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Sample records for include capillary tips

  1. A low-makeup beveled tip capillary electrophoresis /electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface for micellar electrokinetic chromatography and nonvolatile buffer capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Mei-Chun; Chen, Yet-Ran; Her, Guor-Rong

    2004-11-01

    A robust interface has been developed for interfacing micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) and nonvolatile buffer capillary electrophoresis (CE) to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The interface consists of two parallel capillaries for separation (50 microm i.d. x 155 microm o.d.) and makeup (50 microm i.d. x 155 microm o.d.) housed within a larger capillary (530 microm i.d. x 690 microm o.d.). The capillaries terminate in a single tapered tip having a beveled edge. The use of a tapered beveled edge results in a greater tip orifice diameter (75 microm) than in a previous design from our laboratory (25 microm) that used a flat tip. While maintaining a similar optimum flow rate and consequently similar sample dilution, a 75-microm beveled emitter is more rugged than a 25-microm flat tip. Furthermore, the incorporation of a sheath liquid capillary allows the compositions of the final spray solution to be controlled. The application of this novel CE/ESI-MS interface was demonstrated for MEKC using mixtures of triazines (positive ion mode) and phenols (negative ion mode). The ability to perform CE/ESI-MS using a nonvolatile buffer was demonstrated by the analysis of gangliosides with a buffer consisting of 40 mM borate and 20 mM alpha-cyclodextrin.

  2. Tapered-Tip Capillary Electrophoresis Nano-Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Ultrasensitive Proteomics: the Mouse Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sam B.; Zamarbide, Marta; Manzini, M. Chiara; Nemes, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Ultrasensitive characterization of the proteome raises the potential to understand how differential gene expression orchestrates cell heterogeneity in the brain. Here, we report a microanalytical capillary electrophoresis nano-flow electrospray ionization (CE-nanoESI) interface for mass spectrometry to enable the measurement of limited amounts of proteins in the mouse cortex. Our design integrates a custom-built CE system to a tapered-tip metal emitter in a co-axial sheath-flow configuration. This interface can be constructed in ion source, and ensures efficient ion generation by sustaining the cone-jet spraying regime. Parallel reaction monitoring provided a 260-zmol lower limit of detection for angiotensin II (156,000 copies). CE was able to resolve a complex mixture of peptides in 330,000 theoretical plates and identify 15 amol ( 1 pg) of BSA or cytochrome c. Over 30 min of separation, 1 ng protein digest from the mouse cortex yielded 217 nonredundant proteins encompassing a 3-log-order concentration range using a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Identified proteins included many products from genes that are traditionally used to mark oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. Finally, key proteins involved in neurodegenerative disorders were detected (e.g., parkinsonism and spastic paraplegia). CE-nanoESI-HRMS delivers sufficient sensitivity to detect proteins in limited amounts of tissues and cell populations to help understand how gene expression differences maintain cell heterogeneity in the brain.

  3. Capillary electrophoresis in an extended nanospray tip-electrospray as an electrophoretic column

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Týčová, Anna; Foret, František

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1388, APR (2015), s. 274-279 ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP206/12/G014 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : mass spectrometry * interface * separation * capillary electrophoresis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.926, year: 2015

  4. Toward Understanding Tip Leakage Flows in Small Compressor Cores Including Stator Leakage Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdanier, Reid A.; Key, Nicole L.

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this work was to provide additional data to supplement the work reported in NASA/CR-2015-218868 (Berdanier and Key, 2015b). The aim of that project was to characterize the fundamental flow physics and the overall performance effects due to increased rotor tip clearance heights in axial compressors. Data have been collected in the three-stage axial research compressor at Purdue University with a specific focus on analyzing the multistage effects resulting from the tip leakage flow. Three separate rotor tip clearances were studied with nominal tip clearance gaps of 1.5 percent, 3.0 percent, and 4.0 percent based on a constant annulus height. Overall compressor performance was previously investigated at four corrected speedlines (100 percent, 90 percent, 80 percent, and 68 percent) for each of the three tip clearance configurations. This study extends the previously published results to include detailed steady and time-resolved pressure data at two loading conditions, nominal loading (NL) and high loading (HL), on the 100 percent corrected speedline for the intermediate clearance level (3.0 percent). Steady detailed radial traverses of total pressure at the exit of each stator row are supported by flow visualization techniques to identify regions of flow recirculation and separation. Furthermore, detailed radial traverses of time-resolved total pressures at the exit of each rotor row have been measured with a fast-response pressure probe. These data were combined with existing three-component velocity measurements to identify a novel technique for calculating blockage in a multistage compressor. Time-resolved static pressure measurements have been collected over the rotor tips for all rotors with each of the three tip clearance configurations for up to five loading conditions along the 100 percent corrected speedline using fast-response piezoresistive pressure sensors. These time-resolved static pressure measurements reveal new knowledge about the

  5. A similarity solution for oil lens redistribution including capillary forces and oil entrapment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijke, van J.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    1997-01-01

    Redistribution of a LNAPL lens (oil) at the phreatic surface is described using a multi-phase flow model, with emphasis on the effect of oil entrapment by water. The flow process is analyzed under the assumption that the vertical capillary and gravitational forces balance. Vertical integration leads

  6. Reproducible preparation of nanospray tips for capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry using 3D printed grinding device

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Týčová, Anna; Přikryl, Jan; Foret, František

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 37, 7-8 (2016), s. 924-930 ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP206/12/G014; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-15479S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : grinding * nanospray tip * 3D printing Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.744, year: 2016

  7. Tuning adhesion forces between functionalized gold colloidal nanoparticles and silicon AFM tips: role of ligands and capillary forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oras, Sven; Vlassov, Sergei; Berholts, Marta; Lõhmus, Rünno; Mougin, Karine

    2018-01-01

    Adhesion forces between functionalized gold colloidal nanoparticles (Au NPs) and scanning probe microscope silicon tips were experimentally investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) equipped with PeakForce QNM (Quantitative Nanoscale Mechanics) module. Au NPs were synthesized by a seed-mediated process and then functionalized with thiols containing different functional groups: amino, hydroxy, methoxy, carboxy, methyl, and thiol. Adhesion measurements showed strong differences between NPs and silicon tip depending on the nature of the tail functional group. The dependence of the adhesion on ligand density for different thiols with identical functional tail-group was also demonstrated. The calculated contribution of the van der Waals (vdW) forces between particles was in good agreement with experimentally measured adhesive values. In addition, the adhesion forces were evaluated between flat Au films functionalized with the same molecular components and silicon tips to exclude the effect of particle shape on the adhesion values. Although adhesion values on flat substrates were higher than on their nanoparticle counterparts, the dependance on functional groups remained the same.

  8. A two-dimensional model of the pressing section of a paper machine including dynamic capillary effects

    KAUST Repository

    Iliev, Oleg P.

    2013-05-15

    Paper production is a problem with significant importance for society; it is also a challenging topic for scientific investigation. This study is concerned with the simulation of the pressing section of a paper machine. A two-dimensional model is developed to account for the water flow within the pressing zone. A Richards-type equation is used to describe the flow in the unsaturated zone. The dynamic capillary pressure-saturation relation is adopted for the paper production process. The mathematical model accounts for the coexistence of saturated and unsaturated zones in a multilayer computational domain. The discretization is performed by the MPFA-O method. Numerical experiments are carried out for parameters that are typical of the production process. The static and dynamic capillary pressure-saturation relations are tested to evaluate the influence of the dynamic capillary effect. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  9. Remembering tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memory aids; Alzheimer disease - remembering tips; Early memory loss - remembering tips; Dementia - remembering tips ... active: Read a lot if you have trouble remembering words. Keep a dictionary close by. Take part ...

  10. Tips for TIPS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, C.F.

    2015-01-01

    The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure is one of the most technically challenging procedures in interventional radiology. During the procedure, interventional radiologists (IRs) insert very thin and long instruments through a little incision in the patient’s neck. They

  11. Gas-Filled Capillary Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L. C.; Kimura, W. D.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a 1-D, quasi-steady-state numerical model for a gas-filled capillary discharge that is designed to aid in selecting the optimum capillary radius in order to guide a laser beam with the required intensity through the capillary. The model also includes the option for an external solenoid B-field around the capillary, which increases the depth of the parabolic density channel in the capillary, thereby allowing for propagation of smaller laser beam waists. The model has been used to select the parameters for gas-filled capillaries to be utilized during the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration -- Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) experiment

  12. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash ... tv tip-overs. The force of a large television falling from tipping furniture can be staggering. A ...

  13. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

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  14. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OnSafety CPSC Stands for Safety The Tipping Point Home > 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point ... 24 hours a day. For young children whose home is a playground, it’s the best way to ...

  15. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device when sleeping? Here are some tips from the U.S. Food ... 395,755 views 9:28 3 Tips for Sleeping With a CPAP - Duration: 2:02. WebMD 66, ...

  16. Automated Parallel Capillary Electrophoretic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingbo; Kane, Thomas E.; Liu, Changsheng; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.; Kernan, John R.

    2000-02-22

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  17. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head ... see news reports about horrible accidents involving young children and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The ...

  18. CPAP Tips

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    Full Text Available ... make your opinion count. Sign in Loading... Loading... Transcript The interactive transcript could not be loaded. Loading... ... Dan Uses CPAP - Duration: 4:17. Harvard Medical School 7,950 views 4:17 Tips for building ...

  19. CPAP Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make your opinion count. Sign in Loading... Loading... Transcript The interactive transcript could not be loaded. Loading... ... Dan Uses CPAP - Duration: 4:17. Harvard Medical School 7,950 views 4:17 Tips for building ...

  20. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash format. Almost ... accidents involving young children and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The force of a large television ...

  1. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... impact can kill a child or cause severe injuries. About 16,000 (mostly young children) were treated in emergency rooms for tip-over related injuries in 2006, that’s about four times more injuries ...

  2. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch ... reports about horrible accidents involving young children and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The force of ...

  3. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... third story of a building. That kind of impact can kill a child or cause severe injuries. ... to prevent a tip-over tragedy. Share Post Facebook Twitter Google Plus Reddit Connect with Me:  Visit ...

  4. Sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenchen; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-06-17

    A sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis (CE) with mass spectrometry is disclosed. The sheathless interface includes a separation capillary for performing CE separation and an emitter capillary for electrospray ionization. A portion of the emitter capillary is porous or, alternatively, is coated to form an electrically conductive surface. A section of the emitter capillary is disposed within the separation capillary, forming a joint. A metal tube, containing a conductive liquid, encloses the joint.

  5. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 24 hours a day. For young children whose home is a playground, it’s the best way to prevent a tip-over tragedy. Share Post Facebook Twitter ... Security, and Legal Notice | Accessibility Policy | Open Government @ CPSC | ...

  6. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sleeping? Here are some tips from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on how to safely ... Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Test new features Loading... Working... Sign ...

  7. A capillary-based probe for in situ detection of enhanced fluorescence signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, F.; Xiao, R.; Zhu, A. N.; Shi, H. C.; Wang, S. Q.

    2013-07-01

    A simple, compact, and high sensitivity capillary-based probe for the in situ detection of fluorescence signals with high sensitivity is demonstrated. A home-made single-multi-mode fiber coupler that is coaxially aligned with the capillary-based probe provides for the transmission of excitation light and the collection and transmission of fluorescence. We propose a conceptually straightforward theoretical model to optimize the factors affecting the fluorescence-capture capability of the capillary-based probe. The fluorescence signal detected by fiber-optic spectroscopy non-linearly increases with the length of the capillary-based probe. In addition, the thicker the capillary tube wall is, the less the fluorescence signals determined are. The performance of the proposed probe is evaluated experimentally by measuring the fluorescence spectra of Cy5.5 dye and blue-green algae. The experimental results show that the proposed probe provides more than a ten-fold increase in fluorescence signal compared with direct measurements by a flat-tipped multi-mode fiber probe. The advantages of the capillary-based probe, which include its simple and compact structure, excellent light collection efficiency, requirement of small sample volume, and recoverability of samples, allow its wide application to in situ detection in the medical, forensic, biological, geological, and environmental fields with high sensitivity.

  8. Tip enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Kawata, Satoshi

    2007-01-01

    This book discusses the recent advances in the area of near-field Raman scattering, mainly focusing on tip-enhanced and surface-enhanced Raman scattering. Some of the key features covered here are the optical structuring and manipulations, single molecule sensitivity, analysis of single-walled carbon nanotubes, and analytic applications in chemistry, biology and material sciences. This book also discusses the plasmonic materials for better enhancement, and optical antennas. Further, near-field microscopy based on second harmonic generation is also discussed. Chapters have been written by some of the leading scientists in this field, who present some of their recent work in this field.·Near-field Raman scattering·Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy·Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy·Nano-photonics·Nanoanalysis of Physical, chemical and biological materials beyond the diffraction limits·Single molecule detection

  9. Endoscopic submucosal dissection with a combination of small-caliber-tip transparent hood and flex knife for large superficial colorectal neoplasias including ileocecal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Naoki; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Horiki, Noriyuki; Matsuda, Michitaka; Setoyama, Takeshi; Suzuki, Shoko; Uemura, Masayo; Iizuka, Yusuke; Fukuda, Katsuyuki; Suzuki, Koyu; Fujita, Yoshiyuki

    2010-08-01

    Large superficial neoplasias of the ileocecal region pose an increased degree of complexity for endoscopic resection. This study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for large superficial colorectal neoplasias including ileocecal lesions. A total of 33 superficial colorectal neoplasias, including eight neoplasias in the ileocecal region, were treated with ESD from December 2005 to April 2009. Therapeutic efficacy, complications, and follow-up results were retrospectively evaluated among three groups: ileocecal region, colon, and rectum. The mean size of all resected neoplasias was 35 +/- 15 mm (range, 20-80 mm) and that of all resected specimens was 41 +/- 15 mm (range, 23-82 mm). The mean procedural time was 121 +/- 90 min (range, 22-420 min). The difference in mean values among the three groups was not significant. The overall rate of en bloc resection was 91% (30/33). Histopathologically, both the lateral and vertical margins in the specimens resected en bloc tested negative (30/30). The rate for en bloc resection in the ileocecal region did not differ significantly from that for the other two groups (p = 0.20 compared with the rate for the colon and p = 0.12 compared with the rate for the rectum). Complications such as perforation and postoperative bleeding did not occur in the ileocecal group. No recurrence was observed in any cases during the mean follow-up period of 20 +/- 12 months (range, 4-44 months). The ESD approach is safe and effective for treating large superficial neoplasias of the ileocecal region such as other colorectal neoplasias.

  10. Advanced portrayal of SMIL coating by allying CZE performance with in-capillary topographic and charge-related surface characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, Lorenz G. [Division of Chemistry and Bioanalytics, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Innovative Tools for the Characterization of Biosimilars, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Leitner, Michael; Traxler, Lukas [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Bonazza, Klaus [Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/164, 1060 Vienna (Austria); Leclercq, Laurent; Cottet, Hervé [Institut des Biomolécules Max Mousseron (IBMM), UMR 5247, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier, Place Eugène Bataillon, CC 1706, 34095 Montpellier (France); Friedbacher, Gernot [Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/164, 1060 Vienna (Austria); Ebner, Andreas [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Stutz, Hanno, E-mail: hanno.stutz@sbg.ac.at [Division of Chemistry and Bioanalytics, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Innovative Tools for the Characterization of Biosimilars, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2017-01-25

    A successive multiple ionic polymer layer (SMIL) coating composed of four layers improved the capillary electrophoretic separation of a recombinant major birch pollen allergen and closely related variants when poly(acrylamide-co-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propansulfonate) (55% PAMAMPS) replaced dextran sulfate as terminal SMIL layer. 55% PAMAMPS decelerated the electroosmotic flow (EOF) due to its lower charge density. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate SMIL properties directly on the inner capillary surface and to relate them to EOF measurements and results of associated CZE separations of a mixture of model proteins and peptides that were performed in the same capillary. For the first time, AFM-based biosensing topography and recognition imaging mode (TREC) under liquid conditions was applied for a sequential characterization of the inner surface of a SMIL coated capillary after selected treatments including pristine SMIL, SMIL after contact with the model mixture, after alkaline rinsing, and the replenishment of the terminal polyelectrolyte layer. A cantilever with tip-tethered avidin was used to determine the charge homogeneity of the SMIL surface in the TREC mode. SMIL coated rectangular capillaries with 100 μm internal diameter assured accessibility of the inner surface for this cantilever type. Observed changes in CZE performance and EOF mobility during capillary treatment were also reflected by alterations in surface roughness and charge distribution of the SMIL coating. A renewal of the terminal SMIL layer restored the original surface properties of SMIL and the separation performance. The alliance of the novel TREC approach and CZE results allows for an improved understanding and a comprehensive insight in effects occurring on capillary coatings. - Highlights: • SMIL coating with a terminal layer of reduced charge density improves CZE separation. • Capillaries with rectangular diameter allow for in-capillary TREC-AFM measurement.

  11. Prom Health and Safety Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Autumn Tips Camping Tips Family Reunions Gardening Tips Halloween Tips Healthy Halloween Prom Tips Spring Break Valentine Tips Winter Holiday ... Breast Cancer Assess Your Relationships Be Safe on Halloween Be Smoke-Free Check Alarm Batteries Know Your ...

  12. DNA typing by capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, N.

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis is becoming more and more important in nucleic acid analysis including DNA sequencing, typing and disease gene measurements. This work summarized the background of DNA typing. The recent development of capillary electrophoresis was also discussed. The second part of the thesis showed the principle of DNA typing based on using the allelic ladder as the absolute standard ladder in capillary electrophoresis system. Future work will be focused on demonstrating DNA typing on multiplex loci and examples of disease diagnosis in the on-line format of PCR-CE. Also capillary array electrophoresis system should allow high throughput, fast speed DNA typing. Only the introduction and conclusions for this report are available here. A reprint was removed for separate processing.

  13. Practical capillary electrophoresis

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberger, Robert

    2000-01-01

    In the 1980s, capillary electrophoresis (CE) joined high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as the most powerful separation technique available to analytical chemists and biochemists. Published research using CE grew from 48 papers in the year of commercial introduction (1988) to 1200 in 1997. While only a dozen major pharmaceutical and biotech companies have reduced CE to routine practice, the applications market is showing real or potential growth in key areas, particularly in the DNA marketplace for genomic mapping and forensic identification. For drug development involving small molecules (including chiral separations), one CE instrument can replace 10 liquid chromatographs in terms of speed of analysis. CE also uses aqueous rather than organic solvents and is thus environmentally friendlier than HPLC. The second edition of Practical Capillary Electrophoresis has been extensively reorganized and rewritten to reflect modern usage in the field, with an emphasis on commercially available apparatus and ...

  14. Fluid Delivery System For Capillary Electrophoretic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingbo; Liu, Changsheng; Kane, Thomas E.; Kernan, John R.; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.

    2002-04-23

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carrousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  15. Tips for Daily Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips and Gadgets for Daily Activities Dressing Tips Shopping Tips Modifying the Bathroom Driving After Stroke Medication ... and resources. Find a group in your area . Online Support If there is not a support group ...

  16. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risks. Other possible complications of the procedure include: fever muscle stiffness in the neck bruising on the ... filtered out by the liver. The TIPS may cause too much of these substances to bypass the ...

  17. Tips to Prevent Tick Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using the right insect repellent and other preventive actions can discourage ticks, mosquitoes, and other biting insects from landing on you. Tips include avoiding tick habitats and minimizing exposed skin.

  18. Tips to Prevent Mosquito Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using the right insect repellent and other preventive actions can discourage mosquitoes from landing on you. Tips include removing mosquito habitats such as standing water, minimizing exposed skin, and staying indoors while mosquitoes are most active.

  19. Mini-flared Kelman tip, reverse tip, and sidewinder tip with torsional phaco: a prospective randomized comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Takashi Hida

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the efficiency of surgical procedures using three phaco tip designs in torsional phacoemulsification using the bevel-down technique. Methods: In this prospective, comparative, masked study, patients were randomly assigned to have torsional coaxial microincision cataract surgery using the mini-flared 45-degree Kelman tip, reversed mini-flared 30-degree Kelman tip, or Sidewinder 30-degree Kelman tip. Clinical measurements included preoperative and 3-month postoperative corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA, endothelial cell counts (ECC, and preoperative and 1-day postoperative central corneal thickness (CCT. Intraoperative measurements included phaco time, torsional time, aspiration time, case time, cumulative dissipated energy (CDE, and balanced salt solution volume (BSS. Results: The study evaluated 150 eyes of 150 patients. Intraoperatively, there was no statistically significant difference in cumulative dissipated energy, case time, torsional time, and aspiration time between the three tip configurations. However, less phaco time was used with the mini-flared 45-degree Kelman tip (p=0.02 than that with the Sidewinder 30-degree Kelman tip or reversed mini-flared 30-degree Kelman tip. The mini-flared 45-degree Kelman tip and the reversed mini-flared 30-degree Kelman tip required significantly less balanced salt solution volume than that required by the Sidewinder 30-degree Kelman tip (p=0.009. There was no statistically significant difference in corrected distance visual acuity and endothelial cell counts between tips 3 months postoperatively (p>0.05. Conclusion: All three tips were effective with no intraoperative complications. When using torsional phacoemulsification through microincisions and the prefracture technique with the bevel-down technique, the mini-flared 45-degree Kelman tip required a lower mean phaco time than the reversed mini-flared 30-degree Kelman tip and the Sidewinder 30-degree Kelman tip.

  20. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... unaware of the deadly danger of this hidden hazard. Parents should include securing TVs, furniture, and appliances in their childproofing efforts. The most vigilant, safety-conscious parent can’t react quickly enough to ...

  1. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... injuries than from exposed electrical outlets. Unfortunately, many parents are unaware of the deadly danger of this hidden hazard. Parents should include securing TVs, furniture, and appliances in ...

  2. Healthy Vision Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Kids >> Healthy Vision Tips Listen All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series ... Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Healthy Vision Tips Healthy vision starts with you! Use these ...

  3. Digestive Health Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Digestive Health Topic / Digestive Health Tips Digestive Health Tips Basics 10 Tips on Belching, Bloating, and Flatulence Belching is caused by swallowed air from: Eating or drinking too fast Poorly fitting dentures; not chewing food completely Carbonated beverages Chewing gum or sucking on ...

  4. Tip studies using CFD and comparison with tip loss models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Johansen, J.

    2004-01-01

    The flow past a rotating LM8.2 blade equipped with two different tips are computed using CFD. The different tip flows are analysed and a comparison with two different tip loss models is made. Keywords: tip flow, aerodynamics, CFD......The flow past a rotating LM8.2 blade equipped with two different tips are computed using CFD. The different tip flows are analysed and a comparison with two different tip loss models is made. Keywords: tip flow, aerodynamics, CFD...

  5. Intramedullary capillary haemangioma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelleher, T

    2012-02-03

    Intramedullary capillary haemangioma is extremely rare and only four cases have been previously reported. We describe a further case, outlining the clinical, radiological, surgical and pathological features.

  6. ESCo for mutual benefit and free energy saving. White paper 1. Including five cases and tips from experts; ESCo voor wederzijds voordeel en gratis energiebesparing. White paper 1. Inclusief vijf cases en experttips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-01-15

    This white paper provides insight into the operation, options and restrictions of ESCo's (Energy Service Companies). The different variants of a relatively simple ESCo-product to an advanced ESCo-project are described and illustrated with examples from practice. Tips from experts can help with the assessment whether entering into a partnership with an ESCo is attractive enough [Dutch] Deze whitepaper geeft inzicht in de werking, mogelijkheden en beperkingen van ESCo's (Energy Service Companies). De verschillende varianten, van een relatief eenvoudige product-ESCo tot een geavanceerde project-ESCo worden beschreven en geillustreerd aan de hand van praktijkvoorbeelden. Tips van expert helpen met de inschatting of het aangaan van een samenwerkingsverband met een ESCo aantrekkelijk is.

  7. The TIPS Liquidity Premium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Martin Møller; Christensen, Jens H.E.; Simon Riddell, Simon

    We introduce an arbitrage-free term structure model of nominal and real yields that accounts for liquidity risk in Treasury inflation-protected securities (TIPS). The novel feature of our model is to identify liquidity risk from individual TIPS prices by accounting for the tendency that TIPS, like...... most fixed-income securities, go into buy-and-hold investors' portfolios as time passes. We find a sizable and countercyclical TIPS liquidity premium, which greatly helps our model in matching TIPS prices. Accounting for liquidity risk also improves the model's ability to forecast inflation and match...

  8. Arctic climate tipping points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenton, Timothy M

    2012-02-01

    There is widespread concern that anthropogenic global warming will trigger Arctic climate tipping points. The Arctic has a long history of natural, abrupt climate changes, which together with current observations and model projections, can help us to identify which parts of the Arctic climate system might pass future tipping points. Here the climate tipping points are defined, noting that not all of them involve bifurcations leading to irreversible change. Past abrupt climate changes in the Arctic are briefly reviewed. Then, the current behaviour of a range of Arctic systems is summarised. Looking ahead, a range of potential tipping phenomena are described. This leads to a revised and expanded list of potential Arctic climate tipping elements, whose likelihood is assessed, in terms of how much warming will be required to tip them. Finally, the available responses are considered, especially the prospects for avoiding Arctic climate tipping points.

  9. Turbine blade squealer tip rail with fence members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, David A

    2012-11-20

    A turbine blade includes an airfoil, a blade tip section, a squealer tip rail, and a plurality of chordally spaced fence members. The blade tip section includes a blade tip floor located at an end of the airfoil distal from the root. The blade tip floor includes a pressure side and a suction side joined together at chordally spaced apart leading and trailing edges of the airfoil. The squealer tip rail extends radially outwardly from the blade tip floor adjacent to the suction side and extends from a first location adjacent to the airfoil trailing edge to a second location adjacent to the airfoil leading edge. The fence members are located between the airfoil leading and trailing edges and extend radially outwardly from the blade tip floor and axially from the squealer tip rail toward the pressure side.

  10. Office 2010 Visual Quick Tips

    CERN Document Server

    Gunter, Sherry Kinkoph

    2010-01-01

    Get more done in Office 2010 in less time with these Quick Tips!. Whether you're new to Microsoft Office or updating from older versions, this is the perfect resource to get you quickly up to speed on Office 2010. Every application is covered, including Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Publisher. Full-color screenshots and numbered steps clearly explain dozens of features and functions-while quick shortcuts, tips, and tricks help you save time and boost productivity. You'll also find great new ways to access and use some Office apps right from the Web.: Walks you through dozens of new fea

  11. [Plastic micro-tips for drug delivery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muslija, A; Guber, A E; Heckele, M; Herrmann, D; Pfleging, W; Schaller, Th

    2002-01-01

    Removal or exact transfer of minimum substance volumes from reservoirs or microfluidic systems may be accomplished by means of miniaturized tips with integrated through-going capillaries. Applications in biomedical engineering, e.g. for the application of drugs, or in life sciences, e.g. equipping of microarrays, require the use of disposable plastic products for hygienic reasons and reasons of costs. For this purpose, a method to fabricate microtips out of plastic by doublesided molding has been developed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe.

  12. Final Technical Report: Electrohydrodynamic Tip Streaming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basaran, Osman [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2016-01-06

    When subjected to strong electric fields, liquid drops and films form conical tips and emit thin jets from their tips. Such electrodydrodynamic (EDH) tip streaming or cone-jetting phenomena, which are sometimes referred to as electrospraying, occur widely in nature, e.g., in ejection of streams of small charged drops from pointed tips of raindrops in thunderclouds, and technology, e.g., in electrospray mass spectrometry or electric field-driven solvent extraction. More recently, EHD cone-jetting has emerged as a powerful technique for direct printing of solar cells, micro- and nano- particle production, and microencapsulation for controlled release. In many of the aforementioned situations, of equal importance to the processes by which one drop disintegrates to form several drops are those by which (a) two drops come together and coalesce and (b) two drops are coupled to form a double droplet system (DDS) or a capillary switch (CS). the main objective of this research program is to advance through simulation, theory, and experiment the breakup, coalescence, and oscillatory dynamics of single and pairs of charged as well as uncharged drops.

  13. Stacking by electroinjection with discontinuous buffers in capillary zone electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shihabi, Zak K

    2002-08-01

    The work presented here demonstrates that electroinjection can be performed using discontinuous buffers, which can result in better stacking than that obtained by hydrodynamic injection. The sample can be concentrated at the tip of the capillary leaving practically the whole capillary for sample separation. This results in several advantages, such as better sample concentration, higher plate number and shorter time of stacking. However, sample introduction by electromigration is suited for samples free or low in salt content. Samples, which are high in salt content, are better introduced by the hydrodynamic injection for stacking by the discontinuous buffers. Different simple methods to introduce the discontinuity in the buffer for electroinjection are discussed.

  14. Tips in Reading Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    Some tips can assist teachers in guiding each pupil to achieve more optimally, with respect to the ability to read well and reading comprehension. Among these 10 specific tips are: (1) teach individualized phonics in context; (2) assist the student to read in proper thought units by covering up words in sentences for clarification; (3) assist…

  15. ADHD: Tips to Try

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español ADHD: Tips to Try KidsHealth / For Teens / ADHD: Tips to Try Print en español TDAH: Consejos que puedes probar ADHD , short for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder , is a ...

  16. Total Telephone Tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corder, Lloyd E.; And Others

    This manual of telephone behavior tips for business and sales professionals offers ways to handle the disgruntled caller and makes suggestions on topics relevant to the telephone. The manual is divided into the following sections and subsections: (1) Common Courtesy (staff tips, answering the telephone, screening calls, transferring calls, taking…

  17. CFD analysis of cloud cavitation on three tip-modified propellers with systematically varied tip geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, K. W.; Andersen, P.

    2015-12-01

    The blade tip loading is often reduced as an effort to restrain sheet and tip vortex cavitation in the design of marine propellers. This CFD analysis demonstrates that an excessive reduction of the tip loading can cause cloud cavitation responsible for much of noise and surface erosion. Detached eddy simulations (DES) are made for cavitating flows on three tip- modified propellers, of which one is a reference propeller having an experimental result from a cavitation tunnel test with a hull model, and the other two are modified from the reference propeller by altering the blade tip loading. DES results have been validated against the experiment in terms of sheet and cloud cavitation. In DES, non-uniform hull wake is modelled by using the inlet flow and momentum sources instead of including a hull model. A 4-bladed Kappel propeller with a smooth tip bending towards the suction side is used as the reference propeller. For the reference propeller, sheet cavitation extends over a whole chord length in the hull wake peak. As the blade gets out of the wake peak, the rear part of sheet cavity is detached in a form of cloud cavitation. For the reference propeller, the tip pitch reduction from the maximum is about 35%. When decreasing the tip pitch reduction to 10%, tip vortex cavitation is formed and cloud cavitation is significantly weakened. When increasing the tip pitch reduction to 60%, sheet cavitation slightly moves to inner radii and cloud cavitation grows larger.

  18. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the liver). Portal hypertension can also occur in children, although children are much less likely to require a TIPS. ... intentionally to solve the problem. Although extremely rare, children may also require a TIPS procedure. TIPS in ...

  19. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vs. risks? What are the limitations of TIPS? What is a Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)? A ... likely to require a TIPS. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A ...

  20. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... TIPS is a minimally invasive procedure that typically has a shorter recovery time than surgery. Your TIPS ...

  1. Predicting casualties implied by TIPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trendafiloski, G.; Wyss, M.; Wyss, B. M.

    2009-12-01

    When an earthquake is predicted, forecast, or expected with a higher than normal probability, losses are implied. We estimated the casualties (fatalities plus injured) that should be expected if earthquakes in TIPs (locations of Temporarily Increased Probability of earthquakes) defined by Kossobokov et al. (2009) should occur. We classified the predictions of losses into the categories red (more than 400 fatalities or more than 1,000 injured), yellow (between 100 and 400 fatalities), green (fewer than 100 fatalities), and gray (undetermined). TIPs in Central Chile, the Philippines, Papua, and Taiwan are in the red class, TIPs in Southern Sumatra, Nicaragua, Vanatu, and Honshu in the yellow class, and TIPs in Tonga, Loyalty Islands, Vanatu, S. Sandwich Islands, Banda Sea, and the Kuriles, are classified as green. TIPs where the losses depend moderately on the assumed point of major energy release were classified as yellow; TIPs such as in the Talaud Islands and in Tonga, where the losses depend very strongly on the location of the epicenter, were classified as gray. The accuracy of loss estimates after earthquakes with known hypocenter and magnitude are affected by uncertainties in transmission and soil properties, the composition of the building stock, the population present, and the method by which the numbers of casualties are calculated. In the case of TIPs, uncertainties in magnitude and location are added, thus we calculate losses for a range of these two parameters. Therefore, our calculations can only be considered order of magnitude estimates. Nevertheless, our predictions can come to within a factor of two of the observed numbers, as in the case of the M7.6 earthquake of October 2005 in Pakistan that resulted in 85,000 fatalities (Wyss, 2005). In subduction zones, the geometrical relationship between the earthquake source capable of a great earthquake and the population is clear because there is only one major fault plane available, thus the epicentral

  2. Sleep Tips: 7 Steps to Better Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn every night. Consider simple tips for better sleep, from setting a sleep schedule to including physical activity in your daily ... factors that can interfere with a good night's sleep — from work stress and family responsibilities to unexpected ...

  3. Proper Use of Capillary Number in Chemical Flooding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Capillary number theory is very important for chemical flooding enhanced oil recovery. The difference between microscopic capillary number and the microscopic one is easy to confuse. After decades of development, great progress has been made in capillary number theory and it has important but sometimes incorrect application in EOR. The capillary number theory was based on capillary tube bundles and Darcy’s law hypothesis, and this should always be kept in mind when used in chemical flooding EOR. The flow in low permeability porous media often shows obvious non-Darcy effects, which is beyond Darcy’s law. Experiments data from ASP flooding and SP flooding showed that remaining oil saturation was not always decreasing as capillary number kept on increasing. Relative permeability was proved function of capillary number; its rate dependence was affected by capillary end effects. The mobility control should be given priority rather than lowering IFT. The displacement efficiency was not increased as displacement velocity increased as expected in heavy oil chemical flooding. Largest capillary number does not always make highest recovery in chemical flooding in heterogeneous reservoir. Misuse of CDC in EOR included the ignorance of mobility ratio, Darcy linear flow hypothesis, difference between microscopic capillary number and the microscopic one, and heterogeneity caused flow regime alteration. Displacement of continuous oil or remobilization of discontinuous oil was quite different.

  4. First Aid Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Diversity In Vision Research & Ophthalmology (DIVRO) Student Training Programs To search for current job openings visit HHS USAJobs Home » NEI for Kids » First Aid Tips Listen All About Vision About the Eye ...

  5. Tips for Daily Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chapter Join our online community Tips for Daily Life Coping skills will help you handle day-to- ... challenges, maximize your independence and live a meaningful life with your diagnosis. Accepting changes Creating a coping ...

  6. Toilet training tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000944.htm Toilet training tips To use the sharing features on ... and 'pee'. Teaching Your Child to Use the Toilet Once your child is comfortable sitting on the ...

  7. Capillary electrophoresis theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Grossman, Paul D

    1992-01-01

    This book is designed to be a practical guide, used by wide audience, including those new to CE, those more experienced, routine users, those interested in technology development, and those involved with applications research. References have been emphasized to allow the reader to explore the detailed specifics and theoretical foundations.This book draws together the rapidly evolving, diverse, and multidisciplinary subject of capillary electrophoresis (CE). It is designed as a practical guide to be used by a wide audience, including those new to CE as well as more experienced users. T

  8. Paper Symposium Capillary Electrophoresis and Capillary Electrochromatography of Peptides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašička, Václav (ed.)

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 5 (2003), s. 765-913 ISSN 0173-0835 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : capillary electrophoresis * capillary electrochromatography Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.040, year: 2003

  9. Biomimetic Unidirectional Capillary Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert, Eric; Moran, Patrick; Dahl, Jason

    2017-11-01

    In arid environments animals require specialized adaptations to collect adequate water. The Texas horned lizard (P. cornutum) has superhydrophylic skin which draws water out of moist soil or directly from water sources. The water then makes its way into the lizard's unidirectional capillary system, made of overlapping scales, which serves to channel water to its mouth. Testing different channel geometries, repeated ``D'' shaped chambers as in Commans et al. (2015) and truncated isosceles triangle chambers, as found in P. cornutum, we show the ability to have passive, unidirectional, fluid transport. Tests were carried out with the capillaries in a horizontal configuration. While both capillary geometries produced the desired traits, the triangular chambers showed superior unidirectionality, with no observed back flow, while ``D'' chambers showed back flow under testing conditions. The chambers provided similar flow rates. These types of channel systems will find use in microfluidics, notably in medical, printing, and lab-on-chip applications.

  10. Capillary electrophoresis of diuretics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riekkola, M L; Jumppanen, J H

    1996-05-31

    The review surveys the application of capillary electrophoresis to the screening, identification and determination of diuretics and probenecid. The number of publications is still limited, but the studies already published clearly show that capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography are excellent alternatives for the investigation of diuretics. High accuracy identifications of diuretics and probenecid, even in urine samples, can be obtained when CZE is used with the marker techniques. This review paper has been written from the viewpoint of practical use and some hints are given for future CE studies on diuretics.

  11. SOI-based nanoelectrospray emitter tips for mass spectrometry: a coupled MEMS and microfluidic design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Bernard; Ashcroft, Alison E.; Buchaillot, Lionel; Arscott, Steve

    2007-03-01

    We present here micromachined nanoelectrospray emitter tips based on a microfluidic capillary slot fabricated using silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology. We couple microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and microfluidic design rules to ensure the rigidity of the structures by taking into account the effect of capillary forces generated by the introduction of liquids into MEMS. The SOI-based microtechnology fabrication process uses four simple steps: photolithography, dry etching, wet etching and dicing. This optimized fabrication process enables cost-effective batch production of chip-based micromachined nanoelectrospray emitter tips. The characteristics of these nanoelectrospray emitter tips were investigated using mass spectrometry. We have detected the protein lysozyme at a concentration as low as 100 fmol µL-1 our results indicate that micromachined electrospray emitter tips are useful in biomolecular analysis.

  12. Optothermally actuated capillary burst valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Johan; Bilenberg, Brian; Kristensen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the optothermal actuation of individual capillary burst valves in an all-polymer microfluidic device. The capillary burst valves are realised in a planar design by introducing a fluidic constriction in a microfluidic channel of constant depth. We show that a capillary burst valve can...

  13. Modeling aerobic biodegradation in the capillary fringe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jian; Kurt, Zohre; Hou, Deyi; Spain, Jim C

    2015-02-03

    Vapor intrusion from volatile subsurface contaminants can be mitigated by aerobic biodegradation. Laboratory column studies with contaminant sources of chlorobenzene and a mixture of chlorobenzene, 1,2-dichlorobenzene, and 1,4-dichlorobenzene showed that contaminants were rapidly degraded in thin reactive zones with high biomass and low substrate concentrations in the vicinity of the capillary fringe. Such behavior was well characterized by a model that includes oxygen-, substrate-, and biomass-dependent biodegradation kinetics along with diffusive transport processes. An analytical solution was derived to provide theoretical support for the simplification of reaction kinetics and the approximation of reactive zone location and mass flux relationships at steady state. Results demonstrate the potential of aerobic natural attenuation in the capillary fringe for preventing contaminant migration in the unsaturated zone. The solution indicates that increasing contaminant mass flux into the column creates a thinner reactive zone and pushes it toward the oxygen boundary, resulting in a shorter distance to the oxygen source and a larger oxygen mass flux that balances the contaminant mass flux. As a consequence, the aerobic biodegradation can reduce high contaminant concentrations to low levels within the capillary fringe and unsaturated zone. The results are consistent with the observations of thin reactive layers at the interface in unsaturated zones. The model considers biomass while including biodegradation in the capillary fringe and unsaturated zone and clearly demonstrates that microbial communities capable of using the contaminants as electron donors may lead to instantaneous degradation kinetics in the capillary fringe and unsaturated zone.

  14. Capillary Rarefaction Associates with Albuminuria: The Maastricht Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Remy J H; Henry, Ronald M A; Houben, Alfons J H M; van der Kallen, Carla J H; Kroon, Abraham A; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Schram, Miranda T; Sep, Simone J S; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Muris, Dennis M J; Gronenschild, Ed H B M; van der Sande, Frank M; Leunissen, Karel M L; Kooman, Jeroen P; Stehouwer, Coen D A

    2016-12-01

    Albuminuria may be a biomarker of generalized (i.e., microvascular and macrovascular) endothelial dysfunction. According to this concept, endothelial dysfunction of the renal microcirculation causes albuminuria by increasing glomerular capillary wall permeability and intraglomerular pressure, the latter eventually leading to glomerular capillary dropout (rarefaction) and further increases in intraglomerular pressure. However, direct evidence for an association between capillary rarefaction and albuminuria is lacking. Therefore, we examined the cross-sectional association between the recruitment of capillaries after arterial occlusion (capillary density during postocclusive peak reactive hyperemia) and during venous occlusion (venous congestion), as assessed with skin capillaroscopy, and albuminuria in 741 participants of the Maastricht Study, including 211 participants with type 2 diabetes. Overall, 57 participants had albuminuria, which was defined as a urinary albumin excretion ≥30 mg/24 h. After adjustment for potential confounders, participants in the lowest tertile of skin capillary recruitment during postocclusive peak reactive hyperemia had an odds ratio for albuminuria of 2.27 (95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 4.80) compared with those in the highest tertile. Similarly, a comparison between the lowest and the highest tertiles of capillary recruitment during venous congestion yielded an odds ratio of 2.89 (95% confidence interval, 1.27 to 6.61) for participants in the lowest tertile. In conclusion, lower capillary density of the skin microcirculation independently associated with albuminuria, providing direct support for a role of capillary rarefaction in the pathogenesis of albuminuria. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  15. Magnet pole tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Craig E.; Chasman, Chellis; Baltz, Anthony J.

    1984-04-24

    An improved magnet which more easily provides a radially increasing magnetic field, as well as reduced fringe field and requires less power for a given field intensity. The subject invention comprises a pair of spaced, opposed magnetic poles which further comprise a pair of pole roots, each having a pole tip attached to its center. The pole tips define the gap between the magnetic poles and at least a portion of each pole tip is separated from its associated pole root. The separation begins at a predetermined distance from the center of the pole root and increases with increasing radial distance while being constant with azimuth within that portion. Magnets in accordance with the subject invention have been found to be particularly advantageous for use in large isochronous cyclotrons.

  16. Coupling of capillary zone electrophoresis to mass spectrometry (MS and MS/MS) via a nanoelectrospray interface for the characterisation of some β-agonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guček, M.; Vreeken, R.J.; Verheij, E.R.

    1999-01-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) was coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) via a nanoelectrospray interface (nESI), using conductively coated tips (8 μm orifice) butted to the end of a fused-silica capillary. The CZE/nESI-MS system was carefully optimised to achieve a stable operation of the

  17. A Fourier analysis approach for capillary polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, Dmitry A; Swinney, Kelly; Norville, Kristin; Lu, David; Bornhop, Darryl J

    2002-03-01

    A new method of fringe interrogation based on Fourier analysis was implemented and tested for a capillary polarimetry detector. It has significant advantages over the previously employed depth of modulation (DOM) approach, including speed and alignment insensitivity. The new and old methods were compared using a set of interference fringes typically used to facilitate nanoliter volume polarimetric determinations. Polarimetric response was calculated with both methods over the range from 0 degrees to 180 degrees. The results were found to be in good agreement with Malus Law and indicate that an fast Fourier transform (fft) could be used for real-time capillary scale polarimetry in a probe volume of 40 nL.

  18. Tips from the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Kim Hughes; Leverett, Thomas; Barrett, Rob J.; Chur-Hansen, Anna; Dantas-Whitney, Maria; Zapata, Gabriela; Garcia, Juan Felix

    1998-01-01

    Five articles present tips for rallying English-as-a-Second-Language students to the enterprise of creating context, tools, and language itself. The articles focus on using original dramas created by students, teaching nonnative English-speaking medical students to comprehend their patients' colloquial language, conducting research with native…

  19. Air Travel Health Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Prevention and Wellness Staying Healthy Healthy Living Travel Occupational Health First Aid and Injury Prevention Crisis ... MoreDepression in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator International Travel: Tips for Staying HealthyTexting and DrivingTravel Needs for ...

  20. 10 Data Visualization Tips

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    communicated through the use of design choices. (as indicated in tip 8). 8. Use colour, size, and position to help the reader see what is important. Colour adds emphasis, highlights particular data points, and draws connections between graphs. The hue, value, and intensity of the colour are significant and may have cultural ...

  1. Sports Dehydration Safety Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sports Dehydration Safety Tips Everything you need to know to keep your kids safe from dehydration when playing sports. To keep kids in top ... to stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids. Dehydration occurs when a body loses more water than ...

  2. Sensitive analysis of amino acids with carrier-mediated single drop microextraction in-line coupled with capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeongmi; Choi, Kihwan; Kim, Jihye; Ahmed, Ahmed Yacine Badjah Hadj; Al-Othman, Zeid A; Chung, Doo Soo

    2011-10-14

    In order to analyze amino acids sensitively without derivatization, we have developed carrier-mediated single drop microextraction (SDME). Nonane-1-sulfonic acid was added to an acidic sample donor solution as a carrier to form neutral ion pair complexes with amino acids. The ion pair complexes were extracted to the organic phase, covering a drop of an aqueous basic acceptor phase hanging at the tip of a capillary, and then back-extracted to the basic acceptor phase, where both the amino acids and the carrier have negative charges and the ion pair complexes are broken. The resulting extract of enriched amino acids was injected into the capillary and analyzed by capillary electrophoresis. With 20-min SDME with agitation of the donor phase, enrichment factors of four aromatic amino acids were up to 120-fold, yielding the LOD of 70-500 nM. The linear dynamic ranges for corrected peak areas were 1-100 μM with linear correlation coefficients larger than 0.9959. With internal standardization, the intraday RSDs of migration times and corrected peak areas were 0.01-0.04% and 2.0-3.7%, respectively. The capabilities of sample cleanup including desalting and preconcentration of carrier-mediated SDME were demonstrated with the analysis of human urine after minimal pretreatment of acidification and centrifugation. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. due to Capillary Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassen M. Ouakad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present modeling and analysis for the static behavior and collapse instabilities of doubly-clamped and cantilever microbeams subjected to capillary forces. These forces can be as a result of a volume of liquid trapped underneath the microbeam during the rinsing and drying process in fabrication. The model considers the microbeam as a continuous medium, the capillary force as a nonlinear function of displacement, and accounts for the mid-plane stretching and geometric nonlinearities. The capillary force is assumed to be distributed over a specific length underneath the microbeam. The Galerkin procedure is used to derive a reduced-order model consisting of a set of nonlinear algebraic and differential equations that describe the microbeams static and dynamic behaviors. We study the collapse instability, which brings the microbeam from its unstuck configuration to touch the substrate and gets stuck in the so-called pinned configuration. We calculate the pull-in length that distinguishes the free from the pinned configurations as a function of the beam thickness and gap width for both microbeams. Comparisons are made with analytical results reported in the literature based on the Ritz method for linear and nonlinear beam models. The instability problem, which brings the microbeam from a pinned to adhered configuration is also investigated. For this case, we use a shooting technique to solve the boundary-value problem governing the deflection of the microbeams. The critical microbeam length for this second instability is also calculated.

  4. Full tip imaging in atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Sichao [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Burgess, Timothy [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Tjing Loi, Shyeh [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Gault, Baptiste [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St W, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Gao, Qiang [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Bao, Peite; Li, Li [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cui, Xiangyuan; Kong Yeoh, Wai [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hoe Tan, Hark; Jagadish, Chennupati [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Ringer, Simon P. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Zheng, Rongkun, E-mail: rongkun.zheng@sydney.edu.au [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-01-15

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is capable of simultaneously revealing the chemical identities and three dimensional positions of individual atoms within a needle-shaped specimen, but suffers from a limited field-of-view (FOV), i.e., only the core of the specimen is effectively detected. Therefore, the capacity to analyze the full tip is crucial and much desired in cases that the shell of the specimen is also the region of interest. In this paper, we demonstrate that, in the analysis of III-V nanowires epitaxially grown from a substrate, the presence of the flat substrate positioned only micrometers away from the analyzed tip apex alters the field distribution and ion trajectories, which provides extra image compression that allows for the analysis of the entire specimen. An array of experimental results, including field desorption maps, elemental distributions, and crystallographic features clearly demonstrate the fact that the whole tip has been imaged, which is confirmed by electrostatic simulations. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The full tip has been imaged by atom probe tomography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The conductive substrate close to specimen tip introduces extra image compression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The apex of the tip is far from a hemispherical shape. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This work demonstrates a way to increase the FOV of APT.

  5. Electroviscous effects in capillary filling of nanochannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Asger; Kristensen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    We theoretically examine the widespread hypothesis of an electroviscous origin of the increase in apparent viscosity observed in recent experiments on capillary filling of nanochannels. Including Debye-layer corrections to the hydraulic resistance, we find that the apparent viscosity reaches...

  6. Tip velocity tracking control for elastic manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, Manfred Dieter Martin

    making it more robust to disturbances and by adding control terms to assist in minimizing the tip position tracking error. Notable contributions include the design, parallelization, and parallel implementation of the tip velocity tracking controller. In addition, experimental results were obtained and a preliminary stability investigation of the controller was done.

  7. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... TIPS. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A TIPS is used to ... the scanner by a cord. Some exams may use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single ...

  8. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or bypass, without the risks that accompany open surgery. TIPS is a minimally invasive procedure that typically has a shorter recovery time than surgery. Your TIPS should have less of an effect ...

  9. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... then placed in this tunnel to keep the pathway open. Patients who typically need a TIPS have ... and stomach. A TIPS procedure involves creating a pathway through the liver that connects the portal vein ( ...

  10. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and/or hydrothorax (in the chest). Budd-Chiari syndrome , a blockage in one or more veins that ... intentionally to solve the problem. Although extremely rare, children may also require a TIPS procedure. TIPS in ...

  11. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart while avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce internal bleeding in the stomach and esophagus in ... TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver and reduces abnormally high blood pressure in the veins of ...

  12. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of TIPS? What is a Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)? A transjugular intrahepatic ... taking our brief survey: Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story ...

  13. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... liver disease are at greater risk for worsening liver failure after TIPS. If your liver failure is severe, a TIPS may not be the best use and a different procedure may be needed to control your symptoms. ... ordinarily filtered out by the liver. The TIPS may cause too much of these ...

  14. Tip-modified Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with tip-modified propellers and the methods which, over a period of two decades, have been applied to develop such propellers. The development is driven by the urge to increase the efficiency of propellers and can be seen as analogous to fitting end plates and winglets to aircraft...... propeller, have efficiency increases of a reasonable magnitude in both open-water and behind-ship conditions....

  15. Ion guiding in alumina capillaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhász, Z.; Sulik, B.; Biri, S.

    2009-01-01

    focus our attention to the measurements with the MCP array. The alumina capillaries were prepared by electro-chemical oxidation of aluminium foils. For the present experiments guiding of 3-6 keV Ne ions has been studied in two samples with capillary diameter of about 140 nm and 260 nm and with capillary...... length of about 15 μm. At these energies, the ions have been efficiently guided by the capillaries up to few degrees tilt angle. In this work, we compare the results obtained by the energy dispersive spectrometer to those studied by the MCP array....

  16. Development of gold nanoparticle-sheathed glass capillary nanoelectrodes for sensitive detection of cerebral dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingzi; Yao, Qianqian; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Li, Meina; Zhu, Anwei; Shi, Guoyue

    2015-01-15

    To develop in vivo monitoring strategies of neurotransmitters involved in brain chemistry is a challenging work for progress in understanding the roles that biomolecules play in pathology and physiology. Here we report a new type of gold nanoparticle-sheathed glass capillary nanoelectrode (Au/GCNE) for sensing cerebral dopamine. First, a size-controlled needle-type quartz capillary was pulled with a laser puller. Then, the capillary tip exterior was chemically functionalized with colloidal gold nanoparticles by the seed-mediated growth protocol. Through insulating the above tip with cathodic electrophoretic paint followed by heating to tune the exposed area of gold-nanoparticle-film, the Au/GCNE with tip apex radius ranging from ~8.9 to ~500 nm can be prepared. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and steady-state voltammetry were utilized to characterize the effective radius of nanoelectrodes. The results showed that the tip apex radius of Au/GCNE was mainly affected by the pre-pulled capillary tip, the modified AuNPs and the cathodic electrophoretic paint. By taking advantage of the modified AuNPs and the enhanced electrochemical performance of the nanoelectrode, a wide dynamic linear range from 2.0×10(-8) M to 5.6×10(-6) M with a low detection limit of 1.0×10(-8) M (S/N=3), as well as good selectivity for dopamine, were first achieved with the Nafion-modified Au/GCNE. In addition, the designed glass substrates of Au/GCNE were mechanically stronger and their sharp tips aided in membrane penetration during implantation in the in vivo experiment. As a result, the Nafion-modified Au/GCNE was successfully applied for amperometrically monitoring dopamine in the striatum of anesthetic rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Embolization with the Amplatzer Vascular Plug in TIPS Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattynama, Peter M. T.; Wils, Alexandra; Linden, Edwin van der; Dijk, Lukas C. van

    2007-01-01

    Vessel embolization can be a valuable adjunct procedure in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). During the creation of a TIPS, embolization of portal vein collaterals supplying esophageal varices may lower the risk of secondary rebleeding. And after creation of a TIPS, closure of the TIPS itself may be indicated if the resulting hepatic encephalopathy severely impairs mental functioning. The Amplatzer Vascular Plug (AVP; AGA Medical, Golden Valley, MN) is well suited for embolization of large-diameter vessels and has been employed in a variety of vascular lesions including congenital arteriovenous shunts. Here we describe the use of the AVP in the context of TIPS to embolize portal vein collaterals (n = 8) or to occlude the TIPS (n = 2)

  18. Imbibition of ``Open Capillary'': Fundamentals and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Marie; Kawano, Ryuji; Kamiya, Koki; Okumura, Ko

    2015-11-01

    Control or transportation of small amount of liquid is one of the most important issues in various contexts including medical sciences or pharmaceutical industries to fuel delivery. We studied imbibition of ``open capillary'' both experimentally and theoretically, and found simple scaling laws for both statics and dynamics of the imbibition, similarly as that of imbibition of capillary tubes. Furthermore, we revealed the existence of ``precursor film,'' which developed ahead of the imbibing front, and the dynamics of it is described well by another scaling law for capillary rise in a corner. Then, to show capabilities of open capillaries, we demonstrated two experiments by fabricating micro mixing devices to achieve (1) simultaneous multi-color change of the Bromothymol blue (BTB) solution and (2) expression of the green florescent protein (GFP). This research was partly supported by ImPACT Program of Council for Science, Technology and Innovation (Cabinet Office, Government of Japan). M. T. is supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Research Fellowships for Young Scientists.

  19. Effect of surfactant on kinetics of thinning of capillary bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Emilia; Kovalchuk, Nina; Simmons, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Kinetics of thinning of capillary bridges is of great scientific and industrial interest being of vital importance for example in various emulsification and microfluidic processes. It is well known that the rate of bridge thinning is proportional to the interfacial tension. Therefore it is expected that the process should slow down by addition of surfactant. The kinetics of capillary bridges in the presence of surfactant was studied by the dripping of liquid from a capillary tip under conditions of nearly zero flow rate (We personal care products. The viscosity, surfactant activity and adsorption kinetics have been controlled by addition of glycerol and sodium chloride. The study has shown that the kinetics of capillary bridges are determined by dynamic surface tension rather than by its equilibrium value. In particular, the kinetics of the bridge thinning for the 0.1 g L-1 aqueous SLES solution is practically the same as that of pure water despite twice lower equilibrium surface tension. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  20. Four degree of freedom liquid dispenser for direct write capillary self-assembly with sub-nanoliter precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beroz, Justin; Bedewy, Mostafa; Reinker, Michael; Chhajer, Vipul; Awtar, Shorya; Hart, A John

    2012-01-01

    Capillary forces provide a ubiquitous means of organizing micro- and nanoscale structures on substrates. In order to investigate the mechanism of capillary self-assembly and to fabricate complex ordered structures, precise control of the meniscus shape is needed. We present a precision instrument that enables deposition of liquid droplets spanning from 2 nl to 300 μl, in concert with mechanical manipulation of the liquid-substrate interface with four degrees of freedom. The substrate has sub-100 nm positioning resolution in three axes of translation, and its temperature is controlled using thermoelectric modules. The capillary tip can rotate about the vertical axis while simultaneously dispensing liquid onto the substrate. Liquid is displaced using a custom bidirectional diaphragm pump, in which an elastic membrane is hydraulically actuated by a stainless steel syringe. The syringe is driven by a piezoelectric actuator, enabling nanoliter volume and rate control. A quantitative model of the liquid dispenser is verified experimentally, and suggests that compressibility in the hydraulic line deamplifies the syringe stroke, enabling sub-nanoliter resolution control of liquid displacement at the capillary tip. We use this system to contact-print water and oil droplets by mechanical manipulation of a liquid bridge between the capillary and the substrate. Finally, we study the effect of droplet volume and substrate temperature on the evaporative self-assembly of monodisperse polymer microspheres from sessile droplets, and demonstrate the formation of 3D chiral assemblies of micro-rods by rotation of the capillary tip during evaporative assembly.

  1. Vacuum scanning capillary photoemission microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aseyev, S.A.; Cherkun, A P; Mironov, B N

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of a conical capillary in a scanning probe microscopy for surface analysis. The probe can measure photoemission from a substrate by transmitting photoelectrons along the capillary as a function of probe position. The technique is demonstrated on a model substrate consisting...

  2. DO SLOVENIAN DEALERS USE TECHNIQUES FOR INCREASING THEIR TIPS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Raspor

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In 1996 Michael Lynn introduced the idea that restaurant managers could increase tips for their waiters and thus increase turnover by training the waiters to engage tip-enhancing behaviours. Since then, the list of tip-enhancing behaviours has expanded. Therefore the potential to increase tips is more accessible. The purpose of this paper was to examine how Slovenian dealers use strategies to increase their tips. We tested fourteen techniques to increase tips. The study was carried out among 473 gaming employees, 279 of which are dealers, in the Slovenian gaming industry, in order to find out how they use these techniques and which of them can bring about an increase in their tips. The study showed that Slovenian dealers mostly do not use these techniques, and that the dealers who do use them tend to receive tips more often. The findings imply that managers and employees should be informed of these techniques in order to increase tips and their overall income. Practical implications are that we suggest that management considers these ideas for increasing flexibility and reducing the cost of work: (1 informing dealers on ways of increasing tips, (2 including the acquisition of this specific knowledge in their career plans, (3 carrying out a reform of the reward system which would include tips. Social implications will be shown in a higher gaming revenue. It is very likely – as shown in our research – that employees will receive higher wages as these will be topped up by tips. The state, in turn, will collect more taxes.

  3. Tipping point leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2003-04-01

    When William Bratton was appointed police commissioner of New York City in 1994, turf wars over jurisdiction and funding were rife and crime was out of control. Yet in less than two years, and without an increase in his budget, Bratton turned New York into the safest large city in the nation. And the NYPD was only the latest of five law-enforcement agencies Bratton had turned around. In each case, he succeeded in record time despite limited resources, a demotivated staff, opposition from powerful vested interests, and an organization wedded to the status quo. Bratton's turnarounds demonstrate what the authors call tipping point leadership. The theory of tipping points hinges on the insight that in any organization, fundamental changes can occur quickly when the beliefs and energies of a critical mass of people create an epidemic movement toward an idea. Bratton begins by overcoming the cognitive hurdles that block organizations from recognizing the need for change. He does this by putting managers face-to-face with operational problems. Next, he manages around limitations on funds, staff, or equipment by concentrating resources on the areas that are most in need of change and that have the biggest payoffs. He meanwhile solves the motivation problem by singling out key influencers--people with disproportionate power due to their connections or persuasive abilities. Finally, he closes off resistance from powerful opponents. Not every CEO has the personality to be a Bill Bratton, but his successes are due to much more than his personality. He relies on a remarkably consistent method that any manager looking to turn around an organization can use to overcome the forces of inertia and reach the tipping point.

  4. On hydraulics of capillary tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.G. Aloyan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the laws of motion of water in the capillary tubes, taken as a model for flowing well, on the analogical net count device. For capillary tube the lower limit value of flow rate is empirically determined above which the total hydraulic resistance of the capillary is practically constant. The specificity of the phenomenon is that the regime of motion, by a Reynolds number, for a given flow rate still remains laminar. This circumstance can perplex the specialists, so the author invites them to the scientific debate on the subject of study. Obviously, to identify the resulting puzzle it is necessary to conduct a series of experiments using capillaries of different lengths and diameters and with different values of overpressure. The article states that in tubes with very small diameter the preliminary magnitude of capillary rise of water in the presence of flow plays no role and can be neglected.

  5. Physiological factors influencing capillary growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egginton, S

    2011-07-01

    (1) Angiogenesis (growth of new capillaries from an existing capillary bed) may result from a mismatch in microvascular supply and metabolic demand (metabolic error signal). Krogh examined the distribution and number of capillaries to explore the correlation between O(2) delivery and O(2) consumption. Subsequently, the heterogeneity in angiogenic response within a muscle has been shown to reflect either differences in fibre type composition or mechanical load. However, local control leads to targetted angiogenesis in the vicinity of glycolytic fibre types following muscle stimulation, or oxidative fibres following endurance training, while heterogeneity of capillary spacing is maintained during ontogenetic growth. (2) Despite limited microscopy resolution and lack of specific markers, Krogh's interest in the structure of the capillary wall paved the way for understanding the mechanisms of capillary growth. Angiogenesis may be influenced by the response of perivascular or stromal cells (fibroblasts, macrophages and pericytes) to altered activity, likely acting as a source for chemical signals modulating capillary growth such as vascular endothelial growth factor. In addition, haemodynamic factors such as shear stress and muscle stretch play a significant role in adaptive remodelling of the microcirculation. (3) Most indices of capillarity are highly dependent on fibre size, resulting in possible bias because of scaling. To examine the consequences of capillary distribution, it is therefore helpful to quantify the area of tissue supplied by individual capillaries. This allows the spatial limitations inherent in most models of tissue oxygenation to be overcome generating an alternative approach to Krogh's tissue cylinder, the capillary domain, to improve descriptions of intracellular oxygen diffusion. © 2010 The Author. Acta Physiologica © 2010 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  6. AERODYNAMICS OF WING TIP SAILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSHTAK AL-ATABI

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Observers have always been fascinated by soaring birds. An interesting feature of these birds is the existence of few feathers extending from the tip of the wing. In this paper, small lifting surfaces were fitted to the tip of a NACA0012 wing in a fashion similar to that of wing tip feathers. Experimental measurements of induced drag, longitudinal static stability and trailing vortex structure were obtained.The tests showed that adding wing tip surfaces (sails decreased the induced drag factor and increased the longitudinal static stability. Results identified two discrete appositely rotated tip vortices and showed the ability of wing tip surfaces to break them down and to diffuse them.

  7. Adipogenesis: forces that tip the scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacDougald, Ormond A; Mandrup, Susanne

    2001-01-01

    factors reviewed include Wnt, transforming growth factor beta, inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin F(2alpha). Tipping the scales towards or away from adipogenesis has profound implications for human health. In this review, we describe recent contributions to the field and will focus on factors...

  8. Ten Timeless Tips for Keeping on Top of Teaching Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poling, Devereaux A.; LoSchiavo, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    We provide tips for helping psychology faculty effectively seek, select, and place new technology into pedagogical practice. We also provide tips to help psychology departments position themselves for a future that includes teaching technologies that have not yet been created. Instead of discussing today's top innovations in teaching (which…

  9. Restaurant Dining: Seven Tips for Staying Gluten Free

    Science.gov (United States)

    GiG Education Bulletin Restaurant Dining: Seven Tips for Staying Gluten-Free Updated May 2014 Tips for Dining Away from Home 1. Selection of eating establishment. • Your success at gluten-free dining will be determined by a number of factors, including the ...

  10. Assessing vitamin D nutritional status: Is capillary blood adequate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, M E; Ducharme, F M; Théorêt, Y; Bélanger, A-S; Delvin, E

    2016-06-01

    Venous blood is the usual sample for measuring various biomarkers, including 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD). However, it can prove challenging in infants and young children. Hence the finger-prick capillary collection is an alternative, being a relatively simple procedure perceived to be less invasive. We elected to validate the use of capillary blood sampling for 25OHD quantification by liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS). Venous and capillary blood samples were simultaneously collected from 15 preschool-aged children with asthma 10days after receiving 100,000IU of vitamin-D3 or placebo and 20 apparently healthy adult volunteers. 25OHD was measured by an in-house LC/MS-MS method. The venous 25OHD values varied between 23 and 255nmol/l. The venous and capillary blood total 25OHD concentrations highly correlated (r(2)=0.9963). The mean difference (bias) of capillary blood 25OHD compared to venous blood was 2.0 (95% CI: -7.5, 11.5) nmol/l. Our study demonstrates excellent agreement with no evidence of a clinically important bias between venous and capillary serum 25OHD concentrations measured by LC/MS-MS over a wide range of values. Under those conditions, capillary blood is therefore adequate for the measurement of 25OHD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. In situ scanning tunneling microscope tip treatment device for spin polarization imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An-Ping [Oak Ridge, TN; Jianxing, Ma [Oak Ridge, TN; Shen, Jian [Knoxville, TN

    2008-04-22

    A tip treatment device for use in an ultrahigh vacuum in situ scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The device provides spin polarization functionality to new or existing variable temperature STM systems. The tip treatment device readily converts a conventional STM to a spin-polarized tip, and thereby converts a standard STM system into a spin-polarized STM system. The tip treatment device also has functions of tip cleaning and tip flashing a STM tip to high temperature (>2000.degree. C.) in an extremely localized fashion. Tip coating functions can also be carried out, providing the tip sharp end with monolayers of coating materials including magnetic films. The device is also fully compatible with ultrahigh vacuum sample transfer setups.

  12. The Tipping Points of Technology Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauno Kekäle

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The tipping point, the decisive point in time in the competition between old and new, is an interesting phenomenon in physics of today. This aspect in technology acceptance is connected to many business decisions such as technology investments, product releases, resource allocation, sales forecasts and, ultimately, affects the profitability and even survival of a company. The tipping point itself is based on many stochastic and dynamic variables, and the process may at least partly be described as path-dependent. This paper analyses the tipping point from three aspects: (1 product performance, (2 features of the market and infrastructure (including related technologies and human network externalities, and (3 actions of the incumbents (including customer lock-in, systems lock-in, and sustaining innovation. The paper is based on the Bass s-curve idea and the technology trajectory concept proposed by Dosi. Three illustrative cases are presented to make the point of the multiple factors affecting technology acceptance and, thus, the tipping point. The paper also suggests outlines for further research in field of computer simulation.

  13. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... liver disease are at greater risk for worsening liver failure after TIPS. If your liver failure is severe, a TIPS may not be the ... children are more likely to be performed before liver transplant in those with ascites or variceal ... 08, 2017 Send us your feedback Did you find the ...

  14. Capillary Electrophoresis in Food and Foodomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Clara; Acunha, Tanize; Valdés, Alberto; García-Cañas, Virginia; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Simó, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Quality and safety assessment as well as the evaluation of other nutritional and functional properties of foods imply the use of robust, efficient, sensitive, and cost-effective analytical methodologies. Among analytical technologies used in the fields of food analysis and foodomics, capillary electrophoresis (CE) has generated great interest for the analyses of a large number of compounds due to its high separation efficiency, extremely small sample and reagent requirements, and rapid analysis. The introductory section of this chapter provides an overview of the recent applications of capillary electrophoresis (CE) in food analysis and foodomics. Relevant reviews and research articles on these topics are tabulated including papers published in the period 2011-2014. In addition, to illustrate the great capabilities of CE in foodomics the chapter describes the main experimental points to be taken into consideration for a metabolomic study of the antiproliferative effect of carnosic acid (a natural diterpene found in rosemary) against HT-29 human colon cancer cells.

  15. Metal Ions Analysis with Capillary Zone Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Ashok Kumar; Aulakh, Jatinder Singh; Kaur, Varinder

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis has recently attracted considerable attention as a promising analytical technique for metal ion separations. Significant advances that open new application areas for capillary electrophoresis in the analysis of metal species occurred based on various auxiliary separation principles. These are mainly due to complexation, ion pairing, solvation, and micellization interactions between metal analytes and electrolyte additives, which alter the separation selectivity in a broad range. Likewise, many separation studies for metal ions have been concentrated on the use of preelectrophoresis derivatization methodology. Approaches suitable for manipulation of selectivity for different metal species including metal cations, metal complexes, metal oxoanions, and organometallic compounds, are discussed, with special attention paid to the related electrophoretic system variables using illustrative examples.

  16. The fabrication and modification of capillary polymer monoliths for the separation of small ions

    OpenAIRE

    Moyna, Aine

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication and modification of polymer monoliths, in capillary formats, for the separation of small ions is presented. The separation of small ions using polymer monoliths has limitations and this work aims to investigate increasing the ion exchange capacity using photo-grafting techniques. Chapter 1.0 includes a comprehensive review on the use of capillary ion chromatography including advancements made in capillary instrumentation, stationary phases and detection devices. This chapter a...

  17. Tip cells: master regulators of tubulogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weavers, Helen; Skaer, Helen

    2014-07-01

    The normal development of an organ depends on the coordinated regulation of multiple cell activities. Focusing on tubulogenesis, we review the role of specialised cells or groups of cells that are selected from within tissue primordia and differentiate at the outgrowing tips or leading edge of developing tubules. Tip or leading cells develop distinctive patterns of gene expression that enable them to act both as sensors and transmitters of intercellular signalling. This enables them to explore the environment, respond to both tissue intrinsic signals and extrinsic cues from surrounding tissues and to regulate the behaviour of their neighbours, including the setting of cell fate, patterning cell division, inducing polarity and promoting cell movement and cell rearrangements by neighbour exchange. Tip cells are also able to transmit mechanical tension to promote tissue remodelling and, by interacting with the extracellular matrix, they can dictate migratory pathways and organ shape. Where separate tubular structures fuse to form networks, as in the airways of insects or the vascular system of vertebrates, specialised fusion tip cells act to interconnect disparate elements of the developing network. Finally, we consider their importance in the maturation of mature physiological function and in the development of disease. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Tipping the scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    In the US, the October 1998 murder of a physician who performed abortions was an outward manifestation of the insidious battle against legal abortion being waged by radical Christian social conservatives seeking to transform the US democracy into a theocracy. This movement has been documented in a publication entitled, "Tipping the Scales: The Christian Right's Legal Crusade Against Choice" produced as a result of a 4-year investigation conducted by The Center for Reproductive Law and Policy. This publication describes how these fundamentalists have used sophisticated legal, lobbying, and communication strategies to further their goals of challenging the separation of church and state, opposing family planning and sexuality education that is not based solely on abstinence, promoting school prayer, and restricting homosexual rights. The movement has resulted in the introduction of more than 300 anti-abortion bills in states, 50 of which have passed in 23 states. Most Christian fundamentalist groups provide free legal representation to abortion clinic terrorists, and some groups solicit women to bring specious malpractice claims against providers. Sophisticated legal tactics are used by these groups to remove the taint of extremism and mask the danger posed to US constitutional principles being posed by "a well-financed and zealous brand of radical lawyers and their supporters."

  19. Torsional Phacoemulsification and Tip Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fırat Helvacıoğlu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the recent advances in cataract surgery is torsional phacoemulsification. It was developed to increase the efficacy of ultrasonic emulsification. In torsional phacoemulsification, the torsional movement of the tip is translated to side-to-side cutting action with the aid of bent phaco tips. Lens material is cut in both directions, rather than only during a forward stroke. The efficiency of this technique is further enhanced by an improvement in followability provided by the inherent non-repulsive nature of the side-to-side motion. Tip selection is very important for the efficiency of torsional phacoemulsification. Theoretically, there are 2 ways to enhance the cutting efficiency of the tip. First is the stroke length; the 22-degree bent 30-degree Kelman mini-flared tip cuts longer than the 12-degree bent 30-degree mini-flared Kelman tip. Second is the angulation or bevel; the higher the degree (45 degrees, the better cutting efficiency. Retrospective analyses of the previously published clinical studies clearly demonstrated that the efficacy of the torsional phacoemulsification has positive correlation with both the aperture angles and neck angles of the tips. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 392-5

  20. Analysis of RNA by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeidsvoll, J; Ueland, P M

    1996-09-01

    Analytical parameters known to be important for the separation of DNA by capillary electrophoresis, including gel polymer concentration, electrical field strength and temperature, were investigated and optimized for the analysis of RNA molecules from 100 to 2000 bases. Denaturation, essential to obtain uniform and identifiable peaks, was accomplished by heating the sample in 80% formamide prior to electrophoresis and the presence of 2-8 M urea in the electrophoresis buffer. Efficient separations were obtained over a wide range of electrical field strengths and temperatures using the gel polymer hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) as separation matrix. Low HPMC concentrations (RNA (> 1000 bases) whereas higher HPMC concentrations were required for optimal separation of low molecular mass RNA. An optimized system was applicable for the separation of the predominating RNA populations (small RNA of 60-300 bases (as a group of unseparated peaks), 18S and 28S rRNA) in total RNA from a human glioma cell line. This is the first systematic investigation of electrophoresis of higher molecular mass RNA in capillaries, and motivates further studies to transfer electrophoresis of RNA to the capillary format.

  1. Drinking in Space: The Capillary Beverage Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, Andrew; Weislogel, Mark; Jenson, Ryan; Graf, John; Pettit, Donald; Kelly, Scott; Lindgren, Kjell; Yui, Kimiya

    2015-11-01

    A selection from as many as 50 different drinks including coffees, teas, and fruit smoothies are consumed daily by astronauts aboard the International Space Station. For practical reasons, the drinks are generally sipped through straws inserted in sealed bags. We present the performance of a special cup designed to allow the drinking operation in much the same manner as on earth, only with the role of gravity replaced by the combined effects of surface tension, wetting, and special container geometry. One can finally `smell the coffee.' Six so-called Space Cups are currently in orbit as part of the Capillary Beverage Experiment which aims to demonstrate specific passive control of poorly wetting aqueous capillary systems through a fun mealtime activity. The mathematical fluid mechanical design process with full numerical simulations is presented alongside experimental results acquired using a drop tower and low-g aircraft before complete characterization aboard the Space Station. Astronaut commentary is both humorous and informative, but the insightful experimental results of the potable space experiment testify to the prospects of new no-moving-parts capillary solutions for certain water-based life support operations aboard spacecraft.

  2. Principles of Micellar Electrokinetic Capillary Chromatography Applied in Pharmaceutical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Árpád Gyéresi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction capillary electrophoresis has shown great potential in areas where electrophoretic techniques have rarely been used before, including here the analysis of pharmaceutical substances. The large majority of pharmaceutical substances are neutral from electrophoretic point of view, consequently separations by the classic capillary zone electrophoresis; where separation is based on the differences between the own electrophoretic mobilities of the analytes; are hard to achieve. Micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, a hybrid method that combines chromatographic and electrophoretic separation principles, extends the applicability of capillary electrophoretic methods to neutral analytes. In micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, surfactants are added to the buffer solution in concentration above their critical micellar concentrations, consequently micelles are formed; micelles that undergo electrophoretic migration like any other charged particle. The separation is based on the differential partitioning of an analyte between the two-phase system: the mobile aqueous phase and micellar pseudostationary phase. The present paper aims to summarize the basic aspects regarding separation principles and practical applications of micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, with particular attention to those relevant in pharmaceutical analysis.

  3. Laser-induced agitation and cavitation from proprietary honeycomb tips for endodontic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Roy; Chan, Keith; Walsh, Laurence James

    2015-05-01

    Cavitation and agitation generated by lasers in fluid-filled root canals create fluid movement and shear stresses along the root canals walls, enhancing removal of the smear layer and biofilm. When used with sodium hypochlorite and EDTA, laser activation of aqueous fluids can increase the efficiency of debridement and disinfection of root canals. However, the use of forward-firing laser fibers with such solutions poses a risk of driving fluid past the root apex, which could cause postoperative complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanism of fluid agitation caused by a novel honeycomb tip. Glass capillary tubes filled with distilled water were used to replicate single-tooth root canals. A 980 nm pulsed diode laser was used with 200 μm diameter plain tips, tube-etched conical tips, and honeycomb tips. To record fluid movements, the tubes were backlit and imaged using a digital camera attached to a microscope. The honeycomb tips generated agitation with fluid movement directed onto the walls, while both the conventional plain fibers and the conical tips created fluid movement largely in a forward direction. The use of honeycomb tips alters the pattern of fluid agitation, and this laterally directed effect might lower the risk of fluid extrusion beyond the apex.

  4. Laser-based capillary polarimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinney, K; Hankins, J; Bornhop, D J

    1999-01-01

    A laser-based capillary polarimeter has been configured to allow for the detection of optically active molecules in capillary tubes with a characteristic inner diameter of 250 microm and a 39-nL (10(-9)) sample volume. The simple optical configuration consists of a HeNe laser, polarizing optic, fused-silica capillary, and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera in communication with a laser beam analyzer. The capillary scale polarimeter is based on the interaction between a polarized laser beam and a capillary tube, which results in a 360 degree fan of scattered light. This array of scattered light contains a set of interference fringe, which respond in a reproducible manner to changes in solute optical activity. The polarimetric utility of the instrument will be demonstrated by the analysis of two optically active solutes, R-mandelic acid and D-glucose, in addition to the nonoptically active control, glycerol. The polarimetric response of the system is quantifiable with detection limits facilitating 1.7 x 10(-3) M or 68 x 10(-12) nmol (7 psi 10(-9) g) sensitivity.

  5. Western blotting using capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gwendolyn J; M Cipolla, Cynthia; Kennedy, Robert T

    2011-02-15

    A microscale Western blotting system based on separating sodium-dodecyl sulfate protein complexes by capillary gel electrophoresis followed by deposition onto a blotting membrane for immunoassay is described. In the system, the separation capillary is grounded through a sheath capillary to a mobile X-Y translation stage which moves a blotting membrane past the capillary outlet for protein deposition. The blotting membrane is moistened with a methanol and buffer mixture to facilitate protein adsorption. Although discrete protein zones could be detected, bands were broadened by ∼1.7-fold by transfer to membrane. A complete Western blot for lysozyme was completed in about one hour with 50 pg mass detection limit from low microgram per milliliter samples. These results demonstrate substantial reduction in time requirements and improvement in mass sensitivity compared to conventional Western blots. Western blotting using capillary electrophoresis shows promise to analyze low volume samples with reduced reagents and time, while retaining the information content of a typical Western blot.

  6. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient Center This ... To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

  7. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) Transjugular ... in the portal vein system. This pressure buildup can cause blood to flow backward from the liver ...

  8. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... physician will numb an area just above your right collarbone with a local anesthetic . A very small ...

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    Full Text Available ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist and patient consultation. View full size ... X-Ray and CT Exams Contrast Materials Venography Images related to Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) Sponsored ...

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    Full Text Available ... in the chest or abdomen. This condition is most commonly seen in adults, often as a result ... minimally invasive procedures such as a TIPS are most often performed by a specially trained interventional radiologist ...

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    Full Text Available ... and lengthy procedures requiring extended fluoroscopy use) death (rare) top of page What are the limitations of TIPS? Patients with more advanced liver disease are at greater risk for worsening liver failure ...

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    Full Text Available ... less likely to require a TIPS. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A ... gown to wear during the procedure. top of page What does the equipment look like? In this procedure, ...

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    Full Text Available ... the hepatic vein in the liver. A small metal device called a stent is placed to keep ... open by the placement of a small, tubular metal device commonly called a stent . During a TIPS ...

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    Full Text Available ... of bleeding that can occur can sometimes be life threatening and those patients are monitored in intensive ... invasive procedure that typically has a shorter recovery time than surgery. Your TIPS should have less of ...

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    Full Text Available ... while avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce internal bleeding in the stomach and esophagus in patients ... site. Using ultrasound, the doctor will identify your internal jugular vein , which is situated above your collarbone, ...

  16. Choking and Strangulation Prevention Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety Sponsors Recalls Media Center Blog Videos Newsletter facebook twitter instagram pinterest gplus youtube Search Menu Why It Matters ... Safety Sponsors Recalls Media Center Blog Videos Newsletter facebook twitter instagram pinterest gplus youtube Sign up for quick tips ...

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    Full Text Available ... hepatic vein to identify the portal venous system. Access is then gained from the hepatic vein into ... TIPS procedure to make sure that it remains open and functions properly. top of page Who interprets ...

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    Full Text Available ... TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient Center This page ... American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise ...

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    Full Text Available ... the portal system using a TIPS needle (a special long needle extending from the neck into the ... Encephalopathy can be treated with certain medications, a special diet or, by revising the stent, but sometimes ...

  20. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... TIPS may successfully reduce internal bleeding in the stomach and esophagus in patients with cirrhosis. Tell your ... the liver into the veins of the spleen, stomach, lower esophagus, and intestines, causing enlarged vessels, bleeding ...

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... in an hour or two but may take up to several hours depending on the complexity of ... normal activities in seven to 10 days. Follow-up ultrasounds will be performed frequently after the TIPS ...

  2. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... portal vein to the hepatic vein in the liver. A small metal device called a stent is ... bowel back to the heart while avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce internal bleeding in the ...

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    Full Text Available ... of an effect than open surgical bypass on future liver transplantation surgery because the abdomen has not ... TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient Center This page ...

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    Full Text Available ... blood draining from the bowel back to the heart while avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce ... blood away from the liver back to the heart). A stent is then placed in this tunnel ...

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    Full Text Available ... you are pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, allergies and medications you’re taking. You ... with ascites or variceal bleeding resistant to traditional medical treatments. The greatest difference in performing TIPS in ...

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    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose ...

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Contrast Materials Venography Images related to Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) Sponsored ...

  8. Search Tips: MedlinePlus

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    ... of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/searchtips.html Search Tips To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. How do I search MedlinePlus? The search box appears at the top ...

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    Full Text Available ... to the heart while avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce internal bleeding in the stomach and ... conditions, allergies and medications you’re taking. You may be advised to stop taking aspirin, nonsteroidal anti- ...

  10. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce internal bleeding in the stomach and esophagus in patients with ... stomach, lower esophagus, and intestines, causing enlarged vessels, bleeding and the accumulation of fluid in the chest ...

  11. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... system. This pressure buildup can cause blood to flow backward from the liver into the veins of ... does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver and reduces abnormally high blood ...

  12. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... liver back to the heart. top of page How should I prepare? You should report to your ... heart beat and blood pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood ...

  13. Computerized automatic tip scanning operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, K.; Fukushima, T.; Nakai, H.; Yanagisawa, A.

    1984-01-01

    In BWR nuclear power stations the Traversing Incore Probe (TIP) system is one of the most important components in reactor monitoring and control. In previous TIP systems, however, operators have suffered from the complexity of operation and long operation time required. The system presented in this paper realizes the automatic operation of the TIP system by monitoring and driving it with a process computer. This system significantly reduces the burden on customer operators and improves plant efficiency by simplifying the operating procedure, augmenting the accuracy of the measured data, and shortening operating time. The process computer is one of the PODIA (Plant Operation by Displayed Information Automation) systems. This computer transfers control signals to the TIP control panel, which in turn drives equipment by microprocessor control. The process computer contains such components as the CRT/KB unit, the printer plotter, the hard copier, and the message typers required for efficient man-machine communications. Its operation and interface properties are described

  14. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... Patients who typically need a TIPS have portal hypertension , meaning they have increased pressure in the portal ... leading to cirrhosis (scarring of the liver). Portal hypertension can also occur in children, although children are ...

  15. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... deeply you are sedated. When the needle is advanced through the liver and the pathway is expanded ... are the limitations of TIPS? Patients with more advanced liver disease are at greater risk for worsening ...

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  18. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... is completed. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits A TIPS is designed to produce the same ... urgent intervention heart arrhythmias or congestive heart failure radiation injury to the skin is a rare complication ( ...

  19. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... local anesthetic medications, general anesthesia or to contrast materials containing iodine (sometimes referred to as "dye" or " ... the placement of the TIPS stent, a contrast material will be injected in the hepatic vein to ...

  20. Tip model of cold fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goennenwein, F.; Boersig, B.

    1991-01-01

    Cold fission is defined to be the limiting case of nuclear fission where virtually all of the available energy is converted into the total kinetic energy of the fragments. The fragments have, therefore, to be born in or at least close to their respective ground states. Starting from the viewpoint that cold fission corresponds to most compact scission configurations, energy constraints have been exploited to calculate minimum tip distances between the two nascent fragments in binary fission. Crucial input parameters to this tip model of cold fission are the ground-state deformations of fragment nuclei. It is shown that the minimum tip distances being compatible with energy conservation vary strongly with both the mass and charge fragmentation of the fission prone nucleus. The tip distances refer to nuclei with equivalent sharp surfaces. In keeping with the size of the surface width of leptodermous nuclei, only configurations where the tip distances are smaller than a few fm may be considered as valid scission configurations. From a comparison with experimental data on cold fission this critical tip distance appears to be 3.0 fm for the model parameters chosen. Whenever the model calculation yields tip distances being smaller than the critical value, a necessary condition for attaining cold fission is considered to be fulfilled. It is shown that this criterion allows to understand in fair agreement with experiment which mass fragmentations are susceptible to lead to cold fission and which fragment-charge divisions are the most favored in each isobaric mass chain. Being based merely on energy arguments, the model cannot aim at predicting fragment yields in cold fission. However, the tip model proposed appears well suited to delineate the phase space where cold fission phenomena may come into sight. (orig.)

  1. Exodontia: tips and techniques for better outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dym, Harry; Weiss, Adam

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews and highlights exodontia tips as well as new techniques to make simple and complex exodontia more predictable and efficient with improved patient outcomes. A discussion of a powered periotome that has been developed to aid in the atraumatic extraction of teeth and another new device, the piezosurgery, increasingly used for outpatient oral surgery procedures are included. Physics forceps, a new type of exodontia forceps, is also discussed in this article. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Impacts on oil recovery from capillary pressure and capillary heterogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bognoe, Thomas

    2008-07-01

    The main conclusions drawn from this thesis are; 7 scientific papers are published on a broad variety of subjects, and describes in detail the experiments and research treated in this thesis. Scientific research has been performed, investigating the subjects of capillary pressure and capillary heterogeneities from different angles. This thesis discusses the findings in this study and aims to illustrate the benefits of the results obtained for further development of other experiments, and/or even the industrial benefits in field development. The methods for wettability alteration have developed throughout the work. From producing heterogeneous wettability alterations, the methods have improved to giving both radial and lateral uniform wettability alterations, which also remains unaltered throughout the duration of the experimental work. The alteration of wettability is dependent on initial water saturation, flow rate, aging time and crude oil composition. Capillary pressure and relative permeability curves have been measured for core plugs at different wettabilities using conventional centrifuge methods. The trends observed are mostly consistent with theory. The production mechanisms of strongly and moderately water wet chalk has been investigated. At strongly water wet conditions in fractured chalk; the flow is governed by capillary forces, showing strong impact from the fractures. At moderately water wet conditions, the impact of the fractures are absent, and a dispersed water front is observed during the displacement. The oil recovery is about the same, at the two wettabilities. Fracture crossing mechanisms at the same wettability conditions have been mapped. And the observations are consistent with those of the water floods. During strongly water wet displacement, the fracture crossing is occurring once the inlet core has reached endpoint of spontaneous imbibition. At moderately water wet conditions the fracture crossing is less abrupt, and creation of wetting

  3. Energy Invariance in Capillary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Élfego; Guan, Jian H.; Xu, Ben; McHale, Glen; Wells, Gary G.; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate the continuous translational invariance of the energy of a capillary surface in contact with reconfigurable solid boundaries. We present a theoretical approach to find the energy-invariant equilibria of spherical capillary surfaces in contact with solid boundaries of arbitrary shape and examine the implications of dynamic frictional forces upon a reconfiguration of the boundaries. Experimentally, we realize our ideas by manipulating the position of a droplet in a wedge geometry using lubricant-impregnated solid surfaces, which eliminate the contact-angle hysteresis and provide a test bed for quantifying dissipative losses out of equilibrium. Our experiments show that dissipative energy losses for an otherwise energy-invariant reconfiguration are relatively small, provided that the actuation time scale is longer than the typical relaxation time scale of the capillary surface. We discuss the wider applicability of our ideas as a pathway for liquid manipulation at no potential energy cost in low-pinning, low-friction situations.

  4. Paramecium swimming in capillary tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Saikat; Um, Soong Ho; Jung, Sunghwan

    2012-04-01

    Swimming organisms in their natural habitat need to navigate through a wide range of geometries and chemical environments. Interaction with boundaries in such situations is ubiquitous and can significantly modify the swimming characteristics of the organism when compared to ideal laboratory conditions. We study the different patterns of ciliary locomotion in glass capillaries of varying diameter and characterize the effect of the solid boundaries on the velocities of the organism. Experimental observations show that Paramecium executes helical trajectories that slowly transition to straight lines as the diameter of the capillary tubes decreases. We predict the swimming velocity in capillaries by modeling the system as a confined cylinder propagating longitudinal metachronal waves that create a finite pressure gradient. Comparing with experiments, we find that such pressure gradient considerations are necessary for modeling finite sized ciliary organisms in restrictive geometries.

  5. Molar volume and adsorption isotherm dependence of capillary forces in nanoasperity contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asay, David B; Kim, Seong H

    2007-11-20

    The magnitude of the capillary force at any given temperature and adsorbate partial pressure depends primarily on four factors: the surface tension of the adsorbate, its liquid molar volume, its isothermal behavior, and the contact geometry. At large contacting radii, the adsorbate surface tension and the contact geometry are dominating. This is the case of surface force apparatus measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments with micrometer-size spheres. However, as the size of contacting asperities decreases to the nanoscale as in AFM experiments with sharp tips, the molar volume and isotherm of the adsorbate become very important to capillary formation as well as capillary adhesion. This effect is experimentally and theoretically explored with simple alcohol molecules (ethanol, 1-butanol, and 1-pentanol) which have comparable surface tensions but differing liquid molar volumes. Adsorption isotherms for these alcohols on silicon oxide are also reported.

  6. Capillary Flows Along Open Channel Conduits: The Open-Star Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weislogel, Mark; Geile, John; Chen, Yongkang; Nguyen, Thanh Tung; Callahan, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Capillary rise in tubes, channels, and grooves has received significant attention in the literature for over 100 years. In yet another incremental extension of such work, a transient capillary rise problem is solved for spontaneous flow along an interconnected array of open channels forming what is referred to as an 'open-star' section. This geometry possesses several attractive characteristics including passive phase separations and high diffusive gas transport. Despite the complex geometry, novel and convenient approximations for capillary pressure and viscous resistance enable closed form predictions of the flow. As part of the solution, a combined scaling approach is applied that identifies unsteady-inertial-capillary, convective-inertial-capillary, and visco-capillary transient regimes in a single parameter. Drop tower experiments are performed employing 3-D printed conduits to corroborate all findings.

  7. X-ray tests of microfocusing mono-capillary optic for protein crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Bilderback, D H

    2001-01-01

    A single, borosilicate-glass capillary was drawn into a 30.5 cm long elliptical shape. The inside diameter was 0.40 mm at the large base end and 0.13 mm at the tip. With 12 keV X-rays from the CHESS D1 bending magnet, the single-bounce capillary produced a focus of better than 18 mu m in diameter (FHWM) at a 3 cm distance from the capillary tip. A flux gain of 110 in the focus position was observed along with a total flux in the spot of 4x10 sup 1 sup 0 X-rays/s (conditions: 5.3 GeV, 182 mA, 1.5% bandwidth multilayer, 12 keV X-rays). A measurement of the far field focus ring diameter yielded a divergence of 3.8 mrad, in good agreement with the 4 mrad design of the optic for protein crystallography. Using a small 25 mu m square beam, we measured the local reflectivity to be greater than 95% and the inner slope errors of the capillary to average about +-150 mu rad, both from raw and elliptically shaped tubing. Our conclusion is that more perfect starting tubing (i.e. one with lower slope errors) is needed to ma...

  8. X-ray tests of microfocusing mono-capillary optic for protein crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilderback, D.H.; Huang, R.

    2001-01-01

    A single, borosilicate-glass capillary was drawn into a 30.5 cm long elliptical shape. The inside diameter was 0.40 mm at the large base end and 0.13 mm at the tip. With 12 keV X-rays from the CHESS D1 bending magnet, the single-bounce capillary produced a focus of better than 18 μm in diameter (FHWM) at a 3 cm distance from the capillary tip. A flux gain of 110 in the focus position was observed along with a total flux in the spot of 4x10 10 X-rays/s (conditions: 5.3 GeV, 182 mA, 1.5% bandwidth multilayer, 12 keV X-rays). A measurement of the far field focus ring diameter yielded a divergence of 3.8 mrad, in good agreement with the 4 mrad design of the optic for protein crystallography. Using a small 25 μm square beam, we measured the local reflectivity to be greater than 95% and the inner slope errors of the capillary to average about ±150 μrad, both from raw and elliptically shaped tubing. Our conclusion is that more perfect starting tubing (i.e. one with lower slope errors) is needed to make even more perfect elliptically figured optics in the future

  9. Genetic variability of Artemisia capillaris (Wormwood capillary) by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fifthty-seven oligonucleotide primers were screened and ten primers were selected (OPA 04, OPA 09, OPA 16, OPA 17, OPA 18, OPG 03, OPG 05, OPG 09, OPG 15 and 391) to amplify DNA from five samples of A. capillaris. A total of 335 RAPD fragments (RAPDs) with all polymorphic fragments (100%) with size ranging ...

  10. Workshop on the coupling of synchrotron radiation IR and X-rays with tip based scanning probe microscopies X-TIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comin, F.; Martinez-Criado, G.; Mundboth, K.; Susini, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 38 - Grenoble (France); Purans, J.; Sammelselg, V. [Tartu Univ. (Estonia); Chevrier, J.; Huant, S. [Universite Joseph-Fourier, Grenoble I, LEPES, 38 (France); Hamilton, B. [School of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Manchester (United Kingdom); Saito, A. [Osaka Univ., RIKEN/SPring8 (Japan); Dhez, O. [OGG, INFM/CNR, 38 - Grenoble (France); Brocklesby, W.S. [Southampton Univ., Optoelectronics Research Centre (United Kingdom); Alvarez-Prado, L.M. [Ovieado, Dept. de Fisica (Spain); Kuzmin, A. [Institute of Solid State Physics - Riga (Latvia); Pailharey, D. [CRMC-N - CNRS, 13 - Marseille (France); Tonneau, D. [CRMCN - Faculte des sciences de Luminy, 13 - Marseille (France); Chretien, P. [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Paris, 75 - Paris (France); Cricenti, A. [ISM-CNR, Rome (Italy); DeWilde, Y. [ESPCI, 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-07-01

    The coupling of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) with synchrotron radiation is attracting increasing attention from nano-science community. By combining these 2 tools one can visualize, for example, the sample nano-structure prior to any X-ray characterization. Coupled with focusing devices or independently, SPM can provide spatial resolution below the optical limits. Furthermore, the possibility of employing SPM to manipulate nano-objects under X-ray beams is another exciting perspective. This document gathers the transparencies of 6 of the presentations made at the workshop: 1) the combination of atomic force microscopy and X-ray beam - experimental set-up and objectives; 2) the combination of scanning probe microscope and X-rays for detection of electrons; 3) towards soft X-ray scanning microscopy using tapered capillaries and laser-based high harmonic sources; 4) near-field magneto-optical microscopy; 5) near-field scanning optical microscopy - a brief overview -; and 6) from aperture-less near-field optical microscopy to infra-red near-field night vision. 4 posters entitled: 1) development of laboratory setup for X-ray/AFM experiments, 2) towards X-ray diffraction on single islands, 3) nano-XEOL using near-field detection, and 4) local collection with a STM tip of photoelectrons emitted by a surface irradiated by visible of UV laser beam, are included in the document.

  11. Investigation on tip enhanced Raman spectra of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinjuan; Liu, Yanqi; Zeng, Zhuo; Wang, Peijie; Fang, Yan; Zhang, Lisheng

    2018-02-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) is a promising analytical approach for some two-dimensional materials and offers the possibility to correlate imaging and chemical data. Tip-enhanced Raman spectra of graphene are discussed in some details, including substrate, gap between tip-apex and sample surface as well as Ag-nanowire. The TERS spectra give special emphasis to the possibility of TERS tip to induce a large number of defects only while got the tip attached to sample surface. Then the dependence of the TERS spectra of graphene and gap between the probe tip and sample surface was studied, and distribution features of electromagnetic (EM) field around tip were also simulated by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD). The Raman signal enhancement of graphene was further discussed with respect to experimental data. Furthermore, the Ag-nanowire as a nano-antenna could significantly enhance the weak Raman signal of D-band of monolayer graphene is shown, and the TERS spectra of graphene with regard to different regions of Ag-nanowires (endpoints, body) were obtained toward investigating into the distribution of electromagnetic field.

  12. A Blade Tip Timing Method Based on a Microwave Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jilong Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Blade tip timing is an effective method for blade vibration measurements in turbomachinery. This method is increasing in popularity because it is non-intrusive and has several advantages over the conventional strain gauge method. Different kinds of sensors have been developed for blade tip timing, including optical, eddy current and capacitance sensors. However, these sensors are unsuitable in environments with contaminants or high temperatures. Microwave sensors offer a promising potential solution to overcome these limitations. In this article, a microwave sensor-based blade tip timing measurement system is proposed. A patch antenna probe is used to transmit and receive the microwave signals. The signal model and process method is analyzed. Zero intermediate frequency structure is employed to maintain timing accuracy and dynamic performance, and the received signal can also be used to measure tip clearance. The timing method uses the rising and falling edges of the signal and an auto-gain control circuit to reduce the effect of tip clearance change. To validate the accuracy of the system, it is compared experimentally with a fiber optic tip timing system. The results show that the microwave tip timing system achieves good accuracy.

  13. Twelve tips for facilitating Millennials' learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David H; Newman, Lori R; Schwartzstein, Richard M

    2012-01-01

    The current, so-called "Millennial" generation of learners is frequently characterized as having deep understanding of, and appreciation for, technology and social connectedness. This generation of learners has also been molded by a unique set of cultural influences that are essential for medical educators to consider in all aspects of their teaching, including curriculum design, student assessment, and interactions between faculty and learners.  The following tips outline an approach to facilitating learning of our current generation of medical trainees.  The method is based on the available literature and the authors' experiences with Millennial Learners in medical training.  The 12 tips provide detailed approaches and specific strategies for understanding and engaging Millennial Learners and enhancing their learning.  With an increased understanding of the characteristics of the current generation of medical trainees, faculty will be better able to facilitate learning and optimize interactions with Millennial Learners.

  14. 3D capillary valves for versatile capillary patterning of channel walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papadimitriou, Vasileios; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate passive capillary patterning of channel walls with a liquid in situ. Patterning is performed using a novel 3D capillary valve system combining three standard capillary stop valves. A range of different patterns is demonstrated in three channel walls. Capillary patterning was designed

  15. Capillary Sharp Inner Edge Manufacturing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hošek, Jan; Studenovský, K.; Najdek, D.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 35 (2009), s. 19-25 ISSN 1584-5982. [MECAHITECH 09 /1./. Bukurešť, 08.10.2009-09.10.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200760905 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : capillary * edge * manufacturing Subject RIV: JR - Other Machinery

  16. Filling of charged cylindrical capillaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, S.; Chanda, Sourayon; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Chakraborty, Suman; Mitra, Sushanta K.

    2014-01-01

    We provide an analytical model to describe the filling dynamics of horizontal cylindrical capillaries having charged walls. The presence of surface charge leads to two distinct effects: It leads to a retarding electrical force on the liquid column and also causes a reduced viscous drag force because

  17. Capillary thinning of polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Szabo, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The capillary thinning of filaments of a Newtonian polybutene fluid and a viscoelastic polyisobutylene solution are analyzed experimentally and by means of numerical simulation. The experimental procedure is as follows. Initially, a liquid sample is placed between two cylindrical plates. Then...

  18. Capillary thinning of polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Szabo, Peter; Hassager, Ole

    1998-01-01

    The capillary thinning of a polymeric filament is analysed experimentally as well as by means of numerical simulation. The experimental procedure is as follows. Initially a liquid sample is kept between two cylindrical plates. Then the bottom plate is lowered under gravity to yield a given strain...

  19. Alar setback technique: a controlled method of nasal tip deprojection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, H M

    2001-11-01

    To describe an alar cartilage-modifying technique aimed at decreasing nasal tip projection in cases with overdeveloped alar cartilages and to compare it with other deprojection techniques used to correct such deformity. Selected case series. University and private practice settings in Alexandria, Egypt. Twenty patients presenting for rhinoplasty who had overprojected nasal tips primarily due to overdeveloped alar cartilages. All cases were primary cases except for one patient, who had undergone 2 previous rhinoplasties. An external rhinoplasty approach was used to set back the alar cartilages by shortening their medial and lateral crura. The choice of performing a high or low setback depended on the preexisting lobule-to-columella ratio. Following the setback, the alar cartilages were reconstructed in a fashion that increased the strength and stability of the tip complex. Subjective evaluation included clinical examination, analysis of preoperative and postoperative photographs, and patient satisfaction. Objective evaluation of nasal tip projection, using the Goode ratio and the nasofacial angle, was performed preoperatively and repeated at least 6 months postoperatively. A low setback was performed in 16 cases (80%) and a high setback in 4 (20%). The mean follow-up period was 18 months (range, 6-36 months). The technique effectively deprojected the nasal tip as evidenced by the considerable postoperative decrease in values of the Goode ratio and the nasofacial angle. No complications were encountered and no revision surgical procedures were required. The alar setback technique has many advantages; it results in precise predictable amounts of deprojection, controls the degree of tip rotation, preserves the natural contour of the nasal tip, respects the tip support mechanisms, increases the strength and stability of nasal tip complex, preserves or restores the normal lobule-to-columella proportion, and does not lead to alar flaring. However, the technique requires

  20. Characterization of a reservoir-type capillary optical microsensor for pCO(2) measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertekin, Kadriye; Klimant, Ingo; Neurauter, Gerhard; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2003-02-06

    A reservoir type of capillary microsensor for pCO(2) measurements is presented. The sensor is based on the measurement of the fluorescence intensity of the anionic form of the pH indicator 1-hydroxy-3,6,8-pyrenetrisulfonate in the form of its ion pair with a quaternary ammonium base in an ethyl cellulose matrix. The glass capillary containing the reservoir sensor was prepared by immersing the tip of the optical fiber into the sensing agent very close to the sensor tip thus providing a very small volume for the sensing reaction. The purpose of the sensing approach is to regenerate the dye/buffer system by diffusion, which may be poisoned by interfering acids, or bleach by photolysis. The fresh cocktail from the reservoir takes the place of protonated form of the dye. The internal buffer system also makes the protonation-deprotonation equilibria reversible. The distal tip of the internal buffer containing reservoir is coated with a gas-permeable but ion-impermeable teflon membrane. The dynamic range for the detection of pCO(2) is between 1 and 20 hPa, which corresponds to the range of dissolved CO(2) in water. The response time is 15 s and the detection limit is 1 hPa of pCO(2.) The recovery performance of this sensor can be improved by means of mechanical adjustment of the sensor tip in a micrometric scale.

  1. Surface tension-induced high aspect-ratio PDMS micropillars with concave and convex lens tips

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huawei

    2013-04-01

    This paper reports a novel method for the fabrication of 3-dimensional (3D) Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropillars with concave and convex lens tips in a one-step molding process, using a CO2 laser-machined Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) mold with through holes. The PDMS micropillars are 4 mm high and have an aspect ratio of 251. The micropillars are formed by capillary force drawing up PDMS into the through hole mold. The concave and convex lens tips of the PDMS cylindrical micropillars are induced by surface tension and are controllable by changing the surface wetting properties of the through holes in the PMMA mold. This technique eliminates the requirements of expensive and complicated facilities to prepare a 3D mold, and it provides a simple and rapid method to fabricate 3D PDMS micropillars with controllable dimensions and tip shapes. © 2013 IEEE.

  2. Nationwide survey of policies and practices related to capillary blood sampling in medical laboratories in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krleza, Jasna Lenicek

    2014-01-01

    Capillary sampling is increasingly used to obtain blood for laboratory tests in volumes as small as necessary and as non-invasively as possible. Whether capillary blood sampling is also frequent in Croatia, and whether it is performed according to international laboratory standards is unclear. All medical laboratories that participate in the Croatian National External Quality Assessment Program (N = 204) were surveyed on-line to collect information about the laboratory's parent institution, patient population, types and frequencies of laboratory tests based on capillary blood samples, choice of reference intervals, and policies and procedures specifically related to capillary sampling. Sampling practices were compared with guidelines from the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Of the 204 laboratories surveyed, 174 (85%) responded with complete questionnaires. Among the 174 respondents, 155 (89%) reported that they routinely perform capillary sampling, which is carried out by laboratory staff in 118 laboratories (76%). Nearly half of respondent laboratories (48%) do not have a written protocol including order of draw for multiple sampling. A single puncture site is used to provide capillary blood for up to two samples at 43% of laboratories that occasionally or regularly perform such sampling. Most respondents (88%) never perform arterialisation prior to capillary blood sampling. Capillary blood sampling is highly prevalent in Croatia across different types of clinical facilities and patient populations. Capillary sampling procedures are not standardised in the country, and the rate of laboratory compliance with CLSI and WHO guidelines is low.

  3. Nanobits: customizable scanning probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajendra; Shaik, Hassan Uddin; Sardan Sukas, Özlem

    2009-01-01

    We present here a proof-of-principle study of scanning probe tips defined by planar nanolithography and integrated with AFM probes using nanomanipulation. The so-called 'nanobits' are 2-4 mu m long and 120-150 nm thin flakes of Si3N4 or SiO2, fabricated by electron beam lithography and standard...... or dislocation of the tips of the nanobit after several scans. This approach allows an unprecedented freedom in adapting the shape and size of scanning probe tips to the surface topology or to the specific application....... silicon processing. Using a microgripper they were detached from an array and fixed to a standard pyramidal AFM probe or alternatively inserted into a tipless cantilever equipped with a narrow slit. The nanobit-enhanced probes were used for imaging of deep trenches, without visible deformation, wear...

  4. ZBrush Professional Tips and Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Gaboury, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Learn to work effectively and creatively with all versions of ZBrush! ZBrush is used by top artists in Hollywood to model and sculpt characters in such films as Avatar, Iron Man, and Pirates of the Caribbean. In addition, this amazing technology is also used in jewelry design, forensic science, aerospace, video games, toy creation, and the medical field. Written by Pixologic's in-house ZBrush expert Paul Gaboury, this full-color, beautifully illustrated guide provides you with the ultimate tips and tricks to maximize your use of all versions of ZBrush. Reveals numerous little-known tips and tr

  5. IMPACT OF CAPILLARY AND BOND NUMBERS ON RELATIVE PERMEABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2002-09-30

    Recovery and recovery rate of oil, gas and condensates depend crucially on their relative permeability. Relative permeability in turn depends on the pore structure, wettability and flooding conditions, which can be represented by a set of dimensionless groups including capillary and bond numbers. The effect of flooding conditions on drainage relative permeabilities is not well understood and is the overall goal of this project. This project has three specific objectives: to improve the centrifuge relative permeability method, to measure capillary and bond number effects experimentally, and to develop a pore network model for multiphase flows. A centrifuge has been built that can accommodate high pressure core holders and x-ray saturation monitoring. The centrifuge core holders can operate at a pore pressure of 6.9 MPa (1000 psi) and an overburden pressure of 17 MPa (2500 psi). The effect of capillary number on residual saturation and relative permeability in drainage flow has been measured. A pore network model has been developed to study the effect of capillary numbers and viscosity ratio on drainage relative permeability. Capillary and Reynolds number dependence of gas-condensate flow has been studied during well testing. A method has been developed to estimate relative permeability parameters from gas-condensate well test data.

  6. Viscoelastic capillary flow: the case of whole blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rabaud

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of spontaneous capillary flow of Newtonian fluids is well-known and can be predicted by the Lucas-Washburn-Rideal (LWR law. However a wide variety of viscoelastic fluids such as alginate, xanthan and blood, does not exhibit the same Newtonian behavior.In this work we consider the Herschel-Bulkley (HB rheological model and Navier-Stokes equation to derive a generic expression that predicts the capillary flow of non-Newtonian fluids. The Herschel-Bulkley rheological model encompasses a wide variety of fluids, including the Power-law fluids (also called Ostwald fluids, the Bingham fluids and the Newtonian fluids. It will be shown that the proposed equation reduces to the Lucas-Washburn-Rideal law for Newtonian fluids and to the Weissenberg-Rabinowitsch-Mooney (WRM law for power-law fluids. Although HB model cannot reduce to Casson’s law, which is often used to model whole blood rheology, HB model can fit the whole blood rheology with the same accuracy.Our generalized expression for the capillary flow of non-Newtonian fluid was used to accurately fit capillary flow of whole blood. The capillary filling of a cylindrical microchannel by whole blood was monitored. The blood first exhibited a Newtonian behavior, then after 7 cm low shear stress and rouleaux formation made LWR fails to fit the data: the blood could not be considered as Newtonian anymore. This non-Newtonian behavior was successfully fit by the proposed equation.

  7. Capture of microparticles by bolus flow in capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; BFSL Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    Previous studies have concluded that microparticles (MPs) can more effectively approach the microvessel wall than nanoparticles because of margination. In this study, however, we show that MPs are not marginated in capillaries where the vessel diameter is comparable to that of red blood cells (RBCs). We numerically investigated the behavior of MPs with a diameter of 1 µm in various microvessel sizes, including capillaries. In capillaries, the flow mode of RBCs shifted from multi-file flow to bolus flow, and MPs were captured by the bolus flow of the RBCs instead of being marginated. Once MPs were captured, they rarely escaped from the vortex-like flow structures between RBCs. These capture events were enhanced when the hematocrit was decreased, and reduced when the shear rate was increased. Our results suggest that microparticles may be rather inefficient drug carriers when targeting capillaries because of capture events, but nanoparticles, which are more randomly distributed in capillaries, may be more effective carriers. This research was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 25000008 and 16J11479.

  8. Tips for Pregnant Moms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Healthy Eating Style Choose a variety of foods and beverages to build your own healthy eating style. Include ... and http: / / www. fns. usda. gov/ wic/ guidance Food and Nutrition Service FNS-457 Revised December 2016 USDA is an ...

  9. Tips for Breastfeeding Moms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Healthy Eating Style Choose a variety of foods and beverages to build your own healthy eating style. Include ... and http: / / www. fns. usda. gov/ wic/ guidance Food and Nutrition Service FNS-458 Revised December 2016 USDA is an ...

  10. Dynamic Remodeling of Pericytes In Vivo Maintains Capillary Coverage in the Adult Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrée-Anne Berthiaume

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Direct contact and communication between pericytes and endothelial cells is critical for maintenance of cerebrovascular stability and blood-brain barrier function. Capillary pericytes have thin processes that reach hundreds of micrometers along the capillary bed. The processes of adjacent pericytes come in close proximity but do not overlap, yielding a cellular chain with discrete territories occupied by individual pericytes. Little is known about whether this pericyte chain is structurally dynamic in the adult brain. Using in vivo two-photon imaging in adult mouse cortex, we show that while pericyte somata were immobile, the tips of their processes underwent extensions and/or retractions over days. The selective ablation of single pericytes provoked exuberant extension of processes from neighboring pericytes to contact uncovered regions of the endothelium. Uncovered capillary regions had normal barrier function but were dilated until pericyte contact was regained. Pericyte structural plasticity may be critical for cerebrovascular health and warrants detailed investigation. : Pericyte-endothelial contact is important for many aspects of cerebrovascular health. Berthiaume et al. use longitudinal two-photon imaging to show that the processes of brain capillary pericytes are structurally plastic in vivo. Their processes can grow hundreds of micrometers to ensure contact with exposed endothelium following ablation of a single pericyte. Keywords: capillary, pericyte, endothelium, blood-brain barrier, blood flow, plasticity, two-photon imaging, Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, stroke

  11. Impact of Pressure and Brine Salinity on Capillary Pressure-Water Saturation Relations in Geological CO2 Sequestration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongwon Jung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Capillary pressure-water saturation relations are required to explore the CO2/brine flows in deep saline aquifers including storage capacity, relative permeability of CO2/brine, and change to stiffness and volume. The study on capillary pressure-water saturation curves has been conducted through experimentation and theoretical models. The results show that as the pressure increases up to 12 MPa, (1 capillary pressure-water saturation curves shift to lower values at given water saturation, (2 after the drainage process, residual water saturation decreases, and (3 after the imbibition process, capillary CO2 trapping increases. Capillary pressure-water saturation curves above 12 MPa appear to be similar because of relatively constant contact angle and interfacial tension. Also, as brine salinity increases from 1 M to 3 M NaCl, (1 capillary pressure-water saturation curves shift to lower capillary pressure, (2 residual water saturation decreases, and (3 capillary CO2 trapping increases. The results show that pressure and brine salinity have an influence on the capillary pressure-water saturation curves. Also, the scaled capillary CO2 entry pressure considering contact angle and interfacial tension is inconsistent with atmospheric conditions due to the lack of wettability information. Better exploration of wettability alteration is required to predict capillary pressure-water saturation curves at various conditions that are relevant to geological CO2 sequestration.

  12. Surface tension in microsystems engineering below the capillary length

    CERN Document Server

    Lambert, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    This book describes how surface tension effects can be used by engineers to provide mechanical functions in miniaturized products (<1 mm). Even if precursors of this field such as Jurin or Laplace already date back to the 18th century, describing surface tension effects from a mechanical perspective is very recent. The originality of this book is to consider the effects of capillary bridges on solids, including forces and torques exerted both statically and dynamically by the liquid along the 6 degrees-of-freedom. It provides a comprehensive approach to various applications, such as capillary adhesion (axial force), centering force in packaging and micro-assembly (lateral force) and recent developments such as a capillary motor (torque). It devises how surface tension can be used to provide mechanical functions such as actuation (bubble-actuated compliant table), sealing and tightness, energy harvesting, nanodispending.

  13. Imaging Catalytic Surfaces by Multiplexed Capillary Electrophoresis With Absorption Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christodoulou, Michael [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A new technique for in situ imaging and screening heterogeneous catalysts by using multiplexed capillary electrophoresis with absorption detection was developed. By bundling the inlets of a large number of capillaries, an imaging probe can be created that can be used to sample products formed directly from a catalytic surface with high spatial resolution. In this work, they used surfaces made of platinum, iron or gold wires as model catalytic surfaces for imaging. Various shapes were recorded including squares and triangles. Model catalytic surfaces consisting of both iron and platinum wires in the shape of a cross were also imaged successfully. Each of the two wires produced a different electrochemical product that was separated by capillary electrophoresis. Based on the collected data they were able to distinguish the products from each wire in the reconstructed image.

  14. In-capillary approach to eliminate SDS interferences in antibody analysis by capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Hernández, Laura; Montealegre, Cristina; Kiessig, Steffen; Moritz, Bernd; Neusüß, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Capillary electrophoresis is an important technique for the characterization of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), especially in the pharmaceutical context. However, identification is difficult as upscaling and hyphenation of used methods directly to mass spectrometry is often not possible due to separation medium components that are incompatible with MS detection. Here a CE-MS method for the analysis of mAbs is presented analyzing SDS-complexed samples. To obtain narrow and intensive peaks of SDS-treated antibodies, an in-capillary strategy was developed based on the co-injection of positively charged surfactants and methanol as organic solvent. For samples containing 0.2% (v/v) of SDS, recovered MS peak intensities up to 97 and 95% were achieved using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or benzalkonium chloride, respectively. Successful removal of SDS was shown in neutral coated capillaries but also in a capillary with a positively charged coating applying reversed polarity. The usefulness of this in-capillary strategy was demonstrated also for other proteins and for antibodies dissolved in up to 10% v/v SDS solution, and in other SDS-containing matrices, including the sieving matrix used in a standard CE-SDS method and gel-buffers applied in SDS-PAGE methods. The developed CE-MS approaches enable fast and reproducible characterization of SDS-complexed antibodies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Rhinoplasty: a simplified, three-stitch, open tip suture technique. Part I: primary rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, R K

    1999-04-01

    Tip suture techniques offer a reliable and dramatic method of tip modification without needing to interrupt the alar rim strip or add tip grafts. The present simplified three-stitch technique consists of the following: (1) a strut suture to fix the columella strut between the crura, (2) bilateral domal creation sutures to create tip definition, and (3) a domal equalization suture to narrow and align the domes. If required, columella septal sutures can be added; either a dorsal rotational suture or a transfixion projection suture can be used. This simplified method represents a refinement based on more than 13 years of experience with tip suture techniques. It does not require a complex operative sequence or specialized sutures. Primary indications are moderate tip deformities of inadequate definition and excessive width and certain specific tip deformities, including the parenthesis tip and nostril/tip disproportion. The primary contraindications are for patients with minor tip deformities that are best done through a closed approach and those with severe tip deformities requiring an open structure graft. The technique is simple, efficacious, and easily learned.

  16. The tip of the iceberg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørst, Lill Rastad

    2010-01-01

      Abstract: The tip of the iceberg: Ice as a nonhuman actor of the climate change debate   The global climate change debate has the Arctic as a core region of concern and ice has become a central aspect of discourses. This article discusses ice representations from six different contexts linked...

  17. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in creating the TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient Center This page ... of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ... To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  18. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver and reduces abnormally high blood pressure in the veins of the stomach, esophagus, bowel and liver, reducing the risk of bleeding from enlarged veins across the esophagus ...

  19. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... failure is severe, a TIPS may not be the best use and a different procedure may be needed to control your symptoms. They are also at risk for encephalopathy , which is an alteration of normal brain function that can lead to confusion. This is ...

  20. Food Allergy: Tips to Remember

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or get better on their own. Outgrowing Food Allergies Most children outgrow their allergies to cow’s milk, egg, soy ... can help you learn when you or your child’s food allergies are resolving with time. Healthy Tips • Always ask ...

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... limitations of TIPS? Patients with more advanced liver disease are at greater risk for worsening liver failure ...

  2. Assigning Effective Homework. Classroom Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Federation of Teachers (NJ), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each new school year brings high hopes, great expectations and challenges for both new and seasoned educators. The American Federation of Teachers (AFT) has developed a series called "Classroom Tips" to help educators start the year right and anticipate the year ahead. Over the past 40 years, most research studies on homework have found that…

  3. Capillary waves with surface viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Denner, Fabian; Morgan, Neal; van Wachem, Berend; Dini, Daniele

    2017-11-01

    Experiments over the last 50 years have suggested a correlation between the surface (shear) viscosity and the stability of a foam or emulsion. With recent techniques allowing more accurate measurements of the elusive surface viscosity, we examine this link theoretically using small-amplitude capillary waves in the presence of the Marangoni effect and surface viscosity modelled via the Boussinesq-Scriven model. The surface viscosity effect is found to contribute a damping effect on the amplitude of the capillary wave with subtle differences to the effect of the convective-diffusive Marangoni transport. The general wave dispersion is augmented to take into account the Marangoni and surface viscosity effects, and a first-order correction to the critical damping wavelength is derived. The authors acknowledge the financial support of the Shell University Technology Centre for fuels and lubricants.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of Capillary Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrova, N. A.; Razinkova, T. L.; Sasorov, P. V.; Bulanov, S. V.; Farina, D.; Pozzoli, R.

    1996-11-01

    The dynamics of capillary plasmas relevant to regimes where amplification of soft x-rays has been observed [J. J. Rocca, et al. Phys. Rev. Lett., 73, 2192 (1994); Phys. Plasmas, 2 2547 (1995)] is investigated by means of a magnetohydrodynamic one-dimensional numerical simulation code which takes into account dissipative processes, ablation and ionization of the wall material. The dynamics of the discharge is found to be different from what could be inferred from standard plasma pinch physics, due to the role of the capillary wall ablation. The formation of a hot dense plasma kernel close to the channel axis, due to the presence of converging shock waves, is observed in the simulation. The main features of this process are found to be in good agreement with the experimental observations of the amplification of Ne-like Ar emission.

  5. Upscaling of CO2-Brine Flow with Capillary Heterogeneity Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, A.; Itthisawatpan, K.; Durlofsky, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale simulation of CO2 storage operations can be expensive computationally, particularly when the effects of fine-scale capillary pressure heterogeneity are included. These effects, which are often ignored in traditional reservoir simulation, can significantly impact the movement of CO2 and should therefore be included in carbon storage simulations. The application of upscaling techniques that handle capillary heterogeneity could lead to reductions in computational cost, though general and robust procedures for this problem have yet to be presented. In this work, we develop and apply a new upscaling technique for two-phase flow in heterogeneous porous media with capillary heterogeneity effects. Fine-scale capillary pressure is modeled using the Leverett J-function and varies with permeability. We show that accurate upscaled models can be constructed by first upscaling capillary pressure under the assumption of capillary equilibrium, and then computing coarse-scale relative permeability functions using a global dynamic upscaling procedure. Some of the key numerical treatments associated with the overall procedure, such as near-well upscaling and the use of global coarse-scale iteration to improve model accuracy, will be described. The new upscaling approach is applied to synthetic heterogeneous two-dimensional aquifer models with flow driven by CO2 injection. Injection via both vertical and horizontal wells is considered. Fine-scale reference results are compared with coarse-scale results generated using both the new upscaling approach and alternative (simpler) methods. In general, of the techniques considered, our new approach is shown to provide the best overall accuracy. Different CO2 injection rates and well locations are considered, which allows us to explore the robustness of the upscaled model. Various strategies for enhancing model robustness will also be applied and assessed.

  6. Capillary Refill using Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Clausen, Christoffer

    2017-01-01

    Master's thesis in Computer science The opportunities within augmented reality is growing. Augmented reality is a combination of the real and the virtual world in real time, and large companies like Microsoft and Google is now investing heavily in the technology. This thesis presents a solution for simulating a medical test called capillary refill, by using augmented reality. The simulation is performed with an augmented reality headset called HoloLens. The HoloLens will recognise a mark...

  7. Capillaries modified by noncovalent anionic polymer adsorption for capillary zone electrophoresis, micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography and capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendahl, L; Hansen, S H; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2001-01-01

    A simple coating procedure for generation of a high and pH-independent electroosmotic flow in capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MEKC) is described. The bilayer coating was formed by noncovalent adsorption of the ionic polymers Polybrene...... capillaries was (4.9+/-0.1) x 10(-4) cm2V(-1)s(-1) in a pH-range of 2-10 (ionic strength = 30 mM). When alkaline compounds were used as test substances intracapillary and intercapillary migration time variations (n = 6) were less than 1% relative standard deviation (RSD) and 2% RSD, respectively in the entire...... pH range. The coating was fairly stable in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate, and this made it possible to perform fast MEKC separations at low pH. When neutral compounds were used as test substances, the intracapillary migration time variations (n = 6) were less than 2% RSD in a pH range of 2...

  8. A computational study of the effect of capillary network anastomoses and tortuosity on oxygen transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, D; Popel, A S

    2000-09-21

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of capillary network anastomoses and tortuosity on oxygen transport in skeletal muscle, as well as the importance of muscle fibers in determining the arrangement of parallel capillaries. Countercurrent flow and random capillary blockage (e.g. by white blood cells) were also studied. A general computational model was constructed to simulate oxygen transport from a network of blood vessels within a rectangular volume of tissue. A geometric model of the capillary network structure, based on hexagonally packed muscle fibers, was constructed to produce networks of straight unbranched capillaries, capillaries with anastomoses, and capillaries with tortuosity, in order to examine the effects of these geometric properties. Quantities examined included the tissue oxygen tension and the capillary oxyhemoglobin saturation. The computational model included a two-phase simulation of blood flow. Appropriate parameters were chosen for working hamster cheek-pouch retractor muscle. Our calculations showed that the muscle-fiber geometry was important in reducing oxygen transport heterogeneity, as was countercurrent flow. Tortuosity was found to increase tissue oxygenation, especially when combined with anastomoses. In the absence of tortuosity, anastomoses had little effect on oxygen transport under normal conditions, but significantly improved transport when vessel blockages were present. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  9. Recent advances in the preparation and application of monolithic capillary columns in separation science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Tingting; Yang, Xi; Xu, Yujing [Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 210009 (China); Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, Nanjing, 210009 (China); Ji, Yibing, E-mail: jiyibing@msn.com [Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 210009 (China); Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, Nanjing, 210009 (China)

    2016-08-10

    Novel column technologies involving various materials and efficient reactions have been investigated for the fabrication of monolithic capillary columns in the field of analytical chemistry. In addition to the development of these miniaturized systems, a variety of microscale separation applications have achieved noteworthy results, providing a stepping stone for new types of chromatographic columns with improved efficiency and selectivity. Three novel strategies for the preparation of capillary monoliths, including ionic liquid-based approaches, nanoparticle-based approaches and “click chemistry”, are highlighted in this review. Furthermore, we present the employment of state-of-the-art capillary monolithic stationary phases for enantioseparation, solid-phase microextraction, mixed-mode separation and immobilized enzyme reactors. The review concludes with recommendations for future studies and improvements in this field of research. - Highlights: • Preparation of novel monolithic capillary columns have shown powerful potential in analytical chemistry field. • Various materials including ionic liquids and nanoparticles involved into capillary monolithic micro-devices are concluded. • Click chemistry strategy applied for preparing monolithic capillary columns is reviewed. • Recent strategies utilized in constructing different capillary monoliths for enantiomeric separation are summarized. • Advancement of capillary monoliths for complex samples analysis is comprehensively described.

  10. Gene expression profiles are different in venous and capillary blood: Implications for vaccine studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, D F; O'Connor, D; Blohmke, C J; Sadarangani, M; Pollard, A J

    2016-10-17

    Detailed analysis of the immunological pathways leading to robust vaccine responses has become possible with the application of systems biology, including transcriptomic analysis. Venous blood is usually obtained for such studies but others have obtained capillary blood (e.g. finger-prick). Capillary samples are practically advantageous, especially in children. The aim of this study was to compare gene expression profiles in venous and capillary blood before, 12h and 24h after vaccination with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide or trivalent inactivated seasonal influenza vaccines. Gene expression at baseline was markedly different between venous and capillary samples, with 4940 genes differentially expressed, and followed a different pattern of changes after vaccination. At baseline, multiple pathways were upregulated in venous compared to capillary blood, including transforming growth factor-beta receptor signalling and toll-like receptor cascades. After vaccination with the influenza vaccine, there was enrichment for T and NK cell related signatures in capillary blood, and monocyte signatures in venous blood. By contrast, after vaccination with the pneumococcal vaccination, there was enrichment of dendritic cells, monocytes and interferon related signatures in capillary blood, whilst at 24h there was enrichment for T and NK cell related signatures in venous blood. These data show differences between venous and capillary gene expression both at baseline, and post vaccination, which may impact on the conclusions regarding immunological mechanisms drawn from studies using these different sampling methodologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Progression of Diabetic Capillary Occlusion: A Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Fu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An explanatory computational model is developed of the contiguous areas of retinal capillary loss which play a large role in diabetic maculapathy and diabetic retinal neovascularization. Strictly random leukocyte mediated capillary occlusion cannot explain the occurrence of large contiguous areas of retinal ischemia. Therefore occlusion of an individual capillary must increase the probability of occlusion of surrounding capillaries. A retinal perifoveal vascular sector as well as a peripheral retinal capillary network and a deleted hexagonal capillary network are modelled using Compucell3D. The perifoveal modelling produces a pattern of spreading capillary loss with associated macular edema. In the peripheral network, spreading ischemia results from the progressive loss of the ladder capillaries which connect peripheral arterioles and venules. System blood flow was elevated in the macular model before a later reduction in flow in cases with progression of capillary occlusions. Simulations differing only in initial vascular network structures but with identical dynamics for oxygen, growth factors and vascular occlusions, replicate key clinical observations of ischemia and macular edema in the posterior pole and ischemia in the retinal periphery. The simulation results also seem consistent with quantitative data on macular blood flow and qualitative data on venous oxygenation. One computational model applied to distinct capillary networks in different retinal regions yielded results comparable to clinical observations in those regions.

  12. Automatic sampling and analysis of organics and biomolecules by capillary action-supported contactless atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Cheng-Huan; Meher, Anil Kumar; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2013-01-01

    Contactless atmospheric pressure ionization (C-API) method has been recently developed for mass spectrometric analysis. A tapered capillary is used as both the sampling tube and spray emitter in C-API. No electric contact is required on the capillary tip during C-API mass spectrometric analysis. The simple design of the ionization method enables the automation of the C-API sampling system. In this study, we propose an automatic C-API sampling system consisting of a capillary (∼1 cm), an aluminium sample holder, and a movable XY stage for the mass spectrometric analysis of organics and biomolecules. The aluminium sample holder is controlled by the movable XY stage. The outlet of the C-API capillary is placed in front of the orifice of a mass spectrometer, whereas the sample well on the sample holder is moved underneath the capillary inlet. The sample droplet on the well can be readily infused into the C-API capillary through capillary action. When the sample solution reaches the capillary outlet, the sample spray is readily formed in the proximity of the mass spectrometer applied with a high electric field. The gas phase ions generated from the spray can be readily monitored by the mass spectrometer. We demonstrate that six samples can be analyzed in sequence within 3.5 min using this automatic C-API MS setup. Furthermore, the well containing the rinsing solvent is alternately arranged between the sample wells. Therefore, the C-API capillary could be readily flushed between runs. No carryover problems are observed during the analyses. The sample volume required for the C-API MS analysis is minimal, with less than 1 nL of the sample solution being sufficient for analysis. The feasibility of using this setup for quantitative analysis is also demonstrated.

  13. Experimental Study of the Effects of Blade Treatments on the Tip Vortex Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchenko, Vera

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigates the effects of blade tip treatments on the characteristics of a wind turbine blade tip vortex. Three blade tip shapes including a blunt edge, leading edge comb, and a winglet were designed and tested in a low speed wind tunnel. The rotor with a blunt edge was considered to be a baseline case corresponding to an untreated blade tip. The leading-edge comb rotor was designed with leading edge tubercles extending from the tip of the blade inward, 6 percent of rotor diameter. The winglet located at the tip of the winglet rotor had a cant angle of 45 degrees. The wind turbine operated at a tip speed ratio of 5 and a tip Reynolds number of 14,000. The tip treatments were intended to weaken the tip vortices by encouraging dissipation (leading edge comb) or promoting the formation of weaker vortices (winglet). Time-resolved and phase-averaged PIV was used to measure the velocity field behind the rotor. The time-averaged velocity field was subtracted from the phase-averaged velocity field to isolate the time-varying components of the flow. The vorticity of the phase-averaged time-varying field was calculated, and the tip vortices were identified using a vortex identification method. Vortex characteristics such as core radius and vortex strength were calculated and compared for the three rotors. The analysis of the vorticity showed that the winglet rotor had weaker tip vortices with a larger core radius, while the serrated tip rotor had strong tip vortices with the same core radius as the baseline case.

  14. Parenting Tips: How to Improve Toddler Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... issues. To encourage listening and cooperation, follow these parenting tips. By Mayo Clinic Staff Life can be ... and a degree of routine. Consider these practical parenting tips. Make sure your displays of affection for ...

  15. Tips for Good Oral Health during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tips for Good Oral Health During Pregnancy B elow are tips for taking care of your oral health while you are pregnant. Getting oral health care, practicing good oral hygiene, eating healthy foods, ...

  16. School Avoidance: Tips for Concerned Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Print Share School Avoidance: Tips for Concerned Parents Page Content ​School avoidance – sometimes called school refusal ... school bully) Actual physical harm Tips for Concerned Parents: As a first step, the management of school ...

  17. Radiofrequency Wire Recanalization of Chronically Thrombosed TIPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majdalany, Bill S., E-mail: bmajdala@med.umich.edu [University of Michigan Health System, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Elliott, Eric D., E-mail: eric.elliott@osumc.edu [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Michaels, Anthony J., E-mail: Anthony.michaels@osumc.edu; Hanje, A. James, E-mail: James.Hanje@osumc.edu [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine (United States); Saad, Wael E. A., E-mail: wsaad@med.umich.edu [University of Michigan Health System, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Radiofrequency (RF) guide wires have been applied to cardiac interventions, recanalization of central venous thromboses, and to cross biliary occlusions. Herein, the use of a RF wire technique to revise chronically occluded transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) is described. In both cases, conventional TIPS revision techniques failed to revise the chronically thrombosed TIPS. RF wire recanalization was successfully performed through each of the chronically thrombosed TIPS, demonstrating initial safety and feasibility in this application.

  18. Injector tip for an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Tsu Pin; Ye, Wen

    2003-05-20

    This invention relates to a the tip structure of a fuel injector as used in a internal combustion engine. Internal combustion engines using Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) technology require a tip structure that directs fuel spray in a downward direction. This requirement necessitates a tip design that is capable of withstanding mechanical stresses associated with the design.

  19. Stress failure of pulmonary capillaries: role in lung and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, J. B.; Mathieu-Costello, O.

    1992-01-01

    Pulmonary capillaries have extremely thin walls to allow rapid exchange of respiratory gases across them. Recently it has been shown that the wall stresses become very large when the capillary pressure is raised, and in anaesthetised rabbits, ultrastructural damage to the walls is seen at pressures of 40 mm Hg and above. The changes include breaks in the capillary endothelial layer, alveolar epithelial layer, and sometimes all layers of the wall. The strength of the thin part of the capillary wall can be attributed to the type IV collagen in the extracellular matrix. Stress failure of pulmonary capillaries results in a high-permeability form of oedema, or even frank haemorrhage, and is apparently the mechanism of neurogenic pulmonary oedema and high-altitude pulmonary oedema. It also explains the exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage that occurs in all racehorses. Several features of mitral stenosis are consistent with stress failure. Overinflation of the lung also leads to stress failure, a common cause of increased capillary permeability in the intensive care environment. Stress failure also occurs if the type IV collagen of the capillary wall is weakened by autoantibodies as in Goodpasture's syndrome. Neutrophil elastase degrades type IV collagen and this may be the starting point of the breakdown of alveolar walls that is characteristic of emphysema. Stress failure of pulmonary capillaries is a hitherto overlooked and potentially important factor in lung and heart disease.

  20. Microstructural control over soluble pentacene deposited by capillary pen printing for organic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wi Hyoung; Min, Honggi; Park, Namwoo; Lee, Junghwi; Seo, Eunsuk; Kang, Boseok; Cho, Kilwon; Lee, Hwa Sung

    2013-08-28

    Research into printing techniques has received special attention for the commercialization of cost-efficient organic electronics. Here, we have developed a capillary pen printing technique to realize a large-area pattern array of organic transistors and systematically investigated self-organization behavior of printed soluble organic semiconductor ink. The capillary pen-printed deposits of organic semiconductor, 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS_PEN), was well-optimized in terms of morphological and microstructural properties by using ink with mixed solvents of chlorobenzene (CB) and 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB). Especially, a 1:1 solvent ratio results in the best transistor performances. This result is attributed to the unique evaporation characteristics of the TIPS_PEN deposits where fast evaporation of CB induces a morphological evolution at the initial printed position, and the remaining DCB with slow evaporation rate offers a favorable crystal evolution at the pinned position. Finally, a large-area transistor array was facilely fabricated by drawing organic electrodes and active layers with a versatile capillary pen. Our approach provides an efficient printing technique for fabricating large-area arrays of organic electronics and further suggests a methodology to enhance their performances by microstructural control of the printed organic semiconducting deposits.

  1. Intracranial capillary hemangioma mimicking a dissociative disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lacasse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Capillary hemangiomas, hamartomatous proliferation of vascular endothelial cells, are rare in the central nervous system (CNS. Intracranial capillary hemangiomas presenting with reversible behavioral abnormalities and focal neurological deficits have rarely been reported. We report a case of CNS capillary hemangioma presenting with transient focal neurological deficits and behavioral abnormalities mimicking Ganser’s syndrome. Patient underwent total excision of the vascular malformation, resulting in complete resolution of his symptoms.

  2. Rapid low energy transient capillary discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, L.; Esaulov, A.; Sylvester, G.; Zambra, M.; Araya, J.

    1999-01-01

    Recently plasmas capable of emitting x-rays and bright VUV radiation were found to be generated for capillary discharges operating in Argon. Rocca et al. (1) has reported laser emission at 46.9 nm. To date the results of Rocca's group have not been reproduced by other groups that have attempted this work. There are a series of mechanisms and phenomenology to describe and understand this kind of experiment. The experiments carried out by the reference group (1) use a 600 kV Marx generator to generate a 40 kA current sinusoidal pulse and 60 ns medium period (dI/d∼ 10 12 A/s) in a 4mm diameter capillary. The argon filled pressure is 500 to 700mtorr. When the laser pulse is emitted the plasma has compressed to an electronic density that is estimated experimentally at 10 18 cm-3 and with an electronic temperature of 60eV. The CCHEN Plasma Physics Laboratory has built a rapid and low energy device for capillary discharges, which is identical to that described in reference (2). When this device is operated at 10kV, a 5kA current pulse and 12ns total duration (with a 10%-90% rise time of 4.8ns) are obtained in a 0.8mm capillary. The device combines the hollow cathode effect to aid gas ionization in the core, with a bundle of energetic electrons originated in a plasma behind the cathode. The discharge operates in Argon at a pressure of 500mtorr in the cathode zone. We have performed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) computer simulations for the electrical, pressure and capillary conditions of our experiment, obtaining radial profiles with temporary resolution for the electron density, plasma density, current, electrons and ions temperature and degree of ionization. A column of compressed plasma at 0.1-0.2mm with an electronic density of 2x10 18 cm-3, 70eV electron temperature and 50eV ion temperature. The experimental program includes pinhole photography in VUV with temporary and spatial resolution using an intensifier camera, MCP, 4 frames and multiple pinholes simultaneously

  3. Capillary electrophoresis and nanomaterials - Part I: Capillary electrophoresis of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Vojtech; Vaculovicova, Marketa

    2017-10-01

    Nanomaterials are in analytical science used for a broad range of purposes, covering the area of sample pretreatment as well as separation, detection, and identification of target molecules. This part of the review covers capillary electrophoresis (CE) of nanomaterials and focuses on the application of CE as a method for characterization used during nanomaterial synthesis and modification as well as the monitoring of their properties and interactions with other molecules. The heterogeneity of the nanomaterial family is extremely large. Depending on different definitions of the term Nanomaterial/Nanoparticle, the group may cover metal and polymeric nanoparticles, carbon nanomaterials, liposomes and even dendrimers. Moreover, these nanomaterials are usually subjected to some kind of surface modification or functionalization, which broadens the diversity even more. Not only for purposes of verification of nanomaterial synthesis and batch-to-batch quality check, but also for determination the polydispersity and for functionality characterization on the nanoparticle surface, has CE offered very beneficial capabilities. Finally, the monitoring of interactions between nanomaterials and other (bio)molecules is easily performed by some kind of capillary electromigration technique. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Revision of capillary cone-jet physics: Electrospray and flow focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M.; Montanero, José M.

    2009-06-01

    Capillary cone jets are natural microfluidic structures arising in steady capillary tip streaming, whose paradigms are electrospray and flow focusing phenomena. In this work, we make a profound revision of the basic underlying physics of generic cone jets from thousands of experimental measurements, most of them reported in the literature. First, the boundaries of the stability region of steady jetting are calculated. We describe these limitations by instability mechanisms associated with the local flow structure in the tip and the issuing jet and with the global behavior of the meniscus. Second, to undertake a general physical treatment of cone jets in steady regime, we analyze the energy balance taking place in the tips of both flow focusing and electrospray. This analysis yields a fundamental result: if the electrospray data are expressed in terms of an effective pressure drop, both phenomena satisfy the same scaling law for the droplet size, which exhibits nearly complete similarity in the parameter window where quasimonodisperse sprays are produced. That effective pressure drop is a function of the liquid properties exclusively, i.e., it does not depend on the operational parameters (flow rate and applied voltage). Moreover, the stability limits of the operational regimes are analyzed in detail, finding fundamental coincidences between flow focusing and electrospray as well. These results provide most useful general description and predictive scaling laws for nearly monodisperse microspraying or nanospraying based on steady cone jets, of immediate applicability in analytical chemistry, chemical engineering, biochemistry, pharmaceutical and food technologies, painting, and many other technological fields.

  5. Shape Oscillations of a Bubble or Drop Attached to a Capillary Tip

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vejražka, Jiří; Vobecká, Lucie; Orvalho, Sandra; Zedníková, Mária; Tihon, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 116, SEP 6 (2014), s. 359-371 ISSN 0009-2509 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/11/0806; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13018 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : bubble oscillations * pendant drop * eigenmode frequency Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.337, year: 2014

  6. Management of the droopy tip: a comparison of three alar cartilage-modifying techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2003-10-01

    The droopy tip is a common nasal deformity in which the tip is inferiorly rotated. Five hundred consecutive rhinoplasty cases were studied to assess the incidence and causes of the droopy tip deformity and to evaluate the role of three alar cartilage-modifying techniques--lateral crural steal, lateral crural overlay, and tongue in groove--in correcting such a deformity. The external rhinoplasty approach was used in all cases. Only one of the three alar cartilage-modifying techniques was used in each case, and the degree of tip rotation and projection was measured both preoperatively and postoperatively. The incidence of droopy tip was 72 percent, and the use of an alar cartilage-modifying technique was required in 85 percent of these cases to achieve the desired degree of rotation. The main causes of droopy tip included inferiorly oriented alar cartilages (85 percent), overdeveloped scrolls of upper lateral cartilages (73 percent), high anterior septal angle (65 percent), and thick skin of the nasal lobule (56 percent). The lateral crural steal technique increased nasal tip rotation and projection, the lateral crural overlay technique increased tip rotation and decreased tip projection, and the tongue-in-groove technique increased tip rotation without significantly changing the amount of projection. The lateral crural overlay technique resulted in the highest degrees of rotation, followed by the lateral crural steal and finally the tongue-in-groove technique. According to these results, the lateral crural steal technique is best indicated in cases with droopy underprojected nasal tip, the lateral crural overlay technique in cases of droopy overprojected nasal tip, and the tongue-in-groove technique in cases where the droopy nasal tip is associated with an adequate amount of projection.

  7. TIP peptide inhalation in experimental acute lung injury: effect of repetitive dosage and different synthetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Erik K; Thomas, Rainer; Liu, Tanghua; Stefaniak, Joanna; Ziebart, Alexander; Duenges, Bastian; Eckle, Daniel; Markstaller, Klaus; David, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of TIP peptides that mimic the lectin-like domain of TNF-α is a novel approach to attenuate pulmonary oedema on the threshold to clinical application. A placebo-controlled porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) demonstrated a reduced thermodilution-derived extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) and improved gas exchange through TIP peptide inhalation within three hours. Based on these findings, the present study compares a single versus a repetitive inhalation of a TIP peptide (TIP-A) and two alternate peptide versions (TIP-A, TIP-B). Following animal care committee approval ARDS was induced by bronchoalveolar lavage followed by injurious ventilation in 21 anaesthetized pigs. A randomised-blinded three-group setting compared the single-dosed peptide variants TIP-A and TIP-B as well as single versus repetitive inhalation of TIP-A (n = 7 per group). Over two three-hour intervals parameters of gas exchange, transpulmonary thermodilution, calculated alveolar fluid clearance, and ventilation/perfusion-distribution were assessed. Post-mortem measurements included pulmonary wet/dry ratio and haemorrhage/congestion scoring. The repetitive TIP-A inhalation led to a significantly lower wet/dry ratio than a single dose and a small but significantly lower EVLWI. However, EVLWI changes over time and the derived alveolar fluid clearance did not differ significantly. The comparison of TIP-A and B showed no relevant differences. Gas exchange and ventilation/perfusion-distribution significantly improved in all groups without intergroup differences. No differences were found in haemorrhage/congestion scoring. In comparison to a single application the repetitive inhalation of a TIP peptide in three-hour intervals may lead to a small additional reduction the lung water content. Two alternate TIP peptide versions showed interchangeable characteristics.

  8. Comparisons Between Histology and Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography of the Periarterial Capillary-Free Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaratnasingam, Chandrakumar; An, Dong; Sakurada, Yoichi; Lee, Cecilia S; Lee, Aaron Y; McAllister, Ian L; Freund, K Bailey; Sarunic, Marinko; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2018-05-01

    To use the capillary-free zone along retinal arteries, a physiologic area of superficial avascularization, as an anatomic paradigm to investigate the reliability of optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) for visualizing the deep retinal circulation. Validity analysis and laboratory investigation. Five normal human donor eyes (mean age 69.8 years) were perfusion-labeled with endothelial antibodies and the capillary networks of the perifovea were visualized using confocal scanning laser microscopy. Regions of the capillary-free zone along the retinal artery were imaged using OCTA in 16 normal subjects (age range 24-51 years). Then, 3 × 3-mm scans were acquired using the RTVue XR Avanti (ver. 2016.1.0.26; Optovue, Inc, Fremont, California, USA), PLEX Elite 9000 (ver. 1.5.0.15909; Zeiss Meditec, Inc, Dublin, California, USA), Heidelberg Spectralis OCT2 (Family acquisition module 6.7.21.0; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany), and DRI-OCT Triton (Ver. 1.1.1; Topcon Corp, Tokyo, Japan). Images of the superficial plexus, deep vascular plexus, and a slab containing all vascular plexuses were generated using manufacturer-recommended default settings. Comparisons between histology and OCTA were performed. Histologic analysis revealed that the capillary-free zone along the retinal artery was confined to the plane of the superficial capillary plexus and did not include the intermediate and deep capillary plexuses. Images derived from OCTA instruments demonstrated a prominent capillary-free zone along the retinal artery in slabs of the superficial plexus, deep plexus, and all capillary plexuses. The number of deep retinal capillaries seen in the capillary-free zone was significantly greater on histology than on OCTA (P zone as an anatomic paradigm, we show that the deep vascular beds of the retina are not completely visualized using OCTA. This may be a limitation of current OCTA techniques. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mixed Fluid Conditions: Capillary Phenomena

    KAUST Repository

    Santamarina, Carlos

    2017-07-06

    Mixed fluid phenomena in porous media have profound implications on soil-atmosphere interaction, energy geotechnology, environmental engineering and infrastructure design. Surface tension varies with pressure, temperature, solute concentration, and surfactant concentration; on the other hand, the contact angle responds to interfacial tensions, surface topography, invasion velocity, and chemical interactions. Interfaces are not isolated but interact through the fluid pressure and respond to external fields. Jumps, snap-offs and percolating wetting liquids along edges and crevices are ubiquitous in real, non-cylindrical porous networks. Pore- and macroscale instabilities together with pore structure variability-and-correlation favor fluid trapping and hinder recovery efficiency. The saturation-pressure characteristic curve is affected by the saturation-history, flow-rate, the mechanical response of the porous medium, and time-dependent reactive and diffusive processes; in addition, there are salient differences between unsaturation by internal gas nucleation and gas invasion. Capillary forces add to other skeletal forces in the porous medium and can generate open-mode discontinuities when the capillary entry pressure is high relative to the effective stress. Time emerges as an important variable in mixed-fluid conditions and common quasi-static analyses may fail to capture the system response.

  10. Two-dimensional capillary origami

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brubaker, N.D.; Lega, J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a global approach to the problem of capillary origami that captures all unfolded equilibrium configurations in the two-dimensional setting where the drop is not required to fully wet the flexible plate. We provide bifurcation diagrams showing the level of encapsulation of each equilibrium configuration as a function of the volume of liquid that it contains, as well as plots representing the energy of each equilibrium branch. These diagrams indicate at what volume level the liquid drop ceases to be attached to the endpoints of the plate, which depends on the value of the contact angle. As in the case of pinned contact points, three different parameter regimes are identified, one of which predicts instantaneous encapsulation for small initial volumes of liquid. - Highlights: • Full solution set of the two-dimensional capillary origami problem. • Fluid does not necessarily wet the entire plate. • Global energy approach provides exact differential equations satisfied by minimizers. • Bifurcation diagrams highlight three different regimes. • Conditions for spontaneous encapsulation are identified.

  11. Two-dimensional capillary origami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, N.D., E-mail: nbrubaker@math.arizona.edu; Lega, J., E-mail: lega@math.arizona.edu

    2016-01-08

    We describe a global approach to the problem of capillary origami that captures all unfolded equilibrium configurations in the two-dimensional setting where the drop is not required to fully wet the flexible plate. We provide bifurcation diagrams showing the level of encapsulation of each equilibrium configuration as a function of the volume of liquid that it contains, as well as plots representing the energy of each equilibrium branch. These diagrams indicate at what volume level the liquid drop ceases to be attached to the endpoints of the plate, which depends on the value of the contact angle. As in the case of pinned contact points, three different parameter regimes are identified, one of which predicts instantaneous encapsulation for small initial volumes of liquid. - Highlights: • Full solution set of the two-dimensional capillary origami problem. • Fluid does not necessarily wet the entire plate. • Global energy approach provides exact differential equations satisfied by minimizers. • Bifurcation diagrams highlight three different regimes. • Conditions for spontaneous encapsulation are identified.

  12. Tip preparation for usage in an ultra-low temperature UHV scanning tunneling microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ernst, S. Wirth, M. Rams, V. Dolocan and F. Steglich

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the preparation and characterization of tungsten tips for the use in UHV low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS, respectively. These specific environments require in situ facilities for tip conditioning, for further sharpening of the tips, as well as for reliable tip characterization. The implemented conditioning methods include direct resistive annealing, annealing by electron bombardment, and self-sputtering with noble gas ions. Moreover, results from in situ tip characterization by field emission and STM experiments were compared to ex situ scanning electron microscopy. Using the so-prepared tips, high resolution STM images and tunneling spectra were obtained in a temperature range from ambient down to 350 mK, partially with applied magnetic field, on a variety of materials.

  13. APPLICATION OF THE NATURALLY-OCCURRING DEUTERIUM ISOTOPE TO TRACING THE CAPILLARY FRINGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturally-occurring deuterium is a useful tracer of subsurface hydrologic processes. A possible application includes the identification of capillary fringes in the vadose zone. Multiple and discontinuous water tables persist in many temperate regions, under various hydrogeologi...

  14. A Zero Dimensional Time-Dependent Model of High-Pressure Ablative Capillary Discharge (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pekker, Leonid

    2008-01-01

    ... plasma core and the ablative capillary walls. The model includes the thermodynamics of partially ionized plasmas and non-ideal effects taking place in the high density plasma and assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE...

  15. Fabrication and modelling of injection moulded all-polymer capillary microvalves for passive microfluidic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kistrup, Kasper; Poulsen, Carl Esben; Østergaard, Peter Friis

    2014-01-01

    from rapid prototyping to pilot (mass) production. (1) Fabrication of an all-polymer microfluidic system using a rapid prototyped master insert for injection moulding and ultrasonic welding, including a systematic experimental characterisation of chip featured geometric capillary microvalve test...

  16. Evaluation and management of Periocular Capillary Hemangioma: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Motowa, Saeed A.; Chaudhry, Imtiaz A.

    2006-01-01

    To review the salient features of periocular capillary hemangioma, provide the ophthalmologist with clinical, diagnostic and histological features characteristic of the tumor and discuss various methods of management. Methods were literature review of periocular capillary hemangioma, diagnostic evaluation with emphasis on treatment through the presentation of illustrative clinical cases. Capillary hemangioma is the most common benign vascular tumor found on the head and neck area including eyelids and orbit. The lesion typically manifests within the first few weeks of life, grows rapidly in the first year during the proliferative phase, then invariably and slowly regresses over the next 4 to 5 years during the involutional phase. The lesion may resolve without leaving any significant cosmetic sequelae in vast majority of patients, however, the functional defects in the form of amblyopia, squint, facial disfigurement and rarely optic atrophy may persist long after complete resolution of the tumor. The diagnosis of the capillary hemangioma requires a combination of clinical and imaging studies such as ultrasonography, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and angiography in selected cases. With the advent of less invasive diagnostic techniques, the need for biopsy in capillary hemangioma has decreased. Nevertheless, it should be differentiated from other periocular tumors such as rhabdomyosarcoma, lymphangioma, chloroma, neuroblastoma, orbital cyst, and orbital cellulites. Treatment is indicated to prevent amblyopia or cosmetic disfigurement. If indicated, intra-lesional corticosteroids may be used to enhance resolution of the tumor. Other forms of treatment tried with variable success include systematic and topical corticosteroids, radiation, surgical excision and intravenous embolization of the tumor. Indecent years, laser ablation of the tumor has been found effective in some cases. Interferon-u has been utilized effectively in cases of capillary

  17. Quantification of local matrix deformations and mechanical properties during capillary morphogenesis in 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniazeva, Ekaterina; Weidling, John W; Singh, Rahul; Botvinick, Elliot L; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico; Putnam, Andrew J

    2012-04-01

    Reciprocal mechanical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are thought to play important instructive roles in branching morphogenesis. However, most studies to date have failed to characterize these interactions on a length scale relevant to cells, especially in three-dimensional (3D) matrices. Here we utilized two complementary methods, spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) and laser optical tweezers-based active microrheology (AMR), to quantify endothelial cell (EC)-mediated deformations of individual ECM elements and the local ECM mechanical properties, respectively, during the process of capillary morphogenesis in a 3D cell culture model. In experiments in which the ECM density was systematically varied, STICS revealed that the rate at which ECs deformed individual ECM fibers on the microscale positively correlated with capillary sprouting on the macroscale. ECs expressing constitutively active V14-RhoA displaced individual matrix fibers at significantly faster rates and displayed enhanced capillary sprouting relative to wild-type cells, while those expressing dominant-negative N19-RhoA behaved in an opposite fashion. In parallel, AMR revealed a local stiffening of the ECM proximal to the tips of sprouting ECs. By quantifying the dynamic physical properties of the cell-ECM interface in both space and time, we identified a correlation linking ECM deformation rates and local ECM stiffening at the microscale with capillary morphogenesis at the macroscale. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  18. Quantification of local matrix deformations and mechanical properties during capillary morphogenesis in 3D†‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniazeva, Ekaterina; Weidling, John W.; Singh, Rahul; Botvinick, Elliot L.; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Reciprocal mechanical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are thought to play important instructive roles in branching morphogenesis. However, most studies to date have failed to characterize these interactions on a length scale relevant to cells, especially in three-dimensional (3D) matrices. Here we utilized two complementary methods, spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) and laser optical tweezers-based active microrheology (AMR), to quantify endothelial cell (EC)-mediated deformations of individual ECM elements and the local ECM mechanical properties, respectively, during the process of capillary morphogenesis in a 3D cell culture model. In experiments in which the ECM density was systematically varied, STICS revealed that the rate at which ECs deformed individual ECM fibers on the microscale positively correlated with capillary sprouting on the macroscale. ECs expressing constitutively active V14-RhoA displaced individual matrix fibers at significantly faster rates and displayed enhanced capillary sprouting relative to wild-type cells, while those expressing dominant-negative N19-RhoA behaved in an opposite fashion. In parallel, AMR revealed a local stiffening of the ECM proximal to the tips of sprouting ECs. By quantifying the dynamic physical properties of the cell-ECM interface in both space and time, we identified a correlation linking ECM deformation rates and local ECM stiffening at the microscale with capillary morphogenesis at the macroscale. PMID:22281872

  19. Homocysteine Facilitates Prominent Polygonal Angiogenetic Networks of a Choroidal Capillary Sprouting Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yih-Jing; Chiu, Chien-Chao; Ke, Chia-Ying; Tien, Ni; Lin, Po-Kang

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the effects of homocysteine on choroidal angiogenesis, we established an ex vivo choroidal sprouting explant model and examined the potential growth factors for angiogenesis. Choroid fragments with retinal pigment epithelium were isolated from mouse and embedded in Matrigel. Homocysteine at different concentrations were added to the culture mediums. The choroidal explants were observed at different time points, and the total area of choroidal sprouting was measured and analyzed. Homocysteine evoked choroidal capillary sprouting by inducing capillary endothelial cell proliferation with pericyte formation and by facilitating polygonal angiogenetic networks. In some cases, vascular lumens were observed in the newly forming capillaries facilitated by homocysteine. The choroidal sprouting effect of homocysteine can only be observed at a certain range of homocysteine concentration, with 1-mM homocysteine exhibiting the most significantly increased choroidal sprouting areas. Isolectin overexpression was noted in the homocysteine-treated group. Possible growth factors for angiogenesis were detected through immunofluorescent staining, which demonstrated the overexpression of platelet-derived growth factor C and angiopoietin 1 in the homocysteine-treated preparations only. In these preparations, platelet-derived growth factor C was highly expressed in the tip cells of sprouting capillaries. We therefore conclude that platelet-derived growth factor C and angiopoietin 1 may play key roles in the choroid angiogenesis evoked by homocysteine.

  20. Modeling capillary forces for large displacements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastrangeli, M.; Arutinov, G.; Smits, E.C.P.; Lambert, P.

    2014-01-01

    Originally applied to the accurate, passive positioning of submillimetric devices, recent works proved capillary self-alignment as effective also for larger components and relatively large initial offsets. In this paper, we describe an analytic quasi-static model of 1D capillary restoring forces

  1. Arrested segregative phase separation in capillary tubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, R. Hans; Lindhoud, Saskia

    2006-01-01

    Phase separation in a capillary tube with one of the phases fully wetting the capillary wall is arrested when the typical size of the phase domains reaches the value of the diameter of the tube. The arrested state consists of an alternating sequence of concave-capped and convex-capped cylindrical

  2. Diagnostics of a high current capillary discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, D.R.; Jones, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    We have demonstrated that thin (10 to 25 μm diameter) capillaries can be fabricated in suitably configured insulators for use in pulse power machines. Large currents can be used to heat these capillaries which produce photons with an energies greater than 1 keV

  3. Assembly for connecting the column ends of two capillary columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, B.; Auer, M.; Pospisil, P.

    1984-01-01

    In gas chromatography, the column ends of two capillary columns are inserted into a straight capillary from both sides forming annular gaps. The capillary is located in a tee out of which the capillary columns are sealingly guided, and to which carrier gas is supplied by means of a flushing flow conduit. A ''straight-forward operation'' having capillary columns connected in series and a ''flush-back operation'' are possible. The dead volume between the capillary columns can be kept small

  4. Preparation of Electrospun Polymer Fibers Using a Copper Wire Electrode in a Capillary Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinbo, Kazunari; Onozuka, Shintaro; Hoshino, Rikiya; Mizuno, Yoshinori; Ohdaira, Yasuo; Baba, Akira; Kato, Keizo; Kaneko, Futao

    2010-04-01

    Polymer fibers were prepared by an electrospinning method utilizing a copper wire electrode in a capillary tube. The morphology of electrospun poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) fibers was observed, and was found to be dependent on the wire electrode tip position in the capillary tube, the concentration of the polymer solution, the distance between the electrodes, and the applied voltage. By using the wire electrode, the experimental setup is simple and the distance between the electrodes and the applied voltage can be easily reduced. Furthermore, the preparation of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) fibers was carried out. P3HT fibers were successfully prepared by mixing poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) in P3HT solution. Orientation control was also carried out by depositing the fibers on a rotating collector electrode, and the alignment of the P3HT:PEO fibers was confirmed. Anisotropy of the optical absorption spectra was also observed for the aligned fibers.

  5. Performance comparison of fiber optic tips in interferrometric displacement measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moro, Erik A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Puckett, Anthony D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grahn, Rick [UNM; Karimi, Hussain [UCSD; Wilson, Kyle [ROSE HULMAN INSTITUTE OT TECH.

    2010-10-21

    Fiber optic displacement sensors have many potential advantages over traditional displacement measurement techniques, including small size, immunity to electromagnetic interference, electrical isolation, and high resolution. In this report, we focus on an interferometric fiber optic sensor, where the gap between the fiber tip and the device under test forms a Fabry-Perot resonant cavity. An optical interrogator measures the reflected intensity at wavelengths ranging from 1510 to 1590 nm. The spacing between resonant frequencies allows us to determine the distance from the tip to the device under test. We consider ferrule connector angled physical contact (FC/APC), ferrule connector ultra physical contact (FC/UPC) and unpolished cleaved tips and compare their influence on sensor performance. A plane wave propagation model is proposed for predicting tip effects. Comparisons are made on the basis of sensor measurement range, resolution, and sensitivity to changes in test conditions. In this paper, we discuss the experimental setup, detail our analysis, and present test results with recommendations for the applications of each tip.

  6. Advanced ceramic material for high temperature turbine tip seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, N. G.; Vogan, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Ceramic material systems are being considered for potential use as turbine blade tip gas path seals at temperatures up to 1370 1/4 C. Silicon carbide and silicon nitride structures were selected for study since an initial analysis of the problem gave these materials the greatest potential for development into a successful materials system. Segments of silicon nitride and silicon carbide materials over a range of densities, processed by various methods, a honeycomb structure of silicon nitride and ceramic blade tip inserts fabricated from both materials by hot pressing were tested singly and in combination. The evaluations included wear under simulated engine blade tip rub conditions, thermal stability, impact resistance, machinability, hot gas erosion and feasibility of fabrication into engine components. The silicon nitride honeycomb and low-density silicon carbide using a selected grain size distribution gave the most promising results as rub-tolerant shroud liners. Ceramic blade tip inserts made from hot-pressed silicon nitride gave excellent test results. Their behavior closely simulated metal tips. Wear was similar to that of metals but reduced by a factor of six.

  7. Capillary electrophoresis of proteins for proteomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, T

    1999-10-01

    Analyses of proteins in complex mixtures such as cell lyzates are presently performed mainly by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. For structural analysis, each protein in a spot is digested with proteases and the fragment peptides are subjected to Edman sequencing and/or mass spectrometry. These works aim at the total analysis of proteins in a complex mixture and reconstruction of their cooperative functions. Genomic studies are now being combined with these proteomic studies. This review article focuses on the application of capillary electrophoresis aiming at the total analysis of complex protein systems or structural analysis of each separated protein. From this viewpoint, articles on capillary zone electrophoresis, capillary isoelectric focusing, and sieving SDS capillary electrophoresis are reviewed. Since these techniques of capillary electrophoresis have been thoroughly reviewed previously, papers published in 1997 and 1998 are mainly covered.

  8. Windows 8 visual quick tips

    CERN Document Server

    McFedries, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Easy-in, easy-out format covers all the bells and whistles of Windows 8 If you want to learn how to work smarter and faster in Microsoft's Windows 8 operating system, this easy-to-use, compact guide delivers the goods. Designed for visual learners, it features short explanations and full-color screen shots on almost every page, and it's packed with timesaving tips and helpful productivity tricks. From enhancing performance and managing digital content to setting up security and much more, this handy guide will help you get more out of Windows 8. Uses full-color screen shots and short, step-by-

  9. Twitter Tips, Tricks, and Tweets

    CERN Document Server

    McFedries, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Maximize your fun and boost your productivity with this updated, full-color guide to tantalizing Twitter tips!. The popularity of Twitter continues to soar, and is fast becoming the most popular social networking site online. Whether you're looking to learn how to set up an account for the first time or are on the prowl for some cool third-party Twitter apps, this full-color guide will boost your entire Twitter experience. Allowing you to communicate with fellow Twitters within a 140-character limit, this fun and fascinating social networking tool is easier than maintaining a blog and quicker

  10. Rebleeding rates following TIPS for variceal hemorrhage in the Viatorr era: TIPS alone versus TIPS with variceal embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaba, Ron C; Bui, James T; Cotler, Scott J; Kallwitz, Eric R; Mengin, Olga T; Martinez, Brandon K; Berkes, Jaime L; Carrillo, Tami C; Knuttinen, M Grace; Owens, Charles A

    2010-08-06

    To compare rebleeding rates following treatment of variceal hemorrhage with TIPS alone versus TIPS with variceal embolization in the covered stent-graft era. In this retrospective study, 52 patients (M:F 29:23, median age 52 years) with hepatic cirrhosis and variceal hemorrhage underwent TIPS insertion between 2003 and 2008. Median Child-Pugh and MELD scores were 8.5 and 13.5. Generally, 10-mm diameter TIPS were created using covered stent-grafts (Viatorr; W.L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, AZ). A total of 37 patients underwent TIPS alone, while 15 patients underwent TIPS with variceal embolization. The rates of rebleeding and survival were compared. All TIPS were technically successful. Median portosystemic pressure gradient reductions were 13 versus 11 mmHg in the embolization and non-embolization groups. There were no statistically significant differences in Child-Pugh and MELD score, or portosystemic pressure gradients between each group. A trend toward increased rebleeding was present in the non-embolization group, where 8/37 (21.6%) patients rebled while 1/15 (6.7%) patients in the TIPS with embolization group rebled (P = 0.159) during median follow-up periods of 199 and 252 days (P = 0.374). Rebleeding approached statistical significance among patients with acute hemorrhage, where 8/32 (25%) versus 0/14 (0%) rebled in the non-embolization and embolization groups (P = 0.055). A trend toward increased bleeding-related mortality was seen in the non-embolization group (P = 0.120). TIPS alone showed a high incidence of rebleeding in this series, whereas TIPS with variceal embolization resulted in reduced recurrent hemorrhage. The efficacy of embolization during TIPS performed for variceal hemorrhage versus TIPS alone should be further compared with larger prospective randomized trials.

  11. Third-generation electrokinetically pumped sheath-flow nanospray interface with improved stability and sensitivity for automated capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometry analysis of complex proteome digests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liangliang; Zhu, Guijie; Zhang, Zhenbin; Mou, Si; Dovichi, Norman J

    2015-05-01

    We have reported a set of electrokinetically pumped sheath flow nanoelectrospray interfaces to couple capillary zone electrophoresis with mass spectrometry. A separation capillary is threaded through a cross into a glass emitter. A side arm provides fluidic contact with a sheath buffer reservoir that is connected to a power supply. The potential applied to the sheath buffer drives electro-osmosis in the emitter to pump the sheath fluid at nanoliter per minute rates. Our first-generation interface placed a flat-tipped capillary in the emitter. Sensitivity was inversely related to orifice size and to the distance from the capillary tip to the emitter orifice. A second-generation interface used a capillary with an etched tip that allowed the capillary exit to approach within a few hundred micrometers of the emitter orifice, resulting in a significant increase in sensitivity. In both the first- and second-generation interfaces, the emitter diameter was typically 8 μm; these narrow orifices were susceptible to plugging and tended to have limited lifetime. We now report a third-generation interface that employs a larger diameter emitter orifice with very short distance between the capillary tip and the emitter orifice. This modified interface is much more robust and produces much longer lifetime than our previous designs with no loss in sensitivity. We evaluated the third-generation interface for a 5000 min (127 runs, 3.5 days) repetitive analysis of bovine serum albumin digest using an uncoated capillary. We observed a 10% relative standard deviation in peak area, an average of 160,000 theoretical plates, and very low carry-over (much less than 1%). We employed a linear-polyacrylamide (LPA)-coated capillary for single-shot, bottom-up proteomic analysis of 300 ng of Xenopus laevis fertilized egg proteome digest and identified 1249 protein groups and 4038 peptides in a 110 min separation using an LTQ-Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer; peak capacity was ∼330. The

  12. Tips and Trends to Start the New Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleich, Michael R

    2018-01-01

    With the New Year comes the opportunity to set goals and advance training and development opportunities for leaders. This article presents five tips and five trends that serve as prognosticators for the coming year, including tips to influence time management and leadership impact and trends, such as sexual harassment training and "soft" skills development, which are now core skills for team success. A shift from hierarchical structures to network- and relationship-centered webs for advanced problem solving is also projected. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2018;49(1):7-9. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Effect of crack propagation on crack tip fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.V. Antunes

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Crack closure influences fatigue crack growth rate and must be included in the design of components. Plasticity induced crack closure is intimately linked with the crack tip plastic deformation, which becomes residual as the crack propagates. The objective here is to study numerically the effect of crack propagation on crack tip fields. The transient effect observed at the beginning of crack propagation is linked to the hardening behavior of material. The effect of mesh refinement is studied, and a singular behavior is evident, which is explained by the sharp crack associated with mesh topology, composed of a regular pattern of square elements. The plastic zone size measured perpendicularly to crack flank in the residual plastic wake is quantified and compared with literature models. Finally, the removal of material at the first node behind crack tip with load cycling was observed for plane strain state and some hardening models in plane stress state.

  14. Stability of helical tip vortices in a rotor far wake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2007-01-01

    , corresponding to Rankine, Gaussian and Scully vortices, at radial extents ranging from the core radius of a tip vortex to several rotor radii. The analysis shows that the stability of tip vortices largely depends on the radial extent of the hub vorticity as well as on the type of vorticity distribution. As part......As a means of analysing the stability of the wake behind a multi-bladed rotor the stability of a multiplicity of helical vortices embedded in an assigned flow field is addressed. In the model the tip vortices in the far wake are approximated by infinitely long helical vortices with constant pitch...... and radius. The work is a further development of a model developed in Okulov (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 521, p. 319) in which the linear stability of N equally azimuthally spaced helical vortices was considered. In the present work the analysis is extended to include an assigned vorticity field due to root...

  15. Charging dynamics in electron transmission through Al2O3 capillaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milosavljević, A.R.; Schiessl, K.; Lemell, C.

    2012-01-01

    We have measured the transmission of low-energy (E=250eV) electrons through insulating Al O nanocapillaries. We find that transmission at the incident energy is quickly suppressed with increasing tilt angle ψ of the capillary axis relative to the incoming electron beam while inelastic transmission...... becomes more important. For small angles of incidence charging dynamics lead to a decrease of total transmission (elastic and inelastic) with time. Our results are interpreted on the basis of a microscopic model for the electron transport within the capillary including also close interactions...... with the capillary wall....

  16. Drop Pinch-Off for Discrete Flows from a Capillary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson M.C.T.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of drop formation and pinch-off from a capillary tube under the influence of gravity has been extensively studied when the internal capillary pressure gradient is constant. This ensures a continuous time independent flow field inside the capillary tube typically of the Poiseuille flow type. Characteristic drop ejection behaviour includes: periodic drop ejection, drop ejection with associated satellite production, complex dripping, chaotic behaviour and jetting. It is well known that this characteristic behaviour is governed by the Weber (We and Ohnesorge (Oh numbers (for a given Bond number and may be delineated in a We verses Oh operability diagram. An in-depth physical understanding of drop ejection is also of great importance to industry where the tight control of drop size and ejection velocity are of critical importance in industrial processes such as sealants used in electronics assembly and inkjet printing. However, the use of such a continuous flow approach for drop ejection in industry is often impractical since such flows cannot be operator controlled. For this reason it is important to investigate so-called discrete pipe flows where the flow can be turned on and off at will. This means the flow inside the pipe is now time-dependent being controlled in a step-wise fashion. As a first stage in the investigation of drop pinch-off behaviour in discrete pipe flows this paper will study the critical pinch-off time required for drop ejection starting from a pendant drop. This is the discrete amount of time the pipe flow is turned on for in order for a drop to be ejected from the capillary. A Newtonian incompressible free-surface CFD flow code developed at the University of Leeds is used to investigate the critical pinch-off time for a range of internal pipe velocities (the central flow maximum in Poiseuille flow. It is found that the time required for drop ejection to occur decreases exponentially with internal pipe velocity

  17. Optical coherence tomography angiography-based capillary velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruikang K.; Zhang, Qinqin; Li, Yuandong; Song, Shaozhen

    2017-06-01

    Challenge persists in the field of optical coherence tomography (OCT) when it is required to quantify capillary blood flow within tissue beds in vivo. We propose a useful approach to statistically estimate the mean capillary flow velocity using a model-based statistical method of eigendecomposition (ED) analysis of the complex OCT signals obtained with the OCT angiography (OCTA) scanning protocol. ED-based analysis is achieved by the covariance matrix of the ensemble complex OCT signals, upon which the eigenvalues and eigenvectors that represent the subsets of the signal makeup are calculated. From this analysis, the signals due to moving particles can be isolated by employing an adaptive regression filter to remove the eigencomponents that represent static tissue signals. The mean frequency (MF) of moving particles can be estimated by the first lag-one autocorrelation of the corresponding eigenvectors. Three important parameters are introduced, including the blood flow signal power representing the presence of blood flow (i.e., OCTA signals), the MF indicating the mean velocity of blood flow, and the frequency bandwidth describing the temporal flow heterogeneity within a scanned tissue volume. The proposed approach is tested using scattering phantoms, in which microfluidic channels are used to simulate the functional capillary vessels that are perfused with the scattering intralipid solution. The results indicate a linear relationship between the MF and mean flow velocity. In vivo animal experiments are also conducted by imaging mouse brain with distal middle cerebral artery ligation to test the capability of the method to image the changes in capillary flows in response to an ischemic insult, demonstrating the practical usefulness of the proposed method for providing important quantifiable information about capillary tissue beds in the investigations of neurological conditions in vivo.

  18. Microwave discharges in capillary tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dervisevic, Emil

    1984-01-01

    This research thesis aims at being a contribution to the study of microwave discharge by a surface wave, and more precisely focusses on the discharge in capillary tubes filled with argon. The author first present theoretical models which describe, on the one hand, the propagation of the surface wave along the plasma column, and, on the other hand, longitudinal and radial profiles of the main discharge characteristics. The second part addresses the study of the influence of parameters (gas pressure and tube radius) on discharge operation and characteristics. Laws of similitude as well as empirical relationships between argon I and argon II emission line intensities, electron density, and electric field in the plasma have been established [fr

  19. Trade and Industrial Policy Strategies (TIPS) - Phase III | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... organization believes to be its future needs (improved educational outcomes and enhanced capacity to undertake empirical policy impact assessment). As a result, TIPS will broaden its thematic agenda to include, in addition to trade analysis, the Real Economy Study and a program of work on the economics of education.

  20. Tips, Tropes, and Trivia: Ideas for Teaching Educational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, William M.; And Others

    The collective experience of more than 50 years has led to the development of approaches that have enhanced student comprehension in the teaching of educational research methods, statistics, and measurement. Tips for teachers include using illustrative problems with one-digit numbers, using common situations and everyday objects to illustrate…

  1. Preventing Childhood Obesity: Tips for Parents and Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of weight gain while allowing normal growth and development. Don’t put your child on a weight-reduction diet without talking to ... regular physical activity prescription including social support The importance of continuing these lifestyle changes well past ... your Child's Weight at the Doctor Preventing Childhood Obesity: Tips ...

  2. Eat Seafood Twice a Week: 10 Tips to Help You Eat More Seafood

    Science.gov (United States)

    10 tips Nutrition Education Series eat seafood twice a week 10 tips to help you eat more seafood Twice a week, make seafood—fish and shellfish—the ... of seafood can help prevent heart disease . 1 eat a variety of seafood Include some that are ...

  3. Shoot regeneration and embryogenesis in lily shoot tips cryopreserved by droplet vitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoot regeneration and embryogenesis were, for the first time, achieved directly in shoot tips of Lilium Oriental hybrid ‘Siberia’ following cryopreservation by droplet-vitrification. Shoot tips (2 mm in length) including 2-3 leaf primordia were excised from 4-week-old adventitious shoots directly r...

  4. Ball tip method for thoracic pedicle screw placement in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kota; Matsumoto, Morio; Iizuka, Shingo

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of ball tip method for thoracic pedicle screw placements in idiopathic scoliosis patients. 24 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were included in this study. Conventional method was performed in 12 patients. Ball tip method was performed in 12 patients. Accuracy of the pedicle screw placement was evaluated based on the postoperative CT. In the ball tip method, a probe which was consisted of ball tip with flexible shaft was used. After removing of cortical bone at a starting point, the probe was inserted manually or sometimes with gently tapping by hammer. During the maneuver, the probe will gradually progress into cancellous bone in the pedicle, without perforating cortical bone in the pedicle. Following expansion of the hole by a rigid gear shift probe, screw was placed in the pedicle. 65.1% of screws were located within pedicle in the conventional group and 86.5% in the ball tip group. 5.3% of screws were located out of pedicle within 2 mm in the conventional group and 8.2% in the ball tip group. 15.8% of screws were located out of pedicle beyond 2 mm and 1.8% in the ball tip group. The ball tip method enhanced the accuracy of thoracic pedicle screw placements in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients. The ball tip method may be effective for accurate pedicle screw placement in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. (author)

  5. Effect of capillary geometry on predicting electroosmotic volumetric flowrates in porous or fibrous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Jennifer; Oyanader, Mario; Arce, Pedro

    2012-07-15

    Electrokinetic-based methods are used in a variety of applications including drug delivery and separation of biomolecules, among others. Many of these applications feature a fibrous or a porous medium that can be modeled by using capillary bundle models to predict the behavior of the electroosmotic flow within the particular system. The role of geometry in predicting volumetric flowrates in porous media is investigated by modeling the electroosmotic flow in idealized capillaries of rectangular, cylindrical, and annular geometries. This is achieved by the coupling of electrostatics and continuum hydrodynamics to obtain analytical expressions that govern the electrokinetically - driven volumetric flow within these idealized capillary geometries. A previous study developed a model to compare the cylindrical and annular capillary geometries by utilizing two methods that compare the areas of the two geometries. The methods used in this previous work will also be used in the present contribution to compare the volumetric flowrates in the cylindrical and annular capillaries with a rectangular capillary. Illustrative results will be presented to aid in the understanding of the influence of the various geometrical and electrostatic parameters that arise from the analysis of these volumetric flowrates. It was found that the electroosmotic volumetric flowrates are significantly affected by the capillary geometry. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Measuring Fan-Blade-Tip Displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Robert F., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Magnets and Hall-effect transducers used to monitor tip-to-shroud clearances. Mounting permanent magnet in end of fan blade and monitoring tip-to-shroud distance by use of output of Hall-effect transducers affixed to surface of shroud. Transducers provide real-time information. By placing magnets in each fan-blade tip, complete set monitored sequentially as each blade rotates past sensor. Application in many rotating machines, providing surrounding materials nonmagnetic and temperatures not severe.

  7. The impact of capillary dilation on the distribution of red blood cells in artificial networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Franca; Reichold, Johannes; Weber, Bruno; Jenny, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that pericytes around capillaries are contractile and able to alter the diameter of capillaries. To investigate the effects of capillary dilation on network dynamics, we performed simulations in artificial capillary networks of different sizes and complexities. The unequal partition of hematocrit at diverging bifurcations was modeled by assuming that each red blood cell (RBC) enters the branch with the faster instantaneous flow. Network simulations with and without RBCs were performed to investigate the effect of local dilations. The results showed that the increase in flow rate due to capillary dilation was less when the effects of RBCs are included. For bifurcations with sufficient RBCs in the parent vessel and nearly equal flows in the branches, the flow rate in the dilated branch did not increase. Instead, a self-regulation of flow was observed due to accumulation of RBCs in the dilated capillary. A parametric study was performed to examine the dependence on initial capillary diameter, dilation factor, and tube hematocrit. Furthermore, the conditions needed for an efficient self-regulation mechanism are discussed. The results support the hypothesis that RBCs play a significant role for the fluid dynamics in capillary networks and that it is crucial to consider the blood flow rate and the distribution of RBCs to understand the supply of oxygen in the vasculature. Furthermore, our results suggest that capillary dilation/constriction offers the potential of being an efficient mechanism to alter the distribution of RBCs locally and hence could be important for the local regulation of oxygen delivery. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. The tip of the iceberg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørst, Lill Rastad

    2010-01-01

      Abstract: The tip of the iceberg: Ice as a nonhuman actor of the climate change debate   The global climate change debate has the Arctic as a core region of concern and ice has become a central aspect of discourses. This article discusses ice representations from six different contexts linked...... to the 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP15) in Copenhagen. The author argues that even though the discussions often seem to be centred on ice alone, the latter gets inscribed in narratives and metaphors which have wider implications for how the Arctic and its Indigenous peoples...... are represented. Ice becomes a nonhuman actor, framing the discussions, acting in specific ways, and linking hybrid networks. Indeed it is used in diverse platforms by scientists, politicians, governments, NGOs, as well as Inuit hunters and fishermen...

  9. AFM tip effect on a thin liquid film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Alonso, R; Legendre, D; Tordjeman, Ph

    2013-06-25

    We study the interaction between an AFM probe and a liquid film deposited over a flat substrate. We investigate the effects of the physical and geometrical parameters, with a special focus on the film thickness E, the probe radius R, and the distance D between the probe and the free surface. Deformation profiles have been calculated from the numerical simulations of the Young-Laplace equation by taking into account the probe/liquid and the liquid/substrate interactions, characterized by the Hamaker constants, Hpl and Hls. We demonstrate that the deformation of a shallow film is determined by a particular characteristic length λF = (2πγE(4)/Hls)(1/2), resulting from the balance between the capillary force (γ is the surface tension) and the van der Waals liquid/substrate attraction. For the case of a bulk liquid, the extent of the interface deformation is simply controlled by the capillary length λC = (γ/Δρg)(1/2). These trends point out two asymptotic regimes, which in turn are bounded by two characteristic film thicknesses Eg = (Hls/2πΔρg)(1/4) and Eγ = (R(2)Hls/2πγ)(1/4). For E > Eg, the bulk behavior is recovered, and for E effect is observed. This tip effect is characterized by the small magnitude of the deformation and an important restriction of its radial extent λF localized below the probe. In addition, we have found that the film thickness has a significant effect on the threshold separation distance Dmin below which the irreversible jump-to-contact process occurs: Dmin is probe radius-dependent for the bulk whereas it is film-thickness-dependent for shallow films. These results have an important impact on the optimal AFM scanning conditions.

  10. Kinetics of liquid annulus formation and capillary forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Y I; Singh, A; Hahn, M; Brown, S; Moudgil, B

    2011-11-15

    The dependence of the capillary adhesion force F(cap) between a silica microsphere and a flat silica surface versus a time period t of the samples' contact (i.e., dwell-in time) is experimentally investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). F(cap) was found to be dependent on t if the humidity was >30-35%. This dependence is exponential, with decay (characteristic) times of ∼10 s. It is suggested that the kinetics of the adhesion process are related to the growth of the water annulus between surfaces. Furthermore, we propose that the growth kinetics has two components: (1) water vapor diffusion from the surrounding humid media into the gap between samples and (2) water drainage from the gap. The theory of diffusion through thin pores (i.e., gaps) is developed, and analytical formulas are obtained for the dependence of the meniscus radius r versus time t. However, the experimental dependence of F(cap) versus t and, consequently, r versus t obtained in this article disagrees with the theoretical prediction by several orders of magnitude. Similar results were obtained from the literature data for capillary forces between an AFM cantilever tip and a flat surface. Possible reasons for the deviation from diffusion theory are suggested: surface and Knudsen regimes of vapor diffusion, nonsteady state vapor flow, and tortuosity. Taking into account the viscous drainage of water from the multilayer gap can explain the experimental kinetics of bridge formation, but only if the viscosity of the adjacent multilayer of water is several orders of magnitude larger than the bulk viscosity.

  11. CFD analysis of cloud cavitation on three tip-modified propellers with systematically varied tip geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, K. W.; Andersen, Poul

    2015-01-01

    The blade tip loading is often reduced as an effort to restrain sheet and tip vortex cavitation in the design of marine propellers. This CFD analysis demonstrates that an excessive reduction of the tip loading can cause cloud cavitation responsible for much of noise and surface erosion. Detached...

  12. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of cations and anions using ion selective detectors in capillary electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nann, A.

    1994-01-01

    The present work reports on the application of ion-selective microelectrodes as potentiometric detectors for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of cations and anions separated by capillary electrophoresis. Due to the high internal resistance of microelectrodes, their potentials are strongly affected by external electrical fields. Therefore, the influence of the electrophoretic field on the electrode response had to be kept at a minimum. With the electrode tip inserted in the capillary aperture (on-column detection), heavy drifts and noise of the signals were observed, mainly because the electrophoretic potential is superimposed on the Nernstian electrode response. As the potential inside the capillary is site-dependent, already minor movements and vibrations not perceptible under the light microscopy cause unacceptable disturbances of the electrode signal. One possibility to solve the problem consists in post- or off-column detection, i.e., with the detector located outside the influence of the electrophoretic field. If quantitative analyses with maximum resolution are to be achieved, only on-column detection is suitable because outside the capillary, the separation efficiency drops drastically. By etching the detector-side capillary end to a conical aperture, the field strength in the last 10 μm fell approximately 1/25 as compared with that in a cylindrical one. Thus, potential drifts and noise were reduced correspondingly so that on-column detection can also be used for potentiometric detection. To obtain quantitative results, the signals of the ion-selective detector were first delogarithmized and then integrated over time. Thus, it was possible to quantify cations and anions with a coefficient of variations ≤5%. (author) figs., tabs., 179 refs

  13. Nautilus Centripetal Capillary Condenser, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Nautilus Centripetal Capillary Condenser (NCCC) is proposed for the microgravity compatible removal of water from a saturated air stream. Successful development of...

  14. Capillary detectors for high resolution tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Annis, P

    1997-01-01

    We present a new tracking device based on glass capillary bundles or layers filled with highly purified liquid scintillator and read out at one end by means of image intensifiers and CCD devices. A large-volume prototype consisting of 5 × 105 capillaries with a diameter of 20 μm and a length of 180 cm and read out by a megapixel CCD has been tested with muon and neutrino beams at CERN. With this prototype a two track resolution of 33 μm was achieved with passing through muons. Images of neutrino interactions in a capillary bundle have also been acquired and analysed. Read-out chains based on Electron Bombarded CCD (EBCCD) and image pipeline devices are also investigated. Preliminary results obtained with a capillary bundle read out by an EBCCD are presented.

  15. Hierarchical capillary adhesion of microcantilevers or hairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianlin; Feng Xiqiao; Xia Re; Zhao Hongping

    2007-01-01

    As a result of capillary forces, animal hairs, carbon nanotubes or nanowires of a periodically or randomly distributed array often assemble into hierarchical structures. In this paper, the energy method is adopted to analyse the capillary adhesion of microsized hairs, which are modelled as clamped microcantilevers wetted by liquids. The critical conditions for capillary adhesion of two hairs, three hairs or two bundles of hairs are derived in terms of Young's contact angle, elastic modulus and geometric sizes of the beams. Then, the hierarchical capillary adhesion of hairs is addressed. It is found that for multiple hairs or microcantilevers, the system tends to take a hierarchical structure as a result of the minimization of the total potential energy of the system. The level number of structural hierarchy increases with the increase in the number of hairs if they are sufficiently long. Additionally, we performed experiments to verify our theoretical solutions for the adhesion of microbeams

  16. Characterization of asphaltenes by nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, W.T.; Tüdös, A.J.; Grutters, M.; Shepherd, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis was used for the separation and characterization of asphaltene samples from different sources. For the separation medium (background electrolyte), mixtures of tetrahydrofuran and a high-permittivity organic solvent could be used. The best results were obtained

  17. Capillary gas chromatography in essential oil analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandra, P.; Bicchi, C. (eds.)

    1987-01-01

    Capillary GC has strongly contributed to the development of essential oil science both from an industrial point of view (quality control, new sources of odoriferous compounds) and from a scientific point of view (phytochemistry, chemotaxonomy, biochemistry, etc). The reserve, however, is also true. Essential oil research has contributed to the present state of the art in capillary gas chromatography, e.g. the polar and sometimes thermolabile character of essential oil components has emphasized the need for more inert capillary columns and better sample introduction systems, selective polar phases have been developed, etc. Within 14 separate contributions of the book the following topics are discussed: general aspects of essential oil preparation and analysis, considerations on the selection of capillary columns for the analysis, microtechniques, headspace versus classical analysis, 'fingerprints', industrial quality control, retention indices, dual channel analysis, gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy coupling, examples of artefact formation, GC-FTIR analysis, multidimensional gas chromatography.

  18. Twelve Tips for Effective Electronic Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Joy

    1994-01-01

    Offers 12 tips for effective electronic presentation. This article is intended for readers who may be considering using electronic presentation for the first time. Offers reasons for its popularity and occasions when it may be used. The tips offer assistance in the design and presentation of electronic material. (LZ)

  19. Economics of tipping the climate dominoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Derek; Traeger, Christian P.

    2016-05-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions can trigger irreversible regime shifts in the climate system, known as tipping points. Multiple tipping points affect each other’s probability of occurrence, potentially causing a `domino effect’. We analyse climate policy in the presence of a potential domino effect. We incorporate three different tipping points occurring at unknown thresholds into an integrated climate-economy model. The optimal emission policy considers all possible thresholds and the resulting interactions between tipping points, economic activity, and policy responses into the indefinite future. We quantify the cost of delaying optimal emission controls in the presence of uncertain tipping points and also the benefit of detecting when individual tipping points have been triggered. We show that the presence of these tipping points nearly doubles today’s optimal carbon tax and reduces peak warming along the optimal path by approximately 1 °C. The presence of these tipping points increases the cost of delaying optimal policy until mid-century by nearly 150%.

  20. Vulvar Lobular Capillary Hemangioma (Pyogenic Granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kian-Mei Chong

    2005-03-01

    Conclusion: Pyogenic granuloma is considered a reactive hyperproliferative vascular response to trauma or other stimuli. The name “pyogenic granuloma” is a misnomer since the condition is not associated with pus and does not represent a granuloma histologically. There are a few cases of lobular capillary hemangioma of the glans penis but it is rare on the female genitalia. We present this case to help physicians become aware that lobular capillary hemangiomas may occur at this site.

  1. Nanobits - exchangable and customisable scanning probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yildiz, Izzet

    Invention of atomic force microscopy (AFM) pioneered a novel aspect for the surface metrology concept. A range of scanning probe methods have been developed over the years based on different sorts of tip-surface interaction: electrical, optical, thermal, force. Reproducible and fast fabrication...... miniaturisation requires the scanning probes to adapt into finer geometries to provide higher lateral resolution. To meet these needs critical dimension AFM (CD-AFM) and deep trench AFM (DT-AFM) were invented, which use different types of AFM tips: high-aspect-ratio tips for DT-AFM and CD tips for CD...... replacement could greatly increase the efficiency and adaptability of a CD system. In this PhD study, NanoBits – nano-sized customisable and exchangeable scanning probe tips – were developed to meet the demands of current AFM applications. Two different methods were followed for the fabrication of Nano...

  2. Enhanced Peptide Detection Toward Single-Neuron Proteomics by Reversed-Phase Fractionation Capillary Electrophoresis Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sam B.; Lombard-Banek, Camille; Muñoz-LLancao, Pablo; Manzini, M. Chiara; Nemes, Peter

    2017-11-01

    The ability to detect peptides and proteins in single cells is vital for understanding cell heterogeneity in the nervous system. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) provides high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) with trace-level sensitivity, but compressed separation during CE challenges protein identification by tandem HRMS with limited MS/MS duty cycle. Here, we supplemented ultrasensitive CE-nanoESI-HRMS with reversed-phase (RP) fractionation to enhance identifications from protein digest amounts that approximate to a few mammalian neurons. An 1 to 20 μg neuronal protein digest was fractionated on a RP column (ZipTip), and 1 ng to 500 pg of peptides were analyzed by a custom-built CE-HRMS system. Compared with the control (no fractionation), RP fractionation improved CE separation (theoretical plates 274,000 versus 412,000 maximum, resp.), which enhanced detection sensitivity (2.5-fold higher signal-to-noise ratio), minimized co-isolation spectral interferences during MS/MS, and increased the temporal rate of peptide identification by up to 57%. From 1 ng of protein digest (development of the brain, including those involved in synaptic transmission and plasticity and cytoskeletal organization. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Pediatric Nasal Lobular Capillary Hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan M. Virbalas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. LCH is a benign vascular growth of the skin and mucous membranes commonly affecting the head and neck. Since it was first described in the nineteenth century, this entity has been variously known as “human botryomycosis” and “pyogenic granuloma.” The shifting nomenclature reflects an evolving understanding of the underlying pathogenesis. We review the histopathology of and current epidemiological data pertaining to LCH which suggests that the development of these lesions may involve a hyperactive inflammatory response influenced by endocrine factors. We report two new cases of pediatric lobular capillary hemangioma (LCH of the nasal cavity and review current theories regarding the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of nasal LCH. Methods. Retrospective case series. Case Series. Two adolescent females presented with symptoms of recurrent epistaxis, nasal obstruction, and epiphora. Both patients underwent computed tomography imaging and biopsy of their intranasal mass. The tumors were excised using image-guided transnasal endoscopic technique. Seven other cases of nasal LCH have been reported to date in the pediatric population. Conclusion. Nasal LCH is a rare cause of an intranasal mass and is associated with unilateral epistaxis, nasal obstruction, and epiphora. We advocate for image-guided endoscopic excision of LCH in the adolescent population.

  4. DNA Sequencing by Capillary Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karger, Barry L.; Guttman, Andras

    2009-01-01

    Sequencing of human and other genomes has been at the center of interest in the biomedical field over the past several decades and is now leading toward an era of personalized medicine. During this time, DNA sequencing methods have evolved from the labor intensive slab gel electrophoresis, through automated multicapillary electrophoresis systems using fluorophore labeling with multispectral imaging, to the “next generation” technologies of cyclic array, hybridization based, nanopore and single molecule sequencing. Deciphering the genetic blueprint and follow-up confirmatory sequencing of Homo sapiens and other genomes was only possible by the advent of modern sequencing technologies that was a result of step by step advances with a contribution of academics, medical personnel and instrument companies. While next generation sequencing is moving ahead at break-neck speed, the multicapillary electrophoretic systems played an essential role in the sequencing of the Human Genome, the foundation of the field of genomics. In this prospective, we wish to overview the role of capillary electrophoresis in DNA sequencing based in part of several of our articles in this journal. PMID:19517496

  5. Capillary interactions in nano-particles suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossev, Dobrin; Warren, Garfield

    2010-03-01

    We have investigated the structures formed by colloidal particles suspended in solvents at volume fractions below 10% and interacting through capillary bridges. Such systems resemble colloidal gas of sticky nano-spheres that form pearl-necklace like chains that, in turn, induce strong viscoleasticity due to the formation of 3-D fractal network. The capillary force dominates the electrostatic and Van der Waals forces in solutions and can bridge multiple particles depending of the volume of the capillary bridge. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is used to study nanoparticles with an average diameter of 10 nm in polar and non-polar organic solvents at ambient temperatures. Computer simulations of a pearl necklace-like chain of spheres is conducted to explain the structure factor when capillary bridges are present. We have also studied the properties of the capillary bridge between a pair of particles. The significance of this study is to explore the possibility of using capillary force as a tool to engineer new colloidal structures and materials in solutions and to optimize their viscoelastic properties.

  6. Intramuscular capillary-type hemangioma: radiologic-pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Sabri; Alomari, Ahmad I.; Chaudry, Gulraiz [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Vascular Anomalies Center, Boston, MA (United States); Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Kozakewich, Harry P. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Vascular Anomalies Center, Boston, MA (United States); Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Fishman, Steven J. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Vascular Anomalies Center, Boston, MA (United States); Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Mulliken, John B. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Vascular Anomalies Center, Boston, MA (United States); Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Plastic and Oral Surgery, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Infantile hemangiomas demonstrate a pattern of proliferative growth in infancy followed by a slow phase of involution. In contrast a rare type of vascular tumor, intramuscular capillary-type hemangioma, usually presents beyond the period of infancy with nonspecific symptoms and no evidence of involution. The purpose of this study was to characterize the clinical, imaging, histopathological characteristics and management of intramuscular capillary-type hemangioma. We performed a retrospective review of a 20-year period to identify children diagnosed with intramuscular capillary-type hemangioma. Patient demographics, imaging and histopathological findings were recorded. We included 18 children (10 boys, 8 girls) with histologically proven intramuscular capillary-type hemangioma - and adequate imaging. The mean age at presentation was 8.1 years (range 1 day to 19 years). Twelve lesions involved muscles of the extremities, 4 were located in the trunk and 2 were in the head and neck. MRI had been performed in all children and demonstrated a soft-tissue mass with flow voids, consistent with fast flow. The lesion was well-circumscribed in 16 children and intralesional fat was seen in 14. Doppler US demonstrated a heterogeneous lesion, predominantly isoechoic to surrounding muscle, with enlarged arterial feeders. Enlarged feeding arteries, inhomogeneous blush and lack of arteriovenous shunting were noted on angiography (n = 5). The most common histopathological findings were lobules of capillaries with plump endothelium and at least some adipose tissue. The lesions were excised in six children. Two children were lost to follow-up. In the remaining 10, follow-up MRI studies ranging from 3 months to 10 years showed that the lesion enlarged in proportion to the child (n = 7), demonstrated slow growth (n = 2) or remained stable (n = 1). There was no change in imaging characteristics on follow-up. Intramuscular capillary-type hemangioma is a rare benign vascular tumor of

  7. The tipping point: A mathematical model for the profit-driven abandonment of restaurant tipping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Sara M.; Herbers, Eileen; Chen, Jack; Abrams, Daniel M.

    2018-02-01

    The custom of voluntarily tipping for services rendered has gone in and out of fashion in America since its introduction in the 19th century. Restaurant owners that ban tipping in their establishments often claim that social justice drives their decisions, but we show that rational profit-maximization may also justify the decisions. Here, we propose a conceptual model of restaurant competition for staff and customers, and we show that there exists a critical conventional tip rate at which restaurant owners should eliminate tipping to maximize profits. Because the conventional tip rate has been increasing steadily for the last several decades, our model suggests that restaurant owners may abandon tipping en masse when that critical tip rate is reached.

  8. Role of ultrasound for central catheter tip localization in neonates: a review of the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Farahbakhsh, Nazanin; Tabatabaii, Seyyed Ahmad

    2018-02-15

    Central catheters are known as "life lines" in intensive care units and are used frequently in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for multiple indications. The central catheters used in NICU includes umbilical venous catheter (UVC), umbilical arterial catheter (UAC) and peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) lines. The tip of these central lines needs to be in a correct position as malpositioned central line tips lead to many neonatal complications. Radiograph either abdomen or chest is the most widely used modality for locating the tip of the central catheter. There are many disadvantages of radiographic confirmation of tip position and recently ultrasound (USG)/echocardiography has been used for localization of catheter tip. USG provides real-time assessment of the tip position with other added advantages like no radiation exposure, need for minimal training for performing USG, minimal handling of the neonate, identification of migration of central lines and making repositioning of central lines under USG guidance. The present evidence supports the use of USG/Echo for localization of central catheter tip and USG has shown to have good sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value when compared with a radiograph. In this review, we discuss about the role of USG/Echo in the identification of tip of central catheters in neonatal care.

  9. Defining toxicological tipping points in neuronal network development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Christopher L; Brown, Jasmine P; Wallace, Kathleen; Wambaugh, John F; Shah, Imran; Shafer, Timothy J

    2018-02-02

    Measuring electrical activity of neural networks by microelectrode array (MEA) has recently shown promise for screening level assessments of chemical toxicity on network development and function. Important aspects of interneuronal communication can be quantified from a single MEA recording, including individual firing rates, coordinated bursting, and measures of network synchrony, providing rich datasets to evaluate chemical effects. Further, multiple recordings can be made from the same network, including during the formation of these networks in vitro. The ability to perform multiple recording sessions over the in vitro development of network activity may provide further insight into developmental effects of neurotoxicants. In the current study, a recently described MEA-based screen of 86 compounds in primary rat cortical cultures over 12 days in vitro was revisited to establish a framework that integrates all available primary measures of electrical activity from MEA recordings into a composite metric for deviation from normal activity (total scalar perturbation). Examining scalar perturbations over time and increasing concentration of compound allowed for definition of critical concentrations or "tipping points" at which the neural networks switched from recovery to non-recovery trajectories for 42 compounds. These tipping point concentrations occurred at predominantly lower concentrations than those causing overt cell viability loss or disrupting individual network parameters, suggesting tipping points may be a more sensitive measure of network functional loss. Comparing tipping points for six compounds with plasma concentrations known to cause developmental neurotoxicity in vivo demonstrated strong concordance and suggests there is potential for using tipping points for chemical prioritization. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Nanoparticle-based capillary electroseparation of proteins in polymer capillaries under physiological conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, C.; Harwigsson, I.; Becker, K.

    2010-01-01

    Totally porous lipid-based liquid crystalline nanoparticles were used as pseudostationary phase for capillary electroseparation with LIF detection of proteins at physiological conditions using unmodified cyclic olefin copolymer capillaries (Topas (R), 6.7 cm effective length). In the absence...

  11. Monoliths in capillary electrochromatography and capillary liquid chromatography in conjunction with mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravcová, Dana; Rantamäki, A. H.; Duša, Filip; Wiedmer, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 37, 7-8 (2016), s. 880-912 ISSN 0173-0835 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : capillary electrochromatography * capillary liquid chromatography * mass spec- trometry * monolithic columns Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.744, year: 2016

  12. Multimodal imaging findings in retinal deep capillary ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Suqin; Wang, Fenghua; Pang, Claudine E; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A; Freund, K Bailey

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the multimodal imaging findings in retinal deep capillary ischemia (DCI). This was a retrospective review of 5 eyes of 4 patients with sudden onset of paracentral scotomas caused by DCI. Multimodal imaging techniques, including color and red-free photographs, near-infrared reflectance, fluorescein angiography, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, were performed in all eyes, and the findings were correlated with microperimetry in two eyes. Imaging findings in DCI were compared with those of a cotton wool spot caused by superficial capillary ischemia (SCI). Unlike SCI, the imaging findings in DCI were subtler during both the acute and chronic phase, but specific optical coherence tomographic findings could readily differentiate these entities. Acute SCI showed inner retinal whitening, edema, and increased reflectivity, whereas acute DCI showed increased reflectivity of middle retinal layers. Chronic DCI showed retinal thinning with middle layer atrophy, whereas chronic SCI showed inner layer atrophy. In one patient, microperimetry showed a paracentral dense scotoma that corresponded well to the optical coherence tomographic findings. Deep capillary ischemia may represent a nonspecific finding of retinal ischemia and produces characteristic changes within the middle retinal layers, analogous to a deep cotton wool spot, but with distinct features differing from the superficial cotton wool spot which is seen in SCI. Among the various multimodal imaging techniques, optical coherence tomography seemed to be the most sensitive and specific technique in detecting DCI in both the acute and chronic phases.

  13. A Unified Elastoplastic Model of Unsaturated Soils Considering Capillary Hysteresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiantian Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike its saturated counterparts, the mechanical behavior of an unsaturated soil depends not only upon its stress history but also upon its hydraulic history. In this paper, a soil-water characteristic relationship which is capable of describing the effect of capillary hysteresis is introduced to characterize the influence of hydraulic history on the skeletal deformation. The capillary hysteresis is viewed as a phenomenon associated with the internal structural rearrangements in unsaturated soils, which can be characterized by using a set of internal state variables. It is shown that both capillary hysteresis and plastic deformation can be consistently addressed in a unified theoretical framework. Within this context, a constitutive model of unsaturated soils is developed by generalizing the modified Cam-Clay model. A hardening function is introduced, in which both the matric suction and the degree of saturation are explicitly included as hardening variables, so that the effect of hydraulic history on the mechanical response can be properly addressed. The proposed model is capable of capturing the main features of the unsaturated soil behavior. The new model has a hierarchical structure, and, depending upon application, it can describe the stress-strain relation and the soil-water characteristics in a coupled or uncoupled manner.

  14. Control of electroosmotic flow in zirconia-coated capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bellaistre, M Crosnier; Mathieu, O; Randon, J; Rocca, J L

    2002-09-20

    The inner surface of a silica capillary has been modified using an anhydrous sol-gel method: zirconium propoxide reacted with silanol groups to give, after hydrolysis, a "zirconia-like" surface. The electroosmotic properties of zirconia-modified capillaries have been studied under various conditions: working parameters were nature and concentration of the electrolyte, ionic strength, pH and solvent composition. Using different ions such as sodium, potassium, chloride, nitrate or methanoate, a positive electroosmotic flow (cathodic flow) was observed in the pH range 5-11. But below pH 5, a negative electroosmotic flow (anodic flow) occurred, corresponding to a permanent positive surface charge of the capillary walls. The value of the electroosmotic flow (including the sign) can be easily controlled by adding multivalent ions in the electrolyte. Some of these modifications of surface charge can be made irreversible. The observed electroosmotic flow has been related to surface characteristics using the triple layer model. With the large set of working parameters, the optimisation of separations can be facilitated. An example of flow control is given for the separation of four antihistaminic compounds.

  15. Complex decongestive physiotherapy decreases capillary fragility in lipedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szolnoky, G; Nagy, N; Kovács, R K; Dósa-Rácz, E; Szabó, A; Bársony, K; Balogh, M; Kemény, L

    2008-12-01

    Lipedema is a disproportional obesity featuring frequent hematoma formation due to even minor traumatic injuries. On the basis of clinical observations, complete decongestive physiotherapy diminishes the incidence of hematomas due to minor injuries beyond leg volume reduction. Hematoma development may be caused by altered capillary resistance (CR) or altered capillary fragility (CF). We measured capillary fragility (CF) before and after complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP) to examine, whether CDP could reduce CF. 38 women with lipedema were included in the study. Twenty-one (21) patients were treated with CDP and 17 using exclusively moisturizers as the control group. CDP comprised once daily manual lymph drainage, intermittent pneumatic compression and multilayered short-stretch bandaging performed throughout a 5-day-course. CF was evaluated with the vacuum suction method (VSM) using Parrot's angiosterrometer in both groups. Decongestive therapy resulted in a significant reduction of the number of petechiae while no change was detected within the control group. Complete decongestive physiotherapy significantly reduced CF in patients with lipedema and this reduction may lead to reduced hematoma formation.

  16. Fabricating PFPE Membranes for Capillary Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael C.; Willis, Peter A.; Greer, Frank; Rolland, Jason

    2009-01-01

    A process has been developed for fabricating perfluoropolyether (PFPE) membranes that contain microscopic holes of precise sizes at precise locations. The membranes are to be incorporated into laboratory-on-a-chip microfluidic devices to be used in performing capillary electrophoresis. The present process is a modified version of part of the process, described in the immediately preceding article, that includes a step in which a liquid PFPE layer is cured into solid (membrane) form by use of ultraviolet light. In the present process, one exploits the fact that by masking some locations to prevent exposure to ultraviolet light, one can prevent curing of the PFPE in those locations. The uncured PFPE can be washed away from those locations in the subsequent release and cleaning steps. Thus, holes are formed in the membrane in those locations. The most straightforward way to implement the modification is to use, during the ultraviolet-curing step, an ultraviolet photomask similar to the photomasks used in fabricating microelectronic devices. In lieu of such a photomask, one could use a mask made of any patternable ultraviolet-absorbing material (for example, an ink or a photoresist).

  17. Periocular capillary hemangioma: management practices in recent years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernandez JA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Jo Anne Hernandez,1,3,4 Audrey Chia,2 Boon Long Quah,1,2 Lay Leng Seah1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Kandang Kerbau Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore; 2Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore; 3National Healthcare Group Eye Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Cardinal Santos Medical Center, San Juan, Manila, Philippines Purpose: To present a case series on the management options for capillary hemangiomas involving the eyelid and orbit. Methods: This is a retrospective chart review of clinically diagnosed capillary hemangioma cases involving the periocular region treated at two local eye institutions. The patients' demographics and clinical presentation – including visual acuity, refractive error, periorbital and orbital examinations, and ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging findings – were reviewed. The clinical progression, modalities of treatment, and treatment outcomes were studied. Results: Sixteen cases of capillary hemangiomas involving the eyelid and orbit were studied. The mean age at consultation was 9.6 months (range: 1 month–72 months. The majority were females (75%, with 50% presenting as upper-eyelid hemangiomas and the remaining as lower-eyelid (38% and glabellar (12% lesions. Combined superficial and deep involvement was common (64%. Cases whose lesions were located at the upper eyelid or superior orbit led to amblyopia (25%. Fifty-six percent of cases (9/16 were managed conservatively, and 44% (7/16 underwent treatment with either single-agent (n = 4 or combined treatments (n = 3. Conclusion: Close monitoring of visual development and prompt institution of amblyopia therapy for children with periocular capillary hemangiomas generally preserve vision. Extensive lesions that affect the visual axis require local and systemic treatments, alone or in combination, in order to reduce the size and impact of lesions on the eyeball, to reduce induced refractive error and

  18. GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Exenatide Increases Capillary Perfusion Independent of Nitric Oxide in Healthy Overweight Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Mark M; Muskiet, Marcel H A; Tonneijck, Lennart; Kramer, Mark H H; Diamant, Michaela; van Raalte, Daniël H; Serné, Erik H

    2015-06-01

    The insulinotropic gut-derived hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) increases capillary perfusion via a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism in rodents. This improves skeletal muscle glucose use and cardiac function. In humans, the effect of clinically used GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) on capillary density is unknown. We aimed to assess the effects of the GLP-1RA exenatide on capillary density as well as the involvement of nitric oxide in humans. We included 10 healthy overweight men (age, 20-27 years; body mass index, 26-31 kg/m(2)). Measurements were performed during intravenous infusion of placebo (saline 0.9%), exenatide, and a combination of exenatide and the nonselective nitric oxide-synthase inhibitor L-N(G)-monomethyl arginine. Capillary videomicroscopy was performed, and baseline and postocclusive (peak) capillary densities were counted. Compared with placebo, exenatide increased baseline and peak capillary density by 20.1% and 8.3%, respectively (both P=0.016). Concomitant L-N(G)-monomethyl arginine infusion did not alter the effects of exenatide. Vasomotion was assessed using laser Doppler fluxmetry. Exenatide nonsignificantly reduced the neurogenic domain of vasomotion measurements (R=-5.6%; P=0.092), which was strongly and inversely associated with capillary perfusion (R=-0.928; P=0.036). Glucose levels were reduced during exenatide infusion, whereas levels of insulin were unchanged. Acute exenatide infusion increases capillary perfusion via nitric oxide-independent pathways in healthy overweight men, suggesting direct actions of this GLP-1RA on microvascular perfusion or interaction with vasoactive factors. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Polydopamine-functionalized poly(ether ether ketone) tube for capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Wenpeng; Liu, Yikun; Yu, Xinhong; Chen, Zilin

    2017-09-22

    Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) is a hyphenated technique that combines the advantages like low sample consumption, high separation efficiency, short analytical time in CE and high sensitivity, powerful molecular structure elucidation in MS. Polyimide-coated fused silica capillary has become the most dominant capillary for CE, but it suffers from swelling and aminolysis of polyimide coating when treated with organic solvents and alkaline buffer in the CE-MS interface in which the polyimide coating at the end of the capillary is exposed to the solution, and this phenomenon can result in current instability, irregular electrospray and clogging at outlet after prolonged use. In this work, poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) capillary was explored as separation capillary for CE-MS. The problems like swelling and aminolysis of polyimide coating were solved due to the high thermal and chemical stability of PEEK material. After modification with polydopamine, PEEK capillary (PD-PEEK) can generate adjustable electroosmotic flow and provide good separation selectivity. The zwitterion polymer of polydopamine can provide cathodic electroosmotic flow (EOF) at high pH value (pH ≥ 5) and anodic EOF at low pH value (pH ≤ 4), and the EOF mobility can also be adjusted by controlling the modification time of polydopamine. Good separation performance was obtained in the analysis for several classes of compounds including amino acids, phenols and plant hormones at rational EOF direction. Repeatability of the PD-PEEK capillary was studied, with relative standard deviations for intra-day, inter-day runs and between tubes less than 4.94%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Crack Tip Mechanics in Distortion Gradient Plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuentes-Alonso, Sandra; Martínez Pañeda, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    The important role of geometrically necessary dislocations in structural integrity assessment has encouraged an extensive use of strain gradient plasticity theories to characterize the behavior at the small scales involved in crack tip deformation. However, despite the popularity of Distortion...... Gradient Plasticity (DGP), the influence on crack tip mechanics of DGP's distinguishing features that entail superior modelling capabilities has not been investigated yet. In this work crack tip fields are thoroughly examined by implementing the higher order theory of DGP in an implicit finite element...

  1. Reverse capillary flow of condensed water through aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jongju; Jeon, Wonjae; Alam Khan, Fakhre; Lee, Jinkee; Baik, Seunghyun

    2015-06-12

    Molecular transport through nanopores has recently received considerable attention as a result of advances in nanofabrication and nanomaterial synthesis technologies. Surprisingly, water transport investigations through carbon nanochannels resulted in two contradicting observations: extremely fast transport or rejection of water molecules. In this paper, we elucidate the mechanism of impeded water vapor transport through the interstitial space of aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (aligned-MWCNTs)--capillary condensation, agglomeration, reverse capillary flow, and removal by superhydrophobicity at the tip of the nanotubes. The origin of separation comes from the water's phase change from gas to liquid, followed by reverse capillary flow. First, the saturation water vapor pressure is decreased in a confined space, which is favorable for the phase change of incoming water vapor into liquid drops. Once continuous water meniscus is formed between the nanotubes by the adsoprtion and agglomeration of water molecules, a high reverse Laplace pressure is induced in the mushroom-shaped liquid meniscus at the entry region of the aligned-MWCNTs. The reverse Laplace pressure can be significantly enhanced by decreasing the pore size. Finally, the droplets pushed backward by the reverse Laplace pressure can be removed by superhydrophobicity at the tip of the aligned-MWCNTs. The analytical analysis was also supported by experiments carried out using 4 mm-long aligned-MWCNTs with different intertube distances. The water rejection rate and the separation factor increased as the intertube distance decreased, resulting in 90% and 10, respectively, at an intertube distance of 4 nm. This mechanism and nanotube membrane may be useful for energy-efficient water vapor separation and dehumidification.

  2. Early adipogenesis is regulated through USP7-mediated deubiquitination of the histone acetyltransferase TIP60

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Yuan; Koppen, Arjen; Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Tasdelen, Ismayil; van de Graaf, Stan F.; van Loosdregt, Jorg; van Beekum, Olivier; Hamers, Nicole; van Leenen, Dik; Berkers, Celia R.; Berger, Ruud; Holstege, Frank C. P.; Coffer, Paul J.; Brenkman, Arjan B.; Ovaa, Huib; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional coregulators, including the acetyltransferase Tip60, have a key role in complex cellular processes such as differentiation. Whereas post-translational modifications have emerged as an important mechanism to regulate transcriptional coregulator activity, the identification of the

  3. Smooth School Transitions: Tips for Military Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Life Listen Text Size Email Print Share Smooth School Transitions: Tips for Military Families Page Content Article ... Internet is a great resource for this. District & School Web sites Parents and children can visit the ...

  4. Helping Your Child: Tips for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inactive computer and video games, or listening to music on hand-held devices while sitting down. Tips ... habits or weight. Remember, you play the biggest role in your children's lives. You can help your ...

  5. Tips for Teens with Diabetes: About Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes is a serious disease. It means that one's blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Having too much glucose in a person's blood is not healthy. This paper offers tips for managing diabetes.

  6. Winter Safety Tips for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter Safety Tips for Older Adults Expert Information from Healthcare Professionals Who Specialize in the Care of ... thick clothing. Think about getting your thermals! –Essential winter wears: hats, gloves or preferably mittens, winter coat, ...

  7. Essential Outdoor Sun Safety Tips for Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vitamin D Essential Outdoor Sun Safety Tips for Winter Winter sports enthusiasts are at increased risk for overexposure ... associated with sun exposure. "It's easy to associate winter with frostbite and windburn, but most people are ...

  8. Can't sleep? Try these tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000853.htm Can't sleep? Try these tips To use the sharing features ... time. But if it happens often, lack of sleep can affect your health and make it hard ...

  9. Impetigo: Tips for Treatment and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DO Videos Contact Close ‹ Back to Healthy Living Impetigo: Tips for Treatment and Prevention The symptoms of ... to other parts of their bodies. Causes of Impetigo Impetigo usually affects preschool and school-aged children, ...

  10. Next Stop Adulthood: Tips for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Print Share Next Stop Adulthood: Tips For Parents Page Content Article Body Becoming a young adult is exciting, difficult, and scary for both parents and teens. It is a time of increasing ...

  11. 6 Tips: IBS and Complementary Health Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health practice for IBS, here are 6 tips: Hypnotherapy (hypnosis). This practice involves the power of suggestion by ... IBS. According to reviews of the scientific literature, hypnotherapy may be a helpful treatment for managing IBS ...

  12. Tips to Manage Anxiety and Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2018 Conference Snapshot Tips to Manage Anxiety and Stress When you're feeling anxious or stressed, the ... Subscribe to ADAA Triumph: Free Monthly E-News Stress Relief Kits Feeling stressed? Get an ADAA stress ...

  13. How many taxa can be recognized within the complex Tillandsia capillaris (Bromeliaceae, Tillandsioideae)? Analysis of the available classifications using a multivariate approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, Lucía V; Galetto, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Tillandsia capillaris Ruiz & Pav., which belongs to the subgenus Diaphoranthema is distributed in Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, northern and central Argentina, and Chile, and includes forms that are difficult to circumscribe, thus considered to form a complex. The entities of this complex are predominantly small-sized epiphytes, adapted to xeric environments. The most widely used classification defines 5 forms for this complex based on few morphological reproductive traits: Tillandsia capillaris Ruiz & Pav. f. capillaris, Tillandsia capillaris f. incana (Mez) L.B. Sm., Tillandsia capillaris f. cordobensis (Hieron.) L.B. Sm., Tillandsia capillaris f. hieronymi (Mez) L.B. Sm. and Tillandsia capillaris f. virescens (Ruiz & Pav.) L.B. Sm. In this study, 35 floral and vegetative characters were analyzed with a multivariate approach in order to assess and discuss different proposals for classification of the Tillandsia capillaris complex, which presents morphotypes that co-occur in central and northern Argentina. To accomplish this, data of quantitative and categorical morphological characters of flowers and leaves were collected from herbarium specimens and field collections and were analyzed with statistical multivariate techniques. The results suggest that the last classification for the complex seems more comprehensive and three taxa were delimited: Tillandsia capillaris (=Tillandsia capillaris f. incana-hieronymi), Tillandsia virescens s. str. (=Tillandsia capillaris f. cordobensis) and Tillandsia virescens s. l. (=Tillandsia capillaris f. virescens). While Tillandsia capillaris and Tillandsia virescens s. str. co-occur, Tillandsia virescens s. l. is restricted to altitudes above 2000 m in Argentina. Characters previously used for taxa delimitation showed continuous variation and therefore were not useful. New diagnostic characters are proposed and a key is provided for delimiting these three taxa within the complex.

  14. Tipping the balance: robustness of tip cell selection, migration and fusion in angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Bentley

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Vascular abnormalities contribute to many diseases such as cancer and diabetic retinopathy. In angiogenesis new blood vessels, headed by a migrating tip cell, sprout from pre-existing vessels in response to signals, e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Tip cells meet and fuse (anastomosis to form blood-flow supporting loops. Tip cell selection is achieved by Dll4-Notch mediated lateral inhibition resulting, under normal conditions, in an interleaved arrangement of tip and non-migrating stalk cells. Previously, we showed that the increased VEGF levels found in many diseases can cause the delayed negative feedback of lateral inhibition to produce abnormal oscillations of tip/stalk cell fates. Here we describe the development and implementation of a novel physics-based hierarchical agent model, tightly coupled to in vivo data, to explore the system dynamics as perpetual lateral inhibition combines with tip cell migration and fusion. We explore the tipping point between normal and abnormal sprouting as VEGF increases. A novel filopodia-adhesion driven migration mechanism is presented and validated against in vivo data. Due to the unique feature of ongoing lateral inhibition, 'stabilised' tip/stalk cell patterns show sensitivity to the formation of new cell-cell junctions during fusion: we predict cell fates can reverse. The fusing tip cells become inhibited and neighbouring stalk cells flip fate, recursively providing new tip cells. Junction size emerges as a key factor in establishing a stable tip/stalk pattern. Cell-cell junctions elongate as tip cells migrate, which is shown to provide positive feedback to lateral inhibition, causing it to be more susceptible to pathological oscillations. Importantly, down-regulation of the migratory pathway alone is shown to be sufficient to rescue the sprouting system from oscillation and restore stability. Thus we suggest the use of migration inhibitors as therapeutic agents for vascular

  15. Quasistatic Microdroplet Production in a Capillary Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valet, M.; Pontani, L.-L.; Prevost, A. M.; Wandersman, E.

    2018-01-01

    We develop a method to produce aqueous microdroplets in an oil phase, based on the periodic extraction of a pending droplet across the oil-air interface. This interface forms a capillary trap inside which a droplet can be captured and detached. This process is found to be capillary based and quasistatic. The droplet size and emission rate are independently governed by the injected volume per cycle and the extraction frequency. We find that the minimum droplet diameter is close to the injection glass-capillary diameter and that variations in surface tension moderately perturb the droplet size. A theoretical model based on surface energy minimization in the oil-water-air phases is derived and captures the experimental results. This method enables robust, versatile, and tunable production of microdroplets at low production rates.

  16. Nanostructured Tip-Shaped Biosensors: Application of Six Sigma Approach for Enhanced Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Joong Kahng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured tip-shaped biosensors have drawn attention for biomolecule detection as they are promising for highly sensitive and specific detection of a target analyte. Using a nanostructured tip, the sensitivity is increased to identify individual molecules because of the high aspect ratio structure. Various detection methods, such as electrochemistry, fluorescence microcopy, and Raman spectroscopy, have been attempted to enhance the sensitivity and the specificity. Due to the confined path of electrons, electrochemical measurement using a nanotip enables the detection of single molecules. When an electric field is combined with capillary action and fluid flow, target molecules can be effectively concentrated onto a nanotip surface for detection. To enhance the concentration efficacy, a dendritic nanotip rather than a single tip could be used to detect target analytes, such as nanoparticles, cells, and DNA. However, reproducible fabrication with relation to specific detection remains a challenge due to the instability of a manufacturing method, resulting in inconsistent shape. In this paper, nanostructured biosensors are reviewed with our experimental results using dendritic nanotips for sequence specific detection of DNA. By the aid of the Six Sigma approach, the fabrication yield of dendritic nanotips increases from 20.0% to 86.6%. Using the nanotips, DNA is concentrated and detected in a sequence specific way with the detection limit equivalent to 1000 CFU/mL. The pros and cons of a nanotip biosensor are evaluated in conjunction with future prospects.

  17. Nanostructured Tip-Shaped Biosensors: Application of Six Sigma Approach for Enhanced Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahng, Seong-Joong; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Chung, Jae-Hyun

    2016-12-23

    Nanostructured tip-shaped biosensors have drawn attention for biomolecule detection as they are promising for highly sensitive and specific detection of a target analyte. Using a nanostructured tip, the sensitivity is increased to identify individual molecules because of the high aspect ratio structure. Various detection methods, such as electrochemistry, fluorescence microcopy, and Raman spectroscopy, have been attempted to enhance the sensitivity and the specificity. Due to the confined path of electrons, electrochemical measurement using a nanotip enables the detection of single molecules. When an electric field is combined with capillary action and fluid flow, target molecules can be effectively concentrated onto a nanotip surface for detection. To enhance the concentration efficacy, a dendritic nanotip rather than a single tip could be used to detect target analytes, such as nanoparticles, cells, and DNA. However, reproducible fabrication with relation to specific detection remains a challenge due to the instability of a manufacturing method, resulting in inconsistent shape. In this paper, nanostructured biosensors are reviewed with our experimental results using dendritic nanotips for sequence specific detection of DNA. By the aid of the Six Sigma approach, the fabrication yield of dendritic nanotips increases from 20.0% to 86.6%. Using the nanotips, DNA is concentrated and detected in a sequence specific way with the detection limit equivalent to 1000 CFU/mL. The pros and cons of a nanotip biosensor are evaluated in conjunction with future prospects.

  18. Moth pollination of Metaplexis japonica (Apocynaceae): pollinaria transfer on the tip of the proboscis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Shinji; Yamazaki, Kazuo

    2005-08-01

    Asclepiad pollinaria (including pollen masses) attach to diverse body parts of flower visitors in many ways. In this paper, we observed nocturnal moths (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae and Noctuidae) transporting the pollinaria of the Japanese species Metaplexis japonica (Thunb.) Makino (Apocynaceae: Asclepiadoideae) on the tip of the proboscis. Flowers of this species may induce nectar-feeding moths to pull out the proboscis along a guide rail (anther slit), thus clipping the pollinaria onto the tip of the proboscis and transferring the pollinaria to the next flower. The transfer of pollinaria on the unique vector of a moth proboscis tip is an interesting pollination mechanism among previously reported entomophiles.

  19. A capillary viscometer designed for the characterization of biocompatible ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, J., E-mail: johannes.nowak@tu-dresden.de; Odenbach, S.

    2016-08-01

    Suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles are receiving a growing interest in biomedical research. These ferrofluids can, e.g., be used for the treatment of cancer, making use of the drug targeting principle or using an artificially induced heating. To enable a safe application the basic properties of the ferrofluids have to be well understood, including the viscosity of the fluids if an external magnetic field is applied. It is well known that the viscosity of ferrofluids rises if a magnetic field is applied, where the rise depends on shear rate and magnetic field strength. In case of biocompatible ferrofluids such investigations proved to be rather complicated as the experimental setup should be close to the actual application to allow justified predictions of the effects which have to be expected. Thus a capillary viscometer, providing a flow situation comparable to the flow in a blood vessel, has been designed. The glass capillary is exchangeable and different inner diameters can be used. The range of the shear rates has been adapted to the range found in the human organism. The application of an external magnetic field is enabled with two different coil setups covering the ranges of magnetic field strengths required on the one hand for a theoretical understanding of particle interaction and resulting changes in viscosity and on the other hand for values necessary for a potential biomedical application. The results show that the newly designed capillary viscometer is suitable to measure the magnetoviscous effect in biocompatible ferrofluids and that the results appear to be consistent with data measured with rotational rheometry. In addition, a strong change of the flow behaviour of a biocompatible ferrofluid was proven for ranges of the shear rate and the magnetic field strength expected for a potential biomedical application. - Highlights: • A capillary viscometer to characterize biocompatible ferrofluids is presented. • Shear rates and capillary diameters

  20. Usage of capillary electrophoresis for common hemoglobinopathies screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Ebrahimi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobinopathies are most common inherited disorders in the world; approximately 7 percent of the worldwide population and 5-6 percent of population of Iran are carriers. The hemoglobin disorders inherit as autosomal recessive and are very common in the Mediterranean area and much of the Asia and Africa. The control of this inherited disorders need to genetic counseling and accurate screening by more advanced and more accurate methods. This study explains features of current Iran hemoglobin disorders, nominates the accessible methods for screening them and introduces the capillary zone electrophoresis as a rapid and more accurate method. The required data were extracted of various articles and then for good explanation, current Iran hemoglobinopathies properties were showed in the tables and electropherograms of important hemoglobin disorders in Iran population were provided for help to interpretation results of blood tests by capillary zone electrophoresis method. Hemoglobin disorders are including thalassemias and hemoglobin variants; Disruption in the production and malfunction of globin chains cause types of hemoglobin disorders. We cannot introduce one of clinical laboratory tests as critical and basic method for screening and distinguishing types of inherited hemoglobin disorders as alone. For distinguishing the types of them must be prepared enough information and data of the hemoglobin disorders and for more accurate analysis must be used simultaneously different methods as gel electrophoresis, high performance liquid chromatography, isoelectric focusing, capillary zone electrophoresis or molecular tests. The capillary electrophoresis is an accurate and rapid method for screening types of the hemoglobin disorders. Other side this method cannot analyze all of them, so must be used biochemical, biophysical and molecular methods for confirmation the results. This review showed we can use the capillary electrophoresis and HPLC as two

  1. Usage of Capillary Electrophoresis for screening common Hemoglobinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobinopathies are most common inherited disorders in the world approximately 7 percent of the worldwide population and 5-6 percent of population of Iran are carriers. For control of this inherited hemoglobin disorders need to accurate screening by more advanced and more accurate methods. This study explains features of current Iran hemoglobin disorders, nominates the accessible methods for screening them and introduces the capillary zone electrophoresis as a rapid & more accurate method. The required data were extracted of various articles and then for good explanation, current Iran hemoglobinopathies properties were showed in the tables and electropherograms of important hemoglobin disorders in Iran population were provided for help to interpretation results of blood tests by capillary zone electrophoresis method. Hemoglobin disorders are including thalassemias & hemoglobin variants Disruption in the production and malfunction of globin chains cause types of hemoglobin disorders. We cannot introduce one of clinical laboratory tests as critical and basic method for screening and distinguishing types of inherited hemoglobin disorders as alone. For distinguishing the types of them must be prepared enough information and data of the hemoglobin disorders and for more accurate analysis must be used simultaneously different methods as Gel electrophoresis, High performance liquid chromatography, Isoelectric focusing, Capillary zone electrophoresis or molecular tests. The capillary electrophoresis is an accurate and rapid method for screening types of the hemoglobin disorders. Other side this method cannot analyze all of them, so must be used biochemical, biophysical and molecular methods for confirmation the results. This review showed we can use the capillary electrophoresis and HPLC as two complementary methods for hemoglobinopathies screening. We can analyze by the methods more hemoglobin disorders and decrease more laboratory errors. Moreover

  2. A capillary viscometer designed for the characterization of biocompatible ferrofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, J.; Odenbach, S.

    2016-01-01

    Suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles are receiving a growing interest in biomedical research. These ferrofluids can, e.g., be used for the treatment of cancer, making use of the drug targeting principle or using an artificially induced heating. To enable a safe application the basic properties of the ferrofluids have to be well understood, including the viscosity of the fluids if an external magnetic field is applied. It is well known that the viscosity of ferrofluids rises if a magnetic field is applied, where the rise depends on shear rate and magnetic field strength. In case of biocompatible ferrofluids such investigations proved to be rather complicated as the experimental setup should be close to the actual application to allow justified predictions of the effects which have to be expected. Thus a capillary viscometer, providing a flow situation comparable to the flow in a blood vessel, has been designed. The glass capillary is exchangeable and different inner diameters can be used. The range of the shear rates has been adapted to the range found in the human organism. The application of an external magnetic field is enabled with two different coil setups covering the ranges of magnetic field strengths required on the one hand for a theoretical understanding of particle interaction and resulting changes in viscosity and on the other hand for values necessary for a potential biomedical application. The results show that the newly designed capillary viscometer is suitable to measure the magnetoviscous effect in biocompatible ferrofluids and that the results appear to be consistent with data measured with rotational rheometry. In addition, a strong change of the flow behaviour of a biocompatible ferrofluid was proven for ranges of the shear rate and the magnetic field strength expected for a potential biomedical application. - Highlights: • A capillary viscometer to characterize biocompatible ferrofluids is presented. • Shear rates and capillary diameters

  3. Validation of capillary blood analysis and capillary testing mode on the epoc Point of Care system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Cao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laboratory test in transport is a critical component of patient care, and capillary blood is a preferred sample type particularly in children. This study evaluated the performance of capillary blood testing on the epoc Point of Care Blood Analysis System (Alere Inc. Methods: Ten fresh venous blood samples was tested on the epoc system under the capillary mode. Correlation with GEM 4000 (Instrumentation Laboratory was examined for Na+, K+, Cl-, Ca2+, glucose, lactate, hematocrit, hemoglobin, pO2, pCO2, and pH, and correlation with serum tested on Vitros 5600 (Ortho Clinical Diagnostics was examined for creatinine. Eight paired capillary and venous blood was tested on epoc and ABL800 (Radiometer for the correlation of Na+, K+, Cl-, Ca2+, glucose, lactate, hematocrit, hemoglobin, pCO2, and pH. Capillary blood from 23 apparently healthy volunteers was tested on the epoc system to assess the concordance to reference ranges used locally. Results: Deming regression correlation coefficients for all the comparisons were above 0.65 except for ionized Ca2+. Accordance of greater than 85% to the local reference ranges were found in all assays with the exception of pO2 and Cl-. Conclusion: Data from this study indicates that capillary blood tests on the epoc system provide comparable results to reference method for these assays, Na+, K+, glucose, lactate, hematocrit, hemoglobin, pCO2, and pH. Further validation in critically ill patients is needed to implement the epoc system in patient transport. Impact of the study: This study demonstrated that capillary blood tests on the epoc Point of Care Blood Analysis System give comparable results to other chemistry analyzers for major blood gas and critical tests. The results are informative to institutions where pre-hospital and inter-hospital laboratory testing on capillary blood is a critical component of patient point of care testing. Keywords: Epoc, Capillary, Transport, Blood gas, Point of care

  4. Use of Plastic Capillaries for Macromolecular Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Rachel R.; Hong, Young-Soo; Ciszak, Ewa M.

    2003-01-01

    Methods of crystallization of biomolecules in plastic capillaries (Nalgene 870 PFA tubing) are presented. These crystallization methods used batch, free-interface liquid- liquid diffusion alone, or a combination with vapor diffusion. Results demonstrated growth of crystals of test proteins such as thaumatin and glucose isomerase, as well as protein studied in our laboratory such dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. Once the solutions were loaded in capillaries, they were stored in the tubes in frozen state at cryogenic temperatures until the desired time of activation of crystallization experiments.

  5. Can positrons be guided by insulating capillaries?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuBois, R.D.; Toekesi, K.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Investigations of guiding of few hundred eV antiparticles by macroscopic insulating capillaries have been described. Using subfemtoamp positron and electron beams, we demonstrated that a portion of the entering beams were transmitted and emerged in the direction of the capillary. We also demonstrated that the transmitted intensities decreased as the capillary tilt angle was increased (see Fig. 1). Both of these are indications of guiding. However, a comparison with transmitted photon data implies that the positron transmission may result from geometric factors associated with our diffuse beams and tapered capillary used in these studies. For electrons, the comparison indicates differences which could imply that even very low intensity beams can be guided. Measurements of the transmitted intensity as a function of charge entering the capillary were inconclusive as no major increases in the transmitted intensity were observed. 2D static simulations imply that our beam intensities, although extremely small with respect to previous guiding experiments, were capable of supplying sufficient charge for guiding to occur. Although not definitive, our study implies that sub-femtoamp beam intensities are sufficient to form charge patches and produce guiding. This may have been observed for electrons with the question remaining open for positrons. That guiding was not clearly seen may have been due to the capillary geometry used or it may indicate that although sufficient charge is being supplied, the surface and bulk resistivities of glass permit this charge to dissipate faster than it is formed. This aspect was not taken into consideration in our simulations but a crude estimate of the discharge rate implies that beam intensities on the order of pA, rather than fA as used here, may be required for guiding to occur in the capillaries used here. Additional studies are required to definitively answer the question as to whether antiparticles

  6. Mapping molecular adhesion sites inside SMIL coated capillaries using atomic force microscopy recognition imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Michael [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Stock, Lorenz G. [Division of Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Department of Molecular Biology, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Innovative Tools for the Characterization of Biosimilars, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Traxler, Lukas [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Leclercq, Laurent [Institut des Biomolécules Max Mousseron (IBMM, UMR 5247, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier), Place Eugène Bataillon, CC 1706, 34095 Montpellier (France); Bonazza, Klaus; Friedbacher, Gernot [Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/164, 1060 Vienna (Austria); Cottet, Hervé [Institut des Biomolécules Max Mousseron (IBMM, UMR 5247, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier), Place Eugène Bataillon, CC 1706, 34095 Montpellier (France); Stutz, Hanno [Division of Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Department of Molecular Biology, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Innovative Tools for the Characterization of Biosimilars, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Ebner, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.ebner@jku.at [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria)

    2016-08-03

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) is a powerful analytical technique for fast and efficient separation of different analytes ranging from small inorganic ions to large proteins. However electrophoretic resolution significantly depends on the coating of the inner capillary surface. High technical efforts like Successive Multiple Ionic Polymer Layer (SMIL) generation have been taken to develop stable coatings with switchable surface charges fulfilling the requirements needed for optimal separation. Although the performance can be easily proven in normalized test runs, characterization of the coating itself remains challenging. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for topographical investigation of biological and analytical relevant surfaces with nanometer resolution and yields information about the surface roughness and homogeneity. Upgrading the scanning tip to a molecular biosensor by adhesive molecules (like partly inverted charged molecules) allows for performing topography and recognition imaging (TREC). As a result, simultaneously acquired sample topography and adhesion maps can be recorded. We optimized this technique for electrophoresis capillaries and investigated the charge distribution of differently composed and treated SMIL coatings. By using the positively charged protein avidin as a single molecule sensor, we compared these SMIL coatings with respect to negative charges, resulting in adhesion maps with nanometer resolution. The capability of TREC as a functional investigation technique at the nanoscale was successfully demonstrated. - Highlights: • SMIL coating allows generation of homogeneous ultra-flat surfaces. • Molecular electrostatic adhesion forces can be determined in the inner wall of CZE capillary with picoNewton accuracy. • Topographical images and simultaneously acquired adhesion maps yield morphological and chemical information at the nanoscale.

  7. Reliable and Accurate Release of Micro-Sized Objects with a Gripper that Uses the Capillary-Force Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Uran

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available There have been recent developments in grippers that are based on capillary force and condensed water droplets. These are used for manipulating micro-sized objects. Recently, one-finger grippers have been produced that are able to reliably grip using the capillary force. To release objects, either the van der Waals, gravitational or inertial-forces method is used. This article presents methods for reliably gripping and releasing micro-objects using the capillary force. The moisture from the surrounding air is condensed into a thin layer of water on the contact surfaces of the objects. From the thin layer of water, a water meniscus between the micro-sized object, the gripper and the releasing surface is created. Consequently, the water meniscus between the object and the releasing surface produces a high enough capillary force to release the micro-sized object from the tip of the one-finger gripper. In this case, either polystyrene, glass beads with diameters between 5–60 µm, or irregularly shaped dust particles of similar sizes were used. 3D structures made up of micro-sized objects could be constructed using this method. This method is reliable for releasing during assembly and also for gripping, when the objects are removed from the top of the 3D structure—the so-called “disassembling gripping” process. The accuracy of the release was lower than 0.5 µm.

  8. Quantification of nucleotides by ICPMS: coupling of ICPMS with capillary electrophoresis or capillary HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, K.; Fujii, S.; Takatsu, A.; Yarita, T.; Zhu, Y.; Chiba, K.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Quantification of nucleotides in small volumes of biological samples has eagerly been demanded. A method using ICPMS coupled with capillary electrophoresis or capillary liquid chromatography is reported. A new interface system, which consists of a double tube nebulizer inserted with a fused silica capillary tube and a cylinder mini-chamber with a sheath gas inlet, was designed. Moreover, the surface conditions of the sampling and skimmer cones, and the introduction of H 2 gas into the plasma were found to significantly improve the signal/background ratio for phosphorus determination at m/z 31. (author)

  9. Capillaries within compartments: microvascular interpretation of dynamic positron emission tomography data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, O L; Keiding, S; Bass, L

    2003-01-01

    estimation of parameters in models with more physiological realism. We explore the standard compartmental model and find that incorporation of blood flow leads to paradoxes, such as kinetic rate constants being time-dependent, and tracers being cleared from a capillary faster than they can be supplied...... single- and multi-capillary systems and include effects of non-exchanging vessels. They are suitable for analysing dynamic PET data from any capillary bed using either intravascular or diffusible tracers, in terms of physiological parameters which include regional blood flow. Udgivelsesdato: 2003-Nov-7...... by blood flow. The inability of the standard model to incorporate blood flow consequently raises a need for models that include more physiology, and we develop microvascular models which remove the inconsistencies. The microvascular models can be regarded as a revision of the input function. Whereas...

  10. Effect of Tip-Speed Constraints on the Optimized Design of a Wind Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dykes, K.; Resor, B.; Platt, A.; Guo, Y.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Parsons, T.; Petch, D.; Veers, P.

    2014-10-01

    This study investigates the effect of tip-velocity constraints on system levelized cost of energy (LCOE). The results indicate that a change in maximum tip speed from 80 to 100~m/s could produce a 32% decrease in gearbox weight (a 33% reduction in cost) which would result in an overall reduction of 1%-9% in system LCOE depending on the design approach. Three 100~m/s design cases were considered including a low tip-speed ratio/high-solidity rotor design, a high tip-speed ratio/ low-solidity rotor design, and finally a flexible blade design in which a high tip-speed ratio was used along with removing the tip deflection constraint on the rotor design. In all three cases, the significant reduction in gearbox weight caused by the higher tip-speed and lower overall gear ratio was counterbalanced by increased weights for the rotor and/or other drivetrain components and the tower. As a result, the increased costs of either the rotor or drivetrain components offset the overall reduction in turbine costs from down-sizing the gearbox. Other system costs were not significantly affected, whereas energy production was slightly reduced in the 100~m/s case low tip-speed ratio case and increased in the high tip-speed ratio case. This resulted in system cost of energy reductions moving from the 80~m/s design to the 100~m/s designs of 1.2% for the low tip-speed ratio, 4.6% for the high tip-speed ratio, and 9.5% for the final flexible case (the latter result is optimistic because the impact of deflection of the flexible blade on power production was not modeled). Overall, the results demonstrate that there is a trade-off in system design between the maximum tip velocity and the overall wind plant cost of energy, and there are many trade-offs within the overall system in designing a turbine for a high maximum tip velocity.

  11. Tipping toward sustainability: emerging pathways of transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westley, Frances; Olsson, Per; Folke, Carl; Homer-Dixon, Thomas; Vredenburg, Harrie; Loorbach, Derk; Thompson, John; Nilsson, Måns; Lambin, Eric; Sendzimir, Jan; Banerjee, Banny; Galaz, Victor; van der Leeuw, Sander

    2011-11-01

    This article explores the links between agency, institutions, and innovation in navigating shifts and large-scale transformations toward global sustainability. Our central question is whether social and technical innovations can reverse the trends that are challenging critical thresholds and creating tipping points in the earth system, and if not, what conditions are necessary to escape the current lock-in. Large-scale transformations in information technology, nano- and biotechnology, and new energy systems have the potential to significantly improve our lives; but if, in framing them, our globalized society fails to consider the capacity of the biosphere, there is a risk that unsustainable development pathways may be reinforced. Current institutional arrangements, including the lack of incentives for the private sector to innovate for sustainability, and the lags inherent in the path dependent nature of innovation, contribute to lock-in, as does our incapacity to easily grasp the interactions implicit in complex problems, referred to here as the ingenuity gap. Nonetheless, promising social and technical innovations with potential to change unsustainable trajectories need to be nurtured and connected to broad institutional resources and responses. In parallel, institutional entrepreneurs can work to reduce the resilience of dominant institutional systems and position viable shadow alternatives and niche regimes.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: microcephaly-capillary malformation syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GeneReviews (1 link) Microcephaly-Capillary Malformation Syndrome Scientific Articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) MICROCEPHALY-CAPILLARY MALFORMATION SYNDROME Sources for This Page Carter ...

  13. Quick-Connect Windowed Non-Stick Penetrator Tips for Rapid Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherritt, Stewart; Jones, Jack A.; Badescu, Mircea

    2009-01-01

    Standard penetrator sampling systems were designed in order to allow for sampling via penetrators to produce a full set of sample acquisitions including volatile liquids, fine powders, and solid fragments. A gravity harpoon sampler has been designed with a removable tip and a quick coupling. The separation allows for sample handling and eliminates sample cross-contamination. Also, this design allows for multiple use of the penetrator body, which is the largest and heaviest part of the penetrator, while allowing for multiple changes of the light-mass, penetrator tip to avoid sample cross-contamination. The penetrator tip design has been improved by adding a spring trap to retain the sample, as well as a means for connecting to a quick coupling. Quick connect tips have been demonstrated in a sample handling carousel. The penetrator was released and rewound and the tips were released into a circular platter for rotation into instrument stations. The pyro-harpoon sampler was fabricated and tested with a NASA Standard Initiator (NSI) pyrotechnic charge. Initial tests collected cryogenic ice, but removal of the small pyro-harpoon from the ice was difficult. A brass metal sheath was then fitted over the harpoon tip, and removal from the ice was greatly alleviated by leaving the sheath in the ice. Quartz windows in the tips allow direct optical and spectral imaging and gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GCMS) pyrolysis, and were found to survive impact. All systems were successfully tested by dropping into sand and into cryogenic ice.

  14. Correlation between enhancement characteristics of MR mammography and capillary density of breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poellinger, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.poellinger@charite.de [Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); El-Ghannam, Sahra; Diekmann, Susanne; Fischer, Thomas [Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Kristiansen, Glen [Universitätsklinikum Bonn, Department of Pathology, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany); Fritzsche, Florian [Institut für Histologie und Zytologie, Bahnhofplatz 11, Postfach, 9101 Herisau (Switzerland); Fallenberg, Eva [Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Morawietz, Lars [Diagnostik Ernst von Bergmann GmbH, Charlottenstr. 72, 14467 Potsdam (Germany); Diekmann, Felix [Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We correlate capillary density of breast lesions with MRM. • Capillary density correlates with tumor enhancement for all lesions. • However no such correlation exists for the malignant or benign groups separately. • Mean vessel number of lymphatic vessels do not correlate with tumor enhancement.These results might be of help in the workup of MR-guided breast biopsies. • These results might be of help in the workup of MR-guided breast biopsies. - Abstract: Objective: To correlate capillary density of breast lesions using the markers D2-40, CD31, and CD34 with early and late enhancement of magnetic resonance mammography (MRM). Materials and methods: The local ethics committee approved this study, and informed consent was available from all patients. The study included 64 women with 66 histologically proven breast lesions (41 malignant, 25 benign). MR-enhancement 1 min after contrast medium administration was determined in the tumor (I{sub t1}/I{sub t0} ratio) and in comparison to the surrounding tissue (I{sub t1}/I{sub t1-fat} ratio). Capillary density was quantified based on immunohistological staining with D2-40, CD31, and CD34 in breast tumors and surrounding breast tissue. Mean capillary densities were correlated with contrast enhancement in the tumor and surrounding breast tissue. The Kruskal–Wallis test was used to test whether lesions with different MR enhancement patterns differed in terms of capillary density. Results: For CD34, there was statistically significant correlation between capillary density and tumor enhancement (r = 0.329, p = 0.012), however not for the malignant or benign groups separately. Mean vessel number identified by staining with D2-40 and CD31 did not correlate significantly with tumor enhancement (D2-40: r = −0.188, p = 0.130; CD31: r = 0.095, p = 0.448). There were no statistically significant differences in capillary density between breast lesions with delayed enhancement or a plateau and lesions showing

  15. New theory for Mode I crack-tip dislocation emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andric, Predrag; Curtin, W. A.

    2017-09-01

    A material is intrinsically ductile under Mode I loading when the critical stress intensity KIe for dislocation emission is lower than the critical stress intensity KIc for cleavage. KIe is usually evaluated using the approximate Rice theory, which predicts a dependence on the elastic constants and the unstable stacking fault energy γusf for slip along the plane of dislocation emission. Here, atomistic simulations across a wide range of fcc metals show that KIe is systematically larger (10-30%) than predicted. However, the critical (crack tip) shear displacement is up to 40% smaller than predicted. The discrepancy arises because Mode I emission is accompanied by the formation of a surface step that is not considered in the Rice theory. A new theory for Mode I emission is presented based on the ideas that (i) the stress resisting step formation at the crack tip creates "lattice trapping" against dislocation emission such that (ii) emission is due to a mechanical instability at the crack tip. The new theory is formulated using a Peierls-type model, naturally includes the energy to form the step, and reduces to the Rice theory (no trapping) when the step energy is small. The new theory predicts a higher KIe at a smaller critical shear displacement, rationalizing deviations of simulations from the Rice theory. Specific predictions of KIe for the simulated materials, usually requiring use of the measured critical crack tip shear displacement due to complex material non-linearity, show very good agreement with simulations. An analytic model involving only γusf, the surface energy γs, and anisotropic elastic constants is shown to be quite accurate, serves as a replacement for the analytical Rice theory, and is used to understand differences between Rice theory and simulation in recent literature. The new theory highlights the role of surface steps created by dislocation emission in Mode I, which has implications not only for intrinsic ductility but also for crack tip

  16. Influence of local capillary trapping on containment system effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Steven [University Of Texas At Austin, Austin, TX (United States). Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering

    2014-03-31

    implications for GCS. The first is that LCT can retain a significant fraction of the CO2 stored in a reservoir – above and beyond the residual saturation -- if the overlying seal were to fail. Thus frameworks for risk assessment should be extended to account for LCT. The second implication is that compared to pressure driven flow in reservoirs, CO2 migration and trapping behave in a qualitatively different manner in heterogeneous reservoirs when buoyancy is the dominant driving force for flow. Thus simulations of GCS that neglect capillary heterogeneity will fail to capture important features of the CO2 plume. While commercial reservoir simulation software can account for fine scale capillary heterogeneity, it has not been designed to work efficiently with such domains, and no simulators can handle fine-scale resolution throughout the reservoir. A possible way to upscale the migration and trapping is to apply an “effective residual saturation” to coarse-scale grids. While the extent of overall immobilization can be correlated in this way, all coarser grids failed to capture the distance traveled by the migrating CO2 for large gravity number. Thus it remains unclear how best to account for LCT in the routine simulation work-flow that will be needed for large-scale GCS. Alternatives meriting investigation include streamline methods, reduced-physics proxies (e.g. particle tracking), and biased invasion percolation algorithms, which are based on precisely the capillary heterogeneity essential for LCT.

  17. Elasto-capillary interactions of drops and particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeijer, Jacco; Pandey, Anupam; Karpitschka, Stefan; Nawijn, Charlotte; Botto, Lorenzo; Andreotti, Bruno

    2017-11-01

    The interaction of solid particles floating on a liquid interface is popularly known as the Cheerios effect. Here we present similar interactions for particles and droplets on elastic surfaces, mediated by elastic deformation. We start with the Inverted Cheerios effect, by considering liquid drops on a solid gel. Remarkably, the interaction can be tuned from attractive to repulsive, as shown experimentally and theoretically. We then turn to more general cases of particles on elastic layers, for which new interaction laws are derived. An overview is given on the various regimes, including the crossover from purely elastic to purely capillary interfaces. ERC Consolidator Grant 616918.

  18. Cyclodextrin-Functionalized Monolithic Capillary Columns: Preparation and Chiral Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adly, Frady G; Antwi, Nana Yaa; Ghanem, Ashraf

    2016-02-01

    In this review, the recently reported approaches for the preparation of cyclodextrin-functionalized capillary monolithic columns are highlighted, with few applications in chiral separations using capillary liquid chromatography (CLC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Chirality 28:97-109, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Application of CHESS single-bounce capillaries at synchrotron beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, R; Szebenyi, T; Pfeifer, M; Woll, A; Smilgies, D-M; Finkelstein, K; Dale, D; Bilderback, D H; Wang, Y; J Vila-Comamala, J; Gillilan, R; Cook, M

    2014-01-01

    Single-bounce capillaries are achromatic X-ray focusing optics that can provide efficient and high demagnification focusing with large numerical apertures. Capillary fabrication at CHESS can be customized according to specific application requirements. Exemplary applications are reviewed in this paper, as well as recent progress on condensers for high-resolution transmission X-ray microscopy and small focal size capillaries.

  20. Ameliorative potential of Artemisia Capillaris Formula on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Artemisia Capillaris Formula (ACF), a traditional Chinese medicinal therapy, has been used clinically in China to treat Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) for many years. However, the mechanism of action of this treatment on NAFLD is still unknown. The goal of the present study is to test whether ...

  1. Van de Graaff generator for capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Jae; Castro, Eric R; Guijt, Rosanne M; Tarn, Mark D; Manz, Andreas

    2017-09-29

    A new approach for high voltage capillary electrophoresis (CE) is proposed, which replaces the standard high voltage power supply with a Van de Graaff generator, a low current power source. Because the Van de Graaff generator is a current-limited source (10μA), potentials exceeding 100kV can be generated for CE when the electrical resistance of the capillary is maximized. This was achieved by decreasing the capillary diameter and reducing the buffer ionic strength. Using 2mM borate buffer and a 5μm i.d. capillary, fluorescently labeled amino acids were separated with efficiencies up to 3.5 million plates; a 5.7 fold improvement in separation efficiency compared to a normal power supply (NPS) typically used in CE. This separation efficiency was realized using a simple set-up without significant Joule heating, making the Van de Graaff generator a promising alternative for applying the high potentials required for enhancing resolution in the separation and analysis of highly complex samples, for example mixtures of glycans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Capillary Electrophoresis Analysis of Conventional Splicing Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Garibay, Gorka Ruiz; Acedo, Alberto; García-Casado, Zaida

    2014-01-01

    of these assays is often challenging. Here, we explore this issue by conducting splicing assays in 31 BRCA2 genetic variants. All variants were assessed by RT-PCR followed by capillary electrophoresis and direct sequencing. If assays did not produce clear-cut outputs (Class-2 or Class-5 according to analytical...

  3. 78 FR 13402 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Tip Reporting Alternative Tip Agreement Used in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... Used in the Cosmetology and Barber Industry AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION..., the IRS is soliciting comments concerning tip reporting alternative commitment used in the cosmetology...: Tip Reporting Alternative Commitment Agreement used in the Cosmetology and Barber Industry. OMB Number...

  4. 75 FR 11226 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Tip Reporting Alternative Tip Agreement Used in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... Used in the Cosmetology and Barber Industry AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION..., the IRS is soliciting comments concerning Tip Reporting Alternative Commitment used in the Cosmetology...: Tip Reporting Alternative Commitment Agreement used in the Cosmetology and Barber Industry. OMB Number...

  5. Epigenetic control of learning and memory in Drosophila by Tip60 HAT action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Songjun; Wilf, Rona; Menon, Trisha; Panikker, Priyalakshmi; Sarthi, Jessica; Elefant, Felice

    2014-12-01

    Disruption of epigenetic gene control mechanisms in the brain causes significant cognitive impairment that is a debilitating hallmark of most neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Histone acetylation is one of the best characterized of these epigenetic mechanisms that is critical for regulating learning- and memory- associated gene expression profiles, yet the specific histone acetyltransferases (HATs) that mediate these effects have yet to be fully characterized. Here, we investigate an epigenetic role for the HAT Tip60 in learning and memory formation using the Drosophila CNS mushroom body (MB) as a well-characterized cognition model. We show that Tip60 is endogenously expressed in the Kenyon cells, the intrinsic neurons of the MB, and in the MB axonal lobes. Targeted loss of Tip60 HAT activity in the MB causes thinner and shorter axonal lobes while increasing Tip60 HAT levels cause no morphological defects. Functional consequences of both loss and gain of Tip60 HAT levels in the MB are evidenced by defects in immediate-recall memory. Our ChIP-Seq analysis reveals that Tip60 target genes are enriched for functions in cognitive processes, and, accordingly, key genes representing these pathways are misregulated in the Tip60 HAT mutant fly brain. Remarkably, we find that both learning and immediate-recall memory deficits that occur under AD-associated, amyloid precursor protein (APP)-induced neurodegenerative conditions can be effectively rescued by increasing Tip60 HAT levels specifically in the MB. Together, our findings uncover an epigenetic transcriptional regulatory role for Tip60 in cognitive function and highlight the potential of HAT activators as a therapeutic option for neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  6. Root-cause analysis of burner tip failures in coal-fired power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Citirik, E.

    2014-01-01

    Warpage and complete or partial tear of burner material was frequently experienced in coal-fired power plants due to material overheating. Root-cause analysis of a burner tip failure is investigated employing stress modeling in the burner tip material in this study. The analyses performed in this research paper include heat transfer and stress analyses employing computational tools. Thermal analysis was performed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT for computing temperature distribution within the burner tip due to convection and radiation. Once the temperature distribution in the burner tip is determined, Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is employed using ANSYS to determine the maximum stress and deformations in burner tip material. Both FLUENT and ANSYS are numerical commercial simulation tools employed in this study. Large temperature gradients along the burner tip result in local bending stresses. These stresses resulting in creep stresses might be causing warpage in the burner tip. In this study, a design option was exercised to eliminate the excessive stress gradient in the burner tip material. Seven different FEA models were developed to simulate different operating conditions. Proposed design modification (Model 5) was able to reduce the maximum compressive stress from 76.09 MPa to 33.59 MPa. Significant reduction in the thermal stress due to design modification in Model 5 made author believe that the proposed design solution would eliminate the burner tip failures in this particular power plant. - Highlights: • Maximum stress and displacement values in the baseline model were computed. • Computations were performed using commercial FEA software ANSYS. • Different operating conditions were simulated in models 1-2-3-4. • Proposed geometry to prevent the failure is simulated in Models 5 and 6. • The proposed design solution reduced the maximum compressive stresses by ∼50%

  7. High-throughput viscosity measurement using capillary electrophoresis instrumentation and its application to protein formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmendinger, Andrea; Dieu, Le-Ha; Fischer, Stefan; Mueller, Robert; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Huwyler, Jörg

    2014-10-01

    Viscosity characterization of protein formulations is of utmost importance for the development of subcutaneously administered formulations. However, viscosity determinations are time-consuming and require large sample volumes in the range of hundreds of microliters to a few milliliters, depending on the method used. In this article, an automated, high-throughput method is described to determine dynamic viscosity of Newtonian fluids using standard capillary electrophoresis (CE) equipment. CE is an analytical method routinely used for the separation and characterization of proteins. In our set-up, the capillary is filled with the test sample, and a constant pressure is applied. A small aliquot of riboflavin is subsequently loaded into the capillary and used as a dye to monitor movement of protein samples. Migration time of the riboflavin peak moving through the filled capillary is converted to the viscosity by applying the Hagen-Poiseuille's law. The instrument is operated without using an electrical field. Repeatability, robustness, linearity, and reproducibility were demonstrated for different capillary lots and instruments, as well as for different capillary lengths and diameters. Accuracy was verified by comparing the viscosity data obtained by CE instrumentation with those obtained by plate/cone rheometry. The suitability of the method for protein formulations was demonstrated, and limitations were discussed. Typical viscosities in the range of 5-40mPas were reliably measured with this method. Advantages of the CE instrumentation-based method included short measurement times (1-15min), small sample volumes (few microliters) for a capillary with a diameter of 50μm and a length of 20.5cm as well as potential to be suitable for high-throughput measurements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of glycated hemoglobin A1c by capillary electrophoresis and capillary isoelectric focusing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koval, Dušan; Kašička, Václav; Cottet, H.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 413, č. 1 (2011), s. 8-15 ISSN 0003-2697 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP203/09/P485; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/08/1428 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : capillary zone electrophoresis * capillary isoelectric focusing * glycated hemoglobin HbA1c Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.996, year: 2011

  9. Validation of capillary blood analysis and capillary testing mode on the epoc Point of Care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jing; Edwards, Rachel; Chairez, Janette; Devaraj, Sridevi

    2017-12-01

    Laboratory test in transport is a critical component of patient care, and capillary blood is a preferred sample type particularly in children. This study evaluated the performance of capillary blood testing on the epoc Point of Care Blood Analysis System (Alere Inc). Ten fresh venous blood samples was tested on the epoc system under the capillary mode. Correlation with GEM 4000 (Instrumentation Laboratory) was examined for Na+, K+, Cl-, Ca2+, glucose, lactate, hematocrit, hemoglobin, pO2, pCO2, and pH, and correlation with serum tested on Vitros 5600 (Ortho Clinical Diagnostics) was examined for creatinine. Eight paired capillary and venous blood was tested on epoc and ABL800 (Radiometer) for the correlation of Na+, K+, Cl-, Ca2+, glucose, lactate, hematocrit, hemoglobin, pCO2, and pH. Capillary blood from 23 apparently healthy volunteers was tested on the epoc system to assess the concordance to reference ranges used locally. Deming regression correlation coefficients for all the comparisons were above 0.65 except for ionized Ca2+. Accordance of greater than 85% to the local reference ranges were found in all assays with the exception of pO2 and Cl-. Data from this study indicates that capillary blood tests on the epoc system provide comparable results to reference method for these assays, Na+, K+, glucose, lactate, hematocrit, hemoglobin, pCO2, and pH. Further validation in critically ill patients is needed to implement the epoc system in patient transport. This study demonstrated that capillary blood tests on the epoc Point of Care Blood Analysis System give comparable results to other chemistry analyzers for major blood gas and critical tests. The results are informative to institutions where pre-hospital and inter-hospital laboratory testing on capillary blood is a critical component of patient point of care testing.

  10. Device including a contact detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a probe for determining an electrical property of an area of a surface of a test sample, the probe is intended to be in a specific orientation relative to the test sample. The probe may comprise a supporting body defining a first surface. A plurality of cantilever...... of cantilever arms (12) contacting the surface of the test sample when performing the movement....... arms (12) may extend from the supporting body in co-planar relationship with the first surface. The plurality of cantilever arms (12) may extend substantially parallel to each other and each of the plurality of cantilever arms (12) may include an electrical conductive tip for contacting the area...

  11. Continuous-Flow Electrophoresis of DNA and Proteins in a Two-Dimensional Capillary-Well Sieve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lian; Cao, Zhen; Yobas, Levent

    2017-09-19

    Continuous-flow electrophoresis of macromolecules is demonstrated using an integrated capillary-well sieve arranged into a two-dimensional anisotropic array on silicon. The periodic array features thousands of entropic barriers, each resulting from an abrupt interface between a 2 μm deep well (channel) and a 70 nm capillary. These entropic barriers owing to two-dimensional confinement within the capillaries are vastly steep in relation to those arising from slits featuring one-dimensional confinement. Thus, the sieving mechanisms can sustain relatively large electric field strengths over a relatively small array area. The sieve rapidly sorts anionic macromolecules, including DNA chains and proteins in native or denatured states, into distinct trajectories according to size or charge under electric field vectors orthogonally applied. The baseline separation is achieved in less than 1 min within a horizontal migration length of ∼1.5 mm. The capillaries are self-enclosed conduits in cylindrical profile featuring a uniform diameter and realized through an approach that avoids advanced patterning techniques. The approach exploits a thermal reflow of a layer of doped glass for shape transformation into cylindrical capillaries and for controllably shrinking the capillary diameter. Lastly, atomic layer deposition of alumina is introduced for the first time to fine-tune the capillary diameter as well as to neutralize the surface charge, thereby suppressing undesired electroosmotic flows.

  12. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... including herbal supplements, and if you have any allergies, especially to local anesthetic medications, general anesthesia or to contrast materials containing iodine (sometimes referred ...

  13. A complete soil hydraulic model accounting for capillary and adsorptive water retention, capillary and film conductivity, and hysteresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakai, Masaru; Van Genuchten, Martinus Th|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31481518X; Alazba, A. A.; Setiawan, Budi Indra; Minasny, Budiman

    2015-01-01

    A soil hydraulic model that considers capillary hysteretic and adsorptive water retention as well as capillary and film conductivity covering the complete soil moisture range is presented. The model was obtained by incorporating the capillary hysteresis model of Parker and Lenhard into the hydraulic

  14. Tip vortices in the actuator line model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Luis; Meneveau, Charles

    2017-11-01

    The actuator line model (ALM) is a widely used tool to represent the wind turbine blades in computational fluid dynamics without the need to resolve the full geometry of the blades. The ALM can be optimized to represent the `correct' aerodynamics of the blades by choosing an appropriate smearing length scale ɛ. This appropriate length scale creates a tip vortex which induces a downwash near the tip of the blade. A theoretical frame-work is used to establish a solution to the induced velocity created by a tip vortex as a function of the smearing length scale ɛ. A correction is presented which allows the use of a non-optimal smearing length scale but still provides the downwash which would be induced using the optimal length scale. Thanks to the National Science Foundation (NSF) who provided financial support for this research via Grants IGERT 0801471, IIA-1243482 (the WINDINSPIRE project) and ECCS-1230788.

  15. Tipping elements in the Arctic marine ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Carlos M; Agustí, Susana; Wassmann, Paul; Arrieta, Jesús M; Alcaraz, Miquel; Coello, Alexandra; Marbà, Núria; Hendriks, Iris E; Holding, Johnna; García-Zarandona, Iñigo; Kritzberg, Emma; Vaqué, Dolors

    2012-02-01

    The Arctic marine ecosystem contains multiple elements that present alternative states. The most obvious of which is an Arctic Ocean largely covered by an ice sheet in summer versus one largely devoid of such cover. Ecosystems under pressure typically shift between such alternative states in an abrupt, rather than smooth manner, with the level of forcing required for shifting this status termed threshold or tipping point. Loss of Arctic ice due to anthropogenic climate change is accelerating, with the extent of Arctic sea ice displaying increased variance at present, a leading indicator of the proximity of a possible tipping point. Reduced ice extent is expected, in turn, to trigger a number of additional tipping elements, physical, chemical, and biological, in motion, with potentially large impacts on the Arctic marine ecosystem.

  16. Twelve tips for teaching brief motivational interviewing to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Elizabeth J; Bannatyne, Amy J; Stark, Ashley C

    2018-03-01

    Shifting from paternalistic to patient-centred doctor-patient relationships has seen a growing number of medical programs incorporate brief motivational interviewing training in their curriculum. Some medical educators, however, are unsure of precisely what, when, and how to incorporate such training. This article provides educators with 12 tips for teaching brief motivational interviewing to medical students, premised on evidence-based pedagogy. Tips were drawn from the literature and authors' own experiences. The 12 tips are: (1) Set clear learning objectives, (2) Select experienced educators, (3) Provide theoretical perspectives, (4) Share the evidence base, (5) Outline the "spirit", principles, and sequence, (6) Show students what it looks like, (7) Give students a scaffold to follow, (8) Provide opportunities for skill practice, (9) Involve clinical students in teaching, (10) Use varied formative and summative assessments, (11) Integrate and maintain, and (12) Reflect and evaluate. We describe what to include and why, and outline when and how to teach the essential components of brief motivational interviewing knowledge and skills in a medical curriculum.

  17. Load Composition Model Workflow (BPA TIP-371 Deliverable 1A)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassin, David P.; Cezar, Gustavo V.; /SLAC

    2017-07-17

    This project is funded under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Strategic Partnership Project (SPP) 17-005 between BPA and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The project in a BPA Technology Improvement Project (TIP) that builds on and validates the Composite Load Model developed by the Western Electric Coordinating Council's (WECC) Load Modeling Task Force (LMTF). The composite load model is used by the WECC Modeling and Validation Work Group to study the stability and security of the western electricity interconnection. The work includes development of load composition data sets, collection of load disturbance data, and model development and validation. This work supports reliable and economic operation of the power system. This report was produced for Deliverable 1A of the BPA TIP-371 Project entitled \\TIP 371: Advancing the Load Composition Model". The deliverable documents the proposed work ow for the Composite Load Model, which provides the basis for the instrumentation, data acquisition, analysis and data dissemination activities addressed by later phases of the project.

  18. A translating stage system for µ-PIV measurements surrounding the tip of a migrating semi-infinite bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B J; Yamaguchi, E; Gaver, D P

    2010-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and evaluated a novel translating stage system (TSS) that augments a conventional micro particle image velocimetry (µ-PIV) system. The TSS has been used to enhance the ability to measure flow fields surrounding the tip of a migrating semi-infinite bubble in a glass capillary tube under both steady and pulsatile reopening conditions. With conventional µ-PIV systems, observations near the bubble tip are challenging because the forward progress of the bubble rapidly sweeps the air-liquid interface across the microscopic field of view. The translating stage mechanically cancels the mean bubble tip velocity, keeping the interface within the microscope field of view and providing a tenfold increase in data collection efficiency compared to fixed-stage techniques. This dramatic improvement allows nearly continuous observation of the flow field over long propagation distances. A large (136-frame) ensemble-averaged velocity field recorded with the TSS near the tip of a steadily migrating bubble is shown to compare well with fixed-stage results under identical flow conditions. Use of the TSS allows the ensemble-averaged measurement of pulsatile bubble propagation flow fields, which would be practically impossible using conventional fixed-stage techniques. We demonstrate our ability to analyze these time-dependent two-phase flows using the ensemble-averaged flow field at four points in the oscillatory cycle.

  19. Tip-Based Nanofabrication for Scalable Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Hu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Tip-based nanofabrication (TBN is a family of emerging nanofabrication techniques that use a nanometer scale tip to fabricate nanostructures. In this review, we first introduce the history of the TBN and the technology development. We then briefly review various TBN techniques that use different physical or chemical mechanisms to fabricate features and discuss some of the state-of-the-art techniques. Subsequently, we focus on those TBN methods that have demonstrated potential to scale up the manufacturing throughput. Finally, we discuss several research directions that are essential for making TBN a scalable nano-manufacturing technology.

  20. Social tipping points and Earth systems dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Alexander eBentley

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Early Warning Signals (EWS have been developed to predict tipping points in Earth Systems. This discussion highlights the potential to apply EWS to human social and economic systems, which may also undergo similar critical transitions. Social tipping points are particularly difficult to predict, however, and the current formulation of EWS, based on a physical system analogy, may be insufficient. As an alternative set of EWS for social systems, we join with other authors encouraging a focus on heterogeneity, connectivity through social networks and individual thresholds to change.

  1. Windows 7 Annoyances Tips, Secrets, and Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Karp, David

    2010-01-01

    Windows 7 may be faster and more stable than Vista, but it's a far cry from problem-free. David A. Karp comes to the rescue with the latest in his popular Windows Annoyances series. This thorough guide gives you the tools you need to fix the troublesome parts of this operating system, plus the solutions, hacks, and timesaving tips to make the most of your PC. Streamline Windows Explorer, improve the Search tool, eliminate the Green Ribbon of Death, and tame User Account Control promptsExplore powerful Registry tips and tools, and use them to customize every aspect of Windows and solve its sho

  2. Metal-organic framework polymethyl methacrylate composites for open-tubular capillary electrochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Man; Yang, Fang; Wang, He-Fang; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2013-11-05

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are attractive as novel separation medium due to their distinguished properties including large surface area, accessible tunnels and diverse structures. Here, we report the incorporation of MOF CAU-1 (CAU=Christian-Albrechts-University) into polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) to produce a new composite (CAU-1@PMMA), and the fabrication of CAU-1@PMMA coated capillary for open tubular capillary electrochromatography (CEC). CAU-1 contains unprecedented [Al8(OH)4(OCH3)8](12+) clusters connected by twelve aminoterephthalic acid linkers, and is highly porous and stable in a variety of buffer solutions. The incorporation of CAU-1 into PMMA not only increases surface area, but also electroosmotic flow (EOF). As a result, the CAU-1@PMMA coated capillary column gives higher column efficiency, larger column capacity, and shorter separation time for baseline separation of two groups of aromatic carboxylic acids than the PMMA coated capillary column. Besides, the incorporation of CAU-1 also improves the resolution for the CEC separation of basic sulfa drugs and structurally related peptides. The run-to-run, day-to-day and column-to-column precision for the EOF of CAU-1@PMMA coated capillary column is 0.3%, 0.4%, and 2.2% (relative standard deviation), respectively. The results show that MOFs composites are promising stationary phases for CEC applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Environmental Education Tips: Weather Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, Audrey H.

    1989-01-01

    Provides weather activities including questions, on weather, heating the earth's surface, air, tools of the meteorologist, clouds, humidity, wind, and evaporation. Shows an example of a weather chart activity. (RT)

  4. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The video is produced by the x-ray machine and a detector that is suspended over a ... the procedure includes an intravenous line (IV), ultrasound machine and devices that monitor your heart beat and ...

  5. Safety Tips: Hazardous Chemical Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses storage of hazardous chemicals and provides a list of eight basic safety rules to use in developing a safe storage system. Suggestions include not storing materials alphabetically, storing nonreactive chemicals together, and not storing oxidizers and fuels together. (JN)

  6. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... all medications that you are taking, including herbal supplements, and if you have any allergies, especially to ... can be treated with certain medications, a special diet or, by revising the stent, but sometimes the ...

  7. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... needle (a special long needle extending from the neck into the liver). A stent is then placed ... the procedure include: fever muscle stiffness in the neck bruising on the neck at the point of ...

  8. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, allergies and medications you’re taking. You may be ... including herbal supplements, and if you have any allergies, especially to local anesthetic medications, general anesthesia or ...

  9. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Other possible complications of the procedure include: fever muscle stiffness in the neck bruising on the neck ... can be treated with certain medications, a special diet or, by revising the stent, but sometimes the ...

  10. Transport of volatile organic compounds across the capillary fringe

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Johnson, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Physical experiments were conducted to investigate the transport of a dissolved volatile organic compound (trichloroethylene, TCE) from shallow groundwater to the unsaturated zone under a variety of conditions including changes in the soil moisture profile and water table position. Experimental data indicated that at moderate groundwater velocities (0.1 m/d), vertical mechanical dispersion was negligible and molecular diffusion was the dominant vertical transport mechanism. Under these conditions, TCE concentrations decreased nearly 3 orders of magnitude across the capillary fringe and soil gas concentrations remained low relative to those of underlying groundwater. Data collected during a water table drop showed a short-term increase in concentrations throughout most of the unsaturated zone, but these concentrations quickly declined and approached initial values after the water table was returned to its original level. In the deep part of the unsaturated zone, the water table drop resulted in a long-term decrease in concentrations, illustrating the effects of hysteresis in the soil moisture profile. A two-dimensional random walk advection-diffusion model was developed to simulate the experimental conditions, and numerical simulations agreed well with experimental data. A simpler, one-dimensional finite-difference diffusion-dispersion model was also developed. One-dimensional simulations based on molecular diffusion also agreed well with experimental data. Simulations which incorporated mechanical dispersion tended to overestimate flux across the capillary fringe. Good agreement between the one- and two-dimensional models suggested that a simple, one-dimensional approximation of vertical transport across the capillary fringe can be useful when conditions are appropriate.

  11. Dielectrophoretic positioning of single nanoparticles on atomic force microscope tips for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiterer, Christian; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Singh, Prabha; Wirth, Janina; Deckert, Volker; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, a combination of Raman spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy, is a powerful technique to detect the vibrational fingerprint of molecules at the nanometer scale. A metal nanoparticle at the apex of an atomic force microscope tip leads to a large enhancement of the electromagnetic field when illuminated with an appropriate wavelength, resulting in an increased Raman signal. A controlled positioning of individual nanoparticles at the tip would improve the reproducibility of the probes and is quite demanding due to usually serial and labor-intensive approaches. In contrast to commonly used submicron manipulation techniques, dielectrophoresis allows a parallel and scalable production, and provides a novel approach toward reproducible and at the same time affordable tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy tips. We demonstrate the successful positioning of an individual plasmonic nanoparticle on a commercial atomic force microscope tip by dielectrophoresis followed by experimental proof of the Raman signal enhancing capabilities of such tips. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Tip off the HAT- Epigenetic control of learning and memory by Drosophila Tip60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Songjun; Elefant, Felice

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of epigenetic gene control mechanisms involving histone acetylation in the brain causes cognitive impairment, a debilitating hallmark of most neurodegenerative disorders. Histone acetylation regulates cognitive gene expression via chromatin packaging control in neurons. Unfortunately, the histone acetyltransferases (HATs) that generate such neural epigenetic signatures and their mechanisms of action remain unclear. Our recent findings provide insight into this question by demonstrating that Tip60 HAT action is critical for morphology and function of the mushroom body (MB), the learning and memory center in the Drosophila brain. We show that Tip60 is robustly produced in MB Kenyon cells and extending axonal lobes and that targeted MB Tip60 HAT loss results in axonal outgrowth disruption. Functional consequences of loss and gain of Tip60 HAT levels in the MB are evidenced by defects in memory. Tip60 ChIP-Seq analysis reveals enrichment for genes that function in cognitive processes and accordingly, key genes representing these pathways are misregulated in the Tip60 HAT mutant fly brain. Remarkably, increasing levels of Tip60 in the MB rescues learning and memory deficits resulting from Alzheimer's disease associated amyloid precursor protein (APP) induced neurodegeneration. Our studies highlight the potential of HAT activators as a therapeutic option for cognitive disorders.

  13. Snap-off in constricted capillary with elastic interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, P.; Alvarado, V.; Carvalho, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Snap-off of bubbles and drops in constricted capillaries occurs in many different situations, from bio-fluid to multiphase flow in porous media. The breakup process has been extensively analyzed both by theory and experiments, but most work has been limited to pure interfaces, at which the surface stress is isotropic and fully defined by the interfacial tension and interface curvature. Complex interfaces may present viscous and elastic behavior leading to a complex stress state that may change the dynamics of the interface deformation and breakup. We extend the available asymptotic model based on lubrication approximation to include elastic interfacial stress. Drop breakup time is determined as a function of the capillary geometry and liquid properties, including the interfacial elastic modulus. Results show that the interfacial elasticity has a stabilizing effect by slowing down the growth of the liquid collar, leading to a larger break-up time. This stabilizing effect has been observed experimentally in different, but related flows [Alvarado et al., "Interfacial visco-elasticity of crude oil-brine: An alternative EOR mechanism in smart waterflooding," in SPE-169127 Improved Oil Recovery Symposium (Society of Petroleum Engineers, 2014)].

  14. Advances in capillary electrophoresis and the implications for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouimet, Claire M; D'amico, Cara I; Kennedy, Robert T

    2017-02-01

    Many screening platforms are prone to assay interferences that can be avoided by directly measuring the target or enzymatic product. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microchip electrophoresis (MCE) have been applied in a variety of formats to drug discovery. CE provides direct detection of the product allowing for the identification of some forms of assay interference. The high efficiency, rapid separations, and low volume requirements make CE amenable to drug discovery. Areas covered: This article describes advances in capillary electrophoresis throughput, sample introduction, and target assays as they pertain to drug discovery and screening. Instrumental advances discussed include integrated droplet microfluidics platforms and multiplexed arrays. Applications of CE to assays of diverse drug discovery targets, including enzymes and affinity interactions are also described. Expert opinion: Current screening with CE does not fully take advantage of the throughputs or low sample volumes possible with CE and is most suitable as a secondary screening method or for screens that are inaccessible with more common platforms. With further development, droplet microfluidics coupled to MCE could take advantage of the low sample requirements by performing assays on the nanoliter scale at high throughput.

  15. High-throughput biological small-angle X-ray scattering with a robotically loaded capillary cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S S; Møller, M; Gillilan, R E

    2012-04-01

    With the rise in popularity of biological small-angle X-ray scattering (BioSAXS) measurements, synchrotron beamlines are confronted with an ever-increasing number of samples from a wide range of solution conditions. To meet these demands, an increasing number of beamlines worldwide have begun to provide automated liquid-handling systems for sample loading. This article presents an automated sample-loading system for BioSAXS beamlines, which combines single-channel disposable-tip pipetting with a vacuum-enclosed temperature-controlled capillary flow cell. The design incorporates an easily changeable capillary to reduce the incidence of X-ray window fouling and cross contamination. Both the robot-control and the data-processing systems are written in Python. The data-processing code, RAW, has been enhanced with several new features to form a user-friendly BioSAXS pipeline for the robot. The flow cell also supports efficient manual loading and sample recovery. An effective rinse protocol for the sample cell is developed and tested. Fluid dynamics within the sample capillary reveals a vortex ring pattern of circulation that redistributes radiation-damaged material. Radiation damage is most severe in the boundary layer near the capillary surface. At typical flow speeds, capillaries below 2 mm in diameter are beginning to enter the Stokes (creeping flow) regime in which mixing due to oscillation is limited. Analysis within this regime shows that single-pass exposure and multiple-pass exposure of a sample plug are functionally the same with regard to exposed volume when plug motion reversal is slow. The robot was tested on three different beamlines at the Cornell High-Energy Synchrotron Source, with a variety of detectors and beam characteristics, and it has been used successfully in several published studies as well as in two introductory short courses on basic BioSAXS methods.

  16. Sieve plugs in fenestrae of glomerular capillaries--site of the filtration barrier?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Jørgen; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    perfusion pressure and a fixative composed of an oxygen-carrying blood substitute fluid containing glutaraldehyde, was employed combined with contrast enhancement. New observations of the glomerular capillary wall revealed that filamentous plugs (about 90 nm in height) filled the capillary fenestrae......The exact location of the filtration barrier of the glomerular capillary wall, which consists of an endothelium, a basement membrane and a visceral epithelium, has not yet been determined. Apparent discrepancies between different investigators in the past could be explained if postmortem...... artifactual tissue changes, due to subnormal blood pressure or anoxia, have taken place in the endothelium before the tissue and tracers have been sufficiently fixed and immobilized by the fixative. To test this supposition, a new method of fixation, which includes a technique to maintain a physiological...

  17. Recent advances in the preparation and application of monolithic capillary columns in separation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Tingting; Yang, Xi; Xu, Yujing; Ji, Yibing

    2016-08-10

    Novel column technologies involving various materials and efficient reactions have been investigated for the fabrication of monolithic capillary columns in the field of analytical chemistry. In addition to the development of these miniaturized systems, a variety of microscale separation applications have achieved noteworthy results, providing a stepping stone for new types of chromatographic columns with improved efficiency and selectivity. Three novel strategies for the preparation of capillary monoliths, including ionic liquid-based approaches, nanoparticle-based approaches and "click chemistry", are highlighted in this review. Furthermore, we present the employment of state-of-the-art capillary monolithic stationary phases for enantioseparation, solid-phase microextraction, mixed-mode separation and immobilized enzyme reactors. The review concludes with recommendations for future studies and improvements in this field of research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Preparation and application of organic-silica hybrid monolithic capillary columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Minghuo; Wu, Ren'an; Zhang, Zhenbin; Zou, Hanfa

    2011-01-01

    Organic-silica hybrid monolithic columns have drawn more and more attention due to the ease of preparation and good mechanical stability in recent years. Many synthetic approaches have been developed and a variety of hybrid monolithic capillary columns have been prepared. The sol-gel process is well recognized in the fabrication of hybrid monolithic columns, which can be mainly classified as one-step, acid/base two-step procedures. The new approaches such as the "one-pot" and nano-scaled inorganic-organic hybrid reagent of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane used as a cross-linker have also emerged for the preparation of hybrid monolithic columns. The applications of the organic-silica hybrid monolithic capillary columns for capillary electrochromatography, micro high-performance liquid chromatography, solid-phase micro-extraction and enzymatic reactor etc. are included in this review. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Capillary pressure and liquid wicking in three-dimensional nonwoven materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, N.; Russell, S. J.

    2008-08-01

    The capillary pressure and liquid wicking in fibrous nonwoven materials depend on the structural arrangement of fibers in three dimensions, which is influenced by the method and conditions used to manufacture the material. By adapting the hydraulic radius mechanism and drag force theory, a model is established for predicting the directional capillary pressure in three-dimensional nonwoven materials. As a case study, equations to predict the velocity of liquid wicking in a one-dimensional wicking strip test for nonwovens having a three-dimensional fiber orientation distribution are given based on the newly established capillary pressure model. These models and equations are based on measurable structural parameters including the fiber orientation distribution, fiber diameter, and fabric porosity.

  20. Surface tension-induced PDMS micro-pillars with controllable tips and tilt angles

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huawei

    2013-12-21

    This paper reports a novel method to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro-pillars using a CO2 laser-machined poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) mold with through-holes. This method eliminates the requirements of expensive and complicated facilities to fabricate a 3D mold. The micro-pillars were formed by the capillary force that draws PDMS into the through-holes of the PMMA mold. The tilt angles of the micro-pillars depend on the tilt angles of the through-holes in the mold, and the concave and convex micro-lens tip shapes of the PDMS micro-pillars can be modified by changing the surface wettability of the PMMA through-holes.

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You should be able to resume your normal activities in seven to 10 days. Follow-up ultrasounds ... Other possible complications of the procedure include: fever muscle stiffness in the ... bleeding that might require a transfusion laceration of ...

  2. Modelling radioiodine transport across a capillary fringe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathias, Simon A.; Butler, Adrian P.; Wheater, Howard S.

    2008-01-01

    Due to its long radioactive half-life, iodine-129 is considered to be an important radionuclide in the context of underground radioactive waste disposal safety assessment. Iodine speciates as iodide (I - ) in reducing conditions and iodate (IO 3 - ) in oxidizing conditions. As iodate is more reactive, it is much less mobile than iodide. Consequently, in considering vertically upward transport within a soil profile, iodine will tend to accumulate at the top of the capillary fringe. In this paper, a model of iodine transport across a capillary fringe is developed by coupling equations for variably saturated flow, oxygen dynamics and rate-limited sorption. Model parameters are obtained by consideration of literature values, calibration on soil column data and other supporting laboratory experiments. The results demonstrate the importance of rate kinetics on the migration and bioavailability of radioiodine in the near-surface environment

  3. Modelling radioiodine transport across a capillary fringe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Simon A; Butler, Adrian P; Wheater, Howard S

    2008-04-01

    Due to its long radioactive half-life, iodine-129 is considered to be an important radionuclide in the context of underground radioactive waste disposal safety assessment. Iodine speciates as iodide (I-) in reducing conditions and iodate (IO3-) in oxidizing conditions. As iodate is more reactive, it is much less mobile than iodide. Consequently, in considering vertically upward transport within a soil profile, iodine will tend to accumulate at the top of the capillary fringe. In this paper, a model of iodine transport across a capillary fringe is developed by coupling equations for variably saturated flow, oxygen dynamics and rate-limited sorption. Model parameters are obtained by consideration of literature values, calibration on soil column data and other supporting laboratory experiments. The results demonstrate the importance of rate kinetics on the migration and bioavailability of radioiodine in the near-surface environment.

  4. Capillary rise and swelling in cellulose sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jonghyun; Kim, Jungchul; Kim, Ho-Young

    2015-11-01

    A cellulose sponge, which is a mundane example of a porous hydrophilic structure, can absorb and hold a significant amount of liquid. We present the results of experimental and theoretical investigation of the dynamics of the capillary imbibition of various aqueous solutions in the sponge that swells at the same time. We find that the rate of water rise against the resistance caused by gravitational and viscous effects deviates from Washburn's rule beyond a certain threshold height. We rationalize the novel power law of the rise height versus time by combining Darcy's law with hygroscopic swelling equation and also predict the threshold height. The scaling law constructed through this work agrees well with the experimental results, shedding light on the physics of capillary flow in deforming porous media.

  5. Intraoral capillary haemangioma: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Parimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangiomas are common benign vascular tumors of the head and neck region which account for 7% of all benign tumors of infancy and childhood. Adults are rarely affected, and they have a female predilection. Based on the microscopic appearance, they are classified into capillary, cavernous, mixed, and sclerosing variety. Incidence of intraoral capillary hemangioma (CH is infrequent, and its topographical presentation on the palatal mucosa and gingiva marks extreme rarity. They are uncommonly encountered by the dentists. The aim of this article is to present a case of CH in a 46-year-old male who presented with a swelling on the posterior hard palate on the left side involving the palatal gingiva and palatal mucosa.

  6. Experimental study of a capillary discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, D.R.; Jones, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    A Z-pinch plasma can be ohmically heated to kilovolt temperatures if instabilities can be prevented and the amount of mass heated is held fixed. The gas embedded laser initiated Z-pinch was an attempt to do this. It was found that the disruptive instabilities did not occur, but that the discharge column accreted mass, probably because of the strong shock which ionizes the embedding gas. In an attempt to overcome this problem a capillary channel has been formed in an insulator so that a solid replaces the embedding gas. The authors have studied the plasma formed by discharging a Marx-water line system through an evacuated 2 cm long 10-25 μm diameter capillary in polyethylene. The Marx-water line system used was a 72 kJ - 600 kV Marx bank which is capable of pulse charging a 1Ω-90 ns water line to 900 kV

  7. Microfluidic chip-capillary electrophoresis devices

    CERN Document Server

    Fung, Ying Sing; Du, Fuying; Guo, Wenpeng; Ma, Tongmei; Nie, Zhou; Sun, Hui; Wu, Ruige; Zhao, Wenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microfluidic chip (MC) devices are relatively mature technologies, but this book demonstrates how they can be integrated into a single, revolutionary device that can provide on-site analysis of samples when laboratory services are unavailable. By introducing the combination of CE and MC technology, Microfluidic Chip-Capillary Electrophoresis Devices broadens the scope of chemical analysis, particularly in the biomedical, food, and environmental sciences. The book gives an overview of the development of MC and CE technology as well as technology that now allows for the fabrication of MC-CE devices. It describes the operating principles that make integration possible and illustrates some achievements already made by the application of MC-CE devices in hospitals, clinics, food safety, and environmental research. The authors envision further applications for private and public use once the proof-of-concept stage has been passed and obstacles to increased commercialization are ad...

  8. Tip Saves Energy, Money for Pennsylvania Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    A wastewater treatment plant in Berks County, Pennsylvania is saving nearly $45,000 a year and reducing hundreds of metric tons of greenhouse gases since employing an energy conservation tip offered by the Water Protection Division in EPA’s R3 and PADEP.

  9. International Travel: Tips for Staying Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Prevention and Wellness Staying Healthy Healthy Living Travel Occupational Health First Aid and Injury Prevention Crisis ... MoreDepression in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Air Travel Health TipsTexting and DrivingTravel Needs for SeniorsFood PoisoningAcute ...

  10. Barbecue Basics: Tips to Prevent Foodborne Illness

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, ... Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Barbecue Basics: Tips to ...

  11. What Do You Mean, 'Tipping Point'?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nes, van E.H.; Shojaei Arani, M.; Staal, A.; Bolt, van der B.; Flores, Bernardo M.; Bathiany, S.; Scheffer, M.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years the use of the term ‘tipping point’ in the scientific literature has exploded. It was originally used loosely as a metaphor for the phenomenon that, beyond a certain threshold, runaway change propels a system to a new state. Although several specific mathematical definitions

  12. Direct calculation of wind turbine tip loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood, D.H.; Okulov, Valery; Bhattacharjee, D.

    2016-01-01

    . We develop three methods for the direct calculation of the tip loss. The first is the computationally expensive calculation of the velocities induced by the helicoidal wake which requires the evaluation of infinite sums of products of Bessel functions. The second uses the asymptotic evaluation...

  13. Tips for Airline Travelers with Sjogren's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tips for Airline Travelers with Sjögren’s Syndrome For more information on Sjogren's syndrome, visit the SSF Web site at www.sjogrens. ... org for more information on Sjögren’s syndrome. New airline rules can have a profound effect on those ...

  14. Recent progress in analytical capillary isotachophoresis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gebauer, Petr; Malá, Zdeňka; Boček, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 1 (2011), s. 83-89 ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/1536; GA ČR GAP206/10/1219; GA AV ČR IAA400310703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : Capillary zone electrophoresis * ITP Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.303, year: 2011

  15. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    D`Silva, A.

    1996-08-06

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conductors is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer. 1 fig.

  16. Bacterial surface layer proteins as a novel capillary coating material for capillary electrophoretic separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Gordaliza, Estefanía, E-mail: emorenog@ucm.es [Division of Analytical Biosciences, Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research, Universiteit Leiden, Einsteinweg 55, 2300, RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Stigter, Edwin C.A. [Division of Analytical Biosciences, Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research, Universiteit Leiden, Einsteinweg 55, 2300, RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Department of Molecular Cancer Research, Universitair Medisch Centrum Utrecht, Wilhelmina Kinder Ziekenhuis, Lundlaan 6, 3584, EA Utrecht (Netherlands); Lindenburg, Petrus W.; Hankemeier, Thomas [Division of Analytical Biosciences, Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research, Universiteit Leiden, Einsteinweg 55, 2300, RA, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-06-07

    A novel concept for stable coating in capillary electrophoresis, based on recrystallization of surface layer proteins on hydrophobized fused silica capillaries, was demonstrated. Surface layer protein A (SlpA) from Lactobacillus acidophilus bacteria was extracted, purified and used for coating pre-silanized glass substrates presenting different surface wettabilities (either hydrophobic or hydrophilic). Contact angle determination on SlpA-coated hydrophobic silica slides showed that the surfaces turned to hydrophilic after coating (53 ± 5°), due to a protein monolayer formation by protein-surface hydrophobic interactions. Visualization by atomic force microscopy demonstrated the presence of a SlpA layer on methylated silica slides displaying a surface roughness of 0.44 ± 0.02 nm. Additionally, a protein layer was visualized by fluorescence microscopy in methylated silica capillaries coated with SlpA and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled. The SlpA-coating showed an outstanding stability, even after treatment with 20 mM NaOH (pH 12.3). The electroosmotic flow in coated capillaries showed a partial suppression at pH 7.50 (3.8 ± 0.5 10{sup −9} m{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}) when compared with unmodified fused silica (5.9 ± 0.1 10{sup −8} m{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}). To demonstrate the potential of this novel coating, the SlpA-coated capillaries were applied for the first time for electrophoretic separation, and proved to be very suitable for the isotachophoretic separation of lipoproteins in human serum. The separations showed a high degree of repeatability (absolute migration times with 1.1–1.8% coefficient-of-variation (CV) within a day) and 2–3% CV inter-capillary reproducibility. The capillaries were stable for more than 100 runs at pH 9.40, and showed to be an exceptional alternative for challenging electrophoretic separations at long-term use. - Highlights: • New coating using recrystallized surface-layer proteins on

  17. Impact of wall potential on the fluid-wall interaction in a cylindrical capillary and a generalized Kelvin equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubov, T.S.; Mainwaring, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work a generalized Kelvin equation for a fluid confined in thick-walled cylindrical capillary is developed. This has been accomplished by including the potential energy function for interaction between a solid wall of a capillary and a confined fluid into the Kelvin equation. Using the Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential, an explicit form of the potential energy functions as expressed by hypergeometrical functions have been derived-firstly, for the interaction between a solid wall and a test atom placed at an arbitrary point in a long open-end capillary, and thereafter for the body-body interaction between the solid wall and a confined Lennard-Jones fluid. Further, this generalized Kelvin equation has been applied to detailed description hysteresis phenomena in such capillaries. All numerical calculations have been carried out for the model argon-graphite system at 90 K

  18. Thermally stable dexsil-400 glass capillary columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maskarinec, M.P.; Olerich, G.

    1980-01-01

    The factors affecting efficiency, thermal stability, and reproducibility of Dexsil-400 glass capillary columns for gas chromatography in general, and for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in particular were investigated. Columns were drawn from Kimble KG-6 (soda-lime) glass or Kimox (borosilicate) glass. All silylation was carried out at 200 0 C. Columns were coated according to the static method. Freshly prepared, degassed solutions of Dexsil-400 in pentane or methylene chloride were used. Thermal stability of the Dexsil 400 columns with respect to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) were tested. Column-to-column variability is a function of each step in the fabrication of the columns. The degree of etching, extent of silylation, and stationary phase film thickness must be carefully controlled. The variability in two Dexsil-400 capillary column prepared by etching, silylation with solution of hexa methyl disilazone (HMDS), and static coating is shown and also indicates the excellent selectivity of Dexsil-400 for the separation of alkylated aromatic compounds. The wide temperature range of Dexsil-400 and the high efficiency of the capillary columns also allow the analysis of complex mixtures with minimal prefractionation. Direct injection of a coal liquefaction product is given. Analysis by GC/MS indicated the presence of parent PAHs, alkylated PAHs, nitrogen and sulfur heterocycles, and their alkylated derivatives. 4 figures

  19. [Macrocephaly-capillary malformation. A neonatal case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coste, K; Sarret, C; Cisse, A; Delabaere, A; Francannet, C; Vanlieferinghen, P

    2012-09-01

    Macrocephaly-cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome first described in 1997 in children with macrocephaly, cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita, and several other abnormalities. Since 2007, this syndrome has been renamed macrocephaly-capillary malformation. The pregnancy was marked by polyhydramnios associated with fetal macrosomia and macrocephaly. Clinical examination of the newborn confirmed overgrowth, macrocephaly, and found skin abnormalities with diffuse marbled skin, filtrum and upper lip vascular anomaly, and several superficial capillary malformations on the chest and abdomen, partial bilateral syndactyly between the 2nd and 3rd toes, and right hemi-hypertrophy of the body. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed moderate right hemimegalencephaly. Radiological examination of the skeleton showed asymmetry of the limbs. At 8 months, the medical follow-up confirmed the diagnosis and its neurosurgical treatment of hydrocephalus secondary to an Arnold Chiari malformation. The patient reported herein presented macrocephaly-capillary malformation syndrome characterized by macrocephaly and more than two of the main reported findings comprising cutis marmorata, superficial vascular anomaly, syndactyly, and body asymmetry. We describe the major components of this multiple malformative syndrome that is rarely reported in the pediatric literature, especially in newborns. This syndrome should be detected early because medical multidisciplinary follow-up is necessary to prevent different complications (neurological, orthopedic, or oncologic). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Student Design Challenges in Capillary Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Dennis P.; Wollman, Andrew; Hall, Nancy R.; Weislogel, Mark; DeLombard, Richard

    2016-01-01

    For some grade 8-12 students, capillary flow has bridged the gap between the classroom and research facility, from normal gravity to microgravity. In the past four years, NASA and the Portland State University (PSU) have jointly challenged students to design test cells, using Computer-Aided Design (CAD), to study capillary action in microgravity as PSU has done on the International Space Station (ISS). Using the student-submitted CAD drawings, the test cells were manufactured by PSU and tested in their 2.1-second drop tower. The microgravity results were made available online for student analysis and reporting. Over 100 such experiments have been conducted, where there has been participation from 15 states plus a German school for the children of U.S. military personnel. In 2016, a related NASA challenge was held in partnership with the ASGSR, again, based on the research conducted by PSU. In this challenge, grade 9-12 students designed and built devices using capillary action to launch droplets as far as possible in NASAs 2.2 Second Drop Tower. Example results will be presented by students at this conference. The challenges engage students in ISS science and technology and can inspire them to pursue technical careers.

  1. Study of tip loss corrections using CFD rotor computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    Tip loss correction is known to play an important role for engineering prediction of wind turbine performance. There are two different types of tip loss corrections: tip corrections on momentum theory and tip corrections on airfoil data. In this paper, we study the latter using detailed CFD compu...... and compared with CFD results for the NordTank 500 kW turbine and the NREL 5 MW turbine. Comparisons show that BEM with the new tip loss function can predict correctly the loading near the blade tip.......Tip loss correction is known to play an important role for engineering prediction of wind turbine performance. There are two different types of tip loss corrections: tip corrections on momentum theory and tip corrections on airfoil data. In this paper, we study the latter using detailed CFD...... computations for wind turbines with sharp tip. Using the technique of determination of angle of attack and the CFD results for a NordTank 500 kW rotor, airfoil data are extracted and a new tip loss function on airfoil data is derived. To validate, BEM computations with the new tip loss function are carried out...

  2. Mechanisms of arm-tip regeneration in the sea star, Leptasterias hexactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenov, Philip V; Bisgrove, Brent; Asotra, Satish; Burke, Robert D

    1989-05-01

    Wound healing and regeneration following amputation of arm-tips of the sea star, Leptasterias hexactis, are described using light microscopy, SEM, TEM, and [ 3 H] thymidine autoradiography. The process can be divided into a number of stages. Initially, the wound is closed by contractions of the stump-tip. Re-epithelialization then occurs through migration of epidermal cells from adjacent areas over the wound to form a thin wound epidermis. This is converted into a thicker, permanent covering in concurrence with the onset of cell cycle activity in the wound epidermis and adjacent epidermal regions. Histolysis and phagocytosis of damaged tissues occur beneath the new epidermis and a small connective tissue scar develops at the wound site within which muscle differentiates. At this time, elevated levels of [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation are initiated in the sub-epidermal tissues of the arm-tip. A variety of differentiated cell types enter the cell cycle including cells of the parietal peritoneum, lining of the radial water canal, and the dermis. Cell division is accompanied by the development of a small new arm-tip complete with terminal ossicle, terminal tentacle, and optic cushion. The radial water canal, radial nerve, and perivisceral coelom extend by outgrowth into this newly developing tip. Accelerated growth of the regenerate then occurs in a zone just proximal to the new tip. There is no evidence of a blastema-like mass of rapidly dividing undifferentiated cells at the tip of regenerating arms. Arm-tip regeneration in this sea star may therefore be best described as a morphallactic-like process in which a true blastema is not formed, but in which scattered cell proliferation plays an essential role.

  3. Development of a Millikelvin dual-tip Josephson scanning tunneling microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychowdhury, Anita

    In this thesis, I first describe the design and construction of a dual-tip millikelvin STM system. The STM is mounted on a dilution refrigerator and the setup includes vibration isolation, rf-filtered wiring, an ultra high vacuum (UHV) sample preparation chamber and sample transfer mechanism. Next I describe a novel superconducting tip fabrication technique. My technique involves dry-etching sections of 250 mum diameter Nb wire with an SF6 plasma in a reactive ion etcher. I present data taken with these tips on various samples at temperatures ranging from 30 mK to 9 K. My results demonstrate that the tips are superconducting, achieve good spectroscopic energy resolution, are mechanically robust over long time periods, and are atomically sharp. I also show data characterizing the performance of our system. This data is in the form of atomic resolution images, spectroscopy, noise spectra and simultaneous scans taken with both tips of the STM. I used these to examine the tip-sample stability, cross talk between the two tips, and to extract the effective noise temperature (˜185 mK) of the sample by fitting the spectroscopy data to a voltage noise model. Finally, I present spectroscopy data taken with a Nb tip on a Nb(100) sample at 30 mK. The enhanced spectroscopic resolution at this temperature allowed me to resolve peaks in the fluctuation-dominated supercurrent at sub-gap voltages. My analysis indicates that these peaks are due to the incoherent tunneling of Cooper pairs at resonant frequencies of the STM's electromagnetic environment. By measuring the response of the STM junction to microwaves, I identified the charge carriers in this regime as Cooper pairs with charge 2e. The amplitude of the response current scales as the square of the Bessel functions, indicating that the pair tunneling originates from photon assisted tunneling in the incoherent regime, rather than the more conventionally observed Shapiro steps in the coherent regime.

  4. Arl3 and RP2 regulate the trafficking of ciliary tip kinesins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Nele; Lane, Amelia; Jovanovic, Katarina; Parfitt, David A.; Aguila, Monica; Thompson, Clare L.; da Cruz, Lyndon; Coffey, Peter J.; Chapple, J. Paul

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Ciliary trafficking defects are the underlying cause of many ciliopathies, including Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP). Anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) is mediated by kinesin motor proteins; however, the function of the homodimeric Kif17 motor in cilia is poorly understood, whereas Kif7 is known to play an important role in stabilizing cilia tips. Here we identified the ciliary tip kinesins Kif7 and Kif17 as novel interaction partners of the small GTPase Arl3 and its regulatory GTPase activating protein (GAP) Retinitis Pigmentosa 2 (RP2). We show that Arl3 and RP2 mediate the localization of GFP-Kif17 to the cilia tip and competitive binding of RP2 and Arl3 with Kif17 complexes. RP2 and Arl3 also interact with another ciliary tip kinesin, Kif7, which is a conserved regulator of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. siRNA-mediated loss of RP2 or Arl3 reduced the level of Kif7 at the cilia tip. This was further validated by reduced levels of Kif7 at cilia tips detected in fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) 3D optic cups derived from a patient carrying an RP2 nonsense mutation c.519C > T (p.R120X), which lack detectable RP2 protein. Translational read-through inducing drugs (TRIDs), such as PTC124, were able to restore Kif7 levels at the ciliary tip of RP2 null cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that RP2 and Arl3 regulate the trafficking of specific kinesins to cilia tips and provide additional evidence that TRIDs could be clinically beneficial for patients with this retinal degeneration. PMID:28444310

  5. Effect of TIPS placement on portal and splanchnic arterial blood flow in 4-dimensional flow MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankovic, Zoran [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Roessle, Martin; Schultheiss, Michael [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Gastroenterology, Freiburg (Germany); Euringer, Wulf; Langer, Mathias [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Salem, Riad; Barker, Alex; Carr, James; Collins, Jeremy D. [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-09-15

    To assess changes in portal and splanchnic arterial haemodynamics in patients undergoing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) using four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, a non-invasive, non-contrast imaging technique. Eleven patients undergoing TIPS implantation were enrolled. K-t GRAPPA accelerated non-contrast 4D flow MRI of the liver vasculature was applied with acceleration factor R = 5 at 3Tesla. Flow analysis included three-dimensional (3D) blood flow visualization using time-resolved 3D particle traces and semi-quantitative flow pattern grading. Quantitative evaluation entailed peak velocities and net flows throughout the arterial and portal venous (PV) systems. MRI measurements were taken within 24 h before and 4 weeks after TIPS placement. Three-dimensional flow visualization with 4D flow MRI revealed good image quality with minor limitations in PV flow. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant increase in PV flow (562 ± 373 ml/min before vs. 1831 ± 965 ml/min after TIPS), in the hepatic artery (176 ± 132 ml/min vs. 354 ± 140 ml/min) and combined flow in splenic and superior mesenteric arteries (770 ml/min vs. 1064 ml/min). Shunt-flow assessment demonstrated stenoses in two patients confirmed and treated at TIPS revision. Four-dimensional flow MRI might have the potential to give new information about the effect of TIPS placement on hepatic perfusion. It may explain some unexpected findings in clinical observation studies. (orig.)

  6. An integrated fritless column for on-chip capillary electrochromatography with conventional stationary phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceriotti, Laura; De Rooij, Nico F.; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2002-01-01

    A new polymer device for use with conventional particulate stationary phases for on-chip, fritless, capillary electrochromatography (CEC) has been realized. The structure includes an injector and a tapered column in which the particles of the stationary phase are retained and stabilized. The chips

  7. Nonlinear gravity-capillary water waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei

    1997-11-01

    Two-dimensional gravity-capillary water waves are analyzed using a fully-nonlinear Cauchy-integral method with spectral accuracy. Standing waves are generated in experiments by vertical oscillation and measured by a non-intrusive optical system along with a wave probe. Nonlinear resonance of standing waves with non-wetting contact line effects are discussed in detail. Amplitude- dependent wave frequency and damping in a glass rectangular tank suggest a new contact-line model. A new type of sideband resonance due to modulated forcing is discovered and explained by weakly-nonlinear analysis. This analytical solution is verified by our numerical simulations and physical experiments. New standing waveforms with dimpled or sharp crests are observed in experiments and computations. These new waveforms have strong symmetry breaking in time as a result of nonlinear harmonic interaction. With increasing wave steepness, steep standing waves experience period- tripling with three distinct forms: sharp crest, dimpled or flat crest, and round crest. Significant breaking occurs in the sharp-crest mode and the dimpled-crest mode. Using a complex-demodulation technique, I find that these breaking waves are related to the same 1:2 internal resonance (harmonic interaction) that causes the new steep waveforms. Novel approaches are used to estimate the (breaking and non-breaking) wave dissipation in steep and breaking standing waves. The breaking events (spray, air entrainment, and plunging) approximately double the wave dissipation. Weak capillarity significantly affects the limiting wave height and the form of standing waves, as demonstrated by both computations and small-scale Faraday-wave experiments. Capillary ripple generation on traveling waves is shown to be significant even at moderate wave steepness. The ubiquitous horizontal asymmetry of traveling waves is shown to be critical to capillary ripple generation. Two new asymmetric modes are identified and are shown to have an

  8. Tips for Good Health in Later Life: For Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Geriatrics Osteoporosis Prevention Related Documents PDF Tips for Good Health in Later Life: For Older Women Download Join our e-newsletter! Resources Tips for Good Health in Later Life: For Older Women Tools ...

  9. Tips to Make Fast Food Friendlier for Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Tips to Make Fast Food Friendlier for Kids Updated:Feb 6,2017 Finding ... reheated or eaten on the road. But when fast food is your only option, try these tips to ...

  10. Cytology of root tips of Dioscoreophyllum cumminsii (STAPF) diel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , University of Nigeria Nsukka. Root tips for the chromosome work were obtained from three sources: runners originating from main vine; sprouting pieces of tubers and redifferentiated root tips from callus. The results showed that normal ...

  11. Devices that Alter the Tip Vortex of a Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlister, Kenneth W.; Tung, Chee; Heineck, James T.

    2001-01-01

    Small devices were attached near the tip of a hovering rotor blade 'in order to alter the structure and trajectory of the trailing vortex. Stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) images were used to quantify the wake behind the rotor blade during the first revolution. A procedure for analyzing the 3D-velocity field is presented that includes a method for accounting for vortex wander. The results show that a vortex generator can alter the trajectory of the trailing vortex and that a major change in the size and intensity of the trailing vortex can be achieved by introducing a high level of turbulence into the core of the vortex.

  12. Investigation of Unsteady Tip Clearance Flow in a Low-Speed One and Half Stage Axial Compressor with LES And PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, Chunill; Hathaway, Michael; Katz, Joseph; Tan, David

    2015-01-01

    The primary focus of this paper is to investigate how a rotor's unsteady tip clearance flow structure changes in a low speed one and half stage axial compressor when the rotor tip gap size is increased from 0.5 mm (0.49% of rotor tip blade chord, 2% of blade span) to 2.4 mm (2.34% chord, 4% span) at the design condition are investigated. The changes in unsteady tip clearance flow with the 0.62 % tip gap as the flow rate is reduced to near stall condition are also investigated. A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is applied to calculate the unsteady flow field at these three flow conditions. Detailed Stereoscopic PIV (SPIV) measurements of the current flow fields were also performed at the Johns Hopkins University in a refractive index-matched test facility which renders the compressor blades and casing optically transparent. With this setup, the unsteady velocity field in the entire flow domain, including the flow inside the tip gap, can be measured. Unsteady tip clearance flow fields from LES are compared with the PIV measurements and both LES and PIV results are used to study changes in tip clearance flow structures. The current study shows that the tip clearance vortex is not a single structure as traditionally perceived. The tip clearance vortex is formed by multiple interlaced vorticities. Therefore, the tip clearance vortex is inherently unsteady. The multiple interlaced vortices never roll up to form a single structure. When phased-averaged, the tip clearance vortex appears as a single structure. When flow rate is reduced with the same tip gap, the tip clearance vortex rolls further upstream and the tip clearance vortex moves further radially inward and away from the suction side of the blade. When the tip gap size is increased at the design flow condition, the overall tip clearance vortex becomes stronger and it stays closer to the blade suction side and the vortex core extends all the way to the exit of the blade passage. Measured and calculated unsteady flow

  13. Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media: Predicting Its Dependence on Capillary Number and Viscosity Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferer, M. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); Anna, Shelley L. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tortora, Paul [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kadambi, J. R. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Oliver, M. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Bromhal, Grant S. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Smith, Duane H. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the need to determine the dependencies of two-phase flow in a wide range of applications from carbon dioxide sequestration to enhanced oil recovery, we have developed a standard two-dimensional, pore-level model of immiscible drainage, incorporating viscous and capillary effects. This model has been validated through comparison with several experiments. For a range of stable viscosity ratios (M=μinjected,nwfdefending,wf ≥ 1), we had increased the capillary number, Nc and studied the way in which the flows deviate from fractal capillary fingering at a characteristic time and become compact for realistic capillary numbers. This crossover has enabled predictions for the dependence of the flow behavior upon capillary number and viscosity ratio. Our results for the crossover agreed with earlier theoretical predictions, including the universality of the leading power-law indicating its independence of details of the porous medium structure. In this article, we have observed a similar crossover from initial fractal viscous fingering (FVF) to compact flow, for large capillary numbers and unstable viscosity ratios M < 1. In this case, we increased the viscosity ratio from infinitesimal values, and studied the way in which the flows deviate from FVF at a characteristic time and become compact for non-zero viscosity ratios. This crossover has been studied using both our pore-level model and micro-fluidic flow-cell experiments. The same characteristic time, τ = 1/M0.7, satisfactorily describes both the pore-level results.

  14. Separation of plant hormones from biofertilizer by capillary electrophoresis using a capillary coated dynamically with polycationic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ting-Fu; Lv, Zhi-Hua; Wang, Yuan-Hong; Yue, Mei-E

    2006-06-01

    A new, simple and rapid capillary electrophoresis (CE) method, using hexadimethrine bromide (HDB) as electroosmotic flow (EOF) modifier, was developed for the identification and quantitative determination of four plant hormones, including gibberellin A3 (GA3), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (4-CA). The optimum separation was achieved with 20 mM borate buffer at pH 10.00 containing 0.005% (w/v) of HDB. The applied voltage was -25 kV and the capillary temperature was kept constant at 25 degrees C. Salicylic acid was used as internal standard for quantification. The calibration dependencies exhibited good linearity within the ratios of the concentrations of standard samples and internal standard and the ratios of the peak areas of samples and internal standard. The correlation coefficients were from 0.9952 to 0.9997. The relative standard deviations of migration times and peak areas were biofertilizer were successfully determined within 7 min, with satisfactory repeatability and recovery.

  15. Colloid Mobilization and Transport during Capillary Fringe Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead filled column. Confocal images showed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively-charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively-charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively-charged and hydrophilic positively-charged colloids did.

  16. An axial approach to detection in capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, John Aaron [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Our approach involves on-axis illumination of the compounds inside the capillary detection region and is applied to absorbance and fluorescence detection. Absorbance measurements were made by focussing an incident laser beam into one capillary end; by using signals collected over the entire length of analyte band, this enhances the analytical path length of conventional absorbance detection 60x. This instrument offers a 15x improvement in detection limits. Three fluorescence detection experiments are discussed, all of which involve insertion of an optical fiber into capillary. The first uses a high refractive index liquid phase to obtain total internal reflectance along capillary axis, this reducing light scatter. The second uses a charge-coupled device camera for simultaneous imaging of a capillary array (this may be useful in genome sequencing, etc.). The third is a study of fluid motion inside the capillary under pressure-driven and electroosmotic flow. The thesis is divided into four parts. Figs, tabs.

  17. Gel electrophoresis in a polyvinylalcohol coated fused silica capillary for purity assessment of modified and secondary-structured oligo- and polyribonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barciszewska, Martyna; Sucha, Agnieszka; Bałabańska, Sandra; Chmielewski, Marcin K

    2016-01-18

    Application of a polyvinylalcohol-coated (PVA-coated) capillary in capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) enables the selective separation of oligoribonucleotides and their modifications at high resolution. Quality assessment of shorter oligomers of small interfering RNA (siRNA) is of key importance for ribonucleic acid (RNA) technology which is increasingly being applied in medical applications. CGE is a technique of choice for calculation of chemically synthesized RNAs and their modifications which are frequently obtained as a mixture including shorter oligoribonucleotides. The use of CGE with a PVA-coated capillary to analyze siRNA mixtures presents an alternative to conventionally employed techniques. Here, we present study on identification of the length and purity of RNA mixture ingredients by using PVA-coated capillaries. Also, we demonstrate the use of PVA-coated capillaries to identify and separate phosphorylated siRNAs and secondary structures (e.g. siRNA duplexes).

  18. AFM tip-sample convolution effects for cylinder protrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Fei-Hu; Gan, Yang

    2017-11-01

    A thorough understanding about the AFM tip geometry dependent artifacts and tip-sample convolution effect is essential for reliable AFM topographic characterization and dimensional metrology. Using rigid sapphire cylinder protrusions (diameter: 2.25 μm, height: 575 nm) as the model system, a systematic and quantitative study about the imaging artifacts of four types of tips-two different pyramidal tips, one tetrahedral tip and one super sharp whisker tip-is carried out through comparing tip geometry dependent variations in AFM topography of cylinders and constructing the rigid tip-cylinder convolution models. We found that the imaging artifacts and the tip-sample convolution effect are critically related to the actual inclination of the working cantilever, the tip geometry, and the obstructive contacts between the working tip's planes/edges and the cylinder. Artifact-free images can only be obtained provided that all planes and edges of the working tip are steeper than the cylinder sidewalls. The findings reported here will contribute to reliable AFM characterization of surface features of micron or hundreds of nanometers in height that are frequently met in semiconductor, biology and materials fields.

  19. Mechanisms for enlarging lesion size during irrigated tip radiofrequency ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helen Høgh; Roman-Gonzalez, Javier; Johnson, Susan B

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Irrigated tip radiofrequency ablation of cardiac arrhythmias was developed to increase the size of the radiofrequency-induced lesion, since cooling of the electrode tip allows use of higher power settings. The purpose of this study was to determine if the increased lesion size during......(3) (P radiofrequency irrigated-tip ablation is that higher power levels can be used...

  20. Modular design of AFM probe with sputtered silicon tip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Thaysen, Jacob; Bouwstra, Siebe

    2001-01-01

    of the thin films constituting the cantilever. The AFM probe has an integrated tip made of a thick sputtered silicon layer, which is deposited after the probe has been defined and just before the cantilevers are released. The tips are so-called rocket tips made by reactive ion etching. We present probes...

  1. A Qualitative Study of the Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIPs): An Assessment of the Use of TIPs by Individuals Affiliated with the Addiction Technology Transfer Centers (ATTCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Susan W.; Suzuki, Marcia; Hubbard, Susan M.; Huang, Judy Y.; Cobb, Anita M.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluated the Addiction Technology Transfer Centers (ATTCs) of the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) as a means of diffusion of innovations, focusing on use of the Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIPs). Qualitative studies at 6 ATTCs that included 57 interviews show that the CSAT is at the forefront of providing resources to the…

  2. Non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis with red light emitting diode absorbance detection for the analysis of basic dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhari, Ali Reza; Breadmore, Michael C; Macka, Miroslav; Haddad, Paul R

    2006-11-24

    Non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis was evaluated for the separation of five hydrophobic basic blue dyes for application in forensic dye analysis. The use of a red light emitting diode as a high intensity, low-noise light source provided sensitive detection of the blue dyes while also allowing the evaluation of solvents that absorb strongly in the UV region. Excellent peak shapes and separation selectivity were obtained in methanol, ethanol, acetonitrile and dimethylsulfoxide, however water, tetrahydrofuran, dimethylformamide and acetone were unsuitable as solvents due to poor peak shapes and a lack of sensitivity, most likely due to adsorption onto the capillary wall. Due to the known compatibility of methanol with capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry, this solvent was examined further with the relative acidity/basicity of the electrolyte being optimised with an artificial neural network. The optimised method was examined for the separation of ink samples from 6 fibre tip and 2 ball point blue or black pens and showed that a unique migration time for the main dye component in seven of the eight pens could be obtained.

  3. [Reparation and application of perfluorodecyl modified silica monolithic capillary column in extraction and enrichment of perfluorooctane sulfonates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke; Zhou, Naiyuan; Chen, Bo

    2011-10-01

    A perfluorodecyl modified silica monolithic capillary column has been prepared by using sol-gel method. The preparation steps included hydrolysis of alkoxy silane, fasculation of silanol, gelation, aging, meso-pore preparation, drying and surface modification. It could be used as a solid phase extraction (SPE) microcolumn for extraction and enrichment of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). The enrichment characteristics and efficiency of the perfluorodecyl modified monolithic silica capillary column has been investigated and compared with C18 silica monolithic capillary column. The results indicated that the perfluorodecyl modified silica monolithic capillary column ( 15 cm x 75 microm) had a higher adsorption capacity and a better enrichment selectivity for PFOS. The average adsorption capacity of the perfluorodecyl modified silica monolithic capillary column was 75 ng. And when the PFOS mass concentration in sample was 0. 25 mg/L, the enrichment factor was 29-fold in average. Owing to the good performance of the perfluorodecyl modified silica monolithic capillary column, it can be used for the extraction and enrichment of trace PFOS in water to meet the requirements of water quality monitoring and analysis.

  4. Implications of turbulent flow in connecting capillaries used in high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorson, John; Lenhoff, Abraham M; Dittmann, Monika; Stoll, Dwight R

    2018-02-09

    The ongoing movement in HPLC toward the use of small columns packed with small particles for high speed separations results in eluted peaks with very small volumetric variances. Avoiding degradation of separation performance under these conditions requires careful consideration of all sources of extra-column peak dispersion. Recent trends towards decreased diameters of connecting capillaries and increased flow rates for analytical-scale separations can result in Reynolds numbers that exceed 2000. This raises the possibility of a transition from laminar to turbulent flow, thereby resulting in a higher than expected pressure drop across the capillary at a given flow rate. In this study we collected pressure drop data as a function of flow rate under many conditions relevant to modern HPLC. The variables studied included capillary diameter (50-120μm) and length (100-550mm), acetonitrile/water composition (0-100%), and temperature (20-80°C). Most of the work involved stainless steel capillaries, but a subset of experiments involved fused silica. We then used the experimental data to train a model that enables prediction of pressure drops for all of the conditions studied. We find that a single global friction factor profile is sufficient to predict pressure drops as a function of flow rate that are in qualitative agreement with the experimental results. The quantitative accuracy of these predictions is generally quite good, with a mean prediction error of about 2% over the entire range of conditions studied. Predictions for some outlying capillaries are not as good, with errors as high as -40%. This variability is probably due mainly to capillary-to-capillary variability, especially in the wall roughness, which is difficult to characterize definitively. We believe the model described here will be very useful to practicing chromatographers for predicting the conditions under which turbulent flow might develop in their connecting capillaries, and the magnitude of the

  5. Reconstruction of nasal tip and columella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Callum; Vuyk, Hade D

    2011-02-01

    Reconstruction of nasal tip and columella defects is demanding area with a range of reconstructive options, varying in complexity depending on requirements from simple skin grafting to multiple stage reconstruction with regional flaps. A framework is suggested to aid the reader in choice of reconstruction by classifying the defect based on size and the requirements of one to three layer (full thickness) reconstruction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Oracle Apex reporting tips and tricks

    CERN Document Server

    Bara, George

    2013-01-01

    Take advantage of all the exciting Reporting features of Oracle Application Express 4.2. Designed for a hands-on approach, this book contains in-depth practical guidelines from George Bara, a well-known Oracle Apex expert and blogger. From Classic to Interactive Reports, Web Services and Pdf Printing, "Oracle Apex Reporting Tips & Tricks" is a must-have for all database developers that want to make the most out of the Oracle Apex reporting engine.

  7. An Experimental Characterization of Tip Leakage Flows and Corresponding Effects on Multistage Compressor Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdanier, Reid Adam

    measurements collected at these part-speed and off-design conditions provides a unique data set for calibrating computational models and predictive algorithms. Further investigations with detailed steady total pressure traverses provide additional insight to tip leakage flow effects on stator performance. A series of data on the 100% corrected speedline further characterize the tip leakage flow using time-resolved measurements from a combination of instrumentation techniques. An array of high-frequency-response piezoresistive pressure transducers installed over the rotors allows quantification of tip leakage flow trajectories. These data, along with measurements from a fast-response total pressure probe downstream of the rotors, evaluate the development of tip leakage flows and assess the corresponding effects of upstream stator wakes. Finally, thermal anemometry measurements collected using the single slanted hot-wire technique evaluate three-dimensional velocity components throughout the compressor. These data facilitate calculations of several flow metrics, including a blockage parameter and phase-locked streamwise vorticity.

  8. High Performance Wafer-Based Capillary Electrochromatography, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II research comprises designing, constructing, and testing a chip-based capillary electrochromatography (CEC) prototype for separation and analysis of...

  9. A Prediction Model of the Capillary Pressure J-Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W S Xu

    Full Text Available The capillary pressure J-function is a dimensionless measure of the capillary pressure of a fluid in a porous medium. The function was derived based on a capillary bundle model. However, the dependence of the J-function on the saturation Sw is not well understood. A prediction model for it is presented based on capillary pressure model, and the J-function prediction model is a power function instead of an exponential or polynomial function. Relative permeability is calculated with the J-function prediction model, resulting in an easier calculation and results that are more representative.

  10. Capillary loss on nailfold capillary microscopy is associated with mortality in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Thais Rohde; Bredemeier, Markus; Hax, Vanessa; Capobianco, Karina Gatz; da Silva Mendonça Chakr, Rafael; Xavier, Ricardo Machado

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this study is to test the association of the severity of nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC) abnormalities with mortality in systemic sclerosis (SSc). One hundred and seventy SSc patients underwent an extensive evaluation (including high-resolution computed tomography, pulmonary function tests, and Doppler echocardiography) at baseline following a standard protocol. Capillary loss on NFC was evaluated using the avascular score (AS, ranging from 0 to 3), and the mean number of ectasias, megacapillaries, and hemorrhages per finger was also recorded. After a mean period of 10.1 ± 4.9 years, the life status of the patients was ascertained. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used for statistical analysis. Overall, 73 patients died. By univariate Cox analysis, the AS was significantly associated with mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.64, 95% CI 1.22 to 2.19, p = 0.001). In our study, this association was stronger than that of race, gender, anticentromere antibodies, anti-topoisomerase I antibodies, and form of disease and had similar strength to that of skin score in univariate analyses. However, after controlling for a combination of variables (age, skin score, gender, race, signs of peripheral ischemia, and extent of interstitial lung disease, all independently associated with mortality), the association of AS with mortality was blunted (HR = 1.15, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.65, p = 0.445). Other NFC variables were not related to mortality. AS was associated with higher risk of death and, despite not having an independent association with mortality after controlling for a set of demographic and clinical variables, may be a useful tool in prognostic evaluation of SSc.

  11. Development of novel separation techniques for biological samples in capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Huan -Tsung [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1994-07-27

    This dissertation includes three different topics: general introduction of capillary electrophoresis (CE); gradient in CE and CE in biological separations; and capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) for DNA separation. Factors such as temperature, viscosity, pH, and the surface of capillary walls affecting the separation performance are demonstrated. A pH gradient between 3.0 and 5.2 is useful to improve the resolution among eight different organic acids. A flow gradient due to the change in the concentration of surfactant, which is able to coat to the capillary wall to change the flow rate and its direction, is also shown as a good way to improve the resolution for organic compounds. A temperature gradient caused by joule heat is shown by voltage programming to enhance the resolution and shorten the separation time for several phenolic compounds. The author also shows that self-regulating dynamic control of electroosmotic flow in CE by simply running separation in different concentrations of surfactant has less matrix effect on the separation performance. One of the most important demonstrations in this dissertation is that the author proposes on-column reaction which gives several advantages including the use of a small amount of sample, low risk of contamination, and time saving and kinetic features. The author uses this idea with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) as a detection mode to detect an on-column digestion of sub-ng of protein. This technique also is applied to single cell analysis in the group.

  12. Modelization and simulation of capillary barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisbona Cortes, F.; Aguilar Villa, G.; Clavero Gracia, C.; Gracia Lozano, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    Among the different underground transport phenomena, that due to water flows is of great relevance. Water flows in infiltration and percolation processes are responsible of the transport of hazardous wastes towards phreatic layers. From the industrial and geological standpoints, there is a great interest in the design of natural devices to avoid the flows transporting polluting substances. This interest is increased when devices are used to isolate radioactive waste repositories, whose life is to be longer than several hundred years. The so-called natural devices are those based on the superimposition of material with different hydraulic properties. In particular, the flow retention in this kind stratified media, in unsaturated conditions, is basically due to the capillary barrier effect, resulting from placing a low conductivity material over another with a high hydraulic conductivity. Covers designed from the effect above have also to allow a drainage of the upper layer. The lower cost of these covers, with respect to other kinds of protection systems, and the stability in time of their components make them very attractive. However, a previous investigation to determine their effectivity is required. In this report we present the computer code BCSIM, useful for easy simulations of unsaturated flows in a capillary barrier configuration with drainage, and which is intended to serve as a tool for designing efficient covers. The model, the numerical algorithm and several implementation aspects are described. Results obtained in several simulations, confirming the effectivity of capillary barriers as a technique to build safety covers for hazardous waste repositories, are presented. (Author)

  13. Gravimetric capillary method for kinematic viscosity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Iwan, J.; Alexander, D.; Jin, Wei-Qing

    1992-01-01

    A novel version of the capillary method for viscosity measurements of liquids is presented. Viscosity data can be deduced in a straightforward way from mass transfer data obtained by differential weighing during the gravity-induced flow of the liquid between two cylindrical chambers. Tests of this technique with water, carbon tetrachloride, and ethanol suggest that this arrangement provides an accuracy of about +/- 1 percent. The technique facilitates operation under sealed, isothermal conditions and, thus can readily be applied to reactive and/or high vapor pressure liquids.

  14. Capillary flow in sacrificially etched nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, Mark N; Hawkins, Aaron R; Murray, Dallin; Maynes, Daniel; Lee, Milton L; Woolley, Adam T; Tolley, H Dennis

    2011-06-01

    Planar nanochannels are fabricated using sacrificial etching technology with sacrificial cores consisting of aluminum, chromium, and germanium, with heights ranging from 18 to 98 nm. Transient filling via capillary action is compared against the Washburn equation [E. W. Washburn, Phys. Rev. 17, 273 (1921)], showing experimental filling speeds significantly lower than classical continuum theory predicts. Departure from theory is expressed in terms of a varying dynamic contact angle, reaching values as high as 83° in channels with heights of 18 nm. The dynamic contact angle varies significantly from the macroscopic contact angle and increases with decreasing channel dimensions.

  15. Paramecium swimming in a capillary tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Saikat; Jung, Sunghwan

    2010-03-01

    Micro-organisms exhibit different strategies for swimming in complex environments. Many micro-swimmers such as paramecium congregate and tend to live near wall. We investigate how paramecium moves in a confined space as compared to its motion in an unbounded fluid. A new theoretical model based on Taylor's sheet is developed, to study such boundary effects. In experiments, paramecia are put inside capillary tubes and their swimming behavior is observed. The data obtained from experiments is used to test the validity of our theoretical model and understand how the cilia influence the locomotion of paramecia in confined geometries.

  16. Tip loss correction for actuator / Navier Stokes computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2004-01-01

    The new tip loss correction, initially developed for ID BEM computations [1], is now extended to 2D Actuator Disc / Navier-Stokes (AD/NS) computations and 3D Actuator Line / Navier-Stokes (AL/NS) computations. As shown in the paper, the tip loss correction is an important and necessary step...... for actuator / Navier-Stokes models. Comparisons of the present results with those obtained from a EM code with new tip correction and experimental data show that the tip loss correction is correctly implemented in the actuator / Navier-Stokes models. The results demonstrate also that difference between......, Actuator Line, Navier-Stokes equations, Tip loss correction....

  17. Selection of case studies describing PICC tip malposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Andrew; Buttle, Andrew

    2016-07-28

    This article presents a number of case studies, spanning a 12-month period, associated with peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) tip location. The aim is to generate debate around the journey PICC tips may take; it is not the purpose of this article to debate technological solutions to the issue of PICC tip location. The discussion of each case illustrates a wide range of potential aberrant PICC tip locations and offers an insight into how the abberant tip location was resolved in each case.

  18. Capillary electrophoresis in a fused-silica capillary with surface roughness gradient

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horká, Marie; Šlais, Karel; Karásek, Pavel; Růžička, F.; Šalplachta, Jiří; Šesták, Jozef; Kahle, Vladislav; Roth, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 19 (2016), s. 3827-3834 ISSN 1615-9306 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-03749S; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-29916A Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : capillary electrophoresis * supercritical water * surface roughness gradient Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry , Separation Impact factor: 2.557, year: 2016

  19. Open tubular capillary column for the separation of cytochrome C tryptic digest in capillary electrochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Faiz; Cheong, Won Jo

    2015-10-01

    A silica capillary of 50 μm internal diameter and 500 mm length (416 mm effective length) was chemically modified with 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenyl isocyanate in the presence of dibutyl tin dichloride as catalyst. Sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate was reacted with the terminal halogen of the bound ligand to incorporate the initiator moiety, and in situ polymerization was performed using a monomer mixture of styrene, N-phenylacrylamide, and methacrylic acid. The resultant open tubular capillary column immobilized with the copolymer layer was used for the separation of tryptic digest of cytochrome C in capillary electrochromatography. The sample was well eluted and separated into many components. The elution patterns of tryptic digest of cytochrome C were studied with respect to pH and water content in the mobile phase. This preliminary study demonstrates that open tubular capillary electrochromatography columns with a modified copolymer layer composed of proper nonpolar and polar units fabricated by reversible addition-fragmentation transfer polymerization can be useful as separation media for proteomic analysis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Electro-capillary effects in capillary filling dynamics of electrorheological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Jayabrata; Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-09-21

    The flow of electrorheological fluids is characterized by an apparent increase in viscosity manifested by the yield stress property of the fluid, which is a function of the applied electric field and the concentration of the suspended solute phase within the dielectric medium. This property of electrorheological fluids generally hinders flow through a capillary if the imposed shear stress is lower than the induced yield stress. This results in a plug-like zone in the flow profile, thus giving the fluid Bingham plastic properties. In the present work, we study such influences of the yield stress on the capillary filling dynamics of an electrorheological fluid by employing a rheologically consistent reduced order formalism. One important feature of the theoretical formalism is its ability to address the intricate interplay between the surface tension and viscous forces, both of which depend sensitively on the electric field. Our analysis reveals that the progress of the capillary front is hindered at an intermediate temporal regime, which is attributable to the increase of the span of the plug-zone across the channel width with time. With a preliminary understanding on the cessation of the capillary front advancement due to the yield stress property of the electrorheological fluids, we further strive to achieve a basic comparison with an experimental study made earlier. Reasonable agreements with the reported data support our theoretical framework. Comprehensive scaling analysis brings further insight to our reported observations over various temporal regimes.

  1. TIP hypospadias repair: A pediatric urology indicator operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, Warren; Bush, Nicol

    2016-02-01

    We review development and evolution of TIP hypospadias repair, including technical changes made to improve its results. We also discuss general risk factors for hypospadias surgical complications. We describe use of a database with prospective data entry to first identify our most common complications and their frequency, and then to monitor results of technical modifications made to reduce their occurrence. Multiple logistic regression of various factors recorded in the database was done to identify those predicting increased risk for urethroplasty complications. Fistula and glans dehiscence are the two most common complications we encountered after TIP repair. Changes in urethral plate tubularization and barrier layers covering the neourethra resulted in a significant reduction in fistulas after proximal TIP. Changes in glansplasty sutures and use of preoperative testosterone to increase glans size did not reduce likelihood for dehiscence, whereas increasing the extent of glans wings dissection did. Logistic regression analysis confirmed proximal meatal location and reoperation predicted increased complications, but also identified glans width ≤ 14 mm as an independent risk factor for hypospadias urethroplasty complications. Systematic, prospective data collection facilitated identification of complications and their risk factors, and provided a means to assess results of modifications made to address them. Limiting the algorithm used for hypospadias repair increases expertise in those techniques used. Reported low surgical volumes for proximal hypospadias repair suggest subspecialization of these cases be carried out so that designated surgeons can achieve sufficient volume to analyze their results and make improvements. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Reliability of widefield capillary microscopy to measure nailfold capillary density in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, M; Masetto, A; Steele, R; Arthurs, E; Baron, M

    2010-01-01

    To determine intra- and inter-observer reliability of widefield microscopy to measure nailfold capillary density in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Five SSc patients were examined with a STEMV-8 Zeiss biomicroscope with 50x magnification. The nailfold of the second, third, fourth and fifth fingers of both hands of each patient were photographed twice by each of two observers, once in the morning and again in the afternoon (total of 32 pictures). Two raters reviewed the photographs to produce capillary density readings. Intra- and inter-rater reliability of the readings were computed using intra-class correlations (ICC). Additional analyses were undertaken to determine the impact of other sources of variability in the data, namely patient, finger, technician and time. Intra-and inter-rater reliability were substantial (ICC 0.72-0.84) when raters were reading the same photographs or photographs taken at the same time of day. Agreement was only fair between morning and afternoon density readings (ICC 0.30-0.37). Patients, individual fingers and technician accounted for a large part of the variability in the data (combined variance component of 7.69 out of the total 12.23). The coefficient of variation of widefield microscopy was 24%. Although intra- and inter-rater reliability of nailfold capillary density measurements using widefield microscopy are good, proper standardisation of the conditions under which capillaroscopy is done and better imaging of nailfold capillary abnormalities should be considered if nailfold capillary density is to be used as an outcome measure in multi-centre clinical trials in SSc.

  3. Integrated refractive index optical ring resonator detector for capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; White, Ian M; Suter, Jonathan D; Zourob, Mohammed; Fan, Xudong

    2007-02-01

    We developed a novel miniaturized and multiplexed, on-capillary, refractive index (RI) detector using liquid core optical ring resonators (LCORRs) for future development of capillary electrophoresis (CE) devices. The LCORR employs a glass capillary with a diameter of approximately 100 mum and a wall thickness of a few micrometers. The circular cross section of the capillary forms a ring resonator along which the light circulates in the form of the whispering gallery modes (WGMs). The WGM has an evanescent field extending into the capillary core and responds to the RI change due to the analyte conducted in the capillary, thus permitting label-free measurement. The resonating nature of the WGM enables repetitive light-analyte interaction, significantly enhancing the LCORR sensitivity. This LCORR architecture achieves dual use of the capillary as a sensor head and a CE fluidic channel, allowing for integrated, multiplexed, and noninvasive on-capillary detection at any location along the capillary. In this work, we used electro-osmotic flow and glycerol as a model system to demonstrate the fluid transport capability of the LCORRs. In addition, we performed flow speed measurement on the LCORR to demonstrate its flow analysis capability. Finally, using the LCORR's label-free sensing mechanism, we accurately deduced the analyte concentration in real time at a given point on the capillary. A sensitivity of 20 nm/RIU (refractive index units) was observed, leading to an RI detection limit of 10-6 RIU. The LCORR marries photonic technology with microfluidics and enables rapid on-capillary sample analysis and flow profile monitoring. The investigation in this regard will open a door to novel high-throughput CE devices and lab-on-a-chip sensors in the future.

  4. Rotor aerodynamic power limits at low tip speed ratio using CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, Robert F; Sarmast, Sasan; Henningson, Dan; Sørensen, Jens N

    2014-01-01

    When investigating limits of rotor aerodynamic models, the Betz limit serves as a solid marker of an upper limit which no model should be able to exceed. A century ago Joukowsky (1912) proposed a rotor aerodynamic model utilizing a rotating actuator disc with a constant circulation. This model has since then been the subject of much controversy as it predicts a power performance that for all tip speed ratios exceeds the Betz limit and which goes to infinity when the tip speed ratio goes to zero. Recently, it was demonstrated that the Joukowsky model is fully consistent with the inviscid Euler equations and that the apparent inconsistency partly can be explained by the lack of viscous effects (Sprensen and van Kuik [4]). However, even including a term to account for the effect of viscosity at small tip speed ratios, the model still predicts a power yield that exceeds the Betz limit. In the present work we study in detail, using a CFD actuator line model, the flow behavior for rotors at small tip speed ratios. It is shown that the excessive swirl appearing towards the rotor center at small tip speed ratios generates vortex breakdown, causing a recirculating zone in the wake that limits the power yield of the rotor. The appearance of vortex breakdown has a similar effect on the flow behavior as the vortex ring state that usually appears at higher tip speed ratios. Limits to where vortex breakdown might occur with tip speed ratio and rotor loading as parameter are investigated and presented in the paper. The limits found correspond to well-known criterion for vortex breakdown onset for swirling flows in general. By applying a criterion for vortex breakdown in combination with the general momentum theory, the power performance always stays below the Betz limit

  5. Anomalous dynamics of capillary rise in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Shikhmurzaev, Yulii D.

    2012-07-09

    The anomalous dynamics of capillary rise in a porous medium discovered experimentally more than a decade ago is described. The developed theory is based on considering the principal modes of motion of the menisci that collectively form the wetting front on the Darcy scale. These modes, which include (i) dynamic wetting mode, (ii) threshold mode, and (iii) interface depinning process, are incorporated into the boundary conditions for the bulk equations formulated in the regular framework of continuum mechanics of porous media, thus allowing one to consider a general case of three-dimensional flows. The developed theory makes it possible to describe all regimes observed in the experiment, with the time spanning more than four orders of magnitude, and highlights the dominant physical mechanisms at different stages of the process. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  6. Tips for leaders, part I: basic principles of leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2011-08-01

    There are many important leadership skills that can be learned from experience, mentoring, reading, discussions, lectures, etc. The subjects include not only business topics and communication skills but also a variety of tips on what to do and what not to do. These include desirable styles of leadership, how to gain the trust of others in the organization, the significance of the appropriate delegation of tasks, the importance of teams, how to manage change, how to win during a crisis, what to do in the early days of becoming a new leader, preventing the loss of one's practice to a rival organization, improving quality, and others. There are also many important attributes of leaders, including having a strong moral compass. Although each of these topics could be a book in of itself, this short series of articles will briefly examine these issues and others.

  7. Heterogeneity of capillary spacing in the hypertrophied plantaris muscle from young-adult and old rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degens, H.; Morse, C.I.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2009-01-01

    Heterogeneity of capillary spacing may affect tissue oxygenation. The determinants of heterogeneity of capillary spacing are, however, unknown. To investigate whether 1) impaired angiogenesis and increased heterogeneity of capillary spacing delays development of hypertrophy during aging and 2)

  8. Quantitative analysis by microchip capillary electrophoresis – current limitations and problem-solving strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revermann, T.; Götz, S.; Künnemeyer, Jens; Karst, U.

    2008-01-01

    Obstacles and possible solutions for the application of microchip capillary electrophoresis in quantitative analysis are described and critically discussed. Differences between the phenomena occurring during conventional capillary electrophoresis and microchip-based capillary electrophoresis are

  9. Approach to analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms by automated constant denaturant capillary electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerheim, Jens; Abrahamsen, Torveig Weum; Kristensen, Annette Torgunrud; Gaudernack, Gustav; Ekstroem, Per O.

    2003-01-01

    Melting gel techniques have proven to be amenable and powerful tools in point mutation and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. With the introduction of commercially available capillary electrophoresis instruments, a partly automated platform for denaturant capillary electrophoresis with potential for routine screening of selected target sequences has been established. The aim of this article is to demonstrate the use of automated constant denaturant capillary electrophoresis (ACDCE) in single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of various target sequences. Optimal analysis conditions for different single nucleotide polymorphisms on ACDCE are evaluated with the Poland algorithm. Laboratory procedures include only PCR and electrophoresis. For direct genotyping of individual SNPs, the samples are analyzed with an internal standard and the alleles are identified by co-migration of sample and standard peaks. In conclusion, SNPs suitable for melting gel analysis based on theoretical thermodynamics were separated by ACDCE under appropriate conditions. With this instrumentation (ABI 310 Genetic Analyzer), 48 samples could be analyzed without any intervention. Several institutions have capillary instrumentation in-house, thus making this SNP analysis method accessible to large groups of researchers without any need for instrument modification

  10. Electromagnetohydrodynamic flow of blood and heat transfer in a capillary with thermal radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, A. [Department of Mathematics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Shit, G.C., E-mail: gopal_iitkgp@yahoo.co.in [Department of Mathematics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai 600113 (India)

    2015-03-15

    This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical study on heat transfer characteristics together with fully developed electromagnetohydrodynamic flow of blood through a capillary, having electrokinetic effects by considering the constant heat flux at the wall. The effect of thermal radiation and velocity slip condition have been taken into account. A rigorous mathematical model for describing Joule heating in electro-osmotic flow of blood including the Poisson–Boltzmann equation, the momentum equation and the energy equation is developed. The alterations in the thermal transport phenomenon, induced by the variation of imposed electromagnetic effects, are thoroughly explained through an elegant mathematical formalism. Results presented here pertain to the case where the height of the capillary is much greater than the thickness of electrical double layer comprising the stern and diffuse layers. The essential features of the electromagnetohydrodynamic flow of blood and associated heat transfer characteristics through capillary are clearly highlighted by the variations in the non-dimensional parameters for velocity profile, temperature profile and the Nusselt number. The study reveals that the temperature of blood can be controlled by regulating Joule heating parameter. - Highlights: • Electromagnetohydrodynamic flow of blood in capillary is studied. • Potential electric field is applied for driving elecroosmotic flow of blood. • Effect of thermal radiation, Joule heating and velocity slip is investigated. • Thermal radiation bears the significant change in the temperature field.

  11. Location and optimization analysis of capillary tube network embedded in active tuning building wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Fuxin; Yu, Yuebin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a building wall with a thermal tuning function is further investigated. This design turns the building wall from a passive thermal system to an active system. A capillary tube network is installed inside the wall to manipulate the thermodynamics and realize more flexibility and potentials of the wall. This novel building wall structure performs efficiently in terms of building load reduction and supplementary heating and cooling, and the structure is convenient for applying low grade or natural energy with a wider temperature range. The capillary tube network's location inside the wall greatly impacts the thermal and energy performance of the building wall. The effects of three locations including external, middle and internal side are analyzed. The results indicate that the internal wall surface temperature can be neutralized from the ambient environment when the embedded tubes are fed with thermal water. The wall can work with a wide range of water temperature and the optimal location of the tube network is relatively constant in different modes. Power benefit with the wall changes from 2 W to 39 W when the outdoor air temperature changes, higher in summer than in winter. - Highlights: • A building wall with a tuning function is proposed using a capillary pipe network. • Low-grade thermal water can be used to actively manipulate the thermal mass. • Location of the capillary network is investigated to maximize the performance. • The innovation can potentially lower down the grade of energy use in buildings.

  12. Nailfold capillary morphological characteristics of hand-arm vibration syndrome: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, QingSong; Chen, GuiPing; Xiao, Bin; Lin, HanSheng; Qu, HongYing; Zhang, DanYing; Shi, MaoGong; Lang, Li; Yang, Bei; Yan, MaoSheng

    2016-11-25

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of nailfold capillaroscopy associated with hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS). In total, 113 male gold miners were recruited: 35 workers who were chronically exposed to vibration and developed vibration-induced white finger were defined as the HAVS group, 39 workers who were exposed to vibration but did not have HAVS were classified as the vibration-exposed controls (VEC) group, and 39 workers without vibration exposure were categorised as the non-VEC (NVEC) group. Video capillaroscopy was used to capture images of the 2nd, 3rd and 4th fingers of both hands. The following nailfold capillary characteristics were included: number of capillaries/mm, avascular areas, haemorrhages and enlarged capillaries. The experiments were carried out in the same winter. All characteristics were evaluated under blinded conditions. Significant differences in all morphological characteristics existed between the groups (pcharacteristics, especially the number of capillaries/mm, avascular areas, haemorrhages, output limb width, input limb width and apical width alterations, revealed significant associations with HAVS. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Escherichia coli adhesive coating as a chiral stationary phase for open tubular capillary electrochromatography enantioseparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Qifeng; Zhang, Kailian; Gao, Die; Wang, Lujun; Yang, Fengqing; Liu, Yao; Xia, Zhining

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria, the microorganism with intrinsic chirality, have numerous fascinating chiral phenomena such as various chirality-triggered biological processes and behaviors. Herein, bacteria were firstly explored as novel chiral stationary phases in open-tubular capillary electrochromatography (OT-CEC) for enantioseparation of fluoroquinolone enantiomers and simultaneous separation of six fluoroquinolone antibiotics. The model strain, i.e. non-pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) DH5α, was adhered onto the inner surface of positively charged polyethyleneimine (PEI) modified capillaries based on the bacterial adhesion characteristics and strong electrostatic interaction. The morphology and thickness of the bacteria adhesive coatings in the capillary were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Baseline separation of ofloxacin and partial separation of lomefloxacin enantiomers could be achieved by the E. coli coated columns. The preparation parameters including the coating time and concentration of bacteria that affecting the chiral resolution were intensively investigated. The electrophoretic parameters, including pH, buffer concentration and applied voltage, were also optimized. The developed method was validated (linearity, LOD, LOQ, intra-day, inter-day and column-to-column repeatability and recovery) and successfully utilized for the quantitative analysis of ofloxacin enantiomers in the ofloxacin tablets. Moreover, only a slight decrease in the separation efficiency was observed after 90 consecutive runs on the E. coli@capillary. These results demonstrated that bacteria are promising stationary phases for chiral separation in CEC. - Highlights: • Bacteria were firstly introduced in OT-CEC as a chiral stationary phase for chiral separation. • Enantioseparation of ofloxacin enantiomers was achieved on E. coli coated open tubular capillary column. • Bacterial stationary phases may be used to

  14. Escherichia coli adhesive coating as a chiral stationary phase for open tubular capillary electrochromatography enantioseparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Qifeng, E-mail: fuqifeng1990@163.com [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Southwest Medical University, Luzhou 646000 (China); Zhang, Kailian; Gao, Die; Wang, Lujun [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Southwest Medical University, Luzhou 646000 (China); Yang, Fengqing; Liu, Yao [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Xia, Zhining, E-mail: tcm_anal_cqu@163.com [Innovative Drug Research Centre and School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China)

    2017-05-29

    Bacteria, the microorganism with intrinsic chirality, have numerous fascinating chiral phenomena such as various chirality-triggered biological processes and behaviors. Herein, bacteria were firstly explored as novel chiral stationary phases in open-tubular capillary electrochromatography (OT-CEC) for enantioseparation of fluoroquinolone enantiomers and simultaneous separation of six fluoroquinolone antibiotics. The model strain, i.e. non-pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) DH5α, was adhered onto the inner surface of positively charged polyethyleneimine (PEI) modified capillaries based on the bacterial adhesion characteristics and strong electrostatic interaction. The morphology and thickness of the bacteria adhesive coatings in the capillary were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Baseline separation of ofloxacin and partial separation of lomefloxacin enantiomers could be achieved by the E. coli coated columns. The preparation parameters including the coating time and concentration of bacteria that affecting the chiral resolution were intensively investigated. The electrophoretic parameters, including pH, buffer concentration and applied voltage, were also optimized. The developed method was validated (linearity, LOD, LOQ, intra-day, inter-day and column-to-column repeatability and recovery) and successfully utilized for the quantitative analysis of ofloxacin enantiomers in the ofloxacin tablets. Moreover, only a slight decrease in the separation efficiency was observed after 90 consecutive runs on the E. coli@capillary. These results demonstrated that bacteria are promising stationary phases for chiral separation in CEC. - Highlights: • Bacteria were firstly introduced in OT-CEC as a chiral stationary phase for chiral separation. • Enantioseparation of ofloxacin enantiomers was achieved on E. coli coated open tubular capillary column. • Bacterial stationary phases may be used to

  15. Capillary-discharge sodium plasma for pulsed-power X-ray laser experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, F.C.; Commisso, R.J.; Cooperstein, G.

    1986-01-01

    A capillary discharge plasma is being studied as a source of sodium plasma for Na/Ne x-ray laser experiments. The objective is to develop an intense x-ray pump of He-α emission from Na for matched-line photopumping of Ne. A uniform Na-bearing plasma (≅2-cm dia and ≅4-cm long) is to be injected into the anode-cathode gap of the Gamble II pulsed-power generator and imploded by MA-level currents to produce the intense sodium K-line radiation. Implosions of neon gas puffs have produced up to 50 GW of 0.92-keV He-α line emission, and similar x-ray power is expected from sodium implosions. Plasma from the capillary is produced by discharging current through an evacuated small hole in a plastic dielectric (≤ 3-mm dia and 1 to 2.5-cm long). A Na-bearing plasma is generated by forming the hole in NaF. Discharges of 30-kA (60-kA) peak current and 2-μs (2.6-μs) period are provided by a 0.6-μF (1.8-μF) capacitor bank charged to 25 kV. Diagnostics to evaluate plasma characteristics include witness plates, Faraday cups, photodiodes, open-shutter photographs, framing images, and visible light and near UV spectrographs. This plasma source emits visible light for 5-10 μs over a region extending - 1.5 cm from the capillary. Emission is more intense for capillary dia ≤ 0.8 mm. Spectroscopic measurements indicate that both positive ions and neutrals are present, including neutral Na from NaF capillaries. Velocities of≅2 cm/μs are deduced from Faraday cup measurements. For a 0.3-mm dia plastic capillary and 30-kA discharge current, ≅100 μg of capillary material is removed, which corresponds to≅10 μg/cm in the plasma

  16. Capillary origami: superhydrophobic ribbon surfaces and liquid marbles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen McHale

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the wetting of a solid by a liquid it is often assumed that the substrate is rigid. However, for an elastic substrate the rigidity depends on the cube of its thickness and so reduces rapidly as the substrate becomes thinner as it approaches becoming a thin sheet. In such circumstances, it has been shown that the capillary forces caused by a contacting droplet of a liquid can shape the solid rather than the solid shaping the liquid. A substrate can be bent and folded as a (pinned droplet evaporates or even instantaneously and spontaneously wrapped on contact with a droplet. When this effect is used to create three dimensional shapes from initially flat sheets, the effect is called capillary origami or droplet wrapping.In this work, we consider how the conditions for the spontaneous, capillary induced, folding of a thin ribbon substrate might be altered by a rigid surface structure that, for a rigid substrate, would be expected to create Cassie–Baxter and Wenzel effects. For smooth thin substrates, droplet wrapping can occur for all liquids, including those for which the Young’s law contact angle (defined by the interfacial tensions is greater than 90° and which would therefore normally be considered relatively hydrophobic. However, consideration of the balance between bending and interfacial energies suggests that the tendency for droplet wrapping can be suppressed for some liquids by providing the flexible solid surface with a rigid topographic structure. In general, it is known that when a liquid interacts with such a structure it can either fully penetrate the structure (the Wenzel case or it can bridge between the asperities of the structure (the Cassie–Baxter case.In this report, we show theoretically that droplet wrapping should occur with both types of solid–liquid contact. We also derive a condition for the transition between the Cassie–Baxter and Wenzel type droplet wrapping and relate it to the same transition condition

  17. Applications of monolithic silica capillary columns in proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barroso, B.; Lubda, D; Bischoff, Rainer

    2003-01-01

    The use and applicability of silica based capillary monolithic reversed-phase columns in proteomic analysis has been evaluated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Chromatographic performance of the monolithic capillaries was evaluated with a tryptic digest of cytochrome C showing

  18. First report of microcephaly-capillary malformations syndrome in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Microcephaly-capillary malformation (MIC-CAP) syndrome is a newly described autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by microcephaly, multiple cutaneous capillary malformations, intractable epilepsy and profound developmental delay. We present the first description of MIC-CAP syndrome in Russia.

  19. Two classes of capillary optical fibers: refractive and photonic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2008-11-01

    This paper is a digest tutorial on some properties of capillary optical fibers (COF). Two basic types of capillary optical fibers are clearly distinguished. The classification is based on propagation mechanism of optical wave. The refractive, singlemode COF guides a dark hollow beam of light (DHB) with zero intensity on fiber axis. The photonic, singlemode COF carries nearly a perfect axial Gaussian beam with maximum intensity on fiber axis. A subject of the paper are these two basic kinds of capillary optical fibers of pure refractive and pure photonic mechanism of guided wave transmission. In a real capillary the wave may be transmitted by a mixed mechanism, refractive and photonic, with strong interaction of photonic and refractive guided wave modes. Refractive capillary optical fibers are used widely for photonic instrumentation applications, while photonic capillary optical fibers are considered for trunk optical communications. Replacement of classical, single mode, dispersion shifted, 1550nm optimized optical fibers for communications with photonic capillaries would potentially cause a next serious revolution in optical communications. The predictions say that such a revolution may happen within this decade. This dream is however not fulfilled yet. The paper compares guided modes in both kinds of optical fiber capillaries: refractive and photonic. The differences are emphasized indicating prospective application areas of these fibers.

  20. Potential of capillary electrophoresis for the profiling of propolis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst, M.J; Somsen, G.W; de Jong, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    The usefulness of capillary electrophoresis (CE) with diode array detection for the profiling of Propolis, a hive product, is investigated. Water extracts of Propolis were analyzed with both capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) at pH 7.0 and 9.3, and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC)

  1. Thermodynamics of Capillary Rise: Why Is the Meniscus Curved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Ulf; Eriksson, Jan Christer

    2004-01-01

    The thermodynamics of capillary rise is explained as the gravitational elevation of the whole column of liquid caused by the positive connection between the liquid, and the solid wall of the capillary tube. The curvature of the meniscus is ascribed to the maintenance of a physiochemical balance throughout the gravitational column of liquid.

  2. Geometry Effects of Capillary on the Evaporation from the Meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Choong Hyo; Jin, Song Wan; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2007-01-01

    The effect of capillary cross-section geometry on evaporation is investigated in terms of the meniscus shape, evaporation rate and evaporation-induced flow for circular, square and rectangular cross-sectional capillaries. The shapes of water and ethanol menisci are not much different from each other in square and rectangular capillaries even though the surface tension of water is much larger than that of ethanol. On the other hand, the shapes of water and ethanol menisci are very different from each other in circular capillary. The averaged evaporation fluxes in circular and rectangular capillaries are measured by tracking the meniscus position. At a given position, the averaged evaporation flux in rectangular capillaries in much larger than that in circular capillary with comparable hydraulic diameter. The flow near the evaporating meniscus is also measured using micro-PIV, so that the rotating vortex motion is observed near the evaporating ethanol and methanol menisci except for the case of methanol meniscus in rectangular capillary. This difference is considered to be due to the existence of corner menisci at the four corners

  3. Variables decreasing tip movement of peripherally inserted central catheters in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnannt, Ralph; Connolly, Bairbre L; Parra, Dimitri A; Amaral, Joao; Moineddin, Rahim; Thakor, Avnesh S

    2016-10-01

    The position of the tip of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is crucial; malposition can lead to malfunction of the line or life-threatening events (e.g., arrhythmias, perforation). To determine what factors other than arm position and accessed vein might influence the tip position of a PICC. Inclusion criteria were upper limb PICC placement, body weight central tip movement in rib units. We included 112 children who received a PICC (42 girls/70 boys, mean age 31±13 months, mean weight 6.5±4.9 kg). The overall range of central tip movement was -1 to +4 rib units (mean +0.8±0.7 rib units). Silicone PICCs moved significantly less than polyurethane PICCs (Pcentral tip movement of a PICC (P>0.05). Silicone PICCs and PICCs inserted into the cephalic vein move less than PICCs made of polyurethane and PICCs inserted into the brachial and basilic veins. These findings might assist operators in deciding which PICC to place in children in a given clinical context.

  4. PhenoTips: patient phenotyping software for clinical and research use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girdea, Marta; Dumitriu, Sergiu; Fiume, Marc; Bowdin, Sarah; Boycott, Kym M; Chénier, Sébastien; Chitayat, David; Faghfoury, Hanna; Meyn, M Stephen; Ray, Peter N; So, Joyce; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J; Brudno, Michael

    2013-08-01

    We have developed PhenoTips: open source software for collecting and analyzing phenotypic information for patients with genetic disorders. Our software combines an easy-to-use interface, compatible with any device that runs a Web browser, with a standardized database back end. The PhenoTips' user interface closely mirrors clinician workflows so as to facilitate the recording of observations made during the patient encounter. Collected data include demographics, medical history, family history, physical and laboratory measurements, physical findings, and additional notes. Phenotypic information is represented using the Human Phenotype Ontology; however, the complexity of the ontology is hidden behind a user interface, which combines simple selection of common phenotypes with error-tolerant, predictive search of the entire ontology. PhenoTips supports accurate diagnosis by analyzing the entered data, then suggesting additional clinical investigations and providing Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) links to likely disorders. By collecting, classifying, and analyzing phenotypic information during the patient encounter, PhenoTips allows for streamlining of clinic workflow, efficient data entry, improved diagnosis, standardization of collected patient phenotypes, and sharing of anonymized patient phenotype data for the study of rare disorders. Our source code and a demo version of PhenoTips are available at http://phenotips.org. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  5. Performance assessment of novel side firing safe tips for endodontic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Roy; Walsh, Laurence J.

    2011-04-01

    During root canal or periodontal treatment, directing laser energy onto the walls of the root canal is essential for effective disinfection. This study assessed the performance of four different fiber modifications that have increased lateral emission, including three designs with safe tips to reduce irradiation directed toward the root apex. Free-running pulsed infrared lasers (Nd:YAG, Er:YAG, and Er,Cr:YSGG) and a diode laser (980 nm) were used in combination with plain ended (forward emitting) laser fibers; conical laser fibers, side firing honeycomb pattern fibers without a safe end; honeycomb fibers with silver coated ends, conical fibers with selectively abraded tips, and selectively abraded honeycomb fibers with silver coated tips (20 fibers for each laser type). Laser emissions forward and laterally were measured, and digital photographs and thermally sensitive paper used to record the emission profiles. Thermochromic dyes painted onto the root surface of an extracted tooth were used to explore the distribution of laser energy with different tips designs. All three safe tipped ends gave reduced emissions in the forward direction (range 17-59%), but had similar lateral emission characteristics. Fiber designs with reduced forward emission may be useful for various dental laser procedures.

  6. Relocalization of human chromatin remodeling cofactor TIP48 in mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigala, Barbara; Edwards, Mina; Puri, Teena; Tsaneva, Irina R.

    2005-01-01

    TIP48 is a highly conserved eukaryotic AAA + protein which is an essential cofactor for several complexes involved in chromatin acetylation and remodeling, transcriptional and developmental regulation and nucleolar organization and trafficking. We show that TIP48 abundance in HeLa cells did not change during the cell cycle, nor did its distribution in various biochemical fractions. However, we observed distinct changes in the subcellular localization of TIP48 during M phase using immunofluorescence microscopy. Our studies demonstrate that in interphase cells TIP48 was found mainly in the nucleus and exhibited a distinct localization in the nuclear periphery. As the cells entered mitosis, TIP48 was excluded from the condensing chromosomes but showed association with the mitotic apparatus. During anaphase, some TIP48 was detected in the centrosome colocalizing with tubulin but the strongest staining appeared in the mitotic equator associated with the midzone central spindle. Accumulation of TIP48 in the midzone and the midbody was observed in late telophase and cytokinesis. This redeployment of TIP48 during anaphase and cytokinesis was independent of microtubule assembly. The relocation of endogenous TIP48 to the midzone/midbody under physiological conditions suggests a novel and distinct function for TIP48 in mitosis and possible involvement in the exit of mitosis

  7. Numerical Simulation of LVAD Inflow Cannulas with Different Tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Mao Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The tip structure of LVAD inflow cannula is one of major factors to lead adverse events such as thrombosis and suction leading to obstruction. In this research, four kinds of tips that had been used in inflow cannulas were selected and designed. The flow field of the four inflow cannulas inserted into the apex of left ventricle (LV was numerically computed by computational fluid dynamics. The flow behavior was analyzed in order to compare the blood compatibility and suction in left ventricle and cannulas after the inflow cannulas with different tips were inserted to the apex of LV. The results showed that the cannula tip structure affected the LVAD performance. Among these four cannulas, the trumpet-tipped inflow cannula owned the best performance in smooth flow velocity distribution without backflow or low-velocity flow so that it was the best in blood compatibility. Nevertheless, the caged tipped cannula was the worst in blood compatibility. And the blunt-tipped and beveled tipped inflow cannulas may obstruct more easily than trumpet and caged tipped inflow cannulas because of their shape. The study indicated that the trumpet tip was the most preferable for the inflow cannula of long-term LVAD.

  8. Semi-empirical crack tip analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Ben Ouezdon, M.

    1988-01-01

    Experimentally observed crack opening displacements are employed as the solution of the multiple crack interaction problem. Then the near and far fields are reconstructed analytically by means of the double layer potential technqiue. Evaluation of the effective stress intensity factor resulting from the interaction of the main crack and its surrounding crazes in addition to the remotely applied load is presented as an illustrative example. It is shown that crazing (as well as microcracking) may constitute an alternative mechanism to Dugdale-Berenblatt models responsible for the cancellation of the singularity at the crack tip.

  9. Protein separation by open tubular capillary electrochromatography employing a capillary coated with phenylalanine functionalized tentacle-type polymer under both cathodic and anodic electroosmotic flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Sun, Yan

    2008-03-07

    The use of a phenylalanine (Phe) functionalized tentacle-type polymer coated capillary column for protein separation by open tubular capillary electrochromatography (OTCEC) was demonstrated in this work. The tentacle-type stationary phase was prepared from silanized fused-silica capillaries of 50 microm I.D. by glycidyl methacrylate graft polymerization and subsequent Phe functionalization. Due to the amphoteric functional groups of the Phe bonded on the tentacle-type polymer stationary phase, protein separation in the prepared column can be performed under both cathodic and anodic electroosmotic flow (EOF) by varying the pH values of the mobile phase. Model proteins including ribonuclease A (RNase A), myoglobin, transferrin, insulin were baseline separated under cathodic EOF with a mobile phase of pH 8.8. Comparison between the separation result of the four proteins under conditions of OTCEC and capillary zone electrophoresis indicates that the migration behavior of the four proteins in the prepared column was the result of the interplay of chromatographic retention and electrophoretic migration. Besides, three basic proteins including RNase A, cytochrome c (Cyt-c) and lysozyme (Lys) were fully resolved under anodic EOF with an acidic running buffer (pH 2.5). The elution order was the same as the isoelectric point values of the proteins (RNase A

  10. Tipping point analysis of a large ocean ambient sound record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livina, Valerie N.; Harris, Peter; Brower, Albert; Wang, Lian; Sotirakopoulos, Kostas; Robinson, Stephen

    2017-04-01

    We study a long (2003-2015) high-resolution (250Hz) sound pressure record provided by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) from the hydro-acoustic station Cape Leeuwin (Australia). We transform the hydrophone waveforms into five bands of 10-min-average sound pressure levels (including the third-octave band) and apply tipping point analysis techniques [1-3]. We report the results of the analysis of fluctuations and trends in the data and discuss the BigData challenges in processing this record, including handling data segments of large size and possible HPC solutions. References: [1] Livina et al, GRL 2007, [2] Livina et al, Climate of the Past 2010, [3] Livina et al, Chaos 2015.

  11. Wall modified photonic crystal fibre capillaries as porous layer open tubular columns for in-capillary micro-extraction and capillary chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazarian, Artaches A. [Australian Centre for Research on Separation Science, School of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 75, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); W.M. Keck FT-ICR-MS Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Sanz Rodriguez, Estrella; Deverell, Jeremy A. [Australian Centre for Research on Separation Science, School of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 75, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); McCord, James; Muddiman, David C. [W.M. Keck FT-ICR-MS Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Paull, Brett, E-mail: Brett.Paull@utas.edu.au [Australian Centre for Research on Separation Science, School of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 75, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, School of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 75, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia)

    2016-01-28

    Wall modified photonic crystal fibre capillary columns for in-capillary micro-extraction and liquid chromatographic separations is presented. Columns contained 126 internal parallel 4 μm channels, each containing a wall bonded porous monolithic type polystyrene-divinylbenzene layer in open tubular column format (PLOT). Modification longitudinal homogeneity was monitored using scanning contactless conductivity detection and scanning electron microscopy. The multichannel open tubular capillary column showed channel diameter and polymer layer consistency of 4.2 ± 0.1 μm and 0.26 ± 0.02 μm respectively, and modification of 100% of the parallel channels with the monolithic polymer. The modified multi-channel capillaries were applied to the in-capillary micro-extraction of water samples. 500 μL of water samples containing single μg L{sup −1} levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons were extracted at a flow rate of 10 μL min{sup −1}, and eluted in 50 μL of acetonitrile for analysis using HPLC with fluorescence detection. HPLC LODs were 0.08, 0.02 and 0.05 μg L{sup −1} for acenaphthene, anthracene and pyrene, respectively, with extraction recoveries of between 77 and 103%. The modified capillaries were also investigated briefly for direct application to liquid chromatographic separations, with the retention and elution of a standard protein (cytochrome c) under isocratic conditions demonstrated, proving chromatographic potential of the new column format, with run-to-run retention time reproducibility of below 1%. - Highlights: • Novel PS-DVB modified photonic crystal fibres for in-capillary micro-extraction. • New method for micro-extraction of PAHs and HPLC-FL detection at sub-ppb levels. • Demonstration of PS-DVB modified photonic crystal fibres for capillary bioseparations.

  12. Effect of smoking on the gingival capillary density: assessment of gingival capillary density with orthogonal polarization spectral imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, J. A.; Mathura, K. R.; Harkisoen, S.; van den Akker, H. P.; Ince, C.

    2005-01-01

    Microvascular changes because of smoking are frequently presumed in models because of the negative effect of smoking portrayed on the microcirculation. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke might lead to a decrease in gingival capillary density. Capillary density was assessed with orthogonal

  13. Rapid capillary coating by epoxy-poly-(dimethylacrylamide): Performance in capillary zone electrophoresis of protein and polystyrene carboxylate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chiari, M.; Cretich, M.; Šťastná, Miroslava; Radko, S. P.; Chrambach, A.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 4 (2001), s. 656-659 ISSN 0173-0835 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4031919 Keywords : capillary coating * capillary zone electrophoresis * proteins Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.282, year: 2001

  14. TiPs: a database of therapeutic targets in pathogens and associated tools.

    KAUST Repository

    Lepore, Rosalba

    2013-05-21

    MOTIVATION: The need for new drugs and new targets is particularly compelling in an era that is witnessing an alarming increase of drug resistance in human pathogens. The identification of new targets of known drugs is a promising approach, which has proven successful in several cases. Here, we describe a database that includes information on 5153 putative drug-target pairs for 150 human pathogens derived from available drug-target crystallographic complexes. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: The TiPs database is freely available at http://biocomputing.it/tips. CONTACT: anna.tramontano@uniroma1.it or allegra.via@uniroma1.it.

  15. A Rotor Tip Vortex Tracing Algorithm for Image Post-Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overmeyer, Austin D.

    2015-01-01

    A neurite tracing algorithm, originally developed for medical image processing, was used to trace the location of the rotor tip vortex in density gradient flow visualization images. The tracing algorithm was applied to several representative test images to form case studies. The accuracy of the tracing algorithm was compared to two current methods including a manual point and click method and a cross-correlation template method. It is shown that the neurite tracing algorithm can reduce the post-processing time to trace the vortex by a factor of 10 to 15 without compromising the accuracy of the tip vortex location compared to other methods presented in literature.

  16. Should we consider the hemi-tip as a proper aesthetic subunit in a nasal reconstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, W; Duron, J B; Jabbour, S; Rem, K; Bertrand, B; Quilichini, J; Revol, M; Mazouz Dorval, S

    2017-08-01

    Defects involving several aesthetic subunits (ASUs) or lying at the junction of an ASU are challenging and require a complex reconstruction. This study aimed to describe the hemi-tip as a new ASU. We conducted a retrospective study including patients who underwent a nasal reconstruction for lower nasal pyramid defects according to our modified ASU principle. Patients who suffered from a subtotal alar defect, which also involved ASUs by considering the hemi-tip as a proper subunit. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Determination of dioxopromethazine hydrochloride by capillary electrophoresis with electrochemiluminescence detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yunhui; Wang Chunyan; Sun Jinying; Zhou Yongchang; You Tianyan; Wang Erkang; Fung Yingsing

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents a rapid method for the determination of dioxopromethazine hydrochloride (DPZ), an antihistamine drug, by the capillary electrophoresis with electrochemiluminescene detection (CE-ECL) using tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) (Ru(bpy) 3 2+ ) reagent. This CE-ECL detection method has high sensitivity, good selectivity and reproducibility for DPZ analysis. Under the optimized conditions: separation capillary, 38 cm length (25 μm i.d.); sample injection, 10 s at 8 kV; separation voltage, 12.5 kV; running buffer, 20 mmol L -1 sodium phosphate of pH 6.0; detection potential, 1.15 V; 50 mmol L -1 of phosphate buffer (pH 7.14) containing 5 mmol L -1 of Ru(bpy) 3 2+ in ECL detection cell, the detection limit of DPZ was 0.05 μmol L -1 (S/N = 3). The linear range extended from 5 to 100 μmol L -1 . The linear curve obtained was Y = 181.62 + 9.28X with a correlation coefficient of 0.9970. The relative standard deviations of the ECL intensity and the migration time for six continuous injections of 5 μmol L -1 DPZ were 3.7% and 0.92%, respectively. The CE-ECL method was applied to analyze DPZ in real samples including tablets, rat serum and human urine, and satisfactory results were obtained without interference from samples matrix. The CE-ECL technique was proved to be a potential method for the detection of DPZ in clinic analysis

  18. A Capillary-Based Static Phase Separator for Highly Variable Wetting Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Evan A.; Graf, John C.; Weislogel, Mark M.

    2010-01-01

    The invention, a static phase separator (SPS), uses airflow and capillary wetting characteristics to passively separate a two-phase (liquid and air) flow. The device accommodates highly variable liquid wetting characteristics. The resultant design allows for a range of wetting properties from about 0 to over 90 advancing contact angle, with frequent complete separation of liquid from gas observed when using appropriately scaled test conditions. Additionally, the design accommodates a range of air-to-liquid flow-rate ratios from only liquid flow to over 200:1 air-to-liquid flow rate. The SPS uses a helix input section with an ice-cream-cone-shaped constant area cross section (see figure). The wedge portion of the cross section is on the outer edge of the helix, and collects the liquid via centripetal acceleration. The helix then passes into an increasing cross-sectional area vane region. The liquid in the helix wedge is directed into the top of capillary wedges in the liquid containment section. The transition from diffuser to containment section includes a 90 change in capillary pumping direction, while maintaining inertial direction. This serves to impinge the liquid into the two off-center symmetrical vanes by the airflow. Rather than the airflow serving to shear liquid away from the capillary vanes, the design allows for further penetration of the liquid into the vanes by the air shear. This is also assisted by locating the air exit ports downstream of the liquid drain port. Additionally, any droplets not contained in the capillary vanes are re-entrained downstream by a third opposing capillary vane, which directs liquid back toward the liquid drain port. Finally, the dual air exit ports serve to slow the airflow down, and to reduce the likelihood of shear. The ports are stove-piped into the cavity to form an unfriendly capillary surface for a wetting fluid to carryover. The liquid drain port is located at the start of the containment region, allowing for

  19. Influence of ignored and well-known zone distortions on the separation performance of proteins in capillary free zone electrophoresis with special reference to analysis in polyacrylamide-coated fused silica capillaries in various buffers. I. Theoretical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjertén, Stellan; Mohabbati, Sheila; Westerlund, Douglas

    2004-10-22

    II). The difference between the experimentally determined total variance and the sum of the calculated variances originating from the width of the starting zone, longitudinal diffusion, Joule heating, sedimentation in the vertical section of the capillary, curvature of the capillary (i.e., the sum of all other variances) was in our most successful experiments about 28% of the variance of diffusion. The zone broadening, 2sigma, caused by diffusion was estimated at 0.77 mm. The total zone width (2sigma) calculated from the experimentally determined plate number was as small as 1 mm when the migration distance was 40 cm. Accordingly, the only efficient way to reduce drastically the total zone width is to decrease the analysis time and, thereby, the diffusional broadening. An important finding was that the variance originating from the loops of the capillary is not always negligible in high-performance runs. Therefore, one should employ straight capillaries and avoid CE apparatus with cartridges that require a strong curvature of the capillary, common in most commercial instruments. Mathematical formulas have been derived for the sedimentation of the solute zone, the enrichment factor, and the migration time in experiments where the solute is dissolved in a dilute running buffer. This zone sharpening method gave very narrow starting zones (0.04-0.4 mm). However, upon high dilution of the buffer the enrichment becomes so strong that part of the sample zone probably sediments out of the capillary; the almost inevitable change in pH may decrease the mobility of the proteins and, thus, cause the enrichment factor to become still lower than expected. Diffusion of the protein in the very narrow starting zone (located close to the tip of the capillary) and sometimes the thermal expansion of the buffer in the capillary contributes to additional loss of protein in the enrichment step. In some buffers, the interaction between the protein and the buffer constituents is so slow that

  20. Unsteady motion of the parasitic capillary ripples on the gravity-capillary waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, K.; Tsuji, Y.; Kukita, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Parasitic capillary ripples generated on the forward face of the gravity-capillary waves are investigated experimentally. Using the optical technique, the slope angle of the wave is measured with sufficient space and time resolution to characterize the small ripple fluctuations. The ripple generation and its steepness is considered from the point of dominant wave asymmetry. The unsteady motion of ripples is analyzed by the two-points optical measurements. Dominant wave has the same phase speed with ripple on average, however the relative distance to the dominant wave fluctuates which can't be negligible comparing with the ripple wavelength. That is, the non-linear interactions with the dominant wave assumed to be essential. (authors)

  1. Lobular Capillary Hemangioma of the Nasal Cavity: A Retrospective Study of 15 Cases in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Hang Chi Chi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lobular capillary hemangioma of the nasal cavity is an uncommon benign vascular tumor of unknown etiology. There have been only very few case reports in Taiwan. Aims: This study aimed to analyze the clinical features, radiological findings, treatment modalities, and outcome of lobular capillary hemangioma treated at a teaching hospital in Taiwan during a period of 10 years. Study Design: Descriptive study. Methods: Retrospective chart reviews were performed on patients who were diagnosed with lobular capillary hemangioma of the nasal cavity at Kaohsiung Armed Forces General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, from January 2003 to December 2012. Data retrieved included age, gender, clinical symptoms, computed tomography (CT findings, treatment modalities, and outcome for further analysis. Results: Of the 15 patients identified, there were five males and ten females ranging from 17 to 86 years of age, with a mean age of 43.8±20.2. Epistaxis was the most common presenting symptom. All patients presented a unilateral nasal lobular capillary hemangioma. The most commonly affected site was the anterior nasal septum, followed by the inferior turbinate, vestibule, middle turbinate, and posterior nasal septum. All lesions presented as soft tissue density without bony erosions under CT examination. Endoscopic excisional surgery (n=12 or classical local excision (n=3 was performed for complete removal of the hemangioma. No evidence of recurrence was observed with 6 to 75 months of follow-up. Conclusion: Lobular capillary hemangioma of the nasal cavity was usually found to occur in anterior septum with epistaxis. Complete excision with endoscopic surgery or classical local excision was recommended and recurrence can be prevented.

  2. Turbine-blade tip clearance and tip timing measurements using an optical fiber bundle sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Iker; Beloki, Josu; Zubia, Joseba; Durana, Gaizka; Aldabaldetreku, Gotzon

    2013-04-01

    Traditional limitations of capacitive, inductive or discharging probe sensor for tip timing and tip clearance measurements are overcome by reflective intensity modulated optical fiber sensors. This paper presents the signals and results corresponding to a one stage turbine rig which rotor has 146 blades, obtained from a transonic wind-tunnel test. The probe is based on a trifurcated bundle of optical fibers that is mounted on turbine casing. It is composed of a central illuminating fiber that guides the light from a laser to the turbine blade, and two concentric rings of receiving fibers that collect the reflected light. Two photodetectors turn this reflected light signal from the receiving rings into voltage. The electrical signals are acquired and saved by a high-sample-rate oscilloscope. In tip clearance calculations the ratio of the signals provided by each ring of receiving fibers is evaluated and translated into distance. In the case of tip timing measurements, only one of the signals is considered to get the arrival time of the blade. The differences between the real and theoretical arrival times of the blades are used to obtain the deflections amplitude. The system provides the travelling wave spectrum, which presents the average vibration amplitude of the blades at a certain nodal diameter. The reliability of the results in the turbine rig testing facilities suggests the possibility of performing these measurements in real turbines under real working conditions.

  3. Quantification of tip-broadening in non-contact atomic force microscopy with carbon nanotube tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinander, Kristoffer; Jensen, Thomas N.; Simonsen, Soren B.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotube terminated atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes have been used for the imaging of 5 nm wide surface supported Pt nanoclusters by non-contact (dynamic mode) AFM in an ultra-high vacuum. The results are compared to AFM measurements done with conventional Si-tips, as well...

  4. Separation of oligopeptides, nucleobases, nucleosides and nucleotides using capillary electrophoresis/electrochromatography with sol-gel modified inner capillary wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svobodová, Jana; Kofroňová, Olga; Benada, Oldřich; Král, Vladimír; Mikšík, Ivan

    2017-09-29

    The aim of this article is to study the modification of an inner capillary wall with sol-gel coating (pure silica sol-gel or silica sol-gel containing porphyrin-brucine conjugate) and determine its influence on the separation process using capillary electrophoresis/electrochromatography method. After modification of the inner capillary surface the separation of analytes was performed using two different phosphate buffers (pH 2.5 and 9.0) and finally the changes in electrophoretic mobilities of various samples were calculated. To confirm that the modification of the inner capillary surface was successful, the parts of the inner surfaces of capillaries were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The analytes used as testing samples were oligopeptides, nucleosides, nucleobases and finally nucleotides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Performance analysis of wind turbines at low tip-speed ratio using the Betz-Goldstein model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, Jerson R.P.; Wood, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • General formulations for power and thrust at any tip-speed ratio are developed. • The Joukowsky model for the blades is modified with specific vortex distributions. • Betz-Goldstein model is shown to be the most consistent at low tip-speed ratio. • The effects of finite blade number are assessed using tip loss factors. • Tip loss for finite blade number may complicate the vortex breakdown. - Abstract: Analyzing wind turbine performance at low tip-speed ratio is challenging due to the relatively high level of swirl in the wake. This work presents a new approach to wind turbine analysis including swirl for any tip-speed ratio. The methodology uses the induced velocity field from vortex theory in the general momentum theory, in the form of the turbine thrust and torque equations. Using the constant bound circulation model of Joukowsky, the swirl velocity becomes infinite on the wake centreline even at high tip-speed ratio. Rankine, Vatistas and Delery vortices were used to regularize the Joukowsky model near the centreline. The new formulation prevents the power coefficient from exceeding the Betz-Joukowsky limit. An alternative calculation, based on the varying circulation for Betz-Goldstein optimized rotors is shown to have the best general behavior. Prandtl’s approximation for the tip loss and a recent alternative were employed to account for the effects of a finite number of blades. The Betz-Goldstein model appears to be the only one resistant to vortex breakdown immediately behind the rotor for an infinite number of blades. Furthermore, the dependence of the induced velocity on radius in the Betz-Goldstein model allows the power coefficient to remain below Betz-Joukowsky limit which does not occur for the Joukowsky model at low tip-speed ratio.

  6. Use of self-collected capillary blood samples for islet autoantibody screening in relatives: a feasibility and acceptability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Rafkin, L E; Matheson, D; Henderson, C; Boulware, D; Besser, R E J; Ferrara, C; Yu, L; Steck, A K; Bingley, P J

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using self-collected capillary blood samples for islet autoantibody testing to identify risk in relatives of people with Type 1 diabetes. Participants were recruited via the observational TrialNet Pathway to Prevention study, which screens and monitors relatives of people with Type 1 diabetes for islet autoantibodies. Relatives were sent kits for capillary blood collection, with written instructions, an online instructional video link and a questionnaire. Sera from capillary blood samples were tested for autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet antigen-2, insulin and zinc transporter 8. 'Successful' sample collection was defined as obtaining sufficient volume and quality to provide definitive autoantibody results, including confirmation of positive results by repeat assay. In 240 relatives who returned samples, the median (range) age was 15.5 (1-49) years and 51% were male. Of these samples, 98% were sufficient for glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet antigen-2 and zinc transporter 8 autoantibody testing and 84% for insulin autoantibody testing and complete autoantibody screen. The upper 90% confidence bound for unsuccessful collection was 4.4% for glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet antigen-2 and/or zinc transporter 8 autoantibody assays, and 19.3% for insulin autoantibodies. Despite 43% of 220 questionnaire respondents finding capillary blood collection uncomfortable or painful, 82% preferred home self-collection of capillary blood samples compared with outpatient venepuncture (90% of those aged 18 years). The perceived difficulty of collecting capillary blood samples did not affect success rate. Self-collected capillary blood sampling offers a feasible alternative to venous sampling, with the potential to facilitate autoantibody screening for Type 1 diabetes risk. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  7. Tipping point analysis of ocean acoustic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livina, Valerie N.; Brouwer, Albert; Harris, Peter; Wang, Lian; Sotirakopoulos, Kostas; Robinson, Stephen

    2018-02-01

    We apply tipping point analysis to a large record of ocean acoustic data to identify the main components of the acoustic dynamical system and study possible bifurcations and transitions of the system. The analysis is based on a statistical physics framework with stochastic modelling, where we represent the observed data as a composition of deterministic and stochastic components estimated from the data using time-series techniques. We analyse long-term and seasonal trends, system states and acoustic fluctuations to reconstruct a one-dimensional stochastic equation to approximate the acoustic dynamical system. We apply potential analysis to acoustic fluctuations and detect several changes in the system states in the past 14 years. These are most likely caused by climatic phenomena. We analyse trends in sound pressure level within different frequency bands and hypothesize a possible anthropogenic impact on the acoustic environment. The tipping point analysis framework provides insight into the structure of the acoustic data and helps identify its dynamic phenomena, correctly reproducing the probability distribution and scaling properties (power-law correlations) of the time series.

  8. Ten tips for authors of scientific articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Tae

    2014-08-01

    Writing a good quality scientific article takes experience and skill. I propose 'Ten Tips' that may help to improve the quality of manuscripts for scholarly journals. It is advisable to draft first version of manuscript and revise it repeatedly for consistency and accuracy of the writing. During the drafting and revising the following tips can be considered: 1) focus on design to have proper content, conclusion, points compliant with scope of the target journal, appropriate authors and contributors list, and relevant references from widely visible sources; 2) format the manuscript in accordance with instructions to authors of the target journal; 3) ensure consistency and logical flow of ideas and scientific facts; 4) provide scientific confidence; 5) make your story interesting for your readers; 6) write up short, simple and attractive sentences; 7) bear in mind that properly composed and reflective titles increase chances of attracting more readers; 8) do not forget that well-structured and readable abstracts improve citability of your publications; 9) when revising adhere to the rule of 'First and Last' - open your text with topic paragraph and close it with resolution paragraph; 10) use connecting words linking sentences within a paragraph by repeating relevant keywords.

  9. Aperiodicity Correction for Rotor Tip Vortex Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Manikandan; Paetzel, Ryan; Bhagwat, Mahendra J.

    2011-01-01

    The initial roll-up of a tip vortex trailing from a model-scale, hovering rotor was measured using particle image velocimetry. The unique feature of the measurements was that a microscope was attached to the camera to allow much higher spatial resolution than hitherto possible. This also posed some unique challenges. In particular, the existing methodologies to correct for aperiodicity in the tip vortex locations could not be easily extended to the present measurements. The difficulty stemmed from the inability to accurately determine the vortex center, which is a prerequisite for the correction procedure. A new method is proposed for determining the vortex center, as well as the vortex core properties, using a least-squares fit approach. This approach has the obvious advantage that the properties are derived from not just a few points near the vortex core, but from a much larger area of flow measurements. Results clearly demonstrate the advantage in the form of reduced variation in the estimated core properties, and also the self-consistent results obtained using three different aperiodicity correction methods.

  10. Tipping point analysis of ocean acoustic noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Livina

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We apply tipping point analysis to a large record of ocean acoustic data to identify the main components of the acoustic dynamical system and study possible bifurcations and transitions of the system. The analysis is based on a statistical physics framework with stochastic modelling, where we represent the observed data as a composition of deterministic and stochastic components estimated from the data using time-series techniques. We analyse long-term and seasonal trends, system states and acoustic fluctuations to reconstruct a one-dimensional stochastic equation to approximate the acoustic dynamical system. We apply potential analysis to acoustic fluctuations and detect several changes in the system states in the past 14 years. These are most likely caused by climatic phenomena. We analyse trends in sound pressure level within different frequency bands and hypothesize a possible anthropogenic impact on the acoustic environment. The tipping point analysis framework provides insight into the structure of the acoustic data and helps identify its dynamic phenomena, correctly reproducing the probability distribution and scaling properties (power-law correlations of the time series.

  11. Gravity-capillary free-surface flows

    CERN Document Server

    Vanden-Broeck, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Free surface problems occur in many aspects of science and of everyday life such as the waves on a beach, bubbles rising in a glass of champagne, melting ice, pouring flows from a container and sails billowing in the wind. Consequently, the effect of surface tension on gravity-capillary flows continues to be a fertile field of research in applied mathematics and engineering. Concentrating on applications arising from fluid dynamics, Vanden-Broeck draws upon his years of experience in the field to address the many challenges involved in attempting to describe such flows mathematically. Whilst careful numerical techniques are implemented to solve the basic equations, an emphasis is placed upon the reader developing a deep understanding of the structure of the resulting solutions. The author also reviews relevant concepts in fluid mechanics to help readers from other scientific fields who are interested in free boundary problems.

  12. Capillary pressure studies under low gravity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, V I; Ravera, F; Liggieri, L; Loglio, G; Pandolfini, P; Makievski, A V; Vincent-Bonnieu, S; Krägel, J; Javadi, A; Miller, R

    2010-12-15

    For the understanding of short-time adsorption phenomena and high-frequency relaxations at liquid interfaces particular experimental techniques are needed. The most suitable method for respective studies is the capillary pressure tensiometry. However, under gravity conditions there are rather strong limitations, in particular due to convections and interfacial deformations. This manuscript provides an overview of the state of the art of experimental tools developed for short-time and high-frequency investigations of liquid drops and bubbles under microgravity. Besides the brief description of instruments, the underlying theoretical basis will be presented and limits of the applied methods under ground and microgravity conditions will be discussed. The results on the role of surfactants under highly dynamic conditions will be demonstrated by some selected examples studied in two space shuttle missions on Discovery in 1998 and Columbia in 2003. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Chiral capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Vega, Elena; Crego, Antonio L; Marina, Maria Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) is a powerful analytical tool, especially in the case of chiral separations, due to the fact that it combines the high efficiency, short analysis time, and versatility of the CE with the sensitivity, selectivity, and the capacity for the identification of unknown chiral compounds offered by MS detection. This chapter describes three methodologies enabling the chiral separation of cationic and anionic compounds using different strategies, illustrating the most employed approaches used in chiral CE-MS. The first methodology uses the partial filling technique for the enantioseparation of a cationic compound using a neutral cyclodextrin. Secondly, the enantioseparation of a cationic compound using low concentrations of a neutral cyclodextrin under acidic conditions is described. Finally, a methodology for the chiral separation of an anionic compound employing low concentrations of a native cyclodextrin under basic conditions is illustrated.

  14. Capillary stress in microporous thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuel, J.; Hurd, A.J.; Frink, L.J.D.; Swol, F. van [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brinker, C.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Ceramic Processing Science Dept.]|[Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Micro Engineering Ceramics; Raman, N.K. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Micro Engineered Ceramics

    1996-06-01

    Development of capillary stress in porous xerogels, although ubiquitous, has not been systematically studied. The authors have used the beam bending technique to measure stress isotherms of microporous thin films prepared by a sol-gel route. The thin films were prepared on deformable silicon substrates which were then placed in a vacuum system. The automated measurement was carried out by monitoring the deflection of a laser reflected off the substrate while changing the overlying relative pressure of various solvents. The magnitude of the macroscopic bending stress was found to reach a value of 180 MPa at a relative pressure of methanol, P/Po = 0.001. The observed stress is determined by the pore size distribution and is an order of magnitude smaller in mesoporous thin films. Density Functional Theory (DFT) indicates that for the microporous materials, the stress at saturation is compressive and drops as the relative pressure is reduced.

  15. Recent Developments in Instrumentation for Capillary Electrophoresis and Microchip-Capillary Electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Felhofer, Jessica L.; Blanes, Lucas; Garcia, Carlos D.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last years there has been an explosion in the number of developments and applications of capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microchip-CE. In part, this growth has been the direct consequence of recent developments in instrumentation associated with CE. This review, which is focused on contributions published in the last five years, is intended to complement the papers presented in this special issue dedicated to Instrumentation and to provide an overview on the general trend and some...

  16. Effects of plastic anisotropy on crack-tip behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Brian Nyvang; Tvergaard, Viggo; Kuroda, Mitsutoshi

    2002-01-01

    For a crack in a homogeneous material the effect of plastic anisotropy on crack-tip blunting and on the near-tip stress and strain fields is analyzed numerically. The full finite strain analyses are carried out for plane strain under small scale yielding conditions, with purely symmetric mode I...... loading remote from the crack-tip. In cases where the principal axes of the anisotropy are inclined to the plane of the crack it is found that the plastic zones as well as the stress and strain fields just around the blunted tip of the crack become non-symmetric. In these cases the peak strain...... on the blunted tip occurs off the center line of the crack, thus indicating that the crack may want to grow in a different direction. When the anisotropic axes are parallel to the crack symmetry is retained, but the plastic zones and the near-tip fields still differ from those predicted by standard isotropic...

  17. Dynamic of cold-atom tips in anharmonic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menold, Tobias; Federsel, Peter; Rogulj, Carola; Hölscher, Hendrik; Fortágh, József

    2016-01-01

    Background: Understanding the dynamics of ultracold quantum gases in an anharmonic potential is essential for applications in the new field of cold-atom scanning probe microscopy. Therein, cold atomic ensembles are used as sensitive probe tips to investigate nanostructured surfaces and surface-near potentials, which typically cause anharmonic tip motion. Results: Besides a theoretical description of this anharmonic tip motion, we introduce a novel method for detecting the cold-atom tip dynamics in situ and real time. In agreement with theory, the first measurements show that particle interactions and anharmonic motion have a significant impact on the tip dynamics. Conclusion: Our findings will be crucial for the realization of high-sensitivity force spectroscopy with cold-atom tips and could possibly allow for the development of advanced spectroscopic techniques such as Q-control. PMID:28144505

  18. Reading Tips for Parents = Consejos practicos de lectura para los padre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Education, Washington, DC. Office of Intergovernmental and Interagency Affairs.

    This booklet for parents, in both English and Spanish, offers suggestions for helping their young children develop and improve their reading skills. The booklet first presents tips for helping infants or preschoolers be ready to read and ready to learn. Suggestions include talking to the infant or toddler, reading aloud starting at 6 months,…

  19. Integrated Solid-Phase Extraction-Capillary Liquid Chromatography (speLC) Interfaced to ESI-MS/MS for Fast Characterization and Quantification of Protein and Proteomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenby, Lasse Gaarde; Such-Sanmartín, Gerard; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2014-01-01

    The high peptide sequencing speed provided by modern hybrid tandem mass spectrometers enables the utilization of fast liquid chromatographic (LC) separation techniques. We present a robust solid-phase extraction/capillary LC system (speLC) for 5-10 min separation of semicomplex peptide mixtures...... prior to ESI-MS/MS for peptide sequencing. This speLC-MS/MS system eliminates sample-to-sample carry-over by using disposable micropipette solid-phase extraction tips (StageTips) for peptide sample loading, concentration, and desalting. Automated analysis of 192 replicates of E. coli peptide mixtures...... in 30 h demonstrated the throughput, stability, and reproducibility of the system. The speLC-MS/MS system detected low-femtomole amounts of peptides and allowed sequencing of 1 μg of HeLa cells protein extracts at a rate of ∼90 peptides/min, identifying more than 1500 peptides (>500 proteins) in a 10...

  20. Temperature-controlled irrigated tip radiofrequency catheter ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, H H; Chen, X; Pietersen, Adrian

    1998-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In patients with ventricular tachycardias due to structural heart disease, catheter ablation cures radiofrequency ablation. Irrigated tip radiofrequency ablation using power control and high infusion rates enlarges lesion......: We conclude that temperature-controlled radiofrequency ablation with irrigated tip catheters using low target temperature and low infusion rate enlarges lesion size without increasing the incidence of cratering and reduces coagulum formation of the tip....