiral with the ring, which suggests a dynamical connection between S/2004 S6 and the spiral.

  4. Galileo and Descartes on Copernicanism and the cause of the tides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaltz, Tad M

    2015-06-01

    Galileo and Descartes were on the front lines of the defense of Copernicanism against theological objections that took on special importance during the seventeenth century. Galileo attempted to overcome opposition to Copernicanism within the Catholic Church by offering a demonstration of this theory that appeals to the fact that the double motion of the earth is necessary as a cause of the tides. It turns out, however, that the details of Galileo's tidal theory compromise his demonstration. Far from attempting to provide a demonstration of the earth's motion, Descartes ultimately argued that his system is compatible with the determination of the Church that the earth is at rest. Nonetheless, Descartes's account of the cause of the tides creates difficulty for this argument. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Observations at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Averkamp, T. F.; Ceccni, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2005-01-01

    Results are presented from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument during the approach and first few orbits around Saturn. During the approach the intensity modulation of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) showed that the radio rotation period of Saturn has increased to 10 hr 45 min plus or minus 36 sec, about 6 min longer than measured by Voyager in 1980-81. Also, many intense impulsive radio signals called Saturn Electrostatic Discharges (SEDs) were detected from saturnian lightning, starting as far as 1.08 AU from Saturn, much farther than terrestrial lightning can be detected from Earth. Some of the SED episodes have been linked to cloud systems observed in Saturn s atmosphere by the Cassini imaging system. Within the magnetosphere plasma wave emissions have been used to construct an electron density profile through the inner region of the magnetosphere. With decreasing radial distance the electron density increases gradually to a peak of about 100 per cubic centimeter near the outer edge of the A ring, and then drops precipitously to values as low as .03 per cubic centimeter over the rings. Numerous nearly monochromatic whistler-mode emissions were observed as the spacecraft passed over the rings that are believed to be produced by meteoroid impacts on the rings. Whistlermode emissions, similar to terrestrial auroral hiss were also observed over the rings, indicating that an electrodynamic interaction, similar to auroral particle acceleration, may be occurring in or near the rings. During the Titan flybys Langmuir probe and plasma wave measurements provided observations of the density and temperature in Titan's ionosphere.

  6. Discovery Of B Ring Propellers In Cassini UVIS, And ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sremcevic, Miodrag; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2012-10-01

    We present evidence for the existence of propellers in Saturn's B ring by combining data from Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) experiments. We identify two propeller populations: (1) tens of degrees wide propellers in the dense B ring core, and (2) smaller, more A ring like, propellers populating the inner B ring. The prototype of the first population is an object observed at 18 different epochs between 2005 and 2010. The ubiquitous propeller "S" shape is seen both in UVIS occultations as an optical depth depletion and in ISS as a 40 degrees wide bright stripe in unlit geometries and dark in lit geometries. Combining the available Cassini data we infer that the object is a partial gap embedded in the high optical depth region of the B ring. The gap moves at orbital speed consistent with its radial location. From the radial separation of the propeller wings we estimate that the embedded body, which causes the propeller structure, is about 1.5km in size located at a=112,921km. The UVIS occultations indicate an asymmetric propeller "S" shape. Since the object is located at an edge between high and relatively low optical depth, this asymmetry is most likely a consequence of the strong surface mass density gradient. We estimate that there are possibly dozen up to 100 other propeller objects in Saturn's B ring. The location of the discovered body, at an edge of a dense ringlet within the B ring, suggests a novel mechanism for the up to now illusive B ring irregular large-scale structure of alternating high and low optical depth ringlets. We propose that this B ring irregular structure may have its cause in the presence of many embedded bodies that shepherd the individual B ring ringlets.

  7. Validation of Galileo orbits using SLR with a focus on satellites launched into incorrect orbital planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sośnica, Krzysztof; Prange, Lars; Kaźmierski, Kamil; Bury, Grzegorz; Drożdżewski, Mateusz; Zajdel, Radosław; Hadas, Tomasz

    2018-02-01

    The space segment of the European Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Galileo consists of In-Orbit Validation (IOV) and Full Operational Capability (FOC) spacecraft. The first pair of FOC satellites was launched into an incorrect, highly eccentric orbital plane with a lower than nominal inclination angle. All Galileo satellites are equipped with satellite laser ranging (SLR) retroreflectors which allow, for example, for the assessment of the orbit quality or for the SLR-GNSS co-location in space. The number of SLR observations to Galileo satellites has been continuously increasing thanks to a series of intensive campaigns devoted to SLR tracking of GNSS satellites initiated by the International Laser Ranging Service. This paper assesses systematic effects and quality of Galileo orbits using SLR data with a main focus on Galileo satellites launched into incorrect orbits. We compare the SLR observations with respect to microwave-based Galileo orbits generated by the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) in the framework of the International GNSS Service Multi-GNSS Experiment for the period 2014.0-2016.5. We analyze the SLR signature effect, which is characterized by the dependency of SLR residuals with respect to various incidence angles of laser beams for stations equipped with single-photon and multi-photon detectors. Surprisingly, the CODE orbit quality of satellites in the incorrect orbital planes is not worse than that of nominal FOC and IOV orbits. The RMS of SLR residuals is even lower by 5.0 and 1.5 mm for satellites in the incorrect orbital planes than for FOC and IOV satellites, respectively. The mean SLR offsets equal -44.9, -35.0, and -22.4 mm for IOV, FOC, and satellites in the incorrect orbital plane. Finally, we found that the empirical orbit models, which were originally designed for precise orbit determination of GNSS satellites in circular orbits, provide fully appropriate results also for highly eccentric orbits with variable linear

  8. CASSINI RSS RAW DATA SET - SAGR12 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio Science Dione Gravity Science Experiment (DIGR3) Raw Data Archive is a time-ordered collection of radio science raw data acquired on December 11...

  9. CASSINI RSS RAW DATA SET - TBOC7 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio Science Titan Bistatic and Occultation experiments (TBOC7) Raw Data Archive is a time-ordered collection of radio science raw data acquired on...

  10. CASSINI RSS RAW DATA SET - SAGR17 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio Science Saturn Gravity Science Experiment (SAGR17) Raw Data Archive is a time-ordered collection of radio science raw data acquired on July 5,...

  11. CASSINI RSS RAW DATA SET - SROC17 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio Science Saturn Ring and Atmospheric Occultation experiments (SROC17) Raw Data Archive is a time-ordered collection of radio science raw data...

  12. CASSINI RSS RAW DATA SET - SAGR9 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio Science Saturn Gravity Science Experiment (SAGR9) Raw Data Archive is a time-ordered collection of radio science raw data acquired on October 8,...

  13. CASSINI RSS RAW DATA SET - RHGR2 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio Science Rhea Gravity Science Experiment (RHGR2) Raw Data Archive is a time-ordered collection of radio science raw data acquired on March 8, 9 and...

  14. CASSINI RSS RAW DATA SET - SAGR12 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio Science Saturn Gravity Science Experiment (SAGR12) Raw Data Archive is a time-ordered collection of radio science raw data acquired on July 31 and...

  15. CASSINI ORBITER SATURN ISSNA/ISSWA 5 MIDR VERSION 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Images of the icy Saturnian satellites Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Iapetus, and Phoebe, derived by the Voyager and Cassini cameras are used to produce new...

  16. CASSINI RSS RAW DATA SET - SAGR1 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio Science Saturn Gravity Science Enhancement Experiment (SAGR1) Raw Data Archive is a time-ordered collection of radio science raw data acquired on...

  17. CASSINI RSS RAW DATA SET - SROC7 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio Science Saturn Atmosphere and Ring Occultation Experiment (SROC7) Raw Data Archive is a time-ordered collection of radio science raw data acquired...

  18. CASSINI SS/S RPWS CALIBRATED LP POTENTIAL CURRENT V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) Langmuir Probe Sweep voltage-current data set comprises calibrated Voltage-Current (U-I) characteristics acquired...

  19. CASSINI SS/S RPWS LP DENSITY FROM FLOATING POTENTIAL V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) Langmuir Probe proxy electron density data set contains electron densities derived using an empirical relation...

  20. CASSINI SS/S RPWS CALIBRATED LP CONTINUOUS CURRENT V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) Langmuir Probe continuous current data set comprises calibrated probe current measurements acquired up to 20 Hz rate...

  1. CASSINI RSS RAW DATA SET - TIGR12 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio Science Titan Gravity Science Experiment (TIGR12) Raw Data Archive is a time-ordered collection of radio science raw data acquired on November 2...

  2. CASSINI RSS RAW DATA SET - SROC20 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio Science Saturn Ring and Atmospheric Occultation experiments (SROC20) Raw Data Archive is a time-ordered collection of radio science raw data...

  3. CASSINI RSS: IONOSPHERIC ELECTRON DENSITY PROFILES EDP1 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains the complete collection of the published Cassini radio occultation electron density profiles of the Titan ionosphere as of September 2008.

  4. CASSINI S MIMI CHEMS SENSOR CALIBRATED DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument(MIMI) Charge Energy Mass Spectrometer (CHEMS) contains a deflection system and an overall field of view of 159 x 4 deg....

  5. CASSINI RSS RAW DATA SET - IAGR1 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio Science Titan Gravity Science Experiment (IAGR1) Raw Data Archive is a time-ordered collection of radio science raw data acquired on September 10,...

  6. CASSINI RSS RAW DATA SET - ENGR5 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio Science Enceladus Gravity Science Experiment (ENGR5) Raw Data Archive is a time-ordered collection of radio science raw data acquired on November...

  7. CASSINI RSS RAW DATA SET - SAGR2 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio Science Saturn Gravity Science Enhancement Experiment (SAGR2) Raw Data Archive is a time-ordered collection of radio science raw data acquired on...

  8. CASSINI RSS RAW DATA SET - SAGR16 V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cassini Radio Science Saturn Gravity Science Experiment (SAGR16) Raw Data Archive is a time-ordered collection of radio science raw data acquired on May 30, 31,...

  9. From Archimedean Hydrostatics to Post-Aristotelian Mechanics: Galileo's Early Manuscripts De motu antiquiora (ca. 1590)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvia, Stefano

    2017-06-01

    Galileo's early inquiries on motion and free fall in Pisa (1588-1592) can be regarded as a case study of multiple knowledge transfer at the very basic roots of modern mechanics. The treatise De motu, unpublished until 1890, is an original but unsuccessful attempt to go beyond Aristotelian physics by extending Archimedean hydrostatics to the dynamics of natural motion and reappraising the late-medieval impetus theory to account for violent motion and acceleration. I will discuss in particular why Galileo was forced to abandon his project before moving to Padua and how the manuscripts De motu provided him with a "research agenda" for further theoretical and experimental investigation.

  10. Between Copernicus and Galileo Christoph Clavius and the Collapse of Ptolemaic Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Lattis, James M

    1994-01-01

    Between Copernicus and Galileo is the story of Christoph Clavius, the Jesuit astronomer and teacher whose work helped set the standards by which Galileo's famous claims appeared so radical, and whose teachings guided the intellectual and scientific agenda of the Church in the central years of the Scientific Revolution. Though relatively unknown today, Clavius was enormously influential throughout Europe in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries through his astronomy books—the standard texts used in many colleges and universities, and the tools with which Descartes, Gassendi, and Me

  11. Precise Pointing for Radio Science Occultations and Radar Mapping During the Cassini Mission at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation challenges and lessons learned from radar and radio science pointing observations during the Cassini mission at Saturn. Implementation of the precise desired pointing reveals key issues in the ground system, the flight system, and the pointing paradigm itself. To achieve accurate pointing on some observations, specific workarounds had to be implemented and folded into the sequence development process. Underlying Cassini's pointing system is a remarkable construct known as Inertial Vector Propagation.

  12. Description of the male of Antodice quadrimaculata Martins Galileo, 2003 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae), with new country record for the species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Rafael C de; Silva, Bianca Piraccini; Julio, Carlos E de Alvarenga

    2018-02-05

    The genus Antodice Thomson, 1864 was revised by Martins Galileo (1998) and currently includes 27 species (Tavakilian Chevillotte 2017), distributed from Mexico to southern South America. Based on a single female specimen collected in Arroyo Cristal, Ka'azapá, Paraguay, the species Antodice quadrimaculata was first described by Martins Galileo in 2003. The holotype specimen was collected on 20 November 1999 by J. Jensen and is deposited in the Museum of Zoology of the University of São Paulo, Brazil. With the help of Carlos Aguilar, from Paraguay's National Museum of Natural History, we were able to determine the exact location where the holotype was collected. With the collection and the description of the male, presented herein, we describe the male of this species record its occurrence in Brazil, a new country record.We identified this species as belonging to the group of Antodice species with yellowish flagellomeres and a black apex, resembling Antodice venustula Lane, 1973 in its elytral color pattern. In A. venustula, the elytra are covered with whitish pubescence and exhibit only two patches of compact white pubescence. In A. quadrimaculata, according to Martins Galileo (2003), the elytra are of a reddish color with whitish pubescence on the dorsal anterior area and close to the apexes, and they also have three patches of compact white pubescence. The specimens of A. quadrimaculata cited herein were collected in the Iguaçu National Park (Parque Nacional do Iguaçu-PNI), the largest fragment of Atlantic forest in southern Brazil, located in the western region of the state of Paraná. The insects were collected using light traps, set up on nights with a new moon. The artificial light source was a 500-Watt incandescent lamp powered by a Honda EP 2500 generator. Sampling began at 6 p.m., ending between midnight and 3 a.m. the next day. The studied material was deposited in the entomological collection of the Museum of Zoology at the State University of

  13. Variations in Near-Infrared Emissivity of Venus Surface Observed by the Galileo Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, G. L.; Roos-Serote, M.; Sugita, S.

    2004-11-01

    We evaluate the spatial variation of venusian surface emissivity at a near-infrared wavelength using multispectral images obtained by the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on board the Galileo spacecraft. The Galileo made a close flyby to Venus in February 1990. During this flyby, NIMS observed the nightside of Venus with 17 spectral channels, which includes the well-known spectral windows at 1.18, 1.74, and 2.3 μ m. The surface emissivity is evaluated at 1.18 μ m, at which thermal radiation emitted from the planetary surface could be detected. To analyze the NIMS observations, synthetic spectra have been generated by means of a line-by-line radiative transfer program which includes both scattering and absorption. We used the discrete ordinate method to calculate the spectra of vertically inhomogeneous plane-parallel atmosphere. Gas opacity is calculated based on the method of Pollack et al. (1993), though binary absorption coefficients for continuum opacity are adjusted to achieve an acceptable fit to the NIMS data. We used Mie scattering theory and a cloud model developed by Pollack et al. (1993) to determine the single scattering albedo and scattering phase function of the cloud particles. The vertical temperature profile of Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) is used in all our calculations. The procedure of the analysis is the followings. We first made a correction for emission angle. Then, a modulation of emission by the cloud opacities is removed using simultaneously measured 1.74 and 2.3 μ m radiances. The resulting images are correlated with the topographic map of Magellan. To search for variations in surface emissivity, this cloud corrected images are divided by synthetic radiance maps that were created from the Magellan data. This work has been supported by The 21st Century COE Program of Origin and Evolution of Planetary Systems of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT).

  14. Cassini MIMI Close-Up of Saturn Energetic Particles: Low Altitude Trapped Radiation, Auroral Ion Acceleration, and Interchange Flow Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Krupp, N.; Paranicas, C.; Roussos, E.; Kollmann, P.

    2017-12-01

    We present observations from the final orbits of the Cassini Mission at Saturn by the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI). Crossing inside the D-Ring at the equator and just above Saturn's atmosphere, these orbits covered regions never visited previously in the mission. Highlights include the confirmation of an inner radiation belt analogous to the inner radiation belt at Earth by the Low Energy Magnetospheric Measurement System (LEMMS), with surprising twists—Saturn's D-ring material appears to be a source for these particles. Details will be presented in another session. The Grand Finale orbits also afforded a close-up view of the auroral ion acceleration regions by the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA). Ionospheric ions at the base of auroral field lines are accelerated perpendicular to the magnetic field to 10's and 100's of keV, and charge exchange with exospheric neutrals to be emitted as energetic neutral atoms and images by INCA. We show that this acceleration region lies at about 0.1 Rs. Another feature seen previously in the mission but imaged with greater resolution is a flow channel associated with interchange motion in the middle magnetosphere. We show this feature to extend over several Saturn radii in the radial direction, and over about 2 Saturn radii azimuthally. Additional data have been received since the writing of this abstract and before Cassini's plunge into the atmosphere on September 15, so additional features may be presented.

  15. Storm clouds on Saturn: Lightning-induced chemistry and associated materials consistent with Cassini/VIMS spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, K.H.; Delitsky, M.L.; Momary, T.W.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    Thunderstorm activity on Saturn is associated with optically detectable clouds that are atypically dark throughout the near-infrared. As observed by Cassini/VIMS, these clouds are ~20% less reflective than typical neighboring clouds throughout the spectral range from 0.8 ??m to at least 4.1 ??m. We propose that active thunderstorms originating in the 10-20 bar water-condensation region vertically transport dark materials at depth to the ~1 bar level where they can be observed. These materials in part may be produced by chemical processes associated with lightning, likely within the water clouds near the ~10 bar freezing level of water, as detected by the electrostatic discharge of lightning flashes observed by Cassini/RPWS (e.g., Fischer et al. 2008, Space Sci. Rev., 137, 271-285). We review lightning-induced pyrolytic chemistry involving a variety of Saturnian constituents, including hydrogen, methane, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, phosphine, and water. We find that the lack of absorption in the 1-2 ??m spectral region by lightning-generated sulfuric and phosphorous condensates renders these constituents as minor players in determining the color of the dark storm clouds. Relatively small particulates of elemental carbon, formed by lightning-induced dissociation of methane and subsequently upwelled from depth - perhaps embedded within and on the surface of spectrally bright condensates such as ammonium hydrosulfide or ammonia - may be a dominant optical material within the dark thunderstorm-related clouds of Saturn. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Jovian discoveries; how Galileo explored the Jovian system fifteen years ago

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, T.

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the famous astronomer Galileo Galilei improved his telescope making it possible to look further into space, people have been staring through telescopes into the far distance in search of new worlds. In January 1610 Galilei discovered the four biggest satellites of Jupiter: Io, Europa,

  17. The Galileo Affair from John Milton to John Paul II: Problems and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finocchiaro, Maurice A.

    1999-01-01

    Distinguishes between Galileo's original 20-year trial and the subsequent 350-year controversy and the historical aftermath of the original episode from the reflective commentary on it. Provides an in-depth characterization and sketch of the historical aftermath and reflective commentary. Contains 90 references. (Author/WRM)

  18. SOLAR OCCULTATION BY TITAN MEASURED BY CASSINI/UVIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capalbo, Fernando J.; Benilan, Yves [Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques (LISA), UMR 7583 du CNRS, Universites Paris Est Creteil (UPEC) and Paris Diderot - UPD, 61 avenue du General de Gaulle, 94010 Creteil Cedex (France); Yelle, Roger V.; Koskinen, Tommi T.; Sandel, Bill R. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 E. University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Holsclaw, Gregory M.; McClintock, William E., E-mail: fernando.capalbo@lisa.u-pec.fr [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 3665 Discovery Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    We present the first published analysis of a solar occultation by Titan's atmosphere measured by the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph on board Cassini. The data were measured during flyby T53 in 2009 April and correspond to latitudes between 21 Degree-Sign and 28 Degree-Sign south. The analysis utilizes the absorption of two solar emission lines (584 A and 630 A) in the ionization continuum of the N{sub 2} absorption cross section and solar emission lines around 1085 A where absorption is due to CH{sub 4}. The measured transmission at these wavelengths provides a direct estimate of the N{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} column densities along the line of sight from the spacecraft to the Sun, which we inverted to obtain the number densities. The high signal-to-noise ratio of the data allowed us to retrieve density profiles in the altitude range 1120-1400 km for nitrogen and 850-1300 km for methane. We find an N{sub 2} scale height of {approx}76 km and a temperature of {approx}153 K. Our results are in general agreement with those from previous work, although there are some differences. Particularly, our profiles agree, considering uncertainties, with the density profiles derived from the Voyager 1 Ultraviolet Spectrograph data, and with in situ measurements by the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer with revised calibration.

  19. Jupiter's Atmospheric Temperatures: From Voyager IRIS to Cassini CIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Conrath, Barney J.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Orton, Glenn S.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Flasar, F. Michael; Fisher, Brendan

    2004-01-01

    Retrievals run on Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer data obtained during the distant Jupiter flyby have been used to generate global temperature maps of the planet in the troposphere and stratosphere. Similar retrievals were performed on Voyager 1 IRIS data and have provided the first detailed IRIS map of the stratosphere. In both data sets, high latitude troposphere temperatures are presented for the first time, and the meridional gradients indicate the presence of circumpolar jets. Thermal winds were calculated for each data set and show strong vertical shears in the zonal winds at low latitudes. The temperatures retrieved from the two spacecraft were also compared with yearly ground-based data obtained over the intervening two decades. Tropospheric temperatures reveal gradual changes at low latitudes, with little obvious seasonal or short-term variation (Orton et al. 1994). Stratospheric temperatures show much more complicated behavior over short timescales, consistent with quasi-quadrennial oscillations at low latitudes, as suggested in prior analyses of shorter intervals of ground- based data (Orton et al. 1991, Friedson 1999). A scaling analysis indicates that meridional motions, mechanically forced by wave or eddy convergence, play an important role in modulating the temperatures and winds in the upper troposphere and stratosphere on seasonal and shorter time scales. At latitudes away from the equator, the mechanical forcing can be derived simply from a temporal record of temperature and its vertical derivative. Ground-based observations with improved vertical resolution and/or long-term monitoring from spacecraft are required for this purpose.

  20. SOLAR OCCULTATION BY TITAN MEASURED BY CASSINI/UVIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capalbo, Fernando J.; Bénilan, Yves; Yelle, Roger V.; Koskinen, Tommi T.; Sandel, Bill R.; Holsclaw, Gregory M.; McClintock, William E.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first published analysis of a solar occultation by Titan's atmosphere measured by the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph on board Cassini. The data were measured during flyby T53 in 2009 April and correspond to latitudes between 21° and 28° south. The analysis utilizes the absorption of two solar emission lines (584 Å and 630 Å) in the ionization continuum of the N 2 absorption cross section and solar emission lines around 1085 Å where absorption is due to CH 4 . The measured transmission at these wavelengths provides a direct estimate of the N 2 and CH 4 column densities along the line of sight from the spacecraft to the Sun, which we inverted to obtain the number densities. The high signal-to-noise ratio of the data allowed us to retrieve density profiles in the altitude range 1120-1400 km for nitrogen and 850-1300 km for methane. We find an N 2 scale height of ∼76 km and a temperature of ∼153 K. Our results are in general agreement with those from previous work, although there are some differences. Particularly, our profiles agree, considering uncertainties, with the density profiles derived from the Voyager 1 Ultraviolet Spectrograph data, and with in situ measurements by the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer with revised calibration.

  1. Cassini-Huygens Investigations of Satellite Surfaces and Interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.; Soderblom, Laurence A.

    2002-07-01

    The Saturnian system contains 18 known satellites ranging from 10 km to 2575 km in radius. In bulk properties and surface appearance these objects show less regularity than the sparser Jupiter system. The Galilean-sized moon Titan sports a dense atmosphere of nitrogen and methane which renders surface observations difficult, but also makes this moon intriguing from the standpoints of climate change and exobiology. The Cassini-Huygens mission will make extensive observations of the satellites over a range of wavelengths, as well as using in-situ sampling of satellite environments (and in the case of Titan, sampling of atmosphere and surface). The goals of these extensive investigations are to understand the bulk properties of the satellites, their surface compositions and evolution through time, as well as interactions with the magnetosphere and rings of Saturn. This knowledge in turn should provide a deeper understanding of the origin of the Saturnian system as a whole and underlying causes for the distinctive differences from the Jovian satellite system.

  2. System design aspects and flight experience of the electrical interfaces across the Galileo spacecraft spin bearing assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landano, Matthew R.

    1993-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft design uses a dual-spin general configuration with spun and despun sections; the mechanical connection between the two sections is accomplished by means of a spin bearing assembly (SBA) whose electrical interfacing uses both slip rings/brushes and rotary transformers that are located within the SBA. Attention is presently given to the design features of the SBA, the electrical interface flight anomaly and investigation experience with Galileo to date, and the responses of the Galileo Flight Team to those anomalies.

  3. Titan's cloud seasonal activity from winter to spring with Cassini/VIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, S.; Le, Mouelic S.; Rannou, P.; Sotin, Christophe; Brown, R.H.; Barnes, J.W.; Griffith, C.A.; Burgalat, J.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    Since Saturn orbital insertion in July 2004, the Cassini orbiter has been observing Titan throughout most of the northern winter season (October 2002-August 2009) and the beginning of spring, allowing a detailed monitoring of Titan's cloud coverage at high spatial resolution with close flybys on a monthly basis. This study reports on the analysis of all the near-infrared images of Titan's clouds acquired by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) during 67 targeted flybys of Titan between July 2004 and April 2010.The VIMS observations show numerous sporadic clouds at southern high and mid-latitudes, rare clouds in the equatorial region, and reveal a long-lived cloud cap above the north pole, ubiquitous poleward of 60??N. These observations allow us to follow the evolution of the cloud coverage during almost a 6-year period including the equinox, and greatly help to further constrain global circulation models (GCMs). After 4. years of regular outbursts observed by Cassini between 2004 and 2008, southern polar cloud activity started declining, and completely ceased 1. year before spring equinox. The extensive cloud system over the north pole, stable between 2004 and 2008, progressively fractionated and vanished as Titan entered into northern spring. At southern mid-latitudes, clouds were continuously observed throughout the VIMS observing period, even after equinox, in a latitude band between 30??S and 60??S. During the whole period of observation, only a dozen clouds were observed closer to the equator, though they were slightly more frequent as equinox approached. We also investigated the distribution of clouds with longitude. We found that southern polar clouds, before disappearing in mid-2008, were systematically concentrated in the leading hemisphere of Titan, in particular above and to the east of Ontario Lacus, the largest reservoir of hydrocarbons in the area. Clouds are also non-homogeneously distributed with longitude at southern mid

  4. A closer look at Galileo Thermal data from a Possible Plume Source North of Pwyll, Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathbun, J. A.; Spencer, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Two different observing techniques, both employing the Hubble Space Telescope, have found evidence for plumes just off Europa's limb (Roth et al., 2014; Sparks et al., 2016). More recent observations using the Jovian transit technique enabled Sparks et al. (2017) to determine that one location was the source of two separate detections: just north of the impact crater Pwyll at 275 W, -16 S, a region we informally call North Pwyll. This source was detected on March 17, 2014 and February 22, 2016. Coinciding with this source is a broad thermal anomaly observed by the Galileo Photopolarimeter-Radiometer (PPR) during the Europan night (Sparks et al., 2017; Spencer et al., 1999). Rathbun et al. (2010) determined detection limits for the PPR observations and found that a 100 km2 hotspot in the vicinity of North Pwyll would have been detected if it had a temperature above about 150 K. We took a closer look at the PPR data and found that there are 5 PPR observations that include the North Pwyll region, at local times varying from midway between midnight and sunrise (the data already published) through midway between sunrise and noon. While at least one observation near noon is required for a complete measurement of the diurnal variation, we were able to fit a thermal model to the available data and found that endogenic heating is not required and that the data can be fit using an albedo of 0.4 and a thermal inertia of 114 in MKS units. Due to the sparseness and noisiness of the data, these values are very uncertain. Rathbun et al. (2010) found Europa's thermal inertias to be in the range of 20-140 MKS and albedos 0.3-0.7, so North Pwyll has a high thermal inertia and low albedo. Unfortunately, the high latitude of the other putative plume source locations (63 S and 75 S) puts them in areas poorly imaged by PPR.

  5. Cryovolcanic features on Titan's surface as revealed by the Cassini Titan Radar Mapper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, R.M.C.; Mitchell, K.L.; Stofan, E.R.; Lunine, J.I.; Lorenz, R.; Paganelli, F.; Kirk, R.L.; Wood, C.A.; Wall, S.D.; Robshaw, L.E.; Fortes, A.D.; Neish, Catherine D.; Radebaugh, J.; Reffet, E.; Ostro, S.J.; Elachi, C.; Allison, M.D.; Anderson, Y.; Boehmer, R.; Boubin, G.; Callahan, P.; Encrenaz, P.; Flamini, E.; Francescetti, G.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.; Hensley, S.; Janssen, M.A.; Johnson, W.T.K.; Kelleher, K.; Muhleman, D.O.; Ori, G.; Orosei, R.; Picardi, G.; Posa, F.; Roth, L.E.; Seu, R.; Shaffer, S.; Soderblom, L.A.; Stiles, B.; Vetrella, S.; West, R.D.; Wye, L.; Zebker, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper obtained Synthetic Aperture Radar images of Titan's surface during four fly-bys during the mission's first year. These images show that Titan's surface is very complex geologically, showing evidence of major planetary geologic processes, including cryovolcanism. This paper discusses the variety of cryovolcanic features identified from SAR images, their possible origin, and their geologic context. The features which we identify as cryovolcanic in origin include a large (180 km diameter) volcanic construct (dome or shield), several extensive flows, and three calderas which appear to be the source of flows. The composition of the cryomagma on Titan is still unknown, but constraints on rheological properties can be estimated using flow thickness. Rheological properties of one flow were estimated and appear inconsistent with ammonia-water slurries, and possibly more consistent with ammonia-water-methanol slurries. The extent of cryovolcanism on Titan is still not known, as only a small fraction of the surface has been imaged at sufficient resolution. Energetic considerations suggest that cryovolcanism may have been a dominant process in the resurfacing of Titan. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc.

  6. Seasonal variations in Titan’s stratosphere observed with Cassini/CIRS during northern spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinatier, Sandrine; Bézard, Bruno; Teanby, Nicholas; Lebonnois, Sébastien; Achterberg, Richard; Gorius, Nicolas; Flasar, F. Michael; CIRS Team

    2017-10-01

    Since 2004, Cassini performed 127 close Titan flybys, observing its atmosphere with instruments including the Cassini Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS). We know from CIRS observations that the global dynamics drastically changed after the northern spring equinox that occurred in August 2009 ([1], [2], [3], [4]). The pole-to-pole middle atmosphere dynamics (above 100 km) experienced a global reversal in less than 2 years after the equinox [4], while the northern hemisphere was entering spring. This new pattern, with downwelling at the south pole, resulted in an enrichment of almost all molecules inside the southern polar vortex since 2011. According to General Circulation Model calculations, this single circulation cell pattern should remain until 2025.We will present an analysis of CIRS limb observations up to 2017, during the entire northern spring. We show that many species (C2H2, HCN, HC3N, C6H6, C4H2, CH3CCH, C2H4) experienced their highest enrichments near the south pole near 500 km in March 2015, with abundances similar to in situ results from INMS at 1000 km [5], suggesting that the air inside the confined polar vortex (observed at latitudes higher than 80°S) was very efficiently transported downward from very high altitudes. In September 2015, an extension of the polar vortex towards lower latitudes (~65°S) was observed, while the molecular abundances decreased by a factor of 10 at 500 km. In the same region, unexpectedly cold stratospheric temperatures were observed below 300 km from May 2013 to the end of 2015. Simultaneously, after the disruption of the north polar vortex after the equinox, the enriched air that was previously confined at very high latitude gradually expended towards mid latitudes at altitudes higher than 300 km. At the beginning of 2016, a zone depleted in molecular gas and aerosol is observed in the entire northern hemisphere between 400 and 500 km, suggesting some complex unknown dynamical effect.References:[1] Teanby, N. et al

  7. Titan’s mid-latitude surface regions with Cassini VIMS and RADAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Coustenis, Athena; Malaska, Michael; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Maltagliati, Luca; Drossart, Pierre; Janssen, Michael; Lawrence, Kenneth; Jaumann, Ralf; Sohl, Frank; Stephan, Katrin; Brown, Robert H.; Bratsolis, Emmanuel; Matsoukas, Christos

    2015-11-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission instruments have revealed Titan to have a complex and dynamic atmosphere and surface. Data from the remote sensing instruments have shown the presence of diverse surface terrains in terms of morphology and composition, suggesting both exogenic and endogenic processes [1]. We define both the surface and atmospheric contributions in the VIMS spectro-imaging data by use of a radiative transfer code in the near-IR range [2]. To complement this dataset, the Cassini RADAR instrument provides additional information on the surface morphology, from which valuable geological interpretations can be obtained [3]. We examine the origin of key Titan terrains, covering the mid-latitude zones extending from 50ºN to 50ºS. The different geological terrains we investigate include: mountains, plains, labyrinths, craters, dune fields, and possible cryovolcanic and/or evaporite features. We have found that the labyrinth terrains and the undifferentiated plains seem to consist of a very similar if not the same material, while the different types of plains show compositional variations [3]. The processes most likely linked to their formation are aeolian, fluvial, sedimentary, lacustrine, in addition to the deposition of atmospheric products though the process of photolysis and sedimentation of organics. We show that temporal variations of surface albedo exist for two of the candidate cryovolcanic regions. The surface albedo variations together with the presence of volcanic-like morphological features suggest that the active regions are possibly related to the deep interior, possibly via cryovolcanism processes (with important implications for the satellite’s astrobiological potential) as also indicated by new interior structure models of Titan and corresponding calculations of the spatial pattern of maximum tidal stresses [4]. However, an explanation attributed to exogenic processes is also possible [5]. We will report on results from our most recent

  8. Iapetus: Tenth Anniversary of the Cassini Flyby and the Albedo Dichotomy Enigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denk, Tilmann

    2017-10-01

    Ten years ago, on 10 Sep 2007, Cassini (the spacecraft) performed the only targeted flyby of Saturn's outermost regular moon Iapetus and came as close as 1620 km to its surface [1]. Cassini approached Iapetus over the unlit low-albedo leading hemisphere, flew over the ridge on the anti-Saturn side during closest approach, and departed over the illuminated bright trailing side. This flyby was different in many aspects to all other satellite flybys of Cassini. For example, it occured near apoapsis of the spacecraft orbit, and the flyby velocity was much lower than ususal, allowing for an unusually intensive observing program. There was also a major change in the sub-spacecraft groundtrack implemented in 2006 primarily because of the discovery of the equatorial ridge in late 2004. Unexpected (and unpleasant) events like a spacecraft safing occuring just about 15 min after data playback start are also part of the story.Iapetus was originally discovered by Cassini (the man) in 1671, and only six years later, he published a paper where he correctly described the albedo dichotomy that Iapetus is famous for [2]. Over the following ~300 years, no progress was made with regard to the cause of this phenomenon. Since the 1970s, numerous ideas have been published, but all shared the common property of not being widely accepted. One of the top science tasks for Cassini (the spacecraft) to solve was this enigma which was among the oldest unresolved questions in planetary sciences.The talk recaps the efforts to explain the albedo dichotomy [3] and gives an overview of the Cassini Iapetus observation planning and execution with an emphasis on the 2007 targeted flyby.As a final sidenote, the monolith from Arthur Clarke's novel "2001 - A Space Odyssey" [4] was not detected in the images.[1] Denk, T. (2008): Cassini at Iapetus: A Bumpy but Successful Flyby. The Planetary Report, Vol. XXVIII, no. 1, pp. 10-16, Jan/Feb 2008.[2] Cassini, J.D. (1677): Some New Observations Made by Sig

  9. Haze and cloud structure of Saturn's North Pole and Hexagon Wave from Cassini/ISS imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Requena, J. F.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Antuñano, A.; Irwin, Patrick G. J.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper we present a study of the vertical haze and cloud structure in the upper two bars of Saturn's Northern Polar atmosphere using the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) instrument onboard the Cassini spacecraft. We focus on the characterization of latitudes from 53° to 90° N. The observations were taken during June 2013 with five different filters (VIO, BL1, MT2, CB2 and MT3) covering spectral range from the 420 nm to 890 nm (in a deep methane absorption band). Absolute reflectivity measurements of seven selected regions at all wavelengths and several illumination and observation geometries are compared with the values produced by a radiative transfer model. The changes in reflectivity at these latitudes are mostly attributed to changes in the tropospheric haze. This includes the haze base height (from 600 ± 200 mbar at the lowest latitudes to 1000 ± 300 mbar in the pole), its particle number density (from 20 ± 2 particles/cm3 to 2 ± 0.5 particles/cm3 at the haze base) and its scale height (from 18 ± 0.1 km to 50 ± 0.1 km). We also report variability in the retrieved particle size distribution and refractive indices. We find that the Hexagonal Wave dichotomizes the studied stratospheric and tropospheric hazes between the outer, equatorward regions and the inner, Polar Regions. This suggests that the wave or the jet isolates the particle distribution at least at tropospheric levels.

  10. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Galileo Broadcast Ephemeris Data (sub-hourly files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Galileo Broadcast Ephemeris Data (sub-hourly files) from the NASA Crustal Dynamics...

  11. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Galileo Broadcast Ephemeris Data (hourly files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Galileo Broadcast Ephemeris Data (hourly files) from the NASA Crustal Dynamics Data...

  12. Ground-Based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Galileo Broadcast Ephemeris Data (daily files) from NASA CDDIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset consists of ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Galileo Broadcast Ephemeris Data (daily files) from the NASA Crustal Dynamics Data...

  13. Cassini Education and Public Outreach: Lessons Learned - It Takes A Village to Reach the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessen, A.

    2011-10-01

    Cassini's Education and Public Outreach program has undergone a couple of program replans and evaluations since 2001. But the strongest lesson learned was the value of reaching out to, and working with national experts in language arts, the planetarium, astronomy and museum community, and the World Wide Web as it developed and began implementing its Education and Public Outreach plans. Along the way, we learned the value of partners, of grabbing some opportunities as they emerged and letting a few ideas go. We also learned the value of talking to our customers, educators and the public. Building opportunities for meaningful student and public participation in the science and engineering of the Cassini Mission has been both a challenge and a privilege. In this talk, Alice Wessen, Manager for Cassini Education and Public Outreach will share a few lessons learned from our mistakes and our successes.

  14. Cassini Operational Sun Sensor Risk Management During Proximal Orbit Saturn Ring Plane Crossings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, David M.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Cassini Spacecraft, launched on October 15th, 1997 which arrived at Saturn on June 30th, 2004, is the largest and most ambitious interplanetary spacecraft in history. As the first spacecraft to achieve orbit at Saturn, Cassini has collected science data throughout its four-year prime mission (2004–08), and has since been approved for a first and second extended mission through 2017. As part of the final extended missions, Cassini will begin an aggressive and exciting campaign of high inclination, low altitude flybys within the inner most rings of Saturn, skimming Saturn’s outer atmosphere, until the spacecraft is finally disposed of via planned impact with the planet. This final campaign, known as the proximal orbits, requires a strategy for managing the Sun Sensor Assembly (SSA) health, the details of which are presented in this paper.

  15. Cassini Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem Fault Protection Challenges During Saturn Proximal Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, David M.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Cassini Spacecraft, launched on October 15th, 1997 arrived at Saturn on June 30th, 2004, is the largest and most ambitious interplanetary spacecraft in history. As the first spacecraft to achieve orbit at Saturn, Cassini has collected science data throughout its four-year prime mission (2004-08), and has since been approved for a first and second extended mission through 2017. As part of the final extended mission, Cassini will begin an aggressive and exciting campaign of high inclination low altitude flybys within the inner most rings of Saturn, skimming Saturn's outer atmosphere, until the spacecraft is finally disposed of via planned impact with the planet. This final campaign, known as the proximal orbits, presents unique fault protection related challenges, the details of which are discussed in this paper.

  16. Cassini detection of Enceladus's cold water-group plume ionosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokar, Robert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thomsen, Michelle F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Robert J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, R E [UNIV OF VIRGINIA; Young, D T [SWRI; Crary, F J [SWRI; Coates, A J [MSSL; Jones, G H [MSSL; Paty, C S [GIT

    2009-01-01

    This study reports direct detection by the Cassini plasma spectrometer of freshly-produced water-group ions (O{sup +}, OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, H{sub 3}O{sup +}) and heavier water dimer ions (H{sub x}O{sub 2}{sup +}) very close to Enceladus and where the plasma begins to emerge from the Enceladus plume The data wcre obtained during two close (52 and 25 km) flybys of Enceladus in 2008, and are similar to ion data in cometary comas. The ions are observed in detectors looking in the Cassini ram direction at energies consistent with the Cassini speed, indicating a nearly stagnant plasma flow in the plume. North of Enceladus the plasma slowing commences about 4 to 6 Enceladus radii away, while south of Enccladus signatures ofthe interaction are detected as far as 22 Enceladus radii away.

  17. Retrievals of Jovian Tropospheric Phosphine from Cassini/CIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, P. G. J.; Parrish, P.; Fouchet, T.; Calcutt, S. B.; Taylor, F. W.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Nixon, C. A.

    2004-01-01

    On December 30th 2000, the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft reached the perijove milestone on its continuing journey to the Saturnian system. During an extended six-month encounter, the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) returned spectra of the Jovian atmosphere, rings and satellites from 10-1400 cm(exp -1) (1000-7 microns) at a programmable spectral resolution of 0.5 to 15 cm(exp -1). The improved spectral resolution of CIRS over previous IR instrument-missions to Jupiter, the extended spectral range, and higher signal-to-noise performance provide significant advantages over previous data sets. CIRS global observations of the mid-infrared spectrum of Jupiter at medium resolution (2.5 cm(exp -1)) have been analysed both with a radiance differencing scheme and an optimal estimation retrieval model to retrieve the spatial variation of phosphine and ammonia fractional scale height in the troposphere between 60 deg S and 60 deg N at a spatial resolution of 6 deg. The ammonia fractional scale height appears to be high over the Equatorial Zone (EZ) but low over the North Equatorial Belt (NEB) and South Equatorial Belt (SEB) indicating rapid uplift or strong vertical mixing in the EZ. The abundance of phosphine shows a similar strong latitudinal variation which generally matches that of the ammonia fractional scale height. However while the ammonia fractional scale height distribution is to a first order symmetric in latitude, the phosphine distribution shows a North/South asymmetry at mid latitudes with higher amounts detected at 40 deg N than 40 deg S. In addition the data show that while the ammonia fractional scale height at this spatial resolution appears to be low over the Great Red Spot (GRS), indicating reduced vertical mixing above the approx. 500 mb level, the abundance of phosphine at deeper levels may be enhanced at the northern edge of the GRS indicating upwelling.

  18. The Global Geology of Titan from Cassini RADAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Rosaly; Malaska, Michael J.

    The variety of geological processes on Titan is rivaled in our Solar System only on Earth. Results from the Cassini-Huygens mission obtained so far have revealed a wide range of geologic and climatological processes. We use data obtained by Cassini’s Titan Radar Mapper (13.78 GHz, lambda=2.17 cm) to analyze the distribution of different types of geologic processes occurring on Titan’s surface, both endogenic and exogenic, and to derive temporal relationships between these processes, at least at local scales. The distribution and interplay of geologic processes is important to provide constraints on models of the interior and of surface-atmosphere interactions. We mapped the SAR images in terms of characteristic morphology of geological features and their radar backscatter in order to determine possible emplacement sequences and the overall distribution of geologic processes. All the major planetary geologic processes - volcanism, tectonism, impact cratering and erosion - appear to have played a role in shaping Titan’s complex surface. This paper will review the distribution and relative ages of different geomorphologic units. While some units (craters, dunes, mountains, channels, lakes and seas) are well established in the literature, the presence of cryovolcanic features is still somewhat controversial, and the origin of undifferentiated plains (known as blandlands) is still mysterious. We now have over half of Titan’s surface imaged by SAR and the interpretation of these and other terrains is better constrained. The results from our latest analyses suggest that a sedimentary origin for the undifferentiated plains is the most likely. Cryovolcanism appears to have occurred on Titan, but it is not ubiquitous, and the major cryovolcanic area appears to be old, now partly covered by dunes. Titan’s surface shows a complex interaction between the surface and atmosphere, with erosional processes being driven by wind, liquids and dissolution.

  19. Processing of the GALILEO fuel rod code model uncertainties within the AREVA LWR realistic thermal-mechanical analysis methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailhe, P.; Barbier, B.; Garnier, C.; Landskron, H.; Sedlacek, R.; Arimescu, I.; Smith, M.; Bellanger, P.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of reliable tools and associated methodology able to accurately predict the LWR fuel behavior in all conditions is of great importance for safe and economic fuel usage. For that purpose, AREVA has developed its new global fuel rod performance code GALILEO along with its associated realistic thermal-mechanical analysis methodology. This realistic methodology is based on a Monte Carlo type random sampling of all relevant input variables. After having outlined the AREVA realistic methodology, this paper will be focused on the GALILEO code benchmarking process, on its extended experimental database and on the GALILEO model uncertainties assessment. The propagation of these model uncertainties through the AREVA realistic methodology is also presented. This GALILEO model uncertainties processing is of the utmost importance for accurate fuel design margin evaluation as illustrated on some application examples. With the submittal of Topical Report GALILEO to the U.S. NRC in 2013, GALILEO and its methodology are on the way to be industrially used in a wide range of irradiation conditions. (authors)

  20. Selenide isotope generators for the Galileo Mission: SIG hermetic bimetal weld transition joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, W.J.

    1979-08-01

    The successful development of the commercial 6061-T651/Silver/304L explosive clad plate material as a bimetal weld transition joint material, as described herein, satisfies all SIG Galileo design requirements for hermetic weld attachment of stainless steel subassemblies to aluminum alloy generator housing or end cover structures. The application of this type weld transition joint to the hermetic attachment of stainless steel shell connectors is well-developed and tested. Based on on-going life tests of stainless steel receptacle/bimetal ring attachment assemblies and metallurgical characterization studies of this transition joint material, it appears evident that this transition joint material has more than adequate capability to meet the 250 to 300 0 F and 50,000 hr. design life of the SIG/Galileo mission. Its extended life temperture capability may well approach 350 to 400 0 F

  1. Galileo's new universe the revolution in our understanding of the cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Maran, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The historical and social implications of the telescope and that instrument's modern-day significance are brought into startling focus in this fascinating account. When Galileo looked to the sky with his perspicillum, or spyglass, roughly 400 years ago, he could not have fathomed the amount of change his astonishing findings—a seemingly flat moon magically transformed into a dynamic, crater-filled orb and a large, black sky suddenly held millions of galaxies—would have on civilizations. Reflecting on how Galileo's world compares with contemporary society, this insightful analysis deftly moves from the cutting-edge technology available in 17th-century Europe to the unbelievable phenomena discovered during the last 50 years, documenting important astronomical advances and the effects they have had over the years.

  2. The General-Purpose Heat Source Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator: Power for the Galileo and Ulysses missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, G.L.; Lombardo, J.J.; Hemler, R.J.; Peterson, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Electrical power for NASA's Galileo mission to Jupiter and ESA's Ulysses mission to explore the polar regions of the Sun will be provided by General-Purpose Heat Source Radioisotope Thermo-electric Generators (GPHS-RTGs). Building upon the successful RTG technology used in the Voyager program, each GPHS-RTG will provide at least 285 W(e) at beginning-of-mission. The design concept has been proven through extensive tests of an electrically heated Engineering Unit and a nuclear-heated Qualification Unit. Four flight generators have been successfully assembled and tested for use on the Galileo and Ulysses spacecraft. All indications are that the GPHS-RTGs will meet or exceed the power requirement of the missions

  3. Comparison between Galileo CBOC Candidates and BOC(1,1 in Terms of Detection Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Dovis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Many scientific activities within the navigation field have been focused on the analysis of innovative modulations for both GPS L1C and Galileo E1 OS, after the 2004 agreement between United States and European Commission on the development of GPS and Galileo. The joint effort by scientists of both parties has been focused on the multiplexed binary offset carrier (MBOC which is defined on the basis of its spectrum, and in this sense different time waveforms can be selected as possible modulation candidates. The goal of this paper is to present the detection performance of the composite BOC implementation of an MBOC signal in terms of detection and false alarm probabilities. A comparison among the CBOC and BOC(1,1 modulations is also presented to show how the CBOC solution, designed to have excellent tracking performance and multipath rejection capabilities, does not limit the acquisition process.

  4. Cost Comparison in 2015 Dollars for Radioisotope Power Systems -- Cassini and Mars Science Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, James Elmer [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Johnson, Stephen Guy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dwight, Carla Chelan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lively, Kelly Lynn [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Radioisotope power systems (RPSs) have enabled missions requiring reliable, long-lasting power in remote, harsh environments such as space since the early 1960s. Costs for RPSs are high, but are often misrepresented due to the complexity of space missions and inconsistent charging practices among the many and changing participant organizations over the years. This paper examines historical documentation associated with two past successful flight missions, each with a different RPS design, to provide a realistic cost basis for RPS production and deployment. The missions and their respective RPSs are Cassini, launched in 1997, that uses the general purpose heat source (GPHS) radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG), and Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), launched in 2011, that uses the multi-mission RTG (MMRTG). Actual costs in their respective years are discussed for each of the two RTG designs and the missions they enabled, and then present day values to 2015 are computed to compare the costs. Costs for this analysis were categorized into two areas: development of the specific RTG technology, and production and deployment of an RTG. This latter category includes material costs for the flight components (including Pu-238 and fine weave pierced fabric (FWPF)); manufacturing of flight components; assembly, testing, and transport of the flight RTG(s); ground operations involving the RTG(s) through launch; nuclear safety analyses for the launch and for the facilities housing the RTG(s) during all phases of ground operations; DOE’s support for NEPA analyses; and radiological contingency planning. This analysis results in a fairly similar 2015 normalized cost for the production and deployment of an RTG—approximately $118M for the GPHS-RTG and $109M for the MMRTG. In addition to these two successful flight missions, the costs for development of the MMRTG are included to serve as a future reference. Note that development costs included herein for the MMRTG do not include

  5. Experimental Galileo System Time (E-GST): One Year of Real-Time Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    turn, GaIn is a joint company consisting of Alenia Spazio, Alcatel Industries, Astrium GmbH, Astrium Ltd., and GSS (Galileo Sistemas y Servicios ...in Proceedings of the 6th Meeting of Representatives of Laboratories Contributing to TAI, 31 March 2004, BIPM, France (http://www1.bipm.org...of the 5th European Frequency and Time Forum (EFTF), 12-14 March 1991, Besançon, France , pp. 435-441. 122

  6. Design of pilot channel tracking loop Systems for high sensitivity Galileo receivers

    OpenAIRE

    Kassabian, Nazelie

    2014-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have been in the center stage of the recent technological upheaval that has been initiated by the rise of smartphones in the last decade. This is clearly reflected in the development of many applications based on GNSS technology as well as the emergence of multi-constellation GNSS with the launch of the first Galileo satellites at the end of the year 2011. GNSS does not only guarantee global positioning, navigation and timing services but also extend...

  7. Polemiche sopra i due massimi sistemi: Galileo e il Piccolo Teatro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Colciago

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper, based on phd dissertation about the relationship between Piccolo Theatre of Milan and local audience community, analyzes the debate rised by catholics politicians around the show Life of Galileo (1963, on the most important italian newspapers and in City Council. These protests, though being speciously raised against that specific show, were an attack towards the artistic independence of Piccolo Theatre, aiming for more pluralism in a public institution financed by the City.

  8. Comparison of Ultra-Rapid Orbit Prediction Strategies for GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Geng; Peng Zhang; Wei Wang; Xin Xie

    2018-01-01

    Currently, ultra-rapid orbits play an important role in the high-speed development of global navigation satellite system (GNSS) real-time applications. This contribution focuses on the impact of the fitting arc length of observed orbits and solar radiation pressure (SRP) on the orbit prediction performance for GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou. One full year’s precise ephemerides during 2015 were used as fitted observed orbits and then as references to be compared with predicted orbits, togeth...

  9. The Faces of Saturn: Images and Texts from Augustus through Dürer to Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, M. H.

    2013-04-01

    This paper follows the thread(s) of Saturn in astrology and art from the Babylonians to Galileo, paying special attention to the planet's political importance from Augustus to the Medici and to its medical/psychological significance from Ficino through Dürer. In passing, I extend David Pingree's astrological interpretation of Dürer's Melencholia I and propose a very personal rationale for the engraving, namely as a memorial to his mother.

  10. European initiative for a new generation of satellite navigation services - Galileo; Die europaeische Initiative fuer eine neue Generation von Satellitennavigationsdiensten - GALILEO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tusk, S. [Bundesministerium fuer Verkehr, Bau- und Wohnungswesen, Berlin (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    The currently existing satellite navigation systems GPS and GLONASS have impressively demonstrated the possibilities of using satellite navigation; there are numerous civilian applications worldwide. However, both systems are controlled nationally and designed for military applications and cannot meet the basic requirements in terms of continuity, integrity and precision required for safety-relevant and sovereign applications. Therefore, the Federal Republic of Germany supports the activities initiated by the EU, which consist of - developing, first of all, technical augmentations to make the existing systems useable without delay also for applications involving exacting requirements (GNSS 1, EGNOS), - carrying out in parallel the definition phase for the development of a global, civilian satellite navigation system (GNSS 2, Galileo). (orig.) [German] Die bisher existierenden Satellitennavigationssysteme GPS und GLONASS haben die Einsatzmoeglichkeiten der Satellitennavigation in eindrucksvoller Weise demonstriert; weltweit haben sich zahlreiche zivile Anwendungen ergeben. Jedoch sind beide Systeme national kontrolliert, auf militaerische Anwendungen zugeschnitten und koennen die fuer sicherheitsrelevante und hoheitliche Anwendungen notwendigen Grundanforderungen nach Kontinuitaet, Integritaet und Praezision nicht garantieren. Daher unterstuetzt die Bundesrepublik Deutschland die von der EU eingeleiteten Aktivitaeten, die daraus bestehen - zunaechst die bestehenden Systeme durch technische Ergaenzungen kurzfristig auch fuer hohe Anforderungen stellende Anwendungen nutzbar zu machen (GNSS 1, EGNOS) - parallel dazu die Definitionsphase zum Aufbau eines globalen zivilen Satellitennavigationssystems (GNSS 2, GALILEO) durchzufuehren. (orig.)

  11. PDS and NASA Tournament Laboratory Project to Engage Citizen Scientists and to Provide New Access to Cassini Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odess, Jennifer; Gordon, Mitch; Showalter, Mark; LaMora, Andy; Del Villar, Ambi; Raugh, Anne; Erickson, Kristen; Galica, Carol; Grayzeck, Ed; Morgan, Thomas; Knopf, Bill

    2014-11-01

    Jennifer Odess (1), Mitch Gordon (2), Mark Showalter (2), Andy LaMora (1), Ambi Del Villar (1), Anne Raugh (3), Kristen Erickson (4), Carol Galica (4), Ed Grayzeck (5), T. Morgan (5), and Bill Knopf (4)1. Appirio Top Coder, Inc2. SETI Institute3. University of Maryland4. NASA Headquarters5. Goddard Space Flight CenterThe Planetary Data System (PDS), working with the NASA Tournament Lab (NTL) and TopCoder® , is using challenge-based competition to generate new applications that increase both access to planetary data and discoverability—allowing users to “mine” data, and thus, to make new discoveries from data already “on the ground”. The first challenge-based completion was an optimized database and API for comet data at the PDS Small Bodies Node (SBN) in 2012. Since start-up, the installation at SBN has been tweaked to provide access to the comet data holdings of the SBN, and has introduced new users and new developers to PDS data. A follow-on contest using Cassini images from the PDS Rings Discipline Node, was designed to challenge the competitors to create new, more transparent, agile tools for public access to NASA’s planetary data, where “public” includes citizen scientists and educators. The experience gained with the API at SBN was applied to establishing a second installation at the PDS Planetary Rings Node (Rings), to serve as the basis to develop similar access tools at Rings to make the growing archive of Cassini images available through the API. The Cassini-Rings project had as its goal to develop a crowd-sourcing project with eventual application across the PDS holdings. From the contest results, a preliminary algorithm can detect known satellites hidden in Saturn’s rings which should prove valuable to programmers. The contest approach is also of potential use to educators for exercises studying the solar system. The progress to date and results of this citizen-scientist project will be discussed.

  12. Galileo e a defesa da cosmologia copernicana: a sua visão do universo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio César Penereiro

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7941.2009v26n1p173 No presente trabalho estudamos o desencontro do argumento de Galileo Galilei relativo à rotação da Terra, contida na obra Diálogo sobre os dois máximos sistemas do mundo ptolomaico e copernicano . Apresentamos algumas descobertas astronômicas realizadas por Galileo e suas consequências para com a ordenação do universo. Uma discussão sobre o método científico intuído por ele é apresentada, cuja intenção é a de encorajar todos a pensar sobre como a observação do cosmos feita por Galileo nos forçou a reconsiderar nossa compreensão do mundo. Em adição, gostaríamos de ajudar a responder algumas questões básicas em física e astronomia.

  13. Scientific and Technical Support for the Galileo Net Flux Radiometer Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sromovsky, Lawrence A.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes work in support of the Galileo Net Flux Radiometer (NFR), an instrument mounted on the Galileo probe, a spacecraft designed for entry into and direct measurements of Jupiter's atmosphere. Tasks originally proposed for the post launch period covered by NCC 2-854 are briefly as follows: attend and support PSG (Project Science Group) and other project science meetings; support in-flight checkouts; maintain and keep safe the spare instrument and GSE (Ground Support Equipment); organize and maintain documentation; finish NFR calibration measurements, documentation, and analysis; characterize and diagnose instrument anomalies; develop descent data analysis tools; and science data analysis and publication. Because we had the capability to satisfy a project support need we also subsequently proposed and were funded to make ground-based observations of Jupiter during the period surrounding the Galileo arrival at Jupiter, using the Swedish Solar Telescope at La Palma, Canary Islands. The following section provides background information on the NFR instrument. Section 3 contains the final report of work done.

  14. Global Ionospheric Modelling using Multi-GNSS: BeiDou, Galileo, GLONASS and GPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaohong; Xie, Weiliang; Zhang, Keke; Yuan, Yongqiang; Li, Xingxing

    2016-09-15

    The emergence of China's Beidou, Europe's Galileo and Russia's GLONASS satellites has multiplied the number of ionospheric piercing points (IPP) offered by GPS alone. This provides great opportunities for deriving precise global ionospheric maps (GIMs) with high resolution to improve positioning accuracy and ionospheric monitoring capabilities. In this paper, the GIM is developed based on multi-GNSS (GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou and Galileo) observations in the current multi-constellation condition. The performance and contribution of multi-GNSS for ionospheric modelling are carefully analysed and evaluated. Multi-GNSS observations of over 300 stations from the Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) and International GNSS Service (IGS) networks for two months are processed. The results show that the multi-GNSS GIM products are better than those of GIM products based on GPS-only. Differential code biases (DCB) are by-products of the multi-GNSS ionosphere modelling, the corresponding standard deviations (STDs) are 0.06 ns, 0.10 ns, 0.18 ns and 0.15 ns for GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou and Galileo, respectively in satellite, and the STDs for the receiver are approximately 0.2~0.4 ns. The single-frequency precise point positioning (SF-PPP) results indicate that the ionospheric modelling accuracy of the proposed method based on multi-GNSS observations is better than that of the current dual-system GIM in specific areas.

  15. GALILEO PROBE DOPPLER WIND EXPERIMENT DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A total of seven data sets are used to derive the wind profile. These include two trajectory data files (probe and orbiter), three frequency data files including the...

  16. GPS and Galileo Developments on Board the International Space Station With the Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzobon, Oscar; Fantinato, Samuele; Dalla Chiara, Andrea; Gamba, Giovanni; Crisci, Massimo; Giordana, Pietro; Enderle, Werner; Chelmins, David; Sands, Obed S.; Clapper, Carolyn J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    knowledge of GNSS orbits and reduce the processing on board. Trade off and various options for telemetry and uplink data are presented and discussed. Finally, integration and validation of the waveform are one of the major challenges of GARISS: The Experiment Development System (EDS) and the the Ground Integration Unit (GIU) for VV will be used prior to conducting the experiment on the ISS. The EDS can be used in lab environment and allows prototyping and verification activities with the simulator, but does not include all hardware components. The GIU on the other side is the flight model which replicates the flying equipment, but has limited flexibility for testing.As conclusion, the project is now approaching the Preliminary Design Review (PDR) and indeed only preliminary results are available. This paper is an opportunity to present the GARISS mission as part of an International cooperation between ESA, NASA and Qascom. The preliminary results include GPS and Galileo processing from space signals, the challenges and trade off decisions, the high level STRS architecture and foreseen experimentation campaign. Detailed results from the test campaigns are expected in 2017.

  17. FMT (Flight Software Memory Tracker) For Cassini Spacecraft-Software Engineering Using JAVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Edwin P.; Uffelman, Hal; Wax, Allan H.

    1997-01-01

    The software engineering design of the Flight Software Memory Tracker (FMT) Tool is discussed in this paper. FMT is a ground analysis software set, consisting of utilities and procedures, designed to track the flight software, i.e., images of memory load and updatable parameters of the computers on-board Cassini spacecraft. FMT is implemented in Java.

  18. In-Flight Position Calibration of the Cassini Articulated Reaction Wheel Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Todd S.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's long-lived Cassini-Huygens spacecraft is currently in its 14th year of flight and in the midst of its second, and final, extended mission. Cassini is a massive interplanetary spacecraft that is three axis stabilized and can maintain attitude control using either its reaction control system thrusters or using reaction wheel control. Cassini has four identical reaction wheels, of which three are mutually orthogonal and have a fixed orientation. The fourth reaction wheel has an articulation motor that allows this reaction wheel to be aligned with the momentum direction of any of the other three fixed reaction wheels. The articulation motor allows this reaction wheel to be used as a replacement for any of the other three wheels without any performance degradation. However, due to limitations in the design of this backup system, there are few telemetric indications of the orientation of this reaction wheel following an articulation. This investigation serves to outline the procedures that have been developed by the Cassini Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem to calibrate the position of the articulated reaction wheel assembly in the event that the momentum direction of this reaction wheel must be reoriented.

  19. Retrieval of Composition and Shadowing Properties of Saturn's Rings from Cassini UVIS Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, E. T.; Colwell, J. E.; Esposito, L. W.

    2017-12-01

    The rings of Saturn consist of centimeter-to-meter sized particles that are covered by a layer of regolith whose grains consist of water ice and some small amount of contaminant that is delivered to the rings through micrometeorite impacts. The mixing of the water ice and meteoritic material is affected by inter-particle collisions and from the meteoritic impacts. Two types of mixtures considered in this investigation are 1) discrete grains of water ice and contaminant and 2) grains of water ice with inclusions of contaminant embedded within the grain. The rough regolith-covered surfaces may result in shadowing between grains that darkens the observed rings reflectance spectra. We compared reflectance spectra of the rings at far ultraviolet wavelengths taken by the Cassini UVIS to models of the rings that include a shadowing function with both types of mixtures and with different contaminant materials. One contaminant that we used was the dark material of Comet 67P, where we retrieved the single scattering albedo at UVIS wavelengths from reflectance spectra measured by the ALICE spectrograph on the Rosetta spacecraft. We compared the reflectance over a range of phase angles with a Hapke model that included macroscopic roughness in order to account for shadowing in the Comet 67P material. We retrieved the ring particle albedo at discrete radial regions in the rings using reflectance spectra over a wide range of phase angles. We corrected the retrieved ring particle albedo for roughness using the shadowing function and then compared the "smooth" ring particle albedo to compositional models. We found that a two-component discrete grain model consisting of greater than ninety percent water ice and contaminant from either Triton tholin or material spectrally similar to Comet 67P were indistinguishable when compared to the UVIS spectra. This suggests a common darkening material and/or processing between the rings and Comet 67P.

  20. Saturn’s Helium Abundance from Cassini VIMS Stellar Occultations and CIRS Limb Temperature Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, Don; Gierasch, Peter J.; Conrath, Barney J.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Nicholson, Phillip D.; Hedman, Matthew M.

    2014-11-01

    We have used Saturn stellar occultations as observed by Cassini VIMS, in concert with Saturn limb temperature profiles derived from Cassini CIRS data to determine the Helium abundance in Saturn’s atmosphere near a few mbars. This quantity is long sought, as indication of the internal evolution that Saturn has undergone. Additionally, previous attempts to determine this quantity have produced inconsistent results ranging from He/H2=0.03±0.02 using Voyager IRIS and RSS (Conrath et al., 1984) to He/H2=0.13±0.02 using only Voyager IRIS (Conrath & Gautier, 2000) with a similar result being found by Orton and Ingersoll (1980) using Pioneer IRR and RSS (He/H2=0.11±0.04). These discordant results motivate us to try yet another approach to yield this quantity, in this case using the Cassini VIMS stellar occultations to yield a profile of atmospheric density, and nearly co-located Cassini CIRS limb profiles to yield atmospheric temperature. Combining the two results then yields the mean molecular weight and thus the He/H2 mixing ratio. We reported preliminary values from an occultation from the 151st Cassini orbit at DPS in 2011 (He/H2=0.14±0.05), but have since identified errors in that analysis that have caused us to revisit the problem. Additionally, that occultation occurred near the large Saturn northern hemisphere storm, with significant longitudinal temperature gradients present. The longitudinal separation between the CIRS and VIMS footprints could have skewed the results. In this report, we will discuss our latest results with the algorithm errors corrected, and using data from an occultation of Betelgeuse on the 161st Cassini orbit. These data have the best S/N of all stellar occultations caught by Cassini VIMS to date, and the combination of the VIMS/CIRS data doesn’t suffer from problems due to proximity to the storm and its associated spatial gradients in temperature.

  1. Continuing Improvement in the Planetary Ephemeris with VLBA Observations of Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dayton L.; Folkner, William M.; Jacobson, Robert A.; Jacobs, Christopher S.; Romney, Jonathan D.; Dhawan, Vivek; Fomalont, Edward B.

    2016-06-01

    During the past decade a continuing series of measurements of the barycentric position of the Saturn system in the inertial International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) has led to a significant improvement in our knowledge of Saturn's orbit. This in turn has improved the current accuracy and time range of the solar system ephemeris produced and maintained by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Our observing technique involves high-precision astrometry of the radio signal from Cassini with the NRAO Very Long Baseline Array, combined with solutions for the orbital motion of Cassini about the Saturn barycenter from Doppler tracking by the Deep Space Network. Our VLBA astrometry is done in a phase-referencing mode, providing nrad-level relative positions between Cassini and angularly nearby extragalactic radio sources. The positions of those reference radio sources are tied to the ICRF through dedicated VLBI observations by several groups around the world. We will present recent results from our astrometric observations of Cassini through early 2016. This program will continue until the end of the Cassini mission in 2017, although future improvement in Saturn's orbit will be more incremental because we have already covered more that a quarter of Saturn's orbital period. The Juno mission to Jupiter, which will orbit Jupiter for about 1.5 years starting in July 2016, will provide an excellent opportunity for us to apply the same VLBA astrometry technique to improve the orbit of Jupiter by a factor of several. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. This work made use of the Swinburne University of Technology software correlator, developed as part of the Australian Major National Research Facilities Program and operated under license. Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract

  2. Preliminary reentry safety assessment of the General Purpose Heat Source module for the Cassini mission: Aerospace Nuclear Safety Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, D. W.; Brenza, P. T.

    1993-04-01

    As asked by the U.S. Department of Energy/Office of Special Applications, and in support of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Cassini mission, The Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) has conducted preliminary one dimensional ablation and thermal analyses of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS). The predicted earth entry conditions provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for a Cassini Venus - Venus - Earth - Jupiter gravity assist (VVEJGA) trajectory were used as initial conditions. The results of this study, which constitute the initial reentry analysis assessment leading to the Cassini Updated Safety Analysis Report (USAR), are discussed in this document.

  3. Preliminary reentry safety assessment of the General Purpose Heat Source module for the Cassini mission: Aerospace Nuclear Safety Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conn, D.W.; Brenza, P.T.

    1993-04-01

    As asked by the U. S. Department of Energy/Office of Special Applications, and in support of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Cassini mission, The Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) has conducted preliminary one-dimensional ablation and thermal analyses of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS). The predicted earth entry conditions provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for a Cassini Venus-Venus-Earth-Jupiter Gravity Assist (VVEJGA) trajectory were used as initial conditions. The results of this study which constitute the initial reentry analysis assessment leading to the Cassini Updated Safety, Analysis Report (USAR) are discussed in this document.

  4. Design of the Precise Time Facility for Galileo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bedrick, S; Bauch, A; Moudrak, A; Schaefer, W

    2004-01-01

    .... In addition, Two-Way Satellite Time and Frequency Transfer (TWSTFT) and GNSS Common-View (CV) equipment is included, since GST will be steered to TAI by linking the PTF master clock to selected European National Metrological Institutes...

  5. Five Fabulous Flybys of the Small Inner Moons of Saturn by the Cassini Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, B. J.; Momary, T.; Clark, R. N.; Brown, R. H.; Filacchione, G.; Mosher, J. A.; Baines, K. H.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2017-12-01

    The Saturn system possesses a number of small unique moons, including the coorbitals Janus and Epimetheus; the ring moons Pan and Daphnis; and Prometheus, Pandora, and Atlas, which orbit near the edge of the main ring system. During the last phases of the Cassini mission, when the spacecraft executed close passes to the F-ring of Saturn, five "best-ever" flybys of these moons occurred. Pan, Daphnis, Atlas, Pandora, and Epimetheus were approached at distances ranging from 6000-40,000 km. The Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) captured data from the spectral range spanning 0.35-5.1 microns, as well as capturing solar phase angles not observed before. When combined with spectra from different regions of the moons obtained throughout the mission, the VIMS observations reveal substantial changes in the depth of water-ice absorption bands and color over the moons' surfaces. These measurements show the accretion of main-ring material onto the moons, with leading sides exhibiting stronger water-ice signatures in general. Atlas and Pandora have red visible spectra similar to the A-ring and unlike other icy moons, which are blue, further revealing accretion of main ring material onto the small inner moons. In general the visible spectra of the moons gets bluer with distance from Saturn until the surface of the moons is dominated by contamination from the E-ring, which is composed of fresh ice. There is a weak correlation between color and albedo, with lower-albedo moons being redder, suggesting the existence of a dark reddish contaminant from the main ring system. The solar phase curves of the moons are similar to those of larger icy moons (unfortunately no opposition surge data was gathered). 2017 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  6. Ultra High Resolution Imaging of Enceladus Tiger Stripe Thermal Emission with Cassini CIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John R.; Gorius, Nicolas; Howett, Carly; Verbiscer, Anne J.; Cassini CIRS Team

    2017-10-01

    In October 2015, Cassini flew within 48 km of Enceladus’ south pole. The spacecraft attitude was fixed during the flyby, but the roll angle of the spacecraft was chosen so that the remote sensing instrument fields of view passed over Damascus, Baghdad, and Cairo Sulci. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument obtained a single interferometer scan during the flyby, using a special mode, enabled by a flight software update, which bypassed numerical filters to improve the fidelity of the interferograms. This generated a total of 11 interferograms, at 5 contiguous spatial locations for each of the 7 - 9 micron (FP4) and 9 - 17 micron (FP3) focal planes, and a single larger field of view for the 17 - 500 micron focal plane (FP1). Strong spikes were seen in the interferograms when crossing each of the sulci, due to the rapid passage of warm material through the field of view. For FP3 and FP4, the temporal variations of the signals from the 5 contiguous detectors can be used to generated 5-pixel-wide images of the thermal emission, which show excellent agreement between the two focal planes. FP3 and FP4 spatial resolution, limited along track by the 5 msec time sampling of the interferogram, and across track by the CIRS field of view, is a remarkable 40 x 40 meters. At this resolution, the tiger stripe thermal emission shows a large amount of structure, including both continuous emission along the fractures, discrete hot spots less than 100 meters across, and extended emission with complex structure.

  7. An Objective Classification of Saturn Cloud Features from Cassini ISS Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Genio, Anthony D.; Barbara, John M.

    2016-01-01

    A k -means clustering algorithm is applied to Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem continuum and methane band images of Saturn's northern hemisphere to objectively classify regional albedo features and aid in their dynamical interpretation. The procedure is based on a technique applied previously to visible- infrared images of Earth. It provides a new perspective on giant planet cloud morphology and its relationship to the dynamics and a meteorological context for the analysis of other types of simultaneous Saturn observations. The method identifies 6 clusters that exhibit distinct morphology, vertical structure, and preferred latitudes of occurrence. These correspond to areas dominated by deep convective cells; low contrast areas, some including thinner and thicker clouds possibly associated with baroclinic instability; regions with possible isolated thin cirrus clouds; darker areas due to thinner low level clouds or clearer skies due to downwelling, or due to absorbing particles; and fields of relatively shallow cumulus clouds. The spatial associations among these cloud types suggest that dynamically, there are three distinct types of latitude bands on Saturn: deep convectively disturbed latitudes in cyclonic shear regions poleward of the eastward jets; convectively suppressed regions near and surrounding the westward jets; and baro-clinically unstable latitudes near eastward jet cores and in the anti-cyclonic regions equatorward of them. These are roughly analogous to some of the features of Earth's tropics, subtropics, and midlatitudes, respectively. This classification may be more useful for dynamics purposes than the traditional belt-zone partitioning. Temporal variations of feature contrast and cluster occurrence suggest that the upper tropospheric haze in the northern hemisphere may have thickened by 2014. The results suggest that routine use of clustering may be a worthwhile complement to many different types of planetary atmospheric data analysis.

  8. Analysis and Modeling of Jovian Radio Emissions Observed by Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menietti, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    Our studies of Jovian radio emission have resulted in the publication of five papers in refereed journals, with three additional papers in progress. The topics of these papers include the study of narrow-band kilometric radio emission; the apparent control of radio emission by Callisto; quasi-periodic radio emission; hectometric attenuation lanes and their relationship to Io volcanic activity; and modeling of HOM attenuation lanes using ray tracing. A further study of the control of radio emission by Jovian satellites is currently in progress. Abstracts of each of these papers are contained in the Appendix. A list of the publication titles are also included.

  9. Electrical properties of Titan's surface from Cassini RADAR scatterometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wye, Lauren C.; Zebker, Howard A.; Ostro, Steven J.; West, Richard D.; Gim, Yonggyu; Lorenz, Ralph D.; The Cassini Radar Team

    2007-06-01

    We report regional-scale low-resolution backscatter images of Titan's surface acquired by the Cassini RADAR scatterometer at a wavelength of 2.18-cm. We find that the average angular dependence of the backscatter from large regions and from specific surface features is consistent with a model composed of a quasi-specular Hagfors term plus a diffuse cosine component. A Gaussian quasi-specular term also fits the data, but less well than the Hagfors term. We derive values for the mean dielectric constant and root-mean-square (rms) slope of the surface from the quasi-specular term, which we ascribe to scattering from the surface interface only. The diffuse term accommodates contributions from volume scattering, multiple scattering, or wavelength-scale near-surface structure. The Hagfors model results imply a surface with regional mean dielectric constants between 1.9 and 3.6 and regional surface roughness that varies between 5.3° and 13.4° in rms-slope. Dielectric constants between 2 and 3 are expected for a surface composed of solid simple hydrocarbons, water ice, or a mixture of both. Smaller dielectric constants, between 1.6 and 1.9, are consistent with liquid hydrocarbons, while larger dielectric constants, near 4.5, may indicate the presence of water-ammonia ice [Lorenz, R.D., 1998. Icarus 136, 344-348] or organic heteropolymers [Thompson, W.R., Squyres, S.W., 1990. Icarus 86, 336-354]. We present backscatter images corrected for angular effects using the model residuals, which show strong features that correspond roughly to those in 0.94-μm ISS images. We model the localized backscatter from specific features to estimate dielectric constant and rms slope when the angular coverage is within the quasi-specular part of the backscatter curve. Only two apparent surface features are scanned with angular coverage sufficient for accurate modeling. Data from the bright albedo feature Quivira suggests a dielectric constant near 2.8 and rms slope near 10.1°. The dark

  10. Favelleran di te sempre le stelle Galileo, i primi Lincei e l'astronomia : Biblioteca dell'Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei e Corsiniana, Roma 6 aprile - 30 giugno 2009

    CERN Document Server

    Romanello, Alessandro; Trentini, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Catalogo dell'esposizione del prezioso patrimonio custodito nella Biblioteca dell'Accademia dei Lincei, costituito da documenti manoscritti riguardanti gli esordi e da libri stampati di Galileo e su Galileo.

  11. Observations of Jupiter's thermal emission made by the Infrared Telescope Facility and the Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    These observations of Jupiter's equator in thermal (heat) emission were made by NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility (top panel) within hours of the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) instrument image (middle inset) and the spectra (bottom). The 'JAILBAR' spectrum is the warmest of 4 spectra taken near the warm spot indicated by the orange dotted line on the left, and the 'HOTMAP' spectrum is taken from the brightest region indicated in the inset (corresponding to the bright feature at 0 degrees longitude in the top panel. The NASA IRTF map was made from images taken at a wavelength of 4.85 microns - a part of Jupiter's spectrum which is very transparent. The bright '5 micron hot spots' are areas allowing us to see to depths corresponding to 4 - 8 bars of pressure in Jupiter's atmosphere. The JAILBAR spectrum is consistent with Galileo probe abundances for water - only 10 - 20% of what was expected if Jupiter had formed with the same composition as the sun. These relatively dry conditions may exist only in these bright spots. The JAILBAR region is a 'warm spot' which is sufficiently clear of clouds that we can sense atmospheric depths far enough to detect temperatures as high as 255 Kelvins, or 0 degrees F. However, the HOTMAP spectrum, shows water abundances which are even ten times drier than this, with temperatures so clear that we can sense down to levels where the temperatures are 293 K, or 68 deg. F. This is the first detection of regions this hot, and is a result of the high spatial resolution of the NIMS instrument at Jupiter.The IRTF map was made by Brendan Fisher and Glenn Orton (JPL), Kartik Parija (Drake Univ.), Jose Luis Ortiz (JPL / Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia) and Milena Marinova (Caltech).The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.This image and other

  12. Design of a recovery scheme for the Galileo spacecraft in the event of nutation damper failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eke, Fidelis O.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and testing of remedial measures that can be taken to achieve reasonable nutation damping of the Galileo spacecraft in the event of failure of its boom damper in flight. One scheme exploits the effects of payload motion on the nutational stability of a spinning spacecraft. This scheme demands that the spacecraft motion compensation algorithm be enabled with the scan platform bore sight pointed in a well chosen direction to produce rapid damping of spacecraft nutation. A second method suggested for nutation damping is a thruster-based open loop control algorithm, utilizing a pair of thrusters as actuators.

  13. Flight of a UV spectrophotometer aboard Galileo 2, the NASA Convair 990 aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, B.; Hunderwadel, J. L.; Hanser, F. A.

    1976-01-01

    An ultraviolet interference-filter spectrophotometer (UVS) fabricated for aircraft-borne use on the DOT Climatic Impact Assessment Program (CIAP) has been successfully tested in a series of flights on the NASA Convair 990, Galileo II. UV flux data and the calculated total ozone above the flight path are reported for several of the flights. Good agreement is obtained with the total ozone as deducted by integration of an ozone sonde vertical profile obtained at Wallops Island, Virginia near the time of a CV-990 underpass. Possible advantages of use of the UVS in the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program are discussed.

  14. Wave Normal and Poynting Vector Calculations using the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospodarsky, G. B.; Averkamp, T. F.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Dougherty, M.; Inan, Umran; Wood, Troy

    2001-01-01

    Wave normal and Poynting vector measurements from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument (RPWS) are used to examine the propagation characteristics of various plasma waves during the Earth flyby on August 18, 1999. Using the five-channel waveform receiver (WFR), the wave normal vector is determined using the Means method for a lightning-induced whistler, equatorial chorus, and a series of low-frequency emissions observed while Cassini was in the magnetosheath. The Poynting vector for these emissions is also calculated from the five components measured by the WFR. The propagation characteristics of the lightning-induced whistler were found to be consistent with the whistler wave mode of propagation, with propagation antiparallel to the magnetic field (southward) at Cassini. The sferic associated with this whistler was observed by both Cassini and the Stanford VLF group at the Palmer Station in Antarctica. Analysis of the arrival direction of the sferic at the Palmer Station suggests that the lightning stroke is in the same sector as Cassini. Chorus was observed very close (within a few degrees) to the magnetic equator during the flyby. The chorus was found to propagate primarily away from the magnetic equator and was observed to change direction as Cassini crossed the magnetic equator. This suggests that the source region of the chorus is very near the magnetic equator. The low-frequency emission in the magnetosheath has many of the characteristics of lion roars. The average value of the angle between the wave normal vector and the local magnetic field was found to be 16 degrees, and the emissions ranged in frequency from 0. 19 to 0.75 f(sub ce), where f(sub ce) is the electron cyclotron frequency. The wave normal vectors of these waves were primarily in one direction for each individual burst (either parallel or antiparallel to the local field) but varied in direction throughout the magnetosheath. This suggests that the sources of the emissions are far from

  15. Space and motion in nature and Scripture: Galileo, Descartes, Newton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiak, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    In the Scholium to the Definitions in Principia mathematica, Newton departs from his main task of discussing space, time and motion by suddenly mentioning the proper method for interpreting Scripture. This is surprising, and it has long been ignored by scholars. In this paper, I argue that the Scripture passage in the Scholium is actually far from incidental: it reflects Newton's substantive concern, one evident in correspondence and manuscripts from the 1680s, that any general understanding of space, time and motion must enable readers to recognize the veracity of Biblical claims about natural phenomena, including the motion of the earth. This substantive concern sheds new light on an aspect of Newton's project in the Scholium. It also underscores Newton's originality in dealing with the famous problem of reconciling theological and philosophical conceptions of nature in the seventeenth century. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. On the Applicability of Galileo FOC Satellites with Incorrect Highly Eccentric Orbits: An Evaluation of Instantaneous Medium-Range Positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Paziewski

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the potential contribution of the first pair of Galileo FOC satellites sent into incorrect highly eccentric orbits for geodetic and surveying applications. We began with an analysis of the carrier to noise density ratio and the stochastic properties of GNSS measurements. The investigations revealed that the signal power of E14 & E18 satellites is higher than for regular Galileo satellites, what is related to their lower altitude over the experiment area. With regard to the noise of the observables, there are no significant differences between all Galileo satellites. Furthermore, the study confirmed that the precision of Galileo data is higher than that of GPS, especially in the case of code measurements. Next analysis considered selected domains of precise instantaneous medium-range positioning: ambiguity resolution and coordinate accuracy as well as observable residuals. On the basis of test solutions, with and without E14 & E18 data, we found that these satellites did not noticeably influence the ambiguity resolution process. The discrepancy in ambiguity success rate between test solutions did not exceed 2%. The differences between standard deviations of the fixed coordinates did not exceed 1 mm for horizontal components. The standard deviation of the L1/E1 phase residuals, corresponding to regular GPS and Galileo, and E14 & E18 satellite signals, was at a comparable level, in the range of 6.5–8.7 mm. The study revealed that the Galileo satellites with incorrect orbits were fully usable in most geodetic, surveying and many other post-processed applications and may be beneficial especially for positioning during obstructed visibility of satellites. This claim holds true when providing precise ephemeris of satellites.

  17. Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer Modeling of Lightning Observed in Galileo Images of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyudine, U. A.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2002-01-01

    We study lightning on Jupiter and the clouds illuminated by the lightning using images taken by the Galileo orbiter. The Galileo images have a resolution of 25 km/pixel and axe able to resolve the shape of the single lightning spots in the images, which have full widths at half the maximum intensity in the range of 90-160 km. We compare the measured lightning flash images with simulated images produced by our ED Monte Carlo light-scattering model. The model calculates Monte Carlo scattering of photons in a ED opacity distribution. During each scattering event, light is partially absorbed. The new direction of the photon after scattering is chosen according to a Henyey-Greenstein phase function. An image from each direction is produced by accumulating photons emerging from the cloud in a small range (bins) of emission angles. Lightning bolts are modeled either as points or vertical lines. Our results suggest that some of the observed scattering patterns axe produced in a 3-D cloud rather than in a plane-parallel cloud layer. Lightning is estimated to occur at least as deep as the bottom of the expected water cloud. For the six cases studied, we find that the clouds above the lightning are optically thick (tau > 5). Jovian flashes are more regular and circular than the largest terrestrial flashes observed from space. On Jupiter there is nothing equivalent to the 30-40-km horizontal flashes which axe seen on Earth.

  18. Comparison of Ultra-Rapid Orbit Prediction Strategies for GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Geng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Currently, ultra-rapid orbits play an important role in the high-speed development of global navigation satellite system (GNSS real-time applications. This contribution focuses on the impact of the fitting arc length of observed orbits and solar radiation pressure (SRP on the orbit prediction performance for GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou. One full year’s precise ephemerides during 2015 were used as fitted observed orbits and then as references to be compared with predicted orbits, together with known earth rotation parameters. The full nine-parameter Empirical Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE Orbit Model (ECOM and its reduced version were chosen in our study. The arc lengths of observed fitted orbits that showed the smallest weighted root mean squares (WRMSs and medians of the orbit differences after a Helmert transformation fell between 40 and 45 h for GPS and GLONASS and between 42 and 48 h for Galileo, while the WRMS values and medians become flat after a 42 h arc length for BeiDou. The stability of the Helmert transformation and SRP parameters also confirmed the similar optimal arc lengths. The range around 42–45 h is suggested to be the optimal arc length interval of the fitted observed orbits for the multi-GNSS joint solution of ultra-rapid orbits.

  19. Processes of Equatorial Thermal Structure: An Analysis of Galileo Temperature Profile with 3-D Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, T.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Bougher, S. W.; Gladstone, G. R.

    2005-01-01

    The Jupiter Thermosphere General Circulation Model (JTGCM) calculates the global dynamical structure of Jupiter's thermosphere self-consistently with its global thermal structure and composition. The main heat source that drives the thermospheric flow is high-latitude Joule heating. A secondary source of heating is the auroral process of particle precipitation. Global simulations of Jovian thermospheric dynamics indicate strong neutral outflows from the auroral ovals with velocities up to approximately 2 kilometers per second and subsequent convergence and downwelling at the Jovian equator. Such circulation is shown to be an important process for transporting significant amounts of auroral energy to equatorial latitudes and for regulating the global heat budget in a manner consistent with the high thermospheric temperatures observed by the Galileo probe. Adiabatic compression of the neutral atmosphere resulting from downward motion is an important source of equatorial heating (less than 0.06 microbar). The adiabatic heating continues to dominate between 0.06 and 0.2 microbar, but with an addition of comparable heating due to horizontal advection induced by the meridional flow. Thermal conduction plays an important role in transporting heat down to lower altitudes (greater than 0.2microbar) where it is balanced by the cooling associated with the wind transport processes. Interestingly, we find that radiative cooling caused by H3(+), CH4, and C2H2 emissions does not play a significant role in interpreting the Galileo temperature profile.

  20. Comparison of Ultra-Rapid Orbit Prediction Strategies for GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Tao; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Wei; Xie, Xin

    2018-02-06

    Currently, ultra-rapid orbits play an important role in the high-speed development of global navigation satellite system (GNSS) real-time applications. This contribution focuses on the impact of the fitting arc length of observed orbits and solar radiation pressure (SRP) on the orbit prediction performance for GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou. One full year's precise ephemerides during 2015 were used as fitted observed orbits and then as references to be compared with predicted orbits, together with known earth rotation parameters. The full nine-parameter Empirical Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) Orbit Model (ECOM) and its reduced version were chosen in our study. The arc lengths of observed fitted orbits that showed the smallest weighted root mean squares (WRMSs) and medians of the orbit differences after a Helmert transformation fell between 40 and 45 h for GPS and GLONASS and between 42 and 48 h for Galileo, while the WRMS values and medians become flat after a 42 h arc length for BeiDou. The stability of the Helmert transformation and SRP parameters also confirmed the similar optimal arc lengths. The range around 42-45 h is suggested to be the optimal arc length interval of the fitted observed orbits for the multi-GNSS joint solution of ultra-rapid orbits.

  1. Comparison of Ultra-Rapid Orbit Prediction Strategies for GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Wei; Xie, Xin

    2018-01-01

    Currently, ultra-rapid orbits play an important role in the high-speed development of global navigation satellite system (GNSS) real-time applications. This contribution focuses on the impact of the fitting arc length of observed orbits and solar radiation pressure (SRP) on the orbit prediction performance for GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou. One full year’s precise ephemerides during 2015 were used as fitted observed orbits and then as references to be compared with predicted orbits, together with known earth rotation parameters. The full nine-parameter Empirical Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) Orbit Model (ECOM) and its reduced version were chosen in our study. The arc lengths of observed fitted orbits that showed the smallest weighted root mean squares (WRMSs) and medians of the orbit differences after a Helmert transformation fell between 40 and 45 h for GPS and GLONASS and between 42 and 48 h for Galileo, while the WRMS values and medians become flat after a 42 h arc length for BeiDou. The stability of the Helmert transformation and SRP parameters also confirmed the similar optimal arc lengths. The range around 42–45 h is suggested to be the optimal arc length interval of the fitted observed orbits for the multi-GNSS joint solution of ultra-rapid orbits. PMID:29415467

  2. Cassini Returns to Saturn's Poles: Seasonal Change in the Polar Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Orton, G. S.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Sinclair, J. A.; Hesman, B. E.; Hurley, J.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Simon-Miller, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    High inclination orbits during Cassini's solstice mission (2012) are providing us with our first observations of Saturn's high latitudes since the prime mission (2007). Since that time, the northern spring pole has emerged into sunlight and the southern autumn pole has disappeared into winter darkness, allowing us to study the seasonal changes occurring within the polar vortices in response to these dramatic insolation changes. Observations from the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer] have revealed (i) the continued presence of small, cyclonic polar hotspots at both spring and autumn poles; and (ii) the emergence of an infrared-bright polar vortex at the north pole, consistent with the historical record of Saturn observations from the 1980s (previous northern spring).

  3. Radio and Plasma Wave Observations at Saturn from Cassini's Approach and First Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Haspodarsky, G. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Averkamp, T. F.; Cecconi, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2005-01-01

    We report data from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument during the approach and first orbit at Saturn. During the approach, radio emissions from Saturn showed that the radio rotation period is now 10 hours 45 minutes 45 k 36 seconds, about 6 minutes longer than measured by Voyager in 1980 to 1981. In addition, many intense impulsive radio signals were detected from Saturn lightning during the approach and first orbit. Some of these have been linked to storm systems observed by the Cassini imaging instrument. Within the magnetosphere, whistler-mode auroral hiss emissions were observed near the rings, suggesting that a strong electrodynamic interaction is occurring in or near the rings.

  4. Fast forward modeling of Titan's infrared spectra to invert VIMS/Cassini hyperspectral images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, S.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Rannou, P.; Combe, J.-P.; Corre, L.L.; Tobie, G.; Barnes, J.W.; Sotin, Christophe; Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    The surface of Titan, the largest icy moon of Saturn, is veiled by a very thick and hazy atmosphere. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft, in orbit around Saturn since July 2004, conduct an intensive survey of Titan with the objective to understand the complex nature of the atmosphere and surface of the mysterious moon and the way they interact. Accurate radiative transfer modeling is necessary to analyze Titan's infrared spectra, but are often very computer resources demanding. As Cassini has gathered hitherto millions of spectra of Titan and will still observe it until at least 2010, we report here on the development of a new rapid, simple and versatile radiative transfer model specially designed to invert VIMS datacubes. ?? 2009 IEEE.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Saturnian satellites Cassini ISS astrometry (Cooper+, 2018)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, N. J.; Lainey, V.; Meunier, L-E.; Murray, C. D.; Zhang, Q-F; Baillie, K.; Evans, M. W.; Thuillot, W.; Vienne, A.

    2017-11-01

    Table1.dat contains astrometric observations of the Saturnian satellites Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Iapetus, Hyperion, Pandora, Janus and Helene,from Cassini ISS NAC images. The camera's field of view is ~0.35-degree with a resolution of ~1.2354-arcsec/pixel. Image size is 1024x1024 pixel. Positions are provided in both right ascension and declination, and as image pixel locations. The orientation of the camera's pointing vector is also provided. Positions are given in the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF), centered on the Cassini spacecraft. Measured reference star positions used to estimate the camera pointing correction are provided separately in table5.dat. The origin of the line, sample coordinate system is at the top left of the image with line, y, increasing downward and sample, x, to the right. (2 data files).

  6. Atmospheric drag model for Cassini orbit determination during low altitude Titan flybys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, F. J.; Antreasian, P. G.; Bordi, J. J.; Criddle, K. E.; Ionasescu, R.; Jacobson, R. A.; Mackenzie, R. A.; Parcher, D. W.; Stauch, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    On April 16, 2005, the Cassini spacecraft performed its lowest altitude flyby of Titan to date, the Titan-5 flyby, flying 1027 km above the surface of Titan. This document discusses the development of a Titan atmospheric drag model for the purpose of the orbit determination of Cassini. Results will be presented for the Titan A flyby, the Titan-5 flyby as well as the most recent low altitude Titan flyby, Titan-7. Different solutions will be compared against OD performance in terms of the flyby B-plane parameters, spacecraft thrusting activity and drag estimates. These low altitude Titan flybys were an excellent opportunity to observe the effect of Titan's atmospheric drag on the orbit determination solution and results show that the drag was successfully modeled to provide accurate flyby solutions.

  7. Skirting Saturn's Rings and Skimming Its Cloud Tops: Planning Cassini's End of Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor-Chapman, Emily; Magee, Kari; Brooks, Shawn; Edgington, Scott; Heventhal, William; Sturm, Erick

    2014-01-01

    In October 2010, the Cassini spacecraft embarked on the seven-year Solstice Mission. The mission will culminate with a spectacular series of orbits that bring Cassini between Saturn's innermost ring, the D ring, and the cloud tops of the planet. The spacecraft will make its closest passages ever to the planet allowing for unprecedented science to be collected on Saturn and its rings. These final orbits will expose the spacecraft to new environments, which presents a number of challenges to planning the final mission phase. While these challenges will require adaptations to planning processes and operations, they are not insurmountable. This paper describes the challenges identified and the steps taken to mitigate them to enable collection of unique Saturn system science.

  8. Statistics of Langmuir wave amplitudes observed inside Saturn's foreshock by the Cassini spacecraft

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Píša, David; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kurth, W. S.; Santolík, Ondřej; Souček, Jan; Gurnett, D. A.; Masters, A.; Hill, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 4 (2015), s. 2531-2542 ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2279; GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/12/2394 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Langmuir waves * foreshock * Saturn * Cassini Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.318, year: 2015 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014JA020560/abstract

  9. Cassini RTG program. Monthly technical progress report, September 29, 1997--October 26, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-24

    This report describes work on the contract to provide Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) and Ancillary Activities in support of the Cassini Spacecraft launch. The craft was successfully launched on October 15, 1997. Early telemetry results show excellent performance from the three launched RTG modules. A major share of this report describes safety analyses for contamination radii in the event of launch failures and generator destruction, as well as launch related activities.

  10. Spatial distribution of Langmuir waves observed upstream of Saturn's bow shock by Cassini

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Píša, David; Santolík, Ondřej; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Souček, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 8 (2016), s. 7771-7784 ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ16-16050Y; GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/12/2394 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Langmuir waves * Cassini * foreshock * Saturn Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.733, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA022912/abstract

  11. Dust Observation by the Radio and Plasma Wave Instrument During Cassini's Grand Finale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, S.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Morooka, M. W.; Wahlund, J. E.; Hsu, S.; Seiss, M.; Srama, R.

    2017-12-01

    Dust particles in the Saturnian system can be detected by the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument onboard Cassini via antenna voltage signals induced by dust impacts. Before the end of the mission, Cassini shifted to high inclination orbits with periapsis in the gaps between the F and G rings for 20 orbits (F ring orbits) and between the D ring and atmosphere for 22 orbits (proximal orbits). These regions are populated with dust particles of previously unknown amounts and size distributions. In-situ measurements by RPWS helped quantify the hazards posed to the spacecraft and instruments onboard. These measurements can be made regardless of the spacecraft attitude, for example, during the first proximal orbit when the high gain antenna was pointed in the ram direction. During the F ring orbits, RPWS measurements have been shown to be consistent with the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA), the dedicated dust instrument onboard Cassini. The proximal orbit data revealed a surprisingly low density of dust larger than 0.1 micron and a rich variety of plasma waves in the planet's upper ionosphere. Close examination of the RPWS Wideband Receiver data indicates that the decay times of the dust impact signals decrease with increasing ionosphere plasma density, which showed large variations from orbit to orbit.

  12. Energy deposition and ion production from thermal oxygen ion precipitation during Cassini's T57 flyby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Darci; Smith, Michael; Jimson, Theodore; Higgins, Alex

    2018-05-01

    Cassini's Radio Science Investigation (RSS) and Langmuir Probe observed abnormally high electron densities in Titan's ionosphere during Cassini's T57 flyby. We have developed a three-dimensional model to investigate how the precipitation of thermal magnetospheric O+ may have contributed to enhanced ion production in Titan's ionosphere. The three-dimensional model builds on previous work because it calculates both the flux of oxygen through Titan's exobase and the energy deposition and ion production rates in Titan's atmosphere. We find that energy deposition rates and ion production rates due to thermal O+ precipitation have a similar magnitude to the rates from magnetospheric electron precipitation and that the simulated ionization rates are sufficient to explain the abnormally high electron densities observed by RSS and Cassini's Langmuir Probe. Globally, thermal O+ deposits less energy in Titan's atmosphere than solar EUV, suggesting it has a smaller impact on the thermal structure of Titan's neutral atmosphere. However, our results indicate that thermal O+ precipitation can have a significant impact on Titan's ionosphere.

  13. Implications on the composition of Titan's mid-latitude surface region from Cassini/VIMS data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, R. M. C.; Solomonidou, A.; Coustenis, A.; Malaska, M.; Rodriguez, S.; Drossart, P.; Elachi, C.; Schmitt, B.; Philippe, S.; Janssen, M. A.; Hirtzig, M.; Wall, S. D.; Lawrence, K. J.; Altobelli, N.; Bratsolis, E.; Radebaugh, J.; Stephan, K.; Brown, R. C.; Le Gall, A. A.; Le Mouelic, S.; Bloom, A. A.; Villanueva, E.; Witasse, O. G.; Matsoukas, C.; Schoenfeld, A.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the surface of Titan using spectro-imaging near-infrared data from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). We apply a radiative transfer code to first determine the contributions of atmospheric haze to the Titan spectrum and then derive the surface albedo (Solomonidou et al. 2014; 2016). We focus here on the geological major units identified in Lopes et al. (2010, 2016), Malaska et al. (2016) and Radebaugh et al. (2016) from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data, including mountains, different types of plains, labyrinths, impact craters, dune fields, and alluvial fans. We find that all regions classified as being the same geomorphological unit in SAR exhibit a coherent spectral response after the VIMS data analysis, thus suggesting a good correlation in the classification between SAR and VIMS. The Huygens landing site appears to be compositionally similar to one type of plains unit (variable plains), suggesting similar plain formation mechanisms. We have sub-categorized the VIMS data into three albedo categories (high, medium, low). By matching the extracted albedos with candidate materials for Titan's surface (GhoSST database), we find that all regions of interest fall into one of three main types of major candidate constituents: water ice, or tholin-like material, or an unknown, very dark material. This suggests that Titan's surface is possibly dominated by tholin-like material and a very dark unknown (most likely organic) material, suggesting that most of the surface is covered by atmospheric/organic deposits. Water-ice is also present at a number of regions as major constituent at latitudes higher than 30ºN and lower than 30ºS. The surface albedo differences and similarities among the various geomorphological units constrain the implications for the geological processes that govern Titan's surface and interior (e.g. aeolian, fluvial, sedimentary, lacustrine, cryovolcanic, tectonic). References: Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: Icarus

  14. Cassini limb images of hazes in Saturn’s northern hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin M.; Garcia, Daniel; del Rio-Gaztelurrutia, Teresa; Garcia-Muñoz, Antonio; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Hueso, Ricardo

    2017-10-01

    We have used high resolution Cassini ISS images of the limb of Saturn to study the vertical distribution, altitude location, thickness and optical properties of the haze layers in the northern hemisphere (1°S to 82°N) in 2013 and 2015. The images cover an ample spectral range from the ultraviolet (UV1 filter, 264 nm) to the near infrared (CB3 filter, 938 nm) including methane absorption bands at 619 nm, 724 nm and 890 nm. Spatial resolution ranges from 1.6 to 13 km/pixel depending on wavelength and latitude. Three latitude bands were selected for the analysis according to the background zonal wind profile measured at cloud level and known dynamical activity: (a) North Polar Region encompassing the Hexagon latitude (74°N) (b) Mid-latitudes (45°N-52°N), and (3) Equator (1°N-3°S). The best defined haze structures and most extended haze layers were found at the latitude of the Hexagon. Up to 6-8 haze layers extending up to 400 km in altitude above clouds (in the pressure range from about 0.7 bar to 0.1 mbar) were detected. The vertical thickness of the layers is in the range 3-15 km compared to the scale height which is about 40 km. The spectral reflectivity is relatively uniform between the layers in the blue and red continuum wavelengths coming from the backward light scattering from the haze particles, while the brightness in the methane bands (relative to red continuum) and in the ultraviolet shows the effects of methane absorption and Rayleigh scattering by the gas, respectively. At mid-latitudes 3-4 haze layers are found spanning up to altitudes 200 km above the clouds. At the Equator 5-6 layers are found extending up to altitudes 250 km above the clouds (up to 2 mbar in pressure level) in a region of great dynamical interest because of the particular structure of the zonal winds and their known oscillations. We comment on the possible nature of the haze layers on the basis of condensing species and photochemistry.

  15. Geology of the Selk crater region on Titan from Cassini VIMS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderblom, J.M.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, L.A.; Barnes, J.W.; Jaumann, R.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Sotin, Christophe; Stephan, K.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of Titan obtained by the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) have revealed Selk crater, a geologically young, bright-rimmed, impact crater located ???800. km north-northwest of the Huygens landing site. The crater rim-crest diameter is ???90. km; its floor diameter is ???60. km. A central pit/peak, 20-30. km in diameter, is seen; the ratio of the size of this feature to the crater diameter is consistent with similarly sized craters on Ganymede and Callisto, all of which are dome craters. The VIMS data, unfortunately, are not of sufficient resolution to detect such a dome. The inner rim of Selk crater is fluted, probably by eolian erosion, while the outer flank and presumed ejecta blanket appear dissected by drainages (particularly to the east), likely the result of fluvial erosion. Terracing is observed on the northern and western walls of Selk crater within a 10-15. km wide terrace zone identified in VIMS data; the terrace zone is bright in SAR data, consistent with it being a rough surface. The terrace zone is slightly wider than those observed on Ganymede and Callisto and may reflect differences in thermal structure and/or composition of the lithosphere. The polygonal appearance of the crater likely results from two preexisting planes of weakness (oriented at azimuths of 21?? and 122?? east of north). A unit of generally bright terrain that exhibits similar infrared-color variation and contrast to Selk crater extends east-southeast from the crater several hundred kilometers. We informally refer to this terrain as the Selk "bench." Both Selk and the bench are surrounded by the infrared-dark Belet dune field. Hypotheses for the genesis of the optically bright terrain of the bench include: wind shadowing in the lee of Selk crater preventing the encroachment of dunes, impact-induced cryovolcanism, flow of a fluidized-ejecta blanket (similar to the bright crater outflows observed on Venus), and erosion of a streamlined upland formed

  16. The Caviar software package for the astrometric reduction of Cassini ISS images: description and examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, N. J.; Lainey, V.; Meunier, L.-E.; Murray, C. D.; Zhang, Q.-F.; Baillie, K.; Evans, M. W.; Thuillot, W.; Vienne, A.

    2018-02-01

    Aims: Caviar is a software package designed for the astrometric measurement of natural satellite positions in images taken using the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) of the Cassini spacecraft. Aspects of the structure, functionality, and use of the software are described, and examples are provided. The integrity of the software is demonstrated by generating new measurements of the positions of selected major satellites of Saturn, 2013-2016, along with their observed minus computed (O-C) residuals relative to published ephemerides. Methods: Satellite positions were estimated by fitting a model to the imaged limbs of the target satellites. Corrections to the nominal spacecraft pointing were computed using background star positions based on the UCAC5 and Tycho2 star catalogues. UCAC5 is currently used in preference to Gaia-DR1 because of the availability of proper motion information in UCAC5. Results: The Caviar package is available for free download. A total of 256 new astrometric observations of the Saturnian moons Mimas (44), Tethys (58), Dione (55), Rhea (33), Iapetus (63), and Hyperion (3) have been made, in addition to opportunistic detections of Pandora (20), Enceladus (4), Janus (2), and Helene (5), giving an overall total of 287 new detections. Mean observed-minus-computed residuals for the main moons relative to the JPL SAT375 ephemeris were - 0.66 ± 1.30 pixels in the line direction and 0.05 ± 1.47 pixels in the sample direction. Mean residuals relative to the IMCCE NOE-6-2015-MAIN-coorb2 ephemeris were -0.34 ± 0.91 pixels in the line direction and 0.15 ± 1.65 pixels in the sample direction. The reduced astrometric data are provided in the form of satellite positions for each image. The reference star positions are included in order to allow reprocessing at some later date using improved star catalogues, such as later releases of Gaia, without the need to re-estimate the imaged star positions. The Caviar software is available for free download from: ftp

  17. Studying Titan's surface photometry in the 5 microns atmospheric window with the Cassini/VIMS instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, T.; Altobelli, N.; Sotin, C.; Le Mouelic, S.; Rodriguez, S.; Philippe, S.; Brown, R. H.; Barnes, J. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Baines, K. H.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the influence of methane gas and a thick aerosols haze in the atmosphere, Titan's surface is only visible in 7 spectral atmospheric windows centered at 0.93, 1.08, 1.27, 1.59, 2.01, 2.7-2.8 and 5 microns with the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). The 5 microns atmospheric window constitutes the only one being almost insensitive to the haze scattering and which presents only a reduced atmospheric absorption contribution to the signal recorded by the instrument. Despite these advantages leading to the almost direct view of the surface, the 5 microns window is also the noisiest spectral window of the entire VIMS spectrum (an effect highly dependent on the time exposure used for the observations), and it is not totally free from atmospheric contributions, enough to keep "artefacts" in mosaics of several thousands of cubes due to atmospheric and surface photometric effects amplified by the very heterogeneous viewing conditions between each Titan flyby. At first order, a lambertian surface photometry at 5 microns has been used as an initial parameter in order to estimate atmospheric opacity and surface photometry in all VIMS atmospheric windows and to determine the albedo of the surface, yet unknown, both using radiative transfer codes on single cubes or empirical techniques on global hyperspectral mosaics. Other studies suggested that Titan's surface photometry would not be uniquely lambertian but would also contain anisotropic lunar-like contributions. In the present work, we aim at constraining accurately the surface photometry of Titan and residual atmospheric absorption effects in this 5 microns window using a comprehensive study of relevant sites located at various latitudes. Those include bright and dark (dunes) terrains, 5-microns bright terrains (Hotei Regio and Tui Regio), the Huygens Landing Site and high latitudes polar lakes and seas. The VIMS 2004 to 2014 database, composed of more than 40,000 hyperspectral cubes acquired on

  18. Outreach for Cassini Huyghens mission and future Saturn and Titan exploration: From the Antikythera Mechanism to the TSSM mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussas, Xenophon; Bampasidis, Georgios; Coustenis, Athena; Solomonidou, Anezina

    2010-05-01

    These days Outreach is an activity tightly related to success in science. The public with its great interest to space and astronomy in general, the solar system exploration and Saturn and Titan in particular, loves the scientific outcome of Cassini and Huygens. This love of the public gives a lot, as its known interest to space, persuades politicians and policy makers to support space and future Saturn and Titan explorations. We use the scientific results from Cassini and Huyghens together with a mosaic from ancient science concerning the history of solar system exploration, such as the oldest known complex astronomical device, the Antikyhtera Mechanism, in outreach activities to ensure future missions and continuous support to present ones. A future mission to the Saturnian System focusing on exotic Titan will broaden people's interest not only to Physics and Astronomy, but to Mechanics, Technology and even Philosophy as well, since, obviously, the roots of the vast contribution of Space Science and Astronomy to the contemporary society can be traced back to the first astronomers of Antiquity. As an example we use the Antikythera Mechanism, a favourite astronomical device for the public, which is the first geared astronomical device ever, constructed that combines the spirit of the ancient Astronomy and scientific accuracy. It is common belief that Astronomy and Astrophysics is a perfect tool to easily involve people in Science, as the public is always interested in space subjects, captivated by the beauty and the mystery of the Universe. Years after the successful entry, descent and landing of the Huygens probe on Titan's surface, the outstanding achievements of the Cassini-Huygens mission enhance the outreach potential of Space Science. Titan is an earth-like world, embedded in a dense nitrogen atmospheric envelop and a surface carved by rivers, mountains, dunes and lakes, its exploration will certainly empower the perspective of the society for space activities

  19. Liquid Elevations and Topographic Constraints of Titan's Lacustrine Basins at the end of Cassini: Hydrology and Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A. G., Jr.; Birch, S.; Corlies, P.; Poggiali, V.; Dietrich, W. E.; Howard, A. D.; Kirk, R. L.; Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Malaska, M.; Moore, J. M.; Mitchell, K. L.

    2017-12-01

    The topographic information provided by Cassini RADAR Altimetry, SAR Topography, and stereo photogrammetry has opened new doors for Titan research by allowing the quantitative analysis of morphologic form as well as relative measurements of liquid elevation. Herein, we investigate the relative elevation of liquid bodies and the three-dimensional morphology of Titan's lacustrine basins in order to provide observables that will constrain connectivity and plausible formation mechanisms. Using delay-Dopler processed altimetry measurements we show that the liquid elevations of Titan's Mare are the same to within measurement error, consistent with an equipotential surface. The liquid elevation of several smaller lakes, however, are found to be several hundreds above this sea level, suggesting that they exist in isolated or perched basins. Within a given topographic basin, the floor elevations of empty lakes are typically higher than the local liquid elevation, suggesting either the presence of an impermeable boundary or local subsurface connectivity. Basins with floors closer to the local phreatic surface appear brighter to both nadir and off-nadir microwave observations than those that are more elevated, indicating a potential change in composition. The majority of Titan's lakes reside in sharp edged depressions whose planform curvature suggests expansion through uniform scarp retreat. Many, but not all, of these basins exhibit flat floors and hundred-meter scale steep-sided raised rims that present a challenge to formation models. Raised rims are found on 57% of all the lakes in our study, including for all lakes >500 km2 in area. With super-resolution altimetry profiles, the raised rims can also be correlated directly with SAR image data, allowing for the identification of raised rims on other lakes, even when they lack topographic data coverage.. The basins are often topographically closed with no evidence for inflow or flow channels at the 300 m resolution of

  20. The Tuscan Artist - Images of Galileo in Milton’s works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toscano Fabio

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available In The Areopagitica, his most important work of prose, John Milton mentions Galileo as the illustrious martyr who fought for the freedom of thought. The name of the great scientist is repeated several times in the English poet’s epic masterpiece: Paradise Lost. In three different passages of the poem, Milton in fact celebrates the “Tuscan Artist” and his crucial achievements in astronomy. Nevertheless, in a subsequent passage, the poet addresses the Copernican issue without openly defending the heliocentric theory confirmed by Galileo’s discoveries. In fact, he neither embraces the Copernican system nor the Ptolemaic one, but instead compares them, following a dialectic method where one cannot fail to notice an echo of Galileo’s Dialogue Concerning the two Chief World Systems. Milton’s literary work presents images of astronomy at that time, thus offering a valuable historical example of scientific communication through art.

  1. Lessons learned from the Galileo and Ulysses flight safety review experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Gary L.

    1998-01-01

    In preparation for the launches of the Galileo and Ulysses spacecraft, a very comprehensive aerospace nuclear safety program and flight safety review were conducted. A review of this work has highlighted a number of important lessons which should be considered in the safety analysis and review of future space nuclear systems. These lessons have been grouped into six general categories: (1) establishment of the purpose, objectives and scope of the safety process; (2) establishment of charters defining the roles of the various participants; (3) provision of adequate resources; (4) provision of timely peer-reviewed information to support the safety program; (5) establishment of general ground rules for the safety review; and (6) agreement on the kinds of information to be provided from the safety review process

  2. Observing Mercury: from Galileo to the stereo camera on the BepiColombo mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonese, Gabriele; Da Deppo, Vania; Naletto, Giampiero; Martellato, Elena; Debei, Stefano; Barbieri, Cesare; Bettanini, Carlo; Capria, Maria T.; Massironi, Matteo; Zaccariotto, Mirko

    2010-01-01

    After having observed the planets from his house in Padova using his telescope, in January 1611 Galileo wrote to Giuliano de Medici that Venus is moving around the Sun as Mercury. Forty years ago, Giuseppe Colombo, professor of Celestial Mechanics in Padova, made a decisive step to clarify the rotational period of Mercury. Today, scientists and engineers of the Astronomical Observatory of Padova and of the University of Padova, reunited in the Center for Space Studies and Activities (CISAS) named after Giuseppe Colombo, are busy to realize a stereo camera (STC) that will be on board the European (ESA) and Japanese (JAXA) space mission BepiColombo, devoted to the observation and exploration of the innermost planet. This paper will describe the stereo camera, which is one of the channels of the SIMBIOSYS instrument, aiming to produce the global mapping of the surface with 3D images.

  3. Far infrared filters for the Galileo-Jupiter and other missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, J. S.; Hunneman, R.; Whatley, A.

    1981-01-01

    Progress in the development of FIR multilayer interference filters for the net flux radiometer and photopolarizing radiometer to be carried on board the Galileo mission to Jupiter is reported. The multilayer interference technique has been extended to the region above 40 microns by the use of PbTe/II-VI materials in hard-coated combination, with the thickest layers composed of CdSe QWOT at 74 microns and PbTe QWOT. Improvements have also been obtained in filters below 20 microns on the basis of the Chebyshev stack design. A composite filter cutting on steeply at 40 microns has been designed which employs a thin crystal quartz substrate, shorter wavelength absorption in ZnS and As2S3 thin films, and supplementary multilayer interference. Finally, absorptive filters have been developed based on II-VI compounds in multilayer combination with KRS-5 (or 6) on a KRS-5 (or 6) substrate

  4. Ganymede’s stratigraphy and crater distributions in Voyager and Galileo SSI images: results from the anti-jovian hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Roland Josef; Schmedemann, Nico; Stephan, Katrin; Werner, Stephanie; Ivanov, Boris A.; Roatsch, Thomas; Jaumann, Ralf; Palumbo, Pasquale

    2017-10-01

    Crater size distributions are a valuable tool in planetary stratigraphy to derive the sequence of geologic events. In this study, we extend our previous work [1] in Ganymede’s sub-jovian hemisphere to the anti-jovian hemisphere. For geologic mapping, the map by [2] is used as a reference. Our study provides groundwork for the upcoming imaging by the JANUS camera aboard ESA’s JUICE mission [3]. Voyager-2 images are reprocessed using a map scale of 700 m/pxl achieved for parts of the anti-jovian hemisphere. To obtain relative ages from crater frequencies, we apply an updated crater scaling law for cratering into icy targets in order to derive a crater production function for Ganymede [1]. Also, we adopt the Poisson timing analysis method discussed and implemented recently [4] to obtain relative (and absolute model) ages. Results are compared to those from the sub-jovian hemisphere [1] as well as to support and/or refine the global stratigraphic system by [2]. Further emphasis is placed on local target areas in the anti-jovian hemisphere imaged by Galileo SSI at regional map scales of 100 to 300 m/pxl in order to study local geologic effects and processes. These areas incorporate (1) dark and (2) light tectonized materials, and (3) impact crater materials including an area with numerous secondaries from ray crater Osiris. References: [1] Wagner R. et al. (2014), DPS meeting #46, abstract 418.09. [2] Collins G. et al. (2013), U.S.G.S. Sci. Inv. Map 3237. [3] Della Corte V. et al. (2014), Proc. SPIE 9143, doi:10.1117/12.2056353. [4] Michael G. et al. (2016), Icarus 277, 279-285.

  5. Return to Galileo? The Inquisition of the International Narcotic Control Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Dan; Drucker, Ernest

    2008-05-07

    Nearly 400 years after Galileo Galilei of Florence was arraigned and convicted of suspected heresy by the ten member Congregation of the Holy Office (Inquisition), the International Narcotic Control Board (INCB) is similarly inserting itself into matters pertaining to innovations in healthcare and the public health response to addiction throughout the world. Like that earlier Inquisition of 1633 that convicted Galileo of heresy for holding that the sun is the centre of the universe with the earth revolving around it (in contradiction to church doctrine of the time) the INCB and its thirteen-member panel, now rails against any evidence out of sync with the established doctrine of the war on drugs--particularly those innovations in public health called harm reduction. The latest healthcare and harm reduction practices to attract the ire of the INCB Inquisition are elements of Canada's most effective and innovative measures to minimize the harms of drugs in Vancouver--supervised injection facilities and, recently, the potential establishment of supervised inhalation rooms--along with the long established practice of providing safer mouthpieces for pulmonary inhalation in British Columbia. This is particularly significant as it comes in the midst of a crucial battle between municipal and provincial authorities in BC with the federal government in Ottawa, which seems determined to undermine all the most effective HR programs that are the result of years of steady local and governmental support in Vancouver and now threatens to derail all these programs and spread doubt about their usefulness despite the overwhelmingly positive findings of serous research.

  6. Probing the Boundaries of the Heliosphere Using Observations of the Polar ENA Flux from IBEX and Cassini/INCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisenfeld, D. B.; Janzen, P. H.; Bzowski, M.; Dialynas, K.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S. A.; Galli, A.; Kubiak, M. A.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N.; Sokol, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The IBEX Mission has been collecting ENAs from the outer heliosphere for nearly eight years, or three-quarters of a solar cycle. In that time, we have observed clear evidence of the imprint of the solar cycle in the time variation in the ENA flux. The most detailed of such studies has focused on the polar ENA flux observed by IBEX-Hi, as the IBEX spacecraft attitude allows for continuous coverage of the ENA flux incident from the ecliptic poles (Reisenfeld et al. 2012, 2016). By time correlating the ENA-derived heliosheath pressure to the observed 1 AU dynamic pressure, we can estimate the distance to the ENA source region. We can further derive the thickness of the ENA-producing region (presumably the inner heliosheath) by assuming pressure balance at the termination shock (TS). This requires using the 1 AU observations to derive the dynamic pressure at the TS shock by use of a mass-loaded solar wind propagation model (Schwadron et al. 2011), and by integrating ENA observations across all energies that significantly contribute to the heliosheath pressure. This means including polar ENA observations from not only IBEX-Hi, but from IBEX-Lo and Cassini/INCA, spanning an energy range of 15 eV to 40 keV. We will present our latest polar ENA observations and estimates for the distance to the TS and the thickness of the heliosheath.

  7. Cassini Ion Mass Spectrometer Peak Calibrations from Statistical Analysis of Flight Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodson, A. K.; Johnson, R. E.

    2017-12-01

    The Cassini Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) is an actuating time-of-flight (TOF) instrument capable of resolving ion mass, energy, and trajectory over a field of view that captures nearly the entire sky. One of three instruments composing the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer, IMS sampled plasma throughout the Kronian magnetosphere from 2004 through 2012 when it was permanently disabled due to an electrical malfunction. Initial calibration of the flight instrument at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) was limited to a handful of ions and energies due to time constraints, with only about 30% of planned measurements carried out prior to launch. Further calibration measurements were subsequently carried out after launch at SwRI and Goddard Space Flight Center using the instrument prototype and engineering model, respectively. However, logistical differences among the three calibration efforts raise doubts as to how accurately the post-launch calibrations describe the behavior of the flight instrument. Indeed, derived peak parameters for some ion species differ significantly from one calibration to the next. In this study we instead perform a statistical analysis on 8 years of flight data in order to extract ion peak parameters that depend only on the response of the flight instrument itself. This is accomplished by first sorting the TOF spectra based on their apparent compositional similarities (e.g. primarily water group ions, primarily hydrocarbon ions, etc.) and normalizing each spectrum. The sorted, normalized data are then binned according to TOF, energy, and counts in order to generate energy-dependent probability density maps of each ion peak contour. Finally, by using these density maps to constrain a stochastic peak fitting algorithm we extract confidence intervals for the model parameters associated with various measured ion peaks, establishing a logistics-independent calibration of the body of IMS data gathered over the course of the Cassini mission.

  8. Temperature variations in Titan's upper atmosphere: Impact on Cassini/Huygens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kazeminejad

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature variations of Titan's upper atmosphere due to the plasma interaction of the satellite with Saturn's magnetosphere and Titan's high altitude monomer haze particles can imply an offset of up to ±30K from currently estimated model profiles. We incorporated these temperature uncertainties as an offset into the recently published Vervack et al. (2004 (Icarus, Vol. 170, 91-112 engineering model and derive extreme case (i.e. minimum and maximum profiles temperature, pressure, and density profiles. We simulated the Huygens probe hypersonic entry trajectory and obtain, as expected, deviations of the probe trajectory for the extreme atmosphere models compared to the simulation based on the nominal one. These deviations are very similar to the ones obtained with the standard Yelle et al. (1997 (ESA SP-1177 profiles. We could confirm that the difference in aerodynamic drag is of an order of magnitude that can be measured by the probe science accelerometer. They represent an important means for the reconstruction of Titan's upper atmospheric properties. Furthermore, we simulated a Cassini low Titan flyby trajectory. No major trajectory deviations were found. The atmospheric torques due to aerodynamic drag, however, are twice as high for our high temperature profile as the ones obtained with the Yelle maximum profile and more than 5 times higher than the worst case estimations from the Cassini project. We propose to use the Cassini atmospheric torque measurements during its low flybys to derive the atmospheric drag and to reconstruct Titan's upper atmosphere density, pressure, and temperature. The results could then be compared to the reconstructed profiles obtained from Huygens probe measurements. This would help to validate the probe measurements and decrease the error bars.

  9. Dynamics and Characteristics of Saturn’s Ribbon Wave Using Cassini Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarson, Jacob L.; Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Blalock, John J.; Gallego, Angelina; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Ewald, Shawn; McCabe, Ryan M.; Garland, Justin

    2017-10-01

    We present an analysis of Saturn’s Ribbon feature using Cassini ISS images captured using the CB2, MT2, and MT3 filters in the near-infrared. First observed by Voyager 1 and 2, the Ribbon is a planetary-scale meandering dark line around 47°N planetographic latitude. During the Voyager flybys, the meandering dark line followed the peak in an eastward atmospheric jet and marked the boundary between cyclonic and anticyclonic shear zones. The shape of the line rapidly changed in the timescale of tens of hours, likely following the shifting path of the meandering jet. During the Cassini era, the 47°N jet has also exhibited wavy cloud morphology; however, unlike previous analyses of Voyager and Hubble images which showed the Ribbon at the center of the eastward jet, we observe that, between 2007 and 2010, the most prominent wave was located at the northern flank of the jet at 50.7°N. We analyze the wave-like morphology observed in the Cassini images. Our analysis covers the Ribbon's temporal evolution on the scale of hours to years. Using map-projected mosaics, we used both automated and manual methods to map the Ribbon’s latitudinal position as a function of longitude and calculate the wave’s Fourier power spectrum. These power spectra show several distinct spectral peaks that evolve over time. We also examine the temporal evolution of the region over several Saturnian rotations to determine the dispersion and the phase speed of the waves. Our work is supported by NASA CDAP grant NNX15AD3392.

  10. A fresh look at Jupiter's synchrotron from the Cassini RADAR flyby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeckel, Chris; Janssen, Michael A.; de Pater, Imke

    2017-10-01

    The temporal variability is one of the big remaining questions in synchrotron radiation. Most known processes affect the radiation belts on time scales of month and years, whereas variations on shorter time scales are still a subject of scientific debate. In this light, the extreme depletion of energetic electrons as revealed by the 2001 Cassini radio measurements during its flyby of Jupiter is very surprising. The obtained estimate of the ultra-relativistic electron number density is considerably lower when compared to model calculations and similar observation. It has long been suspected that the measurements suffered from large systematic uncertainties. The uncertainties were reduced by recalibrating the raw data the Cassini RADAR measurements based on an improved understanding of the instrument after a decade of operation at Titan. The uncertainties pertaining to spacecraft pointing and the Jovian thermal radiation were solved for by applying a Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo optimization to the full set of 20 Jupiter scans. The synchrotron radiation was then recovered by subtracting the thermal radiation extending from Jupiter’s upper atmosphere, which comprises up to 97% of the total signal strength in the Cassini frequency band. The excellent knowledge of the instrument allows for constraining the disk-averaged brightness temperature of 158.6K ± 2.4K and can be used to improve the calibration of radio telescope such as the Very Large Array. The new retrieval confirmed that systematic artifacts propagated into the initial analysis. The synchrotron radio flux was revised upwards to agree with model predictions of a depleted magnetosphere. Radio maps indicated an enhancement at higher latitudes of electrons, requiring processes to scatter particles to higher latitudes. Comparison with other radio maps demonstrated a positive correlation between the energy of the electrons and the scattering they experienced. This behavior is indicative of wave-particle interactions

  11. Temperature variations in Titan's upper atmosphere: Impact on Cassini/Huygens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kazeminejad

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature variations of Titan's upper atmosphere due to the plasma interaction of the satellite with Saturn's magnetosphere and Titan's high altitude monomer haze particles can imply an offset of up to ±30K from currently estimated model profiles. We incorporated these temperature uncertainties as an offset into the recently published Vervack et al. (2004 (Icarus, Vol. 170, 91-112 engineering model and derive extreme case (i.e. minimum and maximum profiles temperature, pressure, and density profiles. We simulated the Huygens probe hypersonic entry trajectory and obtain, as expected, deviations of the probe trajectory for the extreme atmosphere models compared to the simulation based on the nominal one. These deviations are very similar to the ones obtained with the standard Yelle et al. (1997 (ESA SP-1177 profiles. We could confirm that the difference in aerodynamic drag is of an order of magnitude that can be measured by the probe science accelerometer. They represent an important means for the reconstruction of Titan's upper atmospheric properties. Furthermore, we simulated a Cassini low Titan flyby trajectory. No major trajectory deviations were found. The atmospheric torques due to aerodynamic drag, however, are twice as high for our high temperature profile as the ones obtained with the Yelle maximum profile and more than 5 times higher than the worst case estimations from the Cassini project. We propose to use the Cassini atmospheric torque measurements during its low flybys to derive the atmospheric drag and to reconstruct Titan's upper atmosphere density, pressure, and temperature. The results could then be compared to the reconstructed profiles obtained from Huygens probe measurements. This would help to validate the probe measurements and decrease the error bars.

  12. Il compasso geometrico e militare di Galileo Galilei testi, annotazioni e disputa negli scritti di G. Galilei, M. Bernegger e B. Capra

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    Il compasso geometrico e militare / di Roberto Vergara Caffarelli - Le operazioni del compasso geometrico e militare / Galileo Galilei - Annotazioni / Mattia Bernaggeri - Usus et fabrica circini cuiusdam proportionis / Baldassarre Capra - Difesa contro alle calunnie ed imposture di Baldassar Capra.

  13. Cassini Attitude Control Operations - Guidelines Levied on Science to Extend Reaction Wheel Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelsteadt, Carson O.

    2011-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft was launched on October 15, 1997 and arrived at Saturn on June 30, 2004. It has performed detailed observations and remote sensing of Saturn, its rings, and its satellites since that time. Cassini deployed the European-built Huygens probe, which descended through the Titan atmosphere (Saturn's largest moon) and landed on its surface on January 14, 2005. The Cassini mission has recently been approved by NASA to continue through September of 2017. This 7-year extension is called the Solstice mission and it presents challenges to the spacecraft operations team and its ability to maintain the health of the spacecraft. To keep the spacecraft healthy for 7 more years, the spacecraft team must carefully manage hydrazine use (about 48% of the 132 kg launch load remains as of January 2011). A vital part of conserving hydrazine is to use the reaction wheel assembly (RWA) control system for precise pointing and slews wherever possible. In any given week, the Cassini spacecraft is commanded to use RWA control about 99% of the time, with about 1% of the time requiring reaction control system (RCS) thruster control (to perform Delta V course corrections or to bias the RWA momentum). Such extensive use of the RWA hardware throughout the mission requires that the RWAs be operated in a way that minimizes degradation in the RWA electronics, DC motor, and spin bearing for each reaction wheel. Three consumables in particular have been identified for the RWAs: (1) Total number of revolutions for each RWA. (2) Time spent at very low wheel speeds. At these low speeds, good elasto-hydrodynamic (EHD) film lubrication may be compromised. (3) Total number of on/off power cycles. The second of these consumables, minimizing the time spent at very low wheel speeds, is especially important to keep the spin bearing healthy and well-lubricated. These consumables are actively managed by the attitude control operations team throughout the mission. One vital management

  14. Cassini radio and plasma wave investigation: Data compression and scientific applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolliscroft, L. J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Alleyne, H. St. C.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kirchner, D. L.; Kurth, W. S.; Thompson, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) experiment being built for the Cassini spacecraft will study a wide range of plasma and radio wave phenomena in the magnetosphere of Saturn and will also make valuable measurements during the cruise phase and at other encounters. A feature of data from wave receivers is the capability of producing vastly more data than the spacecraft telemetry link is capable of transmitting back to the Earth. Thus, techniques of on-board data compression and data reduction are important. The RPWS instrument has one processor dedicated to data compression tasks.

  15. Titan's Elusive Lakes? Properties and Context of Dark Spots in Cassini TA Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, R. D.; Elachi, C.; Stiles, B.; West, R.; Janssen, M.; Lopes, R.; Stofan, E.; Paganelli, F.; Wood, C.; Kirk, R.

    2005-01-01

    Titan's atmospheric methane abundance suggests the likelihood of a surface reservoir of methane and a surface sink for its photochemical products, which might also be predominantly liquid. Although large expanses of obvious hydrocarbon seas have not been unambiguously observed, a number of rather radar-dark spots up to approximately 30 km across are observed in the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data acquired during the Cassini TA encounter on October 26th 2004. Here we review the properties and setting of these dark spots to explore whether these may be hydrocarbon lakes.

  16. Risk Assessment of Cassini Sun Sensor Integrity Due to Hypervelocity Impact of Saturn Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Allan Y.

    2016-01-01

    A sophisticated interplanetary spacecraft, Cassini is one of the heaviest and most sophisticated interplanetary spacecraft humans have ever built and launched. Since achieving orbit at Saturn in 2004, Cassini has collected science data throughout its four-year prime mission (2004-08), and has since been approved for first and second extended missions through September 2017. In late 2016, the Cassini spacecraft will begin a daring set of ballistic orbits that will hop the rings and dive between the upper atmosphere of Saturn and its innermost D-ring twenty-two times. The "dusty" environment of the inner D-ring region the spacecraft must fly through is hazardous because of the possible damage that dust particles, travelling at speeds as high as 31.4 km/s, can do to spacecraft hardware. During hazardous proximal ring-plane crossings, the Cassini mission operation team plans to point the high-gain antenna to the RAM vector in order to protect most of spacecraft instruments from the incoming energetic ring dust particles. However, this particular spacecraft attitude will expose two Sun sensors (that are mounted on the antenna dish) to the incoming dust particles. High-velocity impacts on the Sun sensor cover glass might penetrate the 2.54-mm glass cover of the Sun sensor. Even without penetration damage, craters created by these impacts on the surface of the cover glass will degrade the transmissibility of light through it. Apart from being directly impacted by the dust particles, the Sun sensors are also threatened by some fraction of ricochet ejecta that are produced by dust particle impacts on the large antenna dish (made of graphite fiber epoxy composite material). Finally, the spacecraft attitude control system must cope with disturbances due to both the translational and angular impulses imparted on the large antenna dish and the long magnetometer boom by the incoming high-velocity projectiles. Analyses performed to quantify the risks the Sun sensors must contend

  17. Novas espécies de Lamiinae (Cerambycidae neotropicais e transferência de Palpicrassus Galileo & Martins, 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubirajara R. Martins

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Novas espécies descritas do Brasil: Nesozineus amazonicus sp. nov. (Amazonas, Xenofrea diagonalis sp. nov. (Rondônia. Mauesia submetallica sp. nov. (Amazonas; da Bolívia: Psapharochrus nearnsi sp. nov. (Santa Cruz, Adetus basalis, sp. nov. (Santa Cruz, La Paz, Palpicrassus inexpectatus sp. nov. (Santa Cruz, Cyrtinus meridialis sp. nov. (Santa Cruz.. Do Panamá: Aerenea panamensis sp. nov. (Chiriqui. O gênero Palpicrassus Galileo & Martins, 2007, originalmente descrito em Pteropliini é transferido para Apomecynini.New species described from Brazil: Nesozineus amazonicus sp. nov. (Amazonas, Xenofrea diagonalis sp. nov. (Rondônia, Mauesia submetallica sp. nov. (Amazonas; from Bolivia: Psapharochrus nearnsi sp. nov. (Santa Cruz; Adetus basalis sp. nov. (Santa Cruz, La Paz, Palpicrassus inexpectatus sp. nov. (Santa Cruz, Cyrtinus meridialis sp. nov. (Santa Cruz., Aerenea panamensis sp. nov. from Panama (Chiriqui. The genus Palpicrassus Galileo & Martins, 2007, originally described in Pteropliini, is transferred to Apomecynini.

  18. Indication, from Pioneer 10/11, Galileo, and Ulysses Data, of an Apparent Anomalous, Weak, Long-Range Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.D.; Lau, E.L.; Turyshev, S.G.; Laing, P.A.; Liu, A.S.; Nieto, M.M.

    1998-01-01

    Radio metric data from the Pioneer 10/11, Galileo, and Ulysses spacecraft indicate an apparent anomalous, constant, acceleration acting on the spacecraft with a magnitude ∼8.5x10 -8 cm/s 2 , directed towards the Sun. Two independent codes and physical strategies have been used to analyze the data. A number of potential causes have been ruled out. We discuss future kinematic tests and possible origins of the signal. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  19. BeiDou and Galileo, Two Global Satellite Navigation Systems in Final Phase of the Construction, Visibility and Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Januszewski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Spatial segment is one of three segments of each satellite navigation systems (SNS. Nowadays two SNSs, GPS and GLONASS, are fully operational, two next SNSs, BeiDou in China and Galileo in Europe, are in final phase of the construction. In the case of China system this segment will consist of 35 satellites with three types of orbits ? medium (MEO, geostationary (GEO and inclined geosynchronous (IGSO. As GEO and IGSO satellites can be used in China and Asia-Pacific region only, BeiDou MEO constellation with 27 fully operational satellites will be taken into account in this paper. The orbital planes of the Galileo constellation will be divided in “slots” that contains at least one operational satellite. The Galileo reference constellation has 24 nominal orbital positions or operational slots in MEO homogeneously distributed in 3 orbital planes; i.e. 8 slots equally spaced per plane. As the error of user’s position obtained from both systems depends on geometry factor DOP (Dilution Of Precision among other things the knowledge of the number of satellites visible by the user above given masking elevation angle Hmin and the distributions of DOP coefficient values, GDOP in particular, is very important. The lowest and the greatest number of satellites visible in open area by the observer at different latitudes for different Hmin, the percentage of satellites visible above angle H, distributions (in per cent of satellites azimuths and GDOP coefficient values for different Hmin for BeiDou and Galileo systems at different latitudes are presented in the paper.

  20. Isochromate fringes simulation by Cassini-like curves for photoelastic analysis of birefringent crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinaldi, D.; Pietroni, P.; Davi, F.

    2009-01-01

    In optically birefringent uniaxial and biaxial crystals, analyzed by plane polariscope, isochromate interference fringes can be observed. By means of the classical electromagnetic theory a Cassini-like analytical equation of the isochromate fringes, depending on the refraction indexes, has been obtained. The proposed analytical equation is a useful tool to evaluate the internal stress state, as it is related to the isochromate shapes owing to the induced variation of the refraction indexes. Uniaxial crystals can assume complex biaxial behaviour due to particular stress configurations. PbWO 4 (PWO) uniaxial scintillating crystals have been studied. The Cassini-like curves fit well experimental measurements in the case of uniaxial stress. In this research work, a simple model has been proved in the case of strong isochromate fringes distortion due to a stress gradient induced by the bending load. The model fits well the interference pattern, acquired experimentally. This study can pave the way for the quality control on scintillating crystals, used in the fields of high-energy detectors, security and biomedical applications, with complex internal stress state.

  1. JUPITER’S PHASE VARIATIONS FROM CASSINI : A TESTBED FOR FUTURE DIRECT-IMAGING MISSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayorga, L. C.; Jackiewicz, J. [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States); Rages, K. [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); West, R. A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Knowles, B. [CICLOPS/Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Lewis, N. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD, 21218 (United States); Marley, M. S. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    We present empirical phase curves of Jupiter from ∼0° to 140° as measured in multiple optical bandpasses by Cassini /Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) during the Millennium flyby of Jupiter in late 2000 to early 2001. Phase curves are of interest for studying the energy balance of Jupiter and understanding the scattering behavior of the planet as an exoplanet analog. We find that Jupiter is significantly darker at partial phases than an idealized Lambertian planet by roughly 25% and is not well fit by Jupiter-like exoplanet atmospheric models across all wavelengths. We provide analytic fits to Jupiter’s phase function in several Cassini /ISS imaging filter bandpasses. In addition, these observations show that Jupiter’s color is more variable with phase angle than predicted by models. Therefore, the color of even a near Jupiter-twin planet observed at a partial phase cannot be assumed to be comparable to that of Jupiter at full phase. We discuss how the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope and other future direct-imaging missions can enhance the study of cool giants.

  2. Emitted Power of Jupiter Based on Cassini CIRS and VIMS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liming; Baines, Kevin H.; Smith, Mark A.; West, Robert A.; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Trammel, Harold J.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Conrath, Barney J.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Orton, Glenn S.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The emitted power of Jupiter and its meridional distribution are determined from observations by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) and Visual and Infrared Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard Cassini during its flyby en route to Saturn in late 2000 and early 2001. Jupiter's global- average emitted power and effective temperature are measured to be 14.10+/-0.03 W/sq m and 125.57+/-0.07 K, respectively. On a global scale, Jupiter's 5-micron thermal emission contributes approx. 0.7+/-0.1 % to the total emitted power at the global scale, but it can reach approx. 1.9+/-0.6% at 15degN. The meridional distribution of emitted power shows a significant asymmetry between the two hemispheres with the emitted power in the northern hemisphere 3.0+/-0.3% larger than that in the southern hemisphere. Such an asymmetry shown in the Cassini epoch (2000-01) is not present during the Voyager epoch (1979). In addition, the global-average emitted power increased approx. 3.8+/-1.0% between the two epochs. The temporal variation of Jupiter's total emitted power is mainly due to the warming of atmospheric layers around the pressure level of 200 mbar. The temporal variation of emitted power was also discovered on Saturn (Li et al., 2010). Therefore, we suggest that the varying emitted power is a common phenomenon on the giant planets.

  3. The End of Cassini: Final VLBA Astrometry Epochs to Improve the Saturn Ephemeris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dayton; Folkner, William M.; Romney, Jonathan D.; Dhawan, Vivek

    2018-01-01

    During the past dozen years we have used the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to measure the position of the Cassini spacecraft in orbit around Saturn. These data, combined with fits of Cassini’s orbit with respect to Saturn from Deep Space Network tracking, have provided a time series of positions for the Saturn system barycenter in the inertial International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). We we report results from the final observing epochs of this program obtained prior to Cassini’s intentional destruction in the atmosphere of Saturn in September 2017. We now know Saturn’s orbit to approximately 0.2 mas (1 nrad), nearly two orders of magnitude better than it was know before the Cassini mission. Our VLBA positions provide the best constraints on the orientation of Saturn’s orbit (inclination and longitude of ascending node), while ranging data provide the best constraints on the orbit semi-major axis and eccentricity. This work has been partially supported by a grant from the NASA Planetary Astronomy program to the Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO. Part of this work has been carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. The Long Baseline Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  4. Theory of physical libration of the Moon caused by a liquid core: Cassini's motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Yu. V.

    2016-07-01

    This is the first part of a study to develop a modern theory of physical libration of the Moon caused by a liquid core. We use a special approach to studying Moon's rotation relying on Poincaré's planetary model and special forms of equations of motion in Andoyer and Poincaré variables. We construct expansions of the force function of the problem (the second harmonic of the selenopotential) in Andoyer and Poincaré variables for a high-precision description of disturbed orbital motion of the Moon. We investigate the main regularities in lunar rotational motion taken as a body with a solid nonspherical mantle and an ellipsoidal liquid core. The motion of the ideal liquid of the core is simple according to Poincaré. The Cassini laws can be dinamically interpreted for the motion of a synchronous satellite with a liquid core. The Cassini angle (the inclination of the rotation axis relative to the normal to the ecliptic plane) determined by us is very consistent with its determinations from laser observations.

  5. Giovanni Domenico Cassini a modern astronomer in the 17th century

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardi, Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a fascinating account of the life and scientific achievements of Giovanni Domenico Cassini, or Cassini I, the most famous astronomer of his time, who is remembered today especially for his observations of the rings and satellites of Saturn and his earlier construction of the great meridian line in the Basilica of San Petronio in Bologna. The various stages of his life are recounted in an engaging style, from his early childhood in Perinaldo and his time at the famous Jesuit College in Genoa, to his later experiences in Bologna and Paris. The emphasis, however, is on the scientific side of his life. The book explores his impressive body of work in diverse fields while also drawing attention to the international character of his endeavors, the rigor of his research, and his outstanding management skills, which combined to make him an early embodiment of the “European scientist.” It was also these abilities that gained him the attention of the most powerfu l king in Europe, Louis XIV of Fran...

  6. Cusp observation at Saturn's high-latitude magnetosphere by the Cassini spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinski, J M; Arridge, C S; Lamy, L; Leisner, J S; Thomsen, M F; Mitchell, D G; Coates, A J; Radioti, A; Jones, G H; Roussos, E; Krupp, N; Grodent, D; Dougherty, M K; Waite, J H

    2014-01-01

    We report on the first analysis of magnetospheric cusp observations at Saturn by multiple in situ instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft. Using this we infer the process of reconnection was occurring at Saturn's magnetopause. This agrees with remote observations that showed the associated auroral signatures of reconnection. Cassini crossed the northern cusp around noon local time along a poleward trajectory. The spacecraft observed ion energy-latitude dispersions—a characteristic signature of the terrestrial cusp. This ion dispersion is “stepped,” which shows that the reconnection is pulsed. The ion energy-pitch angle dispersions suggest that the field-aligned distance from the cusp to the reconnection site varies between ∼27 and 51 RS. An intensification of lower frequencies of the Saturn kilometric radiation emissions suggests the prior arrival of a solar wind shock front, compressing the magnetosphere and providing more favorable conditions for magnetopause reconnection. Key Points We observe evidence for reconnection in the cusp plasma at Saturn We present evidence that the reconnection process can be pulsed at Saturn Saturn's cusp shows similar characteristics to the terrestrial cusp PMID:25821276

  7. C3 Hydrocarbon Abundance in Titan's Atmosphere with Cassini Infrared Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Nicholas; Nixon, Conor; Achterberg, Richard; Jolly, Antoine; Sung, Keeyoon; Irwin, Patrick; Flasar, F. M.

    2018-01-01

    Titan, the largest moon of the Saturn system, has an astrobiologically important atmosphere. The anoxic nature and high N2 abundance make it a strong analog to the early Earth. The secondary species, CH4, is easily photodissociated, and reactions between its dissociated products give rise to highly complex hydrocarbons and nitriles. The Voyager flyby and 14 year Cassini campaign allowed for the intense study of several of these molecules, enabling scientists to increase our understanding of the chemical pathways present above Titan. In this work, we report abundance profiles of four major C3 gasses expected to occur in Titan’s atmosphere, derived from Cassini/Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) data, allowing us to fill the gaps in the photochemical zoo that is Titan’s atmosphere.Using the NEMESIS iterative radiative transfer module, we retrieved vertical abundance profiles for propane (C3H8) and propyne (CHCCH3) both initially detected by the Voyager IRIS instrument. Using newly available line data, we were also able to determine the first vertical abundance profiles for propene (C3H6), initially detected in 2013. We present profiles for several latitudes and times and compare to photochemical model predictions and previous observations. We also discuss our ongoing search for allene (CH2CCH2), an isomer of propyne, which has yet to be definitively detected. The abundances we determined will help to further our understanding of the chemical pathways that occur in Titan's atmosphere.

  8. New Style of Volcanic Eruption Activity Identified in Galileo NIMS data at Marduk Fluctus, Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A. G.; Davies, R. L.; Veeder, G. J.; de Kleer, K.; De Pater, I.; Matson, D.

    2017-12-01

    Analysis of observations of Marduk Fluctus, Io, by the Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) reveals a style of volcanic activity not previously seen on Io - a very short-duration, highly-changeable, powerful thermal event, similar to what might be expected from a strombolian-like explosion. Marduk Fluctus is a persistent active volcano characterised by ≈3600 km2 of silicate flows [1]. Between 1996 and 2001, NIMS obtained 44 observations of Marduk Fluctus at a wide variety of spatial and spectral resolutions. Six observations were obtained during Galileo orbit E4, with five nighttime observations obtained on 1996 Dec 19 in the space of less than three hours. Three of these observations were each separated by one minute. Compared to the previous observation obtained a few hours earlier, the first two of these three observations show an order of magnitude increase in spectral radiance (corrected for emission angle). Spectral radiance then dropped back to the background level one minute later. The emission angles for these five E4 observations are large (>70°), but even without the emission angle radiance correction the spike in activity is still a factor of five larger than the pre- and post-spike radiances. The NIMS spectrum of the central observation shows a shift in peak of thermal emission to short wavelengths characteristic of the exposure of a large area of incandescent lava. The rapid increase and decrease in activity suggests an equally rapid physical process, the most likely being a large strombolian explosion that generated small clasts that cooled rapidly. The presence of such events provide an additional volcanic process that can be imaged with the intent of determining lava composition from eruption temperature, an important constraint on internal composition and state. For this particular eruption type, eruption temperature can be constrained if non-saturated, multiple-wavelength IR observations are obtained simultaneously and with very

  9. The atmospheres of Saturn and Titan in the near-infrared: First results of Cassini/Vims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, K.H.; Momary, T.W.; Buratti, B.J.; Matson, D.L.; Nelson, R.M.; Drossart, P.; Sicardy, B.; Formisano, V.; Bellucci, G.; Coradini, A.; Griffith, C.; Brown, R.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Langevin, Y.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Jaumann, R.; McCordt, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sotin, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    The wide spectral coverage and extensive spatial, temporal, and phase-angle mapping capabilities of the Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini-Huygens Orbiter are producing fundamental new insights into the nature of the atmospheres of Saturn and Titan. For both bodies, VIMS maps over time and solar phase angles provide information for a multitude of atmospheric constituents and aerosol layers, providing new insights into atmospheric structure and dynamical and chemical processes. For Saturn, salient early results include evidence for phosphine depletion in relatively dark and less cloudy belts at temperate and mid-latitudes compared to the relatively bright and cloudier Equatorial Region, consistent with traditional theories of belts being regions of relative downwelling. Additional Saturn results include (1) the mapping of enhanced trace gas absorptions at the south pole, and (2) the first high phase-angle, high-spatial-resolution imagery of CH4 fluorescence. An additional fundamental new result is the first nighttime near-infrared mapping of Saturn, clearly showing discrete meteorological features relatively deep in the atmosphere beneath the planet's sunlit haze and cloud layers, thus revealing a new dynamical regime at depth where vertical dynamics is relatively more important than zonal dynamics in determining cloud morphology. Zonal wind measurements at deeper levels than previously available are achieved by tracking these features over multiple days, thereby providing measurements of zonal wind shears within Saturn's troposphere when compared to cloudtop movements measured in reflected sunlight. For Titan, initial results include (1) the first detection and mapping of thermal emission spectra of CO, CO2, and CH3D on Titan's nightside limb, (2) the mapping of CH4 fluorescence over the dayside bright limb, extending to ??? 750 km altitude, (3) wind measurements of ???0.5 ms-1, favoring prograde, from the movement of a persistent

  10. Moon taken by Galileo after completing its first Earth Gravity Assist

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Galileo spacecraft images of the Moon were taken at (right photo) 6:47 pm Pacific Standard Time (PST), 12-08-90, and at (left photo) 9:35 am PST, 12-09-90, at a range of more than 350,000 miles. The picture on the right shows the dark Oceanus Procellarum in the upper center, with Mare Imbrium above it and the smaller circular Mare Humorum below. The Orientale Basin, with a small mare in its center, is on the lower left near the limb or edge. Between stretches the cratered highland terrain, with scattered bright young craters on highlands and maria alike. The picture at left shows the globe of the Moon rotated, putting Mare Imbrium on the eastern limb and moving the Orientale Basin almost to the center. The extent of the cratered highlands on the far side is very apparent. At lower left, near the limb, is the South-Pole-Aitken basin, similar to Orientale but very much older and some 1,200 miles in diameter. This feature was previously known as a large depression in the southern far side

  11. Great Physicists - The Life and Times of Leading Physicists from Galileo to Hawking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropper, William H.

    2004-09-01

    Here is a lively history of modern physics, as seen through the lives of thirty men and women from the pantheon of physics. William H. Cropper vividly portrays the life and accomplishments of such giants as Galileo and Isaac Newton, Marie Curie and Ernest Rutherford, Albert Einstein and Niels Bohr, right up to contemporary figures such as Richard Feynman, Murray Gell-Mann, and Stephen Hawking. We meet scientists--all geniuses--who could be gregarious, aloof, unpretentious, friendly, dogged, imperious, generous to colleagues or contentious rivals. As Cropper captures their personalities, he also offers vivid portraits of their great moments of discovery, their bitter feuds, their relations with family and friends, their religious beliefs and education. In addition, Cropper has grouped these biographies by discipline--mechanics, thermodynamics, particle physics, and others--each section beginning with a historical overview. Thus in the section on quantum mechanics, readers can see how the work of Max Planck influenced Niels Bohr, and how Bohr in turn influenced Werner Heisenberg. Our understanding of the physical world has increased dramatically in the last four centuries. With Great Physicists , readers can retrace the footsteps of the men and women who led the way.

  12. LBS AUGMENTED REALITY ASSISTIVE SYSTEM FOR UTILITIES INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT THROUGH GALILEO AND EGNOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Stylianidis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a continuous and increasing demand for solutions, both software and hardware-based, that are able to productively handle underground utilities geospatial data. Innovative approaches that are based on the use of the European GNSS, Galileo and EGNOS, sensor technologies and LBS, are able to monitor, document and manage utility infrastructures’ data with an intuitive 3D augmented visualisation and navigation/positioning technology. A software and hardware-based system called LARA, currently under develop- ment through a H2020 co-funded project, aims at meeting that demand. The concept of LARA is to integrate the different innovative components of existing technologies in order to design and develop an integrated navigation/positioning and information system which coordinates GNSS, AR, 3D GIS and geodatabases on a mobile platform for monitoring, documenting and managing utility infrastruc- tures on-site. The LARA system will guide utility field workers to locate the working area by helping them see beneath the ground, rendering the complexity of the 3D models of the underground grid such as water, gas and electricity. The capacity and benefits of LARA are scheduled to be tested in two case studies located in Greece and the United Kingdom with various underground utilities. The paper aspires to present the first results from this initiative. The project leading to this application has received funding from the European GNSS Agency under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 641460.

  13. Galileo IOV Electrical Power Subsystem Relies On Li-Ion Batter Charge Management Controlled By Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douay, N.

    2011-10-01

    In the frame of GALILEO In-Orbit Validation program which is composed of 4 satellites, Thales Alenia Space France has designed, developed and tested the Electrical Power Subsystem. Besides some classical design choices like: -50V regulated main power bus provided by the PCDU manufactured by Terma (DK), -Solar array, manufactured by Dutch-Space (NL), using Ga-As triple junction technology from Azur Space Power Solar GmbH, -SAFT (FR) Lithium-ion Battery for which cell package balancing function is required, -Solar Array Drive Mechanism, provided by RUAG Space Switzerland, to transfer the power. This subsystem features a fully autonomous, failure tolerant, battery charge management able to operate even after a complete unavailability of the on-board software. The battery charge management is implemented such that priority is always given to satisfy the satellite main bus needs in order to maintain the main bus regulation under MEA control. This battery charge management principle provides very high reliability and operational robustness. So, the paper describes : -the battery charge management concept using a combination of PCDU hardware and relevant battery lines monitoring, -the functional aspect of the single point failure free S4R (Sequential Switching Shunt Switch Regulator) and associated performances, -the failure modes isolated and passivated by this architecture. The paper will address as well the autonomous balancing function characteristics and performances.

  14. Mountains on Io: High-resolution Galileo observations, initial interpretations, and formation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, E.P.; Jaeger, W.L.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; McEwen, A.S.; Milazzo, M.; Moore, J.; Phillips, C.B.; Radebaugh, J.; Simonelli, D.; Chuang, F.; Schuster, P.; Alexander, D.D.A.; Capraro, K.; Chang, S.-H.; Chen, A.C.; Clark, J.; Conner, D.L.; Culver, A.; Handley, T.H.; Jensen, D.N.; Knight, D.D.; LaVoie, S.K.; McAuley, M.; Mego, V.; Montoya, O.; Mortensen, H.B.; Noland, S.J.; Patel, R.R.; Pauro, T.M.; Stanley, C.L.; Steinwand, D.J.; Thaller, T.F.; Woncik, P.J.; Yagi, G.M.; Yoshimizu, J.R.; Alvarez Del Castillo, E.M.; Beyer, R.; Branston, D.; Fishburn, M.B.; Muller, Birgit; Ragan, R.; Samarasinha, N.; Anger, C.D.; Cunningham, C.; Little, B.; Arriola, S.; Carr, M.H.; Asphaug, E.; Morrison, D.; Rages, K.; Banfield, D.; Bell, M.; Burns, J.A.; Carcich, B.; Clark, B.; Currier, N.; Dauber, I.; Gierasch, P.J.; Helfenstein, P.; Mann, M.; Othman, O.; Rossier, L.; Solomon, N.; Sullivan, R.; Thomas, P.C.; Veverka, J.; Becker, T.; Edwards, K.; Gaddis, L.; Kirk, R.; Lee, E.; Rosanova, T.; Sucharski, R.M.; Beebe, R.F.; Simon, A.; Belton, M.J.S.; Bender, K.; Fagents, S.; Figueredo, P.; Greeley, R.; Homan, K.; Kadel, S.; Kerr, J.; Klemaszewski, J.; Lo, E.; Schwarz, W.; Williams, D.; Williams, K.; Bierhaus, B.; Brooks, S.; Chapman, C.R.; Merline, B.; Keller, J.; Tamblyn, P.; Bouchez, A.; Dyundian, U.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Showman, A.; Spitale, J.; Stewart, S.; Vasavada, A.; Breneman, H.H.; Cunningham, W.F.; Johnson, T.V.; Jones, T.J.; Kaufman, J.M.; Klaasen, K.P.; Levanas, G.; Magee, K.P.; Meredith, M.K.; Orton, G.S.; Senske, D.A.; West, A.; Winther, D.; Collins, G.; Fripp, W.J.; Head, J. W.; Pappalardo, R.; Pratt, S.; Prockter, L.; Spaun, N.; Colvin, T.; Davies, M.; DeJong, E.M.; Hall, J.; Suzuki, S.; Gorjian, Z.; Denk, T.; Giese, B.; Koehler, U.; Neukum, G.; Oberst, J.; Roatsch, T.; Tost, W.; Wagner, R.; Dieter, N.; Durda, D.; Geissler, P.; Greenberg, R.J.; Hoppa, G.; Plassman, J.; Tufts, R.; Fanale, F.P.; Granahan, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    During three close flybys in late 1999 and early 2000 the Galileo spacecraft ac-quired new observations of the mountains that tower above Io's surface. These images have revealed surprising variety in the mountains' morphologies. They range from jagged peaks several kilometers high to lower, rounded structures. Some are very smooth, others are covered by numerous parallel ridges. Many mountains have margins that are collapsing outward in large landslides or series of slump blocks, but a few have steep, scalloped scarps. From these observations we can gain insight into the structure and material properties of Io's crust as well as into the erosional processes acting on Io. We have also investigated formation mechanisms proposed for these structures using finite-element analysis. Mountain formation might be initiated by global compression due to the high rate of global subsidence associated with Io's high resurfacing rate; however, our models demonstrate that this hypothesis lacks a mechanism for isolating the mountains. The large fraction (???40%) of mountains that are associated with paterae suggests that in some cases these features are tectonically related. Therefore we have also simulated the stresses induced in Io's crust by a combination of a thermal upwelling in the mantle with global lithospheric compression and have shown that this can focus compressional stresses. If this mechanism is responsible for some of Io's mountains, it could also explain the common association of mountains with paterae. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Lbs Augmented Reality Assistive System for Utilities Infrastructure Management Through Galileo and Egnos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianidis, E.; Valaria, E.; Smagas, K.; Pagani, A.; Henriques, J.; Garca, A.; Jimeno, E.; Carrillo, I.; Patias, P.; Georgiadis, C.; Kounoudes, A.; Michail, K.

    2016-06-01

    There is a continuous and increasing demand for solutions, both software and hardware-based, that are able to productively handle underground utilities geospatial data. Innovative approaches that are based on the use of the European GNSS, Galileo and EGNOS, sensor technologies and LBS, are able to monitor, document and manage utility infrastructures' data with an intuitive 3D augmented visualisation and navigation/positioning technology. A software and hardware-based system called LARA, currently under develop- ment through a H2020 co-funded project, aims at meeting that demand. The concept of LARA is to integrate the different innovative components of existing technologies in order to design and develop an integrated navigation/positioning and information system which coordinates GNSS, AR, 3D GIS and geodatabases on a mobile platform for monitoring, documenting and managing utility infrastruc- tures on-site. The LARA system will guide utility field workers to locate the working area by helping them see beneath the ground, rendering the complexity of the 3D models of the underground grid such as water, gas and electricity. The capacity and benefits of LARA are scheduled to be tested in two case studies located in Greece and the United Kingdom with various underground utilities. The paper aspires to present the first results from this initiative. The project leading to this application has received funding from the European GNSS Agency under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 641460.

  16. The Calm Methane Northern Seas of Titan from Cassini Radio Science Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouf, Essam A.; French, Richard G.; Wong, Kwok; Anabtawi, Aseel; Schinder, Paul J.; Cassini Radio Science Team

    2016-10-01

    We report on results from 3 bistatic scattering observations of Titan northern seas conducted by the Cassini spacecraft in 2014 ( flybys T101, T102, and T106). The onboard Radio Science instrument transmits 3 sinusoidal signals of 0.94, 3.6, and 13 cm wavelengths. The spacecraft is continuously maneuvered to point in incidence direction so that mirror-like reflections from Titan's surface are observed at the ground stations of the NASA Deep Space Network. The corresponding ground-track in all 3 cases crossed different regions of Kraken Mare, and in the case of T101 also crossed Ligeia Mare. A nearly pure sinusoidal reflected signal was clearly detectable in the observed echoes spectra over surface regions identified in the Cassini RADAR images as potential liquid regions. Weaker quasi-specular echoes were also evident over some intermediate dry land and near sea shores. Cassini transmits right-circularly-polarized (RCP) signals and both the RCP and LCP echo components are observed. Their spectral shape, bandwidth, and total power are the observables used to infer/constrain physical surface properties. Presented results are limited to the 3.6 cm wavelength signal which has the largest SNR. The remarkably preserved sinusoidal echo spectral shape and the little detectable Doppler broadening strongly suggest surface that is smooth on scales large compared to 3.6 cm. If long wavelength gravity waves are present, they must be very subtle. The measured RCP/LCP echo power ratio provides direct measurement of the surface dielectric constant and is diagnostic of the liquid composition. The power ratio measurements eliminate possible significant ethane contribution and strongly imply predominantly liquid methane and nitrogen composition. Carefully calibrated measurements of the absolute echo power and the inferred dielectric constant constrain the presence of any capillary waves of wavelength << 3.6 cm. The latter affect wave coherence across the Fresnel region, reducing the

  17. New Magnetic Field Model for Saturn From Cassini Radio and Magnetometers Observations: The Birotor Dipole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galopeau, P. H. M.

    2017-12-01

    Since the insertion of Cassini in the Saturnian system in July 2004, the radio and plasma wave science (RPWS) experiment on board the spacecraft revealed the presence of two distinct and variable rotation periods in the Saturnian kilometric radiation (SKR) which were attributed to the northern and southern hemispheres respectively. The present study is based on the hypothesis that the periodic time modulations present in the SKR are mainly due to the rotation of Saturn's inner magnetic field. The existence of a double period implies that the inner field is not only limited to a simple rotation dipole but displays more complex structures having the same time periodicities than the radio emission. In order to build a model of this complex magnetic field, it is absolutely necessary to know the accurate phases of rotation linked with the two periods. The radio observations from the RPWS experiment allow a continuous and accurate follow-up of these rotation phases, since the SKR emission is permanently observable and produced very close to the planetary surface. A continuous wavelet transform analysis of the intensity of the SKR signal received at 290 kHz between July 2004 and June 2012 was performed in order to calculate in the same time the different periodicities and phases. The rotation phases associated to the main two periods allow us to define a North and South longitude system essential for such a study. In this context, a dipole model ("birotor dipole") was proposed for Saturn's inner magnetic field: this dipole presents the particularity to have North and South poles rotating around Saturn's axis at two different angular velocities; this dipole is tilted and not centered. 57 Cassini's revolutions, the periapsis of which is less than 5 Saturnian radii, have been selected for this study. For each of these chosen orbits, it is possible to fit with high precision the measurements of the MAG data experiment given by the magnetometers embarked on board Cassini. A

  18. Cassini's motions and resonant librations of synchronous satellites of big planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Yu. V.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction. In the paper the rotations of synchronous satellites of the Jupiter, Saturn, Uran and Neptune are studied. On the base theory of resonant rotation of the rigid satellite on precessing elliptical orbit [1], [2] parameters of Cassini's motions and periods of free resonant librations have been determined for big grope of satellites of planets considered as rigid non-spherical bodies. Here I use observed values of coefficients of second harmonics of gravitational potensials ( 2 J and 22 C ) and of dimension less moment of inertia I = C / ?mr 2 ? of Io, Europa, Ganimede, Callisto and also Rhea and Titan, obtained on the base of data of space missions to these bodies [3]. Here C is the polar moment of inertia, m and r is the mass and the mean radius of satellite. Mentioned parameters 2 J , 22 C and I also have been evaluated for a wide set of another's satellites of big planets for their models as homogeneous ellipsoids of known forms and sizes (www.nasa.gov). These models also have been obtained here effective applications. For corresponding models the notation (e) is used here. For another from considered satellites (without indexes) we use also ellipsoidal models of hydrostatic equilibrium state of synchronous satellite [4]. The full list of discussed parameters for satellites of planets is presented in the paper [5]. Perturbed orbital motions of considered satellites we discribe by mean orbital elements reffered to local Laplacian planes of corresponding satellites ( http://ssd.jpl.nasa. gov/sat_elem. html). From them: the eccentricity ( e ), the inclination of orbit plane ( i ), the mean orbital motion and its period ( n and n T ), the angular velocity and period of preseccion of orbit plane of satellite on local Laplacian plane ( n? and T? ). In our approach all mentioned parameters are considered as constants and more fine effects in orbital motions of satellites do not take into account in this paper. The purpose of paper is to study syncronous

  19. Earth-based and Cassini-spacecraft Observations of Irregular Moons of Jupiter and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denk, Tilmann; Mottola, S.; Roatsch, T.; Rosenberg, H.; Neukum, G.

    2010-10-01

    We observed irregular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn with the ISS camera of the Cassini spacecraft [1] and with the 1.23-m telescope of the Calar Alto observatory in Spain [2]. Scientific goals are the determination of rotation periods, rotation-axis orientations, spin directions, size parameters, color properties, phase curves, and searches for binaries. Himalia (J6), the largest of the irregular jovian moons, has been imaged by Cassini on 18 Dec 2000; a body size of 120±5 km x 150±10 km and an albedo of 0.05±0.01 have been measured [3,4]. Earth-based observations revealed that Himalia's rotation period is probably 9.3 h, which is in agreement with the 9.2 to 9.8 h suggested by [5], although periods of 7.8 or 11.7 h cannot be ruled out yet. In the saturnian system, 10 irregular moons were scheduled for Cassini ISS observations over time spans >9 hrs until end-of-August, 2010. Observation distances vary between 5.6 and 22 million km, corresponding to ISS pixel scales of 34 to 130 km. For the objects measured so far, the rotation periods vary significantly. For instance, Siarnaq (S/2000 S3; size 40 km) and Ymir (S/2000 S1; 18 km) exhibit rotation periods of 6.7 h and 7.3 h, respectively, while Kiviuq (S/2000 S5; 16 km) might take about 22 h for one rotation. First results from the observation campaigns will be presented at the meeting. References: [1] Porco, C.C., et al. (2004), Space Sci. Rev. 115, 363; [2] http://www.caha.es/CAHA/Telescopes/1.2m.html; [3] Denk, T. et al. (2001), Conference on Jupiter (Planet, Satellites & Magnetosphere), Boulder, CO, 25-30 June 2001, abstracts book p. 30-31; [4] Porco, C.C., et al. (2003), Science 299, 1541; [5] Degewij, J., et al. (1980), Icarus 44, 520. We gratefully acknowledge funding by the German Space Agency (DLR) Bonn through grant no. 50 OH 0305.

  20. Equinoctial Activity Over Titan Dune Fields Revealed by Cassini/vims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, S.; Le Mouelic, S.; Barnes, J. W.; Hirtzig, M.; Rannou, P.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R. H.; Bow, J.; Vixie, G.; Cornet, T.; Bourgeois, O.; Narteau, C.; Courrech Du Pont, S.; Le Gall, A.; Reffet, E.; Griffith, C. A.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.; Baines, K. H.; Nicholson, P. D.; Coustenis, A.

    2012-12-01

    Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn, is the only satellite in the solar system with a dense atmosphere. The close and continuous observations of Titan by the Cassini spacecraft, in orbit around Saturn since July 2004, bring us evidences that Titan troposphere and low stratosphere experience an exotic, but complete meteorological cycle similar to the Earth hydrological cycle, with hydrocarbons evaporation, condensation in clouds, and rainfall. Cassini monitoring campaigns also demonstrate that Titan's cloud coverage and climate vary with latitude. Titan's tropics, with globally weak meteorological activity and widespread dune fields, seem to be slightly more arid than the poles, where extensive and numerous liquid reservoirs and sustained cloud activity have been discovered. Only a few tropo-spheric clouds have been observed at Titan's tropics during the southern summer. As equinox was approaching (in August 2009), they occurred more frequently and appeared to grow in strength and size. We present here the observation of intense brightening at Titan's tropics, very close to the equinox. These detections were conducted with the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard Cassini. We will discuss the VIMS images of the three individual events detected so far, observed during the Titan's flybys T56 (22 May 2009), T65 (13 January 2010) and T70 (21 June 2010). T56, T65 and T70 observations show an intense and transient brighten-ing of large regions very close to the equator, right over the extensive dune fields of Senkyo, Belet and Shangri-La. They all appear spectrally and morphologically different from all transient surface features or atmospheric phenomena previously reported. Indeed, these events share in particular a strong brightening at wavelengths greater than 2 μm (especially at 5 μm), making them spectrally distinct from the small tropical clouds observed before the equinox and the large storms observed near the equator in September and October

  1. Tidal Control of Jet Eruptions on Enceladus as Observed by Cassini ISS between 2005 and 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurford, T. A.; Helfenstein, P.; Spitale, J. N.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of Enceladus have revealed active jets of material erupting from cracks on its south polar surface. It has previously been proposed that diurnal tidal stress, driven by Enceladus' orbital eccentricity, may actively produce surface movement along these cracks daily and thus may regulate when eruptions occur. Our analysis of the stress on jet source regions identified in Cassini ISS images reveals tidal stress as a plausible controlling mechanism of jet activity. However, the evidence available in the published and preliminary observations of jet activity between 2005 and 2007 may not be able to solidify the link between tidal stress and eruptions from fissures. Ongoing, far more comprehensive analyses based on recent, much higher resolution jetting observations have the potential to prove otherwise.

  2. Infrared Limb Sounding with Cassini CIRS: Optimal Viewing Strategy Using Horizon Nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixon, Conor A.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Flasar, F. Michael

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate a question of science optimization during Cassini flybys of Titan. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) makes limb during the closest approach period when the visible horizon circle is moving swiftly across the planet. We have sought to discover if any points on the horizon are preferred for limb sounding due to having minimum movement relative to the surface. By numerical calculation, backed by geometric analysis, we find that two limited regions on the horizon are continuously visible during the entire encounter. We term these "limb nodes" and show how they may be employed by CIRS to optimize science by minimizing the source of systematic error due to spatial smear. These conclusions are applicable to many similar scenarios of spacecraft limb sounding during hyperbolic flyby encounters.

  3. The sand seas of titan: Cassini RADAR observations of longitudinal dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, R.D.; Wall, S.; Radebaugh, J.; Boubin, G.; Reffet, E.; Janssen, M.; Stofan, E.; Lopes, R.; Kirk, R.; Elachi, C.; Lunine, J.; Mitchell, Ken; Paganelli, F.; Soderblom, L.; Wood, C.; Wye, L.; Zebker, H.; Anderson, Y.; Ostro, S.; Allison, M.; Boehmer, R.; Callahan, P.; Encrenaz, P.; Ori, G.G.; Francescetti, G.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.; Hensley, S.; Johnson, W.; Kelleher, K.; Muhleman, D.; Picardi, G.; Posa, F.; Roth, L.; Seu, R.; Shaffer, S.; Stiles, B.; Vetrella, S.; Flamini, E.; West, R.

    2006-01-01

    The most recent Cassini RADAR images of Titan show widespread regions (up to 1500 kilometers by 200 kilometers) of near-parallel radar-dark linear features that appear to be seas of longitudinal dunes similar to those seen in the Namib desert on Earth. The Ku-band (2.17-centimeter wavelength) images show ???100-meter ridges consistent with duneforms and reveal flow interactions with underlying hills. The distribution and orientation of the dunes support a model of fluctuating surface winds of ???0.5 meter per second resulting from the combination of an eastward flow with a variable tidal wind. The existence of dunes also requires geological processes that create sand-sized (100- to 300-micrometer) particulates and a lack of persistent equatorial surface liquids to act as sand traps.

  4. Laser Mode Behavior of the Cassini CIRS Fourier Transform Spectrometer at Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasunas, John C.

    2012-01-01

    The CIRS Fourier transform spectrometer aboard the NASA/ESA/ASI Cassini orbiter has been acquiring spectra of the Saturnian system since 2004. The CIRS reference interferometer employs a laser diode to trigger the interferogram sampling. Although the control of laser diode drive current and operating temperature are stringent enough to restrict laser wavelength variation to a small fraction of CIRS finest resolution element, the CIRS instrument does need to be restarted every year or two, at which time it may start in a new laser mode. By monitoring the Mylar absorption features in uncalibrated spectra due to the beam splitter Mylar substrate, it can be shown that these jumps are to adjacent modes and that most of the eight-year operation so far is restricted to three adjacent modes. For a given mode, the wavelength stability appears consistent with the stability of the laser diode drive curren.t and operating temperature.

  5. Effective stability around the Cassini state in the spin-orbit problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansottera, Marco; Lhotka, Christoph; Lemaître, Anne

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the long-time stability in the neighborhood of the Cassini state in the conservative spin-orbit problem. Starting with an expansion of the Hamiltonian in the canonical Andoyer-Delaunay variables, we construct a high-order Birkhoff normal form and give an estimate of the effective stability time in the Nekhoroshev sense. By extensively using algebraic manipulations on a computer, we explicitly apply our method to the rotation of Titan. We obtain physical bounds of Titan's latitudinal and longitudinal librations, finding a stability time greatly exceeding the estimated age of the Universe. In addition, we study the dependence of the effective stability time on three relevant physical parameters: the orbital inclination, , the mean precession of the ascending node of Titan orbit, , and the polar moment of inertia,.

  6. Astrometry of Cassini With the Vlba to Improve the Saturn Ephemeris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dayton L.; Folkner, William M.; Jacobson, Robert A.; Jacobs, Christopher S.; Dhawan, Vivek; Romney, Jon; Fomalont, Ed

    2015-01-01

    Planetary ephemerides have been developed and improved over centuries. They are a fundamental tool for understanding solar system dynamics, and essential for planetary and small body mass determinations, occultation predictions, high-precision tests of general relativity, pulsar timing, and interplanetary spacecraft navigation. This paper presents recent results from a continuing program of high-precision astrometric very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of the Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn, using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). We have previously shown that VLBA measurements can be combined with spacecraft orbit determinations from Doppler and range tracking and VLBI links to the inertial extragalactic reference frame to provide the most accurate barycentric positions currently available for Saturn. Here we report an additional five years of VLBA observations along with improved phase reference source positions, resulting in an improvement in residuals with respect to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's dynamical ephemeris.

  7. Examining the Combined Saturn and Ring Exosphere/Ionosphere using Cassini's Proximal orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, O. J.; Tseng, W. L.; Johnson, R. E.; Perry, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    Neutral molecules that are emitted from Saturn's exobase (i.e., H2) and the main rings (i.e., H2, O2, H) are a source of material for both the Saturn and ring ionospheres as well as Saturn's magnetosphere (Tseng et al., 2013 [PSS 85 164 - 167]). However, the density gradient of H2 produced from the main rings is very different than that produced by Saturn's exospheric flux due to its emission from the ring plane and distance from Saturn. Cassini measurements obtained during the proximal orbits can likely be used to identify contributions from Saturn and the rings. Here we present results obtained from Monte Carlo models of the Saturn and ring exosphere used to analyze INMS data of neutrals and ions measured along the trajectories of the Proximal orbits. Understanding the sources of neutrals and the concomitant ions can help provide insight about the dynamics occurring in the Saturn system.

  8. Flyby Error Analysis Based on Contour Plots for the Cassini Tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, P. W.; Gist, E. M.; Goodson, T. D.; Hahn, Y.; Wagner, S. V.; Williams, P. N.

    2008-01-01

    The maneuver cancellation analysis consists of cost contour plots employed by the Cassini maneuver team. The plots are two-dimensional linear representations of a larger six-dimensional solution to a multi-maneuver, multi-encounter mission at Saturn. By using contours plotted with the dot product of vectors B and R and the dot product of vectors B and T components, it is possible to view the effects delta V on for various encounter positions in the B-plane. The plot is used in operations to help determine if the Approach Maneuver (ensuing encounter minus three days) and/or the Cleanup Maneuver (ensuing encounter plus three days) can be cancelled and also is a linear check of an integrated solution.

  9. Studies from Cassini's high-inclination orbits: ion cyclotron wave belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisner, J. S.; Russell, C. T.; Dougherty, M. K.; Persoon, A. M.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Strangeway, R. J.; Cowee, M. M.

    2007-08-01

    Surrounding Saturn is a cloud of neutral water-group molecules. When these particles are ionized and accelerated by Saturn's corotating magnetized plasma, they generate ion cyclotron waves. When the inclination of the Cassini spacecraft's orbits rose to about fifty-five degrees in late 2006, new insights into the behavior of these ion cyclotron waves were obtained as the spacecraft passed through the equatorial plane, revealing latitudinal structure of the wave belt. Centered at the magnetic equator the wave amplitude grows with height in either direction, reaching a maximum at +/- 0.2 Rs and then decreasing until they disappear by +/- 0.3 Rs. Doppler shifts caused by the motion of the spacecraft reveal that these waves propagate primarily away from the equatorial plane. Using these high-inclination orbits, we study the wave growth and damping regions and their propagation characteristics. These properties give insight into the structure and ionization of Saturn's water cloud.

  10. Saturn's north polar cyclone and hexagon at depth revealed by Cassini/VIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, K.H.; Momary, T.W.; Fletcher, L.N.; Showman, A.P.; Roos-Serote, M.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    A high-speed cyclonic vortex centered on the north pole of Saturn has been revealed by the visual-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini-Huygens Orbiter, thus showing that the tropospheres of both poles of Saturn are occupied by cyclonic vortices with winds exceeding 135 m/s. High-spatial-resolution (~200 km per pixel) images acquired predominantly under night-time conditions during Saturn's polar winter-using a thermal wavelength of 5.1 ??m to obtain time-lapsed imagery of discrete, deep-seated (>2.1-bar) cloud features viewed in silhouette against Saturn's internally generated thermal glow-show a classic cyclonic structure, with prograde winds exceeding 135 m/s at its maximum near 88.3?? (planetocentric) latitude, and decreasing to Saturn indicates that cyclonic circulation may be an important dynamical style in planets with significant atmospheres. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Flux and composition of interstellar dust at Saturn from Cassini's Cosmic Dust Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altobelli, N; Postberg, F; Fiege, K; Trieloff, M; Kimura, H; Sterken, V J; Hsu, H-W; Hillier, J; Khawaja, N; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G; Blum, J; Burton, M; Srama, R; Kempf, S; Gruen, E

    2016-04-15

    Interstellar dust (ISD) is the condensed phase of the interstellar medium. In situ data from the Cosmic Dust Analyzer on board the Cassini spacecraft reveal that the Saturnian system is passed by ISD grains from our immediate interstellar neighborhood, the local interstellar cloud. We determine the mass distribution of 36 interstellar grains, their elemental composition, and a lower limit for the ISD flux at Saturn. Mass spectra and grain dynamics suggest the presence of magnesium-rich grains of silicate and oxide composition, partly with iron inclusions. Major rock-forming elements (magnesium, silicon, iron, and calcium) are present in cosmic abundances, with only small grain-to-grain variations, but sulfur and carbon are depleted. The ISD grains in the solar neighborhood appear to be homogenized, likely by repeated processing in the interstellar medium. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Imaging the interaction of the heliosphere with the interstellar medium from Saturn with Cassini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimigis, S M; Mitchell, D G; Roelof, E C; Hsieh, K C; McComas, D J

    2009-11-13

    We report an all-sky image of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) >6 kilo-electron volts produced by energetic protons occupying the region (heliosheath) between the boundary of the extended solar atmosphere and the local interstellar medium (LISM). The map obtained by the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA) onboard Cassini reveals a broad belt of energetic protons whose nonthermal pressure is comparable to that of the local interstellar magnetic field. The belt, centered at approximately 260 degrees ecliptic longitude extending from north to south and looping back through approximately 80 degrees, appears to be ordered by the local interstellar magnetic field. The shape revealed by the ENA image does not conform to current models, wherein the heliosphere resembles a cometlike figure aligned in the direction of Sun's travel through the LISM.

  13. Fast forward modeling of Titan’s infrared spectra to invert VIMS/CASSINI hyperspectral images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, S.; Le Mouélic, S.; Rannou, P.; Combe, J.; Le Corre, L.; Griffith, C. A.; Tobie, G.; Barnes, J. W.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R. H.; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.

    2009-12-01

    The surface of Titan, the largest icy moon of Saturn, is veiled by a very thick and hazy atmosphere. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft, in orbit around Saturn since July 2004, has been conducting an intensive survey of Titan with the objective of understanding the complex nature and interaction of the atmosphere and surface of this mysterious moon. Retrieving and separating contributions from the surface and the atmosphere in Titan’s infrared spectra requires accurate radiative transfer modeling, which is often very demanding of computer resources. As Cassini has gathered hitherto millions of spectra of Titan and will continue to observe it until at least 2010, we report here on the development of a new rapid, simple and versatile radiative transfer model specially designed to process VIMS datacubes. Currently, our model accounts for gas absorption, haze scattering and surface reflectance and can be implemented in an inversion scheme. First results of forward modeling provide spectral shapes that are consistent with VIMS measurements, as well as surface and aerosol properties in the range of validity for Titan. Further inversion tests will be carried on VIMS hyperspectral images for the estimate of spatial coherence of the results, accuracy of the surface reflectance within the atmospheric windows, and potential needs for improved input data and modeling. This work was partly performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Calibrated VIMS data appear courtesy of the VIMS team. We thank the CNES French agency for its financial support.

  14. On Radiative Factors in Planetary Rings: New Insight Derived from Cassini CIRS Observations at Saturn Equinox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, S. M.; Spilker, L. J.; Pilorz, S.; Edgington, S. G.; Deau, E.; Morishima, R.

    2012-12-01

    Since arriving at Saturn in 2004, Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer has recorded tens of millions of spectra of Saturn's rings (personal communication, M. Segura). CIRS records far infrared radiation (16.7-1000 microns) at focal plane 1 (FP1). Thermal emission from Saturn's rings peaks at FP1 wavelengths. CIRS spectra are well characterized as blackbody emission at an effective temperature Te, multiplied by a scalar factor related to ring emissivity (Spilker et al. [2005, 2006]). CIRS can therefore characterize the rings' temperature and study the thermal environment to which the ring particles are subject. We focus on CIRS data from the 2009 Saturnian equinox. As the Sun's disk crossed the ring plane, CIRS obtained several radial scans of the rings at a variety of phase angles, local hour angles and distances. With the Sun's rays striking the rings at an incidence angle of zero, solar heating is virtually absent, and thermal radiation from Saturn and sunlight reflected by Saturn dominate the thermal environment. These observations appear to present a paradox. Equinox data show that the flux of thermal energy radiated by the rings can even exceed the energy incident upon them as prescribed by thermal models, particularly in the C ring and Cassini Division (Ferrari and Leyrat [2006], Morishima et al. [2009, 2010]). Conservation principles suggest that such models underestimate heating of the rings in these cases, as it is clearly unphysical for the rings to radiate significantly more energy than is incident upon them. In this presentation, we will describe our efforts to resolve this paradox and determine what doing so can teach us about Saturn's rings. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2012 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  15. Revisit the modeling of the Saturnian ring atmosphere and ionosphere from the "Cassini Grand Finale" results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, W. L.; Johnson, R. E.; Tucker, O. J.; Perry, M. E.; Ip, W. H.

    2017-12-01

    During the Cassini Grand Finale mission, this spacecraft, for the first time, has done the in-situ measurements of Saturn's upper atmosphere and its rings and provides critical information for understanding the coupling dynamics between the main rings and the Saturnian system. The ring atmosphere is the source of neutrals (i.e., O2, H2, H; Tseng et al., 2010; 2013a), which is primarily generated by photolytic decomposition of water ice (Johnson et al., 2006), and plasma (i.e., O2+ and H2+; Tseng et al., 2011) in the Saturnian magnetosphere. In addition, the main rings have strong interaction with Saturn's atmosphere and ionosphere (i.e., a source of oxygen into Saturn's upper atmosphere and/or the "ring rain" in O'Donoghue et al., 2013). Furthermore, the near-ring plasma environment is complicated by the neutrals from both the seasonally dependent ring atmosphere and Enceladus torus (Tseng et al., 2013b), and, possibly, from small grains from the main and tenuous F and G rings (Johnson et al.2017). The data now coming from Cassini Grand Finale mission already shed light on the dominant physics and chemistry in this region of Saturn's magnetosphere, for example, the presence of carbonaceous material from meteorite impacts in the main rings and each gas species have similar distribution in the ring atmosphere. We will revisit the details in our ring atmosphere/ionosphere model to study, such as the source mechanism for the organic material and the neutral-grain-plasma interaction processes.

  16. Reconciling Electrical Properties of Titan's Surface Derived from Cassini RADAR Scatterometer and Radiometer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebker, H. A.; Wye, L. C.; Janssen, M.; Paganelli, F.; Cassini RADAR Team

    2006-12-01

    We observe Titan, Saturn's largest moon, using active and passive microwave instruments carried on board the Cassini spacecraft. The 2.2-cm wavelength penetrates the thick atmosphere and provides surface measurements at resolutions from 10-200 km over much of the satellite's surface. The emissivity and reflectivity of surface features are generally anticorrelated, and both values are fairly high. Inversion of either set of data alone yields dielectric constants ranging from 1.5 to 3 or 4, consistent with an icy hydrocarbon or water ice composition. However, the dielectric constants retrieved from radiometric data alone are usually less than those inferred from backscatter measurements, a discrepancy consistent with similar analyses dating back to lunar observations in the 1960's. Here we seek to reconcile Titan's reflectivity and emissivity observations using a single physical model of the surface. Our approach is to calculate the energy scattered by Titan's surface and near subsurface, with the remainder absorbed. In equilibrium the absorption equals the emission, so that both the reflectivity and emissivity are described by the model. We use a form of the Kirchhoff model for modeling surface scatter, and a model based on weak localization of light for the volume scatter. With this model we present dielectric constant and surface roughness parameters that match both sets of Cassini RADAR observations over limited regions on Titan's surface, helping to constrain the composition and roughness of the surface. Most regions display electrical properties consistent with solid surfaces, however some of the darker "lake-like" features at higher latitudes can be modeled as either solid or liquid materials. The ambiguity arises from the limited set of observational angles available.

  17. «Una reflexión serena y objetiva». Galileo y el intento de autorrehabilitación de la Iglesia Católica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beltrán, Antonio

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available Not available.En 1979, el papa Juan Pablo II ordenaba una «reflexión serena y objetiva» sobre el caso Galileo. Posteriormente el pontífice ha reiterado el impulso y el respeto de la Iglesia a la libertad de la investigación y a la legítima autonomía de la ciencia. Aquí se examinan dos ejemplos de estas directrices y actitudes de la Iglesia. El primero es la interpretación de las condenas de Copérnico y Galileo que empezó a gestarse, tras la muerte de este último, en el seno de la Iglesia católica, y que hoy tiene su última versión en W. Brandmüller, uno de los miembros de la comisión papal para el estudio del caso Galileo, interpretación que diluye la gravedad de las condenas de 1616 y 1633 y atribuye a la Iglesia un escrúpulo científico que Galileo no habría tenido. El segundo ejemplo examinado es el «caso Paschini»: la censura y manipulación de su texto sobre Galileo por parte de las autoridades del Vaticano que se lo habían encargado.

  18. The GalileoMobile Project: sharing astronomy with students and teachers around the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez Herrera, Sandra; Del Sordo, Fabio; Spinelli, Patricia; Ntormousi, Eva

    2015-08-01

    Astronomy is an inspiring tool that can be used to motivate children to learn more about the world, to encourage critical thinking, and engage them in different scientific disciplines. Although many outreach programs bring astronomy to the classroom, most of them act in developed countries and rely heavily on internet connection. This leaves pupils and teachers in remote areas with little access to the latest space missions and the modern astronomical advances. GalileoMobile is an itinerant astronomy education initiative aiming to bridge this gap by donating educational material and organizing activities, experiments and teacher workshops at schools in rural areas. The initiative is run on a voluntary basis by an international team of astronomers, educators, and science communicators, working together to stimulate curiosity and interest in learning, to exchange different visions of the cosmos and to inspire a feeling of unity "under the same sky" between people from different cultures. Since the creation of the project in 2008, we have travelled to Chile, Bolivia, Peru, India, Uganda, Brazil and Colombia, and worked with about 70 schools. From our experiences, we learnt that 1) bringing experts from other countries is very stimulating for children and encourages a collaboration beyond borders; 2) inquiry-based methods are important for making the learning process more effective; 3) involving local educators in our activities helps the longstanding continuation of the project. We are incorporating these lessons learned into a new concept of the project. Constellation 2015, aims to establish a South American network of schools committed to the long-term organisation of astronomical outreach activities amongst their pupils and local communities. Constellation was declared Cosmic Light Project by the International Year of Light 2015 and awarded funding by the OAD. At this Focus Meeting, we will present the outcomes from our latest expeditions in Brazil and Colombia in

  19. Galileo observations of post-imbrium lunar craters during the first Earth-Moon flyby

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Alfred S.; Gaddis, Lisa R.; Neukum, Gerhard; Hoffmann, Harald; Pieters, Carle M.; Head, James W.

    Copernican-age craters are among the most conspicuous features seen on the far side and western limb of the Moon in the Galileo multispectral images acquired in December 1990. Among the new morphologic observations of far-side craters are bright rays, continuous ejecta deposits, and dark rings associated with probable impact-melt veneers. These observations suggest that the mapped age assignments of several large far-side craters (Ohm, Robertson, and possibly Lowell and Lenz) need revision. New crater size-frequency measurements on Lunar Orbiter images suggest the following age reassignments: Hausen (170 km diameter), Pythagoras (120 km), and Bullialdus (61 km) from Eratosthenian to Upper Imbrian, and Carpenter (60 km) and Harpalus (39 km) from Copernican to Eratosthenian. Colors and albedos of craters (away from impact-melt veneers) are correlated with their geologic emplacement ages as determined from counts of superposed craters; these age-color relations are used to estimate the emplacement age (time since impact event) for other Copernican-age craters. These age-color relations indicate a probable Copernican age for 27 far-side or western limb craters larger than 10 km diameter that were not previously mapped as Copernican. The apparent deficiency of Copernican craters on the far side compared with the near side in published geologic maps is not present in our data. Age-color trends differ between mare and highland regions and between the interiors and continuous ejecta of the craters. Similar trends are established for color and albedo versus soil-maturity indices for the returned lunar samples, with distinct trends for mare and highland soils. However, the mare versus highland offsets are reversed in the two comparisons. These relations can be explained by variations in regolith thicknesses and rates of mixing with relatively fresh, crystalline ejecta. Therefore, the soil-maturity trends represent longer geologic time periods in regions with thinner

  20. Detecting 3D Vegetation Structure with the Galileo Space Probe: Can a Distant Probe Detect Vegetation Structure on Earth?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher E Doughty

    Full Text Available Sagan et al. (1993 used the Galileo space probe data and first principles to find evidence of life on Earth. Here we ask whether Sagan et al. (1993 could also have detected whether life on Earth had three-dimensional structure, based on the Galileo space probe data. We reanalyse the data from this probe to see if structured vegetation could have been detected in regions with abundant photosynthetic pigments through the anisotropy of reflected shortwave radiation. We compare changing brightness of the Amazon forest (a region where Sagan et al. (1993 noted a red edge in the reflectance spectrum, indicative of photosynthesis as the planet rotates to a common model of reflectance anisotropy and found measured increase of surface reflectance of 0.019 ± 0.003 versus a 0.007 predicted from only anisotropic effects. We hypothesize the difference was due to minor cloud contamination. However, the Galileo dataset had only a small change in phase angle (sun-satellite position which reduced the observed anisotropy signal and we demonstrate that theoretically if the probe had a variable phase angle between 0-20°, there would have been a much larger predicted change in surface reflectance of 0.1 and under such a scenario three-dimensional vegetation structure on Earth could possibly have been detected. These results suggest that anisotropic effects may be useful to help determine whether exoplanets have three-dimensional vegetation structure in the future, but that further comparisons between empirical and theoretical results are first necessary.

  1. Detecting 3D Vegetation Structure with the Galileo Space Probe: Can a Distant Probe Detect Vegetation Structure on Earth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Christopher E; Wolf, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Sagan et al. (1993) used the Galileo space probe data and first principles to find evidence of life on Earth. Here we ask whether Sagan et al. (1993) could also have detected whether life on Earth had three-dimensional structure, based on the Galileo space probe data. We reanalyse the data from this probe to see if structured vegetation could have been detected in regions with abundant photosynthetic pigments through the anisotropy of reflected shortwave radiation. We compare changing brightness of the Amazon forest (a region where Sagan et al. (1993) noted a red edge in the reflectance spectrum, indicative of photosynthesis) as the planet rotates to a common model of reflectance anisotropy and found measured increase of surface reflectance of 0.019 ± 0.003 versus a 0.007 predicted from only anisotropic effects. We hypothesize the difference was due to minor cloud contamination. However, the Galileo dataset had only a small change in phase angle (sun-satellite position) which reduced the observed anisotropy signal and we demonstrate that theoretically if the probe had a variable phase angle between 0-20°, there would have been a much larger predicted change in surface reflectance of 0.1 and under such a scenario three-dimensional vegetation structure on Earth could possibly have been detected. These results suggest that anisotropic effects may be useful to help determine whether exoplanets have three-dimensional vegetation structure in the future, but that further comparisons between empirical and theoretical results are first necessary.

  2. Texture and composition of Titan's equatorial region inferred from Cassini SAR inversion: Implications for aeolian transport at Saturn's largest moon

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, Antoine; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Lemonnier, Florentin; Gall, Alice Le; Ferrari, Cécile; Paillou, Philippe; Narteau, Clément

    2017-01-01

    Sand seas on Titan may reflect the present and past climatic conditions. Understanding the morphodynamics and physico-chemical properties of Titan's dunes is therefore essential for a better comprehension of the climatic and geological history of the largest Saturn's moon. We derived quantitatively surface properties (texture, composition) from the modelling of microwave backscattered signal and Monte-Carlo inversion of despeckled Cassini/SAR data over sand sea. We show that dunes and interdu...

  3. The Gravity Field of Saturn and the Mass of the Saturnian Rings at the end of the Cassini Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Robert A.; Brozovic, Marina; Roth, Duane C.

    2016-05-01

    Following its flyby of Titan on 2016 November 29, Cassini will begin a set 20 high inclination orbits, known as the F-ring orbits, that pass over the ring plane and have periapses near the F-ring. The final Titan flyby on 2017 April 22 will redirect the spacecraft into the proximal orbits, a series 22 orbits with periapses between the innermost D-ring and the upper layer of Saturn’s atmosphere. The proximal orbits will be strongly perturbed the gravitational field of Saturn and slightly perturbed by the gravity of rings. The ring gravity will also affect the F-ring orbits. This paper presents the results of an analysis of simulated radiometric data acquired during the final 42 Cassini orbits. We investigate the sensitivity of the data to the ring mass and gravitational harmonics of the planet. We limit the simulated data quantity to the DSN coverage currently being requested by the Cassini Project augumented by several critical passes expected to be obtained from ESA southern hemisphere stations. We assume a data accuracy consistent with projected effects of solar plasma. In the dynamical model of the spacecraft motion we account for non-gravitational accelerations caused by the planned momentum management to be performed with Reaction Wheel Assembly and thrusters, by the Radioisotope Thermo-electric Generator, and by solar radiation pressure. We use a weighted-least squares procedure to obtain estimates of spacecraft’s state, masses of the rings, the gravity harmonics, and the non-gravitational accelerations. We find that the final orbits of the Cassini mission should yield high accuracy estimates of the gravitational harmonics through J12 and statistically meaningful estimates of the A- and B-ring masses.The research described in this paper was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Adminstration.

  4. Analyse d'occultations solaires et stellaires par Titan observées par l'instrument Cassini/VIMS

    OpenAIRE

    Bellucci , Aurélie

    2008-01-01

    The observation of solar and stellar occultations by Titan allows us to study the thick atmosphere of this Saturnian satellite, regarding its gas and haze composition. The principle of these observations, done by the visible and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft, is to measure the transmission of the stellar or solar flux through Titan?s atmosphere. Data consist in a set of lightcurves at different wavelengths and a set of spectra for different altitudes of t...

  5. The composition of the Jovian atmosphere as determined by the Galileo probe mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, H B; Atreya, S K; Carignan, G R; Donahue, T M; Haberman, J A; Harpold, D N; Hartle, R E; Hunten, D M; Kasprzak, W T; Mahaffy, P R; Owen, T C; Way, S H

    1998-09-25

    The Galileo probe mass spectrometer determined the composition of the Jovian atmosphere for species with masses between 2 and 150 amu from 0.5 to 21.1 bars. This paper presents the results of analysis of some of the constituents detected: H2, He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, NH3, H2O, H2S, C2 and C3 nonmethane hydrocarbons, and possibly PH3 and Cl. 4He/H2 in the Jovian atmosphere was measured to be 0.157 +/- 0.030. 13C/C12 was found to be 0.0108 +/- 0.0005, and D/H and 3He/4He were measured. Ne was depleted, < or = 0.13 times solar, Ar < or = 1.7 solar, Kr < or = 5 solar, and Xe < or = 5 solar. CH4 has a constant mixing ratio of (2.1 +/- 0.4) x 10(-3) (12C, 2.9 solar), where the mixing ratio is relative to H2. Upper limits to the H2O mixing ratio rose from 8 x 10(-7) at pressures <3.8 bars to (5.6 +/- 2.5) x 10(-5) (16O, 0.033 +/- 0.015 solar) at 11.7 bars and, provisionally, about an order of magnitude larger at 18.7 bars. The mixing ratio of H2S was <10(-6) at pressures less than 3.8 bars but rose from about 0.7 x 10(-5) at 8.7 bars to about 7.7 x 10(-5) (32S, 2.5 solar) above 15 bars. Only very large upper limits to the NH3 mixing ratio have been set at present. If PH3 and Cl were present, their mixing ratios also increased with pressure. Species were detected at mass peaks appropriate for C2 and C3 hydrocarbons. It is not yet clear which of these were atmospheric constituents and which were instrumentally generated. These measurements imply (1) fractionation of 4He, (2) a local, altitude-dependent depletion of condensables, probably because the probe entered the descending arm of a circulation cell, (3) that icy planetesimals made significant contributions to the volatile inventory, and (4) a moderate decrease in D/H but no detectable change in (D + 3He)/H in this part of the galaxy during the past 4.6 Gyr.

  6. Large Impact Features on Europa: Results of the Galileo Nominal Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Johnnie N.; Asphaug, E.; Sullivan, R.J.; Klemaszewski, J.E.; Bender, K.C.; Greeley, R.; Geissler, P.E.; McEwen, A.S.; Turtle, E.P.; Phillips, C.B.; Tufts, B.R.; Head, J. W.; Pappalardo, R.T.; Jones, K.B.; Chapman, C.R.; Belton, M.J.S.; Kirk, R.L.; Morrison, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Galileo Orbiter examined several impact features on Europa at considerably better resolution than was possible from Voyager. The new data allow us to describe the morphology and infer the geology of the largest impact features on Europa, which are probes into the crust. We observe two basic types of large impact features: (1) "classic" impact craters that grossly resemble well-preserved lunar craters of similar size but are more topographically subdued (e.g., Pwyll) and (2) very flat circular features that lack the basic topographic structures of impact craters such as raised rims, a central depression, or central peaks, and which largely owe their identification as impact features to the field of secondary craters radially sprayed about them (e.g., Callanish). Our interpretation is that the classic craters (all Callisto, probably due to the enhanced viscous relaxation produced by a steeper thermal gradient on Europa. Pedestal ejecta facies on Europa (and Ganymede) may be produced by the relief-flattening movement of plastically deforming but otherwise solid ice that was warm at the time of emplacement. Callanish and Tyre do not appear to be larger and even more viscously relaxed versions of the classic craters; rather they display totally different morphologies such as distinctive textures and a series of large concentric structural rings cutting impact-feature-related materials. Impact simulations suggest that the distinctive morphologies would not be produced by impact into a solid ice target, but may be explained by impact into an ice layer ~10 to 15 km thick overlying a low-viscosity material such as water. The very wide (near antipodal) separation of Callanish and Tyre imply that ~10-15 km may have been the global average thickness of the rigid crust of Europa when these impacts occurred. The absence of detectable craters superposed on the interior deposits of Callanish suggests that it is geologically young (<108years). Hence, it seems likely that our

  7. IMF dependence of Saturn's auroras: modelling study of HST and Cassini data from 12–15 February 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Belenkaya

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available To gain better understanding of auroral processes in Saturn's magnetosphere, we compare ultraviolet (UV auroral images obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST with the position of the open-closed field line boundary in the ionosphere calculated using a magnetic field model that employs Cassini measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF as input. Following earlier related studies of pre-orbit insertion data from January 2004 when Cassini was located ~ 1300 Saturn radii away from the planet, here we investigate the interval 12–15 February 2008, when UV images of Saturn's southern dayside aurora were obtained by the HST while the Cassini spacecraft measured the IMF in the solar wind just upstream of the dayside bow shock. This configuration thus provides an opportunity, unique to date, to determine the IMF impinging on Saturn's magnetosphere during imaging observations, without the need to take account of extended and uncertain interplanetary propagation delays. The paraboloid model of Saturn's magnetosphere is then employed to calculate the magnetospheric magnetic field structure and ionospheric open-closed field line boundary for averaged IMF vectors that correspond, with appropriate response delays, to four HST images. We show that the IMF-dependent open field region calculated from the model agrees reasonably well with the area lying poleward of the UV emissions, thus supporting the view that the poleward boundary of Saturn's auroral oval in the dayside ionosphere lies adjacent to the open-closed field line boundary.

  8. El caso Galileo o las Paradojas de una Racionalidad Científica Positivista según Paul Karl Feyerabend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Gargiulo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Galilean case meant for Feyerabend the opportunity to prove methodological and historically the paradoxes and limitations of a positivist notion of science. Feyerabend demonstrates the contradictions that suppose the different attempts of neo-positivism logical to establish a demarcation criterion that defines what science is. He realizes how in the case of Galileo Galilei those elements against which the logical positivism tries to delimit a negative definition of science, paradoxically constitute the heart of the scientific endeavor. Now this does not mean –as a considerable number of critics have pointed out– that Feyerabend uphold an anarchic, irrational or relativist view about science. Conversely, in a positive sense it is possible to say that the emblematic case of Galileo not only offered to Feyerabend the occasion to formulate a negative and sceptical argumentation with regard to that notion of science but, at the same time, it represented for him a chance to rethink the science from a broader perspective or rationality.

  9. Last Looks at the Eye of Saturn by Cassini/VIMS During the Grand Finale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momary, Thomas W.; Baines, Kevin H.; Badman, Sarah; Brown, Robert H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Clark, Roger Nelson; Nicholson, Philip D.; Sotin, Christophe

    2017-10-01

    A lasting remnant of the Great Storm that erupted on Saturn in late 2010 has been a massive lone anticyclone persisting to the present time in a NH3-dry 5-µm-bright “desert” zone that spans the entire Saturnian globe at 34o N. We have been observing this oval storm with Cassini/VIMS since 2011 and, in 2017, as Cassini performs its Grand Finale orbits close to the planet, have captured it at our highest resolution since January 2012 at 260 km/pixel - enough to resolve spiral structure inside the oval at 5 µm. The spot drifts latitudinally in Saturn’s zonal currents: it was at 35.9o planetocentric latitude in May 2011, wandered northward to 37.8o in 2012, hovered near 37o through 2013, meandered as far south as 36.5o in 2014, drifted northward to 37o in 2015, and then returned back to about 36.3o in 2016, where it remains presently. It has also periodically bumped up against the dark band above it, spinning off material in 2013, 2015, and 2017. We measured a prograde zonal drift speed of 22 m/s in 2012, increasing as much as 60% through 2013, then relaxing to a more moderate 15 m/s in 2014 and 2015. It slowed considerably in 2016 to 4.7 m/s and is currently drifting slightly faster at 8.5 m/s. The spot has varied in size over time as it spins, spanning 4.9o x 3.2o in 2011, elongating to 7.3o x 2.9o by 2013, contracting to 5.5o x 2.9o in 2014, enlarging again to 9o x 4o in 2015, and contracting currently to 7.0o x 3.2o (6100 x 3200 km) in 2017, symmetrically oval in shape. It has varied in terms of cloudiness, being 90% 5-µm dark (obscured) in 2011, whereas by 2013 it was mostly bright (clear) with a thin dark edge. It was 90% dark in 2015, and in 2017 is about 65% obscured, with a bright central eye. Utilizing night observations to isolate thermal flux, we have found that the mean 5-µm flux coming from the anticyclone has diminished steadily by about 75% since 2013. The entire storm latitude of ~34o N itself has remained persistently 5-µm bright since 2011

  10. Compositional mapping of Saturn's satellite Dione with Cassini VIMS and implications of dark material in the Saturn system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R.N.; Curchin, J.M.; Jaumann, R.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Brown, R.H.; Hoefen, T.M.; Stephan, K.; Moore, Johnnie N.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Nicholson, P.D.; Nelson, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    Cassini VIMS has obtained spatially resolved imaging spectroscopy data on numerous satellites of Saturn. A very close fly-by of Dione provided key information for solving the riddle of the origin of the dark material in the Saturn system. The Dione VIMS data show a pattern of bombardment of fine, sub-0.5-??m diameter particles impacting the satellite from the trailing side direction. Multiple lines of evidence point to an external origin for the dark material on Dione, including the global spatial pattern of dark material, local patterns including crater and cliff walls shielding implantation on slopes facing away from the trailing side, exposing clean ice, and slopes facing the trailing direction which show higher abundances of dark material. Multiple spectral features of the dark material match those seen on Phoebe, Iapetus, Hyperion, Epimetheus and the F-ring, implying the material has a common composition throughout the Saturn system. However, the exact composition of the dark material remains a mystery, except that bound water and, tentatively, ammonia are detected, and there is evidence both for and against cyanide compounds. Exact identification of composition requires additional laboratory work. A blue scattering peak with a strong UV-visible absorption is observed in spectra of all satellites which contain dark material, and the cause is Rayleigh scattering, again pointing to a common origin. The Rayleigh scattering effect is confirmed with laboratory experiments using ice and 0.2-??m diameter carbon grains when the carbon abundance is less than about 2% by weight. Rayleigh scattering in solids is also confirmed in naturally occurring terrestrial rocks, and in previously published reflectance studies. The spatial pattern, Rayleigh scattering effect, and spectral properties argue that the dark material is only a thin coating on Dione's surface, and by extension is only a thin coating on Phoebe, Hyperion, and Iapetus, although the dark material abundance

  11. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. II. Results at the end of nominal mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R.N.; Cuzzi, J.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Nicholson, P.D.; McCord, T.B.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Tosi, F.; Nelson, R.M.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detailed analysis of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's icy satellites as derived by full-disk observations obtained by visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) experiment aboard Cassini. In this paper, we have extended the coverage until the end of the Cassini's nominal mission (June 1st 2008), while a previous paper (Filacchione, G., and 28 colleagues [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290, hereby referred to as Paper I) reported the preliminary results of this study. During the four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the entire population of Saturn's icy satellites allowing us to make a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the major satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus) and irregular moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso, Phoebe). The results we discuss here are derived from the entire dataset available at June 2008 which consists of 1417 full-disk observations acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (as defined in Paper I: I/F continua at 0.55 ??m, 1.822 ??m and 3.547 ??m, visible spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide bands depths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to investigate the disk-integrated composition of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants" abundances and typical regolith grain properties. These quantities vary from the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Janus visible colors are intermediate between these two classes having a slightly positive spectral slope. These results could help to decipher the origins and evolutionary history of the minor moons of the Saturn's system. We introduce a polar representation of the spectrophotometric

  12. Titan’s mid-latitude surface region from Cassini/VIMS data: Implications on the composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena; M. C Lopes, Rosaly; Malaska, Michael; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Drossart, Pierre; Elachi, Charles; Schmitt, Bernard; Philippe, Sylvain; Janssen, Michael A.; Hirtzig, Mathieu; Wall, Stephen D.; Lawrence, Kenneth J.; Altobelli, Nicolas; Bratsolis, Emmanuel; Radebaugh, Jani; Stephan, Katrin; Brown, Robert H.; Le Mouélic, Stephane; Le Gall, Alice; Villanueva, Edward; Bloom, Anthony; Witasse, Olivier; Matsoukas, Christos; Schoenfeld, Ashley

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the surface of Titan using spectro-imaging near-infrared data from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). We apply a radiative transfer code to first determine the contributions of atmospheric haze to the Titan spectrum and then derive the surface albedo (Solomonidou et al. 2014; 2016). We focus here on the geological major units identified in Lopes et al. (2010, 2016), Malaska et al. (2016) and Radebaugh et al. (2016) from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), data including mountains, different types of plains, labyrinths, impact craters, dune fields, and alluvial fans. We find that all regions classified as being the same geomorphological unit in SAR exhibit a coherent spectral response after the VIMS data analysis, thus suggesting a good correlation in the classification between SAR and VIMS. The Huygens landing site appears to be compositionally similar to one type of plains unit (variable plains), suggesting similar plain formation mechanisms. We have sub-categorized the VIMS data into three albedo categories (high, medium, low). By matching the extracted albedos with candidate materials for Titan’s surface (GhoSST database), we find that all regions of interest fall into one out of three main types of major candidate constituents: water ice, tholin-like material, or an unknown, very dark material. This suggests that Titan’s surface is possibly dominated by tholin-like material and a very dark unknown (most likely organic) material, and that most of the surface is covered by atmospheric/organic deposits. Water ice is also present at a number of regions as major constituent at latitudes higher than 30N and 30S. The surface albedo differences and similarities among the various geomorphological units constrain the implications for the geological processes that govern Titan’s surface and interior (e.g. aeolian, fluvial, sedimentary, lacustrine, cryovolcanic, tectonic).References: Lopes et al.: Icarus, 205, 540-558, 2010; Lopes

  13. A Model of Titan-like Chemistry to Connect Experiments and Cassini Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Alexander W.; Sciamma-O’Brien, Ella; Salama, Farid; Mazur, Eric

    2018-02-01

    A numerical model is presented for interpreting the chemical pathways that lead to the experimental mass spectra acquired in the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) laboratory experiments and for comparing the electron density and temperature of the THS plasma to observations made at Titan by the Cassini spacecraft. The THS plasma is a pulsed glow-discharge experiment designed to simulate the reaction of N2/CH4-dominated gas in Titan's upper atmosphere. The transient, one-dimensional model of THS chemistry tracks the evolution of more than 120 species in the direction of the plasma flow. As the minor species C2H2 and C2H4 are added to the N2/CH4-based mixture, the model correctly predicts the emergence of reaction products with up to five carbon atoms in relative abundances that agree well with measured mass spectra. Chemical growth in Titan's upper atmosphere transpires through ion–neutral and neutral–neutral chemistry, and the main reactions involving a series of known atmospheric species are retrieved from the calculation. The model indicates that the electron density and chemistry are steady during more than 99% of the 300 μs long discharge pulse. The model also suggests that the THS ionization fraction and electron temperature are comparable to those measured in Titan's upper atmosphere. These findings reaffirm that the THS plasma is a controlled analog environment for studying the first and intermediate steps of chemistry in Titan's upper atmosphere.

  14. Distribution of icy particles across Enceladus' surface as derived from Cassini-VIMS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Hansen, G. B.; Clark, R. N.; Buratti, B. J.; Brown, R. H.; Baines, K. H.; Newman, S. F.; Bellucci, G.; Filacchione, G.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Griffith, C. A.; Hibbitts, C. A.; McCord, T. B.; Nelson, R. M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Sotin, C.; Wagner, R.

    2008-02-01

    The surface of Enceladus consists almost completely of water ice. As the band depths of water ice absorptions are sensitive to the size of particles, absorptions can be used to map variations of icy particles across the surface. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observed Enceladus with a high spatial resolution during three Cassini flybys in 2005 (orbits EN 003, EN 004 and EN 011). Based on these data we measured the band depths of water ice absorptions at 1.04, 1.25, 1.5, and 2 μm. These band depths were compared to water ice models that represent theoretically calculated reflectance spectra for a range of particle diameters between 2 μm and 1 mm. The agreement between the experimental (VIMS) and model values supports the assumption that pure water ice characterizes the surface of Enceladus and therefore that variations in band depth correspond to variations in water ice particle diameters. Our measurements show that the particle diameter of water ice increases toward younger tectonically altered surface units with the largest particles exposed in relatively "fresh" surface material. The smallest particles were generally found in old densely cratered terrains. The largest particles (˜0.2 mm) are concentrated in the so called "tiger stripes" at the south pole. In general, the particle diameters are strongly correlated with geologic features and surface ages, indicating a stratigraphic evolution of the surface that is caused by cryovolcanic resurfacing and impact gardening.

  15. TITAN’S UPPER ATMOSPHERE FROM CASSINI/UVIS SOLAR OCCULTATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capalbo, Fernando J.; Bénilan, Yves [Laboratoire Inter-Universitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques (LISA), UMR 7583 du CNRS, Universités Paris Est Créteil (UPEC) and Paris Diderot - UPD, 61 avenue du Général de Gaulle, F-94010, Créteil Cédex (France); Yelle, Roger V.; Koskinen, Tommi T., E-mail: fernando.capalbo@lisa.u-pec.fr [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 E. University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Titan’s atmosphere is composed mainly of molecular nitrogen, methane being the principal trace gas. From the analysis of 8 solar occultations measured by the Extreme Ultraviolet channel of the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) on board Cassini, we derived vertical profiles of N{sub 2} in the range 1100–1600 km and vertical profiles of CH{sub 4} in the range 850–1300 km. The correction of instrument effects and observational effects applied to the data are described. We present CH{sub 4} mole fractions, and average temperatures for the upper atmosphere obtained from the N{sub 2} profiles. The occultations correspond to different times and locations, and an analysis of variability of density and temperature is presented. The temperatures were analyzed as a function of geographical and temporal variables, without finding a clear correlation with any of them, although a trend of decreasing temperature toward the north pole was observed. The globally averaged temperature obtained is (150 ± 1) K. We compared our results from solar occultations with those derived from other UVIS observations, as well as studies performed with other instruments. The observational data we present confirm the atmospheric variability previously observed, add new information to the global picture of Titan’s upper atmosphere composition, variability, and dynamics, and provide new constraints to photochemical models.

  16. High-resolution CASSINI-VIMS mosaics of Titan and the icy Saturnian satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; McCord, T.B.; Coradini, A.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; Cerroni, P.; Baines, K.H.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Combes, M.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Formisano, V.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, Christophe; Soderbloom, L.A.; Griffith, C.; Matz, K.-D.; Roatsch, Th.; Scholten, F.; Porco, C.C.

    2006-01-01

    The Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the CASSINI spacecraft obtained new spectral data of the icy satellites of Saturn after its arrival at Saturn in June 2004. VIMS operates in a spectral range from 0.35 to 5.2 ??m, generating image cubes in which each pixel represents a spectrum consisting of 352 contiguous wavebands. As an imaging spectrometer VIMS combines the characteristics of both a spectrometer and an imaging instrument. This makes it possible to analyze the spectrum of each pixel separately and to map the spectral characteristics spatially, which is important to study the relationships between spectral information and geological and geomorphologic surface features. The spatial analysis of the spectral data requires the determination of the exact geographic position of each pixel on the specific surface and that all 352 spectral elements of each pixel show the same region of the target. We developed a method to reproject each pixel geometrically and to convert the spectral data into map projected image cubes. This method can also be applied to mosaic different VIMS observations. Based on these mosaics, maps of the spectral properties for each Saturnian satellite can be derived and attributed to geographic positions as well as to geological and geomorphologic surface features. These map-projected mosaics are the basis for all further investigations. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Water Vapor in Titan's Stratosphere from Cassini CIRS Far-Infrared Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Anderson, C. M.; Gorius, N.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Coustenis, A.; Teanby, N. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Bezard, B.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Here we report the measurement of water vapor in Titan's stratosphere using the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). CIRS senses water emissions in the far infrared spectral region near 50 micron, which we have modeled using two independent radiative transfer codes. From the analysis of nadir spectra we have derived a mixing ratio of 0.14 +/- 0.05 ppb at an altitude of 97 km, which corresponds to an integrated (from 0 to 600 km) surface normalized column abundance of 3.7 +/- 1.3 1014 molecules/cm2. In the latitude range 80S to 30N we see no evidence for latitudinal variations in these abundances within the error bars. Using limb observations, we obtained mixing ratios of 0.13 +/- 0.04 ppb at an altitude of 115 km and 0.45 +/- 0.15 ppb at an altitude of 230 km, confirming that the water abundance has a positive vertical gradient as predicted by photochemical models. We have also fitted our data using scaling factors of 0.1-0.6 to these photochemical model profiles, indicating that the models over-predict the water abundance in Titan's lower stratosphere.

  18. The First Six Months of Iapetus Observations by the Cassini ISS Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denk, T.; Neukum, G.; Helfenstein, P.; Thomas, P. C.; Turtle, E. P.; McEwen, A. S.; Roatsch, T.; Veverka, J.

    2005-01-01

    Since Saturn arrival in June 2004, Iapetus has been studied intensively by the Cassini ISS camera [1] at various ranges. The first of two relatively close flybys in the primary mission occurred on Dec 31, 2004 at an altitude of approx.123,400 km over the northern leading hemisphere, resulting in images with a minimum pixel scale of 740 m. Detailed results of this flyby are given in [2], while this abstract covers the observations obtained earlier. Among the most important discoveries are: (a) Four giant impact basins with diameters between 390 and 550 km were detected, three of them are located in the dark terrain [3]. (b) Data revealed a >1300 km long ridge that marks exactly Iapetus' equator within the dark terrain. Individual mountains within the western part of the ridge reach heights of approx.20 km over surrounding terrain [3]. (c) Impact craters were confirmed to be the main geological feature within the dark terrain and at high southern latitudes. (d) There are numerous craters with dark walls roughly facing towards the central parts of the dark hemisphere [3]. (e) Almost all parts of Iapetus have been imaged at least at low resolution (< 60 km/pxl).

  19. Discovery of a New Cassini-Size Basin on Mars from MOLA Topographic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, H.; Sakimoto, S.; Roark, J.

    1999-01-01

    MOLA profile data collected during the Science Phasing Operations have revealed a previously unknown, 450 km wide, 2 km deep basin on Mars centered at 30N, 312W near the Phison Rupes. This structure, as large as and somewhat deeper than the very obvious Cassini impact basin located 1000 km to the SW, is not apparent in the existing good quality Viking imagery. Gridded MOLA data show the basin as a closed depression, but elevation contours show only weak correlation with what little structure exists in the area and with mapped geologic units. From analysis of slope breaks readily visible in two MOLA profiles we suggest this is at least a three-ring basin. Portions of rings from concentric fits to slope breaks align with some of the linear ridge-like structures of the Phison Rupes, and outline a region of lower crater density and smoother inter-crater plains. The discovery of such a pronounced topographic depression which lacks obvious visible structure suggests more such previously unknown features may exist on Mars, and that MOLA data may be useful in finding them.

  20. An Analysis of Cassini Observations Regarding the Structure of Jupiter's Equatorial Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, David S.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.

    2012-01-01

    A variety of intriguing atmospheric phenomena reside on both sides of Jupiter's equator. 5-micron bright hot spots and opaque plumes prominently exhibit dynamic behavior to the north, whereas compact, dark chevron-shaped features and isolated anticyclonic disturbances periodically occupy the southern equatorial latitudes. All of these phenomena are associated with the vertical and meridional perturbations of Rossby waves disturbing the mean atmospheric state. As previous observational analysis and numerical simulations have investigated the dynamics of the region, an examination of the atmosphere's vertical structure though radiative transfer analysis is necessary for improved understanding of this unique environment. Here we present preliminary analysis of a multispectral Cassini imaging data set acquired during the spacecraft's flyby of Jupiter in 2000. We evaluated multiple methane and continuum spectral channels at available viewing angles to improve constraints on the vertical structure of the haze and cloud layers comprising these interesting features. Our preliminary results indicate distinct differences in the structure for both hemispheres. Upper troposphere hazes and cloud layers are prevalent in the northern equatorial latitudes, but are not present in corresponding southern latitudes. Continued analysis will further constrain the precise structure present in these phenomena and the differences between them.

  1. Titan's ionosphere in the magnetosheath: Cassini RPWS results during the T32 flyby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Garnier

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The Cassini mission has provided much information about the Titan environment, with numerous low altitude encounters with the moon being always inside the magnetosphere. The only encounter taking place outside the magnetopause, in the magnetosheath, occurred the 13 June 2007 (T32 flyby. This paper is dedicated to the analysis of the Radio and Plasma Wave investigation data during this specific encounter, in particular with the Langmuir probe, providing a detailed picture of the cold plasma environment and of Titan's ionosphere with these unique plasma conditions. The various pressure terms were also calculated during the flyby. The comparison with the T30 flyby, whose geometry was very similar to the T32 encounter but where Titan was immersed in the kronian magnetosphere, reveals that the evolution of the incident plasma has a significant influence on the structure of the ionosphere, with in particular a change of the exo-ionospheric shape. The electrical conductivities are given along the trajectory of the spacecraft and the discovery of a polar plasma cavity is reported.

  2. Titan's ionosphere in the magnetosheath: Cassini RPWS results during the T32 flyby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Garnier

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The Cassini mission has provided much information about the Titan environment, with numerous low altitude encounters with the moon being always inside the magnetosphere. The only encounter taking place outside the magnetopause, in the magnetosheath, occurred the 13 June 2007 (T32 flyby. This paper is dedicated to the analysis of the Radio and Plasma Wave investigation data during this specific encounter, in particular with the Langmuir probe, providing a detailed picture of the cold plasma environment and of Titan's ionosphere with these unique plasma conditions. The various pressure terms were also calculated during the flyby. The comparison with the T30 flyby, whose geometry was very similar to the T32 encounter but where Titan was immersed in the kronian magnetosphere, reveals that the evolution of the incident plasma has a significant influence on the structure of the ionosphere, with in particular a change of the exo-ionospheric shape. The electrical conductivities are given along the trajectory of the spacecraft and the discovery of a polar plasma cavity is reported.

  3. A Three-Dimensional View of Titan's Surface Features from Cassini RADAR Stereogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, R. L.; Howington-Kraus, E.; Redding, B. L.; Becker, T. L.; Lee, E. M.; Stiles, B. W.; Hensley, S.; Hayes, A.; Lopes, R. M.; Lorenz, R. D.; Mitchell, K. L.; Radebaugh, J.; Paganelli, F.; Soderblom, L. A.; Stofan, E. R.; Wood, C. A.; Wall, S. D.; Cassini RADAR Team

    2008-12-01

    As of the end of its four-year Prime Mission, Cassini has obtained 300-1500 m resolution synthetic aperture radar images of the surface of Titan during 19 flybys. The elongated image swaths overlap extensively, and ~2% of the surface has now been imaged two or more times. The majority of image pairs have different viewing directions, and thus contain stereo parallax that encodes information about Titan's surface relief over distances of ~1 km and greater. As we have previously reported, the first step toward extracting quantitative topographic information was the development of rigorous "sensor models" that allowed the stereo systems previously used at the USGS and JPL to map Venus with Magellan images to be used for Titan mapping. The second major step toward extensive topomapping of Titan has been the reprocessing of the RADAR images based on an improved model of the satellite's rotation. Whereas the original images (except for a few pairs obtained at similar orbital phase, some of which we have mapped previously) were offset by as much as 30 km, the new versions align much better. The remaining misalignments, typically carbono)logic" cycle of precipitation, evaporation, and surface and subsurface fluid flow?

  4. Spatially resolved near infrared observations of Enceladus' tiger stripe eruptions from Cassini VIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Deepak; Hedman, Matthew M.; Clark, Roger N.; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2017-08-01

    Particle properties of individual fissure eruptions within Enceladus' plume have been analyzed using high spatial resolution Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observations from the Cassini mission. To first order, the spectra of the materials emerging from Cairo, Baghdad and Damascus sulci are very similar, with a strong absorption band around 3 μm due to water-ice. The band minimum position indicates that the ice grains emerging from all the fissures are predominantly crystalline, which implies that the water-ice particles' formation temperatures are likely above 130 K. However, there is also evidence for subtle variations in the material emerging from the different source fissures. Variations in the spectral slope between 1-2.5 μm are observed and probably reflect differences in the size distributions of particles between 0.5 and 5 μm in radius. We also note variations in the shape of the 3 μm water-ice absorption band, which are consistent with differences in the relative abundance of > 5 μm particles. These differences in the particle size distribution likely reflect variations in the particle formation conditions and/or their transport within the fissures. These observations therefore provide strong motivation for detailed modeling to help place important constraints on the diversity of the sub-surface environmental conditions at the geologically active south-pole of Enceladus.

  5. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  6. Contra Galileos: la crítica neoplatónica de Juliano el Apóstata al Cristianismo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Guarde Paz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo explora las relaciones entre la crítica neoplatónica al cristianismo del Emperador Juliano el Apóstata y las de sus predecesores, los Christenhasser Celso y Porfirio. En la primera parte introduciremos las motivaciones que empujaron a Juliano a su apostasía de la fe cristiana así como las bases de su paganismo, construido sobre el neoplatonismo y la teúrgia oriental de Jámblico de Calcis. A continuación se sistematizarán los argumentos de su Contra Galileos, enfatizando los puntos de contacto con la tradición anticristiana precedente y resaltando el uso retórico e instrumental que el autor realiza del judaísmo.

  7. Origin, Bulk Chemical Composition and Physical Structure of the Galilean Satellites of Jupiter: A Post-Galileo Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, A. J. R.

    1999-01-01

    The origin of Jupiter and the Galilean satellite system is examined in the light of the new data that has been obtained by the NASA Galileo Project. In particular, special attention is given to a theory of satellite origin which was put forward at the start of the Galileo Mission and on the basis of which several predictions have now been proven successful. These predictions concern the chemical composition of Jupiter's atmosphere and the physical structure of the satellites. According to the proposed theory of satellite origin, each of the Galilean satellites formed by chemical condensation and gravitational accumulation of solid grains within a concentric family of orbiting gas rings. These rings were cast off equatorially by the rotating proto-Jovian cloud (PJC which contracted gravitationally to form Jupiter some 4 1/2 billion years ago. The PJC formed from the gas and grains left over from the gas ring that had been shed at Jupiter's orbit by the contracting proto-solar cloud (PSC Supersonic turbulent convection provides the means for shedding discrete gas rings. The temperatures T (sub n) of the system of gas rings shed by the PSC and PJC vary with their respective mean orbital radii R (sub n) (n = 0, 1,2,...) according as T (sub n) proportional to R (sub n) (exp -0.9). If the planet Mercury condenses at 1640 K, so accounting for the high density of that planet via a process of chemical fractionation between iron and silicates, then T (sub n) at Jupiter's orbit is 158 K. Only 35% of the water vapour condenses out. Thus fractionation between rock and ice, together with an enhancement in the abundance of solids relative to gas which takes place through gravitational sedimentation of solids onto the mean orbit of the gas ring, ensures nearly equal proportions of rock and ice in each of Ganymede and Callisto. Io and Europa condense above the H20 ice point and consist solely of hydrated rock (h-rock). The Ganymedan condensate consists of h-rock and H20 ice. For

  8. Design of a Circularly Polarized Galileo E6-Band Textile Antenna by Dedicated Multiobjective Constrained Pareto Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaut Dierck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Designing textile antennas for real-life applications requires a design strategy that is able to produce antennas that are optimized over a wide bandwidth for often conflicting characteristics, such as impedance matching, axial ratio, efficiency, and gain, and, moreover, that is able to account for the variations that apply for the characteristics of the unconventional materials used in smart textile systems. In this paper, such a strategy, incorporating a multiobjective constrained Pareto optimization, is presented and applied to the design of a Galileo E6-band antenna with optimal return loss and wide-band axial ratio characteristics. Subsequently, different prototypes of the optimized antenna are fabricated and measured to validate the proposed design strategy.

  9. The Outer Planets and their Moons Comparative Studies of the Outer Planets prior to the Exploration of the Saturn System by Cassini-Huygens

    CERN Document Server

    Encrenaz, T; Owen, T. C; Sotin, C

    2005-01-01

    This volume gives an integrated summary of the science related to the four giant planets in our solar system. It is the result of an ISSI workshop on «A comparative study of the outer planets before the exploration of Saturn by Cassini-Huygens» which was held at ISSI in Bern on January 12-16, 2004. Representatives of several scientific communities, such as planetary scientists, astronomers, space physicists, chemists and astrobiologists have met with the aim to review the knowledge on four major themes: (1) the study of the formation and evolution processes of the outer planets and their satellites, beginning with the formation of compounds and planetesimals in the solar nebula, and the subsequent evolution of the interiors of the outer planets, (2) a comparative study of the atmospheres of the outer planets and Titan, (3) the study of the planetary magnetospheres and their interactions with the solar wind, and (4) the formation and properties of satellites and rings, including their interiors, surfaces, an...

  10. Low-cost, 4-system, precise GNSS positioning: a GPS, Galileo, BDS and QZSS ionosphere-weighted RTK analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odolinski, Robert; Teunissen, Peter J. G.

    2017-12-01

    With the combination of emerging GNSSs, single-frequency (SF) precise RTK positioning becomes possible. In this contribution we evaluate such low-cost ublox receiver and antenna performance when combining real data of four CDMA systems, namely L1 GPS, E1 Galileo, L1 QZSS, and B1 BDS. Comparisons are made to more expensive dual-frequency (DF) GPS receivers and antennas. The formal and empirical ambiguity success rates and positioning precisions will first be evaluated while making use of L1+E1, so as to investigate whether instantaneous SF RTK is possible without the need of B1 BDS or L1 QZSS. This is followed by an analysis of the SF 4-system model performance when the residual ionosphere can be ignored and modeled as a function of the baseline length, respectively. The analyses are conducted for a location in Dunedin, New Zealand, and compared to Perth, Australia with the better visibility of BDS and QZSS. The results indicate that successful instantaneous and precise RTK positioning is feasible while using L1 GPS and E1 Galileo data, and that the SF 4-system model is competitive to DF GPS even when residual ionospheric delays are present. We finally demonstrate that when the impact from the ionosphere increases and more than one epoch is needed for successful ambiguity resolution, the SF 4-system model performance can still remain competitive with the DF GPS receivers. This is particularly true in Perth with more satellites and when higher than customary elevation cut-off angles need to be used to avoid low-elevation multipath.

  11. Optical modulator including grapene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  12. Statistical study of Saturn's auroral electron properties with Cassini/UVIS FUV spectral images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustin, J.; Grodent, D.; Radioti, A.; Pryor, W.; Lamy, L.; Ajello, J.

    2017-03-01

    About 2000 FUV spectra of different regions of Saturn's aurora, obtained with Cassini/UVIS from December 2007 to October 2014 have been examined. Two methods have been employed to determine the mean energy of the precipitating electrons. The first is based on the absorption of the auroral emission by hydrocarbons and the second uses the ratio between the brightness of the Lyman-α line and the H2 total UV emission (Lyα/H2), which is directly related to via a radiative transfer formalism. In addition, two atmospheric models obtained recently from UVIS polar occultations have been employed for the first time. It is found that the atmospheric model related to North observations near 70° latitude provides the results most consistent with constraints previously published. On a global point of view, the two methods provide comparable results, with mostly in the 7-17 keV range with the hydrocarbon method and in the 1-11 keV range with the Lyα/H2 method. Since hydrocarbons have been detected on ∼20% of the auroral spectra, the Lyα/H2 technique is more effective to describe the primary auroral electrons, as it is applicable to all spectra and allows an access to the lowest range of energies (≤5 keV), unreachable by the hydrocarbon method. The distribution of is found fully compatible with independent HST/ACS constraints (emission peak in the 840-1450 km range) and FUSE findings (emission peaking at pressure level ≤0.2 μbar). In addition, exhibits enhancements in the 3 LT-10 LT sector, consistent with SKR intensity measurements. An energy flux-electron energy diagram built from all the data points strongly suggests that acceleration by field-aligned potentials as described by Knight's theory is a main mechanism responsible for electron precipitation creating the aurora. Assuming a fixed electron temperature of 0.1 keV, a best-fit equatorial electron source population density of 3 × 103 m-3 is derived, which matches very well to the plasma properties observed with

  13. Titan's Sand Seas properties from the modelling of microwave-backscattered signal of Cassini/SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Antoine; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Lommonier, Florentin; Ferrari, Cécile; Paillou, Philippe; Le Gall, Alice; Narteau, Clément

    2016-04-01

    Titan's sand seas may reflect the current and past surface conditions. Assessing the physicochemical properties and the morphodynamics of the equatorial linear dunes is a milestone in our comprehension of the climatic and geological history of the largest Saturn's moon. Based on enhanced SAR processing leading to despeckled Cassini RADAR data sets, we analyzed quantitatively the surface properties (e.g., slopes, texture, composition...) over the sand seas. First, using a large amount of overlaps and a wide range of incidence angle and azimuths, we show that the radar cross-section over the inter-dunes strongly differs from the one over the dunes. This strongly suggests significant difference in the physical properties between these two geomorphic units. Then, we derived quantitatively the surface properties from the modelling of microwave-backscattered signal using a Monte-Carlo inversion. Our results show that dunes are globally more microwaves absorbent than the inter-dunes. The inter-dunes are smoother with a higher dielectric constant than the dunes. Considering the composition, the inter-dunes are in between the dunes and the bright inselbergs mainly composed of water ice, suggesting the presence of a shallow layer of sediment in between the dunes. This may suggest that Titan dunes are developing over a coarser sediment bed similarly to what is observed in some terrestrial sand seas such as in Ténéré desert (Niger, see also contribution #EGU2016-13383). Additionally, potential secondary bedforms (such as ripples) as well as avalanche faces may have been detected.

  14. Spectroscopy, morphometry, and photoclinometry of Titan's dunefields from Cassini/VIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, J.W.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, L.; Sotin, Christophe; Le, Mouelic S.; Rodriguez, S.; Jaumann, R.; Beyer, R.A.; Buratti, B.J.; Pitman, K.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.; Nicholson, P.

    2008-01-01

    Fine-resolution (500 m/pixel) Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) T20 observations of Titan resolve that moon's sand dunes. The spectral variability in some dune regions shows that there are sand-free interdune areas, wherein VIMS spectra reveal the exposed dune substrate. The interdunes from T20 are, variously, materials that correspond to the equatorial bright, 5-??m-bright, and dark blue spectral units. Our observations show that an enigmatic "dark red" spectral unit seen in T5 in fact represents a macroscopic mixture with 5-??m-bright material and dunes as its spectral endmembers. Looking more broadly, similar mixtures of varying amounts of dune and interdune units of varying composition can explain the spectral and albedo variability within the dark brown dune global spectral unit that is associated with dunes. The presence of interdunes indicates that Titan's dunefields are both mature and recently active. The spectrum of the dune endmember reveals the sand to be composed of less water ice than the rest of Titan; various organics are consistent with the dunes' measured reflectivity. We measure a mean dune spacing of 2.1 km, and find that the dunes are oriented on the average in an east-west direction, but angling up to 10?? from parallel to the equator in specific cases. Where no interdunes are present, we determine the height of one set of dunes photoclinometrically to be between 30 and 70 m. These results pave the way for future exploration and interpretation of Titan's sand dunes. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Disribution and interplay of geologic processes on Titan from Cassini radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, R.M.C.; Stofan, E.R.; Peckyno, R.; Radebaugh, J.; Mitchell, K.L.; Mitri, Giuseppe; Wood, C.A.; Kirk, R.L.; Wall, S.D.; Lunine, J.I.; Hayes, A.; Lorenz, R.; Farr, Tom; Wye, L.; Craig, J.; Ollerenshaw, R.J.; Janssen, M.; LeGall, A.; Paganelli, F.; West, R.; Stiles, B.; Callahan, P.; Anderson, Y.; Valora, P.; Soderblom, L.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper is providing an unprecedented view of Titan's surface geology. Here we use Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image swaths (Ta-T30) obtained from October 2004 to December 2007 to infer the geologic processes that have shaped Titan's surface. These SAR swaths cover about 20% of the surface, at a spatial resolution ranging from ~350 m to ~2 km. The SAR data are distributed over a wide latitudinal and longitudinal range, enabling some conclusions to be drawn about the global distribution of processes. They reveal a geologically complex surface that has been modified by all the major geologic processes seen on Earth - volcanism, tectonism, impact cratering, and erosion and deposition by fluvial and aeolian activity. In this paper, we map geomorphological units from SAR data and analyze their areal distribution and relative ages of modification in order to infer the geologic evolution of Titan's surface. We find that dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are more widespread than lakes, putative cryovolcanic features, mottled plains, and craters and crateriform structures that may be due to impact. Undifferentiated plains are the largest areal unit; their origin is uncertain. In terms of latitudinal distribution, dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are located mostly at low latitudes (less than 30 degrees), with no dunes being present above 60 degrees. Channels formed by fluvial activity are present at all latitudes, but lakes are at high latitudes only. Crateriform structures that may have been formed by impact appear to be uniformly distributed with latitude, but the well-preserved impact craters are all located at low latitudes, possibly indicating that more resurfacing has occurred at higher latitudes. Cryovolcanic features are not ubiquitous, and are mostly located between 30 degrees and 60 degrees north. We examine temporal relationships between units wherever possible, and conclude that aeolian and fluvial

  16. Distribution and interplay of geologic processes on Titan from Cassini radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, R.M.C.; Stofan, E.R.; Peckyno, R.; Radebaugh, J.; Mitchell, K.L.; Mitri, Giuseppe; Wood, C.A.; Kirk, R.L.; Wall, S.D.; Lunine, J.I.; Hayes, A.; Lorenz, R.; Farr, Tom; Wye, L.; Craig, J.; Ollerenshaw, R.J.; Janssen, M.; LeGall, A.; Paganelli, F.; West, R.; Stiles, B.; Callahan, P.; Anderson, Y.; Valora, P.; Soderblom, L.

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper is providing an unprecedented view of Titan's surface geology. Here we use Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image swaths (Ta-T30) obtained from October 2004 to December 2007 to infer the geologic processes that have shaped Titan's surface. These SAR swaths cover about 20% of the surface, at a spatial resolution ranging from ???350 m to ???2 km. The SAR data are distributed over a wide latitudinal and longitudinal range, enabling some conclusions to be drawn about the global distribution of processes. They reveal a geologically complex surface that has been modified by all the major geologic processes seen on Earth - volcanism, tectonism, impact cratering, and erosion and deposition by fluvial and aeolian activity. In this paper, we map geomorphological units from SAR data and analyze their areal distribution and relative ages of modification in order to infer the geologic evolution of Titan's surface. We find that dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are more widespread than lakes, putative cryovolcanic features, mottled plains, and craters and crateriform structures that may be due to impact. Undifferentiated plains are the largest areal unit; their origin is uncertain. In terms of latitudinal distribution, dunes and hummocky and mountainous terrains are located mostly at low latitudes (less than 30??), with no dunes being present above 60??. Channels formed by fluvial activity are present at all latitudes, but lakes are at high latitudes only. Crateriform structures that may have been formed by impact appear to be uniformly distributed with latitude, but the well-preserved impact craters are all located at low latitudes, possibly indicating that more resurfacing has occurred at higher latitudes. Cryovolcanic features are not ubiquitous, and are mostly located between 30?? and 60?? north. We examine temporal relationships between units wherever possible, and conclude that aeolian and fluvial/pluvial/lacustrine processes are the

  17. Looking For Thermal IR Polarization In Saturn's Rings With Cassini/CIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgington, Scott G.; Spilker, L. J.; Jennings, D. E.; Altobelli, N.; Pilorz, S. H.; Pearl, J. C.; Leyrat, C.; CIRS Team

    2007-10-01

    The Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) FP1 channel is a polarizing interferometer covering the spectral range from 10 to 600 cm-1. By rotating the instrument about its optical axis, it is possible to measure the IR polarization of target objects over that spectral range. This requires the FP1 footprint on the rings, the emission angle, and the phase angle to be fairly constant for the duration of the observation. With these constraints, we turned two composition observations, both allocated long periods of time for sitting-and-staring, into polarization observations. The time was divided equally amongst observations of the A, B, and C rings, with one observation taking place on the lit side and the other on the unlit side. We chose relative rotations of 0, 30, and 60 degrees (future observations will use 0, 45, 90, and 135 degree rotations). For each ring, we will determine the Stokes Vector (I, Q, U, V) and the degree of polarization, (Q+U+V)/I. We will also examine the degree to which the temperature and emissivity varies with the orientation of the field of view. One of the observation takes place at low phase angles. At low phase angles, the filling factor of the C-Ring has been shown to increase steeply with decreasing spacecraft elevation (Altobelli, et al., 2007). We will determine the limitations of this physical effect on the determination of the polarization of the C-ring. Successful measurements should provide information on the microscopic roughness of ring particles. We will report on results of these observations. For a similar analysis pertaining to Iapetus' surface, see J. C. Pearl, et al. (this meeting). The research described in this paper was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  18. Nanodust Detection between 1 and 5 AU Using Cassini Wave Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schippers, P.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Lecacheux, A.; Belheouane, S.; Moncuquet, M.; Kurth, W. S.; Mann, I.; Mitchell, D. G.; André, N.

    2015-06-01

    The solar system contains solids of all sizes, ranging from kilometer-sized bodies to nano-sized particles. Nanograins have been detected in situ in the Earth's atmosphere, near cometary and giant planet environments, and more recently in the solar wind at 1 AU. The latter nanograins are thought to be formed in the inner solar system dust cloud, mainly through the collisional break-up of larger grains, and are then picked up and accelerated by the magnetized solar wind because of their large charge-to-mass ratio. In the present paper, we analyze the low frequency bursty noise identified in the Cassini radio and plasma wave data during the spacecraft cruise phase inside Jupiter's orbit. The magnitude, spectral shape, and waveform of this broadband noise are consistent with the signatures of the nano particles that traveled at solar wind speed and impinged on the spacecraft surface. Nanoparticles were observed whenever the radio instrument was turned on and able to detect them at different heliocentric distances between Earth and Jupiter, suggesting their ubiquitous presence in the heliosphere. We analyzed the radial dependence of the nanodust flux with heliospheric distance and found that it is consistent with the dynamics of nanodust originating from the inner heliosphere and picked up by the solar wind. The contribution of the nanodust produced in the asteroid belt appears to be negligible compared to the trapping region in the inner heliosphere. In contrast, further out, nanodust is mainly produced by the volcanism of active moons such as Io and Enceladus.

  19. TITAN'S BULK COMPOSITION CONSTRAINED BY CASSINI-HUYGENS: IMPLICATION FOR INTERNAL OUTGASSING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobie, G.; Gautier, D.; Hersant, F.

    2012-01-01

    In the present report, by using a series of data gathered by the Cassini-Huygens mission, we constrain the bulk content of Titan's interior for various gas species (CH 4 , CO 2 , CO, NH 3 , H 2 S, Ar, Ne, Xe), and we show that most of the gas compounds (except H 2 S and Xe) initially incorporated within Titan are likely stored dissolved in the subsurface water ocean. CO 2 is likely to be the most abundant gas species (up to 3% of Titan's total mass), while ammonia should not exceed 1.5 wt%. We predict that only a moderate fraction of CH 4 , CO 2 , and CO should be incorporated in the crust in the form of clathrate hydrates. By contrast, most of the H 2 S and Xe should be incorporated at the base of the subsurface ocean, in the form of heavy clathrate hydrates within the high-pressure ice layer. Moreover, we show that the rocky phase of Titan, assuming a composition similar to CI carbonaceous chondrites, is a likely source for the noble gas isotopes ( 40 Ar, 36 Ar, 22 Ne) that have been detected in the atmosphere. A chondritic core may also potentially contribute to the methane inventory. Our calculations show that a moderate outgassing of methane containing traces of neon and argon from the subsurface ocean would be sufficient to explain the abundance estimated by the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer. The extraction process, implying partial clathration in the ice layers and exsolvation from the water ocean, may explain why the 22 Ne/ 36 Ar ratio in Titan's atmosphere appears higher than the ratio in carbonaceous chondrites.

  20. TITAN'S BULK COMPOSITION CONSTRAINED BY CASSINI-HUYGENS: IMPLICATION FOR INTERNAL OUTGASSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobie, G. [Universite de Nantes, LPGNantes, UMR 6112, F-44322 Nantes (France); Gautier, D. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Hersant, F. [Universite Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270, Floirac (France)

    2012-06-20

    In the present report, by using a series of data gathered by the Cassini-Huygens mission, we constrain the bulk content of Titan's interior for various gas species (CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, CO, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, Ar, Ne, Xe), and we show that most of the gas compounds (except H{sub 2}S and Xe) initially incorporated within Titan are likely stored dissolved in the subsurface water ocean. CO{sub 2} is likely to be the most abundant gas species (up to 3% of Titan's total mass), while ammonia should not exceed 1.5 wt%. We predict that only a moderate fraction of CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, and CO should be incorporated in the crust in the form of clathrate hydrates. By contrast, most of the H{sub 2}S and Xe should be incorporated at the base of the subsurface ocean, in the form of heavy clathrate hydrates within the high-pressure ice layer. Moreover, we show that the rocky phase of Titan, assuming a composition similar to CI carbonaceous chondrites, is a likely source for the noble gas isotopes ({sup 40}Ar, {sup 36}Ar, {sup 22}Ne) that have been detected in the atmosphere. A chondritic core may also potentially contribute to the methane inventory. Our calculations show that a moderate outgassing of methane containing traces of neon and argon from the subsurface ocean would be sufficient to explain the abundance estimated by the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer. The extraction process, implying partial clathration in the ice layers and exsolvation from the water ocean, may explain why the {sup 22}Ne/{sup 36}Ar ratio in Titan's atmosphere appears higher than the ratio in carbonaceous chondrites.

  1. Investigation of Jupiter's Equatorial Hotspots and Plumes Using Cassini ISS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, David S.; Showman, A. P.; Vasavada, A. R.; Simon-Miller, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present updated analysis of Jupiter's equatorial meteorology from Cassini observations. For two months preceding the spacecraft's closest approach, the ISS onboard regularly imaged the atmosphere. We created time-lapse movies from this period in order to analyze the dynamics of equatorial 5-micron hot spots and their interactions with adjacent latitudes. Hot spots are quasi-stable, rectangular dark areas on visible-wavelength images, with defined eastern edges that sharply contrast with surrounding clouds, but a diffuse western edge serving as a nebulous boundary with adjacent equatorial plumes. Hot spots exhibit significant variations in size and shape over timescales of days and weeks. Some of these changes correspond with passing vortex systems from adjacent latitudes interacting with hot spots. Strong anticyclonic gyres present to the south and southeast of the dark areas appear to circulate into hot spots. Impressive, bright white plumes occupy spaces in between hot spots. Compact cirrus-iike 'scooter' clouds flow rapidly through the plumes before disappearing within the dark areas. This raises the possibility that the plumes and fast-moving clouds are at higher altitudes, because their speed does not match previously published zonal wind profiles. Most profiles represent the drift speed of the hot spots at their latitude from pattern matching of the entire longitudinal image strip. If a downward branch of an equatorially-trapped Rossby waves controls the overall appearance of hot spots, however, the westward phase velocity of the wave leads to underestimates of the true jet stream speed. Instead, our expanded data set demonstrating the rapid flow of these scooter clouds may be more illustrative of the actual jet stream speed at these latitudes. This research was supported by a NASA JDAP grant and the NASA Postdoctoral Program.

  2. The Evolution and Fate of Saturn's Stratospheric Vortex: Infrared Spectroscopy from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Hesman, B. E.; Arhterberg, R. K.; Bjoraker, G.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Hurley, J.; Sinclair, J.; Gorius, N.; Orton, G. S.; Read, P. L.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The planet-encircling springtime storm in Saturn's troposphere (December 2010-July 2011) produced dramatic perturbations to stratospheric temperatures, winds and composition at mbar pressures that persisted long after the tropospheric disturbance had abated. Observations from the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), supported by ground-based imaging from the VISIR instrument on the Very Large Telescope,is used to track the evolution of a large, hot stratospheric anticyclone between January 2011 and the present day. The evolutionary sequence can be divided into three phases: (I) the formation and intensification of two distinct warm airmasses near 0.5 mbar between 25 and 35N (one residing directly above the convective storm head) between January-April 2011, moving westward with different zonal velocities; (II) the merging of the warm airmasses to form the large single 'stratospheric beacon' near 40N between April and June 2011, dissociated from the storm head and at a higher pressure (2 mbar) than the original beacons; and (III) the mature phase characterized by slow cooling and longitudinal shrinkage of the anticyclone since July 2011, moving west with a near-constant velocity of 2.70+/-0.04 deg/day (-24.5+/-0.4 m/s at 40N). Peak temperatures of 220 K at 2 mbar were measured on May 5th 2011 immediately after the merger, some 80 K warmer than the quiescent surroundings. Thermal winds hear calculations in August 2011 suggest clockwise peripheral velocities of 200400 mls at 2 mbar, defining a peripheral collar with a width of 65 degrees longitude (50,000 km in diameter) and 25 degrees latitude. Stratospheric acetylene (C2H2) was uniformly enhanced by a factor of three within the vortex, whereas ethane (C2H6) remained unaffected. We will discuss the thermal and chemical characteristics of Saturn's beacon in its mature phase, and implications for stratospheric vortices on other giant planets.

  3. Water Vapor in Titan's Stratosphere from Cassini/CIRS Far-infrared Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottini, V.; Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Anderson, C. M.; Gorius, N.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Coustenis, A.; Teanby, N. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Bezard, B.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Since the first detection of water vapor in Titan's stratosphere by disk-average observations from the Infrared Space Observatory (Coustenis et al. 1998) we report here the successful detection of stratospheric water vapor using the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS, Flasar et al. 2004). CIRS senses water emissions in the far infrared spectral region near 50 microns, which we have modeled using two independent radiative transfer codes (NEMESIS, Irwin et al 2008 and ART, Coustenis et al. 2007, 2010). From the analysis of nadir spectra we have derived a mixing ratio of (0.14 0.05) ppb at an altitude of 97 kilometers, which corresponds to an integrated (from 0 to 600 kilometers) surface normalized column abundance of (3.7 plus or minus 1.3) x 10(exp 14) molecules per square centimeter. In the latitude range 80 S to 30 N we see no evidence for latitudinal variations in these abundances within the error bars. Using limb observations, we obtained mixing ratios of (0.13 plus or minus 0.04) ppb at an altitude of 115 kilometers and (0.45 plus or minus 0.15) ppb at an altitude of 230 kilometers, confirming that the water abundance has a positive vertical gradient as predicted by photochemical models (e.g. Lara et al. 1996, Wilson and Atreya 2004, Horst et al. 2008); retrieved scaling factors (from approximately 0.1 to approximately 0.6) to the water profile suggested by these models show that water vapor is present in Titan stratosphere with less abundance than predicted.

  4. Equatorial Oscillation and Planetary Wave Activity in Saturn's Stratosphere Through the Cassini Epoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerlet, S.; Fouchet, T.; Spiga, A.; Flasar, F. M.; Fletcher, L. N.; Hesman, B. E.; Gorius, N.

    2018-01-01

    Thermal infrared spectra acquired by Cassini/Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) in limb-viewing geometry in 2015 are used to derive 2-D latitude-pressure temperature and thermal wind maps. These maps are used to study the vertical structure and evolution of Saturn's equatorial oscillation (SEO), a dynamical phenomenon presenting similarities with the Earth's quasi-biennal oscillation (QBO) and semi-annual oscillation (SAO). We report that a new local wind maximum has appeared in 2015 in the upper stratosphere and derive the descent rates of other wind extrema through time. The phase of the oscillation observed in 2015, as compared to 2005 and 2010, remains consistent with a ˜15 year period. The SEO does not propagate downward at a regular rate but exhibits faster descent rate in the upper stratosphere, combined with a greater vertical wind shear, compared to the lower stratosphere. Within the framework of a QBO-type oscillation, we estimate the absorbed wave momentum flux in the stratosphere to be on the order of ˜7 × 10-6 N m-2. On Earth, interactions between vertically propagating waves (both planetary and mesoscale) and the mean zonal flow drive the QBO and SAO. To broaden our knowledge on waves potentially driving Saturn's equatorial oscillation, we searched for thermal signatures of planetary waves in the tropical stratosphere using CIRS nadir spectra. Temperature anomalies of amplitude 1-4 K and zonal wave numbers 1 to 9 are frequently observed, and an equatorial Rossby (n = 1) wave of zonal wave number 3 is tentatively identified in November 2009.

  5. NANODUST DETECTION BETWEEN 1 AND 5 AU USING CASSINI WAVE MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schippers, P.; Vernet, N. Meyer-; Lecacheux, A.; Belheouane, S.; Moncuquet, M. [LESIA—CNRS—Observatoire de Paris, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Kurth, W. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Mann, I. [EISCAT Scientific Association, Kiruna, Sweden and Department of Physics Umeå University (Sweden); Mitchell, D. G. [Applied Physics Laboratory, John Hopkins University, Laurel, MD (United States); André, N. [IRAP, 9 Avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31028 Toulouse (France)

    2015-06-10

    The solar system contains solids of all sizes, ranging from kilometer-sized bodies to nano-sized particles. Nanograins have been detected in situ in the Earth's atmosphere, near cometary and giant planet environments, and more recently in the solar wind at 1 AU. The latter nanograins are thought to be formed in the inner solar system dust cloud, mainly through the collisional break-up of larger grains, and are then picked up and accelerated by the magnetized solar wind because of their large charge-to-mass ratio. In the present paper, we analyze the low frequency bursty noise identified in the Cassini radio and plasma wave data during the spacecraft cruise phase inside Jupiter's orbit. The magnitude, spectral shape, and waveform of this broadband noise are consistent with the signatures of the nano particles that traveled at solar wind speed and impinged on the spacecraft surface. Nanoparticles were observed whenever the radio instrument was turned on and able to detect them at different heliocentric distances between Earth and Jupiter, suggesting their ubiquitous presence in the heliosphere. We analyzed the radial dependence of the nanodust flux with heliospheric distance and found that it is consistent with the dynamics of nanodust originating from the inner heliosphere and picked up by the solar wind. The contribution of the nanodust produced in the asteroid belt appears to be negligible compared to the trapping region in the inner heliosphere. In contrast, further out, nanodust is mainly produced by the volcanism of active moons such as Io and Enceladus.

  6. An Efficient Method to Design Premature End-of-Life Trajectories: A Hypothetical Alternate Fate for Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, Mar; Senent, Juan

    2015-01-01

    What would happen if, hypothetically, the highly successful Cassini mission were to end prematurely due to lack of propellant or sudden subsystem failure? A solid plan to quickly produce a solution for any given scenario, regardless of where the spacecraft is along its reference path, must be in place to safely dispose of the spacecraft and meet all planetary protection requirements. As a contingency plan for this hypothetical situation, a method to design viable high-fidelity terminating trajectories based on a hybrid approach that exploits two-body and three-body flyby transfers combined with a numerical optimization scheme is detailed in this paper.

  7. A Flight-Calibrated Methodology for Determination of Cassini Thruster On-Times for Reaction Wheel Biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarani, Siamak

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for accurate and flight-calibrated determination of the on-times of the Cassini spacecraft Reaction Control System (RCS) thrusters, without any form of dynamic simulation, for the reaction wheel biases. The hydrazine usage and the delta V vector in body frame are also computed from the respective thruster on-times. The Cassini spacecraft, the largest and most complex interplanetary spacecraft ever built, continues to undertake ambitious and unique scientific observations of planet Saturn, Titan, Enceladus, and other moons of Saturn. In order to maintain a stable attitude during the course of its mission, this three-axis stabilized spacecraft uses two different control systems: the RCS and the reaction wheel assembly control system. The RCS is used to execute a commanded spacecraft slew, to maintain three-axis attitude control, control spacecraft's attitude while performing science observations with coarse pointing requirements, e.g. during targeted low-altitude Titan and Enceladus flybys, bias the momentum of reaction wheels, and to perform RCS-based orbit trim maneuvers. The use of RCS often imparts undesired delta V on the spacecraft. The Cassini navigation team requires accurate predictions of the delta V in spacecraft coordinates and inertial frame resulting from slews using RCS thrusters and more importantly from reaction wheel bias events. It is crucial for the Cassini spacecraft attitude control and navigation teams to be able to, quickly but accurately, predict the hydrazine usage and delta V for various reaction wheel bias events without actually having to spend time and resources simulating the event in flight software-based dynamic simulation or hardware-in-the-loop simulation environments. The methodology described in this paper, and the ground software developed thereof, are designed to provide just that. This methodology assumes a priori knowledge of thrust magnitudes and thruster pulse rise and tail-off time

  8. Ballistic Transport: After the Cassini Grand Finale, is there a Final Consensus on Ring Origin and Age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, P. R.; Durisen, R. H.; Cuzzi, J. N.

    2017-12-01

    As the Cassini mission comes to its much anticipated end, somewhat befittingly to be immortalized and enshrined for all time within the gaseous confines of a planet named for the Greek god of time (Kronos), we find the time appropriate to return to the subject of ring age and origin. During Cassini's remarkable tenure, important measurements have been obtained that can help to elucidate and perhaps settle the debate once and for all on whether the rings are young or old. At the forefront lie the results of the Cassini Dust Analyzer (CDA) experiment which indicate that the range of the micrometeoroid flux at infinity for Saturn are comparable to the nominal value of the meteoroid flux value currently adopted for use in ballistic transport (BT) applications and models (Estrada et al., 2015, 2017). Moreover, the source of the micrometeoroid flux has been localized to the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt (EKB) and is not cometary in origin as previously assumed (Altobelli et al., 2015). A major consequence of these measurements is that the EKB flux is much more gravitationally focused increasing the impact flux on the rings by a factor of ˜25 relative to cometary. This implies that the process of micrometeoroid bombardment and BT is likely even more influential in the rings' structural and compositional evolution over time. This measurement taken together with recent analysis of the bulk mass fraction of non-icy constituents (Zhang et al., 2017a,b) using Cassini radiometry data argue strongly for young rings. Another observation that will help to provide a constraint (though not absolute) is the pending measurement of the (B) ring mass. A high mass estimate as argued by some does not necessarily mean old rings, whereas a low mass ring would certainly imply as much. There are several factors that can offer insight on to the age of the rings from BT modeling, such as saturation of the ramp(s), color differences across the B-C (A-CD) boundaries, color differences across plateaus

  9. On magnetospheric electron impact ionisation and dynamics in Titan's ram-side and polar ionosphere – a Cassini case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Lewis

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We present data from the sixth Cassini flyby of Titan (T5, showing that the magnetosphere of Saturn strongly interacts with the moon's ionosphere and exo-ionosphere. A simple electron ionisation model provides a reasonable agreement with the altitude structure of the ionosphere. Furthermore, we suggest that the dense and cold exo-ionosphere (from the exobase at 1430 km and outward to several Titan radii from the surface can be explained by magnetospheric forcing and other transport processes whereas exospheric ionisation by impacting low energy electrons seems to play a minor role.

  10. Auroral current systems in Saturn's magnetosphere: comparison of theoretical models with Cassini and HST observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The first simultaneous observations of fields and plasmas in Saturn's high-latitude magnetosphere and UV images of the conjugate auroral oval were obtained by the Cassini spacecraft and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST in January 2007. These data have shown that the southern auroral oval near noon maps to the dayside cusp boundary between open and closed field lines, associated with a major layer of upward-directed field-aligned current (Bunce et al., 2008. The results thus support earlier theoretical discussion and quantitative modelling of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling at Saturn (Cowley et al., 2004, that suggests the oval is produced by electron acceleration in the field-aligned current layer required by rotational flow shear between strongly sub-corotating flow on open field lines and near-corotating flow on closed field lines. Here we quantitatively compare these modelling results (the "CBO" model with the Cassini-HST data set. The comparison shows good qualitative agreement between model and data, the principal difference being that the model currents are too small by factors of about five, as determined from the magnetic perturbations observed by Cassini. This is suggested to be principally indicative of a more highly conducting summer southern ionosphere than was assumed in the CBO model. A revised model is therefore proposed in which the height-integrated ionospheric Pedersen conductivity is increased by a factor of four from 1 to 4 mho, together with more minor adjustments to the co-latitude of the boundary, the flow shear across it, the width of the current layer, and the properties of the source electrons. It is shown that the revised model agrees well with the combined Cassini-HST data, requiring downward acceleration of outer magnetosphere electrons through a ~10 kV potential in the current layer at the open-closed field line boundary to produce an auroral oval of ~1° width with UV emission intensities of a few tens of kR.

  11. GPHS-RTGs in support of the Cassini Mission. Semi annual technical progress report, 1 April 1996--29 September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-20

    This technical progress report discusses work on the Radioisotope Generators and Ancillary Activities for the Cassini spacecraft. The Cassini spacecraft is expected to launch in October 1997, and will explore Saturn and its moons. This progress report discusses issues in: spacecraft integration and liason, engineering support, safety, qualified unicouple fabrication, ETG fabrication and testing, ground support equipment, RTG shipping and launch support, designs, reviews and mission application. Safety analysis of the RTGs during reentry and launch accidents are covered. This report covers the period of April 1 to September 29, 1996.

  12. One last look from the dark side: Cassini's final views of Saturn's rings from with the planet's shadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Matthew M.; Burns, Joseph A.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Tiscareno, Matthew S.; Evans, Michael W.; Baker, Emily

    2017-10-01

    Around the start of Cassini's Grand Finale, the spacecraft passed a dozen times through Saturn's shadow, enabling its cameras and spectrometers to observe the ring system at extremely high phase angles. These opportunities yielded the best combination of signal-to-noise and resolution for many parts of Saturn's fainter dusty rings, and allowed the main rings to be viewed from previously inaccessible lighting geometries. We will highlight some of the surprising features found in the data obtained by Cassini's Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) during these time periods, and discuss what they might be able to tell us about the structure and dynamics of Saturn's various ring systems. For example, ISS captured global views of the entire ring system that reveal previously unseen structures in dust-filled regions like the D ring and the zone between Saturn's F and G rings, as well as novel fine-scale structures in the core of the E ring near Enceladus' orbit. These structures provide new insights into the forces that sculpt these tenuous rings. ISS and VIMS also detected an unexpected brightening and highly unusual spectra of the main rings at extremely high phase angles. These data may provide novel information about the distribution of small grains and particles in these denser rings.

  13. Comparison of the Cloud Morphology Spatial Structure Between Jupiter and Saturn Using JunoCam and Cassini ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Justin; Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Blalock, John J.; Gunnarson, Jacob; McCabe, Ryan M.; Gallego, Angelina; Hansen, Candice; Orton, Glenn S.

    2017-10-01

    We present an analysis of the spatial-scales contained in the cloud morphology of Jupiter’s southern high latitudes using images captured by JunoCam in 2016 and 2017, and compare them to those on Saturn using images captured using the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) on board the Cassini orbiter. For Jupiter, the characteristic spatial scale of cloud morphology as a function of latitude is calculated from images taken in three visual (600-800, 500-600, 420-520 nm) bands and a near-infrared (880- 900 nm) band. In particular, we analyze the transition from the banded structure characteristic of Jupiter’s mid-latitudes to the chaotic structure of the polar region. We apply similar analysis to Saturn using images captured using Cassini ISS. In contrast to Jupiter, Saturn maintains its zonally organized cloud morphology from low latitudes up to the poles, culminating in the cyclonic polar vortices centered at each of the poles. By quantifying the differences in the spatial scales contained in the cloud morphology, our analysis will shed light on the processes that control the banded structures on Jupiter and Saturn. Our work has been supported by the following grants: NASA PATM NNX14AK07G, NASA MUREP NNX15AQ03A, and NSF AAG 1212216.

  14. Observations in the Saturn system during approach and orbital insertion, with Cassini's visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R.H.; Baines, K.H.; Bellucci, G.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Formisano, V.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, Christophe; Baugh, N.; Griffith, C.A.; Hansen, G.B.; Hibbitts, C.A.; Momary, T.W.; Showalter, M.R.

    2006-01-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer observed Phoebe, Iapetus, Titan and Saturn's rings during Cassini's approach and orbital insertion. Phoebe's surface contains water ice, CO2, and ferrous iron. lapetus contains CO2 and organic materials. Titan's atmosphere shows methane fluorescence, and night-side atmospheric emission that may be CO2 and CH3D. As determined from cloud motions, the winds at altitude 25-30 km in the south polar region of Titan appear to be moving in a prograde direction at velocity ???1 m s-1. Circular albedo features on Titan's surface, seen at 2.02 ??m, may be palimpsests remaining from the rheological adjustment of ancient impact craters. As such, their long-term persistence is of special interest in view of the expected precipitation of liquids and solids from the atmosphere. Saturn's rings have changed little in their radial structure since the Voyager flybys in the early 1980s. Spectral absorption bands tentatively attributed to Fe2+ suggest that iron-bearing silicates are a source of contamination of the C ring and the Cassini Division. ?? ESO 2006.

  15. The geology of Hotei Regio, Titan: Correlation of Cassini VIMS and RADAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderblom, L.A.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, J.M.; Barnes, J.W.; Kirk, R.L.; Sotin, Christophe; Jaumann, R.; MacKinnon, D.J.; Mackowski, D.W.; Baines, K.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    Joint Cassini VIMS and RADAR SAR data of ???700-km-wide Hotei Regio reveal a rich collection of geological features that correlate between the two sets of images. The degree of correlation is greater than anywhere else seen on Titan. Central to Hotei Regio is a basin filled with cryovolcanic flows that are anomalously bright in VIMS data (in particular at 5 ??m) and quite variable in roughness in SAR. The edges of the flows are dark in SAR data and appear to overrun a VIMS-bright substrate. SAR-stereo topography shows the flows to be viscous, 100-200 m thick. On its southern edge the basin is ringed by higher (???1 km) mountainous terrain. The mountains show mixed texture in SAR data: some regions are extremely rough, exhibit low and spectrally neutral albedo in VIMS data and may be partly coated with darker hydrocarbons. Around the southern margin of Hotei Regio, the SAR image shows several large, dendritic, radar-bright channels that flow down from the mountainous terrain and terminate in dark blue patches, seen in VIMS images, whose infrared color is consistent with enrichment in water ice. The patches are in depressions that we interpret to be filled with fluvial deposits eroded and transported by liquid methane in the channels. In the VIMS images the dark blue patches are encased in a latticework of lighter bands that we suggest to demark a set of circumferential and radial fault systems bounding structural depressions. Conceivably the circular features are tectonic structures that are remnant from an ancient impact structure. We suggest that impact-generated structures may have simply served as zones of weakness; no direct causal connection, such as impact-induced volcanism, is implied. We also speculate that two large dark features lying on the northern margin of Hotei Regio could be calderas. In summary the preservation of such a broad suite of VIMS infrared color variations and the detailed correlation with features in the SAR image and SAR topography

  16. Optimization of Saturn paraboloid magnetospheric field model parameters using Cassini equatorial magnetic field data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Belenkaya

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paraboloid model of Saturn's magnetosphere describes the magnetic field as being due to the sum of contributions from the internal field of the planet, the ring current, and the tail current, all contained by surface currents inside a magnetopause boundary which is taken to be a paraboloid of revolution about the planet-Sun line. The parameters of the model have previously been determined by comparison with data from a few passes through Saturn's magnetosphere in compressed and expanded states, depending on the prevailing dynamic pressure of the solar wind. Here we significantly expand such comparisons through examination of Cassini magnetic field data from 18 near-equatorial passes that span wide ranges of local time, focusing on modelling the co-latitudinal field component that defines the magnetic flux passing through the equatorial plane. For 12 of these passes, spanning pre-dawn, via noon, to post-midnight, the spacecraft crossed the magnetopause during the pass, thus allowing an estimate of the concurrent subsolar radial distance of the magnetopause R1 to be made, considered to be the primary parameter defining the scale size of the system. The best-fit model parameters from these passes are then employed to determine how the parameters vary with R1, using least-squares linear fits, thus providing predictive model parameters for any value of R1 within the range. We show that the fits obtained using the linear approximation parameters are of the same order as those for the individually selected parameters. We also show that the magnetic flux mapping to the tail lobes in these models is generally in good accord with observations of the location of the open-closed field line boundary in Saturn's ionosphere, and the related position of the auroral oval. We then investigate the field data on six passes through the nightside magnetosphere, for which the spacecraft did not cross the magnetopause, such that in this case we compare the

  17. Mapping the Thermal Inertia of Saturn’s Rings with Cassini CIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Shawn M.; Spilker, L. J.; PIlorz, S. H.; Showalter, M. R.

    2013-10-01

    We use data from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer to map out the thermal response of Saturn's ring particles passing through Saturn's shadow and to determine variations in ring thermal inertia. CIRS records far infrared radiation in three separate detectors, each of which covers a distinct wavelength range. In this work, we analyze rings spectra recorded at focal plane 1 (FP1), as its wavelength response (16.7-1000 microns) is well suited to detecting direct thermal emission from Saturn's rings. The thermal budget of the rings is typically dominated by solar radiation. When ring particles enter Saturn’s shadow this source of energy is abruptly cut off with a consequential drop in ring temperature. Likewise, temperatures rebound when particles exit the shadow. To characterize these heating and cooling events, FP1 was repeatedly scanned across the main rings. Each scan was offset from either the ingress or egress shadow boundary by an amount corresponding to a fraction of a Keplerian orbit. By resampling these scans onto a common radial grid, we can map out the rings’ response to the abrupt changes in insolation at shadow ingress and egress. Periods near equinox represent a unique situation. During this time the Sun's disk crosses the ring plane and its rays strike the rings at zero incidence. Solar heating is virtually absent, and thermal radiation from Saturn and sunlight reflected by Saturn dominate the thermal environment. While ring temperature variations at equinox are much more subtle, they represent temperature contrasts that vary at the unique timescale corresponding to variations in Saturn contributions to the rings’ thermal budget. By analyzing CIRS data at a variety of locations and epochs, we will map out thermal inertia across the rings and attempt to tease out structural information about the particles which comprise Saturn’s rings. This presentation will report upon our progress towards these ends. This research was carried out at the

  18. Investigation of Titan's surface and atmosphere photometric functions using the Cassini/VIMS instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Thomas; Altobelli, Nicolas; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Maltagliati, Luca; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Sotin, Christophe; Brown, Robert; Barnes, Jason; Buratti, Bonnie; Baines, Kevin; Clark, Roger; Nicholson, Phillip

    2015-04-01

    After 106 flybys spread over 10 years, the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument acquired 33151 hyperspectral cubes pointing at the surface of Titan on the dayside. Despite this huge amount of data available for surface studies, and due to the strong influence of the atmosphere (methane absorption and haze scattering), Titan's surface is only visible with VIMS in 7 spectral atmospheric windows centred at 0.93, 1.08, 1.27, 1.59, 2.01, 2.7-2.8 and 5 microns. Atmospheric scattering and absorption effects dominate Titan's spectrum at wavelengths shorter than 3 microns, while the 5 micron window, almost insensitive to the haze scattering, only presents a reduced atmospheric absorption contribution to the signal recorded by VIMS. In all cases, the recorded I/F represents an apparent albedo, which depends on the atmospheric contributions and the surface photometry at each wavelength. We therefore aim to determine real albedo values for Titan's surface by finding photometric functions for the surface and the atmosphere that could be used as a basis for empirical corrections or Radiative Transfer calculations. After updating the navigation of the VIMS archive, we decomposed the entire VIMS data set into a MySQL relational database gathering the viewing geometry, location, time (season) and I/F (for pure atmosphere and surface-atmosphere images) for each pixel of the 33151 individual VIMS cubes. We then isolated all the VIMS pixels where Titan's surface has been repeatedly imaged at low phase angles (< 20 degrees) in order to characterize phase curves for the surface at 5 microns and for the atmosphere. Among these, the T88 flyby appears noteworthy, with a "Emergence-Phase Function (EPF)"-type observation: 25 cubes acquired during the same flyby, over the same area (close to Tortola Facula, in relatively dark terrains), at a constant incidence and with varying emergence and phase (from 0 to 60 degrees) angles. The data clearly exhibit an increase

  19. GPHS-RTGs in support of the Cassini Mission. Semi-annual technical progress report, April 3, 1995--October 1, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document is the April-October 1995 Progress Report on the Cassini RTG Program. Nine tasks are summarized; (1) Spacecraft integration and liason, (2) Engineering support, (3) Safety, (4) Unicouple fabrication, (5) ETG fabrication, assembly, and test, (6) Ground support equipment, (7) RTG shipping and launch support, (8) Design, reviews, and mission applications, and (9) Project management, QA, contract changes, and material acquisitions

  20. Near real-time PPP-based monitoring of the ionosphere using dual-frequency GPS/BDS/Galileo data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhinmin; Li, Yangyang; Li, Fei; Guo, Jinyun

    2018-03-01

    Ionosphere delay is very important to GNSS observations, since it is one of the main error sources which have to be mitigated even eliminated in order to determine reliable and precise positions. The ionosphere is a dispersive medium to radio signal, so the value of the group delay or phase advance of GNSS radio signal depends on the signal frequency. Ground-based GNSS stations have been used for ionosphere monitoring and modeling for a long time. In this paper we will introduce a novel approach suitable for single-receiver operation based on the precise point positioning (PPP) technique. One of the main characteristic is that only carrier-phase observations are used to avoid particular effects of pseudorange observations. The technique consists of introducing ionosphere ambiguity parameters obtained from PPP filter into the geometry-free combination of observations to estimate ionospheric delays. Observational data from stations that are capable of tracking the GPS/BDS/GALILEO from the International GNSS Service (IGS) Multi-GNSS Experiments (MGEX) network are processed. For the purpose of performance validation, ionospheric delays series derived from the novel approach are compared with the global ionospheric map (GIM) from Ionospheric Associate Analysis Centers (IAACs). The results are encouraging and offer potential solutions to the near real-time ionosphere monitoring.