WorldWideScience

Sample records for include breast cancer

  1. [Histopathological characteristics of genital and breast cancer included in epidemiologic study cohort].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matei, Mioara; Azoicăi, Doina

    2009-01-01

    The correct management of genitals and breast cancers and the improving of the preventional and therapeutical successes ratio involve the knowledge of the histopathological features of these nosological entities which have different origins, different risk factors, different simptomatology and also different prognosis. The descriptive evaluation of the histopathological features of the genitals and breast cancers to women from North-Eastern region of Romania. We have been included in the study 96 women (age range 23-77 years, mean 54,49) diagnosed with breast cancer, ovarian cancer, endometrial cancer and cervical cancer at the hospital admission, residency in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics within 23 months. The following main parameters were assessed: histological types, stage at diagnosis, Pap test. After data collection, these have been codified and included in a MS Excel Database, in order to be processed with SPSS 16 and EpiInfo 3.5.1. (2008) Softwares. The following cases' repartition on diagnostic types was observed: breast cancer (44 cases), cervical cancer (24 cases), endometrial cancer (16 cases) and ovarian cancer (12 cases). In our study, the most affected range of age was 40-69 years for breast cancer, 30-59 years for cervical cancer, over 6 years for endometrial cancer and 50-59 years for ovarian cancer. For the cervical neoplasia, 40% of analyzed cases were in incipient stages (in situ to IB stage lessions). More than 50% of breast cancer cases have been diagnosed in advances stages (IIB to IIIC stages). For the endometrium carcinoma, 45% of cases have been identified in incipient stages (in situ to IC). The ovarian neoplasia cases have been detected, most frequently, in advanced stages (III and IV). 25% of women which participated in our study had showed cervical changes. From a histopathological point of view, for cervical neoplasia, squamous carcinoma was the most frequent type (87%), for breast neoplasia--invasive ductal carcinoma (80

  2. Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast cancer: Breast cancer and abortion: collaborative reanalysis of data from 53 epidemiological studies, including 83000 women with breast cancer from 16 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beral, V.; Bull, D.; Doll, R.; Peto, R.; Reeves, G.; van den Brandt, P.A.; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer and abortion: collaborative reanalysis of data from 53 epidemiological studies, including 83?000 women with breast cancer from 16 countries. Beral V, Bull D, Doll R, Peto R, Reeves G; Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer. BACKGROUND: The Collaborative Group on

  3. Including Antenna Models in Microwave Imaging for Breast-Cancer Screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubæk, Tonny; Meincke, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Microwave imaging is emerging as a tool for screening for breast cancer, but the lack of methods for including the characteristics of the antennas of the imaging systems in the imaging algorithms limits their performance. In this paper, a method for incorporating the full antenna characteristics...

  4. Menarche, menopause, and breast cancer risk: Individual participant meta-analysis, including 118 964 women with breast cancer from 117 epidemiological studies

    OpenAIRE

    Hamajima, N; Hirose, K; Tajima, K; Rohan, T; Friedenreich, CM; Calle, EE; Gapstur, SM; Patel, AV; Coates, RJ; Liff, JM; Talamini, R; Chantarakul, N; Koetsawang, S; Rachawat, D; Marcou, Y

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Menarche and menopause mark the onset and cessation, respectively, of ovarian activity associated with reproduction, and affect breast cancer risk. Our aim was to assess the strengths of their effects and determine whether they depend on characteristics of the tumours or the affected women. METHODS: Individual data from 117 epidemiological studies, including 118 964 women with invasive breast cancer and 306 091 without the disease, none of whom had used menopausal hormone thera...

  5. Menarche, menopause, and breast cancer risk: individual participant meta-analysis, including 118 964 women with breast cancer from 117 epidemiological studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beral, V.; Bull, D.; Pirie, K.

    2012-01-01

    by age at menopause were stronger for oestrogen receptor-positive disease than for oestrogen receptor-negative disease (p effects of menarche and menopause on breast cancer risk might not be acting merely by lengthening women's total number of reproductive......Background Menarche and menopause mark the onset and cessation, respectively, of ovarian activity associated with reproduction, and affect breast cancer risk. Our aim was to assess the strengths of their effects and determine whether they depend on characteristics of the tumours or the affected...... women. Methods Individual data from 117 epidemiological studies, including 118 964 women with invasive breast cancer and 306 091 without the disease, none of whom had used menopausal hormone therapy, were included in the analyses. We calculated adjusted relative risks (RRs) associated with menarche...

  6. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  7. An improved technique for breast cancer irradiation including the locoregional lymph nodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurkmans, C. W.; Saarnak, A. E.; Pieters, B. R.; Borger, J. H.; Bruinvis, I. A.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To find an irradiation technique for locoregional irradiation of breast cancer patients which, compared with a standard technique, improves the dose distribution to the internal mammary-medial supraclavicular (IM-MS) lymph nodes. The improved technique is intended to minimize the lung dose

  8. Breast Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... from starting. Risk-reducing surgery . General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  9. Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  10. Stages of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  11. Breast cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  12. Breast cancer characteristics and survival differences between Maori, Pacific and other New Zealand women included in the Quality Audit program of Breast Surgeons of Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ian; Scott, Nina; Seneviratne, Sanjeewa; Kollias, James; Walters, David; Taylor, Corey; Roder, David

    2015-01-01

    The Quality Audit (BQA) program of the Breast Surgeons of Australia and New Zealand (NZ) collects data on early female breast cancer and its treatment. BQA data covered approximately half all early breast cancers diagnosed in NZ during roll-out of the BQA program in 1998-2010. Coverage increased progressively to about 80% by 2008. This is the biggest NZ breast cancer database outside the NZ Cancer Registry and it includes cancer and clinical management data not collected by the Registry. We used these BQA data to compare socio-demographic and cancer characteristics and survivals by ethnicity. BQA data for 1998-2010 diagnoses were linked to NZ death records using the National Health Index (NHI) for linking. Live cases were followed up to December 31st 2010. Socio-demographic and invasive cancer characteristics and disease-specific survivals were compared by ethnicity. Five-year survivals were 87% for Maori, 84% for Pacific, 91% for other NZ cases and 90% overall. This compared with the 86% survival reported for all female breast cases covered by the NZ Cancer Registry which also included more advanced stages. Patterns of survival by clinical risk factors accorded with patterns expected from the scientific literature. Compared with Other cases, Maori and Pacific women were younger, came from more deprived areas, and had larger cancers with more ductal and fewer lobular histology types. Their cancers were also less likely to have a triple negative phenotype. More of the Pacific women had vascular invasion. Maori women were more likely to reside in areas more remote from regional cancer centres, whereas Pacific women generally lived closer to these centres than Other NZ cases. NZ BQA data indicate previously unreported differences in breast cancer biology by ethnicity. Maori and Pacific women had reduced breast cancer survival compared with Other NZ women, after adjusting for socio-demographic and cancer characteristics. The potential contributions to survival

  13. Breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Masayoshi

    1992-01-01

    More than 20-year follow-up of A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has a crucial role in determining the relationship of radiation to the occurrence of breast cancer. In 1967, Wanebo et al have first reported 27 cases of breast cancer during the period 1950-1966 among the Adult Health Study population of A-bomb survivors. Since then, follow-up surveys for breast cancer have been made using the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort, and the incidence of breast cancer has increased year by year; that is breast cancer was identified in 231 cases by the first LSS series (1950-1969), 360 cases by the second LSS series (1950-1974), 564 cases by the third LSS series (1950-1980), and 816 cases in the fourth LSS series (1950-1085). The third LSS series have revealed a high risk for radiation-induced breast cancer in women aged 10 or less at the time of exposure (ATE). Both relative and absolute risks are found to be decreased with increasing ages ATE. Based on the above-mentioned findings and other studies on persons exposed medical radiation, radiation-induced breast cancer is characterized by the following: (1) the incidence of breast cancer is linearly increased with increasing radiation doses; (2) both relative and absolute risks for breast cancer are high in younger persons ATE; (3) age distribution of breast cancer in proximally exposed A-bomb survivors is the same as that in both distally A-bomb survivors and non-exposed persons, and there is no difference in histology between the former and latter groups. Thus, immature mammary gland cells before the age of puberty are found to be most radiosensitive. (N.K.)

  14. A collection of annotated and harmonized human breast cancer transcriptome datasets, including immunologic classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelands, Jessica; Decock, Julie; Boughorbel, Sabri; Rinchai, Darawan; Maccalli, Cristina; Ceccarelli, Michele; Black, Michael; Print, Cris; Chou, Jeff; Presnell, Scott; Quinn, Charlie; Jithesh, Puthen; Syed, Najeeb; Al Bader, Salha B J; Bedri, Shahinaz; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Chaussabel, Damien; Kuppen, Peter; Miller, Lance D; Bedognetti, Davide; Hendrickx, Wouter

    2017-01-01

    The increased application of high-throughput approaches in translational research has expanded the number of publicly available data repositories. Gathering additional valuable information contained in the datasets represents a crucial opportunity in the biomedical field. To facilitate and stimulate utilization of these datasets, we have recently developed an interactive data browsing and visualization web application, the Gene Expression Browser (GXB). In this note, we describe a curated compendium of 13 public datasets on human breast cancer, representing a total of 2142 transcriptome profiles. We classified the samples according to different immune based classification systems and integrated this information into the datasets. Annotated and harmonized datasets were uploaded to GXB. Study samples were categorized in different groups based on their immunologic tumor response profiles, intrinsic molecular subtypes and multiple clinical parameters. Ranked gene lists were generated based on relevant group comparisons. In this data note, we demonstrate the utility of GXB to evaluate the expression of a gene of interest, find differential gene expression between groups and investigate potential associations between variables with a specific focus on immunologic classification in breast cancer. This interactive resource is publicly available online at: http://breastcancer.gxbsidra.org/dm3/geneBrowser/list.

  15. Breast cancer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Cancer specialists will soon be able to compare mammograms with computerized images of breast cancer from across Europe, in a bid to improve diagnosis and treatment....The new project, known as MammoGrid, brings together computer and medical imaging experts, cancer specialists, radiologists and epidemiologists from Bristol, Oxford, Cambridge, France and Italy" (1 page).

  16. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  17. Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... modulators and aromatase inhibitors, reduce the risk of breast cancer in women with a high risk of the disease. These medications carry a risk of side effects, so doctors reserve these medications for women who ...

  18. Breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, L.; Krygier, G.; Castillo, C.

    2009-01-01

    This article is about the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of breast cancer. Positive diagnosis is based on clinical mammary exam, mammography, mammary ultrasonography, and histological study. Before the chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatment are evaluated the risks

  19. Extensions of the Rosner-Colditz breast cancer prediction model to include older women and type-specific predicted risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Robert J; Colditz, Graham A; Tamimi, Rulla M; Chen, Wendy Y; Hankinson, Susan E; Willett, Walter W; Rosner, Bernard

    2017-08-01

    A breast cancer risk prediction rule previously developed by Rosner and Colditz has reasonable predictive ability. We developed a re-fitted version of this model, based on more than twice as many cases now including women up to age 85, and further extended it to a model that distinguished risk factor prediction of tumors with different estrogen/progesterone receptor status. We compared the calibration and discriminatory ability of the original, the re-fitted, and the type-specific models. Evaluation used data from the Nurses' Health Study during the period 1980-2008, when 4384 incident invasive breast cancers occurred over 1.5 million person-years. Model development used two-thirds of study subjects and validation used one-third. Predicted risks in the validation sample from the original and re-fitted models were highly correlated (ρ = 0.93), but several parameters, notably those related to use of menopausal hormone therapy and age, had different estimates. The re-fitted model was well-calibrated and had an overall C-statistic of 0.65. The extended, type-specific model identified several risk factors with varying associations with occurrence of tumors of different receptor status. However, this extended model relative to the prediction of any breast cancer did not meaningfully reclassify women who developed breast cancer to higher risk categories, nor women remaining cancer free to lower risk categories. The re-fitted Rosner-Colditz model has applicability to risk prediction in women up to age 85, and its discrimination is not improved by consideration of varying associations across tumor subtypes.

  20. Breast cancer statistics, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, Carol; Siegel, Rebecca; Bandi, Priti; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the American Cancer Society provides an overview of female breast cancer statistics in the United States, including trends in incidence, mortality, survival, and screening. Approximately 230,480 new cases of invasive breast cancer and 39,520 breast cancer deaths are expected to occur among US women in 2011. Breast cancer incidence rates were stable among all racial/ethnic groups from 2004 to 2008. Breast cancer death rates have been declining since the early 1990s for all women except American Indians/Alaska Natives, among whom rates have remained stable. Disparities in breast cancer death rates are evident by state, socioeconomic status, and race/ethnicity. While significant declines in mortality rates were observed for 36 states and the District of Columbia over the past 10 years, rates for 14 states remained level. Analyses by county-level poverty rates showed that the decrease in mortality rates began later and was slower among women residing in poor areas. As a result, the highest breast cancer death rates shifted from the affluent areas to the poor areas in the early 1990s. Screening rates continue to be lower in poor women compared with non-poor women, despite much progress in increasing mammography utilization. In 2008, 51.4% of poor women had undergone a screening mammogram in the past 2 years compared with 72.8% of non-poor women. Encouraging patients aged 40 years and older to have annual mammography and a clinical breast examination is the single most important step that clinicians can take to reduce suffering and death from breast cancer. Clinicians should also ensure that patients at high risk of breast cancer are identified and offered appropriate screening and follow-up. Continued progress in the control of breast cancer will require sustained and increased efforts to provide high-quality screening, diagnosis, and treatment to all segments of the population. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society, Inc.

  1. Recurrent Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy you may have received after your first breast cancer diagnosis was intended to kill any cancer cells that ... age 35 at the time of their original breast cancer diagnosis, face a higher risk of recurrent breast cancer. ...

  2. Inheritance of proliferative breast disease in breast cancer kindreds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skolnick, M.H.; Cannon-Albright, L.A.; Goldgar, D.E.; Ward, J.H.; Marshall, C.J.; Schumann, G.B.; Hogle, H.; McWhorter, W.P.; Wright, E.C.; Tran, T.D.; Bishop, D.T.; Kushner, J.P.; Eyre, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have emphasized that genetic susceptibility to breast cancer is rare and is expressed primarily as premenopausal breast cancer, bilateral breast cancer, or both. Proliferative breast disease (PBD) is a significant risk factor for the development of breast cancer and appears to be a precursor lesion. PBD and breast cancer were studied in 103 women from 20 kindreds that were selected for the presence of two first degree relatives with breast cancer and in 31 control women. Physical examination, screening mammography, and four-quadrant fine-needle breast aspirates were performed. Cytologic analysis of breast aspirates revealed PBD in 35% of clinically normal female first degree relatives of breast cancer cases and in 13% of controls. Genetic analysis suggests that genetic susceptibility causes both PBD and breast cancer in these kindreds. This study supports the hypothesis that this susceptibility is responsible for a considerable portion of breast cancer, including unilateral and postmenopausal breast cancer

  3. Quality assessment of delineation and dose planning of early breast cancer patients included in the randomized Skagen Trial 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francolini, Giulio; Thomsen, Mette S; Yates, Esben S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To report on a Quality assessment (QA) of Skagen Trial 1, exploring hypofractionation for breast cancer patients with indication for regional nodal radiotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Deviations from protocol regarding target volume delineations and dose parameters (Dmin...

  4. Breast Cancer -- Male

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  5. Breast Cancer Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  6. Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  7. Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves ... a link to this page included, e.g., “Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves ...

  8. Breast Cancer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  9. Breast cancer in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Iris; Lindsay, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer is defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or in the first postpartum year. Breast cancer is one of the more common malignancies to occur during pregnancy and, as more women delay childbearing, the incidence of breast cancer in pregnancy is expected to increase. This article provides an overview of diagnosis, staging, and treatment of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. Recommendations for management of breast cancer in pregnancy are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  11. General Information about Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  12. Breast-feeding after breast cancer in childbearing women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camune, Barbara; Gabzdyl, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    According to the American Cancer Society in 2007, about 178,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year in the United States. Of these, 25% have tumors in their childbearing years and may desire future opportunities for pregnancy and lactation. Although there is a multitude of options related to preserving fertility, little is known about the residual effects of breast cancer treatment and the ability to breast-feed afterward. This article describes the epidemiological relationship between breast cancer and pregnancy and lactation. Basic types of treatment for breast cancer including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation are reviewed. Practical information on how to support breast-feeding after breast cancer is included.

  13. Breast Cancer Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  14. Breast cancer screening in Korean woman with dense breast tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Eun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ann [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Asian women, including Korean, have a relatively higher incidence of dense breast tissue, compared with western women. Dense breast tissue has a lower sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer and a higher relative risk for breast cancer, compared with fatty breast tissue. Thus, there were limitations in the mammographic screening for women with dense breast tissue, and many studies for the supplemental screening methods. This review included appropriate screening methods for Korean women with dense breasts. We also reviewed the application and limitation of supplemental screening methods, including breast ultrasound, digital breast tomosynthesis, and breast magnetic resonance imaging; and furthermore investigated the guidelines, as well as the study results.

  15. Breast cancer screening in Korean woman with dense breast tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hee Jung; Ko, Eun Sook; Yi, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Asian women, including Korean, have a relatively higher incidence of dense breast tissue, compared with western women. Dense breast tissue has a lower sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer and a higher relative risk for breast cancer, compared with fatty breast tissue. Thus, there were limitations in the mammographic screening for women with dense breast tissue, and many studies for the supplemental screening methods. This review included appropriate screening methods for Korean women with dense breasts. We also reviewed the application and limitation of supplemental screening methods, including breast ultrasound, digital breast tomosynthesis, and breast magnetic resonance imaging; and furthermore investigated the guidelines, as well as the study results

  16. Breast cancer in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in situ - male; Intraductal carcinoma - male; Inflammatory breast cancer - male; Paget disease of the nipple - male; Breast cancer - male ... The cause of breast cancer in men is not clear. But there are risk factors that make breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to ...

  17. [Atypical onset of therapy-related acute promyelocytic leukemia after combined modality therapy including (89)Sr for metastatic breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsu, Yoshikazu; Aotsuka, Nobuyuki; Masuda, Shinichi; Matsuura, Yasuhiro; Wakita, Hisashi

    2013-08-01

    A 51-year-old woman diagnosed as having left breast cancer with axillary lymph node and liver metastases seven years earlier was seen in our office because of severe pancytopenia. She had received chemotherapy including several cycles of doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide and docetaxel followed by hormone therapy containing leuprorelin and tamoxifen over four years. For management of bone pain due to metastasis, she had also undergone stereotaxic radiation therapy of the neck one and a half years earlier and unsealed internal radiation therapy with (89)Sr injection five months prior to the current presentation, Subsequently, myelosuppression progressively worsened and she finally required a blood transfusion. Although bone marrow examination showed severe hypoplasia, but neither blastic nor dysplastic, a test for PML-RARA fluorescence in situ hybridization was positive. After administration of all-trans retinoic acid, hematogenesis improved within three weeks. Neither disseminated intravascular coagulation nor retinoic acid syndrome was observed during the course of her illness. This is the first report describing acute promyelocytic leukemia after administration of (89)Sr, to our knowledge, and with an atypical onset and progression. As the number of cancer survivors increases due to improvements in medical intervention, clinicians must take more notice of special characteristics of therapy-related leukemia modified by previous treatments.

  18. [Pregnancy and breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Torres, Nicolás; Asbun-Bojalil, Juan; Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino

    2013-01-01

    association of breast cancer and pregnancy is not common. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the pregnancy, young age, stage, treatment, prognosis and mortality of women with breast cancer during pregnancy. retrospective analysis from March 1992 to February 2009, 16 patients were included with breast cancer and pregnancy. They were analized: histological characteristic of tumor, therapeutic response of the oncological treatment, evolution of the pregnancy. From of baby born: Apgar and weight. The woman's mortality with breast cancer during pregnancy was evaluated for age group and for interval of time between late pregnancy and diagnosis posterior of breast cancer and pregnancy. characteristic predominant clinicohistological: stage III (81.2%), T3-T4 (75%), N+ 93.7%, invasive ductal carcinoma (87.5%), histological grade 2-3 (93.7%), receptor estrogeno positive (43.7%); RPpositive (25%); HER-2/neu positive (31.2%). 27 chemotherapy cycles were applied with 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin and cyclophosphamide during the second or third trimester of the pregnancy, there were not severe adverse effects for the mothers and the baby born exposed to chemotherapy. The mean time to disease recurrence was 18.8 months (range, 6-62 months). The rate of mortality for specific age (breast cancer and pregnancy.

  19. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, James S., E-mail: james.lawson@unsw.edu.au; Heng, Benjamin [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    2010-04-30

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix.

  20. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix

  1. Mortality and recurrence rates among systemically untreated high risk breast cancer patients included in the DBCG 77 trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maj Britt; Nielsen, Torsten O.; Knoop, Ann S.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Following loco-regional treatment for early breast cancer accurate prognostication is essential for communicating benefits of systemic treatment. The aim of this study was to determine time to recurrence and long-term mortality rates in high risk patients according to patient characte......Background: Following loco-regional treatment for early breast cancer accurate prognostication is essential for communicating benefits of systemic treatment. The aim of this study was to determine time to recurrence and long-term mortality rates in high risk patients according to patient...... and EGFR positive. Multivariate categorical and fractional polynomials (MFP) models were used to construct prognostic subsets by clinicopathologic characteristics. Results: In a multivariate model, mortality rate was significantly associated with age, tumor size, nodal status, invasion, histological type...

  2. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  3. Olaparib In Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-17

    Metastatic Breast Cancer; Invasive Breast Cancer; Somatic Mutation Breast Cancer (BRCA1); Somatic Mutation Breast Cancer (BRCA2); CHEK2 Gene Mutation; ATM Gene Mutation; PALB2 Gene Mutation; RAD51 Gene Mutation; BRIP1 Gene Mutation; NBN Gene Mutation

  4. Immunotherapy of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criscitiello, Carmen; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunoediting is the process by which the immune system protects the host from tumor development and guides the somatic evolution of tumors by eliminating highly immunogenic tumor cells. A fundamental dogma of tumor immunology and of cancer immunosurveillance in particular is that cancer cells express antigens that differentiate them from their nontransformed counterparts. Molecular studies clearly show that these antigens were often products of mutated cellular genes, aberrantly expressed normal genes, or genes encoding viral proteins. There is a strict correlation between genetic instability and the immune landscape of a breast cancer. Mutational heterogeneity in breast cancer is associated with new cancer-associated genes and new cancer antigens. Frequencies of somatic mutations or mutational burden can be related to the immunogenicity of breast cancer. We believe that molecular subtypes of breast cancer that are triple negative, luminal B-like or HER2-positive have a high mutational burden and can be considered immunogenic. The increasing knowledge of the immune system's capacity to not only recognize and destroy cancer, but also to shape cancer immunogenicity will develop more informed attempts to control cancer via immunological approaches. To be effective in breast cancer, immunotherapies will have to increase the quality or quantity of immune effector cells, reveal additional protective tumor antigens, and/or eliminate cancer-induced immunosuppressive mechanisms. Multiple immunotherapy approaches are under investigation in patients with breast cancer. These include vaccine approaches to elicit strong specific immune responses to tumor antigens such as WT-1, HER2 and NY-ESO-1, approaches involving adoptive transfer of in vitro-expanded, naturally arising or genetically engineered tumor-specific lymphocytes, therapeutic administration of monoclonal antibodies to target and eliminate tumor cells, and approaches that inhibit or destroy the molecular or

  5. Proteomic classification of breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamel, Dalia

    2012-11-01

    Being a significant health problem that affects patients in various age groups, breast cancer has been extensively studied to date. Recently, molecular breast cancer classification has advanced significantly with the availability of genomic profiling technologies. Proteomic technologies have also advanced from traditional protein assays including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry to more comprehensive approaches including mass spectrometry and reverse phase protein lysate arrays (RPPA). The purpose of this manuscript is to review the current protein markers that influence breast cancer prediction and prognosis and to focus on novel advances in proteomic classification of breast cancer.

  6. Breast cancer and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knabben, Laura; Mueller, Michel D

    2017-08-29

    Background In the past decades the incidence of pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) increased. Possible explanations are the trend to postpone childbearing and the general increase in the incidence of breast cancer. Materials and methods A sytematic review of the literature was performed with the aim to report on incidence, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of breast cancer during pregnancy. We also cover the issue of pregnancy following a diagnosis of breast cancer including fertility preservation and prognosis. Results Ultrasound is the imaging method of choice in pregnancy, but mammography can also be performed as the fetal irradiation dose is low. To avoid a delay in diagnosis every sonographic mass in pregnant women which does not clearly correspond to a cyst needs further investigation by biopsy. Treatment should follow as close as possible the guidelines for non-pregnant patients. Administration of chemotherapy is possible after the first trimester. There is a large body of evidence for the use of anthracyclines. In contrast radiotherapy, trastuzumab and antihormonal treatment by tamoxifen are contraindicated during pregnancy. Pregnancy does not seem to influence prognosis. Most adverse obstetric outcomes are related to preterm delivery, which should therefore, whenever possible, be avoided. Young patients with breast cancer and incomplete family planning should be referred for counseling about fertility preservation options before the initiation of adjuvant treatment. A pregnancy following breast cancer does not have a negative impact on prognosis. Conclusion Multidisciplinary management of women with breast cancer in pregnancy is mandatory and data should be collected to allow further improvement in management.

  7. Tamoxifen for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Karn

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the common cancers. Hormonal therapy along with surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted therapy are vital modalities for the management of breast cancer. Tamoxifen has been the most widely used hormonal therapy for more than two decades. In this article we review the benefits, dose, duration and timing of Tamoxifen therapy in patients with breast cancer. Keywords: breast cancer, hormonal therapy, tamoxifen.

  8. The inflammatory/cancer-related IL-6/STAT3/NF-κB positive feedback loop includes AUF1 and maintains the active state of breast myofibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrayani, Siti-Fauziah; Al-Harbi, Bothaina; Al-Ansari, Mysoon M; Silva, Gabriela; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2016-07-05

    The IL-6/STAT3/NF-κB positive feedback loop links inflammation to cancer and maintains cells at a transformed state. Similarly, cancer-associated myofibroblats remains active even in absence of cancer cells. However, the molecular basis of this sustained active state remains elusive. We have shown here that breast cancer cells and IL-6 persistently activate breast stromal fibroblasts through the stimulation of the positive IL-6/STAT3/NF-κB feedback loop. Transient neutralization of IL-6 in culture inhibited this signaling circuit and reverted myofibrobalsts to a normalized state, suggesting the implication of the IL-6 autocrine feedback loop as well. Importantly, the IL-6/STAT3/NF-κB pro-inflammatory circuit was also active in cancer-associated fibroblasts isolated from breast cancer patients. Transient inhibition of STAT3 by specific siRNA in active fibroblasts persistently reduced the level of the RNA binding protein AUF1, blocked the loop and normalized these cells. Moreover, we present clear evidence that AUF1 is also part of this positive feedback loop. Interestingly, treatment of breast myofibroblasts with caffeine, which has been previously shown to persistently inhibit active breast stromal fibroblasts, blocked the positive feedback loop through potent and sustained inhibition of STAT3, AKT, lin28B and AUF1. These results indicate that the IL-6/STAT3/NF-κB positive feedback loop includes AUF1 and is responsible for the sustained active status of cancer-associated fibroblasts. We have also shown that normalizing myofibroblasts, which could be of great therapeutic value, is possible through the inhibition of this procarcinogenic circuit.

  9. How reassuring is a normal breast ultrasound in assessment of a screen-detected mammographic abnormality? A review of interval cancers after assessment that included ultrasound evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, M.L.; Welman, C.J.; Celliers, L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To review factors resulting in a false-negative outcome or delayed cancer diagnosis in women recalled for further evaluation, including ultrasound, after an abnormal screening mammogram. Materials and methods: Of 646,692 screening mammograms performed between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2004, 34,533 women were recalled for further assessment. Nine hundred and sixty-four interval cancers were reported in this period. Forty-six of these women had been recalled for further assessment, which specifically included ultrasound evaluation in the preceding 24 months, and therefore, met the inclusion criteria for this study. Screening mammograms, further mammographic views, ultrasound scans, clinical findings, and histopathology results were retrospectively reviewed by two consultant breast radiologists. Results: The interval cancer developed in the contralateral breast (n = 9), ipsilateral breast, but different site (n = 6), and ipsilateral breast at the same site (n = 31) as the abnormality for which they had recently been recalled. In the latter group, 10 were retrospectively classified as a false-negative outcome, nine had a delay in obtaining a biopsy, and 12 had a delay due to a non-diagnostic initial biopsy. Various factors relating to these outcomes are discussed. Conclusion: Out of 34,533 women who attended for an assessment visit and the 46 women who subsequently developed an interval breast cancer, 15 were true interval cancers, 10 had a false-negative assessment outcome, and 21 had a delay to cancer diagnosis on the basis of a number of factors. When there is discrepancy between the imaging and histopathology results, a repeat biopsy rather than early follow-up would have avoided a delay in some cases. A normal ultrasound examination should not deter the radiologist from proceeding to stereotactic biopsy, if the index mammographic lesion is suspicious of malignancy.

  10. Unemployment among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Kathrine; Ewertz, Marianne; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Badsberg, Jens Henrik; Osler, Merete

    2014-05-01

    Though about 20% of working age breast cancer survivors do not return to work after treatment, few studies have addressed risk factors for unemployment. The majority of studies on occupational consequences of breast cancer focus on non-employment, which is a mixture of sickness absence, unemployment, retirement pensions and other reasons for not working. Unemployment in combination with breast cancer may represent a particular challenge for these women. The aim of the present study is therefore to analyze the risk for unemployment in the years following diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer. This study included 14,750 women diagnosed with breast cancer in Denmark 2001-2009 identified through a population-based clinical database and linked with information from Danish administrative population based registers for information on labour market affiliation, socio-demography and co-morbid conditions. Multivariable analyses were performed by Cox's proportional hazard models. Two years after treatment, 81% of patients were still part of the work force, 10% of which were unemployed. Increasing duration of unemployment before breast cancer was associated with an adjusted HR = 4.37 (95% CI: 3.90-4.90) for unemployment after breast cancer. Other risk factors for unemployment included low socioeconomic status and demography, while adjuvant therapy did not increase the risk of unemployment. Duration of unemployment before breast cancer was the most important determinant of unemployment after breast cancer treatment. This allows identification of a particularly vulnerable group of patients in need of rehabilitation.

  11. HEREDITARY BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Bit-Sava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast cancer occurs in 5–20 % of cases and it is associated with inherited mutations in particular genes, such as BRCA1 и BRCA2 in most cases. The CHEK2, PTEN, TP53, ATM, RAD51, BLM, PALB2, Nbs genes are associated with low and median risks ofdeveloping breast cancer. Molecular genetic studies identify germinal mutations underlying hereditary breast cancer. In most cases hereditary breast cancer refers to triple-negative phenotype, which is the most aggressive type of breast cancer, that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. The review presents the diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer. Clinical-morphological aspects allow the new diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer to be identified. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors demonstrate the potential for effective treatment of BRCA-associated breast cancer.

  12. Breast cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  13. Breast Cancer and Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guluzar Arzu Turan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women and may accompany infertility. The relationship between infertility treatment and breast cancer has not yet been proven. However, estrogen exposure is well known to cause breast cancer. Recent advances in treatment options have provided young patients with breast cancer a chance of being mother [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(3.000: 317-323

  14. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Breast Cancer KidsHealth / For Kids / Breast Cancer What's in this ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  15. Radioisotope techniques used in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auyong Tingkun

    2001-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the commonest cancer in women. Treatment and prognosis of breast cancer depend very much on accurate diagnosis, staging and follow-up of patients. Recently, there are several radioisotope techniques developed and have great impact on management of breast cancer. These include scintimammography, sentinel lymph node detection and positron emission tomography. This article is to review these important techniques

  16. A collection of annotated and harmonized human breast cancer transcriptome datasets, including immunologic classification [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Roelands

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The increased application of high-throughput approaches in translational research has expanded the number of publicly available data repositories. Gathering additional valuable information contained in the datasets represents a crucial opportunity in the biomedical field. To facilitate and stimulate utilization of these datasets, we have recently developed an interactive data browsing and visualization web application, the Gene Expression Browser (GXB. In this note, we describe a curated compendium of 13 public datasets on human breast cancer, representing a total of 2142 transcriptome profiles. We classified the samples according to different immune based classification systems and integrated this information into the datasets. Annotated and harmonized datasets were uploaded to GXB. Study samples were categorized in different groups based on their immunologic tumor response profiles, intrinsic molecular subtypes and multiple clinical parameters. Ranked gene lists were generated based on relevant group comparisons. In this data note, we demonstrate the utility of GXB to evaluate the expression of a gene of interest, find differential gene expression between groups and investigate potential associations between variables with a specific focus on immunologic classification in breast cancer. This interactive resource is publicly available online at: http://breastcancer.gxbsidra.org/dm3/geneBrowser/list.

  17. Breast asymmetry and predisposition to breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Scutt, Diane; Lancaster, Gillian A; Manning, John T

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: It has been shown in our previous work that breast asymmetry is related to several of the known risk factors for breast cancer, and that patients with diagnosed breast cancer have more breast volume asymmetry, as measured from mammograms, than age-matched healthy women. METHODS: In the present study, we compared the breast asymmetry of women who were free of breast disease at time of mammography, but who had subsequently developed breast cancer, with that of age-matched healthy ...

  18. What You Need to Know about Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Breast Cancer This booklet is about breast cancer. Learning about your cancer can help you take ... This booklet covers: Basics about breast anatomy and breast cancer Treatments for breast cancer, including taking part in ...

  19. Markers of breast cancer stromal fibroblasts in the primary tumour site associated with lymph node metastasis : a systematic review including our case series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azevedo Koike Folgueira, Maria Aparecida; Maistro, Simone; Hirata Katayama, Maria Lucia; Roela, Rosimeire Aparecida; Lopes Mundim, Fiorita Gonzales; Nanogaki, Suely; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Brentani, M. Mitzi

    2013-01-01

    CAFs (cancer-associated fibroblasts), the most abundant cell type in breast cancer stroma, produce a plethora of chemokines, growth factors and ECM (extracellular matrix) proteins, that may contribute to dissemination and metastasis. Axillary nodes are the first metastatic site in breast cancer;

  20. Breast cancer detection using double reading of unenhanced MRI including T1-weighted, T2-weighted STIR, and diffusion-weighted imaging: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimboli, Rubina M; Verardi, Nicola; Cartia, Francesco; Carbonaro, Luca A; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance of unenhanced MRI in detecting breast cancer and to assess the impact of double reading. A total of 116 breasts of 67 women who were 36-89 years old were studied at 1.5 T using an unenhanced protocol including axial T1-weighted gradient-echo, T2-weighted STIR, and echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Two blinded readers (R1 and R2) independently evaluated unenhanced images using the BIRADS scale. A combination of pathology and negative follow-up served as the reference standard. McNemar and kappa statistics were used. Per-breast cancer prevalence was 37 of 116 (32%): 30 of 37 (81%) invasive ductal carcinoma, five of 37 (13%) ductal carcinoma in situ, and two of 37 (6%) invasive lobular carcinoma. Per-breast sensitivity of unenhanced MRI was 29 of 37 (78%) for R1, 28 of 37 (76%) for R2, and 29 of 37 (78%) for double reading. Specificity was 71 of 79 (90%) for both R1 and R2 and 69 of 79 (87%) for double reading. Double reading did not provide a significant increase in sensitivity. Interobserver agreement was almost perfect (Cohen κ = 0.873). An unenhanced breast MRI protocol composed of T1-weighted gradient echo, T2-weighted STIR, and echo-planar DWI enabled breast cancer detection with sensitivity of 76-78% and specificity of 90% without a gain in sensitivity from double reading.

  1. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... incidence of breast cancer subtypes by race/ethnicity, poverty, and state. Journal of the National Cancer Institute ... PubMed Abstract] Tamoxifen for early breast cancer: an overview of the randomised trials. Early Breast Cancer Trialists’ ...

  2. NIH study confirms risk factors for male breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooled data from studies of about 2,400 men with breast cancer and 52,000 men without breast cancer confirmed that risk factors for male breast cancer include obesity, a rare genetic condition called Klinefelter syndrome, and gynecomastia.

  3. Rate of Clinical Complete Response for 1 Year or More in Bone-Metastatic Breast Cancer after Comprehensive Treatments including Autologous Formalin-Fixed Tumor Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranishi, Fumito; Imaoka, Yuki; Sumi, Yuusuke; Uemae, Yoji; Yasuda-Kurihara, Hiroko; Ishihara, Takeshi; Miyazaki, Tsubasa; Ohno, Tadao

    2018-01-01

    No effective treatment has been developed for bone-metastatic breast cancer. We found 3 cases with clinical complete response (cCR) of the bone metastasis and longer overall survival of the retrospectively examined cohort treated comprehensively including autologous formalin-fixed tumor vaccine (AFTV). AFTV was prepared individually for each patient from their own formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissues. Three patients maintained cCR status of the bone metastasis for 17 months or more. Rate of cCR for 1 year or more appeared to be 15% (3/20) after comprehensive treatments including AFTV. The median overall survival time (60.0 months) and the 3- to 8-year survival rates after diagnosis of bone metastasis were greater than those of historical control cohorts in Japan (1988-2002) and in the nationwide population-based cohort study of Denmark (1999-2007). Bone-metastatic breast cancer may be curable after comprehensive treatments including AFTV, although larger scale clinical trial is required.

  4. Rate of Clinical Complete Response for 1 Year or More in Bone-Metastatic Breast Cancer after Comprehensive Treatments including Autologous Formalin-Fixed Tumor Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumito Kuranishi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. No effective treatment has been developed for bone-metastatic breast cancer. We found 3 cases with clinical complete response (cCR of the bone metastasis and longer overall survival of the retrospectively examined cohort treated comprehensively including autologous formalin-fixed tumor vaccine (AFTV. Patients and Methods. AFTV was prepared individually for each patient from their own formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissues. Results. Three patients maintained cCR status of the bone metastasis for 17 months or more. Rate of cCR for 1 year or more appeared to be 15% (3/20 after comprehensive treatments including AFTV. The median overall survival time (60.0 months and the 3- to 8-year survival rates after diagnosis of bone metastasis were greater than those of historical control cohorts in Japan (1988–2002 and in the nationwide population-based cohort study of Denmark (1999–2007. Conclusion. Bone-metastatic breast cancer may be curable after comprehensive treatments including AFTV, although larger scale clinical trial is required.

  5. Contralateral breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients with family history of breast cancer is associated with a 15.4% probability of simultaneous ... second breast is the history of having had cancer in the opposite breast. 5' 15 The important factors that point to ... contralateral mirror image biopsy at the time of definitive surgery as a means of detecting an occult second ...

  6. Statins and breast cancer prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahern, T. P.; Lash, T. L.; Damkier, P.

    2014-01-01

    Much preclinical and epidemiological evidence supports the anticancer effects of statins. Epidemiological evidence does not suggest an association between statin use and reduced incidence of breast cancer, but does support a protective effect of statins-especially simvastatin-on breast cancer...... recurrence. Here, we argue that the existing evidence base is sufficient to justify a clinical trial of breast cancer adjuvant therapy with statins and we advocate for such a trial to be initiated without delay. If a protective effect of statins on breast cancer recurrence is supported by trial evidence......, then the indications for a safe, well tolerated, and inexpensive treatment can be expanded to improve outcomes for breast cancer survivors. We discuss several trial design opportunities-including candidate predictive biomarkers of statin safety and efficacy-and off er solutions to the key challenges involved...

  7. Unemployment among breast cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Kathrine; Ewertz, Marianne; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Though about 20% of working age breast cancer survivors do not return to work after treatment, few studies have addressed risk factors for unemployment. The majority of studies on occupational consequences of breast cancer focus on non-employment, which is a mixture of sickness absence......, unemployment, retirement pensions and other reasons for not working. Unemployment in combination with breast cancer may represent a particular challenge for these women. The aim of the present study is therefore to analyze the risk for unemployment in the years following diagnosis and treatment for breast...... cancer. METHOD: This study included 14,750 women diagnosed with breast cancer in Denmark 2001-2009 identified through a population-based clinical database and linked with information from Danish administrative population based registers for information on labour market affiliation, socio...

  8. Awareness and current knowledge of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mehwish; Daniyal, Muhammad; Khan, Asmat Ullah

    2017-10-02

    Breast cancer remains a worldwide public health dilemma and is currently the most common tumour in the globe. Awareness of breast cancer, public attentiveness, and advancement in breast imaging has made a positive impact on recognition and screening of breast cancer. Breast cancer is life-threatening disease in females and the leading cause of mortality among women population. For the previous two decades, studies related to the breast cancer has guided to astonishing advancement in our understanding of the breast cancer, resulting in further proficient treatments. Amongst all the malignant diseases, breast cancer is considered as one of the leading cause of death in post menopausal women accounting for 23% of all cancer deaths. It is a global issue now, but still it is diagnosed in their advanced stages due to the negligence of women regarding the self inspection and clinical examination of the breast. This review addresses anatomy of the breast, risk factors, epidemiology of breast cancer, pathogenesis of breast cancer, stages of breast cancer, diagnostic investigations and treatment including chemotherapy, surgery, targeted therapies, hormone replacement therapy, radiation therapy, complementary therapies, gene therapy and stem-cell therapy etc for breast cancer.

  9. Awareness and current knowledge of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Akram

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Breast cancer remains a worldwide public health dilemma and is currently the most common tumour in the globe. Awareness of breast cancer, public attentiveness, and advancement in breast imaging has made a positive impact on recognition and screening of breast cancer. Breast cancer is life-threatening disease in females and the leading cause of mortality among women population. For the previous two decades, studies related to the breast cancer has guided to astonishing advancement in our understanding of the breast cancer, resulting in further proficient treatments. Amongst all the malignant diseases, breast cancer is considered as one of the leading cause of death in post menopausal women accounting for 23% of all cancer deaths. It is a global issue now, but still it is diagnosed in their advanced stages due to the negligence of women regarding the self inspection and clinical examination of the breast. This review addresses anatomy of the breast, risk factors, epidemiology of breast cancer, pathogenesis of breast cancer, stages of breast cancer, diagnostic investigations and treatment including chemotherapy, surgery, targeted therapies, hormone replacement therapy, radiation therapy, complementary therapies, gene therapy and stem-cell therapy etc for breast cancer.

  10. Breast Cancer - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Expand Section Breast Biopsy - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Breast Cancer - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual ...

  11. Risk of second non-breast cancer among patients treated with and without postoperative radiotherapy for primary breast cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis of population-based studies including 522,739 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grantzau, Trine; Overgaard, Jens

    2016-01-01

    of the general female population. From each study the SIRs were extracted and then pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. SIRs were pooled as an overall estimate and according to time since breast cancer diagnosis. RESULTS: 22 studies were eligible for inclusion, comprising 245,575 irradiated and 277,164 non......, thyroid and connective tissues progressively increased over time, peaking at 10-15years following breast cancer diagnosis. Summary estimates at ⩾15years after breast cancer irradiation were 1.91 for lung, 2.71 for esophagus, 3.15 for thyroid and 6.54 at ⩾10years for second sarcomas. Non...

  12. [Breast cancer surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Georges; Berclaz, Gilles; Langer, Igor; Pittet-Cuenod, Brigitte; Delaloye, Jean-François

    2007-10-24

    Breast conserving surgery followed by radiation therapy is the treatment of choice for early breast cancer. For patients who choice or need a mastectomy, breast reconstruction provides an acceptable alternative. Breast cancer surgery has been evolving through minimally invasive approaches. Sentinel node biopsy has already remplaced axillary lymph node dissection in the evaluation of the axilla. Local ablation of the tumor may be a valuable alternative to surgery in the future.

  13. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  14. Radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boljesikova, E.; Ligacova, A.

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of breast carcinoma, reduces local recurrences about 20% (after breast conserving surgery or mastectomy), reduces 15 y mortality for cancer about 5%. The irradiation volumes can cover whole breast ± boost, partial breast, chest wall and regional lymph nodes. In contribution are analysed indications of radiotherapy, radiation techniques with focus on new trends, altered fractionation, partial breast irradiation and toxicity. (author)

  15. Propranolol and survival from breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardwell, Chris R; Pottegård, Anton; Vaes, Evelien

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preclinical studies have demonstrated that propranolol inhibits several pathways involved in breast cancer progression and metastasis. We investigated whether breast cancer patients who used propranolol, or other non-selective beta-blockers, had reduced breast cancer-specific or all......-cause mortality in eight European cohorts. METHODS: Incident breast cancer patients were identified from eight cancer registries and compiled through the European Cancer Pharmacoepidemiology Network. Propranolol and non-selective beta-blocker use was ascertained for each patient. Breast cancer-specific and all......-analysis techniques. Dose-response analyses by number of prescriptions were also performed. Analyses were repeated investigating propranolol use before cancer diagnosis. RESULTS: The combined study population included 55,252 and 133,251 breast cancer patients in the analysis of breast cancer-specific and all...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Breast cancer Breast cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  17. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menopause Map Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July 2010 Download PDFs English ... G. Komen Foundation What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  18. Breast Cancer Screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altaf, Fadwa J.

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer is a very common health problem in Saudi females that can be reduced by early detection through introducing breast cancer screening. Literature review reveals significant reduction in breast cancer incidence and outcome after the beginning of breast cancer screening. The objectives of this article are to highlight the significance of breast cancer screening in different international societies and to write the major guidelines of breast cancer screening in relation to other departments involved with more emphasis on the Pathology Department guidelines in tissue handling, diagnostic criteria and significance of the diagnosis. This article summaries and acknowledges major work carried out before, and recommends similar modified work in order to meet the requirement for the Saudi society. (author)

  19. Breast cancer predisposition syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemel, Deborah; Domchek, Susan M

    2010-10-01

    A small, but important, percentage of breast cancer cases is caused by the inheritance of a single copy of a mutated gene. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the genes most commonly associated with inherited breast cancer; however, mutations in TP53 and PTEN cause Li-Fraumeni syndrome and Cowden syndrome, respectively, both of which are associated with high lifetime risks of breast cancer. Advances in the field of breast cancer genetics have led to an improved understanding of detection and prevention strategies. More recently, strategies to target the underlying genetic defects in BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated breast and ovarian cancers are emerging and may have implications for certain types of sporadic breast cancer. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Neuroendocrine breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, Susana; Esteves, Joana; Costa, Sílvia; Vale, Sílvio; Maciel, Jorge

    2012-08-13

    Neuroendocrine breast cancer is thought to account for about 1% of all breast cancers. This rare type of breast malignancy is more common in older women and presents as a low-grade, slow-growing cancer. The most definitive markers that indicate neuroendocrine carcinoma are the presence of chromogranin, synaptophysin or neuron-specific enolase, in at least 50% of malignant tumour cells. The authors present a case report of an 83-year-old woman, admitted to their institution with right breast lump. Physical examination, mammography and ultrasonography showed a 2.4 cm nodule, probably a benign lesion (BI-RADS 3). A fine needle aspiration biopsy was performed and revealed proliferative epithelial papillary lesion. She was submitted to excisional biopsy and histology showed endocrine breast cancer well differentiated (G1). Immunohistochemically, tumour cells were positive for synaptophysin. These breast cancers are characterised for their excellent prognosis and conservative treatment is almost always enough to obtain patient cure.

  1. An update on inflammatory breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Thapaliya

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory breast cancer is one of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer. Once considered to be a uniformly fatal disease, treatment of this entity has evolved significantly over the last two decades. In this article, we review the epidemiology, pathology, biologic underpinnings, radiologic advances, and treatment modalities for inflammatory breast cancer. Updates in surgical therapy, medical oncologic therapy and radiation therapy are reviewed. Emphasis is on cutting edge information regarding inflammatory breast cancer. The management of inflammatory breast cancer is best served by a multidisciplinary team. Continued research into molecular pathways and potential targets is imperative. Future clinical trials should include evaluation of conventional therapy with targeted therapies.

  2. PET scan for breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radioactive substance (called a tracer) to look for breast cancer. This tracer can help identify areas of cancer ... only after a woman has been diagnosed with breast cancer. It is done to see if the cancer ...

  3. Contralateral breast cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unnithan, Jaya; Macklis, Roger M.

    2001-01-01

    The use of breast-conserving treatment approaches for breast cancer has now become a standard option for early stage disease. Numerous randomized studies have shown medical equivalence when mastectomy is compared to lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy for the local management of this common problem. With an increased emphasis on patient involvement in the therapeutic decision making process, it is important to identify and quantify any unforeseen risks of the conservation approach. One concern that has been raised is the question of radiation- related contralateral breast cancer after breast radiotherapy. Although most studies do not show statistically significant evidence that patients treated with breast radiotherapy are at increased risk of developing contralateral breast cancer when compared to control groups treated with mastectomy alone, there are clear data showing the amount of scattered radiation absorbed by the contralateral breast during a routine course of breast radiotherapy is considerable (several Gy) and is therefore within the range where one might be concerned about radiogenic contralateral tumors. While radiation related risks of contralateral breast cancer appear to be small enough to be statistically insignificant for the majority of patients, there may exist a smaller subset which, for genetic or environmental reasons, is at special risk for scatter related second tumors. If such a group could be predicted, it would seem appropriate to offer either special counselling or special prevention procedures aimed at mitigating this second tumor risk. The use of genetic testing, detailed analysis of breast cancer family history, and the identification of patients who acquired their first breast cancer at a very early age may all be candidate screening procedures useful in identifying such at- risk groups. Since some risk mitigation strategies are convenient and easy to utilize, it makes sense to follow the classic 'ALARA' (as low as reasonably

  4. Male breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lautrup, Marianne D; Thorup, Signe S; Jensen, Vibeke

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Describe prognostic parameters of Danish male breast cancer patients (MBCP) diagnosed from 1980–2009. Determine all-cause mortality compared to the general male population and analyze survival/mortality compared with Danish female breast cancer patients (FBCP) in the same period...

  5. Breast cancer and HIV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intuition might dictate that the outcome of both surgical and adjuvant treatment of breast cancer in these patients would be poor because of the effect on immunity. We recently published a prospective cohort study which compared the treatment outcomes of breast cancer in HIV- infected and -uninfected patients.3 This was ...

  6. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  7. Progesterone Receptor Scaffolding Function in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    response. PR are expressed in multiple human tissues including the uterus, mammary gland , brain, pancreas, thymus , bone, ovary, testes, and in the...ABSTRACT Progesterone receptors (PR) are critical mediators of mammary gland development and contribute to breast cancer progression. Progestin...receptors (PR) are critical for massive breast epithelial cell expansion during mammary gland development and contribute to breast cancer progression

  8. Height and Breast Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ben; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Delahanty, Ryan J

    2015-01-01

    -analysis to investigate associations between height and breast cancer risk using data from 159 prospective cohorts totaling 5216302 women, including 113178 events. In a consortium with individual-level data from 46325 case patients and 42482 control patients, we conducted a Mendelian randomization analysis using...... a genetic score that comprised 168 height-associated variants as an instrument. This association was further evaluated in a second consortium using summary statistics data from 16003 case patients and 41335 control patients. RESULTS: The pooled relative risk of breast cancer was 1.17 (95% confidence......BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have linked adult height with breast cancer risk in women. However, the magnitude of the association, particularly by subtypes of breast cancer, has not been established. Furthermore, the mechanisms of the association remain unclear. METHODS: We performed a meta...

  9. Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peer; Ejlertsen, Bent; Jensen, Maj-Britt

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG), with an associated database, was introduced as a nationwide multidisciplinary group in 1977 with the ultimate aim to improve the prognosis in breast cancer. Since then, the database has registered women diagnosed with primary invasive...... nonmetastatic breast cancer. The data reported from the departments to the database included details of the characteristics of the primary tumor, of surgery, radiotherapy, and systemic therapies, and of follow-up reported on specific forms from the departments in question. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: From 1977 through...... 2014, ~110,000 patients are registered in the nationwide, clinical database. The completeness has gradually improved to more than 95%. DBCG has continuously prepared evidence-based guidelines on diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer and conducted quality control studies to ascertain the degree...

  10. Does Aluminium Trigger Breast Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jennrich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Breast cancer is by far the most common cancer in women in the western world. In 90% of breast cancers, environmental factors are among the causes. The frequency with which the tumour occurs in the outer upper part of the breast has risen with above average rates in recent decades. Aluminium salts as ingredients in deodorants and antiperspirants are being absorbed by the body to a greater extent than hitherto assumed. Their toxicity for healthy and diseased breast tissue cells includes various well-documented pathomechanisms. In the sense of primary and secondary prevention, the cancer-triggering potential of aluminium and its use in anti-perspirant deodorants must be re-evaluated. For the same reason the access to a targeted diagnosis and treatment of aluminium loading must be facilitated.

  11. A preclinical evaluation of the MEK inhibitor refametinib in HER2-positive breast cancer cell lines including those with acquired resistance to trastuzumab or lapatinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Shea, John; Cremona, Mattia; Morgan, Clare; Milewska, Malgorzata; Holmes, Frankie; Espina, Virginia; Liotta, Lance; O’Shaughnessy, Joyce; Toomey, Sinead; Madden, Stephen F.; Carr, Aoife; Elster, Naomi; Hennessy, Bryan T.; Eustace, Alex J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The MEK/MAPK pathway is commonly activated in HER2-positive breast cancer, but little investigation of targeting this pathway has been undertaken. Here we present the results of an in vitro preclinical evaluation of refametinib, an allosteric MEK1/2 inhibitor, in HER2-positive breast cancer cell lines including models of acquired resistance to trastuzumab or lapatinib. Methods A panel of HER2-positive breast cancer cells were profiled for mutational status and also for anti-proliferative response to refametinib alone and in combination with the PI3K inhibitor (PI3Ki) copanlisib and the HER2-targeted therapies trastuzumab and lapatinib. Reverse phase protein array (RPPA) was used to determine the effect of refametinib alone and in combination with PI3Ki and HER2-inhibitors on expression and phosphorylation of proteins in the PI3K/AKT and MEK/MAPK pathways. We validated our proteomic in vitro findings by utilising RPPA analysis of patients who received either trastuzumab, lapatinib or the combination of both drugs in the NCT00524303/LPT109096 clinical trial. Results Refametinib has anti-proliferative effects when used alone in 2/3 parental HER2-positive breast cancer cell lines (HCC1954, BT474), along with 3 models of these 2 cell lines with acquired trastuzumab or lapatinib resistance (6 cell lines tested). Refametinib treatment led to complete inhibition of MAPK signalling. In HCC1954, the most refametinib-sensitive cell line (IC50 = 397 nM), lapatinib treatment inhibits phosphorylation of MEK and MAPK but activates AKT phosphorylation, in contrast to the other 2 parental cell lines tested (BT474-P, SKBR3-P), suggesting that HER2 may directly activate MEK/MAPK and not PI3K/AKT in HCC1954 cells but not in the other 2 cell lines, perhaps explaining the refametinib-sensitivity of this cell line. Using RPPA data from patients who received either trastuzumab, lapatinib or the combination of both drugs together with chemotherapy in the NCT00524303 clinical trial

  12. A preclinical evaluation of the MEK inhibitor refametinib in HER2-positive breast cancer cell lines including those with acquired resistance to trastuzumab or lapatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, John; Cremona, Mattia; Morgan, Clare; Milewska, Malgorzata; Holmes, Frankie; Espina, Virginia; Liotta, Lance; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce; Toomey, Sinead; Madden, Stephen F; Carr, Aoife; Elster, Naomi; Hennessy, Bryan T; Eustace, Alex J

    2017-10-17

    The MEK/MAPK pathway is commonly activated in HER2-positive breast cancer, but little investigation of targeting this pathway has been undertaken. Here we present the results of an in vitro preclinical evaluation of refametinib, an allosteric MEK1/2 inhibitor, in HER2-positive breast cancer cell lines including models of acquired resistance to trastuzumab or lapatinib. A panel of HER2-positive breast cancer cells were profiled for mutational status and also for anti-proliferative response to refametinib alone and in combination with the PI3K inhibitor (PI3Ki) copanlisib and the HER2-targeted therapies trastuzumab and lapatinib. Reverse phase protein array (RPPA) was used to determine the effect of refametinib alone and in combination with PI3Ki and HER2-inhibitors on expression and phosphorylation of proteins in the PI3K/AKT and MEK/MAPK pathways. We validated our proteomic in vitro findings by utilising RPPA analysis of patients who received either trastuzumab, lapatinib or the combination of both drugs in the NCT00524303/LPT109096 clinical trial. Refametinib has anti-proliferative effects when used alone in 2/3 parental HER2-positive breast cancer cell lines (HCC1954, BT474), along with 3 models of these 2 cell lines with acquired trastuzumab or lapatinib resistance (6 cell lines tested). Refametinib treatment led to complete inhibition of MAPK signalling. In HCC1954, the most refametinib-sensitive cell line (IC 50 = 397 nM), lapatinib treatment inhibits phosphorylation of MEK and MAPK but activates AKT phosphorylation, in contrast to the other 2 parental cell lines tested (BT474-P, SKBR3-P), suggesting that HER2 may directly activate MEK/MAPK and not PI3K/AKT in HCC1954 cells but not in the other 2 cell lines, perhaps explaining the refametinib-sensitivity of this cell line. Using RPPA data from patients who received either trastuzumab, lapatinib or the combination of both drugs together with chemotherapy in the NCT00524303 clinical trial, we found that 18% (n

  13. Breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Owens

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumours are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to the pathology of breast cancer will greatly aid the pursuit of novel therapies targeted at eliminating these cells. This review will summarise what is currently known about the origins of breast CSCs, their role in disease progression and ways in which they may be targeted therapeutically.

  14. Sensitivity of docetaxel-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells to microtubule-destabilizing agents including vinca alkaloids and colchicine-site binding agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C Wang

    Full Text Available One of the main reasons for disease recurrence in the curative breast cancer treatment setting is the development of drug resistance. Microtubule targeted agents (MTAs are among the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of breaset cancer and therefore overcoming taxane resistance is of primary clinical importance. Our group has previously demonstrated that the microtubule dynamics of docetaxel-resistant MCF-7TXT cells are insensitivity to docetaxel due to the distinct expression profiles of β-tubulin isotypes in addition to the high expression of p-glycoprotein (ABCB1. In the present investigation we examined whether taxane-resistant breast cancer cells are more sensitive to microtubule destabilizing agents including vinca alkaloids and colchicine-site binding agents (CSBAs than the non-resistant cells.Two isogenic MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines were selected for resistance to docetaxel (MCF-7TXT and the wild type parental cell line (MCF-7CC to examine if taxane-resistant breast cancer cells are sensitive to microtubule-destabilizing agents including vinca alkaloids and CSBAs. Cytotoxicity assays, immunoblotting, indirect immunofluorescence and live imaging were used to study drug resistance, apoptosis, mitotic arrest, microtubule formation, and microtubule dynamics.MCF-7TXT cells were demonstrated to be cross resistant to vinca alkaloids, but were more sensitive to treatment with colchicine compared to parental non-resistant MCF-7CC cells. Cytotoxicity assays indicated that the IC50 of MCF-7TXT cell to vinorelbine and vinblastine was more than 6 and 3 times higher, respectively, than that of MCF-7CC cells. By contrast, the IC50 of MCF-7TXT cell for colchincine was 4 times lower than that of MCF-7CC cells. Indirect immunofluorescence showed that all MTAs induced the disorganization of microtubules and the chromatin morphology and interestingly each with a unique pattern. In terms of microtubule and chromain morphology, MCF-7TXT cells were

  15. Oxalate induces breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellaro, Andrés M; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L; Pucci, Oscar A; Gil, German A

    2015-10-22

    Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still largely unknown but breast cancers presenting microcalcifications are more often associated with a poorer prognosis. We combined Capillary Electrochromatography, histology, and gene expression (qRT-PCR) to analyze patient-matched normal breast tissue vs. breast tumor. Potential carcinogenicity of oxalate was tested by its inoculation into mice. All data were subjected to statistical analysis. To study the biological significance of oxalates within the breast tumor microenvironment, we measured oxalate concentration in both human breast tumor tissues and adjoining non-pathological breast tissues. We found that all tested breast tumor tissues contain a higher concentration of oxalates than their counterpart non-pathological breast tissue. Moreover, it was established that oxalate induces proliferation of breast cells and stimulates the expression of a pro-tumorigenic gene c-fos. Furthermore, oxalate generates highly malignant and undifferentiated tumors when it was injected into the mammary fatpad in female mice, but not when injected into their back, indicating that oxalate does not induce cancer formation in all types of tissues. Moreover, neither human kidney-epithelial cells nor mouse fibroblast cells proliferate when are treated with oxalate. We found that the chronic exposure of breast epithelial cells to oxalate promotes the transformation of breast cells from normal to tumor cells, inducing the expression of a proto-oncogen as c-fos and proliferation in breast cancer cells

  16. Oxalate induces breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellaro, Andrés M.; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H.; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L.; Pucci, Oscar A.; Gil, German A.

    2015-01-01

    Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still largely unknown but breast cancers presenting microcalcifications are more often associated with a poorer prognosis. We combined Capillary Electrochromatography, histology, and gene expression (qRT-PCR) to analyze patient-matched normal breast tissue vs. breast tumor. Potential carcinogenicity of oxalate was tested by its inoculation into mice. All data were subjected to statistical analysis. To study the biological significance of oxalates within the breast tumor microenvironment, we measured oxalate concentration in both human breast tumor tissues and adjoining non-pathological breast tissues. We found that all tested breast tumor tissues contain a higher concentration of oxalates than their counterpart non-pathological breast tissue. Moreover, it was established that oxalate induces proliferation of breast cells and stimulates the expression of a pro-tumorigenic gene c-fos. Furthermore, oxalate generates highly malignant and undifferentiated tumors when it was injected into the mammary fatpad in female mice, but not when injected into their back, indicating that oxalate does not induce cancer formation in all types of tissues. Moreover, neither human kidney-epithelial cells nor mouse fibroblast cells proliferate when are treated with oxalate. We found that the chronic exposure of breast epithelial cells to oxalate promotes the transformation of breast cells from normal to tumor cells, inducing the expression of a proto-oncogen as c-fos and proliferation in breast cancer cells

  17. Soy, Probiotics, and Breast Cancer Prevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kurzer, Mindy

    2001-01-01

    .... The methods include in vitro studies to determine the intestinal microflora responsible for phytoestrogen metabolism, and a human feeding study in which 20 postmenopausal breast cancer survivors...

  18. Soy, Probiotics, and Breast Cancer Prevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kurzer, Mindy

    2000-01-01

    .... The methods include in vitro studies to determine the intestinal microflora responsible for phytoestrogen metablism, and a human feeding study in which 18 postmenopausal breast cancer survivors...

  19. Comparison of normal tissue dose with three-dimensional conformal techniques for breast cancer irradiation including the internal mammary nodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Hans Paul; Dolsma, Willemtje; van t Veld, Aart; Bijl, HP; Langendijk, JA

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the Para Mixed technique for irradiation of the internal mammary nodes (IMN) with three commonly used strategies, by analyzing the dose to the heart and other organs at risk. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Four different three-dimensional conformal dose plans were created for 30 breast

  20. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Breast Cancer Evista (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Keoxifene (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Nolvadex (Tamoxifen ...

  1. Breast Cancer in Young Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Campaign Initiatives Participation in Cancer Moonshot Stay Informed Breast Cancer in Young Women Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Syndicate this page Marleah’s family history of breast cancer was her motivation for pursuing a career where ...

  2. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-20

    Benign Breast Neoplasm; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  3. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-30

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  4. Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiansen P

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Peer Christiansen,1 Bent Ejlertsen,2,3 Maj-Britt Jensen,3 Henning Mouridsen3 1Department of Surgery P, Breast Surgery Unit, Aarhus University Hospital/Randers Regional Hospital, Aarhus C, 2Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, 3DBCG-secretariat, Department 2501, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark Aim of database: Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG, with an associated database, was introduced as a nationwide multidisciplinary group in 1977 with the ultimate aim to improve the prognosis in breast cancer. Since then, the database has registered women diagnosed with primary invasive nonmetastatic breast cancer. The data reported from the departments to the database included details of the characteristics of the primary tumor, of surgery, radiotherapy, and systemic therapies, and of follow-up reported on specific forms from the departments in question. Descriptive data: From 1977 through 2014, ~110,000 patients are registered in the nationwide, clinical database. The completeness has gradually improved to more than 95%. DBCG has continuously prepared evidence-based guidelines on diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer and conducted quality control studies to ascertain the degree of adherence to the guidelines in the different departments. Conclusion: Utilizing data from the DBCG database, a long array of high-quality DBCG studies of various designs and scope, nationwide or in international collaboration, have contributed to the current updating of the guidelines, and have been an instrumental resource in the improvement of management and prognosis of breast cancer in Denmark. Thus, since the establishment of DBCG, the prognosis in breast cancer has continuously improved with a decrease in 5-year mortality from ~37% to 15%. Keywords: breast cancer, database, guidelines, quality control, research

  5. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the other breast may consider a bilateral mastectomy, meaning both breasts are removed. This includes women with ... Fluorouracil (5-FU, Adrucil) Gemcitabine (Gemzar) Methotrexate (multiple brand names) Paclitaxel (Taxol) Protein-bound paclitaxel (Abraxane) Vinorelbine ( ...

  6. Racial and Ethnic Differences in Breast Cancer Risk Factors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    John, Esther

    2000-01-01

    ... Breast Cancer Research Program. Breast cancer cases were identified through the cancer registry covering the San Francisco Bay Area and include Latina, African-American and White women aged 35-79 years diagnosed with invasive...

  7. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  8. General Information about Male Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  9. Coping with a Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Coping With a Breast Cancer Diagnosis Coping with breast cancer A breast cancer diagnosis can cause a wide range of ... as normal a routine as possible. Be patient. Coping with breast cancer requires time, acceptance, a fighting ...

  10. Learning about Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Learning About Breast Cancer Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News Features Funding Divisions Funding ...

  11. Preeclampsia and breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pacheco, Nadja Livia Pekkola; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In parous women preeclampsia has been associated with reduced risk of developing breast cancer. Characteristics of births following preeclamptic pregnancies may help understand mechanisms involved in the breast cancer risk reduction inferred by preeclampsia. METHODS: We conducted...... a register-based cohort study of all Danish women giving birth during 1978-2010 (n = 778,701). The association between preeclampsia and breast cancer was evaluated overall and according to birth characteristics by means of incidence rate ratios (IRR) estimated in Poisson regression models. RESULTS: Compared...... with women with non-preeclamptic pregnancies only, women with one or more preeclamptic pregnancies were 19% significantly less likely to develop breast cancer (IRR = 0.81 [95% CI 0.72-0.93]). We found some indication of greater risk reduction in women with term births, one or more previous births...

  12. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peer Review and Funding Outcomes Step 4: Award Negotiation & Issuance Manage Your Award Grants Management Contacts Monitoring ... with inflammatory breast cancer, but, due to the importance of radiation therapy in treating this disease, experts ...

  13. Breast Cancer Screening in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Kalager, Mette

    2017-01-01

    Background: Effective breast cancer screening should detect early-stage cancer and prevent advanced disease. Objective: To assess the association between screening and the size of detected tumors and to estimate overdiagnosis (detection of tumors that would not become clinically relevant). Design......) and nonadvanced (≤20 mm) breast cancer tumors in screened and nonscreened women were measured. Two approaches were used to estimate the amount of overdiagnosis: comparing the incidence of advanced and nonadvanced tumors among women aged 50 to 84 years in screening and nonscreening areas; and comparing...... for regional differences in women younger than the screening age, found that 711 invasive tumors and 180 cases of DCIS were overdiagnosed in 2010 (overdiagnosis rate of 48.3% [including DCIS] and 38.6% [excluding DCIS]). Limitation: Regional differences complicate interpretation. Conclusion: Breast cancer...

  14. Midbody Accumulation in Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Hematology and Oncology, Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research, Children’s Hospital Boston and Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston...include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 W81XWH-08-1-0457 Breast cancer is a complex disease that...we propose that MBds 1) will serve as markers for breast CSCs, 2) may have diagnostic /prognositc value for breast cancer progression and 3) could

  15. Breast tissue, oral and urinary microbiomes in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hannah; Altemus, Jessica; Niazi, Farshad; Green, Holly; Calhoun, Benjamin C; Sturgis, Charles; Grobmyer, Stephen R; Eng, Charis

    2017-10-20

    It has long been proposed that the gut microbiome contributes to breast carcinogenesis by modifying systemic estrogen levels. This is often cited as a possible mechanism linking breast cancer and high-fat, low-fiber diets as well as antibiotic exposure, associations previously identified in population-based studies. More recently, a distinct microbiome has been identified within breast milk and tissue, but few studies have characterized differences in the breast tissue microbiota of patients with and without cancer, and none have investigated distant body-site microbiomes outside of the gut. We hypothesize that cancerous breast tissue is associated with a microbiomic profile distinct from that of benign breast tissue, and that microbiomes of more distant sites, the oral cavity and urinary tract, will reflect dysbiosis as well. Fifty-seven women with invasive breast cancer undergoing mastectomy and 21 healthy women undergoing cosmetic breast surgery were enrolled. The bacterial 16S rRNA gene was amplified from urine, oral rinse and surgically collected breast tissue, sequenced, and processed through a QIIME-based bioinformatics pipeline. Cancer patient breast tissue microbiomes clustered significantly differently from non-cancer patients ( p =0.03), largely driven by decreased relative abundance of Methylobacterium in cancer patients (median 0.10 vs. 0.24, p =0.03). There were no significant differences in oral rinse samples. Differences in urinary microbiomes were largely explained by menopausal status, with peri/postmenopausal women showing decreased levels of Lactobacillus . Independent of menopausal status, however, cancer patients had increased levels of gram-positive organisms including Corynebacterium ( p <0.01), Staphylococcus ( p =0.02) , Actinomyces ( p <0.01), and Propionibacteriaceae ( p <0.01). Our observations suggest that the local breast microbiota differ in patients with and without breast cancer. Cancer patient urinary microbiomes were

  16. Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risk factors for breast cancer are female sex and advancing age, inherited risk, breast density, obesity, alcohol consumption, and exposure to ionizing radiation. Interventions to prevent breast cancer include chemoprevention (e.g. SERMs, AIs), risk-reducing surgery (e.g. mastectomy, oophorectomy). Review the evidence on risk factors and interventions to prevent breast cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  17. Predictors of Lymphedema Following Breast Cancer Surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swenson, Karen K

    2006-01-01

    .... Cases will be identified in the physical therapy or cancer centers. Controls will be identified using the oncology registry and include patients with breast cancer surgery who have not developed lymphedema...

  18. Contraception and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhothisuwan, Kris

    2004-10-01

    Oral contraceptive use is weakly associated with breast cancer risk in the general population, but the association among women with a familial predisposition to breast cancer is less clear. Recent studies indicating that oral contraception may increase the risk of breast cancer more in subjects who are BRCA 1 or BRCA 2 mutation carriers. Features of hormonal contraceptive use, such as duration of use, age at first use, and the dose and type of hormone within the contraceptives, have little effect on breast cancer risk. Women who begin use before age 20 have higher relative risks of having breast cancer diagnosed while they are using combined oral contraceptives and in the 5 years after stopping than do women who begin use at older ages. Given that on influence of oral contraceptives on the breast has been hypothesized to be greatest before the cellular differentiation that occurs with a first pregnancy. A significant trend of increasing risk with first use before age 20 years was observed. Among women diagnosed at ages 30 to 34 years the relative risk associated with recent oral contraceptive use was 1.54 if use began before age 20 years and 1.13 it use began at older ages.

  19. Paclitaxel and doxorubicin in metastatic breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehl, J; Boesgaard, M; Paaske, T

    1996-01-01

    For the past decades the anthracyclines have been regarded as among the most active drugs for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. However, the 5-year survival rate in patients with stage IV breast cancer continues to be below 20%, and new active drugs and drug combinations clearly must...... be explored. Paclitaxel (Taxol; Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ) has been demonstrated to be highly effective in treating patients with advanced breast cancer, including those with anthracycline-resistant breast cancer, a fact that has led to efforts to combine paclitaxel and anthracyclines...

  20. Breast Cancer Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

  1. Expression of the breast cancer resistance protein in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faneyte, Ian F.; Kristel, Petra M. P.; Maliepaard, Marc; Scheffer, George L.; Scheper, Rik J.; Schellens, Jan H. M.; van de Vijver, Marc J.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is involved in in vitro multidrug resistance and was first identified in the breast cancer cell line MCF7/AdrVp. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of BCRP in resistance of breast cancer to anthracycline treatment. EXPERIMENTAL

  2. Breast cancer in Accra, Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    -Richardson's .... breast cancer cases followed by lobular carcinomas ... lobular carcinoma. Malignant breast tumours of all kinds are most common in the age group 40-49 years (Table 2). Almost all (94.4%) cancers occur after age 29 years.

  3. Vitamin D and Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Janowsky, Esther

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of our current work is to determine whether there are differences in blood levels of 1,25-dihydroxy- vitamin D between women with breast cancer and two control groups of women without breast cancer...

  4. Gravidomimetic Prevention of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andersen, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that a novel synthetic peptide can prevent breast cancer, we utilized a standard model to induce breast cancer in rats and initiated a dose-finding study in which four log doses...

  5. Life After Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    FACTS FOR LIFE Life After Breast Cancer Treatment Once breast cancer treatment ends, you may face a new set of issues and concerns. ... fear. If fear starts to disrupt your daily life, talk with your doctor. Getting the support and ...

  6. Bisphosphonates in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Aju; Brufsky, Adam

    2015-08-15

    Bisphosphonates are osteoclast inhibitors, currently being used in oncology to prevent or delay bone morbidity in cancer. Oral and intravenous formulations of bisphosphonates have been found to be efficacious in preventing skeletal-related events such as bone pain, pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression and hypercalcemia of malignancy, in patients with bone metastatic breast cancer. Bisphosphonates are also used to prevent bone loss associated with anti-estrogen therapy using aromatase inhibitors. In addition to its role in preventing bone resorption, several pre-clinical studies have noted an anti-tumor role as well. Recent research effort has particularly focused on investigating an adjuvant role for bisphosphonates in early breast cancer. Recently, few randomized trials have found a beneficial effect for adjuvant use of the aminobisphosphonate, zoledronate, in older patients who are post-menopausal. This review article will summarize the various clinical studies investigating the role of bisphosphonates in breast cancer. © 2014 UICC.

  7. Breast cancer chemoprevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Sestak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Trials with tamoxifen have clearly shown that the risk of developing oestrogen receptor positive breast cancer can be reduced by at least 50% with prophylactic agents. The current challenge is to find new agents which achieve this or better efficacy, but with fewer side effects. Recent results indicate that the SERM raloxifene has similar efficacy to tamoxifen, but leads to fewer endometrial cancers, gynecological symptoms, and thromboembolic events. Results for contralateral tumors in adjuvant trials suggest that aromatase inhibitors may be able to prevent up to 70%–80% of ER-positive breast cancers, and this is currently being investigated in two large prevention trials, one using anastrozole (IBIS-II and the other exemestane (MAP.3. New agents are needed for receptor negative breast cancer and several possibilities are currently under investigation.

  8. Breast edema in breast cancer patients following breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbelen, Hanne; Gebruers, Nick; Beyers, Tinne; De Monie, Anne-Caroline; Tjalma, Wiebren

    2014-10-01

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is commonly used in breast cancer treatment. Despite its benefits, some women will be troubled by breast edema. Breast edema may cause an unsatisfactory cosmetic result, influencing the quality of life. The purpose of this systematic review is to investigate the incidence of breast edema and to identify risk factors of breast edema in breast cancer patients following BCS and radiotherapy. A systematic literature search was performed using different electronic databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane, Embase) until June 2014. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) research studies that included female breast cancer patients who were treated with BCS and radiotherapy and (2) studies that investigated the incidence of breast edema and/or risk factors of breast edema. Exclusion criteria were (1) reviews or case studies and (2) studies published before 1995. We identified in total 28 papers which represented 4,011 patients. There was a great variation in the incidence of breast edema (0-90.4 %). We identified several possible risk factors for breast edema namely increasing irradiated breast volume, increasing boost volume, the use of a photon boost, increasing breast separation, a higher density of the breast tissue, a large tumor, a higher specimen weight, postoperative infection, acute postoperative toxicity, and diabetes mellitus. However, their prognostic value remains uncertain. Breast edema is a common complaint after BCS and radiotherapy. A number of possible risk factors associated with breast edema were identified, but further research is warranted.

  9. Checkpoint inhibitors in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polk, Anne; Svane, Inge-Marie; Andersson, Michael

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: An increasing number of compounds directed against immune checkpoints are currently under clinical development. In this review we summarize current research in breast cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A computer-based literature search was carried out using PubMed and EMBASE; data...... reported at international meetings and clinicaltrials.gov were included as well. RESULTS: The obtained overall response rate of PD-1/PD-L1 monotherapy varied from 5 to 30% in heavily pretreated triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). The median duration of progression free survival and overall survival were...... and induce long standing anti-tumor immunity in a subgroup of breast cancer patients. However, the identification of predictive biomarkers is crucial for further development of this treatment modality....

  10. Causal attribution among women with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina W. B. Peuker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Causal attribution among women with breast cancer was studied. The study included 157 women outpatients with breast cancer. A form for sociodemographic and clinical data and the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R were used. The results showed that women attributed breast cancer primarily to psychological causes, which does not correspond to known multifactorial causes validated by the scientific community. Providing high quality, patient-centered care requires sensitivity to breast cancer women’s beliefs about the causes of their cancer and awareness of how it can influence patient’s health behaviors after diagnosis. If women with breast cancer attribute the illness to modifiable factors then they can keep a healthy lifestyle, improving their recovery and decrease the probability of cancer recurrence after diagnosis.

  11. Immunophenotyping of hereditary breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Groep, P.

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary breast cancer runs in families where several family members in different generations are affected. Most of these breast cancers are caused by mutations in the high penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 which account for about 5% of all breast cancers. However, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 may

  12. Breast Cancer Basics and You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Basics and You Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... more than 232,670 new cases of female breast cancer in the United States in 2014. More than ...

  13. Pregnancy associated breast cancer and pregnancy after breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğer, Emek; Çalışkan, Eray; Mallmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and its frequency is increasing as more women postpone their pregnancies to their thirties and forties. Breast cancer diagnosis during pregnancy and lactation is difficult and complex both for the patient and doctors. Delay in diagnosis is frequent and treatment modalities are difficult to accept for the pregnant women. The common treatment approach is surgery after diagnosis, chemotherapy after the first trimester and radiotherapy after delivery. Even though early stage breast cancers have similar prognosis, advanced stage breast cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation have poorer prognosis than similar stage breast cancers diagnosed in non-pregnant women. Women who desire to become pregnant after treatment of breast cancer will have many conflicts. Although the most common concern is recurrence of breast cancer due to pregnancy, the studies conducted showed that pregnancy has no negative effect on breast cancer prognosis. In this review we search for the frequency of breast cancer during pregnancy, the histopathological findings, risk factor, diagnostic and treatment modalities. We reviewed the literature for evidence based findings to help consult the patients on the outcome of breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation, and also inform the patients who desire to become pregnant after breast cancer according to current evidences. PMID:24592003

  14. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage 0-IIB Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-05

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  15. Breast cancer screening controversies: who, when, why, and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetlen, Alison; Mack, Julie; Chan, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Mammographic screening is effective in reducing mortality from breast cancer. The issue is not whether mammography is effective, but whether the false positive rate and false negative rates can be reduced. This review will discuss controversies including the reduction in breast cancer mortality, overdiagnosis, the ideal screening candidate, and the optimal imaging modality for breast cancer screening. The article will compare and contrast screening mammography, tomosynthesis, whole-breast screening ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and molecular breast imaging. Though supplemental imaging modalities are being utilized to improve breast cancer diagnosis, mammography still remains the gold standard for breast cancer screening. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Campaign Buttons and Badges Stay Informed Rates by State for Other Kinds of Cancer All Cancers Combined ... Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ...

  17. Hereditary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight...... into the tumor biology to guide the search of new high-risk alleles and provide better classification of the growing number of BRCA1/2 variants of unknown significance (VUS). In this review, we provide an overview of hereditary breast cancer, its genetic background, and clinical implications, before focusing...... on the pathologically and molecular features associated with the disease. Recent transcriptome and genome profiling studies of tumor series from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers as well as familial non-BRCA1/2 will be discussed. Special attention is paid to its association with molecular breast cancer subtypes as well...

  18. Breast cancer in systemic lupus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernatsky, S.; Ramsey-Goldman, R.; Petri, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective There is a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) versus the general population. We assessed a large sample of SLE patients, evaluating demographic and clinical characteristics and breast cancer risk. Methods We performed case-cohort analyses within a multi......-center international SLE sample. We calculated the breast cancer hazard ratio (HR) in female SLE patients, relative to demographics, reproductive history, family history of breast cancer, and time-dependent measures of anti-dsDNA positivity, cumulative disease activity, and drugs, adjusted for SLE duration. Results...... There were 86 SLE breast cancers and 4498 female SLE cancer-free controls. Patients were followed on average for 7.6 years. Versus controls, SLE breast cancer cases tended to be white and older. Breast cancer cases were similar to controls regarding anti-dsDNA positivity, disease activity, and most drug...

  19. Effects of Breast Cancer Fatalism on Breast Cancer Awareness among Nursing Students in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakci, Hulya; Ayyildiz, Tulay Kuzlu; Yildirim, Nuriye; Ozturk, Ozlem; Topan, Aysel Kose; Tasdemir, Nurten

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women and leading cause of death worldwide, including in Turkey. High perceptions of cancer fatalism are associated with lower rates of participation in screening for breast cancer. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of breast cancer fatalism and other factors on breast cancer awareness among nursing students in Turkey. This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at three universities in the Western Black Sea region. The sample was composed of 838 nursing students. Data were collected by Personal Information Form, Powe Fatalism Inventory (PFI) and Champion's Health Belief Model Scale (CHBMS). Breast cancer fatalism perception of the students was at a low level. It was determined that students' seriousness perception was moderate, health motivation, BSE benefits and BSE self-efficacy perceptions were high, and BSE barriers and sensitivity perceptions were low. In addition, it was determined that students awareness of breast cancer was affected by breast cancer fatalism, class level, family history of breast cancer, knowledge on BSE, source of information on BSE, frequency of BSE performing, having breast examination by a healthcare professional within the last year and their health beliefs. In promoting breast cancer early diagnosis behaviour, it is recommended to evaluate fatalism perceptions and health beliefs of the students and to arrange training programs for this purpose.

  20. Breast self examination and breast cancer: Knowledge and practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    knowledge and practice of BSE and knowledge on breast cancer. Responses on awareness on breast cancer were weighed using a 3-point. Likert's scale. ... have shown no significant effect of regular BSE on breast cancer ... Table 1: Characteristics of women surveyed concerning breast self-examination and breast cancer.

  1. Pregnancy-associated Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Ashley S

    2016-12-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting pregnancy. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer refers to breast cancer that is diagnosed during pregnancy or within the first postpartum year. The incidence is increasing as more women delay childbearing. Breast cancer can be safely diagnosed, staged, and treated during pregnancy while protecting the fetus and mother with excellent outcomes for both. Avoiding diagnostic delays is vital to prognosis. This article provides an overview of the diagnosis, staging, management, and prognosis of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. Relevant current literature is reviewed.

  2. Normal breast physiology: the reasons hormonal contraceptives and induced abortion increase breast-cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, Angela

    2014-01-01

    A woman gains protection from breast cancer by completing a full-term pregnancy. In utero, her offspring produce hormones that mature 85 percent of the mother's breast tissue into cancer-resistant breast tissue. If the pregnancy ends through an induced abortion or a premature birth before thirty-two weeks, the mother's breasts will have only partially matured, retaining even more cancer-susceptible breast tissue than when the pregnancy began. This increased amount of immature breast tissue will leave the mother with more sites for cancer initiation, thereby increasing her risk of breast cancer. Hormonal contraceptives increase breast-cancer risk by their proliferative effect on breast tissue and their direct carcinogenic effects on DNA. Hormonal contraceptives include estrogen-progestin combination drugs prescribed in any manner of delivery: orally, transdermally, vaginally, or intrauterine. This article provides the detailed physiology and data that elucidate the mechanisms through which induced abortion and hormonal contraceptives increase breast-cancer risk.

  3. Psychosocial aspects of breast cancer treatement in Accra, Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To evaluate psychosocial influences and effects of breast cancer treatment. Design: Cohort questionnaire survey. Setting: Surgical Outpatient Department, Korle Bu Teaching Hospital (KBTH), Accra, Ghana. Subjects: Women previously treated for breast cancer, including those still on hormonal therapy.

  4. NUCKS overexpression in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittas Christos

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NUCKS (Nuclear, Casein Kinase and Cyclin-dependent Kinase Substrate is a nuclear, DNA-binding and highly phosphorylated protein. A number of reports show that NUCKS is highly expressed on the level of mRNA in several human cancers, including breast cancer. In this work, NUCKS expression on both RNA and protein levels was studied in breast tissue biopsies consisted of invasive carcinomas, intraductal proliferative lesions, benign epithelial proliferations and fibroadenomas, as well as in primary cultures derived from the above biopsies. Specifically, in order to evaluate the level of NUCKS protein in correlation with the histopathological features of breast disease, immunohistochemistry was employed on paraffin sections of breast biopsies of the above types. In addition, NUCKS expression was studied by means of Reverse Transcription PCR (RT-PCR, real-time PCR (qRT-PCR and Western immunoblot analyses in the primary cell cultures developed from the same biopsies. Results The immunohistochemical Results showed intense NUCKS staining mostly in grade I and II breast carcinomas compared to normal tissues. Furthermore, NUCKS was moderate expressed in benign epithelial proliferations, such as adenosis and sclerosing adenosis, and highly expressed in intraductal lesions, specifically in ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS. It is worth noting that all the fibroadenoma tissues examined were negative for NUCKS staining. RT-PCR and qRT-PCR showed an increase of NUCKS expression in cells derived from primary cultures of proliferative lesions and cancerous tissues compared to the ones derived from normal breast tissues and fibroadenomas. This increase was also confirmed by Western immunoblot analysis. Although NUCKS is a cell cycle related protein, its expression does not correlate with Ki67 expression, neither in tissue sections nor in primary cell cultures. Conclusion The results show overexpression of the NUCKS protein in a number of non

  5. Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  6. Diabetes and Breast Cancer Subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heleen K Bronsveld

    Full Text Available Women with diabetes have a worse survival after breast cancer diagnosis compared to women without diabetes. This may be due to a different etiological profile, leading to the development of more aggressive breast cancer subtypes. Our aim was to investigate whether insulin and non-insulin treated women with diabetes develop specific clinicopathological breast cancer subtypes compared to women without diabetes.This cross-sectional study included randomly selected patients with invasive breast cancer diagnosed in 2000-2010. Stratified by age at breast cancer diagnosis (≤50 and >50 years, women with diabetes were 2:1 frequency-matched on year of birth and age at breast cancer diagnosis (both in 10-year categories to women without diabetes, to select ~300 patients with tumor tissue available. Tumor MicroArrays were stained by immunohistochemistry for estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER, PR, HER2, Ki67, CK5/6, CK14, and p63. A pathologist scored all stains and revised morphology and grade. Associations between diabetes/insulin treatment and clinicopathological subtypes were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Morphology and grade were not significantly different between women with diabetes (n = 211 and women without diabetes (n = 101, irrespective of menopausal status. Premenopausal women with diabetes tended to have more often PR-negative (OR = 2.44(95%CI:1.07-5.55, HER2-negative (OR = 2.84(95%CI:1.11-7.22, and basal-like (OR = 3.14(95%CI:1.03-9.60 tumors than the women without diabetes, with non-significantly increased frequencies of ER-negative (OR = 2.48(95%CI:0.95-6.45 and triple negative (OR = 2.60(95%CI:0.88-7.67 tumors. After adjustment for age and BMI, the associations remained similar in size but less significant. We observed no evidence for associations of clinicopathological subtypes with diabetes in postmenopausal women, or with insulin treatment in general.We found no compelling evidence that women with diabetes

  7. Diabetes and Breast Cancer Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronsveld, Heleen K; Jensen, Vibeke; Vahl, Pernille; De Bruin, Marie L; Cornelissen, Sten; Sanders, Joyce; Auvinen, Anssi; Haukka, Jari; Andersen, Morten; Vestergaard, Peter; Schmidt, Marjanka K

    2017-01-01

    Women with diabetes have a worse survival after breast cancer diagnosis compared to women without diabetes. This may be due to a different etiological profile, leading to the development of more aggressive breast cancer subtypes. Our aim was to investigate whether insulin and non-insulin treated women with diabetes develop specific clinicopathological breast cancer subtypes compared to women without diabetes. This cross-sectional study included randomly selected patients with invasive breast cancer diagnosed in 2000-2010. Stratified by age at breast cancer diagnosis (≤50 and >50 years), women with diabetes were 2:1 frequency-matched on year of birth and age at breast cancer diagnosis (both in 10-year categories) to women without diabetes, to select ~300 patients with tumor tissue available. Tumor MicroArrays were stained by immunohistochemistry for estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER, PR), HER2, Ki67, CK5/6, CK14, and p63. A pathologist scored all stains and revised morphology and grade. Associations between diabetes/insulin treatment and clinicopathological subtypes were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Morphology and grade were not significantly different between women with diabetes (n = 211) and women without diabetes (n = 101), irrespective of menopausal status. Premenopausal women with diabetes tended to have more often PR-negative (OR = 2.44(95%CI:1.07-5.55)), HER2-negative (OR = 2.84(95%CI:1.11-7.22)), and basal-like (OR = 3.14(95%CI:1.03-9.60) tumors than the women without diabetes, with non-significantly increased frequencies of ER-negative (OR = 2.48(95%CI:0.95-6.45)) and triple negative (OR = 2.60(95%CI:0.88-7.67) tumors. After adjustment for age and BMI, the associations remained similar in size but less significant. We observed no evidence for associations of clinicopathological subtypes with diabetes in postmenopausal women, or with insulin treatment in general. We found no compelling evidence that women with diabetes, treated

  8. Breast cancer imaging devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moadel, Renee M

    2011-05-01

    Conventional mammography is a screening procedure constrained by low specificity in the detection of breast cancer. Approximately 40% of women undergoing mammography screening have dense breast tissue, and conventional mammographic imaging has a sensitivity range of only 50%-85% for malignant lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now recommended for breast cancer screening in high-risk patients. However, approximately 15% of patients cannot tolerate MRI. These are the clinical situations in which positron emission mammography (PEM) and breast-specific gamma (BSG) camera systems fulfill a need for primary breast cancer imaging. Because breast cancer is the most common malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death among women, many nuclear medicine imaging techniques are essential in the evaluation and therapy of patients with this disease. Nuclear medicine surgical techniques consist of sentinel lymph node localization and the use of radiolabeled seeds for intraoperative localization of nonpalpable breast cancers. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the PEM Flex Solo II scanner, which has the capability for stereotactic biopsy, with an array of pixelated lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) crystals, position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT), and a spatial resolution of 2.4 mm. Clear PEM is a scanner in development with cerium-doped LYSO (LYSO:Ce) crystals, multipixel avalanche photodiodes, depth of interaction measurement with a resolution of 1.3 mm. The Dilon 6800 Gamma Camera is a BSG device approved by the FDA with stereotactic biopsy guidance capability, a pixelated array of sodium iodide crystals, PS-PMTs, and an extrinsic spatial resolution of 6 mm at 3 cm from the camera. GE has just received clearance from the FDA for a molecular breast imaging camera, the Discovery NM 750 b, with pixelated cadmium zinc telluride crystals, semiconductor photoelements and an extrinsic resolution of 3.5 mm at 3 cm. The Society of

  9. Breast Cancer Diagnostics Based on Spatial Genome Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    breast tissues made up of invasive breast carcinomas, benign diseased tissues ( fibroadenoma and hyperplasia) and normal breast tissues [11]. To enable an...positioning patterns were also compared between benign disease ( fibroadenoma and hyperplasia; not including atypical hyperplasia, which is linked to breast ...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-08-2-0098 TITLE: Breast Cancer Diagnostics Based on

  10. The role of versican G3 domain in regulating breast cancer cell motility including effects on osteoblast cell growth and differentiation in vitro – evaluation towards understanding breast cancer cell bone metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du William

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Versican is detected in the interstitial tissues at the invasive margins of breast carcinoma, is predictive of relapse, and negatively impacts overall survival rates. The versican G3 domain is important in breast cancer cell growth, migration and bone metastasis. However, mechanistic studies evaluating versican G3 enhanced breast cancer bone metastasis are limited. Methods A versican G3 construct was exogenously expressed in the 66c14 and the MC3T3-E1 cell line. Cells were observed through light microscopy and viability analyzed by Coulter Counter or determined with colorimetric proliferation assays. The Annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection kit was used to detect apoptotic activity. Modified Chemotactic Boyden chamber migration invasion assays were applied to observe tumor migration and invasion to bone stromal cells and MC3T3-E1 cells. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP staining and ALP ELISA assays were performed to observe ALP activity in MC3T3-E1 cells. Results In the four mouse breast cancer cell lines 67NR, 66c14, 4T07, and 4T1, 4T1 cells expressed higher levels of versican, and showed higher migration and invasion ability to MC3T3-E1 cells and primary bone stromal cells. 4T1 conditioned medium (CM inhibited MC3T3-E1 cell growth, and even lead to apoptosis. Only 4T1 CM prevented MC3T3-E1 cell differentiation, noted by inhibition of alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity. We exogenously expressed a versican G3 construct in a cell line that expresses low versican levels (66c14, and observed that the G3-expressing 66c14 cells showed enhanced cell migration and invasion to bone stromal and MC3T3-E1 cells. This observation was prevented by selective EGFR inhibitor AG1478, selective MEK inhibitor PD 98059, and selective AKT inhibitor Triciribine, but not by selective JNK inhibitor SP 600125. Versican G3 enhanced breast cancer cell invasion to bone stromal cells or osteoblast cells appears to occur through enhancing EGFR/ERK or AKT signaling

  11. Breast Cancer - Early Diagnosis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-28

    This podcast answers a listener's question about how to tell if she has breast cancer.  Created: 4/28/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/28/2011.

  12. Breast cancer screening barriers and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Ana; Stuifbergen, Alexa

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that early detection from breast cancer screening is an effective means to reduce overall mortality from breast cancer. Findings from multiple research studies suggest that women with chronic disabling conditions are less likely to participate in breast cancer screening due to the multiple barriers they face. Barriers include those related to finances, environment, physical limitations, health carers' attitudes and lack of knowledge, and psychosocial issues. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the existing evidence of the barriers to breast cancer screening experienced by women with physical disabilities. Rehabilitation nurses that work with women who have chronic disabling conditions can be instrumental in eliminating these barriers to breast cancer screening through their efforts to promote health which is consistent with the philosophy of maximizing the health potential and quality of life of these women whose needs are often overlooked. © 2012 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  13. Body mass index and breast cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Qi; Burgess, Stephen; Turman, Constance

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is increasing evidence that elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with reduced survival for women with breast cancer. However, the underlying reasons remain unclear. We conducted a Mendelian randomization analysis to investigate a possible causal role of BMI in survival...... from breast cancer. Methods: We used individual-level data from six large breast cancer case-cohorts including a total of 36 210 individuals (2475 events) of European ancestry. We created a BMI genetic risk score (GRS) based on genotypes at 94 known BMI-associated genetic variants. Association between...... the BMI genetic score and breast cancer survival was analysed by Cox regression for each study separately. Study-specific hazard ratios were pooled using fixed-effect meta-analysis. Results: BMI genetic score was found to be associated with reduced breast cancer-specific survival for estrogen receptor (ER...

  14. Early diagnosis of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semiglazov, V.F.

    1989-01-01

    Modern data are presentd on epidemology etiopathogensis and statistics of breast cancer. Home and international clinical and histological classifications is given. Much attention is paid to the methods for early diagnosis of pretumor diseases and breast cancer: clinical roentgenomammography, thrmography and computerized tomomammography. The role of self-examination in cancer early detection has been analyzed. Special attention is paid to system of detection of minimal and unpalpable form of breast cancer, screening of these tumors. 113 refs.; 60 figs.; 6 tabs

  15. Imaging Management of Breast Density, a Controversial Risk Factor for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon, Shannon; Williams, Angela; Weinfurtner, Jared; Drukteinis, Jennifer S

    2017-04-01

    Breast density is well recognized as an independent risk factor for the development of breast cancer. However, the magnitude of risk is controversial. As the public becomes increasingly aware of breast density as a risk factor, legislation and notification laws in relation to breast density have become common throughout the United States. Awareness of breast density as a risk factor for breast cancer presents new challenges for the clinician in the approach to the management and screening of women with dense breasts. The evidence and controversy surrounding breast density as a risk factor for the development of breast cancer are discussed. Common supplemental screening modalities for breast cancer are also discussed, including tomosynthesis, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging. A management strategy for screening women with dense breasts is also presented. The American College of Radiology recognizes breast density as a controversial risk factor for breast cancer, whereas the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recognizes breast density as a modest risk factor. Neither organization recommends the routine use of supplemental screening in women with dense breasts without considering additional patient-related risk factors. Breast density is a poorly understood and controversial risk factor for the development of breast cancer. Mammography is a screening modality proven to reduce breast cancer-related mortality rates and is the single most appropriate tool for population-based screening. Use of supplemental screening modalities should be tailored to individual risk assessment.

  16. Drug transporters in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümler, Iben; Stenvang, Jan; Moreira, José

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advances that have taken place in the past decade, including the development of novel molecular targeted agents, cytotoxic chemotherapy remains the mainstay of cancer treatment. In breast cancer, anthracyclines and taxanes are the two main chemotherapeutic options used on a routine...... basis. Although effective, their usefulness is limited by the inevitable development of resistance, a lack of response to drug-induced cancer cell death. A large body of research has resulted in the characterization of a plethora of mechanisms involved in resistance; ATP-binding cassette transporter...

  17. [Breast tomosynthesis: a new tool for diagnosing breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Miravete, P; Etxano, J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer continues to be the most common malignant tumor in women in occidental countries. Mammography is currently the technique of choice for screening programs; however, although it has been widely validated, mammography has its limitations, especially in dense breasts. Breast tomosynthesis is a revolutionary advance in the diagnosis of breast cancer. It makes it possible to define lesions that are occult in the glandular tissue and therefore to detect breast tumors that are impossible to see on conventional mammograms. In considering the combined use of mammography and tomosynthesis, many factors must be taken into account apart from cancer detection; these include additional radiation, the recall rate, and the time necessary to carry out and interpret the two tests. In this article, we review the technical principles of tomosynthesis, it main uses, and the future perspective for this imaging technique. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Progress in diagnosis of breast cancer: Advances in radiology technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, J Mari Beth; Schiska, Alan D

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer in females between the ages of 15 and 54, and the second leading cause of cancer death in women in the United States. Diagnosis begins with detection by breast examination (clinical breast exam or breast self-exam) or by radiologic studies, like mammography. Many advances in the diagnosis of breast cancer have taken place in recent years. This article will review the history of radiologic advances in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Use of technological advancements in digital breast tomosynthesis, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound in breast cancer diagnosis will be presented. Advantages and disadvantages of these diagnostic interventions when compared to older, traditional X-ray films will be discussed. It is important for all nurses, including radiology and oncology nurses, to be well informed about these varied diagnostic modalities, and appreciate the fact that advances in radiologic imaging technologies can yield improved outcomes for breast cancer patients.

  19. Progress in diagnosis of breast cancer: Advances in radiology technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mari Beth Linder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer in females between the ages of 15 and 54, and the second leading cause of cancer death in women in the United States. Diagnosis begins with detection by breast examination (clinical breast exam or breast self-exam or by radiologic studies, like mammography. Many advances in the diagnosis of breast cancer have taken place in recent years. This article will review the history of radiologic advances in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Use of technological advancements in digital breast tomosynthesis, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound in breast cancer diagnosis will be presented. Advantages and disadvantages of these diagnostic interventions when compared to older, traditional X-ray films will be discussed. It is important for all nurses, including radiology and oncology nurses, to be well informed about these varied diagnostic modalities, and appreciate the fact that advances in radiologic imaging technologies can yield improved outcomes for breast cancer patients.

  20. Opioids and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe; Ahern, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids may alter immune function, thereby potentially affecting cancer recurrence. The authors investigated the association between postdiagnosis opioid use and breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: Patients with incident, early stage breast cancer who were diagnosed during 1996 through...... 2008 in Denmark were identified from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group Registry. Opioid prescriptions were ascertained from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Follow-up began on the date of primary surgery for breast cancer and continued until breast cancer recurrence, death......, emigration, 10 years, or July 31, 2013, whichever occurred first. Cox regression models were used to compute hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals associating breast cancer recurrence with opioid prescription use overall and by opioid type and strength, immunosuppressive effect, chronic use (≥6 months...

  1. Mindfulness Meditation or Survivorship Education in Improving Behavioral Symptoms in Younger Stage 0-III Breast Cancer Survivors (Pathways to Wellness)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-15

    Cancer Survivor; Early-Stage Breast Carcinoma; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  2. Retrospective analysis of metastatic behaviour of breast cancer subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savci-Heijink, C. Dilara; Halfwerk, Hans; Hooijer, Gerrit K. J.; Horlings, Hugo M.; Wesseling, Jelle; van de Vijver, Marc J.

    2015-01-01

    Among breast cancer patients who develop distant metastases, there is marked variability in the clinical course, including metastasis pattern. Here, we present a retrospective study of breast cancer patients who all developed distant metastases focusing on the association between breast cancer

  3. The genetics of breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, D; Easton, D F

    1995-10-01

    A number of genes are known to be involved in inherited susceptibility to breast and/or ovarian cancer. In the context of high-risk families the most important genes are BRCA1 on chromosome 17q, which is associated with a high penetrance of both breast and ovarian cancer, and BRCA2 on chromosome 13q, which causes a high risk of breast cancer but a lower risk of ovarian cancer. Other high-risk cancer genes that confer increased risks of breast or ovarian cancer in addition to other cancers include the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer genes and the TP53 gene, which causes breast cancer as part of the Li-Fraumeni syndrome. The predisposing mutations in these genes are relatively rare in the population. More common genes which are associated with an increased, but lower, risk of breast cancer are the ataxiatelangiectasia gene and the HRAS1 gene. This paper reviews recent progress in mapping and cloning of these susceptibility genes, and provides estimates of the cancer risks associated with each gene and the frequency of predisposing mutations.

  4. OPTIMIZATION OF DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING IN BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Velichko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of breast imaging for 47200 women. Breast cancer was detected in 862 (1.9% patients, fibroadenoma in 1267 (2.7% patients and isolated breast cysts in 1162 (2.4% patients. Different types of fibrocystic breast disease (adenosis, diffuse fibrocystic changes, local fibrosis and others were observed in 60.1% of women. Problems of breast cancer visualization during mammography, characterized by the appearance of fibrocystic mastopathy (sclerosing adenosis, fibrous bands along the ducts have been analyzed. Data on the development of diagnostic algorithms including the modern techniques for ultrasound and interventional radiology aimed at detecting early breast cancer have been presented.  

  5. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  6. Getting free of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halttunen, Arja; Hietanen, P; Jallinoja, P

    1992-01-01

    who had less thoughts of recurrence belonged to a group that had gone through an eight-week group psychotherapy intervention, were less depressed and had more other illnesses. Women who felt 'cured' had less limitations and restrictions due to cancer and belonged more often to higher social classes......Twenty-two breast cancer patients who were relapse-free and had no need for cancer-related treatment were interviewed 8 years after mastectomy in order to evaluate their feelings of getting free of breast cancer and the meaning of breast cancer in their lives. The study is a part of an intervention...... and follow-up study of 57 breast cancer patients. Half of the 22 patients still had frequent or occasional thoughts of recurrence and over two-thirds still thought they had not been 'cured' of cancer. More than half of the patients admitted that going through breast cancer had made them more mature. Women...

  7. Reproduction and Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanf, Volker; Hanf, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Summary Reproduction is doubtlessly one of the main biological meanings of life. It is therefore not surprising that various aspects of reproduction impact on breast cancer risk. Various developmental levels may become targets of breast tumorigenesis. This review follows the chronologic sequence of events in the life of a female at risk, starting with the intrauterine development. Furthermore, the influence of both contraceptive measures and fertility treatment on breast cancer development is dealt with, as well as various pregnancy-associated factors, events, and perinatal outcomes. Finally, the contribution of breast feeding to a reduced breast cancer risk is discussed. PMID:25759622

  8. BREAST CANCER IN KUMASI, GHANA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    David Ofori-Adjei

    2012-03-01

    Mar 1, 2012 ... SUMMARY. Background: Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in Ghanaian women. Objective: To describes the characteristics of breast cancer patients attending the Komfo Anokye Teaching. Hospital in Kumasi, Ghana. Method: The study was conducted at the Komfo. Anokye Teaching ...

  9. Estrogens and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HANKINSON SUSAN E

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we summarize the epidemiologic evidence for the associations of oral contraceptives and postmenopausal hormones with risk of breast cancer. We also describe the biologic plausibility of these relationships. Overall, there appears to be little, if any, increase in risk with oral contraceptive use in general, even among users for 10 or more years. However, compared to never users, current oral contraceptive users appear to have a modest elevation in risk that subsides within about 10 years after cessation of use. For postmenopausal hormones, the weight of the evidence suggests little or no increase in risk among users of short duration, or for use in the past. However, current longer term use is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer that increases with duration. This increase in risk is large enough, and well enough supported, to be considered along with the other risks and benefits of postmenopausal hormone therapy.

  10. Inflammatory breast cancer in accessory abdominal breast tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy C. Miles, MD, MPH

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Accessory breast tissue results from failure of the embryologic mammary ridge, also known as the milk line, to involute. As a result, ectopic breast tissue can develop anywhere along this ridge, which extends from the axilla—the most common location—to the groin. Primary breast cancer in accessory breast tissue is uncommon but has been reported in multiple prior studies. We present a rare case of inflammatory breast cancer presenting in upper abdominal accessory breast tissue in women with a personal history of ipsilateral breast cancer, and highlight the challenges of both diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer in accessory breast tissue.

  11. Radiation as a cause of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, N.; Silverstone, S.M.

    1976-01-01

    The possible role of radiation as a factor in the causation of breast cancer was investigated. Some variables said to be associated with a high risk of breast cancer include genetic factors, pre-existing breast disease, artificial menopause, family history of breast cancer, failure to breast feed, older than usual age at time of first pregnancy, high socioeconomic status, specific blood groups, fatty diet, obesity, and hormonal imbalances. To this list we must add ionizing radiation as an additional and serious risk factor in the causation of breast cancer. Among the irradiated groups which have an increase in the incidence of cancer of the breast are: tuberculous women subjected to repeated fluoroscopy; women who received localized x-ray treatments for acute post-partum mastitis; atom-bomb survivors; other x-ray exposures involving the breast, including irradiation in children and in experimental animals; and women who were treated with x rays for acne or hirsuitism. The dose of radiation received by the survivors of the atom bomb who subsequently developed cancer of the breast ranged from 80 to 800 rads, the tuberculous women who were fluoroscoped received an estimated 50 to 6,000 rads, the women who were treated for mastitis probably were exposed to 30 to 700 rads, and the patients with acne received 100 to 6,000 rads. These imprecise estimates are compared with mammographic doses in the range of 10s of rads to the breast at each examination, an imprecise estimate depending on technique and equipment. However imprecise these estimates may be, it is apparent that younger women are more likely than older women to develop cancer from exposure to radiation. It is pointed out that the American Cancer Society advises that women under 35 years should have mammography only for medical indication, not for so-called screening

  12. Optimized NSAIDS for Breast Cancer Prevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carson, Dennis A

    2005-01-01

    ...) develop breast cancer less frequently. However, these drugs have side effects toward the stomach, liver and kidneys, particularly at the high doses potentially required to prevent breast cancer...

  13. Functional viability profiles of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brough, Rachel; Frankum, Jessica R; Sims, David; Mackay, Alan; Mendes-Pereira, Ana M; Bajrami, Ilirjana; Costa-Cabral, Sara; Rafiq, Rumana; Ahmad, Amar S; Cerone, Maria Antonietta; Natrajan, Rachael; Sharpe, Rachel; Shiu, Kai-Keen; Wetterskog, Daniel; Dedes, Konstantine J; Lambros, Maryou B; Rawjee, Teeara; Linardopoulos, Spiros; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Turner, Nicholas C; Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan

    2011-08-01

    The design of targeted therapeutic strategies for cancer has largely been driven by the identification of tumor-specific genetic changes. However, the large number of genetic alterations present in tumor cells means that it is difficult to discriminate between genes that are critical for maintaining the disease state and those that are merely coincidental. Even when critical genes can be identified, directly targeting these is often challenging, meaning that alternative strategies such as exploiting synthetic lethality may be beneficial. To address these issues, we have carried out a functional genetic screen in >30 commonly used models of breast cancer to identify genes critical to the growth of specific breast cancer subtypes. In particular, we describe potential new therapeutic targets for PTEN-mutated cancers and for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers. We also show that large-scale functional profiling allows the classification of breast cancers into subgroups distinct from established subtypes. Despite the wealth of molecular profiling data that describe breast tumors and breast tumor cell models, our understanding of the fundamental genetic dependencies in this disease is relatively poor. Using high-throughput RNA interference screening of a series of pharmacologically tractable genes, we have generated comprehensive functional viability profiles for a wide panel of commonly used breast tumor cell models. Analysis of these profiles identifies a series of novel genetic dependencies, including that of PTEN-null breast tumor cells upon mitotic checkpoint kinases, and provides a framework upon which additional dependencies and candidate therapeutic targets may be identified.

  14. Integrated Immunotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    dependent on both direct cytotoxicity and immune-mediated mechanisms. Key characteristics of doxorubicin- induced immunogenic cell death include...rapamycin, bortezomib, etc., IVM is particularly promising because its direct anti-tumor cytotoxic effects can be further expanded through the induction of...selectin mediated adhesive properties of breast cancer cell lines. Biomaterials 33, 9037 (Dec, 2012). 11. Y. Raz, N. Erez, An inflammatory vicious

  15. In situ breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, Luis

    2004-01-01

    In situ breast cancer, particularly the ductal type, is increasing in frequency in the developed countries as well as in Ecuador, most probably. These lesions carry a higher risk of developing a subsequent invasive cancer. Treatment has changed recently due to results of randomized studies, from classical mastectomy to conservative surgery associated to radiotherapy. The Van Nuys Prognostic Index is currently the most usual instrument to guide diagnosis and treatment. Tamoxifen seems to decrease significantly the risk of tumor recurrence after initial treatment. (The author)

  16. Interleukin-19 in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Yin Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory cytokines within the tumor microenvironment are linked to progression in breast cancer. Interleukin- (IL- 19, part of the IL-10 family, contributes to a range of diseases and disorders, such as asthma, endotoxic shock, uremia, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. IL-19 is expressed in several types of tumor cells, especially in squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, tongue, esophagus, and lung and invasive duct carcinoma of the breast. In breast cancer, IL-19 expression is correlated with increased mitotic figures, advanced tumor stage, higher metastasis, and poor survival. The mechanisms of IL-19 in breast cancer have recently been explored both in vitro and in vivo. IL-19 has an autocrine effect in breast cancer cells. It directly promotes proliferation and migration and indirectly provides a microenvironment for tumor progression, which suggests that IL-19 is a prognostic marker in breast cancer and that antagonizing IL-19 may have therapeutic potential.

  17. [Echographic semiotics of cancer of the breast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesnin, A G; Tereshchenko, A O

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of ultrasonic tomograms of 228 cases of breast cancer identified three ultrasonographic patterns of tumor which included seven basic variants. Ultrasonographic features of tumor were compared to their histology. Methods of ultrasonic examination of the breast and processing data are described.

  18. Awareness Of Breast Cancer Screening Among Female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mortality and morbidity rate of carcinoma of the breast among Nigerian women is alarming and is a serious health issue to health professionals especially nurses. The high rate of mortality and morbidity associated with breast cancer can be reduced through early detection measures which include mammography, ...

  19. Axillary staging for breast cancer during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, S N; Amant, F; Cardonick, E H

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Safety of sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy for breast cancer during pregnancy is insufficiently explored. We investigated efficacy and local recurrence rate in a large series of pregnant patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Women diagnosed with breast cancer who underwent SLN biopsy during...... pregnancy were identified from the International Network on Cancer, Infertility and Pregnancy, the German Breast Group, and the Cancer and Pregnancy Registry. Chart review was performed to record technique and outcome of SLN biopsy, locoregional and distant recurrence, and survival. RESULTS: We identified...... were alive and free of disease. Eleven patients experienced a locoregional relapse, including 1 isolated ipsilateral axillary recurrence (0.7%). Eleven (7.6%) patients developed distant metastases, of whom 9 (6.2%) died of breast cancer. No neonatal adverse events related to SLN procedure during...

  20. Behavioral Symptoms after Breast Cancer Treatment: A Biobehavioral Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Fagundes; Angie LeRoy; Maryanne Karuga

    2015-01-01

    Being diagnosed and treated for breast cancer is emotionally and physically challenging. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of death for women in the United States. Accordingly, women with a breast cancer history are the largest group of female cancer survivors. Psychological stress substantially augments adverse autonomic, endocrine, and immune discharge, including enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines. Importantly, inflammation is a k...

  1. Effects of irradiation for cervical cancer on subsequent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harlan, L.C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Previous research suggests that cervical cancer patients have a lower risk of breast cancer than women in the general population. Possible explanations include opposing risk factors for cervical cancer and breast cancer, the effect of irradiation used to treat cervical cancer, or both. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between irradiation for cervical cancer and the subsequent development of breast cancer. There was no statistically significant relationship between radiation to the ovarian area and the risk of breast cancer in this study. However, the results were consistent with a 19% reduction in risk for women irradiated for cervical cancer when compared to nonirradiated women. In a dose-response analysis, there was a nonsignificant trend of decreased risk of breast cancer with increased radiation up to 1800 rad. There was no consistent pattern for higher doses. The trend, although nonsignificant, differed by age. Women <60 years of age at irradiation were generally at a lower risk of breast cancer than nonirradiated women. Women over 59 years were at an increased risk. There are some potentially important findings from this study which might influence medical care. These should be examined in the larger International Radiation Study

  2. Awareness and current knowledge of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Akram, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mehwish; Daniyal, Muhammad; Khan, Asmat Ullah

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer remains a worldwide public health dilemma and is currently the most common tumour in the globe. Awareness of breast cancer, public attentiveness, and advancement in breast imaging has made a positive impact on recognition and screening of breast cancer. Breast cancer is life-threatening disease in females and the leading cause of mortality among women population. For the previous two decades, studies related to the breast cancer has guided to astonishing advancement in our under...

  3. Awareness and current knowledge of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Akram; Mehwish Iqbal; Muhammad Daniyal; Asmat Ullah Khan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer remains a worldwide public health dilemma and is currently the most common tumour in the globe. Awareness of breast cancer, public attentiveness, and advancement in breast imaging has made a positive impact on recognition and screening of breast cancer. Breast cancer is life-threatening disease in females and the leading cause of mortality among women population. For the previous two decades, studies related to the breast cancer has guided to astonishing advancement in ...

  4. Associations Between Cancer Predisposition Testing Panel Genes and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Fergus J; Shimelis, Hermela; Hu, Chunling; Hart, Steven N; Polley, Eric C; Na, Jie; Hallberg, Emily; Moore, Raymond; Thomas, Abigail; Lilyquist, Jenna; Feng, Bingjian; McFarland, Rachel; Pesaran, Tina; Huether, Robert; LaDuca, Holly; Chao, Elizabeth C; Goldgar, David E; Dolinsky, Jill S

    2017-09-01

    Germline pathogenic variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to an increased lifetime risk of breast cancer. However, the relevance of germline variants in other genes from multigene hereditary cancer testing panels is not well defined. To determine the risks of breast cancer associated with germline variants in cancer predisposition genes. A study population of 65 057 patients with breast cancer receiving germline genetic testing of cancer predisposition genes with hereditary cancer multigene panels. Associations between pathogenic variants in non-BRCA1 and non-BRCA2 predisposition genes and breast cancer risk were estimated in a case-control analysis of patients with breast cancer and Exome Aggregation Consortium reference controls. The women underwent testing between March 15, 2012, and June 30, 2016. Breast cancer risk conferred by pathogenic variants in non-BRCA1 and non-BRCA2 predisposition genes. The mean (SD) age at diagnosis for the 65 057 women included in the analysis was 48.5 (11.1) years. The frequency of pathogenic variants in 21 panel genes identified in 41 611 consecutively tested white women with breast cancer was estimated at 10.2%. After exclusion of BRCA1, BRCA2, and syndromic breast cancer genes (CDH1, PTEN, and TP53), observed pathogenic variants in 5 of 16 genes were associated with high or moderately increased risks of breast cancer: ATM (OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 2.22-3.62), BARD1 (OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.31-3.63), CHEK2 (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.31-1.67), PALB2 (OR, 7.46; 95% CI, 5.12-11.19), and RAD51D (OR, 3.07; 95% CI, 1.21-7.88). Conversely, variants in the BRIP1 and RAD51C ovarian cancer risk genes; the MRE11A, RAD50, and NBN MRN complex genes; the MLH1 and PMS2 mismatch repair genes; and NF1 were not associated with increased risks of breast cancer. This study establishes several panel genes as high- and moderate-risk breast cancer genes and provides estimates of breast cancer risk associated with pathogenic variants in these genes among

  5. X-ray examination for breast cancer: Benefit versus risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalrymple, G.V.; Baker, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    Cancer of the breast is the most common malignancy afflicting American women. According to the American Cancer Society, one of 11 women (9 percent) born in the United States today, will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. Twenty-seven percent of all cancers in women and 19 percent of all cancer deaths in women are attributable to breast cancer. In 1982, 112,000 women were found to have cancer of the breast, and 37,000 women died from breast cancer. X-ray examinations of the breast are of considerable value in the diagnosis of breast cancer. This may be especially true in the asymptomatic patient who does not have a palpable mass. These x-ray examinations, however, are associated with both a finite though small risk of induction of cancer of the breasts and even smaller risk of death from cancer of the breast. This chapter presents a brief review of cancer of the breast and discusses the value of diagnostic studies, including x-ray mammography; the benefits and risks associated with x-ray examinations; and the future potential of computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound as imaging modalities in the detection of breast cancer

  6. Overdiagnosis in breast cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Beau, Anna-Belle; Christiansen, Peer

    2017-01-01

    Overdiagnosis in breast cancer screening is an important issue. A recent study from Denmark concluded that one in three breast cancers diagnosed in screening areas in women aged 50-69 years were overdiagnosed. The purpose of this short communication was to disentangle the study's methodology...

  7. Breast cancer in the elderly

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    breast cancer at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Of these, 27. (25.2%) ... age groups wit11 less emphasis 011 the elderly. Breast cancer has, however, been found to be a serious disease in terms of incidence and mor- tality in older women.GJ .... a disease of the relatively young in our environ- men t.

  8. Breast cancer in the elderly

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JhfBK: A I'ccr-mvicw Journal of liiomeclical Scicnccs. July 2002, Vol. 1 No. 1 pp 33-42. Breast cancer in the elderly. ABSTRACT. Between Janua~y 1997 and December 2001,107 patients were admitted and treated for breast cancer at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Of these, 27. (25.2%) were aged 60 ...

  9. Conventional surgery in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapia Herrera, Andres

    2013-01-01

    General aspects of breast cancer were described from the epidemiological point of view, clinical and pathological, as well as its impact at global and national levels. Parenchyma conservative surgery and/or breast skin was analyzed exhaustively as a cancer treatment analyzed exhaustively, to your specifications, requirements, technical aspects, risks, benefits, degree of oncological safety and benefits for patients [es

  10. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-06

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  11. Methylation of Breast Cancer Predisposition Genes in Early-Onset Breast Cancer: Australian Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron M Scott

    Full Text Available DNA methylation can mimic the effects of both germline and somatic mutations for cancer predisposition genes such as BRCA1 and p16INK4a. Constitutional DNA methylation of the BRCA1 promoter has been well described and is associated with an increased risk of early-onset breast cancers that have BRCA1-mutation associated histological features. The role of methylation in the context of other breast cancer predisposition genes has been less well studied and often with conflicting or ambiguous outcomes. We examined the role of methylation in known breast cancer susceptibility genes in breast cancer predisposition and tumor development. We applied the Infinium HumanMethylation450 Beadchip (HM450K array to blood and tumor-derived DNA from 43 women diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 40 years and measured the methylation profiles across promoter regions of BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, PALB2, CDH1, TP53, FANCM, CHEK2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Prior genetic testing had demonstrated that these women did not carry a germline mutation in BRCA1, ATM, CHEK2, PALB2, TP53, BRCA2, CDH1 or FANCM. In addition to the BRCA1 promoter region, this work identified regions with variable methylation at multiple breast cancer susceptibility genes including PALB2 and MLH1. Methylation at the region of MLH1 in these breast cancers was not associated with microsatellite instability. This work informs future studies of the role of methylation in breast cancer susceptibility gene silencing.

  12. Methylation of Breast Cancer Predisposition Genes in Early-Onset Breast Cancer: Australian Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Cameron M; Joo, JiHoon Eric; O'Callaghan, Neil; Buchanan, Daniel D; Clendenning, Mark; Giles, Graham G; Hopper, John L; Wong, Ee Ming; Southey, Melissa C

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation can mimic the effects of both germline and somatic mutations for cancer predisposition genes such as BRCA1 and p16INK4a. Constitutional DNA methylation of the BRCA1 promoter has been well described and is associated with an increased risk of early-onset breast cancers that have BRCA1-mutation associated histological features. The role of methylation in the context of other breast cancer predisposition genes has been less well studied and often with conflicting or ambiguous outcomes. We examined the role of methylation in known breast cancer susceptibility genes in breast cancer predisposition and tumor development. We applied the Infinium HumanMethylation450 Beadchip (HM450K) array to blood and tumor-derived DNA from 43 women diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 40 years and measured the methylation profiles across promoter regions of BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, PALB2, CDH1, TP53, FANCM, CHEK2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Prior genetic testing had demonstrated that these women did not carry a germline mutation in BRCA1, ATM, CHEK2, PALB2, TP53, BRCA2, CDH1 or FANCM. In addition to the BRCA1 promoter region, this work identified regions with variable methylation at multiple breast cancer susceptibility genes including PALB2 and MLH1. Methylation at the region of MLH1 in these breast cancers was not associated with microsatellite instability. This work informs future studies of the role of methylation in breast cancer susceptibility gene silencing.

  13. Green Tea and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Anna H; Butler, Lesley M

    2014-01-01

    The identification of modifiable lifestyle factors that could reduce the risk of breast cancer is a research priority. Despite the enormous chemo preventive potential of green tea and compelling evidence from animal studies, its role in breast cancer development in humans is still unclear. Part of the uncertainty is related to the relatively small number of epidemiological studies on green tea and breast cancer and that the overall results from case-control studies and prospective cohort studies are discordant. In addition, the mechanisms by which green tea intake may influence risk of breast cancer in humans remains not well studied. We review the human studies that have evaluated the relationship between green tea intake and four biomarkers (sex steroid hormones, mammographic density, insulin-like growth factor, adiponectin) that are believed to be important in breast cancer development. Results from these biomarker studies are also inconclusive. Limitations of human studies and areas of further investigations are discussed. PMID:21538855

  14. Radiation-induced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finnerty, N.A.; Buzdar, A.U.; Blumenschein, G.R.

    1984-01-01

    Between 1975 and 1983, sixteen patients with a history of irradiation at an early age to the head, neck, or chest areas for a variety of conditions in whom breast cancer subsequently developed were seen at out institute. The median latent period between the irradiation and the development of breast cancer was 420 months. The distribution of patients by stage of the disease and the median age at diagnosis of this subgroup was similar to the breast cancer observed in the general population. The subsequent course of this disease was also similar to the breast cancer observed in the general population. A substantial number of women have been exposed to irradiation at a young age, and these women are at a higher risk of having breast cancer develop. These women should be closely observed to discover the disease in an early curable stage

  15. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first full-term baby, and certain breast conditions. Obesity is also a risk factor for breast cancer ... with BRCA-1 and BRCA-2 mutations? Does gender of offspring have an ... differences in breast cancer risk. Develop surrogate markers to ...

  16. Worse survival after breast cancer in women with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bens, Annet; Papadopoulos, Fotios C; Pukkala, Eero; Ekbom, Anders; Gissler, Mika; Mellemkjær, Lene

    2018-04-01

    A history of anorexia nervosa has been associated with a reduced risk of developing breast cancer. We investigated survival after breast cancer among women with a prior anorexia nervosa diagnosis compared with women in a population comparison group. This register-based study included combined data from Sweden, Denmark and Finland. A total of 76 and 1462 breast cancer cases identified among 22,654 women with anorexia nervosa and 224,619 women in a population comparison group, respectively, were included in the study. Hazard ratios (HR) for overall and breast cancer-specific mortality after breast cancer diagnosis were estimated using Cox regression. Cause of death was available only for Swedish and Danish women; therefore, the analysis on breast cancer-specific mortality was restricted to these women. We observed 23 deaths after breast cancer among anorexia nervosa patients and 247 among population comparisons. The overall mortality after the breast cancer diagnosis was increased in women with a history of anorexia nervosa compared with population comparisons (HR 2.5, 95% CI 1.6-3.9) after adjustment for age, period and extent of disease. Results were similar for overall (HR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4-3.6) and breast cancer-specific mortality (HR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.6) among Swedish and Danish women. We found that female breast cancer patients with a prior diagnosis of anorexia nervosa have a worse survival compared with other breast cancer patients.

  17. Relationship between Microcalcification and infiltration in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Tai Que; Jeon, Mal Soon; Kim, Yang Sook

    1990-01-01

    Microcalcification is one of the most common findings in breast cancer and most of cases with microcalcification only reveal non infiltrating type of cancer and better prognosis. We analysed 70 cases of breast cancer pathologically proved among 2,115 patients that underwent xermammography from 1983. 10.1 to 1989. 7. 30 and studied relationship between xerographic findings and nature of infiltration in breast cancer. The results were as follows: 1. Among 2,115 patients which were performed xeromammography, 70 cases were pathologically proved breast cancer and incident was 3.3%. 2. Incidence of breast cancer in terms of age was 0.2% in third decade. 1.2% in fourth decade, 4.4% in fifth decade, 14.3% in sixth decade, 15 % over seventh decade. Of total 70 patients, 51 cases were included over fifth decade. 3. Xeromammgraphy findings were classified microcalcification only, mass only, microcalcification with mass. Incidence of xerography findings such as microcalcification only (22%) was less than that of mass density (78%). 4. In 16 cases of microcalcification only. Incidence below 50 years (75%) were more than that over 50 (25%). 5. Infiltrating breast cancers (67%) were more than non-infiltrating breast cancer (33%) and number of non-infiltrating breast cancer with xerographic findings of microcalcification only (56%) was no more than that of infiltrating breast cancer (44%) but number of infiltrating breast cancer with mass (75%) was much more than non-infiltrating breast cancer (25%)

  18. Relationship between Microcalcification and infiltration in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Tai Que; Jeon, Mal Soon; Kim, Yang Sook [Marynoll Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-10-15

    Microcalcification is one of the most common findings in breast cancer and most of cases with microcalcification only reveal non infiltrating type of cancer and better prognosis. We analysed 70 cases of breast cancer pathologically proved among 2,115 patients that underwent xermammography from 1983. 10.1 to 1989. 7. 30 and studied relationship between xerographic findings and nature of infiltration in breast cancer. The results were as follows: 1. Among 2,115 patients which were performed xeromammography, 70 cases were pathologically proved breast cancer and incident was 3.3%. 2. Incidence of breast cancer in terms of age was 0.2% in third decade. 1.2% in fourth decade, 4.4% in fifth decade, 14.3% in sixth decade, 15 % over seventh decade. Of total 70 patients, 51 cases were included over fifth decade. 3. Xeromammgraphy findings were classified microcalcification only, mass only, microcalcification with mass. Incidence of xerography findings such as microcalcification only (22%) was less than that of mass density (78%). 4. In 16 cases of microcalcification only. Incidence below 50 years (75%) were more than that over 50 (25%). 5. Infiltrating breast cancers (67%) were more than non-infiltrating breast cancer (33%) and number of non-infiltrating breast cancer with xerographic findings of microcalcification only (56%) was no more than that of infiltrating breast cancer (44%) but number of infiltrating breast cancer with mass (75%) was much more than non-infiltrating breast cancer (25%)

  19. Eating Disorders and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Katie M; Whelan, Denis R; Sandler, Dale P; Weinberg, Clarice R

    2017-02-01

    Eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa affect overall and reproductive health and may also affect breast cancer risk. We studied the association between self-reported eating disorders and breast cancer risk in a prospective cohort study. In 2003-2009, the Sister Study enrolled women ages 35-74 years who had a sister with breast cancer but had never had it themselves. Using data from 47,813 women, we estimated adjusted HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between eating disorders and invasive breast cancer over a median of 5.4 years of follow-up. Three percent (n = 1,569) of participants reported a history of an eating disorder. Compared with women who never had an eating disorder, women who reported eating disorders in the past had reduced breast cancer risk (HR = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.42-0.92). In this large prospective, observational cohort study, we observed an inverse association between having a history of an eating disorder and invasive breast cancer. Historical eating disorders may be associated with a long-term reduction in breast cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(2); 206-11. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Pregnancy associated breast cancer and pregnancy after breast cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Doğer, Emek; Çalışkan, Eray; Mallmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and its frequency is increasing as more women postpone their pregnancies to their thirties and forties. Breast cancer diagnosis during pregnancy and lactation is difficult and complex both for the patient and doctors. Delay in diagnosis is frequent and treatment modalities are difficult to accept for the pregnant women. The common treatment approach is surgery after diagnosis, chemotherapy after the first trimester and...

  1. Asymptomatic Bladder Metastasis from Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Cormio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Breast cancer is the most common nondermatologic cancer in women. Common metastatic sites include lymph nodes, lung, liver, and bone. Metastases to the bladder are extremely rare, with all reported cases presenting with urinary symptoms. Case Report. Herein, we report the first case of completely asymptomatic bladder metastasis from breast cancer, occasionally revealed, 98 months after the initial diagnosis of lobular breast carcinoma, by a follow-up computed tomography scanning showing thickening of left bladder wall and grade II left hydronephrosis. A positive staining for estrogen and progesterone receptors was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Discussion. The reported case confirms that bladder metastases from breast cancer tend to occur late after the diagnosis of the primary tumor and, for the first time, points out they can be asymptomatic. Conclusion. Such data support the need for careful follow-up and early intervention whenever such clinical situation is suspected.

  2. Screening for Breast Cancer: Detection and Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents Screening ... Breast Cancer" Articles #BeBrave: A life-saving test / Breast Cancer Basics ... and Diagnosis / Staging and Treatment / Selected National Cancer Institute Breast ...

  3. Breast cancer in men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, C.M. de; Villas-Boas, C.L.P.; Koch, H.A.; Nogueira, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    After a study of all cases of masculine breast cancer registered at the INCa from 1983 to 1989, the author present the most usual clinical, radiological and histopathological findings. The ductal infiltrating type of carcinoma was predominant; there were also six cases of secondary implant and two patients who died. The value of this article lies on the opportunity of presenting 11 cases of this pathology, which represent only 0,2% of malignant tumors in men, and to describe its manifestations and call the attention of radiologists for this entity. (author)

  4. Dietary influence on estrogens and cytokines in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Nian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer affects one out of eight women in their lifetime. Many factors contribute to the development of breast cancer, such as hereditary mutations and lifetime exposure to environmental factors, including estrogen. In addition, overweight and obesity, especially with increased waist circumference, are known to be associated with breast cancer risk. This review will summarize our understanding of the effect of diet on breast cancer incidence and progression. Since some inflammatory cytokines that are changed by a high-fat diet are known to promote the growth of breast cancer cells, these cytokines may serve as biomarkers to monitor the dietary influence for women at high risk of breast cancer and as future therapeutic targets for breast cancer treatment.

  5. Breast cancer phenotype, nodal status and palpability may be useful in the detection of overdiagnosed screening-detected breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouckaert, O; Schoneveld, A; Truyers, C; Kellen, E; Van Ongeval, C; Vergote, I; Moerman, P; Floris, G; Wildiers, H; Christiaens, M R; Van Limbergen, E; Neven, P

    2013-07-01

    Breast cancer remains the leading cause of female cancer death despite improvements in treatment and screening. Screening is often criticized for leading to overdiagnosis and overtreatment. However, few have attempted to identify overdiagnosed cases. A large, consecutive series of patients treated for primary operable, screening-detected, breast cancer (n = 1610). Details from pathology and clinical reports, treatment and follow-up were available from our prospectively managed database. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional models were used to study the prognostic variables in screening-detected breast cancers for distant metastatic and breast cancer-specific survival. We included 1610 patients. The mean/median follow-up was 6.0/6.0 years. Univariate analysis: tumor size, palpability, breast cancer phenotype and nodal status were predictors of distant metastasis and breast cancer-specific death. Multivariate analysis: palpability, breast cancer phenotype and nodal status remained independent prognostic variables. Palpability differed by breast cancer phenotype. Screening-detected breast cancer is associated with excellent outcome. Palpability, nodal status and breast cancer phenotype are independent prognostic variables that may select patients at increased risk for distant metastatic relapse and breast cancer-specific death. Overdiagnosed cases reside most likely in the nonpalpable node negative subgroup with a Luminal A phenotype.

  6. Exercise in Targeting Metabolic Dysregulation in Stage I-III Breast or Prostate Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-12

    Cancer Survivor; No Evidence of Disease; Obesity; Overweight; Prostate Carcinoma; Sedentary Lifestyle; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  7. Breast cancer in Kumasi, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohene-Yeboah, M.; Adjei, E.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in Ghanaian women.To describes the characteristics of breast cancer patients attending the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, Ghana.The study was conducted at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital. Between July 1st 2004 and June 30th 2009 patients presenting with breast lumps were assessed by clinical examination, imaging studies and pathological examination. Relevant clinical and pathological were recorded prospectively data on all patients with microscopically proven breast cancer. The cancers were graded according to the modified Bloom-Richardson system. Tissue immunoperoxidase stains for oestrogen, progesterone receptors and c-erb2 oncogene were performed with commercially prepared antigens and reagents.Nineteen thousand four hundred and twenty – three (19,423) patients were seen during the study period. There were 330 (1.7%) patients with histologically proven breast cancer. The mean age was 49.1 years. A palpable breast lump was detected in 248 patients (75.2%). Two hundred and eighty –one patients (85.2%) presented with Stages III and IV , 271 (82.1%) invasive and 230 ( 85.2%) high grade carcinomas. Oestrogen and progesterone receptors were positive in 32 and 9 cases respectively. Her2 protein was positive in 11 cases. In Kumasi, as in other parts of Ghana, breast cancer affects mostly young pre-menopausal who present with advanced disease. The cancers have unfavourable prognostic features and are unlikely to respond to hormonal therapy. (au)

  8. Breast Cancer Patients' Depression Prediction by Machine Learning Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetković, Jovana

    2017-09-14

    One of the most common cancer in females is breasts cancer. This cancer can has high impact on the women including health and social dimensions. One of the most common social dimension is depression caused by breast cancer. Depression can impairs life quality. Depression is one of the symptom among the breast cancer patients. One of the solution is to eliminate the depression in breast cancer patients is by treatments but these treatments can has different unpredictable impacts on the patients. Therefore it is suitable to develop algorithm in order to predict the depression range.

  9. Insulin and Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    hypothesis. Int J Cancer i1995; 62:403-6. 45) Kim YI. Diet, lifestyle and colonrectal cancer : Is hyperinsulinemia the missing link? Nutrition Reviews 1999...with colonrectal cancer , another type of cancer whose etiology has been related to impaired fasting glucose and * hyperinsulinemic insulin resistance...and colonrectal cancer : Is hyperinsulinemia the missing link? Nutrition Reviews 1999; 56:275-9. 46) Kaaks R. Nutrition, hormones, and breast cancer : Is

  10. Aging Impacts Transcriptome but not Genome of Hormone-dependentBreast Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yau, Christina; Fedele, Vita; Roydasgupta, Ritu; Fridlyand, Jane; Hubbard, Alan; Gray, Joe W.; Chew, Karen; Dairkee, Shanaz H.; Moore, DanH.; Schittulli, Francesco; Tommasi, Stefania; Paradiso, Angelo; Albertson, Donna G.; Benz, Christopher C.

    2007-10-09

    Age is one of the most important risk factors for human malignancies, including breast cancer; in addition, age-at-diagnosis has been shown to be an independent indicator of breast cancer prognosis. However, except for inherited forms of breast cancer, there is little genetic or epigenetic understanding of the biological basis linking aging with sporadic breast cancer incidence and its clinical behavior.

  11. Ghrelin receptor agonists as novel breast cancer therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    CHEUK MAN CHERIE AU

    2017-01-01

    The human cell studies and the live mouse studies are intended to provide the information that is needed to apply therapies to treat breast cancer patients, based on our novel discoveries. We believe that des-acyl ghrelin-like compounds will be novel breast cancer therapeutics while avoiding well-documented serious side effects, including joint pain, osteoporosis or endometrial cancer. Our findings could therefore improve the quality of life of women treated for breast cancer, improve complia...

  12. Novel Targeted Therapies for Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0461 TITLE: Novel Targeted Therapies for Inflammatory Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jose Silva CONTRACTING...CONTRACT NUMBER Novel Targeted Therapies for Inflammatory Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0461 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) l 5d...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC, ~5% of all breast cancers ) is the most lethal form of breast cancer , presenting a 5- year

  13. Hierarchical clustering of breast cancer methylomes revealed differentially methylated and expressed breast cancer genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Hsuan Lin

    Full Text Available Oncogenic transformation of normal cells often involves epigenetic alterations, including histone modification and DNA methylation. We conducted whole-genome bisulfite sequencing to determine the DNA methylomes of normal breast, fibroadenoma, invasive ductal carcinomas and MCF7. The emergence, disappearance, expansion and contraction of kilobase-sized hypomethylated regions (HMRs and the hypomethylation of the megabase-sized partially methylated domains (PMDs are the major forms of methylation changes observed in breast tumor samples. Hierarchical clustering of HMR revealed tumor-specific hypermethylated clusters and differential methylated enhancers specific to normal or breast cancer cell lines. Joint analysis of gene expression and DNA methylation data of normal breast and breast cancer cells identified differentially methylated and expressed genes associated with breast and/or ovarian cancers in cancer-specific HMR clusters. Furthermore, aberrant patterns of X-chromosome inactivation (XCI was found in breast cancer cell lines as well as breast tumor samples in the TCGA BRCA (breast invasive carcinoma dataset. They were characterized with differentially hypermethylated XIST promoter, reduced expression of XIST, and over-expression of hypomethylated X-linked genes. High expressions of these genes were significantly associated with lower survival rates in breast cancer patients. Comprehensive analysis of the normal and breast tumor methylomes suggests selective targeting of DNA methylation changes during breast cancer progression. The weak causal relationship between DNA methylation and gene expression observed in this study is evident of more complex role of DNA methylation in the regulation of gene expression in human epigenetics that deserves further investigation.

  14. Epigenetics and Breast Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An T. Vo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several of the active compounds in foods, poisons, drugs, and industrial chemicals may, by epigenetic mechanisms, increase or decrease the risk of breast cancers. Enzymes that are involved in DNA methylation and histone modifications have been shown to be altered in several types of breast and other cancers resulting in abnormal patterns of methylation and/or acetylation. Hypermethylation at the CpG islands found in estrogen response element (ERE promoters occurs in conjunction with ligand-bonded alpha subunit estrogen receptor (Erα dimers wherein the ligand ERα dimer complex acts as a transcription factor and binds to the ERE promoter. Ligands could be 17-β-estradiol (E2, phytoestrogens, heterocyclic amines, and many other identified food additives and heavy metals. The dimer recruits DNA methyltransferases which catalyze the transfer of methyl groups from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM to 5′-cytosine on CpG islands. Other enzymes are recruited to the region by ligand-ERα dimers which activate DNA demethylases to act simultaneously to increase gene expression of protooncogenes and growth-promoting genes. Ligand-ERα dimers also recruit histone acetyltransferase to the ERE promoter region. Histone demethylases such as JMJD2B and histone methyltransferases are enzymes which demethylate lysine residues on histones H3 and/or H4. This makes the chromatin accessible for transcription factors and enzymes.

  15. Diet and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Romieu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Both diet and nutrition have been studied in relationship with breast cancer risk, as the great variation among different countries in breast cancer incidence could possibly be explained through the inflammatory and immune response, as well as antioxidant intake, among others.To date, no clear association with diet beyond overweight and weight gain has been found, except for alcohol consumption. Nonetheless, the small number of studies done in middle to low income countries where variability of food intake is wider,is beginning to show interesting results.Tanto la dieta como la nutrición han sido estudiadas en relación con el riesgo de cáncer de mama, dada la gran variación de incidencia de cáncer entre países, y la posibilidad de explicarla a través de la respuesta inflamatoria o inmune, así como ingesta de antioxidantes,entre otros.Hasta la fecha, ninguna asociación clara con la dieta ha sido encontrada, excepto para el consumo de alcohol, más allá del sobrepeso y del incremento de peso. Sin embargo, los estudios que se están realizando en países de mediano a bajo nivel de ingresos, con mayor variabilidad de ingesta de alimentos, comienzan a mostrar resultados interesantes.

  16. Estrogens in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terzieff, V.; Vázquez, A.

    2004-01-01

    The prolonged exposure to estrogen increases the risk of cancer breast, the precise role of estrogen in the carcinogenesis process is unclear. They are capable of inducing cell proliferation through different channels receptor Estrogen (ER) known, for example through MAPkinasa sensitivity the promoter of proliferation effect depends on the level of RE, or type to â, integrity (mutations may alter its function) and ligand. The different types of estrogens and related compounds have different profile of affinity for RE and effect end. The modulatory role of progestogens proliferation is very complex, and the interaction between the effector pathways of progestin’s, estrogens, EGF and IGF family - maybe others - determines the final effect .. Estrogens are mutagenic per se weak, but is now known for its hepatic metabolism occur highly reactive species such as quinones, and catechol, powerful mutagens in vitro. Direct or indirect genotoxicity probably explains Part of the effects of estrogen on tumor cells. The use of hormone replacement (HTR) increases the risk of CM, as proportional to the time of use. The combination with progestin seems to be increased risk (R R 2). It is unclear the role of phyto estrogens in the prevention the CM. In the male breast is known that the proliferative response to parenchymal different hormonal maneuvers is different. The effect is minimal castration are and maximum with the combination of estrogen and progesterone. It is unclear, however, the risk of the population exposed to hormone therapy for cancer prostate or otherwise

  17. Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication and Breast Cancer Metastasis to Bone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donahue, Henry

    2001-01-01

    .... We found that: 1) expressing the metastasis suppressing gene BRMS1 in diverse cancer cell lines, including breast and melanoma, restores homotypic gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC); 2...

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and improve quality of life . Strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) to relieve pain from cancer that has spread to bones throughout the body. Other treatment options Other treatment options for metastatic breast cancer include: Drug therapy with bisphosphonates or denosumab to reduce bone disease ...

  19. Awareness of Breast Cancer and Breast Self Examination Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Breast cancer is the commonest malignancy affecting women in Nigeria. Regular breast self examination reduces morbidity and mortality from this disease. Objective: To assess the knowledge of breast cancer, breast self examination and practice amongst secondary school teachers in Enugu , Nigeria.

  20. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor E. R. Harris

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT for early stage breast cancer is a technique for partial breast irradiation. There are several technologies in clinical use to perform breast IORT. Regardless of technique, IORT generally refers to the delivery of a single dose of radiation to the periphery of the tumor bed in the immediate intraoperative time frame, although some protocols have performed IORT as a second procedure. There are two large prospective randomized trials establishing the safety and efficacy of breast IORT in early stage breast cancer patients with sufficient follow-up time on thousands of women. The advantages of IORT for partial breast irradiation include: direct visualization of the target tissue ensuring treatment of the high-risk tissue and eliminating the risk of marginal miss; the use of a single dose coordinated with the necessary surgical excision thereby reducing omission of radiation and the selection of mastectomy for women without access to a radiotherapy facility or unable to undergo several weeks of daily radiation; favorable toxicity profiles; patient convenience and cost savings; radiobiological and tumor microenvironment conditions which lead to enhanced tumor control. The main disadvantage of IORT is the lack of final pathologic information on the tumor size, histology, margins, and nodal status. When unexpected findings on final pathology such as positive margins or positive sentinel nodes predict a higher risk of local or regional recurrence, additional whole breast radiation may be indicated, thereby reducing some of the convenience and low-toxicity advantages of sole IORT. However, IORT as a tumor bed boost has also been studied and appears to be safe with acceptable toxicity. IORT has potential efficacy advantages related to overall survival related to reduced cardiopulmonary radiation doses. It may also be very useful in specific situations, such as prior to oncoplastic reconstruction to improve accuracy of

  1. Breast cancer metastatic to the kidney with renal vein involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasu, Hatsuko; Miura, Katsutoshi; Baba, Megumi; Nagata, Masao; Yoshida, Masayuki; Ogura, Hiroyuki; Takehara, Yasuo; Sakahara, Harumi

    2015-02-01

    The common sites of breast cancer metastases include bones, lung, brain, and liver. Renal metastasis from the breast is rare. We report a case of breast cancer metastatic to the kidney with extension into the renal vein. A 40-year-old woman had undergone left mastectomy for breast cancer at the age of 38. A gastric tumor, which was later proved to be metastasis from breast cancer, was detected by endoscopy. Computed tomography performed for further examination of the gastric tumor revealed a large left renal tumor with extension into the left renal vein. It mimicked a primary renal tumor. Percutaneous biopsy of the renal tumor confirmed metastasis from breast cancer. Surgical intervention of the stomach and the kidney was avoided, and she was treated with systemic chemotherapy. Breast cancer metastatic to the kidney may present a solitary renal mass with extension into the renal vein, which mimics a primary renal tumor.

  2. The Effect of Simvastatin on Breast Cancer Cell Growth in Women With Stage I-II Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-02

    Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage I Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IA Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IB Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIB Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  3. Axillary Lymph Nodes and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... white blood cells that help fight illness. If breast cancer spreads, the lymph nodes in the underarm (called ... if they contain cancer cells. This helps determine breast cancer stage and guide treatment. Sentinel node biopsy and ...

  4. Summer Student Breast Cancer Research Training Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zaloga, Gary P

    2005-01-01

    ... projects addressed the effects of omega-3 lipids upon breast cancer cells. 0mega-3 lipids were found to decrease breast cancer-induced muscle cell proteolysis and to induce apoptosis in cancer cells...

  5. Gastric Metastasis of Ectopic Breast Cancer Mimicking Axillary Metastasis of Primary Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selami Ilgaz Kayılıoğlu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic breast tissue has the ability to undergo all the pathological changes of the normal breast, including breast cancer. Gastrointestinal metastasis of breast cancer is rarely observed and it is very difficult to differentiate gastric metastases from primary gastric cancer. We present a case of 52-year-old female, who suffered from abdominal pain. Physical examination showed a palpable mass in the left anterior axilla and computerized tomography revealed gastric wall thickening with linitis plastica. When gastroscopic biopsy showed no signs of malignancy, excisional biopsy was performed in the left axilla. Histological examination revealed invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast, consistent with ectopic breast cancer. Further gastroscopic submucosal biopsies and immunohistochemical studies revealed gastric metastases of invasive lobular carcinoma. Axillary ectopic breast tissue carcinomas can mimic axillary lymphadenopathies. Additionally, gastric metastasis of breast cancer is an uncommon but possible condition. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of ectopic breast cancer with gastric metastasis.

  6. Breast cancer incidence in Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altantsetseg, Dalkhjav; Davaasambuu, Ganmaa; Rich-Edwards, Janet; Davaalkham, Dambadarjaa; Tretli, Steinar; Hoover, Robert N.; Frazier, A. Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Data on international variation in breast cancer incidence may help to identify additional risk factors. Substantially lower breast cancer rates in Asia than in North America and Western Europe are established, but differences within Asia have been largely ignored despite heterogeneity in lifestyles and environments. Mongolia’s breast cancer experience is of interest because of its shared genetics but vastly different diet compared with other parts of Asia. Methods Age-standardized breast cancer incidence and mortality rates obtained from the International Association of Cancer Registries are presented for several Asian countries. Mongolian incidence rates obtained from its cancer registry describe incidence within the country. Results Breast cancer incidence in Mongolia (age standardized 8.0/100,000) is almost a third of rates in China (21.6/100,000), and over five times that of Japan (42.7/100,000) and Russia (43.2/100,000). Rates within Mongolia appear to have increased slightly over the last decade and are higher in urban than rural areas (annual percentage increase of age-standardized rates from 1998 to 2005 was 3.60 and 2.57%, respectively). The increase in breast cancer incidence with age plateaus at menopause, as in other Asian populations. Conclusions Mongolia’s low breast cancer incidence is of particular interest because of their unusual diet (primarily red meat and dairy) compared with other Asian countries. More intensive study of potential dietary, reproductive and lifestyle factors in Mongolia with comparison to other Asian populations may provide more clarity in what drives the international breast cancer rate differences. PMID:22543542

  7. Miscellaneous syndromes and their management: occult breast cancer, breast cancer in pregnancy, male breast cancer, surgery in stage IV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colfry, Alfred John

    2013-04-01

    Surgical therapy for occult breast cancer has traditionally centered on mastectomy; however, breast conservation with whole breast radiotherapy followed by axillary lymph node dissection has shown equivalent results. Patients with breast cancer in pregnancy can be safely and effectively treated; given a patient's pregnancy trimester and stage of breast cancer, a clinician must be able to guide therapy accordingly. Male breast cancer risk factors show strong association with BRCA2 mutations, as well as Klinefelter syndrome. Several retrospective trials of surgical therapy in stage IV breast cancer have associated a survival advantage with primary site tumor extirpation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Association of ABO and Rh blood groups with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Suraya, Faryal; Jamil, Badar; Rouq, Fwziah Al; Meo, Anusha Sultan; Sattar, Kamran; Ansari, Mohammad Javed; Alasiri, Saleh A

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association of "ABO" and "Rhesus" blood groups with incidence of breast cancer. In this study, we identified 70 research documents from data based search engines including "PubMed", "ISI-Web of Knowledge", "Embase" and "Google Scholar". The research papers were selected by using the primary key-terms including "ABO blood type", "Rhesus" blood type and "breast cancer". The research documents in which "ABO" and "Rhesus" blood types and breast cancer was debated were included. After screening, we reviewed 32 papers and finally we selected 25 research papers which met the inclusion criteria and remaining documents were excluded. Blood group "A" has high incidence of breast cancer (45.88%), blood group "O" has (31.69%); "B" (16.16%) and blood group "AB" has (6.27%) incidence of breast cancer. Blood group "A" has highest and blood group "AB" has least association with breast cancer. Furthermore, "Rhesus +ve" blood group has high incidence of breast cancer (88.31%) and "Rhesus -ve" blood group has least association with breast cancer (11.68%). Blood group "A" and "Rhesus +ve" have high risk of breast cancer, while blood type "AB" and "Rhesus -ve" are at low peril of breast cancer. Physicians should carefully monitor the females with blood group "A" and "Rh +ve" as these females are more prone to develop breast cancer. To reduce breast cancer incidence and its burden, preventive and screening programs for breast cancer especially in young women are highly recommended.

  9. Reappraising antiangiogenic therapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerbel, Robert S

    2011-10-01

    Phase III trials of antiangiogenic drugs for metastatic breast cancer have either had only limited success, e.g. the monoclonal anti-VEGF antibody bevacizumab when used with various conventional chemotherapy regimens, or have failed altogether, e.g. the small molecule oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) sunitinib. No phase III trial has yet demonstrated an overall survival benefit and the progression free survival (PFS) benefits, when attained with bevacizumab are short, with perhaps one exception. Together, these results call for a reappraisal of using antiangiogenic drugs for breast cancer and possible strategies to improve their efficacy. Among the reasons to help explain the limited benefits observed thus far include the possibility that angiogenesis may not be a major driver of breast cancer growth, compared to some other types of cancer; that acquired resistance may develop rapidly to VEGF-pathway targeting antiangiogenic drugs, in part due to angiogenic growth factor redundancy; that optimal chemotherapy regimens have not been used in conjunction with an antiangiogenic drug; and that antiangiogenic drugs may secondarily aggravate biologic aggressiveness of the tumors, thereby reducing their overall efficacy after inducing an initial benefit. Several possible strategies are discussed for improving the efficacy of antiangiogenic drugs, including combination with different chemotherapy regimens, e.g. long term and less toxic metronomic chemotherapy protocols; validation of predictive biomarkers to individualize patient therapy; development of improved preclinical therapy models, e.g. involving advanced metastatic breast cancer, and combination with other types of anti-cancer agents especially biologies such as trastuzumab for Her2-positive breast cancer. Reasons for the current concern regarding use of antiangiogenic drug treatments for early stage cancers, including breast cancer, are also discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mammographic detection of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homer, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Mammography, whether film or xerography, is a complementary examination to breast palpation in the detection of breast cancer. According to the guidelines of the American Cancer Society, mammography should be performed on every asymptomatic woman, at least once, over the age of 35. Annual mammography after 50 is also advised. The radiation dose to the breast from current equipment is so low as to not be considered a factor in denying a woman this screening examination. Mammography has a role in evaluating the woman with solitary and multiple breast masses. It is the only proved reliable modality able to detect nonpalpable breast cancers and small tumors less than 2 cm in size. All nonpalpable lesions should be excised by directed biopsy, using a preoperative localization technique

  11. CONTINUING EDUCATION 111 Breast Cancer In Pregnancy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reported overall survival rate for breast cancer in pregnancy is poor,. reflecting the more advanced stage of the disease at diagnosis. An approach to the management of breast cancer in pregnancy is presented by a case illustration and a review of literature. KEY WORDS: Breast Cancer, Pregnancy, Management breast ...

  12. Breast cancer cell lines: friend or foe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdall, Sarah E; Hanby, Andrew M; Lansdown, Mark RJ; Speirs, Valerie

    2003-01-01

    The majority of breast cancer research is conducted using established breast cancer cell lines as in vitro models. An alternative is to use cultures established from primary breast tumours. Here, we discuss the pros and cons of using both of these models in translational breast cancer research

  13. Influence of diabetes mellitus on mortality in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yunhai; Zhang, Xiang; Gu, Chen; Xia, Jiazeng

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant tumours among women worldwide. Besides, diabetes mellitus is also a major health problem in developed countries. This study explores the association between diabetes mellitus and breast cancer patients' survival outcomes. A systematic literature search in Embase (http://www.embase.com) and MEDLINE (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed) was conducted from January 1960 to April 2014 and systematically identified clinical studies that evaluated the association between breast cancer mortality and diabetes mellitus. Clinical studies investigating the association between diabetes mellitus and breast cancer patients' survival outcomes were included. Twenty publications were chosen for the meta-analysis, of which 16 studies had all-cause mortality data and 12 studies had breast cancer mortality data. Published from 2001 to 2013, all 20 studies followed a total of 2,645,249 patients including more than 207,832 diabetic patients. Pre-existing diabetes mellitus was associated with a 37% increased risk for all-cause mortality in women with breast cancer (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.37; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.34-1.41; P = 0.02). Diabetes mellitus was associated with a 17% increased risk for breast cancer mortality in women with breast cancer (HR = 1.17; 95% CI: 1.11-1.22; P diabetes mellitus are at higher risk of breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality after initial breast cancer diagnosis. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  14. Awareness of Breast Cancer and Practice of Breast Self ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objective: Breast cancer is the commonest cancer among women in globally and in Nigeria. In Nigeria, cases of breast cancer cases have been prevalent for three decades and more than 90% of cases can be detected by women themselves through breast self – examination. The objective of this study ...

  15. The prognostic analysis of clinical breast cancer subtypes among patients with liver metastases from breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiao Feng; Dong, Na Na; Zhang, Ti; Li, Qiang

    2013-02-01

    To determine whether the inferior outcome noted with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) reflects a higher risk population among patients with breast cancer liver metastases. A total of 123 patients with breast cancer liver metastases diagnosed at Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital were included in this study. Breast cancer subtype was assigned using immunohistochemistry or fluorescence in situ hybridization: hormone receptor (HR) positive (+)/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negative (-), HR+/HER2+, HR-/HER2+ and triple-negative subtype. Clinical features and survival were evaluated in different subtypes. The median age at breast cancer diagnosis was 47 years (range, 23-67 years). Breast cancer subtype was confirmed in all patients (39.8% with HR+/HER2-, 24.4% with HR+/HER2+, 15.3% with HR-/HER2+ and 20.3% with TNBC). The median overall survival after liver metastases was 29 months (range, 4-89 months), and the overall 1-, 2- and 3-year survival rate was 68.3, 48.0 and 34.1%, respectively. Survival was found to be impacted by breast cancer subtype (P = 0.001), and was shortest for patients with TNBC. Time to liver metastases (TTLM) less than 24 months and liver metastasis lesions ≥3 were found to be important predictors of poor survival after liver metastases (P = 0.009 and 0.001, respectively). The results indicate that clinical breast cancer subtype remains an independent prognostic predictor among patients with breast cancer liver metastases. Liver metastases arising from TNBC confers the worst prognosis, and novel agents capable of controlling intrahepatic and extrahepatic TNBC are needed.

  16. Prognosis of synchronous bilateral breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Marianne; Tjønneland, Anne; Balslev, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Currently, no consistent evidence-based guidelines for the management of synchronous bilateral breast cancer (SBBC) exist and it is uncertain how presenting with SBBC affects patients' prognosis. We conducted a review of studies analyzing the association between SBBC and prognosis. The studies...... that reported adjusted effect measures were included in meta-analyses of effect of bilaterality on breast cancer mortality. From 57 initially identified records 17 studies from 11 different countries including 8,050 SBBC patients were included. The quality of the studies varied but was generally low with small...... sample sizes, and lack of consistent, detailed histo-pathological information. When doing meta-analysis on the subgroup of studies that provided adjusted effect estimates on breast cancer mortality (nine studies including 3,631 SBBC cases), we found that bilaterality in itself had a negative impact...

  17. Hormones, Women and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... women who • Are older • Have no children • Delayed pregnancy until after age 30 • Have used combination hormone therapy (estrogen plus progestin) for more than five years • Have a mother, sister, or daughter who has had breast cancer Did you know? Breast pain alone is not ...

  18. Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-08

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  19. [Trisomy 21 and breast cancer: A genetic abnormality which protects against breast cancer?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel-Billard, C; Cordier, C; Tomasetto, C; Jégu, J; Mathelin, C

    2016-04-01

    Trisomy 21 (T21) is the most common chromosomal abnormality and one of the main causes of intellectual disability. The tumor profile of T21 patients is characterized by the low frequency of solid tumors including breast cancer. The objective of this work was to analyze the literature to find possible clues for the low frequency of breast cancer in T21 persons with a focus on one hand to the various risks and protective factors against breast cancer for women T21, and on the other hand to changes in the expression of different genes located on chromosome 21. T21 women have hormonal and societal risk factors for breast cancer: frequent nulliparity, lack of breastfeeding, physical inactivity and high body mass index. The age of menopause, earlier in T21 women, has a modest protective effect against breast cancer. The low rate of breast tumors in T21 women is probably mainly linked to the reduced life expectancy compared to the general population (risk of death before the age of onset of the majority of breast cancers) and the presence of a third chromosome 21, characterizing the disease. It might lead to the increased expression of a number of genes contributing directly or undirectly to tumor suppression, decreased tumor angiogenesis and increased cell apoptosis. Moreover, changes in the mammary stroma of persons T21 could have an inhibitory role on the development of breast tumors. The low frequency of breast cancers for T21 patients may not only be explained by hormonal and societal factors, but also by genetic mechanisms which could constitute an interesting axis of research in breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents ... the time a woman is taking the pills, notes Leslie Ford, M.D., associate director for NCI's ...

  1. Melatonin, Aging and Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hill, Steven

    2001-01-01

    ... conditions for tumor induction, promotion and progression. The pineal gland, via its hormone melatonin, has been shown by numerous laboratories to inhibit the proliferation of both human and animal models of breast cancer...

  2. MHC Genes and Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pillai, Shiv

    2000-01-01

    Tumors are believed to emerge only when immune surveillance fails. We wished to ascertain whether the failure to inherit putative protective alleles of HLA class II genes is linked to the development of breast cancer...

  3. Molecular genetics of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radice, P.; Pierotti, M. A. [Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy). Division of Experimental Oncology

    1997-09-01

    In the last two decades, molecular studies have enlightened the complexity of the genetic alterations that occur in breast cancer cells. To date, more than 40 different genes or loci have been found to be altered in breast carcinomas. Although some of these genes, as for example ERBB2, appear to be mutated in a high proportion of cases, their mechanism of action and their role in the different stages of cancer development are still poorly understood. More recently, two major determinants of the inherited predisposition to breast cancer, BRCA1 and BRCA2, have been isolated. As a consequence, it is now possible to screen families with a positive history of breast carcinomas for the identification of mutations carriers, in order to address these individuals into adequate programs of cancer surveillance and prevention.

  4. Palbociclib for Advanced Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    An interim analysis of the PALOMA3 trial shows that women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer who received palbociclib plus fulvestrant had longer progression-free survival rates than women who received a placebo plus fulvestrant.

  5. Decline in breast cancer mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njor, Sisse Helle; Schwartz, Walter; Blichert-Toft, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Funen/rest of Denmark. As multidisciplinary teams were introduced gradually in the rest of Denmark from 1994, the screening effect was slightly underestimated. RESULTS: Over 14 years, women targeted by screening in Funen experienced a 22% (95% confidence interval 11%-32%) reduction in breast cancer......OBJECTIVES: When estimating the decline in breast cancer mortality attributable to screening, the challenge is to provide valid comparison groups and to distinguish the screening effect from other effects. In Funen, Denmark, multidisciplinary breast cancer management teams started before screening...... was introduced; both activities came later in the rest of Denmark. Because Denmark had national protocols for breast cancer treatment, but hardly any opportunistic screening, Funen formed a "natural experiment", providing valid comparison groups and enabling the separation of the effect of screening from other...

  6. Cadherin-11 and Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Byers, Stephen W

    2005-01-01

    .... In year one of this grant we showed that the presence of the cadherin-11 splice variant promotes invasion of cadherin-11 positive breast cancer cells, perhaps by promoting cell-ECM interactions...

  7. Molecular genetics of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radice, P.; Pierotti, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    In the last two decades, molecular studies have enlightened the complexity of the genetic alterations that occur in breast cancer cells. To date, more than 40 different genes or loci have been found to be altered in breast carcinomas. Although some of these genes, as for example ERBB2, appear to be mutated in a high proportion of cases, their mechanism of action and their role in the different stages of cancer development are still poorly understood. More recently, two major determinants of the inherited predisposition to breast cancer, BRCA1 and BRCA2, have been isolated. As a consequence, it is now possible to screen families with a positive history of breast carcinomas for the identification of mutations carriers, in order to address these individuals into adequate programs of cancer surveillance and prevention

  8. Understanding your breast cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... provider about the risks and benefits before taking hormone therapy . You may want to avoid taking estrogen combined with progesterone or progestin. If you have a family history of breast cancer, ask your provider about genetic ...

  9. The Adjunctive Digital Breast Tomosynthesis in Diagnosis of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Lung Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT and digital mammography (DM for breast cancers. Materials and Methods. Fifty-seven female patients with pathologically proved breast cancer were enrolled. Three readers gave a subjective assessment superiority of the index lesions (mass, focal asymmetry, architectural distortion, or calcifications and a forced BIRADS score, based on DM reading alone and with additional DBT information. The relevance between BIRADS category and index lesions of breast cancer was compared by chi-square test. Result. A total of 59 breast cancers were reviewed, including 17 (28.8% mass lesions, 12 (20.3% focal asymmetry/density, 6 (10.2% architecture distortion, 23 (39.0% calcifications, and 1 (1.7% intracystic tumor. Combo DBT was perceived to be more informative in 58.8% mass lesions, 83.3% density, 94.4% architecture distortion, and only 11.6% calcifications. As to the forced BIRADS score, 84.4% BIRADS 0 on DM was upgraded to BIRADS 4 or 5 on DBT, whereas only 27.3% BIRADS 4A on DM was upgraded on DBT, as BIRADS 4A lesions were mostly calcifications. A significant P value (<0.001 between the BIRADS category and index lesions was noted. Conclusion. Adjunctive DBT gives exquisite information for mass lesion, focal asymmetry, and/or architecture distortion to improve the diagnostic performance in mammography.

  10. The adjunctive digital breast tomosynthesis in diagnosis of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tsung-Lung; Liang, Huei-Lung; Chou, Chen-Pin; Huang, Jer-Shyung; Pan, Huay-Ben

    2013-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and digital mammography (DM) for breast cancers. Fifty-seven female patients with pathologically proved breast cancer were enrolled. Three readers gave a subjective assessment superiority of the index lesions (mass, focal asymmetry, architectural distortion, or calcifications) and a forced BIRADS score, based on DM reading alone and with additional DBT information. The relevance between BIRADS category and index lesions of breast cancer was compared by chi-square test. A total of 59 breast cancers were reviewed, including 17 (28.8%) mass lesions, 12 (20.3%) focal asymmetry/density, 6 (10.2%) architecture distortion, 23 (39.0%) calcifications, and 1 (1.7%) intracystic tumor. Combo DBT was perceived to be more informative in 58.8% mass lesions, 83.3% density, 94.4% architecture distortion, and only 11.6% calcifications. As to the forced BIRADS score, 84.4% BIRADS 0 on DM was upgraded to BIRADS 4 or 5 on DBT, whereas only 27.3% BIRADS 4A on DM was upgraded on DBT, as BIRADS 4A lesions were mostly calcifications. A significant P value (BIRADS category and index lesions was noted. Adjunctive DBT gives exquisite information for mass lesion, focal asymmetry, and/or architecture distortion to improve the diagnostic performance in mammography.

  11. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Britton, Kelly M.; Kirby, John A.; Lennard, Thomas W.J.; Meeson, Annette P.

    2011-01-01

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative....

  12. Radiofrequency Tagged Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-19

    Positive Axillary Lymph Node; Stage 0 Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage I Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IA Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IB Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIB Breast Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer AJCC v7

  13. Breast cancer and spaceflight: risk and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Yael R; Bacal, Kira; Jones, Jeffrey A; Hamilton, Douglas R

    2007-04-01

    Spaceflight exposes astronauts to a host of environmental factors which could increase their risk for cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown an increased incidence of breast cancer in female commercial flight attendants, with occupational risk factors as one of the proposed mechanisms for the higher incidence in this cohort. Since female astronauts are exposed to similar occupational conditions as flight attendants, they too may be at an increased risk for breast cancer. With the planning of exploration class missions to the Moon and to Mars it is important to assess and minimize the risk for breast malignancy, and to have a well-defined protocol for the diagnosis and treatment of a breast mass discovered during a mission. Risk factors for development of breast cancer in the female astronaut include ionizing radiation, disrupted melatonin homeostasis secondary to circadian shifting, chemical exposure, and changes in immune function. Preflight, in-flight, and postflight screening and management modalities include imaging and fine needle aspiration (FNA). Employing such a strategy may provide a viable management approach in the case of a newly diagnosed breast mass inflight.

  14. The Breast Cancer DNA Interactome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    RG . Demonstration of receptors for insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 on Hs578T human breast cancer cells. J Biol Chem. 1993;268:26045-8...Interaction Profiles in Breast Cancer Reveal Altered Chromatin Architecture Michael J. Zeitz1*, Ferhat Ay2, Julia D. Heidmann1, Paula L. Lerner1...Illumina sequencing data have been submitted to the GEO database accession number: GSE49521. Mapping and Filtering of 4C Reads We first de -multiplexed the

  15. Increased risk for depression after breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suppli, Nis P; Johansen, Christoffer; Christensen, Jane

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the risk for first depression, assessed as incident hospital contacts for depression and incident use of antidepressants, among women with breast cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Danish national registries were used to identify 1,997,669 women with no diagnosis of cancer...... or a major psychiatric disorder. This cohort was followed from 1998 to 2011 for a diagnosis of breast cancer and for the two outcomes, hospital contact for depression and redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants. Rate ratios for incident hospital contacts for depression and incident use of antidepressants...... associated with use of antidepressants. CONCLUSION: Women with breast cancer are at long-term increased risk for first depression, including both severe episodes leading to hospital contact and use of antidepressants. Clinicians should be aware that the risk is highest in women with comorbid conditions, node...

  16. Iodide transport and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Vikki L; McCabe, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the leading cause of cancer death in women, with incidence rates that continue to rise. The heterogeneity of the disease makes breast cancer exceptionally difficult to treat, particularly for those patients with triple-negative disease. To address the therapeutic complexity of these tumours, new strategies for diagnosis and treatment are urgently required. The ability of lactating and malignant breast cells to uptake and transport iodide has led to the hypothesis that radioiodide therapy could be a potentially viable treatment for many breast cancer patients. Understanding how iodide is transported, and the factors regulating the expression and function of the proteins responsible for iodide transport, is critical for translating this hypothesis into reality. This review covers the three known iodide transporters - the sodium iodide symporter, pendrin and the sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporter - and their role in iodide transport in breast cells, along with efforts to manipulate them to increase the potential for radioiodide therapy as a treatment for breast cancer. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  17. BILATERAL BREAST CANCER: DIAGNOSIS AND PROGNOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursaru, Manuela; Jari, Irma; Gheorghe, Liliana; Naum, A G; Scripcariu, V; Negru, D

    2016-01-01

    To assess bilateral breast cancer patients, initially diagnosed with stage II unilateral breast cancer. 113 patients with stage 0-II breast cancer diagnosed between 1983 and 2011 were assessed. Of these, 8 patients had bilateral breast cancer: 7 patients with metachronous bilateral breast cancer and 1 patient with synchronous breast cancer. Breast ultrasound, mammography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were used to diagnose recurrence, loco regional and distant metastasis. Age at diagnosis ranged from 37 to 59 years, with a maximum age incidence in the 4th decade (age between: 31-40 years). The average time interval between the two breast cancers was 8.125 years. The most common histological type was invasive ductal carcinoma. All eight patients with bilateral breast cancer had at least one type of recurrence/metastasis, mostly in the liver, and statistically the pleuropulmonary and liver metastases were the most frequent causes of death. Patients in the 4th decade diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer are at risk of developing bilateral breast cancer. In metachronous breast cancer, the time interval between the detection of the second breast cancer and death is directly proportional to the time interval between the two breast cancers. TASTASES, DEATH.

  18. Chemoprevention of Breast Cancer by Dietary Polyphenols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Magdalena Mocanu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The review will discuss in detail the effects of polyphenols on breast cancer, including both the advantages and disadvantages of the applications of these natural compounds. First, we focus on the characterization of the main classes of polyphenols and then on in vitro and in vivo experiments carried out in breast cancer models. Since the therapeutic effects of the administration of a single type of polyphenol might be limited because of the reduced bioavailability of these drugs, investigations on combination of several polyphenols or polyphenols with conventional therapy will also be discussed. In addition, we present recent data focusing on clinical trials with polyphenols and new approaches with nanoparticles in breast cancer. Besides the clinical and translational findings this review systematically summarizes our current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer effects of polyphenols, which are related to apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, plasma membrane receptors, signaling pathways and epigenetic mechanisms. At the same time the effects of polyphenols on primary tumor, metastasis and angiogenesis in breast cancer are discussed. The increasing enthusiasm regarding the combination of polyphenols and conventional therapy in breast cancer might lead to additional efforts to motivate further research in this field.

  19. Carcinoma showing thymus-like elements of the thyroid gland: report of three cases including one case with breast cancer history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guanjun; Liu, Xi; Huang, Wei; Li, Xiaofeng; Johnstone, Marianne; Deng, Yuan; Ke, Yongqiang; Nunes, Quentin M; Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Yili; Zhang, Xuebin

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoma showing thymus-like elements (CASTLE) is a rare malignant tumor of the thyroid or adjacent neck soft tissues, whose histogenesis is still debated. It may resemble other primary or metastatic poorly differentiated tumors histologically and the differential diagnosis is crucial for CASTLE has a better prognosis. However, CASTLE as a second primary tumor has not been reported in the literature. We report three cases of thyroid CASTLE, including a unique tumor following breast-conserving surgery for early-stage breast invasive carcinoma. There were two female and one male. All three tumors were located in the right lobe of the thyroid, and one tumor showed extension into the surrounding soft tissue. Histologically, all tumors showed expansive growth and consisted of cords, nests or sheets of epithelial cells divided into irregularly shaped lobules by fibrous connective tissue with lymphoplasmacytic infiltration. Focal squamous differentiation resembling Hassall's corpuscles were observed. All cases stained positively for CD5, CD117, high molecular weight cytokeratin, cytokeratin, P63, carcinoembryonic antigen and epithelial membrane antigen. Positive staining for Bcl-2 in two cases and chromogranin A in one case was noted. Ki-67 expression ranged from 15 to 25%. Thyroid transcription factor and CD3 were negative. There was no evidence of recurrent or metastatic disease at following surgery. These features demonstrated CASTLE may arise from branchial pouch remnants, the thyroid solid cell nests. CASTLE is a rare entity, awareness of its occurrence as a second primary tumor is important to avoid overtreatment because it is associated with a favorable prognosis.

  20. Prognosis of pregnancy-associated breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guek Eng; Mayer, Erica L; Partridge, Ann

    2017-06-01

    Conventionally, breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and within the years following have been referred to collectively as pregnancy-associated breast cancer. However, increasing evidence suggests that breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy is a different entity from that diagnosed postpartum, both in terms of prognosis and biology. Given the increasing number of women who find themselves diagnosed with breast cancer during or following a pregnancy, future research and discussion should separate these two into distinct groups: breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and breast cancer diagnosed postpartum in an effort to enhance our understanding to inform and improve clinical management and counseling.

  1. Family History of Cancer in Relation to Breast Cancer Subtypes in African American Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethea, Traci N; Rosenberg, Lynn; Castro-Webb, Nelsy; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Ruiz-Narváez, Edward A; Charlot, Marjory; Park, Song-Yi; Bandera, Elisa V; Troester, Melissa A; Ambrosone, Christine B; Palmer, Julie R

    2016-02-01

    The evidence on the relation of family history of cancers other than breast cancer to breast cancer risk is conflicting, and most studies have not assessed specific breast cancer subtypes. We assessed the relation of first-degree family history of breast, prostate, lung, colorectal, ovarian, and cervical cancer and lymphoma or leukemia, to the risk of estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)), ER(-), and triple-negative breast cancer in data from the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk Consortium. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to calculate ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI). There were 3,023 ER(+) and 1,497 ER(-) breast cancer cases (including 696 triple-negative cases) and 17,420 controls. First-degree family history of breast cancer was associated with increased risk of each subtype: OR = 1.76 (95% CI, 1.57-1.97) for ER(+), 1.67 (1.42-1.95) for ER(-), and 1.72 (1.38-2.13) for triple-negative breast cancer. Family history of cervical cancer was associated with increased risk of ER(-) (OR = 2.39; 95% CI, 1.36-4.20), but not ER(+) cancer. Family history of both breast and prostate cancer was associated with increased risk of ER(+) (3.40; 2.42-4.79) and ER(-) (2.09; 1.21-3.63) cancer, but family history of both breast and lung cancer was associated only with ER(-) cancer (2.11; 1.29-3.46). A family history of cancers other than breast may influence the risk of breast cancer, and associations may differ by subtype. Greater surveillance and counseling for additional screening may be warranted for women with a family history of cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Optical Imaging in Breast Cancer Diagnosis: The Next Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Herranz, Michel; Ruibal, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers among the population of the Western world. Diagnostic methods include mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance; meanwhile, nuclear medicine techniques have a secondary role, being useful in regional assessment and therapy followup. Optical imaging is a very promising imaging technique that uses near-infrared light to assess optical properties of tissues and is expected to play an important role in breast cancer detection. Optical breast i...

  3. Combined doxorubicin and paclitaxel in advanced breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehl, J; Boesgaard, M; Paaske, T

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Paclitaxel has shown activity in metastatic breast cancer, including anthracycline-resistant breast cancer. The efficacy, toxicity and optimal scheduling of the combination of the two drugs needs to be defined. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty women with advanced breast cancer who had...... of doxorubicin and paclitaxel is highly active, but is accompanied by the dose-limiting toxic effects of neutropenia, neuropathy and cardiotoxicity....

  4. Breast cancer and breast health awareness as an evolving health promotion concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plesnicar, A.; Kralj, B.; Kovac, V.

    2004-01-01

    Background. Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant disease in the majority of developed countries. In the last few years the introduction of mammography screening programmes has resulted in an improved survival of breast cancer patients. However, the incidence of the disease in these countries is still on the increase. Present focus on secondary breast cancer prevention activities, consisting of early detection and treatment, cannot ensure a decrease of breast cancer incidence. Improved breast health awareness could therefore represent a part of specific health promotion activities aimed at decreasing the incidence of breast cancer. Conclusions. In developed countries breast cancer is a significant health care issue. Secondary breast cancer prevention activities should therefore be complemented by specific health promotion activities in order to reduce its incidence in the future. Primary breast cancer prevention would include health promotion activities aimed at enhancement of the individual as well as collective breast health awareness. Properly enlightened members of the influential population groups could attain appropriate changes in the fields of legislation, taxation, customs and commercial regulations that would enable women to control their own breast health. (author)

  5. Risk of endometrial cancer after tamoxifen treatment of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.E. van Leeuwen (Flora); J. Benraadt (J.); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); C.H.F. Gimbrère (Charles); R. Otter (Renée); L.J. Scheuten (Leo); R.A. Damhuis (Ronald); M. Bontenbal (Marijke); A.I. Diepenhorst; A.W. van den Belt-Dusebout (Alexandra); H. van Tinteren (Harm)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractSince large trials have been set up to assess whether tamoxifen decreases the risk of breast cancer in healthy women, it has become important to investigate the drug's potential adverse effects, including occurrence of endometrial cancer. We undertook a case-control study in the

  6. Melatonin: an Inhibitor of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Steven M.; Belancio, Victoria P.; Dauchy, Robert T.; Xiang, Shulin; Brimer, Samantha; Mao, Lulu; Hauch, Adam; Lundberg, Peter W.; Summers, Whitney; Yuan, Lin; Frasch, Tripp; Blask, David E.

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses recent work on melatonin-mediated circadian regulation and metabolic and molecular signaling mechanisms involved in human breast cancer growth and associated consequences of circadian disruption by exposure to light at night (LEN). The anti-cancer actions of the circadian melatonin signal in human breast cancer cell lines and xenografts heavily involve MT1 receptor-mediated mechanisms. In estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-positive human breast cancer, melatonin, via the MT1 receptor, suppresses ERα mRNA expression and ERα transcriptional activity. As well, melatonin regulates the transactivation of other members of the nuclear receptor super-family, estrogen metabolizing enzymes, and the expression of core clock and clock-related genes. Furthermore, melatonin also suppresses tumor aerobic metabolism (Warburg effect), and, subsequently, cell-signaling pathways critical to cell proliferation, cell survival, metastasis, and drug resistance. Melatonin demonstrates both cytostatic and cytotoxic activity in breast cancer cells that appears to be cell type specific. Melatonin also possesses anti-invasive/anti-metastatic actions that involve multiple pathways including inhibition of p38 MAPK and repression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Studies demonstrate that melatonin promotes genomic stability by inhibiting the expression of LINE-1 retrotransposons. Finally, research in animal and human models indicate that LEN induced disruption of the circadian nocturnal melatonin signal promotes the growth, metabolism, and signaling of human breast cancer to drive breast tumors to endocrine and chemotherapeutic resistance. These data provide the strongest understanding and support of the mechanisms underpinning the epidemiologic demonstration of elevated breast cancer risk in night shift workers and other individuals increasingly exposed to LEN. PMID:25876649

  7. Diagnosis delay in Libyan female breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermiah Eramah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims To study the diagnosis delay and its impact on stage of disease among women with breast cancer on Libya. Methods 200 women, aged 22 to 75 years with breast cancer diagnosed during 2008–2009 were interviewed about the period from the first symptoms to the final histological diagnosis of breast cancer. This period (diagnosis time was categorized into 3 periods: 6 months. If diagnosis time was longer than 3 months, the diagnosis was considered delayed (diagnosis delay. Consultation time was the time taken to visit the general practitioner after the first symptoms. Retrospective preclinical and clinical data were collected on a form (questionnaire during an interview with each patient and from medical records. Results The median of diagnosis time was 7.5 months. Only 30.0% of patients were diagnosed within 3 months after symptoms. 14% of patients were diagnosed within 3–6 months and 56% within a period longer than 6 months. A number of factors predicted diagnosis delay: Symptoms were not considered serious in 27% of patients. Alternative therapy (therapy not associated with cancer was applied in 13.0% of the patients. Fear and shame prevented the visit to the doctor in 10% and 4.5% of patients, respectively. Inappropriate reassurance that the lump was benign was an important reason for prolongation of the diagnosis time. Diagnosis delay was associated with initial breast symptom(s that did not include a lump (p  Diagnosis delay was associated with bigger tumour size (p Conclusions Diagnosis delay is very serious problem in Libya. Diagnosis delay was associated with complex interactions between several factors and with advanced stages. There is a need for improving breast cancer awareness and training of general practitioners to reduce breast cancer mortality by promoting early detection. The treatment guidelines should pay more attention to the early phases of breast cancer. Especially, guidelines for good practices in managing

  8. Targeting Androgen Receptor in Breast Cancer: Enzalutamide as a Novel Breast Cancer Therapeutic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    AR+ BCK4 breast cancer cells. Enzalutamide synergizes with Fulvestrant (ICI) to oppose estrogen- induced proliferation of ER+/AR+ BCK4 cells...and mTOR in breast cancer. In Preparation that is included in the appendix of this report. Figure 5. Experimental design of testing...or care of human subjects, vertebrate animals , biohazards, and/or select agents No significant changes, but we had to do a three year re-write of

  9. Energy expenditure in women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuconi, Carolina Pereira; Ceolin Alves, Ana Lígia; Toulson Davisson Correia, Maria Isabel

    2015-04-01

    To assess the energy expenditure of women with breast cancer and the effectiveness of available predictive equations (PEs) for the estimation of energy requirements in these subjects. Women with breast cancer and healthy women controls underwent indirect calorimetry and nutritional assessment. The estimation of energy requirements included PEs (Harris-Benedict [HB], corrected by injury and activity factors), the Mifflin St. Jeor, and the quick formula of 25 kcal/kg of body weight (BW). Statistical analyses, including Student's t test, a paired t test, Bland-Altman analysis, and backward multivariate linear regression, were performed using the SPSS 17.0 software. Statistical significance was set at P breast cancer and 19 healthy women were evaluated. Analysis of nutritional status revealed 64.7% of the patients were overweight/obese, and 88.2% had an excess of body fat mass. The resting energy expenditure (REE) of the breast cancer patients was similar to that of the healthy women, even after adjustment for fat free mass (FFM) (P breast cancer was similar to that of healthy women. The energy requirements of these patients may be calculated based on the quick formula of 25 kcal/kg of BW. Nonetheless, this estimation should be used cautiously as it results in wide variations when used alone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Triple negative breast cancer: the role of metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, S J R; Rhodes, A

    2014-12-01

    The incidence of breast cancer in Malaysia and other Asian countries is on the increase, reflecting lifestyle changes some of which are known risk factors for the development of breast cancer. Most breast cancers are amenable to adjuvant therapies that target hormone receptors or HER2 receptors on the surface of the cancer cells and bring about significant improvement in survival. However, approximately 17% of Malaysian women with breast cancer, present with tumours that are devoid of these receptors and are consequently termed 'triple negative' breast cancers. These triple negative breast cancers typically occur in women of a younger age than receptor positive cancers, are predominantly of high grade tumours and the prognosis is usually poor. There is therefore a pressing need to understand the biological pathways that drive these tumours, in order that effective strategies are developed to treat these aggressive tumours. With the increasing affluence of developing countries, obesity and Type II Diabetes are also on the rise. These diseases are associated with an increased risk of developing a range of cancers including those of the breast. In particular, the metabolic syndrome has been shown to be associated with triple negative breast cancer. This article reviews some of the metabolic pathways and biomarkers which have been shown to be aberrantly expressed in triple negative breast cancer and highlights some of the ongoing work in this area.

  11. Expression and Activation of STAT Transcription Factors in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schaber, John D

    1998-01-01

    .... Other endocrine or cytokine-based therapies, including glucocorticoids and interferons, which have been highly effective as adjuvant treatment of hematological cancers, have also shown promise in breast cancer...

  12. Clinical diagnosis of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leis, H P

    1975-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant neoplasm in women, and 6% will develop it during their normal life expectancy. There is a group who have a high risk of developing breast cancer. The recent improvement in cure rates seems to be jue chiefly to earlier diagnosis rather than to improved methods of therapy. The physician, by careful periodic breast examinations and by the judicious use of diagnostic aids such as mammography and thermography, especially in the high risk group, has a golden opportunity to pick up cancer in a localized stage where the prognosis for cure with appropriate therapy is excellent. A tentative diagnosis of breast cancer (Table XI) can be made with a fair degree of accuracy by taking a careful history, utilizing and combining available statistics about the frequency, median age, characteristic symptom complexes of the common breast lesions and factors related to a high mammary carcinoma risk, and by a systematic and thorough breast examination supplemented with diagnostic aids when appropriate. However, biopsy and histologic examination is mandatory in all patients with a) true, three dimentional, dominant lumps even if diagnostic aids are negative except for cysts which can be safely aspirated under controlled conditions; b) suspicious lesions found by diagnostic aids even though there are no clinical findings; c) serous, serosanguineous, bloody, or watery nipple discharge; and d) other signs of cancer, i.e. eczema of the nipple, axillary adenopathy, etc., in order to determine with absolute accuracy whether the lesion is benign or malignant.

  13. [Innovations in locoregional treatments of breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, G; Monnier, S; Vinh-Hung, V

    2010-10-27

    Breast conserving therapy including breast conserving surgery followed by radiation therapy is the treatment of choice for early breast cancer. Sentinel lymph node biopsy is a minimally approach that allows to evaluate the axilla with less morbidity and avoid an axillary lymph node biopsy. This surgical technique is now evaluated in more specific situations. Modern surgical techniques such as oncoplastic surgery allow to excise larger tumors and obtain better cosmetic results. In a near future it is expected that intraoperative radiation therapy will remplace classicals approaches of radiotherapy for selected patients.

  14. Defining the cellular precursors to human breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Patricia J.; Arendt, Lisa M.; Skibinski, Adam; Logvinenko, Tanya; Klebba, Ina; Dong, Shumin; Smith, Avi E.; Prat, Aleix; Perou, Charles M.; Gilmore, Hannah; Schnitt, Stuart; Naber, Stephen P.; Garlick, Jonathan A.; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Human breast cancers are broadly classified based on their gene-expression profiles into luminal- and basal-type tumors. These two major tumor subtypes express markers corresponding to the major differentiation states of epithelial cells in the breast: luminal (EpCAM+) and basal/myoepithelial (CD10+). However, there are also rare types of breast cancers, such as metaplastic carcinomas, where tumor cells exhibit features of alternate cell types that no longer resemble breast epithelium. Until now, it has been difficult to identify the cell type(s) in the human breast that gives rise to these various forms of breast cancer. Here we report that transformation of EpCAM+ epithelial cells results in the formation of common forms of human breast cancer, including estrogen receptor-positive and estrogen receptor-negative tumors with luminal and basal-like characteristics, respectively, whereas transformation of CD10+ cells results in the development of rare metaplastic tumors reminiscent of the claudin-low subtype. We also demonstrate the existence of CD10+ breast cells with metaplastic traits that can give rise to skin and epidermal tissues. Furthermore, we show that the development of metaplastic breast cancer is attributable, in part, to the transformation of these metaplastic breast epithelial cells. These findings identify normal cellular precursors to human breast cancers and reveal the existence of a population of cells with epidermal progenitor activity within adult human breast tissues. PMID:21940501

  15. Breast MRI, digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis: comparison of three methods for early detection of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Roganovic

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and early detection is important for its successful treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of three methods for early detection of breast cancer: breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, digital mammography, and breast tomosynthesis in comparison to histopathology, as well as to investigate the intraindividual variability between these modalities.  We included 57 breast lesions, each detected by three diagnostic modalities: digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, and subsequently confirmed by histopathology. Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS was used for characterizing the lesions. One experienced radiologist interpreted all three diagnostic modalities. Twenty-nine of the breast lesions were malignant while 28 were benign. The sensitivity for digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, was 72.4%, 93.1%, and 100%, respectively; while the specificity was 46.4%, 60.7%, and 75%, respectively. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve analysis showed an overall diagnostic advantage of breast tomosynthesis over both breast MRI and digital mammography. The difference in performance between breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography was significant (p < 0.001, while the difference between breast tomosynthesis and breast MRI was not significant (p = 0.20. 

  16. Breast cancer treatment: historical review and current approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulakowski, A.

    1994-01-01

    The evolution and development of opinions on the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer since Galen to present time is presented. The concept of breast cancer as a local disease has been replaced by the understanding of its systemic character. On this background described are the methods of surgical treatment beginning from early - supraradical, to present -conservative approaches. The ''milestones'' in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer of the last 40 years are presented. Current methods of breast cancer management include correct diagnosis (clinical examination, mammography, ultrasound, fine needle aspiration biopsy), TNM staging, adequate loco-regional therapy, systemic therapy, rehabilitation, reconstruction and careful follow-up. (author)

  17. Mammographic Breast Density in Malaysian Women with Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriah Jamal; Humairah Samad Cheung

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the mammographic breast density of women with breast cancer detected on voluntary mammographic screening at two selected screening centers in Malaysia. This was a retrospective study of Full-Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) images of 150 Malaysian women with biopsy-proven breast cancer. The study population comprised 73 Malays (37.7 %), 59 Chinese (39.3 %) and 18 Indians (12.0 %). The Tabar breast density Patterns (I - V) were used to evaluate mammographic breast density. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The results were compared with findings from a similar study on a group of 668 women who did not have breast cancer. The results showed that 44.7 % of the study population had dense breasts (Patterns IV and V), 14.7 % had predominantly fatty breasts (Patterns II and III) while 40.7 % had Pattern I. The proportion of study population with dense breasts decreased with age. In conclusion, the proportion of women with dense breasts decreased with age. Majority of the women with cancer (44.7 %) had dense breasts of Tabar Patterns IV and V, which has been associated with increased risk of breast cancer detected by voluntary mammographic screening. The results support the notion that increased breast density is a risk factor of breast cancer. (author)

  18. On ionising radiation and breast cancer risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattson, Anders

    1999-05-01

    A cohort of 3,090 women with clinical diagnosis of benign breast disease (BBD) was studied. Of these, 1,216 were treated with radiation therapy during 1925-54 (median age 40 years). The mean dose to the breasts was 5.8 Gy (range 0-50 Gy). Among other organs the lung received the highest scattered dose (0.75 Gy; range 0.004-8.98 Gy) and the rectum the lowest (0.008 Gy; range 0-0.06 Gy). A pooled analysis of eight breast cancer incidence cohorts was done, including: tumour registry data on breast cancer incidence among women in the Life Span Study cohort of atomic bomb survivors; women in Massachusetts who received repeated chest fluoroscopic during lung collapse treatment for tuberculosis; women who received x-ray therapy for acute post-partum mastitis; women who were irradiated in infancy for enlarged thymus glands ; two Swedish cohorts of women who received radiation treatments during infancy for skin hemangioma; and the BBD cohort. Together the cohorts included almost 78,000 women (-35,000 were exposed), around 1.8 million woman-years and 1500 cases. The breast cancer incidence rate as a function of breast dose was analysed using linear-quadratic Poisson regression models. Cell-killing effects and other modifying effects were incorporated through additional log-linear terms. Additive (EAR) and multiplicative (ERR) models were compared in estimating the age-at-exposure patterns and time related excess. The carcinogenic risks associated with radiation in mammographic mass screening is evaluated. Assessment was made in terms of breast cancer mortality and years of life. Effects were related to rates not influenced by a mammographic mass screening program and based on a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 40-year old women with no history of breast cancer being followed to 100 years of age. Two radiation risk assumptions were compared. The dose-response relationship is linear with little support in data for an upward curvature at low to medium doses. The competing effect

  19. Statins and risk of breast cancer recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakellakis M

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Minas Sakellakis,1 Karolina Akinosoglou,1 Anastasia Kostaki,2 Despina Spyropoulou,1 Angelos Koutras,1 1Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, University Hospital, Patras Medical School, Patras, 2Department of Statistics, Athens University of Economics and Business, Athens, Greece Background: The primary end point of our study was to test whether the concurrent use of a statin is related to a lower risk of recurrence and increased relapse-free survival in patients with early breast cancer. Materials and methods: We reviewed 610 female patients with stage I, II, or III breast cancer who had been surgically treated and who had subsequently received at least adjuvant chemotherapy in order to prevent recurrence. Results: Among the 610 patients with breast cancer, 83 (13.6% were receiving a statin on a chronic basis for other medical purposes. Overall, statin users displayed longer mean relapse-free survival (16.6 vs 10.2 years, P=0.028. After data had been adjusted for patient and disease characteristics, statin users maintained a lower risk of recurrence. This favorable outcome in statin users was particularly evident when we included only younger patients in the analysis (20 vs 10 years, P=0.006. Conclusion: Statins may be linked to a favorable outcome in early breast cancer patients, especially in younger age-groups. Keywords: statins, breast, cancer, adjuvant, recurrence

  20. Endocrine determinants of breast density and breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheus, M.

    2007-01-01

    Worldwide, breast cancer is the most common malignancy among females. The total breast area on a mammogram can be dived in a radiologicaly dense area (glandular and stromal tissue) and a non-dense area (mainly fat tissue). Women with a high proportion of dense breast tissue (percent breast density)

  1. Diet and breast cancer: understanding risks and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Cynthia A

    2012-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the United States. Extensive research has been completed to evaluate the relationship between dietary factors and breast cancer risk and survival after breast cancer; however, a summary report with clinical inference is needed. Materials and This review summarizes the current epidemiological and clinical trial evidence relating diet to breast cancer incidence, recurrence, survival, and mortality. The review includes emerging epidemiological studies that assess risk within breast cancer subtypes as well as a summary of previous and ongoing dietary intervention trials designed to modify breast cancer risk. The available literature suggests that both low-fat and high-fiber diets may be weakly protective against breast cancer, whereas total energy intake and alcohol appear to be positively associated. Fiber may be weakly protective possibly through modulation of estrogen, whereas fruit and vegetable intake is not clearly associated with risk. Obesity is a risk factor for postmenopausal disease, and adult weight gain should be avoided to reduce risk. In survivors, diet has the greatest potential influence on overall mortality rather than breast cancer-specific events. Diet is modestly associated with breast cancer risk; associations appear more pronounced for postmenopausal disease, and healthy choices after diagnosis and treatment likely support longevity more so than reduced risk for recurrent disease.

  2. Other primary malignancies in breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving surgery and radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Min; Cormier, Janice N; Xing, Yan; Giordano, Sharon Hermes; Chai, Christy; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Vlastos, Georges; Kuerer, Henry M; Mirza, Nadeem Q; Buchholz, Thomas A; Hunt, Kelly K

    2013-05-01

    Our purpose was to examine the incidence and impact on survival of other primary malignancies (OPM) outside of the breast in breast cancer patients and to identify risk factors associated with OPM. Patients with stage 0-III breast cancer treated with breast conserving therapy at our center from 1979 to 2007 were included. Risk factors were compared between patients with/without OPM. Logistic regression was used to identify factors that were associated with OPM. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated. Among 4,198 patients in this study, 276 (6.6 %) developed an OPM after breast cancer treatment. Patients with OPM were older and had a higher proportion of stage 0/I disease and contralateral breast cancer compared with those without OPM. In a multivariate analysis, older patients, those with contralateral breast cancer, and those who did not receive chemotherapy or hormone therapy were more likely to develop OPM after breast cancer. Patients without OPM had better overall survival. The SIR for all OPM sites combined after a first primary breast cancer was 2.91 (95 % confidence interval: 2.57-3.24). Significantly elevated risks were seen for numerous cancer sites, with SIRs ranging from 1.84 for lung cancer to 5.69 for ovarian cancer. Our study shows that breast cancer patients have an increased risk of developing OPM over the general population. The use of systemic therapy was not associated with increased risk of OPM. In addition to screening for a contralateral breast cancer and recurrences, breast cancer survivors should undergo screening for other malignancies.

  3. AR Signaling in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Rahim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR, a member of the steroid hormone receptor family status has become increasingly important as both a prognostic marker and potential therapeutic target in breast cancer. AR is expressed in up to 90% of estrogen receptor (ER positive breast cancer, and to a lesser degree, human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2 amplified tumors. In the former, AR signaling has been correlated with a better prognosis given its inhibitory activity in estrogen dependent disease, though conversely has also been shown to increase resistance to anti-estrogen therapies such as tamoxifen. AR blockade can mitigate this resistance, and thus serves as a potential target in ER-positive breast cancer. In HER2 amplified breast cancer, studies are somewhat conflicting, though most show either no effect or are associated with poorer survival. Much of the available data on AR signaling is in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC, which is an aggressive disease with inferior outcomes comparative to other breast cancer subtypes. At present, there are no approved targeted therapies in TNBC, making study of the AR signaling pathway compelling. Gene expression profiling studies have also identified a luminal androgen receptor (LAR subtype that is dependent on AR signaling in TNBC. Regardless, there seems to be an association between AR expression and improved outcomes in TNBC. Despite lower pathologic complete response (pCR rates with neoadjuvant therapy, patients with AR-expressing TNBC have been shown to have a better prognosis than those that are AR-negative. Clinical studies targeting AR have shown somewhat promising results. In this paper we review the literature on the biology of AR in breast cancer and its prognostic and predictive roles. We also present our thoughts on therapeutic strategies.

  4. Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing breast cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  5. Awareness of breast cancer and breast self-examination among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Awareness of breast cancer and breast self-examination among female undergraduate students in a higher teachers training college in Cameroon. ... Conclusion: Though most students are aware of the existence of breast cancer, their overall knowledge on its risk factors and clinical presentation is insufficient with a ...

  6. Glypican-3 Expression in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Hua Tsai

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Immunohistochemical staining with TMA was convenient and feasible for analyzing Glypican-3 expression status in breast cancer. However, our preliminary results show that Glypican-3 expression had no significant prognostic value in breast cancer.

  7. Optimized NSAIDS for Breast Cancer Prevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carson, Dennis A

    2005-01-01

    .... Also, how these agents prevent breast cancer is not understood. This project will develop an optimized NSAID for breast cancer prevention that can be taken safely at high doses, and will determine its mechanisms of action...

  8. DNA Methylation Alterations in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yamamoto, Fumiichiro

    2002-01-01

    We have performed the NotI-MseI MS-AFLP experiments using normal and tumor DNA from breast cancer patients and determined the identity of bands exhibiting consistent changes in breast cancer DNA fingerprint...

  9. HER2 Genetic Link to Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    When researchers discovered the HER2 gene's importance to breast cancer growth, this led to the development of trastuzumab and other treatments that have improved survival for women with HER2-positive breast cancer.

  10. Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... hormone therapy does not increase the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, according to an updated analysis ...

  11. Breast Cancer Epidemiology in Puerto Rico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nazario, Cruz M; Freudenheim, Jo

    2008-01-01

    This project has two mayor goals: to design and conduct a pilot case-control breast cancer study among Puerto Rican women, and to train and develop researchers in breast cancer at the University of Puerto Rico...

  12. Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Us Information For… Media Policy Makers CDC Employees and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Finding Breast Cancer Early Can ...

  13. Vectors for Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deisseroth, Albert B

    2005-01-01

    The objective is to design, build and study vectors which would be able to break tolerance to breast cancer associated TAA and be used to suppress the recurrence of metastatic breast cancer following surgical resection...

  14. Vectors for Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deisseroth, Albert

    2004-01-01

    The objective is to design, build and study vectors which would be able to break tolerance to breast cancer associated TAA and be used to suppress the recurrence of metastatic breast cancer following surgical resection...

  15. THERAPEUTIC OPTIONS FOR BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Georgescu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer remains a major public health problem, being the second cause of cancer death in women. There is a marked tendency to restrict the extension of surgical gesture, which directly leads to two different attitudes: radical surgery and conservative surgery, to which, at least in our country, there are still some delays. Prospective and retrospective studies have shown that, in 20 years, conservative and radical therapy had about the same rate of survival and disease-free interval, at least for stage I and II breast cancer, the only real counterargument against conservative surgery being that, in principle, the higher rate of recurrence local constraint can be solved by postoperative radiotherapy. Finally, the survival rate is the main parameter of evaluation, assessing the effectiveness of the treatment in breast cancer, and in all its other forms.

  16. Progestin and breast cancer risk: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Marsha; Porter, Nancy; Orekoya, Olubunmi; Hebert, James R; Adams, Swann Arp; Bennett, Charles L; Steck, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review summarizes research on the use of progestin and breast cancer risk. Although mainly used for contraception, progestin can help treat menstrual disorders, and benign breast, uterine, and ovarian diseases. Breast cancer is the leading site of new, non-skin, cancers in females in the United States, and possible factors that may modulate breast cancer risk need to be identified. ProQuest (Ann Arbor, MI) and PubMed-Medline (US National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) databases were used to search for epidemiologic studies from 2000 to 2015 that examined the association between progestin and breast cancer. Search terms included epidemiologic studies + progesterone or progestin or progestogen or contraceptive or contraceptive agents + breast cancer or breast neoplasms. A total of six studies were included in the review. Five of the six studies reported no association between progestin-only formulations (including norethindrone oral contraceptives, depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, injectable, levonorgestrel system users, implantable and intrauterine devices) and breast cancer risk. Duration of use was examined in a few studies with heterogeneous results. Unlike studies of other oral contraceptives, studies indicate that progestin-only formulations do not increase the risk of breast cancer, although the literature is hampered by small sample sizes. Future research is needed to corroborate these findings, as further understanding of synthetic progesterone may initiate new prescription practices or guidelines for women's health.

  17. Pregnancy-related characteristics and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasky, Theodore M; Li, Yanli; Jaworowicz, David J; Potischman, Nancy; Ambrosone, Christine B; Hutson, Alan D; Nie, Jing; Shields, Peter G; Trevisan, Maurizio; Rudra, Carole B; Edge, Stephen B; Freudenheim, Jo L

    2013-09-01

    Breast tissues undergo extensive physiologic changes during pregnancy, which may affect breast carcinogenesis. Gestational hypertension, preeclampsia/eclampsia, gestational diabetes, pregnancy weight gain, and nausea and vomiting (N&V) during pregnancy may be indicative of altered hormonal and metabolic profiles and could impact breast cancer risk. Here, we examined associations between these characteristics of a woman's pregnancy and her subsequent breast cancer risk. Participants were parous women that were recruited to a population-based case-control study (Western New York Exposures and Breast Cancer Study). Cases (n = 960), aged 35-79 years, had incident, primary, histologically confirmed breast cancer. Controls (n = 1,852) were randomly selected from motor vehicle records (pregnancy experiences. Multivariable-adjusted logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). N&V during pregnancy was inversely associated with breast cancer risk. Relative to those who never experienced N&V, ever experiencing N&V was associated with decreased risk (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.56-0.84) as were increased N&V severity (p trend pregnancies (p trend pregnancies. Associations were stronger for more recent pregnancies (breast cancer subtype including estrogen receptor and HER2 expression status. Other pregnancy characteristics examined were not associated with risk. We observed strong inverse associations between pregnancy N&V and breast cancer risk. Replication of these findings and exploration of underlying mechanisms could provide important insight into breast cancer etiology and prevention.

  18. PET imaging in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombardieri, E.; Crippa, F.

    2001-01-01

    The basis of tumour imaging with PET is a specific uptake mechanism of positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals. Among the potential tracers for breast cancer (fluorodeoxyglucose, methionine, tyrosine, fluoro-estradiol, nor-progesterone), 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose labelled with fluorine (FDG) is the most widely used radiopharmaceutical because breast cancer is particularly avid of FDG and 18 F has the advantages of the a relatively long physical half-life. Mammography is the first choice examination in studying breast masses, due to its very good performances, an excellent compliance and the best value regarding the cost/effectiveness aspects. The FDG uptake in tissue correlates with the histological grade and potential aggressiveness of breast cancer and this may have prognostic consequences. Besides the evaluation of breast lesions, FDG-PET shows a great efficacy in staging lymph node involvement prior surgery and this could have a great value in loco-regional staging. Whole body PET provides also information with regard to metastasis localizations both in soft tissue and bone, and plays an important clinical role mainly in detecting recurrent metastatic disease. In fact for its metabolic characteristics PET visualizes regions of enhanced metabolic activity and can complete other imaging modalities based on structural anatomic changes. Even though CT and MRI show superior resolution characteristics, it has been demonstrated that PET provides more accurate information in discriminating between viable tumour, fibrotic scar or necrosis. These statements are coming from the examination of more than 2000 breast cancer detection

  19. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  20. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-14

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  1. Doxorubicin plus paclitaxel in advanced breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dombernowsky, P; Boesgaard, M; Andersen, E

    1997-01-01

    The combination of bolus doxorubicin and paclitaxel (Taxol; Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ) as a 3-hour infusion is highly active in patients with metastatic breast cancer, but it has considerable cardiotoxicity. In this ongoing study, the potential effect of increasing the interval...... between administration of a short infusion of doxorubicin followed by a 3-hour infusion of paclitaxel was evaluated. Included were patients with metastatic breast cancer, who received doxorubicin 50 mg/m2 followed by paclitaxel 200 mg/m2 at intervals of 30 minutes, 4 hours, and 24 hours every 3 weeks...... followed by a 3-hour infusion of paclitaxel is highly active against metastatic breast cancer. The potential for cardiotoxicity with the regimen is reduced considerably if the maximum recommended cumulative dose of doxorubicin is reduced to 360 mg/m2 with a maximum single dose of 50 mg/m2....

  2. Serum FAS and the Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newschaffer, Craig

    2002-01-01

    ...) as a means of breast cancer early detection. Fatty acid synthase (FAS) is associated with poor breast cancer prognosis and is elevated in both breast cancer and in situ disease compared to normal breast tissue...

  3. Partial Breast Reconstruction Using Various Oncoplastic Techniques for Centrally Located Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Chun Park

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAs the breast cancer incidence has increased, breast-conserving surgery has replaced total mastectomy as the predominant procedure. However, centrally located breast cancers pose significant challenges to successful breast-conserving surgeries. Therefore, we performed partial mastectomy and oncoplastic procedures on centrally located breast cancer as a means of partial breast reconstruction. The authors examined and evaluated the functional and aesthetic usefulness of this reconstruction method.MethodsFrom January 2007 to June 2011, 35 patients with centrally located breast cancers who underwent various oncoplastic procedures based on the breast size and resection volume. The oncoplastic procedures performed included volume displacement surgical techniques such as purse-string suture, linear suture, and reduction mammaplasty. Other oncoplastic procedures included volume replacement procedures with an adipofascial, thoracoepigastric, intercostal artery perforator, thoracodorsal artery perforator, or latissimus dorsi flap.ResultsMean patient age was 49 years, and mean follow-up period was 11 months. In cases of small to moderate-sized breasts and resection volumes 50 g, volume replacement procedures were performed. In cases of larger breasts and smaller resection volumes, glandular reshaping was performed. Finally, in cases of larger breasts and larger resection volumes, reduction mammaplasty was performed. This reconstruction method also elicits a high patient satisfaction rate with no significant complications.ConclusionsIn centrally located breast cancer, oncoplastic surgery considering breast size and resection volume is safe and provides appropriate aesthetic outcomes. Therefore, our method is advisable for breast cancer patients who elect to conserve their breasts and retain a natural breast shape.

  4. Behavioral Symptoms after Breast Cancer Treatment: A Biobehavioral Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Fagundes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Being diagnosed and treated for breast cancer is emotionally and physically challenging. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of death for women in the United States. Accordingly, women with a breast cancer history are the largest group of female cancer survivors. Psychological stress substantially augments adverse autonomic, endocrine, and immune discharge, including enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines. Importantly, inflammation is a key biological mechanism underlying the symptom cluster of pain, depression, fatigue, and sleep disturbances; there is also good evidence that inflammation contributes to breast cancer recurrence. Stress may exert direct effects on psychological and physiological risk processes. In this review, we take a biobehavioral approach to understanding predictors and mechanisms underlying somatic symptoms in breast cancer survivors.

  5. Diet and risk of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kotepui, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Diet may play a role in both promoting and inhibiting human breast cancer development. In this review, nutritional risk factors such as consumption of dietary fat, meat, fiber, and alcohol, and intake of phytoestrogen, vitamin D, iron, and folate associated with breast cancer are reviewed. These nutritional factors have a variety of associations with breast cancer risk. Type of fat consumed has different effects on risk of breast cancer: consumption of meat is associated with heterocyclic ami...

  6. Nonessential amino acid metabolism in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geck, Renee C; Toker, Alex

    2016-09-01

    Interest in studying cancer metabolism has risen in recent years, as it has become evident that the relationship between cancer and metabolic pathways could reveal novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Metabolic starvation therapy is particularly promising due to its low toxicity. Nonessential amino acids are promising metabolites for such therapy because they become essential in many tumor cells, including breast cancer cells. This review will focus on four nonessential amino acid metabolism pathways: glutamine-glutamate, serine-glycine, cysteine, and arginine-proline metabolism. Recent studies of these amino acids have revealed metabolic enzymes that have the potential to be effective as cancer therapy targets or biomarkers for response to metabolic starvation therapy. The review will also discuss features of nonessential amino acid metabolism that merit further investigation to determine their relevancy to breast cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Leptin: A proliferative factor for breast cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldefie-Chezet, F.; Damez, M.; Latour, M. de; Konska, G.; Mishellani, F.; Fusillier, C.; Guerry, M.; Penault-Llorca, F.; Guillot, J.; Vasson, M.-P.

    2005-01-01

    Mammary adipose tissue is an important source of paracrine mitogens and anti-mitogens, including insulin-like growth factor, transforming growth factors, and cytokines (especially, TNFα and IL-1β). Nevertheless, it is also an important source of the adipocytokine, leptin. Recently, leptin was reported to stimulate the proliferation of various cell types (pancreatic β cells, prostate, colorectal, lung, etc.) as a new growth factor. It was also shown to stimulate the proliferation of breast cancer cell lines. In this study, we conducted an immunohistochemical analysis of leptin expression in normal tissue and benign and malignant ductal breast cell, representing the different states of the invasion process. We determined for the first time that leptin is expressed both by ductal breast tumors and by benign lesions as atypical hyperplasia. This suggests that leptin may be taken up or synthesized by all modified ductal breast cells, and may prove a proliferative factor. Moreover, leptin is unexpressed by normal tissue in the healthy breast but is exhibited by the normal tissue in near vicinity of the malignant ductal breast lesions. We also postulated that leptin may be a prognostic or diagnostic factor for ductal breast cancer. These putative hypotheses require further study

  8. Environmental Estrogens and Breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    llmiawati llmiawati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent studies revealed that various man-made chemicals disrupting properties with endocrine- contribute in the development of breast cancer.objective: To review the state of the science of the endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC and their role in the development of breast cancer.Methods: Key papers on experimental and epidemiologic studies examining the associations between EDC and breast cancer were searched throJgh the Google Sch-olar and pubMedusing Results: EDC effects depend on the level and timing of exposure, with critical window on developmentalstages. Diethylstilbestrol(DES and bispIenolA(BpA aretwo thoroughlystudied environmental estrogenic compounds. Epidemiological studies showed increased breast cancer incident in women exposed to DES during gestation. ExperimentalstuQies revealed that BPA induces architectural and gene expression froRte changes ir i"J"rt r;;;"ry gtand, with the stroma of fetal mammary gland as the primary target. ihe effects of these environmental estrogens are mostly mediated through the estrogen ieceptors a and B. Their exposure may further sensitize the mammary tissuelo the hit or otner carcinogens. Epigenome alteration in the mammary gland has also been implicated in its neoplastic dLvelopre"nt.Conclusions: Fetal and perinatal stages are the critical exposure windows to environmental estrogens and multiple mechanism is irnplicated in the development of breast cancer resulted from this exposure.

  9. The relationship between breast cancer and air pollution: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Homaei Shandiz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution consists of chemicals resulting from many human activities and natural resources, which can cause gene mutations. Almost, it is proven that air pollution contributes to lung cancer and its relationship with other cancers including bladder, cervical cancer, ovary, prostate, brain and breast cancer is suspected. Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in women and the prominent cause of death among them all around the world. Poor prediction of risk factor leads to discovery of more reliable factors. Mammary tumors in animals that are generated by chemicals compounds, give possible mechanisms for effects of environmental pollutants. Therefore, the purpose of our study is to review the available literature for investigating the relation of ambient air pollution and breast cancer. Findings of our study highlight the possibility of increasing in occurrence of breast cancer, developing to invasive cancer and mortality in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women exposed to air pollution.

  10. Age at Diagnosis and Breast Cancer Survival in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vostakolaei, Fatemeh Asadzadeh; Broeders, Mireille J. M.; Rostami, Nematollah; van Dijck, Jos A. A. M.; Feuth, Ton; Kiemeney, Lambertus A. L. M.; Verbeek, André L. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Tumour characteristics are the most important prognostic factors in breast cancer. Patient-related factors such as young age at diagnosis, obesity, and smoking behaviour may also modify disease outcome. Due to the absence of a unique definition for “young age breast cancer” and the resulting variation in disease management, findings on the association between young age and prognosis of breast cancer are controversial. Methods. This study included 1500 patients with a primary diagnosis of breast cancer in six Iranian hospitals from 5 provinces. We modelled the relative excess risk (RER) of breast cancer death to age at diagnosis and tumour characteristics. Results. Excess risks of death were observed for stage IV disease and poorly differentiated tumours: RER of 4.3 (95% CI: 1.05–17.65) and 3.4 (95% CI: 1.17–9.87), respectively. “Older” patients, particularly those aged 50 and over, presented more often with advanced and poorly differentiated tumours (P = 0.001). After adjustment for stage, histological grade, Her-2 expression, estrogen and progesterone receptors, and place of residency, breast cancer mortality was not significantly different across age groups. Conclusion. We conclude that there is no prognostic effect of age at diagnosis of breast cancer among breast cancer patients treated at cancer centres in different parts of Iran; young and relatively old women have similar risks of dying from breast cancer. PMID:23227345

  11. Age at Diagnosis and Breast Cancer Survival in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Asadzadeh Vostakolaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tumour characteristics are the most important prognostic factors in breast cancer. Patient-related factors such as young age at diagnosis, obesity, and smoking behaviour may also modify disease outcome. Due to the absence of a unique definition for “young age breast cancer” and the resulting variation in disease management, findings on the association between young age and prognosis of breast cancer are controversial. Methods. This study included 1500 patients with a primary diagnosis of breast cancer in six Iranian hospitals from 5 provinces. We modelled the relative excess risk (RER of breast cancer death to age at diagnosis and tumour characteristics. Results. Excess risks of death were observed for stage IV disease and poorly differentiated tumours: RER of 4.3 (95% CI: 1.05–17.65 and 3.4 (95% CI: 1.17–9.87, respectively. “Older” patients, particularly those aged 50 and over, presented more often with advanced and poorly differentiated tumours (P=0.001. After adjustment for stage, histological grade, Her-2 expression, estrogen and progesterone receptors, and place of residency, breast cancer mortality was not significantly different across age groups. Conclusion. We conclude that there is no prognostic effect of age at diagnosis of breast cancer among breast cancer patients treated at cancer centres in different parts of Iran; young and relatively old women have similar risks of dying from breast cancer.

  12. Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

    2011-01-01

    A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast…

  13. Pregnancy and abortion in breast cancer patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast cancer in pregnancy is by itself not an indication for abortion. We document the case histories of 2 patients with breast cancer (recurrent or advanced) who elected to carry pregnancies to term. Pregnancy concurrent with or subsequent to breast cancer is not associated with a worse prognosis than would be observed ...

  14. Knowledge, awareness, and practices concerning breast cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Breast cancer is by far the most frequent cancer of women. However the preventive measures for such problem are probably less than expected. Objectives: The objectives of this study are to assess the breast cancer knowledge and awareness and factors associated with the practice of breast self examination ...

  15. Search for new breast cancer susceptibility genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenburg, Rogier Abel

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the search for new high-risk breast cancer susceptibility genes by linkage analysis. To date 20-25% of familial breast cancer is explained by mutations in the high-risk BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer susceptibility genes. For the remaining families the genetic etiology is

  16. Realizing the promise of breast cancer vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Erica Jackson, Hatem SolimanUniversity of South Florida/Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: Breast cancer vaccines are being developed to stimulate adaptive antitumor immune responses in patients. These vaccines have the potential to treat breast cancer with minimal side effects and toxicity. However, many obstacles still need to be overcome to fully realize the vaccines' clinical benefit. A review of the literature was conducted to assess the use of vaccines in targeting transformed cells. Four vaccines currently under study were discussed, each summarizing the different vaccine platforms used to introduce target antigen to the patient's immune system. The advantages and disadvantages of each method were discussed, although no one method was found to be superior. Additional issues addressed included overcoming tumor-induced immunosuppression, immune evasion of transformed cells, the use of vaccines in combination therapy, and the challenges of using these vaccines in various clinical settings. Vaccines may be most effective in patients with minimal residual disease, as opposed to using them in the metastatic setting. Also, specific clinical trial design considerations for the use of vaccines in cancer patients, such as time-to-failure end points, were discussed. Understanding these various elements will be important to the translation of breast cancer vaccine therapy into routine clinical practice.Keywords: breast cancer, vaccine, immunotherapy, immune tolerance, peptide vaccine, dendritic cell vaccine

  17. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy After Mastectomy in Preventing Recurrence in Patients With Stage IIa-IIIa Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-06

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Medullary Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  18. Breast cancer diagnosis: biographical disruption, emotional experiences and strategic management in Thai women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamputtong, Pranee; Suwankhong, Dusanee

    2015-09-01

    In this article we draw on Bury's theory of biographical disruption to discuss the meanings of, and emotional experiences related to, being diagnosed with breast cancer among southern Thai women. Qualitative methods, including in-depth interviewing and drawing methods, were used to collect data from 20 women with breast cancer. The women perceived breast cancer to be a rhok raai; an evil or dread disease. They believed that breast cancer would lead to death. The disruption in their biography occurred when they detected abnormalities indicating breast cancer. The women's narratives revealed their chaotic lives upon this diagnosis and the news precipitated in them shock, fear, anxiety and loss of hope. Although they experienced chaos and disruption, the women cultivated strategies that helped them cope with their experiences by accepting their fate and adhering to Buddhist beliefs and practices. Through their narratives of biographical disruption, the women in our study offer healthcare providers knowledge that could lead to an appreciation of their needs and concerns. This knowledge is crucial for health professionals who wish to provide emotional support to women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer in Thailand and elsewhere. © 2015 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  19. Mismatch Repair Polymorphisms as Markers of Breast Cancer Prevalence in the Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappil, Maya; Terry, Mary Beth; Delgado-Cruzata, Lissette; Liao, Yuyan; Santella, Regina M

    2016-09-01

    Major breast cancer susceptibility genes involved in DNA repair, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, have been identified. However, mutations in these genes account for only 5-10% of identified breast cancer cases. Additional DNA repair pathway genes may also contribute to susceptibility. We investigated the association between 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in mismatch repair (MMR) genes and breast cancer risk among 313 sister-sets enrolled in the New York site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry (BCFR) (n=744) using conditional logistic regression analysis. An increase in breast cancer risk was observed for women with the MUTYH_rs3219489 variant allele (odds ratio (OR)=2.23, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.10-4.52) and for women with the MSH2_rs2303428 variant allele (OR=1.73, 95% CI=1.00-2.99). Deficiencies in DNA repair pathways, such as MMR, have implications for the onset of familial breast cancer. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. Angiogenesis in male breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanthan Rani

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male breast cancer is a rare but aggressive and devastating disease. This disease presents at a later stage and in a more advanced fashion than its female counterpart. The immunophenotype also appears to be distinct when compared to female breast cancer. Angiogenesis plays a permissive role in the development of a solid tumor and provides an avenue for nutrient exchange and waste removal. Recent scrutiny of angiogenesis in female breast cancer has shown it to be of significant prognostic value. It was hypothesized that this holds true in invasive ductal carcinoma of the male breast. In the context of male breast cancer, we investigated the relationship of survival and other clinico-pathological variables to the microvascular density of the tumor tissue. Methods Seventy-five cases of primary male breast cancer were identified using the records of the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency over a period of 26 years. Forty-seven cases of invasive ductal carcinoma of the male breast had formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks that were suitable for this study. All cases were reviewed. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for the angiogenic markers (cluster designations 31 (CD31, 34 (CD34 and 105 (CD105, von Willebrand factor (VWF, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Microvascular density (MVD was determined using average, centre, and highest microvessel counts (AMC, CMC, and HMC, respectively. Statistical analyses compared differences in the distribution of survival times and times to relapse between levels of MVD, tumor size, node status and age at diagnosis. In addition, MVD values were compared within each marker, between each marker, and were also compared to clinico-pathological data. Results Advanced age and tumor size were related to shorter survival times. There were no statistically significant differences in distributions of survival times and times to relapse between levels of MVD variables. There was no

  1. Screening for breast cancer with mammography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C; Nielsen, Margrethe

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A variety of estimates of the benefits and harms of mammographic screening for breast cancer have been published and national policies vary. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effect of screening for breast cancer with mammography on mortality and morbidity. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched Pub...... excluded a biased trial and included 600,000 women in the analyses. Three trials with adequate randomisation did not show a significant reduction in breast cancer mortality at 13 years (relative risk (RR) 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79 to 1.02); four trials with suboptimal randomisation showed...... misclassification of cause of death. The trials with adequate randomisation did not find an effect of screening on cancer mortality, including breast cancer, after 10 years (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.10) or on all-cause mortality after 13 years (RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.03).Numbers of lumpectomies and mastectomies...

  2. Hormone receptor expression in male breast cancers | Akosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Male breast cancers are rare but have been found in higher proportions in Black Africans. Prognostic factors for breast cancers include tumour size, grade and stage, and hormone receptor status. The hormone receptor status is an invaluable guide in the use of adjuvant endocrine therapy, but none of the reports available ...

  3. hisBreast cancer Molecular subtypes and their clinicopathological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with varying clinical outcomes in histologically similar tumors. Micro arrays gene profiling has identified several breast cancer subtypes which include luminal A, Luminal B, Basal, and Her2 subtype. These subtypes show variable prognosis and response to therapy.

  4. Dietary patterns and survival in German postmenopausal breast cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.; Buck, K.; Seibold, P.; Heinz, J.; Obi, N.; Flesch-Janys, D.; Chang-Claude, J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Research on the association between dietary patterns and breast cancer survival is very limited. METHODS: A prospective follow-up study was conducted in Germany, including 2522 postmenopausal breast cancer patients diagnosed in 2001-2005 with available food frequency questionnaire data.

  5. Breast cancer screening implementation and reassurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerø, J; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Brodersen, John

    2013-01-01

    difference in reported psychosocial aspects had disappeared or been reduced because of the nationwide screening implementation. METHODS: The 1000 women included in the previous survey were posted part I of the questionnaire Consequences of Screening in Breast Cancer (COS-BC1) in August 2011, nearly 5 years...

  6. N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids of Marine Origin and Multifocality in Human Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouldamer, Lobna; Goupille, Caroline; Vildé, Anne; Arbion, Flavie; Body, Gilles; Chevalier, Stephan; Cottier, Jean Philippe; Bougnoux, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The microenvironment of breast epithelial tissue may contribute to the clinical expression of breast cancer. Breast epithelial tissue, whether healthy or tumoral, is directly in contact with fat cells, which in turn could influence tumor multifocality. In this pilot study we investigated whether the fatty acid composition of breast adipose tissue differed according to breast cancer focality. Twenty-three consecutive women presenting with non-metastatic breast cancer underwent breast-imaging procedures including Magnetic Resonance Imaging prior to treatment. Breast adipose tissue specimens were collected during breast surgery. We established a biochemical profile of adipose tissue fatty acids by gas chromatography. We assessed whether there were differences according to breast cancer focality. We found that decreased levels in breast adipose tissue of docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids, the two main polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids of marine origin, were associated with multifocality. These differences in lipid content may contribute to mechanisms through which peritumoral adipose tissue fuels breast cancer multifocality.

  7. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues. Here, two High-Aspect Ratio Vessels turn at about 12 rmp to keep breast tissue constructs suspended inside the culture media. Syringes allow scientists to pull for analysis during growth sequences. The tube in the center is a water bubbler that dehumidifies the air to prevent evaporation of the media and thus the appearance of destructive bubbles in the bioreactor.

  8. Awareness of breast cancer risk factors and practice of breast self examination among high school students in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayurt, Ozgül; Ozmen, Dilek; Cetinkaya, Aynur Cakmakçi

    2008-10-17

    Young breast cancer patients have a lower rate of survival than old breast cancer patients due to being diagnosed at advanced stages. Breast self-examination makes women more "breast aware", which in turn may lead to an earlier diagnosis of breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate knowledge and practice of breast self-examination and to determine knowledge of risk factors for breast cancer among high school students. This is a descriptive and cross-sectional study. It was conducted in a high school in Manisa, Turkey. The study sample included 718 female high school students. A socio-demographic characteristics data form, knowledge of breast self examination and risk factors for breast cancer form and breast self examination practice form were used to collect data. The female high school students had insufficient knowledge about breast self-examination and a low percentage of students reported that they had performed breast self examination monthly. The most common reason for not doing breast self- examination was "not knowing how to perform breast self-examination" (98.5%). Most of the students had little knowledge of the risk factors for breast cancer. The most widely known risk factor by the students was personal history of breast cancer (68.7%). There was a significant relation between breast self-examination practice and age, school grade, knowledge about breast cancer and knowledge about breast self- examination. There is a need to increase knowledge of adolescent females about the risks of breast cancer and benefits of early detection. In fact, health care professionals can develop effective breast health care programs and help young women to acquire good health habits.

  9. Awareness of breast cancer risk factors and practice of breast self examination among high school students in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çetinkaya Aynur

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Young breast cancer patients have a lower rate of survival than old breast cancer patients due to being diagnosed at advanced stages. Breast self-examination makes women more "breast aware", which in turn may lead to an earlier diagnosis of breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate knowledge and practice of breast self-examination and to determine knowledge of risk factors for breast cancer among high school students. Methods This is a descriptive and cross-sectional study. It was conducted in a high school in Manisa, Turkey. The study sample included 718 female high school students. A socio-demographic characteristics data form, knowledge of breast self examination and risk factors for breast cancer form and breast self examination practice form were used to collect data. Results The female high school students had insufficient knowledge about breast self-examination and a low percentage of students reported that they had performed breast self examination monthly. The most common reason for not doing breast self- examination was "not knowing how to perform breast self-examination" (98.5%. Most of the students had little knowledge of the risk factors for breast cancer. The most widely known risk factor by the students was personal history of breast cancer (68.7%. There was a significant relation between breast self-examination practice and age, school grade, knowledge about breast cancer and knowledge about breast self- examination. Conclusion There is a need to increase knowledge of adolescent females about the risks of breast cancer and benefits of early detection. In fact, health care professionals can develop effective breast health care programs and help young women to acquire good health habits.

  10. Mouse models of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakur Mohibi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy and second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women. Despite advances in genetic and biochemical analyses, the incidence of breast cancer and its associated mortality remain very high. About 60 - 70% of breast cancers are Estrogen Receptor alpha (ER-α positive and are dependent on estrogen for growth. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs have therefore provided an effective targeted therapy to treat ER-α positive breast cancer patients. Unfortunately, development of resistance to endocrine therapy is frequent and leads to cancer recurrence. Our understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in the development of ER-α positive tumors and their resistance to ER antagonists is currently limited due to lack of experimental models of ER-α positive breast cancer. In most mouse models of breast cancer, the tumors that form are typically ER-negative and independent of estrogen for their growth. However, in recent years more attention has been given to develop mouse models that develop different subtypes of breast cancers, including ER-positive tumors. In this review, we discuss the currently available mouse models that develop ER-α positive mammary tumors and their potential use to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of ER-α positive breast cancer development and endocrine resistance.

  11. Calcium influx pathways in breast cancer: opportunities for pharmacological intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, I; Roberts-Thomson, S J; Monteith, G R

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+ influx through Ca2+ permeable ion channels is a key trigger and regulator of a diverse set of cellular events, such as neurotransmitter release and muscle contraction. Ca2+ influx is also a regulator of processes relevant to cancer, including cellular proliferation and migration. This review focuses on calcium influx in breast cancer cells as well as the potential for pharmacological modulators of specific Ca2+ influx channels to represent future agents for breast cancer therapy. Altered expression of specific calcium permeable ion channels is present in some breast cancers. In some cases, such changes can be related to breast cancer subtype and even prognosis. In vitro and in vivo models have now helped identify specific Ca2+ channels that play important roles in the proliferation and invasiveness of breast cancer cells. However, some aspects of our understanding of Ca2+ influx in breast cancer still require further study. These include identifying the mechanisms responsible for altered expression and the most effective therapeutic strategy to target breast cancer cells through specific Ca2+ channels. The role of Ca2+ influx in processes beyond breast cancer cell proliferation and migration should become the focus of studies in the next decade. PMID:24460676

  12. Job Authority and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudrovska, Tetyana

    2013-01-01

    Using the 1957-2011 data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, I integrate the gender relations theory, a life course perspective, and a biosocial stress perspective to explore the effect of women's job authority in 1975 (at age 36) and 1993 (at age 54) on breast cancer incidence up to 2011. Findings indicate that women with the authority to hire, fire, and influence others' pay had a significantly higher risk of a breast cancer diagnosis over the next 30 years compared to housewives and employed women with no job authority. Because job authority conferred the highest risk of breast cancer for women who also spent more hours dealing with people at work in 1975, I suggest that the assertion of job authority by women in the 1970s involved stressful interpersonal experiences, such as social isolation and negative social interactions, that may have increased the risk of breast cancer via prolonged dysregulation of the glucocorticoid system and exposure of breast tissue to the adverse effects of chronically elevated cortisol. This study contributes to sociology by emphasizing gendered biosocial pathways through which women's occupational experiences become embodied and drive forward physiological repercussions.

  13. Genetic heterogeneity in breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, T I

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 20% of breast cancer patients have a family history of the disease, and in one-fourth of these cases breast cancer appears to be inherited as an autosomally dominant trait. Five genes and gene regions involved in breast cancer susceptibility have been uncovered. Germ-line mutations in the recently cloned BRCA1 gene at 17q21 is considered to be responsible for the disease in a majority of the breast-ovarian cancer families and in 40-45% of the site-specific breast cancer families, but appears not to be involved in families with both male and female breast cancer cases. The BRCA2 locus at 13q12-q13 appears to be involved in 40-45% of the site-specific breast cancer families, and in most of the families with affected males. The gene located in this region, however, does not seem to confer susceptibility to ovarian cancer. The TP53 gene is involved in breast cancer development in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome and Li-Fraumeni syndrom-like families, whereas germ-line mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene is present in a subset of male breast cancers. Furthermore, females who are obligate carriers of ataxia telangiectasia (AT) have a 4-12 times relative risk of developing breast cancer as compared with the general female population, indicating that germ-line mutations in AT also confer susceptibility to breast cancer.

  14. breast cancer screening in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Participants underwent Clinical Breast Examination (CBE), breast transillumination ... with low 5-year survival (of 39%). In the past, resource allocation for health was skewed towards infectious dis- eases such as HIV/AIDS and malaria. Currently however, a rapidly ... tality by up to 25-30 % in women over 50 years old (2-. 4).

  15. Antiangiogenic therapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D.L.; Andersson, M.; Andersen, Jon Alexander Lykkegaard

    2010-01-01

    and optimal use of these agents for the treatment of breast cancer. Currently, the most promising approach has been the use of bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the most potent pro-angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Small molecular inhibitors of VEGF...... tyrosine kinase activity, such as sorafenib, appear promising. While, the role of sunitinib and inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in breast cancer has to be defined. Several unanswered questions remain, such as choice of drug(s), optimal duration of therapy and patient selection criteria...

  16. Common breast cancer risk alleles and risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Näslund-Koch, C; Nordestgaard, B G; Bojesen, S E

    2017-01-01

    mammography in Denmark, the average 5-year breast cancer risk was 1.5%, overall and 1.1%, 1.4%, 1.6%, 1.7%, 2.1%, for the 1(st) through 5(th) quintile, respectively. Based on age, nulliparity, familial history, and allele sum, 25% of women aged 50-69, and 94% of women aged 40-49, had absolute 5-year breast...... cancer risks ≤ 1.5%. Using polygenic risk score led to similar results. CONCLUSION: Common breast cancer risk alleles are associated with incidence and mortality of breast cancer in the general population, but not with other cancers. After including breast cancer allele sum in risk assessment, 25...

  17. Breast Cancer Stem Cells in Antiestrogen Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Schafer JIM ,O’Regan RM, Jordan VC. Antitumor action of physiological estradiol on tamox- ifen stimulated breast tumors grown in athymic mice. Clin. Cancer...JS, Crowe DL (2009) Tumor initiating cancer stem cells from human breast cancer cell lines. Int J Oncol 34:1449–1453. 10. Woodward WA, Chen MS... Crowe DL (2009) Tumor initiating cancer stem cells from human breast cancer cell lines. Int J Oncol 34: 1449–1453. 49. Woodward WA, Chen MS, Behbod F

  18. Tamoxifen therapy in breast cancer control worldwide.

    OpenAIRE

    Love, R. R.; Koroltchouk, V.

    1993-01-01

    In most developed and many developing countries, breast cancer is the most frequent cancer and the leading cause of cancer death among women. At least 50% of all breast cancer patients worldwide would survive longer, however, if public awareness about and early detection of the condition were increased and greater use were made of efficient treatment of proven value. With early-stage, localized breast cancer, local treatment combined with adjuvant hormonal therapy with tamoxifen, a synthetic ...

  19. Nanotechnology-Enabled Optical Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    also rare cases of stromal tumors in the breast that includes benign fibroadenomas , sarcomas, and phyllodes tumors. Fibroadenomas is the most common...Enabled Optical Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Rebekah Drezek, Ph.D...Imaging of Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Rebekah Drezek, Ph.D. 5e. TASK NUMBER

  20. Computerized Prediction of Risk for Developing Breast Cancer Based on Bilateral Mammographic Breast Tissue Asymmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xingwei; Lederman, Dror; Tan, Jun; Wang, Xiao Hui; Zheng, Bin

    2011-01-01

    This study developed and assessed a computerized scheme to detect breast abnormalities and predict the risk of developing cancer based on bilateral mammographic tissue asymmetry. A digital mammography database of 100 randomly selected negative cases and 100 positive cases for having high-risk of developing breast cancer was established. Each case includes four images of craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral oblique (MLO) views of the left and right breast. To detect bilateral mammographic tissue...

  1. CYP17 genetic polymorphism, breast cancer, and breast cancer risk factors: Australian Breast Cancer Family Study

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Jiun-Horng; Gertig, Dorota M; Chen, Xiaoqing; Dite, Gillian S; Jenkins, Mark A; Milne, Roger L; Southey, Melissa C; McCredie, Margaret RE; Giles, Graham G; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hopper, John L; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Because CYP17 can influence the degree of exposure of breast tissues to oestrogen, the interaction between polymorphisms in this gene and hormonal risk factors is of particular interest. We attempted to replicate the findings of studies assessing such interactions with the -34T?C polymorphism. Methods Risk factor and CYP17 genotyping data were derived from a large Australian population-based case-control-family study of 1,284 breast cancer cases and 679 controls. Crude and adjust...

  2. Adverse effects of breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odle, Teresa G

    2014-01-01

    As breast cancer outcomes improve and more people with breast cancer survive longer following diagnosis, many survivors must deal with the effects of treatment. Some adverse effects last a short time and have little influence on breast cancer patients' quality of life, yet others can cause long-term complications and add to increased morbidity and mortality among survivors. This article reviews the adverse effects of breast cancer treatments and how they affect the health and quality of life of those receiving treatment. The article also explains how adverse effects can interrupt treatment and how physicians and survivors can manage adverse effects of breast cancer treatment.

  3. Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spellman, Paul T.; Heiser, Laura; Gray, Joe W.

    2009-06-18

    Breast cancer is predominantly a disease of the genome with cancers arising and progressing through accumulation of aberrations that alter the genome - by changing DNA sequence, copy number, and structure in ways that that contribute to diverse aspects of cancer pathophysiology. Classic examples of genomic events that contribute to breast cancer pathophysiology include inherited mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CHK2 that contribute to the initiation of breast cancer, amplification of ERBB2 (formerly HER2) and mutations of elements of the PI3-kinase pathway that activate aspects of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and deletion of CDKN2A/B that contributes to cell cycle deregulation and genome instability. It is now apparent that accumulation of these aberrations is a time-dependent process that accelerates with age. Although American women living to an age of 85 have a 1 in 8 chance of developing breast cancer, the incidence of cancer in women younger than 30 years is uncommon. This is consistent with a multistep cancer progression model whereby mutation and selection drive the tumor's development, analogous to traditional Darwinian evolution. In the case of cancer, the driving events are changes in sequence, copy number, and structure of DNA and alterations in chromatin structure or other epigenetic marks. Our understanding of the genetic, genomic, and epigenomic events that influence the development and progression of breast cancer is increasing at a remarkable rate through application of powerful analysis tools that enable genome-wide analysis of DNA sequence and structure, copy number, allelic loss, and epigenomic modification. Application of these techniques to elucidation of the nature and timing of these events is enriching our understanding of mechanisms that increase breast cancer susceptibility, enable tumor initiation and progression to metastatic disease, and determine therapeutic response or resistance. These studies also

  4. Breast cancer epidemiology and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broeders, M. J. M.; Verbeek, A. L. M.

    1997-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in the Western society. Over the past decades it has become apparent that breast cancer incidence rates are increasing steadily, whereas the mortality rates for breast cancer have remained relatively constant. Information through the media on this rising number of cases has increased breast health awareness but has also introduced anxiety in the female population. This combination of factors has made the need for prevention of breast cancer an urgent matter. Breast cancer does not seem to be a single disease entity. A specific etiologic factor may therefore have more influence on one form may therefore have more influence on one form of breast cancer than another. So far though, as shown in their summary of current knowledge on established and dubious risk factors, no risk factors have been identified that can explain a major part of the incidence. Efforts to identify other ways for primary prevention have also been discouraging, even though breast cancer is one of the most investigated tumours world-wide. Thus, at this point i time, the most important strategy to reduce breast cancer mortality is early detection through individual counselling and organised breast screening programs. The recent isolation of breast cancer susceptibility genes may introduce new ways to reduce the risk of breast cancer in a small subset of women

  5. Biomarkers of the Metabolic Syndrome and Breast Cancer Prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Qiu-Li; Xu, Wang-Hong, E-mail: mtao@buffalo.edu [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Tao, Meng-Hua, E-mail: mtao@buffalo.edu [Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)

    2010-04-28

    In spite of its public health importance, our understanding of the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis and progress is still evolving. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a constellation of biochemical abnormalities including visceral adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia and high blood pressure. The components of the MS have all been related to late-stage disease and even to a poor prognosis of breast cancer through multiple interacting mechanisms. In this review, we aim to present a summary of recent advances in the understanding of the contribution of the MS to breast cancer with the emphasis on the role of biomarkers of the MS in the prognosis of breast cancer.

  6. Biomarkers of the Metabolic Syndrome and Breast Cancer Prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Qiu-Li; Xu, Wang-Hong; Tao, Meng-Hua

    2010-01-01

    In spite of its public health importance, our understanding of the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis and progress is still evolving. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a constellation of biochemical abnormalities including visceral adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia and high blood pressure. The components of the MS have all been related to late-stage disease and even to a poor prognosis of breast cancer through multiple interacting mechanisms. In this review, we aim to present a summary of recent advances in the understanding of the contribution of the MS to breast cancer with the emphasis on the role of biomarkers of the MS in the prognosis of breast cancer

  7. Ultrasound screening of contralateral breast after surgery for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Ja [Department of Radiology, Seoul Metropolitan Government Seoul National University, Boramae Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Se-Yeong; Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Nariya [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Han, Wonshik [Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Woo Kyung, E-mail: moonwk@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The addition of supplemental US to mammography depicted additional 5.0 cancers per 1000 postoperative women. • Positive biopsy rate of mammography-detected lesions was 66.7% (4 of 6) and that of US-detected lesions was 40.0% (6 of 15). • US can be helpful to detect mammographically occult breast cancer in the contralateral breast in women with previous history of cancer and dense breast. - Abstract: Objective: To determine whether supplemental screening ultrasound (US) to mammography could improve cancer detection rate of the contralateral breast in patients with a personal history of breast cancer and dense breasts. Materials and methods: During a one-year study period, 1314 screening patients with a personal history of breast cancer and dense breasts simultaneously underwent mammography and breast US. BI-RADS categories were given for mammography or US-detected lesions in the contralateral breast. The reference standard was histology and/or 1-year imaging follow-up, and the cancer rate according to BI-RADS categories and cancer detection rate and positive biopsy rate according to detection modality were analyzed. Results: Of 1314 patients, 84 patients (6.4%) were categorized as category 3 with one interval cancer and one cancer which was upgraded to category 4A after 6-month follow-up US (2.5% cancer rate, 95% CIs 1.5–9.1%). Fifteen patients (1.1%) had category 4A or 4B lesions in the contralateral breast. Four lesions were detected on mammography (two lesions were also visible on US) and 11 lesions were detected on US and 5 cancers were confirmed (33.3%, 95% CIs 15.0–58.5%). Six patients (0.5%) had category 4C lesions, 2 detected on mammography and 4 on US and 4 cancers were confirmed (66.7%, 95% CIs 29.6–90.8%). No lesions were categorized as category 5 in the contralateral breast. Cancer detection rate by mammography was 3.3 per 1000 patients and that by US was 5.0 per 1000 patients, therefore overall cancer detection rate by

  8. Ultrasound screening of contralateral breast after surgery for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Ja; Chung, Se-Yeong; Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Nariya; Han, Wonshik; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The addition of supplemental US to mammography depicted additional 5.0 cancers per 1000 postoperative women. • Positive biopsy rate of mammography-detected lesions was 66.7% (4 of 6) and that of US-detected lesions was 40.0% (6 of 15). • US can be helpful to detect mammographically occult breast cancer in the contralateral breast in women with previous history of cancer and dense breast. - Abstract: Objective: To determine whether supplemental screening ultrasound (US) to mammography could improve cancer detection rate of the contralateral breast in patients with a personal history of breast cancer and dense breasts. Materials and methods: During a one-year study period, 1314 screening patients with a personal history of breast cancer and dense breasts simultaneously underwent mammography and breast US. BI-RADS categories were given for mammography or US-detected lesions in the contralateral breast. The reference standard was histology and/or 1-year imaging follow-up, and the cancer rate according to BI-RADS categories and cancer detection rate and positive biopsy rate according to detection modality were analyzed. Results: Of 1314 patients, 84 patients (6.4%) were categorized as category 3 with one interval cancer and one cancer which was upgraded to category 4A after 6-month follow-up US (2.5% cancer rate, 95% CIs 1.5–9.1%). Fifteen patients (1.1%) had category 4A or 4B lesions in the contralateral breast. Four lesions were detected on mammography (two lesions were also visible on US) and 11 lesions were detected on US and 5 cancers were confirmed (33.3%, 95% CIs 15.0–58.5%). Six patients (0.5%) had category 4C lesions, 2 detected on mammography and 4 on US and 4 cancers were confirmed (66.7%, 95% CIs 29.6–90.8%). No lesions were categorized as category 5 in the contralateral breast. Cancer detection rate by mammography was 3.3 per 1000 patients and that by US was 5.0 per 1000 patients, therefore overall cancer detection rate by

  9. Radiation treatment for breast cancer. Recent advances.

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, Edward

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review recent advances in radiation therapy in treatment of breast cancer. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE and CANCERLIT were searched using the MeSH words breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in situ, sentinel lymph node biopsy, and postmastectomy radiation. Randomized studies have shown the efficacy of radiation treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and for invasive breast cancer. MAIN MESSAGE: Lumpectomy followed by radiation is effective treatment for DCIS. In early breast c...

  10. Alcohol and breast cancer: the mechanisms explained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sader, Hassen; Abdul-Jabar, Hani; Allawi, Zahra; Haba, Yasser

    2009-08-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of death amongst women, several studies have shown significant association between alcohol consumption and breast cancer. The aim of this overview is to highlight some of the mechanisms by which alcohol consumption could increase the risk of developing breast cancer. Using online Medline search engine, article containing details about mechanisms which explain the link between alcohol and breast cancer were examined. A number of mechanisms were found by which alcohol could increase the risk of breast cancer, alcohol's interaction and effect on oestrogen secretion; number of oestrogen receptors; the generation of acetaldehyde and hydroxyl free radicals; cells migration and metastasis; secretion of IGF1 and interaction with HRT and folate metabolism. In conclusion, it is essential for clinicians to understand these mechanisms and inform patients of the link between alcohol and breast cancer. Breast cancer; Alcohol; Mechanisms.

  11. Human papilloma viruses (HPV and breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Sutherland Lawson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Human papillomaviruses (HPV may have a role in some breast cancers. The purpose of this study is to fill important gaps in the evidence. These gaps are: (i confirmation of the presence of high risk for cancer HPVs in breast cancers, (ii evidence of HPV infections in benign breast tissues prior to the development of HPV positive breast cancer in the same patients, (iii evidence that HPVs are biologically active and not harmless passengers in breast cancer.Methods: RNA-seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA was used to identify HPV RNA sequences in breast cancers. We also conducted a retrospective cohort study based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR analyses to identify HPVs in archival specimens from Australian women with benign breast biopsies who later developed breast cancer. To assess whether HPVs in breast cancer were biologically active, the expression of the oncogenic protein HPV E7 was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC.Results: Thirty (3.5% low risk and 20 (2.3% high risk HPV types were identified in 855 breast cancers from the TCGA data base. The high risk types were HPV 18 (48%, HPV 113 (24%, HPV 16 (10%, HPV 52 (10%. Data from the PCR cohort study, indicated that HPV type 18 was the most common type identified in breast cancer specimens (55% of 40 breast cancer specimens followed by HPV 16 (13%. The same HPV type was identified in both the benign and subsequent breast cancer in 15 patients. HPV E7 proteins were identified in 72% of benign breast specimens and 59% of invasive breast cancer specimens.Conclusions: There were 4 observations of particular interest: (i confirmation by both NGS and PCR of the presence of high risk HPV gene sequences in breast cancers, (ii a correlation between high risk HPV in benign breast specimens and subsequent HPV positive breast cancer in the same patient, (iii HPVs in breast cancer are likely to be biologically active (as shown by transcription of HPV DNA to RNA plus the expression of

  12. Human Papilloma Viruses and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, James S; Glenn, Wendy K; Salyakina, Daria; Delprado, Warick; Clay, Rosemary; Antonsson, Annika; Heng, Benjamin; Miyauchi, Shingo; Tran, Dinh D; Ngan, Christopher C; Lutze-Mann, Louise; Whitaker, Noel J

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) may have a role in some breast cancers. The purpose of this study is to fill important gaps in the evidence. These gaps are: (i) confirmation of the presence of high risk for cancer HPVs in breast cancers, (ii) evidence of HPV infections in benign breast tissues prior to the development of HPV-positive breast cancer in the same patients, (iii) evidence that HPVs are biologically active and not harmless passengers in breast cancer. RNA-seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) was used to identify HPV RNA sequences in breast cancers. We also conducted a retrospective cohort study based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses to identify HPVs in archival specimens from Australian women with benign breast biopsies who later developed breast cancer. To assess whether HPVs in breast cancer were biologically active, the expression of the oncogenic protein HPV E7 was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Thirty (3.5%) low-risk and 20 (2.3%) high-risk HPV types were identified in 855 breast cancers from the TCGA database. The high risk types were HPV 18 (48%), HPV 113 (24%), HPV 16 (10%), HPV 52 (10%). Data from the PCR cohort study indicated that HPV type 18 was the most common type identified in breast cancer specimens (55% of 40 breast cancer specimens) followed by HPV 16 (13%). The same HPV type was identified in both the benign and subsequent breast cancer in 15 patients. HPV E7 proteins were identified in 72% of benign breast specimens and 59% of invasive breast cancer specimens. There were four observations of particular interest: (i) confirmation by both NGS and PCR of the presence of high-risk HPV gene sequences in breast cancers, (ii) a correlation between high-risk HPV in benign breast specimens and subsequent HPV-positive breast cancer in the same patient, (iii) HPVs in breast cancer are likely to be biologically active (as shown by transcription of HPV DNA to RNA plus the expression of HPV E7 proteins), (iv) HPV

  13. Genomic Changes in Normal Breast Tissue in Women at Normal Risk or at High Risk for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danforth, David N

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic breast cancer develops through the accumulation of molecular abnormalities in normal breast tissue, resulting from exposure to estrogens and other carcinogens beginning at adolescence and continuing throughout life. These molecular changes may take a variety of forms, including numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities, epigenetic changes, and gene expression alterations. To characterize these abnormalities, a review of the literature has been conducted to define the molecular changes in each of the above major genomic categories in normal breast tissue considered to be either at normal risk or at high risk for sporadic breast cancer. This review indicates that normal risk breast tissues (such as reduction mammoplasty) contain evidence of early breast carcinogenesis including loss of heterozygosity, DNA methylation of tumor suppressor and other genes, and telomere shortening. In normal tissues at high risk for breast cancer (such as normal breast tissue adjacent to breast cancer or the contralateral breast), these changes persist, and are increased and accompanied by aneuploidy, increased genomic instability, a wide range of gene expression differences, development of large cancerized fields, and increased proliferation. These changes are consistent with early and long-standing exposure to carcinogens, especially estrogens. A model for the breast carcinogenic pathway in normal risk and high-risk breast tissues is proposed. These findings should clarify our understanding of breast carcinogenesis in normal breast tissue and promote development of improved methods for risk assessment and breast cancer prevention in women.

  14. Antiangiogenic therapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D.L.; Andersson, M.; Andersen, Jon Alexander Lykkegaard

    2010-01-01

    and optimal use of these agents for the treatment of breast cancer. Currently, the most promising approach has been the use of bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the most potent pro-angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Small molecular inhibitors of VEGF...... tyrosine kinase activity, such as sorafenib, appear promising. While, the role of sunitinib and inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in breast cancer has to be defined. Several unanswered questions remain, such as choice of drug(s), optimal duration of therapy and patient selection criteria......ABSTRACT: Angiogenesis is an important component of cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. Therefore, inhibition of angiogenesis is an attractive strategy for treatment of cancer. We describe existing clinical trials of antiangiogenic agents and the challenges facing the clinical development...

  15. Plasma DNA integrity index as a potential molecular diagnostic marker for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Azza M; Teama, Salwa; Fawzy, Amal; El Deftar, Mervat

    2016-06-01

    Plasma DNA integrity index is increased in various malignancies including breast cancer, the most common cancer in women worldwide; early detection is crucial for successful treatment. Current screening methods fail to detect many cases of breast cancer at an early stage. In this study, we evaluated the level of plasma DNA integrity index in 260 females (95 with breast cancer, 95 with benign breast lesions, and 70 healthy controls) to verify its potential value in discriminating malignant from benign breast lesions. The criteria of the American Joint Committee on Cancer were used for staging of breast cancer patients. DNA integrity index was measured by real-time PCR. DNA integrity index was significantly higher in breast cancer than in benign breast patients and healthy subjects (P = cancer group was 85.3 % at 0.55 DNA integrity index cutoff. In conclusion, the plasma DNA integrity index may be a promising molecular diagnostic marker of malignancy in breast lesions.

  16. Nanotechnology for breast cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takemi; Decuzzi, Paolo; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Sakamoto, Jason H; Tasciotti, Ennio; Robertson, Fredika M; Ferrari, Mauro

    2009-02-01

    Breast cancer is the field of medicine with the greatest presence of nanotechnological therapeutic agents in the clinic. A pegylated form of liposomally encapsulated doxorubicin is routinely used for treatment against metastatic cancer, and albumin nanoparticulate chaperones of paclitaxel were approved for locally recurrent and metastatic disease in 2005. These drugs have yielded substantial clinical benefit, and are steadily gathering greater beneficial impact. Clinical trials currently employing these drugs in combination with chemo and biological therapeutics exceed 150 worldwide. Despite these advancements, breast cancer morbidity and mortality is unacceptably high. Nanotechnology offers potential solutions to the historical challenge that has rendered breast cancer so difficult to contain and eradicate: the extreme biological diversity of the disease presentation in the patient population and in the evolutionary changes of any individual disease, the multiple pathways that drive disease progression, the onset of 'resistance' to established therapeutic cocktails, and the gravity of the side effects to treatment, which result from generally very poor distribution of the injected therapeutic agents in the body. A fundamental requirement for success in the development of new therapeutic strategies is that breast cancer specialists-in the clinic, the pharmaceutical and the basic biological laboratory-and nanotechnologists-engineers, physicists, chemists and mathematicians-optimize their ability to work in close collaboration. This further requires a mutual openness across cultural and language barriers, academic reward systems, and many other 'environmental' divides. This paper is respectfully submitted to the community to help foster the mutual interactions of the breast cancer world with micro- and nano-technology, and in particular to encourage the latter community to direct ever increasing attention to breast cancer, where an extraordinary beneficial impact may

  17. Caloric Restriction in Treating Patients With Stage 0-I Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-25

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer

  18. Breast Cancer in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tessier Cloutier, B; Clarke, A E; Ramsey-Goldman, R

    2013-01-01

    Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries.......Evidence points to a decreased breast cancer risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We analyzed data from a large multisite SLE cohort, linked to cancer registries....

  19. Breast Cancer Tissue Repository

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iglehart, J

    1997-01-01

    The Breast Tissue Repository at Duke enters its fourth year of finding. The purpose of the Repository at Duke is to provide substantial quantities of frozen tissue for explorative molecular studies...

  20. Understanding and potentially reducing second breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, D.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Long term survival after breast cancer diagnosis has increased markedly in the last decade: 15-year relative survival after breast cancer diagnosis is now 75% in the US. Associated with these excellent survival prospects, however, long term studies suggest that contralateral second breast cancer rates are in the range from 10 to 15% at 15 years post treatment, and are still higher for BRCA1/2 carriers, as well as for still longer term survivors. These second cancer risks are much higher than those for a comparable healthy woman to develop a first breast cancer. It follows that women with breast cancer are highly prone to develop a second breast cancer. We propose here a new option for reducing the disturbingly high risk of a contralateral second breast cancer. in patients with both estrogen positive and negative primary breast cancer: prophylactic mammary irradiation (PMI) of the contralateral breast. The rationale behind PMI is evidence that standard post-Iumpectomy radiotherapy of the affected (ipsilateral) breast substantially reduces the long-term genetically-based second cancer risk in the ipsilateral breast, by killing the existing premalignant cells in that breast. This suggests that there are relatively few premalignant cells in the breast (hundreds or thousands, not millions), so even a fairly modest radiation cell-kill level across the whole breast would be expected to kill essentially all of them. If this is so, then a modest radiation dose-much lower than that to the affected breast--delivered uniformly to the whole contralateral breast, and typically delivered at the same time as the radiotherapy of the ipsilateral breast, would have the potential to markedly reduce second-cancer risks in the contralateral breast by killing essentially all the pre-malignant cells in that breast while causing only a very low level of radiation-induced sequelae. Therefore we hypothesize that low-dose prophylactic mammary irradiation of the contralateral breast

  1. Mass screening in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strax, P.

    1977-01-01

    Some questions about mass screening in breast cancer are answered it being concluded that: 1. mass screening for the detection of early breast cancer is the only means with proven potential for lowering the death rate of the disease; 2. mammography is an importante - if not the most important modality in mass screening; 3. new film - screen combinations generally available are capable of producing mammograms of excelent quality with radiation doses down to .1 rad into the body of breast. The risk of malignant changes from such dosage - even when given periodically is negligeable. New equipment, to be available, shortly, will use the new film - screen combinations in an automated manner with must reduce cost in time, filme, personnel and processing - of more than 50%. This would make mass screening more practical. (M.A.) [pt

  2. Breast Cancer Management: Present Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Th. T. Singh

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The management of breast cancer is perhaps the most controversial of all and has evolved a sea change over the years. Contrast enhanced MRI imaging is emerging as the most efficient imaging diagnostic tool. Newer approaches for the biopsy of inoperable breast cancer are aimed at obtaining diagnostically adequate tissue samples while minimizing invasiveness and the risk of complications. The regional vigour that Halsted followed rigorously, albeit, achieved significant locoregional control, could not lead to improved long-term survival. With the passage of time, people have understood the systemic nature of the disease and the paramount need to incorporate systemic treatment even in relatively earlier stages and curtain surgical ablative techniques. The role of primary systemic therapy in the management of breast cancer is fast emerging as a vital option. In HER 2/neu gene overexpressed patients, addition of trastuzumab to the systemic treatment is a distinct improvement in overall survival. (Med J Indones 2007; 16:55-60 Keywords: breast cancer, tumour, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, systemic therapy

  3. Hormone therapy for breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is different from hormone therapy to treat menopause symptoms. Hormones and Breast Cancer The hormones estrogen and progesterone ... other tissues such as fat and skin. After menopause, the ovaries stop producing these hormones. But the body continues to make a small ...

  4. Breast Cancer Startup Challenge winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten winners of a world-wide competition to bring emerging breast cancer research technologies to market faster were announced today by the Avon Foundation for Women, in partnership with NCI and the Center for Advancing Innovation (CAI). Avon is providing

  5. Preoperative irradiation in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-eight patients with breast cancer stage III - (VICC 1978) were submitted to preoperative radiation with tumor dose of 5.000 cGy in five weeks. The period of treatment and observation was from March 1977 to December 1986. (M.A.C.) [pt

  6. Genetic determinants of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Gonzalez-Zuloeta Ladd (Angela)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBreast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in the Western world and it is estimated that women who survive to the age of 85 years will have a 1 in 9 lifetime probability of developing this type of neoplasia (1, 2). The degree of risk is not spread homogeneously across the

  7. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Hansen, Thomas van Overeem; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities in the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). However, only approximately 25% of cases of HBOC can be ascribed to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Recently, exome sequencing has uncovered substantial locus heterogeneity among...

  8. Radiation pneumonitis in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrino, R.; Carvalho, H.A.; Gomes, H.C.; Kuang, L.F.; Aguilar, P.B.; Lederman, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-nine observations of patients with breast cancer frm 1980 to 1985 were reviewed. All of them received radiotherapy. In 44.9% radiologic findings of radiation pneumonitis were detected and only 9% presented mild or moderate respiratory symptoms. (M.A.C.) [pt

  9. Risk of primary non-breast cancer after female breast cancer by age at diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellemkjær, Lene; Christensen, Jane; Frederiksen, Kirsten Skovsgaard

    2011-01-01

    Women diagnosed with breast cancer at young age have been shown to be at higher risk of developing a new primary cancer than women diagnosed at older ages, but little is known about whether adjustment for calendar year of breast cancer diagnosis, length of follow-up, and/or breast cancer treatment...... alters the risk pattern by age....

  10. Mutation analysis of breast cancer gene BRCA among breast cancer Jordanian females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atoum, Manar F.; Al-Kayed, Sameer A.

    2004-01-01

    To screen mutations of the tumor suppressor breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) within 3 exons among Jordanian breast cancer females. A total of 135 Jordanian breast cancer females were genetically analyzed by denaturing gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) for mutation detection in 3 BRCA1 exons (2, 11 and 20) between 2000-2002 in Al-Basheer Hospital, Amman, Jordan. Of the studied patients 50 had a family history of breast cancer, 28 had a family history of cancer other than breast cancer, and 57 had no family history of any cancer. Five germline mutations were detected among breast cancer females with a family history of breast cancers (one in exon 2 and 4 mutations in exon 11). Another germline mutation (within exon 11) was detected among breast cancer females with family history of cancer other than breast cancer, and no mutation was detected among breast cancer females with no family history of any cancer or among normal control females. Screening mutations within exon 2, exon 11 and exon 20 showed that most screened mutations were within BRCA1 exon 11 among breast cancer Jordanian families with a family history of breast cancer. (author)

  11. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Jaal, Jana; Treasure, Tom; Foschi, Roberto; Ricardi, Umberto; Groen, Harry; Tavilla, Andrea; Ardanaz, Eva

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  12. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Zwan, J.M.V.D.; Izarzugaza, I.; Jaal, J.; Treasure, T.; Foschi, R.; Ricardi, U.; Groen, H.; Tavilla, A.; Ardanaz, E.

    2012-01-01

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  13. Characterizing and Targeting Replication Stress Response Defects in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    with RSR- intact T47D breast cancer cells and two RSR-defect (MDA-MB-231 and Hs578T) breast cancer cell lines. After incubation, the cells were stained...RSR defective breast cancer cells. Two RSR defective breast cancer cell liens, MDA-MB-231 and Hs578T, and RSR intact breast cancer cell line, T47D

  14. Environmental Factors and Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast Cancer Risk and Environmental Factors For millions of women whose lives have been affected by breast cancer, the 1994 discovery of the first breast ... gene by researchers from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and their collaborators, was a ...

  15. Bilateral breast cancer : mammographic and clinical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Oh, Ki Keun; Jun, Hwang Yoon; Lee, Byung Chan; Lee, Kyong Sik; Lee, Yong Hee [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-06-01

    To evaluate the mammographic and clinical features of bilateral breast cancer. We retrospectively reviewed clinical records(n=23) and mammograms (n=15) of 23 patients with bilateral breast cancer. Patients' age, location of the tumor and pathologic staging were determined from clinical records. Mammographic features were classified as spiculated mass, nonspiculated mass, mass with microcalcification, microcalcification only, asymmetric density, and normal. Of the 23 cases of bilateral breast cancer, 8(34.8%) were synchronous and 15(65.2%) were metachronous. Age at diagnosis of cancer in the first breast was between 27 and 59(mean 43) years ; there was no statistically significant difference in mean age between patients with synchronous and metachronous cancer. The mean interval between the diagnosis of each lesion of the metachronous pairs was 9.1 years. In 11 of 23 cases(48%), tumors were locaated in the same quadrant, and in the other 12 cases(52%), they were in different quadrant. At mammography, five of 15 metachronous cancers(33%) were similar in appearance and 10 pairs(67%) were different. In 4 of 23 cases(17%), cancer in the first breast was at stage 0 and stage 1, and in 13 of 23(57%), cancer in the second breast was at this same stage. In bilateral breast cancer, the two breasts frequently show different mammographic features. Cancer of the second breast was at an early stage; this suggest that regular examination and mammography are important and can allow early detection of contralateral breast cancer.

  16. Breast Cancer After Treatment of Hodgkin's Lymphoma: General Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alm El-Din, Mohamed A.; El-Badawy, Samy A.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2008-01-01

    The improved survival rates among patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma over the past few decades have come with increased incidence of second malignancies. One of the major concerns among female survivors is the significantly elevated risk of breast cancer that appears with extended follow-up. In this review, we include the published literature regarding the risk of breast cancer after irradiation for Hodgkin's lymphoma. We also present the possible long-term surveillance strategies and the optimal time to start screening these women. This could potentially help in early detection of secondary breast cancers and consequently improve outcomes. Furthermore, because of prior radiotherapy, the management of the breast cancer among this unique population has been controversial. We discuss the characteristics of breast cancer that occurs after Hodgkin's lymphoma and also treatment options that could be implemented

  17. Breast cancer and associated factors: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Ataollahi, MR; Sharifi, J; Paknahad, MR; Paknahad, A

    2015-01-01

    This article investigated different dimensions of breast cancer and its associated factors. It revealed that breast cancer was and continues to be among the most prevalent and growing malignant diseases among Iranian women in the past four decades. In this article, required information was collected through literature review and keyword (cancer, breast cancer, cell, gene, life quality, women, prevalence, productivity, age, obesity, alcohol, cigarette, menopause, genetic, Cytokine, and mortali...

  18. Medical hypothesis: Xenoestrogens as preventable causes of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, D.L. (Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC (United States)); Bradlow, H.L. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)); Wolff, M. (City Univ. of New York, NY (United States)); Woodruff, T. (Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Hoel, D.G. (Medical Univ. of South Carolina, SC (United States)); Anton-Culver, H. (Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States))

    1993-10-01

    Changes in documented risk factors for breast cancer and rates of screening cannot completely explain recent increases in incidence or mortality. Established risk factors for breast cancer, including genetics, account for at best 30% of cases. Most of these risk factors can be linked to total lifetime exposure to bioavailable estrogens. Experimental evidence reveals that compounds such as some chlorinated organics, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), triazine herbicides, and pharmaceuticals affect estrogen production and metabolism and thus function as xenoestrogens. Many of these xenoestrogenic compounds also experimentally induce mammary carcinogensis. Recent epidemiologic studies have found that breast fat and serum lipids of women with breast cancer contain significantly elevated levels of some chlorinated organics compared with noncancer controls. As the proportion of inherited breast cancer in the population is small, most breast cancers are due to acquired mutations. The authors hypothesize that substances such as xenoestrogens increase the risk of breast cancer by mechanisms which include interaction with breast-cancer susceptibility genes. A series of epidemiologic studies need to be developed to evaluate this hypothesis.

  19. Predictors for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yun; Zhuang, Zhigang; Dewing, Michelle; Apple, Sophia; Chang, Helena

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, radical breast cancer surgery has been largely replaced by breast conservation treatment, due to early diagnosis and more effective adjuvant treatment. While breast conservation is mostly preferred, the trend of bilateral mastectomy has risen in the United States. The aim of this study is to determine factors influencing patients' choice for having contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). This is a retrospective study of 373 patients diagnosed with primary invasive breast cancer who were treated by bilateral or unilateral mastectomy (BM or UM) at the Revlon/UCLA Breast Center between Jan. 2002 and Dec. 2010. In the BM group, only those with unilateral breast cancer who chose CPM were included in the analysis. When compared with the UM group, the following factors were found to be associated with BM: younger age, pre-menopausal, a family history of breast/ovarian cancer, BRCA mutation, more breast biopsies, history of breast augmentation, having MRI study within 6 months before the surgery, more likely to have reconstruction and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) and fewer had neoadjuvant/adjuvant chemotherapy/radiation. When patients with bilateral breast cancer were excluded, multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated younger patients with negative nodes, SLNB as the only nodal surgery and positive family history were significant factors predicting CPM and immediate reconstruction using tissue expanders or implants. Younger age, lower TN stage, requiring only SLNB and high risk family history predict contralateral prophylactic mastectomy. Tissue expander/implant-based reconstructions were more frequently chosen by patients with BM.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ikeda, Debra

    2002-01-01

    .... Choline peaks are present in 57% of breast cancers but contrary to other research data some invasive ductal cancers do not contain choline as a detectable metabolite, particularly in lobular cancer that has dispersed cells...

  1. Gastric metastasis from invasive lobular breast cancer, mimicking primary gastric cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Hoon; Son, Seung-Myoung; Choi, Young Jin

    2018-03-01

    Gastric metastasis from invasive lobular breast cancer is relatively rare, commonly presented among multiple metastases, several years after primary diagnosis of breast cancer. Importantly, gastric cancer that is synchronously presented with lobular breast cancer can be misdiagnosed as primary gastric cancer; therefore, accurate differential diagnosis is required. A 39-year-old woman was visited to our hospital because of right breast mass and progressive dyspepsia. Invasive lobular carcinoma of breast was diagnosed on core needle biopsy. Gastroscopy revealed a diffuse scirrhous mass at the prepyloric antrum and diagnosed as poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma on biopsy. Synchronous double primary breast and gastric cancers were considered. Detailed pathological analysis focused on immunohistochemical studies of selected antibodies, including those of estrogen receptors, gross cystic disease fluid protein-15, and caudal-type homeobox transcription factor 2, were studied. As a result, gastric lesion was diagnosed as metastatic gastric cancer originating from breast. Right breast conserving surgery was performed, and duodenal stent was inserted under endoscopic guidance to relieve the patient's symptoms. Systemic chemotherapy with combined administration of paclitaxel and trastuzumab was initiated. Forty-one months after the diagnosis, the patient is still undergoing the same therapy. No recurrent lesion has been identified in the breast and evidence of a partial remission of gastric wall thickening has been observed on follow-up studies without new metastatic lesions. Clinical suspicion, repeat endoscopic biopsy, and detailed histological analysis, including immunohistochemistry, are necessary for diagnosis of metastatic gastric cancer from the breast.

  2. Computed tomography of the breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Soo Young; Lee, Yul; Bae, Sang Hoon; Yoon, Jong Sup; Lee, Ki Chu [Hallym University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-12-15

    The indication of computed tomography for the breast lesion are 1) Unusually extensive or small breast caused technical difficulties in performing mammograms. 2) Questionable mammographic findings, especially in dense proliferative breast parenchyme. 3) Microcancer. 4) Suspicious regional lymph node enlargement or invasive of the chest wall by breast cancer. The diagnosis of breast CT in breast cancer is based on pathologic anatomic changes and characteristic increase of mean CT No. of lesion following contrast enhancement. Authors analysed CT of the 34 patients who were clinically suspected breast cancer, and compared with mammography. The results are as follows: 1. Pathological diagnosis of 34 cases were 27 cases of breast cancer, 4 cases of fibrocystic disease, 2 cases of fibroadenoma, and 1 case of intraductal papilloma. The diagnostic accuracy of CT in 27 breast cancer was 93% (25 cases) and mammography 71% (19 case). 2. Correct diagnosis of CT in 7 benign breast disease is in 5 cases and mammography in 5 cases. 3. The most important finding of CT in breast cancer is characteristic increase of CT No. of lesion following contrast enhancement (200 ml, 65%): over average 50 HU in 19 cases of 27 breast cancers, 30-50 HU in a 6 cases, 20-30 HU in 2 cases with tumor necrosis. 4. Computed with mammography, other more valuable CT findings of breast cancer are axillary lymph node enlargement and adjacentic pectoral muscle invasion. 5. In conclusion, breast CT is considered as valuable diagnostic tool in evaluation of breast cancer, but not of benign breast disease.

  3. Ron in Breast Development and Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Waltz, Susan E

    2004-01-01

    .... Virtually nothing is known regarding the function of Ron in the breast. However, two recent studies have shown that Ron is over-expressed and highly phosphorylated in a significant fraction of human and feline breast cancers...

  4. Ron in Breast Development and Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Waltz, Susan

    2003-01-01

    .... Virtually nothing is known regarding the function of Ron in the breast. However, two recent studies have shown the Ron is over- expressed and highly phosphorylated in a significant fraction of human and feline breast cancers...

  5. Breast carcinoma after cancer therapy in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, F.P.; Corkery, J.; Vawter, G.; Fine, W.; Sallan, S.E.

    1983-01-01

    Among 910 survivors of childhood cancer, four developed infiltrating carcinoma of the breast and another had noninfiltrating breast tumor. Expected frequency was 0.3 cases of breast cancer in the series. The affected women developed breast carcinoma at ages 20, 25 and 38 years, and the men at ages 38 and 39 years, respectively. Each patient had received orthovoltage chest irradiation for treatment of Wilms' tumor or bone sarcoma between seven and 34 years previously, and estimated radiation dose to the breast exceeded 300 rad in each instance. Four patients also received diverse forms of chemotherapy. Survivors of childhood cancer have increased risk of developing breast cancer and should undergo periodic screening, particularly after breast tissue had been irradiated. Individualized radiotherapy planning can help exclude the breasts from treatment fields for some thoracic neoplasms

  6. Notch and VEGF Interactions in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shawber, Carrie J

    2006-01-01

    The proposal objective is to define Notch and VEGFR-3 in breast cancer. We investigated this relationship in primary endothelial cell cultures, mouse embryos, human breast tumors, and mouse mammary tumor xenografts...

  7. Impact of modifiable lifestyle factors on outcomes after breast cancer diagnosis: the Setouchi Breast Cancer Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Naruto; Akiyama, Ichiro; Ishihara, Setsuko; Ishibe, Youichi; Kawasaki, Kensuke; Saito, Makoto; Shien, Tadahiko; Nomura, Tsunehisa; Hara, Fumikata; Mizoo, Taeko; Mizota, Yuri; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Ohsumi, Shozo; Doihara, Hiroyoshi

    2015-06-01

    The primary purpose of this large cohort study is to investigate the effects on breast cancer outcomes of modifiable lifestyle factors after breast cancer diagnosis. These factors include physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, obesity and weight gain after diagnosis, alternative medicine and dietary factors. Women diagnosed with Stage 0 to III breast cancer are eligible for participation to this study. Lifestyle, use of alternative medicine, psychosocial factors, reproductive factors and health-related quality of life will be assessed using a questionnaire at the time of breast cancer diagnosis (baseline), and 1, 2, 3 and 5 years after diagnosis. Clinical information and breast cancer outcomes will be obtained from a breast cancer database. The primary endpoint will be disease-free survival. Secondary endpoints are overall survival, health-related quality of life, breast cancer-related symptoms and adverse events. Patient recruitment commenced in February 2013. Enrollment of 2000 breast cancer patients is planned during the 5-year recruitment period. The concept of the study is described in this article. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Prophylactic bilateral mastectomy for breast cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Kelly A

    2004-09-01

    Prophylactic bilateral mastectomy, or preventive removal of the breasts, is an option for women who are at increased risk of developing breast cancer. Among the highest risk groups are those women with a significant family history of breast cancer and those with a known genetic predisposition to the disease. There are many issues surrounding prophylactic mastectomy. Recent research has demonstrated that prophylactic mastectomy may be effective in preventing breast cancer in high-risk women, as well as those with a known BRCA1/2 mutation. The limited research that has been done on the psychosocial implications of the preventive surgery suggests that prophylactic mastectomy may be effective in reducing distress levels in high-risk women and that most women who have had the surgery do not experience psychosocial difficulties. Overall, women who have had prophylactic mastectomy are satisfied with their decision to have the preventive surgery. However, women who choose prophylactic mastectomy may differ compared with those who do not. The results may not be generalizable to all high-risk women. Counseling of high-risk women, specifically those with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, should include a discussion of prophylactic mastectomy, including the medical and psychosocial risks and benefits.

  9. Breast MRI in pregnancy-associated breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Shin Jung; Shin, Sang Soo; Lim, Hyo Soon; Baek, Jang Mi; Seon, Hyun Ju; Heo, Suk Hee; Kim, Jin Woong; Park, Min Ho

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of MR imaging and to describe the MR imaging findings of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. From 2006 to 2013, MR images of 23 patients with pregnancy-associated breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated. MR images were reviewed to evaluate lesion detection and imaging findings of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. MR images were analyzed by using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System and an additional MR-detected lesion with no mammographic or sonographic abnormality was determined. MR imaging depicted breast cancer in all patients, even in marked background parenchymal enhancement. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer was seen as a mass in 20 patients and as non-mass enhancement with segmental distribution in 3 patients. The most common features of the masses were irregular shape (85%), non-circumscribed margin (85%), and heterogeneous enhancement (60%). An additional site of cancer was detected with MR imaging in 5 patients (21.7%) and the type of surgery was changed. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer was usually seen as an irregular mass with heterogeneous enhancement on MR images. Although these findings were not specific, MR imaging was useful in evaluating the disease extent of pregnancy-associated breast cancer

  10. Breast MRI in pregnancy-associated breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Shin Jung; Shin, Sang Soo [Dept. of of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hyo Soon; Baek, Jang Mi; Seon, Hyun Ju; Heo, Suk Hee; Kim, Jin Woong; Park, Min Ho [Chonnam National University Medical School, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of MR imaging and to describe the MR imaging findings of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. From 2006 to 2013, MR images of 23 patients with pregnancy-associated breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated. MR images were reviewed to evaluate lesion detection and imaging findings of pregnancy-associated breast cancer. MR images were analyzed by using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System and an additional MR-detected lesion with no mammographic or sonographic abnormality was determined. MR imaging depicted breast cancer in all patients, even in marked background parenchymal enhancement. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer was seen as a mass in 20 patients and as non-mass enhancement with segmental distribution in 3 patients. The most common features of the masses were irregular shape (85%), non-circumscribed margin (85%), and heterogeneous enhancement (60%). An additional site of cancer was detected with MR imaging in 5 patients (21.7%) and the type of surgery was changed. Pregnancy-associated breast cancer was usually seen as an irregular mass with heterogeneous enhancement on MR images. Although these findings were not specific, MR imaging was useful in evaluating the disease extent of pregnancy-associated breast cancer.

  11. Breast transillumination a viable option for breast cancer screening ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Mammography is an established screening tool for breast cancer in high-income countries but may not be feasible for most resource poor nations. Alternative modalities are needed to mitigate the impact of the increasing incidence and mortality due to breast cancer. This may require the development of new ...

  12. Immunohistochemical characteristics of breast cancer after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lushnikov, E.F.; Dorosevich, A.E.

    1983-01-01

    Histological and immunohistochemical examination of the tissue from 45 breast cancer patients after surgery (14) and combined treatment (31) Was performed. Using direct Coons method the localization of immune complexes and immunoglobulins of the main classes (G, A, M) was revealed. Deposits of immune complexes including immunoglobulins of different classes were found in 8 patients of the 1st group and 22 patients of the 2 nd group. Immune complexes were mostly localized extracellularly in the stroma. After irradiation extensive deposit and more intense fluorescence of immune complexes in the stroma of a tumor, lumps in the walls of the major vessels were observed. It is assumed that immune complexes and immunoglobulins of different classes related to breast cancer epithelial cells, block the immunological interaction of T lymphocytes with cancer cells were carried out. The suppression effect of radiotherapy on tumor cell receptor activity has been shown that is not only of theoretical but also of practical interest

  13. The clinicopathologic characteristics and prognostic significance of triple-negativity in node-negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Wonshik

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Triple-negative (TN breast cancer, which is defined as being negative for the estrogen receptor (ER, the progesterone receptor (PR, and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2, represents a subset of breast cancer with different biologic behaviour. We investigated the clinicopathologic characteristics and prognostic indicators of lymph node-negative TN breast cancer. Methods Medical records were reviewed from patients with node-negative breast cancer who underwent curative surgery at Seoul National University Hospital between Jan. 2000 and Jun. 2003. Clinicopathologic variables and clinical outcomes were evaluated. Results Among 683 patients included, 136 had TN breast cancer and 529 had non-TN breast cancer. TN breast cancer correlated with younger age (p = 0.003, and higher histologic and nuclear grade (p p p = 0.003, and a high level of p53 (p p p = 0.004. Relapse free survival (RFS was significantly shorter among patients with TN breast cancer compared with those with non-TN breast cancer (4-year RFS rate 85.5% vs. 94.2%, respectively; p = 0.001. On multivariate analysis, young age, close resection margin, and triple-negativity were independent predictors of shorter RFS. Conclusion TN breast cancer had higher relapse rate and more aggressive clinicopathologic characteristics than non-TN in node-negative breast cancer. Thus, TN breast cancer should be integrated into the risk factor analysis for node-negative breast cancer.

  14. The Risk and Clinical/Molecular Characteristics of Breast Cancer in Women with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    genotype- breast cancer correlation. WES was attempted to identify breast cancer predisposition in addition to the NF1 gene mutation. Aim 3 is to...history information includes NF1, malignant neoplasm, CNS tumor, and 8 number of relatives with breast cancer . Genetic test results on NF1 gene...Data regarding screening, detection and treatment of cancers other than breast , was not collected. Additionally, the study cohort represents

  15. Environmental cadmium and breast cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Carolyn M.; Chen, John J.; Kovach, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent women's cancer, with an age-adjusted incidence of 122.9 per 100,000 US women. Cadmium, a ubiquitous carcinogenic pollutant with multiple biological effects, has been reported to be associated with breast cancer in one US regional case-control study. We examined the association of breast cancer with urinary cadmium (UCd), in a case-control sample of women living on Long Island (LI), NY (100 with breast cancer and 98 without), a region with an especially high...

  16. Breast and Gynecologic Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    [[{"fid":"184","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","field_folder[und]":"15"},"type":"media","attributes":{"alt":"Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","title":"Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","height":"266","width":"400"," | Prevention and early detection of breast, cervix, endometrial and ovarian cancers and their precursors.

  17. A case control study of breast cancer risk and exposure to injectable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    breast cancer. Design. A population-based case-control study of breast cancer risk in relation to the use of IPes among coloured and black women. Setting. The Western Cape, including the Cape metropole and surrounding rural areas. Study subjects. All coloured and black women with newly diagnosed breast cancer, ...

  18. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci...

  19. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Couch (Fergus); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); G.A. Mendoza-Fandino (Gustavo A.); S. Nord (Silje); J. Lilyquist (Janna); C. Olswold (Curtis); B. Hallberg (Boubou); S. Agata (Simona); H. Ahsan (Habibul); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C.B. Ambrosone (Christine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); V. Arndt (Volker); B.K. Arun (Banu); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); M. Barile (Monica); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); L. Beckmann (Lars); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); J. Benítez (Javier); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); C. Blomqvist (Carl); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); H. Brenner (Hermann); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); S.S. Buys (Saundra S.); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M.A. Caligo (Maria); F. Canzian (Federico); T.A. Carpenter (Adrian); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); S.J. Chanock (Stephen J.); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); J.M. Cunningham (Julie); K. Czene (Kamila); M.B. Daly (Mary B.); F. Damiola (Francesca); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); P. Devilee (Peter); O. Díez (Orland); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); S.M. Domchek (Susan); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); M. Dumont (Martine); A.M. Dunning (Alison); D. Eccles (Diana); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); A.B. Ekici (Arif); H. Eliassen (Heather); S.D. Ellis (Steve); P.A. Fasching (Peter); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); A. Försti (Asta); F. Fostira (Florentia); W.D. Foulkes (William); M.O.W. Friebel (Mark ); E. Friedman (Eitan); D. Frost (Debra); M. Gabrielson (Marike); M. Gammon (Marilie); P.A. Ganz (Patricia A.); S.M. Gapstur (Susan M.); J. Garber (Judy); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); S.A. Gayther (Simon); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); M. Ghoussaini (Maya); G.G. Giles (Graham); G. Glendon (Gord); A.K. Godwin (Andrew K.); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); D. Goldgar (David); A. González-Neira (Anna); M.H. Greene (Mark H.); J. Gronwald (Jacek); P. Guénel (Pascal); M.J. Gunter (Marc J.); L. Haeberle (Lothar); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); U. Hamann (Ute); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); S. Hart (Stewart); S. Healey (Sue); T. Heikkinen (Tuomas); B.E. Henderson (Brian); J. Herzog (Josef); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); R.N. Hoover (Robert); J.L. Hopper (John); K. Humphreys (Keith); D. Hunter (David); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny N.); C. Isaacs (Claudine); A. Jakubowska (Anna); M. James (Margaret); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); U.B. Jensen; E.M. John (Esther); M. Jones (Michael); M. Kabisch (Maria); S. Kar (Siddhartha); B.Y. Karlan (Beth Y.); S. Khan (Sofia); K.T. Khaw; M.G. Kibriya (Muhammad); J.A. Knight (Julia); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); V. Kristensen (Vessela); A. Kwong (Ava); Y. Laitman (Yael); D. Lambrechts (Diether); C. Lazaro (Conxi); E. Lee (Eunjung); L. Le Marchand (Loic); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); A. Lindblom (Annika); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); J. Liu (Jianjun); J. Long (Jirong); J. Lubinski (Jan); P.L. Mai (Phuong); E. Makalic (Enes); K.E. Malone (Kathleen E.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); S. Margolin (Sara); F. Marme (Federick); J.W.M. Martens (John); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A. Meindl (Alfons); A. Miller (Austin); R.L. Milne (Roger); P. Miron (Penelope); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); R. Nussbaum (Robert); K. Offit (Kenneth); E. Olah; O.I. Olopade (Olufunmilayo I.); J.E. Olson (Janet); A. Osorio (Ana); S.K. Park (Sue K.); P.H.M. Peeters; B. Peissel (Bernard); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); J. Peto (Julian); C. Phelan (Catherine); R. Pilarski (Robert); B. Poppe (Bruce); K. Pykäs (Katri); P. Radice (Paolo); N. Rahman (Nazneen); J. Rantala (Johanna); C. Rappaport (Christine); G. Rennert (Gad); A.L. Richardson (Andrea); M. Robson (Mark); I. Romieu (Isabelle); A. Rudolph (Anja); E.J.T. Rutgers (Emiel); M.-J. Sanchez (Maria-Jose); R. Santella (Regina); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); D.F. Schmidt (Daniel); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); R.J. Scott (Rodney); L. Senter (Leigha); P. Sharma (Priyanka); J. Simard (Jacques); C.F. Singer (Christian); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); P. Soucy (Penny); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Steinemann (Doris); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (Marie); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); C. Szabo (Csilla); R. Tamimi (Rulla); W. Tapper (William); P.J. Teixeira; S.-H. Teo; M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M. Thomassen (Mads); D. Thompson (Deborah); L. Tihomirova (Laima); A.E. Toland (Amanda); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); T. Truong (Thérèse); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); A. Teulé (A.); R. Tumino (Rosario); N. Tung (Nadine); C. Turnbull (Clare); G. Ursin (Giski); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); Z. Wang (Zhaoming); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); E. Weiderpass (Elisabete); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); A.S. Whittemore (Alice S.); H. Wildiers (Hans); R. Winqvist (Robert); X.R. Yang (Xiaohong R.); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); S. Yao (Song); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); W. Zheng (Wei); P. Hall (Per); P. Kraft (Peter); C. Vachon (Celine); S. Slager (Susan); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); A.A.N. Monteiro (Alvaro A. N.); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractCommon variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10-8) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative

  20. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci,

  1. Perspectives of Breast Cancer Thermotherapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphandéry, Edouard

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the use of different types of thermotherapies to treat breast cancer is reviewed. While hyperthermia is most commonly used as an adjuvant in combination with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy or cryotherapy to enhance the therapeutic effect of these therapies, thermoablation is usually carried out alone to eradicate small breast tumors. A recently developed thermotherapy, called magnetic hyperthermia, which involves localized heating of nanoparticles under the application of an alternating magnetic field, is also presented. The advantages and drawbacks of these different thermotherapies are highlighted. PMID:24959300

  2. Metabolic implication of tumor:stroma crosstalk in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Andrea; Chiarugi, Paola

    2014-02-01

    The metabolic properties of cancer cells significantly differ from those of normal cells. In particular, cancer cells are largely dependent on aerobic glycolysis, a phenomenon that has been exploited clinically by using labelled glucose for positron emission tomography imaging. Importantly, cancer-associated alterations in metabolism are not merely due to the resulting response to cell proliferation and survival. Indeed, direct metabolic regulation could be driven by tumor oncogenes and/or suppressors, as demonstrated in several solid tumors, including breast cancer. Despite the fact that most breast cancer studies have focused on the intrinsic characteristics of breast tumor cells, it is now widely accepted that tumor microenvironment plays an important role in defining and reprogramming cancer cell metabolism. Tumor:stroma crosstalk, as well as inflammatory cues, concurs to outlining the cancer metabolism, impact on cancer aggressiveness and ultimately on patient survival and therapeutic responses. The aim of this review is to (i) gather the most recent data regarding the metabolic alterations in breast cancer, (ii) describe the role of tumor microenvironment in breast cancer cell metabolic reprogramming, and (iii) contemplate how targeting metabolic pathways aberrantly activated in breast cancer could help current therapeutic regimens.

  3. The Role of Oncoplastic Breast Surgery in Breast Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emiroğlu, Mustafa; Sert, İsmail; İnal, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to discuss indications, advantages, disadvantages, oncologic and aesthetic results of Oncoplastic Surgery (OBS). Pubmed and Medline database were searched for articles published between 1998 and 2014 for keywords: oncoplastic breast surgery, therapeutic mammoplasty, oncoplastic breast reduction, synchrenous reconstructions. Role of OBS in breast cancer surgery, its aspects to be considered, its value and results have been interpreted. This technique has advantages by providing more extensive tumourectomy, yielding better aesthetic results compared with breast conserving surgery, allowing oncoplastic reduction in breast cancer patients with macromastia, with higher patient satisfaction and quality of life and by being inexpensive due to single session practice. As for its disadvantages are: re-excision is more difficult, risk for mastectomy is higher, it is depent on the Surgeron's experience, it has a risk for delay in adjuvant therapies and its requirement for additional imaging studies during management. Main indications are patients with small tumour/breast volume, macromastia, multifocality, procedures which can disrupt breast cosmesis such as surgeries for upper inner breas tquadrient tumours. Contraindications are positive margin problems after wide excision, diffuse malign microcalsifications, inflammatory breast cancer, history of radiotherapy and patients' preferences. Despite low evidence level, Oncoplastic Breast Surgery seems to be both reliable and acceptable in terms of oncologic and aesthetic aspects. Oncoplastic Breast Surgery increase the application rate of breast conserving surgery by obviating practical limitations and improve the results of breast conserving surgery. Correct patient and technique choice in OBS is vital for optimization of post surgical.

  4. Sentinel Lymph Node Dissection in Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uth, Charlotte Caspara; Christensen, Mette Haulund; Oldenbourg, Mette Holmqvist

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the use of sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND) in the treatment of patients with locally recurrent breast cancer. METHODS: A total of 147 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer were included from five different breast surgery departments...... to be a feasible procedure in locally recurrent breast cancer and can spare a clinically significant number of patients an unnecessary ALND and the following risk of sequelae. In patients who had previous ALND, SLNDAR identified metastases that would have been overlooked following the current guidelines. A large...... in Denmark. Data on previous breast and axillary surgery, adjuvant treatment, second operation in the breast and axilla, and lymphoscintigraphy were collected retrospectively from the original patient files. RESULTS: SLND after recurrence (SLNDAR) was successful in 72 of 144 patients (50 %). The detection...

  5. Breast cancer and the environment: a life course approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Breast Cancer and the Environment: The Scientific Evidence; Research Methodology; Future Directions, Institute of Medicine

    2012-01-01

    .... Breast Cancer and the Environment reviews the current evidence on a selection of environmental risk factors for breast cancer, considers gene-environment interactions in breast cancer, and explores...

  6. Sexual Dysfunction in Breast Cancer: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Ebrahimi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sexual dysfunction in breast cancer patients is considered as a common and distressing problem. Considering the increasing number of breast cancer survivors living for longer periods of time with the disease and the importance of their quality of life, we conducted the present study to compare the sexual functioning in breast cancer patients with their healthy counterparts.Methods: In this case-control study, breast cancer patients who completed their treatment protocol and were followed up for at least six months were included. The controls were healthy women with normal clinical breast examinations. All subjects filled-in the Persian version of Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire.Results: A total of 165 subjects including 71 breast cancer patients and 94 healthy women were studied. The frequency of sexual dysfunction in cases and controls was 52.6% and 47.4%, respectively (P = 0.09. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding domain scores, except for vaginal lubrication (P = 0.045. Logistic regression analysis indicated that significant determinants of sexual dysfunction in breast cancer group was patients' age (OR = 4.0, 95%CI: 1.3 – 11.5, P = 0.01 and age of the spouse (OR= 9.8, 95% CI: 1.8-51.9, P= 0.007, while in controls, only emotional relationship with the husband was the significant predictive factor (OR = 6.3, 95%CI: 1.9 – 20.5, P = 0.002.Conclusions: Our findings indicated that sexual dysfunction is prevalent in Iranian women regardless of their physical health status. The frequency of vaginal dryness in breast cancer patients was significantly higher than controls. Age of the patient and the spouse (>40 were the only significant predictors of sexual dysfunction among women with breast cancer. Preventive strategies, sexual education and access to effective treatment should be planned in supportive care of breast cancer patients.

  7. Microbial dysbiosis is associated with human breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caiyun Xuan

    Full Text Available Breast cancer affects one in eight women in their lifetime. Though diet, age and genetic predisposition are established risk factors, the majority of breast cancers have unknown etiology. The human microbiota refers to the collection of microbes inhabiting the human body. Imbalance in microbial communities, or microbial dysbiosis, has been implicated in various human diseases including obesity, diabetes, and colon cancer. Therefore, we investigated the potential role of microbiota in breast cancer by next-generation sequencing using breast tumor tissue and paired normal adjacent tissue from the same patient. In a qualitative survey of the breast microbiota DNA, we found that the bacterium Methylobacterium radiotolerans is relatively enriched in tumor tissue, while the bacterium Sphingomonas yanoikuyae is relatively enriched in paired normal tissue. The relative abundances of these two bacterial species were inversely correlated in paired normal breast tissue but not in tumor tissue, indicating that dysbiosis is associated with breast cancer. Furthermore, the total bacterial DNA load was reduced in tumor versus paired normal and healthy breast tissue as determined by quantitative PCR. Interestingly, bacterial DNA load correlated inversely with advanced disease, a finding that could have broad implications in diagnosis and staging of breast cancer. Lastly, we observed lower basal levels of antibacterial response gene expression in tumor versus healthy breast tissue. Taken together, these data indicate that microbial DNA is present in the breast and that bacteria or their components may influence the local immune microenvironment. Our findings suggest a previously unrecognized link between dysbiosis and breast cancer which has potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  8. Palbociclib: A new hope in the treatment of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Priyadharsini Palanisamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer being one of the common cancers has high morbidity and mortality. Despite the conventional treatment, the burden of the disease increases year after year. There is a need for newer drugs that target the different mechanisms in the pathogenesis. The interaction of cyclins with cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs plays a major role in the abnormal cell cycle in cancer and it is considered to be an important target. Palbociclib is a CDK inhibitor currently approved for the treatment of breast cancer. The preclinical studies with breast cancer lines were sensitive to palbociclib and the clinical trials phase I, phase II (PALOMA 1, and phase III (PALOMA 2, 3, PENTELOPE, PEARL showed that the drug was efficacious when combined other conventional drugs for breast cancer. Palbociclib was also been tested in various other germ cell tumors, melanoma, multiple myeloma, glioblastoma multiforme etc., The major adverse effect of the drug includes hematological toxicity mainly neutropenia, gastrointestinal adverse effects.

  9. Influence of specific comorbidities on survival after early-stage breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertz, Marianne; Land, Lotte Holm; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg

    2018-01-01

    , and effect of medical adjuvant treatment among breast cancer patients suffering from 12 major comorbidities compared with breast cancer patients without comorbidities. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study population was identified from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group and included 59,673 women without...... were used to assess the effect of comorbidities on mortality, all-cause and breast cancer specific, using patients without comorbidity as reference. RESULTS: At breast cancer diagnosis, 16% of patients had comorbidities and 84% did not. Compared with the latter, the risk of dying from all causes...... with a greater risk of dying than comorbidities diagnosed more than 5 years before breast cancer diagnosis. With a few exceptions, the effect of adjuvant treatment on breast cancer mortality was similar among patients with and without comorbidity. CONCLUSION: Breast cancer mortality was not significantly...

  10. An ER activity profile including ER, PR, Bcl-2 and IGF-IR may have potential as selection criterion for letrozole or tamoxifen treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Katrine L; Rasmussen, Birgitte B; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E

    2009-01-01

    microarrays from formalin fixed paraffin embedded primary tumor material from a subgroup of patients (9.4%), who have participated in the international, randomized, phase III clinical trial PO25 comparing letrozole with tamoxifen in 907 patients with advanced breast cancer. The expression levels of ER...

  11. Breast Cancer In Pregnancy: Management Approach

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    procrastinate in deciding on hiopsy'fi' 9. The reported overall survival rate for breast cancer in pregnancy is poor,. reflecting the more advanced stage of disease at diagnosis?“ 8,1046. Breast cancer is the commonest cancer that occurs with. pregnancy and lactation. Twelve percent of patients seen in an Ibadan series were ...

  12. Breast cancer with axillary lymph node involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belaid, A.; Kanoun, S.; Kallel, A.; Ghorbel, I.; Azoury, F.; Heymann, S.; Marsiglia, H.; Bourgier, C.; Belaid, A.; Ghorbel, I.; Kanoun, S.; Kallel, A.; Pichenot, C.; Verstraet, R.; Marsiglia, H.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer of women in western countries. There are one million new cases per year in the world which represents 22% of all female cancers, and more than 370.000 deaths due to breast cancer per year (14% of cancer mortality). More than half of breast cancers are associated with axillary nodal involvement. Post-operative radiation therapy (XRT) is a crucial part of locoregional treatment in axillary nodal involvement breast cancer owing to a 15-years risk reduction of locoregional recurrence of 70% and to a 5.4% risk reduction of specific mortality. In 3D-conformal irradiation in such breast cancers, target volumes are chest wall when mastectomy was performed or breast and boost of tumor bed in case of breast conservative surgery, and supra-clavicular and/or axillary and/or internal mammary node areas. The main organs at risk are ipsilateral lung, heart and brachial plexus. The aim of this article is to describe epidemiologic, radio anatomic and prognostic features of axillary nodal involvement breast cancer and to propose guidelines for 3D-conformal treatment planning in locally advanced breast cancers. This review is illustrated by a case report. (authors)

  13. Diet and risk of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manas Kotepui

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Diet may play a role in both promoting and inhibiting human breast cancer development. In this review, nutritional risk factors such as consumption of dietary fat, meat, fiber, and alcohol, and intake of phytoestrogen, vitamin D, iron, and folate associated with breast cancer are reviewed. These nutritional factors have a variety of associations with breast cancer risk. Type of fat consumed has different effects on risk of breast cancer: consumption of meat is associated with heterocyclic amine (HCA exposure; different types of plant fiber have various effects on breast cancer risk; alcohol consumption may increase the risk of breast cancer by producing acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species (ROS; intake of phytoestrogen may reduce risk of breast cancer through genomic and non-genomic action; vitamin D can reduce the risk of breast cancer by inhibiting the process of cancer invasion and metastasis; intake of dietary iron may lead to oxidative stress, DNA damage, and lipid peroxidation; and lower intake of folate may be linked to a higher risk of breast cancer.

  14. Catalog of genetic progression of human cancers: breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmedt, Christine; Yates, Lucy; Kulka, Janina

    2016-03-01

    With the rapid development of next-generation sequencing, deeper insights are being gained into the molecular evolution that underlies the development and clinical progression of breast cancer. It is apparent that during evolution, breast cancers acquire thousands of mutations including single base pair substitutions, insertions, deletions, copy number aberrations, and structural rearrangements. As a consequence, at the whole genome level, no two cancers are identical and few cancers even share the same complement of "driver" mutations. Indeed, two samples from the same cancer may also exhibit extensive differences due to constant remodeling of the genome over time. In this review, we summarize recent studies that extend our understanding of the genomic basis of cancer progression. Key biological insights include the following: subclonal diversification begins early in cancer evolution, being detectable even in in situ lesions; geographical stratification of subclonal structure is frequent in primary tumors and can include therapeutically targetable alterations; multiple distant metastases typically arise from a common metastatic ancestor following a "metastatic cascade" model; systemic therapy can unmask preexisting resistant subclones or influence further treatment sensitivity and disease progression. We conclude the review by describing novel approaches such as the analysis of circulating DNA and patient-derived xenografts that promise to further our understanding of the genomic changes occurring during cancer evolution and guide treatment decision making.

  15. Impact of preventive therapy on the risk of breast cancer among women with benign breast disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzick, Jack; Sestak, Ivana; Thorat, Mangesh A

    2015-11-01

    There are three main ways in which women can be identified as being at high risk of breast cancer i) family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer, which includes genetic factors ii) mammographically identified high breast density, and iii) certain types of benign breast disease. The last category is the least common, but in some ways the easiest one for which treatment can be offered, because these women have already entered into the treatment system. The highest risk is seen in women with lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS), but this is very rare. More common is atypical hyperplasia (AH), which carries a 4-5-fold risk of breast cancer as compared to general population. Even more common is hyperplasia of the usual type and carries a roughly two-fold increased risk. Women with aspirated cysts are also at increased risk of subsequent breast cancer. Tamoxifen has been shown to be particularly effective in preventing subsequent breast cancer in women with AH, with a more than 70% reduction in the P1 trial and a 60% reduction in IBIS-I. The aromatase inhibitors (AIs) also are highly effective for AH and LCIS. There are no published data on the effectiveness of tamoxifen or the AIs for breast cancer prevention in women with hyperplasia of the usual type, or for women with aspirated cysts. Improving diagnostic consistency, breast cancer risk prediction and education of physicians and patients regarding therapeutic prevention in women with benign breast disease may strengthen breast cancer prevention efforts. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Pulsed Dose Rate (PDR - BT) brachytherapy in treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skowronek, J.

    2007-01-01

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (EBRT) of the conserved breast became widely accepted in the last decades for the treatment of early invasive breast cancer. The standard technique of RT after breast conservation is to treat the whole breast up to a total dose of 45 to 50 Gy. Initially brachytherapy for breast cancer was used in addition of external radiation to boost a portion of the breast to higher doses. However, over the past 10 years, the application of brachytherapy in breast cancer has changed. In early stage breast cancer, research has shown that the area that requires radiation treatment to prevent the cancer from returning is the breast tissue that surrounds the area where the initial cancer was removed. Because this typically includes only a part of the breast, brachytherapy is now being used to treat the targeted portion of the breast and as a result allows accelerated delivery of the radiation dose so that treatment is completed in four to five days. Another indications for PDR - BT as a part of treatment in locally advanced breast cancer or as a palliative treatment are discussed in the paper, too. Preliminary results with PDR - BT boost technique are promising. However, more experience and longer follow-up are required to define whether these methods might improve local tumor control for breast cancer patients. In this article the current status, indications, technical aspects and published results of PDR brachytherapy (PDR - BT) in breast cancer treatment are reviewed. (author)

  17. Internet tools to enhance breast cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shachar, Shlomit Strulov; Muss, Hyman B

    2016-01-01

    Internet tools have become a great aid in the daily practice of physicians who treat breast cancer patients. In cancer care there are frequent and important intersections where major decisions need to be made; these include (1) whether or not to give chemotherapy; (2) how much toxicity to expect, and (3) the life expectancy of the patient, considering non-breast cancer comorbidities. These decisions can be made more accurately using calculators based on data sets of thousands of patients as opposed to physician intuition. Such tools also help patients and caregivers in optimal decision making, as they estimate the absolute benefits and risks of treatment. In this perspective we describe selected internet sites that are useful across several domains of care, including the potential benefits of different adjuvant regimens for early breast cancer, prognosis after neoadjuvant therapy, prognosis for ductal carcinoma in situ , and toxicity and life expectancy estimates. We review the variables required to use the tools, the results obtained, the methods of validation, and the advantages and disadvantages of each tool.

  18. Physical activity influences the immune system of breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that physical activity in breast cancer patients can not only improve quality of life. Influences on physical and psychological levels have been evaluated, but effects on the immune system of breast cancer patients are hardly known. A PubMed search identified relevant trials and meta-analyses from 1970 to 2013. This review summarizes the results of international studies and the current discussion of effects of physical activity on the immune system of breast cancer patients. Highlighted are effects of physical activity on the immune system. Seven original articles and 14 reviews included in this review. Two original and the review articles includes other tumor entities besides breast cancer.Evaluated methods such as dose-response relationships for exercise in oncology, hardly exist. Increased immunological anti-cancer activity due to physical activity is probably mediated via an increase in number and cytotoxicity of monocytes and natural killer cells and cytokines.

  19. Breast cancer screening in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, L S; Haynes, S G

    1996-01-01

    There is currently an epidemic of breast cancer in women 65 years of age and older. The purposes of this paper are to explore the breast cancer screening behaviors of older women and to identify some of the determinants of screening in these women. Data were analyzed from the 1987 National Health Interview Survey, a continuous nationwide household interview survey of the U.S. civilian, noninstitutionalized population. As in other studies, the utilization of breast cancer screening by older women was less in older women than in younger women. This was true for both mammography and clinical breast examination. A number of determinants of screening in older women were identified here. Women with a usual source of care and/or no activity limitation, as well as high school graduates, were the ones most likely to have received a screening mammogram and/or a screening clinical breast exam during the past year. The failure of older women to receive adequate breast cancer screening is an important concern which should be reevaluated, given the breast cancer epidemic in this population. This study identified a number of determinants of breast cancer screening in older women. For the most part, these determinants point to the primary care physician as the key to breast cancer screening in these women. Therefore, the primary care physician must be informed of, and encouraged to follow, the recommendations for periodic breast cancer screening in older women.

  20. Syncytin is involved in breast cancer-endothelial cell fusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Bolette; Holck, S.; Christensen, I.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cancer cells can fuse spontaneously with normal host cells, including endothelial cells, and such fusions may strongly modulate the biological behaviour of tumors. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We now show that human breast cancer cell lines and 63 out of 165 (38%) breast cancer...... specimens express syncytin, an endogenous retroviral envelope protein, previously implicated in fusions between placental trophoblast cells. Additionally, endothelial and cancer cells are shown to express ASCT-2, a receptor for syncytin. Syncytin antisense treatment decreases syncytin expression...... and inhibits fusions between breast cancer cells and endothelial cells. Moreover, a syncytin inhibitory peptide also inhibits fusions between cancer and endothelial cells. These results are the first to show that syncytin is expressed by human cancer cells and is involved in cancer-endothelial cell fusions....

  1. Educational Counseling in Improving Communication and Quality of Life in Spouses and Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-06

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  2. Opportunistic Breast Cancer Education and Screening in Rural Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Linda S; Bejarano, Suyapa A; Onega, Tracy L; Stenquist, Derek S; Chamberlin, Mary D

    2016-08-01

    In Honduras, the breast cancer burden is high, and access to women's health services is low. This project tested the connection of community-based breast cancer detection with clinical diagnosis and treatment in a tightly linked and quickly facilitated format. The Norris Cotton Cancer Center at Dartmouth College partnered with the Honduran cancer hospital La Liga Contra el Cancer to expand a cervical cancer screening program, which included self-breast exam (SBE) education and clinical breast exams (CBEs), to assess patient attitudes about and uptake of breast cancer education and screening services. The cervical cancer screening event was held in Honduras in 2013; 476 women from 31 villages attended. Half of the women attending elected to receive a CBE; most had concerns about lactation. Clinicians referred 12 women with abnormal CBEs to La Liga Contra el Cancer for additional evaluation at no cost. All referred patients were compliant with the recommendation and received follow-up care. One abnormal follow-up mammogram/ultrasound result was negative on biopsy. One woman with an aggressive phyllodes tumor had a mastectomy within 60 days. Multimodal education about breast cancer screening maximized delivery of women's health services in a low-tech rural setting. The addition of opportunistic breast cancer education and screening to a cervical cancer screening event resulted in high uptake of services at low additional cost to program sponsors. Such novel strategies to maximize delivery of women's health services in low-resource settings, where there is no access to mammography, may result in earlier detection of breast cancer. Close follow-up of positive results with referral to appropriate treatment is essential.

  3. The Role of Sigma Receptor in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pusztai, Lajos

    2004-01-01

    We have completed specific tasks #1 and #2. Sigma 1 receptor (Sig 1 R) mRNA expression was examined in 109 human tissue specimens including normal breast, hyperplasia, ductal carcinoma in situ, and invasive cancer...

  4. Pathologically confirmed breast cancer in Malawi: a descriptive study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: Malawian women with breast cancer commonly have long symptom durations prior to diagnosis, young age, and poorly differentiated tumors. Improved clinical and pathological characterization, including hormone receptor status, are urgently needed to better understand this disease in Malawi.

  5. Study Forecasts New Breast Cancer Cases by 2030

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new study from NCI researchers is forecasting important trends in the types and molecular makeup of breast cancer cases through 2030, including a reduction in the proportion of cases that are considered to be difficult to treat.

  6. The Effects of Brief Psychotherapy of Coping with Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCaul, Kevin

    1997-01-01

    .... Our novel approach tested the effects of brief psychotherapy provided by phone. The final sample included 61 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer who were randomly assigned to either the phone treatment or a "standard treatment" condition...

  7. Breast cancer heterogeneity: mechanisms, proofs, and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsuan Hsiao, Ming-Chih Chou, Carol Fowler, Jeffrey T. Mason, Yan-gao Man

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human breast cancer represents a group of highly heterogeneous lesions consisting of about 20 morphologically distinct subtypes with substantially different molecular and/or biochemical signatures, clinical courses, and prognoses. This study analyzed the possible correlation between the morphological presentations of breast cancer and two hypothesized models of carcinogenesis, in order to identify the intrinsic mechanism(s and clinical implications of breast cancer heterogeneity.

  8. Breast cancer heterogeneity: mechanisms, proofs, and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiao, Yi-Hsuan; Chou, Ming-Chih; Fowler, Carol; Mason, Jeffrey T.; Man, Yan-gao

    2010-01-01

    Human breast cancer represents a group of highly heterogeneous lesions consisting of about 20 morphologically distinct subtypes with substantially different molecular and/or biochemical signatures, clinical courses, and prognoses. This study analyzed the possible correlation between the morphological presentations of breast cancer and two hypothesized models of carcinogenesis, in order to identify the intrinsic mechanism(s) and clinical implications of breast cancer heterogeneity.

  9. Body mass index, age at breast cancer diagnosis, and breast cancer subtype: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouckaert, O; Van Asten, K; Laenen, A; Soubry, A; Smeets, A; Nevelstreen, I; Vergote, I; Wildiers, H; Paridaens, R; Van Limbergen, E; Weltens, C; Moerman, P; Floris, G; Neven, P

    2018-02-01

    Evidence suggests that premenopausal obesity decreases and postmenopausal obesity increases breast cancer risk. Because it is not well known whether this is subtype dependent, we studied the association between body mass index (BMI) and age at breast cancer diagnosis, or the probability of being diagnosed with a specific breast cancer phenotype, by menopausal status. All patients with non-metastatic operable breast cancer from the University Hospital Leuven diagnosed between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2013 were included (n = 7020) in this cross-sectional study. Linear models and logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. Allowing correction for age-related BMI-increase, we used the age-adjusted BMI score which equals the difference between a patient's BMI score and the population-average BMI score corresponding to the patient's age category. The quadratic relationship between the age-adjusted BMI and age at breast cancer diagnosis (p = 0.0207) interacted with menopausal status (p < 0.0001); increased age at breast cancer diagnosis was observed with above-average BMI scores in postmenopausal women, and with below-average BMI scores in premenopausal women. BMI was linearly related to the probabilities of Luminal B and HER2-like breast cancer phenotypes, but only in postmenopausal women. The relative changes in probabilities between both these subtypes mirrored each other. BMI associates differently before and after menopause with age at breast cancer diagnosis and with the probability that breast cancer belongs to a certain phenotype. The opposite effect of increasing BMI on relative frequencies of Luminal B and HER2-like breast cancers suggests a common origin.

  10. A Genome Wide Linkage Search for Breast Cancer Susceptibility Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paula; McGuffog, Lesley; Easton, Douglas F.; Mann, Graham J.; Pupo, Gulietta M.; Newman, Beth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Szabo, Csilla; Southey, Melissa; Renard, Hélène; Odefrey, Fabrice; Lynch, Henry; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Couch, Fergus; Hopper, John L.; Giles, Graham G.; McCredie, Margaret R. E.; Buys, Saundra; Andrulis, Irene; Senie, Ruby; Goldgar, David E.; Oldenburg, Rogier; Kroeze-Jansema, Karin; Kraan, Jaennelle; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Klijn, Jan G. M.; van Asperen, Christi; van Leeuwen, Inge; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Cornelisse, Cees J.; Devilee, Peter; Baskcomb, Linda; Seal, Sheila; Barfoot, Rita; Mangion, Jon; Hall, Anita; Edkins, Sarah; Rapley, Elizabeth; Wooster, Richard; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Eccles, Diana; Evans, D. Gareth; Futreal, P. Andrew; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Weber, Barbara L.; Rahman, Nazneen; Stratton, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in known breast cancer susceptibility genes account for a minority of the familial aggregation of the disease. To search for further breast cancer susceptibility genes, we performed a combined analysis of four genome-wide linkage screens, which included a total of 149 multiple case breast cancer families. All families included at least three cases of breast cancer diagnosed below age 60 years, at least one of whom had been tested and found not to carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. Evidence for linkage was assessed using parametric linkage analysis, assuming both a dominant and a recessive mode of inheritance, and using nonparametric methods. The highest LOD score obtained in any analysis of the combined data was 1.80 under the dominant model, in a region on chromosome 4 close to marker D4S392. Three further LOD scores over 1 were identified in the parametric analyses and two in the nonparametric analyses. A maximum LOD score of 2.40 was found on chromosome arm 2p in families with four or more cases of breast cancer diagnosed below age 50 years. The number of linkage peaks did not differ from the number expected by chance. These results suggest regions that may harbor novel breast cancer susceptibility genes. They also indicate that no single gene is likely to account for a large fraction of the familial aggregation of breast cancer that is not due to mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. PMID:16575876

  11. Outcome of breast cancer screening in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Bak, Martin; von Euler-Chelpin, My

    2017-01-01

    were node negative and 40% ≤10 mm. False-positive rate was around 2%; higher for North Denmark Region than for the rest of Denmark. Three out of 10 breast cancers in screened women were diagnosed as interval cancers. Conclusions: High coverage by examination and low interval cancer rate are required...... for screening to decrease breast cancer mortality. Two pioneer local screening programs starting in the 1990s were followed by a decrease in breast cancer mortality of 22-25%. Coverage by examination and interval cancer rate of the national program were on the favorable side of values from the pioneer programs...

  12. Knowledge towards breast cancer among Libyan women in Tripoli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef A Taher

    2016-11-01

    Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate that Libyan women have acceptable level of knowledge regarding breast cancer. However, improvement of the health systems and awareness regarding breast cancer is needed.

  13. Virus-Targeted Therapeutic for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Faller, Douglas

    1997-01-01

    .... Our approach initially involves investigation of EBV sequences in breast cancer cell lines and specimens, determination of whether treatment with Arginine Butyrate will induce the viral thymidine...

  14. Breast cancer literacy among higher secondary students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhandari, Parash Mani; Thapa, Kiran; Dhakal, Sarmila

    2016-01-01

    .0 %) and discharge of pus (14.1 %) were the three most commonly recognized symptoms. Nearly one in two (47.1 %) students indicated that the school curriculum inadequately informed them on breast cancer. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates poor knowledge on breast cancer risk factors, symptoms and curability among...... higher secondary school students in Western Nepal. Still, several myths regarding breast cancer persist. Half of the students had the perception that school curriculum inadequately informed them on breast cancer. Future studies should aim at the measures necessary to address the inadequate knowledge......, along with the perceived gap in school curriculum. © 2016 Bhandari et al....

  15. MicroRNA Related Polymorphisms and Breast Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Sofia; Greco, Dario; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in microRNAs (miRNA) or in the miRNA binding sites may affect the miRNA dependent gene expression regulation, which has been implicated in various cancers, including breast cancer, and may alter individual susceptibility to cancer...

  16. Aetio-pathogenesis of breast cancer | Abdulkareem | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a literature review on the aetiology and pathogenesis of breast cancer, which is the most common cancer worldwide, and the second leading cause of cancer death, especially in Western countries. Several aetiological factors have been implicated in its pathogenesis, and include age, genetics, family history, diet, ...

  17. Frequent epigenetic inactivation of Wnt antagonist genes in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H; Toyota, M; Caraway, H; Gabrielson, E; Ohmura, T; Fujikane, T; Nishikawa, N; Sogabe, Y; Nojima, M; Sonoda, T; Mori, M; Hirata, K; Imai, K; Shinomura, Y; Baylin, S B; Tokino, T

    2008-01-01

    Although mutation of APC or CTNNB1 (β-catenin) is rare in breast cancer, activation of Wnt signalling is nonetheless thought to play an important role in breast tumorigenesis, and epigenetic silencing of Wnt antagonist genes, including the secreted frizzled-related protein (SFRP) and Dickkopf (DKK) families, has been observed in various tumours. In breast cancer, frequent methylation and silencing of SFRP1 was recently documented; however, altered expression of other Wnt antagonist genes is largely unknown. In the present study, we found frequent methylation of SFRP family genes in breast cancer cell lines (SFRP1, 7 out of 11, 64%; SFRP2, 11 out of 11, 100%; SFRP5, 10 out of 11, 91%) and primary breast tumours (SFRP1, 31 out of 78, 40%; SFRP2, 60 out of 78, 77%; SFRP5, 55 out of 78, 71%). We also observed methylation of DKK1, although less frequently, in cell lines (3 out of 11, 27%) and primary tumours (15 out of 78, 19%). Breast cancer cell lines express various Wnt ligands, and overexpression of SFRPs inhibited cancer cell growth. In addition, overexpression of a β-catenin mutant and depletion of SFRP1 using small interfering RNA synergistically upregulated transcriptional activity of T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancer factor. Our results confirm the frequent methylation and silencing of Wnt antagonist genes in breast cancer, and suggest that their loss of function contributes to activation of Wnt signalling in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:18283316

  18. Genomic Instability and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    indicated. (B) Schematic diagrams of wild-type and mutant FIGN1 used in this study. (C) GST pull down experiments confirmed a direct interaction...States, Korea, Hong Kong, India and China. Many of them are continuing breast cancer research, with topics ranging from DNA damage response, mitotic...N-terminal-tagged fusion protein. SFB (triple-epitope of S-protein, FLAG, and streptavi- din binding peptide), Myc, MBP, and GST -tagged proteins were

  19. Integrated Immunotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    needs to be explored in further studies (Figure 19). The early activation and cytokine production from innate immune cells such as NK/ NKT cells is very...surrounding microenvironments, and implications for immune response and dendritic cell function in vitro using 3D microculture techniques. We have...in attempts to restore/enhance the immune response. Additionally, we have begun preparing breast cancer cell lines to aid quantifying progress in

  20. Molecular Detection of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-02-01

    based on the identification of novel genes found in tasks 3C and 3D . -3B. Develop non-radioactive detection schema. A nested primer approach was...genes. - 3D . As described in the proposal, screening for novel breast cancer peptides will begin this year. In order to identify cell surface...Clarke Springer Semin Immunopathoi Springer, Heidelberg Bearbeitung: Artikel: 539 Seite(n): 1-10 Springer, EB Schneider Druck GmbH, Rothenburg 1

  1. Pharmacogenomics of endocrine therapy in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ingle, James N

    2013-01-01

    The most important modality of treatment in the two-thirds of patients with an estrogen receptor (ER)-positive early breast cancer is endocrine therapy. In postmenopausal women, options include the selective ER modulators (SERMs), tamoxifen and raloxifene, and the ‘third-generation’ aromatase inhibitors (AIs), anastrozole, exemestane and letrozole. Under the auspices of the National Institutes of Health Global Alliance for Pharmacogenomics, Japan, the Mayo Clinic Pharmacogenomics Research Net...

  2. Perspective Insight into Future Potential Fusion Gene Transcript Biomarker Candidates in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryong Nam Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing has accelerated the discovery of a variety of new fusion gene types in clinical breast cancer samples by analyzing cancer genomes and transcriptomes. Although previous studies have focused on a few clinically validated oncogenic fusion genes as diagnostic and therapeutic targets in breast cancer, a perspective consideration has not been given thus far for a plethora of breast cancer fusion genes, which are being newly identified at an overwhelmingly increasing pace. In this perspective review, we discuss diverse fusion gene types recently identified in a variety of breast cancer subtypes, including breast clinical cancer samples in TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas database. This perspective review will confer fresh and promising guidance onto breast cancer surgeons, clinical oncologists, and tumor biologists in determining research directions for seeking and developing novel fusion gene biomarkers for breast cancer diagnostics and therapeutic treatment in upcoming years.

  3. Perspective Insight into Future Potential Fusion Gene Transcript Biomarker Candidates in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ryong Nam; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young

    2018-02-07

    Next generation sequencing has accelerated the discovery of a variety of new fusion gene types in clinical breast cancer samples by analyzing cancer genomes and transcriptomes. Although previous studies have focused on a few clinically validated oncogenic fusion genes as diagnostic and therapeutic targets in breast cancer, a perspective consideration has not been given thus far for a plethora of breast cancer fusion genes, which are being newly identified at an overwhelmingly increasing pace. In this perspective review, we discuss diverse fusion gene types recently identified in a variety of breast cancer subtypes, including breast clinical cancer samples in TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) database. This perspective review will confer fresh and promising guidance onto breast cancer surgeons, clinical oncologists, and tumor biologists in determining research directions for seeking and developing novel fusion gene biomarkers for breast cancer diagnostics and therapeutic treatment in upcoming years.

  4. Fetal microchimerism in breast and colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, M; Biggar, R J; Stamper, Casey L

    2011-01-01

    1574 Background: Cells acquired by a woman from her baby that durably persist in her blood and tissues is known as fetal microchimerism (FMc). In women with breast cancer, frequency and quantity of FMc in blood and breast tissue is reduced compared to healthy women. Whether the absence of fetal...... microchimerism predicts risk for developing breast cancer is unknown. FMc was evaluated in buffy coat cells from presumed healthy women who later developed breast cancer or colon cancer, a cancer in which prior pregnancy appears protective but has different associations with endocrine risk factors. METHODS....... DNA from repository buffy coat specimens was tested for male FMc with quantitative PCR targeting the DYS14gene on the Y chromosome. For this analysis, 89 women who developed breast cancer and 67 women who developed colon cancer were evaluable for FMc. Results were compared to 272 women who remained...

  5. Fetal microchimerism in breast and colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, M; Biggar, R J; Stamper, Casey L

    2011-01-01

    microchimerism predicts risk for developing breast cancer is unknown. FMc was evaluated in buffy coat cells from presumed healthy women who later developed breast cancer or colon cancer, a cancer in which prior pregnancy appears protective but has different associations with endocrine risk factors. METHODS......1574 Background: Cells acquired by a woman from her baby that durably persist in her blood and tissues is known as fetal microchimerism (FMc). In women with breast cancer, frequency and quantity of FMc in blood and breast tissue is reduced compared to healthy women. Whether the absence of fetal....... DNA from repository buffy coat specimens was tested for male FMc with quantitative PCR targeting the DYS14gene on the Y chromosome. For this analysis, 89 women who developed breast cancer and 67 women who developed colon cancer were evaluable for FMc. Results were compared to 272 women who remained...

  6. Role of Aspirin in Breast Cancer Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wendy Y; Holmes, Michelle D

    2017-07-01

    Chemotherapy and hormonal therapy have significantly decreased breast cancer mortality, although with considerable side effects and financial costs. In the USA, over three million women are living after a breast cancer diagnosis and are eager for new treatments that are low in toxicity and cost. Multiple observational studies have reported improved breast cancer survival with regular aspirin use. Furthermore, pooled data from five large randomized trials of aspirin for cardiovascular disease showed that subjects on aspirin had decreased risk of cancer mortality and decreased risk of metastatic cancer. Although the potential mechanism for aspirin preventing breast cancer is not known, possible pathways may involve platelets, inflammation, cyclooxygenase (COX) 2, hormones, or PI3 kinase. This review article summarizes the current epidemiologic and clinical trial evidence as well as possible underlying mechanisms that justify current phase III randomized trials of aspirin to improve breast cancer survival.

  7. Prognostic significance of centromere 17 copy number gain in breast cancer depends on breast cancer subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyuongyul; Jang, Min Hye; Chung, Yul Ri; Lee, Yangkyu; Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Sung-Won; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kim, In Ah; Park, So Yeon

    2017-03-01

    Increased copy number of chromosome enumeration probe (CEP) targeting centromere 17 is frequently encountered during HER2 in situ hybridization (ISH) in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to clarify the clinicopathologic significance of CEP17 copy number gain in a relatively large series of breast cancer patients. We analyzed 945 cases of invasive breast cancers whose HER2 fluorescence ISH reports were available from 2004 to 2011 at a single institution and evaluated the association of CEP17 copy number gain with clinicopathologic features of tumors and patient survival. We detected 186 (19.7%) cases of CEP17 copy number gain (CEP17≥3.0) among 945 invasive breast cancers. In survival analysis, CEP17 copy number gain was not associated with disease-free survival of the patients in the whole group. Nonetheless, it was found to be an independent adverse prognostic factor in the HER2-negative group but not in the HER2-positive group. In further subgroup analyses, CEP17 copy number gain was revealed as an independent poor prognostic factor in HER2-negative and hormone receptor-positive breast cancers, and it was associated with aggressive histologic variables including high T stage, high histologic grade, lymphovascular invasion, p53 overexpression, and high Ki-67 proliferative index. In conclusion, we found that elevated CEP17 count can serve as a prognostic marker in luminal/HER2-negative subtype of invasive breast cancer. We advocate the use of the dual-colored fluorescence ISH using CEP17 rather than the single-colored one because it gives additional valuable information on CEP17 copy number alterations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiation Therapy in Treating Post-Menopausal Women With Early Stage Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Cribriform Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Ductal Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Mucinous Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Positive; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Carcinoma

  9. Accessory breast tissue in axilla masquerading as breast cancer recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal Shikha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic or accessory breast tissue is most commonly located in the axilla, though it may be present anywhere along the milk line. Development is hormone dependent, similar to normal breast tissue. These lesions do not warrant any intervention unless they produce discomfort, thus their identification and distinction from other breast pathologies, both benign and malignant, is essential. We report a case with locally advanced breast cancer who presented with an ipsilateral axillary mass following surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Subsequent evaluation with excision biopsy showed duct ectasia in axillary breast tissue and the patient was continued on hormone therapy with tamoxifen.

  10. Cigarette Smoking and Breast Cancer Risk in Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Women: The Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Avonne E; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Baumgartner, Richard N; Pinkston, Christina M; Boone, Stephanie D; John, Esther M; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Hines, Lisa M; Giuliano, Anna R; Wolff, Roger K; Slattery, Martha L

    2016-03-01

    Few epidemiological studies have included Hispanics with the evaluation of the effects of cigarette smoking and breast cancer. We examined the relationship between cigarette smoking, ethnicity, and breast cancer risk using data from the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study (BCHDS). The BCHDS is a consortium of three population-based case-control studies, including U.S. non-Hispanic whites (NHWs) (1,525 cases; 1,593 controls), U.S. Hispanics/Native Americans (1,265 cases; 1,495 controls), and Mexican women (990 cases; 1,049 controls). Multivariable logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Breast cancer risk was elevated among Mexican former smokers (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.04-1.96) and among those who smoked ≥ 31 years (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.13-3.35), compared to never smokers. In addition, Mexican former smokers with a history of alcohol consumption had increased breast cancer risk (OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.01-5.21). Among NHW premenopausal women, breast cancer risk was increased for smoking ≥ 20 cigarettes per day (OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.07-2.41). Our findings suggest the possibility of ethnic differences with the associations between cigarette smoking and breast cancer risk.

  11. Cardiotoxic heart failure in breast cancer survivors: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jordan M; Pressler, Susan J; Friese, Christopher R

    2016-07-01

    To report an analysis of the concept of cardiotoxic heart failure in breast cancer survivors. Despite numerous studies describing cardiotoxic effects of breast cancer therapies, the literature lacks consistent terminology to describe cancer treatment-induced heart failure, defined by the authors as 'cardiotoxic heart failure'. Breast cancer survivors who develop heart failure may not fit existing conceptual models. A concept analysis of cardiotoxic heart failure in breast cancer survivors is needed to integrate previous research findings and establish the scientific foundation for future intervention research. Concept analysis. An integrative review (1999-2014) was conducted to examine aetiologies and risk factors for heart failure in female breast cancer survivors. Databases searched were CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EmBase, Medline and Scopus. Walker and Avant's method for concept analysis includes: select concept; determine purpose; identify uses; define attributes; identify model case; describe borderline, related and contrary cases; identify antecedents/consequences; define empirical referents. In the literature, substantial variation was noted in terminology for breast cancer treatment-induced cardiotoxicity. The authors define cardiotoxic heart failure in breast cancer survivors as chronic heart failure resulting from breast cancer treatment-induced cardiotoxicity among women without pre-existing heart failure diagnosis. No studies were found that described quality of life or tested interventions to preserve quality of life for this population. Prospective studies are needed to develop interventions for symptom management to improve quality of life in breast cancer survivors with heart failure. New conceptual paradigms may be needed to improve outcomes for this vulnerable population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. [THE EFFECT OF PREGNANCY ON BREAST CANCER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalon, Shelly Tartakover; Shochet, Gali Epstein; Drucker, Liat; Lishner, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Cancer and pregnancy coincide in about one in 1,000 pregnancies. One of the most common malignancies associated with pregnancy is breast cancer. Women with pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) have a higher likelihood of being diagnosed with metastatic disease and estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumors than do non-pregnant women. Controversies exist regarding the effect of pregnancy on breast cancer prognosis. Some researchers suggest that pregnancy does not affect breast cancer prognosis, whereas others claim the opposite. Although PABC is usually discovered in an advanced stage, breast cancer metastasis on the placenta is a rare event. During cancer progression, the surrounding microenvironment co-evolves into an activated state through continuous communication with the malignant cells, thereby promoting tumor growth. The effect of pregnancy and placental environment on breast cancer biology is the issue of this review. Placental and cancer cells implantation processes share similar molecular pathways. This suggests that placental factors may affect breast cancer cells biology. Previously, we analyzed the effect of first trimester human placenta on breast cancer cells. Breast cancer cells were co-cultured with placental explants during their implantation on matrigel substrate. We found that the placenta reduced ER expression on the cancer cells and induced their migration and invasion abilities. As a result of it, breast cancer cells migrated away from the placental implantation sites. Hormonal pathways were involved in these phenomena. These results may explain the high incidence of metastases during pregnancy in on the one hand and the rarity of metastases on the placenta on the other hand.

  13. The psychological impact of breast reconstruction after prophylactic or therapeutic mastectomy for breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gopie, Jessica Premdee

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the psychological impact of two types of breast reconstruction after prophylactic or therapeutic mastectomy for breast cancer was investigated with a prospective study including 202 patients from different hospitals in the South-West of the Netherlands between 2007-2012. With

  14. Using the Internet for information about breast cancer: a questionnaire-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlechild, Sophie Anna; Barr, Lester

    2013-09-01

    To identify the proportion of breast cancer patients that used the Internet for breast cancer information; to classify patterns of use based on patient demographics; and to evaluate whether using the Internet for this purpose was beneficial or problematic. Also to recognize whether a specific demographic group was more likely to experience problems when using the Internet for breast cancer information. A 10-item questionnaire was given to patients who attended the breast unit at the University Hospital of South Manchester between May and June 2011 following breast cancer treatment within the last 5 years. 200 questionnaires were completed. 50.5% of patients had used the Internet for breast cancer information, with younger (pincome (pInternet for breast cancer information, particularly those from ethnic minorities. Health professionals need to include a discussion about Internet use in consultations with breast cancer patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fatty acid metabolites in rapidly proliferating breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph T O'Flaherty

    Full Text Available Breast cancers that over-express a lipoxygenase or cyclooxygenase are associated with poor survival possibly because they overproduce metabolites that alter the cancer's malignant behaviors. However, these metabolites and behaviors have not been identified. We here identify which metabolites among those that stimulate breast cancer cell proliferation in vitro are associated with rapidly proliferating breast cancer.We used selective ion monitoring-mass spectrometry to quantify in the cancer and normal breast tissue of 27 patients metabolites that stimulate (15-, 12-, 5-hydroxy-, and 5-oxo-eicosatetraenoate, 13-hydroxy-octadecaenoate [HODE] or inhibit (prostaglandin [PG]E2 and D2 breast cancer cell proliferation. We then related their levels to each cancer's proliferation rate as defined by its Mib1 score.13-HODE was the only metabolite strongly, significantly, and positively associated with Mib1 scores. It was similarly associated with aggressive grade and a key component of grade, mitosis, and also trended to be associated with lymph node metastasis. PGE2 and PGD2 trended to be negatively associated with these markers. No other metabolite in cancer and no metabolite in normal tissue had this profile of associations.Our data fit a model wherein the overproduction of 13-HODE by 15-lipoxygenase-1 shortens breast cancer survival by stimulating its cells to proliferate and possibly metastasize; no other oxygenase-metabolite pathway, including cyclooxygenase-PGE2/D2 pathways, uses this specific mechanism to shorten survival.

  16. Estrogen receptor positive breast cancers and their association with environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannel Sylvio

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological studies to assess risk factors for breast cancer often do not differentiate between different types of breast cancers. We applied a general linear model to determine whether data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program on annual county level age-adjusted incidence rates of breast cancer with and without estrogen receptors (ER+ and ER- were associated with environmental pollutants. Results Our final model explained approximately 38% of the variation in the rate of ER+ breast cancer. In contrast, we were only able to explain 14% of the variation in the rate of ER- breast cancer with the same set of environmental variables. Only ER+ breast cancers were positively associated with the EPA's estimated risk of cancer based on toxic air emissions and the proportion of agricultural land in a county. Meteorological variables, including short wave radiation, temperature, precipitation, and water vapor pressure, were also significantly associated with the rate of ER+ breast cancer, after controlling for age, race, premature mortality from heart disease, and unemployment rate. Conclusions Our findings were consistent with what we expected, given the fact that many of the commonly used pesticides and air pollutants included in the EPA cancer risk score are classified as endocrine disruptors and ER+ breast cancers respond more strongly to estrogen than ER- breast cancers. The findings of this study suggest that ER+ and ER- breast cancers have different risk factors, which should be taken into consideration in future studies that seek to understand environmental risk factors for breast cancer.

  17. Role of MicroRNA Regulation in Obesity-Associated Breast Cancer: Nutritional Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasiappan, Ravi; Rajarajan, Dheeran

    2017-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy diagnosed in women, and the incidence of breast cancer is increasing every year. Obesity has been identified as one of the major risk factors for breast cancer progression. The mechanisms by which obesity contributes to breast cancer development is not yet understood; however, there are a few mechanisms counted as potential producers of breast cancer in obesity, including insulin resistance, chronic inflammation and inflammatory cytokines, adipokines, and sex hormones. Recent emerging evidence suggests that alterations in microRNA (miRNA) expressions are found in several diseases, including breast cancer and obesity; however, miRNA roles in obesity-linked breast cancer are beginning to unravel. miRNAs are thought to be potential noninvasive biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of cancer patients with comorbid conditions of obesity as well as therapeutic targets. Recent studies have evidenced that nutrients and other dietary factors protect against cancer and obesity through modulation of miRNA expressions. Herein, we summarize a comprehensive overview of up-to-date information related to miRNAs and their molecular targets involved in obesity-associated breast cancer. We also address the mechanisms by which dietary factors modulate miRNA expression and its protective roles in obesity-associated breast cancer. It is hoped that this review would provide new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of obesity-associated breast cancer to reduce the burden of breast cancer. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  18. Time trends in axilla management among early breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gondos, Adam; Jansen, Lina; Heil, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    for a comparative study of axillary management trends among patients with first non-metastatic breast cancer who were not selected for neoadjuvant therapy during the last decade. We used an additional short questionnaire to compare clinical care patterns in 2014. Results Patients treated in cancer centers were......Background We examined time trends in axilla management among patients with early breast cancer in European clinical settings. Material and methods EUROCANPlatform partners, including population-based and cancer center-specific registries, provided routinely available clinical cancer registry data...

  19. Breast and cervical cancers diagnosed and stage at diagnosis among women served through the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacqueline W; Royalty, Janet; Henley, Jane; White, Arica; Richardson, Lisa C

    2015-05-01

    To assess cancers diagnosed and the stage of cancer at the time of diagnosis among low-income, under-insured, or uninsured women who received services through the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP). Using the NBCCEDP database, we examined the number and percent of women diagnosed during 2009-2011 with in situ breast cancer, invasive breast cancer, and invasive cervical cancer by demographic and clinical characteristics, including age, race and ethnicity, test indication (screening or diagnostic), symptoms (for breast cancer), and screening history (for cervical cancer). We examined these characteristics by stage at diagnosis, a new variable included in the database obtained by linking with state-based central cancer registries. There were 11,569 women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, 1,988 with in situ breast cancer, and 583 with invasive cervical cancer through the NBCCEDP. Women who reported breast symptoms or who had diagnostic mammography were more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer, and at a later stage, than those who did not have symptoms or who had screening mammography. Women who had been rarely or never screened for cervical cancer were more likely to be diagnosed with cervical cancer, and at a later stage, than women who received regular screenings. Women served through the NBCCEDP who have not had prior screening or who have symptoms were more often diagnosed with late-stage disease.

  20. Breast cancer practice guidelines: evaluation and quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, S B

    1997-11-01

    The utility of practice guidelines in breast cancer management remains unproved. This paper examines the scope and goals of published guidelines and their utility in the process of breast cancer treatment quality improvement. Although existing breast cancer guidelines vary widely in scope and intent, they provide a framework for meaningful quality-of-care evaluation. Among the few comprehensive breast cancer guideline programs are those developed by the Ontario Cancer Treatment Practice Guidelines Initiative, the Revlon/UCLA Breast Center, the Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC), the Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO), and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN). Ultimately, guidelines will prove useful only if they are utilized as part of a comprehensive program to improve quality, cost-effectiveness, and outcomes. To accomplish this, they must include mechanisms for revision and evaluation. The evaluation of guideline utility in quality improvement, particularly in breast cancer care, is a complex long-term process, which should include input from practitioners, institutions, payors, and government.

  1. Course of disease and follow-up in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebner, F.; Hackl, H.; Hoermann, M.; Schneider, G.

    1986-01-01

    Besides individual care, regular follow-up studies in breast cancer patients have different aims, relative to different tumor stages at presentation. In early stages emphasis has to be laid on detection of loco-regional recurrences, which will not reduce overall survival if diagnosed and treated early. In addition, treatment effects and changes in the activity of disease are evaluated. Radiographic studies for detection of distant metastases are justified if followed by proper treatment. Early diagnosis of cancer of the opposite breast and of such cancers that are associated with breast cancer (colon, ovaries, endometrium) is imperative. The aim of a regular follow-up in more advanced tumor stages is to monitor the extent of disease and to prevent complications (e.g. fractures, spinal cord compression). In familial breast cancer first degree relatives should be included in the follow-up plan. The patient's psychosocial needs, even if not verbalized, should not be neglected. (Author)

  2. Long-term side effects of adjuvant breast cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, Ciska

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Breast cancer accounts for one-third of all cancers in females and 24% of the patients are younger than 55 years of age. More than 10% all Dutch women will develop breast cancer and 70-80% of all breast cancer patients will survive over 5 years.

  3. Automatically assessed volumetric breast density and breast cancer risk : The era of digital screening mammography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, J.O.P .

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among females worldwide. As the burden of breast cancer is high, many countries have introduced a breast cancer screening program with the aim to find and treat breast cancers in an early stage. In the Netherlands, women between the ages of 50

  4. An introduction to microwave imaging for breast cancer detection

    CERN Document Server

    Conceição, Raquel Cruz; O'Halloran, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book collates past and current research on one of the most promising emerging modalities for breast cancer detection. Readers will discover how, as a standalone technology or in conjunction with another modality, microwave imaging has the potential to provide reliable, safe and comfortable breast exams at low cost. Current breast imaging modalities include X- ray, Ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Positron Emission Tomography. Each of these methods suffers from limitations, including poor sensitivity or specificity, high cost, patient discomfort, and exposure to potentially harmful ionising radiation. Microwave breast imaging is based on a contrast in the dielectric properties of breast tissue that exists at microwave frequencies. The book begins by considering the anatomy and dielectric properties of the breast, contrasting historical and recent studies. Next, radar-based breast imaging algorithms are discussed, encompassing both early-stage artefact removal, and data independent and adaptive ...

  5. Breast cancer literacy and health beliefs related to breast cancer screening among American Indian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Soonhee; Burnette, Catherine E; Lee, Yeon-Shim; Jun, Jung Sim; Lee, Hee Yun; Lee, Kyoung Hag

    2018-03-28

    The purpose of this article is to examine the health beliefs and literacy about breast cancer and their relationship with breast cancer screening among American Indian (AI) women. Using the Health Belief Model (HBM) and hierarchical logistic regression with data from a sample of 286 AI female adults residing in the Northern Plains, we found that greater awareness of breast cancer screening was linked to breast cancer screening practices. However, perceived barriers, one of the HBM constructs, prevented such screening practices. This study suggested that culturally relevant HBM factors should be targeted when developing culturally sensitive breast cancer prevention efforts.

  6. Multimodal Imaging of Hypoxia in Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chughtai, K

    2012-01-01

    Knowing “what” and “where” brings us closer to “how”. In this project, we have used mass spectrometers to know “what” is present inside breast cancer cells and “where” these molecules are located in human breast tumor xenograft models. Understanding the molecular composition of breast tumors is a

  7. Determinants of suicidal ideation in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Min; Jang, Ji-Eun; Stewart, Robert; Kim, Seon-Young; Kim, Sung-Wan; Kang, Hee-Ju; Shin, Il-Seon; Park, Min-Ho; Yoon, Jung-Han; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2013-12-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at higher risk of psychological problems including suicidal ideation. However, studies on suicidal ideation in breast cancer survivors have been rare and have not been investigated prospectively. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and independent risk factors for suicidal ideation within 1 week and at 1 year after breast surgery for breast cancer. A total of 284 patients with breast cancer were evaluated within 1 week after breast surgery, and 244 (84%) were followed up 1 year later. Suicidal ideation was ascertained using the item 'suicidal thoughts' from the Beck Depression Inventory. Various factors potentially related to suicidal ideation were evaluated including sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, and genetic polymorphisms on serotonin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) systems. Suicidal ideation was present in 10.9% of participants at 1 week and 11.4% at 1 year after breast surgery. Suicidal ideation was independently associated with depression and physical disability at 1 week and with living alone, anxiety, advanced cancer stage, and the BDNF met allele (but not with genetic polymorphisms on serotonergic system) at 1 year after breast surgery. Suicidal ideation was common and had similar prevalences in both short-term and longer-term follow-ups after breast cancer. However, associated factors were substantially different between the two evaluation points, which suggest that time-specific programs may be needed for identifying and managing suicidal risk in patients with breast cancer. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Lifetime grain consumption and breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farvid, Maryam S; Cho, Eunyoung; Eliassen, A Heather; Chen, Wendy Y; Willett, Walter C

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated individual grain-containing foods and whole and refined grain intake during adolescence, early adulthood, and premenopausal years in relation to breast cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study II. Grain-containing food intakes were reported on a baseline dietary questionnaire (1991) and every 4 years thereafter. Among 90,516 premenopausal women aged 27-44 years, we prospectively identified 3235 invasive breast cancer cases during follow-up to 2013. 44,263 women reported their diet during high school, and from 1998 to 2013, 1347 breast cancer cases were identified among these women. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) of breast cancer for individual, whole and refined grain foods. After adjusting for known breast cancer risk factors, adult intake of whole grain foods was associated with lower premenopausal breast cancer risk (highest vs. lowest quintile: RR 0.82; 95 % CI 0.70-0.97; P trend = 0.03), but not postmenopausal breast cancer. This association was no longer significant after further adjustment for fiber intake. The average of adolescent and early adulthood whole grain food intake was suggestively associated with lower premenopausal breast cancer risk (highest vs lowest quintile: RR 0.74; 95 % CI 0.56-0.99; P trend = 0.09). Total refined grain food intake was not associated with risk of breast cancer. Most individual grain-containing foods were not associated with breast cancer risk. The exceptions were adult brown rice which was associated with lower risk of overall and premenopausal breast cancer (for each 2 servings/week: RR 0.94; 95 % CI 0.89-0.99 and RR 0.91; 95 % CI 0.85-0.99, respectively) and adult white bread intake which was associated with increased overall breast cancer risk (for each 2 servings/week: RR 1.02; 95 % CI 1.01-1.04), as well as breast cancer before and after menopause. Further, pasta intake was inversely associated with

  9. Breast cancer in women using digoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biggar, Robert J; Andersen, Louise Elisabeth; Kroman, Niels

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Digoxin use is associated with increased incidence of breast and uterus cancers. We postulated that digoxin use might affect tumor characteristics and increase relapse risk in women with breast cancer. METHODS: Incident breast cancer cases in Danish women (n = 49,312; 1995 to 2008...... in Cox regression models. RESULTS: At diagnosis, tumors in digoxin users were more likely ER+ (85.4% vs. 78.6%: P = 0.002) and have grade 1 ductal histology (37.2% vs. 25.7%; P = 0.004), compared to non-users. 45 relapses occurred in women already using digoxin at breast cancer diagnosis (1,487 person...... cancers arising in digoxin-using women had better prognostic features. After adjustment for markers, overall breast cancer relapse risk in digoxin users was not increased significantly, although recurrence hazards for ER+ tumors were higher in the first year following diagnosis....

  10. Manganese superoxide dismutase and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Christensen, Mariann; Lash, Timothy L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) inhibits oxidative damage and cancer therapy effectiveness. A polymorphism in its encoding gene (SOD2: Val16Ala rs4880) may confer poorer breast cancer survival, but data are inconsistent. We examined the association of SOD2 genotype and breast...... cancer recurrence (BCR) among patients treated with cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapy (Cyclo). We compared our findings with published studies using meta-analyses. METHODS: We conducted a population-based case-control study of BCR among women in Jutland, Denmark. Subjects were diagnosed with non......-metastatic breast cancer from 1990-2001, received adjuvant Cyclo, and were registered in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. We identified 118 patients with BCR and 213 matched breast cancer controls. We genotyped SOD2 and used conditional logistic regression to compute the odds ratio (OR) and associated 95...

  11. Dietary changes among breast cancer patients in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaharudin, Soraya Hanie; Sulaiman, Suhaina; Shahril, Mohd Razif; Emran, Nor Aina; Akmal, Sharifah Noor

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer patients often show an interest in making dietary changes after diagnosis of breast cancer to improve their health condition and prevent cancer recurrence. The objective of the study was to determine changes in dietary intake 2 years after diagnosis among breast cancer patients. One hundred sixteen subjects were asked to complete a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, diet recalls, and dietary changes questionnaire to assess dietary intake before and after diagnosis. The information on sociodemographic background, cancer treatment history, and anthropometric indices was also collected. Seventy-two subjects considered diet as a contributing factor to breast cancer, and 67 subjects changed their dietary habits after breast cancer diagnosis. The reasons for changes in diet were physician and dietitian advice and desire to cure cancer. The sources of information were derived from their physician, mass media, and family members. Total energy, protein, total fat, fatty acids, and vitamin E intake were significantly decreased after diagnosis. Meanwhile, the intake of β-carotene and vitamin C increased significantly after diagnosis. The changes included reduction in red meat, seafood, noodles, and poultry intake. An increased consumption of fruits, vegetables, fish, low-fat milk, and soy products was observed. The subjects tended to lower high-fat foods intake and started to eat more fruits and vegetables. Breast cancer patients had changed to a healthier diet after breast cancer diagnosis, although the changes made were small. This will be helpful to dietitians in providing a better understanding of good eating habits that will maintain patients' health after breast cancer diagnosis.

  12. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelttari, Liisa M; Khan, Sofia; Vuorela, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition......, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD......51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS). We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients...

  13. Breast-conserving therapy in patients with bilateral breast cancer: Do today's treatment choices burn bridges for tomorrow?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilroy, Jeffrey S.; Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, Nancy Price

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine how often initial treatment choices limit treatment options for subsequent breast cancer management in patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy (BCT), in particular with treatment of internal mammary nodes. Methods and Materials: Between January 1985 and June 2001, 464 women with pathologic Stage 0, I, and II (T0-2, N0-1) breast cancer underwent BCT at our institution. All 464 patients had computed tomography-based treatment planning. In patients with bilateral breast cancer, the planning computed tomography scans were used to determine the impact initial radiation therapy fields had on treatment options for subsequent contralateral breast cancer. Results: There were 500 breast cancers diagnosed in 464 patients. Thirty-six patients (8%) had bilateral breast cancer with 9 (2%) synchronous and 27 (6%) metachronous primaries. In 80 patients, the ipsilateral internal mammary nodes were explicitly treated. Initial breast cancer treatment choices impacted subsequent treatment decisions for the contralateral breast in only 2 of 464 patients (0.4%) in the study: 2 of 80 patients (2.5%) whose internal mammary nodes were treated, and 2 of 27 patients (7.4%) who developed metachronous bilateral breast cancer. Conclusions: Initial BCT, including internal mammary node irradiation, rarely compromised future contralateral breast-conserving therapy

  14. Multidisciplinary Management of Breast Cancer During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shachar, Shlomit Strulov; Gallagher, Kristalyn; McGuire, Kandace; Zagar, Timothy M; Faso, Aimee; Muss, Hyman B; Sweeting, Raeshall; Anders, Carey K

    2017-03-01

    Although breast cancer during pregnancy (BCDP) is rare (occurring with only 0.4% of all BC diagnoses in female patients aged 16-49 years), management decisions are challenging to both the patient and the multidisciplinary team. Experts in breast cancer at the University of North Carolina conducted a targeted literature search regarding the multidisciplinary treatment approaches to BCDP: medical, surgical, and radiation oncology. Supportive care, including antiemetic agents, and imaging approaches were also reviewed. Review of the literature revealed key points in the management of BCDP. Surgical management is similar to that in nonpregnant patients; pregnant patients may safely undergo breast-conserving surgery. Recommendations should be tailored to the individual according to the clinical stage, tumor biology, genetic status, gestational age, and personal preferences. Anthracycline-based chemotherapy can be safely initiated only in the second and third trimesters. The rate of congenital abnormalities in children exposed to chemotherapy is similar to the national average (approximately 3%). Dosing of chemotherapy should be similar to that in the nonpregnant patient (i.e., actual body surface area). Antihuman epidermal growth factor receptor 2 therapy, radiation, and endocrine treatment are contraindicated in pregnancy and lactation. Care should include partnership with obstetricians. The literature regarding prognosis of BCDP is mixed. To maximize benefit and minimize risk to the mother and fetus, an informed discussion with the patient and her medical team should result in an individualized treatment plan, taking into account the timing of the pregnancy and the stage and subtype of the breast cancer. Because BCDP is rare, it is essential to collect patient data in international registries. The Oncologist 2017;22:324-334 IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Breast cancer during pregnancy is a major ethical and professional challenge for both the patient and the

  15. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  16. Estimating the Risks of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Carolyn; Correa, Candace; Duane, Frances K

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Radiotherapy reduces the absolute risk of breast cancer mortality by a few percentage points in suitable women but can cause a second cancer or heart disease decades later. We estimated the absolute long-term risks of modern breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods First, a systematic literature...... review was performed of lung and heart doses in breast cancer regimens published during 2010 to 2015. Second, individual patient data meta-analyses of 40,781 women randomly assigned to breast cancer radiotherapy versus no radiotherapy in 75 trials yielded rate ratios (RRs) for second primary cancers...... and cause-specific mortality and excess RRs (ERRs) per Gy for incident lung cancer and cardiac mortality. Smoking status was unavailable. Third, the lung or heart ERRs per Gy in the trials and the 2010 to 2015 doses were combined and applied to current smoker and nonsmoker lung cancer and cardiac mortality...

  17. Physiological Stress Reactivity and Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wadhwa, Pathik

    2003-01-01

    ... cancer and matched healthy controls. The aims of the project are: (1) to quantify parameters of biological reactivity to a behavioral stress paradigm in women with and without breast cancer; (2) To examine...

  18. Physiological Stress Reactivity and Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wadhwa, Pathik

    2001-01-01

    ... cancer and matched healthy controls. The aims of the project are: (1) To quantify parameters of biological reactivity to a behavioral stress paradigm in women with and without breast cancer; (2...

  19. Physiological Stress Reactivity and Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wadhwa, Pathik

    2005-01-01

    ... cancer and matched healthy controls. The aims of the project are: (1) To quantify parameters of biological reactivity to a behavioral stress paradigm in women with and without breast cancer; (2...

  20. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W.J. Lennard

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP, have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC, combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  1. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Kelly M.; Kirby, John A.; Lennard, Thomas W.J.; Meeson, Annette P.

    2011-01-01

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis. PMID:24212798

  2. Cancer Stem Cells and Side Population Cells in Breast Cancer and Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Kelly M. [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); Kirby, John A. [Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Lennard, Thomas W.J. [Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, 3rd Floor William Leech Building, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Meeson, Annette P., E-mail: annette.meeson@ncl.ac.uk [Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom); North East England Stem Cell Institute, Bioscience Centre, International Centre for Life, Central Parkway, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 3BZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-19

    In breast cancer it is never the primary tumour that is fatal; instead it is the development of metastatic disease which is the major cause of cancer related mortality. There is accumulating evidence that suggests that Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) may play a role in breast cancer development and progression. Breast cancer stem cell populations, including side population cells (SP), have been shown to be primitive stem cell-like populations, being long-lived, self-renewing and highly proliferative. SP cells are identified using dual wavelength flow cytometry combined with Hoechst 33342 dye efflux, this ability is due to expression of one or more members of the ABC transporter family. They have increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and apoptotic stimuli and have increased migratory potential above that of the bulk tumour cells making them strong candidates for the metastatic spread of breast cancer. Treatment of nearly all cancers usually involves one first-line agent known to be a substrate of an ABC transporter thereby increasing the risk of developing drug resistant tumours. At present there is no marker available to identify SP cells using immunohistochemistry on breast cancer patient samples. If SP cells do play a role in breast cancer progression/Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), combining chemotherapy with ABC inhibitors may be able to destroy both the cells making up the bulk tumour and the cancer stem cell population thus preventing the risk of drug resistant disease, recurrence or metastasis.

  3. Hereditary Breast Cancer: The Era of New Susceptibility Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevi Apostolou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among females. 5%–10% of breast cancer cases are hereditary and are caused by pathogenic mutations in the considered reference BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. As sequencing technologies evolve, more susceptible genes have been discovered and BRCA1 and BRCA2 predisposition seems to be only a part of the story. These new findings include rare germline mutations in other high penetrant genes, the most important of which include TP53 mutations in Li-Fraumeni syndrome, STK11 mutations in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and PTEN mutations in Cowden syndrome. Furthermore, more frequent, but less penetrant, mutations have been identified in families with breast cancer clustering, in moderate or low penetrant genes, such as CHEK2, ATM, PALB2, and BRIP1. This paper will summarize all current data on new findings in breast cancer susceptibility genes.

  4. [Cutaneous manifestations of male breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hali, Fouzia; Khadir, Khadija; Idhammou, Wassima; Bensardi, Fatima-Zahra; Lefriyekh, Mohamed-Rachid; Benider, Abdelatif; Zamiati, Soumia; Benchikhi, Hakima

    2011-11-01

    The appearance of skin symptoms in male breast is the main reason for consultation in our context. The aim of this study is to describe the various cutaneous manifestations of male breast cancer through a series of cases collected in a dermatology department. A retrospective study was conducted in the dermatology department at the CHU Ibn Rochd January 1988 to December 2009. All cases of male breast cancer initially diagnosed in dermatology were included. The various epidemiological, clinical, histological and therapeutic data were collected from medical records. Twenty cases were collected. The mean age was 61.25 years. Skin invasion by tumor was found in all patients, and it was the reason for consultation. It was a cutaneous involvement at the nipple and areola (17 cases) and at the periareolar skin (three cases). The clinical appearance of skin involvement was vegetative type in 12 cases, infiltrating with nipple retraction in five cases and nodule with skin change in three cases. The average period of consultation was 25 months. The axillary lymph nodes were noted in 11 patients and distant metastases in eight patients. The cutaneous metastases outside breast were noted in six patients. The histological types were: infiltrating ductal carcinoma in 15 cases (75%), papillary carcinoma in two cases (10%) and non-specific carcinoma in three cases (15%). The treatment was surgery in 14 patients and consisted of radical mastectomy with complete axillary nodal dissection according to Patey. Complementary therapies, chemotherapy or radiotherapy, were indicated in 14 patients. Our single-center study with dermatological recruitment illustrates the frequency and variety of skin disease in male breast cancer and demonstrates that they are still the main reason for consultation in our context. Better information for public and practitioners would allow earlier diagnosis and a more favourable prognosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Cancer of the breast -- primary irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recht, Abram

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The combination of breast-conserving surgery (CS) and radiotherapy (RT) is now accepted as a standard treatment option for most women with clinical Stage I or II invasive breast cancer. However, numerous controversies remain concerning the optimal means of selecting patients for such treatment and the details of treatment technique. These include: 1) Whether some patients can be treated by CS without RT with a low risk of local recurrence. 2) The meaning and use of patient-related and histologic factors, such as patient age, the status of the microscopic resection margins, and the presence of an extensive intraductal component (EIC). 3) Techniques of RT of the breast (e.g., is a boost dose needed, and how to give it). 4) The role of treatment of the regional lymph nodes, both by surgery and RT. 5) The integration of adjuvant systemic therapy with RT and surgery. 6) The management of patients with noninvasive ductal carcinoma. 7) The detection, prognosis, and management of breast recurrences after breast-conserving therapy. In this refresher course we will examine several of these issues

  6. Nanomedicine applications in the treatment of breast cancer: current state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Si, Mengjie; Xue, Hui-Yi; Wong, Ho-Lun

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant disease in women worldwide, but the current drug therapy is far from optimal as indicated by the high death rate of breast cancer patients. Nanomedicine is a promising alternative for breast cancer treatment. Nanomedicine products such as Doxil ® and Abraxane ® have already been extensively used for breast cancer adjuvant therapy with favorable clinical outcomes. However, these products were originally designed for generic anticancer purpose and not specifically for breast cancer treatment. With better understanding of the molecular biology of breast cancer, a number of novel promising nanotherapeutic strategies and devices have been developed in recent years. In this review, we will first give an overview of the current breast cancer treatment and the updated status of nanomedicine use in clinical setting, then discuss the latest important trends in designing breast cancer nanomedicine, including passive and active cancer cell targeting, breast cancer stem cell targeting, tumor microenvironment-based nanotherapy and combination nanotherapy of drug-resistant breast cancer. Researchers may get insight from these strategies to design and develop nanomedicine that is more tailored for breast cancer to achieve further improvements in cancer specificity, antitumorigenic effect, antimetastasis effect and drug resistance reversal effect.

  7. Posterior breast cancer: Mammographic and ultrasonographic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Ana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Posterior breast cancers are located in the prepectoral region of the breast. Owing to this distinctive anatomical localization, physical examination and mammographic or ultrasonographic evaluation can be difficult. The purpose of the study was to assess possibilities of diagnostic mammography and breast ultrasonography in detection and differentiation of posterior breast cancers. Methods. The study included 40 women with palpable, histopathological confirmed posterior breast cancer. Mammographic and ultrasonographic features were defined according to Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS lexicon. Results. Based on standard two-view mammography 87.5%, of the cases were classified as BI-RADS 4 and 5 categories, while after additional mammographic views all the cases were defined as BIRADS 4 and 5 categories. Among 96 mammographic descriptors, the most frequent were: spiculated mass (24.0%, architectural distortion (16.7%, clustered microcalcifications (12.6% and focal asymmetric density (12.6%. The differentiation of the spiculated mass was significantly associated with the possibility to visualize the lesion at two-view mammography (p = 0.009, without the association with lesion diameter (p = 0.083 or histopathological type (p = 0.055. Mammographic signs of invasive lobular carcinoma were significantly different from other histopathological types (architectural distortion, p = 0.003; focal asymmetric density, p = 0.019; association of four or five subtle signs of malignancy, p = 0.006. All cancers were detectable by ultrasonography. Mass lesions were found in 82.0% of the cases. Among 153 ultrasonographic descriptors, the most frequent were: irregular mass (15.7%, lobulated mass (7.2%, abnormal color Doppler signals (20.3%, posterior acoustic attenuation (18.3%. Ultrasonographic BI-RADS 4 and 5 categories were defined in 72.5% of the cases, without a significant difference among various histopathological types (p = 0

  8. Breast cancer incidence by estrogen receptor status in Denmark from 1996 to 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigaard, J; Stahlberg, C; Jensen, M-B

    2012-01-01

    During the past 50 years, breast cancer incidence has increased by 2-3 % annually. Despite many years of testing for estrogen receptors (ER), evidence is scarce on breast cancer incidence by ER status. The aim of this paper was to investigate the increase in breast cancer incidence by ER status....... Data were obtained from the clinical database of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group which holds nationwide data on diagnosis, including pathology, treatment, and follow-up on primary breast cancers since 1977. All Danish women...

  9. Extracellular vesicles: An overview of biogenesis, function, and role in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Quan Bin; Yao, Yu Feng; Ren, Zhao Jun; Li, Xiu Juan; Tang, Jin Hai

    2017-02-01

    Extracellular vesicles have emerged as important mediators of intercellular communication and play an active role in cancer, including breast cancer. Despite limited studies, initial observations suggest that these vesicles are important in breast physiology and pathophysiology. We here, in brief, describe their potential use as future biomarkers and therapeutic agents in breast cancer. Extracellular vesicles in blood and breast fluid may have a great potential to detect and predict the presence of breast cancer, and extracellular vesicles modulation may emerge as a therapeutic approach in cancer therapy.

  10. PET in management of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung-Chul

    2004-01-01

    Full text: PET provides useful information about tumor metabolism enabling accurate visualization of malignant lesions. Approximately 60-80% suspicious lesions on mammography have benign histology and about 10% of breast cancers with palpable mass are not identified in mammography. The key roles of PET technology in breast cancer are in: primary diagnosis, staging, recurrent diseases monitoring and prediction of therapy response. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET for the diagnosis of breast cancer has been reported to be 68-100% and 83-100%, respectively. Considering the increasing number of small breast tumors detected by mammography and false negative results, the clinical relevance of FDG-PET for the primary diagnosis is limited. In selected patients, however, for example with dense breasts, breasts implants, augmented breast or after breast surgery, which can affect the accuracy of mammography, and in cases with equivocal mammography, FDG-PET can provide clinically relevant information. PET accurately determines the extent of disease, including the loco-regional lymph node status. Furthermore, whole-body PET imaging promises a high diagnostic accuracy for detecting recurrent or metastatic breast carcinoma with a high positive predictive value. We studied the usefulness of the FDG-PET in 42 preoperative patients with suspected breast cancer in differentiation of lesions. The diagnostic value of FDG-PET in terms of sensitivity and specificity was 95% and 77% respectively in primary mass while it was 73% and 100% for axillary lymph nodes. PET is much more accurate than other conventional modalities. The sensitivity of FDG-PET for correct staging of axillary nodal status is 84-100%. It has the potential to replace conventional procedures for the staging of distant metastases. We observed the sensitivity and the specificity of FDG-PET to be 96% and 85% to detect distant metastases. FDG-PET may become the method of choice for the early assessment of

  11. Quality of life outcomes in patients with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theofilou Paraskevi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Health-related quality of life is now considered an important endpoint in cancer clinical trials. It has been shown that assessing quality of life in cancer patients could contribute to improved treatment and could even serve as a prognostic factor along with medical parameters. This paper presents a review of quality of life outcomes in patients with breast cancer according to previous descriptive findings. This is a bibliographic review of the literature covering publications that appeared in English language biomedical journals between 1987 and 2008. The search strategy included a combination of the key words quality of life and breast cancer in the titles of published articles. The major findings are summarized and presented under different headings: evaluation of health-related quality of life i at the time of diagnosis, ii during treatment, and iii after the completion of treatment. Breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy might experience several side-effects and symptoms that have a negative effect on their quality of life. Also adjuvant hormonal therapies were found to have a similar negative impact on quality of life. Psychological distress-anxiety and depression were found to be common among breast cancer patients. Symptoms-pain, fatigue, and insomnia were among the most common symptoms reported. There was quite an extensive body of literature on quality of life in breast cancer patients. These papers have made a considerable contribution to improving breast cancer care.

  12. Breast Cancer During Pregnancy: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serden Ay

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available During pregnancy breast cancer is rarely seen. In this case, when the patient was being operated for the right breast cancer which was diagnosed in the first exam, a left breast cancer was also detected in the operation. When the patient analysed retrospectively, lesion in the left breast could not detected because of the lactation period. Consequently,pregnancy patients must be re-examined after the lactation period to avoid any possible mistakes. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(3.000: 492-494

  13. Midbody Accumulation in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    cancer cells undergo asymmetric events during cell division that generate different daughter cells. One daughter receives the singular midbody (MB) that is made during every cell division. The cell with this so-called postmitotic midbody derivative accumulates additional MBds with successive divisions. In breast tumor sections, rare cells stain for MBds adjacent to the basal layer, the position of putative breast cancer stem cells. MBds are present in high numbers in several human breast cancer cell lines and in human tumors, but are rarely found in normal breast

  14. Genetic Factors in Breast Cancer: Center for Interdisciplinary Biobehavioral Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    2006. [18] L. A. Brinton, J. R. Daling, J. M. Liff, et al., “ Oral contraceptives and breast cancer risk among younger women,” Journal of the National...perceived social support reported fewer anxiety and depressive symptoms [63]. These results also revealed a positive relationship between breast cancer...64], along with other more general measures of psychological well-being, including depression and anxiety. Future studies incorporating these

  15. Elucidation of the Molecular Mechanisms for Aberrant Expression of Breast Cancer Specific Gene 1 in Invasive and Metastatic Breast Carcinomas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Jingwen

    2005-01-01

    ...%) of tumor tissues of diversified cancer types including liver, esophagus, colon, gastric, lung, prostate, cervical, and breast cancer but rarely expressed in tumor matched non neoplastic adjacent tissues (NNAT) (0.6...

  16. Social Cultural Influences on Breast Cancer Views and Breast Health Practices Among Chinese Women in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Chenyu; Beaver, Kinta; Campbell, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Incidence rates for breast cancer have increased significantly among Chinese women, accompanied by low utilization of breast screening and delay in symptom presentation. The aims of this study were to explore (1) views on breast cancer and breast health among Chinese women in the United Kingdom and (2) the potential influence of social and cultural context on views and screening behavior. Qualitative interviews were carried out with 22 Chinese women. Pertinent aspects of Grounded Theory methods, including simultaneous data collection and analysis, constant comparison, and memo writing, were used. Four themes emerged: cultural views on breast cancer, information sources and knowledge, breast screening practice, and views on healthcare services. The theme views on breast cancer had 3 subthemes: a fearful disease, taboo, and fatalism. Aspects of traditional Chinese culture had important influences on Chinese women's views on breast cancer. Self-care formed the most significant strategy to promote health and prevent illness. Although the study found high utilization of breast screening when offered, only 6 women reported breast awareness practices. This study found that traditional beliefs were not the sole determinant of breast health behavior. The way in which breast screening services are offered in the United Kingdom may reduce the significance of cultural views and shape individuals' health behavior. Findings indicate that information on breast awareness should be delivered to this group of women in Chinese by health professionals through Chinese mass media.

  17. Breast self examination and breast cancer: Knowledge and practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Medical students play an important role in creating a supportive environment within their communities for screening behaviours in health promotion. Medical students must possess the appropriate knowledge concerning breast self examination (BSE) and breast cancer to be effective health educators.

  18. Awareness of breast cancer and breast self-examination among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-09-29

    Sep 29, 2017 ... in the evil eye [30] while 96.8% of Arab-speaking women in Qatar attributed its occurrence to fate/destiny and less than one-fifth to. Gods' punishment and bad luck [31]. As observed elsewhere. [6,18,28,32] the commonest symptom of breast cancer identified by our respondents was breast lump. However ...

  19. A new look at breast density and breast cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haars, G.

    2008-01-01

    Breast density, as visible on mammograms, comprises connective and epithelial tissue and can be seen to represent the glandular target tissue for breast cancer, whereas the non-dense tissue mainly comprises fat. High percentages of density are established to be one of the strongest risk factors of

  20. Research Training Program in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    entry. Genes & Dev. 12: 456-461. Zhao, J., Kennedy, B.K., Lawrence, B.D., Barbie , D., Matera, A.G., Fletcher, J.A., and Harlow, E. 2000. NPAT links...Analysis of the NuRD subunits reveals a histone deacetylase core complex and a genetic studies of early breast cancer evolution . Breast Cancer Res