WorldWideScience

Sample records for include career information

  1. Careers in focus library and information science

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Careers in Focus: Library and Information Science, Second Edition profiles 19 careers for professionals interested in this field. Job profiles include:. -Acquisitions librarians. -Book conservators. -Children's librarians. -Corporate librarians. -Film and video librarians. -Law librarians. -Library assistants. -Library media specialists. -Medical librarians. -Research assistants.

  2. Career information processing strategies of secondary school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the strategies commonly adopted by Osun state secondary school students in processing career information. It specifically examined the sources of career information available to the students, the uses to which the students put the information collected and how their career decision making skills can be ...

  3. Relationships among Career and Life Stress, Negative Career thoughts, and Career Decision State: A Cognitive Information Processing Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock-Yowell, Emily; Peterson, Gary W.; Reardon, Robert C.; Leierer, Stephen J.; Reed, Corey A.

    2011-01-01

    According to cognitive information processing theory, career thoughts mediate the relationship between career and life stress and the ensuing career decision state. Using a sample of 232 college students and structural equation modeling, this study found that an increase in career and life stress was associated with an increase in negative career…

  4. Career Planning Modules for the Officer Career Information and Planning System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Susan D.; And Others

    This discussion of the modules in an experimental computer-aided system for officer career information and planning system (OCIPS) includes the reasons for its development, a description of the seven modules, and the findings of a preliminary test of four of the modules for feasibility and credibility. Initially developed in response to a need…

  5. Government, Including: Air Traffic Controllers, Aviation Safety Inspectors, Airspace Systems Inspection Pilots, Accident Investigators, Electronics Technicians, Engineers, Meteorologists. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers in aviation available in federal, state, and local governmental agencies. The first part of the booklet provides general information about civil aviation careers with the federal government, including pay scales, job classifications, and working conditions.…

  6. Explore a Career in Health Sciences Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for a second career, working in health sciences librarianship might be the right career for you! Read ... MLA's most revered leaders speaks about the health librarianship profession Read about things of interest to a ...

  7. Reconciling Sex Differences in Information-Processing and Career Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolleat, Patricia L.

    1990-01-01

    Information processing theory could be made more sensitive to differences in career outcomes for males and females by (1) examining the nature of the career decision; (2) expanding the notion of information; (3) relating the vocational schema to the gender schema; and (4) noting whether variables are general, sex related, or sex specific. (SK)

  8. Accounting Students’ Choice on Accounting Information Technology Careers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Hasanah Uswati Dewi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The important role of accounting information systems professionals, motivate researchers to analyze further the interest of students to the profession in the field of accounting information systems. The aim of this study explores the factors that influence students to choose and do not choose a profession in the field of accounting information systems.This research was conducted using questionnaires. The population was undergraduate accounting students. Sample research was done randomly.This research shows that the interest in undergraduate accounting students for a career in the field of information systems is very small and this research also appears that the academic supervisor is one of the dominant factors influencing student choice in choosing a career in the field of information systems. Beside this, this study also found that respondents are not interested in a career in accounting information systems more due to that field of information systems is not a career they aspire.

  9. Accounting Students’ Choice on Accounting Information Technology Careers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Hasanah Uswati Dewi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The important role of accounting information systems professionals, motivate researchers to analyze further the interest of students to the profession in the field of accounting information systems. The aim of this study explores the factors that influence students to choose and do not choose a profession in the field of accounting information systems. This research was conducted using questionnaires. The population was undergraduate accounting students. Sample research was done randomly.This research shows that the interest in undergraduate accounting students for a career in the field of information systems is very small and this research also appears that the academic supervisor is one of the dominant factors influencing student choice in choosing a career in the field of information systems. Beside this, this study also found that respondents are not interested in a career in accounting information systems more due to that field of information systems is not a career they aspire.

  10. Career information processing strategies of secondary school

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adebowale

    Well planned and well organised career guidance services are becoming increasingly ... nature of work, conditions of service, training opportunities, labour market ... problems, generate concepts and solutions to problems and employ verbal and .... in all these cases, the Relative Significance Index (RSI) was utilised as a ...

  11. 76 FR 73683 - Whirlpool Corporation, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,593] Whirlpool Corporation, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing, Andrews International, IBM Corporation... refrigerators and trash compactors. The notice was published in the Federal Register on October 25, 2010 (75 FR...

  12. 76 FR 72978 - Whirlpool Corporation Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,593] Whirlpool Corporation Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing, Andrews International, IBM Corporation... workers are engaged in the production of refrigerators and trash compactors. The notice was published in...

  13. Evaluation of radiography careers information on the Internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boxall, Amy; Holmes, Ken

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate whether information about radiography careers that was placed on the Internet was accessible, accurate, understandable, comprehensive, abundant and attractive to a sample of school children. Additionally this paper investigated whether the sample of school children had access to the Internet and whether they knew how to use it. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess views on the radiography information, Internet access and knowledge of how to use the Internet. Questionnaire data were then analysed and the Websites were ranked. Thirty-three Websites were evaluated; these gave varying qualities of information with questionnaire scores ranging from 188 to 76. This investigation showed that there are many Websites available about radiography as a career. The site that performed most successfully overall in this evaluation was the NHS Careers Website. This site was ranked highest for the design section but the University of Salford's Website performed top for content

  14. Academic & Technical Skills + Life/Work Skills + Career Information & Guidance = Success in Career Building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Phillip S.

    There has been a renaissance in the thinking about career development. It is becoming accepted that information is not enough; in addition to academic and technical skills, youth and adults need to learn life/work designing and building skills to become healthy, productive, and self-reliant citizens. Despite the fact that Canadian students have…

  15. Influencing young women to pursue a career in the creative information technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosco, Michele

    A leaky pipeline is often cited as the cause for the underrepresentation of women in computer-related professions. However, females may not even enter the pipeline; that is, they do not even enroll in creative information technology coursework as early as high school. Creative information technology careers include web design, digital photography, and multimedia. Constructs of the social cognitive career theory---outcome expectations and self-efficacy--provided the theoretical framework for this investigation to determine why young women are not exhibiting interest in these careers. Using an action research structure, a female-segregated technology club was implemented at the high school. The study intended to increase the participants' interest in pursuing careers in the creative information technology field through the components of career choice as outlined in the theoretical framework. The outcome expectations of "With whom will I work?" and "What will I do?" were addressed through the presentation of female role models and career information. Self-efficacy was targeted through technology skills' instruction directly related to the creative information technology fields. Data was collected through the administration of a pretest/posttest survey instrument, researcher observations, individual participant interviews, and an analysis of the participants' creative products. Quantitative findings indicated that there were few statistically significant program effects. The participants' perceptions of those employed in these careers did not change, but their technology self-efficacy increased on three indicators. Analysis of qualitative data yielded a more complete picture: although the young women had little prior knowledge of those employed in these fields, they did enjoy learning technology to develop creative projects in a social atmosphere where they could persevere through the technology frustrations they encountered. All of the data types affirmed that the

  16. Career Choice Of Students Of Library And Information Science In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Library and Information Science is not a top rank choice of course by candidates seeking admission into tertiary institutions in Imo State. Most of those who eventually get enrolled for the programme are not interested in practicing librarianship upon graduation. They prefer careers in other establishments even if they are to ...

  17. Career Education: The Leisure Occupations Cluster. Information Series No. 86.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoven, Peter J.; Vinton, Dennis A.

    The guide is intended to supplement career education curricula with information about leisure occupations (recreation, hospitality, and tourism). It traces the growth and significance of leisure occupations with regard to the scientific, economic, and social advances which have motivated more Americans than ever before to seek leisure…

  18. A Review of Previous Studies on Information Processing in Career Decision Making among University Students

    OpenAIRE

    池田, 智子; Satoko, Ikeda

    2018-01-01

    This review of the researches of career choice of Japanese university students focused the studies on decision-making theory conducted in Japan. The present review suggested the necessity of examination of the effect of self-efficacy about career information search on the process of career choice. It is also needed to examine the relationship between specific self-efficacy about career information search and career decision-making self-efficacy, moreover, general self-efficacy.

  19. How do early career health sciences information professionals gain competencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Bethany A; Rodriguez, Bredny

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe early career health sciences information professionals' self-reported attainment of the Medical Library Association (MLA) Competencies for Lifelong Learning and Professional Success and to investigate the various methods by which participants developed these competencies. A SurveyMonkey survey was designed to ascertain participants' demographic information and their competency attainment. "Early career" health information professionals were defined as those with less than five years of professional experience. Participants were asked to rate each of the seven competencies on a five-point Likert scale regarding their level of agreement with the statement, "I have demonstrated this competency." Participants who responded positively were then asked to indicate how they acquired the competency on a multiple-choice, multiple-answer list. Free-text fields were provided for general comments and for participants to elaborate on their answers. The survey was distributed through the MLA email discussion list and other related email discussion lists. Participation was anonymous. One hundred eighty-seven responses were received. Out of those 187 respondents, 95 completed the entire survey. The majority of early career health sciences information professionals agreed that they had attained all 7 competencies. Of the various methods used to develop competencies, the most selected method was formal library and information studies education. Participants were least likely to report attaining competencies via mentoring, volunteering, or internships. Participants reported the highest level of confidence in having attained the "Health Sciences Information Services" competency, and the lowest level of confidence in having attained the "Research, Analysis, and Interpretation" competency. These results contribute to the ongoing discussions regarding proposed changes to the MLA competencies. The results may also inform the development of

  20. Biosemiotics: Communication and Causation (Information included

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ramon Álvarez

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Pretensions of Biosemiotics as a unified approach to biological information are critically scrutinized within the study of different projects of semiotisation of nature and naturalization ot cultural processes. Main textual references and arguments are presented and critically pondered. Biosemiotics is here presented as an analytical method to study communication as founded in causality.

  1. How do early career health sciences information professionals gain competencies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany A. Myers, MSLIS, AHIP

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe early career health sciences information professionals’ self-reported attainment of the Medical Library Association (MLA Competencies for Lifelong Learning and Professional Success and to investigate the various methods by which participants developed these competencies. Methods: A SurveyMonkey survey was designed to ascertain participants’demographic information and their competency attainment. ‘‘Early career’’ health information professionals were defined as those with less than five years of professional experience. Participants were asked to rate each of the seven competencies on a five-point Likert scale regarding their level of agreement with the statement, ‘‘I have demonstrated this competency.’’ Participants who responded positively were then asked to indicate how they acquired the competency on a multiple-choice, multiple-answer list. Free-text fields were provided for general comments and for participants to elaborate on their answers. The survey was distributed through the MLA email discussion list and other related email discussion lists. Participation was anonymous. Results: One hundred eighty-seven responses were received. Out of those 187 respondents, 95 completed the entire survey. The majority of early career health sciences information professionals agreed that they had attained all 7 competencies. Of the various methods used to develop competencies, the most selected method was formal library and information studies education. Participants were least likely to report attaining competencies via mentoring, volunteering, or internships. Participants reported the highest level of confidence in having attained the ‘‘Health Sciences Information Services’’ competency, and the lowest level of confidence in having attained the ‘‘Research, Analysis, and Interpretation’’ competency. Conclusions: These results contribute to the ongoing discussions

  2. Exploring the Relationship between Career Interests and Work Values as Measured by the Choices Career Information Delivery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Leila Kristine

    2010-01-01

    Person by environment fit is the most common approach used to support career decision making. In short, individuals learn how their personal characteristics can be "matched" to the occupations that correspond to those characteristics. Various career assessments have been designed to facilitate this matching process, including the O* "NET Interest…

  3. Information Nation: Education and Careers in the Emerging Information Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Jeffrey M.; Guzman, Indira R.; Stam, Kathryn R.

    2010-01-01

    Information and IT are central to virtually every industry in which the United States plays a leadership role--financial services, entertainment engineering, aerospace, medicine, law, agriculture, and dozens of other fields--yet colleges have failed to attract, teach, and produce a new generation of information professionals to meet the growing…

  4. Airline Careers. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in airlines. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers in the airline industry, including salaries, working conditions, job requirements, and projected job opportunities. In the main part of the booklet, the following 22 job…

  5. The Chameleon Career: An Exploratory Study of the Work Biography of Information Technology Workers in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ituma, Afam; Simpson, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to explore claims about the changing nature of careers by focusing on how information technology (IT) workers enact careers in the context of Nigeria. The theoretical framework guiding this research is that societal context (social structure and institutions) has an influence on the career patterns exhibited by…

  6. Conceptualization and Exploration of Composite Career Anchors: An Analysis of Information Systems Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Hindupur V.; Potosky, Denise

    2003-01-01

    Information systems professionals (n=163) completed measures of career anchors and outcomes (career/job satisfaction, job performance, perceived advancement prospects); 46% had multiple dominant anchors and these individuals did not have significantly different career outcomes than those with single dominant anchors. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  7. Tapping into Alumni as a Source of Authentic Information and Advice on Careers in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Timothy J.

    2018-01-01

    This article describes how my psychology department utilizes our alumni to educate current and prospective students about careers in psychology. I explain how we developed an alumni careers website and on-campus alumni careers sessions for students. High school students and our psychology majors reported that they found this information valuable,…

  8. InsightSTEM Campus Ambassadors: Welcoming, Including, and Supporting All in STEM Careers Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel-Storr, J.

    2016-12-01

    Definitions of genders and, races, ethnicities, abilities and sexualities tend to exist on a binary scale (e.g. male/female, black/white) both for inclusiveness and evaluation of programs. This has the potential to be a schism for individuals who are choosing to enter STEM fields when if their self-identity does not fit this these predefined multi-polar templates. At InsightSTEM, in our Campus Ambassadors program (which has over 290 grassroots members in over 25 countries) we have been striving to nullify this effect... For example, on our application, we choose to not ask for any demographic data, in any spectrum, because those data make no sense on a global stage. We question that if race, gender, sexuality and ethnicity are all on a spectrum: is any program devoted to a particular group appropriate? Instead we deliver professional development to students worldwide to train them to become aware and inclusive STEM educators, involving everyone in their programs no matter what their background. We will present the ways we work with our Campus Ambassadors to create programs that, rather than focusing on particular groups, are truly inclusive, in developing their skills and empowering them to create inclusive programs worldwide for all. InsightSTEM Campus Ambassadors: Welcoming, Including, and & Supporting All in STEM Careers Worldwide

  9. Employees on the rebound: Extending the careers literature to include boomerang employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swider, Brian W; Liu, Joseph T; Harris, T Brad; Gardner, Richard G

    2017-06-01

    As employee careers have evolved from linear trajectories confined within 1 organization to more dynamic and boundaryless paths, organizations and individuals alike have increasingly considered reestablishing prior employment relationships. These "boomerang employees" follow career paths that feature 2 or more temporally separated tenures in particular organizations ("boomerang organizations"). Yet, research to date is mute on how or to what extent differences across boomerang employees' career experiences, and the learning and knowledge developed at and away from boomerang organizations, meaningfully impact their performance following their return. Addressing this omission, we extend a careers-based learning perspective to construct a theoretical framework of a parsimonious, yet generalizable, set of factors that influence boomerang employee return performance. Results based on a sample of boomerang employees and employers in the same industry (professional basketball) indicate that intra- and extraorganizational knowledge construction and disruptions, as well as transition events, are significantly predictive of boomerangs' return performance. Comparisons with 2 matched samples of nonboomerang employees likewise suggest distinctive patterns in the performance of boomerang employees. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. 75 FR 77665 - Whirlpool Corporation, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,593] Whirlpool Corporation, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing and Andrews International, Fort Smith... subject firm. The workers are engaged in the production of refrigerators and trash compactors. The company...

  11. Professional Development across the Teaching Career: Teachers' Uptake of Formal and Informal Learning Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Dirk; Kunter, Mareike; Klusmann, Uta; Ludtke, Oliver; Baumert, Jurgen

    2011-01-01

    This study examined teachers' uptake of formal and informal learning opportunities across the career cycle. Analyses were based on data from 1939 German secondary teachers in 198 schools. Results showed that formal learning opportunities (in-service training) were used most frequently by mid-career teachers, whereas informal learning opportunities…

  12. Providing Internet Access to the Ohio Career Information System for All Residents: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Morgan V.

    Expanded Internet access to the Ohio Career Information System (OCIS) would provide adults in Ohio who need to or wish to make career changes with the best available information about occupations, education and training programs, and financial aid. In order to determine the feasibility of improving access without cost to users, an advisory group,…

  13. Personal Values, Social Capital, and Higher Education Student Career Decidedness: A New "Protean"-Informed Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearon, Colm; Nachmias, Stefanos; McLaughlin, Heather; Jackson, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the role of personal values as motivational antecedents for understanding higher education (HE) student career decidedness among university business school (UBS) students. We propose a new "protean"-informed HE student career decidedness model for theorizing how both personal values and social capital mediators…

  14. Career information in the mathematical sciences (CIMS). Final report, November 1, 1992--October 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterrett, A.

    1996-01-29

    This report documents the preparation and distribution of materials designed to aid students is assessing their interests in and prospects for a career in the mathematical sciences. Activities included the preparation of two books, two videos, a world wide web home page, and a workshop meeting on ``Math in Careers`` held at the University of California at Berkeley in January, 1995.

  15. Accounting Students’ Choice on Accounting Information Technology Careers (P.178-188

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Hasanah Uswati Dewi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The important role of accounting information systems professionals, motivate researchers to analyze further the interest of students to the profession in the field of accounting information systems. The aim of this study explores the factors that influence students to choose and do not choose a profession in the field of accounting information systems.This research was conducted using questionnaires. The population was undergraduate accounting students. Sample research was done randomly.This research shows that the interest in undergraduate accounting students for a career in the field of information systems is very small and this research also appears that the academic supervisor is one of the dominant factors influencing student choice in choosing a career in the field of information systems. Beside this, this study also found that respondents are not interested in a career in accounting information systems more due to that field of information systems is not a career they aspire.Keywords: accounting information system, accounting career, students.

  16. Including patients’ perspectives in patient information leaflets: A polyocular approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage-Butler, Antoinette Mary

    2013-01-01

    Existing research reveals that patients’ perspectives are missing from mandatory patient information leaflets (PILs). At the same time, there is overwhelming consensus that they should be included in this genre, and a corresponding need for potential approaches to tackle this problem. This paper ...

  17. The Differences in Career-Related Variables between Temporary and Permanent Employees in Information Technology Companies in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Jinkook; Lim, Beomsik

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in career-related variables, such as career commitment and career satisfaction, based on employment status (temporary vs. permanent employees) and job type (professional vs. nonprofessional employees). With a sample of 302 employees working in information technology companies in Korea, it was…

  18. Engaging the optics community in the development of informative, accessible resources focusing on careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin-Girard, Anne-Sophie; Gingras, F.; Zambon, V.; Thériault, G.

    2014-09-01

    Young people often have biased and pre-conceived ideas about scientists and engineers that can dissuade them from considering a career in optics. This situation is compounded by the fact that existing resources on careers in optics are not suitable since they mostly focus on more general occupations such as a physicist and an electrical engineer. In addition, the linguistic register is not adapted for students, and many of these resources are only available to guidance counselors. To create appropriate resources that will inform high school students on different career opportunities in optics and photonics, we sought the collaboration of our local optics community. We selected seven specific occupations: entrepreneur in optics, university professor, teacher, technician, research and development engineer, sales representative and graduate student in optics. For each career, a list of daily tasks was created from the existing documentation by a guidance counselor and was validated by an expert working in the field of optics. Following a process of validation, we built surveys in which professionals were asked to select the tasks that best represented their occupation. The surveys were also used to gather other information such as level of education and advice for young people wishing to pursue careers in optics. Over 175 professionals answered the surveys. With these results, we created a leaflet and career cards that are available online and depict the activities of people working in optics and photonics. We hope that these resources will help counter the negative bias against scientific careers and inform teenagers and young adults on making career choices that are better suited to their preferences and aspirations.

  19. SUSTAINING OCCUPATIONAL INFORMATION FOR CAREER CHOICE AND DEVELOPMENT IN STUDENTS OF TECHNICAL COLLEGES IN ENUGU STATE, NIGERIA

    OpenAIRE

    Moses Ikebe Odo

    2015-01-01

    This study takes on the issue of sustaining occupational information for career choice and development in students of technical colleges in Enugu State, Nigeria. The method adopted for this study was the survey design and the population included were all final year students of the three government technical colleges in Enugu State of Nigeria. The technical colleges were sampled as follows: Government Technical College, Enugu (156 students); Government Technical College, Nsukka (148 students);...

  20. Career development learning in higher education: how authentic work experiences and opportunities for career exploration canincrease self-efficacy and inform career identity

    OpenAIRE

    Benton, Paula

    2015-01-01

    A recent study suggests that enhancing career development is a key motivator for students entering university (Kandiko & Mawer, 2013). This article discusses the place of career development learning within the ‘employability’ agenda. It draws upon on social learning and constructivist theories of career development in a qualitative case study exploring undergraduate students’ experiences of placements in relation to their career development learning and employability. Findings suggest signifi...

  1. Accounting Students’ Choice on Accounting Information Technology Careers

    OpenAIRE

    Nurul Hasanah Uswati Dewi

    2014-01-01

    The important role of accounting information systems professionals, motivate researchers to analyze further the interest of students to the profession in the field of accounting information systems. The aim of this study explores the factors that influence students to choose and do not choose a profession in the field of accounting information systems. This research was conducted using questionnaires. The population was undergraduate accounting students. Sample research was done randomly....

  2. Understanding employees' informal workplace learning: The joint influence of career motivation and self-construal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Monique; Yang, H.; Sanders, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to investigate the joint influence of employees' career motivation and their self-construal on their engagement in three informal workplace learning activities: keeping up-to-date, asking for feedback from supervisors and knowledge sharing. Design/methodology/approach –

  3. Job Outlook Information: Careers for the Future. InfoSeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiana Career and Postsecondary Advancement Center, Bloomington.

    Job outlook information forecasts the growth and decline of jobs in the near future--usually for a 10-year period. The purpose of this information is to help individuals understand where future employment opportunities may occur, but the individual must also consider his/her skills and interests and the level of education needed to accomplish…

  4. Impacting Student Perceptions about Careers in Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walstrom, Kent A.; Schambach, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    A shortage of graduates prepared to fill the available jobs in Information Systems remains. Previous studies have verified the shortage and attempted to explain why students do not major in Information Technology related fields. Since prior studies identified lack of awareness regarding the discipline as a major reason in ignoring the major, the…

  5. [The informed consent in international clinical trials including developing countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro Surís, Alexander; Monreal Agüero, Magda Elaine

    2008-01-01

    The informed consent procedure has been one of the most important controversies of ethical debates about clinical trials in developing countries. In this essay we present our recommendations about important aspects to consider in the informed consent procedure for clinical trials in developing countries. We performed a full publications review identified by MEDLINE using these terms combinations: informed consent, developing countries, less developed countries and clinical trials. To protect volunteers in less developed countries should be valuated the importance of the community in the informed consent proceeding. The signing and dating of the informed consent form is not always the best procedure to document the informed consent. The informed consent form should be written by local translators. Alternative medias of communications could be needed for communicatios of the information to volunteers. Comparing with developed countries the informed consent proceeding in clinical trials in developing countries frequently require additional efforts. The developing of pragmatic researches is needed to implement informed consent proceedings assuring subjects voluntarily in each developing country. The main aspects to define in each clinical trial for each country are the influence of the community, the effective communication of the information, the documentation of the informed consent and local authority's control.

  6. Personal values, social capital and higher education student career decidedness: a new ‘protean’ informed model

    OpenAIRE

    Fearon, C.; Nachmias, S.; McLaughlin, H.; Jackson, S.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the role of personal values as motivational antecedents for understanding HE student career decidedness among university business school (UBS) students. We propose a new ‘protean’ informed HE student career decidedness model for theorizing how both personal values and social capital mediators (student social capital; personal, social and enterprise skills; access to resources) help in the student-centric and self-directed processes of career decision-making. A mixed me...

  7. Impact of information communication technologies (ICTs) on career ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Findings revealed that the most applicable ICT facilities to female academia's job is the computer systems (58.7%) and the internet connectivity (51%), Also, out of the several ICT based activities investigated, the most applicable was information retrieval activity (53%). Greater number of the population under study was ...

  8. Leadership Perceptions of Information Technology (IT) Employee Career Development: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Timothy Michael

    2009-01-01

    The offshoring movement has had a profound effect on U.S. based IT employee career development and growth opportunities. This phenomenological study included an analysis of the central phenomenon through observations and lived experiences of 10 HR managers and 10 IT operational managers equally distributed between two U.S. based IT services…

  9. New research builds strong case for including informal migrant ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-21

    Apr 21, 2016 ... The informal sector is a major source of income for the urban poor. ... Two new studies supported by IDRC seek to address this gap. ... provided a detailed analysis of businesses owned by cross-border traders in a number of ...

  10. INFORMATION ON FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS INCLUDED IN ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Gust

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This survey aims at emphasizing several aspects of the recognition, measurement and presentation of information on capital assets and how they are reflected in accounting. In this respect, here is a presentation of the calculation, preparation and regulation of impairment that can affect capital assets and the way accounting entries may influence the financial status and performance of a company. Although the bookkeeping variants of asset impairment, namely the Romanian and the international ones, are different, the information reported in annual financial statements is the same and assets are shown at their fair values. The issues approached in the paper herein are vast and they open new prospects to scientific research.

  11. Dietary Preferences and Nutritional Information Needs Among Career Firefighters in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Justin; Farioli, Andrea; Korre, Maria; Kales, Stefanos N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considerable cardiovascular disease and cancer risk among firefighters are attributable to excess adiposity. Robust evidence confirms strong relationships between dietary patterns and the risk of chronic disease. Dietary modification is more likely to be effective when the strategy is appealing and addresses knowledge gaps. Objective: To assess career firefighters' diet practices and information needs, compare the relative appeal of proposed diet plans, and examine how these vary ...

  12. 77 FR 6587 - PHB Die Casting a Subsidiary of PHB, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Concepts...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-64,292] PHB Die Casting a... 19, 2008, applicable to workers of PHB Die Casting, a subsidiary of PHB, Inc., including on-site... production of die castings. New information shows that a worker from Burns Industrial Group (BIG Inc) was...

  13. Informální u č ení v karié ř e žen. / Informal learning within the career development of women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Hloušková

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this text is to describe how informal learning influences the career development of women. Answer to the above mentioned question follows from a qualitative study within a research study on the topic: The needs of adults in relation to the building of their careers and how to satisfy these through career counselling andguidance services. Qualitative approach was implemented as biographic research with the use of the life story method. For the purpose of this text, we used a sample of seven women of different ages, the same degree of education, with at least one-year-work experience and with different types of changes in their careers. The data suggest that women learn informally either due to the pressure of a situation or „for the future“. If women learn as a result of the pressure of the situation, informal learning represents a tool for satisfying needs that are perceived as deficit. In fact, these women don'tplan their career development in a long-term perspective and from the point of view of career building, informal learning becomes a tool for changing the current state. In case that women learn for the future, via learning they try to satisfy needs which canbe regarded (according to Maslow as the self-realization needs. These women plan their career development and this is why it is possible to consider informal learning as a direct tool for their career development.

  14. The information value of early career productivity in mathematics: a ROC analysis of prediction errors in bibliometricly informed decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Jonas; Danell, Rickard

    The aim of this study was to provide a framework to evaluate bibliometric indicators as decision support tools from a decision making perspective and to examine the information value of early career publication rate as a predictor of future productivity. We used ROC analysis to evaluate a bibliometric indicator as a tool for binary decision making. The dataset consisted of 451 early career researchers in the mathematical sub-field of number theory. We investigated the effect of three different definitions of top performance groups-top 10, top 25, and top 50 %; the consequences of using different thresholds in the prediction models; and the added prediction value of information on early career research collaboration and publications in prestige journals. We conclude that early career performance productivity has an information value in all tested decision scenarios, but future performance is more predictable if the definition of a high performance group is more exclusive. Estimated optimal decision thresholds using the Youden index indicated that the top 10 % decision scenario should use 7 articles, the top 25 % scenario should use 7 articles, and the top 50 % should use 5 articles to minimize prediction errors. A comparative analysis between the decision thresholds provided by the Youden index which take consequences into consideration and a method commonly used in evaluative bibliometrics which do not take consequences into consideration when determining decision thresholds, indicated that differences are trivial for the top 25 and the 50 % groups. However, a statistically significant difference between the methods was found for the top 10 % group. Information on early career collaboration and publication strategies did not add any prediction value to the bibliometric indicator publication rate in any of the models. The key contributions of this research is the focus on consequences in terms of prediction errors and the notion of transforming uncertainty

  15. Career Anchors of United States Air Force Information Systems Workers: A Turnover Predictor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wynne, Lee

    2002-01-01

    ...) and the work of Schein (1987) to measure the career anchors, job satisfaction, and turnover intention of AF IS workers to determine if those whose job type and career anchor match report higher satisfaction and lower turnover...

  16. A longitudinal study of the educational and career trajectories of female participants of an urban informal science education program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadigan, Kathleen A.; Hammrich, Penny L.

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal case study is to describe the educational trajectories of a sample of 152 young women from urban, low-income, single-parent families who participated in the Women in Natural Sciences (WINS) program during high school. Utilizing data drawn from program records, surveys, and interviews, this study also attempts to determine how the program affected the participants' educational and career choices to provide insight into the role informal science education programs play in increasing the participation of women and minorities in science, math, engineering, and technology (SMET)-related fields. Findings revealed 109 participants (93.16%) enrolled in a college program following high school completion. Careers in medical or health-related fields followed by careers in SMET emerged as the highest ranking career paths with 24 students (23.76%) and 21 students (20.79%), respectively, employed in or pursuing careers in these areas. The majority of participants perceived having staff to talk to, the job skills learned, and having the museum as a safe place to go as having influenced their educational and career decisions. These findings reflect the need for continued support of informal science education programs for urban girls and at-risk youth.

  17. Information management for global environmental change, including the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center

    1994-06-01

    The issue of global change is international in scope. A body of international organizations oversees the worldwide coordination of research and policy initiatives. In the US the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) was established in November of 1993 to provide coordination of science, space, and technology policies throughout the federal government. NSTC is organized into nine proposed committees. The Committee on Environmental and Natural Resources (CERN) oversees the US Department of Energy`s Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). As part of the USGCRP, the US Department of Energy`s Global Change Research Program aims to improve the understanding of Earth systems and to strengthen the scientific basis for the evaluation of policy and government action in response to potential global environmental changes. This paper examines the information and data management roles of several international and national programs, including Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) global change information programs. An emphasis will be placed on the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which also serves as the World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases.

  18. An Informal Science Education Program's Impact on STEM Major and STEM Career Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habig, Bobby; Gupta, Preeti; Levine, Brian; Adams, Jennifer

    2018-04-01

    While there is extensive evidence that STEM careers can be important pathways for augmenting social mobility and for increasing individual prestige, many youth perceive a STEM trajectory as an unattractive option. In the USA, women and members of historically marginalized racial and ethnic groups continue to be underrepresented across STEM disciplines. One vehicle for generating and sustaining interest in STEM is providing youth long-term access to informal science education (ISE) institutions. Here, we incorporate triangulation methods, collecting and synthesizing both qualitative and quantitative data, to examine how participation in a longitudinal ISE out-of-school time (OST) program facilitated by the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) impacted the STEM trajectories of 66 alumni. Findings revealed that 83.2% of alumni engaged in a STEM major, and 63.1% in a STEM career, the majority whom were females and/or members of historically underrepresented racial and ethnic groups. Based on interviews with a purposeful sample of 21 AMNH alumni, we identified four program design principles that contributed to persistence in STEM: (1) affording multiple opportunities to become practitioners of science; (2) providing exposure to and repeated experiences with STEM professionals such as scientists, educators, and graduate students to build social networks; (3) furnishing opportunities for participants to develop shared science identities with like-minded individuals; and (4) offering exposure to and preparation for a variety of STEM majors and STEM careers so that youth can engage in discovering possible selves. These findings support our central thesis that long-term engagement in ISE OST programs fosters persistence in STEM.

  19. The internal career orientation of permanent and contracting information technology staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Havran

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between types of employment (permanent or contracting for two variables: flow and career success orientation in an information technology environment. The study was performed in a sub-division of a large telecommunications company that focuses on software development and implementation. Two questionnaires measuring flow and career success orientation, were administered to groups of 150 permanent and 150 contracting staff respectively. Factor analyses indicated that the career success orientation questionnaire measured two dimensions labeled as ‘work focus’ and ‘self focus’, and the flow questionnaire measured ‘enjoyment’ and ‘control of consciousness’. Contracting and permanent employees were compared with regard to the four dimensions and it was found that contract workers experienced their work more optimally than the permanent workers did, because they obtained higher scores on the ‘control of consciousness scale’. Opsomming Die primêre doel van die ondersoek was om die verwantskap tussen tipes indiensneming (permanent en kontraktering te ondersoek vir twee veranderlikes: vloei en beroepsuksesoriëntasie in ’n inligtingstegnologieomgewing. Die ondersoek is uitgevoer in ’n onderafdeling van ’n groot telekommunikasiemaatskappy wat fokus op programmatuurontwikkeling en -implementering. Twee vraelyste wat vloei en beroepsuksesoriëntasie meet, is toegepas op 150 permanente werknemers en 150 kontrakteurs. Faktorontledings het aangedui dat die beroepsuksesoriënteringsvraelys twee dimensies gemeet het, naamlik ‘werkfokus’ en ‘selffokus’. Die vloei-vraelys het ‘werksgenot’ en ‘bewustsheidbeheer’ gemeet. Kontrakteurs en permanente werknemers is met mekaar vergelyk in terme van die vier dimensies en die uitslae van die bewustheids beheerskaal het aangedui dat kontrakteurs hul werk meer optimaal ervaar in teenstelling met permanente werkers.

  20. Harnessing health information to foster disadvantaged teens' community engagement, leadership skills, and career plans: a qualitative evaluation of the Teen Health Leadership Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keselman, Alla; Ahmed, Einas A; Williamson, Deborah C; Kelly, Janice E; Dutcher, Gale A

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a qualitative evaluation of a small-scale program aiming to improve health information literacy, leadership skills, and interest in health careers among high school students in a low-income, primarily minority community. Graduates participated in semi-structured interviews, transcripts of which were coded with a combination of objectives-driven and data-driven categories. The program had a positive impact on the participants' health information competency, leadership skills, academic orientation, and interest in health careers. Program enablers included a supportive network of adults, novel experiences, and strong mentorship. The study suggests that health information can provide a powerful context for enabling disadvantaged students' community engagement and academic success.

  1. Communication of job-related information and work family conflict in dual-career couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedelia Theunissen

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available It is known that work-family conflict is a determinant of marital dissatisfaction. The goal of this study was to determine whether inadequate communication regarding the sharing of job-related information between dual-career spouses contributes to marital dissatisfaction. The Work Perception Questionnaire (WPQ was designed and administered to obtain information on dimensions that 80 dual-career couples (married or in co-habitation perceived to contribute to marital conflict and that have an impact on the quality of their relationships. The main findings indicated that male partners experienced more marital conflict than their female partners if they did not have adequate job-related information about their partner’s work. However, the findings for the female partners were nonsignificant. The implications of the findings are discussed. Opsomming Dit is algemeen bekend dat werk- en gesinskonflik ‘n oorsaak van huweliksontevredenheid is. Die doel van hierdie studie was om te bepaal of ontoereikende kommunikasie oor werksverwante inligting tussen gades in dubbelloopbaanverhoudings ‘n bydraende faktor tot huweliksontevredenheid is. Die Werk Persepsie Vraelys (WPV is ontwerp en toegepas ten einde inligting te versamel rakende sekere dimensies wat volgens die persepsies van 80 dubbelloopbaanpare (wat getroud is of saamwoon aanleiding gee tot huwelikskonflik en wat moontlik ‘n impak op die gehalte van hul verhouding mag hê. Die belangrikste bevinding was dat manlike gades meer huwelikskonflik ervaar indien hul gades nie werksverwante inligting met hulle deel nie. Die resultate vir vroulike gades was egter nie beduidend nie. Die implikasies van die resultate word bespreek.

  2. 76 FR 2144 - Quest Diagnostics, Inc. Information Technology Help Desk Services Including On-Site Leased...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    .... Information Technology Help Desk Services Including On-Site Leased Workers From Modis, West Norriton, PA..., applicable to workers of Quest Diagnostics, Inc., Information Technology Help Desk Services, West Norriton... Quest Diagnostics, Inc., Information Technology Help Desk [[Page 2145

  3. 77 FR 19719 - Whirlpool Corporation Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing, IBM...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... Logistics, Eurest, Canteen, Kelly Services, Inc., Prodriver, Arkansas Warehouse, Inc., Andrews International... information shows that workers leased from Andrews International employed on-site at the Fort Smith, Arkansas...) tax account under the name U.S. Security. Accordingly, the Department is amending this certification...

  4. Career cartography: a conceptualization of career development to advance health and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feetham, Suzanne; Doering, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to propose a conceptualization of career development that emphasizes the interdependence between research, practice, and policy. Career cartography applies three decades of career development experience to lay out a systematic, comprehensive, and iterative approach for planning and communicating the outcomes of science at any career stage. To inform practice and policy, nurse researchers must be clear on the intended destination and trajectory of the science, and be skilled in communicating that science and vision to diverse stakeholders. Career cartography builds on the science of cartography, is developed within the context of public and health policy, and is composed of several components, including a destination statement, career mapping, a supportive career cartography team, and use of communication and dissemination strategies. The successful utilization of career cartography may accelerate advancement of individual careers, scientific impact, and the discipline as a whole by guiding nurse researchers to be deliberative in career planning and to communicate successfully the outcomes of research across a wide variety of stakeholders. Career cartography provides a framework for planning a nurse researcher's program of research and scholarship to advance science, policy, and health of the public. Career cartography guides nurse researchers to realize their full potential to advance the health of the public and inform public and health policy in academic and practice environments. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  5. Career Development: Issues of Gender, Race, and Class. Information Series No. 371.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitt-Gohdes, Wanda L.

    The premise of this paper is that, although career choice implies options, issues of gender, race, and class may constrain the occupational choices an individual makes. Dominant career development theories are being reexamined for their appropriateness to diverse groups. This paper reviews the following theories: Ginzberg, Ginsburg, Axelrad, and…

  6. Critical Success Factors to Improve Perception of Information Technology Careers: A Specific Case in a Mexican Higher Education Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Aldrette-Malacara

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available It is a fact that fashion plays an important role to select a career, new options of careers from engineering are preferred by students instead of traditional options; for example, Mechatronics, Aeronautics, Automotive specializations, Bionics, Biomedical and others are so popular. Every day, new necessities are required in the world and it is necessary to find the way to solve them, for that reason these new majors are good options to students, however traditional areas are important too. Information Technology is not the exception because every enterprise, school, association and organization needs computers with systems that help to solve specific situations or to manage resources. In Mexico, Information Technology careers are been affected for low enrollment of students, of course private universities have suffered more this situation than public schools [1]. In this research work are shown the most important factors that have a real incidence to choose an Information Technology career. The methodology consisted in the design of a survey using seven points Likert´s scale where potential students could express more about their expectative, preferences and required abilities to study these majors. The mentioned survey had three versions and each one was validated through Cronbach’s Alpha. Data collected were analyzed using statistical software SPSS to obtain the critical success factors.

  7. Dietary Preferences and Nutritional Information Needs Among Career Firefighters in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Justin; Farioli, Andrea; Korre, Maria; Kales, Stefanos N

    2015-07-01

    Considerable cardiovascular disease and cancer risk among firefighters are attributable to excess adiposity. Robust evidence confirms strong relationships between dietary patterns and the risk of chronic disease. Dietary modification is more likely to be effective when the strategy is appealing and addresses knowledge gaps. To assess career firefighters' diet practices and information needs, compare the relative appeal of proposed diet plans, and examine how these vary in association with body composition. Cross-sectional, online survey distributed to members of the International Association of Fire Fighters. Most firefighters do not currently follow any specific dietary plan (71%) and feel that they receive insufficient nutrition information (68%), but most are interested in learning more about healthy eating (75%). When presented with written descriptions of diets without names or labels and asked to rank them in order of preference, firefighters most often rated the Mediterranean diet as their favorite and gave it a more favorable distribution of relative rankings (PPaleo, Atkins, Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes, and Esselsteyn Engine 2 (low-fat, strictly plant-based) diets. Obese respondents reported more limited nutritional knowledge (Pdiet; however, 75% want to learn more about healthy eating. Among popular dietary choices, firefighters were most receptive to a Mediterranean diet and least receptive to a strictly plant-based diet.

  8. 14 CFR 11.35 - Does FAA include sensitive security information and proprietary information in the Federal Docket...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... RULEMAKING PROCEDURES Rulemaking Procedures General § 11.35 Does FAA include sensitive security information and proprietary information in the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS)? (a) Sensitive security information. You should not submit sensitive security information to the rulemaking docket, unless you are...

  9. Motivation and career development

    OpenAIRE

    Flemr, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this diploma thesis is to outline various theories of work motivation, career growth and their practical application in sales team management within a sales organization. In the theoretical part the paper deals with the definition of essential terms including but not limited to motivation, work motivation, career and work career. Moreover, it focuses on selected motivational theories, basic criteria and current principles of managing the work career, career growth and de...

  10. Ohio Career Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This resource is designed to provide Ohio labor market information for use with advisory committees to stimulate and inform dialogue about the current evaluation and future planning of programs. It provides reports for 23 career fields in 6 career clusters. Each report highlights careers and occupations in the field and answers these questions:…

  11. Inked Careers: Tattooing Professional Paths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela DeLuca

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of career has an interdisciplinary and historical constitution, which includes persons, groups, organizations and society. Given that, we aim to deepen the interactionist notion of career from the understanding of a deviant path, supported by a theory and a method appropriated to the cited call for interdisciplinary approaches. Dilemmas (Hughes, 1958 and conflicts (Hughes, 1937 emerged as important analytical categories. Although necessary, these two concepts were not sufficient to contemplate analyses in their entirety. For this reason we conceptualized a third possibility of controversy during a career: the inquiries. The study followed the Narrative method to analyze objective and subjective changes during a tattoo artist’s career through interviews and informal conversations carried out over 22 months. The discussion presents three main contributions. Theoretically, a new understanding of the concept of careers, linking past, present and future and the idea of non-linearity of experienced and envisioned careers. Methodologically, suggesting orientations for future career studies such as the use of turning points as a methodological tool and the investigation of deviant fields. Finally, our defense of the interactionist perspective as suitable for career studies, since it allows the investigation of deviant elements.

  12. 12 CFR 516.55 - What information must I include in my public notice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What information must I include in my public notice? 516.55 Section 516.55 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY APPLICATION PROCESSING PROCEDURES Publication Requirements § 516.55 What information must I include in my...

  13. 12 CFR 516.120 - What information should a comment include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What information should a comment include? 516.120 Section 516.120 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY APPLICATION PROCESSING PROCEDURES Comment Procedures § 516.120 What information should a comment include? (a...

  14. 10 CFR 719.10 - What information must be included in the legal management plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What information must be included in the legal management plan? 719.10 Section 719.10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACTOR LEGAL MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENTS Legal Management Plan § 719.10 What information must be included in the legal management plan? The legal management...

  15. 40 CFR 725.355 - Information to be included in the TME application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... or the environment as a result of the test marketing. The TME application must be in writing and must... the microorganism as a result of test marketing, including information regarding duration and route of... for Test Marketing § 725.355 Information to be included in the TME application. (a) To review a TME...

  16. CAREER AND WORK RELATIONS IN THE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICE INDUSTRY: THE PERSPECTIVES OF IT PROFESSIONALS AND THEIR MANAGERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter Moreno

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates work relations and career perspectives of IT professionals in the information technology service industry. The research is based on the case of executives, managers and technical professionals which work in a large Brazilian company that provides consulting and systems development and implementation services, and reveals a considerable vulnerability in the relationship between the company and such professionals. The human resources business model adopted seems to impose restrictions to the development of the professionals, consequently limiting their future performance, and concurring for the continuing devaluation of IT as a profession. The sustainability of such a model is discussed, given its long term risks for the companies’ service quality and competitiveness, as well as its implications for the attractiveness of Information Technology as a career.

  17. A comprehensive medical student career development program improves medical student satisfaction with career planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Brian J; Hammoud, Maya M; Middleton, Eric; Moroney, Donney; Schigelone, Amy

    2007-01-01

    In 1999, the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) initiated a new career development program (CDP). The CDP incorporates the 4-phase career development model described by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Careers in Medicine (CiM). The CDP offers self-assessment exercises with guidance from trained counselors for 1st- and 2nd-year medical students. Career exploration experiences include Career Seminar Series luncheons, shadow experiences with faculty, and a shadow program with second-year (M2) and fourth-year (M4) medical students. During the decision-making phase, students work with trained faculty career advisors (FCA). Mandatory sessions are held on career selection, preparing the residency application, interviewing, and program evaluation. During the implementation phase, students meet with deans or counselors to discuss residency application and matching. An "at-risk plan" assists students who may have difficulty matching. The CiM Web site is extensively used during the 4 stages. Data from the AAMC and UMMS Graduation Questionnaires (GQ) show significant improvements for UMMS students in overall satisfaction with career planning services and with faculty mentoring, career assessment activities, career information, and personnel availability. By 2003, UMMS students had significantly higher satisfaction in all measured areas of career planning services when compared with all other U.S. medical students.

  18. Information required from States, including 'small quantities protocol' status, under the Protocol Additional to Safeguards Agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuley, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Model, or Additional, Protocol to the Model Safeguards Agreement, INFCIRC/153, contains, inter alia, provisions for expanded declarations from Member States to the IAEA. These provisions include earlier design information declarations and information on fuel cycles activities, such a mining and milling, that were not previously part of safeguards. The session discusses the extent of the expanded declarations and provides examples of the forms that will be used to provide the information to the Agency. (author)

  19. 78 FR 68907 - Agency Information Collection (Foot (Including Flatfeet (pes planus)) Conditions Disability...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... planus)) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire). Type of Review: New data collection. Abstract... (Including Flatfeet (pes planus)) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review AGENCY...)) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...

  20. Employment, Salary & Placement Information for Johnson County Community College Career Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Karen A.

    More than forty-six career programs are offered at Johnson County Community College (JCCC) in Kansas, in such areas as Cosmetology, Dental Assistance, and Travel and Tourism. These programs specialize in the types of industries that are currently growing at high rates, such as computer-related occupations and special education teachers. This…

  1. Retaining At-Risk Students: The Role of Career and Vocational Education. Information Series No. 335.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindall, Lloyd W.

    This paper reviews the literature related to the role of career and vocational education in retaining at-risk secondary youth and motivating them to return to secondary or postsecondary school. Selected literature from nonvocational but related areas of service is reviewed to provide the reader with an overview of the scope of the problem and the…

  2. 15 CFR 2006.1 - Information to be included in petition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... property right, or foreign direct investment matter for which the rights of the United States under the... nature of any foreign direct investment proposed by the United States person, including estimates of... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Information to be included in petition...

  3. 12 CFR 563b.105 - What information must I include in my business plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... information must I include in my business plan? (a) Prior to filing an application for conversion, you must adopt a business plan reflecting your intended plans for deployment of the proposed conversion proceeds. Your business plan is required, under § 563b.150, to be included in your conversion application. At a...

  4. The Roles of Negative Career Thinking and Career Problem-Solving Self-Efficacy in Career Exploratory Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock-Yowell, Emily; Katz, Sheba P.; Reardon, Robert C.; Peterson, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    The respective roles of social cognitive career theory and cognitive information processing in career exploratory behavior were analyzed. A verified path model shows cognitive information processing theory's negative career thoughts inversely predict social cognitive career theory's career problem-solving self-efficacy, which predicts career…

  5. Protean career: perspectives of study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litvinova Ye.Yu.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes different approaches to study of models of constructing the employment career in current environment. The changes having taken place in interrelationsbetween employees and organizations over recent 15 years led to changes in their mutual expectations including the ones concerning the career development. Boundaryless career based on career mobility and protean career based on subjective understanding of career success are regarded as alternatives to traditional careers. The main attributes of “new careers” are: an increased independence in employee-organization dyads, low level of mutual obligations, freedom of choice, self-actualization, priority of career loyalty and self-management in contrast to organization loyalty. Changes in career conceptualizing inevitably led to revision of career competences. Traditional professional competences give way to career meta-competences like adaptiveness, capacity for education, self-management, taking responsibility. At the same time empirical studies displaya prematurity of statements about the expressed loss of interest to traditional careers.

  6. Extending FDA guidance to include consumer medication information (CMI) delivery on mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Adam; Blalock, Susan J; Carpenter, Delesha

    This paper describes the current state of consumer-focused mobile health application use and the current U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidance on the distribution of consumer medication information (CMI), and discusses recommendations and considerations for the FDA to expand CMI guidance to include CMI in mobile applications. Smartphone-based health interventions have been linked to increased medication adherence and improved health outcomes. Trends in smartphone ownership present opportunities to more effectively communicate and disseminate medication information; however, current FDA guidance for CMI does not outline how to effectively communicate CMI on a mobile platform, particularly in regards to user-centered design and information sourcing. As evidence supporting the potential effectiveness of mobile communication in health care continues to increase, CMI developers, regulating entities, and researchers should take note. Although mobile-based CMI offers an innovative mechanism to deliver medication information, caution should be exercised. Specifically, considerations for developing mobile CMI include consumers' digital literacy, user experience (e.g., usability), and the quality and accuracy of new widely used sources of information (e.g., crowd-sourced reviews and ratings). Recommended changes to FDA guidance for CMI include altering the language about scientific accuracy to address more novel methods of information gathering (e.g., anecdotal experiences and Google Consumer Surveys) and including guidance for usability testing of mobile health applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Interpreting Early Career Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnatt, Joan; Gahlsdorf Terrell, Dianna; D'Souza, Lisa Andries; Jong, Cindy; Cochran-Smith, Marilyn; Viesca, Kara Mitchell; Gleeson, Ann Marie; McQuillan, Patrick; Shakman, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Career decisions of four teachers are explored through the concept of figured worlds in this qualitative, longitudinal case study. Participants were purposefully chosen for similarity at entry, with a range of career trajectories over time. Teacher career paths included remaining in one school, repeated changes in schools, attrition after…

  8. The African American Male Librarian: Motivational Factors in Choosing a Career in Library and Information Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Kendrick, Kaetrena D.

    2009-01-01

    A recent American Library Association (ALA) report has shown that less than 1% of credentialed librarians are African American males. This article discusses possible reasons for this dearth; and, in an effort to inform future LIS recruiting and marketing campaigns, the included study attempted to discover which factors lead African American males…

  9. Informing Royal Navy People Strategy: Understanding Career Aspirations and Behaviours of Naval Personnel

    OpenAIRE

    Bewley, Elizabeth Emma; Royal Navy (Great Britain); Ministry of Defence (Great Britain)

    2016-01-01

    Following a series of imposed redundancies in the Royal Navy (RN) there was a need to understand the career desires of remaining personnel and how these interact with important organisational behaviours and turnover. Taking a social psychology perspective, this thesis addresses criticisms over the high use of non-working populations in research and provides the first empirical evidence for the utility, applicability and relevance of specific psychological theories to the RN. Chapter 2 explore...

  10. [Career consciousness among Japanese female students: relationships between vocational motivation and career exploration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Tomoko

    2008-04-01

    This questionnaire study investigated career consciousness among 348 Japanese female freshman and sophomore college students. Variables included career consciousness (belief in the idea of a best-fit vocation, passivity, and giving priority to personal interests), vocational motives (self-improvement, interpersonal, status), as well as career decision-making self-efficacy (self-appraisal, gathering occupational information) and career exploration (self and environmental exploration). The results of causal analyses showed that the belief in the idea of a best-fit vocation and passivity had effects on all three vocational motives, but giving priority to personal interests had an effect only on motivation for self-improvement. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) models were constructed with career exploration as dependent variables, career consciousness as fixed factors, and career decision-making self-efficacy as covariates. The results of the analyses showed that students who had high career decision-making self-efficacy engaged in both self exploration and environmental exploration activities with a higher frequency. Students with a greater passive tendency toward their career engaged in both self and environmental exploration with a lower frequency. Belief in the idea of a best-fit vocation was associated only with differences in frequency of self exploration. Giving priority to personal interests did not produce differences in career exploration activities.

  11. Utilization of E-Counseling in Career Information Dissemination Among Undergraduates of Federal Universities in South East Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Chinweike Omeje

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This descriptive survey study was designed to find out the utilization of e-counseling in career information dissemination among the undergraduates of the federal universities in South East Nigeria. Three research questions and three null hypotheses guided the study. The population of the study consisted of 36 guidance counselors and 64,997 undergraduates of the federal universities in South East Nigeria. The sample consisted of 1,036 participants. This is made up of all the 36 guidance counselors in the federal universities in South East Nigeria, and 1,000 undergraduates randomly selected from the various universities. In each university, 200 undergraduates made up of 100 males and 100 females were randomly selected using balloting by replacement. All the guidance counselors were used due to smallness in number. The instrument for data collection was the E-Counselling Career Information Dissemination Questionnaire (E-CCIDQ. The reliability of the instrument was established using Cronbach’s alpha statistical analysis, and reliability indices of .91, .85, and .84 were obtained for the three clusters. Data for the research questions were answered using percentage, mean, and standard deviation, while the null hypotheses were analyzed using t test statistics tested at the .05 level of significance. The research findings revealed that the universities in South East of Nigeria have e-counseling facilities and the students are very aware of e-counseling opportunities in the universities. Also, the counselors and undergraduates to a high extent utilize e-counseling in career information dissemination. Based on findings, discussions and some recommendations were made.

  12. Elaboration of a guide including relevant project and logistic information: a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Tchaikowisky M. [Faculdade de Tecnologia e Ciencias (FTC), Itabuna, BA (Brazil); Bresci, Claudio T.; Franca, Carlos M.M. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    For every mobilization of a new enterprise it is necessary to quickly obtain the greatest amount of relative information in regards to location and availability of infra-structure, logistics, and work site amenities. Among this information are reports elaborated for management of the enterprise, (organizational chart, work schedule, objectives, contacts, etc.) as well as geographic anomalies, social-economic and culture of the area to be developed such as territorial extension, land aspects, local population, roads and amenities (fuel stations ,restaurants and hotels), infra-structure of the cities (health, education, entertainment, housing, transport, etc.) and logistically the distance between cities the estimated travel time, ROW access maps and notable points, among other relevant information. With the idea of making this information available for everyone involved in the enterprise, it was elaborated for GASCAC Spread 2A a rapid guide containing all the information mentioned above and made it available for all the vehicles used to transport employees and visitors to the spread. With this, everyone quickly received the majority of information necessary in one place, in a practical, quick, and precise manner, since the information is always used and controlled by the same person. This study includes the model used in the gas pipeline GASCAC Spread 2A project and the methodology used to draft and update the information. Besides the above, a file in the GIS format was prepared containing all necessary planning, execution and tracking information for enterprise activities, from social communication to the execution of the works previously mentioned. Part of the GIS file information was uploaded to Google Earth so as to disclose the information to a greater group of people, bearing in mind that this program is free of charge and easy to use. (author)

  13. Using the Internet to Facilitate Career Choices in Psychology-Related Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, Jonathan M.; Lippert, Anne M.; Malik, Sarah E.

    2018-01-01

    Career planning for psychology majors has broadened to include a diverse array of opportunities (e.g., medicine, law, education, government, and military). The Internet has made it possible for students to learn about and quickly obtain information regarding these new career options. This article describes various career resources on the Internet…

  14. Tornadoes: Nature's Most Violent Storms. A Preparedness Guide Including Safety Information for Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American National Red Cross, Washington, DC.

    This preparedness guide explains and describes tornadoes, and includes safety information for schools. A tornado is defined as a violently rotating column of air extending from a thunderstorm to the ground. The guide explains the cause of tornadoes, provides diagrams of how they form, describes variations of tornadoes, and classifies tornadoes by…

  15. 41 CFR 301-71.103 - What information must be included on all travel authorizations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... included on all travel authorizations? 301-71.103 Section 301-71.103 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 71-AGENCY TRAVEL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS Travel Authorization § 301-71.103 What information must be...

  16. 29 CFR 575.4 - Information to be included in application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information to be included in application. 575.4 Section 575.4 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS WAIVER OF CHILD LABOR PROVISIONS FOR AGRICULTURAL EMPLOYMENT OF 10 AND 11 YEAR OLD MINORS IN HAND...

  17. 41 CFR 102-75.125 - What information must agencies include in the title report?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 373, took place on the property. Hazardous substance activity includes situations where any hazardous substance was stored for one year or more, known to have been released, or disposed of on the... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What information must...

  18. 34 CFR 364.42 - What objectives and information must be included in the State plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What objectives and information must be included in the State plan? 364.42 Section 364.42 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE...

  19. 12 CFR 516.20 - What information must I include in my draft business plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... business plan? 516.20 Section 516.20 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE... What information must I include in my draft business plan? If you must submit a draft business plan... described in the savings association's draft business plan; and (d) Demonstrate how applicable requirements...

  20. AGU Panel meets on career topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, Charles

    Graduate students and their career opportunities in ocean and earth sciences were the focus of the Education and Human Resources (E & HR) Committee meeting held at the 1982 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. A standing committee of AGU, the E & HR committee is responsible for matters concerning education in earth, ocean, and planetary sciences from precollege through graduate programs, including career guidance, academic preparation, student recruitment, and manpower supply and demand.At the meeting a draft of the AGU-sponsored Careers in Oceanography booklet by committee chairman C. Hollister was thoroughly discussed and a new draft will emerge soon for final approval. The booklet is designed to complement the Careers in Geophysics booklet recently published by AGU; the booklets contain information about planning a career, job opportunities, educational requirements, and a synopsis of where the prospective student might apply.

  1. Can motivations for studying dentistry inform us about gender and BME differences in dental academic careers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waylen, A; Barnes, O; Kenyon, P; Neville, P

    2017-01-13

    There are various motivators that prompt people to study dentistry but there is evidence that the salience of each varies according to gender and black and minority ethnic (BME) group. Given the current focus on inequality within the science, technology, engineering, medicine and mathematics (STEMM) academic disciplines where dentistry sits, it is important to understand the relevance of different motivators to different social groups if inequality is to be overcome. We carried out a survey of dental students from 11 out of the 18 dental schools in the UK to find out what prompted them to study dentistry. Our findings showed that most people make a personal choice to study dentistry and follow a patient-focused career while the prospect of an academic career was important for less than half of our sample. Differences according to gender and BME group were apparent but did not follow these trends. In order to continue to improve the diversity within dental academia dental schools should consider the different preferences of the workforce and work to broaden its potential.

  2. Career Education Instructional Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    State Univ. of New York, Oswego. Coll. at Oswego. Dept. of Industrial Arts and Technology.

    The guide is designed primarily for industrial arts teachers at the middle school level who wish to integrate career education into their curricula. The lessons and activities attempt to establish a balance among career information, technical information, and hands-on experience. The guide contains six lesson plans which cover the topics: the…

  3. Banking, Technology Workers and Their Career Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Lesley; West, Jim

    2001-01-01

    An Australian bank developed a four-stage career development strategy for information technology workers: (1) career coaching sessions with executives; (2) career coaching seminars for line managers and team leaders; (3) staff career planning workshops; and (4) online career development support. The program resulted in increased satisfaction,…

  4. Public Policies for Career Development. Case Studies And Emerging Issues For Designing Career Information And Guidance Systems In Developing And Transition Economies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, A. G.; Fretwell, David H.

    2004-01-01

    The following pages summarize the findings of seven case-studies of public policy in career guidance carried out in Chile, the Philippines, Poland, Romania, Russia, South Africa and Turkey. The objectives of this World Bank study were: to identify and describe the distinctive issues faced by developing and transition economies in forming effective…

  5. Women in Nontraditional Careers: Setting Them Up to Succeed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Laurie; Tuchscherer, Jerry

    1992-01-01

    Idaho's Nontraditional-by-Gender Scholarship Program includes the following elements of success: provision of realistic information to women about jobs, support groups and peer advisors, placement, career fairs and on-campus interviews, business-labor-education partnerships, and career guidance and counseling. (SK)

  6. Women Administrators: Careers, Self-Perceptions, and Mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepner, Marilyn M.; Faaborg, Linda W.

    This report presents an analysis and interpretation of responses from women administrators in higher education concerning influences on their careers, professional mobility, and self-perceptions. Issues discussed include the inadequacy of information concerning women administrators, influences on career growth, differences between academic and…

  7. On the use of risk-informed regulation including organizational factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibelli, S.M.O.; Alvarenga, M.A.B.

    1998-01-01

    Risk-Informed Regulation (RIR) can be applied by using Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) as a basic tool. Traditionally, PSA methodology encompasses the calculation of failure probabilities of Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs) and direct associated human errors. However, there are indirect causes related to human failures, associated with Organizational Factors, which are normally not included in fault trees, that may influence plant risk evaluation. This paper discusses on possible applications of RIR and on Organizational Factors. It also presents a classification of Angra-1 NPP unresolved issues, aiming a future inclusion of these factors into a PSA calculation. (author)

  8. [Gender differences in career motivation: female doctors' ambitions benefit from family friendly work environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pas, B R; Lagro-Janssen, A L M; Doorewaard, J A C M; Eisinga, R N; Peters, C P

    2008-10-04

    To determine gender differences in career motivation and the effect of a family friendly work environment. Cross-sectional pilot investigation. A web survey among male and female doctors (n = 107; 72 women and 35 men) in different specialties, including surgical, internal medicine and general practitioners, was used to gather information on different dimensions of career motivation and perceptions of the family friendliness of the work environment. Differences were analysed by means of t-tests and regression analyses. Male doctors had higher scores on career identity and on career planning than female doctors. However, male and female doctors did not differ in their willingness to achieve top positions. Female doctors were more determined concerning their career goals than their male counterparts. The family friendliness of the work environment had an overall positive effect on career motivation for both male and female doctors. However, a family friendly work environment had a negative effect on the career identity of male doctors. For male and female doctors alike, support to achieve career goals and elimination of career barriers lead to increased career identity. Male and female doctors differed in certain dimensions of career motivation. Offering support for career goals and taking away career barriers leads to a higher career motivation than offering a family friendly work environment.

  9. Optimisation of chromatographic resolution using objective functions including both time and spectral information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Lapasió, J R; Pous-Torres, S; Ortiz-Bolsico, C; García-Alvarez-Coque, M C

    2015-01-16

    The optimisation of the resolution in high-performance liquid chromatography is traditionally performed attending only to the time information. However, even in the optimal conditions, some peak pairs may remain unresolved. Such incomplete resolution can be still accomplished by deconvolution, which can be carried out with more guarantees of success by including spectral information. In this work, two-way chromatographic objective functions (COFs) that incorporate both time and spectral information were tested, based on the peak purity (analyte peak fraction free of overlapping) and the multivariate selectivity (figure of merit derived from the net analyte signal) concepts. These COFs are sensitive to situations where the components that coelute in a mixture show some spectral differences. Therefore, they are useful to find out experimental conditions where the spectrochromatograms can be recovered by deconvolution. Two-way multivariate selectivity yielded the best performance and was applied to the separation using diode-array detection of a mixture of 25 phenolic compounds, which remained unresolved in the chromatographic order using linear and multi-linear gradients of acetonitrile-water. Peak deconvolution was carried out using the combination of orthogonal projection approach and alternating least squares. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Orientations in adolescent use of information and communication technology: a digital divide by sociodemographic background, educational career, and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivusilta, Leena K; Lintonen, Tomi P; Rimpelä, Arja H

    2007-01-01

    The role of information and communication technology (ICT) in adolescents' lives was studied, with emphasis on whether there exists a digital divide based on sociodemographic background, educational career, and health. The assumption was that some groups of adolescents use ICT more so that their information utilization skills improve (computer use), while others use it primarily for entertainment (digital gaming, contacting friends by mobile phone). Data were collected by mailed survey from a nationally representative sample of 12- to 18-year-olds (n=7,292; response 70%) in 2001 and analysed using ANOVA. Computer use was most frequent among adolescents whose fathers had higher education or socioeconomic status, who came from nuclear families, and who continued studies after compulsory education. Digital gaming was associated with poor school achievement and attending vocational rather than upper secondary school. Mobile phone use was frequent among adolescents whose fathers had lower education or socioeconomic status, who came from non-nuclear families, and whose educational prospects were poor. Intensive use of each ICT form, especially of mobile phones, was associated with health problems. High social position, nuclear family, and a successful educational career signified good health in general, independently of the diverse usage of ICT. There exists a digital divide among adolescents: orientation to computer use is more common in educated well-off families while digital gaming and mobile phone use accumulate at the opposite end of the spectrum. Poorest health was reported by mobile phone users. High social background and success at school signify better health, independently of the ways of using ICT.

  11. Preliminary Safety Information Document for the Standard MHTGR. Volume 1, (includes latest Amendments)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1986-01-01

    With NRC concurrence, the Licensing Plan for the Standard HTGR describes an application program consistent with 10CFR50, Appendix O to support a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review and design certification of an advanced Standard modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) design. Consistent with the NRC's Advanced Reactor Policy, the Plan also outlines a series of preapplication activities which have as an objective the early issuance of an NRC Licensability Statement on the Standard MHTGR conceptual design. This Preliminary Safety Information Document (PSID) has been prepared as one of the submittals to the NRC by the US Department of Energy in support of preapplication activities on the Standard MHTGR. Other submittals to be provided include a Probabilistic Risk Assessment, a Regulatory Technology Development Plan, and an Emergency Planning Bases Report.

  12. Career adaptability and career entrenchment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zacher, Hannes; Ambiel, Rodolfo A.M.; Noronha, Ana Paula Porto

    2015-01-01

    Career adaptability constitutes a resource that can help employees to effectively manage career changes and challenges. The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between the two higher-order constructs of career adaptability and career entrenchment (i.e., the perceived inability

  13. Accounting Students’ Choice on Accounting Information Technology Careers (P.178-188)

    OpenAIRE

    Nurul Hasanah Uswati Dewi

    2016-01-01

    The important role of accounting information systems professionals, motivate researchers to analyze further the interest of students to the profession in the field of accounting information systems. The aim of this study explores the factors that influence students to choose and do not choose a profession in the field of accounting information systems.This research was conducted using questionnaires. The population was undergraduate accounting students. Sample research was done randomly.This ...

  14. Undergraduate female science-related career choices: A phenomenological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Kathy S.

    This qualitative phenomenological study used a modified Groenewald's five steps method with semi-structured, recorded, and transcribed interviews to focus on the underrepresentation of females in science-related careers. The study explored the lived experiences of a purposive sample of 25 senior female college students attending a college in Macon, Georgia. Ten major themes emerged from the research study that included (a) journey to a science-related career; (b) realization of career interest; (c) family support (d) society's role; (e) professors' treatment of students; (f) lack of mentors and models; (g) gender and career success; (h) females and other disadvantages in science-related careers; (i) rewards of the journey; and (j) advice for the journey. The three minor themes identified were (a) decision-making; (b) career awareness; and (c) guidance. The key findings revealed that females pursuing a science degree or subsequent science-related career, shared their experience with other females interested in science as a career choice, dealt with barriers standing in the way of their personal goals, lack role models, and received little or no support from family and friends. The study findings may offer information to female college students interested in pursuing science-related careers and further foundational research on gender disparities in career choice.

  15. Informal learning of temporary agency workers in low-skill jobs: The role of self-profiling, career control, and job challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preenen, P.; Verbiest, S.; van Vianen, A.; van Wijk, E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop and investigate the idea that self-profiling and career control by temporary agency workers (TAWs) in low-skill jobs are positively related to informal learning and that this relationship is mediated by job challenge. Design/methodology/approach: An

  16. Informal learning of temporary agency workers in low-skill jobs : the role of self-profiling, career control and job challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preenen, P.T.Y.; Verbiest, S.; Vianen, A. van; Wijk, E. van

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this paper is to develop and investigate the idea that self-profiling and career control by temporary agency workers (TAWs) in low-skill jobs are positively related to informal learning and that this relationship is mediated by job challenge. Design/methodology/approach. An

  17. 12 CFR 573.6 - Information to be included in privacy notices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and 573.15; (4) The categories of nonpublic personal information about your former customers that you... personal information about your former customers, other than those parties to whom you disclose information... applicable; and (ii) State whether the third party is: (A) A service provider that performs marketing...

  18. Psychological career resources as predictors of working adults’ career anchors: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinde Coetzee

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the relationship between the psychological career resources and career anchors of a sample of 2 997 working adults at predominantly managerial and supervisory levels in the service industry. The Psychological Career Resources Inventory and the Career Orientations Inventory were applied. Stepwise regression analyses indicated dimensions of psychological career resources as significant predictors of  participants’ career anchors. The findings add valuable new knowledge that can be used to inform organisational career development support practices as well as career counselling and guidance services concerned with promoting individuals’ employability and experiences of intrinsic career success.

  19. The Efficacy of Consulting Practicum in Enhancing Students' Readiness for Professional Career in Management Information Systems: An Empirical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan, Ikpe Justice

    2016-01-01

    Consulting practicum (CP) is a form of experiential learning technique to prepare students for professional careers. While CP has become a popular way to help students acquire the essential practical skills and experience to enhance career readiness and ensure a smooth transition from college to employment, there is a lack of empirical studies…

  20. Funding opportunities for investigators in the early stages of career development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumandea, C Amelia; Balke, C William

    2009-03-10

    Many sources of advice and guidance are available to the early career investigator. Generally, mentors serve as the primary source of information, although program and review officers are the most underutilized resources. This article organizes these opportunities to enable early career investigators to plot a rational trajectory for career success. A list of the major agencies that provide grant support for early career investigators is included. In addition, funding opportunities are organized on the basis of the stage in career development pathway and the type of terminal degree.

  1. Information-seeking behavior during residency is associated with quality of theoretical learning, academic career achievements, and evidence-based medical practice: a strobe-compliant article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oussalah, Abderrahim; Fournier, Jean-Paul; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Braun, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Data regarding knowledge acquisition during residency training are sparse. Predictors of theoretical learning quality, academic career achievements and evidence-based medical practice during residency are unknown. We performed a cross-sectional study on residents and attending physicians across several residency programs in 2 French faculties of medicine. We comprehensively evaluated the information-seeking behavior (I-SB) during residency using a standardized questionnaire and looked for independent predictors of theoretical learning quality, academic career achievements, and evidence-based medical practice among I-SB components using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Between February 2013 and May 2013, 338 fellows and attending physicians were included in the study. Textbooks and international medical journals were reported to be used on a regular basis by 24% and 57% of the respondents, respectively. Among the respondents, 47% refer systematically (4.4%) or frequently (42.6%) to published guidelines from scientific societies upon their publication. The median self-reported theoretical learning quality score was 5/10 (interquartile range, 3-6; range, 1-10). A high theoretical learning quality score (upper quartile) was independently and strongly associated with the following I-SB components: systematic reading of clinical guidelines upon their publication (odds ratio [OR], 5.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.77-17.44); having access to a library that offers the leading textbooks of the specialty in the medical department (OR, 2.45, 95% CI, 1.33-4.52); knowledge of the specialty leading textbooks (OR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.09-4.10); and PubMed search skill score ≥5/10 (OR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.01-3.73). Research Master (M2) and/or PhD thesis enrolment were independently and strongly associated with the following predictors: PubMed search skill score ≥5/10 (OR, 4.10; 95% CI, 1.46-11.53); knowledge of the leading medical journals of the specialty (OR, 3.33; 95

  2. Information-seeking Behavior During Residency Is Associated With Quality of Theoretical Learning, Academic Career Achievements, and Evidence-based Medical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oussalah, Abderrahim; Fournier, Jean-Paul; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Braun, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Data regarding knowledge acquisition during residency training are sparse. Predictors of theoretical learning quality, academic career achievements and evidence-based medical practice during residency are unknown. We performed a cross-sectional study on residents and attending physicians across several residency programs in 2 French faculties of medicine. We comprehensively evaluated the information-seeking behavior (I-SB) during residency using a standardized questionnaire and looked for independent predictors of theoretical learning quality, academic career achievements, and evidence-based medical practice among I-SB components using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Between February 2013 and May 2013, 338 fellows and attending physicians were included in the study. Textbooks and international medical journals were reported to be used on a regular basis by 24% and 57% of the respondents, respectively. Among the respondents, 47% refer systematically (4.4%) or frequently (42.6%) to published guidelines from scientific societies upon their publication. The median self-reported theoretical learning quality score was 5/10 (interquartile range, 3–6; range, 1–10). A high theoretical learning quality score (upper quartile) was independently and strongly associated with the following I-SB components: systematic reading of clinical guidelines upon their publication (odds ratio [OR], 5.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.77–17.44); having access to a library that offers the leading textbooks of the specialty in the medical department (OR, 2.45, 95% CI, 1.33–4.52); knowledge of the specialty leading textbooks (OR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.09–4.10); and PubMed search skill score ≥5/10 (OR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.01–3.73). Research Master (M2) and/or PhD thesis enrolment were independently and strongly associated with the following predictors: PubMed search skill score ≥5/10 (OR, 4.10; 95% CI, 1.46–11.53); knowledge of the leading medical journals of the

  3. A systems theory approach to career development: Exploring factors that affect science as a career choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskey, Brian K.

    This research project was designed to examine the factors that affect students' choice in a career. Specifically, the factors of (a) achievement, (b) interest, (c) self-efficacy, (d) perceived preparation for a career, and (e) being informed about a career will be under investigation. Of key importance to the study is how these factors can affect a student's perception about choosing a science career. A quantitative analysis of secondary data from the 2006 and 2009 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) international assessment and attitudinal questionnaire provided data on student perceptions and aptitude in science. The sample from PISA included over 400,000 15 year-old students from 57 countries. From the 57 countries, 30 countries, comprised by Organization for Economic and Cooperative Development (OECD), were isolated for analysis. Within this group of 30, 11 were selected for comparison based on their questionnaire response to expectations for a career in science at age 30. The Institute for Educational Science's, International Data Explorer was utilized to acquire and analyze data from the 2006 and 2009 PISA international tests and questionnaires to determine significance between scaled scores and PISA indices. Variables were chosen as factors affecting student's perception on various systems outlined by the Systems Theory of Career Development (Patton & McMahon, 1997) and the Systems Theory of Career Development Framework (Patton & McMahon, 1999). Four country groups were established based on student responses to question 30a from the 2006 PISA attitudinal questionnaire, which asks what career students expected to have at age 30. The results from comparing country groups showed that countries in Group A, which showed the highest values for students expecting a career in science, also had the highest average values for achievement on the PISA science literacy assessment. Likewise, countries that had the lowest values for expecting a career in

  4. Career Development of Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Anna M., Ed.; Vetter, Louise, Ed.

    The five major papers whose full texts are included address themselves to various topics that can influence the lives of women in their career choices and advancement. Federal Legislation: Impact on Women's Careers, Mary Allen Jolley, discusses sex discrimination, legal gains made over the past 10 years, sex role stereotyping, and vocational…

  5. Genetic parameter estimates for carcass traits and visual scores including or not genomic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordo, D G M; Espigolan, R; Tonussi, R L; Júnior, G A F; Bresolin, T; Magalhães, A F Braga; Feitosa, F L; Baldi, F; Carvalheiro, R; Tonhati, H; de Oliveira, H N; Chardulo, L A L; de Albuquerque, L G

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether visual scores used as selection criteria in Nellore breeding programs are effective indicators of carcass traits measured after slaughter. Additionally, this study evaluated the effect of different structures of the relationship matrix ( and ) on the estimation of genetic parameters and on the prediction accuracy of breeding values. There were 13,524 animals for visual scores of conformation (CS), finishing precocity (FP), and muscling (MS) and 1,753, 1,747, and 1,564 for LM area (LMA), backfat thickness (BF), and HCW, respectively. Of these, 1,566 animals were genotyped using a high-density panel containing 777,962 SNP. Six analyses were performed using multitrait animal models, each including the 3 visual scores and 1 carcass trait. For the visual scores, the model included direct additive genetic and residual random effects and the fixed effects of contemporary group (defined by year of birth, management group at yearling, and farm) and the linear effect of age of animal at yearling. The same model was used for the carcass traits, replacing the effect of age of animal at yearling with the linear effect of age of animal at slaughter. The variance and covariance components were estimated by the REML method in analyses using the numerator relationship matrix () or combining the genomic and the numerator relationship matrices (). The heritability estimates for the visual scores obtained with the 2 methods were similar and of moderate magnitude (0.23-0.34), indicating that these traits should response to direct selection. The heritabilities for LMA, BF, and HCW were 0.13, 0.07, and 0.17, respectively, using matrix and 0.29, 0.16, and 0.23, respectively, using matrix . The genetic correlations between the visual scores and carcass traits were positive, and higher correlations were generally obtained when matrix was used. Considering the difficulties and cost of measuring carcass traits postmortem, visual scores of

  6. 12 CFR 716.6 - Information to be included in privacy notices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) Financial service providers; (ii) Non-financial companies; and (iii) Others. (4) Disclosures under exception... CREDIT UNIONS PRIVACY OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL INFORMATION Privacy and Opt Out Notices § 716.6 Information... jointly with another financial institution, you satisfy the disclosure requirement of paragraph (a)(5) of...

  7. 16 CFR 313.6 - Information to be included in privacy notices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... nonpublic personal information about your former customers that you disclose and the categories of... former customers, other than those parties to whom you disclose information under §§ 313.14 and 313.15... marketing services on your behalf or on behalf of you and another financial institution; or (B) A financial...

  8. 12 CFR 40.6 - Information to be included in privacy notices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... categories of nonpublic personal information about the bank's former customers that the bank discloses and... personal information about the bank's former customers, other than those parties to whom the bank discloses... performs marketing services on the bank's behalf or on behalf of the bank and another financial institution...

  9. 12 CFR 332.6 - Information to be included in privacy notices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of nonpublic personal information about your former customers that you disclose and the categories of... former customers, other than those parties to whom you disclose information under §§ 332.14 and 332.15... third party is: (A) A service provider that performs marketing services on your behalf or on behalf of...

  10. Designing Better Graphs by Including Distributional Information and Integrating Words, Numbers, and Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, David M.; Sandor, Aniko

    2009-01-01

    Statistical graphs are commonly used in scientific publications. Unfortunately, graphs in psychology journals rarely portray distributional information beyond central tendency, and few graphs portray inferential statistics. Moreover, those that do portray inferential information generally do not portray it in a way that is useful for interpreting…

  11. Career education attitudes and practices of K-12 science educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Walter S.

    A random sample of 400 K-12 science educators who were members of the National Science Teachers Association were surveyed regarding their attitude toward and practice of career education in their science teaching. These science teachers rejected a narrowly vocational view, favoring instead a conception of career education which included self-perception, values analysis, and vocational skills objectives. The science educators affirmed the importance of career education for a student's education, asserted career education ought to be taught in their existing science courses, and expressed a willingness to do so. Fewer than one-third of the science teachers, however, reported incorporating career education at least on a weekly basis in their science lessons. The major impediment to including more career education in science teaching was seen to be their lack of knowledge of methods and materials relevant to science career education, rather than objections from students, parents, or administrators; their unwillingness; or their evaluation of career education as unimportant. Thus, in order to improve this aspect of science teaching, science teachers need more concrete information about science career education applications.

  12. 75 FR 47566 - Office of Vocational and Adult Education; Overview Information; Promoting Rigorous Career and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Vocational and Adult Education; Overview Information; Promoting... Preference Priority: For FY 2010, this priority is a competitive preference priority. Under 34 CFR 75.105(c... meets this priority. This priority is: Commitment to the Project The Assistant Secretary for Vocational...

  13. The Gender-Mediated Impact of a Career Development Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassie, Diana V. W.; Chen, Charles P.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the differential impact of an educational intervention on high school students' career maturity based on gender. Dimensions of career maturity investigated include congruence, career certainty, career indecision, career decision-making self-efficacy and career exploration. Females were found to increase significantly in…

  14. Career success in a boundaryless career world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arthur, Michael B.; Khapova, S.N.; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper compares contemporary career theory with the theory applied in recent career success research. The research makes inconsistent use of career theory, and in particular neglects the interdependence of the objective and subjective careers, and boundaryless career issues of

  15. 78 FR 36305 - Proposed Information Collection (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ..., crystalline and infectious arthritis) and Dysbaric Osteonecrosis Disability Benefits Questionnaire). Type of... Osteonecrosis Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Benefits... solicits comments on information needed to adjudicate the claim for VA disability benefits related to a...

  16. Extending the formal model of a spatial data infrastructure to include volunteered geographical information

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cooper, Antony K

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available , Information and Computational Viewpoints of the Reference Model for Open Distributed Processing (RM-ODP). We identified six stakeholders: Policy Maker, Producer, Provider, Broker, Value-added Reseller and End User. The Internet has spawned the development...

  17. Utah Delivers Opportunities for Career Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Kristine; Fischio, Shannon

    2006-01-01

    Providing information and resources to support career exploration is key to the mission of career and technical education (CTE) in Utah. Utah CTE has responded in a variety of ways to meet the career exploration needs of students of all ages. This article discusses how the career and technical education in Utah delivers opportunities for career…

  18. Health Careers Planning Guide--Illinois. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Champaign.

    This notebook of career counseling materials is a compilation of career information on nursing and the allied health fields. The first section provides general information useful in choosing a health career on such topics as career planning, career mobility, employment prospects, financial aid, terminology in health job titles, and an annotated…

  19. 17 CFR 248.6 - Information to be included in privacy notices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... examples to illustrate the types of third parties in each category: (i) Financial service providers; (ii) Non-financial companies; and (iii) Others. (4) Disclosures under exception for service providers and... (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS S-P AND S-AM Regulation S-P: Privacy of Consumer Financial Information and...

  20. 75 FR 3925 - Proposed Information Collection Request for Administrative Procedures-20 CFR 601 Including Form...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ... provided in the desired format, reporting burden (time and financial resources) is minimized, collection... prescribes the use of Form MA 8-7, Transmittal for Unemployment Insurance Materials. This simple check off... interested in comments that: Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the...

  1. 17 CFR 160.6 - Information to be included in privacy notices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... future to disclose, but to whom you do not currently disclose, nonpublic personal information. (f) Model... privacy notices. 160.6 Section 160.6 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING... that you make disclosures to other nonaffiliated companies: (1) For your everyday business purposes...

  2. 12 CFR 216.6 - Information to be included in privacy notices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... customers that you disclose and the categories of affiliates and nonaffiliated third parties to whom you disclose nonpublic personal information about your former customers, other than those parties to whom you... applicable; and (ii) State whether the third party is: (A) A service provider that performs marketing...

  3. Synthesis of realistic driving cycles with high accuracy and computational speed, including slope information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvas, E.; Hereijgers, K.; Peng, Huei; Hofman, T.; Steinbuch, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a new method to synthesize driving cycles, where not only the velocity is considered, yet also the road slope information of the real-world measured driving cycle. Driven by strict emission regulations and tight fuel targets, hybrid or electric vehicle manufacturers aim to

  4. Beyond bureaucracy and entrepreneurialism:examining the multiple discursive codes informing the work, careers and subjectivities of management graduates

    OpenAIRE

    Loacker, Bernadette Isabel; Sliwa, Martyna

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines how discursive codes and demands associated with ‘bureaucratic and entrepreneurial regimes’ of work and career organization shape the work, careers and subjectivities of management graduates. The study is based on an analysis of 30 narratives of management professionals who graduated from an Austrian business school in the early 1970s or 2000s. Its insights suggest that variegated discursive codes manifest in the graduates’ articulated professional practices and subjectivi...

  5. Australian mineral industry annual review 1977 (including information to June 1978)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J

    1979-01-01

    This article records growth of the Australian mineral industry and reports production, consumption, treatment, trade, prices, new developments, exploration, and resources for all mineral commodities including fuels. Equivalent development abroad is summarized. Appendices include principal mineral producers, associations, etc. and royalties. Black coal is described under the headings: production, ex-mine value of output, employment, wages and salaries, production per manshift, interstate trade, port facilities, consumption, stock, prices, new developments, exploration, resources, world review, and coke. There are numerous tables of data and a flow chart of the Australian black coal industry, 1977. Brown coal includes production, consumption, new developments, exploration, resources, and world review.

  6. 40 CFR 725.155 - Information to be included in the MCAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluation of the health and environmental effects of the microorganism, or any microbial mixture or article... genetic material, including any regulatory sequences and structural genes and the products of those genes... introduction; and a description of the regulatory and structural genes that are components of the introduced...

  7. 36 CFR 51.5 - What information will the prospectus include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... minimum requirements of the concession contract. The minimum requirements of the concession contract, include, but are not limited to the following: (1) The minimum acceptable franchise fee or other forms of... resources of the park area; and (5) Any other minimum requirements that the new contract may specify...

  8. 40 CFR 720.45 - Information that must be included in the notice form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... manufactured, processed, or used. (2) A process description of each manufacture, processing, and use operation which includes a diagram of the major unit operations and chemical conversions, the identity and entry... composition that can be represented by a specific, complete chemical structure diagram (a Class 1 substance...

  9. WORK- LIFE BALANCE AND WORK- LIFE CONFLICT ON CAREER ADVANCEMENT OF WOMEN PROFESSIONALS IN INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY SECTOR, BENGALURU, INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Munwari Padmanabhan; S. Sampath Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of socio-economic, personal and career advancement aspects were analysed from 75 information and communication technology (ICT) women professionals, from 7 various ICT organisations from Bengaluru, India. ICT industry continues to be the largest private sector employer in India for women in that 800,000 women currently working in this sector account for over 30 per cent of the existing hires and this figure is all set to rise in the future. The characteristics of the ICT industry...

  10. Combining Chemical Information Literacy, Communication Skills, Career Preparation, Ethics, and Peer Review in a Team-Taught Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mary Lou Baker; Seybold, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    The widely acknowledged need to include chemical information competencies and communication skills in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum can be accommodated in a variety of ways. We describe a team-taught, semester-length course at Wright State University which combines chemical information literacy, written and oral communication skills,…

  11. Information Broker/Free Lance Librarian--New Careers--New Library Services. Miscellaneous Studies No. 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Barbara B., Ed.

    Proceedings of a workshop on the information broker--a person or organization that provides information on demand for a fee, usually to make a profit--includes edited transcripts of the following presentations: "Introduction," Maxine Davis; "The Free-Lance Alternative: Turning Traditional Skills New Directions," Susan Klement;…

  12. Information seeking and students studying for professional careers: the cases of engineering and law students in Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Kerins

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of two empirical studies which explored the information seeking behaviour of engineering and law students in Ireland. Findings reveal similar patterns in the information seeking behaviour between students studying to become professionals and information seeking patterns of these groups identified in Leckie et al.'s model. Students learned their information seeking strategies, including effective and less effective approaches, from educators and continuing mis-perceptions of libraries and information professionals. The studies suggest that engineering and law students in Ireland could benefit from greater information literacy training and awareness, enabling them to acquire the information skills they need to function effectively and efficiently in their future professional work lives.

  13. Gender Equality Policies and Higher Education Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    Gender equality policies regulate the Swedish labour market, including higher education. This study analyses and discusses the career development of postgraduate students in the light of labour market influences. The principle of gender separation is used to understand these effects. Swedish register data encompassing information on 585…

  14. The Changing Career Strategies of Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Tony; Davies, Goronwy

    1999-01-01

    Faced with reduced employment security, managers are redefining careers to include work/personal life balance. Changes in any area can cause revision of career strategies. Depending on how they define careers, managers recognize career development as an individual, not an organizational, responsibility. (SK)

  15. A Study of Career Planning Assessments

    OpenAIRE

    Firkola, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of career planning assessments. Background on key career concepts is first introduced. A number of career planning assessments are then examined. These assessments included reviewing ones personal history, interest inventories, values assessments, personality assessments, and aptitude tests. The importance and limitations of these career assessments is then discussed.

  16. Including α s1 casein gene information in genomic evaluations of French dairy goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carillier-Jacquin, Céline; Larroque, Hélène; Robert-Granié, Christèle

    2016-08-04

    Genomic best linear unbiased prediction methods assume that all markers explain the same fraction of the genetic variance and do not account effectively for genes with major effects such as the α s1 casein polymorphism in dairy goats. In this study, we investigated methods to include the available α s1 casein genotype effect in genomic evaluations of French dairy goats. First, the α s1 casein genotype was included as a fixed effect in genomic evaluation models based only on bucks that were genotyped at the α s1 casein locus. Less than 1 % of the females with phenotypes were genotyped at the α s1 casein gene. Thus, to incorporate these female phenotypes in the genomic evaluation, two methods that allowed for this large number of missing α s1 casein genotypes were investigated. Probabilities for each possible α s1 casein genotype were first estimated for each female of unknown genotype based on iterative peeling equations. The second method is based on a multiallelic gene content approach. For each model tested, we used three datasets each divided into a training and a validation set: (1) two-breed population (Alpine + Saanen), (2) Alpine population, and (3) Saanen population. The α s1 casein genotype had a significant effect on milk yield, fat content and protein content. Including an α s1 casein effect in genetic and genomic evaluations based only on male known α s1 casein genotypes improved accuracies (from 6 to 27 %). In genomic evaluations based on all female phenotypes, the gene content approach performed better than the other tested methods but the improvement in accuracy was only slightly better (from 1 to 14 %) than that of a genomic model without the α s1 casein effect. Including the α s1 casein effect in a genomic evaluation model for French dairy goats is possible and useful to improve accuracy. Difficulties in predicting the genotypes for ungenotyped animals limited the improvement in accuracy of the obtained estimated breeding values.

  17. CERN's new Career Structure Main Changes in a Nutshell

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    All Staff Members will have received an official notification of their position in the new career path structure, with effect from 1 September 2001. A Weekly Bulletin announcement two weeks ago (Bulletin 33/2001) referred to documents and contacts for individual or general information, notably via the HR Division Web site (see below). The present article summarises the main changes between the MOAS and the MAPS (Merit Advancement and Promotion Scheme). The aim of MAPS is to make the career structure more dynamic, while retaining positive elements of the MOAS scheme, notably an annual interview and performance assessment process. The main changes are: - Career reviews including salary band promotion at several stages in a person's career replace the previous automatic grade-to-grade progression within a career path. - Speeds of advancement can be modulated to a greater extent. - The exceptional advancement zone is re-designed. - Premiums or allowances linked to performance, responsibility, and specific labou...

  18. Career Transitions and Career Success in the "New" Career Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudzikowski, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    The "new" career, most notably the boundaryless career, is associated with high career mobility, which is in turn associated with employability and career success of individuals. The current study examined how frequency, form (organisational, horizontal or vertical) and impact (objective career success) of career transitions have changed…

  19. A Career Exploration Program: An Effective Alternative to the Traditional Use of Faculty Advisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Kenneth E; Kwasigroch, Thomas E; Wooten, Daniel J; Lybrand, Cynthia; Peeples, Catherine R

    2016-11-01

    Providing medical students with resources to make effective career choices is challenging for medical schools as career options outnumber the formal clinical rotations students can experience during their undergraduate education. In 2009, the authors introduced the Career Exploration (CE) courses into the required curriculum at the Quillen College of Medicine. This three-course sequence includes large-group sessions addressing broad issues related to career choices, small-group specialty interest groups, individual student self-assessments, assignments through which students receive individualized feedback, and individual student advising sessions. The overall objective of the course sequence is to involve all students in career planning from the beginning of medical school so as to help them make more informed career decisions. The authors used improvement in student satisfaction with career planning activities as a surrogate measure for the outcome of helping students make more informed career choices. Students evaluated the CE courses positively, and overall satisfaction scores averaged 4 (1 = poor to 5 = excellent). Scores on Association of American Medical Colleges Graduation Questionnaire items related to career planning showed improved student satisfaction from 2010 to 2015. Succession planning for the first- and second-year career advisor is vital-as is faculty development for all clinical advisors to ensure that they have current information regarding both the curriculum and Match process, especially as residency selection becomes increasingly competitive. Enhancing the role of fourth-year students who serve as CE III mentors has the potential to prepare these students to be better teachers as residents.

  20. Utilities and Power - Sector Report. Malaysia: including electricity, gas, water, sewerage, telecommunications and information technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This report is one of a series designed to introduce British exporters to the opportunities offered by the Malaysian market. The Seventh Malaysia Plan, covering the five year period, 1996-2000, contains an ambitious menu of infrastructure projects. Total expenditure under the Plan is envisaged at RM450 billion, of which around RM380 billion will be sourced from the private sector. This is an indication of the wealth accumulated within the Malaysian economy. The infrastructure developments identified are designed to take the country towards Vision 2020. These infrastructure developments will continue to make the country highly attractive to foreign investors, who were the catalyst for Malaysia`s explosive growth over the last few years. Malaysian Corporations have also grown rapidly and are becoming international investors and traders in their own right, including in the United Kingdom. As they expand, seeking new markets, they are looking also for partners with whom they can share technology and jointly develop projects. Such companies are often ideal partners for UK companies wishing to enter the Malaysian and Asian market. Malaysia offers opportunities to companies prepared to make the small effort to know and understand the country and its people. This report will assist companies to develop a useful understanding of the market. (author)

  1. 76 FR 32227 - DST Systems, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Comsys Information Technology Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-03

    ..., Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Comsys Information Technology Services, Megaforce, and Kelly Services Kansas City, MO; DST Technologies, a Wholly Owned Subsidiary of DST Systems, Inc., Boston... Information Technology Services, Megaforce, and Kelly Services, Kansas City, Missouri (subject firm). The...

  2. Career Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verification of Employment Life at the Lab Career Stories Dual Careers Inclusion & Diversity Work-Life ) Make yourself at home Life at the Lab Life at the Lab Inclusion & Diversity Inclusion & © & Cover Letter Tips Social Media Tips Learn More Watch Videos Employee Spotlight Student Successes

  3. Non-pollen palynomorphs: From unknown curiosities to informative fossils. Celebrating the scientific career of Bas van Geel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooghiemstra, H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the scientific career of Bas van Geel at the moment of his retirement from the University of Amsterdam. The development of the research line of non-pollen palynomorph analysis is compared with other developments in palaeoecology.

  4. Career development from the employee perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Beranová, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    1 Abstract The theoretical part of the bachelor thesis focuses on the definition of career from its traditional concept to the present and on the issue of career development. Attention is paid to the developmental aspects of career and the theories of career stages. An important part of the thesis is formed by the presentation of factors influencing the career development, including the personality traits and other individual factors, for example gender and age perspective, intercultural cont...

  5. Lenore White Harmon: One Woman's Career Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Nadya A.

    1997-01-01

    Presents biographical information on Lenore White Harmon, noted professor, counselor, and researcher. In a question-and-answer section, Harmon describes her early career decisions, work history, research efforts, professional contributions, important influences and reflections on her career development. (KW)

  6. Security careers skills, compensation, and career paths

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    The third edition of Security Careers is the authoritative reference for current job descriptions and pay practices of security, compliance, ethics, environmental, health and safety occupations. The job descriptions and compensation ranges in this report are drawn from research from the Foushée Group, which has been conducting this research since 1980. Security Careers includes more than 75 job descriptions for security-related positions, which range from the entry-level security guard to the top global corporate executive. It also provides four years of compensation trend data to give a th

  7. Balancing Family and Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andam, Aba Bentil; Dawson, Silvina Ponce; Horton, K. Renee; Sandow, Barbara

    2005-10-01

    In essentially all countries, responsibilities for child care, cooking, cleaning, and other homemaking tasks fall predominantly on the wife and mother. In addition, the childbearing years come during the period when a physicist must study hard, work long hours on research, and take temporary positions, often abroad. Thus, balancing family and career has long been one of the major barriers to women's participation in science and engineering fields, including physics. While many young women believe that they must choose between having children and having a science career, the fact is that the majority of women physicists in both developing and developed countries have successfully done both. This paper summarizes some ideas and recommendations raised in discussions, especially focused on easing the challenges of having children while in temporary jobs, returning to physics after a career break, the need for "family-friendly" working conditions, and the dual-career problem facing couples where both are scientists.

  8. Insights on STEM Careers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, Joanne Roth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-05

    This presentation will provide career advice for individuals seeking to go beyond just having a job to building a successful career in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Careful planning can be used to turn a job into a springboard for professional advancement and personal satisfaction. Topics to be addressed include setting priorities, understanding career ladders, making tough choices, overcoming stereotypes and assumptions by others, networking, developing a professional identify, and balancing a career with family and other personal responsibilities. Insights on the transition from individual technical work to leadership will also be provided. The author will draw upon experiences gained in academic, industrial, and government laboratory settings, as well as extensive professional service and community involvement.

  9. [Career counselling and choice of speciality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillevang, G.; Ringsted, C.

    2008-01-01

    Career counselling is meant to support and ensure an early and relevant choice of specialty. Self-awareness regarding personality, life goals, wishes for family life, and lifestyle is of help in narrowing down the number of specialties to those that fit personal attitudes and preferences. The cou......Career counselling is meant to support and ensure an early and relevant choice of specialty. Self-awareness regarding personality, life goals, wishes for family life, and lifestyle is of help in narrowing down the number of specialties to those that fit personal attitudes and preferences....... The counsellor must be aware that the trainees' subjective opinions about the specialties may not be in line with the actual conditions. Hence, career counselling should provide factual knowledge about the specialties including information on the working conditions and defining characteristics of the specialties...

  10. Special Issue: Book Reviews. Resources for Career Management, Counseling, Training and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Clara, Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This special issue includes reviews of 32 books on the following topics: management, human resources, and organizational development; career counseling, guidance, and assessment; job search; resumes; careers in specific fields; careers for special populations; career transitions; and finding balance. (SK)

  11. Quartet cards as the media of career exploration for lower-grade primary school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Ayriza

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A career developed through the optimization of one’s potentials will irrevocably play a role in the development of self-identity as well as the psychological well-being of the individual. When children are introduced and allowed to explore as many career options as possible during their developmental stage, they are more likely to have a fruitful career development in the future. The preceding study showed that the career interests and knowledge of lower-grade primary students fit the Holland Career Categories: realistic, investigative, artistic, social, enterprising, and conventional (RIASEC. It was also found that the students’ career interest and knowledge levels varied, with most in the low level. This second-year study aims to expand the results of the previous study by developing the use of Quartet cards as the media of career exploration for lower-grade primary students. By using the research and development method, this study develops Quartet Career Cards into three difficulty levels: low, medium, and high. The Quartet cards media have undergone feasibility tests conducted by experts in theory and media, as well as a series of field testing consisting of preliminary, main, and operational stages among a total of 266 primary students of grades 1, 2, and 3. A revision was made on several components including the images, information, colors, font sizes, illustration styles, and card sizes. The findings show that Quartet Career Cards meet the feasibility standards for the media of career exploration

  12. Exploring Dance Careers. A Student Guidebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Richard; Hansen, Mary Lewis

    One of six student guidebooks in a series of 11 arts and humanities career exploration guides for grade 7-12 teachers, counselors, and students, this student book on exploration of dance careers presents information on specific occupations in both performance careers and dance education. An introductory section describes the four different dance…

  13. Dual Career Marriages: Elements for Potential Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maples, Mary F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the family and work relationships of dual career couples and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these relationships. Various ingredients including personality traits that contribute to the success of the two-career partnership are listed. (RC)

  14. The Impact of Approved Accounting Standard AASB 1024 “Consolidated Accounts” on the Information Included in Consolidated Financial Statements

    OpenAIRE

    Pramuka, Bambang Agus

    1995-01-01

    The intent of consolidated financial statements is to provide meaningful, relevant, useful, and reliable information about the operations of a group of companies. In compliance with AASB 1024 'Consolidated Accounts', and AAS 24 Consolidated Financial Reports', a parent entity now has to include in its consolidated financial statements all controlled entities, regardless of their legal form or the ownership interest held. The new Standard also pr...

  15. Effect on attendance by including focused information on spirometry in preventive health checks: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ørts, Lene Maria; Løkke, Anders; Bjerregaard, Anne-Louise; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Sandbæk, Annelli

    2016-12-01

    Early detection of lung diseases can help to reduce their severity. Lung diseases are among the most frequently occurring and serious diseases worldwide; nonetheless, many patients remain undiagnosed. Preventive health checks including spirometry can detect lung diseases at early stages; however, recruitment for health checks remains a challenge, and little is known about what motivates the attendance. The aim of the study is to examine whether focused information on spirometry in the invitation compared to general information will impact the attendance rate in preventive health checks. This randomized, controlled trial tests the effect of information on spirometry embedded in the Check your Health Preventive Program (CHPP). The CHPP is an open-label, household cluster-randomized, controlled trial offering a preventive health check to 30- to -49-year-olds in a Danish municipality from 2012 to 2017 (n = 26,216). During 2015-2016, 4356 citizens aged 30-49 years will be randomized into two groups. The intervention group receives an invitation which highlights the value and contents of spirometry as part of a health check and information about lung diseases. The comparison group receives a standard invitation containing practical information and specifies the contents of the general health check. Outcomes are (1) differences in attendance rates measured by the proportion of citizens attending each of the two study groups and (2) proportion of persons at risk defined by smoking status and self-reported lung symptoms in the study groups. The proportion of participants with abnormal spirometry assessed at the preventive health check will be compared between the two study groups. The results from the present study will inform future recruitment strategies to health checks. The developed material on content, value, and information about lung disease is feasible and transferable to other populations, making it easy to implement if effective. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT

  16. Validating Common Measures of Self-Efficacy and Career Attitudes within Informal Health Education for Middle and High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterman, Karen; Withy, Kelley; Boulay, Rachel

    2018-06-01

    A common challenge in the evaluation of K-12 science education is identifying valid scales that are an appropriate fit for both a student's age and the educational outcomes of interest. Though many new scales have been validated in recent years, there is much to learn about the appropriate educational contexts and audiences for these measures. This study investigated two such scales, the DEVISE Self-Efficacy for Science scale and the Career Interest Questionnaire (CIQ), within the context of two related health sciences projects. Consistent patterns were found in the reliability of each scale across three age groups (middle school, high school, early college) and within the context of each project. As expected, self-efficacy and career interest, as measured through these scales, were found to be correlated. The pattern of results for CIQ scores was also similar to that reported in other literature. This study provides examples of how practitioners can validate established measures for new and specific contexts and provides some evidence to support the use of the scales studied in health science education contexts.

  17. Perioperative careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicker, Paul

    2012-05-01

    When I look back at how my career started, I think to myself, what if I had undertaken the BA in Business Studies which I had been accepted for, instead of the BSc in Nursing for which I was still waiting to hear the results of my interview? Well, probably I would have spent four years studying business, followed by 40 years sitting in an office somewhere; Tesco, Sainsbury's or Marks and Spencer probably. I was lucky though, my father phoned up every couple of weeks (I was only 17 and didn't really have a clue what I wanted to do) and eventually they said 'yes' and I started my nursing career. Perhaps this is the first bit of advice for anybody thinking of a career in health:

  18. 26 CFR 301.6103(h)(2)-1 - Disclosure of returns and return information (including taxpayer return information) to and by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... administration. 301.6103(h)(2)-1 Section 301.6103(h)(2)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Returns Returns and Records § 301.6103(h)(2)-1 Disclosure of returns and return information (including..., shall, to the extent provided by section 6103(h)(2) (A), (B), and (C) and subject to the requirements of...

  19. Education and Career Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Brečko

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The author has been represented four basic domains, which we should include in the career development of new employers; individual, people/employees, organisation and work task. Each of these domains includes three subordinate or learning tasks, which are very important for balancing the educational plan of new employees. The author warns about the most important role of the work organisation. Twelve learning tasks, suggested in the system of the new employee career development bring new challenges for educational organisations but also limits. The author is also quite sure career development programs must become part of the regular school curriculum especially at the end of schooling and before entry into the work organisation.

  20. Alternative careers in science leaving the ivory tower

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Many science students find themselves in the midst of graduate school or sitting at a lab bench, and realize that they hate lab work! Even worse is realizing that they may love science, but science (at least academic science) is not providing many job opportunities these days. What's a poor researcher to do !? This book gives first-hand descriptions of the evolution of a band of hardy scientists out of the lab and into just about every career you can imagine. Researchers from every branch of science found their way into finance, public relations, consulting, business development, journalism, and more - and thrived there! Each author tells their personal story, including descriptions of their career path, a typical day, where to find information on their job, opportunities to career growth, and more. This is a must-read for every science major, and everyone who is looking for a way to break out of their career rut.

  1. One physical educator's career cycle: strong start, great run, approaching finish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Amelia Mays; Lynn, Susan K

    2014-03-01

    This article is nested within a longitudinal project examining 6 teachers' journeys along their career cycles (Lynn & Woods, 2010; Woods & Earls, 1995; Woods & Lynn, 2001). Two participants from the initial 6 continue to teach K-12 physical education; 1 of these participants, Everett, is examined in the current study. This veteran teacher's career-cycle movement and the environmental factors that both enhanced and constrained his career development are examined through the lens of Fessler and Christensen's career cycle model (1992). Data sources included: 8 formal interviews with Everett; formal interviews with his university teacher educators, student-teacher supervisor, principal, and spouse; informal interviews; field notes; and systematic teaching observations. An interpretative framework was used to assess the perceptions and meanings Everett gave to experiences as a physical educator and coach. Several factors acutely influenced Everett's career progression, including: (a) his individual disposition, (b) the impact and continued influence of a professional preparation program, and (c) his school and community support. He entered the profession with great promise and spent most of his career in the enthusiastic and growing, and the career stability, stages before shifting into the career frustration stage where he currently remains. Everett was able to negotiate personal and organizational environmental factors that have been identified as barriers for some physical educators. Therefore, viewing his professional life through the lens of the career cycle provides insights into the areas of change necessary to motivate and retain high-quality physical educators such as Everett.

  2. Counseling Model Application: A Student Career Development Guidance for Decision Maker and Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwan; Gustientiedina; Sunarti; Desnelita, Yenny

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to design a counseling model application for a decision-maker and consultation system. This application as an alternative guidance and individual career development for students, that include career knowledge, planning and alternative options from an expert tool based on knowledge and rule to provide the solutions on student’s career decisions. This research produces a counseling model application to obtain the important information about student career development and facilitating individual student’s development through the service form, to connect their plan with their career according to their talent, interest, ability, knowledge, personality and other supporting factors. This application model can be used as tool to get information faster and flexible for the student’s guidance and counseling. So, it can help students in doing selection and making decision that appropriate with their choice of works.

  3. Human capital and career success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Anders; Kato, Takao

    capital formally through schooling for career success, as well as the gender gap in career success rates. Second, broadening the scope of human capital by experiencing various occupations (becoming a generalist) is found to be advantageous for career success. Third, initial human capital earned through......Denmark’s registry data provide accurate and complete career history data along with detailed personal characteristics (e.g., education, gender, work experience, tenure and others) for the population of Danish workers longitudinally. By using such data from 1992 to 2002, we provide rigorous...... formal schooling and subsequent human capital obtained informally on the job are found to be complements in the production of career success. Fourth, though there is a large body of the literature on the relationship between firm-specific human capital and wages, the relative value of firm-specific human...

  4. Career Builders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Margery

    2012-01-01

    While a main goal for corporate trainers traditionally has been to train employees to reach organizational goals, many trainers may find their roles expanding. With companies cutting back on staffing and consolidating multiple job roles into single positions, career development has taken on a much larger significance. At forward-thinking…

  5. Opportunities in Marine and Maritime Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzmann, Wm. Ray

    This book describes careers related to the sea. The following chapters are included: (1) "The World of Water"; (2) "Cruise Ship Careers"; (3) "Oceanography and the Marine Sciences"; (4) "Fishing"; (5) "Commerical Diving"; (6) "Maritime Transportation"; (7) "Shipbuilding"; (8) "Military Careers Afloat"; (9) "Miscellaneous Marine and Maritime…

  6. Trends in Career and Technical Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojewski, Jay W.; Asunda, Paul; Kim, Soo Jung

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review was to identify current trends and issues in research focusing on career and technical education (CTE). The primary sources of literature for this review included all research articles published in three refereed scholarly journals--"Career and Technical Education Research," "Journal of Career and Technical…

  7. Asian American Career Development: A Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Kantamneni, Neeta; Smothers, Melissa K.; Chen, Yung-Lung; Fitzpatrick, Mary; Terry, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    This study used a modified version of consensual qualitative research design to examine how contextual, cultural, and personal variables influence the career choices of a diverse group of 12 Asian Americans. Seven domains of influences on career choices emerged including family, culture, external factors, career goals, role models, work values,…

  8. An International Discussion about Cross-Cultural Career Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Debra S.

    2012-01-01

    Career assessments are a common resource used by career practitioners internationally to help inform individuals' career decision-making. Research on the topic of cross-cultural career assessment has been mostly limited to the applicability of an established inventory to a different culture. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the existing…

  9. Resident career planning needs in internal medicine: a qualitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Rina L; Windish, Donna M; Rosenbaum, Julie R

    2010-12-01

    Few residency programs have centralized resources for career planning. As a consequence, little is known about residents' informational needs regarding career planning. To examine career preparation stressors, practical needs, and information that residents wished they were privy to when applying. In 2007 and 2008, we surveyed 163 recent graduates or graduating residents from 10 Yale-based and Yale-affiliated hospitals' internal medicine programs regarding their experiences with applying for positions after residency. We included questions about demographics, mentorship, stress of finding a job or fellowship, and open-ended questions to assess barriers and frustrations. Qualitative data were coded independently and a classification scheme was negotiated by consensus. A total of 89 residents or recent graduates responded, and 75% of them found career planning during residency training at least somewhat stressful. Themes regarding the application process included (1) knowledge about the process, (2) knowledge about career paths and opportunities, (3) time factors, (4) importance of adequate personal guidance and mentorship, and (5) self-knowledge regarding priorities and the desired outcome. Residents identified the following advice as most important: (1) start the process as early as possible and with a clear knowledge of the process timeline, (2) be clear about personal goals and priorities, and (3) be well-informed about a prospective employer and what that employer is looking for. Most residents felt career planning should be structured into the curriculum and should occur in the first year or throughout residency. This study highlights residents' desire for structured dissemination of information and counseling with regard to career planning during residency. Our data suggest that exposure to such resources may be beneficial as early as the first year of training.

  10. Missing the target: including perspectives of women with overweight and obesity to inform stigma-reduction strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhl, R M; Himmelstein, M S; Gorin, A A; Suh, Y J

    2017-03-01

    Pervasive weight stigma and discrimination have led to ongoing calls for efforts to reduce this bias. Despite increasing research on stigma-reduction strategies, perspectives of individuals who have experienced weight stigma have rarely been included to inform this research. The present study conducted a systematic examination of women with high body weight to assess their perspectives about a broad range of strategies to reduce weight-based stigma. Women with overweight or obesity ( N  = 461) completed an online survey in which they evaluated the importance, feasibility and potential impact of 35 stigma-reduction strategies in diverse settings. Participants (91.5% who reported experiencing weight stigma) also completed self-report measures assessing experienced and internalized weight stigma. Most participants assigned high importance to all stigma-reduction strategies, with school-based and healthcare approaches accruing the highest ratings. Adding weight stigma to existing anti-harassment workplace training was rated as the most impactful and feasible strategy. The family environment was viewed as an important intervention target, regardless of participants' experienced or internalized stigma. These findings underscore the importance of including people with stigmatized identities in stigma-reduction research; their insights provide a necessary and valuable contribution that can inform ways to reduce weight-based inequities and prioritize such efforts.

  11. Career management: understanding the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackowiak, J; Eckel, F M

    1985-02-01

    This article is the first of a three-part series on career management for hospital pharmacists. Work attitudes, life cycles, needs, and career trends are discussed. Three basic work attitudes exist. Some see work as punishment. Others believe work in itself is good, i.e., they have a strong work ethic. Some view work as a means to satisfy, at least partially, a range of needs. Attitudinal transition points are likely to occur at specific times in the adult life cycle. The stages of the life cycle can be labeled as leaving, reaching out, questioning, midlife crisis, settling down, and mellowing. A progression through each of these stages is required for normal adult psychological development. Every individual exhibits a blend of needs that changes throughout life. Jobs can fulfill existence, relatedness, and growth needs. Relatedness needs include the need for love, affiliation, social esteem, and power, and growth needs include the need for self-esteem, competence, achievement, and autonomy. Three important career trends are the changing opportunities for advancement, women in careers, and dual-career couples. The number of women pharmacists is increasing as is the number of two-career couples. Tips for managing two-career relationships are presented. Pharmacists can manage their careers more effectively by understanding their needs, identifying their basic attitude toward work, and being aware of the trends occurring in pharmacy.

  12. Canadian National Guidelines and Recommendations for Integrating Career Advising Into Medical School Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howse, Kelly; Harris, June; Dalgarno, Nancy

    2017-11-01

    Career planning, decision making about specialty choice, and preparation for residency matching are significant sources of stress for medical students. Attempts have been made to structure and formalize career advising by including it in accreditation standards. There is an expressed need for national guidelines on career advising for medical students. The Future of Medical Education in Canada Postgraduate (FMEC PG) Implementation Project was created to ensure Canadian medical trainees receive the best education possible. From this, a diverse sub-working group (SWG), representing different Canadian regions, was formed to review career advising processes across the country. The SWG developed, through a modified formal consensus methodology, a strategy for medical student career advising that is adaptable to all schools in alignment with existing accreditation standards. The SWG outlined five guiding principles and five essential elements for Canadian universities offering an MD degree with recommendations on how to integrate the elements into each school's career advising system. The five essential elements are a structured approach to career advising, information about available career options, elective guidance, preparation for residency applications, and social accountability. This Perspective endorses the view of the FMEC PG Implementation Project that national guidelines are important to ensure Canadian medical schools are consistently meeting accreditation standards by providing reliable and quality career advising to all medical students. The SWG's position, based on national and provincial feedback, is that these guidelines will stimulate discourse and action regarding the requirements and processes to carry out these recommendations nationwide and share across borders.

  13. Career fields for inspection and enforcement personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartley, H.J.; Harrison, O.J.; Kraas, I.W.; Hagerup, J.E.; Heyer, F.H.K.; Schwartz, E.G.

    1978-09-01

    This document is a report on the development of career fields for Headquarters and regional positions of NRC/IE. Data on the development of qualifications requirements were examined for commonality of knowledge and performance; career fields were postulated as a result of that examination, and then those career fields were tested and revised by more extensive examination. Proposed as a result of this work are four career fields: Construction--Vendor, Health Physics, Reactor Operations, and Safeguards; and two ''career ladders'': Fuel Facilities and Investigation. (The term ''career ladder'' was chosen to describe the relatively narrow patterns of positions open to its members.) All career fields include subfields, which are described in full in the report. In addition to recommending acceptance of these career fields, this document proposes the combination of certain subfields, the retitling of some positions, and the adoption of a standard nomenclature for all NRC/IE positions. 56 figures, 2 tables

  14. The Impact of Career Exploration on Career Development among Hong Kong Chinese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Raysen; Arnold, John

    2014-01-01

    Career exploration is widely believed to produce positive career development outcomes among college and university students. Some research has supported this belief, but there is little information about exactly which outcomes it affects and whether any benefits of career exploration can be observed beyond individualistic western cultures. We…

  15. The Impact of Career Boundarylessness on Subjective Career Success: The Role of Career Competencies, Career Autonomy, and Career Insecurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colakoglu, Sidika N.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the theoretical frameworks of the career enactment and the stress perspectives, this study develops and tests a model in which career boundarylessness affects subjective career success through its effect on three career competencies--knowing-why, knowing-how, and knowing-whom--and career autonomy and career insecurity. The results…

  16. Subordinating careers to market forces? A critical analysis of European career guidance policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingela Bergmo-Prvulovic

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explores language regarding career and career development in European policy documents on career guidance in order to disclose underlying view(s of these phenomena conveyed in the texts. Qualitative content analysis was used to approach the subject in the texts, followed by a sender-oriented interpretation. Sources for interpretation include several sociological and pedagogical approaches based upon social constructionism. These provide a framework for understanding how different views of career phenomena arise. The characterization of career phenomena in the documents falls into four categories: contextual change, environment-person correspondence, competence mobility, and empowerment. An economic perspective on career dominates, followed by learning and political science perspectives. Policy formulations convey contradictory messages and a form of career 'contract' that appears to subordinate individuals' careers to global capitalism, while attributing sole responsibility for career to individuals.

  17. Information Seeking and Students Studying for Professional Careers: The Cases of Engineering and Law Students in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerins, Gillian; Madden, Ronan; Fulton, Crystal

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the results of two empirical studies which explored the information seeking behaviour of engineering and law students in Ireland. Findings reveal similar patterns in the information seeking behaviour between students studying to become professionals and information seeking patterns of these groups identified in the Leckie et al.…

  18. Career Cruiser: A Career and Education Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Life is a journey filled with many twists and turns. While the journey can be exciting, it is a good idea to know where you are going so you can decide how to get there. Career development is all about getting the knowledge and skills you need to make more informed career decisions. Right now is an excellent time to develop skills that will help…

  19. Career portfolio” as a Tool to Renew Career Capital

    OpenAIRE

    Cybal-Michalska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the Author stressed the subject of the career phenomenon. The discourse presented here related to the career that requires taking into account multicontextual changes in the area of work and changes that make employees face new challenges, emphasizes the importance of constructing one’s own career “portfolio”, as a tool to renew one’s career. The most important changes include the increase in the role of the career and the ability to plan, manage and monitor one’s career in a...

  20. Academic and non-academic career options for marine scientists. - Support measures for early career scientists offered at MARUM - Center for Marine Environmental Sciences, University of Bremen, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbeln, Dierk; Klose, Christina

    2015-04-01

    Early career scientists at MARUM cover a wide range of research topics and disciplines including geosciences, biology, chemistry, social sciences and law. Just as colourful as the disciplinary background of the people, are their ideas for their personal careers. With our services and programmes, we aim to address some important career planning needs of PhD students and early career Postdocs, both, for careers in science and for careers outside academia. For PhD students aiming to stay in science, MARUM provides funding opportunities for a research stay abroad for a duration of up to 6 months. A range of courses is offered to prepare for the first Postdoc position. These include trainings in applying for research funding, proposal writing and interview skills. Following MARUM lectures which are held once a month, early career scientists are offered the opportunity to talk to senior scientists from all over the world in an informal Meet&Greet. Mentoring and coaching programmes for women in science are offered in cooperation with the office for equal opportunities at the University of Bremen. These programmes offer an additional opportunity to train interpersonal skills and to develop personal career strategies including a focus on special challenges that especially women might (have to) face in the scientific community. Early career scientists aiming for a non-academic career find support on different levels. MARUM provides funding opportunities for placements in industry, administration, consulting or similar. We offer trainings in e.g. job hunting strategies or interview skills. For a deeper insight into jobs outside the academic world, we regularly invite professionals for informal fireside chats and career days. These events are organised in cooperation with other graduate programmes in the region to broaden the focus of both, the lecturers and the participants. A fundamental component of our career programmes is the active involvement of alumni of MARUM and our

  1. 25 CFR 115.605 - What information will the BIA include in its notice of the decision to restrict your IIM account?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...: Hearing Process for Restricting an IIM Account § 115.605 What information will the BIA include in its... notice of its decision to restrict your account, the only information the public notice will include is... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What information will the BIA include in its notice of...

  2. Snowmass 2013 Young Physicists Science and Career Survey Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J. [Fermilab; Asaadi, J. [Syracuse U.; Carls, B. [Fermilab; Cotta, R. [UC, Irvine; Guenette, R. [Yale U.; Kiburg, B. [Fermilab; Kobach, A. [Northwestern U.; Lippincott, H. [Fermilab; Littlejohn, B. [Cincinnati U.; Love, J. [Argonne; Penning, B. [Fermilab; Santos, M. Soares [Fermilab; Strauss, T. [thomas.strauss@lhep.unibe.ch; Szelc, A. [Yale U.; Worcester, E. [Brookhaven; Yu, F. [Fermilab

    2013-07-30

    From April to July 2013 the Snowmass Young Physicists (SYP) administered an online survey collecting the opinions and concerns of the High Energy Physics (HEP) community. The aim of this survey is to provide input into the long term planning meeting known as the Community Summer Study (CSS), or Snowmass on the Mississippi. In total, 1112 respondents took part in the survey including 74 people who had received their training within HEP and have since left for non-academic jobs. This paper presents a summary of the survey results including demographic, career outlook, planned experiments and non-academic career path information collected.

  3. Science Careers and Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagoda, Sue; Cremer, Bob

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes proceedings and student experiences at the 1980 Science Career Workshop for Physically Disabled Students at the Lawrence Hall of Science (University of California). Includes a description of the key-note speaker's topics, and other workshop activities. (DS)

  4. Career Opportunities for Theatre Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Susan

    2017-07-01

    Never have there been such a vast number of career opportunities for all levels of staff within the perioperative environment including healthcare support workers, operating department practitioners and nurses.

  5. Resource Guide to Careers in Toxicology, 3rd Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Society of Toxicology, Reston, VA.

    This resource guide was prepared by the Tox 90's Educational Issues Task Force of the Society of Toxicology. The introduction provides information on the Society of Toxicology and financial support for graduate students in toxicology. Other sections include career opportunities in toxicology, academic and postdoctoral programs in toxicology, and…

  6. Careers "Fact Sheets" for clinical engineering & biomedical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacela, A F

    1991-01-01

    Three Careers "Fact Sheets" include information on CE and BMET job titles, job descriptions, and certification. These materials are intended to aid in furthering professional recognition for Clinical Engineers and BMETs, and may be useful in communicating with Administration or Human Resources departments.

  7. Capitalizing on Social Media for Career Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoffery, Cam; Kenzig, Melissa; Hyden, Christel; Hernandez, Kristen

    2018-01-01

    Social media is powerful and has effective tools for career advancement. Health promotion professionals at all stages of their career can employ social media to develop their profile, network with a range of colleagues, and learn about jobs and other career-enhancing opportunities. This article focuses on several social media resources, describes their key functions for career development, and offers strategies for effective use. Steps in using social media include creating a personal profile, sharing products such as newsletters or publications, and locating volunteer and job opportunities. Learning skills to use social media effectively is important to advancing careers and to the expansion of the public health workforce.

  8. Adult Career Changers: A Developmental Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Margaretha S.

    1999-01-01

    Adults requesting career guidance at a counseling center completed a problem-checklist and the Identity, Information, and Barriers scales of the My Vocational Situation inventory. Respondents indicated a need for information on careers; lack of clarity regarding interests, talents, and goals; and worries about self-confidence, independence, and…

  9. Identifying the factors that affect the job satisfaction of early career Notre Dame graduate physiotherapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacopanos, Eleni; Edgar, Susan

    2016-11-01

    Objective Previous studies have highlighted the short career intentions and high attrition rates of physiotherapists from the profession. The aim of the present study was to examine the job satisfaction and attrition rates of early career physiotherapists graduating from one Western Australian university. Methods A self-administered online survey was conducted of 157 Notre Dame physiotherapy graduates (2006-2012), incorporating a job satisfaction rating scale. Results Results showed that lowered job satisfaction was related to working in the cardiorespiratory area of physiotherapy and working in multiple jobs since graduation. The majority of graduates did not predict a long-term career in physiotherapy, highlighting a lack of career progression and limited scope of practice as influential factors. Conclusions Job satisfaction in early career physiotherapists varies across different clinical areas of practice related to several factors, including challenge and flexibility. New roles in the profession, including extended scope roles, may impact on the future job satisfaction of physiotherapists. Further studies are needed to explore the effect of these roles on workforce trends, including attrition rates. What is known about the topic? Physiotherapists predict careers of 10 years or less on entry into the profession. No previous studies have explored the individual factors influencing job satisfaction in early career physiotherapists across different clinical settings. What does this paper add? This study highlights specific factors influencing the job satisfaction of early career physiotherapists, including clinical area of practice. Physiotherapists working in the cardiorespiratory area were less satisfied, as were physiotherapists undertaking multiple positions since graduation. What are the implications for practitioners? This study informs employers and workforce planners on the factors affecting job satisfaction in early career physiotherapists. In addition

  10. An Examination of the Career, Salary and Training Expectations of Information Technology Professionals Working in the Help Desk Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, William C.

    2013-01-01

    The Information Technology (IT) help desk positions serve as the gateway between the IT department and users. Although IT is one of the most employable job categories, and crucial for business, staffing these positions with properly trained and certified IT personnel and retaining them is a major challenge for IT help desk managers. What are the…

  11. Career Goals and Decisions: An Intersectionality Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardon, Emma

    This project explores the career paths to date of seven graduates of the University of Waterloo's Mechanical Engineering program, and examines the influences that led them to choose their university program. I particularly considered the participants' status as members of underrepresented or overrepresented groups, using the contexts of the history of the profession of Mechanical Engineering and prior research on underrepresentation in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics fields. I used semi-structured interviews and an intersectionality framework to investigate aspects of identity, interests, and career influences. I found three key themes among the participants: human influences, including information sources, role models, and mentors; influences of educational and outreach activities; and personal interests and aptitudes. I use the uncovered themes to recommend a combination of future studies and outreach programs.

  12. Preparing Students for the Future: Making Career Development a Priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughey, Kenneth F.; Hughey, Judith K.

    1999-01-01

    Presents information relevant to school counseling about the implications of work changes. Outlines foundational guides for student success: improving decision making, learning about career paths, acquiring employability skills, and developing lifelong learning attitudes. Describes activities to facilitate career development. (SK)

  13. Careers in Culinary Arts

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, James Peter

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation was to give individuals interested in pursuing a career in culinary arts the advice and access to education surrounding this field. Culinary arts covers the multidisciplinary field and areas of practice and study which includes culinary performing arts (cooking), gastronomy (food studies), bakery and pastry arts, food and beverage studies (bar, restaurant, barista), wine studies , food product development and health, hygiene and nutrition. So many individuals ...

  14. Career competencies for the modern career

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, Marinka; Scheerens, Jaap

    2006-01-01

    Career development gains new meaning in the context of employability demands in a knowledge economy. In this context, increased mobility, a dynamic work environment, and an increased level of career support from employers are seen as characteristics of a modern career. All of these characteristics

  15. Career choice and perceptions of nursing among healthcare students in higher educational institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Sok Ying; Wu, Ling Ting; Chow, Yeow Leng; Lim, Siriwan; Tan, Khoon Kiat

    2017-05-01

    Due to the ageing population and competition from other healthcare courses, a greater demand in the healthcare workforce has made it challenging for educational institutions to attract school leavers to enter nursing courses. Understanding the considerations of students who have chosen non-nursing healthcare courses and their perceptions of nursing can help identify specific strategies to enhance the attractiveness of nursing course. This study aims to examine the differences between healthcare career choices and perceptions of nursing as a career choice among first-year non-nursing healthcare students. A descriptive survey design was conducted at the beginning of the healthcare courses of seven healthcare groups and from four higher educational institutions in Singapore. A total of 451 students responded, yielding an overall response rate of 52.7%. The online survey was administered using a valid and reliable 35-item parallel scale, known as the Healthcare Career Choice and Nursing Career Choice. The participants perceived prior healthcare exposure as the most influential factor and self-efficacy as the least influential factor when choosing nursing as a career. In comparison to their own healthcare career choices, nursing was perceived to have greater gender stigma and, as nurses, they would be less likely to achieve higher qualifications and career advancements, and they would be less likely to enjoy fulfilling careers. They also perceived that they would be less likely to gain their parents' support to pursue nursing and to make their parents proud. This study provides educators and policy-makers with vital information to develop key strategies to improve nursing enrolment in educational institutions. These strategies include early exposure to nursing as a rewarding career during school years, addressing the issue of gender stigma, and promoting information on the career and educational advancement of a registered nurse to parents of school leavers. Copyright

  16. Theory-Informed Research Training and Mentoring of Underrepresented Early-Career Faculty at Teaching-Intensive Institutions: The Obesity Health Disparities PRIDE Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beech, Bettina M; Bruce, Marino A; Thorpe, Roland J; Heitman, Elizabeth; Griffith, Derek M; Norris, Keith C

    2018-01-01

    Mentoring has been consistently identified as an important element for career advancement in many biomedical and health professional disciplines and has been found to be critical for success and promotion in academic settings. Early-career faculty from groups underrepresented in biomedical research, however, are less likely to have mentors, and in general, receive less mentoring than their majority-group peers, particularly among those employed in teaching-intensive institutions. This article describes Obesity Health Disparities (OHD) PRIDE, a theoretically and conceptually based research training and mentoring program designed for early-career faculty who trained or are employed at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).

  17. NASA Procurement Career Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Procurement Career Development Program establishes an agency-wide framework for the management of career development activity in the procurement field. Within this framework, installations are encouraged to modify the various components to meet installation-specific mission and organization requirements. This program provides a systematic process for the assessment of and planning for the development, training, and education required to increase the employees' competence in the procurement work functions. It includes the agency-wide basic knowledge and skills by career field and level upon which individual and organizational development plans are developed. Also, it provides a system that is compatible with other human resource management and development systems, processes, and activities. The compatibility and linkage are important in fostering the dual responsibility of the individual and the organization in the career development process.

  18. 30 CFR 254.26 - What information must I include in the “Worst case discharge scenario” appendix?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and environmental importance, if any, specified in the appropriate Area Contingency Plan(s). (d) A... COAST LINE Oil-Spill Response Plans for Outer Continental Shelf Facilities § 254.26 What information... Control Systems for Use on Water, and ASTM F818-93, Standard Definitions Relating to Spill Response...

  19. 77 FR 73053 - Comment Request for Information Collection on Administrative Procedures Including Form MA 8-7...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... format, reporting burden (time and financial resources) is minimized, collection instruments are clearly... prescribes the use of Form MA 8-7, Transmittal for Unemployment Insurance Materials. This simple check off... particularly interested in comments which: Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary...

  20. 15 CFR Appendix 1 to Part 960 - Filing Instructions and Information To Be Included in the Licensing Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... authorized to do business. Sec. IILaunch Segment Information Provide the characteristics of the launch... site; (4) Anticipated operational date; (5) The range of orbits and altitudes (nominal apogee and... but not limited to: Tasking procedures; scheduling plans; data format (downlinked and distributed data...

  1. Careers and people

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Early-career scientists honoured Nine physicists were among 67 US-based researchers to be awarded a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers at a White House ceremony in late December 2008. The award comes with up to five years' funding for research deemed critical to government missions. This year's winners include nuclear physicist Mickey Chiu and particle physicist Hooman Davoudiasl, both of the Brookhaven National Laboratory; biophysicist Michael Elowitz of the California Institute of Technology; Chad Fertig, an atomic physicist at the University of Georgia; astronomer Charles Kankelborg of Montana State University; astrophysicist Merav Opher of George Mason University; theorist Robin Santra of the Argonne National Laboratory; quantum-computing researcher Raymond Simmons of the National Institute of Standards and Technologies in Boulder, Colorado; and string theorist Anastasia Volovich of Brown University.

  2. Advanced theoretical and experimental studies in automatic control and information systems. [including mathematical programming and game theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desoer, C. A.; Polak, E.; Zadeh, L. A.

    1974-01-01

    A series of research projects is briefly summarized which includes investigations in the following areas: (1) mathematical programming problems for large system and infinite-dimensional spaces, (2) bounded-input bounded-output stability, (3) non-parametric approximations, and (4) differential games. A list of reports and papers which were published over the ten year period of research is included.

  3. Career Issues in HRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on career issues in human resource development (HRD). "Are Careers What They Used To Be: A Factor Analysis of Schein's Career Orientations Inventory" (Gerri Mukri, Sharon Confessore) is a statistical analysis of Schein's Career Orientations Inventory that finds the inventory to be a…

  4. Social Technologies to Jump Start Geoscience Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Christopher; Martinez, Cynthia; Gonzales, Leila

    2010-05-01

    Collaborative and social technologies have been increasingly used to facilitate distributed data collection and observation in science. However, "Web 2.0" and basic social media are seeing limited coordinated use in building student and early-career geoscientists knowledge and understanding of the profession and career for which they have undertaken. The current generation of geology students and early career professionals are used to ready access to myriad of information and interaction opportunities, but they remain largely unaware about the geoscience profession, what the full scope of their opportunities are, and how to reach across institutional and subdisciplinary boundaries to build their own professional network. The American Geological Institute Workforce Program has tracked and supported the human resources of the geosciences since 1952. With the looming retirement of Baby Boomers, increasing demand for quality geoscientists, and a continued modest supply of students entering the geosciences, AGI is working to strengthen the human resource pipeline in the geosciences globally. One aspect of this effort is the GeoConnection Network, which is an integrated set of social networking, media sharing and communication Web 2.0 applications designed to engage students in thinking about careers in the geosciences and enabling them to build their own personal professional network. Developed by the American Geological Institute (AGI), GeoConnection links practicing and prospective geoscientists in an informal setting to share information about the geoscience profession, including student and career opportunities, current events, and future trends in the geosciences. The network includes a Facebook fan page, YouTube Channel, Twitter account and GeoSpectrum blog, with the goal of helping science organizations and departments recruit future talent to the geoscience workforce. On the social-networking platform, Facebook, the GeoConnection page is a forum for students and

  5. A contribution to quantum cryptography in finite-dimensional systems including further results from the field of quantum information theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranade, Kedar S.

    2009-01-01

    This PhD thesis deals with quantum-cryptographic protocols which allow general finite-dimensional quantum systems (qudits) as carriers of information in contrast to the predominantly used two-dimensional quantum systems (qubits). The main focus of investigations is the maximum tolerable error rate of such protocols and its behaviour as a function of the dimension of the information carriers. For this purpose, several concepts are introduced which allow the treatment of this problem. In particular, protocols are presented which work up to a maximum tolerate error rate, and it is shown that a wide class of protocols cannot be used for higher error rates. Among other things, it turns out that the maximum tolerable error rate for two-basis protocols increases up to 50% for high dimensions. Apart from the above-mentioned main subjects of this thesis, some other results from the field of quantum information theory are given, which were achieved during this PhD project. (orig.)

  6. Career Guidance for Learning-Disabled Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Charles P.; Chan, Janice

    2014-01-01

    Learning disabilities (LDs) describe a number of disorders that affect the way information is acquired, retained, organized, and understood. This article aims to address the critical issue of improving the career well-being of LD youth. It first examines several critical issues that affect LD high school students/youth in their career development.…

  7. Tube Maps for Effective Geoscience Career Planning and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, C. M.; Wilson, C. E.; Houlton, H. R.

    2013-12-01

    One of the greatest challenges faced by students and new graduates is the advice that they must take charge of their own career planning. This is ironic as new graduates are least prepared to understand the full spectrum of options and the potential pathways to meeting their personal goals. We will examine the rationale, tools, and utility of an approach aimed at assisting individuals in career planning nicknamed a "tube map." In particular, this approach has been used in support of geoscientist recruitment and career planning in major European energy companies. By utilizing information on the occupational sequences of geoscience professionals within an organization or a community, a student or new hire can quickly understand the proven pathways towards their eventual career goals. The tube map visualizes the career pathways of individuals in the form of a subway map, with specific occupations represented as "stations" and pathway interconnections represented as "transfers." The major application of this approach in the energy sector was to demonstrate both the logical career pathways to either senior management or senior technical positions, as well as present the reality that time must be invested in "lower level" jobs, thereby nullifying a persistent overinflated sense of the speed of upward mobility. To this end, we have run a similar occupational analysis on several geoscience employers, including one with somewhat non-traditional geoscience positions and another that would be considered a very traditional employer. We will examine the similarities and differences between the resulting 'tube maps,' critique the tools used to create the maps, and assess the utility of the product in career development planning for geoscience students and new hires.

  8. Aviation Career Awareness Program [and Related Materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Edwin T.

    The learning packet focuses on general aviation and is to be used in career awareness programs at the elementary level. It includes a document which presents a group of units on general aviation and its related careers. The units include the following: (1) aircraft manufacturing, (2) instruments and controls, (3) how airplanes fly, (4) flight…

  9. Graphic Design Career Guide 2. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, James

    The graphic design field is diverse and includes many areas of specialization. This guide introduces students to career opportunities in graphic design. The guide is organized in four parts. "Part One: Careers in Graphic Design" identifies and discusses the various segments of the graphic design industry, including: Advertising, Audio-Visual, Book…

  10. AEL Career Decision-Making Program. Worker Trait Group File Content Notebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appalachia Educational Lab., Charleston, WV.

    The Career Information System File is utilized in the organization and management procedures of the Career Information System (CIS) component of the Career Decision-Making (CDM) Program developed by Appalachia Educational Laboratory. (See CE 019 229 for an overview of the total CDM Program.) The twelve career areas and worker trait groups used to…

  11. Career anchors and career resilience: Supplementary constructs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Van Vuuren

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Previously the authors reported on a study in which an attempt was made at defining and measuring the construct career resilience (Fourie & Van Vuuren, 1998. The present article continues this investigation by reporting on the relationship between career resilience and career anchors, as defined in Scheins (1975; 1978; 1990; 1992 career anchor model. The aim of the study was to determine whether career anchor patterning could potentially inhibit or facilitate individuals' levels of career resilience. The "Career Resilience Questionnaire" (CRQ (Fourie & Van Vuuren, 1998 together with Scheins (1990 "Career Orientations Inventory" (COI were administered to 352 skilled employees. The findings regarding the statistical relationship between the two constructs are discussed. Opsomming Loopbaanankers en loopbaangehardheid: supplementere konstrukte? In n vorige publikasie van Fourie en Van Vuuren (1998 is die bevindinge aangaande die afbakening en meting van die konstruk, loopbaangehardheid, gerapporteer. In die huidige artikel word die ondersoek voortgesit met 'n beskrywing van die verwantskap tussen loopbaangehardheid en loopbaanankers, soos gedefinieer in die loopbaanankermodel van Schein (1975; 1978; 1990; 1992. Die doel met die studie was om te bepaal of die mate van loopbaanankerontplooiing individuele vlakke van loopbaangehardheid potensieel fasiliteer ofinhibeer. Die "Career Resilience Questionnaire" (CRQ (Fourie & Van Vuuren, 1998 is tesame met die "Career Orientation Inventory" (COI (Schein, 1990 op 352 geskoolde werknemers geadministreer. Die bevindinge betreffende die statistiese verwantskap tussen die twee konstrukte word bespreek.

  12. 30 CFR 254.23 - What information must I include in the “Emergency response action plan” section?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... response operations on your behalf. You must describe the team's organizational structure as well as the... include the number and types of personnel available from each identified labor source. (d) A planned... primary and secondary radio frequencies that will be used. (e) A listing of the types and characteristics...

  13. To Boldly Go: Practical Career Advice for Young Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, P.

    1998-05-01

    Young scientists in nearly every field are finding the job market of the 1990's a confusing and frustrating place. Ph.D. supply is far larger than that needed to fill entry-level positions in "traditional" research careers. More new Ph.D. and Master's degree holders are considering a wider range of careers in and out of science, but feel ill-prepared and uninformed about their options. Some feel their Ph.D. training has led them to a dead-end. I present a thorough and practical overview to the process of career planning and job hunting in the 1990's, from the perspective of a young scientist. I cover specific steps that young scientists can take to broaden their horizons, strengthen their skills, and present their best face to potential employers. An important part of this is the realization that most young scientists possess a range of valuable "transferable skills" that are highly sought after by employers in and out of science. I will summarize the specifics of job hunting in the 90's, including informational interviewing, building your network, developing a compelling CV and resume, cover letters, interviewing, based on my book "To Boldly Go: A Practical Career Guide for Scientists". I will also identify other resources available for young scientists. Finally, I will highlight individual stories of Ph.D.-trained scientists who have found exciting and fulfilling careers outside the "traditional" world of academia.

  14. A mixed-methods study of mid-career science teachers: The growth of professional empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, Amy Laphelia

    The purpose of this concurrent, mixed-methods study was to examine the professional empowerment qualities of mid-career (years 4-8), science teachers. I used the construct of professional empowerment as the theoretical frame to explore K-12 mid-career science teachers' career trajectories and consider how they can be supported professionally and ideally retained over time. In investigating the qualities of these teachers, I also constructed a new teaching trajectory model and tested the differences between mid-career and veteran science teachers. I analyzed seventy-eight surveys of mid-career science teachers across Texas, including six in-depth, interview-based case studies. The qualitative piece used behavior-over-time graphing combined with the interviews and the quantitative component used survey data from the Teacher Empowerment Survey (TES). Results indicated that science content knowledge gain through professional development opportunities was an especially important factor in supporting mid-career teachers' sense of empowerment. This increased content knowledge connected positively with the dimensions of decision-making, status, and impact. In a between-group analysis using a larger subset of TES data, I analyzed 254 surveys by conducting a nonparametric statistical test. A statistically significant difference was found between the two groups, in that mid-career science teachers had a lower sense of "status" than their more experienced counterparts (p empowerment. The study was situated within a broader scope of exploring how educational leaders and professional development providers can understand and support science teachers of varying experience levels. A well-designed and possibly differentiated professional development program could successfully connect with these kind of empowered and receptive mid-career science teachers, and thus increase the probability of implementing quality science education programs, content, and pedagogy into schools. The

  15. Factors influencing career decisions in internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, C; Cawood, T

    2012-08-01

    Numerous factors influence career decisions for internal medicine trainees and Fellows. There is a perception that a greater emphasis is placed on work-family balance by younger physicians. To determine the characteristics of the modern internal medicine workforce and ascertain whether job flexibility is important to career decision-making. We hypothesised that factors which reflect flexibility would be highly influential in decision-making, especially for women and those with young children. A questionnaire was mailed to 250 New Zealand internal medicine trainees and Fellows. It focused on factors, including job flexibility, interest and collegial support, and included demographic details which were primarily aimed at ascertaining family responsibilities. Response rate was 54%. The majority of female physicians are the main person responsible for their children (62%), and the majority of their partners work full-time (80%). This contrasts with male physicians, of whom only 4% are the main person responsible for their children. Flexibility was found to be more influential in women, those with young children, trainees and those working in outpatient-based subspecialties. However, contrary to our original hypothesis, flexibility was not reported to be highly influential in any group, with career choice being most influenced by interest and enjoyment, intellectual challenge and variety within the job. It is hoped that results will inform employers and those involved with training to enable them to better cater for the needs of the workforce and also encourage trainees to consider future family commitments when making career decisions. © 2012 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  16. Career Planning and Development for Early-Career Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early career development can be looked at as being of two major phases. The first phase is the formal educational process leading to an awarded degree, postdoctoral training, and potentially formal certification in a scientific discipline. The second phase is the informal educa...

  17. Task Analysis: A Systematic Approach to Designing New Careers Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Vivian C.

    This guide presents the primary approaches, tools, and techniques utilized by the New Careers Training Laboratory (NCTL) staff to provide skills in training and to conduct agency task analyses. Much of the technical information has been taken from an earlier NCTL publication by Tita Beal, "A New Careers Guide for Career Development…

  18. Development and Implementation of an Online Careers Seminar in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinthaupt, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Psychology departments are increasing their attention to providing career options and guidance for majors. I review the literature on the use of career courses in psychology and describe the development and implementation of an online careers seminar that provides psychology majors and minors with a wide range of information and resources. Student…

  19. Local Middle School Receives School-to-Career Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teacher Enhancement Program. The money will be used to help students explore career opportunities and and career development by giving them access to people working in local businesses and government Middle School Receives School-to-Career Grant For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs

  20. Explore Your Future: Careers in the Natural Gas Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Gas Association, Arlington, VA. Educational Services.

    This career awareness booklet provides information and activities to help youth prepare for career and explore jobs in the natural gas industry. Students are exposed to career planning ideas and activities; they learn about a wide variety of industry jobs, what workers say about their jobs, and how the industry operates. Five sections are…

  1. Dual career and job sharing - two careers or half a career?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbronner, Renée; Stünitz, Holger

    2017-04-01

    One option for a dual career that is often considered is job sharing. After 20 years of job sharing during the most competitive years of our careers we would like to share a few thoughts on some of the problems we came across. The typical job sharing situation is one of a young couple about to found a family. However, this need not be the case, many alternative models are thinkable, few are actually liveable. The list of problems we came across includes: 1 - The hiring age for professors keeps dropping. This adds extra stress to the competitive post doc time 2 - Postdoc positions are not designed for dual career. ... and much less for job sharing. 3 - The higher the academic position the less likely it is offered for job sharing. - because it is claimed that leadership and responsibility cannot be shared. - because two half positions do indeed cost more than one whole (what hiring institutions fail to see is that they get two instead of one fully qualified scientists in return) - because they are difficult to plan: what happens if one partner leaves the department? 4 - Age difference of dual career partners Partners of different age have different qualifications and experiences. Usually the career of the more advanced partners is promoted more, the career of the second partner falls behind.

  2. Factors in career choice among US nephrologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Gearoid M; Thomas, Lynette; Tucker, J Kevin; Lin, Julie

    2012-11-01

    There is a projected shortage of kidney specialists, and retention of trainees in nephrology is important. Determining factors that result in choosing a nephrology career could inform future strategies to attract nephrology fellows. An anonymous, internet-based survey was sent to members of the American Society of Nephrology in June 2009. Respondents answered questions about demographics, training background, and career choices. Of the 3399 members, 913 (23%) returned the survey. Mean age was 51.1 ± 10.5 years, and 46.1% were academic nephrologists. In addition, 38.4% of respondents graduated between 2000 and 2009. Interest in nephrology began early in training, with the intellectual aspects of nephrology, early mentoring, and participation in nephrology electives named as the most common reasons in choosing nephrology. Academic nephrologists were more likely to have participated in research in medical school, have a master's degree or PhD, and successfully obtained research funding during training. Academic debt was higher among nonacademic nephrologists. Research opportunities and intellectual stimulation were the main factors for academic nephrologists when choosing their first postfellowship positions, whereas geographic location and work-life balance were foremost for nonacademic nephrologists. These findings highlight the importance of exposing medical students and residents to nephrology early in their careers through involvement in research, electives, and positive mentoring. Further work is needed to develop and implement effective strategies, including increasing early exposure to nephrology in preclinical and clinical years, as well as encouraging participation in research, in order to attract future nephrology trainees.

  3. Career Development forWomen in Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boshielo, P.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear technology is a highly specialised field that requires a variety of professionals. Nuclear engineers, statisticians, physicists, information technology professionals, analysts, policy makers, scientists and other professionals. Because of the variety of backgrounds, many young female professionals need training and professional development opportunities to become well rounded in these disciplines. There has been a rising awareness of the need for development of the women professionals across the international field of the nuclear industry. Due to growth and expansion of nuclear power worldwide, a strong community of skilled next generation women professionals is required. Developing women professionals to fill this challenging need can first be addressed by making university students and young female professionals already working in the industry aware of the nuclear community and the unique career opportunities it encompasses. Once the decision is made to pursue a career in the nuclear community, professional development opportunities are an essential building block to becoming a more effective member of the international nuclear community. Current opportunities available to be discussed include international training, internships and fellowships, graduate degrees and professional networks. Present needs and gaps in the current professional development offerings will be identified as well as suggested ways they can be filled. In conclusion, programmes still needed in support of the career development of the female professionals will be addressed. (author)

  4. Rural and remote young people's health career decision making within a health workforce development program: a qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Koshila; Jones, Debra; Naden, Kathryn; Roberts, Chris

    2015-01-01

    One strategy aimed at resolving ongoing health workforce shortages in rural and remote settings has been to implement workforce development initiatives involving the early activation and development of health career aspirations and intentions among young people in these settings. This strategy aligns with the considerable evidence showing that rural background is a strong predictor of rural practice intentions and preferences. The Broken Hill Regional Health Career Academy Program (BHRHCAP) is an initiative aimed at addressing local health workforce challenges by helping young people in the region develop and further their health career aspirations and goals. This article reports the factors impacting on rural and remote youths' health career decision-making within the context of a health workforce development program. Data were collected using interviews and focus groups with a range of stakeholders involved in the BHRHCAP including local secondary school students, secondary school teachers, career advisors, school principals, parents, and pre-graduate health students undertaking a clinical placement in Broken Hill, and local clinicians. Data interpretation was informed by the theoretical constructs articulated within socio cognitive career theory. Young people's career decision-making in the context of a local health workforce development program was influenced by a range of personal, contextual and experiential factors. These included personal factors related to young people's career goals and motivations and their confidence to engage in career decision-making, contextual factors related to BHRHCAP program design and structure as well as the visibility and accessibility of health career pathways in a rural setting, and experiential factors related to the interaction and engagement between young people and role models or influential others in the health and education sectors. This study provided theoretical insight into the broader range of interrelating and

  5. Social Values for Ecosystem Services (SolVES): using GIS to include social values information in ecosystem services assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrouse, B.C.; Semmens, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    Ecosystem services can be defined in various ways; simply put, they are the benefits provided by nature, which contribute to human well-being. These benefits can range from tangible products such as food and fresh water to cultural services such as recreation and esthetics. As the use of these benefits continues to increase, additional pressures are placed on the natural ecosystems providing them. This makes it all the more important when assessing possible tradeoffs among ecosystem services to consider the human attitudes and preferences that express underlying social values associated with their benefits. While some of these values can be accounted for through economic markets, other values can be more difficult to quantify, and attaching dollar amounts to them may not be very useful in all cases. Regardless of the processes or units used for quantifying such values, the ability to map them across the landscape and relate them to the ecosystem services to which they are attributed is necessary for effective assessments. To address some of the needs associated with quantifying and mapping social values for inclusion in ecosystem services assessments, scientists at the Rocky Mountain Geographic Science Center (RMGSC), in collaboration with Colorado State University, have developed a public domain tool, Social Values for Ecosystem Services (SolVES). SolVES is a geographic information system (GIS) application designed to use data from public attitude and preference surveys to assess, map, and quantify social values for ecosystem services. SolVES calculates and maps a 10-point Value Index representing the relative perceived social values of ecosystem services such as recreation and biodiversity for various groups of ecosystem stakeholders. SolVES output can also be used to identify and model relationships between social values and physical characteristics of the underlying landscape. These relationships can then be used to generate predicted Value Index maps for areas

  6. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Specimen Data (includes physical specimens, collection information, status, storage locations, and laboratory results associated with individual specimens)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set includes physical specimens, paper logs and Freezerworks database of all logged information on specimens collected from Hawaiian monk seals since 1975....

  7. Evaluation of the 235U prompt fission neutron spectrum including a detailed analysis of experimental data and improved model information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudecker, Denise; Talou, Patrick; Kahler, Albert C.; White, Morgan C.; Kawano, Toshihiko

    2017-09-01

    We present an evaluation of the 235U prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) induced by thermal to 20-MeV neutrons. Experimental data and associated covariances were analyzed in detail. The incident energy dependence of the PFNS was modeled with an extended Los Alamos model combined with the Hauser-Feshbach and the exciton models. These models describe prompt fission, pre-fission compound nucleus and pre-equilibrium neutron emissions. The evaluated PFNS agree well with the experimental data included in this evaluation, preliminary data of the LANL and LLNL Chi-Nu measurement and recent evaluations by Capote et al. and Rising et al. However, they are softer than the ENDF/B-VII.1 (VII.1) and JENDL-4.0 PFNS for incident neutron energies up to 2 MeV. Simulated effective multiplication factors keff of the Godiva and Flattop-25 critical assemblies are further from the measured keff if the current data are used within VII.1 compared to using only VII.1 data. However, if this work is used with ENDF/B-VIII.0β2 data, simulated values of keff agree well with the measured ones.

  8. Career Education--A Humanistic View (Part 3 of the ERIC Clearinghouse on Teacher Education Project on Career Education).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Robert J.; Agne, Russell M.

    This monograph examines the career education concept. Four interrelated premises discussed include specialism, sequentialism, fundamentalism, and credentialism. Each premise is presented in light of its functional and dysfunctional role in career education. Suggestions are included which would a) enable career education to enhance the principle of…

  9. CAREER GUIDANCE EXPERIENCE ABROAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Tolstoguzov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe the experience of careeroriented activities carried out with students of schools in developed and developing countries. Career Guidance in Russia, despite the vast experience of its implementation, is experiencing serious difficulties. In this regard, it is important to take into account the international experience career-oriented activities, such as in the developed countries of North America and the European Union as well as in several Asian countries with rapidly growing economies and a large demographic potential, taking into account the best variants for the Russian education system. Methods. The experience of career-oriented work undertaken with pupils of the USA, Canada, Israel, France, UK, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Japan, Singapore, China and India is shown on the basis of the comparative analysis of different publications and information sources. The author has made an attempt to generalize the principles of psycho-pedagogical and administrative assistance in professional self-determination of senior pupils abroad. Scientific novelty. The approaches to career-oriented activities in countries with different levels of economic development are compared for the first time. Some principles are revealed. Firstly, the higher the income level per capita in the country, the greater attention is given to vocational guidance. The politics in the developed countries is based on interests of the individual: children’s acquaintance with the world of professions begins already at younger school and the moment of definitive selfdetermination is postponed till the end of their senior stage of education; the possibility of direction change of professional preparation in case of detection of discrepancy of qualities of the pupil to originally selected profile is provided. Career-oriented activity in developing countries, on the contrary, is rigidly coordinated to requirements of economy and a labour market

  10. Networking Skills as a Career Development Practice: Lessons from the Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, M. G.; Kontak, R.; Holloway, T.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; Steiner, A. L.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Adams, A. S.; de Boer, A. M.; Staudt, A. C.; Fiore, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    Professional networking is often cited as an important component of scientific career development, yet there are few resources for early career scientists to develop and build networks. Personal networks can provide opportunities to learn about organizational culture and procedures, expectations, advancement opportunities, and best practices. They provide access to mentors and job placement opportunities, new scientific collaborations, speaker and conference invitations, increased scientific visibility, reduced isolation, and a stronger feeling of community. There is evidence in the literature that a sense of community positively affects the engagement and retention of underrepresented groups, including women, in science. Thus women scientists may particularly benefit from becoming part of a network. The Earth Science Women’s Network (ESWN) began in 2002 as an informal peer-to-peer mentoring initiative among a few recent Ph.D.s. The network has grown exponentially to include over 1000 women scientists across the globe. Surveys of our membership about ESWN report positive impacts on the careers of women in Earth sciences, particularly those in early career stages. Through ESWN, women share both professional and personal advice, establish research collaborations, communicate strategies on work/life balance, connect with women at various stages of their careers, and provide perspectives from cultures across the globe. We present lessons learned through the formal and informal activities promoted by ESWN in support of the career development of women Earth scientists.

  11. Career Counsellors and Suicide Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popadiuk, Natalee Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Recent discussions suggest that career counsellors need to be trained in more holistic frameworks in order to deal with the career and psychological issues of their clients. In particular, research shows a strong connection between employment and suicidality, including changes in socioeconomic status, disruption in employment, sudden unemployment,…

  12. Project CAREER/CAN. Final Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Educational Evaluation Services, Inc., Chestnut Hill, MA.

    A description and evaluation of (1) the development of the 4-column process which completes the behavioral objective data base, (2) the development of the computer retrieval capability, and (3) the pilot testing of the product in high school classrooms are included in this summative evaluation of Project CAREER/CAN. (Goals of Project CAREER/CAN,…

  13. Apparel Manufacturing (Course Outline), Exciting Careers in Apparel Manufacturing: 9377.01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    A course for youth and adults interested in a career in apparel manufacturing and the needle trades is presented. Instruction will include a sampling tour of interest, introducing all phases of the industry from designing to shipping. Instructional materials include films, transparencies, lectures and demonstrations, information sheets,…

  14. Goodbye Career, Hello Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komisar, Randy

    2000-01-01

    Success in today's economy means throwing out the old career rules. The "noncareer" career is driven by passion for the work and has the fluidity and flexibility needed in the contemporary workplace. (JOW)

  15. Dentistry: Careers in Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Dentistry e-mail Print Share Careers in Dentistry A dental education opens up a world of ... accredited training programs in your area . Careers in Dentistry Be a Dentist General Dentistry Dental Specialties Dental ...

  16. Second Careers in Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Kellye

    1992-01-01

    Describes career changes and retirement choices made by outgoing "career" superintendents. Choices ranged from teaching and consulting to administering philanthropic organizations and launching a charter-boat business. (MLH)

  17. CareerConnector

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — CareerConnector is USAID's premiere recruiting tool. It is powered by Monster and integrated with www.usajobs.gov. CareerConnector tracks the progression of a...

  18. Are skills learned in nursing transferable to other careers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Aitken, Leanne M

    2005-01-01

    To determine the influence of skills gained in nursing on the transition to a non-nursing career. Little is known about the impact that nursing skills have on the transition to new careers or about the transferability of nursing skills to professions outside nursing. A postal questionnaire was mailed to respondents who had left nursing. The questionnaire included demographic, nursing education and practice information, reasons for entering and leaving nursing, perceptions of the skills gained in nursing and the ease of adjustment to a new career. Data analysis included exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, Pearson product moment correlations and linear and multiple regression analysis. Skills learned as a nurse that were valuable in acquiring a career outside nursing formed two factors, including "management of self and others" and "knowledge and skills learned," explaining 32% of the variation. The highest educational achievement while working as a nurse, choosing nursing as a "default choice," leaving nursing because of "worklife/homelife balance" and the skills of "management of self and others" and "knowledge and skills" had a significant relationship with difficulty adjusting to a non-nursing work role and, overall, explained 28% of the variation in this difficulty adjusting. General knowledge and skills learned in nursing prove beneficial in adjusting to roles outside nursing.

  19. Census Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indicators Economic Studies Industry Statistics Portal Other Economic Programs Business is a large part of Classification Codes (i.e., NAICS) Economic Census Economic Indicators Economic Studies Industry Statistics Portal Other Economic Programs Business Latest Information Business Characteristics Classification Codes

  20. Career Cartography: From Stories to Science and Scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Deleise S; Rosemberg, Marie-Anne S; Visovatti, Moira; Munro-Kramer, Michelle L; Feetham, Suzanne

    2017-05-01

    To present four case scenarios reflecting the process of research career development using career cartography. Career cartography is a novel approach that enables nurses, from all clinical and academic settings, to actively engage in a process that maximizes their clinical, teaching, research, and policy contributions that can improve patient outcomes and the health of the public. Four early-career nurse researchers applied the career cartography framework to describe their iterative process of research career development. They report the development process of each of the components of career cartography, including destination statement, career map, and policy statement. Despite diverse research interests and career mapping approaches, common experiences emerged from the four nurse researchers. Common lessons learned throughout the career cartography process include: (a) have a supportive mentorship team, (b) start early and reflect regularly, (c) be brief and to the point, (d) keep it simple and avoid jargon, (e) be open to change, (f) make time, and (g) focus on the overall career destination. These four case scenarios support the need for nurse researchers to develop their individual career cartography. Regardless of their background, career cartography can help nurse researchers articulate their meaningful contributions to science, policy, and health of the public. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  1. A Perspective of Middle Schools and the Motivating Factors that will Influence Students to Pursue Careers in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollins-Miller, Cornelia B.

    This dissertation project will determine what factors are being used to engage students to obtain careers in science. It will explore factors and other theories that contribute to persuading students to think about careers in science after college. The participants of the study included counselors, parents, principals, middle school students and teachers. All of the participants were surveyed. Information from the participants was collected and analyzed according to their responses. The results indicated that there were many contributing factors that the participants thought changed their attitudes about science and engaging in a science career.

  2. Career Commitment in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Diane L.

    1992-01-01

    A longitudinal, repeated-measures descriptive survey used to measure career commitment and its relationship to turnover and work performance in 320 newly employed registered nurses at one hospital found that career commitment is not a stable phenomenon. The direct association between career commitment and turnover and with job performance is weak.…

  3. BULGARIAN TEACHERS’ CAREER MOTIVATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislava Stoyanova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A review of several studies of teachers’ career motivation since Bulgarian Renaissance till nowadays is presented in this paper. 203 Bulgarian teachers in public schools were studied by means of a questionnaire created by Slavchov & Stoyanova (2007 measuring career motivational types, according to Moses’ typology (2003. The career motivational type of Authenticity seekers was the most preferred by the studied Bulgarian teachers, followed by Personal developers and Stability seekers. Career builders as a career motivational type was minor career motivator, the least preferred one by Bulgarian teachers. A lot of significant positive correlations existed between teachers’ career motivational types. Some social-demographic factors (such as gender, specialty, work experience, and age differentiated teachers’ career motivators. The type of Autonomy seekers was more preferred career motivator by male teachers than by female teachers in correspondence to the traditional stereotypes for men. Longer teachers’ work experience and teachers’ advance in age were related to more frequency of Stability seekers, but less frequency of Novelty seekers career motivator. Preschool and elementary school teachers preferred more strongly Authenticity seekers as a career motivator than teachers in natural sciences and mathematics. Establishing major career motivators for teachers may be related to opportunities for improvement of performance and work satisfaction.

  4. Career transition and dental school faculty development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Jeffery L; Hendricson, William D; Partida, Mary N; Rugh, John D; Littlefield, John H; Jacks, Mary E

    2013-11-01

    Academic dentistry, as a career track, is not attracting sufficient numbers of new recruits to maintain a corps of skilled dental educators. The Faculty Development Program (FDP) at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Dental School received federal funds to institute a 7-component program to enhance faculty recruitment and retention and provide training in skills associated with success in academics including:(1) a Teaching Excellence and Academic Skills (TExAS)Fellowship, (2) training in research methodology,evidence-based practice research, and information management, (3) an annual dental hygiene faculty development workshop for dental hygiene faculty, (4) a Teaching Honors Program and Academic Dental Careers Fellowship to cultivate students' interest in educational careers, (5) an Interprofessional Primary Care Rotation,(6) advanced education support toward a master's degree in public health, and (7) a key focus of the entire FDP, an annual Career Transition Workshop to facilitate movement from the practice arena to the educational arm of the profession.The Career Transition Workshop is a cap stone for the FDP; its goal is to build a bridge from practice to academic environment. It will provide guidance for private practice, public health, and military dentists and hygienists considering a career transition into academic dentistry. Topics will be addressed including: academic culture, preparation for the academic environment,academic responsibilities, terms of employment,compensation and benefits, career planning, and job search / interviewing. Instructors for the workshop will include dental school faculty who have transitioned from the practice, military, and public health sectors into dental education.Objectives of the Overall Faculty Development Program:• Provide training in teaching and research skills,career planning, and leadership in order to address faculty shortages in dental schools and under representation of minority

  5. Organizing a Campus Seminar on Careers in Entertainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walt Disney Productions, Anaheim, CA.

    Developed by Walt Disney Productions as part of a project granted by the Career Education Program of the Office of Education, this handbook is designed to help college and university fine arts departments in planning and carrying out an on-campus seminar on careers in entertainment. Sections include Why Hold a Seminar on Careers in Entertainment?,…

  6. Career challenges and opportunities in the global chemistry enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article serves as an overview of the various career challenges and opportunities faced by chemistry professionals in the 21st century in the global chemistry enterprise. One goal is to highlight a broad spectrum of career paths, including non-traditional careers, and to showcase examples of ch...

  7. Career Education of Hearing-Impaired Students: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, Michael, Ed.; Watson, Douglas, Ed.

    This monograph reviews the many efforts that have been made in the fields of education and vocational rehabilitation to develop and refine career preparation services for hearing-impaired individuals. The following papers are included in the volume: "Career Education: A Literature Review," by Charlene Dwyer; "A Current Profile of Career Education…

  8. Good Looks and Good Practice: The Attitudes of Career Practitioners to Attractiveness and Appearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Julia; Hooley, Tristram; Bagri, Kiren Kaur

    2017-01-01

    Empirical evidence attests the impact that career image has on objective career success, yet little is known of how career practitioners conceptualise and operationalise this information. This article presents the quantitative findings of an online survey of career practitioners (n = 399, 74% female, 89% white and 75% from the U.K.) exploring…

  9. Online Career Guidance: Does Knowledge Equate to Power for High School Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galliott, Natal'ya

    2017-01-01

    The provision of online career information and guidance is becoming more popular among career counselling practitioners and policy makers targeting the postschool transitions of youth. Internet-based career exploration and guidance systems provide convenience and economy to both individuals confronted with career decision making as well as those…

  10. A mixed methods analysis of experiences and expectations among early-career medical oncologists in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, W K Tim; Kirby, Emma; Broom, Alex; Sibbritt, David; Francis, Kay; Karapetis, Christos S; Karikios, Deme; Harrup, Rosemary; Lwin, Zarnie

    2018-01-26

    A viable and sustainable medical oncology profession is integral for meeting the increasing demand for quality cancer care. The aim of this study was to explore the workforce-related experiences, perceptions and career expectations of early-career medical oncologists in Australia. A mixed-methods design, including a survey (n  =  170) and nested qualitative semistructured interviews (n  =  14) with early-career medical oncologists. Recruitment was through the Medical Oncology Group of Australia. Qualitative data were thematically analyzed and for the survey results, logistic regression modeling was conducted. Early-career medical oncologists experienced uncertainty regarding their future employment opportunities. The competitive job market has made them cautious about securing a preferred job leading to a perceived need to improve their qualifications through higher degree training and research activities. The following themes and trends were identified from the qualitative and quantitative analyses: age, career stage and associated early-career uncertainty; locale, professional competition and training preferences; participation in research and evolving professional expectations; and workload and career development opportunities as linked to career uncertainty. Perceived diminished employment opportunities in the medical oncology profession, and shifting expectations to be "more qualified," have increased uncertainty among junior medical oncologists in terms of their future career prospects. Structural factors relating to adequate funding of medical oncology positions may facilitate or inhibit progressive change in the workforce and its sustainability. Workforce planning and strategies informed by findings from this study will be necessary in ensuring that both the needs of cancer patients and of medical oncologists are met. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Managing your brand career management and personal PR for librarians

    CERN Document Server

    Still, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Managing Your Brand: Career Management and Personal PR for Librarians sets out guidelines for developing career pathways, including options for career change and the exploration of community service, as an avenue that can provide new opportunities. The text allows librarians at all levels to maximize their talents, providing them with career planning strategies that will facilitate professional development and personal satisfaction. Early chapters provide advice and strategies to readers, with later chapters addressing working relationships, librarianship, scholarship, and other forms

  12. The relationship between career competencies, career identity, motivation and quality of choice

    OpenAIRE

    Meijers, Frans; Kuijpers, Marinka; Gundy, Chad

    2018-01-01

    In this article we focus on the effects of career education and guidance among students (ages 12–19) enrolled in prevocational and secondary vocational education in The Netherlands. Our study included 3,499 students and 166 teachers in 226 classes in 34 schools. The results showed that career competencies positively contributed to learning motivation, experienced quality of study choice, experienced fit of choice with learning tasks, and experienced fit of internship. Career identity positive...

  13. Making clinical academic careers more attractive: views from questionnaire surveys of senior UK doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Trevor W; Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    To report on doctors' reasons, as expressed to our research group, for choosing academic careers and on factors that would make a career in clinical academic medicine more attractive to them. Postal, email and web questionnaires. UK. A total of 6936 UK-trained doctors who graduated in 1996, 1999 and 2000. Open-ended comments about a career in clinical academic medicine. Of doctors who provided reasons for pursuing a long-term career in clinical academic medicine, the main reasons were enjoyment of academic work and personal satisfaction, whether expressed directly in those terms, or in terms of intellectual stimulation, enjoyment of research, teaching and the advancement of medicine, and the job being more varied than and preferable to clinical work alone. Doctors' suggestions for making clinical academic medicine more attractive included improved pay and job security, better funding of research, greater availability of academic posts, more dedicated time for research (and less service work) and more support and mentoring. Women were more likely than men to prioritise flexible working hours and part-time posts. Medical schools could provide more information, as part of student teaching, about the opportunities for and realities of a career in clinical academic medicine. Women, in particular, commented that they lacked the role models and information which would encourage them to consider seriously an academic career. Employers could increase academic opportunities by allowing more time for teaching, research and study and should assess whether job plans make adequate allowance for academic work.

  14. The Life Design Group: A Case Study Vignette in Group Career Construction Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Susan R.; Stoltz, Kevin B.

    2016-01-01

    Providing cost efficient, yet effective, student services, including career services, is a critical component in higher education. Career services must include the perspectives of the 21st-century work place. We advocate for the delivery of career development services in a group format using a narrative approach to career counseling with college…

  15. Career Awareness, Career Planning, and Career Transition Needs among Sports Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallee, David

    2006-01-01

    This study is conducted with 56 recently retired full-time sports coaches to examine the importance of career awareness, postsport career planning, and career transition needs. Results indicate that the individuals do not have a high level of career awareness, have done relatively little postsport career planning during their coaching careers, and…

  16. Integrating parts of the APhA Career Pathway Evaluation Program for pharmacy professionals into a career development lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Brooke A; Burton, Samantha J; Shepler, Brian M

    To use parts of the APhA Career Pathway Evaluation Program for Pharmacy Professionals in a career development laboratory designed to provide students with relevant information that will help them prepare for successful careers across the profession of pharmacy. Students enrolled in the second professional year of pharmacy school participated in an interactive three-hour career development laboratory. Students completed the APhA Career Pathway Evaluation Program for Pharmacy Professionals Online Assessment Tool prior to the laboratory. In class, the students were randomized into eight groups. Two career profiles were assigned to each group for discussion during a thirty-minute brainstorming session. The groups reported their knowledge for each career profile to the entire class, and the instructors supplemented the discussion with details and more specific information about each profile. Two years of data were collected (n=300 students). One hundred and twenty four (41.3%) students responded to the voluntary post-laboratory survey questions. Overall, students rated the career pathway activities favorably with an average score of 8.13 out of 10. After participation in the discussion, 74 (59.7%) respondents indicated their career interests had been impacted. This career development laboratory is one example of how the APhA Career Pathway Evaluation Program for Pharmacy Professionals can be effectively incorporated into the PharmD curriculum in order to help students explore the various career options they might not have otherwise discovered on their own. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. An Assessment of the Factors in Office Automation Systems Affecting Air Force Middle Managers and Clerical Workers in the Information Management Career Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    organization was important. Informal structures are present in all organizations and include values, ethical standards, taboos, and special relations...impression that the office of the future will evolve into a white collar sweatshop (Steinbrecher:8). This statement points out the basic problem of user

  18. Optometry: Careers with Vision. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Optometric Association, St. Louis, MO.

    This brochure gives basic facts about optometry which may be helpful in considering such a career. Included are a discussion as to what an optometrist is, the development of the profession, the need for practitioners projected by State to 1980, types of services rendered, and the variety of employment opportunities available. Over one-third of the…

  19. Careers in the Music Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Peter J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes jobs in the music industry, including instrument designer, sales representative, instrument repair-person, retail music sales-person, recording engineer, and careers in the new video music industry. Educational requirements, personal qualifications, and the advantages and disadvantages of each job are discussed. (AM)

  20. IB Offering Certificate for Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2012-01-01

    The International Baccalaureate (IB) organization, best known in the United States for its prestigious two-year diploma program for juniors and seniors, will enter new terrain this fall as it formally rolls out an initiative centered on a variety of career pathways that includes engineering, culinary arts, and automotive technology. The move comes…

  1. Are NCAA Division I Athletes Prepared for End-of-Athletic-Career Transition? A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lauren; Buttell, Frederick P

    2018-01-01

    This review focuses on research that specifically highlights the constructs, paradigms, and factors that impact the end-of-athletic-career transition. However, the majority of the research conducted around this topic is established outside of the United States and regarding professional athletes. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is one of the most dominant athletic institutions in the world, and arguably transitions the most end-of-athletic-career athletes per year, and minimal research exists on this specific collegiate athletic population. The purpose of this review is to review the existent literature on this topic and highlight the leading research and components impacting athletes during the end-of-athletic-career transition in order to inform future research and practices with the college athletics population. This review utilizes a Client Oriented Practical Evidence Search question as an Evidence Based Practice approach to guide the literature search and literature review process while identifying the leading research contributing to end-of-athletic-career transition. Following rigorous search criteria, a total of 14 articles were included in the literature review. The selected articles identified central constructs impacting the athletic career transition process, including retirement planning, identity loss, coping skills, and support systems. Additional research is warranted in the United States, particularly with the NCAA collegiate athletes in order to better understand the end-of-athletic-career transition process, as well as instituting interventions to increase resilience in college senior NCAA athletes transitioning out of sport.

  2. Studying historical occupational careers with multilevel growth models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke Schulz

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article we propose to study occupational careers with historical data by using multilevel growth models. Historical career data are often characterized by a lack of information on the timing of occupational changes and by different numbers of observations of occupations per individual. Growth models can handle these specificities, whereas standard methods, such as event history analyses can't. We illustrate the use of growth models by studying career success of men and women, using data from the Historical Sample of the Netherlands. The results show that the method is applicable to male careers, but causes trouble when analyzing female careers.

  3. Quality of referral: What information should be included in a request for diagnostic imaging when a patient is referred to a clinical radiologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    G Pitman, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    Referral to a clinical radiologist is the prime means of communication between the referrer and the radiologist. Current Australian and New Zealand government regulations do not prescribe what clinical information should be included in a referral. This work presents a qualitative compilation of clinical radiologist opinion, relevant professional recommendations, governmental regulatory positions and prior work on diagnostic error to synthesise recommendations on what clinical information should be included in a referral. Recommended requirements on what clinical information should be included in a referral to a clinical radiologist are as follows: an unambiguous referral; identity of the patient; identity of the referrer; and sufficient clinical detail to justify performance of the diagnostic imaging examination and to confirm appropriate choice of the examination and modality. Recommended guideline on the content of clinical detail clarifies when the information provided in a referral meets these requirements. High-quality information provided in a referral allows the clinical radiologist to ensure that exposure of patients to medical radiation is justified. It also minimises the incidence of perceptual and interpretational diagnostic error. Recommended requirements and guideline on the clinical detail to be provided in a referral to a clinical radiologist have been formulated for professional debate and adoption. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  4. Qualifying for Career Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Kovač

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The need for education in various spheres of life, which allows a person to fully develop his/her personality, is more and more presen t also in our society. The discussed educational programme Discovering Vocational Goals and Forming Strategies· to Realize them qualifies people for autonomous career planning by offer­ ing them one of the possible ways of making decisions in relation to profession and job. In the course of the realization of the programme the participants are given the chance to think about the kind of work that would suit their interests, capabilities and individual characteristics as weel as the needs in certain environments (possible employers. They are encouraged to make an actual plan, stating how and when the desired objective will be reached. In 1995 the pro­ gramme was being carried out within nine semi­ nars organized at the Employment Offices in Maribor and Ptuj. During that time the pro­ gramme has also been evaluated by Doba - Education Office, which was funded by the Ministry of Work, Family and Social Matters. The paper includes the content of the programme as well as the assessments of the research project. The presented data show that the participants learned the method of career planning and acqu­ired greater self-confidence and motivation to solve their job problem actively.

  5. Career drop outs of young elite athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Fišer

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The main problem of the study was to examine the characteristics of sports career drop outs of young elite sportswomen and their adaptation to the post-sport life. The sample included 20 ex-young elite sportswomen, who had brought their successful sport careers to an end before the age of 19. We used a modified interview about sports career termination (Cecić Erpič, 1998 for the investigation of the characteristics of their sports careers. To examine the caracteristics of sport careers we used frequency analysis and cluster analysis. The results showed that the participants mostly stated more than one reason for the termination of their career. The most common reasons for career termination were: lack of motivation, bad relations with trainers or co-competitors and dedication to school or education. After the end of a sports career most of the young sportswomen stayed actively in touch with sport, either as trainers, judges, or they remained engaged in sports for recreation.

  6. CAREER DEVELOPMENT OF TEXTILE INDUSTRY EMPLOYEES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    UROŠEVIĆ Snežana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Textile industry is a very important industrial branch because it produces clothes for nearly seven billion people and textile materials for technical usage. It employs a huge number of competitive and qualified, mostly female work force. It is also technologically and technically challenging. Thus, it is vital to employ qualified and well trained employees with certain competences, knowledge and skills in order to respond to rapid technological and market changes. Here, we will consider the influence of the career development on doing business in the textile industry while acquiring the competitive advantage. Career development is a lifelong process and it is includes knowledge management. The term career has several meanings while nowadays it can mean advancement. The career usually reflects the professional development path of an individual during his or her working career. The career is that concept which connects and unifies most strongly and explicitly individual and organizational interests and needs. The theoretical part explains terms such as career development, importance and improvement of employees for an organization, the possibility for career development within the textile industry. The second part of the paper deals with research conducted among the employees of the textile sector in Leskovac, the town in Serbia with a long-lasting textile tradition.

  7. Developing research career indicators using open data: the RISIS infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cañibano, C.; Woolley, R.; Iversen, E.; Hinze, S.; Hornbostel, S.; Tesch, J.

    2016-07-01

    This paper introduces the research infrastructure for rsearch and innovation policy studies (RISIS) and its ongoing work on the development of indicators for research careers. The paper first describes the rationale for developing an information system on research careers. It then uses and example to demonstratate the possibilities arising from aggregating open data from different datasets within the RISIS platform to create new information and monitoring possibilies with regard to research careers. (Author)

  8. The reciprocal dynamic model of career decision ambiguity tolerance with career indecision: A longitudinal three-wave investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Tracey, Terence J G

    2017-10-01

    The current study investigated the dynamic interplay of career decision ambiguity tolerance and career indecision over 3 assessment times in a sample of college students (n = 583). While the previous research has repeatedly shown an association of career decision ambiguity tolerance with career indecision, the direction of this association has not been adequately assessed with longitudinal investigation. It was hypothesized in this study that there is a reciprocal pattern of career decision ambiguity tolerance leading to subsequent career indecision and career indecision leading to subsequent career decision ambiguity tolerance. Using a cross-lagged panel design, this study found support for the reciprocal pattern that aversion to ambiguity led to increased negative affect and choice anxiety in career decision making, while negative affect and choice anxiety led to increased aversion to ambiguity. Additionally, this study revealed that aversion led to decreased readiness for career decision making and readiness for career decision making led to increased interests in new information. The key findings were discussed with respect to the theoretical and clinical implications for career counseling along with limitations and suggestions for future research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Association of preresidency peer-reviewed publications with radiation oncology resident choice of academic versus private practice career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Shearwood; Thomas, Charles R; Wilson, Lynn D; Holliday, Emma B; Jaboin, Jerry J

    The decision of radiation oncology residents to pursue academic versus private practice careers plays a central role in shaping the present and future of the field, but factors that are potentially predictive of this decision are lacking. This study was performed to examine the role of several factors publicly available before residency on postresidency career choice, including preresidency peer-reviewed publications (PRPs), which have been associated with resident career choice in comparably competitive subspecialties such as neurosurgery. Using a combination of Internet searches, telephone interviews, and the 2015 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology directory, a list of 2016 radiation oncology resident graduates was compiled, along with their postresidency career choice. PRP was defined as the number of PubMed publications encompassing the end of the calendar year (2010) in which residency applications were due; this number was then correlated with career choice. A total of 163 residents from 76 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-certified programs were examined: 78% were male, 22% were MDs/PhDs, and 79 graduates (48%) chose academic careers. Fifty-two percent of graduates had at least 1 PRP at the time of application to radiation oncology residency; 35% had more than 1 PRP. Regarding career choice, the difference between 0 and 1+ PRP was statistically significant (odds ratio, 3.3; P 1 PRP. Sex, PhD, or non-PhD dual degree status were not associated with career choice. Radiation oncology residency graduates with 1 or more PRPs at the time of residency application were roughly 2 times more likely to choose an academic career as their initial career choice than graduates with no preresidency PRPs. This information may prove useful to medical students, medical school advisors, and residency program directors and deserves further prospective investigation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier

  10. Defense Threat Reduction Agency > Careers > Onboarding > Onboarding

    Science.gov (United States)

    includes developing professional networks, identifying additional training and development opportunities , and celebrating accomplishments. Mission Personalization Networking Learning Career Development Basic and Applied Science Research Funding Opportunities Science of WMD Sensing and Recognition Network

  11. Good looks and good practice: the attitudes of career practitioners to attractiveness and appearance

    OpenAIRE

    Yates, Julia; Hooley, Tristram; Kaur Bagri, Kiren

    2016-01-01

    Empirical evidence attests the impact that career image has on objective career success, yet little is known of how career practitioners conceptualise and operationalise this information. This article presents the quantitative findings of an online survey of career practitioners (n = 399, 74% female, 89% white and 75% from the U.K.) exploring their attitudes and practices towards issues of appearance and attractiveness. Career practitioners who participated in this survey acknowledged that be...

  12. Use of Cognitive Therapy and the Balance Sheet Procedure to Assist Career Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, Marianne M.

    1989-01-01

    A balance sheet technique enables counselors to help clients identify and overcome anxiety associated with career decision making. Steps include describing the problem, brainstorming alternatives, listing expected positive and negative outcomes in terms of self and others, seeking information, and choosing alternatives. (SK)

  13. It's My Life! Career Paths for Young Women in Transition. Coordinator's Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, Carol; And Others

    This document is the coordinator's handbook for a four-day workshop for young women in transition from high school to two-year colleges. The program covers career information, self-awareness and skills assessment (with special regard for mathematics), the many roles of women, and decision making and planning. It includes large- and small-group…

  14. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Florida's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  15. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Arkansas' college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  16. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Minnesota's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  17. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Alaska's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  18. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on South Carolina's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  19. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Kentucky's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  20. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Georgia's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  1. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on North Dakota's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  2. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Alabama's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  3. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on New Mexico's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  4. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Tennessee's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  5. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on California's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  6. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on West Virginia's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  7. Radiation oncology career decision variables for graduating trainees seeking positions in 2003-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Lynn D.; Flynn, Daniel F.; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology trainees must consider an array of variables when deciding upon an academic or private practice career path. This prospective evaluation of the 2004 graduating radiation oncology trainees, evaluates such variables and provides additional descriptive data. Methods: A survey that included 15 questions (one subjective, eleven categorical, and 3 continuous variables) was mailed to the 144 graduating radiation oncology trainees in United States programs in January of 2004. Questions were designed to gather information regarding factors that may have influenced career path choices. The responses were anonymous, and no identifying information was sought. Survey data were collated and analyzed for differences in both categorical and continuous variables as they related to choice of academic or private practice career path. Results: Sixty seven (47%) of the surveys were returned. Forty-five percent of respondents indicated pursuit of an academic career. All respondents participated in research during training with 73% participating in research publication authorship. Post graduate year-3 was the median in which career path was chosen, and 20% thought that a fellowship position was 'perhaps' necessary to secure an academic position. Thirty percent of the respondents revealed that the timing of the American Board of Radiology examination influenced their career path decision. Eighteen variables were offered as possibly influencing career path choice within the survey, and the top five identified by those seeking an academic path were: (1) colleagues, (2) clinical research, (3) teaching, (4) geography, (5) and support staff. For those seeking private practice, the top choices were: (1) lifestyle, (2) practice environment, (3) patient care, (4) geography, (5) colleagues. Female gender (p = 0.064), oral meeting presentation (p = 0.053), and international meeting presentation (p 0.066) were the variables most significantly associated with pursuing an

  8. Radiation oncology career decision variables for graduating trainees seeking positions in 2003-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Lynn D [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Flynn, Daniel F [Department of Radiation Oncology, Holy Family Hospital, Methuen, MA (United States); Haffty, Bruce G [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology trainees must consider an array of variables when deciding upon an academic or private practice career path. This prospective evaluation of the 2004 graduating radiation oncology trainees, evaluates such variables and provides additional descriptive data. Methods: A survey that included 15 questions (one subjective, eleven categorical, and 3 continuous variables) was mailed to the 144 graduating radiation oncology trainees in United States programs in January of 2004. Questions were designed to gather information regarding factors that may have influenced career path choices. The responses were anonymous, and no identifying information was sought. Survey data were collated and analyzed for differences in both categorical and continuous variables as they related to choice of academic or private practice career path. Results: Sixty seven (47%) of the surveys were returned. Forty-five percent of respondents indicated pursuit of an academic career. All respondents participated in research during training with 73% participating in research publication authorship. Post graduate year-3 was the median in which career path was chosen, and 20% thought that a fellowship position was 'perhaps' necessary to secure an academic position. Thirty percent of the respondents revealed that the timing of the American Board of Radiology examination influenced their career path decision. Eighteen variables were offered as possibly influencing career path choice within the survey, and the top five identified by those seeking an academic path were: (1) colleagues, (2) clinical research, (3) teaching, (4) geography, (5) and support staff. For those seeking private practice, the top choices were: (1) lifestyle, (2) practice environment, (3) patient care, (4) geography, (5) colleagues. Female gender (p = 0.064), oral meeting presentation (p = 0.053), and international meeting presentation (p 0.066) were the variables most significantly associated with pursuing an

  9. Career Construction Materials: The Story of a Career Development Curriculum in a Turkish School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briddick, William C.; Sensoy-Briddick, Hande; Savickas, Suzanne

    2018-01-01

    The arrival of life design and in its advance challenged the field to refocus toward a more useful understanding of the lifelong process of career development including neglected areas within the field such as career development during childhood. Reviews of the literature reflect an ongoing neglect of the stage of childhood in this lifelong…

  10. The relationship between career competencies, career identity, motivation and quality of choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, Frans; Kuijpers, Marinka; Gundy, Chad

    2018-01-01

    In this article we focus on the effects of career education and guidance among students (ages 12–19) enrolled in prevocational and secondary vocational education in The Netherlands. Our study included 3,499 students and 166 teachers in 226 classes in 34 schools. The results showed that career

  11. The Relationship between Career Competencies, Career Identity, Motivation and Quality of Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijers, Frans; Kuijpers, Marinka; Gundy, Chad

    2013-01-01

    In this article we focus on the effects of career education and guidance among students (ages 12-19) enrolled in prevocational and secondary vocational education in The Netherlands. Our study included 3,499 students and 166 teachers in 226 classes in 34 schools. The results showed that career competencies positively contributed to learning…

  12. Social Justice and Career Development: Views and Experiences of Australian Career Development Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Mary; Arthur, Nancy; Collins, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Career development practice had its origins in social justice reform over 100 years ago. A social justice perspective requires practitioners to examine the environmental context of their work, including the social, economic and political systems that influence people's career development. Achieving socially just outcomes for clients may…

  13. What Schools Are Doing around Career Development: Implications for Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Justin C.; Wallace, Eric W.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the role that schools are playing in supporting career development for young people. It examines the history of career-related programming in schools, including school-to-work programs, career and technical education, the college and career readiness movement, and current school reform initiatives. This understanding of…

  14. Corrosion Control Specialist Career Ladder AFSC 53530, 53550, 53570, and 53690. Occupational Survey Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air Force Occupational Measurement Center, Lackland AFB, TX.

    The report describes the results of a detailed occupational survey of the corrosion control career ladder. Responses to a 457-task, time rating inventory from 1,015 personnel (representing 64 percent of the career field) were analyzed to produce seven specific findings and the career ladder structure. The career ladder includes a variety of jobs…

  15. Towards Understanding the Two Way Interaction Effects of Extraversion and Openness to Experience on Career Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Ridhi; Rangnekar, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examined potential two-way interaction effects of the Big Five personality traits extraversion and openness to experience on career commitment measured in terms of three components of career identity, career resilience, and career planning. Participants included 450 managers from public and private sector organizations in North…

  16. Career guidance in communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rie

    for the development of a critically reflexive career guidance practice. The considerations are organised around seven elements. 1. Creating opportunity, structure and access 2. Entering a community and increasing visibility 3. Providing guidance in communities 4. Exploring potentials in guidance situations 5...... in career guidance practices as well as in the lives of the people in the communities. This paper falls into two parts: The first part considers the collective as the starting point for the development of meaningful career guidance activities. Based on previous research on career guidance in communities......The aim of this paper is to inspire practitioners and professionals to leave their offices to bring career guidance into communities that might not identify with career guidance in the first instance. By making the effort to engage with communities, practitioners may bring about a critical change...

  17. The who, what, when, and how of choosing a dietetics career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordly, Daphne; Dubé, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    We describe factors influencing the career choices of students enrolled in Canadian dietetics programs. A survey was administered, in class or online, to core first- and fourth-year classes in seven dietetics programs in various provinces (n=397). Data were analyzed with the use of descriptive statistics. Chi-square testing for independence established significant relationships. Students ranked personal satisfaction, job security, and a professional career as important general career outcomes. These factors were also perceived to be attainable through a dietetics career. The majority of students chose dietetics while they were enrolled in a post-secondary degree program (44%), were primarily influenced by family members (54%), and based their choice on information acquired through the media (50%). Motivations for choosing dietetics included an interest in nutrition (91%) and health (90%), and a desire to help others (82%). Younger students placed more importance on economic rewards and having a position of authority than did older students. Older students identified personal satisfaction as more important in career selection than did younger students. Female respondents placed higher value on job flexibility than did their male counterparts. Career choice is based on a variety of internal and external factors. Opportunities exist for strategic recruitment efforts by educators and the profession.

  18. CAREER PLANS OF GRADUATES OF A CANADIAN DENTAL SCHOOL: PRELIMINARY REPORT OF A 5-YEAR SURVEY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Usama; Fairbanks, Connor; Flores-Mir, Carlos; Kilistoff, Alan; Easton, Rick

    2016-07-01

    Comprehensive data on the characteristics and opinions of graduating dental students in Canada are lacking. Specifically, only minimal information is available on graduates' immediate career plans and factors that may influence their decisions regarding these plans. Our aim was to gather such data to allow better understanding of this issue and improve the design of future studies on this topic. The Career Development Committee at the school of dentistry, University of Alberta, designed a short survey to be administered to graduating students over 5 years to gain insight into their immediate career plans and opinions on career services at the school. Preliminary results from 2012-2014 are reported here. With a response rate of close to 90% (n = 99/111), the data reveal considerable differences in immediate career plans between the surveyed students and those in other schools in Canada and the United States. Of the students, 89% were planning to work in a general dental practice and only 9% were planning to enroll in advanced education, including general practice residency training. More research is needed to better understand the factors affecting career path decisions of students.

  19. Evaluating Career Development Resources: Lessons from the Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, M.; Laursen, S. L.

    2010-12-01

    Retention of geoscientists throughout the professional pipeline is especially challenging in the case of groups that are already underrepresented in science, including racial minorities and women. The Earth Science Women’s Network (ESWN) is a professional network of early-career female geoscientists that provides its members with a variety of career resources, through both informal, online and in-person networking and formal career development workshops. The group’s members are of diverse nationalities and racial/ethnic backgrounds, of various age cohorts and career stages, but primarily graduate students, postdocs, and early-career researchers. With funding from an NSF ADVANCE grant to ESWN, we have conducted a detailed survey of ESWN members as part of an evaluation-with-research study that aims to determine the career needs of young geoscientists. The survey data provide information about members’ personal and professional situations, their professional development needs, and obstacles they face as young women scientists. ESWN members indicated a variety of areas of professional growth that would advance their scientific careers, but at all career stages, members chose expanding their professional networks as among their top career needs. Professional networking has established benefits for retention of people from groups underrepresented in science, including women: it introduces young scientists to career best practices and advancement opportunities, provides access to role models, and creates a sense of community. ESWN members strongly indicate that their professional networks benefited from their involvement with the Network. The community aspect of network-building is especially important for people from underrepresented groups, as they often feel alone due to the lack of role models. The intimate character of the ESWN discussion list greatly contributes to its members’ sense of community. Moreover, personal concerns and professional success are

  20. Career Path Suggestion using String Matching and Decision Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Akshay; P. Panda, Supriya

    2015-05-01

    High school and college graduates seemingly are often battling for the courses they should major in order to achieve their target career. In this paper, we worked on suggesting a career path to a graduate to reach his/her dream career given the current educational status. Firstly, we collected the career data of professionals and academicians from various career fields and compiled the data set by using the necessary information from the data. Further, this was used as the basis to suggest the most appropriate career path for the person given his/her current educational status. Decision trees and string matching algorithms were employed to suggest the appropriate career path for a person. Finally, an analysis of the result has been done directing to further improvements in the model.

  1. Effective career ladders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, B; Rabbitts, D; Shover, J; Torres, M; VanDerHeyden, B; Violand-Jones, S

    1992-01-01

    Motivation, quality improvement, productivity enhancement. These are just some of the benefits of an effective career ladder program. The key term here is effective. It is easy for laboratory personnel to stagnate professionally if they do not have a career ladder program, but it is even easier for them to become frustrated--even cynical--over a program that fails to live up to its expectations to encourage, support, and reward professional advancement. If you have been looking form some ideas to get your own career ladder program off the ground, the following responses from your colleagues may help as CLMR asks: What makes your career ladder program effective?

  2. Clinical Research Careers: Reports from a NHLBI Pediatric Heart Network Clinical Research Skills Development Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wyman W.; Richmond, Marc; Li, Jennifer S.; Saul, J. Philip; Mital, Seema; Colan, Steven D.; Newburger, Jane W.; Sleeper, Lynn A.; McCrindle, Brain W.; Minich, L. LuAnn; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Marino, Bradley S.; Williams, Ismee A.; Pearson, Gail D.; Evans, Frank; Scott, Jane D.; Cohen, Meryl S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Wyman W. Lai, MD, MPH, and Victoria L. Vetter, MD, MPH. The Pediatric Heart Network (PHN), funded under the U.S. National Institutes of Health-National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NIH–NHLBI), includes two Clinical Research Skills Development (CRSD) Cores, which were awarded to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and to the Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of New York–Presbyterian. To provide information on how to develop a clinical research career to a larger number of potential young investigators in pediatric cardiology, the directors of these two CRSD Cores jointly organized a one-day seminar for fellows and junior faculty from all of the PHN Core sites. The participants included faculty members from the PHN and the NHLBI. The day-long seminar was held on April 29, 2009, at the NHLBI site, immediately preceding the PHN Steering Committee meeting in Bethesda, MD. Methods The goals of the seminar were 1) to provide fellows and early investigators with basic skills in clinical research 2) to provide a forum for discussion of important research career choices 3) to introduce attendees to each other and to established clinical researchers in pediatric cardiology, and 4) to publish a commentary on the future of clinical research in pediatric cardiology. Results The following chapters are compilations of the talks given at the 2009 PHN Clinical Research Skills Development Seminar, published to share the information provided with a broader audience of those interested in learning how to develop a clinical research career in pediatric cardiology. The discussions of types of clinical research, research skills, career development strategies, funding, and career management are applicable to research careers in other areas of clinical medicine as well. Conclusions The aim of this compilation is to stimulate those who might be interested in the research career options available to investigators. PMID:21167335

  3. Getting Started in Academic Careers: On the Cutting Edge Resources for Graduate Students, Postdoctoral Fellows, and Early Career Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, R.; Ormand, C.; Manduca, C. A.; Wright-Dunbar, R.; Allen-King, R.

    2007-12-01

    The professional development program,'On the Cutting Edge', offers on-line resources and annual multi-day workshops for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in pursuing academic careers. Pre- workshop surveys reveal that early career faculty, post-docs, and graduate students have many questions about teaching (e.g., what are effective teaching strategies, how to design a course, how to prepare a syllabus, how to teach large courses), research (e.g., initiate and fund future research, set up and manage a lab, obtain equipment), and career management (e.g., understand tenure requirements, balance all it all). The graduate students and post-docs also have questions about jobs and the job search process. Their questions show a lack of familiarity with the nature of academic positions at different kinds of educational institutions (two-year colleges, primarily undergraduate institutions, and research universities). In particular, they are uncertain about what educational setting will best fit their values and career goals and how teaching loads and research expectations vary by institution. Common questions related to the job search process include where to find job listings (the most common question in recent years), when to start the job search process, how to stand out as an applicant, and how to prepare for interviews. Both groups have questions about how to develop new skills: how to develop, plan and prepare a new course (without it taking all of their time), how to expand beyond their PhD (or postdoc) research projects, how to develop a research plan, and where to apply for funding. These are important topics for advisors to discuss with all of their students and postdocs who are planning on careers in academia. On the Cutting Edge offers workshops and web resources to help current and future faculty navigate these critical stages of their careers. The four-day workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your

  4. A Qualitative Study of the Influences on Clinical Academic Physicians' Postdoctoral Career Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Veronica F; Barratt, Helen; Rees, Geraint; Fulop, Naomi J

    2018-01-23

    To describe the influences on clinical academic physicians' postdoctoral career decision-making. Thirty-five doctoral trainee physicians from University College London took part in semi-structured interviews in 2015 and 2016. Participants were asked open-ended questions about their career to-date, their experiences undertaking a PhD, and their career plans post-PhD. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Thematic analysis was used to generate, review, and define themes from the transcripts. Emerging differences and similarities in participants' reasons for pursuing a PhD were then grouped to produce typologies to explore how their experiences influenced their career decision-making. Participants described four key reasons for undertaking a PhD, which formed the basis of the four typologies identified. These reasons included: to pursue a clinical academic career; to complete an extensive period of research to understand whether a clinical academic career was the desired path forward; to improve clinical career prospects; and to take a break from clinical training. These findings highlight the need to target efforts at retaining clinical academic physicians according to their reasons for pursuing a PhD and their subsequent experiences with the process. Those responsible for overseeing clinical training must be well-informed of the long-term benefits of training academically-qualified physicians. In light of current political uncertainty, universities, hospitals, and external agencies alike must increase their efforts to inspire and assuage early-career clinical academic physicians' fears regarding their academic future.This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CCBY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  5. Burnout and career satisfaction among American surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanafelt, Tait D; Balch, Charles M; Bechamps, Gerald J; Russell, Thomas; Dyrbye, Lotte; Satele, Daniel; Collicott, Paul; Novotny, Paul J; Sloan, Jeff; Freischlag, Julie A

    2009-09-01

    To determine the incidence of burnout among American surgeons and evaluate personal and professional characteristics associated with surgeon burnout. : Burnout is a syndrome of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization that leads to decreased effectiveness at work. A limited amount of information exists about the relationship between specific demographic and practice characteristics with burnout among American surgeons. Members of the American College of Surgeons (ACS) were sent an anonymous, cross-sectional survey in June 2008. The survey evaluated demographic variables, practice characteristics, career satisfaction, burnout, and quality of life (QOL). Burnout and QOL were measured using validated instruments. Of the approximately 24,922 surgeons sampled, 7905 (32%) returned surveys. Responders had been in practice 18 years, worked 60 hours per week, and were on call 2 nights/wk (median values). Overall, 40% of responding surgeons were burned out, 30% screened positive for symptoms of depression, and 28% had a mental QOL score >1/2 standard deviation below the population norm. Factors independently associated with burnout included younger age, having children, area of specialization, number of nights on call per week, hours worked per week, and having compensation determined entirely based on billing. Only 36% of surgeons felt their work schedule left enough time for personal/family life and only 51% would recommend their children pursue a career as a physician/surgeon. Burnout is common among American surgeons and is the single greatest predictor of surgeons' satisfaction with career and specialty choice. Additional research is needed to identify individual, organizational, and societal interventions that preserve and promote the mental health of American surgeons.

  6. The influence of career orientations on subjective work experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinde Coetzee

    2010-11-01

    Research purpose: The study empirically assessed the causal influence of individuals’ career orientations on their perceived life satisfaction, job or career satisfaction, sense of happiness and their perceptions of work as a valuable activity as aspects of their subjective work experiences. Motivation for study: From an organisational perspective, research on individuals’ inner definitions of career success and satisfaction is needed to guide current selection, placement, development, reward and retention practices. Research design, approach and method: A quantitative survey was conducted on a random sample of 2997 participants at predominantly managerial and supervisory level in the service industry. The measuring instruments consisted of an adapted five-factor career orientations model of the Career Orientations Inventory and a 4-item global subjective work experiences scale. Structural equation modelling (SEM was conducted to achieve the aim of the study. Main findings/results: Statistically significant causal relationships were observed between the career orientations and subjective work experiences variables. Practical implications: Individuals’ career orientations influence their general sense of life and job or career satisfaction, happiness and perceptions of work as a valuable activity. Organisations concerned with the retention of staff need to find a way of aligning individuals’ career needs and motives with the goals and aspirations of the organisation. Contribution/value-add: The research confirms the need for assessing the inner career orientations of employees as these provide valuable information regarding the motives and values driving individuals’ career decision making and subjective experiences of their working lives.

  7. Card Sort Technique in Vocational Guidance/Career Counseling: Pilot Study about Career Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülin ACAR

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to develop and to pilot a not-test technique for assessing career and work values. This instrument was developed during a Career Counseling course taught by one of the authors of this paper. The first stage of development was the generation of a master list of career and work values, as reflected in the current literature related to theories and vocational research. From this master list 38 career values were selected resulting in the final deck that was used in testing. This deck of cards was given the name Career Values Cards (MEDEK and administered to a total of 75 high school students. Following administration each of the subjects was asked to complete a MEDEK evaluation form designed to assess reactions to the MEDEK experience. Results of the survey indicated that the MEDEK was an easy-to-use, understandable, and enjoyable technique to increase self-awareness and enhance insight, and a source of important information for students engaged in career counseling and career development by enhancing personal identification of personal career and work values.

  8. Health Inequality and Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Structural explanations of career choice and development are well established. Socioeconomic inequality represents a powerful factor shaping career trajectories and economic outcomes achieved by individuals. However, a robust and growing body of evidence demonstrates a strong link between socioeconomic inequality and health outcomes. Work is a key…

  9. Procurement Career Management Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of the Treasury, Washington, DC.

    This handbook is the result of the Treasury Department's efforts to increase professionalism among its procurement employees nationwide through its Procurement Career Management Program. First, the scope and objectives of the Procurement Career Management Program are discussed. The remaining sections of the handbook deal with the following program…

  10. TRIANGULATION OF METHODS OF CAREER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Turnsek Mikacic

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an overview of the current research in the field of career education and career planning. Presented results constitute a model based on the insight into different theories and empirical studies about career planning as a building block of personal excellence. We defined credibility, transferability and reliability of the research by means of triangulation. As sources of data of triangulation we included essays of participants of education and questionnaires. Qualitative analysis represented the framework for the construction of the paradigmatic model and the formulation of the final theory. We formulated a questionnaire on the basis of our own experiences in the area of the education of individuals. The quantitative analysis, based on the results of the interviews, confirms the following three hypotheses: The individuals who elaborated a personal career plan and acted accordingly, changed their attitudes towards their careers and took control over their lives; in addition, they achieved a high level of self-esteem and self-confidence, in tandem with the perception of personal excellence, in contrast to the individuals who did not participate in career education and did not elaborate a career plan. We used the tools of NLP (neurolinguistic programming as an additional technique at learning.

  11. Studi Tentang Work Life Balance dan Kepuasan Karir Pekerja Wanita di Jakarta [A Study of Work-Life Balance and Career Satisfaction of Working Women in Jakarta

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvia Diana Purba; Levi Nilawati

    2015-01-01

    This research proposes to find out the influence of availability of career information on career satisfaction of career woman in Jakarta, Participants in this study are 199 women, consist of lecturers, doctors, police women, bank employees, etc. Work-life balance, awareness of organizational plans for self, and match between individual and organizational career plans are used as mediating variables on the impact of availability of career information toward career satisfaction. Research findin...

  12. [Structure and career advancement in cardiology in Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modena, M G; Molinari, R; Lalla, M

    1999-03-01

    Women are less present on the labor market and many studies have demonstrated the existence of gender differences regarding participation rate and career advancement of women. The process through which job-, career- and research-related choices are structured within the realm of Italian cardiology, is described in this study emphasizing the effects of productivity, gender and family commitments. In June 1996, a questionnaire was mailed to all members of the Italian societies of cardiology. It included mainly (pre-coded) set-choice questions concerning individual characteristics, career-related data, and information pertaining to teaching, scientific and research activity. Returned questionnaires numbered 1715 (21.4% of the total mailed), 83% were completed by males and 17% by females. For both hospital and academic careers, advancement in rank was influenced by variables denoting productivity, family and individual characteristics. Promotion to the upper ranks of the hierarchy was highly dependent upon time (once the effects of the covariates were eliminated). This is a situation that is typical of the internal labor market, that is, of an institution in which staff members are ranked on a hierarchical scale according to formal criteria that are "rigid" and institutionalized, partially and totally sheltered from competition. Therefore, once a member has gained access to the first level of the hierarchy, his/her professional career is to a certain extent pre-determined and the seniority ends up taking on importance in promotion decisions to an appreciable extent; in this field, the weight of seniority on promotion ranges between 30 and 50%.

  13. Career profiles in the oilsands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, C.G.

    2009-07-15

    This career profile provided details of the owner of Detector Dog Services International, a company that uses trained dogs to detect drugs in oil and gas operations. When drugs are detected, the camp manager is informed, and personnel are then required to complete a rehabilitation program. Belgian shepherds, Labrador retrievers, and springer spaniels are used. The dogs are sometimes selected from the local animal protection service and are trained using kits containing controlled substances used by Health Canada for drug detector training purposes. The dogs are typically trained for a period of 4 weeks. It was concluded that a knowledge of law and human rights is required for personnel interested in drug detection careers. Individuals with law enforcement backgrounds are also preferred. 1 fig.

  14. The experiences of clients and healthcare providers regarding the provision of reproductive health services including the prevention of HIV and AIDS in an informal settlement in Tshwane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L.S. Mataboge

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Globally challenges regarding healthcare provision are sometimes related to a failure to estimate client numbers in peri-urban areas due to rapid population growth. About one-sixth of the world's population live in informal settlements which are mostly characterised by poor healthcare service provision. Poor access to primary healthcare may expose residents of informal settlement more to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS than their rural and urban counterparts due to a lack of access to information on prevention, early diagnosis and treatment. The objective of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of both the reproductive health services' clients and the healthcare providers with regard to the provision of reproductive health services including the prevention of HIV and AIDS in a primary healthcare setting in Tshwane. A qualitative, exploratory and contextual design using a phenomenological approach to enquire about the participants' experiences was implemented. Purposive sampling resulted in the selection of 23 clients who used the reproductive healthcare services and ten healthcare providers who were interviewed during individual and focus group interviews respectively. Tesch's method for qualitative data analysis was used. Ethical principles guided the study, and certain strategies were followed to ensure trustworthiness. The findings revealed that females who lived in informal settlements were aware of the inability of the PHC setting to provide adequate reproductive healthcare to meet their needs. The HCPs acknowledged that healthcare provision was negatively affected by policies. It was found that the community members could be taught how to coach teenagers and support each other in order to bridge staff shortages and increase health outcomes including HIV/AIDS prevention.

  15. The experiences of clients and healthcare providers regarding the provision of reproductive health services including the prevention of HIV and AIDS in an informal settlement in Tshwane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L.S. Mataboge

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Globally challenges regarding healthcare provision are sometimes related to a failure to estimate client numbers in peri-urban areas due to rapid population growth. About one-sixth of the world's population live in informal settlements which are mostly characterised by poor healthcare service provision. Poor access to primary healthcare may expose residents of informal settlement more to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS than their rural and urban counterparts due to a lack of access to information on prevention, early diagnosis and treatment. The objective of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of both the reproductive health services' clients and the healthcare providers with regard to the provision of reproductive health services including the prevention of HIV and AIDS in a primary healthcare setting in Tshwane. A qualitative, exploratory and contextual design using a phenomenological approach to enquire about the participants' experiences was implemented. Purposive sampling resulted in the selection of 23 clients who used the reproductive healthcare services and ten healthcare providers who were interviewed during individual and focus group interviews respectively. Tesch's method for qualitative data analysis was used. Ethical principles guided the study, and certain strategies were followed to ensure trustworthiness. The findings revealed that females who lived in informal settlements were aware of the inability of the PHC setting to provide adequate reproductive healthcare to meet their needs. The HCPs acknowledged that healthcare provision was negatively affected by policies. It was found that the community members could be taught how to coach teenagers and support each other in order to bridge staff shortages and increase health outcomes including HIV/AIDS prevention.

  16. A factor analytic study of adult career concerns, career status and career resilience

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    D. Litt. et Phil. Factor analytic techniques were used to investigate the psychometric properties of three measuring instruments, namely the Adult Career Concerns Inventory (Super, Thompson & Lindeman, 1988), the Career Attitudes and Strategies Inventory (Holland & Gottfredson, 1994), and the Career Resilience Questionnaire (Fourie & Van Vuuren, 1998). The analyses served the purpose of elucidating the conceptual meanings of the constructs of career concerns, career status and career resil...

  17. Managing Career Development in the Not for Profit Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Maher, Chi

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a report on a pilot study that was conducted to inform a DBA research project. It will investigate employee perceptions of their career development in the not-for-profit (NFP) sector. Theoretical and empirically based literature searches were conducted on career development for this study. Some researchers argue that the old career model (which involves an employee working for an organisation and committed to the organisation and in turn, the organisation offers the employ...

  18. Career Decision-making of Women's Junior College Students and Career Guidance : An Examination of Self-growth Motivation and Career Decision-making Self-efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    泉水, 清志; Sensui, Kiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine effects of career decision-making by measuring self-growth motivation and career decision-making self-efficacy of women's junior college students, and to examine career guidance in junior college. A questionnaire was administered to 397, including 286 qualification major and 111 general education major, with women's junior college students. Results showed that self-growth motivation was higher with second-year and general education major students, that...

  19. Social Cognitive Career Theory and Middle School Student Career Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickinger, Pamela H.

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of social cognitive career theory, social cognitive career variables, demographic variables, and the contextual variable, parent support, were examined to determine their predictive value for eighth-grade students' career exploration behavior. Results suggest that the social cognitive career variable, intentions/goals,…

  20. A REFLECTION ON UNIVERSITY STUDIES AND FURTHER CAREER DEVELOPMENT OF CHOSEN CULS FACULTIES’ GRADUATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymešová, Pavla

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is focused on professional orientation and direction of the careers of graduates of Faculty of Economics and Management (FEM and Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources (FAFNR at Czech University of Life Sciences Prague (CULS. The general information and theoretical part is devoted to the topic of career, its concept and definition, and it deals with chosen determinants of career orientation and career development. The concept of career is considered within the sphere of specialized terminology mainly used in humanities disciplines, it defines subjective and objective career. Moreover, the concepts of life developmental tasks and career maturity are being mapped. The existence of typical stages of development is also discussed, for which there are typical qualitative differences on the level of information, in relation to a given profession and in motivation towards the profession (with regard to the stage that includes university studies. Significant influence of objective and situational factors, which interfere with career orientation and the choice of a profession, is further included. A look at a person’s personality with respect to the determinants of career orientation and career development also forms a part of the general information part. In its first part of the empirical section, the article is focused on the concept and definition of career from the beginning of the 1990s. This includes the views of Czech as well as foreign authors. In the second part, the article tries to present practical consequences of students’ career orientation and it deals with processing an estimate whether the observed faculties’ graduates remain working in the field related to what they studied within five years from graduation. A part of the study is also formed by a description of the main motives leading to choosing a profession during university studies. The chosen attributes were monitored among a selected group of

  1. Adolescents' perceptions of flavored tobacco products, including E-cigarettes: A qualitative study to inform FDA tobacco education efforts through videogames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camenga, D R; Fiellin, L E; Pendergrass, T; Miller, Erica; Pentz, M A; Hieftje, K

    2018-07-01

    Flavored tobacco products have been shown to appeal to youth, however tobacco control strategies have traditionally not focused on these products. To inform the adaptation of an existing videogame to focus on the prevention of flavored tobacco product use, this study explored adolescents' perceptions, beliefs, and social norms surrounding these products, including flavored e-cigarettes. We conducted and analyzed transcripts from seven focus groups with 11-17-year-old adolescents (n = 33) from after-school programs in CT and CA in 2016. Participants discussed flavored tobacco product beliefs and experiences, and how these compared to traditional cigarettes. Thematic analysis of transcripts revealed that participants could name flavors in tobacco products, even though few discussed first-hand experience with the products. Most groups perceived that flavored tobacco product and flavored e-cigarette use facilitated peer approval and acceptance. All groups discussed how youth could easily access flavored tobacco products, including e-cigarettes. Flavoring was a salient aspect of e-cigarette advertisements; however the groups did not recall exposure to other types of flavored tobacco product counter-marketing. These data can help inform the development of tobacco control strategies, novel interventions (such as videogames), and future FDA efforts to prevent adolescent tobacco product use through education and risk communication. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Healthcare organization-education partnerships and career ladder programs for health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Janette S; Chuang, Emmeline; Morgan, Jennifer C

    2014-12-01

    Increasing concerns about quality of care and workforce shortages have motivated health care organizations and educational institutions to partner to create career ladders for frontline health care workers. Career ladders reward workers for gains in skills and knowledge and may reduce the costs associated with turnover, improve patient care, and/or address projected shortages of certain nursing and allied health professions. This study examines partnerships between health care and educational organizations in the United States during the design and implementation of career ladder training programs for low-skill workers in health care settings, referred to as frontline health care workers. Mixed methods data from 291 frontline health care workers and 347 key informants (e.g., administrators, instructors, managers) collected between 2007 and 2010 were analyzed using both regression and fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (QCA). Results suggest that different combinations of partner characteristics, including having an education leader, employer leader, frontline management support, partnership history, community need, and educational policies, were necessary for high worker career self-efficacy and program satisfaction. Whether a worker received a wage increase, however, was primarily dependent on leadership within the health care organization, including having an employer leader and employer implementation policies. Findings suggest that strong partnerships between health care and educational organizations can contribute to the successful implementation of career ladder programs, but workers' ability to earn monetary rewards for program participation depends on the strength of leadership support within the health care organization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Research on the evaluation indicators of skilled employees’ career success based on grounded theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulei Chu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: summarized and sorted career success evaluation indicators of skilled employees Design/methodology/approach: Based on Grounded Theory, through interviews and questionnaires to railway skilled employees Findings and Originality/value: the study shows that “subjective career success”, including work-family balance, life satisfaction, career satisfaction, perception of career success, “objective career success”, including level of total revenue venue, growth rate of wage and times of promotion, “knowledge and skills career success” including upgrade of knowledge and skills, classification of skills, external competitiveness and job autonomy, are three important career success evaluation indicators of skilled employees. Originality/value: The results show that different age groups, different titles and different positions of skilled employees, there is a significant difference in the choice of career success evaluation indicators. It provides a useful reference to establish a career development system for the skilled employees.

  4. Survey of Retired Military Pharmacist's Transition to a Civilian Pharmacy Career Path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, David; Wellman, Greg; Mahmood, Maysaa; Freye, Ryan; Remund, Daniel; Samples, Phil L

    2015-12-01

    To explore variables relevant to transition to civilian pharmacy career path for retiring military pharmacists. A cross-sectional survey was designed to collect information from retired military pharmacists including demographics, military service information, postretirement employment and perceptions of transition, satisfaction, level of responsibility, work environment, rewards (level of financial compensation, opportunities for professional development and career advancement, health benefits), and level of supervisory support. The questionnaire also included additional items asking about their perception of their military experience, transition to civilian work and the impact the military career had on their personal and family life. Respondents included 140 retired pharmacists from the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, or Coast Guard. Factors found to be significant predictors of transition to civilian career included: bureaucracy in current job, time elapsed since retirement, extent to which an individual misses military structure and chain of command, access to military facilities and Veterans Administration benefits, and reporting little or no stress in committed long-term personal relationship while in the military. Findings suggest that the majority of retired military pharmacists perceived the transition to civilian professional sector was about what they expected or easier than expected. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  5. Career Exploration among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Ghosh, Arpita; Chang, Wen-hsin; Figueiredo, Catia; Bachhuber, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    College is a significant time for undergraduates to declare majors and choose career paths. For many undergraduates, choosing both a major and a career path is challenging. Research shows that many universities deliver career interventions through dedicated career decision-making courses (Mead & Korschgen, 1994). However, there has been…

  6. Dimensionality of Women's Career Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Sandra J.; Wijting, Jan P.

    1982-01-01

    Factor analysis of data from two samples identified nine indices of women's career orientation. Two factors accounted for significant variance common to the indices: career centeredness, which reflects the importance attached to a career relative to other life activities, and career commitment, which implies a commitment to lifetime employment.…

  7. Role Induction in Career Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Kantamneni, Neeta; Chen, Yung-Lung; Novakovic, Alexandra; Guillen, Amy; Priester, Paul E.; Henry, Caroline; Terry, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Many vocational psychologists advocate addressing career as well as personal concerns in career counseling. However, some clients may have inappropriate expectations toward career counseling and may not be prepared or want to discuss personal issues. This study examined whether perceptions of the career counseling process could be modified with…

  8. ‘AN INCREDIBLY STEEP HILL:’ HOW GENDER, RACE, AND CLASS SHAPE PERSPECTIVES ON ACADEMIC CAREERS AMONG BEGINNING BIOMEDICAL PHD STUDENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Christine V.; Campbell, Patricia B.; McGee, Richard

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyzes perspectives on academic careers among 60 beginning PhD students in the biomedical sciences. It presents seven perspectives on academic careers articulated by the students in the sample and explains the way that race/ethnicity, gender, and students’ family education backgrounds are tied to those perspectives. The findings show that traditionally underrepresented students find the academic career path less navigable than students from well-represented groups. Among underrepresented students, even those from higher family education backgrounds, experiences related to race/ethnicity and gender often inform perceptions of the academic career even before they start their graduate research training. As the composition of the graduate population changes to include more women and underrepresented racial and ethnic minority men, it is important to note that not all graduate students enter with the same perspectives and views of the academic career and that there are meaningful differences in perspectives across demographic lines. Graduate programs can play a critical role in providing information and support for graduate students as they navigate their career choices, particularly at the earliest stages of training. By becoming sensitive to students’ perspectives on career options, and understanding how differences in perspectives arise, mentors and others can align advising strategies with the experiences and views of students. PMID:28239250

  9. Studi Tentang Work Life Balance dan Kepuasan Karir Pekerja Wanita di Jakarta [A Study of Work-Life Balance and Career Satisfaction of Working Women in Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Diana Purba

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This research proposes to find out the influence of availability of career information on career satisfaction of career woman in Jakarta, Participants in this study are 199 women, consist of lecturers, doctors, police women, bank employees, etc. Work-life balance, awareness of organizational plans for self, and match between individual and organizational career plans are used as mediating variables on the impact of availability of career information toward career satisfaction. Research finding shows that work-life balance and awareness of organizational plans have no significant effects as mediating variables on the impact of the availability of career information toward career satisfaction. Meanwhile, the match between individual and organizational career plans have a significant effect as a weak mediating variable. Work-life balance issues seem not to be a concern informing career satisfaction among career women in Indonesia.

  10. Work Life Stress and Career Resilience of Licensed Nursing Facility Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Dennis R; Rogers, Rob; LeCrone, Harold H; Kelley, Katherine; Scott, Joel H

    2018-04-01

    Career resilience provided a frame for understanding how Licensed Nursing Facility Administrators (LNFAs) sustain role performance and even thrive in stressful skilled nursing facility work environments. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of in-depth interviews with18 LNFAs, averaging 24 years of experience were conducted by a five-member research team. Analysis was informed by evidence-based frameworks for career resilience in the health professions as well as the National Association of Long-Term Care Administrator Boards' (NAB) five domains of competent administrative practice. Findings included six sources of work stressors and six sources of professional satisfaction. Also, participants identified seven strategic principles and 10 administrative practices for addressing major sources of stress. Recommendations are provided for research and evidence-based application of the career resilience perspective to LNFA practice aimed at reducing role abandonment and energizing the delivery of the quality of care that each resident deserves.

  11. Athletes’ careers across cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryba, Tatiana; Stambulova, Natalia

    This symposium will introduce a project developed under the auspices of the International Society of Sport Psychology (ISSP) in an effort to inspire and support the development of culturally sensitive theoretical frameworks and research methodologies in career studies and career assistance services...... around the world. The cultural approach to the theory and practice of sport psychological research has been recently articulated in two edited books, Cultural Sport Psychology (Schinke & Hanrahan, 2009) and The Cultural Turn in Sport Psychology (Ryba, Schinke, & Tenenbaum, 2010). The presenters...... in this symposium continue the initiated dialogue of the relevance of culture and cultural issues in their analyses of how social and cultural discourses shape career development and career transitions of athletes in different countries. Opening the foundations of sport psychological knowledge to culturally diverse...

  12. Composing and Arranging Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Elliott; And Others

    1977-01-01

    With the inspiration, the originality, the skill and craftsmanship, the business acumen, the patience, and the luck, it's possible to become a classical composer, pop/rock/country composer, jingle composer, or educational composer. Describes these careers. (Editor/RK)

  13. A smashing career choice

    CERN Multimedia

    Battersby, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    "There's more diversity in physics careers than you might think. Stephen Battersby talks to three very different phsicists, all doing their bit to help us learn more about the world we live in." (2 pages)

  14. Career and Technical Education at a Crossroads: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutright, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    Career and technical education in the United States has reached a critical juncture. A three round Delphi method was used to determine a consensus on the future events of career and technical education to better inform educational decision makers. Forty-one individual experts in the field were invited to serve as panelists for the Delphi study and…

  15. Careers in Fashion. Teacher Edition. Marketing Education LAPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Jana

    This learning activity packet is designed to help students to acquire a competency, namely: how to use knowledge of careers in the fashion industry to gain information about their career choices. The unit consists of the competency, three objectives, suggested learning activities, transparency masters, handout materials for activities, and a…

  16. Knowing the Community: Women Planning Careers in Educational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperandio, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Women aspiring to be principals and superintendents in the U.S. public school system have little information concerning optimum career paths to leadership. This article considers recent research and theory regarding career planning in the context of K-12 schools, and the different approaches adopted by male and female aspirants. The choice of…

  17. Putting Action Back into Action Planning: Experiences of Career Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgen, William A.; Maglio, Asa-Sophia T.

    2007-01-01

    This study used the critical incident technique to investigate what helped and hindered unemployed and career-changing people in implementing the action plans they developed while participating in career or employment counseling. Information from interviews with 23 women and 16 men generated 9 categories of helping incidents and 9 categories of…

  18. Studying historical occupational careers with multilevel growth models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, W.; Maas, I.

    2010-01-01

    In this article we propose to study occupational careers with historical data by using multilevel growth models. Historical career data are often characterized by a lack of information on the timing of occupational changes and by different numbers of observations of occupations per individual.

  19. Career Anchors: Results of an Organisational Study in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnall, Jane

    1998-01-01

    Career anchors of 374 British employees were identified using Schein's questionnaire. Age, gender, and length of service had no significant effect on distribution of anchors. Job level had some relationship. The information could be used to determine appropriate career-development strategies. (SK)

  20. Future Careers in Geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vink, G. E.; van der Vink, G. E.

    2001-05-01

    A new generation of Geoscientists are abandoning the traditional pathways of oil exploration and academic research to pursue careers in public policy, international affairs, business, education and diplomacy. They are using their backgrounds in Geoscience to address challenging, multi-disciplinary problems of societal concern. To prepare for such careers, students are developing a broad understanding of science and a basic literacy in economics, international affairs, and policy-making.

  1. Effectiveness of a structured motivational intervention including smoking cessation advice and spirometry information in the primary care setting: the ESPITAP study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin-Lujan Francisco

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is current controversy about the efficacy of smoking cessation interventions that are based on information obtained by spirometry. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness in the primary care setting of structured motivational intervention to achieve smoking cessation, compared with usual clinical practice. Methods Design Multicentre randomized clinical trial with an intervention and a control group. Setting 12 primary care centres in the province of Tarragona (Spain. Subjects of study 600 current smokers aged between 35 and 70 years with a cumulative habit of more than 10 packs of cigarettes per year, attended in primary care for any reason and who did not meet any of the exclusion criteria for the study, randomly assigned to structured intervention or standard clinical attention. Intervention Usual advice to quit smoking by a general practitioner as well as a 20-minute personalized visit to provide detailed information about spirometry results, during which FEV1, FVC, FEF 25-75% and PEF measurements were discussed and interpreted in terms of theoretical values. Additional information included the lung age index (defined as the average age of a non-smoker with the same FEV1 as the study participant, comparing this with the chronological age to illustrate the pulmonary deterioration that results from smoking. Measurements Spirometry during the initial visit. Structured interview questionnaire administered at the primary care centre at the initial visit and at 12-month follow-up. Telephone follow-up interview at 6 months. At 12-month follow-up, expired CO was measured in patients who claimed to have quit smoking. Main variables Smoking cessation at 12 months. Analysis Data will be analyzed on the basis of "intention to treat" and the unit of analysis will be the individual smoker. Expected results Among active smokers treated in primary care we anticipate significantly higher smoking cessation in the

  2. Carolinas Energy Career Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classens, Anver; Hooper, Dick; Johnson, Bruce

    2013-03-31

    Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC), located in Charlotte, North Carolina, established the Carolinas Energy Career Center (Center) - a comprehensive training entity to meet the dynamic needs of the Charlotte region's energy workforce. The Center provides training for high-demand careers in both conventional energy (fossil) and renewable energy (nuclear and solar technologies/energy efficiency). CPCC completed four tasks that will position the Center as a leading resource for energy career training in the Southeast: • Development and Pilot of a New Advanced Welding Curriculum, • Program Enhancement of Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) Technology, • Student Support through implementation of a model targeted toward Energy and STEM Careers to support student learning, • Project Management and Reporting. As a result of DOE funding support, CPCC achieved the following outcomes: • Increased capacity to serve and train students in emerging energy industry careers; • Developed new courses and curricula to support emerging energy industry careers; • Established new training/laboratory resources; • Generated a pool of highly qualified, technically skilled workers to support the growing energy industry sector.

  3. Early career professionals: the mission of a task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, G D; Lauw, M N

    2016-07-01

    Early career researchers and clinicians face unique challenges in comparison with more senior colleagues, for instance connecting with expert leaders outside of their own institution to enhance their expertise. As the largest international thrombosis and hemostasis professional society, the ISTH can play a central role in supporting the development of early career professionals. The ISTH Early Career Task Force was formed to improve support for, and encourage collaboration between early career thrombosis and hemostasis researchers and clinicians. These activities include (1) maintaining an online forum for early career ISTH members to connect, promote clinical, research, funding and educational activities, and to generate a sense of community; (2) broaden ISTH's reach with early career professionals in the developing world through promotion of the Reach-the-World fellowships and translating ISTH websites into six languages; (3) encourage early career engagement with ISTH activities, such as guidelines and guidance document processing and online webinar series; and (4) establishing this early career forum series in this journal. The JTH Forum series will highlight the early career perspective on a wide range of issues relevant to this group, and all ISTH early career members are encouraged to contribute. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  4. Industrial & Engineering Systems Career Cluster ITAC for Career-Focused Education: Transportation Sub-Cluster. Integrated Technical & Academic Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Designed for Ohio educators responsible for planning programs to prepare high school students for careers in transportation, this document presents an overview of Ohio's Integrated Technical and Academic Competencies (ITAC) system of career-focused education and specific information about the transportation subcluster of the industrial and…

  5. Ocean FEST and TECH: Inspiring Hawaii's Students to Pursue Ocean, Earth and Environmental Science Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, B. C.; Wren, J. L.; Ayau, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Ocean TECH (Technology Expands Career Horizons) is a new initiative funded by NSF/GeoEd to stimulate interest in ocean, earth and environmental science careers - and the college majors that lead to such careers - among Hawaii's underrepresented students in grades 6-14. The Ocean TECH project features hands-on ocean science and technology and interactions with career professionals. Ocean TECH builds upon Ocean FEST (Families Exploring Science Together), a previous NSF/OEDG project aimed at teaching fun hands-on science in culturally and locally relevant ways to Hawaii's elementary school students and their families. Ocean FEST was rigorously evaluated (including cognitive pre-testing developed in partnership with external evaluators) and shown to be successful both in teaching science content and changing attitudes toward ocean, earth and environmental science careers. Over the course of the four-year grant, Ocean FEST reached 20,99 students and adults, including 636 classroom teachers and other volunteers who assisted with program delivery, most of whom were from underrepresented groups. For more info on Ocean FEST: http://oceanfest.soest.hawaii.edu/ Ocean TECH events have various formats, but common themes include: (1) Using technology as a hook to engage students in ocean, earth and environmental science. (2) Bringing middle school through community college students to college campuses, where they engage in hands-on science activities and learn about college majors. (3) Drawing direct links between the students' hands-on science activities and the research currently occurring at the UH Manoa's School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), such as C-MORE and HOT research. (4) Respecting and valuing students' local knowledge and experiences. (5) Explicitly showing, through concrete examples, how becoming an ocean, earth or environmental scientist addresses would beneit Hawaii (6) Having graduate students from diverse backgrounds serve as instructors and

  6. The Relationship between Management, Career Planning and Career Development of Medical and Non-medical Faculty Members of Kohgiluyeh and Boyerahmad Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Sajjadikhah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: There are many mechanisms for the development of human resources, which career development is one of its central components. The aim of this study was to determine the factors related to career development faculty members (Medical and Non-medical of Kohgiluyeh and Boyer-Ahmad province, Iran. Methods: The present paper was a cross-sectional, descriptive correlation method study.  The study population consisted of 535 faculty members (medical, government, NGOs in Kohgiluyeh and Boyer province, Iran, of which 400 participants were randomly selected for the present study. Data were collected through standard questionnaires as a research tool, of career development, career planning and career management for data analysis and statistical tests including linear regression, t-test, regression, and correlation coefficient was used. Results: Career development status and its related factors (Career management and career planning scientific faculty members was desirable. The findings show that between career planning and career management, career development, a significant positive correlation was observed (P

  1. Career adaptability and employee engagement of adults employed in an insurance company: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Tladinyane

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: As a resiliency resource, career adaptability relates to an individual’s ability to adapt to new work demands and is seen to impact various occupational outcomes such as engagement. Research purpose: The aim of the study was to determine the relationship dynamics between career adaptability (measured by Career Adapt-Abilities Scale and employee engagement (measured by Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. Motivation for the study: As a personal resource, career adaptability enables employees to deal with job demands, facilitating employee engagement. Limited research exists on the impact of career adaptability variables on employee engagement, bearing significant relevance in the current workforce. Research design, approach and method: A quantitative survey was conducted with a convenience sample (N = 131 of employees in an insurance company within South Africa. Main findings/results: Significant positive relationships were found between career adaptability and employee engagement. The results suggest that participants who have experienced higher employee engagement have better developed career adaptability skills. Practical implications: Managers and human resource practitioners need to recognise how people’s career adaptability influences their level of engagement in the organisation. Contribution: This research is the first to investigate the construct of career adaptability in an insurance company and the findings add to the existing career literature and provide valuable information that can be used to inform career development and engagement strategies. Keywords: career adaptability; career development; employee engagement; vocational guidance.

  2. Making clinical academic careers more attractive: views from questionnaire surveys of senior UK doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Trevor W; Goldacre, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives To report on doctors’ reasons, as expressed to our research group, for choosing academic careers and on factors that would make a career in clinical academic medicine more attractive to them. Design Postal, email and web questionnaires. Setting UK. Participants A total of 6936 UK-trained doctors who graduated in 1996, 1999 and 2000. Main outcome measures Open-ended comments about a career in clinical academic medicine. Results Of doctors who provided reasons for pursuing a long-term career in clinical academic medicine, the main reasons were enjoyment of academic work and personal satisfaction, whether expressed directly in those terms, or in terms of intellectual stimulation, enjoyment of research, teaching and the advancement of medicine, and the job being more varied than and preferable to clinical work alone. Doctors’ suggestions for making clinical academic medicine more attractive included improved pay and job security, better funding of research, greater availability of academic posts, more dedicated time for research (and less service work) and more support and mentoring. Women were more likely than men to prioritise flexible working hours and part-time posts. Conclusions Medical schools could provide more information, as part of student teaching, about the opportunities for and realities of a career in clinical academic medicine. Women, in particular, commented that they lacked the role models and information which would encourage them to consider seriously an academic career. Employers could increase academic opportunities by allowing more time for teaching, research and study and should assess whether job plans make adequate allowance for academic work. PMID:26380103

  3. Operational Forces soldiers’ perceptions of attributes and skills for career success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishreen Rawoot

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: A career within the South African Operational Forces is physically, mentally and emotionally challenging. It is a diverse working environment with its own organisational culture and unique challenges. Research purpose: The aim of the study was to explore the perceptions of Operational Forces soldiers regarding the unique requirements that facilitated their career success. Motivation for the study: A low percentage of candidates successfully complete the Operational Forces training. The financial implications of training candidates make it important to be able to identify candidates who have the potential to be successful, early on in the process. Research design, approach and method: Data were collected through a self-administered qualitative survey (n = 98. All participants were permanent Operational Forces soldiers with varying ranks and years of experience. The data were thematically analysed in order to identify themes and specific attributes and skills associated with a successful career in the Operational Forces. Main findings: A number of themes emerged from the data, each of which contributed to our understanding of the research question. The themes included self-concept, personality, interests, cognitive and physical factors. Practical and managerial implications: The research findings may help to inform decisions about approaches, practices and methodologies of the South African Operational Forces recruitment and selection process. Results also provide military organisations with the key characteristics to consider when identifying candidates with the highest potential for successful careers. Contribution and value-add: The study extends previous career success research by contributing an additional base of information regarding career success and factors that are perceived to influence it.

  4. DUAL CAREER COUPLES IN KOLKATA AND THEIR STRESSFUL WORK LIFE BALANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Jhilam Rudra De

    2017-01-01

    Dual-career couples were exceptions to the norm in the 1960s, but on date it is difficult to assess the number of married career women in the work force. Previous researches suggest that, the problems of the working women, who are a significant part of a dual career couple, may include lack of flexibility in the workplace, male-trailing spouses, career versus relationship child bearing conflicts etc. The key for dual career couples is to establish a system to help them balance their career an...

  5. Subjective performance evaluations and employee careers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Anders; Lange, Fabian; Kriechell, Ben

    Firms commonly use supervisor evaluations to assess the performance of employees who work in complex environments. Doubts persist whether their subjective nature invalidates using these performance measures to learn about careers of individuals and to inform theory in personnel economics. We...... examine personnel data from six large companies and establish how subjective ratings, interpreted as ordinal rankings of employee performances within narrowly defined peer-groups, correlate with objective career outcomes. We find many similarities across firms in how subjective ratings correlate with base...

  6. Developing a career advancement program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinette, Shirley L

    2003-01-01

    managers in the department of diagnostic imaging at Yale-New Haven Hospital in New Haven, Conn., to develop a Career Ladder for all diagnostic imaging staff members, called the Career Advancement Program (CAP). The process has been time consuming and has required intense discussion and debate. The draft plan is for one CAP with multiple tracks to be used by all staff, both technical and support. A copy of the draft plan is included in this article.

  7. Nurses' leadership self-efficacy, motivation, and career aspirations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cziraki, Karen; Read, Emily; Spence Laschinger, Heather K; Wong, Carol

    2018-02-05

    Purpose This paper aims to test a model examining precursors and outcomes of nurses' leadership self-efficacy, and their aspirations to management positions. Design/methodology/approach A cross-sectional survey of 727 registered nurses across Canada was conducted. Structural equation modelling using Mplus was used to analyse the data. Findings Results supported the hypothesized model: χ 2 (312) = 949.393; CFI = 0.927; TLI = 0.919; RMSEA = 0.053 (0.049-0.057); SRMR 0.044. Skill development opportunities ( ß = 0.20), temporary management roles ( ß = 0.12) and informal mentoring ( ß = 0.11) were significantly related to nurses' leadership self-efficacy, which significantly influenced motivation to lead ( ß = 0.77) and leadership career aspirations ( ß = 0.23). Motivation to lead was significantly related to leadership career aspirations ( ß = 0.50). Practical implications Nurses' leadership self-efficacy is an important determinant of their motivation and intention to pursue a leadership career. Results suggest that nurses' leadership self-efficacy can be influenced by providing opportunities for leadership mastery experiences and mentorship support. Leadership succession planning should include strategies to enhance nurses' leadership self-efficacy and increase front-line nurses' interest in leadership roles. Originality value With an aging nurse leader workforce, it is important to understand factors influencing nurses' leadership aspirations to develop and sustain nursing leadership capacity. This research study makes an important contribution to the nursing literature by showing that nurses' leadership self-efficacy appears to be an important determinant of their motivation to lead and desire to pursue a career as a nurse leader.

  8. Organizational Careers: A forward theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney G. Glaser, Ph.D., Hon. Ph.D.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In general, organizations obtain work from people by offering them some kind of career within their structures. The operation of organizations, therefore, depends on people’s assuming a career orientation toward them. To generate this orientation, organizations distribute rewards, working conditions, and prestige to their members according to career level; thus these benefits are properties of the organizational career. To advance in this career is to receive more or better of all or some of these benefits. Generally speaking, therefore, people work to advance their organizational careers. But also, generally speaking, people do not like to talk about their careers or to be asked about them in everyday conversations with many or unknown people. In this sense, a person’s own organizational career is a sensitive or “taboo topic.” Discussions with others about one’s career occur only under the most private, discreet conditions. As a result, while people may talk abstractly and generally about careers, these discussions are typically based on a combination of the little they know of their own career and much speculation. They often have very little particular or general knowledge based on actual careers. These observations apply also to a large sector or the sociological community, as indicated by a brief perusal of the table of contents of sociological monographs and readers on organizations. The topic of careers is seldom discussed and almost never concertedly focused upon.

  9. Career patterns of healthcare executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, D F; Myrtle, R C

    2001-02-01

    This research examines the job and career changes of healthcare executives and managers working in different segments of the healthcare industry in the western United States. The results suggest that the job and career patterns in the healthcare delivery sector are undergoing significant transformation. One third of the respondents reports that at least one of their last four job changes was involuntary or unplanned. One half of those attempted to make a career change. This study identifies four different executive and management career patterns. The most common was one of multiple career changes. The second pattern was that of a single career change, followed by a 'traditional' career in which one did not seek a career change. The final pattern was characterized as a movement back and forth between two different segments of the healthcare industry. Age, gender, marital status and education were not associated with any specific career pattern. The need to achieve results early in the respondent's career had a strong influence on career patterns. This study confirms the fluidity of career movement and the changing permeability between the various segments of the healthcare industry. It also suggests that career success increasingly will require broad management experience in those different segments.

  10. 76 FR 65187 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... careers. This study includes a new student assessment in algebraic skills, reasoning, and problem solving... respondents, including through the use of information technology. Dated: October 17, 2011. Kate Mullan, Acting... information collection and OMB Control Number when making your request. Individuals who use a...

  11. Student nurses' motivation to choose gerontological nursing as a career in China: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Min; Cheng, Cheng; Tian, Yan; Fan, Xiuzhen

    2015-07-01

    The world's population is aging, and the need for nurses is increasing. Working with older adults, however, has always been an unpopular career choice among student nurses. It is important to understand student nurses' motivation for choosing gerontological nursing as a career. The purpose of this study was to examine the motivation for choosing gerontological nursing as a career and to identify the associated factors among student nurses. Cross-sectional survey. Participants were last-semester student nurses from 7 universities offering nursing undergraduate programs in Shandong, China. Of the 1290 student nurses, 916 completed the survey (a response rate of 71.0%). The outcome variable was the motivation to choose gerontological nursing as a career. This was measured using a motivation questionnaire that included expectancy and value subscales. Other instruments included the Chinese version of the Facts on Aging Quiz I, the Geriatrics Attitudes Scale, the Anxiety about Aging Scale, a clinical practice environment questionnaire and a self-administered general information questionnaire. Student nurses' expectancy and value aspects of motivation for choosing gerontological nursing as a career were both at a moderate level; the highest value they held was of personal interest. Clinical practice environment, anxiety about aging and the attitudes about geriatrics were the main factors influencing student nurses' motivation to choose gerontological nursing as a career in China. It is imperative for nurse educators to improve the gerontological nursing clinical practice environment for student nurses. Moreover, cultivating student nurses' positive attitudes about geriatrics and relieving anxiety about aging could be beneficial. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Effects of Discipline-based Career Course on Nursing Students' Career Search Self-efficacy, Career Preparation Behavior, and Perceptions of Career Barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soonjoo Park, RN, PhD

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: The discipline-based career course was effective in decreasing perceptions of career barriers and increasing career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior among nursing students.

  13. How To Stay Stuck in the Wrong Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Herminia

    2002-01-01

    An effective midlife career change is challenging to bring about successfully. Identity and its relationship to work are key factors. A three-point plan to a successful career change includes the following: know thyself, consult trusted advisors, and think big. (JOW)

  14. High School Student Opinion Polling on Career Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, Leah Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the use of student learning polls as indicators of student perceptions and influences on career exploration. No Child Left Behind requires schools that fail to make adequate yearly progress for two consecutive years to develop continuous improvement plans. The concept of career preparation for students is included in these…

  15. Five-Factor Personality Traits as Predictor of Career Maturity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atli, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to determine the predictive strength of personality traits based on the five-factor theory on the level of career maturity Research Methods: The sample of the study included a total of 429 high school students, 248 females (57.8%) and 181 males (42.2%). The study utilized the "Career Maturity Scale" to determine…

  16. Late Career Decision-Making: A Qualitative Panel Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilmar Schaufeli; Annet de Lange; Juhani Ilmarinen; Per Erik Solem; Trude Furunes; Reidar Mykletun; Astri Syse

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this longitudinal qualitative interview study (3 waves of interviews) was to examine the nature of older workers’ late career decision-making processes, including the main drivers and obstacles for prolonging working life or retiring. Late career decision-making is regarded as a process

  17. Education-Career Planning and Middle School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusty, Jerry; Spenser, Niles; JoLynn, Camey V.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors emphasize a comprehensive and developmental view of education career planning, with special emphasis on middle schools. Research findings that underscore the need for effective education-career planning are presented, followed by the variables and data that are salient for planning. The article includes a framework for…

  18. A Content Analysis of Women's Career Choices in Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Tonya R.

    2010-01-01

    A feminist content analysis of 81 films was conducted as a means to assist mental health practitioners in guiding the career choices of young women and to explore the possibilities for change through this medium. The review of the 117 lead female characters revealed themes including: the idea that relationships should be secondary to careers in…

  19. The Unsung Role of the Career Assistant Principal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Catherine

    Common views of the assistant principal (AP) as the "Marine Corps sergeant type" with nowhere better to be are outdated. Career APs have diverse roles in school administration, often including, but not limited to, discipline. Many career APs find rewards in working with children and put high value on having a balanced personal life. Two…

  20. Health physics as a career

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Health physics includes the protection of man and his environment against the effects of radiations and radioactive substances. As a career it deals with research, regulatory aspects of radiation protection and radiation monitoring. For a health physicist a post-graduate degree in Physics is required, while technical personnel should have a degree or technical diploma. NUCOR, UCOR, ESCOM and the Division for Radiation Control of the Department of Health and Welfare are some of the institutions that make use of the services of health physicists. As South Africa is one of the major uranium producers, there will be an increasing demand for health physicists in the future

  1. Career Practitioners' Conceptions of Social Media in Career Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Jaana; Vuorinen, Raimo; Sampson, James P., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the outcomes of a study, undertaken from a phenomenographic perspective, of career practitioners' conceptions of social media usage in career services. Fifteen Finnish career practitioners--representing comprehensive, secondary and higher education as well as public employment services--were interviewed in focus groups. The…

  2. Career learning and career learning environment in Dutch higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, Frans; Kuijpers, Marinka

    2018-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to focus on the effects of career development and guidance among students (age 17-23) enrolled in higher education in The Netherlands. First the paper explores whether the development of career competencies contribute to career identity, learning motivation,

  3. Career learning and career learning environment in Dutch higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinka Kuijpers; dr. Frans Meijers

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to focus on the effects of career development and guidance among students (age 17-23) enrolled in higher education in The Netherlands. First the paper explores whether the development of career competencies contribute to career identity, learning motivation,

  4. Effects of Career Choice Intervention on Components of Career Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Petri; Vinokur, Amiram D.; Vuori, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    This randomized experimental study (N = 1,034) examines both the direct and the indirect effects of the Towards Working Life intervention on 2 components of adolescents' career preparation: preparedness for career choice and attitude toward career planning. The intervention comprised a 1-week workshop program, the proximal goals of which were to…

  5. Career Development Theory and Its Application. Career Knowledge Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Career Development Association, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Covers career development theory, models, and techniques and how to apply them; understand the steps in the career development process and why career choice and development theory is important as well as limitations. Presents the assumptions that underlie four different types of theories; trait and factor, learning, developmental, and transition…

  6. Physician satisfaction and burnout at different career stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrbye, Liselotte N; Varkey, Prathibha; Boone, Sonja L; Satele, Daniel V; Sloan, Jeff A; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2013-12-01

    To explore the work lives, professional satisfaction, and burnout of US physicians by career stage and differences across sexes, specialties, and practice setting. We conducted a cross-sectional study that involved a large sample of US physicians from all specialty disciplines in June 2011. The survey included the Maslach Burnout Inventory and items that explored professional life and career satisfaction. Physicians who had been in practice 10 years or less, 11 to 20 years, and 21 years or more were considered to be in early, middle, and late career, respectively. Early career physicians had the lowest satisfaction with overall career choice (being a physician), the highest frequency of work-home conflicts, and the highest rates of depersonalization (all Pcareer worked more hours, took more overnight calls, had the lowest satisfaction with their specialty choice and their work-life balance, and had the highest rates of emotional exhaustion and burnout (all Pcareer physicians were most likely to plan to leave the practice of medicine for reasons other than retirement in the next 24 months (4.8%, 12.5%, and 5.2% for early, middle, and late career, respectively). The challenges of middle career were observed in both men and women and across specialties and practice types. Burnout, satisfaction, and other professional challenges for physicians vary by career stage. Middle career appears to be a particularly challenging time for physicians. Efforts to promote career satisfaction, reduce burnout, and facilitate retention need to be expanded beyond early career interventions and may need to be tailored by career stage. Copyright © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Overconfidence and Career Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Jonathan F; Thöni, Christian

    2016-01-01

    People self-assess their relative ability when making career choices. Thus, confidence in their own abilities is likely an important factor for selection into various career paths. In a sample of 711 first-year students we examine whether there are systematic differences in confidence levels across fields of study. We find that our experimental confidence measures significantly vary between fields of study: While students in business related academic disciplines (Political Science, Law, Economics, and Business Administration) exhibit the highest confidence levels, students of Humanities range at the other end of the scale. This may have important implications for subsequent earnings and professions students select themselves in.

  8. Wind Power Career Chat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Flowers

    2011-01-01

    This document will teach students about careers in the wind energy industry. Wind energy, both land-based and offshore, is expected to provide thousands of new jobs in the next several decades. Wind energy companies are growing rapidly to meet America's demand for clean, renewable, and domestic energy. These companies need skilled professionals. Wind power careers will require educated people from a variety of areas. Trained and qualified workers manufacture, construct, operate, and manage wind energy facilities. The nation will also need skilled researchers, scientists, and engineers to plan and develop the next generation of wind energy technologies.

  9. Overconfidence and Career Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Jonathan F.; Thöni, Christian

    2016-01-01

    People self-assess their relative ability when making career choices. Thus, confidence in their own abilities is likely an important factor for selection into various career paths. In a sample of 711 first-year students we examine whether there are systematic differences in confidence levels across fields of study. We find that our experimental confidence measures significantly vary between fields of study: While students in business related academic disciplines (Political Science, Law, Economics, and Business Administration) exhibit the highest confidence levels, students of Humanities range at the other end of the scale. This may have important implications for subsequent earnings and professions students select themselves in. PMID:26808273

  10. Career Education: A Brief Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaska, Charles J.

    1983-01-01

    Career education, which is designed to promote cognitive, affective, and psychomotor skills at all educational levels, is especially important for exceptional children. A comprehensive approach to career development is needed by school districts, along with feedback from former students. (SEW)

  11. A view from inside Arizona and New Mexico Indian country: pursuing a health career path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Barbara A; Petri, Linda; Knoki-Wilson, Ursula

    2007-01-01

    bills are paid', making sure their children were not negatively affected by their decision to further their education, and being sure of the worth of further education in the workplace. Several across-interview themes included pursuing many sequential incremental educational and career steps, many interruptions and failed attempts at pursuing advanced education, and informal, verbal information-gathering patterns when seeking career advancement information. Barriers to career advancement and education arise from multiple sources. Supporting career advancement of community-rooted health workers in Indian Country will require partnership and collaboration across the education, health services, and community sectors. Financial management supports, workplace policies designed to support career-oriented education, consistent and accurate information regarding the educational process, and making courses more accessible will be necessary to support these non-traditional students. Health professions schools should regard their community-based graduates as ambassadors and provide them with ongoing accurate information, because they will be sought after to provide information to others. Innovative programs to assist in loan consolidation and financial management are needed to allow native health workers to be able to provide for their families should they wish to advance their careers. Collaboration across disciplines and programs in the education sector to support a limited set of prerequisite courses would help eliminate unnecessary or redundant courses.

  12. How To Help Your Child Choose a Career. New and Revised Edition. Today's Youth and Tomorrow's Careers Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Luther B.

    This edition of a handbook aimed at helping parents help their children make a career choice has been rewritten and updated. New material begins with the introduction, which provides a rationale for involving parents in their sons' and daughters' career decisions. Other new material includes sections on women and work, minorities and work,…

  13. Investigating the relationship between employees’ career anchors and their psychosocial employability attributes in a financial company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf M. Oosthuizen

    2014-10-01

    Research purpose: The objective of the study was to investigate the relationship between employees’ career anchors and their psychosocial employability attributes as important career meta-capacities in contemporary career development. The study also investigated whether individuals from different age and race groups differed significantly regarding these career meta-capacities. Motivation for the study: Career management has become essential in the contemporary workplace for employees to sustain their employability. Research points to the importance of psychosocial career meta-capacities in helping employees to manage their career development and employability. Research design, approach and method: A cross-sectional quantitative survey using primary data was conducted on a non-probability purposive sample (N = 108 of full-time employees (67% women; 78% 26–45 years old; 78% black employees at a South African financial company. Correlations and Scheffé’s post-hoc test were performed to achieve the research objectives. Main findings: Significant positive relationships were observed between the participants’ career anchors and their psychosocial employability attributes. Age and race groups differed significantly only in terms of their career anchors. Practical/managerial implications: Career management practices in the organisation should accommodate the differences in career orientations and how these relate to the psychosocial employability attributes of their employees. Contribution: The findings add potentially important insights that may inform human resource practices aimed at enhancing the career development and employability of employees and addressing the career needs of different age and race groups.

  14. APECS: A Network for Polar Early Career Scientist Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderlin, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Association of Polar Early Career Researchers (APECS) is an international and interdisciplinary organization for undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, early faculty members, educators and others with interests in the polar regions, alpine regions and the wider Cryosphere. APECS is a scientific, non-profit organization with free individual membership that aims to stimulate research collaborations and develop effective future leaders in polar research, education, and outreach. APECS grew out of the 4th International Polar Year (2007-08), which emphasized the need to stimulate and nurture the next generation of scientists in order to improve the understanding and communication of the polar regions and its global connections. The APECS organizational structure includes a Council and an elected Executive Committee that are supported by a Directorate. These positions are open to all individual members through a democratic process. The APECS Directorate is funded by the Norwegian Research Council, the University of Tromsø and the Norwegian Polar Institute and is hosted by the University of Tromsø. Early career scientists benefit from a range of activities hosted/organized by APECS. Every year, numerous activities are run with partner organizations and in conjunction with major polar conferences and meetings. In-person and online panels and workshops focus on a range of topics, from developing field skills to applying for a job after graduate school. Career development webinars are hosted each fall and topical research webinars are hosted throughout the year and archived online (http://www.apecs.is). The APECS website also contains abundant information on polar news, upcoming conferences and meetings, and job postings for early career scientists. To better respond to members' needs, APECS has national/regional committees that are linked to the international overarching organization. Many of these committees organize regional meetings or

  15. Effects of Discipline-based Career Course on Nursing Students' Career Search Self-efficacy, Career Preparation Behavior, and Perceptions of Career Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soonjoo

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a discipline-based career course on perceptions of career barriers, career search self-efficacy, and career preparation behavior of nursing students. Differences in career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior by the students' levels of career barriers were also examined. The study used a modified one-group, pretest-posttest design. The convenience sample consisted of 154 undergraduate nursing students in a university. The discipline-based career course consisted of eight sessions, and was implemented for 2 hours per session over 8 weeks. The data were collected from May to June in 2012 and 2013 using the following instruments: the Korean Career Indecision Inventory, the Career Search Efficacy Scale, and the Career Preparation Behavior Scale. Descriptive statistics, paired t test, and analysis of covariance were used to analyze the data. Upon the completion of the discipline-based career course, students' perceptions of career barriers decreased and career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior increased. Career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior increased in students with both low and high levels of career barriers. The difference between the low and high groups was significant for career search self-efficacy but not for career preparation behavior. The discipline-based career course was effective in decreasing perceptions of career barriers and increasing career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior among nursing students. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Borders of "the boundarlyless career"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutaiba, Sami Stephan; Sommerlund, Julie

    2007-01-01

    , the methodology can inspire scholars to explore the findings observed in this paper. Practical implications – The idealization of the boundaryless career is problematic, as it poses problems to those concerned with the career. A more flexible ideal of careers would be preferable to researchers and organisational...

  17. Development of alternative situation adequate communication strategies for the nuclear emergency protection including web-based information and communication for a based on the empirical assessment of real event communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The report is the documentation of the research project StSch4456 of the German department of environment, nature protection and reactor safety. The project was aimed to investigate the question how to design information for the public concerning a radiological event. This requires not only knowledge on the everyday information reception habit and preferences of the public including web-based information, but also specific knowledge on the human information processing under conditions of incomplete information, time pressure or emotional strains

  18. Psychological career resources of working adults: A South African survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinde Coetzee

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to explore broad trends regarding how individuals from various age, educational, marital, race and gender groups in the South African organisational context differ in terms of their psychological career resources, as measured by the Psychological Career Resources Inventory. A sample of 2 997 working adults registered as students at a South African higher distance education institution participated in this study. The results indicate significant differences between the various biographical variables and the participants’ psychological career resources. In the context of employment equity, and with more women entering the workplace, this study is expected to contribute important knowledge that will inform career development practices concerned with enhancing employees’ career meta-competencies as an important element of their general employability.

  19. Toward late career transitioning: a proposal for academic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Robin; McLeod, Robin; Latter, David; Keshavjee, Shaf; Rotstein, Ori; Fehlings, Michael G; Ahmed, Najma; Nathens, Avery; Rutka, James

    2017-09-01

    In the absence of a defined retirement age, academic surgeons need to develop plans for transition as they approach the end of their academic surgical careers. The development of a plan for late career transition represents an opportunity for departments of surgery across Canada to initiate a constructive process in cooperation with the key stakeholders in the hospital or institution. The goal of the process is to develop an individual plan for each faculty member that is agreeable to the academic surgeon; informs the surgical leadership; and allows the late career surgeon, the hospital, the division and the department to make plans for the future. In this commentary, the literature on the science of aging is reviewed as it pertains to surgeons, and guidelines for late career transition planning are shared. It is hoped that these guidelines will be of some value to academic programs and surgeons across the country as late career transition models are developed and adopted.

  20. Career Issues in Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on career issues in organizations. "Learning During Downsizing: Stories from the Survivors" (Sharon J. Confessore) describes a study to demonstrate that survivors of corporate downsizings undertake learning activities and use many resources to accomplish the learning tasks.…

  1. Careers in Dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Sandra

    Trends in the current job market in the field of dance are identified, and aspects, such as personal qualifications, training requirements, income potential, and employment possibilities, are discussed. Employment opportunities in the professional world, the field of education, and the corporate environment are explored. Career opportunities for…

  2. Careers in biomedical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, R E; Rotger, V I; Herrera, M C

    2010-01-01

    Although biomedical engineering was started in Argentina about 35 years ago, it has had a sustained growth for the last 25 years in human resources, with the emergence of new undergraduate and postgraduate careers, as well as in research, knowledge, technological development, and health care.

  3. My Career: Composer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganelli, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about his career as a composer and offers some advice for aspiring composers. The author works as a composer in the movie industry, creating music that supports a film's story. Other composers work on television shows, and some do both television and film. The composer uses music to tell the audience what kind of…

  4. Careers | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    community. Learn More » Life at Argonne Our diverse community values work-life balance. Find your niche ; enjoy life at work! Learn More » Back to top Twitter Flickr Facebook Linked In YouTube Pinterest Google National Security User Facilities Science Work with Us About Safety News Careers Apply for a Job External

  5. Manufacturing and Merchandising Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Peter J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Anyone with a flair for business, product development, or promotion might consider a manufacturing or merchandising occupation. The music industry offers many career opportunities for administrators, salespersons, marketing specialists--the record industry offers positions from promotion manager to rack jobber. Describes instrument company…

  6. Expanding career options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smilde, Rineke

    2009-01-01

    The musical landscape in Europe shows a complex picture. Societal change leads to change in the careers of artists. We see an increasing number of unstable jobs in the music profession. It no longer offers many opportunities for full-time, long-term contract work, but is often more project-based,

  7. Clifford Geertz: A career

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bošković Aleksandar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some concepts of the recently deceased American anthropologist Clifford Geertz, putting them into the specific context of his rich and interesting career, influences that he had, as well as some reactions to his ideas. A particular attention is placed upon the concept of culture, as the key concept in the 20th century American anthropology.

  8. Domestic Violence Survivors' Access of Career Counseling Services: A Qualitative Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronister, Krista M.; Linville, Deanna; Kaag, Kristi Palmer

    2008-01-01

    The present study was a qualitative investigation of the impact of domestic violence on women's career development and the contextual barriers and supports that affect women's ability to access career counseling services. Our sample included 11 women who completed various stages of a community-based career counseling intervention program. The…

  9. Psychology Students' Expectations Regarding Educational Requirements and Salary for Desired Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strapp, Chehalis M.; Drapela, Danica J.; Henderson, Cierra I.; Nasciemento, Emily; Roscoe, Lauren J.

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the accuracy of psychology majors' expectations regarding careers. Psychology majors, including 101 women and 35 men (M[subscript age] = 23 years; standard deviation[subscript age] = 6.25), indicated a desired career and estimated the level of education needed and the expected annual salary for the career. Students'…

  10. What schools are doing around career development: implications for policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Justin C; Wallace, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the role that schools are playing in supporting career development for young people. It examines the history of career-related programming in schools, including school-to-work programs, career and technical education, the college and career readiness movement, and current school reform initiatives. This understanding of schools' history, roles, opportunities, and constraints can help practitioners and policymakers think about how to build a system that supports youth development. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  11. The future is yours--Get ready! Career options in scientific and technical fields. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    This 50 page brochure was developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory to encourage high school students to begin considering careers in the scientific and technical fields. The topics of the brochure include career selection, career options, a review of training required for each occupation, a collection of profiles of BNL employees describing how they chose and prepared for their careers, a description of BNL educational programs for high school students, and profiles of some of the students participating in these programs.

  12. Student Experiential Opportunities in National Security Careers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2007-12-31

    This report documents student experiential opportunities in national security careers as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), being performed under a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. This report includes a brief description of how experiential opportunities assist students in the selection of a career and a list of opportunities in the private sector and government. The purpose of the NSPP is to promote national security technologies through business incubation, technology demonstration and validation, and workforce development. Workforce development activities will facilitate the hiring of students to work with professionals in both the private and public sectors, as well as assist in preparing a workforce for careers in national security. The goal of workforce development under the NSPP grant is to assess workforce needs in national security and implement strategies to develop the appropriate workforce.

  13. Burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being among US neurologists in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busis, Neil A; Shanafelt, Tait D; Keran, Christopher M; Levin, Kerry H; Schwarz, Heidi B; Molano, Jennifer R; Vidic, Thomas R; Kass, Joseph S; Miyasaki, Janis M; Sloan, Jeff A; Cascino, Terrence L

    2017-02-21

    To study prevalence of and factors that contribute to burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being in US neurologists. A total of 4,127 US American Academy of Neurology member neurologists who had finished training were surveyed using validated measures of burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being from January 19 to March 21, 2016. Response rate was 40.5% (1,671 of 4,127). Average age of participants was 51 years, with 65.3% male and nearly equal representation across US geographic regions. Approximately 60% of respondents had at least one symptom of burnout. Hours worked/week, nights on call/week, number of outpatients seen/week, and amount of clerical work were associated with greater burnout risk. Effective support staff, job autonomy, meaningful work, age, and subspecializing in epilepsy were associated with lower risk. Academic practice (AP) neurologists had a lower burnout rate and higher rates of career satisfaction and quality of life than clinical practice (CP) neurologists. Some factors contributing to burnout were shared between AP and CP, but some risks were unique to practice setting. Factors independently associated with profession satisfaction included meaningfulness of work, job autonomy, effectiveness of support staff, age, practicing sleep medicine (inverse relationship), and percent time in clinical practice (inverse relationship). Burnout was strongly associated with decreased career satisfaction. Burnout is common in all neurology practice settings and subspecialties. The largest driver of career satisfaction is the meaning neurologists find in their work. The results from this survey will inform approaches needed to reduce burnout and promote career satisfaction and well-being in US neurologists. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Mortality and career radiation doses for workers at a commercial nuclear power plant: feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, R.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Hrubec, Z.; Hurwitz, P.E.; Goff, T.E.; Wilson, J.

    1989-01-01

    Career radiation doses for 8,961 male workers at the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP) were determined for both utility (n = 4,960) and contractor (n = 4,001) employees. Workers were followed from the time of first employment at CCNPP (including plant construction) to the end of 1984 (mean follow-up = 5.4 y). Plant operation began in 1975. The mean duration of employment was 1.9 y at CCNPP and 3.1 y in the nuclear industry. Career radiation doses were determined from dosimetry records kept by the utility company and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). For all exposed workers, the average career dose was 21 mSv and was higher for contractor (30 mSv) than utility (13 mSv) workers. Career doses were also higher among those employed in the nuclear industry for greater than or equal to 15 y (111 mSv) and among workers classified as health physicists (56 mSv). Cumulative doses of greater than or equal to 50 mSv were received by 12% of the workers; the maximum career dose reported was 470 mSv. The availability of social security numbers for practically all employees facilitated record-linkage methods to determine mortality; 161 deaths were identified. On average the workers experienced mortality from all causes that was 15% less than that of the general population of the U.S., probably due to healthier members of the population being selected for employment. Our investigation demonstrates that historical information is available from which career doses could be constructed and that, in principle, it is feasible to conduct epidemiologic studies of nuclear power plant workers in the U.S. Although difficult, the approach taken could prove useful until such time as a comprehensive registry of U.S. radiation workers is established

  15. Career Paths of School Administrators in Illinois: Insights From an Analysis of State Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ringel, Jeanne

    2004-01-01

    ... from a general shortage of people qualified to be school administrators. This perception was called into question recently by three studies based on empirical information on administrative careers...

  16. Policy and system strategies in promoting child health information systems, including the role of Medicaid, the state children's health insurance program, and public financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacTaggart, Patricia; Bagley, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Government, through its unique roles as regulator, purchaser, provider, and facilitator, has an opportunity and an obligation to play a major role in accelerating the implementation of electronic health record systems and electronic health information exchange. Providers, who are expected to deliver appropriate care at designated locations at an appropriate cost, are dependent on health information technology for efficient effective health care. As state and federal governments move forward with health care purchasing reforms, they must take the opportunity to leverage policy and structure and to align incentives that enhance the potential for provider engagement in electronic health record adoption.

  17. Sixty-Year Career in Solar Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, C.

    2018-05-01

    This memoir reviews my academic career in solar physics for 60 years, including my research on non-LTE modeling, white-light flares, and small-scale solar activities. Through this narrative, the reader can catch a glimpse of the development of solar physics research in mainland China from scratch. In the end, some prospects for future development are given.

  18. 17 CFR 240.13d-101 - Schedule 13D-Information to be included in statements filed pursuant to § 240.13d-1(a) and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... directors or to fill any existing vacancies on the board; (e) Any material change in the present... best of my knowledge and belief, I certify that the information set forth in this statement is true... existing Securities Exchange Act rules as to such matters as clarity and size (Securities Exchange Act Rule...

  19. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 34: How early career-stage US aerospace engineers and scientists produce and use information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the production and use of information by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who had changed their American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) membership from student to professional in the past five years.

  20. Informant-related effects of neurofeedback and cognitive training in children with ADHD including a waiting control phase: a randomized-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minder, Franziska; Zuberer, Agnieszka; Brandeis, Daniel; Drechsler, Renate

    2018-02-02

    There is controversy regarding the clinical efficacy of neurofeedback (NF) and computerized cognitive training (CogT) as treatments for ADHD. Meta-analyses claim that probably blinded teachers observe smaller effects than parents, because they are less biased. We investigated informant-specific effects by manipulating the involvement of informants, by controlling for waiting time effects, and by adding a blinded outcome measure. Seventy-seven children with ADHD were randomly allocated to slow cortical potential NF or to individualized CogT (of attention, working memory or inhibition). The training was conducted in schools (NF: n = 19, CogT: n = 19) or in outpatient clinics (NF: n = 19, CogT: n = 20). Three assessments were scheduled: baseline, followed by a waiting period, pre-training, and post-training. Multivariate Analyses of Variance were conducted to assess parent- and teacher-rated changes in ADHD symptoms and executive functions (EF), and changes according to standardized classroom observations. Both treatments resulted in significant improvements according to informants, with larger effects for parents (ADHD symptoms: parent η p 2  = .32; teacher η p 2  = .10), and according to observations (η p 2  = .19). The setting had no effect on outcome. Considerable waiting time effects were revealed for ADHD symptom ratings by both informants, for EF ratings only by teachers. Changed classroom behavior was uncorrelated with teacher-rated changes. Overall, the results do not support the notion that teachers are more objective while being as sensitive to change as parents. The three sources seem to contribute differential and mostly unrelated pieces of information to the evaluation of treatments.

  1. An empirical investigation on the relationship between parenting styles and employees' career adaptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Sedrpoushan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between parenting styles and employees' career adaptability. The statistical population includes all employees in Polyacrid's Factory of Isfahan in 2012. The proposed study selects a sample of 321 employees using cluster sampling. The study has used a based on Baumrind's theorem, which maintains three groups of permissive, authoritarian and authoritative in Likert scale. The results of our study have indicated that there is definitely a difference in parenting style among various members in terms of career concern, career curiosity and career confidence but such relationship does not exists in terms of career control. In addition, the study explains that people with permissive parenting style have less career concern, career curiosity and career confidence than those with permissive parenting style do.

  2. Association of Polar Early Career Scientists: a model for experiential learning in professional development for students and early career researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, A. C.; Hindshaw, R. S.; Fugmann, G.; Mariash, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Association of Polar Early Career Scientists was established by early career researchers during the 2007-2008 International Polar Year as an organization for early career researchers in the polar and cryospheric sciences. APECS works to promote early career researchers through soft-skills training in both research and outreach activities, through advocating for including early career researchers in all levels of the scientific process and scientific management, and through supporting a world-wide network of researchers in varied fields. APECS is lead by early career researchers; this self-driven model has proved to be an effective means for developing the leadership, management, and communication skills that are essential in the sciences, and has shown to be sustainable even in a community where frequent turn-over is inherent to the members. Since its inception, APECS has reached over 5,500 members in more than 80 countries, and we have placed more than 50 early career researchers on working groups and steering committees with organizations around the world in the last two years alone. The close partnerships that APECS has with national and international organizations exposes members to both academic and alternative career paths, including those at the science-policy interface. This paper describes APECS's approach to experiential learning in professional development and the best practices identified over our nearly ten years as an organization.

  3. Career anchors and values from different career management perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Cunha da Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – To analyze the relationships between career anchors and young Generation Y professionals’ values, from the career concept perspective. Design/methodology/approach – Research concerning the proposed objective was carried out through quantitative research involving 189 Business Administration majors from a Catholic university in São Paulo, Brazil. We used two instruments to identify the career anchors and values of respondents: Schein (1990 and Schwartz (1994, respectively. We used statistical techniques to explore the relationships between career anchors and values. Findings – Among the results, mention should be made to the statistical relationships found between analyzed career anchors and values. It is also important to stress that, although the Lifestyle career anchor was predominantly present in the conglomerate division, this anchor was the predominant characteristic in the differentiation of the smaller group of respondents, the new career group. The General Management Career Anchor, which presents a lower incidence, is the predominant characteristic of the larger group, referring to organizational careers. As well as the Lifestyle career anchor, the Hedonism value was predominant among respondents. Originality/value – The need to consider the following was found: Generation Y presents generational characteristics that drive people management to propose work structures that offer activities to generate learning, pleasure, self-fulfillment and conciliation between work and personal life.

  4. Characterization of highly informative cross-species microsatellite panels for the Australian dugong (Dugong dugon) and Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) including five novel primers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Margaret Kellogg; Broderick, Damien; Ovenden, Jennifer R.; Tucker, Kimberly Pause; Bonde, Robert K.; McGuire, Peter M.; Lanyon, Janet M.

    2010-01-01

    The Australian dugong (Dugong dugon) and Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) are threatened species of aquatic mammals in the order Sirenia. Sirenian conservation and management actions would benefit from a more complete understanding of genetic diversity and population structure. Generally, species-specific microsatellite markers are employed in conservation genetic studies; however, robust markers can be difficult and costly to isolate. To increase the number of available markers, dugong and manatee microsatellite primers were evaluated for cross-species amplification. Furthermore, one manatee and four dugong novel primers are reported. After polymerase chain reaction optimization, 23 (92%) manatee primers successfully amplified dugong DNA, of which 11 (48%) were polymorphic. Of the 32 dugong primers tested, 27 (84%) yielded product in the manatee, of which 17 (63%) were polymorphic. Dugong and manatee primers were compared and the most informative markers were selected to create robust and informative marker-panels for each species. These crossspecies microsatellite marker-panels can be employed to assess other sirenian populations and can provide beneficial information for the protection and management of these unique mammals.

  5. Characterization of highly informative cross-species microsatellite panels for the Australian dugong (Dugong dugon) and Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) including five novel primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Margaret Kellogg; Broderick, Damien; Ovenden, Jennifer R; Tucker, Kimberly Pause; Bonde, Robert K; McGuire, Peter M; Lanyon, Janet M

    2010-03-01

    The Australian dugong (Dugong dugon) and Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) are threatened species of aquatic mammals in the order Sirenia. Sirenian conservation and management actions would benefit from a more complete understanding of genetic diversity and population structure. Generally, species-specific microsatellite markers are employed in conservation genetic studies; however, robust markers can be difficult and costly to isolate. To increase the number of available markers, dugong and manatee microsatellite primers were evaluated for cross-species amplification. Furthermore, one manatee and four dugong novel primers are reported. After polymerase chain reaction optimization, 23 (92%) manatee primers successfully amplified dugong DNA, of which 11 (48%) were polymorphic. Of the 32 dugong primers tested, 27 (84%) yielded product in the manatee, of which 17 (63%) were polymorphic. Dugong and manatee primers were compared and the most informative markers were selected to create robust and informative marker-panels for each species. These cross-species microsatellite marker-panels can be employed to assess other sirenian populations and can provide beneficial information for the protection and management of these unique mammals. Published 2009. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  6. [Evaluation of the Initial Stage Career Exploration Inventory (ISCEI)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Tomoko

    2010-06-01

    The Initial Stage Career Exploration Inventory (ISCEI) was designed to assess career exploration among students in the early stage of making career decisions. The reliability, validity, and applicability of the ISCEI were investigated. In Study 1, responses on the ISCEI from student participants (n = 294 : 69 men, 225 women) were factor analyzed. The results suggested a 3-factor structure consisting of "self-understanding," "information gathering" and "learning from others." Comparison between the ISCEI and self-improvement motive, vocational decisions, and career decision-making self-efficacy scales from the Career Exploration Survey (CES) indicated that the ISCEI had sufficient construct validity. Study 2 investigated the applicability of the ISCEI. The responses of student participants (n = 859 : 451 men, 408 women) on the ISCEI indicated high "self-understanding," neutral "information gathering," and comparatively low "learning from others" scores, which were similarly related to the CES as in Study 1. These findings indicate that the ISCEI can be used as a tool for understanding career exploration among students in the initial stage of making career decision.

  7. Clinical placements and nursing students' career planning: a qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Lisa; McCall, Louise; Wray, Natalie

    2010-04-01

    Many nursing students enter undergraduate programmes with preconceived ideas about their future nursing careers, and intend to practice in particular areas such as midwifery or paediatrics. Through clinical placements, students are exposed to different clinical areas and professional socialization is facilitated. However, little is known about the influence of clinical placements on students' career intentions. This paper reports nursing findings drawn from a large qualitative study conducted in Victoria, Australia that sought to explore the influence of health professional students' clinical placements on their future career intentions. Participants were invited to be involved in either face-to-face or focus group interviews depending upon their own preference. Thematic data analysis revealed three main themes: 're-affirming career choice', 'working in a particular area' and 'work location'. Findings from the study add to our understanding of factors influencing nursing students' planning for their future careers including the impact of clinical placements.

  8. Talent Development as an Alternative to Orthodox Career Thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt Larsen, Henrik; Schramm-Nielsen, Jette; Stensaker, Inger

    2011-01-01

    This chapter argues that orthodox career thinking–which focuses on vertical progression to higher-level managerial positions—is suffering from three shortcomings. First, it is insufficient to explain career dynamics in modern knowledge organizations. Second, it does not see strategic organizational...... change as a catalyst for career and disregards the importance of experiential learning on the job. Third, it does not incorporate how career is embedded in the organizational and cultural context, including a wide range of national, institutional features. Based on this, the chapter suggests that we move...... the focus from narrow career thinking to the more broad-banded concept of talent. The talent concept signifies any kind of outstanding competence of an individual (whether it is managerial or any kind of significant specialist field) which is strategically important to the organization, difficult to achieve...

  9. Profiling the careers of Thoroughbred horses racing in Australia between 2000 and 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velie, B D; Wade, C M; Hamilton, N A

    2013-03-01

    Research investigating trends in racehorse careers require a benchmark for accurate comparison. Currently little whole population data exists for horses racing in Australia. To determine the range and variation in career length and number of career starts for horses racing in Australia. To document and provide evidence regarding the current differences between the sexes for career length and careers starts. Racing data were collected for Thoroughbreds over a 10-year period. Career length, number of career starts and spells per year were evaluated. Statistical analyses were performed using the statistical package R. A total of 2,782,774 performance records yielded career information for 164,046 horses. Median career length and number of career starts for the population were 14.7 months and 10 starts, respectively. Significant differences (PThoroughbreds racing in Australia with careers longer than 12, 24, 36 and 48 months was 56.65, 32.35, 16.66 and 7.74, respectively. Clear differences in career outcomes exist between intact males, females and geldings racing in Australia. Future research should be conscious of these differences when analysing population data. © 2012 EVJ Ltd.

  10. Career development from the organizational perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Miková, Barbora

    2016-01-01

    The bachelor thesis introduces a topic of career development in organizational context. The aim of this work was to present the concept of career development from organizational perspective and to outline the contrast between the traditional career and the contemporary career concepts with the new psychological contract taken into consideration. The contemporary view of career also changes the organizational approach towards the career planning and career management of its employees. The majo...

  11. Voting for a Career

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Benjamin Carl Krag

    effects depending on the senator's career ambitions. While retiring senators are no longer accountable to anyone but themselves, revolving door politicians will be accountable to their future employers, because they depend on them for post-elective employment. During their final Congress, this should lead......I investigate how the revolving door affects voting in the Senate. The literature on final-term problems suggests that senators should become more extreme before they leave office, because they no longer are accountable to voters. Lack of electoral accountability could, however, have different...... revolving door senators to moderate themselves, while retiring ones should grow more partisan. Using data on post-elective career trajectories from 102nd to the 113th Senate, I present fixed effects estimates that back this claim. I show that the effect is driven by senators, who choose to resign...

  12. Cannabis careers revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Järvinen, Margaretha; Ravn, Signe

    2014-01-01

    A considerable part of today's sociological research on recreational drug use is (explicitly or implicitly) inspired by Howard Becker's classical model of deviant careers. The aim of the present paper is to directly apply Becker's theory to empirical data on present-day cannabis use and to suggest...... in treatment for cannabis problems in Copenhagen, Denmark. We suggest a revision of Becker's career model in relation to four aspects: initiation of cannabis use, differentiation between socially integrated and individualised, disintegrated use, social control from non-users, and the users' moral stance...... on cannabis. A central point of the paper is that social interaction may both motivate cannabis use, as Becker proposed, and serve as a protective factor against extensive, problematic use....

  13. Career Concerns in Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Auriol, Emmanuelle; Friebel, Guido; Pechlivanos, Lambros

    2002-01-01

    We investigate how changes in the commitment power of a principal affect cooperation among agents who work in a team. When the principal and her agents are symmetrically uncertain about the agents' innate abilities, workers have career concerns. Then, unless the principal can commit herself to long-term wage contracts, an implicit sabotage incentive emerges. Agents become reluctant to help their teammates. Anticipating this risk, and in order to induce the desired level of cooperation, the pr...

  14. Career age peaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polozov Andrey Anatolievich

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Most researchers seem career as translational motion the steps to the top. However, very similar to that on the ladder just two steps – in 25 and 39 years. At age 25, the largest value reaches the value of the index of intelligence, and at the age of 39 years – management experience. Best results have revealed 6 years after the beginning of its profile.

  15. Pharmacy career deciding: making choice a "good fit".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Sarah Caroline; Shann, Phillip; Hassell, Karen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore factors influencing career deciding amongst pharmacy students and graduates in the U.K. Group interviews were used to devise a topic guide for five subsequent focus groups with pharmacy students and graduates. Focus groups were tape-recorded, recordings transcribed, and transcripts analysed. Key themes and interlinking factors relating to pharmacy career deciding were identified in the transcripts, following a constructivist approach. Participants' described making a "good fit" between themselves, their experiences, social networks etc. and pharmacy. Central to a coherent career deciding narrative were: having a job on graduation; and the instrumental advantage of studying a vocational course. Focusing on career deciding of UK pharmacy students and graduates may limit the study's generalisability to other countries. However, our findings are relevant to those interested in understanding students' motivations for healthcare careers, since our results suggest that making a "good fit" describes a general process of matching between a healthcare career and personal experience. As we have found that pharmacy career deciding was not, usually, a planned activity, career advisors and those involved in higher education recruitment should take into account the roles played by personal preferences and values in choosing a degree course. A qualitative study like this can illustrate how career deciding occurs and provide insight into the process from a student's perspective. This can help inform guidance processes, selection to healthcare professions courses within the higher education sector, and stimulate debate amongst those involved with recruitment of healthcare workers about desirable motivators for healthcare careers.

  16. Project Career: A qualitative examination of five college students with traumatic brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Amanda; Sampson, Elaine; Stauffer, Callista; Leopold, Anne; Jacobs, Karen; Hendricks, Deborah J; Elias, Eileen; Chen, Hui; Rumrill, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Project Career is an interprofessional five-year development project designed to improve the employment success of undergraduate college and university students with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The case study information was collected and synthesized by the project's Technology and Employment Coordinators (TECs) at each of the project's three university sites. The project's evaluation is occurring independently through JBS International, Inc. Five case studies are presented to provide an understanding of student participants' experiences within Project Career. Each case study includes background on the student, engagement with technology, vocational supports, and interactions with his/her respective TEC. A qualitative analysis from the student's case notes is provided within each case study, along with a discussion of the overall qualitative analysis. Across all five students, the theme Positive Outcomes was mentioned most often in the case notes. Of all the different type of challenges, Cognitive Challenges were most often mentioned during meetings with the TECs, followed by Psychological Challenges, Physical Challenges, Other Challenges, and Academic Challenges, respectively. Project Career is providing academic enrichment and career enhancement that may substantially improve the unsatisfactory employment outcomes that presently await students with TBI following graduation.

  17. Bioinformatics education in high school: implications for promoting science, technology, engineering, and mathematics careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarik, Dina N; Patterson, Davis G; Cohen, Carolyn; Sanders, Elizabeth A; Peterson, Karen A; Porter, Sandra G; Chowning, Jeanne Ting

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effects of our Bio-ITEST teacher professional development model and bioinformatics curricula on cognitive traits (awareness, engagement, self-efficacy, and relevance) in high school teachers and students that are known to accompany a developing interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers. The program included best practices in adult education and diverse resources to empower teachers to integrate STEM career information into their classrooms. The introductory unit, Using Bioinformatics: Genetic Testing, uses bioinformatics to teach basic concepts in genetics and molecular biology, and the advanced unit, Using Bioinformatics: Genetic Research, utilizes bioinformatics to study evolution and support student research with DNA barcoding. Pre-post surveys demonstrated significant growth (n = 24) among teachers in their preparation to teach the curricula and infuse career awareness into their classes, and these gains were sustained through the end of the academic year. Introductory unit students (n = 289) showed significant gains in awareness, relevance, and self-efficacy. While these students did not show significant gains in engagement, advanced unit students (n = 41) showed gains in all four cognitive areas. Lessons learned during Bio-ITEST are explored in the context of recommendations for other programs that wish to increase student interest in STEM careers.

  18. Effect of postgraduate training on job and career satisfaction among health-system pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padiyara, Rosalyn S; Komperda, Kathy E

    2010-07-01

    The effect of postgraduate training on job and career satisfaction among health-system pharmacists was evaluated. A mail-based questionnaire was sent to a random sample of pharmacist members of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Previously validated questions for job and career satisfaction among pharmacists were utilized. The questionnaire was designed to obtain information regarding general employment, work environment, job satisfaction, career satisfaction, postgraduate training, and demographic characteristics. Pharmacists who had completed either a pharmacy residency or fellowship were classified as having postgraduate training. Questionnaires returned within two months of the original mailing date were included in the analysis. Responses from pharmacists who were retired, employed in a nonpharmacy career, or unemployed were excluded. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Of the 2499 questionnaires mailed, 36 were undeliverable; 1058 were completed, yielding a response rate of 43%. Of these, 48 were excluded, resulting in 1010 questionnaires suitable for analysis. Approximately 37% of respondents indicated completion of postgraduate training. The most common practice setting was a community, not-for-profit hospital (40.9%). Overall, 90.7% of respondents indicated they were either satisfied or highly satisfied with their current employment. Approximately 45% of pharmacists with postgraduate training indicated they were highly satisfied with their employment, compared with 32.7% of pharmacists without postgraduate training (p training were more satisfied with their job than those who did not complete such training.

  19. Social cognitive model of career self-management: toward a unifying view of adaptive career behavior across the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lent, Robert W; Brown, Steven D

    2013-10-01

    Social cognitive career theory (SCCT) currently consists of 4 overlapping, segmental models aimed at understanding educational and occupational interest development, choice-making, performance and persistence, and satisfaction/well-being. To this point, the theory has emphasized content aspects of career behavior, for instance, prediction of the types of activities, school subjects, or career fields that form the basis for people's educational/vocational interests and choice paths. However, SCCT may also lend itself to study of many process aspects of career behavior, including such issues as how people manage normative tasks and cope with the myriad challenges involved in career preparation, entry, adjustment, and change, regardless of the specific educational and occupational fields they inhabit. Such a process focus can augment and considerably expand the range of the dependent variables for which SCCT was initially designed. Building on SCCT's existing models, we present a social cognitive model of career self-management and offer examples of the adaptive, process behaviors to which it can be applied (e.g., career decision making/exploration, job searching, career advancement, negotiation of work transitions and multiple roles).

  20. CISN Display - Reliable Delivery of Real-time Earthquake Information, Including Rapid Notification and ShakeMap to Critical End Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, H.; Hauksson, E.; Thomas, E.; Friberg, P.; Given, D.

    2002-12-01

    The California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN) Display is part of a Web-enabled earthquake notification system alerting users in near real-time of seismicity, and also valuable geophysical information following a large earthquake. It will replace the Caltech/USGS Broadcast of Earthquakes (CUBE) and Rapid Earthquake Data Integration (REDI) Display as the principal means of delivering graphical earthquake information to users at emergency operations centers, and other organizations. Features distinguishing the CISN Display from other GUI tools are a state-full client/server relationship, a scalable message format supporting automated hyperlink creation, and a configurable platform-independent client with a GIS mapping tool; supporting the decision-making activities of critical users. The CISN Display is the front-end of a client/server architecture known as the QuakeWatch system. It is comprised of the CISN Display (and other potential clients), message queues, server, server "feeder" modules, and messaging middleware, schema and generators. It is written in Java, making it platform-independent, and offering the latest in Internet technologies. QuakeWatch's object-oriented design allows components to be easily upgraded through a well-defined set of application programming interfaces (APIs). Central to the CISN Display's role as a gateway to other earthquake products is its comprehensive XML-schema. The message model starts with the CUBE message format, but extends it by provisioning additional attributes for currently available products, and those yet to be considered. The supporting metadata in the XML-message provides the data necessary for the client to create a hyperlink and associate it with a unique event ID. Earthquake products deliverable to the CISN Display are ShakeMap, Ground Displacement, Focal Mechanisms, Rapid Notifications, OES Reports, and Earthquake Commentaries. Leveraging the power of the XML-format, the CISN Display provides prompt access to

  1. Factors Affecting Career Progress of MBA Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien T. Supangco

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explored the factors that affect career progress of students in the MBA program of the University of the Philippines.To understand career progression, four measures of career progress were used in this study, namely: number of promotions, number of years in between promotions, total cash compensation, and number of administrative levels from the company president. On the other hand, the factors used to explain career progess included human capital, organizational, interpersonal and demographic variables.The results showed that the different measures of career progress had distinct determinants implying different dynamics. It appeared that measures of career progress that are sensitive to the value employers attach to the individual (Whitely, Dougherty, & Dreher, 1991 such as total compensation, total number of promotion and years per promotion were related with human capital factors such as work experience and number of companies worked for. On the other hand, measures that relate to centrality if the position, in which market forces have less impact, were associated with organizational variables such as organization size and the demographic variable gender.While gender did not explain variation in total compensation, number of promotions and number of uears between promotions, these null results are important for two reasons. First, it implies that the female MBA students were at par with their male counterparts as fas as these measures of career progress are concerned. Second, it challenges the generalizability of the finding of gender segregation at the organizational level-where men receive significantly higher wages that women-which is a common finding among studies done in the United States. The results using the MBA students as sample show that income and promotion parity may indeed be achievable and this brings hope to women in general.However, the statistical significance of gender in explaining career progress as centrality

  2. Career choices of today's medical students: where does surgery rank?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, E; Healy, D; Hill, A D K; O'Connell, P R; Kerin, M; McHugh, S; Coyle, P; Kelly, J; Walsh, S R; Coffey, J C

    2013-09-01

    The national junior doctor recruitment crisis prompts an appraisal of medical student attitudes to different career pathways. The purpose of this study was to perform a national review of surgical career intentions of Irish final year medical students. Ethical and institutional approval was obtained at each study location. A questionnaire was designed and distributed to final year students. Domains assessed included demographics, career plans and reasons associated. Anonymised responses were collated and evaluated. Categorical data were compared with Fisher's exact test. Responses were obtained from 342 students in four medical schools of whom 78.6% were undergraduates. Over half (53%) were Irish, with Malaysia, Canada and the USA the next most common countries of origin. Only 18% of students intended to pursue surgery, with 60% stating they did not plan to, and 22% undecided. Of those who plan not to pursue surgery, 28% were unsure about a speciality but the most common choices were medicine (39%), general practice (16%) and paediatrics (8%). Reasons for not picking a career in surgery included long hours and the unstructured career path. Suggestions to improve uptake included earlier and more practical exposure to surgery, improved teaching/training and reduction in working hours. In this study 18% of final year medical students identified surgery as their chosen career pathway. Although lifestyle factors are significant in many students' decision, perceived quality and duration of surgical training were also relevant and are modifiable factors which, if improved could increase interest in surgery as a career.

  3. Career satisfaction and retention risk among Wisconsin internists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giriyappa, Pradeep; Sullivan, Kandis K

    2009-09-01

    Physician career satisfaction has been studied extensively, but career satisfaction as it relates to retention is less well studied. The objective was to assess the relationship between career satisfaction and retention in primary care internal medicine physicians in Wisconsin. In this descriptive quantitative study, survey data was assessed for correlations between career satisfaction, risk to retention, and demographics. The survey included 1231 primary care internal medicine physicians in the Wisconsin Medical Directory (2007). Responses were measured by career satisfaction variables, and demographics and retention variables for the purpose of correlations and regression analysis. Survey responses included 573 physicians. An additional 85 physicians were disqualified. The final survey group included 1146 physicians for a response rate of 50%. A total of 116 physicians (20.2%) reported anticipating leaving their current position, 84 (14.7%) physicians reported anticipating leaving the career of medicine. Identified at risk for retention were 144 (25.1%) physicians. The lowest career satisfaction scores were reported in the areas of compensation (3.19) and practice (3.42) on a scale of 1 (very dissatisfied) to 5 (very satisfied). The highest correlations to retention were associated with practice, followed by compensation satisfaction. The level of significance for this study was identified as 0.05, and the P-value was 0.000. The study findings reveal a significant risk to the stability of continuity of care for patients, and may cost Wisconsin health care organizations more than $35 million in recruitment costs to replace departing physicians.

  4. Preparing Graduate Students for Non-Academic Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    One of the primary topics discussed at the conference concerned career development, since most graduate students will not have the academic careers of their advisors. Goals included reviewing the primary functions of physicists in industry, evaluating how students are currently prepared for these careers, and identifying how to fill gaps in preparation. A number of non-academic physicists provided insight into meeting these goals. Most physics graduate programs in general do not purposely prepare students for a non-academic career. Strategies for overcoming this shortcoming include advising students about these careers and providing training on broadly valued professional skills such as written and verbal communication, time and project management, leadership, working in teams, innovation, product development, and proposal writing. Alumni and others from industry could provide guidance on careers and skills and should be invited to talk to students. Academic training could also better prepare students for non-academic careers by including engineering and cross disciplinary problem solving as well as incorporating software and toolsets common in industry.

  5. Entrepreneurship Training for Females Offers New Challenges to Career Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, Carol

    1981-01-01

    Recent efforts in entrepreneurship training for women are described. These include research and development efforts, opportunities in the public schools, and the development of guidelines for career counseling to potential female entrepreneurs. (CT)

  6. Mediating Role of Career Commitment in the Relationship of Promotional Opportunities, Rewards and Career Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Tisman Pasha

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to investigate the mediating role of career commitment between career development practices and career success of employee in insurance sector of Pakistan. Survey method was adopted to collect the data form 374 employees working in insurance sector systematic sampling. PLS-SEM technique was used using Smart PLS 2.0 to analyze the data. Findings of the study suggests that employees’ career development practices have positive relationship with career commitment and career success. Career commitment also have a positive relation with career success. Finally, career commitment mediates the positive role between career development practices and career of insurance sector employees. The effect of career development practices on career commitment and effect of career development practices on career success has been checked in past studies but the mediating role of career commitment particularly for the employees of insurance sector has not been checked before.

  7. Career Orientations and Career Route Preferences in R&D Organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroni, Alberto

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 151 Italian scientists and engineers and case studies of a career development system for technical professionals revealed that career orientation (as measured by Schein's career anchors) is a useful predictor of career route preferences. (Author/JOW)

  8. A Content Analysis of Australian IS Early Career Job Advertisements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Anne Kennan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding of the knowledge, skills and competencies demanded of early career information systems graduates in Australia. Job advertisements from 2006 were collected and investigated using content analysis software to determine the frequencies and patterns of occurrence of specific requirements. There was a high demand for technical knowledge and competencies as well as communication skills. A core cluster of IS knowledge and skills emerged which appear to be in demand across a wide variety of jobs. Issues raised include the role of entry level positions in the preparation of their incumbents for future more senior positions. The findings add an Australian perspective to the literature on information systems job ads and should be of value to educators.

  9. The Career Development of 10 Year Olds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Linda; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examined career development of 24 preadolescents and assessed how career development was related to their perceptions of their family, self-image, career awareness, interests, and work/family aspirations. Findings suggest that, by age 10, children have thought about their future and can articulate their career and family aspirations. Career goals…

  10. Career Readiness: Has Its Time Finally Come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) released a "What Is Career Ready?" definition. As the career-readiness definition explains, there is much overlap between "college readiness" and "career readiness," but academic preparedness for college alone is not enough to be truly career-ready.…

  11. The Effect of Career Counsellors on the Decision to Pursue Higher Education: A Mixed-Methods Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon Eliophotou, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The article examines the role of career counsellors in secondary education in Cyprus, with emphasis on their effect on students' career decisions. Survey research was used to collect information from 611 students and 36 career counsellors in Cyprus. Students were asked to rate the importance of several factors as influences on their career…

  12. Self-Efficacy as a Predictor of Career Decision Making among Secondary School Students in Busia County, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogutu, Joel Peter; Odera, Peter; Maragia, Samuel N.

    2017-01-01

    The most common constrain to career progression among youth in Kenya is the inability to make informed career decisions. Majority of high school students suffer from excitement for attaining university degree self-actualization rather than taking up career that enhances development of talents and skills that are job market driven. This study aimed…

  13. Career boundarylessness and career success : a review, integration and guide to future research.

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Y.; Arthur, M. B.; Khapova, S. N.; Hall, R.; Lord, R.

    2018-01-01

    The concept of boundaryless careers characterizes emerging career patterns that are less dependent on traditional organizational career management. Based on an evidence-based review of literature on the relationship between career boundarylessness and career success published from 1994 to 2018, we found that boundaryless careers have mixed effects on the various indictors of career success, and these effects depend on the operationalization of career boundarylessness, the motives (voluntary v...

  14. An investigation of career change using a narrative and story-telling inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willie T. Chinyamurindi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The role of the career change experience has been investigated in this research. Understanding career change will assist with organisational interventions for the support and retention of employees.Research purpose: The study explores the factors that influence career change amongst a sample of distance learners.Motivation for the study: Distance learning is becoming popular in South Africa as individuals can work and learn simultaneously. Some people use distance learning to facilitate career change.Research design, approach and method: A narrative and storytelling inquiry was used. Data was obtained through unstructured interviews by purposive sampling.Main findings: Sources of career change included personal growth and ambition, and structural changes in relation to current work. The career change experience was found through participants’ stories and narratives to influence individual well-being. Finally, distance learning was favoured as a vehicle for career change for its flexibility and low cost.Practical/managerial implications: Organisations will benefit from an understanding of employee career change experiences as identified in this study. Arising from this, support and retention interventions can be put in place.Contribution/value-add: The research study shifts attention to career change as part of the career decision-making process. This focus is an emerging area of inquiry in the careers literature. This adds to the body of knowledge by identifying, in a South African context, the factors influencing career change and the impact of this on the individual. Interventions for individuals and organisations are suggested.

  15. Career Opportunities for Theatre Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadman, Victoria

    2017-11-01

    'What's the point in doing that?' This is often the response given to those saying they are undertaking education outside of work hours. Many do not see their role in theatre as just a job, but now want a career which means extra studying. Ideally this needs to be in advance so they are one step ahead for when an opportunity arises. Career opportunities and education go hand in hand together, and so it is difficult to discuss one without mentioning the other to some degree. We need education to access career opportunities, but we also need career routes to help drive education forward.

  16. Borders of the "Boundaryless Career"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie; Boutaiba, Sami

    2007-01-01

    : a theoretical argument, and a qualitative ethnographic study, involving observations and interviews. Findings - The theoretical argument questions the underlying premise and promise of the notion of the boundaryless career, namely that modern careers amount to a higher level of personal freedom. This empirical...... of careers makes both "new" and "old" types of careers possible. Design/methodology/approach - The approach is twofold: a theoretical argument, and a qualitative ethnographic study, involving observations and interviews. Findings - The theoretical argument questions the underlying premise and promise...

  17. The Influence of Teachers' Career Guidance Profiles on Students' Career Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittendorff, Kariene; Beijaard, Douwe; den Brok, Perry; Koopman, Maaike

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we examine the relationship between different career guidance styles of vocational education teachers and vocational education students' career competencies (i.e. career reflection, career exploration and networking). Questionnaires on students' perceptions of the career guidance of their teachers during career conversations, and…

  18. Dentistry - a professional contained career in healthcare. A qualitative study of Vocational Dental Practitioners' professional expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Jennifer E; Clarke, Wendy; Eaton, Kenneth A; Wilson, Nairn H F

    2007-11-16

    New graduates in the UK presently spend one year in training as Vocational Dental Practitioners (VDPs) in preparation for primary dental care. There is a growing recognition that the emerging workforce has very different professional expectations to those of earlier generations, with implications for the profession, patients and the performance of health systems. The objectives of this study were to investigate why VDPs' in England and Wales perceive they chose dentistry as a professional career; how they perceive their vision has changed and the implications for their professional career plans, both short- and longterm. Purposive sampling of schemes was undertaken to include urban, rural and metropolitan schemes, schemes in areas with and without dental schools and geographic coverage across England and Wales. All VDPs in these schemes were initiated to participate in this qualitative study using focus groups. A topic guide was utilised to standardise data collection. Informants' views were recorded on tape and in field notes. Data were transcribed and analysed using Framework Methodology. A total of 99 VDPs participated in the 10 focus groups. Their choice of dentistry as a professional career was motivated by multiple categories of influence: 'academic', 'healthcare', 'lifestyle', the influence of 'family', 'friends', 'careers advice' and 'work experience'. Consideration of the features of the 'professional job' appears to have been key to their choice of dentistry and the 'active rejection of medicine' as an alternative career.Entry into the profession was proving a challenging process for some but not all VDPs. Informants perceived that their vision had been moderated as a result of 'personal student debt', 'national workforce initiatives', 'limitations on clinical practice' and the 'cost of additional training'.Short term goals focused around 'recovery from the past' and 'preparation for the future'. Longterm goals covered the spectrum of opportunities within

  19. Developing a weighting strategy to include mobile phone numbers into an ongoing population health survey using an overlapping dual-frame design with limited benchmark information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Margo L; Ferguson, Raymond A; Hughes, Phil J; Steel, David G

    2014-09-04

    In 2012 mobile phone numbers were included into the ongoing New South Wales Population Health Survey (NSWPHS) using an overlapping dual-frame design. Previously in the NSWPHS the sample was selected using random digit dialing (RDD) of landline phone numbers. The survey was undertaken using computer assisted telephone interviewing (CATI). The weighting strategy needed to be significantly expanded to manage the differing probabilities of selection by frame, including that of children of mobile-only phone users, and to adjust for the increased chance of selection of dual-phone users. This paper describes the development of the final weighting strategy to properly combine the data from two overlapping sample frames accounting for the fact that population benchmarks for the different sampling frames were not available at the state or regional level. Estimates of the number of phone numbers for the landline and mobile phone frames used to calculate the differing probabilities of selection by frame, for New South Wales (NSW) and by stratum, were obtained by apportioning Australian estimates as none were available for NSW. The weighting strategy was then developed by calculating person selection probabilities, selection weights, applying a constant composite factor to the dual-phone users sample weights, and benchmarking to the latest NSW population by age group, sex and stratum. Data from the NSWPHS for the first quarter of 2012 was used to test the weighting strategy. This consisted of data on 3395 respondents with 2171 (64%) from the landline frame and 1224 (36%) from the mobile frame. However, in order to calculate the weights, data needed to be available for all core weighting variables and so 3378 respondents, 2933 adults and 445 children, had sufficient data to be included. Average person weights were 3.3 times higher for the mobile-only respondents, 1.3 times higher for the landline-only respondents and 1.7 times higher for dual-phone users in the mobile frame

  20. LHCb Early Career Scientist Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrick Koppenburg for the LHCb Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    On 15 September 2016, the LHCb collaboration awarded the first set of prizes for outstanding contributions of early career scientists.   From left to right: Guy Wilkinson (LHCb spokesperson), Sascha Stahl, Kevin Dungs, Tim Head, Roel Aaij, Conor Fitzpatrick, Claire Prouvé, Patrick Koppenburg (chair of committee) and Sean Benson. Twenty-five nominations were submitted and considered by the committee, and 5 prizes were awarded to teams or individuals for works that had a significant impact within the last year. The awardees are: Roel Aaij, Sean Benson, Conor Fitzpatrick, Rosen Matev and Sascha Stahl for having implemented and commissioned the revolutionary changes to the LHC Run-2 high-level-trigger, including the first widespread deployment of real-time analysis techniques in High Energy Physics;   Kevin Dungs and Tim Head for having launched the Starterkit initiative, a new style of software tutorials based on modern programming methods. “Starterkit is a group of ph...

  1. Industrial Physics Careers: A Large Company Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollner, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    Statistical data from the American Institute of Physics and the National Science Foundation show that only about a third of physics graduates get permanent jobs in academia. A few work in government labs and hospitals. The majority of physics Ph.D.s, however, find employment in the private sector (industry). This trend has been increasing, i.e., recent Ph.D.s are even more likely to start careers in industry. Industrial physicists work in small, medium or large companies in a broad range of fields, including aerospace, semiconductors, automotive, energy, information technology, contract research, medical, chemical, optics, etc. They are also represented in fields outside of physics, such as finance. Even the ``inventor'' of the Powerball lottery game is a Ph.D. physicist. In my talk, I will describe pathways to success for an industrial physicist, from the perspective of employment in three different large corporations. Based on the NIST Baldridge criteria of Performance Excellence, I will discuss how to achieve and measure organizational success through focus on products and customers. Individual performance is linked to the goals of the organization. Performance has two components: Goals and behaviors. Both are key to success as an individual contributor or manager.[4pt] References: [0pt] http://www.aip.org/statistics/trends/emptrends.html [0pt] http://www.aps.org/about/governance/committees/commemb/index.cfm [0pt] http://www.quality.nist.gov/

  2. Information Impact | Journal of Information and Knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Impact | Journal of Information and Knowledge Management

    the students was not library and information science they all had their career prior their ... boils down to a career decision-making process”. That is .... choose secretarial option do so on the account of their failure to be registered in accounting.

  3. Career Guidance in India Based on O*NET and Cultural Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Mohit

    2018-01-01

    The Occupational Information Network (O*NET) is the primary source of occupational information in the United States (US). In this study, I review O*NET's usage for career guidance in India and conceive a career intervention based on it. In an empirical evaluation adopting a posttest-only experimental design with post-graduate management students…

  4. A Nation at Risk: The Economic Consequences of Neglecting Career Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Phillip S.

    1990-01-01

    Neglect of career development at all levels, K-adult, is costly to employers, taxpayers, and individuals. The information delivered through computer-based career guidance systems is vital, but it must be accompanied by training in critical reasoning skills so that relevant information for decision making can be selected through the insight gained…

  5. Two executives, one career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Cynthia R; Murray, Shelley S

    2005-02-01

    For six years, Cynthia Cunningham and Shelley Murray shared an executive job at Fleet Bank. One desk, one chair, one computer, one telephone, and one voice-mail account. To their clients and colleagues, they were effectively one person, though one person with the strengths and ideas of two, seamlessly handing projects back and forth. Although their department was dissolved after the bank merged with Bank of America, the two continue to consider themselves a package-they have one resume, and they are seeking their next opportunity together. Their choice to share a job was not only a quality-of-life decision but one intended to keep their careers on course: "Taking two separate part-time jobs would have thrown us completely off track" they write in this first-person account."We're both ambitious people, and neither of us wanted just a job. We wanted careers" In this article, the two highly motivated women reveal their determination to manage the demands of both family and career. Flextime,telecommuting, and compressed workweeks are just some of the options open to executives seeking greater work/ life balance, and the job share, as described by Cunningham and Murray, could well be the next solution for those wishing to avoid major trade-offs between their personal and professional lives. Cunningham and Murray describe in vivid detail how they structured their unusual arrangement, how they sold themselves to management, and the hurdles they faced along the way. Theirs is a win-win story, for the company and for them.

  6. Influence of career self-efficacy beliefs on career exploration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The career self-efficacy has positive and strong statistically significant association with past performances accomplishment of the students (r= .752, P< .01). However, it was statistically significant and has weak relationship with career exploration behaviour (r= .214, P<.05).Verbal persuasion is more significant association (r ...

  7. Career Engagement: Bridging Career Counseling and Employee Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neault, Roberta A.; Pickerell, Deirdre A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a model of career engagement that helps bridge the gap between career counselors' focus on supporting individuals to find meaningful work and employers' desire for an engaged, productive, and committed workforce. They briefly review highlights of the employee engagement literature, introduce the Career…

  8. Career Trajectories of Older Women: Implications for Career Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimrose, Jenny; McMahon, Mary; Watson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    As work and employment transitions become more frequent and difficult, the demand for formal career guidance increases. Women are likely to experience structural labour market disadvantage and may benefit from formal support that is sympathetic to their particular needs. Yet the traditional psychological paradigms that dominate career guidance…

  9. Choosing the right career: What approach? Implications for career ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presentation made here accepts the thesis that the choice of career is not a simple matter. In fact, it asserts that more than ever before, the choice of a career on a training programme now requires a lot of thinking as well as taking into consideration several factors before choosing, planning and entering into a particular ...

  10. Career opportunities in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, L

    Oncology nursing offers nurses a wide range of opportunities. Nurses need a wide range of skills in order to care for patients who may have acute oncological illnesses or require palliative care. The nature of the nurse/patient relationship can be intense. Nurses generally find this enhances job satisfaction. The pressures exerted on nurses working in oncology can be immense. Oncology nursing is rewarding but very demanding and therefore the nurse has to be resourceful. Early career planning is advisable to take advantage of the opportunities that are currently available.

  11. Facebook use among early-career veterinarians in Ontario, Canada (March to May 2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijs, Cynthia A; Coe, Jason B; Christofides, Emily; Muise, Amy; Desmarais, Serge

    2013-04-15

    To explore the nature and content of information publicly posted to Facebook by early-career veterinarians. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Sample-352 early-career veterinarians. Publicly accessible Facebook profiles were searched online from March to May 2010 for profiles of early-career veterinarians (graduates from 2004 through 2009) registered with the College of Veterinarians of Ontario, Canada. The content of veterinarians' Facebook profiles was evaluated and then categorized as low, medium, or high exposure in terms of the information a veterinarian had publicly posted to Facebook. Through the use of content analysis, high-exposure profiles were further analyzed for publicly posted information that may have posed risks to an individual's or the profession's public image. Facebook profiles for 352 of 494 (71%) registered early-career veterinarians were located. One-quarter (25%) of profiles were categorized as low exposure (ie, high privacy), over half (54%) as medium exposure (i.e., medium privacy), and 21% as high exposure (i.e., low privacy). Content analysis of the high-exposure profiles identified publicly posted information that may pose risks to an individual's or the profession's reputation, including breaches of client confidentiality, evidence of substance abuse, and demeaning comments toward others. Almost a quarter of veterinarians' Facebook profiles viewed in the present study contained publicly available content of a questionable nature that could pose a risk to the reputation of the individual, his or her practice, or the veterinary profession. The increased use of Facebook and all types of social media points to the need for raised awareness by veterinarians of all ages of how to manage one's personal and professional identities online to minimize reputation risks for individuals and their practices and to protect the reputation and integrity of the veterinary profession.

  12. Career Development at Nova Southeastern University

    Science.gov (United States)

    . Continuing Education Financial Aid Career Development Regional Campuses International Affairs Veterans Development Skip secondary navigation Menu Overview About Us Our Staff Peer Advisor Program Career Ambassadors Handshake Internships Student Testimonials Veterans Alumni Career Services Volunteer Opportunities Handshake

  13. Advancing career counseling and employment support for survivors: an intervention evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, M Meghan; Nitzel, Camie; Duke, Alysondra; Baker, Cynthia M; Bovaird, James A

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this research was to conduct a replication-based and extension study examining the effectiveness of a 5-week career group counseling intervention, Advancing Career Counseling and Employment Support for Survivors (ACCESS; Chronister, 2008). The present study was conducted in a markedly different geographic region within a larger community as compared with the original investigation conducted by Chronister and McWhirter (2006). Women survivors of intimate partner violence (N = 73) participated in ACCESS, with career-search self-efficacy, perceived career barriers, perceived career supports, anxiety, and depression assessed at preintervention, postintervention, and 8-week follow-up. Women survivors demonstrated significant improvements in career-search self-efficacy and perceived career barriers at postintervention. Moreover, these same improvements were maintained at the 8-week follow-up assessment with the addition of significant improvements in perceived future financial supports, anxiety, and depression compared with preintervention scores. This work replicates the initial findings regarding the effectiveness of ACCESS with respect to career-search self-efficacy (Chronister & McWhirter, 2006) as well as extends the initial research to include improvements in perceived career barriers and perceived career supports. Moreover, the present study extends the work to include the mental health outcomes of anxiety and depression; results demonstrated improvements in these areas at 8-week follow-up. This investigation begins to fill a critical need for evaluated career-focused interventions for the underserved population of women survivors of intimate partner violence.

  14. Competence and Career. A Double Career Structure and Reduced Recognition in Aging Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Kade

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The occupation is a relationship of appropriation, which is only realized in relationships of recognition between organization and work. The organization includes its members by a mutual exchange of benefits, which is referred to as a relationship of recognition. The basic rule of the mutuality of relationships of recognition is called into question in knowledge-based organizations of "aging institutions." The limited reciprocity of the "closed opportunity structure" is the result of an institutional reduplication of a career policy under the pressure of innovations. A response to this is a change of individual career strategies. The article focuses on the consequences for the development of careers and competencies. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0801592

  15. Jumpstarting Academic Careers: A Workshop and Tools for Career Development in Anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanofsky, Samuel D; Voytko, Mary Lou; Tobin, Joseph R; Nyquist, Julie G

    2011-01-01

    Career development is essential and has the potential to assist in building a sustained faculty within academic departments of Anesthesiology. Career development is essential for growth in academic medicine. Close attention to the details involved in career management, goal setting as part of career planning, and professional networking are key elements. This article examines the specific educational strategies involved in a 120 minute workshop divided into four 25 minute segments with 20 minutes at the end for discussion for training junior faculty in career development. The teaching methods include 1) brief didactic presentations, 2) pre-workshop completion of two professional development tools, 3) facilitated small group discussion using trained facilitators and 4) use of a commitment to change format. Three major learning tools were utilized in conjunction with the above methods: a professional network survey, a career planning and development form and a commitment to change form. Forty one participants from 2009 reported 80 projected changes in their practice behaviors in relation to career management: Build or enhance professional network and professional mentoring (36.3%); Set career goals, make a plan, follow though, collaborate, publish (35.1%); Increase visibility locally or nationally (10.0%); Building core skills, such as clinical, teaching, leading (36.3%); Identify the criteria for promotion in own institution (5.0%); Improved methods of documentation (2.5%). Over the past two years, the workshop has been very well received by junior faculty, with over 95% marking each of the following items as excellent or good (presentation, content, audiovisuals and objectives met). The challenge for continuing development and promotion of academic anesthesiologists lies in the explicit training of faculty for career advancement. Designing workshops using educational tools to promote a reflective process of the faculty member is the one method to meet this

  16. Web-based Academic Roadmaps for Careers in the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, D. P.; Veeger, A. I.; Grossman-Garber, D.

    2007-12-01

    To a greater extent than most science programs, geology is underrepresented in K-12 curricula and the media. Thus potential majors have scant knowledge of academic requirements and career trajectories, and their idea of what geologists do--if they have one at all--is outdated. We have addressed these concerns by developing a dynamic, web-based academic roadmap for current and prospective students, their families, and others who are contemplating careers in the geosciences. The goals of this visually attractive "educational pathway" are to not only improve student recruitment and retention, but to empower student learning by creating better communication and advising tools that can render our undergraduate program transparent for learners and their families. Although we have developed academic roadmaps for four environmental and life science programs at the University of Rhode Island, we focus here on the roadmap for the geosciences, which illustrates educational pathways along the academic and early-career continuum for current and potential (i.e., high school) students who are considering the earth sciences. In essence, the Geosciences Academic Roadmap is a "one-stop'" portal to the discipline. It includes user- friendly information about our curriculum, outcomes (which at URI are tightly linked to performance in courses and the major), extracurricular activities (e.g., field camp, internships), careers, graduate programs, and training. In the presentation of this material extensive use is made of streaming video, interviews with students and earth scientists, and links to other relevant sites. Moreover, through the use of "Hot Topics", particular attention is made to insure that examples of geoscience activities are not only of relevance to today's students, but show geologists using the modern methods of the discipline in exciting ways. Although this is a "work-in-progress", evaluation of the sites, by high school through graduate students, has been strongly

  17. Career exploration behavior of Korean medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Hyejin An; Seung-Hee Lee

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study is to analyze the effects of medical students? social support and career barriers on career exploration behavior mediated by career decision-making self-efficacy. Methods We applied the t-test to investigate the difference among the variables based on gender and admission types. Also, we performed path analysis to verify the effect of perceived career barriers and social support on career exploration behavior with career decision efficacy as a mediator. Results First, we no...

  18. Career Planning Trends in Japanese Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Firkola, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of career planning trends in Japanese companies. Research on career development in Japan is first reviewed. Career planning practices in Japanese companies are examined. Factors influencing career planning choice are then discussed. It was found that there appears to be a change occurring in the career planning practices, specifically the shifting of responsibility for an employees' career from the employer to the employee. (JEL Classifi-cation: M12, M54

  19. Culture-centered Career Intervention. [and] Diversity, Flexibility, and Career Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spokane, Arnold R.; Fouad, Nadya A.; Swanson, Jane L.; Walsh, W. Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Includes two commentaries on the special section. Spokane, Fouad, and Swanson emphasize the importance of two dimensions of clients' cultural context: dominant/subordinate and individual/collective. Walsh highlights research needs related to career intervention and personality, culture, process, and socioeconomic status. (Contains 15 and 11…

  20. Career on the Move: Geography, Stratification, and Scientific Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, Pierre; Wang, Dashun; Sinatra, Roberta; Song, Chaoming; Blondel, Vincent D.; Barabási, Albert-László

    2014-04-01

    Changing institutions is an integral part of an academic life. Yet little is known about the mobility patterns of scientists at an institutional level and how these career choices affect scientific outcomes. Here, we examine over 420,000 papers, to track the affiliation information of individual scientists, allowing us to reconstruct their career trajectories over decades. We find that career movements are not only temporally and spatially localized, but also characterized by a high degree of stratification in institutional ranking. When cross-group movement occurs, we find that while going from elite to lower-rank institutions on average associates with modest decrease in scientific performance, transitioning into elite institutions does not result in subsequent performance gain. These results offer empirical evidence on institutional level career choices and movements and have potential implications for science policy.