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Sample records for include additional effects

  1. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  2. Fatigue Behavior and Modeling of Additively Manufactured Ti-6Al-4V Including Interlayer Time Interval Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torries, Brian; Shamsaei, Nima

    2017-12-01

    The effects of different cooling rates, as achieved by varying the interlayer time interval, on the fatigue behavior of additively manufactured Ti-6Al-4V specimens were investigated and modeled via a microstructure-sensitive fatigue model. Comparisons are made between two sets of specimens fabricated via Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™), with variance in interlayer time interval accomplished by depositing either one or two specimens per print operation. Fully reversed, strain-controlled fatigue tests were conducted, with fractography following specimen failure. A microstructure-sensitive fatigue model was calibrated to model the fatigue behavior of both sets of specimens and was found to be capable of correctly predicting the longer fatigue lives of the single-built specimens and the reduced scatter of the double-built specimens; all data points fell within the predicted upper and lower bounds of fatigue life. The time interval effects and the ability to be modeled are important to consider when producing test specimens that are smaller than the production part (i.e., property-performance relationships).

  3. The consequences of including non-additive effects on the genetic evaluation of harvest body weight in Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neira Roberto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we used different animal models to estimate genetic and environmental variance components on harvest weight in two populations of Oncorhynchus kisutch, forming two classes i.e. odd- and even-year spawners. Methods The models used were: additive, with and without inbreeding as a covariable (A + F and A respectively; additive plus common environmental due to full-sib families and inbreeding (A + C + F; additive plus parental dominance and inbreeding (A + D + F; and a full model (A + C + D + F. Genetic parameters and breeding values obtained by different models were compared to evaluate the consequences of including non-additive effects on genetic evaluation. Results Including inbreeding as a covariable did not affect the estimation of genetic parameters, but heritability was reduced when dominance or common environmental effects were included. A high heritability for harvest weight was estimated in both populations (even = 0.46 and odd = 0.50 when simple additive models (A + F and A were used. Heritabilities decreased to 0.21 (even and 0.37 (odd when the full model was used (A + C + D + F. In this full model, the magnitude of the dominance variance was 0.19 (even and 0.06 (odd, while the magnitude of the common environmental effect was lower than 0.01 in both populations. The correlation between breeding values estimated with different models was very high in all cases (i.e. higher than 0.98. However, ranking of the 30 best males and the 100 best females per generation changed when a high dominance variance was estimated, as was the case in one of the two populations (even. Conclusions Dominance and common environmental variance may be important components of variance in harvest weight in O. kisutch, thus not including them may produce an overestimation of the predicted response; furthermore, genetic evaluation was seen to be partially affected, since the ranking of selected animals changed with the inclusion of

  4. effects of sulphur addition on addition on and mechanical properties

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    234-8034714355. 8034714355. 1. EFFECTS OF SULPHUR ADDITION ON. ADDITION ON. 2. AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES O. 3. 4. C. W. Onyia. 5. 1DEPT. OF METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS. 6. 2, 4DEPT. OF METALLURGICAL ...

  5. EVAPORATION: a new vapour pressure estimation methodfor organic molecules including non-additivity and intramolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compernolle, S.; Ceulemans, K.; Müller, J.-F.

    2011-09-01

    We present EVAPORATION (Estimation of VApour Pressure of ORganics, Accounting for Temperature, Intramolecular, and Non-additivity effects), a method to predict (subcooled) liquid pure compound vapour pressure p0 of organic molecules that requires only molecular structure as input. The method is applicable to zero-, mono- and polyfunctional molecules. A simple formula to describe log10p0(T) is employed, that takes into account both a wide temperature dependence and the non-additivity of functional groups. In order to match the recent data on functionalised diacids an empirical modification to the method was introduced. Contributions due to carbon skeleton, functional groups, and intramolecular interaction between groups are included. Molecules typically originating from oxidation of biogenic molecules are within the scope of this method: aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, ethers, esters, nitrates, acids, peroxides, hydroperoxides, peroxy acyl nitrates and peracids. Therefore the method is especially suited to describe compounds forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA).

  6. effects of sulphur addition on addition on and mechanical properties

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    The effects of sulphur addition addition addition on the microstruc on the microstruc. 14. Al-12wt%Si alloy have alloy have alloy have been investigated in thi been investigated in this been investigated in thi been investigated .... ce sand castings for micro-structural structural structural carried out carried out to determine the.

  7. Additive and non-additive effects on fitness traits

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GScholtz

    2014-11-09

    Nov 9, 2014 ... To develop effective suckler cow replacement strategies, beef producers must have information about breed-specific genetic effects for economically .... regression coefficients representing individual and maternal additive effects; βk and βl are partial regression coefficients representing individual and ...

  8. EVAPORATION: a new vapour pressure estimation methodfor organic molecules including non-additivity and intramolecular interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Compernolle

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present EVAPORATION (Estimation of VApour Pressure of ORganics, Accounting for Temperature, Intramolecular, and Non-additivity effects, a method to predict (subcooled liquid pure compound vapour pressure p0 of organic molecules that requires only molecular structure as input. The method is applicable to zero-, mono- and polyfunctional molecules. A simple formula to describe log10p0(T is employed, that takes into account both a wide temperature dependence and the non-additivity of functional groups. In order to match the recent data on functionalised diacids an empirical modification to the method was introduced. Contributions due to carbon skeleton, functional groups, and intramolecular interaction between groups are included. Molecules typically originating from oxidation of biogenic molecules are within the scope of this method: aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, ethers, esters, nitrates, acids, peroxides, hydroperoxides, peroxy acyl nitrates and peracids. Therefore the method is especially suited to describe compounds forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA.

  9. Vibration of Piezoelectric Nanowires Including Surface Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ansari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, surface and piezoelectric effects on the vibration behavior of nanowires (NWs are investigated by using a Timoshenko beam model. The electric field equations and the governing equations of motion for the piezoelectric NWs are derived with the consideration of surface effects. By the exact solution of the governing equations, an expression for the natural frequencies of NWs with simply-supported boundary conditions is obtained. The effects of piezoelectricity and surface effects on the vibrational behavior of Timoshenko NWs are graphically illustrated. A comparison is also made between the predictions of Timoshenko beam model and those of its Euler-Bernoulli counterpart. Additionally, the present results are validated through comparison with the available data in the literature.

  10. BIOLOGIC AND ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF INCLUDING DIFFERENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biologic and economic effects of including three agro-industrial by-products as ingredients in turkey poult diets were investigated using 48 turkey poults in a completely randomised design experiment. Diets were formulated to contain the three by-products – wheat offal, rice husk and palm kernel meal, each at 20% level ...

  11. Food Additives and Effects to Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayper Boga

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Food purchasing patterns have changed dramatically over the past fifty years. Packaged and processed foods get many a family through the day. They’re convenient, portable, and they stay fresh for a long time. There are over fourteen thousand man-made chemicals added to American food supply today. Food additives are not natural nutrition for humans or their pets. Children are suffering the most from food additives because they are exposed to food chemicals from infancy, and human bodies were not meant to be exposed to the degree of chemicals and food additives that we are currently. These additives, may include side effects, food allergies, increased waist lines, decreased absorption of minerals and vitamins, cancer and more. It is important for everyone to be aware of the types of chemicals and food additives they are consuming. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2010; 19(3.000: 141-154

  12. Controlled Carbon Source Addition to an Alternating Nitrification-Denitrification Wastewater Treatment Process Including Biological P Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, Steven Howard; Henze, Mogens

    1995-01-01

    The paper investigates the effect of adding an external carbon source on the rate of denitrification in an alternating activated sludge process including biological P removal. Two carbon sources were examined, acetate and hydrolysate derived from biologically hydrolyzed sludge. Preliminary batch...... that external carbon source addition may serve as a suitable control variable to improve process performance....... process, the addition of either carbon source to the anoxic zone also resulted in an instantaneous and fairly reproducible increase in the denitrification rate. Some release of phosphate associated with the carbon source addition was observed. With respect to nitrogen removal, these results indicate...

  13. Jet-calculus approach including coherence effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.M.; Migneron, R.; Narayanan, K.S.S.

    1987-01-01

    We show how integrodifferential equations typical of jet calculus can be combined with an averaging procedure to obtain jet-calculus-based results including the Mueller interference graphs. Results in longitudinal-momentum fraction x for physical quantities are higher at intermediate x and lower at large x than with the conventional ''incoherent'' jet calculus. These results resemble those of Marchesini and Webber, who used a Monte Carlo approach based on the same dynamics

  14. Structural Optimization Including Centrifugal and Coriolis Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    the desired frequency changes with excellent accuracy. MSC/ NASTRAN finite element solution sequences were modified to incorporate rotary effects. DMAP ...properties can be altered by a nonlinear change factor. These manipulations may be done by selective use of the MATMOD DMAP module. In the MSC/ NASTRAN ...Examples were carried out using the general purpose software package MSC/ NASTRAN and ADS (Automated Design Synthesis). "I OTIC copy INSpE TE 6

  15. Controlled Carbon Source Addition to an Alternating Nitrification-Denitrification Wastewater Treatment Process Including Biological P Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaacs, Steven Howard; Henze, Mogens

    1995-01-01

    The paper investigates the effect of adding an external carbon source on the rate of denitrification in an alternating activated sludge process including biological P removal. Two carbon sources were examined, acetate and hydrolysate derived from biologically hydrolyzed sludge. Preliminary batch...... experiments performed in 5 liter bottles indicated that the denitrification rate can be instantaneously increased through the addition of either carbon source. The amount by which the rate was increased depended on the amount of carbon added. In the main experiments performed in a pilot scale alternating...... process, the addition of either carbon source to the anoxic zone also resulted in an instantaneous and fairly reproducible increase in the denitrification rate. Some release of phosphate associated with the carbon source addition was observed. With respect to nitrogen removal, these results indicate...

  16. Excessive Additive Effect On Engine Oil Viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Vojtěch Kumbár; Jiří Votava

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is excessive additive (for oil filling) effect on engine oil dynamic viscosity. Research is focused to commercially distribute automotive engine oil with viscosity class 15W–40 designed for vans. There were prepared blends of new and used engine oil without and with oil additive in specific ratio according manufacturer’s recommendations. Dynamic viscosity of blends with additive was compared with pure new and pure used engine oil. The temperature dependence dynamic...

  17. EVAPORATION: a new vapor pressure estimation method for organic molecules including non-additivity and intramolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compernolle, S.; Ceulemans, K.; Müller, J.-F.

    2011-04-01

    We present EVAPORATION (Estimation of VApour Pressure of ORganics, Accounting for Temperature, Intramolecular, and Non-additivity effects), a method to predict vapour pressure p0 of organic molecules needing only molecular structure as input. The method is applicable to zero-, mono- and polyfunctional molecules. A simple formula to describe log10p0(T) is employed, that takes into account both a wide temperature dependence and the non-additivity of functional groups. In order to match the recent data on functionalised diacids an empirical modification to the method was introduced. Contributions due to carbon skeleton, functional groups, and intramolecular interaction between groups are included. Molecules typically originating from oxidation of biogenic molecules are within the scope of this method: carbonyls, alcohols, ethers, esters, nitrates, acids, peroxides, hydroperoxides, peroxy acyl nitrates and peracids. Therefore the method is especially suited to describe compounds forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA).

  18. Additive effects in radiation grafting and curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viengkhou, V.; Ng, L.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Detailed studies on the accelerative effect of novel additives in radiation grafting and curing using acrylated monomer/oligomer systems have been performed in the presence of ionising radiation and UV as sources. Methyl methacrylate (MMA) is used as typical monomer for these grafting studies in the presence of the additives with model backbone polymers, cellulose and propropylene. Additives which have been found to accelerate these grafting processes are: mineral acid, occlusion compounds like urea, thermal initiators and photoinitiators as well as multifunctional monomers such as multifunctional acrylates. The results from irradiation with gamma rays have also been compared with irradiation from a 90W UV lamp. The role of the above additives in accelerating the analogous process of radiation curing has been investigated. Acrylated urethanes, epoxies and polyesters are used as oligomers together with acrylated monomers in this work with uv lamps of 300 watts/inch as radiation source. In the UV curing process bonding between film and substrate is usually due to physical forces. In the present work the presence of additives are shown to influence the occurrence of concurrent grafting during cure thus affecting the nature of the bonding of the cured film. The conditions under which concurrent grafting with UV can occur will be examined. A mechanism for accelerative effect of these additives in both grafting and curing processes has been proposed involving radiation effects and partitioning phenomena

  19. Effects from additives on deacetylation of chitin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campana Filho, Sergio P.; Signini, Roberta

    2001-01-01

    Deacetylation reactions of commercial chitin were carried out in aqueous sodium hydroxide solution at 115 deg C for 6 hours. The effect from additives (sodium borohydride or anthraquinone) and of bubbling inert gas (nitrogen or argon) on the characteristics of deacetylated samples were evaluated. Average degrees of acetylation and intrinsic viscosity were determined by 1 H NMR spectroscopy and capillary viscometry, respectively. X-ray diffraction was employed to evaluate changes in crystallinity and infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor structural changes due to deacetylation. The bubbling of inert gas during the deacetylation reaction resulted in more crystalline samples of chitosan. Deacetylation carried out without any additive produced slightly more deacetylated chitosan but they were severely depolymerized. The depolymerization process was much less important when sodium borohydride was added to the reaction medium but the addition of anthraquinone and the bubbling of nitrogen, or argon, did not have any effect, this suggests that oxygen is not required for depolymerization. (author)

  20. Excessive Additive Effect On Engine Oil Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kumbár

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is excessive additive (for oil filling effect on engine oil dynamic viscosity. Research is focused to commercially distribute automotive engine oil with viscosity class 15W–40 designed for vans. There were prepared blends of new and used engine oil without and with oil additive in specific ratio according manufacturer’s recommendations. Dynamic viscosity of blends with additive was compared with pure new and pure used engine oil. The temperature dependence dynamic viscosity of samples was evaluated by using rotary viscometer with standard spindle. Concern was that the oil additive can moves engine oil of several viscosity grades up. It is able to lead to failure in the engine. Mathematical models were used for fitting experimental values of dynamic viscosity. Exponential fit function was selected, which was very accurate because the coefficient of determination R2 achieved high values (0.98–0.99. These models are able to predict viscosity behaviour blends of engine oil and additive.

  1. Effects of additives on PVG dosifilm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wenxiu; Liu, Aiguo

    1995-01-01

    Dosifilm PVG is a new radiochromic film dosimeter composed of matrix material polyvinyl butyral (PVB), leuco malachite green (LMG) and additive halogenated organic compound (RX), etc. The control of the dose range on PVG dosifilm was examined. The addition of halogenated compounds played an important role in the radiation reaction of LMG beyond the concentration of LMG. Bromide is more effective than chloride in this system, the oxidative species are X · and X 2 · - . PVB with N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) can induce the oxidation of LMG before irradiation. The reaction mechanism of PVG was discussed. Different linear ranges of radiation response on PVG dosifilm could be controlled by alternating the relative concentrations of halogenated compounds and LMG. (author)

  2. 78 FR 56695 - Proposed Listing of Additional Waters To Be Included on Indiana's 2010 List of Impaired Waters...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9900-95--Region 5] Proposed Listing of Additional Waters To Be Included on Indiana's 2010 List of Impaired Waters Under the Clean Water Act AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Reopening of comment period. SUMMARY: EPA is reopening the comment period...

  3. 78 FR 35929 - Proposed Listing of Additional Waters To Be Included on Indiana's 2010 List of Impaired Waters...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9823-3] Proposed Listing of Additional Waters To Be Included on Indiana's 2010 List of Impaired Waters Under Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act AGENCY... comment. Section 303(d)(2) requires that states submit and EPA approve or disapprove lists of waters for...

  4. Additive Effectiveness Investigations in Alternative Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Proprietary chemistry marketed by Innospec as Stadis 450. The CI/LI and FSII were added to the SPKs in bulk before additizing to the test plan. Since...275 275 275 ASTM Code ɚ ɚ ɚ. ɚ 4AP > 4P ɚ ɚ ɚ >4AP > 4P Ellipsometry Depth, 2.5mm2 nm 8.9 9.7 10.9 12.2 219.4 181.9 4.3 7.3 9.0 >250 >250 Maximum...23.0 23.0 D3241 Jet Fuel Thermal Stability Test Temperature °C 275 275 275 275 275 275 275 275 275 275 275 ASTM Code ɚ ɚ ɚ. ɚ 4AP > 4P ɚ ɚ ɚ >4AP

  5. Microfluidic System Simulation Including the Electro-Viscous Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Eileen; Chen, C. P.; Majumdar, Alok

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a practical approach using a general purpose lumped-parameter computer program, GFSSP (Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program) for calculating flow distribution in a network of micro-channels including electro-viscous effects due to the existence of electrical double layer (EDL). In this study, an empirical formulation for calculating an effective viscosity of ionic solutions based on dimensional analysis is described to account for surface charge and bulk fluid conductivity, which give rise to electro-viscous effect in microfluidics network. Two dimensional slit micro flow data was used to determine the model coefficients. Geometry effect is then included through a Poiseuille number correlation in GFSSP. The bi-power model was used to calculate flow distribution of isotropically etched straight channel and T-junction microflows involving ionic solutions. Performance of the proposed model is assessed against experimental test data.

  6. Improvement of prediction ability for genomic selection of dairy cattle by including dominance effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanyu Sun

    Full Text Available Dominance may be an important source of non-additive genetic variance for many traits of dairy cattle. However, nearly all prediction models for dairy cattle have included only additive effects because of the limited number of cows with both genotypes and phenotypes. The role of dominance in the Holstein and Jersey breeds was investigated for eight traits: milk, fat, and protein yields; productive life; daughter pregnancy rate; somatic cell score; fat percent and protein percent. Additive and dominance variance components were estimated and then used to estimate additive and dominance effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. The predictive abilities of three models with both additive and dominance effects and a model with additive effects only were assessed using ten-fold cross-validation. One procedure estimated dominance values, and another estimated dominance deviations; calculation of the dominance relationship matrix was different for the two methods. The third approach enlarged the dataset by including cows with genotype probabilities derived using genotyped ancestors. For yield traits, dominance variance accounted for 5 and 7% of total variance for Holsteins and Jerseys, respectively; using dominance deviations resulted in smaller dominance and larger additive variance estimates. For non-yield traits, dominance variances were very small for both breeds. For yield traits, including additive and dominance effects fit the data better than including only additive effects; average correlations between estimated genetic effects and phenotypes showed that prediction accuracy increased when both effects rather than just additive effects were included. No corresponding gains in prediction ability were found for non-yield traits. Including cows with derived genotype probabilities from genotyped ancestors did not improve prediction accuracy. The largest additive effects were located on chromosome 14 near DGAT1 for yield traits for both

  7. LTRACK: Beam-transport calculation including wakefield effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, K.C.D.; Cooper, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    LTRACK is a first-order beam-transport code that includes wakefield effects up to quadrupole modes. This paper will introduce the readers to this computer code by describing the history, the method of calculations, and a brief summary of the input/output information. Future plans for the code will also be described

  8. Additional potential effects of nuclear war on ecological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, T.C.; Harwell, M.A.; Cropper, W.P. Jr.; Grover, H.D.

    1985-01-01

    The authors summarize biological and ecosystem responses to enhanced UV-B, air pollutants, radiation, and fire. The concentrations and biological responses associated with these perturbations are based on current experience and experimentation. Additional research is needed to quantify probable post-nuclear war exposures and potential responses. A summary is provided of all the potential effects of nuclear war on the variety of the Earth's ecosystems, including perturbations from climatic alterations, radiation, pollutants, and UV-B

  9. Double-photoionization of helium including quadrupole radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgan, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ludlow, J A [AUBURN UNIV; Lee, Teck - Ghee [AUBURN UNIV; Pindzola, M S [AUBURN UNIV; Robicheaux, F [AUBURN UNIV

    2009-01-01

    Non-perturbative time-dependent close-coupling calculations are carried out for the double photoionization of helium including both dipole and quadrupole radiation effects. At a photon energy of 800 eV, accessible at CUlTent synchrotron light sources, the quadrupole interaction contributes around 6% to the total integral double photoionization cross section. The pure quadrupole single energy differential cross section shows a local maxima at equal energy sharing, as opposed to the minimum found in the pure dipole single energy differential cross section. The sum of the pure dipole and pure quadrupole single energy differentials is insensitive to non-dipole effects at 800 eV. However, the triple differential cross section at equal energy sharing of the two ejected electrons shows strong non-dipole effects due to the quadrupole interaction that may be experimentally observable.

  10. Generalized fluid theory including non-Maxwellian kinetic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izacard, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    The results obtained by the plasma physics community for the validation and the prediction of turbulence and transport in magnetized plasmas come mainly from the use of very central processing unit (CPU)-consuming particle-in-cell or (gyro)kinetic codes which naturally include non-Maxwellian kinetic effects. To date, fluid codes are not considered to be relevant for the description of these kinetic effects. Here, after revisiting the limitations of the current fluid theory developed in the 19th century, we generalize the fluid theory including kinetic effects such as non-Maxwellian super-thermal tails with as few fluid equations as possible. The collisionless and collisional fluid closures from the nonlinear Landau Fokker-Planck collision operator are shown for an arbitrary collisionality. Indeed, the first fluid models associated with two examples of collisionless fluid closures are obtained by assuming an analytic non-Maxwellian distribution function (e.g. the INMDF (Izacard, O. 2016b Kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions in magnetized plasmas. Phys. Plasmas 23, 082504) that stands for interpreted non-Maxwellian distribution function). One of the main differences with the literature is our analytic representation of the distribution function in the velocity phase space with as few hidden variables as possible thanks to the use of non-orthogonal basis sets. These new non-Maxwellian fluid equations could initiate the next generation of fluid codes including kinetic effects and can be expanded to other scientific disciplines such as astrophysics, condensed matter or hydrodynamics. As a validation test, we perform a numerical simulation based on a minimal reduced INMDF fluid model. The result of this test is the discovery of the origin of particle and heat diffusion. The diffusion is due to the competition between a growing INMDF on short time scales due to spatial gradients and the thermalization on longer time scales. The results

  11. Evaluation of fatigue data including reactor water environmental effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinski, S.T.; Nickell, R.E.; Van Der Sluys, W.A.; Yukawa, S.

    2002-01-01

    Laboratory data have been gathered in the past decade indicating a significant reduction in component fatigue life when reactor water environmental effects are experimentally simulated. However, these laboratory data have not been supported by nuclear power plant component operating experience. The laboratory data under simulated operating conditions are being used to support arguments for revising the design-basis fatigue curves in the ASME Code Section III, Division 1, for Class 1 components. A thorough review of available laboratory fatigue data and their applicability to actual component operating conditions was performed. The evaluation divided the assembly, review and assessment of existing laboratory fatigue data and its applicability to plant operating conditions into four principal tasks: (1) review of available laboratory data relative to thresholds for environmental parameters, such as temperature, reactor water oxidation potential, strain rate, strain amplitude, reactor water flow rate, and component metal sulfur content; (2) determination of the relevance of the laboratory data to actual plant operating conditions; (3) review of laboratory S-N data curve-fitting models; and (4) assessment of existing ASME Code Section III Class 1 margins This paper summarizes the results of the data review. In addition, recommendations are made for additional laboratory testing intended to improve the applicability of laboratory test results under simulated reactor water environmental conditions. (authors)

  12. Two-dimensional analysis of motion artifacts, including flow effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litt, A.M.; Brody, A.S.; Spangler, R.A.; Scott, P.D.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of motion on magnetic resonance images have been theoretically analyzed for the case of a point-like object in simple harmonic motion and for other one-dimensional trajectories. The authors of this paper extend this analysis to a generalized two-dimensional magnetization with an arbitrary motion trajectory. The authors provide specific solutions for the clinically relevant cases of the cross-sections of cylindrical objects in the body, such as the aorta, which has a roughly one-dimensional, simple harmonic motion during respiration. By extending the solution to include inhomogeneous magnetizations, the authors present a model which allows the effects of motion artifacts and flow artifacts to be analyzed simultaneously

  13. Neutrinos from Cosmic Accelerators including Magnetic Field and Flavor Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Winter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the particle physics ingredients affecting the normalization, shape, and flavor composition of astrophysical neutrinos fluxes, such as different production modes, magnetic field effects on the secondaries (muons, pions, and kaons, and flavor mixing, where we focus on pγ interactions. We also discuss the interplay with neutrino propagation and detection, including the possibility to detect flavor and its application in particle physics, and the use of the Glashow resonance to discriminate pγ from pp interactions in the source. We illustrate the implications on fluxes and flavor composition with two different models: (1 the target photon spectrum is dominated by synchrotron emission of coaccelerated electrons and (2 the target photon spectrum follows the observed photon spectrum of gamma-ray bursts. In the latter case, the multimessenger extrapolation from the gamma-ray fluence to the expected neutrino flux is highlighted.

  14. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Pueblo NTMS quadrangel, Colorado, including concentrations of forty-three additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, S.S. Jr.

    1978-12-01

    This report is a supplement to the HSSR uranium evaluation report for the Pueblo quadrangle (Shannon, 1978), which presented the field and uranium data for the 861 water and 1060 sediment samples collected from 1402 locations in the quadrangle. This supplement presents those data again and the results of subsequent multielement analyses of those HSSR samples. In addition to uranium, the concentrations of 12 elements are presented for the waters and 42 elements for the sediments

  15. Effect of antistripping additives on the compaction of bituminous concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the effect of antistripping additives on the compaction of bituminous concrete. To do this, the densities obtained on test sections with and without additive were compared. Comparisons of nuclear d...

  16. A hydrodynamic model for granular material flows including segregation effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberg Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The simulation of granular flows including segregation effects in large industrial processes using particle methods is accurate, but very time-consuming. To overcome the long computation times a macroscopic model is a natural choice. Therefore, we couple a mixture theory based segregation model to a hydrodynamic model of Navier-Stokes-type, describing the flow behavior of the granular material. The granular flow model is a hybrid model derived from kinetic theory and a soil mechanical approach to cover the regime of fast dilute flow, as well as slow dense flow, where the density of the granular material is close to the maximum packing density. Originally, the segregation model has been formulated by Thornton and Gray for idealized avalanches. It is modified and adapted to be in the preferred form for the coupling. In the final coupled model the segregation process depends on the local state of the granular system. On the other hand, the granular system changes as differently mixed regions of the granular material differ i.e. in the packing density. For the modeling process the focus lies on dry granular material flows of two particle types differing only in size but can be easily extended to arbitrary granular mixtures of different particle size and density. To solve the coupled system a finite volume approach is used. To test the model the rotational mixing of small and large particles in a tumbler is simulated.

  17. A hydrodynamic model for granular material flows including segregation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilberg, Dominik; Klar, Axel; Steiner, Konrad

    2017-06-01

    The simulation of granular flows including segregation effects in large industrial processes using particle methods is accurate, but very time-consuming. To overcome the long computation times a macroscopic model is a natural choice. Therefore, we couple a mixture theory based segregation model to a hydrodynamic model of Navier-Stokes-type, describing the flow behavior of the granular material. The granular flow model is a hybrid model derived from kinetic theory and a soil mechanical approach to cover the regime of fast dilute flow, as well as slow dense flow, where the density of the granular material is close to the maximum packing density. Originally, the segregation model has been formulated by Thornton and Gray for idealized avalanches. It is modified and adapted to be in the preferred form for the coupling. In the final coupled model the segregation process depends on the local state of the granular system. On the other hand, the granular system changes as differently mixed regions of the granular material differ i.e. in the packing density. For the modeling process the focus lies on dry granular material flows of two particle types differing only in size but can be easily extended to arbitrary granular mixtures of different particle size and density. To solve the coupled system a finite volume approach is used. To test the model the rotational mixing of small and large particles in a tumbler is simulated.

  18. Method for assessment of stormwater treatment facilities – Synthetic road runoff addition including micro-pollutants and tracer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cederkvist, Karin; Jensen, Marina Bergen; Holm, Peter Engelund

    2017-01-01

    % in the dual porosity filter, stressing the importance of including a conservative tracer for correction of contaminant retention values. The method is considered useful in future treatment performance testing of STFs. The observed performance of the STFs is presented in coming papers.......Stormwater treatment facilities (STFs) are becoming increasingly widespread but knowledge on their performance is limited. This is due to difficulties in obtaining representative samples during storm events and documenting removal of the broad range of contaminants found in stormwater runoff...

  19. Magnetic properties of nickel halide hydrates including deuteration effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeFotis, G.C., E-mail: gxdefo@wm.edu [Chemistry Department, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA, 23187 United States (United States); Van Dongen, M.J.; Hampton, A.S.; Komatsu, C.H.; Trowell, K.T.; Havas, K.C.; Davis, C.M.; DeSanto, C.L. [Chemistry Department, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA, 23187 United States (United States); Hays, K.; Wagner, M.J. [Chemistry Department, George Washington University, Washington, DC, 20052 United States (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic measurements on variously hydrated nickel chlorides and bromides, including deuterated forms, are reported. Results include locations and sizes of susceptibility maxima, T{sub max} and χ{sub max}, ordering temperatures T{sub c}, Curie constants and Weiss theta in the paramagnetic regime, and primary and secondary exchange interactions from analysis of low temperature data. For the latter a 2D Heisenberg model augmented by interlayer exchange in a mean-field approximation is applied. Magnetization data to 16 kG as a function of temperature show curvature and hysteresis characteristics quite system dependent. For four materials high field magnetization data to 70 kG at 2.00 K are also obtained. Comparison is made with theoretical relations for spin-1 models. Trends are apparent, primarily that T{sub max} of each bromide hydrate is less than for the corresponding chloride, and that for a given halide nD{sub 2}O (n=1 or 2) deuterates exhibit lesser T{sub max} than do nH{sub 2}O hydrates. A monoclinic unit cell determined from powder X-ray diffraction data on NiBr{sub 2}·2D{sub 2}O is different from and slightly larger than that of NiBr{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O. This provides some rationale for the difference in magnetic properties between these. - Highlights: • The magnetism of Ni(II) chloride and bromide dihydrates and monohydrates is studied. • Effects of replacing H{sub 2}O by D{sub 2}O are examined for both hydration states and both halides. • Exchange interactions in bromides are weaker than in corresponding chlorides. • Exchange interactions are weaker in D{sub 2}O than in corresponding H{sub 2}O containing systems. • The unit cell of NiBr{sub 2}·2D{sub 2}O is different from and slightly larger than that of NiBr{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O.

  20. 78 FR 67369 - National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program: Addition to the Vaccine Injury Table to Include All...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... individuals who have been injured by covered childhood vaccines. Prior to this publication, trivalent... later of: (A) The first day of the first month which begins more than 4 weeks after the date of the... is the first day of the first month beginning more than 4 weeks after the effective date of Public...

  1. Drag reduction by natural polymeric additives in PMDS microchannel: Effect of types of additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Fiona W.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Drag reduction technology was used in medical applications to enhance the blood flow in semiclogged blood streams which can be an alternative treatment for atherosclerosis. In this present study, natural polymeric drag reducing additives (DRA was introduced to replace synthetic polymer which has the possibility of bringing side effects to human health. Three different sources, namely okra, aloe vera and hibiscus were utilized to extract the natural polymeric additives which were then tested in custom made microchannel simulating human heart blood vessels. The performance of different types of additives was evaluated using pressure measurements. The maximum drag reduction up to 63.48% is achieved using 300 ppm of hibiscus mucilage at operating pressure of 50 mbar. In this present work, hibiscus showed the best drag reduction performance, giving the highest %FI in most of the cases. This experimental results proved that these natural polymeric additives could be utilized as DRA in enhancing the blood flow in semiclogged blood streams.

  2. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Arminto NTMS quadrangle, Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-three additional elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, T.L.

    1979-11-01

    During the summers of 1976 and 1977, 570 water and 1249 sediment samples were collected from 1517 locations within the 18,000-km/sup 2/ area of the Arminto NTMS quadrangle of central Wyoming. Water samples were collected from wells, springs, streams, and artifical ponds; sediment samples were collected from wet and dry streams, springs, and wet and dry ponds. All water samples were analyzed for 13 elements, including uranium, and each sediment sample was analyzed for 43 elements, including uranium and thorium. Uranium concentrations in water samples range from below the detection limit to 84.60 parts per billion (ppb) with a mean of 4.32 ppb. All water sample types except pond water samples were considered as a single population in interpreting the data. Pond water samples were excluded due to possible concentration of uranium by evaporation. Most of the water samples containing greater than 20 ppb uranium grouped into six clusters that indicate possible areas of interest for further investigation. One cluster is associated with the Pumpkin Buttes District, and two others are near the Kaycee and Mayoworth areas of uranium mineralization. The largest cluster is located on the west side of the Powder River Basin. One cluster is located in the central Big Horn Basin and another is in the Wind River Basin; both are in areas underlain by favorable host units. Uranium concentrations in sediment samples range from 0.08 parts per million (ppm) to 115.50 ppm with a mean of 3.50 ppm. Two clusters of sediment samples over 7 ppm were delineated. The first, containing the two highest-concentration samples, corresponds with the Copper Mountain District. Many of the high uranium concentrations in samples in this cluster may be due to contamination from mining or prospecting activity upstream from the sample sites. The second cluster encompasses a wide area in the Wind River Basin along the southern boundary of the quadrangle.

  3. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Gillette NTMS quadrangle, Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, R.G.; George, W.E.; Minor, M.M.; Simi, O.R.; Talcott, C.L.; Hensley, W.K.; Cheadle, J.M. III.

    1980-08-01

    During 1976 and 1977, 752 water and 843 sediment samples were collected from 1419 locations within the 17 700-km 2 area of the Gillette quadrangle, Wyoming. Water samples were collected primarily from wells, and also from springs, ponds, and streams; sediment samples were collected primarily from stream channels, and also from springs and ponds. Each water sample was analyzed for uranium and each sediment sample was analyzed for 43 elements, including uranium and thorium. Uranium concentrations in water samples range from below the detection limit of 0.02 to 212.20 ppB and have a median of 1.10 ppB. The highest background uranium concentrations, as well as the highest individual uranium values, are in areas where favorable host units for uranium mineralization crop out. These units are the Wasatch and Fort Union formations in the Powder River Basin and the Inyan Kara group in the Black Hills. Uranium concentrations in sediment samples range from 0.64 to 29.83 ppM and have a median of 3.24 ppM. Background uranium concentrations are strongly controlled by the exposed geologic unit, and range from 4 to 8 ppM for the Cretaceous Colorado group to 1 to 3 ppM for the Triassic and Paleozoic units exposed in the Black Hills. Several areas where the Wasatch and Fort Union formations are exposed exhibit uranium concentrations in sediment samples that are slightly, but distinctly, above background values for these units. All of these areas are also associated with notably high uranium concentrations in water samples. Because epigenetic uranium mineralization in economically important areas can exhibit a similar geochemical signature, these areas within the Gillette quadrangle should be further examined for the possible presence of uranium mineralization

  4. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Newcastle NTMS Quadrangle, Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, S.J.; Sandoval, W.F.; Gallimore, D.L.; Talcott, C.L.; Martinez, R.G.; Minor, M.E.; Mills, C.F.

    1980-06-01

    Water and sediment samples were collected and each water sample was analyzed for U, and each sediment sample was analyzed for 43 elements, including U and Th. Uranium concentrations in water samples range from below the detection limit of 0.02 ppB to 702.26 ppB and have a median of 1.73 ppB and a mean of 11.76 ppB. Water samples containing high uranium concentrations generally are associated with known uranium mining activity or units known to be uranium bearing. About one-third of the water samples containing high uranium concentrations were collected from locations within the Pumpkin Buttes and Turnercrest-Ross Districts. Nearly half of the water samples containing high uranium concentrations were collected from locations just west of the Monument Hill and Highland Flats-Box Creek Districts. Similar anomalous uranium concentrations in this region have been reported updip from Exxon's Highland uranium deposits. High uranium concentrations were also found associated with the Lance Creek-Old Woman Anticline District. Uranium concentrations in sediment samples range from 1.14 to 220.70 ppM and have a median of 3.37 ppM and a mean of 4.03 ppM. Throughout the major uranium mining districts of the Powder River Basin, sediment samples with high uranium concentrations were collected from dry streams located near wells producing water samples with high uranium concentrations. High uranium concentrations were also found associated with the Lance Creek oil field where uranium mineralization is known in the White River formation. High uranium concentrations were also found in sediment samples in areas where uranium mineralization is not known. These samples are from dry streams in areas underlain by the White River formation, the Niobrara formation, and the Pierre, Carlisle, Belle Fourche, and Mowry shales

  5. Modeling Electric Double-Layers Including Chemical Reaction Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2014-01-01

    A physicochemical and numerical model for the transient formation of an electric double-layer between an electrolyte and a chemically-active flat surface is presented, based on a finite elements integration of the nonlinear Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including chemical reactions. The model works...

  6. Plasmon modes of metallic nanowires including quantum nonlocal effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Afshin, E-mail: a.moradi@kut.ac.ir [Department of Engineering Physics, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah, Iran and Department of Nano Sciences, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    The properties of electrostatic surface and bulk plasmon modes of cylindrical metallic nanowires are investigated, using the quantum hydrodynamic theory of plasmon excitation which allows an analytical study of quantum tunneling effects through the Bohm potential term. New dispersion relations are obtained for each type of mode and their differences with previous treatments based on the standard hydrodynamic model are analyzed in detail. Numerical results show by considering the quantum effects, as the value of wave number increases, the surface modes are slightly red-shifted first and then blue-shifted while the bulk modes are blue-shifted.

  7. Transient motion of hypersonic vehicles including time history effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, W. H.; Van Roessel, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    An analytic method is developed for calculating the transient pitching motion of a wedge in hypersonic flow, taking into account fully the interaction between its motion and the unsteady air flow passing it. The effects of past motion history on the present state of motion are shown to be caused by the wave reflection from the bow shock. In the Newtonian limit they are equivalent to that of an added moment of inertia. The time history effects generally tend to decrease the damping, rendering the oscillatory motion more persistent. Numerical examples are given.

  8. High Bypass Ratio Jet Noise Reduction and Installation Effects Including Shielding Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Czech, Michael J.; Doty, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to study the propulsion airframe aeroacoustic installation effects of a separate flow jet nozzle with a Hybrid Wing Body aircraft configuration where the engine is installed above the wing. Prior understanding of the jet noise shielding effectiveness was extended to a bypass ratio ten application as a function of nozzle configuration, chevron type, axial spacing, and installation effects from additional airframe components. Chevron types included fan chevrons that are uniform circumferentially around the fan nozzle and T-fan type chevrons that are asymmetrical circumferentially. In isolated testing without a pylon, uniform chevrons compared to T-fan chevrons showed slightly more low frequency reduction offset by more high frequency increase. Phased array localization shows that at this bypass ratio chevrons still move peak jet noise source locations upstream but not to nearly the extent, as a function of frequency, as for lower bypass ratio jets. For baseline nozzles without chevrons, the basic pylon effect has been greatly reduced compared to that seen for lower bypass ratio jets. Compared to Tfan chevrons without a pylon, the combination with a standard pylon results in more high frequency noise increase and an overall higher noise level. Shielded by an airframe surface 2.17 fan diameters from nozzle to airframe trailing edge, the T-fan chevron nozzle can produce reductions in jet noise of as much as 8 dB at high frequencies and upstream angles. Noise reduction from shielding decreases with decreasing frequency and with increasing angle from the jet inlet. Beyond an angle of 130 degrees there is almost no noise reduction from shielding. Increasing chevron immersion more than what is already an aggressive design is not advantageous for noise reduction. The addition of airframe control surfaces, including vertical stabilizers and elevon deflection, showed only a small overall impact. Based on the test results, the best

  9. Effect of Boron Addition on the Mechanical Wear Resistance of Additively Manufactured Biomedical Titanium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantri, S. A.; Torgerson, T.; Ivanov, E.; Scharf, T. W.; Banerjee, R.

    2018-03-01

    The effect of the addition of boron to the biomedical alloy Ti-13Nb-13Zr (TNZ) has been studied. A noticeable change between TNZ and TNZ-0.5B has been observed both in terms of morphology, and size scale of the α precipitates along with the in situ formation of TiB precipitates during laser processing. These contrasting microstructures are responsible for differences in mechanical hardness and sliding wear properties and mechanisms.

  10. Modeling heart rate variability including the effect of sleep stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliński, Mateusz; Gierałtowski, Jan; Żebrowski, Jan

    2016-02-01

    We propose a model for heart rate variability (HRV) of a healthy individual during sleep with the assumption that the heart rate variability is predominantly a random process. Autonomic nervous system activity has different properties during different sleep stages, and this affects many physiological systems including the cardiovascular system. Different properties of HRV can be observed during each particular sleep stage. We believe that taking into account the sleep architecture is crucial for modeling the human nighttime HRV. The stochastic model of HRV introduced by Kantelhardt et al. was used as the initial starting point. We studied the statistical properties of sleep in healthy adults, analyzing 30 polysomnographic recordings, which provided realistic information about sleep architecture. Next, we generated synthetic hypnograms and included them in the modeling of nighttime RR interval series. The results of standard HRV linear analysis and of nonlinear analysis (Shannon entropy, Poincaré plots, and multiscale multifractal analysis) show that—in comparison with real data—the HRV signals obtained from our model have very similar properties, in particular including the multifractal characteristics at different time scales. The model described in this paper is discussed in the context of normal sleep. However, its construction is such that it should allow to model heart rate variability in sleep disorders. This possibility is briefly discussed.

  11. Aerodynamic heating of ballistic missile including the effects of gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The aerodynamic heating of a ballistic missile due to only convection is analysed taking into consideration the effects of gravity. The amount of heat transferred to the wetted area and to the nose region has been separately determined, unlike A Miele's treatise without consideration of gravity. The peak heating ratesto the ...

  12. Aerodynamic heating of ballistic missile including the effects of gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The aerodynamic heating of a ballistic missile due to only convection is analysed taking into consideration the effects of gravity. The amount of heat transferred to the wetted area and to the nose region has been separately determined, unlike A Miele's treatise without consideration of gravity. The peak heating rates ...

  13. Aerodynamic heating of ballistic missile including the effects of gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/sadh/025/05/0463-0473. Keywords. Aerodynamic heating; ballistic missile; gravity; flat-earth. Abstract. The aerodynamic heating of a ballistic missile due to only convection is analysed taking into consideration the effects of gravity. The amount of heat transferred to the wetted area and to the ...

  14. A thermal lens model including the Soret effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera, Humberto; Sira, Eloy; Rahn, Kareem; Garcia-Sucre, Maximo

    2009-01-01

    In this letter we generalize the thermal lens model to account for the Soret effect in binary liquid mixtures. This formalism permits the precise determination of the Soret coefficient in a steady-state situation. The theory is experimentally verified using the measured values in the ethanol/water mixtures. The time evolution of the Soret signal has been used to derive mass-diffusion times from which mass-diffusion coefficients were calculated. (Author)

  15. Aeroelastic modal dynamics of wind turbines including anisotropic effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoldan, Peter Fisker

    and the computationally efficient implicit Floquet analysis in anisotropic conditions. The tool is validated against system identifications with the partial Floquet method on the nonlinear BHawC model of a 2.3 MW wind turbine. System identification results show that nonlinear effects on the 2.3 MW turbine in most cases....... These harmonics appear in calculated frequency responses of the turbine. Extreme wind shear changes the modal damping when the flow is separated due to an interaction between the periodic mode shape and the local aerodynamic damping influenced by a periodic variation in angle of attack....

  16. Dynamic hysteresis modeling including skin effect using diffusion equation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Souad, E-mail: souadhamada@yahoo.fr [LSP-IE: Research Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Batna, 05000 Batna (Algeria); Louai, Fatima Zohra, E-mail: fz_louai@yahoo.com [LSP-IE: Research Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Batna, 05000 Batna (Algeria); Nait-Said, Nasreddine, E-mail: n_naitsaid@yahoo.com [LSP-IE: Research Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Batna, 05000 Batna (Algeria); Benabou, Abdelkader, E-mail: Abdelkader.Benabou@univ-lille1.fr [L2EP, Université de Lille1, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2016-07-15

    An improved dynamic hysteresis model is proposed for the prediction of hysteresis loop of electrical steel up to mean frequencies, taking into account the skin effect. In previous works, the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for low frequency (DELF) was coupled with the inverse static Jiles-Atherton (JA) model in order to represent the hysteresis behavior for a lamination. In the present paper, this approach is improved to ensure the reproducibility of measured hysteresis loops at mean frequency. The results of simulation are compared with the experimental ones. The selected results for frequencies 50 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz and 400 Hz are presented and discussed.

  17. The combined effect of smoking and radon - additive or multiplicative?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasek, L.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the work is to evaluate the risk of lung cancer when combined radon and smoking exposure. Methodologically the evaluation is based on case and control study nested in two cohort studies, including 11,000 miners and 12,000 residents exposed to high concentrations of radon in homes. Radon exposure in individuals is complemented by information on smoking gained personally from them or from their relatives. The study is based on 1,073 cases of lung cancer among miners and 372 cases in population study. Control subjects were randomly selected in each study based on gender, year of birth and age achieved. The combined effect of smoking and radon is evaluated using the so-called geometric mixed models, whose special case is an additive or multiplicative model. The resulting model of the risk is closer to additive interaction (parameter of mixed model 0.2). The consequences of the model in the study of population are illustrated by estimates of lifetime risk in a hypothetical population of smokers and nonsmokers. Compared to the multiplicative risk model, the lifetime risk significantly increased according to the best geometric mixed model, especially in the population of non-smokers. (author)

  18. Effect of salt additives on concrete degradation : interim report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Many chemical additives designed to inhibit the corrosive effect of salt on rebars are being marketed. Their effect on Portland Cement Concrete is neither known nor understood. This study is an attempt to determine if there is an effect and to unders...

  19. Effect of additives on CuO/Al nanothermite properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, V. V.; Kazutin, M. V.; Kozyrev, N. V.

    2017-10-01

    The effect of additives on CuO/Al nanothermite properties is reported. The incorporation of additives resulted in the decreased sensitivity. It had an adverse impact on gas dynamic characteristics of CuO/Al nanothermite, up to the loss of the unique capability of burning in narrow channels.

  20. Homogenization of long fiber reinforced composites including fiber bending effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2016-01-01

    of the reinforcing fibers is captured by higher order strain terms, resulting in an accurate representation of the micro-mechanical behavior of the composite. Numerical examples show that the accuracy of the proposed model is very close to a non-homogenized finite-element model with an explicit discretization......This paper presents a homogenization method, which accounts for intrinsic size effects related to the fiber diameter in long fiber reinforced composite materials with two independent constitutive models for the matrix and fiber materials. A new choice of internal kinematic variables allows...... to maintain the kinematics of the two material phases independent from the assumed constitutive models, so that stress-deformation relationships, can be expressed in the framework of hyper-elasticity and hyper-elastoplasticity for the fiber and the matrix materials respectively. The bending stiffness...

  1. Shunted Piezoelectric Vibration Damping Analysis Including Centrifugal Loading Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, James B.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Provenza, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive vibration of turbomachinery blades causes high cycle fatigue problems which require damping treatments to mitigate vibration levels. One method is the use of piezoelectric materials as passive or active dampers. Based on the technical challenges and requirements learned from previous turbomachinery rotor blades research, an effort has been made to investigate the effectiveness of a shunted piezoelectric for the turbomachinery rotor blades vibration control, specifically for a condition with centrifugal rotation. While ample research has been performed on the use of a piezoelectric material with electric circuits to attempt to control the structural vibration damping, very little study has been done regarding rotational effects. The present study attempts to fill this void. Specifically, the objectives of this study are: (a) to create and analyze finite element models for harmonic forced response vibration analysis coupled with shunted piezoelectric circuits for engine blade operational conditions, (b) to validate the experimental test approaches with numerical results and vice versa, and (c) to establish a numerical modeling capability for vibration control using shunted piezoelectric circuits under rotation. Study has focused on a resonant damping control using shunted piezoelectric patches on plate specimens. Tests and analyses were performed for both non-spinning and spinning conditions. The finite element (FE) shunted piezoelectric circuit damping simulations were performed using the ANSYS Multiphysics code for the resistive and inductive circuit piezoelectric simulations of both conditions. The FE results showed a good correlation with experimental test results. Tests and analyses of shunted piezoelectric damping control, demonstrating with plate specimens, show a great potential to reduce blade vibrations under centrifugal loading.

  2. Potential energy surface for ? dissociation including spin-orbit effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Matthew R.; Aquino, Adelia J. A.; de Jong, Wibe A.; Granucci, Giovanni; Hase, William L.

    2012-10-01

    Previous experiments [J. Phys. Chem. A 116, 2833 (2012)] have studied the dissociation of 1,2-diiodoethane radical cation ( ? ) and found a one-dimensional distribution of translational energy, an odd finding considering most product relative translational energy distributions are two-dimensional. The goal of this study is to obtain an accurate understanding of the potential energy surface (PES) topology for the unimolecular decomposition reaction ? → C2H4I+ + I•. This is done through comparison of many single-reference electronic structure methods, coupled-cluster single-point (energy) calculations, and multi-reference energy calculations used to quantify spin-orbit (SO) coupling effects. We find that the structure of the ? reactant has a substantial effect on the role of the SO coupling on the reaction energy. Both the BHandH and MP2 theories with an ECP/6-31++G** basis set, and without SO coupling corrections, provide accurate models for the reaction energetics. MP2 theory gives an unsymmetric structure with different C-I bond lengths, resulting in a SO energy for ? similar to that for the product I-atom and a negligible SO correction to the reaction energy. In contrast, DFT gives a symmetric structure for ? , similar to that of the neutral C2H4I2 parent, resulting in a substantial SO correction and increasing the reaction energy by 6.0-6.5 kcalmol-1. Also, we find that, for this system, coupled-cluster single-point energy calculations are inaccurate, since a small change in geometry can lead to a large change in energy.

  3. Effects of various additives on sintering of aluminum nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komeya, K.; Inoue, H.; Tsuge, A.

    1982-01-01

    Effects of thirty additives on sintering A/N were investigated. The addition of alkali earth oxides and rare earth oxides gave fully densified aluminum nitride. This is due to the formation of nitrogen-containing aluminate liquid in the system aluminum nitride-alkali earth oxides or rare earth oxides. Microstructural studies of the sintered specimens with the above two types of additives suggested that the densification was due to the liquid phase sintering. Additions of silicon compounds resulted in poor densification by the formation of highly refractory compounds such as A/N polytypes.

  4. Microscopic description of production cross sections including deexcitation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekizawa, Kazuyuki

    2017-07-01

    Background: At the forefront of the nuclear science, production of new neutron-rich isotopes is continuously pursued at accelerator laboratories all over the world. To explore the currently unknown territories in the nuclear chart far away from the stability, reliable theoretical predictions are inevitable. Purpose: To provide a reliable prediction of production cross sections taking into account secondary deexcitation processes, both particle evaporation and fission, a new method called TDHF+GEMINI is proposed, which combines the microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory with a sophisticated statistical compound-nucleus deexcitation model, GEMINI++. Methods: Low-energy heavy ion reactions are described based on three-dimensional Skyrme-TDHF calculations. Using the particle-number projection method, production probabilities, total angular momenta, and excitation energies of primary reaction products are extracted from the TDHF wave function after collision. Production cross sections for secondary reaction products are evaluated employing GEMINI++. Results are compared with available experimental data and widely used grazing calculations. Results: The method is applied to describe cross sections for multinucleon transfer processes in 40Ca+124Sn (Ec .m .≃128.54 MeV ), 48Ca+124Sn (Ec .m .≃125.44 MeV ), 40Ca+208Pb (Ec .m .≃208.84 MeV ), 58Ni+208Pb (Ec .m .≃256.79 MeV ), 64Ni+238U (Ec .m .≃307.35 MeV ), and 136Xe+198Pt (Ec .m .≃644.98 MeV ) reactions at energies close to the Coulomb barrier. It is shown that the inclusion of secondary deexcitation processes, which are dominated by neutron evaporation in the present systems, substantially improves agreement with the experimental data. The magnitude of the evaporation effects is very similar to the one observed in grazing calculations. TDHF+GEMINI provides better description of the absolute value of the cross sections for channels involving transfer of more than one proton, compared to the grazing

  5. Aeroelastic modal dynamics of wind turbines including anisotropic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisker Skjoldan, P.

    2011-03-15

    Several methods for aeroelastic modal analysis of a rotating wind turbine are developed and used to analyse the modal dynamics of two simplified models and a complex model in isotropic and anisotropic conditions. The Coleman transformation is used to enable extraction of the modal frequencies, damping, and periodic mode shapes of a rotating wind turbine by describing the rotor degrees of freedom in the inertial frame. This approach is valid only for an isotropic system. Anisotropic systems, e.g., with an unbalanced rotor or operating in wind shear, are treated with the general approaches of Floquet analysis or Hill's method which do not provide a unique reference frame for observing the modal frequency, to which any multiple of the rotor speed can be added. This indeterminacy is resolved by requiring that the periodic mode shape be as constant as possible in the inertial frame. The modal frequency is thus identified as the dominant frequency in the response of a pure excitation of the mode observed in the inertial frame. A modal analysis tool based directly on the complex aeroelastic wind turbine code BHawC is presented. It uses the Coleman approach in isotropic conditions and the computationally efficient implicit Floquet analysis in anisotropic conditions. The tool is validated against system identifications with the partial Floquet method on the nonlinear BHawC model of a 2.3 MW wind turbine. System identification results show that nonlinear effects on the 2.3 MW turbine in most cases are small, but indicate that the controller creates nonlinear damping. In isotropic conditions the periodic mode shape contains up to three harmonic components, but in anisotropic conditions it can contain an infinite number of harmonic components with frequencies that are multiples of the rotor speed. These harmonics appear in calculated frequency responses of the turbine. Extreme wind shear changes the modal damping when the flow is separated due to an interaction between

  6. Additive Main Effects and Multiplicative Interaction Analysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Additive main effects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI) analysis is a recently recommended effective method to study the genotype by environment (GxE) interaction pattern of multi-environment varietal trials. This work deals with modeling and examining the GxE interaction pattern of the multi-environment trials of 43 ...

  7. Direct and Maternal Additive Effects on Rabbit Growth and Linear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth and linear body measurements of rabbits which consisted of 17 ew Zealand White (ZW), 19 Chinchilla (CH), 29 ZW x CH and 33 CH x ZW kittens were compared. The aim of the experiment was to evaluate the crossbreeding effects (i.e direct and maternal additive effect) for growth (individual body weight, IBW) and ...

  8. Properties of wood-plastic composites: effect of inorganic additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakraji, E. H.; Salman, N.

    2003-01-01

    Wood-plastic composites from Syrian tree species (white poplar, cypress tree, and white willow) were prepared using gamma-ray irradiation. Dry wood was impregnated with acrylamide or butylmethacrylate at various methanol compositions as the swelling solvent. Effect of inorganic additives and co-additives such as lithium nitrate (LiNO 3 ), copper sulfate (CuSO 4 ) and sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ), used at a very low concentration (1%), on the polymer loading (PL) and the compression strength (CS) was also investigated. It has been found that all the additives and co-additives, except Cu 2+ , increase the PL values and only Li + has a positive effect on CS. (Author)

  9. Properties of wood-plastic composites: effect of inorganic additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakraji, Elias Hanna; Salman, Numan

    2003-01-01

    Wood-plastic composites from Syrian tree species (white poplar, cypress tree, and white willow) were prepared using gamma-ray irradiation. Dry wood was impregnated with acrylamide or butylmethacrylate at various methanol compositions as the swelling solvent. Effect of inorganic additives and co-additives such as lithium nitrate (LiNO 3 ), copper sulfate (CuSO 4 ) and sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ), used at a very low concentration (1%), on the polymer loading (PL) and the compression strength (CS) was also investigated. It has been found that all the additives and co-additives, except Cu 2+ , increase the PL values and only Li + has a positive effect on CS

  10. Promotional effects of new types of additives on fat crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Shinichi; Kida, Haruyasu; Sato, Kiyotaka

    2014-01-01

    We examined the promotional effects of additives on fat crystallization, such as inorganic (talc, carbon nanotube (CNT), and graphite) and organic (theobromine, ellagic acid dihydrate (EAD), and terephthalic acid) materials. The triacylglycerols (TAGs) of trilauroylglycerol (LLL), trimyristoylglycerol (MMM), and tripalmitoylglycerol (PPP) were employed as the fats. The additives (1 wt%) were added to the molten TAGs, and then the mixtures were cooled at a rate of 1°C/min followed by heating at a rate of 5°C/min. The crystallization and melting properties were observed using differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and polarized optical microscope (POM). Consequently, we found that the above six additives remarkably increased the initial temperatures of crystallization (Ti) on cooling without changing the melting temperatures. For example, in the case of LLL, the increases in Ti were 2.6°C (talc), 3.9°C (CNT), 8.1°C (graphite), 1.1°C (theobromine), 2.0°C (EAD), and 6.8°C (terephthalic acid). Very similar effects were observed for the crystallization of MMM and PPP with the six additives. Furthermore, the polymorphs of the first occurring crystals were changed from metastable to more stable forms by many of these additives. The POM observation revealed that the crystallization was initiated at the surfaces of additive particles. This study has shown for the first time that the heterogeneous nucleation of fat crystals can be greatly promoted by new types of additives. Such additives have great potential to promote fat crystallization by not only hydrophobic but also hydrophilic molecular interactions between the fats and additives.

  11. Effects of additives on glyphosate activity in purple nutsedge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rungsit Suwanketnikom

    1998-01-01

    Effects of additives on 14 C-glyphosate penetration into purple nutsedge leaves were examined in the laboratory and efficacy of glyphosate for purple nutsedge control was studied in the greenhouse and field. The addition of (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 at 1.0% (v/v) + diesel oil at 1,0% (v/v) + Tendal at 1.0% (v/v) increased 14 C-glyphosate penetration into nutsedge leaves more than the addition of either one alone. (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 at 1.0% + diesel oil at 1.0% + Tendal at 0.12 or 0.25% increased the phytotoxicity of glyphosate at 0.5 and 0.75 kg, a.e./ha on nutsedge plants in the greenhouse but not in the field. Additives did not enhance glyphosate activity by reducing the number of nutsedae tubers. (author)

  12. Effect Of Formulating Additives On The Properties Of Ibuprofen Tablets

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of the comparative effects of different formulating additives and film coating on the properties of ibuprofen tablets was made. The tested properties were hardeness (H), friability (F), the disintegration time (D) and dissolution characteristics of ibuprofen tablets. The hardeness, friability, the hardeness friability ratio ...

  13. Additive Effects of Rhizophora Racemose (Red Mangrove) On Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was carried out at the Teaching and Research Farm of Rivers State University of Science and Technology, Port Harcourt to determine the additive effect of pulverized Rhizophora racemosa (Red Mangrove) leaves on the hematology and bursa of Fabricus of broilers. Sixty (60) day-old, Anak broiler chicks ...

  14. Effect of micronized zeolite addition to lamb concentrate feeds on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of micronized zeolite addition to lamb concentrate feeds on growth performance and some blood chemistry and metabolites. ... No differences were observed between the groups in terms of blood urea nitrogen, plasma glucose, serum creatinine, triglyceride, sodium, potassium and chlorine concentration. However ...

  15. Effect of fluoride additives on production and characterization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Temperature reduction of -Al2O3 formation has been achieved by introducing fluoride in the alumina precursor. The effects of ZnF2 additive and milling on the phase transformation as well as micrograph of the prepared -Al2O3 particles were investigated. The samples were characterized by different techniques such as ...

  16. Effect of fluoride additives on production and characterization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of fluoride additives on production and characterization of nano-α-Al2O3 particles. F MIRJALILI. Department of Material Engineering, Maybod Branch, Islamic Azad University, Maybod 89156–75164, Iran. MS received 1 December 2013; revised 30 January 2014. Abstract. Nano-α-Al2O3 particles were synthesized by ...

  17. Effect of aluminum addition on electrical properties, dielectric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of aluminum addition on electrical properties, dielectric characteristics, and its stability of (Pr, Co, Cr, Y)-added zinc oxide-based varistors. Choon-W Nahm. Electrical Properties Volume 33 Issue 3 June 2010 pp 239-245 ... Department of Electrical Engineering, Dongeui University, Busan 614-714, Republic of Korea ...

  18. Experimental analysis on the effect of addition of Rhizoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of addition of Rhizoma gastrodiae on mycelia and exopolysaccharide production by submerged culture of Grifola frondosa was investigated. About 7% (v/v) of R. gastrodiae extract was added to the basal medium used for its biomass and exopolysaccharide productions. The biomass and exopolysaccharide ...

  19. Effects of various additives to enhance growth performance, blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of various additives to enhance growth performance, blood profiles, and reduce malodour emissions in growing pigs. W.G. Kwak, I.H. Park, W Yun, J.H. Lee, C.H. Lee, S.Y. Oh, H.J. Oh, Shudong Liu, Y.H. Kim, J.C. Park, G.S. Kim, J.H. Cho ...

  20. Effects of water and sawdust additives on thermal effusivity, thermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of water and sawdust additives on the thermal effusivity (e), thermal conductivity (λ), and durability of cement-stabilized laterites were investigated. The thermal effusivity (e) and conductivity(λ) have direct influ-ence on heat transfer and thermal insulation in buildings, and the parameters were determined by hot ...

  1. Effects of sulphur addition on modification and mechanical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of sulphur addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of sand cast Al-12wt%Si alloy have been investigated in this study. For this purpose, different amounts of sulphur were added to Al-12wt%Si alloy in an induction furnace to produce sand castings for micro-structural and mechanical properties ...

  2. The effect of one additional driver mutation on tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Johannes G; Bozic, Ivana; Allen, Benjamin; Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Nowak, Martin A

    2013-01-01

    Tumor growth is caused by the acquisition of driver mutations, which enhance the net reproductive rate of cells. Driver mutations may increase cell division, reduce cell death, or allow cells to overcome density-limiting effects. We study the dynamics of tumor growth as one additional driver mutation is acquired. Our models are based on two-type branching processes that terminate in either tumor disappearance or tumor detection. In our first model, both cell types grow exponentially, with a faster rate for cells carrying the additional driver. We find that the additional driver mutation does not affect the survival probability of the lesion, but can substantially reduce the time to reach the detectable size if the lesion is slow growing. In our second model, cells lacking the additional driver cannot exceed a fixed carrying capacity, due to density limitations. In this case, the time to detection depends strongly on this carrying capacity. Our model provides a quantitative framework for studying tumor dynamics during different stages of progression. We observe that early, small lesions need additional drivers, while late stage metastases are only marginally affected by them. These results help to explain why additional driver mutations are typically not detected in fast-growing metastases. PMID:23396615

  3. Effects of additional nanosilica of compressive strength on mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retno Setiati, N.

    2017-07-01

    The use of nanosilica as one of the innovations in concrete technology has developed very rapidly. Some research mentioned that nanosilica obtained from the synthesis process silica sand is a type of material that is as pozolan when added to the concrete mix, so as to accelerate the hydration process in concrete. With the addition of nanosilica into the concrete mix, the compressive strength of the concrete can be increased and it has a high durability. This study aims to determine the effect from the addition of nanosilica on mechanical properties of concrete. Laboratory testing is conducted by making the mortar test specimen size of 50 mm x 50 mm x 50 mm. The material used is composed of silica sand, nanosilica, gravel, superplasticizer, cement, and water. Nanosilica percentage amount is added as much as 5, 10, and 15% by weight of cement. Testing of mechanical properties such as compressive strength mortar done at age 3, 7, 14, and 28 days. Based on the analysis and discussion obtained that at 28 days, mortar with the addition of 5% and 15% nanosilica has the compressive strength of 23 MPa. Addition nanosilika into the mortar to improve the mechanical properties by increasing the compressive strength of mortar. The compressive strength of mortar with the addition of 10% nanosilica is 19 MPa. The increase in compressive strength of mortar with the addition of 5% and 15% nano silica is 21% larger than the mortar with the addition of 10% nanosilica and without nanosilica. Nanosilica addition of more than 10% can cause agglomeration when mixed into the mortar so that the impact on the compressive strength of mortar.

  4. Effect of trehalose addition on volatiles responsible for strawberry aroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopjar, Mirela; Hribar, Janez; Simcic, Marjan; Zlatić, Emil; Pozrl, Tomaz; Pilizota, Vlasta

    2013-12-01

    Aroma is one of the most important quality properties of food products and has a great influence on quality and acceptability of foods. Since it is very difficult to control, in this study the effect of addition of trehalose (3, 5 and 10%) to freeze-dried strawberry cream fillings was investigated as a possible means for retention of some of the aroma compounds responsible for the strawberry aroma. In samples with added trehalose, higher amounts of fruity esters were determined. Increase of trehalose content did not cause a proportional increase in the amount of fruity esters. However, results of our research showed that trehalose addition did not have the same effect on both gamma-decalactone and furaneol.

  5. Effect of additives on densification and deformation of tetragonal zirconia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutz, M.M.R.; Boutz, M.M.R.; Winnubst, Aloysius J.A.; Hartgers, F.; Burggraaf, A.J.; Burggraaf, Anthonie

    1994-01-01

    The effect of additives (Bi2O3, Fe2O3) on densification and creep rates of tetragonal ZrO2-Y2O3 has been investigated. In Bi2O3-doped Y-TZP, a reactive liquid forms at temperatures above 800–900DaggerC, which leads to a strong enhancement of densification for concentrations of 1–2 mol % Bi2O3.

  6. Transformation of brushite to hydroxyapatite and effects of alginate additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Seniz; Bjørnøy, Sindre H.; Bassett, David C.; Strand, Berit L.; Sikorski, Pawel; Andreassen, Jens-Petter

    2017-06-01

    Phase transformations are important processes during mineral formation in both in vivo and in vitro model systems and macromolecules are influential in regulating the mineralization processes. Calcium phosphate mineralized alginate hydrogels are potential candidates for hard tissue engineering applications and transformation of the resorbable calcium phosphate phases to apatitic bone mineral in vivo enhances the success of these composite materials. Here, the transformation of brushite to hydroxyapatite (HA) and the effects of alginate additives on this process are studied by the investigation of supersaturation profiles with HA-seeded and unseeded experiments. This experimental design allows for detailed kinetic interpretation of the transformation reactions and deduction of information on the nucleation stage of HA by evaluating the results of seeded and unseeded experiments together. In the experimental conditions of this work, transformation was controlled by HA growth until the point of near complete brushite dissolution where the growth and dissolution rates were balanced. The presence of alginate additives at low concentration were not highly influential on transformation rates during the growth dominated region but their retardant effect became more pronounced as the dissolution and growth rates reached an equilibrium where both reactions were effective on transformation kinetics. Decoupling of seeded and unseeded transformation experiments suggested that alginate additives retard HA nucleation and this was most evident in the presence of G-block oligomers.

  7. Effect of Urea Addition on Soda Pulping of Oak Wood

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Nam-Seok; Matsumoto, Yuji; Cho, Hee-Yeon; Shin, Soo-Jeong; Oga, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted to find a sulfur-free additive for alkaline pulping liquors that would have an effect similar to that of sulfide in kraft pulping. Some reagents that partially fulfill this role have been found, but they are too expensive to be used in the quantities required to make them effective. As an alternative method to solve air pollution problem and difficulty of pulp bleaching of kraft pulping process, NaOH-Urea pulping was applied. The properties of NaOH-Urea pul...

  8. Effect of Additives on the Selectivity and Reactivity of Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yi-Ru; Wu, Qi; Lin, Xian-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Enzymes have been widely used as efficient, eco-friendly, and biodegradable catalysts in organic chemistry due to their mild reaction conditions and high selectivity and efficiency. In recent years, the catalytic promiscuity of many enzymes in unnatural reactions has been revealed and studied by chemists and biochemists, which has expanded the application potential of enzymes. To enhance the selectivity and activity of enzymes in their natural or promiscuous reactions, many methods have been recommended, such as protein engineering, process engineering, and media engineering. Among them, the additive approach is very attractive because of its simplicity to use and high efficiency. In this paper, we will review the recent developments about the applications of additives to improve the catalytic performances of enzymes in their natural and promiscuous reactions. These additives include water, organic bases, water mimics, cosolvents, crown ethers, salts, surfactants, and some particular molecular additives. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Effects of small ionic amphiphilic additives on reverse microemulsion morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzopoulos, Marios Hopkins; James, Craig; Rogers, Sarah; Grillo, Isabelle; Dowding, Peter J; Eastoe, Julian

    2014-05-01

    Initial studies (Hopkins Hatzopoulos et al. (2013)) have shown that ionic hydrotropic additives can drive a sphere-to-cylinder (ellipsoid) transition in water-in-oil (w/o) microemulsions stabilized by the anionic surfactant Aerosol-OT; however the origins of this behaviour remained unclear. Here systematic effects of chemical structure are explored with a new set of hydrotropes, in terms of an aromatic versus a saturated cyclic hydrophobic group, and linear chain length of alkyl carboxylates. It is proposed that hydrotrope-induced microemulsion sphere-to-cylinder (ellipsoid) transitions are linked to additive hydrophobicity, and so a correlation between the bulk aqueous phase critical aggregation concentration (cac) and perturbation of microemulsion structure is expected. Water-in-oil microemulsions were formulated as a function of water content w (= [water]/[AOT]) and concentration of different hydrotropes, being either cyclic (sodium benzoate or sodium cyclohexanoate), or linear chain systems (sodium hexanoate, sodium heptanoate and sodium octanoate). Phase behaviour studies were performed as a function of w, additive type and temperature at total surfactant concentration [ST]=0.10M and constant mole fraction x=0.10 (x=[hydrotrope]/[ST]). Microemulsion domain structures were investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), and these data were fitted by structural models to yield information on the shapes (spheres, ellipsoids or cylinders) and sizes of the nanodroplets. Under the conditions of study hydrotrope chemical structure has a significant effect on microemulsion structure: sodium cyclohexanoate does not induce the formation of cylindrical/ellipsoidal nanodroplets, whereas the aromatic analogue sodium benzoate does. Furthermore, the short chain sodium hexanoate does not cause anisotropic microemulsions, but the more hydrophobic longer chain heptanoate and octanoate analogues do induce sphere-to-ellipsoid transitions. This study shows that underlying

  10. Additive effects of acetic acid upon hydrothermal reaction of amylopectin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugano, Motoyuki; Katoh, Harumi; Komatsu, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Okado, Kohta; Kakuta, Yusuke; Hirano, Katsumi

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that over 0.8 kg kg −1 of starch is consisted of amylopectin (AP). In this study, production of glucose for raw material of ethanol by hydrothermal reaction of AP as one of the model compound of food is discussed. Further, additive effects of acetic acid upon hydrothermal reactions of AP are also investigated. During hydrothermal reaction of AP, production of glucose occurred above 453 K, and the glucose yield increased to 0.48 kg kg −1 at 473 K. Upon hydrothermal reaction of AP at 473 K, prolongation of the holding time was not effective for the increase of the glucose yield. Upon hydrothermal reaction of AP at 473 K for 0 s, the glucose yield increased significantly by addition between 0.26 mol L −1 and 0.52 mol L −1 of acetic acid. However, the glucose yield decreased and the yield of the other constituents increased with the increases of concentration of acetic acid from 0.65 mol L −1 to 3.33 mol L −1 . It was considered that hydrolysis of AP to yield glucose was enhanced due to the increase of the amount of proton derived from acetic acid during hydrothermal reaction with 0.52 mol L −1 of acetic acid. -- Highlights: ► Glucose production by hydrothermal reaction of amylopectin (AP) at 473 K. ► Glucose yield increased to 0.48 kg kg -1 at 473 K. ► Prolongation of holding time was not effective for glucose yield. ► Glucose yield increased significantly by acetic acid (0.26–0.52 mol L-1) addition. ► Hydrolysis of AP to glucose was enhanced due to increase of proton from acetic acid.

  11. Priming effects in Haplic Luvisol after different substrate additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolova, I.; Blagodatskaya, E.; Blagodatsky, S.; Kuzyakov, Y.

    2009-04-01

    Although soils contain considerable amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC), most of it is not easily available for microorganisms. Addition of various substrates to soil (for example, plant residues, root exudates) may affect SOC mineralization. The addition of mineral nutrients, especially N, may also affect C turnover and so change the mineralization rate of SOC. Such short-term changes in mineralization of organic substance of soil were termed as "priming-effects" (Bingemann et al., 1953). Priming effect leads to additional mineralization of SOC (van Elsas and van Overbeek, 1993). It has been shown that not only plant residues induce priming effects (Sauerbeck, 1966; Stemmer et al., 1999; Bell et al., 2003), but also easily available substrates such as sugars or amino acids, which are present in soil solutions and root exudates (Vasconcellos, 1994; Shen and Bartha, 1997; Hamer and Marschner, 2002). Since easily available substrates may not only accelerate SOC mineralization, but also may retard it, Kuzyakov et al. (2000) differentiated between positive and negative priming effects. It is not clear until now, how long priming effects persists in soil after substrate addition, and if they are induced every time when a substrate becomes available in soil. So, the aim of this study was to evaluate effects of glucose and plant residues on SOM decomposition, and influence of glucose on plant residues decomposition in soil. The experimental layout was designed as two factor experiment: 1) plant residues and 2) available substrate amendment. Maize shoot residues (50 mg added to 5 g soil) were 14C labeled (9•104 DPM per 5 g soil). Soil without of any plant residues served as a control for this treatment. Two levels of D (+) glucose as easily available substrates were added after three months of pre-incubation of soil samples with maize residues: 0.009 mg glucose C g-1 soil and 0.225 mg glucose C g-1 soil. The glucose was uniformly labelled with 14C (2.37•104 DPM per 5

  12. Stability of additive treatment effects in multiple treatment comparison meta-analysis: a simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mills E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Kristian Thorlund1, Edward Mills1,21Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, 2Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, CanadaBackground: Many medical interventions are administered in the form of treatment combinations involving two or more individual drugs (eg, drug A + drug B. When the individual drugs and drug combinations have been compared in a number of randomized clinical trials, it is possible to quantify the comparative effectiveness of all drugs simultaneously in a multiple treatment comparison (MTC meta-analysis. However, current MTC models ignore the dependence between drug combinations (eg, A + B and the individual drugs that are part of the combination. In particular, current models ignore the possibility that drug effects may be additive, ie, the property that the effect of A and B combined is equal to the sum of the individual effects of A and B. Current MTC models may thus be suboptimal for analyzing data including drug combinations when their effects are additive or approximately additive. However, the extent to which the additivity assumption can be violated before the conventional model becomes the more optimal approach is unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the comparative statistical performance of the conventional MTC model and the additive effects MTC model in MTC scenarios where additivity holds true, is mildly violated, or is strongly violated.Methods: We simulated MTC scenarios in which additivity held true, was mildly violated, or was strongly violated. For each scenario we simulated 500 MTC data sets and applied the conventional and additive effects MTC models in a Bayesian framework. Under each scenario we estimated the proportion of treatment effect estimates that were 20% larger than ‘the truth' (ie, % overestimates, the proportion that were 20% smaller than ‘the truth' (ie, % underestimates,The coverage of the 95% credible

  13. PREDATOR IDENTITY AND ADDITIVE EFFECTS IN A TREEHOLE COMMUNITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Marcus W.; Lounibos, L. Philip

    2007-01-01

    Multiple predator species can interact as well as strongly affect lower trophic levels, resulting in complex, nonadditive effects on prey populations and community structure. Studies of aquatic systems have shown that interactive effects of predators on prey are not necessarily predictable from the direct effects of each species alone. To test for complex interactions, the individual and combined effects of a top and intermediate predator on larvae of native and invasive mosquito prey were examined in artificial analogues of water-filled treeholes. The combined effects of the two predators were accurately predicted from single predator treatments by a multiplicative risk model, indicating additivity. Overall survivorship of both prey species decreased greatly in the presence of the top predator Toxorhynchites rutilus. By itself, the intermediate predator Corethrella appendiculata increased survivorship of the native prey species Ochlerotatus triseriatus and decreased survivorship of the invasive prey species Aedes albopictus relative to treatments without predators. Intraguild predation did not occur until alternative prey numbers had been reduced by approximately one-half. Owing to changes in size structure accompanying its growth, T. rutilus consumed more prey as time progressed, whereas C. appendiculata consumed less. The intermediate predator, C. appendiculata, changed species composition by preferentially consuming A. albopictus, while the top predator, T. rutilus, reduced prey density, regardless of species. Although species interactions were in most cases predicted from pairwise interactions, risk reduction from predator interference occurred when C. appendiculata densities were increased and when the predators were similarly sized. PMID:16676542

  14. The influence of oil additives on the effectiveness of herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Chwedoruk

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The possibility to decrease herbicide doses without reducing their weed controlling effectiveness was investigated in two microplots and one field experiment. The following herbicides were used: atrazine, mixture of atrazine with terbutrine, MCPA + MCPP, MCPA + dikamba, desmedipham and phenmedipham (Betanal 31, 32 or 37. They were combined with one or several of the following adjuvants: parafinic oil, refuse product of rape oil rafination, oil mixture from the Institute of Organic Chemistry Industry (IPO-Warsaw, surfactant Rokafenol N-1O, mineral oil Nr 8 (Aviol. It was shown that the doses of herbicides could be lowered by 30-50% without loosing their phytotoxic effect on weeds due to addition of adjuvants. The mineral oil 8 was very active in a mixture with Betanal 37 and was completly non toxic toward sugar beets. The oil mixture from IPO and Rokafenol N-10 were very active in mixtures with atrazine or atraizine with terbutrine.

  15. EFFECT OF THE HERBAL ADDITIVE "YUCCA" ON RABBIT SPERMATOZOA CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Baláži

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to evaluate the effect of the plant additive “Yucca” on rabbit spermatozoa characteristics. Rabbit males of New Zealand White line were used in the experiments. Males in control group were fed with commercially available normal granular feed. In experimental group (E1 5 g of plant Yucca shidigera was added to the 100 kg of the normal feed. In the second experimental group (E2 20 g of Yucca shidigera was added to 100 kg of the normal feed. The males were fed from weaning until they reached the sexual maturity. Semen samples from 5 New Zealand White (NZW rabbit males in each group were collected using an artificial vagina and evaluated using the CASA system for concentration and motility. The males in E2 group had significantly higher sperm motility in comparison with the control group (91.54±1.84% vs. 74.08±5.97%. The males in E1 and E2 group had significantly higher progressive motility in comparison with the control group (72.56±4.75% and 82.84±2.55% vs. 53.98±6.49%, respectively. This preliminary study suggests that the addition of Yucca shidigera plant into the normal feed had positive effects on male’s spermatozoa parameters.

  16. Physiological effects of some synthetic food colouring additives on rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboel-Zahab, H; el-Khyat, Z; Sidhom, G; Awadallah, R; Abdel-al, W; Mahdy, K

    1997-11-01

    Three different synthetic chocolate colourant agents (A, B and C) were administered to healthy adult male albino rats for 30 and 60 day periods to evaluate their effects on body weight, blood picture, liver and kidney functions, blood glucose, serum and liver lipids, liver nucleic acids (DNA and RNA), thyroid hormones (T3 and T4) and growth hormone. In addition, histopathological examinations of liver, kidney and stomach sections were studied. These parameters were also investigated 30 days after colourant stoppage (post effect). Ingestion of colourant C (brown HT and indigocarmine) significantly decreased rat body weight, serum cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol fraction, while, T4 hormone, liver RNA content, liver enzymes (S. GOT, S. GPT and alkaline phosphatase), total protein and globulin fractions were significantly elevated. Significant increases were observed in serum total lipids, cholesterol, triglycerides, total protein, globulin and serum transaminases in rats whose diets were supplemented with chocolate colours A and B (sunset yellow, tartrazine, carmoisine and brilliant blue in varying concentrations). Haematological investigations demonstrated selective neutropenia and lymphocytosis with no significant alterations of total white blood cell counts in all rat groups, while haemoglobin concentrations and red blood cell counts were significantly decreased in the rats who were administered food additives A and B. Eosinophilia was noted in rats fed on colourant A only. No changes were recorded for blood glucose, growth hormone and kidney function tests. Histopathological studies showed brown pigment deposition in the portal tracts and Van Küpffer cells of the liver as well as in the interstitial tissue and renal tubular cells of the kidney mainly induced by colourant A. Congested blood vessels and areas of haemorrhage in both liver and renal sections were revealed in those rats who were given colourants B and C. There were no-untoward-effects recorded in the

  17. Effect of Chemical Additives in Sump on Boric Acid Solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Hu; Kim, Young Soo; No, Hee Cheon

    2007-01-01

    Boric acid precipitation, which happens in the pressurized water reactor core during post-LOCA long-term cooling period, could adhere to fuel rod surfaces and, as a result, block the fuel assembly cooling channels. Deposition of boric acid and other impurities on the fuel rods will increase thermal resistance, and then induce fuel temperature to exceed its safety limit, finally causes reactor core damage or meltdown. Therefore, recently, the boric acid precipitation issue was raised by NRC when nuclear power plants in USA, for example, Waterford EPU, applied for power uprate licenses. NRC highlighted boric acid precipitation as a generic issue due to non-conservatism in vendor's model in 2005. Also the Westinghouse Owners Group held meetings to discuss the methodology to avoid boric acid precipitation in the current PWR nuclear power plants. Until now there is no database for evaluating the properties of a boric acid-water mixture, together with chemical additives, such as Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH), Tri-sodium Phosphate (Na 3 PO 4 ) and fiberglass, being added from the containment sump, when the concentration is close to the solubility limit. Therefore, this study investigated boric acid solubility when boric acid is mixed with NaOH, Na 3 PO 4 and other chemical additives. Another purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between boric acid solubility and the effects of chemical additives, boric acid volatility, boiling phenomenon, etc. The empirical equation of boric acid solubility in the mixture solution is deduced from experiment results and chemical dynamics theories

  18. Effects of Ti addition on LFZ Bi-2212 thin rods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angurel, L. A.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to reproduce previous results in Bi-2212 single crystals, the effects associated with the addition of Ti to the precursors of Laser Floating Zone textured Bi-2212 thin rods have been analyzed. It has been found that Ti induces a great number of nucleation centers in the molten zone and, in consequence, it reduces the grain size one order of magnitude. In addition, using the same growth conditions, the texture of the sample is strongly degraded. These microstructural changes strongly affect the superconducting properties showing that Ti addition destroys the network of low angle grain boundaries that are responsible for the high critical currents in these materials.

    Se ha analizado el efecto de la introducción de Ti en precursores de Bi-2212 para ser texturados mediante láser a través del método de zona flotante, todo ello debido a los resultados esperanzadores obtenidos en monocristales. Se ha encontrado que el Ti introduce un gran número de centros de nucleación en la zona fundida, por lo que se reducen las dimensiones de los granos en un orden de magnitud aproximadamente. Por otra parte, y utilizando las mismas condiciones de crecimiento, se observa que la textura de la muestra se degrada severamente, Estos cambios microestructurales afectan en gran medida a las propiedades superconductoras, demostrándose que la introducción de Ti destruye la red de fronteras de grano de bajo ángulo, que son las responsables en estos materiales de las altas corrientes criticas.

  19. Mortar cohesión. The effect of additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro, J. H.

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was concerned with the hydration of clinker compounds in the presence of different additives; it appeared that accelerating additives, such as calcium chloride and silicic acid, produce longer fibers of tobermorite, whereas inhibitors, such as sugar, produce shorter fibers of tobermorite. This same effect was observed in the hydration of anhydrite, in which large crystals of gypsum were produced in the presence of sodium sulphate. So the cohesion in mortars of cement and anhydrite is explained in terms of the role of fibers.Se estudia la hidratación del clínker en presencia de diferentes aditivos encontrándose que los aceleradores, como el cloruro cálcico y el ácido salicílico, producen tobermorita de fibra larga y los inhibidores, como el azúcar, tobermorita de fibra corta. Este mismo efecto se encuentra en la anhidrita, produciéndose cristales de yeso largo, en presencia del sulfato de sodio, y cristales cortos en ausencia del catalizador. La cohesión de un mortero depende luego del largo de sus fibras. Así la cohesión de los morteros de cemento y anhidrita se explican en función del rol de la fibra.

  20. Dolomite addition effects on the thermal expansion of ceramic tiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, Luis Fernando Bruno; Boschi, Anselmo Ortega

    1997-01-01

    The thermal expansion of ceramic tiles is of greater importance in engineering applications because the ceramics are relatively brittle and cannot tolerate large internal strain imposed by thermal expansion. When ceramic bodies are produced for glazed ties the compatibility of this property of the components should be considered to avoid damage in the final products. Carbonates are an important constituent of ceramic wall-title bodies and its presence in formulations and the reactions that occur between them and other components modify body properties. The influence in expansivity by additions of calcium magnesium carbonate in a composition of wall tile bodies has been investigated. The relative content of mineralogical components was determined by X-ray diffraction and thermal expansion by dilatometric measurements. The results was indicated that with the effect of calcium-magnesium phases and porosity on thermal expansion of wall tile bodies. (author)

  1. Effect of Additives on the Physicochemical and Drug Release ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To prepare and evaluate spherical agglomerates of pioglitazone hydrochloride (PGH) for direct compression with different additives. Method: Spherical agglomerates of pioglitazone hydrochloride were prepared by emulsion solvent diffusion method with and without additives (polyethylene glycol 6000, polyvinyl ...

  2. No additive effect of cannabis on cognition in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Brian D; Dragovic, Milan; Badcock, Johanna C; Morgan, Vera A; Castle, David; Jablensky, Assen; Stefanis, Nikos C

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to examine the association between lifetime cannabis use and estimates of both premorbid and current cognitive function in psychotic disorders in an Australian cohort. In an Australian multicenter cohort, 1237 participants with an established ICD-10 diagnosis of psychotic disorder were categorised according to history of lifetime cannabis use (non-users, n=354; cannabis users, n=221; cannabis dependency, n=662). Groups were analyzed according to available indices of cognitive ability: the National Adult Reading Test - Revised (NART-R) for ability prior to illness onset; and the Digit Symbol Coding Test (DSCT) for current ability. Two-way analysis of variance was conducted without any covariate, followed by a two-way analysis of covariance (using age, age at onset of psychiatric illness, premorbid IQ and the Socio-Economic Index for Areas (SEIFA) rankings). Whilst there appeared to be a significant association between cannabis use and mean DSCT (higher DSCT scores in cannabis using groups) F(2,1080)=9.478, pcannabis use and cognitive function in psychotic disorders. Taken together, it would appear that cannabis use or dependence has no additive effect on cognitive dysfunction in these disorders. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Transient Response Dynamic Module Modifications to Include Static and Kinetic Friction Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misel, J. E.; Nenno, S. B.; Takahashi, D.

    1984-01-01

    A methodology that supports forced transient response dynamic solutions when both static and kinetic friction effects are included in a structural system model is described. Modifications that support this type of nonlinear transient response solution are summarized for the transient response dynamics (TRD) NASTRAN module. An overview of specific modifications for the NASTRAN processing subroutines, INITL, TRD1C, and TRD1D, are described with further details regarding inspection of nonlinear input definitions to define the type of nonlinear solution required, along with additional initialization requirements and specific calculation subroutines to successfully solve the transient response problem. The extension of the basic NASTRAN nonlinear methodology is presented through several stages of development to the point where constraint equations and residual flexibility effects are introduced into the finite difference Newmark-Beta recurrsion formulas. Particular emphasis is placed on cost effective solutions for large finite element models such as the Space Shuttle with friction degrees of freedom between the orbiter and payloads mounted in the cargo bay. An alteration to the dynamic finite difference equations of motion is discussed, which allows one to include friction effects at reasonable cost for large structural systems such as the Space Shuttle. Data are presented to indicate the possible impact of transient friction loads to the payload designer for the Space Shuttle. Transient response solution data are also included, which compare solutions without friction forces and those with friction forces for payloads mounted in the Space Shuttle cargo bay. These data indicate that payload components can be sensitive to friction induced loads.

  4. Additional therapeutic effect of balneotherapy in low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Murat; Sahin, Ozlem; Elden, Hasan; Hayta, Emrullah; Kaptanoglu, Ece

    2011-08-01

    Balneotherapy has been widely used for treatment of chronic low back pain recently. However there are only a few clinical controlled trials on balneotherapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of balneotherapy in patients with chronic low back pain. Sixty patients with lumbar spondylosis were included in the study. In Group 1, patients received both balneotherapy and physiotherapy and in Group 2, patients received only physiotherapy for three weeks. The intensity of the pain was evaluated by Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and functional disability was scored according to Revised Oswestry Index (ROI). Spinal mobility was assessed by the Schober and lateral flexion tests. Variables were evaluated before and after the three weeks of treatment. The groups were comparable regarding age (P = 0.970) and sex (P = 0.357). There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups for baseline VAS (P = 0.838), Schober test (P = 0.226), and right (P = 0.642) and left (P = 0.674) lateral flexion measurements, and ROI scores (P = 0.798). At the end of the therapy, all clinical parameters significantly improved in patients in both of the groups (P balneotherapy may be effective in the treatment of patients with chronic low back pain.

  5. Electrodeposition of Asphaltenes. 2. Effect of Resins and Additives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khvostichenko, Daria S; Andersen, Simon Ivar

    2010-01-01

    Electrodeposition of asphaltenes from oil/heptane, asphaltene/heptane, and asphaltene/heptane/additive mixtures has been investigated. Toluene, native petroleum resins, and a synthetic asphaltene dispersant, p-nonylphenol, were used as additives. The addition of these components led to partial...... of preparation of the mixture and the toluene content. Introduction of petroleum resins into asphaltene/heptane mixtures resulted in neutralization of the asphaltene particle charge. The addition of p-nonylphenol to asphaltene suspensions in heptane did not alter the charge of asphaltene particles. Current...

  6. Chemistry of Food Additives: Direct and Indirect Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, George H.

    1984-01-01

    The primary component(s), impurities, and degradation products of polysorbate 80, nitrate and nitrite salts, and diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) are discussed. Safety considerations related to these food additives are also noted. The chick-edema factor which results from an additive in poultry feed is also discussed. (JN)

  7. Additivity of Feature-based and Symmetry-based Grouping Effects in Multiple Object Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chundi eWang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Multiple object tracking (MOT is an attentional process wherein people track several moving targets among several distractors. Symmetry, an important indicator of regularity, is a general spatial pattern observed in natural and artificial scenes. According to the laws of perceptual organization proposed by Gestalt psychologists, regularity is a principle of perceptual grouping, such as similarity and closure. A great deal of research reported that feature-based similarity grouping (e.g., grouping based on color, size, or shape among targets in MOT tasks can improve tracking performance. However, no additive feature-based grouping effects have been reported where the tracking objects had two or more features. Additive effect refers to a greater grouping effect produced by grouping based on multiple cues instead of one cue. Can spatial symmetry produce a similar grouping effect similar to that of feature similarity in MOT tasks? Are the grouping effects based on symmetry and feature similarity additive? This study includes four experiments to address these questions. The results of Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated the automatic symmetry-based grouping effects. More importantly, an additive grouping effect of symmetry and feature similarity was observed in Experiments 3 and 4. Our findings indicate that symmetry can produce an enhanced grouping effect in MOT and facilitate the grouping effect based on color or shape similarity. The where and what pathways might have played an important role in the additive grouping effect.

  8. Triple Active Antiretroviral Regimen Including Enfuvirtide Via the Biojector is Effective and Safe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Loutfy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available For full HIV virological suppression, three fully active antiretroviral agents are required. New drug classes should be included to ensure that agents are fully active. The addition of enfuvirtide and efavirenz to the present patient’s new antiretroviral regimen ensured that two fully active agents were in use in the setting of a moderate degree of nucleoside resistance and a high level of protease resistance, and where non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were still fully active. Both viral load and CD4 count responded favourably to this regimen. The patient received support from physicians and clinic staff in the introduction and use of enfuvirtide. To reduce injection site reactions, a needle-free injection system (Biojector proved effective.

  9. Additive genetic and maternal effects on litter traits in rabbits*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogmeier, D; Dzapo, V; Mao, I L

    1994-01-12

    Additive genetic and maternal effects were estimated for several litter traits in rabbits. A total of 457 litters of 3267 animals from a reciprocal crossbreeding experiment were analysed by an animal model using a derivate-free REML procedure. Heritability estimates for litter size at birth, weaning and slaughter ranged from 0.09 to 0.25, for litter-weight traits from 0.00 to 0.13 and for preweaning and postweaning mortality rates from 0.00 to 0.19. Additive genetic contribution to the variation in a litter trait was found to be higher at birth and during the postweaning period than during the suckling period. Maternal effects accounted for approximately 10 % of the variation in most of the preweaning litter traits. Live litter size at birth was found to be the main source of variation in preweaning traits, explaining between 2.3 % and 43.2 % of the total variation. Heritability estimates and genetic correlations indicated live litter size at birth to be a useful selection criterion for the improvement of litter traits in rabbits. Our results indicated that a litter size of approximately 11 would be optimal before litter size at weaning and litter weight at weaning began to decline. Genetic selection for live litter size at birth would result in significant improvement in litter size and litter weight at later ages. ZUSAMMENFASSUNG: Schätzung additiv-genetischer und maternaler Effekte auf Wurfmerkmale beim Kaninchen An insgesamt 457 Würfen mit 3267 Einzeltieren, die aus einem reziproken Kreuzungsversuch stammten, wurden additiv-genetische und maternale Effekte für zahlreiche Wurfmerkmale anhand eines Tiermodells (DFREML-Methode) geschätzt. Heritabilitätsschätzungen wurden für Wurfgröße und Wurfgewicht zu unterschiedlichen Zeitpunkten (Geburt, Absetzen und Erreichen des Schlachtgewichts) aurchgeführt. Der additiv-genetische Variationsanteil an der Gesamtvariation war dabei bei der Geburt und nach dem Absetzen höher als während der Säugezeit. Die Sch

  10. Effect of Additional Structure on Effective Stack Height of Gas Dispersion in Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takenobu Michioka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Wind-tunnel experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of additional structure (building, sea wall and banking on the effective stack height, which is usually used in safety analyses of nuclear power facilities in Japan. The effective stack heights were estimated with and without the additional structure in addition to the reactor building while varying several conditions such as the source height, the height of additional structure and the distance between the source position and the additional structure. When the source height is equivalent to the reactor building height, the additional structure enhances both the vertical and horizontal gas dispersion widths and decreases the ground gas concentration, and it means that the additional structure does not decrease the effective stack height. When the source height is larger than the reactor height, the additional structures might affect the effective stack height. As the distance between the source and the additional structure decreases, or as the height of the additional structure increases, the structure has a larger effect on the effective stack height.

  11. IMMUNOMODULATORY EFFECT OF PHYTO-ADDITIVES IN BROILER CHICKENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAVINIA ŞTEF

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was been performed in the sector of Nutrition and Animal Feeding discipline from Timisoara Didactic Station, on a 6 week period, beginning with hatching and finishing with 42 days of age, on 120 broilers divided into four experimental variants, each of them with 30 individuals. In LEU group was incorporated essential oils of Satureja hortensis, Mentha piperita and Hyperici herba 250 mg in 1 kg combined fodder, in LEP group was included in combined fodder structure a plants premix in 2%, in LEUP group was incorporated plants premix 2% +250 mg essential oil of Satureja hortensis, Mentha piperita, Hyperici herba in 1 kg combined fodder. After seric lizozime quntification was observed an increase with 303.46% in LEPU group, followed by LEU with 200.14%, results who demonstrated the presence of an immunological stimulation in broiler chickens. Increased values of seric properdine were observed in LEPU group, with 210.45% more increased in comparison with LM group, followed by LEU group, demonstrating that the changing of unspecific immune effectors values took place like a result of a exogenous substance with immunomodulator effect. Was also observed an easy increase of limfocytes in LPU group, but not so important like in first two determinations, if the experiment will continue, these values maybe will be significant increased, taking into consideration that these increases become more evident after a period of time after stimulation.

  12. Neurologic Outcome After Resection of Parietal Lobe Including Primary Somatosensory Cortex: Implications of Additional Resection of Posterior Parietal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, June Sic; Lee, Sang Kun; Chung, Chun Kee

    2017-10-01

    Postoperative neurologic outcomes after primary somatosensory cortex (S1) resection have not been well documented. This study was designed to evaluate the neurologic deterioration that follows resection of the S1 areas and to assess the risk factors associated with these morbidities. We reviewed 48 consecutive patients with medically intractable epilepsy who underwent resection of the S1 and/or the adjacent cortex. The 48 patients were categorized into 4 groups according to the resected area as seen on postoperative magnetic resonance images: group 1 (resection of S1 only; n = 4), 2 (the posterior parietal cortex [PPC] only; n = 24), 3 (S1 and PPC; n = 10), and 4 (S1 and precentral gyrus; n = 10). After the resection of S1 areas, 19 patients (40%) experienced neurologic worsening, including 6 (13%) with permanent and 13 (27%) with transient deficits. Patients with permanent deficits included 2 with motor dysphasia, 1 with dysesthesia, 2 with equilibrium impairments, and 1 with fine movement disturbance of the hand. The overall and permanent neurologic risks were 25% and 0% in group 1, 17% and 4% in group 2, 80% and 20% in group 3, and 60% and 30% in group 4, respectively. Multivariate analysis determined that the resection of both S1 and PPC was the only significant risk factor for neurologic deficits (P = 0.002). The neurologic risk of the resection of S1 and/or its adjacent cortical areas was 40%. The additional resection of the PPC was significantly associated with the development of postoperative neurologic impairments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Hamiltonian and Lagrangian dynamics of charged particles including the effects of radiation damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hong; Burby, Joshua; Davidson, Ronald; Fisch, Nathaniel; Chung, Moses

    2015-11-01

    The effects of radiation damping (radiation reaction) on accelerating charged particles in modern high-intensity accelerators and high-intensity laser beams have becoming increasingly important. Especially for electron accelerators and storage rings, radiation damping is an effective mechanism and technique to achieve high beam luminosity. We develop Hamiltonian and Lagrangian descriptions of the classical dynamics of a charged particle including the effects of radiation damping in the general electromagnetic focusing channels encountered in accelerators. The direct connection between the classical Hamiltonian and Lagrangian theories and the more fundamental QED description of the synchrotron radiation process is also addressed. In addition to their theoretical importance, the classical Hamiltonian and Lagrangian theories of the radiation damping also enable us to numerically integrate the dynamics using advanced structure-preserving geometric algorithms. These theoretical developments can also be applied to runaway electrons and positrons generated during the disruption or startup of tokamak discharges. This research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-09CH11466).

  14. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Billings NTMS Quadrangle, Montana, including concentrations of forty-three additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broxton, D.E.

    1979-08-01

    This report contains data collected during a geochemical survey for uranium in the Billings quadrangle of south-central Montana. Totals of 1665 water and 1424 sediment samples were collected from 1998 locations in the quadrangle. Histograms and statistical data for uranium concentrations in water and sediment samples and thorium concentrations in sediment samples are given. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters in Appendix I-A and for sediments in Appendix I-B. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included in Appendix I-B. Appendix II describes standard LASL HSSR field and analytical procedures and explains the codes used in Appendix I. In addition to uranium, waters were analyzed for calcium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, titanium, and zinc (Appendix I-A). Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as aluminum, antimony, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, niobium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, scandium, silver, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, tin, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, ytterbium, and zinc (Appendix I-B). All elemental analyzes were performed at the LASL. Water samples delayed neutron counting, and plasma-source emission spectroscopy. Sediments were analyzed by delayed neutron counting, neutron activation analysis, x-ray fluorescence, and arc-source emission spectrography

  15. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Leadville NTMS Quadrangle, Colorado, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planner, H.N.

    1980-10-01

    A total of 1797 locations was sampled over a 19 330-km 2 area, providing an average density of one sample location per 11 km 2 . This report contains results for uranium in water samples and uranium and 42 additional elements in sediment samples. A total of 1279 water samples was collected from streams (1125) and springs (154). Uranium concentrations for all water samples range from below the detection limit of 0.02 ppB to 37.56 ppB. Mean concentrations in streams and springs are 1.05 ppB and 1.19 ppB, respectively. A total of 1784 sediment samples was collected from streams (1590), springs (193), and one pond. Uranium concentrations in sediments range from 1.27 to 223.80 ppM. Statistical mean uranium concentrations for wet stream (8.55 ppM) and spring (7.51 ppM) sediments are found to be greater than their dry counterparts (5.13 ppM and 4.96 ppM, respectively). Field data, recorded at the collection site, are reported with the elemental concentrations for each water and sediment sample listed. These data include a scintillometer determination of the equivalent uranium, pH and conductivity measurements, and geographic and weather information

  16. Effect of Ferrous Additives on Magnesia Stone Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimich, V.

    2017-11-01

    The article deals with the modification of the magnesia binder with additives containing two- and three-valent iron cations which could be embedded in the chloromagnesium stone structure and also increase the strength from 60 MPa in a non-additive stone to 80MPa, water resistance from 0.58 for clear stone to 0.8 and reduce the hygroscopicity from 8% in the non-additive stone to 2% in the modified chloromagnesium stone. It is proposed to use the iron hydroxide sol as an additive in the quantities of up to 1% of the weight of the binder. The studies were carried out using the modern analysis methods: the differentialthermal and X-ray phase analysis. The structure was studied with an electron microscope with an X-ray microanalyzer. A two-factor plan-experiment was designed which allowed constructing mathematical models characterizing the influence of variable factors, such as the density of the zatcher and the amount of sol in the binder, on the basic properties of the magnesian stone. The result of the research was the magnesia stone with the claimed properties and formed from minerals characteristic for magnesian materials as well as additionally formed from amachenite and goethite. It has been established that a highly active iron hydroxide sol the ion sizes of which are commensurate with magnesium ions is actively incorporated into the structure of pentahydroxychloride and magnesium hydroxide changing the habit of crystals compacting the structure of the stone and changing its hygroscopicity.

  17. Laser Beam Melting of Alumina: Effect of Absorber Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniz, Liliana; Colin, Christophe; Bartout, Jean-Dominique; Terki, Karim; Berger, Marie-Hélène

    2018-03-01

    Ceramic laser beam melting offers new manufacturing possibilities for complex refractory structures. Poor absorptivity in near infra-red wavelengths of oxide ceramics is overcome with absorber addition to ceramic powders. Absorbers affect powder bed densities and geometrical stability of melted tracks. Optimum absorber content is defined for Al2O3 by minimizing powder bed porosity, maximizing melting pool geometrical stability and limiting shrinkage. Widest stability fields are obtained with addition of 0.1 wt.% C and 0.5 wt.% β-SiC. Absorption coefficient values of Beer-Lambert law follow stability trends: they increase with C additions, whereas with β-SiC, a maximum is reached for 0.5 wt.%. Powder particle ejections are also identified. Compared to metallic materials, this ejection phenomenon can no longer be neglected when establishing a three-dimensional manufacturing strategy.

  18. The cosmological constant. A small addition with a great effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessner, G.

    1999-01-01

    The consequences of a cosmological constant Λ to cosmological models on the one hand and to Newton's gravitational law in the weak field expansion on the other hand are discussed. In case of a negative Λ with Λ∼10 -56 cm -2 the universe is open but does not expand forever. Furthermore, its age is compatible with the age of the oldest globular clusters. On the other hand, Newton's gravitational law is modified by an additional attractive force term linearly increasing woth the distance. This term acts only over very large distances. If one assumes a value Λ∼=-10 -56 cm -2 the additional term acts for stars over a characteristic scale of about 120 pc and for galaxies over a characteristic scale of about 0.8 Mpc. A positive cosmological constant Λ∼=-10 -56 cm -2 leads to an additional repulsive force which would have prevented the existence of galaxy clusters

  19. Effect of carbon nanofibre addition on the mechanical properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Carbon-epoxy (C-epoxy) laminated composites having different fibre volume fractions (40, 50, 60 and. 70) were fabricated with and without the addition of aminofunctionalized carbon nanofibres (A-CNF). Flexural strength, interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) and tensile strength of the composite laminates were ...

  20. Effect of micronized zeolite addition to lamb concentrate feeds on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OEM

    2016-09-21

    Sep 21, 2016 ... Natural zeolites are utilized in a number of industries such as pollution control ... the impact of zeolites on milk quality, an addition of 2.5% of clinoptilolite (zeolite) to goat feeds was demonstrated to ... triglyceride, calcium and phosphorus was carried out with spectrophotometry, and the tests for sodium,.

  1. Effects of organic additives on microstructure and mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Green bodies of porous Si3N4 ceramics were shaped by extrusion technique using different organic additives as binder during extrusion molding. Different porosity, microstructures and mechanical properties after the extrusion, drying, debinding and sintering stages were investigated. The solid slurry content of 70 ...

  2. Supplemental effects of feed additives on the utilization of cassava ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and fifty 7-day old (hybro strain) broiler chicks were randomly distributed into five dietary treatments in a completely randomized design. Diet 1 which served as the control had 25% CPM, while diets 2, 3, 4 and 5 had the same composition as diet 1 but with the inclusion of feed additives, bakers' yeast, enzyme ...

  3. Softening effect of Ikpiru and Yanyanku, two traditional additives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ikpiru and Yanyanku are two additives used for the traditional alkaline fermentation of African locust bean (Parkia biglobosa. Benth) to produce food condiments in Benin. In this study, African locust beans (Parkia biglobosa. Benth) were fermented with or without Ikpiru and Yanyanku to assess the factors explaining the ...

  4. Effect of fluxing additive on sintering temperature, microstructure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    doping have been described and discussed. Additionally, in situ Raman spectroscopy has been used for the first time to investigate and compare the phase transition temperatures of pure and Li2CO3-added BaTiO3. 2. Experimental. Batches (50g) of GPR grade TiO2 and BaCO3 (Aldrich. Chemicals Company Inc.) powder ...

  5. Effect of fluoride additives on production and characterization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    was assigned to the SDBS burnout, the 800 and 1100. ◦. C peaks were associated with the phase transformation, and, finally, the endothermic peak was due to dehydration. (figure 7). However, by adding the ZnF2 additive, the exothermic peaks of phase transformation shifted to 404 and 744. ◦. C, as a result of the reduction ...

  6. Effects of organic additives on microstructure and mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Y2O3 and Lu2O3 were used as sintering additives, CMC, MC, and HPMC as binder, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) as plasticizer. Castor oil was selected as lubricant to reduce the friction force bet- ween Si3N4 particles, and glycerol as moisturizing agent. Figure 1 shows a flow diagram for fabricating porous silicon nitride ...

  7. EFFECTS OF PROPERTIES POLYMERIC ADDITIVES IN RHEOLOGIC AND DRILLING FLUIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielly Vieira de Lucena

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of carboxymethylcellulose, CMC (filtrate reducer and xanthan gum (viscosifier in plastic and apparent viscosity at yield strength and the volume of filtrate in the composition of drilling fluids based on water was investigated based on statistical design. Five formulations consist of a range of concentrations used commercially were utilized in the design of the experiment. The formulations were prepared in accordance with company standards Petrobras. Regression models were calculated and correlated with the properties of the compositions. The relevance and validation of the models were confirmed by statistical analysis. The design can be applied to statistically optimize the mud properties considering the addition of CMC and xanthan gum, and to provide a better understanding of the influence of additives on the properties of polymer-based fluid system water. From the study it was observed that the values of the rheological properties vary with the concentration of additives, increasing with increasing concentration of the same, and that the concentration of the additives caused a decline of parameter values filtration.

  8. Effects of Video Games as Reinforcers for Computerized Addition Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Saul; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Four 2nd-grade students completed addition problems on a computer, using video games as reinforcers. Two variable ratio schedules of reinforcement failed to increase student accuracy or the rate of correct responses. In a no-games reinforcement condition, students had more opportunities to respond and had a greater number of correct answers.…

  9. Prediction of Broadband Shock-Associated Noise Including Propagation Effects Originating NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven; Morris, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    An acoustic analogy is developed based on the Euler equations for broadband shock-associated noise (BBSAN) that directly incorporates the vector Green s function of the linearized Euler equations and a steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solution (SRANS) to describe the mean flow. The vector Green s function allows the BBSAN propagation through the jet shear layer to be determined. The large-scale coherent turbulence is modeled by two-point second order velocity cross-correlations. Turbulent length and time scales are related to the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate. An adjoint vector Green s function solver is implemented to determine the vector Green s function based on a locally parallel mean flow at different streamwise locations. The newly developed acoustic analogy can be simplified to one that uses the Green s function associated with the Helmholtz equation, which is consistent with a previous formulation by the authors. A large number of predictions are generated using three different nozzles over a wide range of fully-expanded jet Mach numbers and jet stagnation temperatures. These predictions are compared with experimental data from multiple jet noise experimental facilities. In addition, two models for the so-called fine-scale mixing noise are included in the comparisons. Improved BBSAN predictions are obtained relative to other models that do not include propagation effects.

  10. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Sante Fe NTMS Quadrangle, New Mexico, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, S.L.

    1980-05-01

    Totals of 982 water and 1155 sediment samples were collected from 1962 locations. Samples were collected at the nominal reconnaissnce density of one sample location per 10 km 2 . Water samples were collected from streams, springs, and wells and were analyzed for uranium. Sediment samples, taken from streams and springs, were analyzed for uranium, thorium, and 41 additional elements. Histograms and statistical data for uranium concentrations in water and sediment samples and thorium concentrations in sediment samples are given. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters and for sediments. U/Th ratios for sediment samples are included. Uranium analyses for water samples and multielement analyses for sediment samples are reported. A supplemental report containing the results of multielement analyses of water samples will be open filed in the near future. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 ppB uranium were reanalyzed by DNC. Sediments were analyzed for U and Th, as well as Al, Sb, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ca, Ce, Cs, Cl, Cr, Co, Cu, Dy, Eu, Au, Hf, Fe, La, Pb, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Ni, Nb, K, Rb, Sa, Sc, Ag, Na, Sr, Ta, Tb, Sn, Ti, W, V, Yb, and Zn. All sediments were analyzed for U by delayed neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron activation analysis for 31 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 9 elements, and by arc-source emission spectroscopy for 2 elements. Analytical results are reported as ppM. Descriptions of procedures used for analysis of water and sediments samples as well as analytical precisions and detection limits are given

  11. Additive main effects and multiplicative interactions (AMMI) analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    environment of Virginia tobacco, 15 hybrids of tobacco including 10 Iranian and 5 international hybrids were evaluated in two different experiments (water stress and normal irrigation) using a randomized completely block design (RCBD) with three ...

  12. Additive main effects and multiplicative interactions analysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eight cassava genotypes were evaluated for harvest index performance across four environments. Data analysis was performed using MATMODEL and GGEbiplot. AMMI analysis of variance showed that 10.02% of the total sum of squares was attributable to environmental effects, 3.99% to genotypic effects and 50.13% to ...

  13. Effect of zirconium addition on the recrystallization behaviour of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is well known that the second phase particles have an effect on recrystallization and grain growth behaviour of an alloy. Particularly the bimodal distribution of second phase particles has an effect which is opposite in sense where coarse second phase particles (> 1 m) stimulate nucleation while fine particles exhibit ...

  14. Effects of WMA Additive on the Rheological Properties of Asphalt Binder and High Temperature Performance Grade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiupeng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sasobit additives with different dosages were added into 70# and 90# virgin asphalt binders to prepare WMA binders. The rheological properties, including G∗ and δ, were measured by using DSR at the temperature ranging from 46°C to 70°C, and the effects of temperature, additive dosage and aging on G∗/sin⁡δ, critical temperature, and H-T PG were investigated. The results indicate that WMA additive improves G∗ but reduces δ, and the improvement on 70# virgin binder is more significant. G∗/sin⁡δ exponentially decreases with the increasing temperature but linearly increases with the increasing additive dosage. Aging effect weakens the interaction between binder and additive but significantly increases the binder’s viscosity; that is why G∗/sin⁡δ is higher after short-term aging. In addition, the critical temperature increases with the increasing additive dosage, and the additive dosage should be more than 3% and 5% to improve H-T PG by one grade for 70# and 90# virgin binder, respectively.

  15. Effects Of Radiation On Electronics-Additional References

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, Frank L.

    1988-01-01

    Bibliography abstracts summarizing literature on effects of radiation on new electronic devices. This and second volume cover years 1984 and 1985. Third volume, covers 1982 and 1983 (previously published).

  16. Additional factors of nuclear war potential effect on ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatchinson, T.; Kharuehll, M.; Kropper, U.; Grover, G.

    1988-01-01

    Available information on response of organisms and ecosystems to increase of ultraviolet radiation, air borne pollutant concentrations, radiation and fires in case of nuclear war is generalized. The presented data are based on accumulated experience and experimental investigations. Potentiality of arising a great amount of stress effect localized regions is noted. Severe consequences for agriculture and population, particularly in sinergic stress effect, are not excluded. 169 refs.; 5 figs.; 25 tabs

  17. Effect of hydrogen addition on autoignited methane lifted flames

    KAUST Repository

    Choin, Byung Chul

    2012-01-01

    Autoignited lifted flames in laminar jets with hydrogen-enriched methane fuels have been investigated experimentally in heated coflow air. The results showed that the autoignited lifted flame of the methane/hydrogen mixture, which had an initial temperature over 920 K, the threshold temperature for autoignition in methane jets, exhibited features typical of either a tribrachial edge or mild combustion depending on fuel mole fraction and the liftoff height increased with jet velocity. The liftoff height in the hydrogen-assisted autoignition regime was dependent on the square of the adiabatic ignition delay time for the addition of small amounts of hydrogen, as was the case for pure methane jets. When the initial temperature was below 920 K, where the methane fuel did not show autoignition behavior, the flame was autoignited by the addition of hydrogen, which is an ignition improver. The liftoff height demonstrated a unique feature in that it decreased nonlinearly as the jet velocity increased. The differential diffusion of hydrogen is expected to play a crucial role in the decrease in the liftoff height with increasing jet velocity.

  18. Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Hypertension, and Their Additive Effects on Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Francesco Damiani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. It is widely accepted that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is independently associated with atherosclerosis. Similar to OSA, hypertension (HTN is a condition associated with atherosclerosis. However, to date, the impact of the simultaneous presence of OSA and HTN on the risk of atherosclerosis has not been extensively studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the consequences of the coexistence of OSA and HTN on carotid intima-media thickness (IMT and on inflammatory markers of atherosclerosis (such as interleukin- [IL-] 6 and pentraxin- [PTX-] 3. Methods. The study design allowed us to define 4 groups: (1 controls (n=30; (2 OSA patients without HTN (n=30; (3 HTN patients without OSA (n=30; (4 patients with OSA and HTN (n=30. In the morning after portable monitoring (between 7 am and 8 am, blood samples were collected, and carotid IMT was measured. Results. Carotid IMT, IL-6, and PTX-3 in OSA normotensive patients and in non-OSA HTN subjects were significantly higher compared to control subjects; in addition, in OSA hypertensive patients they were significantly increased compared to OSA normotensive, non-OSA HTN, or control subjects. Conclusions. OSA and HTN have an additive role in the progression of carotid atherosclerosis and in blood levels of inflammatory markers for atherosclerosis, such as interleukin-6 and pentraxin-3.

  19. Effects of enzyme Additive on Nutrient intake, Digestibility and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutrient intake, digestibility and rumen metabolites were determined in sixteen yearling cattle fed Panicum maximum hay supplemented with concentrate diet in which an exogenous fibrolytic enzyme, ROXAZYME G2® (which consist of Cellulase, hemicellulase and beta glucanase) was included at 0, 50, 100 and 150mg/kg.

  20. Effects of silage additives on ruminal and intestinal microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensiling is the preservation of forage for livestock through microbial fermentation. Although ensiling of plant material by its associated surface microbial community alone is possible, the cost of an uncontrolled fermentation can include dry matter loss, decreased quality, and spoilage. While prope...

  1. Effective face recognition using bag of features with additive kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shicai; Bebis, George; Chu, Yongjie; Zhao, Lindu

    2016-01-01

    In past decades, many techniques have been used to improve face recognition performance. The most common and well-studied ways are to use the whole face image to build a subspace based on the reduction of dimensionality. Differing from methods above, we consider face recognition as an image classification problem. The face images of the same person are considered to fall into the same category. Each category and each face image could be both represented by a simple pyramid histogram. Spatial dense scale-invariant feature transform features and bag of features method are used to build categories and face representations. In an effort to make the method more efficient, a linear support vector machine solver, Pegasos, is used for the classification in the kernel space with additive kernels instead of nonlinear SVMs. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve very high recognition accuracy on the ORL, YALE, and FERET databases.

  2. Measurement of [Formula: see text] production with additional jet activity, including [Formula: see text] quark jets, in the dilepton decay channel using pp collisions at [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Asilar, E; Bergauer, T; Brandstetter, J; Brondolin, E; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Knünz, V; König, A; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Matsushita, T; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schieck, J; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Lauwers, J; Luyckx, S; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Abu Zeid, S; Blekman, F; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; De Bruyn, I; Deroover, K; Heracleous, N; Keaveney, J; Lowette, S; Moreels, L; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Van Parijs, I; Barria, P; Brun, H; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Fasanella, G; Favart, L; Grebenyuk, A; Karapostoli, G; Lenzi, T; Léonard, A; Maerschalk, T; Marinov, A; Perniè, L; Randle-Conde, A; Reis, T; Seva, T; Vander Velde, C; Yonamine, R; Vanlaer, P; Yonamine, R; Zenoni, F; Zhang, F; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Crucy, S; Dobur, D; Fagot, A; Garcia, G; Gul, M; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Poyraz, D; Ryckbosch, D; Salva, S; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Tytgat, M; Van Driessche, W; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bondu, O; Brochet, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Da Silveira, G G; Delaere, C; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jafari, A; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Mertens, A; Musich, M; Nuttens, C; Perrini, L; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Beliy, N; Hammad, G H; Júnior, W L Aldá; Alves, F L; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Correa Martins Junior, M; Hamer, M; Hensel, C; Mora Herrera, C; Moraes, A; Pol, M E; Rebello Teles, P; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Huertas Guativa, L M; Malbouisson, H; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Ahuja, S; Bernardes, C A; De Souza Santos, A; Dogra, S; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Mercadante, P G; Moon, C S; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Romero Abad, D; Ruiz Vargas, J C; Aleksandrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Iaydjiev, P; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Glushkov, I; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Ahmad, M; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Cheng, T; Du, R; Jiang, C H; Plestina, R; Romeo, F; Shaheen, S M; Spiezia, A; Tao, J; Wang, C; Wang, Z; Zhang, H; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Li, Q; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Xu, Z; Avila, C; Cabrera, A; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Puljak, I; Ribeiro Cipriano, P M; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Micanovic, S; Sudic, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Rykaczewski, H; Bodlak, M; Finger, M; Finger, M; El Sawy, M; El-Khateeb, E; Elkafrawy, T; Mohamed, A; Salama, E; Calpas, B; Kadastik, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Tiko, A; Veelken, C; Eerola, P; Pekkanen, J; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Talvitie, J; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Favaro, C; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Machet, M; Malcles, J; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Zghiche, A; Antropov, I; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Busson, P; Cadamuro, L; Chapon, E; Charlot, C; Dahms, T; Davignon, O; Filipovic, N; Florent, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Lisniak, S; Mastrolorenzo, L; Miné, P; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Ortona, G; Paganini, P; Pigard, P; Regnard, S; Salerno, R; Sauvan, J B; Sirois, Y; Strebler, T; Yilmaz, Y; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Aubin, A; Bloch, D; Brom, J-M; Buttignol, M; Chabert, E C; Chanon, N; Collard, C; Conte, E; Coubez, X; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Goetzmann, C; Le Bihan, A-C; Merlin, J A; Skovpen, K; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Bernet, C; Boudoul, G; Bouvier, E; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Courbon, B; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fan, J; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Lagarde, F; Laktineh, I B; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Pequegnot, A L; Perries, S; Ruiz Alvarez, J D; Sabes, D; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Toriashvili, T; Lomidze, D

    2016-01-01

    Jet multiplicity distributions in top quark pair ([Formula: see text]) events are measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7[Formula: see text]. The measurement is performed in the dilepton decay channels ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]). The absolute and normalized differential cross sections for [Formula: see text] production are measured as a function of the jet multiplicity in the event for different jet transverse momentum thresholds and the kinematic properties of the leading additional jets. The differential [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] cross sections are presented for the first time as a function of the kinematic properties of the leading additional [Formula: see text] jets. Furthermore, the fraction of events without additional jets above a threshold is measured as a function of the transverse momenta of the leading additional jets and the scalar sum of the transverse momenta of all additional jets. The data are compared and found to be consistent with predictions from several perturbative quantum chromodynamics event generators and a next-to-leading order calculation.

  3. Effect of Additive Alloying Element on the Dezincification of Brass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, S. R.; Lee, S. W.; Song, J. T.

    1979-01-01

    Dezincification phenomenon of 70% Cu-30% Zn brass containing small amounts of Sn (<1.7%) has been studied in 0.5M acidic chloride solutions. All the specimens used were prepared originally from electrolytic copper and zinc and chemical grade tin. Recording of potentiodynamic polarization curves and examination of the microstructure for the specimens in various conditions were main experimetal techniques. Potentiodynamic polarization curves thus obtained revealed that 7/3 brass could initially be dezincified either by selective dissolution of zinc or by copper redeposition mechanism depending on the electrode potential. Experimental results showed that addition of small amount of tin (from 0.74% up to 1.76%) to 7/3 brass could inhibit dezincification in case the copper redeposition mechanism holds. This was found to be possible through that the added tin promotes hydrogen evolution reaction on the brass and this h.e.r. competes with copper redeposition retarding the latter. In other words, dezincification in 7/3 brass is replaced to general corrosion by the addition of small amounts of tin. Microscopic examinations for the specimens which had been subjected to potentiostatic polarization at given potentials showed that the well-defined dizincified layer could only be developed at elevated temperature (90 .deg. C), and in case the dezincified copper layer had already formed on the electrode surface. It was found through the microscopic examination of the dezincified specimen that the dezincification front occurred in 7/3 brass was protruding along the grain boundaries in the brass matrix, indicating the latter was serving as a diffusion channel for the outgoing zinc atom to the electrode/solution interface

  4. Effect of ethanol fuel additive on diesel emissions.; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, R. L.; Poola, R. B.; Sekar, R.; Schaus, J. E.; McPartlin, P.

    2001-01-01

    Engine-out emissions from a Volkswagen model TDI engine were measured for three different fuels: neat diesel fuel, a blend of diesel fuel and additives containing 10% ethanol, and a blend of diesel fuel and additives containing 15% ethanol. The test matrix covered five speeds from 1,320 to 3,000 rpm, five torques from 15 Nm to maximum plus the 900-rpm idle condition, and most of the points in the FTP-75 and US-06 vehicle tests. Emissions of particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NO(sub x)), unburned hydrocarbons (HCs), and carbon monoxide (CO) were measured at each point, as were fuel consumption, exhaust oxygen, and carbon dioxide output. PM emissions were reduced up to 75% when ethanol-diesel blends were used instead of neat diesel fuel. Significant reductions in PM emissions occurred over one-half to two-thirds of the test matrix. NO(sub x) emissions were reduced by up to 84%. Although the regions of reduced NO(sub x) emissions were much smaller than the regions of reduced PM emissions, there was considerable overlap between the two regions where PM emissions were reduced by up to 75% and NO(sub x) emissions were reduced by up to 84%. Such simultaneous reduction of both PM and NO(sub x) emissions would be difficult to achieve by any other means. HC and CO emissions were also reduced in the regions of reduced PM and NO(sub x) emissions that overlapped. Because the ethanol-diesel blends contain less energy on both a per-unit-mass basis and a per-unit-volume basis, there was a reduction in maximum torque of up to 10% and an increase in brake-specific fuel consumption of up to 7% when these blends were used

  5. Effects of various additives on antioxidant and antimicrobial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigated the effects of rosemary extract (RE), α-tocopherol (AT) and chitosan (CH) added individually or in combination as compared with butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) on microbiological parameters [total viable count (TVC), lactic acid bacteria (LAB), enterobacteria (ENB), pseudomonas bacteria (PSY)], pH and ...

  6. Effect of Addition of Ficus exasperata and Spoudias mombin Leaves ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peeled and unpeeled cassava tubers (TMS 30572) were soaked with the leaves of Ficus exasperata (Ipin) and Spondias mombin (Iyeye) and the effects were determined on functional and sensory properties. The cassava samples were soaked in water to ferment for 72 h, pressed, dried, milled and sieved to obtain lafun ...

  7. Effects of enzyme additive on haematological and serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of an exogenous fibrolytic enzyme (ROXAZYME G®) on blood parameters of calves fed fresh grass and grass hay-based diets. Chemical composition of concentrate, fresh grass and grass-hay were determined. Sixteen crossbred (N'dama × Muturu) calves were subjected to ...

  8. Effect of collector, frother and depressant addition on the copper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Currently, the acid insoluble copper (sulphides) losses on the scavenger banks are very high, from about 0.3 % TCu to 0.77 % TCu. Mineralogical tests carried out on the scavenger feed samples showed that the valuable minerals were liberated. This indicated that the chemical environment might have an effect on the ...

  9. Refrigerant Performance Evaluation Including Effects of Transport Properties and Optimized Heat Exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignoli, Riccardo; Brown, J Steven; Skye, H; Domanski, Piotr A

    2017-08-01

    Preliminary refrigerant screenings typically rely on using cycle simulation models involving thermodynamic properties alone. This approach has two shortcomings. First, it neglects transport properties, whose influence on system performance is particularly strong through their impact on the performance of the heat exchangers. Second, the refrigerant temperatures in the evaporator and condenser are specified as input, while real-life equipment operates at imposed heat sink and heat source temperatures; the temperatures in the evaporator and condensers are established based on overall heat transfer resistances of these heat exchangers and the balance of the system. The paper discusses a simulation methodology and model that addresses the above shortcomings. This model simulates the thermodynamic cycle operating at specified heat sink and heat source temperature profiles, and includes the ability to account for the effects of thermophysical properties and refrigerant mass flux on refrigerant heat transfer and pressure drop in the air-to-refrigerant evaporator and condenser. Additionally, the model can optimize the refrigerant mass flux in the heat exchangers to maximize the Coefficient of Performance. The new model is validated with experimental data and its predictions are contrasted to those of a model based on thermodynamic properties alone.

  10. Quantum three-body reaction dynamics including the geometric phase effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Accurate quantum mechanical reactive scattering calculations within the framework of symmetrized hyperspherical coordinate techniques are presented for several processes involving collisions of an electron with a hydrogen atom and an atom with a diatomic molecule in three-dimensional space, and the collinear collision of an atom with a diatomic molecule. In addition to the interest of the processes themselves, the results are compared with previous experimental and theoretical results in such a way as to provide tests of the general usefulness of the methods used. The general theory for the calculation of accurate differential cross sections in the reactive collision of an atom with a diatomic molecule including the geometric phase effect in three-dimensional space is described. This methodology has permitted, for the first time, the calculation of integral and differential cross sections over a significantly larger range of collision energies (up to 2.6 eV total energy) than previously possible for the system H + H 2 . The authors present numerical solutions of the quantum mechanical streamlines of probability current density for collinear atom-diatom reactions. It is used to study the barrier height dependence of dynamics on the Cl + HCl reaction

  11. 76 FR 23812 - Reliability and Continuity of Communications Networks, Including Broadband Technologies; Effects...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-28

    ...] Reliability and Continuity of Communications Networks, Including Broadband Technologies; Effects on Broadband...: Effects on Broadband Communications Networks of Damage or Failure of Network Equipment or Severe Overload... Docket 10-92 (Effects on Broadband Communications Networks of Damage or Failure of Network Equipment or...

  12. Ethers as gasoline additives : toxicokinetics and acute effects in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Nihlén, Annsofi

    1999-01-01

    Ethers or other oxygen-containing compounds are used as replacements for lead in gasoline and to ensure complete combustion. Methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) is already in use world-wide and ethyl tertiary-butyl ether (ETBE) may be used increasingly in the future. The aims of the present thesis were to study the uptake and disposition (toxicokinetics) of MTBE and ETBE in humans, to address the issue of biological monitoring and to measure acute effects (assessed by questio...

  13. ALE: Additive Latent Effect Models for Grade Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Zhiyun; Ning, Xia; Rangwala, Huzefa

    2018-01-01

    The past decade has seen a growth in the development and deployment of educational technologies for assisting college-going students in choosing majors, selecting courses and acquiring feedback based on past academic performance. Grade prediction methods seek to estimate a grade that a student may achieve in a course that she may take in the future (e.g., next term). Accurate and timely prediction of students' academic grades is important for developing effective degree planners and early war...

  14. The Prediction of Broadband Shock-Associated Noise Including Propagation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven; Morris, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    An acoustic analogy is developed based on the Euler equations for broadband shock- associated noise (BBSAN) that directly incorporates the vector Green's function of the linearized Euler equations and a steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solution (SRANS) as the mean flow. The vector Green's function allows the BBSAN propagation through the jet shear layer to be determined. The large-scale coherent turbulence is modeled by two-point second order velocity cross-correlations. Turbulent length and time scales are related to the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation. An adjoint vector Green's function solver is implemented to determine the vector Green's function based on a locally parallel mean flow at streamwise locations of the SRANS solution. However, the developed acoustic analogy could easily be based on any adjoint vector Green's function solver, such as one that makes no assumptions about the mean flow. The newly developed acoustic analogy can be simplified to one that uses the Green's function associated with the Helmholtz equation, which is consistent with the formulation of Morris and Miller (AIAAJ 2010). A large number of predictions are generated using three different nozzles over a wide range of fully expanded Mach numbers and jet stagnation temperatures. These predictions are compared with experimental data from multiple jet noise labs. In addition, two models for the so-called 'fine-scale' mixing noise are included in the comparisons. Improved BBSAN predictions are obtained relative to other models that do not include the propagation effects, especially in the upstream direction of the jet.

  15. Nutrient additions in pristine Patagonian Sphagnum bog vegetation: can phosphorus addition alleviate (the effects of) increased nitrogen loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, C; van Dijk, G; Smolders, A J P; Pancotto, V A; Elzenga, T J T M; Roelofs, J G M; Grootjans, A P

    2012-05-01

    Sphagnum-bog ecosystems have a limited capability to retain carbon and nutrients when subjected to increased nitrogen (N) deposition. Although it has been proposed that phosphorus (P) can dilute negative effects of nitrogen by increasing biomass production of Sphagnum mosses, it is still unclear whether P-addition can alleviate physiological N-stress in Sphagnum plants. A 3-year fertilisation experiment was conducted in lawns of a pristine Sphagnum magellanicum bog in Patagonia, where competing vascular plants were practically absent. Background wet deposition of nitrogen was low (≈ 0.1-0.2 g · N · m(-2) · year(-1)). Nitrogen (4 g · N · m(-2) · year(-1)) and phosphorus (1 g · P · m(-2) · year(-1)) were applied, separately and in combination, six times during the growing season. P-addition substantially increased biomass production of Sphagnum. Nitrogen and phosphorus changed the morphology of Sphagnum mosses by enhancing height increment, but lowering moss stem density. In contrast to expectations, phosphorus failed to alleviate physiological stress imposed by excess nitrogen (e.g. amino acid accumulation, N-saturation and decline in photosynthetic rates). We conclude that despite improving growth conditions by P-addition, Sphagnum-bog ecosystems remain highly susceptible to nitrogen additions. Increased susceptibility to desiccation by nutrients may even worsen the negative effects of excess nitrogen especially in windy climates like in Patagonia. © 2011 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  16. The effect of feed additives in pheasants fattening: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin GAŠPAROVIČ

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fattening pheasants for the production of quality meat is a relatively recent development. With its high protein and low fat content, meat of pheasant is a highly nutritious food whose value exceeds that of broiler chickens meat. Despite the fact that the intensive rearing of pheasants has developed relatively quickly in recent years, information on the fattening capabilities and slaughter values of pheasants is often insufficient in the current literature. The length of the fattening period also differs in the literature and reported from 13 to 20 weeks while highest weight gains of pheasants to occur between 4 and 12 weeks of age. Growth of pheasants is also reflected in the weight and dimensions of internal organs, crop, oesophagus, gizzard and intestine grow up to 12 weeks of age, after which they develop their physiological ability. The structure, weight and length of the digestive tract and other internal organs of pheasants depend on housing system, gender and nutrition. Relatively few investigations were conducted to determine the influence of feed additives on fattening performance of pheasants. One of the possibilities is the use of humic acids in nutrition pheasant. Humic acids are organic compounds naturally present in soil and they positively affected growth ability, feed conversion and reducing mortality.

  17. Effects of Charcoal Addition on the Properties of Carbon Anodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asem Hussein

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Wood charcoal is an attractive alternative to petroleum coke in production of carbon anodes for the aluminum smelting process. Calcined petroleum coke is the major component in the anode recipe and its consumption results in a direct greenhouse gas (GHG footprint for the industry. Charcoal, on the other hand, is considered as a green and abundant source of sulfur-free carbon. However, its amorphous carbon structure and high contents of alkali and alkaline earth metals (e.g., Na and Ca make charcoal highly reactive to air and CO2. Acid washing and heat treatment were employed in order to reduce the reactivity of charcoal. The pre-treated charcoal was used to substitute up to 10% of coke in the anode recipe in an attempt to investigate the effect of this substitution on final anode properties. The results showed deterioration in the anode properties by increasing the charcoal content. However, by adjusting the anode recipe, this negative effect can be considerably mitigated. Increasing the pitch content was found to be helpful to improve the physical properties of the anodes containing charcoal.

  18. The effect of yeast culture addition on utility of calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Doležal

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, examined was the effect of a yeast culture (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Strain 47 on performance (especially on daily gains, feed conversion and condition in an experiment with a group of Holstein calves within the period of plant nutrition. Animals received a diet consisting of 3 kg of good maize silage, 5.5 kg of grass haylage, 1 kg of meadow hay and 1.6 kg of supplementary starter feed mixture ČOT B. The yeast culture was added to the starter in the dose of 1 g.kg–1. This means that each experimental calf received 1.6 g of yeast culture per day. The supplement of yeast culture showed a positive effect on daily gains and on the final body weight of calves; however, the differences were statistically not significant (P>0.05. In control and experimental groups, the mean conversion rates of concentrate were 2.19 kg and 2.13 kg, respectively. There was no difference in feed intake and feed conversion efficiency. The difference in final live body weights of calves in the control and experimental groups was also not significant. However, the condition of calves in the experimental group was much better and the scours were in general less frequent.

  19. Modeling of Temperature-Dependent Noise in Silicon Nanowire FETs including Self-Heating Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Anandan, P.; Malathi, N.; Mohankumar, N.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowires are leading the CMOS era towards the downsizing limit and its nature will be effectively suppress the short channel effects. Accurate modeling of thermal noise in nanowires is crucial for RF applications of nano-CMOS emerging technologies. In this work, a perfect temperature-dependent model for silicon nanowires including the self-heating effects has been derived and its effects on device parameters have been observed. The power spectral density as a function of thermal resi...

  20. Monitoring the extraction of additives and additive degradation products from polymer packaging into solutions by multi-residue method including solid phase extraction and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouech, Charlène; Lafay, Florent; Wiest, Laure; Baudot, Robert; Léonard, Didier; Cren-Olivé, Cécile

    2014-02-01

    The use of polymer materials in industry for product packaging is increasing. The presence of additives in the polymer matrix enables the modification or improvement of the properties and performance of the polymer, but these industries are concerned regarding the extractability of these additives. The quantification of these additives is particularly challenging because of the presence of these substances as contaminants in all the analytical equipment and the diversity of their physicochemical properties. In this context, a multi-residue analytical method was developed for the trace analysis of the twenty main additives (and their degradation products) authorized in plastic products such as pharmaceutical packaging (e.g., antioxidants, release agents, and light absorbers). This analytical method consisted of a solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by an analysis using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer (UHPLC-MS/MS). A comparison of two ionization interfaces and the optimization of the extraction procedure were discussed. The influence of the quality of the solvent type (distilled versus not distilled) and the nature of the SPE cartridges (Polypropylene versus Teflon(®)) were demonstrated. The optimized method exhibited a quantification limit lower than 20 ng mL(-1) and recoveries between 70 % and 120 % for all compounds. Finally, the method was validated according to the ICH directive and was subsequently applied to the extraction of polymers under different pH conditions and storage temperatures. To the best of our knowledge, this study presents the first methodology allowing the simultaneous quantification of 24 additives at low ng mL(-1).

  1. Effect of vitamin D therapy in addition to amitriptyline on migraine attacks in pediatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cayir,A.; Turan,M.I.; Tan,H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of supplementary vitamin D therapy in addition to amitriptyline on the frequency of migraine attacks in pediatric migraine patients. Fifty-three children 8-16 years of age and diagnosed with migraine following the International Headache Society 2005 definition, which includes childhood criteria, were enrolled. Patients were classified into four groups on the basis of their 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels. Group 1 had normal 25(OH)D ...

  2. Situational effects of the school factors included in the dynamic model of educational effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Creemers

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We present results of a longitudinal study in which 50 schools, 113 classes and 2,542 Cypriot primary students participated. We tested the validity of the dynamic model of educational effectiveness and especially its assumption that the impact of school factors depends on the current situation of the school and on the type of problems/difficulties the school is facing. Reference is made to the methods used to test this assumption of the dynamic model by measuring school effectiveness in mathematics, Greek language, and religious education over two consecutive school years. The main findings are as follows. School factors were found to have situational effects. Specifically, the development of a school policy for teaching and the school evaluation of policy for teaching were found to have stronger effects in schools where the quality of teaching at classroom level was low. Moreover, time stability in the effectiveness status of schools was identified and thereby changes in the functioning of schools were found not to have a significant impact on changes in the effectiveness status of schools. Implications of the findings for the development of the dynamic model and suggestions for further research are presented.

  3. Effects of nitrogen and water addition on trace element stoichiometry in five grassland species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jiangping; Weiner, Jacob; Wang, Ruzhen; Luo, Wentao; Zhang, Yongyong; Liu, Heyong; Xu, Zhuwen; Li, Hui; Zhang, Yuge; Jiang, Yong

    2017-07-01

    A 9-year manipulative experiment with nitrogen (N) and water addition, simulating increasing N deposition and changing precipitation regime, was conducted to investigate the bioavailability of trace elements, iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) in soil, and their uptake by plants under the two environmental change factors in a semi-arid grassland of Inner Mongolia. We measured concentrations of trace elements in soil and in foliage of five common herbaceous species including 3 forbs and 2 grasses. In addition, bioaccumulation factors (BAF, the ratio of the chemical concentration in the organism and the chemical concentration in the growth substrate) and foliar Fe:Mn ratio in each plant was calculated. Our results showed that soil available Fe, Mn and Cu concentrations increased under N addition and were negatively correlated with both soil pH and cation exchange capacity. Water addition partly counteracted the positive effects of N addition on available trace element concentrations in the soil. Foliar Mn, Cu and Zn concentrations increased but Fe concentration decreased with N addition, resulting in foliar elemental imbalances among Fe and other selected trace elements. Water addition alleviated the effect of N addition. Forbs are more likely to suffer from Mn toxicity and Fe deficiency than grass species, indicating more sensitivity to changing elemental bioavailability in soil. Our results suggested that soil acidification due to N deposition may accelerate trace element cycling and lead to elemental imbalance in soil-plant systems of semi-arid grasslands and these impacts of N deposition on semi-arid grasslands were affected by water addition. These findings indicate an important role for soil trace elements in maintaining ecosystem functions associated with atmospheric N deposition and changing precipitation regimes in the future.

  4. Study Modules for Calculus-Based General Physics. [Includes Modules 1 and 2: Dimensions and Vector Addition; Rectilinear Motion; plus a Trigonometry and Calculus Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Robert G., Ed.; And Others

    This is part of a series of 42 Calculus Based Physics (CBP) modules totaling about 1,000 pages. The modules include study guides, practice tests, and mastery tests for a full-year individualized course in calculus-based physics based on the Personalized System of Instruction (PSI). The units are not intended to be used without outside materials;…

  5. Occurrence and effects of plastic additives on marine environments and organisms: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermabessiere, Ludovic; Dehaut, Alexandre; Paul-Pont, Ika; Lacroix, Camille; Jezequel, Ronan; Soudant, Philippe; Duflos, Guillaume

    2017-09-01

    Plastics debris, especially microplastics, have been found worldwide in all marine compartments. Much research has been carried out on adsorbed pollutants on plastic pieces and hydrophobic organic compounds (HOC) associated with microplastics. However, only a few studies have focused on plastic additives. These chemicals are incorporated into plastics from which they can leach out as most of them are not chemically bound. As a consequence of plastic accumulation and fragmentation in oceans, plastic additives could represent an increasing ecotoxicological risk for marine organisms. The present work reviewed the main class of plastic additives identified in the literature, their occurrence in the marine environment, as well as their effects on and transfers to marine organisms. This work identified polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE), phthalates, nonylphenols (NP), bisphenol A (BPA) and antioxidants as the most common plastic additives found in marine environments. Moreover, transfer of these plastic additives to marine organisms has been demonstrated both in laboratory and field studies. Upcoming research focusing on the toxicity of microplastics should include these plastic additives as potential hazards for marine organisms, and a greater focus on the transport and fate of plastic additives is now required considering that these chemicals may easily leach out from plastics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Metabolic effect of alkaline additives and guanosine/gluconate in storage solutions for red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Angelo; Reisz, Julie A; Culp-Hill, Rachel; Korsten, Herbert; van Bruggen, Robin; de Korte, Dirk

    2018-04-06

    Over a century of advancements in the field of additive solutions for red blood cell (RBC) storage has made transfusion therapy a safe and effective practice for millions of recipients worldwide. Still, storage in the blood bank results in the progressive accumulation of metabolic alterations, a phenomenon that is mitigated by storage in novel storage additives, such as alkaline additive solutions. While novel alkaline additive formulations have been proposed, no metabolomics characterization has been performed to date. We performed UHPLC-MS metabolomics analyses of red blood cells stored in SAGM (standard additive in Europe), (PAGGSM), or alkaline additives SOLX, E-SOL 5 and PAG3M for either 1, 21, 35 (end of shelf-life in the Netherlands), or 56 days. Alkaline additives (especially PAG3M) better preserved 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Deaminated purines such as hypoxanthine were predictive of hemolysis and morphological alterations. Guanosine supplementation in PAGGSM and PAG3M fueled ATP generation by feeding into the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway via phosphoribolysis. Decreased urate to hypoxanthine ratios were observed in alkaline additives, suggestive of decreased generation of urate and hydrogen peroxide. Despite the many benefits observed in purine and redox metabolism, alkaline additives did not prevent accumulation of free fatty acids and oxidized byproducts, opening a window for future alkaline formulations including (lipophilic) antioxidants. Alkalinization via different strategies (replacement of chloride anions with either high bicarbonate, high citrate/phosphate, or membrane impermeant gluconate) results in different metabolic outcomes, which are superior to current canonical additives in all cases. © 2018 AABB.

  7. Modeling additive and non-additive effects in a hybrid population using genome-wide genotyping: prediction accuracy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, J-M; Makouanzi, G; Cros, D; Vigneron, Ph

    2016-02-01

    Hybrids are broadly used in plant breeding and accurate estimation of variance components is crucial for optimizing genetic gain. Genome-wide information may be used to explore models designed to assess the extent of additive and non-additive variance and test their prediction accuracy for the genomic selection. Ten linear mixed models, involving pedigree- and marker-based relationship matrices among parents, were developed to estimate additive (A), dominance (D) and epistatic (AA, AD and DD) effects. Five complementary models, involving the gametic phase to estimate marker-based relationships among hybrid progenies, were developed to assess the same effects. The models were compared using tree height and 3303 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers from 1130 cloned individuals obtained via controlled crosses of 13 Eucalyptus urophylla females with 9 Eucalyptus grandis males. Akaike information criterion (AIC), variance ratios, asymptotic correlation matrices of estimates, goodness-of-fit, prediction accuracy and mean square error (MSE) were used for the comparisons. The variance components and variance ratios differed according to the model. Models with a parent marker-based relationship matrix performed better than those that were pedigree-based, that is, an absence of singularities, lower AIC, higher goodness-of-fit and accuracy and smaller MSE. However, AD and DD variances were estimated with high s.es. Using the same criteria, progeny gametic phase-based models performed better in fitting the observations and predicting genetic values. However, DD variance could not be separated from the dominance variance and null estimates were obtained for AA and AD effects. This study highlighted the advantages of progeny models using genome-wide information.

  8. Situational effects of the school factors included in the dynamic model of educational effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creerners, Bert; Kyriakides, Leonidas

    We present results of a longitudinal study in which 50 schools, 113 classes and 2,542 Cypriot primary students participated. We tested the validity of the dynamic model of educational effectiveness and especially its assumption that the impact of school factors depends on the current situation of

  9. Modeling of Temperature-Dependent Noise in Silicon Nanowire FETs including Self-Heating Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Anandan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nanowires are leading the CMOS era towards the downsizing limit and its nature will be effectively suppress the short channel effects. Accurate modeling of thermal noise in nanowires is crucial for RF applications of nano-CMOS emerging technologies. In this work, a perfect temperature-dependent model for silicon nanowires including the self-heating effects has been derived and its effects on device parameters have been observed. The power spectral density as a function of thermal resistance shows significant improvement as the channel length decreases. The effects of thermal noise including self-heating of the device are explored. Moreover, significant reduction in noise with respect to channel thermal resistance, gate length, and biasing is analyzed.

  10. Effect of the addition of mixture of plant components on the mechanical properties of wheat bread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Monika; Dziki, Dariusz; Biernacka, Beata; Różyło, Renata; Miś, Antoni; Hassoon, Waleed H.

    2017-10-01

    Instrumental methods of measuring the mechanical properties of bread can be used to determine changes in the properties of it during storage, as well as to determine the effect of various additives on the bread texture. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the mixture of plant components on the physical properties of wheat bread. In particular, the mechanical properties of the crumb and crust were studied. A sensory evaluation of the end product was also performed. The mixture of plant components included: carob fiber, milled grain red quinoa and black oat (1:2:2) - added at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 % - into wheat flour. The results showed that the increase of the addition of the proposed additive significantly increased the water absorption of flour mixtures. Moreover, the use of the mixture of plant components above 5% resulted in the increase of bread volume and decrease of crumb density. Furthermore, the addition of the mixture of plant components significantly affected the mechanical properties of bread crumb. The hardness of crumb also decreased as a result of the mixture of plant components addition. The highest cohesiveness was obtained for bread with 10% of additive and the lowest for bread with 25% of mixture of plant components. Most importantly, the enrichment of wheat flour with the mixture of plant components significantly reduced the crust failure force and crust failure work. The results of sensory evaluation showed that the addition of the mixture of plant components of up to 10% had little effect on bread quality.

  11. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Dalhart NTMS quadrangle, New Mexico/Texas/Oklahoma, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, T.L.

    1980-08-01

    Totals of 1583 water samples and 503 sediment samples were collected from 2028 locations within the 20 000-km/sup 2/ area of the quadrangle at an average density of one location per 9.86 km/sup 2/. Water samples were collected from wells, springs, and streams and were analyzed for uranium. Sediment samples were collected from streams and springs and were analyzed for uranium, thorium, and 41 additional elements. All field and analytical data are listed in the appendixes of this report. Discussion is limited to anomalous samples, which are considered to be those containing over 20 ppB uranium for waters and over 5 ppM uranium for sediments. Uranium concentrations in water samples range from below the detection limit of 0.2 ppB to 1457.65 ppB and average 7.41 ppB. Most of the seventy anomalous water samples (4.4% of all water samples) are grouped spatially into five clusters or areas of interest. Samples in three of the clusters were collected along the north edge of the quadrangle where Mesozoic strata are exposed. The other two clusters are from the central and southern portions where the Quaternary Ogallala formation is exposed. Sediment samples from the quadrangle have uranium concentrations that range from 0.90 ppM to 27.20 ppM and average 3.27 ppM. Fourteen samples (2.8% of all sediment samples) contain over 5 ppM uranium and are considered anomalous. The five samples with the highest concentrations occur where downcutting streams expose Cretaceous units beneath the Quaternary surficial deposits. The remaining anomalous sediment samples were collected from scattered locations and do not indicate any single formation or unit as a potential source for the anomalous concentrations.

  12. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Dalhart NTMS quadrangle, New Mexico/Texas/Oklahoma, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, T.L.

    1980-08-01

    Totals of 1583 water samples and 503 sediment samples were collected from 2028 locations within the 20 000-km 2 area of the quadrangle at an average density of one location per 9.86 km 2 . Water samples were collected from wells, springs, and streams and were analyzed for uranium. Sediment samples were collected from streams and springs and were analyzed for uranium, thorium, and 41 additional elements. All field and analytical data are listed in the appendixes of this report. Discussion is limited to anomalous samples, which are considered to be those containing over 20 ppB uranium for waters and over 5 ppM uranium for sediments. Uranium concentrations in water samples range from below the detection limit of 0.2 ppB to 1457.65 ppB and average 7.41 ppB. Most of the seventy anomalous water samples (4.4% of all water samples) are grouped spatially into five clusters or areas of interest. Samples in three of the clusters were collected along the north edge of the quadrangle where Mesozoic strata are exposed. The other two clusters are from the central and southern portions where the Quaternary Ogallala formation is exposed. Sediment samples from the quadrangle have uranium concentrations that range from 0.90 ppM to 27.20 ppM and average 3.27 ppM. Fourteen samples (2.8% of all sediment samples) contain over 5 ppM uranium and are considered anomalous. The five samples with the highest concentrations occur where downcutting streams expose Cretaceous units beneath the Quaternary surficial deposits. The remaining anomalous sediment samples were collected from scattered locations and do not indicate any single formation or unit as a potential source for the anomalous concentrations

  13. Additional flow field studies of the GA(W)-1 airfoil with 30-percent chord Fowler flap including slot-gap variations and cove shape modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, W. H., Jr.; Ostowari, C.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental measurements were made to determine the effects of slot gap opening and flap cove shape on flap and airfoil flow fields. Test model was the GA(W)-1 airfoil with 0.30c Fowler flap deflected 35 degrees. Tests were conducted with optimum, wide and narrow gaps, and with three cove shapes. Three test angles were selected, corresponding to pre-stall and post-stall conditions. Reynolds number was 2,200,000 and Mach number was 0.13. Force, surface pressure, total pressure, and split-film turbulence measurements were made. Results were compared with theory for those parameters for which theoretical values were available.

  14. Petrographic and Geochemical Characterization of Ore-Bearing Intrusions of the Noril'sk type, Siberia; With Discussion of Their Origin, Including Additional Datasets and Core Logs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czamanske, Gerald K.

    2002-01-01

    The Noril'sk I, Talnakh, and Kharaelakh intrusions of the Noril'sk district host one of the outstanding metal concentrations in the world; contained Cu-Ni resources are comparable to the deposits at Sudbury, Ontario and the platinum group element (PGE) resource is second only to that of the Bushveld Complex. Our opportunity to cooperatively sample and study this district in Siberian Russia arose in 1990 through a memorandum of understanding between the U.S. Geological Survey and the former Ministry of Geology of the U.S.S.R. The world-class significance of these deposits and the possibility that understanding their geologic context, including construction of a credible 'ore-deposit model,' will lead to discovery of similar deposits elsewhere, inspired extensive studies of the ores, the mafic-intrusions which host them, and associated flood basalts.

  15. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Elk City NTMS Quadrangle, Idaho/Montana, including concentrations of forty-five additional elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broxton, D.E.; Beyth, M.

    1980-07-01

    Totals of 1580 water and 1720 sediment samples were collected from 1754 locations in the quadrangle. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters in Appendix I-A and for sediments in Appendix I-B. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included in Appendix I-B. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 parts per billion (ppB) uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting (DNC). A supplemental report containing the multielement analyses of water samples will be open filed in the near future. Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as aluminum, antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, niobium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, selenium, scandium, silver, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, tin, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, ytterbium, zinc, and zirconium. Basic statistics for 40 of these elements are presented. All sediments were analyzed for uranium by delayed-neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron-activation analysis for 30 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 12 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results for sediments are reported as parts per million.

  16. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Lewistown NTMS Quadrangle, Montana, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, S.S. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    Totals of 758 water and 1170 sediment samples were collected from 1649 locations in the Levistown quadrangle. Water samples were collected at streams, springs, wells, ponds, and marshes; sediment samples were obtained from streams, springs, and ponds. Histograms and statistical data for uranium concentrations in water and sediment samples and thorium concentrations in sediment samples are given. All samples were collected at the nominal reconnaissance density of one sample location per 10 km 2 . Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters and for sediments. Uranium to thorium (U/Th) ratios for sediment samples are included. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 ppB U were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting. Sediments were analyzed for U and Th as well as Al, Sb, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ca, Ce, Cs, Cl, Cr, Co, Cu, Dy, Eu, Au, Hf, Fe, La, Pb, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Ni, Nb, K, Rb, Sa, Sc, Ag, Na, Sr, Ta, Tb, Sn, Ti, W, V, Yb, and Zn. All sediments were analyzed for U by delayed neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron activation analysis for 31 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 9 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results are reported as parts per million. Descriptions of procedures used for analysis of water and sediments samples as well as analytical precisions and detection limits are given

  17. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Torrington NTMS quadrangle, Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, S.S. Jr.; Romero, M.T.; Simi, O.R.; Martell, C.J.; Minor, M.M.; Hensley, W.K.; Mills, C.S.

    1980-07-01

    This report contains data collected during a geochemical survey (August and September 1977) for uranium in the Torrington National Topographic Map Series quadrangle of east-central Wyoming by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) as part of the nationwide Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR). Totals of 1119 water and 756 sediment samples were collected from 1677 locations in the quadrangle. Histograms and statistical data for uranium concentrations in water and sediment samples and thorium concentrations in sediment samples are given. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters and for sediments. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are included. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 ppB uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting (DNC). Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as aluminum, antimony, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, niobium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, scandium, silver, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, tin, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, ytterbium, and zinc. All sediments were analyzed for uranium by DNC. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron-activation analysis for 31 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 9 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results for sediments are reported as parts per million

  18. Detailed uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the eastern portion of the Montrose NTMS Quadrangle, Colorado, including concentrations of forty-five additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maassen, L.W.

    1981-01-01

    In September and October 1979, the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) conducted a detailed geochemical survey for uranium primarily in the Sawatch Range in the eastern part of the Montrose National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) quadrangle, Colorado, as part of the National Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR). Totals of 1034 water and 2087 sediment samples were collected from streams and springs from 2088 locations within a 5420-km 2 area. Statistical data for uranium concentrations in water and sediment samples are presented. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters and for sediments in appendices. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included. This report contains uranium analyses for water samples and multielement analyses for sediment samples. Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as Al, Sb, As, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ca, Ce, Cs, Cl, Cr, Co, Cu, Dy, Eu, Au, Hf, Fe, La, Pb, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Ni, Nb, K, Rb, Sm, Sc, Se, Ag, Na, Sr, Ta, Tb, Sn, Ti, W, V, Yb, Zn, and Zr. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. Sediments were analyzed for uranium by delayed neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron activation analysis for 31 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 12 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Descriptions of procedures as analytical precisions and detection limits are given in the appendix

  19. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Rock Springs NTMS Quadrangle, Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, T.L.

    1981-01-01

    This report contains data collected by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) during a regional geochemical survey for uranium in the Rock Springs National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) quadrangle, southwestern Wyoming, as part of the nationwide hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR). Totals of 397 water and 1794 sediment samples were collected from 1830 locations in the Rock Springs quadrangle of southern Wyoming during the summer of 1976. The average uranium concentration of all water samples is 6.57 ppb and the average sediment uranium concentration is 3.64 ppM. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters and for sediments in the appendices. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included. A sample location overlay (Plate I) at 1:250 000 scale for use in conjunction with the Rock Springs NTMS quadrangle sheet (US Geological Survey, 1954) is provided. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 ppB uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting. Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as Al, Sb, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ca, Ce, Cs, Cl, Cr, Co, Cu, Dy, Eu, Au, Hf, Fe, La, Pb, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Ni, Nb, K, Rb, Sm, Sc, Ag, Na, Sr, Ta, Tb, Sn, T, W, V, Yb, and Zn. All sediments were analyzed for uranium by delayed-neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron-activation analysis for 30 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 12 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. These analytical methods are described briefly in the appendix. This report is simply a data release and is intended to make the data available to the DOE and to the public as quickly as possible

  20. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Butte NTMS Quadrangle, Montana, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broxton, D.E.; George, W.E.; Montoya, J.V.; Martell, C.J.; Hensley, W.K.; Hanks, D.

    1980-05-01

    This report contains data collected during a geochemical survey for uranium in the Butte National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) quadrangle of west-central Montana. Histograms and statistical data for uranium concentrations in water and sediment samples and thorium concentrations in sediment samples are given. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters and for sediments. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included. This report contains uranium analyses for water samples and multielement analyses for sediment samples. A supplemental report containing the results of multielement analyses of water samples will be open filed in the near future. Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as aluminum, antimony, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, niobium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, scandium, silver, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, tin, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, ytterbium, and zinc. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 ppB uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting (DNC). All sediments were analyzed for uranium by DNC. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron activation analysis for 31 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 9 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results for sediments are reported as parts per million. Descriptions of procedures used for analysis of water and sediment samples as well as analytical precisions and detection limits are given

  1. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Ashton NTMS quadrangle, Idaho/Montana/Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, S.S. Jr; Sandoval, W.F.; Gallimore, D.L.; Hansel, J.M.; Hensley, W.K.; Pirtle, J.; Macdonell, C.J.

    1980-08-01

    This report contains data collected during a geochemical survey for uranium in the Ashton National Topographic Map Series quadrangle of eastern Idaho, southwestern Montana, and northwestern Wyoming by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) as part of the nationwide Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR). The LASL is responsible for conducting the HSSR primarily in the Rocky Mountain states of New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana and in Alaska. Totals of 1141 water and 1500 sediment samples were collected from 1539 locations in the quadrangle by a commercial contractor. Water samples were collected at streams, springs, wells, ponds, and marshes; sediment samples were obtained from streams, springs, and ponds. Histograms and statistical data for uranium concentrations in water and sediment samples and thorium concentrations in sediment samples are given. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 ppB uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting (DNC). Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as aluminum, antimony, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, niobium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, scandium, silver, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, tin, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, ytterbium, and zinc. All sediments were analyzed for uranium by DNC. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron activation analysis for 31 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 9 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results for sediments are reported as parts per million

  2. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for Saint Johns NTMS quadrangle, Arizona/New Mexico including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maassen, L.W.; George, W.E.; Apel, C.T.; Hansel, J.M.; Hensley, W.K.; Minor, M.M.; Mills, C.F.

    1980-08-01

    This report contains data collected during a geochemical survey for uranium in the St. Johns National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) quadrangle of Arizona/New Mexico by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) as part of the nationwide Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR). Totals of 848 water and 1475 sediment samples were collected from 2136 locations in the quadrangle. Histograms and statistical data for uranium concentrations in water and sediment samples and thorium concentrations in sediment samples are given. Listings of the field and uranium data for water samples are given in Appendix I-A. Listings of the field and elemental data for sediment samples are given in Appendix I-B. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included. Appendix II describes standard LASL HSSR field and analytical procedures and explains the codes used in Appendix I. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. Water samples collected in 1976 containing more than 10 ppB uranium and those collected in 1979 containing more than 40 ppB uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting (DNC). Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as aluminum, antimony, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, niobium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, scandium, silver, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, tin, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, ytterbium, and zinc. All sediments were analyzed for uranium by DNC. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron-activation analysis for 31 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 9 elements, and by arc-source emission spectroscopy for 2 elements. Analytical results for sediments are reported as parts per million

  3. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Rock Springs NTMS quadrangle, Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, T.L.; George, W.E.; Gallimore, D.L.; Hansel, J.M.; Hensley, W.K.; Jackson, C.K.; Bunker, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    Totals of 397 water and 1794 sediment samples were collected from 1830 locations in the Rock Springs quadrangle of southern Wyoming during the summer of 1976. Water samples were collected from 230 streams, 123 springs, 28 wells, and 16 artificial ponds. Sediment samples were collected from 231 wet streams and 1389 dry streams, 119 wet springs and 8 dry springs 29 artificial ponds and 18 natural ponds. The average uranium concentration of all water samples if 6.57 ppB and the average sediment uranium concentration is 3.64 ppM. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters and for sediments in Appendices. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 ppB uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting (DNC). Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as aluminum, antimony, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, niobium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, scandium, silver, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, tin, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, ytterbium, and zinc. All sediments were analyzed for uranium by delayed-neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron-activation analysis for 30 elements by x-ray fluorescence for 12 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. These analytical methods are described briefly

  4. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the vernal NTMS quadrangle, Utah/Colorado, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purson, J.D.

    1980-08-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory conducted a geochemical reconnaissance for uranium in the Vernal NTMS quadrangle, Utah/Colorado, in the summers of 1977 and 1978. Totals of 422 water and 1552 sediment samples were collected from 1652 locations. These samples were collected at an average density of one sample location per 11 km 2 over an 18,800 km 2 area. Water samples were collected from streams and springs. Only those samples containing >10 ppB uranium for waters and >8 ppM uranium for sediments are discussed; however, all field and analytical data are included in the appendixes. The uranium concentrations in waters range from below the detection limit of 0.01 ppB to 108.04 ppB, with a mean uranium concentration for all water types of 3.11 ppB. Three clusters of samples containing relatively high uranium values are defined; they are associated with the Duchesne River formation, the Mancos shale, or the Uinta Mountain group and Browns Park formations. A few of the samples having the highest uranium values are associated with host rocks favorable for significant uranium mineralization. Sediments collected in this study have uranium concentrations that range between 0.70 ppM and 56.70 ppM, with a mean of 3.46 ppM. The majority of sediment samples with relatively high uranium concentrations were collected from one area in the Sand Wash basin in the northeastern corner of the quadrangle and are associated with the Wasatch formation. None of the water clusters define areas of significant interest; however, the area having high uranium values in sediments is worthy of further study

  5. Including Finite Surface Span Effects in Empirical Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of finite span on the jet-surface interaction noise source and the jet mixing noise shielding and reflection effects is considered using recently acquired experimental data. First, the experimental setup and resulting data are presented with particular attention to the role of surface span on far-field noise. These effects are then included in existing empirical models that have previously assumed that all surfaces are semi-infinite. This extended abstract briefly describes the experimental setup and data leaving the empirical modeling aspects for the final paper.

  6. Approach to include load sequence effects in the design of an offshore wind turbine substructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dragt, R.C.; Allaix, D.L.; Maljaars, J.; Tuitman, J.T.; Salman, Y.; Otheguy, M.E.

    2017-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the main design drivers for offshore wind substructures. Using Fracture Mechanics methods, load sequence effects such as crack growth retardation due to large load peaks can be included in the fatigue damage estimation. Due to the sequence dependency, a method is required that

  7. Bending of I-beam with the transvers shear effect included – FEM calculated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grygorowicz, Magdalena; Lewiński, Jerzy [Poznan University of Technology, Institute of Applied Mechanics ul. Jana Pawła II No. 24, 60-138 Poznań POLAND (Poland)

    2016-06-08

    The paper is devoted to three-point bending of an I-beam with include of transvers shear effect. Numerical calculations were conducted independently with the use of the SolidWorks system and the multi-purpose software package ANSYS The results of FEM study conducted with the use of two systems were compared and presented in tables and figures.

  8. Spectral interferometry including the effect of transparent thin films to measure distances and displacements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hlubina, P.

    2004-01-01

    A spectral-domain interferometric technique is applied for measuring mirror distances and displacements in a dispersive Michelson interferometer when the effect of transparent thin films coated onto the interferometer beam splitter and compensator is known. We employ a low-resolution spectrometer in two experiments with different amounts of dispersion in a Michelson interferometer that includes fused-silica optical sample. Knowing the thickness of the optical sample and the nonlinear phase function of the thin films, the positions of the interferometer mirror are determined precisely by a least-squares fitting of the theoretical spectral interferograms to the recorded ones. We compare the results of the processing that include and do not include the effect of transparent thin films (Author)

  9. Measurement of Cl2 Concentration in a XeCl Hollow Cathode Discharge Including the Effect of H2 Addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    Janossy, M., Csillag, L., Rozsa , K., and Salamon, T. Phys. A, 68: 317 (1978). 63. Janossy, M., Rozsa , K., Csillag, L., and Bergow, J. Phys. A, 46: 379...1974). 64. Rozsa , K., Janossy, M., Bergow, J., and Csillag, L. Opt. C 23: 15 (1977). 65. Nuchkov, N. K., Grozeva, M. G., and Sabotinov, N. V. Opt. 27

  10. Effect of including liquid vinasse in the diet of rabbits on growth performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina de Oliveira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of liquid vinasse (LV in the diet for growing rabbits on performance, carcass yield and intestinal morphometry were assessed. Eighty New Zealand white rabbits were used in a randomized block design with five treatments (LV inclusion at 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 g/kg diet and four replications. There was no effect of the treatment on final weight, daily weight gain, mortality rate and carcass yield characteristics. The daily intakes of feed, dry matter, crude protein and energy and feed conversion decreased linearly with increase in LV in the diet. Including LV affected the duodenum crypt depth and the ilium villus perimeter and height linearly and affected the duodenum villus perimeter, height and the absorption surfaces and ilium crypt depth and absorption surface quadratically. There was no effect of including LV on jejunum morphometry. Vinasse can be used to feed growing rabbits at up to 87.8 g per kilogram of diet.

  11. Effects of Coal Combustion Additives on the Forms and Recovery of Uranium in Coal Bottom Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ye; Li, Yilian

    2017-04-01

    Recovering uranium from uranium-rich coal ash is an important way to utilize unconventional uranium resource. Although it might be expected that the uranium in residual form would prevent uranium recovery from coal ash, raising the recovery rate in way of controlling residual uranium has not yet been studied. In this study, three different kinds of combustion promoting additives were investigated by coal combustion experiments, in order to decrease the proportion of residual-form uranium in ash and increase the acid leaching rate. Analytical procedures included Tessier sequential extraction, acidleaching, and characterization(ICP-MS, XRF, BET and SEM-EDS). It was showed that the effects of additives in reducing residual uranium were as the following order: alkaline earth metal compounds > transition metal compounds> alkali metal compounds. Adding alkali metal additives(KCl, NaCl, K2CO3, Na2CO3) raised the percentage of residual uranium largely. Additionally, one transition metal additive(Fe2O3) reached a decreasing amplitude of 5.15%, while the other two additives(MnO2 and Fe3O4)made the rates increased. However, coal combustion with alkaline earth metal compounds mixed had target effects. Among this kind of additives(Ca(OH)2, CaCO3, CaO, CaCl2), CaCO3displayed the best effect on restricting the rising proportion of residual uranium by 18%. Moreover, the leaching recovery research indicated that CaCO3 could raise the recovery rate by 10.8%. The XRF profiles supported that the CaCO3 could lower the concentration of SiO2 in the bottom ash from 79.76% to 49.69%. Besides, The BET and SEM revealed that the decomposition of CaCO3 brought about a variation of surface structures and area, which promoted the contact between the leaching agent and bottom ash. The uranium content increase was determined by ICP-MS and EDS. These findings suggest that CaCO3 could be a favorable additive for the controlling of residual uranium and improvement of uranium recovery rates. Key words

  12. Mechanics of damping for fiber composite laminates including hygro-thermal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated mechanics theory was developed for the modeling of composite damping from the micromechanics to the laminate level. Simplified, design oriented equations based on hysteretic damping are presented for on-axis plies, off-axis plies, and laminates including the effect of temperature, moisture, and interply hysteretic damping. The temperature rise within vibrating composite laminates resulting from strain energy dissipation is also modeled, and their coupled hygro-thermo-mechanical response is predicted. The method correlates well with reported damping measurements. Application examples illustrate the effect of various ply, laminate, and hygro-thermal parameters on the overall damping performance of composite laminates.

  13. Relationship of sea level muon charge ratio to primary composition including nuclear target effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goned, A.; Shalaby, M.; Salem, A. M.; Roushdy, M.

    1985-01-01

    The discrepancy between the muon charge ratio observed at low energies and that calculated using pp data is removed by including nuclear target effects. Calculations at high energies show that the primary iron spectrum is expected to change slope from 2 to 2.2 to 2.4 to 2.5 for energies approx. 4 x 10 to the 3 GeV/nucleon if scaling features continue to the highest energies.

  14. Reduction of the oestrogenic effect of zearalenone in pigs by a feed additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endre Brydl

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Zearalenone is phenolic resorcyclic acid lactone produced by a number of Fusarium species grown on grains, predominantly on maize, in high moisture environment. Due to its oestrogenic effects, feeds contaminated with zearalenone can cause striking negative effects on reproduction primarily in pigs. The aim of the study was to test the efficiency of a feed additive developed for enzymatic decomposition of mycotoxins. A total of sixty 6-week-old conventional Dutch Landrace × Hungarian Large White F1 female pigs weaned at 30 ± 2 days of age were divided into 6 groups of 10 animals. Between 50 and 70 days of age, 4 groups of pigs (experimental were treated with zearalenone (8 or 16 mg/pig dose administered every other day via an oesophageal tube; pigs from the other two groups were not treated with zearalenone and served as controls. Throughout the experiment, the diet of two experimental groups and one control group was supplemented with a feed additive (named: Detoxa Plus at a concentration of 1 kg/tonne; pigs from the other control group received neither zearalenone treatment, nor the feed additive. Pigs’ live weight, weight of ovaries and uterus, histological characteristics of the ovaries, uterus, vagina, spleen and lymph nodes, liver concentrations of zearalenone and its metabolites (α- and β-zearalenol were studied. This study showed the preventive capacity of the feed additive against zearalenone. Positive effects included the prevention of uterine enlargement, beneficial effects on the histopathological scores of ovaries, uterus and vagina and reduced concentration of zearalenone and metabolites in the liver. This study demonstrates for the first time that due to its enzymatic activity Detoxa Plus renders zearalenone contaminated feeds less toxic.

  15. Effects of maternally exposed food coloring additives on laryngeal histology in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başak, Kayhan; Doguç, Duygu Kumbul; Aylak, Firdevs; Karadayi, Nimet; Gültekin, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    Experimental reports showed carcinogenic effects of artificial food colors and additives (AFCAs) on many organs, including the head and neck region. We aimed to investigate the effect of AFCAs on laryngeal histomorphology and immunohistochemical expression in maternally exposed rats. "No observable adverse effect levels" of commonly used AFCAs as a mixture were given to female rats before and during gestation. Histopathological and immunohistochemical findings were evaluated in their offspring. Significant decreasing in goblet cell count and cilia loss were observed with AFCAs in maternally exposed rats (p<0.05). Immunohistochemically, the Ki67 index was significantly increased and villin expression was significantly reduced in laryngeal epithelium in the study group (p<0.05), whereas expression of cyclooxygenase type 2, Muc-2, Muc-5AC, p53, and epidermal growth factor receptors did not differ between the groups. This study demonstrated that maternal exposure of AFCAs plays a role in the mucosal defense system and possibly in carcinogenesis.

  16. Microwave frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) produce widespread neuropsychiatric effects including depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pall, Martin L

    2016-09-01

    Non-thermal microwave/lower frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) act via voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) activation. Calcium channel blockers block EMF effects and several types of additional evidence confirm this mechanism. Low intensity microwave EMFs have been proposed to produce neuropsychiatric effects, sometimes called microwave syndrome, and the focus of this review is whether these are indeed well documented and consistent with the known mechanism(s) of action of such EMFs. VGCCs occur in very high densities throughout the nervous system and have near universal roles in release of neurotransmitters and neuroendocrine hormones. Soviet and Western literature shows that much of the impact of non-thermal microwave exposures in experimental animals occurs in the brain and peripheral nervous system, such that nervous system histology and function show diverse and substantial changes. These may be generated through roles of VGCC activation, producing excessive neurotransmitter/neuroendocrine release as well as oxidative/nitrosative stress and other responses. Excessive VGCC activity has been shown from genetic polymorphism studies to have roles in producing neuropsychiatric changes in humans. Two U.S. government reports from the 1970s to 1980s provide evidence for many neuropsychiatric effects of non-thermal microwave EMFs, based on occupational exposure studies. 18 more recent epidemiological studies, provide substantial evidence that microwave EMFs from cell/mobile phone base stations, excessive cell/mobile phone usage and from wireless smart meters can each produce similar patterns of neuropsychiatric effects, with several of these studies showing clear dose-response relationships. Lesser evidence from 6 additional studies suggests that short wave, radio station, occupational and digital TV antenna exposures may produce similar neuropsychiatric effects. Among the more commonly reported changes are sleep disturbance/insomnia, headache, depression

  17. PTAC: a computer program for pressure-transient analysis, including the effects of cavitation. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kot, C A; Youngdahl, C K

    1978-09-01

    PTAC was developed to predict pressure transients in nuclear-power-plant piping systems in which the possibility of cavitation must be considered. The program performs linear or nonlinear fluid-hammer calculations, using a fixed-grid method-of-characteristics solution procedure. In addition to pipe friction and elasticity, the program can treat a variety of flow components, pipe junctions, and boundary conditions, including arbitrary pressure sources and a sodium/water reaction. Essential features of transient cavitation are modeled by a modified column-separation technique. Comparisons of calculated results with available experimental data, for a simple piping arrangement, show good agreement and provide validation of the computational cavitation model. Calculations for a variety of piping networks, containing either liquid sodium or water, demonstrate the versatility of PTAC and clearly show that neglecting cavitation leads to erroneous predictions of pressure-time histories.

  18. Including Effects of Water Stress on Dead Organic Matter Decay to a Forest Carbon Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Lee, J.; Han, S. H.; Kim, S.; Son, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Decay of dead organic matter is a key process of carbon (C) cycling in forest ecosystems. The change in decay rate depends on temperature sensitivity and moisture conditions. The Forest Biomass and Dead organic matter Carbon (FBDC) model includes a decay sub-model considering temperature sensitivity, yet does not consider moisture conditions as drivers of the decay rate change. This study aimed to improve the FBDC model by including a water stress function to the decay sub-model. Also, soil C sequestration under climate change with the FBDC model including the water stress function was simulated. The water stress functions were determined with data from decomposition study on Quercus variabilis forests and Pinus densiflora forests of Korea, and adjustment parameters of the functions were determined for both species. The water stress functions were based on the ratio of precipitation to potential evapotranspiration. Including the water stress function increased the explained variances of the decay rate by 19% for the Q. variabilis forests and 7% for the P. densiflora forests, respectively. The increase of the explained variances resulted from large difference in temperature range and precipitation range across the decomposition study plots. During the period of experiment, the mean annual temperature range was less than 3°C, while the annual precipitation ranged from 720mm to 1466mm. Application of the water stress functions to the FBDC model constrained increasing trend of temperature sensitivity under climate change, and thus increased the model-estimated soil C sequestration (Mg C ha-1) by 6.6 for the Q. variabilis forests and by 3.1 for the P. densiflora forests, respectively. The addition of water stress functions increased reliability of the decay rate estimation and could contribute to reducing the bias in estimating soil C sequestration under varying moisture condition. Acknowledgement: This study was supported by Korea Forest Service (2017044B10-1719-BB01)

  19. The effect of additional physiotherapy to hospital inpatients outside of regular business hours: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusco, Natasha K; Paratz, Jennifer

    2006-12-01

    Provision of out of regular business hours (OBH) physiotherapy to hospital inpatients is widespread in the hospital setting. This systematic review evaluated the effect of additional OBH physiotherapy services on patient length of stay (LOS), pulmonary complications, discharge destination, discharge mobility status, quality of life, cost saving, adverse events, and mortality compared with physiotherapy only within regular business hours. A literature search was completed on databases with citation tracking using key words. Two reviewers completed data extraction and quality assessment independently by using modified scales for historical cohorts and case control studies as well as the PEDro scale for randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials. This search identified nine articles of low to medium quality. Four reported a significant reduction in LOS associated with additional OBH physiotherapy, with two articles reporting overall significance and two reporting only for specific subgroups. Two studies reported significant reduction in pulmonary complications for two different patient groups in an intensive care unit (ICU) with additional OBH physiotherapy. Three studies accounted for discharge destination and/or discharge mobility status with no significant difference reported. Quality of life, adverse events, and mortality were not reported in any studies. Cost savings were considered in three studies, with two reporting a cost saving. This systematic review was unable to conclude that the provision of additional OBH physiotherapy made significant improvement to patient outcomes for all subgroups of inpatients. One study in critical care reported that overnight physiotherapy decreased LOS and reduced pulmonary complications of patients in the ICU. However, the studies in the area of orthopaedics, neurology, postcardiac surgery, and rheumatology, which all considered additional daytime weekend physiotherapy intervention, did not provide

  20. Evaluation of additive effects of hydrolyzed jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) esters and glycerol: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jaimi; Marshall, Brooke; Gacula, Maximo; Rheins, Lawrence

    2008-12-01

    Glycerol has long served the topical prescriptive and personal care industry as a versatile and functional active and inactive ingredient. In skin care products, it acts primarily as an emollient, softening the skin through robust humectant hydration action. Hydrolyzed Jojoba Esters K-20W (K-20W) have been shown to increase skin hydration and improve sensory skin "feel" when included in a variety of skin, hair, and nail care cosmetic/personal care formulations. The addition of glycerol and hydrolyzed jojoba esters provides a substantial long-acting 24 h (moisturizing) skin hydration effect for topical products. A small pilot study was conducted to support the "proof of concept" that an enhanced, additive role exists between these two ingredients resulting in a long-term (24 h) skin moisturization effect. Topical treatments were applied to the skin (lower leg) of subjects, and evaluations were made at baseline and 8- to 24-h post-application. Skin hydration data were obtained via bio-instrumental transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements and expert clinical skin grading, including standardized digital clinical photography. Clinical skin grading evaluations and TEWL measurements found that significantly lower evaporative (P skin care lotion at 8 and 24 h posttreatment. This preliminary data "proof of concept" supports the position that glycerol and hydrolyzed jojoba esters work in tandem to enhance skin moisturization for at least 24 h. This unique moisturizing potential may prove valuable in the future development of cosmetic and over-the-counter/prescriptive topical products, including new medicaments containing botanicals. This fact is further reinforced with the recent greater commercial use and demand for defined safe botanicals in cosmetic as well as pharmaceutical topical formulations. Additional mechanistic studies are underway.

  1. A new wall function boundary condition including heat release effect for supersonic combustion flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Zhen-Xun; Jiang, Chong-Wen; Lee, Chun-Hian

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new wall function including heat release effect is theoretically derived. • The new wall function is a unified form holding for flows with/without combustion. • The new wall function shows good results for a supersonic combustion case. - Abstract: A new wall function boundary condition considering combustion heat release effect (denoted as CWFBC) is proposed, for efficient predictions of skin friction and heat transfer in supersonic combustion flows. Based on a standard flow model including boundary-layer combustion, the Shvab–Zeldovich coupling parameters are introduced to derive a new velocity law-of-the-wall including the influence of combustion. For the temperature law-of-the-wall, it is proposed to use the enthalpy–velocity relation, instead of the Crocco–Busemann equation, to eliminate explicit influence of chemical reactions. The obtained velocity and temperature law-of-the-walls constitute the CWFBC, which is a unified form simultaneously holding for single-species, multi-species mixing and multi-species reactive flows. The subsequent numerical simulations using this CWFBC on an experimental case indicate that the CWFBC could accurately reflect the influences on the skin friction and heat transfer by the chemical reactions and heat release, and show large improvements compared to previous WFBC. Moreover, the CWFBC can give accurate skin friction and heat flux for a coarse mesh with y + up to 200 for the experimental case, except for slightly larger discrepancy of the wall heat flux around ignition position.

  2. Effect of some addition agents on the electrodeposition of cadmium from acidic chloride baths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Halim, A.M.; Baghlaf, A.O.; Sobahi, M.I.

    1984-01-01

    A further development of a chloride-based cadmium plating bath containing 0.3 M CdCl 2 .(5/2)H 2 O, 0.1 M HCl, 0.4 M H 3 BO 3 and 2.0 M NH 4 Cl (bath I) is described. The influences of the individual addition agents thiourea, coumarin Ni 2+ ions and I - ions on the characteristics of cadmium electrodeposition from acidic chloride electrolytes containing 0.3 M CdCl 2 .(5/2)H 2 O, 0.1 M HCl, 0.4 M H 3 BO 3 , 2.0 M NH 4 Cl, 0.5 M sodium potassium tartrate and 5 g gelatin l -1 (bath II) were studied. Bath II including a combination of the four above-mentioned additives was denoted bath III. The additive-containing bath III produced a brighter but less hard cadmium deposit than the additive-free bath II. The individual effects of melamine, 3-methyl-4-p-methoxyphenylazopyrazol-5-one, dimethylformamide (DMF) and DMF with biacetyl-bis-(benzoylhydrazone) on the cathodic polarization and current efficiency of cadmium electrodeposition from baths II and III, as well as on the morphology and microhardness of the as-plated cadmium deposits, were investigated and discussed. (Auth.)

  3. Effect of fructo-oligosaccharide and isomalto-oligosaccharide addition on baking quality of frozen dough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Young; Jang, Sung-Bum; Lim, Seung-Taik

    2016-12-15

    The baking quality of frozen doughs containing different levels of fructo-oligosaccharides (FO) or isomalto-oligosaccharides (IMO) (3-9%, w/w flour), and stored for 0-8weeks at -18°C, was examined. The addition of FO or IMO increased the proof volume of the dough and the loaf volume of bread prepared from frozen dough. A 6% addition of FO or IMO was optimum, giving the highest proof volume and bread loaf volume, but a higher concentration than 6% induced low baking quality including lower proof volume and bread loaf volume. The bread crumb was moister and softer after the addition of FO or IMO before, and even after, frozen storage. Darker crumb colour was observed in the bread after the addition of FO or IMO. The oligosaccharides added to the frozen dough were effective in improving the quality of bread made from frozen dough, except for resulting in a darker bread crumb. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. CFD simulations and reduced order modeling of a refrigerator compartment including radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, Ozgur; Oskay, Ruknettin; Paksoy, Akin; Aradag, Selin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Free convection in a refrigerator is simulated including radiation effects. ► Heat rates are affected drastically when radiation effects are considered. ► 95% of the flow energy can be represented by using one spatial POD mode. - Abstract: Considering the engineering problem of natural convection in domestic refrigerator applications, this study aims to simulate the fluid flow and temperature distribution in a single commercial refrigerator compartment by using the experimentally determined temperature values as the specified constant wall temperature boundary conditions. The free convection in refrigerator applications is evaluated as a three-dimensional (3D), turbulent, transient and coupled non-linear flow problem. Radiation heat transfer mode is also included in the analysis. According to the results, taking radiation effects into consideration does not change the temperature distribution inside the refrigerator significantly; however the heat rates are affected drastically. The flow inside the compartment is further analyzed with a reduced order modeling method called Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and the energy contents of several spatial and temporal modes that exist in the flow are examined. The results show that approximately 95% of all the flow energy can be represented by only using one spatial mode

  5. Including shielding effects in application of the TPCA method for detection of embedded radiation sources.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, William C.; Shokair, Isaac R.

    2011-12-01

    Conventional full spectrum gamma spectroscopic analysis has the objective of quantitative identification of all the radionuclides present in a measurement. For low-energy resolution detectors such as NaI, when photopeaks alone are not sufficient for complete isotopic identification, such analysis requires template spectra for all the radionuclides present in the measurement. When many radionuclides are present it is difficult to make the correct identification and this process often requires many attempts to obtain a statistically valid solution by highly skilled spectroscopists. A previous report investigated using the targeted principal component analysis method (TPCA) for detection of embedded sources for RPM applications. This method uses spatial/temporal information from multiple spectral measurements to test the hypothesis of the presence of a target spectrum of interest in these measurements without the need to identify all the other radionuclides present. The previous analysis showed that the TPCA method has significant potential for automated detection of target radionuclides of interest, but did not include the effects of shielding. This report complements the previous analysis by including the effects of spectral distortion due to shielding effects for the same problem of detection of embedded sources. Two examples, one with one target radionuclide and the other with two, show that the TPCA method can successfully detect shielded targets in the presence of many other radionuclides. The shielding parameters are determined as part of the optimization process using interpolation of library spectra that are defined on a 2D grid of atomic numbers and areal densities.

  6. Non-kinematic Flux-transport Dynamos Including the Effects of Diffusivity Quenching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimura, Chiaki; Yokoyama, Takaaki [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2017-04-10

    Turbulent magnetic diffusivity is quenched when strong magnetic fields suppress turbulent motion in a phenomenon known as diffusivity quenching. Diffusivity quenching can provide a mechanism for amplifying magnetic field and influencing global velocity fields through Lorentz force feedback. To investigate this effect, we conducted mean field flux-transport dynamo simulations that included the effects of diffusivity quenching in a non-kinematic regime. We found that toroidal magnetic field strength is amplified by up to approximately 1.5 times in the convection zone as a result of diffusivity quenching. This amplification is much weaker than that in kinematic cases as a result of Lorentz force feedback on the system’s differential rotation. While amplified toroidal fields lead to the suppression of equatorward meridional flow locally near the base of the convection zone, large-scale equatorward transport of magnetic flux via meridional flow, which is the essential process of the flux-transport dynamo, is sustainable in our calculations.

  7. Effect on lamb meat quality of including thyme (Thymus zygis ssp. gracilis) leaves in ewes' diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Gema; Díaz, Pedro; Bañón, Sancho; Garrido, María Dolores

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of including thyme leaves (TL) in the diet of pregnant sheep on the sensorial characteristics, bacterial spoilage and oxidative stability of lamb meat stored in modified atmosphere (70% O(2):30% CO(2)). For this, thirty-six sheep were randomly assigned to three groups: control (basal diet), T(1) (3.7% thyme leaves), T(2) (7.5% thyme leaves). Meat spoilage (TV, PSY, MY, ENT, and LA), TBARS, CIELAB coordinates, metmyoglobin and the sensory characteristics of fresh lamb meat were analyzed on days 0, 7, 14 and 21. The presence of antioxidant compounds in the diet containing TL delayed (Pmeat. In general, this effect was more pronounced at the higher level of TL (7.5%). High Pearson's correlation coefficients were found between the sensory attributes, CIELAB coordinates and TBARS. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling of the Direct Current Generator Including the Magnetic Saturation and Temperature Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso J. Mercado-Samur

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the inclusion of temperature effect on the field resistance on the direct current generator model DC1A, which is valid to stability studies is proposed. First, the linear generator model is presented, after the effect of magnetic saturation and the change in the resistance value due to temperature produced by the field current are included. The comparison of experimental results and model simulations to validate the model is used. A direct current generator model which is a better representation of the generator is obtained. Visual comparison between simulations and experimental results shows the success of the proposed model, because it presents the lowest error of the compared models. The accuracy of the proposed model is observed via Modified Normalized Sum of Squared Errors index equal to 3.8979%.

  9. Two phase formation of massive elliptical galaxies: study through cross-correlation including spatial effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modak, Soumita; Chattopadhyay, Tanuka; Chattopadhyay, Asis Kumar

    2017-11-01

    Area of study is the formation mechanism of the present-day population of elliptical galaxies, in the context of hierarchical cosmological models accompanied by accretion and minor mergers. The present work investigates the formation and evolution of several components of the nearby massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) through cross-correlation function (CCF), using the spatial parameters right ascension (RA) and declination (DEC), and the intrinsic parameters mass (M_{*}) and size. According to the astrophysical terminology, here these variables, namely mass, size, RA and DEC are termed as parameters, whereas the unknown constants involved in the kernel function are called hyperparameters. Throughout this paper, the parameter size is used to represent the effective radius (Re). Following Huang et al. (2013a), each nearby ETG is divided into three parts on the basis of its Re value. We study the CCF between each of these three components of nearby massive ETGs and the ETGs in the high redshift range, 0.5work (De et al. 2014) suggesting other possibilities for the formation of the outermost part. A probable cause of this improvement is the inclusion of the spatial effects in addition to the other parameters in the study.

  10. Gender differences in episodic memory and visual working memory including the effects of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, Franz; Petermann, Franz; Lepach, Anja Christina

    2013-01-01

    Analysing the relationship between gender and memory, and examining the effects of age on the overall memory-related functioning, are the ongoing goals of psychological research. The present study examined gender and age group differences in episodic memory with respect to the type of task. In addition, these subgroup differences were also analysed in visual working memory. A sample of 366 women and 330 men, aged between 16 and 69 years of age, participated in the current study. Results indicate that women outperformed men on auditory memory tasks, whereas male adolescents and older male adults showed higher level performances on visual episodic and visual working memory measures. However, the size of gender-linked effects varied somewhat across age groups. Furthermore, results partly support a declining performance on episodic memory and visual working memory measures with increasing age. Although age-related losses in episodic memory could not be explained by a decreasing verbal and visuospatial ability with age, women's advantage in auditory episodic memory could be explained by their advantage in verbal ability. Men's higher level visual episodic memory performance was found to result from their advantage in visuospatial ability. Finally, possible methodological, biological, and cognitive explanations for the current findings are discussed.

  11. Litter Decomposition in a Semiarid Dune Grassland: Neutral Effect of Water Supply and Inhibitory Effect of Nitrogen Addition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulin Li

    Full Text Available The decomposition of plant material in arid ecosystems is considered to be substantially controlled by water and N availability. The responses of litter decomposition to external N and water, however, remain controversial, and the interactive effects of supplementary N and water also have been largely unexamined.A 3.5-year field experiment with supplementary nitrogen and water was conducted to assess the effects of N and water addition on mass loss and nitrogen release in leaves and fine roots of three dominant plant species (i.e., Artemisia halondendron, Setaria viridis, and Phragmites australis with contrasting substrate chemistry (e.g. N concentration, lignin content in this study in a desertified dune grassland of Inner Mongolia, China. The treatments included N addition, water addition, combination of N and water, and an untreated control. The decomposition rate in both leaves and roots was related to the initial litter N and lignin concentrations of the three species. However, litter quality did not explain the slower mass loss in roots than in leaves in the present study, and thus warrant further research. Nitrogen addition, either alone or in combination with water, significantly inhibited dry mass loss and N release in the leaves and roots of the three species, whereas water input had little effect on the decomposition of leaf litter and fine roots, suggesting that there was no interactive effect of supplementary N and water on litter decomposition in this system. Furthermore, our results clearly indicate that the inhibitory effects of external N on dry mass loss and nitrogen release are relatively strong in high-lignin litter compared with low-lignin litter.These findings suggest that increasing precipitation hardly facilitates ecosystem carbon turnover but atmospheric N deposition can enhance carbon sequestration and nitrogen retention in desertified dune grasslands of northern China. Additionally, litter quality of plant species

  12. Effects of Low Light on Agronomic and Physiological Characteristics of Rice Including Grain Yield and Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-hua LIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Light intensity is one of the most important environmental factors that determine the basic characteristics of rice development. However, continuously cloudy weather or rainfall, especially during the grain-filling stage, induces a significant loss in yield and results in poor grain quality. Stress caused by low light often creates severe meteorological disasters in some rice-growing regions worldwide. This review was based on our previous research and related research regarding the effects of low light on rice growth, yield and quality as well as the formation of grain, and mainly reviewed the physiological metabolism of rice plants, including characteristics of photosynthesis, activities of antioxidant enzymes in rice leaves and key enzymes involved in starch synthesis in grains, as well as the translocations of carbohydrate and nitrogen. These characteristics include various grain yield and rice quality components (milling and appearance as well as cooking, eating and nutritional qualities under different rates of shading imposed at the vegetative or reproductive stages of rice plants. Furthermore, we discussed why grain yield and quality are reduced under the low light environment. Next, we summarized the need for future research that emphasizes methods can effectively improve rice grain yield and quality under low light stress. These research findings can provide a beneficial reference for rice cultivation management and breeding program in low light environments.

  13. Path-integral isomorphic Hamiltonian for including nuclear quantum effects in non-adiabatic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xuecheng; Shushkov, Philip; Miller, Thomas F.

    2018-03-01

    We describe a path-integral approach for including nuclear quantum effects in non-adiabatic chemical dynamics simulations. For a general physical system with multiple electronic energy levels, a corresponding isomorphic Hamiltonian is introduced such that Boltzmann sampling of the isomorphic Hamiltonian with classical nuclear degrees of freedom yields the exact quantum Boltzmann distribution for the original physical system. In the limit of a single electronic energy level, the isomorphic Hamiltonian reduces to the familiar cases of either ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) or centroid molecular dynamics Hamiltonians, depending on the implementation. An advantage of the isomorphic Hamiltonian is that it can easily be combined with existing mixed quantum-classical dynamics methods, such as surface hopping or Ehrenfest dynamics, to enable the simulation of electronically non-adiabatic processes with nuclear quantum effects. We present numerical applications of the isomorphic Hamiltonian to model two- and three-level systems, with encouraging results that include improvement upon a previously reported combination of RPMD with surface hopping in the deep-tunneling regime.

  14. Three-Dimensional Orbits of Earth Satellites, Including Effects of Earth Oblateness and Atmospheric Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jack N.; Goodwin, Frederick K.; Mersman, William A.

    1958-01-01

    The principal purpose of the present paper is to present sets of equations which may be used for calculating complete trajectories of earth satellites from outer space to the ground under the influence of air drag and gravity, including oblateness effects, and to apply these to several examples of entry trajectories starting from a circular orbit. Equations of motion, based on an "instantaneous ellipse" technique, with polar angle as independent variable, were found suitable for automatic computation of orbits in which the trajectory consists of a number of revolutions. This method is suitable as long as the trajectory does not become nearly vertical. In the terminal phase of the trajectories, which are nearly vertical, equations of motion in spherical polar coordinates with time as the independent variable were found to be more suitable. In the first illustrative example the effects of the oblateness component of the earth's gravitational field and of atmospheric rotation were studied for equatorial orbits. The satellites were launched into circular orbits at a height of 120 miles, an altitude sufficiently high that a number of revolutions could be studied. The importance of the oblateness component of the earth's gravitational field is shown by the fact that a satellite launched at circular orbital speed, neglecting oblateness, has a perigee some 67,000 feet lower when oblateness forces are included in the equations of motion than when they are not included. Also, the loss in altitude per revolution is double that of a satellite following an orbit not subject to oblateness. The effect of atmospheric rotation on the loss of altitude per revolution was small. As might be surmised, the regression of the line of nodes as predicted by celestial mechanics is unchanged when drag is included. It is clear that the inclination of the orbital plane to the equator will be relatively unaffected by drag for no atmospheric rotation since the drag lies in the orbital plane in

  15. Additive effects of oral fluoropyrimidine derivative S-1 and radiation on human hypopharyngeal cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Takahiro; Otsuki, Naoki; Masai, Yohko; Sasaki, Ryohei; Tsukuda, Mamoru; Nibu, Ken-Ichi

    2008-08-01

    The results presented here provide evidence of the enhancing effect of oral fluoropyrimidine derivative S-1 in concomitant chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer and further insights into its biological mechanism. To investigate the additive effect of S-1 and radiation for human hypopharyngeal cancer. Nude mice bearing hypopharyngeal cancer cells (H891) were used for an in vivo model. S-1 was administered at a volume of 0.01 mg/g body weight per mouse for 14 days, and tumors were irradiated with 2.0 Gy on days 1 and 8. Mice treated with either radiation or S-1 alone were used as controls. The growth of tumors in each group was measured and, after completion of the treatment, a focused DNA array was used to determine mRNA expression levels in the tumors of 132 genes related to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), radiation or carcinogenesis. The additive antitumor effect of S-1 and radiation was statistically confirmed on day 14 (p=0.01). DNA array assay showed significant changes in expression of several genes, including DNA repair gene POLD, angiogenesis-related genes bFGF and TP, DNA topoisomerase TOP2A, and nucleoside transporter gene ENT1.

  16. An investigation of the effect of pit latrine additives on VIP latrine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manufacturers of various commercial pit latrine additives claim that by addition of this product to pit content, accumulation rate and pit content volume can be reduced, thereby preventing the pit from ever reaching capacity. This paper presents a comprehensive study conducted to determine the effects of additives on pit ...

  17. Widespread non-additive and interaction effects within HLA loci modulate the risk of autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenz, Tobias L.; Deutsch, Aaron J.; Han, Buhm; Hu, Xinli; Okada, Yukinori; Eyre, Stephen; Knapp, Michael; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Abecasis, Goncalo; Becker, Jessica; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Chen, Wei-Min; Franke, Andre; Gladman, Dafna D.; Gockel, Ines; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Martin, Javier; Nair, Rajan P.; Noethen, Markus M.; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rahman, Proton; Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Stuart, Philip E.; Tsoi, Lam C.; van Heel, David A.; Worthington, Jane; Wouters, Mira M.; Klareskog, Lars; Elder, James T.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Schumacher, Johannes; Rich, Stephen S.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes confer substantial risk for autoimmune diseases on a log-additive scale. Here we speculated that differences in autoantigen-binding repertoires between a heterozygote's two expressed HLA variants might result in additional non-additive risk effects. We tested the

  18. The effectiveness of Additional Literacy Support (ALS) in Years 3 and 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunn, Tim

    2008-08-01

    This study compared the progress in reading and spelling of 256 children in 11 classes in 9 English primary schools in Years 3 and 4, and a partially overlapping sample of 126 children who received additional help with literacy during 1 year. Teachers and teaching assistants used either Additional Literacy Support (ALS), a highly structured set of small group teaching materials devised by the English National Literacy Strategy, or a wide variety of other materials including other published intervention programmes, reading scheme-based, computer-based and individually designed interventions, or a combination of ALS and other interventions. The influence of a broad range of contextual factors were investigated, especially whether children's qualities, school factors such as socio-economic status and class size, and delivery differences made significant differences to the outcomes of the different interventions. The study used a naturalistic quasi-experimental design, in which teachers were asked to record details of their children and interventions without altering their professional decisions, which has not been used before in investigating literacy difficulties in context. ALS was marginally more effective than other interventions in the majority of classes, but was clearly superior in value for money terms. Children's qualities did not appear to affect outcomes. Although children receiving additional help made better than average progress, overall catch-up was limited, especially in spelling. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Bifurcation of space-charge wave in a plasma waveguide including the wake potential effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae [Department of Physics and Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 15588, South Korea and Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    The wake potential effects on the propagation of the space-charge dust ion-acoustic wave are investigated in a cylindrically bounded dusty plasma with the ion flow. The results show that the wake potential would generate the double frequency modes in a cylindrically bounded dusty plasma. It is found that the upper mode of the wave frequency with the root of higher-order is smaller than that with the root of lower-order in intermediate wave number domains. However, the lower mode of the scaled wave frequency with the root of higher-order is found to be greater than that with the root of lower-order. It is found that the influence in the order of the root of the Bessel function on the wave frequency of the space-charge dust-ion-acoustic wave in a cylindrically confined dusty plasma decreases with an increase in the propagation wave number. It is also found that the double frequency modes increase with increasing Mach number due to the ion flow in a cylindrical dusty plasma. In addition, it is found that the upper mode of the group velocity decreases with an increase in the scaled radius of the plasma cylinder. However, it is shown that the lower mode of the scaled group velocity of the space-charge dust ion acoustic wave increases with an increase in the radius of the plasma cylinder. The variation of the space-charge dust-ion-acoustic wave due to the wake potential and geometric effects is also discussed.

  20. Numerical analysis of trajectories and aberrations of a Wien filter including the effect of fringing fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Makoto; Tsuno, Katsushige

    1990-12-01

    Trajectory equations of a stigmatic Wien filter including the effects of unmatched fringing fields are formulated, and an optimum shape with minimum geometrical aberrations is described. A low-aberration Wien filter is realized under the following conditions: (1) electric and magnetic fields satisfy the orthogonal relation even in the off-axial region, and (2) gap lengths between electrodes and magnetic poles are the same for achieving the balancing condition of electric and magnetic forces in fringing regions. The former condition can be realized by both fields with finite but the same hexapole components; this fact enables us to design a filter with simplified geometry that fulfills the latter condition simultaneously. It is shown that a large deflection of trajectories and resultant aberrations appear if the gap lengths are set to be different.

  1. Effects of Cannabis Use on Human Behavior, Including Cognition, Motivation, and Psychosis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkow, Nora D; Swanson, James M; Evins, A Eden; DeLisi, Lynn E; Meier, Madeline H; Gonzalez, Raul; Bloomfield, Michael A P; Curran, H Valerie; Baler, Ruben

    2016-03-01

    With a political debate about the potential risks and benefits of cannabis use as a backdrop, the wave of legalization and liberalization initiatives continues to spread. Four states (Colorado, Washington, Oregon, and Alaska) and the District of Columbia have passed laws that legalized cannabis for recreational use by adults, and 23 others plus the District of Columbia now regulate cannabis use for medical purposes. These policy changes could trigger a broad range of unintended consequences, with profound and lasting implications for the health and social systems in our country. Cannabis use is emerging as one among many interacting factors that can affect brain development and mental function. To inform the political discourse with scientific evidence, the literature was reviewed to identify what is known and not known about the effects of cannabis use on human behavior, including cognition, motivation, and psychosis.

  2. Modeling of cylindrical surrounding gate MOSFETs including the fringing field effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Santosh K.; Baishya, Srimanta

    2013-01-01

    A physically based analytical model for surface potential and threshold voltage including the fringing gate capacitances in cylindrical surround gate (CSG) MOSFETs has been developed. Based on this a subthreshold drain current model has also been derived. This model first computes the charge induced in the drain/source region due to the fringing capacitances and considers an effective charge distribution in the cylindrically extended source/drain region for the development of a simple and compact model. The fringing gate capacitances taken into account are outer fringe capacitance, inner fringe capacitance, overlap capacitance, and sidewall capacitance. The model has been verified with the data extracted from 3D TCAD simulations of CSG MOSFETs and was found to be working satisfactorily. (semiconductor devices)

  3. Highly accurate spectral retardance characterization of a liquid crystal retarder including Fabry-Perot interference effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Asticio [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad de La Frontera, Temuco (Chile); Center for Optics and Photonics, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 4016, Concepción (Chile); Mar Sánchez-López, María del [Instituto de Bioingeniería, Universidad Miguel Hernández, 03202 Elche (Spain); García-Martínez, Pascuala [Departament d' Òptica, Universitat de València, 45100 Burjassot (Spain); Arias, Julia; Moreno, Ignacio [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Óptica y Tecnología Electrónica, Universidad Miguel Hernández, 03202 Elche (Spain)

    2014-01-21

    Multiple-beam Fabry-Perot (FP) interferences occur in liquid crystal retarders (LCR) devoid of an antireflective coating. In this work, a highly accurate method to obtain the spectral retardance of such devices is presented. On the basis of a simple model of the LCR that includes FP effects and by using a voltage transfer function, we show how the FP features in the transmission spectrum can be used to accurately retrieve the ordinary and extraordinary spectral phase delays, and the voltage dependence of the latter. As a consequence, the modulation characteristics of the device are fully determined with high accuracy by means of a few off-state physical parameters which are wavelength-dependent, and a single voltage transfer function that is valid within the spectral range of characterization.

  4. North american natural gas supply forecast: the Hubbert method including the effects of institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, D. B.; Kolodziej, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the U.S. and southern Canadian natural gas supply market is considered. An important model for oil and natural gas supply is the Hubbert curve. Not all regions of the world are producing oil or natural gas following a Hubbert curve, even when price and market conditions are accounted for. One reason is that institutions are affecting supply. We investigate the possible effects of oil and gas market institutions in North America on natural gas supply. A multi-cycle Hubbert curve with inflection points similar to the Soviet Union's oil production multi-cycle Hubbert curve is used to determine North American natural gas discovery rates and to analyze how market specific institutions caused the inflection points. In addition, we analyze the latest shale natural gas projections critically. While currently, unconventional resources of natural gas suggest that North American natural gas production will increase without bound, the model here suggests a peak in North American natural gas supplies could happen in 2013. (author)

  5. Modelling the Colour of Strawberry Spread During Storage, Including Effects of Technical Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadivec Mirta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The colour of freshly processed strawberry spread changes relatively rapidly from a bright red to a dull red, which then makes its appearance generally less acceptable for consumers. The colours of strawberry spreads following several processing conditions were measured under different storage conditions. Additional sugar and colorant had only slight effects on the colour decay, while exclusion of oxygen and daylight did not affect this process. The only condition that clearly maintained the freshly processed appearance was storage at 4°C. Hexagonal bottles were filled with the strawberry spreads and their colour was repeatedly measured at the six sides of the bottles, using a Minolta chroma meter. Data were analysed using non-linear indexed regression analysis based on a logistic function for the three colour aspect of a*, b* and L*. This technology allowed the determination of the variation in these data in terms of improved reliability (R2adj, >90%. It also allowed better interpretation of the processes involved. All variations in the data could be attributed to technical variation.

  6. North American Natural Gas Supply Forecast: The Hubbert Method Including the Effects of Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Kolodziej

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the U.S. and southern Canadian natural gas supply market is considered. An important model for oil and natural gas supply is the Hubbert curve. Not all regions of the world are producing oil or natural gas following a Hubbert curve, even when price and market conditions are accounted for. One reason is that institutions are affecting supply. We investigate the possible effects of oil and gas market institutions in North America on natural gas supply. A multi-cycle Hubbert curve with inflection points similar to the Soviet Union’s oil production multi-cycle Hubbert curve is used to determine North American natural gas discovery rates and to analyze how market specific institutions caused the inflection points. In addition, we analyze the latest shale natural gas projections critically. While currently, unconventional resources of natural gas suggest that North American natural gas production will increase without bound, the model here suggests a peak in North American natural gas supplies could happen in 2013.

  7. Investigate The Effect of Additives on Mechanical Properties During Casting of 6351 Aluminium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum is one of the significant and widely used metals in the manufacturing industries. The effectiveness of casting processes depends upon various process parameters like type of sand, moulding process and additive used. However, the additive in the sand plays important roles to make a perfect casting. Hence, in this research work the experiment were performed to investigate the effect of additives like Tamarind Powder, Starch Powder and Coal dust on the Mechanical Properties namely during casting of aluminium alloys.

  8. Thermal histories of chondrules in solar nebula shocks, including the effect of molecular line cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Melissa A.

    Chondrules are millimeter-sized, silicate (mostly ferromagnesian) igneous spheres found within chondritic meteorites. They are some of the oldest materials in our Solar System, having formed within a few million years of its birth. Chondrules were melted at high temperature (over 1800 K), while they were free-floating objects in the early solar nebula. Their petrology and chemistry constrain their formation, especially their thermal histories. Chondrules provide some of the most powerful constraints on conditions in the solar nebula. Models in which chondrule precursors melted by passage through solar nebula shocks are very promising, and meet most constraints on chondrule formation in broad brush. However, these models have been lacking in some of the relevant physics. Previous shock models have used incorrect approximations to the input radiation boundary condition, and the opacity of solids has been treated simply. Most important, a proper treatment of cooling due to molecular line emission has not been included. In this thesis, the shock model is significantly improved in order to determine if it remains consistent with observational constraints. The appropriate boundary condition for the input radiation and the proper method for calculation of the opacity of solids are determined, and a complete treatment of molecular line cooling due to water is included. Previous estimates of the effect of line cooling predicted chondrule cooling rates in excess of 10,000 K per hour. However, once molecular line cooling due to water was incorporated into the full shock model, it was found that line cooling has a minimal effect on the thermal histories of gas and chondrules. This behavior is attributed mostly to the thermal buffering of the gas due to hydrogen dissociation and recombination, which tends to keep the gas temperature at approximately 2000 K until the column densities of water become optically thick to line emission. Chondrule cooling rates in the range of 10

  9. Double-gate junctionless transistor model including short-channel effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz, B C; Pavanello, M A; Ávila-Herrera, F; Cerdeira, A

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a physically based model for double-gate junctionless transistors (JLTs), continuous in all operation regimes. To describe short-channel transistors, short-channel effects (SCEs), such as increase of the channel potential due to drain bias, carrier velocity saturation and mobility degradation due to vertical and longitudinal electric fields, are included in a previous model developed for long-channel double-gate JLTs. To validate the model, an analysis is made by using three-dimensional numerical simulations performed in a Sentaurus Device Simulator from Synopsys. Different doping concentrations, channel widths and channel lengths are considered in this work. Besides that, the series resistance influence is numerically included and validated for a wide range of source and drain extensions. In order to check if the SCEs are appropriately described, besides drain current, transconductance and output conductance characteristics, the following parameters are analyzed to demonstrate the good agreement between model and simulation and the SCEs occurrence in this technology: threshold voltage (V TH ), subthreshold slope (S) and drain induced barrier lowering. (paper)

  10. Stress analysis of fuel claddings with axial fins including creep effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, R.

    1977-01-01

    For LMFBR fuel claddings with axial fins the stress and strain fields are calculated which may be caused by internal pressure, differential thermal expansion and irradiation induced differential swelling. To provide an appropriate description of the cladding material it is assumed that the total strain is the sum of a linear elastic and a creep term, where the latter one includes the thermal as well as the irradiation induced creep. First the linear elastic problem is treated by a semi-analytical method leading to a bipotential equation for Airys' stress function. Solving this equation analytically means that the field equations valid within the cladding are satisfied exactly. By applying a combined point matching- least square-method the boundary conditions could be satisfied approximately such that in most cases the remaining error is within the uncertainty range of the loading conditions. Then the nonlinear problem which includes creep is approximated by a sequence of linear elastic solutions with time as parameter. The accumulated creep strain is treated here as an imposed strain field. To study the influence of different effects such as fin shape, temperature region, irradiation induced creep and swelling or internal pressure, a total of eleven cases with various parameter variations are investigated. The results are presented graphically in the following forms: stress and strain distributions over the cladding cross section for end of life conditions and boundary stresses and strains versus time. (Auth.)

  11. Thymoquinone causes multiple effects, including cell death, on dividing plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanien, Sameh E; Ramadan, Ahmed M; Azeiz, Ahmed Z Abdel; Mohammed, Rasha A; Hassan, Sabah M; Shokry, Ahmed M; Atef, Ahmed; Kamal, Khalid B H; Rabah, Samar; Sabir, Jamal S M; Abuzinadah, Osama A; El-Domyati, Fotouh M; Martin, Gregory B; Bahieldin, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) is a major constituent of Nigella sativa oil with reported anti-oxidative activity and anti-inflammatory activity in animal cells. It also inhibits proliferation and induces programmed cell death (apoptosis) in human skin cancer cells. The present study sought to detect the influence of TQ on dividing cells of three plant systems and on expression of Bcl2-associated athanogene-like (BAG-like) genes that might be involved during the process of cell death. BAG genes are known for the regulation of diverse physiological processes in animals, including apoptosis, tumorigenesis, stress responses, and cell division. Synthetic TQ at 0.1mg/mL greatly reduced wheat seed germination rate, whereas 0.2mg/mL completely inhibited germination. An Evans blue assay revealed moderate cell death in the meristematic zone of Glycine max roots after 1h of TQ treatment (0.2mg/mL), with severe cell death occurring in this zone after 2h of treatment. Light microscopy of TQ-treated (0.2mg/mL) onion hairy root tips for 1h revealed anti-mitotic activity and also cell death-associated changes, including nuclear membrane disruption and nuclear fragmentation. Transmission electron microscopy of TQ-treated cells (0.2mg/mL) for 1h revealed shrinkage of the plasma membrane, leakage of cell lysate, degradation of cell walls, enlargement of vacuoles and condensation of nuclei. Expression of one BAG-like gene, previously associated with cell death, was induced 20 min after TQ treatment in Glycine max root tip cells. Thus, TQ has multiple effects, including cell death, on dividing plant cells and plants may serve as a useful system to further investigate the mechanisms underlying the response of eukaryotic cells to TQ. © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  12. Characterizations of milkfish (Chanos chanos) meatballs as effect of nanoencapsulation liquid smoke addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swastawati, Fronthea; Ambaryanto; Cahyono, Bambang; Wijayanti, Ima; Chilmawati, Diana

    2018-02-01

    Milkfish meatballs are one of the value-added product that is potential to be developed because this product is favored by consumers. The aims of this study were mainly to evaluate the effect of nano encapsulation liquid smoke addition to the properties of milkfish meatballs. The different concentration (0%, 1%, 3% and 5%) of nano encapsulation liquid smoke was treated into milkfish meatballs with three replications. Test parameters used include texture (hardness, deformation and gel strength); proximate (moisture, protein, fat, ash and carbohydrates content); sensory (organoleptic and hedonic). Parametric data were analysis using ANOVA and non-parametric parameters using Kruskal Wallis test. Analysis of variant shows that nanoencapsulation gave significant effect on the hardness, deformation, and gel strength; protein, lipid, ash and water content(P0.05). The best texture characteristic was obtained by milkfish meatball added with 1% of nanoencapsulation liquid smoke indicated by the moisture water; protein; fat; ash and carbohydrate content: 66,35%; 12,69%; 6,75%; 2,42% and 5,93% respectively. The best organoleptic and hedonic value of milkfish meatballs was achieved by a panelist at the sample with the addition of 1% liquid smoke, but this sample found gave no significance different to control in terms of sensory valle.

  13. Cell size dependence of additive versus synergetic effects of UV radiation and PAHs on oceanic phytoplankton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echeveste, Pedro; Agusti, Susana; Dachs, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons' (PAHs) toxicity is enhanced by the presence of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), which levels have arisen due to the thinning of the ozone layer. In this study, PAHs' phototoxicity for natural marine phytoplankton was tested. Different concentrations of a mixture of 16 PAHs were added to natural phytoplankton communities from the Mediterranean Sea, Atlantic, Arctic and Southern Oceans and exposed to natural sunlight received in situ, including treatments where the UVR bands were removed. PAHs' toxicity was observed for all the phytoplankton groups studied in all the waters and treatments tested, but only for the pico-sized group a synergetic effect of the mixture and UVR was observed (p = 0.009). When comparing phototoxicity in phytoplankton from oligotrophic and eutrophic waters, synergy was only observed at the oligotrophic communities (p = 0.02) where pico-sized phytoplankton dominated. The degree of sensitivity was related to the trophic degree, decreasing as Chlorophyll a concentration increased. - Highlights: → The smallest picocyanobacteria were the most sensitive to PAHs and UVR. → PAHs-UVR synergism for the picophytoplankton and the oligotrophic communities. → PAHs-UVR additivity for the nanophytoplankton and the eutrophic communities. → An irradiance threshold is suggested to determine the joint action of UVR and PAHs. - Cell size and UVR levels determine additive/synergetic effects of PAHs and UVR to oceanic phytoplankton.

  14. Cell size dependence of additive versus synergetic effects of UV radiation and PAHs on oceanic phytoplankton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echeveste, Pedro, E-mail: pecheveste@imedea.uib-csic.es [Department of Global Change Research, IMEDEA (CSIC-UIB) Instituto Mediterraneo de Estudios Avanzados, Miquel Marques 21, 07190 Esporles, Illes Balears (Spain); Agusti, Susana [Department of Global Change Research, IMEDEA (CSIC-UIB) Instituto Mediterraneo de Estudios Avanzados, Miquel Marques 21, 07190 Esporles, Illes Balears (Spain); Dachs, Jordi [Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research, IDAEA-CSIC, Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain)

    2011-05-15

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons' (PAHs) toxicity is enhanced by the presence of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), which levels have arisen due to the thinning of the ozone layer. In this study, PAHs' phototoxicity for natural marine phytoplankton was tested. Different concentrations of a mixture of 16 PAHs were added to natural phytoplankton communities from the Mediterranean Sea, Atlantic, Arctic and Southern Oceans and exposed to natural sunlight received in situ, including treatments where the UVR bands were removed. PAHs' toxicity was observed for all the phytoplankton groups studied in all the waters and treatments tested, but only for the pico-sized group a synergetic effect of the mixture and UVR was observed (p = 0.009). When comparing phototoxicity in phytoplankton from oligotrophic and eutrophic waters, synergy was only observed at the oligotrophic communities (p = 0.02) where pico-sized phytoplankton dominated. The degree of sensitivity was related to the trophic degree, decreasing as Chlorophyll a concentration increased. - Highlights: > The smallest picocyanobacteria were the most sensitive to PAHs and UVR. > PAHs-UVR synergism for the picophytoplankton and the oligotrophic communities. > PAHs-UVR additivity for the nanophytoplankton and the eutrophic communities. > An irradiance threshold is suggested to determine the joint action of UVR and PAHs. - Cell size and UVR levels determine additive/synergetic effects of PAHs and UVR to oceanic phytoplankton.

  15. Piping failure analysis for the Korean nuclear piping including the effect of in-service inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, S.Y. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst.(KAERI), Daejeon (Korea); Choi, Y.H. [Korea Inst. of Nuclear Safety(KINS), Daejeon (Korea)

    2004-07-01

    The purposes of this paper are to perform piping failure analysis for the failed safety class piping in Korean nuclear power plants(NPPs) and evaluate the effect of an in-service inspection(ISI) on the piping failure probability. For data collection, a database for piping failure events was constructed with 135 data fields including population data, event data, and service history data. A total of 6 kinds of events with 25 failure cases up to June 30, 2003 were identified from Korean NPPs. The failed systems were main feedwater system, CVCS, primary sampling system, essential service water system, and CANDU purification system. Piping failure analyses such as evaluation of the impact on nuclear safety and piping integrity and the root cause analysis were performed and the piping failure frequencies for the failed piping were calculated by using population data. The result showed that although the integrity was not maintained in the failed piping, the safety of the plants was maintained for all the events. And the root causes of the events were analyzed as FAC, vibration, thermal fatigue, corrosion, and/or an improper weld joint. The piping failure frequencies ranged from 6.08E-5/Cr-Yr to 1.15E-3/Cr-Yr for the events. According to the ASME Code sec. XI requirements, the small bore piping less than the nominal diameter of 4 inch is exempt from ISI. There, however, were many piping failures reported in the small bore piping. The effect of ISI considering the pipe size on the piping failure probability was investigated by using the Win-PRAISE program based on probabilistic fracture mechanics. The results showed that there is no significant difference between the small and large bore piping from the viewpoint of the ISI effect on the piping failure probability. It means that ISI for a small bore piping is recommended as well as the large bore piping. (orig.)

  16. A new model for including the effect of fly ash on biochemical methane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertner, Pablo; Huiliñir, César; Pinto-Villegas, Paula; Castillo, Alejandra; Montalvo, Silvio; Guerrero, Lorna

    2017-10-01

    The modelling of the effect of trace elements on anaerobic digestion, and specifically the effect of fly ash, has been scarcely studied. Thus, the present work was aimed at the development of a new function that allows accumulated methane models to predict the effect of FA on the volume of methane accumulation. For this, purpose five fly ash concentrations (10, 25, 50, 250 and 500mg/L) using raw and pre-treated sewage sludge were used to calibrate the new function, while three fly ash concentrations were used (40, 150 and 350mg/L) for validation. Three models for accumulated methane volume (the modified Gompertz equation, the logistic function, and the transfer function) were evaluated. The results showed that methane production increased in the presence of FA when the sewage sludge was not pre-treated, while with pretreated sludge there is inhibition of methane production at FA concentrations higher than 50mg/L. In the calibration of the proposed function, it fits well with the experimental data under all the conditions, including the inhibition and stimulating zones, with the values of the parameters of the methane production models falling in the range of those reported in the literature. For validation experiments, the model succeeded in representing the behavior of new experiments in both the stimulating and inhibiting zones, with NRMSE and R 2 ranging from 0.3577 to 0.03714 and 0.2209 to 0.9911, respectively. Thus, the proposed model is robust and valid for the studied conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimization of piezoelectric cantilever energy harvesters including non-linear effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, R; McWilliam, S; Popov, A A

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a versatile non-linear model for predicting piezoelectric energy harvester performance. The presented model includes (i) material non-linearity, for both substrate and piezoelectric layers, and (ii) geometric non-linearity incorporated by assuming inextensibility and accurately representing beam curvature. The addition of a sub-model, which utilizes the transfer matrix method to predict eigenfrequencies and eigenvectors for segmented beams, allows for accurate optimization of piezoelectric layer coverage. A validation of the overall theoretical model is performed through experimental testing on both uniform and non-uniform samples manufactured in-house. For the harvester composition used in this work, the magnitude of material non-linearity exhibited by the piezoelectric layer is 35 times greater than that of the substrate layer. It is also observed that material non-linearity, responsible for reductions in resonant frequency with increases in base acceleration, is dominant over geometric non-linearity for standard piezoelectric harvesting devices. Finally, over the tested range, energy loss due to damping is found to increase in a quasi-linear fashion with base acceleration. During an optimization study on piezoelectric layer coverage, results from the developed model were compared with those from a linear model. Unbiased comparisons between harvesters were realized by using devices with identical natural frequencies—created by adjusting the device substrate thickness. Results from three studies, each with a different assumption on mechanical damping variations, are presented. Findings showed that, depending on damping variation, a non-linear model is essential for such optimization studies with each model predicting vastly differing optimum configurations. (paper)

  18. Adult vaccination strategies for the control of pertussis in the United States: an economic evaluation including the dynamic population effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Coudeville

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prior economic evaluations of adult and adolescent vaccination strategies against pertussis have reached disparate conclusions. Using static approaches only, previous studies failed to analytically include the indirect benefits derived from herd immunity as well as the impact of vaccination on the evolution of disease incidence over time. METHODS: We assessed the impact of different pertussis vaccination strategies using a dynamic compartmental model able to consider pertussis transmission. We then combined the results with economic data to estimate the relative cost-effectiveness of pertussis immunization strategies for adolescents and adults in the US. The analysis compares combinations of programs targeting adolescents, parents of newborns (i.e. cocoon strategy, or adults of various ages. RESULTS: In the absence of adolescent or adult vaccination, pertussis incidence among adults is predicted to more than double in 20 years. Implementing an adult program in addition to childhood and adolescent vaccination either based on 1 a cocoon strategy and a single booster dose or 2 a decennial routine vaccination would maintain a low level of pertussis incidence in the long run for all age groups (respectively 30 and 20 cases per 100,000 person years. These strategies would also result in significant reductions of pertussis costs (between -77% and -80% including additional vaccination costs. The cocoon strategy complemented by a single booster dose is the most cost-effective one, whereas the decennial adult vaccination is slightly more effective in the long run. CONCLUSIONS: By providing a high level of disease control, the implementation of an adult vaccination program against pertussis appears to be highly cost-effective and often cost-saving.

  19. Cooling Strategies for Vane Leading Edges in a Syngas Environment Including Effects of Deposition and Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, Forrest [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Bons, Jeffrey [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The Department of Energy has goals to move land based gas turbine systems to alternate fuels including coal derived synthetic gas and hydrogen. Coal is the most abundant energy resource in the US and in the world and it is economically advantageous to develop power systems which can use coal. Integrated gasification combined cycles are (IGCC) expected to allow the clean use of coal derived fuels while improving the ability to capture and sequester carbon dioxide. These cycles will need to maintain or increase turbine entry temperatures to develop competitive efficiencies. The use of coal derived syngas introduces a range of potential contaminants into the hot section of the gas turbine including sulfur, iron, calcium, and various alkali metals. Depending on the effectiveness of the gas clean up processes, there exists significant likelihood that the remaining materials will become molten in the combustion process and potentially deposit on downstream turbine surfaces. Past evidence suggests that deposition will be a strong function of increasing temperature. Currently, even with the best gas cleanup processes a small level of particulate matter in the syngas is expected. Consequently, particulate deposition is expected to be an important consideration in the design of turbine components. The leading edge region of first stage vanes most often have higher deposition rates than other areas due to strong fluid acceleration and streamline curvature in the vicinity of the surface. This region remains one of the most difficult areas in a turbine nozzle to cool due to high inlet temperatures and only a small pressure ratio for cooling. The leading edge of a vane often has relatively high heat transfer coefficients and is often cooled using showerhead film cooling arrays. The throat of the first stage nozzle is another area where deposition potentially has a strongly adverse effect on turbine performance as this region meters the turbine inlet flow. Based on roughness

  20. Concentration addition, independent action and generalized concentration addition models for mixture effect prediction of sex hormone synthesis in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadrup, Niels; Taxvig, Camilla; Pedersen, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    and compared to the experimental mixture data. Mixture 1 contained environmental chemicals adjusted in ratio according to human exposure levels. Mixture 2 was a potency adjusted mixture containing five pesticides. Prediction of testosterone effects coincided with the experimental Mixture 1 data. In contrast...... was the predominant but not sole driver of the mixtures, suggesting that one chemical alone was not responsible for the mixture effects. In conclusion, the GCA model seemed to be superior to the CA and IA models for the prediction of testosterone effects. A situation with chemicals exerting opposing effects...

  1. Sunlight Effects on Immune System: Is There Something Else in addition to UV-Induced Immunosuppression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. González Maglio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sunlight, composed of different types of radiation, including ultraviolet wavelengths, is an essential source of light and warmth for life on earth but has strong negative effects on human health, such as promoting the malignant transformation of skin cells and suppressing the ability of the human immune system to efficiently detect and attack malignant cells. UV-induced immunosuppression has been extensively studied since it was first described by Dr. Kripke and Dr. Fisher in the late 1970s. However, skin exposure to sunlight has not only this and other unfavorable effects, for example, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, but also a positive one: the induction of Vitamin D synthesis, which performs several roles within the immune system in addition to favoring bone homeostasis. The impact of low levels of UV exposure on the immune system has not been fully reported yet, but it bears interesting differences with the suppressive effect of high levels of UV radiation, as shown by some recent studies. The aim of this article is to put some ideas in perspective and pose some questions within the field of photoimmunology based on established and new information, which may lead to new experimental approaches and, eventually, to a better understanding of the effects of sunlight on the human immune system.

  2. Effects of Adiponectin Including Reduction of Androstenedione Secretion and Ovarian Oxidative Stress Parameters In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio V Comim

    Full Text Available Adiponectin is the most abundantly produced human adipokine with anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and insulin-sensitizing properties. Evidence from in vitro studies has indicated that adiponectin has a potential role in reproduction because it reduces the production of androstenedione in bovine theca cells in vitro. However, this effect on androgen production has not yet been observed in vivo. The current study evaluated the effect of adiponectin on androstenedione secretion and oxidative stress parameters in a rodent model. Seven-week-old female Balb/c mice (n = 33, previously treated with equine gonadotropin chorionic, were assigned to one of four different treatments: Group 1, control (phosphate-buffered saline; Group 2, adiponectin 0.1 μg/mL; Group 3, adiponectin 1.0 μg/mL; Group 4, adiponectin 5.0 μg/mL. After 24 h, all animals were euthanized and androstenedione levels were measured in the serum while oxidative stress markers were quantified in whole ovary tissue. Female mice treated with adiponectin exhibited a significant reduction (about 60% in serum androstenedione levels in comparison to controls. Androstenedione levels decreased from 0.78 ± 0.4 ng/mL (mean ± SD in controls to 0.28 ± 0.06 ng/mL after adiponectin (5 μg/mL treatment (P = 0.01. This change in androgen secretion after 24 hours of treatment was associated with a significant reduction in the expression of CYP11A1 and STAR (but not CYP17A1. In addition, ovarian AOPP product levels, a direct product of protein oxidation, decreased significantly in adiponectin-treated mice (5 μg/mL; AOPP (mean ± SD decreased to 4.3 ± 2.1 μmol/L in comparison with that of the controls (11.5 ± 1.7 μmol/L; P = 0.0003. Our results demonstrated for the first time that acute treatment with adiponectin reduced the levels of a direct oxidative stress marker in the ovary as well as decreased androstenedione serum levels in vivo after 24 h.

  3. Food additives, contaminants and other minor components: effects on human gut microbiota-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca-Saavedra, Paula; Mendez-Vilabrille, Veronica; Miranda, Jose Manuel; Nebot, Carolina; Cardelle-Cobas, Alejandra; Franco, Carlos M; Cepeda, Alberto

    2018-02-01

    Gut bacteria play an important role in several metabolic processes and human diseases, such as obesity and accompanying co-morbidities, such as fatty liver disease, insulin resistance/diabetes, and cardiovascular events. Among other factors, dietary patterns, probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, antibiotics, and non-dietary factors, such as stress, age, exercise, and climatic conditions, can dramatically impact the human gut microbiota equilibrium and diversity. However, the effect of minor food constituents, including food additives and trace contaminants, on human gut microbiota has received less attention. Consequently, the present review aimed to provide an objective perspective of the current knowledge regarding the impacts of minor food constituents on human gut microbiota and consequently, on human health.

  4. In vitro effectiveness of Castellani solution including various ingredients against different microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şükran Çopur

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: As the external auditory canal is a moisturearea, it facilitates the growth of bacteria and fungi. Infectionsand inflammation due to Staphylococcus aureus,Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aspergillus spp. and Candidaalbicans can develop in this area. Classical Castellanisolution including boric acid, fenol, fucsin, resorcinol, acetone,and alcohol is used for external ear tract infectionsdue to fungi and bacteria, and also for the superficial dermatophytoses,and eczematous dermatitis of the externalear tract infections.The purpose of this study is to investigate of the in vitroeffectiveness of classical Castellani solution and its differentformulations with different dilutions against the standardyeast and bacteria strains.Methods: C. albicans ATCC 10231, C. krusei ATCC6258, C. dubliniensis CD 36, C. guilliermondii ATCC6260, C. parapsilosis ATCC22019, E. coli ATCC 25922,P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853, MRSA ATCC 43300, Staphylococcusaureus ATCC 25923, and S. epidermidis ATCC12228 strains were included in the study. Broth microdilutionmethod was used for each microorganism and Castellaniformulation. The tests are repeated at least twice.Results: The inhibitory concentration of classical Castellanisolution against bacteria and fungi is 1/64-1/256,1/32-1/64 for fuchsin free solution, 1/32-1/128 for boricacid-free solution and, 1/64-1/128 for resorcinol-free solution.Conclusions: As a conclusion we think that the classicalCastellani solution and its different formulations at variousdilutions may be effective antimicrobial agents for differentpatient populations. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (3:302-305Key words: Castellani solution, antimicrobial activity, in vitro

  5. Effect of potassium addition on YBa2Cu3O x superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, K.; Sakai, N.; Murakami, M.; Hirabayashi, I.

    2006-01-01

    Long period post-annealing in the oxygen atmosphere is necessary for YBa 2 Cu 3 O x (Y123) bulk superconductors to impart superconductivity. We have investigated whether Y123 shows good superconductivity without oxygen annealing by potassium addition. If K + ion substitutes on Ba 2+ site since the size of K + ion is close to that of Ba 2+ ion, we can expect hole doping effect without additional oxygen annealing. We confirmed that the sample without potassium addition exhibited no superconductivity, while the sample with potassium addition had the onset T c of above 90 K. This implies that the potassium addition certainly promotes the superconductivity of Y123

  6. Rheology Effects on Predicted Fiber Orientation and Elastic Properties in Large Scale Polymer Composite Additive Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaogui Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Short fiber-reinforced polymers have recently been introduced to large-scale additive manufacturing to improve the mechanical performances of printed-parts. As the short fiber polymer composite is extruded and deposited on a moving platform, velocity gradients within the melt orientate the suspended fibers, and the final orientation directly affects material properties in the solidified extrudate. This paper numerically evaluates melt rheology effects on predicted fiber orientation and elastic properties of printed-composites in three steps. First, the steady-state isothermal axisymmetric nozzle melt flow is computed, which includes the prediction of die swell just outside the nozzle exit. Simulations are performed with ANSYS-Polyflow, where we consider the effect of various rheology models on the computed outcomes. Here, we include Newtonian, generalized Newtonian, and viscoelastic rheology models to represent the melt flow. Fiber orientation is computed using Advani–Tucker fiber orientation tensors. Finally, elastic properties in the extrudate are evaluated based from predicted fiber orientation distributions. Calculations show that the Phan–Thien–Tanner (PTT model yields the lowest fiber principal alignment among considered rheology models. Furthermore, the cross section averaged elastic properties indicate a strong transversely isotropic behavior in these composites, where generalized Newtonian models yield higher principal Young’s modulus, while the viscoelastic fluid models result in higher shear moduli.

  7. Fatigue performance of additively manufactured meta-biomaterials: The effects of topology and material type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, S M; Hedayati, R; Li, Y; Lietaert, K; Tümer, N; Fatemi, A; Rans, C D; Pouran, B; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2018-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) techniques enable fabrication of bone-mimicking meta-biomaterials with unprecedented combinations of topological, mechanical, and mass transport properties. The mechanical performance of AM meta-biomaterials is a direct function of their topological design. It is, however, not clear to what extent the material type is important in determining the fatigue behavior of such biomaterials. We therefore aimed to determine the isolated and modulated effects of topological design and material type on the fatigue response of metallic meta-biomaterials fabricated with selective laser melting. Towards that end, we designed and additively manufactured Co-Cr meta-biomaterials with three types of repeating unit cells and three to four porosities per type of repeating unit cell. The AM meta-biomaterials were then mechanically tested to obtain their normalized S-N curves. The obtained S-N curves of Co-Cr meta-biomaterials were compared to those of meta-biomaterials with same topological designs but made from other materials, i.e. Ti-6Al-4V, tantalum, and pure titanium, available from our previous studies. We found the material type to be far more important than the topological design in determining the normalized fatigue strength of our AM metallic meta-biomaterials. This is the opposite of what we have found for the quasi-static mechanical properties of the same meta-biomaterials. The effects of material type, manufacturing imperfections, and topological design were different in the high and low cycle fatigue regions. That is likely because the cyclic response of meta-biomaterials depends not only on the static and fatigue strengths of the bulk material but also on other factors that may include strut roughness, distribution of the micro-pores created inside the struts during the AM process, and plasticity. Meta-biomaterials are a special class of metamaterials with unusual or unprecedented combinations of mechanical, physical (e.g. mass transport

  8. Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in a quintessence cosmological model: Including anisotropic stress of dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y. T.; Xu, L. X.; Gui, Y. X.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect in the quintessence cold dark matter model with constant equation of state and constant speed of sound in dark energy rest frame, including dark energy perturbation and its anisotropic stress. Comparing with the ΛCDM model, we find that the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW)-power spectrums are affected by different background evolutions and dark energy perturbation. As we change the speed of sound from 1 to 0 in the quintessence cold dark matter model with given state parameters, it is found that the inclusion of dark energy anisotropic stress makes the variation of magnitude of the ISW source uncertain due to the anticorrelation between the speed of sound and the ratio of dark energy density perturbation contrast to dark matter density perturbation contrast in the ISW-source term. Thus, the magnitude of the ISW-source term is governed by the competition between the alterant multiple of (1+3/2xc-circumflex s 2 ) and that of δ de /δ m with the variation of c-circumflex s 2 .

  9. Representation-free description of light-pulse atom interferometry including non-inertial effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinert, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.kleinert@uni-ulm.de [Institut für Quantenphysik and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology (IQST), Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Kajari, Endre; Roura, Albert [Institut für Quantenphysik and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology (IQST), Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Schleich, Wolfgang P. [Institut für Quantenphysik and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology (IQST), Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Texas A& M University Institute for Advanced Study (TIAS), Institute for Quantum Science and Engineering (IQSE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States)

    2015-12-30

    Light-pulse atom interferometers rely on the wave nature of matter and its manipulation with coherent laser pulses. They are used for precise gravimetry and inertial sensing as well as for accurate measurements of fundamental constants. Reaching higher precision requires longer interferometer times which are naturally encountered in microgravity environments such as drop-tower facilities, sounding rockets and dedicated satellite missions aiming at fundamental quantum physics in space. In all those cases, it is necessary to consider arbitrary trajectories and varying orientations of the interferometer set-up in non-inertial frames of reference. Here we provide a versatile representation-free description of atom interferometry entirely based on operator algebra to address this general situation. We show how to analytically determine the phase shift as well as the visibility of interferometers with an arbitrary number of pulses including the effects of local gravitational accelerations, gravity gradients, the rotation of the lasers and non-inertial frames of reference. Our method conveniently unifies previous results and facilitates the investigation of novel interferometer geometries.

  10. Effects of surfactant mixtures, including Corexit 9527, on bacterial oxidation of acetate and alkanes in crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruheim, P.; Bredholt, H.; Eimhjellen, K. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Dept. of Biotechnology

    1999-04-01

    Mixtures of nonionic and anionic surfactants, including Corexit 9527, were tested to determine their effects on bacterial oxidation of acetate and alkanes in crude oil by cells pregrown on these substrates. Corexit 9527 inhibited oxidation of the alkanes in crude oil by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus ATCC 31012, while Span 80, a Corexit 9527 constituent, markedly increased the oil oxidation rate. Another Corexit 9257 constituent, the negatively charged dioctyl sulfosuccinate (AOT), strongly reduced the oxidation rate. The combination of Span 80 and AOT increased the rate, but not as much as Span 80 alone increased it, which tentatively explained the negative effect of Corexit 9527. The results of acetate uptake and oxidation experiments indicated that the nonionic surfactants interacted with the acetate uptake system while the anionic surfactant interacted with the oxidation system of the bacteria. The overall effect of Corexit 9527 on alkane oxidation by A. calcoaceticus ATCC 31012 thus seems to be the sum of the independent effects of the individual surfactants in the surfactant mixture. When Rhodococcus sp. strain 094 was used, the alkane oxidation rate decreased to almost zero in the presence of a mixture of Tergitol 15-S-7 and AOT even though the Tergitol 15-S-7 surfactant increased the alkane oxidation rate and AOT did not affect it. This indicated that there was synergism between the two surfactants rather than an additive effect like that observed for A. calcoaceticus ATCC 31012.

  11. Effect of Salt and Ethanol Addition on Zein-Starch Dough and Bread Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brennan M; Bean, Scott R; Selling, Gordon; Sessa, David; Aramouni, Fadi M

    2017-03-01

    Development of viscoelastic doughs from non-wheat proteins allows for a wider range of gluten-free products. Little work has been completed to describe mechanisms of zein functionality in food systems. To identify factors responsible for dough development in zein-starch mixtures and their influence on zein bread quality, a mixture of 20% zein-80% maize starch was mixed with water and various reagents. Salts, NaSCN, NaCl, and Na 2 SO 4 were evaluated at concentrations from 0 to 2M for their influence on the properties of zein-starch dough systems. NaSCN at low concentrations produced softer dough. Ethanol treatments produced softer more workable dough in the absence of salts. Increasing concentrations of NaCl and Na 2 SO 4 resulted in coalescing of the proteins and no dough formation. The addition of β-ME had minimal softening effects on zein-starch dough. Specific volumes of zein-starch bread increased with decreasing NaCl addition in bread formulations. Likewise, including 5% ethanol (v/v) in the bread formula increased bread quality. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  12. Lung cancer risk from radon and smoking - additive or multiplicative effect?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasek, L.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the work is to evaluate the risk of lung cancer when combined radon and smoking exposure. Methodologically the evaluation is based on case and control study nested in two cohort studies, including 11,000 miners and 12,000 residents exposed to high concentrations of radon in homes. Radon exposure in individuals is complemented by information on smoking gained personally from them or from their relatives. The study is based on 1,073 cases of lung cancer among miners and 372 cases in population study. Control subjects were randomly selected in each study based on gender, year of birth and age achieved. The combined effect of smoking and radon is evaluated using the so-called geometric mixed models, whose special case is an additive or multiplicative model. The resulting model of the risk is closer to additive interaction (parameter of mixed model 0.2). The consequences of the model in the study of population are illustrated by estimates of lifetime risk in a hypothetical population of smokers and nonsmokers. Compared to the multiplicative risk model, the lifetime risk significantly increased according to the best geometric mixed model, especially in the population of non-smokers. (author)

  13. LOX/GOX sensitivity of fluoroelastomers. [effect of formulation components and addition of fire retardants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshen, N.; Mill, T.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of formulation components and the addition of fire retardants on the impact sensitivity of Viton B fluoroelastomer in liquid oxygen was studied with the objective of developing a procedure for reliably reducing this sensitivity. Component evaluation, carried out on more than 40 combinations of components and cure cycles, showed that almost all the standard formulation agents, including carbon, MgO, Diak-3, and PbO2, will sensitize the Viton stock either singly or in combinations, some combinations being much more sensitive than others. Cure and postcure treatments usually reduced the sensitivity of a given formulation, often dramatically, but no formulated Viton was as insensitive as the pure Viton B stock. Coating formulated Viton with a thin layer of pure Viton gave some indication of reduced sensitivity, but additional tests are needed. It is concluded that sensitivity in formulated Viton arises from a variety of sources, some physical and some chemical in origin. Elemental analyses for all the formulated Vitons are reported as are the results of a literature search on the subject of LOX impact sensitivity.

  14. Autolysis of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) meat: characterization and the effects of protein additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakpetch, P; Benjakul, S; Visessanguan, W; Kijroongrojana, K

    2008-03-01

    Autolytic activity of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) mince in the absence and in the presence of 2.5%NaCl was investigated. Pacific white shrimp mince exhibited the maximum autolytic activity at 35 and 40 degrees C in the absence and in the presence of 2.5%NaCl, respectively, as evidenced by the highest TCA-soluble peptide content and the greatest disappearance of myosin heavy chain (MHC). The autolysis was more pronounced in the acidic pH values, followed by alkaline pH ranges. Pepstatin A showed the highest inhibition toward autolysis in the acidic condition, revealing that aspartic proteinase was dominant in shrimp muscle. Nevertheless, soybean trypsin inhibitor effectively inhibited the autolysis at neutral and alkaline pH values, suggesting that serine proteinase was present in shrimp mince but contributed to autolysis at a lower extent in shrimp meat. Autolysis in shrimp meat could be inhibited partially by all protein additives, including bovine plasma protein (BPP), egg white (EW), and whey protein concentrate (WPC). The inhibition of autolysis increased when the level of protein additives increased with the concomitant increase in band intensity of MHC retained. WPC and BPP in the range of 2% to 3% exhibited the highest inhibition toward autolysis of shrimp mince.

  15. Direct Numerical Simulations of Microstructure Effects During High-Rate Loading of Additively Manufactured Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaile, Corbett; Owen, Steven; Moore, Nathan

    2017-06-01

    The properties of most engineering materials depend on the characteristics of internal microstructures and defects. In additively manufactured (AM) metals, these can include polycrystalline grains, impurities, phases, and significant porosity that qualitatively differ from conventional engineering materials. The microscopic details of the interactions between these internal defects, and the propagation of applied loads through the body, act in concert to dictate macro-observable properties like strength and compressibility. In this work, we used Sandia's ALEGRA finite element software to simulate the high-strain-rate loading of AM metals from laser engineered net shaping (LENS) and thermal spraying. The microstructural details of the material were represented explicitly, such that internal features like second phases and pores are captured and meshed as individual entities in the computational domain. We will discuss the dependence of the high-strain-rate mechanical properties on microstructural characteristics such as the shapes, sizes, and volume fractions of second phases and pores. In addition, we will examine how the details of the microstructural representation affect the microscopic material response to dynamic loads, and the effects of using ``stair-step'' versus conformal interfaces smoothed via the SCULPT tool in Sandia's CUBIT software. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the US DOE NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Effects of Increased Summer Precipitation and Nitrogen Addition on Root Decomposition in a Temperate Desert.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Zhao

    Full Text Available Climate change scenarios that include precipitation shifts and nitrogen (N deposition are impacting carbon (C budgets in arid ecosystems. Roots constitute an important part of the C cycle, but it is still unclear which factors control root mass loss and nutrient release in arid lands.Litterbags were used to investigate the decomposition rate and nutrient dynamics in root litter with water and N-addition treatments in the Gurbantunggut Desert in China. Water and N addition had no significant effect on root mass loss and the N and phosphorus content of litter residue. The loss of root litter and nutrient releases were strongly controlled by the initial lignin content and the lignin:N ratio, as evidenced by the negative correlations between decomposition rate and litter lignin content and the lignin:N ratio. Fine roots of Seriphidium santolinum (with higher initial lignin content had a slower decomposition rate in comparison to coarse roots.Results from this study indicate that small and temporary changes in rainfall and N deposition do not affect root decomposition patterns in the Gurbantunggut Desert. Root decomposition rates were significantly different between species, and also between fine and coarse roots, and were determined by carbon components, especially lignin content, suggesting that root litter quality may be the primary driver of belowground carbon turnover.

  17. Effect of EP additives in synthetic base oils. Goseiyu ni taisuru kyokuatsuzai no koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, S.; Akiba, K.; Yokomori, Y. (National Defence Academy, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1994-07-01

    Accompanying the spread of applicability of synthetic base oils, the effects of various additives on them have been discussed. As a link of a study relating to additives for synthetic oils, the anti-seizure effects of sulfur-based extreme pressure additives (abbreviated S-additives), phosphates and zinc dithiophosphate (ZDP) on three kinds of synthetic base oil- poly-[alpha] olefin (PAO), dialkyl adipate (DA), trimethylol propane ester (TMP) - were investigated in this work. In addition, various additives in these oils were compared in adsorptivity to iron powder, and pyrolytic characteristic or hydrolytic characteristic on iron powder. The anti-seizure effects of extreme pressure additives on each kind of synthetic base oil were compared as shown in the following: DA>PAO, TMP, or PAO[ge]DA>TMP in S-additives; PAO>DA, TMP in phosphates; and PAO>TMP>DA in ZDP. These relations are controlled mainly by pyrolysis in S-additives, by adsorptivity in phosphates and by both of them in ZDP. 6 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Nutrient additions in pristine Patagonian Sphagnum bog vegetation : can phosphorus addition alleviate (the effects of) increased nitrogen loads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fritz, C.; Dijk, G. van; Smolders, A.J.P.; Pancotto, V.A.; Elzenga, J.T.M.; Roelofs, J.G.M.; Grootjans, A.P.

    Sphagnum-bog ecosystems have a limited capability to retain carbon and nutrients when subjected to increased nitrogen (N) deposition. Although it has been proposed that phosphorus (P) can dilute negative effects of nitrogen by increasing biomass production of Sphagnum mosses, it is still unclear

  19. Effectiveness of the Touch Math Technique in Teaching Basic Addition to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yikmis, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to reveal whether the touch math technique is effective in teaching basic addition to children with autism. The dependent variable of this study is the children's skills to solve addition problems correctly, whereas teaching with the touch math technique is the independent variable. Among the single-subject research models, a…

  20. Effect of Vitamin C Addition on some Quality Aspects of Wheat Bread ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The effect of vitamin C addition on some quality aspects of wheat bread was evaluated. Subjects/Materials and Methods: Wheat bread was produced using the straight dough method with addition of varying quantities of vitamin C (between 0.05 to 0.40g) as an improver, with the sample without vitamin C serving ...

  1. Effects of Some Chemical Food Additives on the Shelf-Life Stability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of Some Chemical Food Additives on the Shelf-Life Stability of Plantain Chips Stored at Ambient Temperature. ... Conclusion: The chemical additives conferred antimicrobial, antioxidant and preservative properties on the plantain chips and therefore prolonged the shelf life up to four weeks. Keywords: Plantain chips ...

  2. Effect of dietary fiber (inulin) addition on phenolics and in vitro bioaccessibility of tomato sauce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomas, Merve; Beekwilder, Jules; Hall, Robert D.; Diez Simon, Carmen; Sagdic, Osman; Capanoglu, Esra

    2018-01-01

    The effect of the addition of inulin (5 and 10%) on the phenolic content and in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of tomato sauces has been investigated. Results have shown that the addition of inulin to tomato sauce significantly decreased the total phenolic content (57–68%), total flavonoid content

  3. Polyelectrolyte addition effect on the properties of setting hydraulic cements based on calcium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Luis A. dos; Oliveira, Luci C. de; Rigo, Eliana C.S.; Boschi, Anselmo Ortega; Carrodeguas, Raul Gracia

    1997-01-01

    In the present work the effects of the addition of some poly electrolytes (sodium alginate and poly acrylic acid) on the solubility, crystalline phases, pH and mechanical strength under compression of three calcium phosphate cements were studied. (author)

  4. Effects of Ni-5%RExOy Composite Additives on Electrochemical Hydrogen Storage Performances of Mg2Ni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Guo-fang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Ni-5%RExOy (CeO2, La2O3, Eu2O3 as composite additives, Mg2Ni-Ni-5%RExOy composites were prepared by the ball milling method. The effects of different additives on the structure, morphology, electrochemistry and kinetic properties of Mg2Ni alloy were studied systematically. The results show that composite additives can improve the proportion of amorphous and nanocrystalline structure of Mg2Ni alloy. The particle size is homogeneous but the agglomeration is observed in the sample with Ni-5%CeO2 additives. The composites with additives show higher maximum discharge capacity and better cycle stabilities. All of these three kinds of composite additives can improve the kinetic properties of the composites effectively, including optimizing the charge-transfer ability, the reversibility of the electrochemical reaction on the alloy surface, and enhancing the diffusion coefficients of H atoms in the bulk of alloy. Among these three kinds of additives, Ni-5%CeO2 additive shows the best catalysis effect on promoting the kinetic properties of the composites.

  5. Effect of Skimmed-Milk and Starter Addition on Lactic Acid Formation in Soyghurt

    OpenAIRE

    Syamsuddin, Yanna; Meilina, Hesti; Septavia, Friday; Darmawan, Rahmad

    2013-01-01

    Research on Effect of Skimmed-Milk and Starter Addition on Lactic Acid Formation in Soyghurt has been done. Soyghurt is a probiotic drinking product made from soy-milk produced by fermentation process using lactic acid bacteria. The bacteria used as starter was Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophillus. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of skimmed-milk and starter addition on the formation of lactic acid. Variables used in this research was skimmed-milk ...

  6. The additive effect of turn-taking cues in human and synthetic voice

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A previous line of research suggests that interlocutors identify appropriate places to speak by cues in the behaviour of the preceding speaker. If used in combination, these cues have an additive effect on listeners? turn-taking attempts. The present study further explores these findings by examining the effect of such turn-taking cues experimentally. The objective is to investigate the possibilities of generating turn-taking cues with a synthetic voice. Thus, in addition ...

  7. An atomic view of additive mutational effects in a protein structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, M.M.; Terwilliger, T.C.

    1996-04-01

    Substitution of a single amino acid in a protein will often lead to substantial changes in properties. If these properties could be altered in a rational way then proteins could be readily generated with functions tailored to specific uses. When amino acid substitutions are made at well-separated locations in a single protein, their effects are generally additive. Additivity of effects of amino acid substitutions is very useful because the properties of proteins with any combination of substitutions can be inferred directly from those of the proteins with single changes. It would therefore be of considerable interest to have a means of knowing whether substitutions at a particular pair of sites in a protein are likely to lead to additive effects. The structural basis for additivity of effects of mutations on protein function was examined by determining crystal structures of single and double mutants in the hydrophobic core of gene V protein. Structural effects of mutations were found to be cumulative when two mutations were made in a single protein. Additivity occurs in this case because the regions structurally affected by mutations at the two sites do not overlap even though the sites are separated by only 9 {angstrom}. Structural distortions induced by mutations in gene V protein decrease rapidly, but not isotropically, with distance from the site of mutation. It is anticipated that cases where structural and functional effects of mutations will be additive could be identified simply by examining whether the regions structurally affected by each component mutation overlap.

  8. The effect of some organic and non-organic additions on the shielding and mechanical properties of radiation shielding concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Yousef, S.; Al-Nassar, M.

    2011-04-01

    Few studies on the effect of some additives on the shielding properties of concrete have been carried out in this research. These studies included the effect of carbon powder, boron compounds, and waste polyethylene. The effect of water to cement ratio has been studied too. The research results showed that carbon powder and some boron compounds could be used to improve shielding concrete properties, and the possibility to add waste polyethylene in shielding concrete without effects on shielding properties. No significant effect for water to cement ratio on shielding properties of concrete. (author)

  9. Dissection of additive, dominance, and imprinting effects for production and reproduction traits in Holstein cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jicai; Shen, Botong; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; VanRaden, Paul M; Cole, John B; Ma, Li

    2017-05-30

    Although genome-wide association and genomic selection studies have primarily focused on additive effects, dominance and imprinting effects play an important role in mammalian biology and development. The degree to which these non-additive genetic effects contribute to phenotypic variation and whether QTL acting in a non-additive manner can be detected in genetic association studies remain controversial. To empirically answer these questions, we analyzed a large cattle dataset that consisted of 42,701 genotyped Holstein cows with genotyped parents and phenotypic records for eight production and reproduction traits. SNP genotypes were phased in pedigree to determine the parent-of-origin of alleles, and a three-component GREML was applied to obtain variance decomposition for additive, dominance, and imprinting effects. The results showed a significant non-zero contribution from dominance to production traits but not to reproduction traits. Imprinting effects significantly contributed to both production and reproduction traits. Interestingly, imprinting effects contributed more to reproduction traits than to production traits. Using GWAS and imputation-based fine-mapping analyses, we identified and validated a dominance association signal with milk yield near RUNX2, a candidate gene that has been associated with milk production in mice. When adding non-additive effects into the prediction models, however, we observed little or no increase in prediction accuracy for the eight traits analyzed. Collectively, our results suggested that non-additive effects contributed a non-negligible amount (more for reproduction traits) to the total genetic variance of complex traits in cattle, and detection of QTLs with non-additive effect is possible in GWAS using a large dataset.

  10. Effects of feed additives on rumen and blood profiles during a starch and fructose challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golder, H M; Celi, P; Rabiee, A R; Lean, I J

    2014-02-01

    We evaluated the effect of feed additives on the risk of ruminal acidosis in Holstein heifers (n = 40) fed starch and fructose in a challenge study. Heifers were randomly allocated to feed additive groups (n = 8 heifers/group): (1) control (no additives); (2) virginiamycin (VM); (3) monensin + tylosin (MT); (4) monensin + live yeast (MLY); and (5) sodium bicarbonate + magnesium oxide (BUF). Heifers were fed 2.5% of body weight (BW) dry matter intake (DMI) per day of a total mixed ration (62:38 forage:concentrate) and feed additives for a 20-d adaptation period. Fructose (0.1% of BW/d) was included for the last 10d of the adaptation period. On d 21, heifers were fed to target a DMI of 1.0% of BW of wheat, fructose at 0.2% of BW, and their feed additives. Rumen fluid samples obtained by stomach tube and blood samples were collected weekly as well as during a 3.6-h period on challenge day (d 21). Virginiamycin and BUF groups maintained a consistently high DMI across the 20-d adaptation period. The MLY heifers had low DMI of the challenge ration. Average daily gain and feed conversion ratio were not affected by feed additives. All rumen and plasma measures changed weekly over adaptation and over the challenge sampling period with the exception of rumen total lactate and histamine concentrations, plasma oxidative stress index, and ceruloplasmin. Substantial within- and between-group variation was observed in rumen and plasma profiles at challenge sampling. No significant group changes were observed in rumen total volatile fatty acids, propionate, acetate-to-propionate ratio, isobutyrate, caproate, isovalerate, total lactate, d- and l-lactate, and pH measures on challenge day. Acetate concentration was increased in the BUF and control groups on challenge day. Butyrate concentration was lower in the MLY and MT groups compared with other groups at challenge. Valerate concentrations were lowest in the control, VM, and BUF groups and lactate concentrations were numerically

  11. Estimation of direct effects for survival data by using the Aalen additive hazards model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Torben; Vansteelandt, Stijn; Gerster, Mette

    2011-01-01

    Aalen's additive regression for the event time, given exposure, intermediate variable and confounders. The second stage involves applying Aalen's additive model, given the exposure alone, to a modified stochastic process (i.e. a modification of the observed counting process based on the first......We extend the definition of the controlled direct effect of a point exposure on a survival outcome, other than through some given, time-fixed intermediate variable, to the additive hazard scale. We propose two-stage estimators for this effect when the exposure is dichotomous and randomly assigned...

  12. Additive effect of linseed oil supplementation on the lipid profiles of older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avelino APA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ana Paula A Avelino,1 Gláucia MM Oliveira,1 Célia CD Ferreira,2 Ronir R Luiz,3 Glorimar Rosa1,4 1Post-Graduate Program of Medicine-Cardiology, 2Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, 3Institute of Public Health Studies, 4Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Josué de Castro Nutrition Institute, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Background: Linseed oil has been investigated as a rich source of n-3 series polyunsaturated fatty acids, which mainly produce a non-atherogenic lipid profile. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of linseed oil supplementation associated with nutritional guidelines on the lipid profiles of older adults, according to the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA.Methods: We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial with 110 older adults randomized in two groups: placebo and linseed oil. The linseed oil group received supplementation with 3 g of linseed oil. Both groups received nutritional guidance and were supplemented for 90 days with monthly blood collection for biochemical analysis. The dietary intake of saturated fat was subdivided into low (<7% SFA/day of the total energy value and high consumption groups (>7% SFA/day of the total energy value.Results: Low SFA (<7% SFA/day of total energy value consumption was associated with lower total cholesterol concentrations. However, we observed that the linseed oil group, including older adults who consumed >7% SFA/day, had a greater reduction in total cholesterol than the placebo group (P=0.020. The same was observed for low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol (P<0.050, suggesting an additive effect of linseed oil and diet. High-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol concentrations were increased significantly in only the linseed group, suggesting that the nutritional intervention alone did not improve HDL cholesterol.Conclusion: The results suggest that the nutritional intervention was effective, but linseed

  13. Effects of additives in α- and θ-alumina: an ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, Erik; Andersson, Jon M; Chirita, Valeriu; Helmersson, Ulf

    2004-01-01

    It is of high fundamental and practical importance to be able to control the formation and stability of the different crystalline phases of alumina (Al 2 O 3 ). In this study, we have used density functional theory methods to investigate the changes induced in the thermodynamically stable α phase and the metastable θ phase as one eighth of the Al atoms are substituted for different additives (Sc, W, Mo, Cr, Cu, Si, and B). The calculations predict that the additives strongly affect the relative stability between the two phases. Most tested additives are shown to shift the relative stability towards, and in some cases completely stabilize, the θ phase, while Cu doping is predicted to increase the relative stability of the α phase. The reasons for these effects are discussed, as are possible implications on the growth and use of doped aluminas in practical applications. In addition, the effects of the additives on bulk moduli and densities of states have been investigated

  14. 3-D MDT with spherical targets by bilinear interpolation for determining blood velocity profiles including the vessel wall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choomphon-anomakhun, Natthaphon; Natenapit, Mayuree

    2018-02-01

    A numerical simulation of three-dimensional (3-D) implant assisted-magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT) using ferromagnetic spherical targets, including the effect from the vessel wall on the blood flow, is presented. The targets were implanted within arterioles and subjected to an externally uniform applied magnetic field in order to increase the effectiveness of targeting magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs). The capture area (As) of the MDCPs was determined by inspection of the particle trajectories simulated from the particle equations of motion. The blood flow velocities at any particle position around the target were obtained by applying bilinear interpolation to the numerical blood velocity data. The effects on As of the type of ferromagnetic materials in the targets and MDCPs, average blood flow rates, mass fraction of the ferromagnetic material in the MDCPs, average radii of MDCPs (Rp) and the externally applied magnetic field strength (μ0H0) were evaluated. Furthermore, the appropriate μ0H0 and Rp for the IA-MDT design is suggested. In the case of the SS409 target and magnetite MDCPs, dimensionless capture areas ranging from 4.1- to 12.4 and corresponding to particle capture efficiencies of 31-94% were obtained with Rp ranging from 100- to 500 nm, weight fraction of 80%, μ0H0 of 0.6 T and an average blood flow rate of 0.01 ms-1. In addition, the more general 3-D modelling of IA-MDT in this work is applicable to IA-MDT using spherical targets implanted within blood vessels for both laminar and potential blood flows including the wall effect.

  15. The effects of electron beam irradiation on additives present in food-contact polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowson, Andrew.

    1991-09-01

    A range of additives (Irganox 1010, Irganox 1076, Irganox 1330, Irgafos 168 and Tinuvin 622) has been incorporated into a variety of food-contact polymers including polypropylene and low density polyethylene. Samples of these stabilized polymers were subjected to electron-beam or gamma irradiation to receive doses of 1,5,10,25 and 50 kGy. The effects of electron-beam irradiation on the amount of extractable antioxidant in polymers were determined. Using hplc techniques it was found that there was a dose-related reduction in the amount of extractable antioxidant similar to that caused by gamma irradiation. The magnitude of this reduction was found to be dependent upon the nature of both the antioxidant and the polymer type. Electron-beam irradiation was also found to cause a dose-related reduction in the levels of the antioxidants Irganox 1010 and Irganox 1076 migrating from polymers into a food simulant. This effect was similar to that caused by gamma irradiation. (author)

  16. Effect of antiwear additives in synthetic base oils. Goseiyu ni taisuru mamo boshizai no koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, S.; Nakashima, T.; Yokomori, Y.; Nishi, S. (The National Defence Academy, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1994-01-01

    The antiwear effects of organic phosphates (tricresyl phosphate (TCP), trioctyl phosphate (TOP) and dioctyl phosphate (DOP)) and a commercial zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate (ZDP) admixed in three different types of synthetic base oils, poly [alpha] olefin (PAO), diester (DA) and trimethylol propane ester (TMP), were examined using a soda four-ball tester. As a result, effects of these antiwear additives were in the following order: PAO>DA[much gt] TMP. Adsorption of these additives on iron powder from the synthetic oil solutions, and hydrolysis or thermal decomposition in the synthetic oils, were also examined. As a result, these effects of the antiwear additives in synthetic base oils were highly affected by the relative intensity of adsorption between additives and synthetic oils on the rubbing surfaces. Furthermore, it was clarified that hydrolysis of phosphates and thermal decomposition of ZDP were affected by synthetic base oils. 14 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. The total assessment profile, volume 2. [including societal impact, cost effectiveness, and economic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, G.; Jutila, S.; King, J.; Muraco, W.; Hansell, J.; Lindeen, J.; Franckowiak, E.; Flaschner, A.

    1975-01-01

    Appendices are presented which include discussions of interest formulas, factors in regionalization, parametric modeling of discounted benefit-sacrifice streams, engineering economic calculations, and product innovation. For Volume 1, see .

  18. Modeling of Pem Fuel Cell Systems Including Controls and Reforming Effects for Hybrid Automotive Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boettner, Daisie

    2001-01-01

    .... This study develops models for a stand-alone Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack, a direct-hydrogen fuel cell system including auxiliaries, and a methanol reforming fuel cell system for integration into a vehicle performance simulator...

  19. Including load sequence effects in the fatigue damage estimation of an offshore wind turbine substructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dragt, R.C.; Maljaars, J.; Tuitman, J.T.; Salman, Y.; Otheguy, M.E.

    2016-01-01

    Retardation is a load sequence effect, which causes a reduced fatigue crack growth rate after an overload is encountered. Retardation can be cancelled when the overload is followed by an underload. The net effect is beneficial to the fatigue lifetime of Offshore Wind Turbines (OWTs). To be able to

  20. A novel method of including Landau level mixing in numerical studies of the quantum Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wooten, Rachel; Quinn, John; Macek, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Landau level mixing should influence the quantum Hall effect for all except the strongest applied magnetic fields. We propose a simple method for examining the effects of Landau level mixing by incorporating multiple Landau levels into the Haldane pseudopotentials through exact numerical diagonalization. Some of the resulting pseudopotentials for the lowest and first excited Landau levels will be presented

  1. Transient performances analysis of wind turbine system with induction generator including flux saturation and skin effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, H.; Zhao, B.; Han, L.

    2010-01-01

    In order to analyze correctly the effect of different models for induction generators on the transient performances of large wind power generation, Wind turbine driven squirrel cage induction generator (SCIG) models taking into account both main and leakage flux saturation and skin effect were...

  2. Beam dynamics in high intensity cyclotrons including neighboring bunch effects: Model, implementation, and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Yang (杨建俊

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Space-charge effects, being one of the most significant collective effects, play an important role in high intensity cyclotrons. However, for cyclotrons with small turn separation, other existing effects are of equal importance. Interactions of radially neighboring bunches are also present, but their combined effects have not yet been investigated in any great detail. In this paper, a new particle in the cell-based self-consistent numerical simulation model is presented for the first time. The model covers neighboring bunch effects and is implemented in the three-dimensional object-oriented parallel code OPAL-cycl, a flavor of the OPAL framework. We discuss this model together with its implementation and validation. Simulation results are presented from the PSI 590 MeV ring cyclotron in the context of the ongoing high intensity upgrade program, which aims to provide a beam power of 1.8 MW (CW at the target destination.

  3. Biological and Health Effects of Exposure to Kerosene-Based Jet Fuels and Performance Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    bacterial strains can initiate the metabolism of PAHs to compounds with toxicity potential. For example, Pseudomonas putida can, through naphthalene 1,2...deoxygenase, initiate a metabolic cascade with possible end products of salicylate, then catechol. Pseudomonas and a number of other hydrocarbon-degrading...4. Metal deactivator 5. Antioxidant Performance additives JP-8 + 100 ɘ.5% 1. Thermal stability package, including performance additives 1–5

  4. Effects of minor alloying additions on the strength and swelling behavior of an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gessel, G.R.

    1978-06-01

    A set of 32 alloys consisting of various additions of the elements Mo, W, Al, Ti, Nb, C and Si to an Fe-7.5 Cr-20 Ni alloy were made in order to investigate the effects of these solute additions on alloy swelling and strength. Both single and multiple additions were examined. The influence of various solute elements on the swelling behavior in the range 500 to 730 0 C was investigated using 4 MeV Ni ion bombardment to a dose 170 dpa. It was found that on an atomic percent basis, the elements may be arranged in order of decreasing effectiveness in reducing peak temperature swelling as follows: Ti, C, Nb, Si, and Mo. Small amounts of aluminum enhance swelling. Additions of Si, Ti, or Nb truncate the high temperature swelling regime of the ternary alloy. Mo, W, and C do not have a strong effect on the temperature dependence of swelling. The results may be interpreted in terms of the effect of point defect trapping on void growth rates, and it is suggested that the changes in peak temperature are the result of small changes in the free vacancy formation energy. A method for treating certain multiple additions is proposed. The effect of these alloying additions on short time high temperature strength properties was estimated using hot hardness measurements over the temperature range 22 to 850 0 C. On an atom percent basis Nb and Ti were most effective in conferring solid solution strengthening and Si the least effective. In the regime 22 to approximately 650 0 C, the hardness data was found to fit an equation of the form: H = H 0 + b/T; where H is the hardness, T is the temperature, and H 0 and b are constants for a given alloy. An empirical method was devised to estimate the hot hardness of alloys containing more than one solute addition

  5. The effect of various pozzolanic additives on the concrete strength index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitola, L.; Sahmenko, G.; Erdmane, D.; Bumanis, G.; Bajare, D.

    2017-10-01

    The concrete industry is searching continuously for new effective mineral additives to improve the concrete properties. Replacing cement with the pozzolanic additives in most cases has resulted not only in positive impact on the environment but also has improved strength and durability of the concrete. Effective pozzolanic additives can be obtained from natural resources such as volcanic ashes, kaolin and other sediments as well as from different production industries that create various by-products with high pozzolanic reactivity. Current research deals with effectiveness evaluation of various mineral additives/wastes, such as coal combustion bottom ash, barley bottom ash, waste glass and metakaolin containing waste as well as calcined illite clays as supplementary cementitious materials, to be used in concrete production as partial cement replacement. Most of the examined materials are used as waste stream materials with potential reactive effect on the concrete. Milling time and fineness of the tested supplementary material has been evaluated and effectiveness was detected. Results indicate that fineness of the tested materials has crucial effect on the concrete compressive strength index. Not in all cases the prolonged milling time can increase fineness and reactivity of the supplementary materials; however the optimal milling time and fineness of the pozolanic additives increased the strength index of concrete up to 1.16 comparing to reference, even in cases when cement was substituted by 20 w%.

  6. Microwave effective surface impedance of structures including a high-Tc superconducting film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartemann, P.

    1992-01-01

    The microwave effective surface impedances of different stacks made of high-temperature superconducting films, dielectric materials and bulk normal metals were computed. The calculations were based on the two-fluid model of superconductors and the conventional transmission line theory. These effective impedances are compared to the calculated intrinsic surface impedances of the stacked superconducting films. The considered superconducting material has been the oxide YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 epitaxially grown on crystalline substrates (MgO, LaAlO 3 , SrTiO 3 ), the film thickness ranging from a few nm to 1μm. Discrepancies between the effective surface resistances or reactances and the corresponding intrinsic values were determined at 10 GHz for non resonant or resonant structures. At resonance the surface resistance discrepancy exhibits a sharp peak which reaches 10 4 or more in relative value according to the geometry and the used materials. Obviously the effective surface reactance shows also huge variations about the resonance and may be negative. Moreover geometries allowing to obtain an effective resistance smaller than the film intrinsic value have been found. The effects of the resonance phenomenon on the electromagnetic wave reflectivity and reflection phase shift are investigated. Therefore the reported theoretical results demonstrate that the effective surface impedance of YBCO films with a thickness smaller than 500 nm can be very different from the intrinsic film impedance according to the structures. (Author). 3 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Thermodynamic Analysis of TEG-TEC Device Including Influence of Thomson Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuanli; Chen, Lingen; Meng, Fankai; Sun, Fengrui

    2018-01-01

    A thermodynamic model of a thermoelectric cooler driven by thermoelectric generator (TEG-TEC) device is established considering Thomson effect. The performance is analyzed and optimized using numerical calculation based on non-equilibrium thermodynamic theory. The influence characteristics of Thomson effect on the optimal performance and variable selection are investigated by comparing the condition with and without Thomson effect. The results show that Thomson effect degrades the performance of TEG-TEC device, it decreases the cooling capacity by 27 %, decreases the coefficient of performance (COP) by 19 %, decreases the maximum cooling temperature difference by 11 % when the ratio of thermoelectric elements number is 0.6, the cold junction temperature of thermoelectric cooler (TEC) is 285 K and the hot junction temperature of thermoelectric generator (TEG) is 450 K. Thomson effect degrades the optimal performance of TEG-TEC device, it decreases the maximum cooling capacity by 28 % and decreases the maximum COP by 28 % under the same junction temperatures. Thomson effect narrows the optimal variable range and optimal working range. In the design of the devices, limited-number thermoelectric elements should be more allocated appropriately to TEG when consider Thomson effect. The results may provide some guidelines for the design of TEG-TEC devices.

  8. Widespread non-additive and interaction effects within HLA loci modulate the risk of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Tobias L; Deutsch, Aaron J; Han, Buhm; Hu, Xinli; Okada, Yukinori; Eyre, Stephen; Knapp, Michael; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Huizinga, Tom W J; Abecasis, Gonçalo; Becker, Jessica; Boeckxstaens, Guy E; Chen, Wei-Min; Franke, Andre; Gladman, Dafna D; Gockel, Ines; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Martin, Javier; Nair, Rajan P; Nöthen, Markus M; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rahman, Proton; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Stuart, Philip E; Tsoi, Lam C; van Heel, David A; Worthington, Jane; Wouters, Mira M; Klareskog, Lars; Elder, James T; Gregersen, Peter K; Schumacher, Johannes; Rich, Stephen S; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sunyaev, Shamil R; de Bakker, Paul I W; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2015-09-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes confer substantial risk for autoimmune diseases on a log-additive scale. Here we speculated that differences in autoantigen-binding repertoires between a heterozygote's two expressed HLA variants might result in additional non-additive risk effects. We tested the non-additive disease contributions of classical HLA alleles in patients and matched controls for five common autoimmune diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (ncases = 5,337), type 1 diabetes (T1D; ncases = 5,567), psoriasis vulgaris (ncases = 3,089), idiopathic achalasia (ncases = 727) and celiac disease (ncases = 11,115). In four of the five diseases, we observed highly significant, non-additive dominance effects (rheumatoid arthritis, P = 2.5 × 10(-12); T1D, P = 2.4 × 10(-10); psoriasis, P = 5.9 × 10(-6); celiac disease, P = 1.2 × 10(-87)). In three of these diseases, the non-additive dominance effects were explained by interactions between specific classical HLA alleles (rheumatoid arthritis, P = 1.8 × 10(-3); T1D, P = 8.6 × 10(-27); celiac disease, P = 6.0 × 10(-100)). These interactions generally increased disease risk and explained moderate but significant fractions of phenotypic variance (rheumatoid arthritis, 1.4%; T1D, 4.0%; celiac disease, 4.1%) beyond a simple additive model.

  9. Effects of Different Addition Amounts of Superphosphate on Vegetable Waste Compost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different addition amounts of superphosphate on vegetable waste compost were studied. Results showed that, addition of superphosphate improved the temperature during the compost. It had the highest temperature of 64.33℃, when the addition quantity of superphosphate was 10.26% of dry matter weight. At the end of the composting, adding superphosphate had no significant effect on C/N, however, it decreased pH and improved the EC of the compost. The EC values were significantly higher than CK, when the addition amount was be tween 4.10%and 10.26%of dry matter weight. When the addition below 10.26%, the GI values were significantly higher than CK(P<0.01, and the highest value was 105.61%, when the addition was 2.05%(S5. Adding superphosphate significantly reduced the nitrogen loss rate of composting(P<0.05, and the lowest was 23.94%,when the addition was 2.05%, meanwhile, the input-output ratio was 3.93, which was the highest value. Under this experimental condition, adding superphosphate promoted the compost maturity significantly, reduced the nitrogen loss rate, and the optimal addition of superphosphate was 2.05%of dry matter weight.

  10. Effects of soil warming and nitrogen addition on soil respiration in a New Zealand tussock grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Scott L; Hunt, John E; Millard, Peter; McSeveny, Tony; Tylianakis, Jason M; Whitehead, David

    2014-01-01

    Soil respiration (RS) represents a large terrestrial source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Global change drivers such as climate warming and nitrogen deposition are expected to alter the terrestrial carbon cycle with likely consequences for RS and its components, autotrophic (RA) and heterotrophic respiration (RH). Here we investigate the impacts of a 3°C soil warming treatment and a 50 kg ha(-1) y(-1) nitrogen addition treatment on RS, RH and their respective seasonal temperature responses in an experimental tussock grassland. Average respiration in untreated soils was 0.96±0.09 μmol m(-2) s(-1) over the course of the experiment. Soil warming and nitrogen addition increased RS by 41% and 12% respectively. These treatment effects were additive under combined warming and nitrogen addition. Warming increased RH by 37% while nitrogen addition had no effect. Warming and nitrogen addition affected the seasonal temperature response of RS by increasing the basal rate of respiration (R10) by 14% and 20% respectively. There was no significant interaction between treatments for R10. The treatments had no impact on activation energy (E0). The seasonal temperature response of RH was not affected by either warming or nitrogen addition. These results suggest that the additional CO2 emissions from New Zealand tussock grassland soils as a result of warming-enhanced RS constitute a potential positive feedback to rising atmospheric CO2 concentration.

  11. Effect of CuO addition on structure and electrical properties of low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 36; Issue 5. Effect of CuO addition on structure and electrical properties of low temperature sintered quaternary piezoelectric ceramics. Jianhua Li ... Keywords. Sintering; microstructure-final; piezoelectric properties; perovskites; Jahn–Teller effect.

  12. Effects of compost and manure additions on the greenhouse gas dynamics of managed grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLonge, M. S.; Silver, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    Grasslands cover approximately 30% of the terrestrial land surface, and have significant potential to increase soil C storage and thus lower atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Organic matter amendments (e.g., compost, manure) have been shown to be effective at increasing grassland soil C both through direct addition and by increasing net primary productivity. However, organic matter additions can also increase N2O and CH4 fluxes. The effects of organic matter amendments on both soil C and greenhouse gas emissions are dependent on their physical and chemical qualities. To explore the impacts of organic matter amendments of different chemical and physical qualities on soil C and greenhouse gas emissions we established research plots on three managed annual grasslands in California. Three replicate blocks were established at each site and included an untreated control, a manure treatment, and a compost treatment. At one site, an additional compost with a lower nitrogen content was also tested. In October 2011, a 1 cm layer of the designated amendment was added to each plot. All plots were sampled for soil (C and N, bulk density, temperature, moisture) and plant (community, aboveground biomass) properties, prior to and for two years following treatment. Plots were also sampled intensively for N2O, CH4, and CO2 fluxes using static chambers on over 35 days throughout the two rainy seasons, where sampling days were selected to target pulses following rain events. Results show that the amendments differentially affected soil C and greenhouse gases among the treatments. One year after treatment, C concentrations in the top 10 cm of soils had increased at all three sites by a mean of 0.5-1% on plots that received either compost treatment, but not on those that received manure. Lower in the profile (10-30 cm), C concentrations were increased by a smaller amount (treatment rain event (the second rain event of the season). Fluxes on all treated plots exceeded those on control

  13. A Comprehensive Review of Effect of Biodiesel Additives on Properties, Performance, and Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiwale, S.; Karthikeyan, A.; Bhojwani, V.

    2017-05-01

    Objectives:- To presents the literature review on effect of biodiesel additives on properties, performance and on emission. Method:-In the current paper reviews are taken from previous years paper which necessitates the need of addition of additives in the blends of biodiesel and studied the its effect on properties, performance and emissions. Emissions from the diesel powered vehicles mostly damaged the earth’s environment and also increased the overall earth’s temperature. This attracts the need of alternative fuels in the field of transportation sector. Past inventions and research showed that Biodiesel can be used as an alternative fuel for the diesel engine. Biodiesel have good combustion characteristics because of their long chain hydrocarbon structure. However biodiesel possesses few disadvantages such as lower heating value, higher flow ability, much high density and not able to flow at low temperature. Higher rate of fuel consumption is identified and higher level of NOx emissions when biodiesel used in an engine as an alternative fuels. Findings:-Different additives such as antioxidants, improvers for cetane number, cold flow properties improver, etc were investigated by the many researcher and scientists and added in the different feedstock of biodiesel or blends of biodiesel with diesel in different proportions. Directly or indirectly fuel additives can improve the reduction in the emissions, improve the fuel economy, and reduce the dependency of the one’s nation on other. Performances of biodiesel vehicles were drastically improved because of additioninthe blends of biodiesel with diesel fuel in specific percentages to meet the international emission standards. Addition of additives in the biodiesel or in the blends of biodiesel basically changes the high temperature and low temperature flow properties of blends of biodiesel. Current paper finds and compares properties of different additives and its effect on blends of biodiesel properties

  14. Effect of xylanase, urea, Tween and Triton additives on bioethanol production of corn stover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xiu; Lu, Jie; Yang, Rui-Feng; Song, Wen-jing; Li, Hai-ming; Wang, Hai-song; Zhou, Jing-hui

    2017-03-01

    Corn stover is a potential source of renewable biomass for conversion to bioethanol. Fed-batch semi-simultaneous saccharifcation and fermentation (S-SSF) of corn stover pretreated by liquid hot water (LHW) was investigated. The present study aimed to confirm the influence of xylanase, urea, Tween and Triton additives on bioethanol. Results show that the positive effect of xylanase, urea, Tween was observed. High ethanol concentration requires the addition of xylanase in the stage of saccharification. The optimal amount of xylanase was 0.2 g/g biomass and addition of Triton (Triton X-100) increases the effect of xylanase. Urea has a promotion effect on the whole fermentation process.When adding 0.1% urea in the fermentation stage,the best promoting rate is 24.2%. In the longitudinal comparison of the Tween series, under the same experimental conditions, the promoting effect of Tween series: Tween 40 > Tween 80 > Tween 20 > Tween 60.

  15. Changes and variations in online and offline communication patterns : Including peer effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hage, Eveline; Noseleit, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The impact of online communication on offline communication has received considerable research attention. Yet predominantly single level studies yield conflicting research findings and lack theoretical foundation. This study deviates from previous studies by developing a peer effect model rooted in

  16. The Bauschinger Effect in Autofrettaged Tubes- A Comparison of Models Including the ASME Code

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parker, Anthony

    1998-01-01

    .... For many years workers have acknowledged the probable influence of the Bauschinger effect which serves to reduce the yield strength in compression as a result of prior tensile plastic overload...

  17. Deliverable 4.2: Methodology for including specific biological effects and pathogen aspects into LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henrik Fred; Olsen, Stig Irving; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2009-01-01

    .e. endocrine disruptors) and the possibilities and relevance of including impact categories on land use and site-specific assessments have been addressed. Further, the special problems on how to deal with land fill and how to do normalization and weighting of impact potentials are also dealt with. The problem...

  18. Sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium of binary mixtures of charged colloids including volume effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Lyklema, J.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium of binary mixtures of charged colloids in the presence of small ions and for non-dilute conditions, by extending the work of Biben and Hansen (1994 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 6 A345). For a monocomponent system, they included a Carnahan-Starling

  19. Effect of Operating Parameters and Chemical Additives on Crystal Habit and Specific Cake Resistance of Zinc Hydroxide Precipitates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwin, Jennifer Louise [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    1999-08-01

    The effect of process parameters and chemical additives on the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates was investigated. The ability of a slurry to be filtered is dependent upon the particle habit of the solid and the particle habit is influenced by certain process variables. The process variables studied include neutralization temperature, agitation type, and alkalinity source used for neutralization. Several commercially available chemical additives advertised to aid in solid/liquid separation were also examined in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation. A statistical analysis revealed that the neutralization temperature and the source of alkalinity were statistically significant in influencing the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates in this study. The type of agitation did not significantly effect the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates. The use of chemical additives in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation had a favorable effect on the filterability. The morphology of the hydroxide precipitates was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy.

  20. Effect of neurosteroids on a model lipid bilayer including cholesterol: An Atomic Force Microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, Mattia; Balleza, Daniel; Vena, Giulia; Puia, Giulia; Facci, Paolo; Alessandrini, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    Amphiphilic molecules which have a biological effect on specific membrane proteins, could also affect lipid bilayer properties possibly resulting in a modulation of the overall membrane behavior. In light of this consideration, it is important to study the possible effects of amphiphilic molecule of pharmacological interest on model systems which recapitulate some of the main properties of the biological plasma membranes. In this work we studied the effect of a neurosteroid, Allopregnanolone (3α,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone or Allo), on a model bilayer composed by the ternary lipid mixture DOPC/bSM/chol. We chose ternary mixtures which present, at room temperature, a phase coexistence of liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains and which reside near to a critical point. We found that Allo, which is able to strongly partition in the lipid bilayer, induces a marked increase in the bilayer area and modifies the relative proportion of the two phases favoring the Ld phase. We also found that the neurosteroid shifts the miscibility temperature to higher values in a way similarly to what happens when the cholesterol concentration is decreased. Interestingly, an isoform of Allo, isoAllopregnanolone (3β,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone or isoAllo), known to inhibit the effects of Allo on GABAA receptors, has an opposite effect on the bilayer properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Experimental Investigations on the Effects of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Fuel Additives on Biodiesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sajith

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of experimental investigations on the influence of the addition of cerium oxide in the nanoparticle form on the major physicochemical properties and the performance of biodiesel. The physicochemical properties of the base fuel and the modified fuel formed by dispersing the catalyst nanoparticles by ultrasonic agitation are measured using ASTM standard test methods. The effects of the additive nanoparticles on the individual fuel properties, the engine performance, and emissions are studied, and the dosing level of the additive is optimized. Comparisons of the performance of the fuel with and without the additive are also presented. The flash point and the viscosity of biodiesel were found to increase with the inclusion of the cerium oxide nanoparticles. The emission levels of hydrocarbon and NOx are appreciably reduced with the addition of cerium oxide nanoparticles.

  2. Evaluation of plant-wide WWTP control strategies including the effects of filamentous bulking sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores Alsina, Xavier; Comas, J.S.; Rodríguez Roda, I.

    2009-01-01

    Model No. 2 (BSM2). In a second series of simulations the parameters of the secondary settler model in the BSM2 are automatically changed on the basis of an on-line calculated risk of filamentous bulking, in order to mimic the effect of growth of filamentous bacteria in the plant. The results...... concentration in both return and waste flow, less biomass in the bioreactors and a reduction of the TSS removal efficiency. The control alternatives using a TSS controller substantially increase the food to microorganisms (F/M) ratio in the bioreactor, thereby reducing both risk and effects of bulking sludge...

  3. Quantum Effect in a Diode Included Nonlinear Inductance-Capacitance Mesoscopic Circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Zhanyuan; Zhang Xiaohong; Ma Jinying

    2009-01-01

    The mesoscopic nonlinear inductance-capacitance circuit is a typical anharmonic oscillator, due to diodes included in the circuit. In this paper, using the advanced quantum theory of mesoscopic circuits, which based on the fundamental fact that the electric charge takes discrete value, the diode included mesoscopic circuit is firstly studied. Schroedinger equation of the system is a four-order difference equation in p-circumflex representation. Using the extended perturbative method, the detail energy spectrum and wave functions are obtained and verified, as an application of the results, the current quantum fluctuation in the ground state is calculated. Diode is a basis component in a circuit, its quantization would popularize the quantum theory of mesoscopic circuits. The methods to solve the high order difference equation are helpful to the application of mesoscopic quantum theory.

  4. Quantified, Interactive Simulation of AMCW ToF Camera Including Multipath Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulczak, David; Lambers, Martin; Kolb, Andreas

    2017-12-22

    In the last decade, Time-of-Flight (ToF) range cameras have gained increasing popularity in robotics, automotive industry, and home entertainment. Despite technological developments, ToF cameras still suffer from error sources such as multipath interference or motion artifacts. Thus, simulation of ToF cameras, including these artifacts, is important to improve camera and algorithm development. This paper presents a physically-based, interactive simulation technique for amplitude modulated continuous wave (AMCW) ToF cameras, which, among other error sources, includes single bounce indirect multipath interference based on an enhanced image-space approach. The simulation accounts for physical units down to the charge level accumulated in sensor pixels. Furthermore, we present the first quantified comparison for ToF camera simulators. We present bidirectional reference distribution function (BRDF) measurements for selected, purchasable materials in the near-infrared (NIR) range, craft real and synthetic scenes out of these materials and quantitatively compare the range sensor data.

  5. Dusty Plasma Modeling of the Fusion Reactor Sheath Including Collisional-Radiative Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezairi, Aouatif; Samir, Mhamed; Eddahby, Mohamed; Saifaoui, Dennoun; Katsonis, Konstantinos; Berenguer, Chloe

    2008-01-01

    The structure and the behavior of the sheath in Tokamak collisional plasmas has been studied. The sheath is modeled taking into account the presence of the dust 2 and the effects of the charged particle collisions and radiative processes. The latter may allow for optical diagnostics of the plasma.

  6. An Improved Heat Budget Estimation Including Bottom Effects for General Ocean Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carder, Kendall; Warrior, Hari; Otis, Daniel; Chen, R. F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper studies the effects of the underwater light field on heat-budget calculations of general ocean circulation models for shallow waters. The presence of a bottom significantly alters the estimated heat budget in shallow waters, which affects the corresponding thermal stratification and hence modifies the circulation. Based on the data collected during the COBOP field experiment near the Bahamas, we have used a one-dimensional turbulence closure model to show the influence of the bottom reflection and absorption on the sea surface temperature field. The water depth has an almost one-to-one correlation with the temperature rise. Effects of varying the bottom albedo by replacing the sea grass bed with a coral sand bottom, also has an appreciable effect on the heat budget of the shallow regions. We believe that the differences in the heat budget for the shallow areas will have an influence on the local circulation processes and especially on the evaporative and long-wave heat losses for these areas. The ultimate effects on humidity and cloudiness of the region are expected to be significant as well.

  7. Electron density in reasonably real metallic surfaces, including interchange and correlation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraga, L.A.; Martinez, G.

    1981-01-01

    By means of a new method, the electron density in a jellium surface is calculated taking in account interchange and correlation effects; reproducing, in this way, the Lang and Kohn results. The new method is self-consistent but not iterative and hence is possible extend it to the solution of the same problem in more reasonably real metallic surfaces. (L.C.) [pt

  8. The cost-effectiveness of gestational diabetes screening including prevention of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marseille, Elliot; Lohse, Nicolai; Jiwani, Aliya

    2013-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with elevated risks of perinatal complications and type 2 diabetes mellitus, and screening and intervention can reduce these risks. We quantified the cost, health impact and cost-effectiveness of GDM screening and intervention in India and Israel,...

  9. Proceedings of the second US-USSR symposium: air pollution effects on vegetation including forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginald D. Noble; Juri L Martin; Keith F., eds. Jensen; Keith F. Jensen

    1989-01-01

    To commemorate the 10th year of cooperation between the US-USSR in the field of environmental protection, a symposium was organized, the major objectives of which were to acquaint US-USSR scientists with project accomplishments; to promote understanding of the nature of environmental problems that relate to air pollution effect on vegetation on a more global scale; to...

  10. Electromagnetic field nonuniformities in large area, high-frequency capacitive plasma reactors, including electrode asymmetry effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansonnens, L; Howling, A A; Hollenstein, Ch

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic wave propagation effects can give rise to important limitations for processing uniformity in large area, radio-frequency (rf) capacitive plasma reactors. The electromagnetic wavefield solution is derived for a capacitive, high-frequency, cylindrical reactor with symmetric or asymmetric electrode areas containing a uniform plasma slab. It is shown that only two distinct electromagnetic modes are necessary and sufficient to determine the electromagnetic fields everywhere within the reactor except close to the sidewalls. The first mode gives rise to the interelectrode rf voltage standing wave effect associated with high frequencies in large area reactors, and the second mode gives rise to the telegraph effect associated with asymmetric electrode areas, which necessitates the redistribution of rf current along the plasma to maintain rf current continuity. This work gives a unified treatment of both effects which have previously been studied separately, experimentally and theoretically, in the literature. The equivalent circuit of each mode is also derived from its respective dispersion relation. Examples of this electromagnetic wavefield solution show that both modes can cause nonuniformity of the plasma rf potential, depending on the reactor geometry, excitation frequency and plasma permittivity and sheath width, which has consequences for large-area plasma processing

  11. Psychophysiological effects of an iTBS modulated virtual reality challenge including participants with spider phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notzon, S; Deppermann, S; Fallgatter, A; Diemer, J; Kroczek, A; Domschke, K; Zwanzger, P; Ehlis, A-C

    2015-12-01

    Preliminary evidence suggests beneficial effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on anxiety. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) as a form of TMS on acute anxiety provoked by a virtual reality (VR) scenario. Participants with spider phobia (n=41) and healthy controls (n=42) were exposed to a spider scenario in VR after one session of iTBS over the prefrontal cortex or sham treatment. Participants with spider phobia reacted with more anxiety compared to healthy controls. Their heart rate and skin conductance increased compared to baseline. Contrary to expectations, iTBS did not influence these reactions, but modulated heart rate variability (HRV). Sympathetic influence on HRV showed an increase in the active iTBS group only. This study does not support the idea of beneficial effects of a single session of iTBS on anxiety, although other protocols or repeated sessions might be effective. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Ce, La and Ba addition on the electrochemical behavior of super duplex stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Yun-Ha; Choi, Yoon-Seok; Kim, Jung-Gu; Park, Yong-Soo

    2010-01-01

    The effects of rare earth metal (REM: Ce, La) and Ba addition on aqueous corrosion properties of super duplex stainless steels (SDSS) were investigated by electrochemical tests and surface analyses. The results of potentiodynamic test indicated that the passive range increased by the addition of Ce, La, and Ba, indicating increased relative resistance to localized corrosion. The EIS measurements showed that the Ce-La-Ba-bearing alloys exhibited higher R ct and R p values than the Ce-La-Ba-free alloy at the passive and breakdown states. Furthermore, the additions of REMs and Ba together promoted the formation of dense chromium-enriched passive film.

  13. Effects of different additives on the performance of spray dryer system during incineration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wey, M Y; Peng, C Y; Wu, H Y; Chiang, B C; Liu, Z S

    2002-06-01

    The spray dryer system was conventionally employed to remove the SOx, NOx, and HCl in the flue gas. However, the removal efficiency of acid gas in the practical incineration flue gas, which contains dust, heavy metals, and acid gas itself, was seldom mentioned in the literature. The alkaline sorbents possess large specific surface that was a main factor on the adsorption of heavy metals and acid gas. Therefore, the primary objective of this study was focused on the effect of different additives on the removal efficiency of acid gas and heavy metals (Cr, Cd and Pb). The mass and element size distribution of heavy metals in fly ash under different additives were also investigated. The results indicated that the removal efficiency of HCl in the spray dryer system was higher than 97.8%. The effects of additives on the removal efficiency of HCl, however, were undistinguished. In the desulfurization process, the highest removal efficiency was 71.3% when the additive of amorphous SiO2 was added in the spray dryer system. The removal efficiency was 66.0% with the additive of CaCl2 and 63.1% without any additives, respectively. It was also found that the spray dryer system could decrease the concentration of metal in fly ash but increase the amount of fly ash. In addition, amorphous SiO2 in the alkaline sorbent tended to increase the adsorption of heavy metal on reactant, because it could enhance the dispersion of alkaline sorbent.

  14. Widespread non-additive and interaction effects within HLA loci modulate the risk of autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Tobias L.; Deutsch, Aaron J.; Han, Buhm; Hu, Xinli; Okada, Yukinori; Eyre, Stephen; Knapp, Michael; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Abecasis, Goncalo; Becker, Jessica; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Chen, Wei-Min; Franke, Andre; Gladman, Dafna D.; Gockel, Ines; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Martin, Javier; Nair, Rajan P.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rahman, Proton; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Stuart, Philip E.; Tsoi, Lam C.; Van Heel, David A.; Worthington, Jane; Wouters, Mira M.; Klareskog, Lars; Elder, James T.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Schumacher, Johannes; Rich, Stephen S.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes confer strong risk for autoimmune diseases on a log-additive scale. Here we speculated that differences in autoantigen binding repertoires between a heterozygote’s two expressed HLA variants may result in additional non-additive risk effects. We tested non-additive disease contributions of classical HLA alleles in patients and matched controls for five common autoimmune diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA, Ncases=5,337), type 1 diabetes (T1D, Ncases=5,567), psoriasis vulgaris (Ncases=3,089), idiopathic achalasia (Ncases=727), and celiac disease (Ncases=11,115). In four out of five diseases, we observed highly significant non-additive dominance effects (RA: P=2.5×1012; T1D: P=2.4×10−10; psoriasis: P=5.9×10−6; celiac disease: P=1.2×10−87). In three of these diseases, the dominance effects were explained by interactions between specific classical HLA alleles (RA: P=1.8×10−3; T1D: P=8.6×1027; celiac disease: P=6.0×10−100). These interactions generally increased disease risk and explained moderate but significant fractions of phenotypic variance (RA: 1.4%, T1D: 4.0%, and celiac disease: 4.1%, beyond a simple additive model). PMID:26258845

  15. [Effects of superphosphate addition on NH3 and greenhouse gas emissions during vegetable waste composting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Sun, Qin-ping; Li, Ni; Liu, Chun-sheng; Li, Ji-jin; Liu, Ben-sheng; Zou, Guo-yuan

    2015-01-01

    To study the effects of superphosphate (SP) on the NH, and greenhouse gas emissions, vegetable waste composting was performed for 27 days using 6 different treatments. In addition to the controls, five vegetable waste mixtures (0.77 m3 each) were treated with different amounts of the SP additive, namely, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25%. The ammonia volatilization loss and greenhouse gas emissions were measured during composting. Results indicated that the SP additive significantly decreased the ammonia volatilization and greenhouse gas emissions during vegetable waste composting. The additive reduced the total NH3 emission by 4.0% to 16.7%. The total greenhouse gas emissions (CO2-eq) of all treatments with SP additives were decreased by 10.2% to 20.8%, as compared with the controls. The NH3 emission during vegetable waste composting had the highest contribution to the greenhouse effect caused by the four different gases. The amount of NH3 (CO2-eq) from each treatment ranged from 59.90 kg . t-1 to 81.58 kg . t-1; NH3(CO2-eq) accounted for 69% to 77% of the total emissions from the four gases. Therefore, SP is a cost-effective phosphorus-based fertilizer that can be used as an additive during vegetable waste composting to reduce the NH3 and greenhouse gas emissions as well as to improve the value of compost as a fertilizer.

  16. Effects of Polymeric Additives on the Crystallization and Release Behavior of Amorphous Ibuprofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yang Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Some polymeric additives were studied to understand their effects on the amorphous phase of ibuprofen (IBU, used as a poorly water soluble pharmaceutical model compound. The amorphous IBU in bulk, as well as in nanopores (diameter ~24 nm of anodic aluminum oxide, was examined with the addition of poly(acrylic acid, poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone, or poly(4-vinylphenol. Results of bulk crystallization showed that they were effective in limiting the crystal growth, while the nucleation of the crystalline phase in contact with water was nearly instantaneous in all cases. Poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone, the most effective additive, was in specific interaction with IBU, as revealed by IR spectroscopy. The addition of the polymers was combined with the nanoscopic confinement to further stabilize the amorphous phase. Still, the IBU with addition of polymeric additives showed sustained release behavior. The current study suggested that the inhibition of the crystal nucleation was probably the most important factor to stabilize the amorphous phase and fully harness its high solubility.

  17. The effects of Na/K additives and flyash on NO reduction in a SNCR process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jiangtao; Yu, Wei; Lu, Ping; Zhang, Yufei; Zhu, Xiuming

    2015-03-01

    An experimental study of Na/K additives and flyash on NO reduction during the selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) process were carried out in an entrained flow reactor (EFR). The effects of reaction temperature (Tr), water vapor, Na/K additives (NaCl, KCl, Na2CO3) and flyash characteristics on NO reduction were analyzed. The results indicated that NO removal efficiency shows a pattern of increasing first and decreasing later with the increase of the temperature at Tr=850-1150°C. Water vapor can improve the performance of NO reduction, and the NO reduction of 70.5% was obtained while the flue gas containing 4% water vapor at 950°C. Na/K additives have a significant promoting effect on NO reduction and widen the SNCR temperature window, the promoting effect of the test additives is ordered as Na2CO3>KCl>NaCl. NO removal efficiency with 125ppm Na2CO3 and 4% water vapor can reach up to 84.9% at the optimal reaction temperature. The additive concentration has no significant effects on NO reduction while its concentration is above 50ppm. Addition of circulating fluidized combustion (CFB) flyash deteriorates NO reduction significantly. However, CFB flyash and Na/K additives will get a coupling effect on NO reduction during the SNCR process, and the best NO reduction can reach 72.3% while feeding Na2CO3-impregnated CFB flyash at 125ppm Na2CO3 and Tr=950°C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Joint additive effects of temperature and UVB radiation on zoeae of the crab Taliepus dentatus

    KAUST Repository

    Carreja, B

    2016-04-06

    Warming and enhanced ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation are 2 global stressors acting across the ocean. We tested their effects on the survival and performance (consumption rates and activity) on the zoea I stage of the Chilean kelp crab Taliepus dentatus. Our goal was to resolve whether these stressors, when acting concurrently, had additive or interactive effects, either synergistic or antagonistic. A multifactorial experiment of 4 temperatures and 3 UVB irradiance levels was run. The larvae showed a significant increase in mortality with increasing temperature. Exposure to UVB reduced the thermal tolerance of the larvae by a significant increase of their mortality rate. Oxygen consumption increased as temperature increased. When exposed to UVB radiation, larval oxygen consumption increased significantly for all the temperatures tested. Two statistical models of joint effects confirmed that the combined effect of both stressors was additive, with no interaction, either synergistic or antagonistic. One of them, the independent action (IA) model, also revealed that concurrent effects on mortality remained additive when doubling the UVB dose. Additivity of the stressors improved the predictability of their effects on larval mortality. Exposure to UVB radiation increased mortality rates by 1.5 times at any temperature tested, independently of the dose. © The authors 2016.

  19. Mechanisms and modeling of the effects of additives on the nitrogen oxides emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Krishna P.; Nguyen, H. Lee; Kang, M. Paul

    1991-01-01

    A theoretical study on the emission of the oxides of nitrogen in the combustion of hydrocarbons is presented. The current understanding of the mechanisms and the rate parameters for gas phase reactions were used to calculate the NO(x) emission. The possible effects of different chemical species on thermal NO(x), on a long time scale were discussed. The mixing of these additives at various stages of combustion were considered and NO(x) concentrations were calculated; effects of temperatures were also considered. The chemicals such as hydrocarbons, H2, CH3OH, NH3, and other nitrogen species were chosen as additives in this discussion. Results of these calculations can be used to evaluate the effects of these additives on the NO(x) emission in the industrial combustion system.

  20. EFFECT OF THE Si POWDER ADDITIONS ON THE PROPERTIES OF SiC COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUOGANG XU

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available By means of transient plastic phase process, the SiC silicon carbide kiln furniture materials were produced through adding Si powder to SiC materials. At the condition of the same additions of SiO2 powder, the effect of the Si powder additions on properties of silicon carbide materials after sintered at 1450°C for 3 h in air atmosphere was studied by means of SEM and other analysis methods. The results showed that silicon powder contributes to both sintering by liquid state and plastic phase combination to improve the strength of samples. When the Si powder additions is lower than 3.5 %, the density and strength of samples increase and porosity decrease with increasing Si powder additions. However when the Si powder additions is higher than 3.5 %, the density and strength of samples decrease and porosity increase with increasing Si powder additions. With increasing of Si additions, the residual strength of sample after thermal shocked increased and linear change rate decreased, and get to boundary value when Si additions is 4.5 %. The results also indicated that at the same sintering temperature, the sample with 3.5 % silicon powder has maximum strength.

  1. Predictive simulations and optimization of nanowire field-effect PSA sensors including screening

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgartner, Stefan

    2013-05-03

    We apply our self-consistent PDE model for the electrical response of field-effect sensors to the 3D simulation of nanowire PSA (prostate-specific antigen) sensors. The charge concentration in the biofunctionalized boundary layer at the semiconductor-electrolyte interface is calculated using the propka algorithm, and the screening of the biomolecules by the free ions in the liquid is modeled by a sensitivity factor. This comprehensive approach yields excellent agreement with experimental current-voltage characteristics without any fitting parameters. Having verified the numerical model in this manner, we study the sensitivity of nanowire PSA sensors by changing device parameters, making it possible to optimize the devices and revealing the attributes of the optimal field-effect sensor. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  2. Electron Beam Adjustment in PLATO RTS 2 Including the Effect of Air Gaps

    CERN Document Server

    Lopes, M C; Trindade, A; Rodrigues, P; Peralta, L

    2002-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Beam characterization for electron dose calculations in PLATO RTS 2 treatment planning system requires the tuning of two adjustment parameters: sqx (the initial angular spread) and FMCS (a "fudge" multiple Coulomb scattering parameter). This work provides a set of suggestions to optimise electron dose calculations with PLATO, taking into account the effect of air gaps between the electron applicator and the patient skin. Material and Methods: Two adjustment criteria have been followed: one which uses just one input data set corresponding to the standard (null) air gap and another one that takes into account the whole range of clinically used distances between the electron applicator and the patient surface. The adjusted values of sqx were compared with experimental data and GEANT3 Monte Carlo code results. A systematic study has been carried out of the effect of both adjustment parameters on electron dose calculations in water. Comparisons of dose distributions and point dose values ha...

  3. Dynamic behavior of a rotating delaminated composite beam including rotary inertia and shear deformation effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan-Ali Jafari-Talookolaei

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A finite element (FE model is developed to study the free vibration of a rotating laminated composite beam with a single delamination. The rotary inertia and shear deformation effects, as well as the bending–extension, bending–twist and extension–twist coupling terms are taken into account in the FE model. Comparison between the numerical results of the present model and the results published in the literature verifies the validity of the present model. Furthermore, the effects of various parameters, such as delamination size and location, fiber orientation, hub radius, material anisotropy and rotating speed, on the vibration of the beam are studied in detail. These results provide useful information in the study of the free vibration of rotating delaminated composite beams.

  4. Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Polyethylene Molecular Crystals from First-Principles Including Nuclear Quantum Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulumba, Nina; Hellman, Olle; Minnich, Austin J

    2017-11-03

    Molecular crystals such as polyethylene are of intense interest as flexible thermal conductors, yet their intrinsic upper limits of thermal conductivity remain unknown. Here, we report a study of the vibrational properties and lattice thermal conductivity of a polyethylene molecular crystal using an ab initio approach that rigorously incorporates nuclear quantum motion and finite temperature effects. We obtain a thermal conductivity along the chain direction of around 160  W m^{-1} K^{-1} at room temperature, providing a firm upper bound for the thermal conductivity of this molecular crystal. Furthermore, we show that the inclusion of quantum nuclear effects significantly impacts the thermal conductivity by altering the phase space for three-phonon scattering. Our computational approach paves the way for ab initio studies and computational material discovery of molecular solids free of any adjustable parameters.

  5. Including children with autism in general education classrooms. A review of effective strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrower, J K; Dunlap, G

    2001-10-01

    Children with autism can benefit from participation in inclusive classroom environments, and many experts assert that inclusion is a civil right and is responsible for nurturing appropriate social development. However, most children with autism require specialized supports to experience success in these educational contexts. This article provides a review of the empirical research that has addressed procedures for promoting successful inclusion of students with autism. Strategies reviewed include antecedent manipulations, delayed contingencies, self-management, peer-mediated interventions, and other approaches that have been demonstrated in the literature to be useful. The article concludes with a discussion of future research needs.

  6. Renovation and Strengthening of Wooden Beams With CFRP Bands Including the Rheological Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kula Krzysztof

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a work analysis of wooden beams reinforced with glued composite bands from the top and resin inclusions, taking into account the rheology of materials. The paper presents numerical model of the multimaterial beam work including rheological phenomena described by linear equations of viscoelasticity. For the construction of this model one used MES SIMULIA ABAQUS environment in which were prepared its own procedures containing rheological models. The calculation results were compared with the literature data. One has done an analysis of the advisability of the use of CFRP reinforcements bands in terms of rheological phenomena.

  7. Brain function and glucocorticoids in obesity and type 2 diabetes including effects of lifestyle interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Stomby, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity and associated metabolic dysregulation are linked to impaired cognitive function and alterations in brain structure, which increases the risk of age-related dementia. Increased glucocorticoid (GC) exposure may be a potential mediator of these negative effects on the brain. Methods and results In paper 1, we tested the relationship between cortisol levels, brain morphology and cognitive function in 200 women and men. Salivary cortisol levels were negatively related to cortic...

  8. pH-Free Measurement of Relative Acidities, Including Isotope Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Charles L

    2017-01-01

    A powerful pH-free multicomponent NMR titration method can measure relative acidities, even of closely related compounds, with excellent accuracy. The history of the method is presented, along with details of its implementation and a comparison with earlier NMR titrations using a pH electrode. Many of its areas of applicability are described, especially equilibrium isotope effects. The advantages of the method, some practical considerations, and potential pitfalls are considered. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The effects of betahistine in addition to epley maneuver in posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guneri, Enis Alpin; Kustutan, Ozge

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of betahistine in addition to Epley maneuver on the quality of life of patients with posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) of the canalithiasis type. Double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Academic university hospital. Seventy-two patients were enrolled in the study. The first group was treated with Epley maneuver only. The second group received placebo drug 2 times daily for 1 week in addition to Epley maneuver, and the third group received 24 mg betahistine 2 times daily for 1 week in addition to Epley maneuver. The effectiveness of the treatments was assessed in each group as well as between them by analyzing and comparing data of 4 different vertigo symptom scales. Epley maneuver, alone or combined with betahistine or placebo, was found to be very effective with a primary success rate of 86.2%. The symptoms were significantly reduced in group 3 patients overall, and those patients younger or older than 50 years of age who had hypertension, with symptom onset <1 month, and with attack duration of less than a minute did significantly better with the combination of betahistine 48 mg daily. Betahistine in addition to Epley maneuver is more effective than Epley maneuver alone or combined with placebo with regard to improvement of symptoms in certain patients. However, future clinical studies covering more patients to investigate the benefit of medical treatments in addition to Epley maneuver are needed.

  10. Effects of the food additive, citric acid, on kidney cells of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xg; Lv, Qx; Liu, Ym; Deng, W

    2015-01-01

    Citric acid is a food additive that is widely used in the food and drink industry. We investigated the effects of citric acid injection on mouse kidney. Forty healthy mice were divided into four groups of 10 including one control group and three citric acid-treated groups. Low dose, middle dose and high dose groups were given doses of 120, 240 and 480 mg/kg of citric acid, respectively. On day 7, kidney tissues were collected for histological, biochemical and molecular biological examination. We observed shrinkage of glomeruli, widened urinary spaces and capillary congestion, narrowing of the tubule lumen, edema and cytoplasmic vacuolated tubule cells, and appearance of pyknotic nuclei. The relation between histopathological changes and citric acid was dose dependent. Compared to the control, T-SOD and GSH-Px activities in the treated groups decreased with increasing doses of citric acid, NOS activity tended to increase, and H2O2 and MDA contents gradually decreased, but the differences between any treated group and the control were not statistically significant. The apoptosis assay showed a dose-dependent increase of caspase-3 activity after administering citrate that was statistically significant. DNA ladder formation occurred after treatment with any dose of citric acid. We concluded that administration of citric acid may cause renal toxicity in mice.

  11. Heat transfer behavior including thermal wake effects in forced air cooling of arrays of rectangular blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridhar, S.; Faghri, M.; Lessmann, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to study thermal wake effects in arrays of rectangular blocks encountered in electronic equipment. Data were obtained for a series of channel heights and flow velocities. The temperature rise due to wake effects behind a single heated module was found to be fairly independent of the channel height and the position of the heated block, for a given approach velocity. The adiabatic temperature rise data for a module due to a heated element immediately upstream of it for different inter-module spacings were found to correlate well in terms of a new parameter called the surface packing density. This paper reports that it was reported by the authors in an earlier paper that both the adiabatic heat transfer coefficient nd pressure-drop data for regular in-line arrays correlated well in terms of a composite geometric parameter called the column packing density. These experiments have been extended to a higher Reynolds number. Empirical correlations are presented here for friction factor and Nusselt number in terms of the volume packing density, and for the thermal wake effects in terms of the surface packing density. Data from literature for arrays with widely different geometric parameters are shown to agree with these correlations

  12. Analysis of error-prone survival data under additive hazards models: measurement error effects and adjustments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ying; Yi, Grace Y

    2016-07-01

    Covariate measurement error occurs commonly in survival analysis. Under the proportional hazards model, measurement error effects have been well studied, and various inference methods have been developed to correct for error effects under such a model. In contrast, error-contaminated survival data under the additive hazards model have received relatively less attention. In this paper, we investigate this problem by exploring measurement error effects on parameter estimation and the change of the hazard function. New insights of measurement error effects are revealed, as opposed to well-documented results for the Cox proportional hazards model. We propose a class of bias correction estimators that embraces certain existing estimators as special cases. In addition, we exploit the regression calibration method to reduce measurement error effects. Theoretical results for the developed methods are established, and numerical assessments are conducted to illustrate the finite sample performance of our methods.

  13. Quantified, Interactive Simulation of AMCW ToF Camera Including Multipath Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bulczak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, Time-of-Flight (ToF range cameras have gained increasing popularity in robotics, automotive industry, and home entertainment. Despite technological developments, ToF cameras still suffer from error sources such as multipath interference or motion artifacts. Thus, simulation of ToF cameras, including these artifacts, is important to improve camera and algorithm development. This paper presents a physically-based, interactive simulation technique for amplitude modulated continuous wave (AMCW ToF cameras, which, among other error sources, includes single bounce indirect multipath interference based on an enhanced image-space approach. The simulation accounts for physical units down to the charge level accumulated in sensor pixels. Furthermore, we present the first quantified comparison for ToF camera simulators. We present bidirectional reference distribution function (BRDF measurements for selected, purchasable materials in the near-infrared (NIR range, craft real and synthetic scenes out of these materials and quantitatively compare the range sensor data.

  14. Effects of site substitution and metal ion addition on doped manganites

    CERN Document Server

    Pradhan, A K; Roul, B K; Sahu, D R; Muralidhar, M

    2002-01-01

    We report transport, magnetization and transmission electron microscopy studies of the effects of A-and B-site substitution, and the addition of metal ions such as Pt, Ag and Sr, on doped ABO sub 3 perovskites, where A = La, Pr etc and B = Mn. Disorder induced by such substitution changes the behaviour of the charge-ordered (CO) state significantly. A-and B-site substitution suppresses the CO phase due to size mismatch and disorder produced by inhomogeneity. On the other hand, addition of metal ions such as Pt and Ag improves several colossal-magnetoresistance properties significantly due to microstructural effects and enhanced current percolation through grain boundaries.

  15. Improvement of shape memory effect in Fe-Mn-Si alloy by slight tantalum addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Cheng-Hsiu; Lin, Hsin-Chih; Lin, Kun-Ming

    2009-01-01

    The effects of slight tantalum (Ta) addition on the microstructures, precipitates, martensitic transformation and shape memory performance of Fe-30Mn-6Si-based alloys were investigated. Experimental results show that the slight Ta addition will increase the c/a ratio of ε martensite, reduce the M s temperature and improve the alloy's shape recovery ability. After TMT at 650 deg. C, the alloy's M s temperature is reduced and lots of (Fe, Mn) 3 Si and TaC precipitates form. The effective nuclei and well-aligned precipitates within the grain interior after TMT will improve significantly the alloy's shape memory performance.

  16. Effects of carbon additives on the performance of negative electrode of lead-carbon battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Xianping; Kang, Zongxuan; Shu, Dong; Liao, Yuqing; Gong, Yibin; He, Chun; Hao, Junnan; Zhong, Yayun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The negative electrode sheets are prepared by simulating manufacture condition of negative plates. • The effect of carbon additives on negative electrode sheets is studied by electrochemical method. • Carbon additives in NAM enhance electrochemical properties of the negative sheets. • The negative sheets with 0.5 wt% carbon additive exhibit better electrochemical performance. • The charge-discharge mechanism is discussed in detail according to the experimental results. - Abstract: In this study, carbon additives such as activated carbon (AC) and carbon black (CB) are introduced to the negative electrode to improve its electrochemical performance, the negative electrode sheets are prepared by simulating the negative plate manufacturing process of lead-acid battery, the types and contents of carbon additives in the negative electrode sheets are investigated in detail for the application of lead-carbon battery. The electrochemical performance of negative electrode sheets are measured by chronopotentiometry, galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, the crystal structure and morphology are characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The experimental results indicate that the appropriate addition of AC or CB can enhance the discharge capacity and prolong the cycle life of negative electrode sheets under high-rate partial-state-of-charge conditions, AC additive exerts more obvious effect than CB additive, the optimum contents for the best electrochemical performance of the negative electrode sheets are determined as 0.5wt% for both AC and CB. The reaction mechanism of the electrochemical process is also discussed in this paper, the appropriate addition of AC or CB in negative electrode can promote the conversion of PbSO 4 to Pb, suppress the sulfation of negative electrode sheets and reduce the electrochemical reaction resistance

  17. Anti-diabetic effects including diabetic nephropathy of anti-osteoporotic trace minerals on diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehira, Fusako; Ishimine, Nau; Miyagi, Ikuko; Eguchi, Yukinori; Shimada, Katsumasa; Kawaguchi, Daisuke; Oshiro, Yoshihide

    2011-04-01

    In our previous study to evaluate the effects of soluble silicon (Si) on bone metabolism, Si and coral sand (CS) as a natural Si-containing material suppressed peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), which regulates both glucose and bone metabolism and increases adipogenesis at the expense of osteogenesis, leading to bone loss. In this study, we investigated the anti-diabetic effects of bone-seeking elements, Si and stable strontium (Sr), and CS as a natural material containing these elements using obese diabetic KKAy mice. Weanling male mice were fed diets containing 1% Ca supplemented with CaCO(3) as the control and CS, and diets supplemented with 50 ppm Si or 750 ppm Sr to control diet for 56 d. The mRNA expressions related to energy expenditure in the pancreas and kidney were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. At the end of feeding, plasma glucose, insulin, leptin, and adiponectin levels decreased significantly in three test groups, while pancreatic PPARγ and adiponectin mRNA expression levels increased significantly toward the normal level, improving the glucose sensitivity of β-cells and inducing a significant decrease in insulin expression. The renal PPARγ, PPARα, and adiponectin expression levels, histologic indices of diabetic glomerulopathy, and plasma indices of renal function were also improved significantly in the test groups. Taken together, anti-osteoporotic trace minerals, Si and Sr, and CS containing them showed novel anti-diabetic effects of lowering blood glucose level, improving the tolerance to insulin, leptin, and adiponectin, and reducing the risk of glomerulopathy through modulation of related gene expression in the pancreas and kidney. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Enduring effects of severe developmental adversity, including nutritional deprivation, on cortisol metabolism in aging Holocaust survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehuda, Rachel; Bierer, Linda M; Andrew, Ruth; Schmeidler, James; Seckl, Jonathan R

    2009-06-01

    In animal models, early life exposure to major environmental challenges such as malnutrition and stress results in persisting cardiometabolic, neuroendocrine and affective effects. While such effects have been associated with pathogenesis, the widespread occurrence of 'developmental programming' suggests it has adaptive function. Glucocorticoids may mediate 'programming' and their metabolism is known to be affected by early life events in rodents. To examine these relationships in humans, cortisol metabolism and cardiometabolic disease manifestations were examined in Holocaust survivors in relation to age at exposure and affective dysfunction, notably lifetime posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Fifty-one Holocaust survivors and 22 controls without Axis I disorder collected 24-h urine samples and were evaluated for psychiatric disorders and cardiometabolic diagnoses. Corticosteroids and their metabolites were assayed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS); cortisol was also measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Holocaust survivors showed reduced cortisol by RIA, and decreased levels of 5alpha-tetrahydrocortisol (5alpha-THF) and total glucocorticoid production by GC-MS. The latter was associated with lower cortisol metabolism by 5alpha-reductase and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11beta-HSD) type-2. The greatest decrements were associated with earliest age of Holocaust exposure and less severe PTSD symptomatology. Cardiometabolic manifestations were associated with decreased 11beta-HSD-2 activity. In controls, 5alpha-reductase was positively associated with trauma-related symptoms (i.e., to traumatic exposures unrelated to the Holocaust). Extreme malnutrition and related stress during development is associated with long-lived alterations in specific pathways of glucocorticoid metabolism. These effects may be adaptive and link with lower risks of cardiometabolic and stress-related disorders in later life.

  19. Multiple Crack Growth Prediction in AA2024-T3 Friction Stir Welded Joints, Including Manufacturing Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlone, Pierpaolo; Citarella, Roberto; Sonne, Mads Rostgaard

    2016-01-01

    A great deal of attention is currently paid by several industries toward the friction stir welding process to realize lightweight structures. Within this aim, the realistic prediction of fatigue behavior of welded assemblies is a key factor. In this work an integrated finite element method - dual...... boundary element method (FEM-DBEM) procedure, coupling the welding process simulation to the subsequent crack growth assessment, is proposed and applied to simulate multiple crack propagation, with allowance for manufacturing effects. The friction stir butt welding process of the precipitation hardened AA...

  20. Path-integral calculation of the second virial coefficient including intramolecular flexibility effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garberoglio, Giovanni, E-mail: garberoglio@fbk.eu [Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Computational Science (LISC), FBK-CMM and University of Trento, via Sommarive 18, I-38123 Povo (Italy); Jankowski, Piotr [Department of Quantum Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Gagarina 7, PL-87-100 Toruń (Poland); Szalewicz, Krzysztof [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Harvey, Allan H. [Applied Chemicals and Materials Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305-3337 (United States)

    2014-07-28

    We present a path-integral Monte Carlo procedure for the fully quantum calculation of the second molecular virial coefficient accounting for intramolecular flexibility. This method is applied to molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and deuterium (D{sub 2}) in the temperature range 15–2000 K, showing that the effect of molecular flexibility is not negligible. Our results are in good agreement with experimental data, as well as with virials given by recent empirical equations of state, although some discrepancies are observed for H{sub 2} between 100 and 200 K.

  1. Specialists meeting on properties of primary circuit structural materials including environmental effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The Specialists Meeting on Properties of Primary Circuit Structural Materials of LMFBRs covered the following topics: overview of materials program in different countries; mechanical properties of materials in air; fracture mechanics studies - component related activities; impact of environmental influences on mechanical properties; relationship of material properties and design methods. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for exchange of information on structural materials behaviour in primary circuit of fast breeder reactors. Special emphasis was placed on environmental effects such as influence of sodium and irradiation on mechanical properties of reactor materials

  2. North American Natural Gas Supply Forecast: The Hubbert Method Including the Effects of Institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, Douglas B.; Kolodziej, Marek

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the U.S. and southern Canadian natural gas supply market is considered. An important model for oil and natural gas supply is the Hubbert curve. Not all regions of the world are producing oil or natural gas following a Hubbert curve, even when price and market conditions are accounted for. One reason is that institutions are affecting supply. We investigate the possible effects of oil and gas market institutions in North America on natural gas supply. A multi-cycle Hubbert cur...

  3. Effect of including decay chains on predictions of equilibrium-type terrestrial food chain models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, G.

    1990-01-01

    Equilibrium-type food chain models are commonly used for assessing the radiological impact to man from environmental releases of radionuclides. Usually these do not take into account build-up of radioactive decay products during environmental transport. This may be a potential source of underprediction. For estimating consequences of this simplification, the equations of an internationally recognised terrestrial food chain model have been extended to include decay chains of variable length. Example calculations show that for releases from light water reactors as expected both during routine operation and in the case of severe accidents, the build-up of decay products during environmental transport is generally of minor importance. However, a considerable number of radionuclides of potential radiological significance have been identified which show marked contributions of decay products to calculated contamination of human food and resulting radiation dose rates. (author)

  4. Evidence for Dose-Additive Effects of Pyrethroids on Motor Activity in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolansky, Marcelo J.; Gennings, Chris; DeVito, Michael J.; Crofton, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Pyrethroids are neurotoxic insecticides used in a variety of indoor and outdoor applications. Previous research characterized the acute dose–effect functions for 11 pyrethroids administered orally in corn oil (1 mL/kg) based on assessment of motor activity. Objectives We used a mixture of these 11 pyrethroids and the same testing paradigm used in single-compound assays to test the hypothesis that cumulative neurotoxic effects of pyrethroid mixtures can be predicted using the default dose–addition theory. Methods Mixing ratios of the 11 pyrethroids in the tested mixture were based on the ED30 (effective dose that produces a 30% decrease in response) of the individual chemical (i.e., the mixture comprised equipotent amounts of each pyrethroid). The highest concentration of each individual chemical in the mixture was less than the threshold for inducing behavioral effects. Adult male rats received acute oral exposure to corn oil (control) or dilutions of the stock mixture solution. The mixture of 11 pyrethroids was administered either simultaneously (2 hr before testing) or after a sequence based on times of peak effect for the individual chemicals (4, 2, and 1 hr before testing). A threshold additivity model was fit to the single-chemical data to predict the theoretical dose–effect relationship for the mixture under the assumption of dose additivity. Results When subthreshold doses of individual chemicals were combined in the mixtures, we found significant dose-related decreases in motor activity. Further, we found no departure from the predicted dose-additive curve regardless of the mixture dosing protocol used. Conclusion In this article we present the first in vivo evidence on pyrethroid cumulative effects supporting the default assumption of dose addition. PMID:20019907

  5. Treatment effects in the prostate including those associated with traditional and emerging therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Andrew J; Ryan, Paul; Van derKwast, Theodorus

    2011-07-01

    Classic treatment options for prostate cancer consist of radical prostatectomy, antiandrogen (or hormonal) therapy, and radiation therapy. Hormonal and radiation therapy, in particular, have well known, often profound effects on the histologic appearance of benign prostate tissue and prostatic carcinoma. The tissue changes induced by these treatments have been comprehensively described in several sources. Novel therapies ranging from focal ablative treatments to highly targeted molecular therapies are beginning to emerge and pathologists will play a central role in documenting the effects of these treatments on normal and malignant prostate tissue. It is therefore important that pathologists have access to basic treatment information and a solid working knowledge of the morphologic changes induced by these therapies. This will ensure accurate interpretation and reporting of posttreatment prostate specimens. This review is based on a presentation given by Dr A. Evans at the International Society of Urological Pathology Companion Society Meeting (Hot Topics in Urological Pathology) at The United States Canadian Academy of Pathology Meeting in Washington DC on March 20, 2010. This review will cover the histopathologic features seen in benign prostate tissue and prostatic carcinoma seen following: hormonal therapy, radiation therapy, ablative therapies such as vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy, interstitial laser thermotherapy, and high-intensity focussed ultrasound. An emphasis is placed on these specific modalities as they are currently in use as primary, salvage, or investigational therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  6. NLO QCD+EW predictions for HV and HV +jet production including parton-shower effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, F.; Lindert, J. M.; Oleari, C.; Pozzorini, S.

    2017-09-01

    We present the first NLO QCD+EW predictions for Higgs boson production in association with a ℓν ℓ or ℓ + ℓ - pair plus zero or one jets at the LHC. Fixed-order NLO QCD+EW calculations are combined with a QCD+QED parton shower using the recently developed resonance-aware method in the POWHEG framework. Moreover, applying the improved MiNLO technique to Hℓν ℓ +jet and Hℓ + ℓ - +jet production at NLO QCD+EW, we obtain predictions that are NLO accurate for observables with both zero or one resolved jet. This approach permits also to capture higher-order effects associated with the interplay of EW corrections and QCD radiation. The behavior of EW corrections is studied for various kinematic distributions, relevant for experimental analyses of Higgsstrahlung processes at the 13 TeV LHC. Exact NLO EW corrections are complemented with approximate analytic formulae that account for the leading and next-to-leading Sudakov logarithms in the high-energy regime. In the tails of transverse-momentum distributions, relevant for analyses in the boosted Higgs regime, the Sudakov approximation works well, and NLO EW effects can largely exceed the ten percent level. Our predictions are based on the POWHEG BOX RES+OpenLoops framework in combination with the Pythia 8.1 parton shower.

  7. Comprehensive study in the inhibitory effect of berberine on gene transcription, including TATA box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yugang; Kheir, Michael M; Chai, Yushuang; Hu, Jun; Xing, Dongming; Lei, Fan; Du, Lijun

    2011-01-01

    Berberine (BBR) is an established natural DNA intercalator with numerous pharmacological functions. However, currently there are neither detailed reports concerning the distribution of this alkaloid in living cells nor reports concerning the relationship between BBR's association with DNA and the function of DNA. Here we report that the distribution of BBR within the nucleus can be observed 30 minutes after drug administration, and that the content of berberine in the nucleus peaks at around 4 µmol, which is twelve hours after drug administration. The spatial conformation of DNA and chromatin was altered immediately after their association with BBR. Moreover, this association can effectively suppress the transcription of DNA in living cell systems and cell-free systems. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) demonstrated further that BBR can inhibit the association between the TATA binding protein (TBP) and the TATA box in the promoter, and this finding was also attained in living cells by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Based on results from this study, we hypothesize that berberine can suppress the transcription of DNA in living cell systems, especially suppressing the association between TBP and the TATA box by binding with DNA and, thus, inhibiting TATA box-dependent gene expression in a non-specific way. This novel study has significantly expanded the sphere of knowledge concerning berberine's pharmacological effects, beginning at its paramount initial interaction with the TATA box.

  8. The role of number words: the phonological length effect in multidigit addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klessinger, Nicolai; Szczerbinski, Marcin; Varley, Rosemary

    2012-11-01

    We explored the role of phonological representations of number words in exact calculation. The reaction times and accuracy of responses in multidigit addition problems were compared across three groups of participants (young healthy, older healthy, and 3 patients with severe aphasia) and two types of addition problems: phonologically long in English (containing the bisyllabic number word "seven") and short in English (monosyllabic number words-e.g., "six"). Older healthy participants were significantly faster and more accurate in calculation than younger healthy participants. The older participants showed no evidence of a phonological length effect. However this effect was apparent in the younger adults, with longer reaction times on phonologically long problems. Furthermore, there was an association between the presence of a phonological length effect and the overall speed of response, suggesting that less proficient calculators were more reliant on phonological mediation of performance. The aphasic participants retained the ability to complete multidigit additions and were as accurate as the younger healthy group, although the response times of two of the 3 patients were slow. The aphasic participants varied with regard to the presence of a phonological length effect. Two participants showed no evidence of phonological mediation, while 1 displayed a phonological length effect. The results suggest that language resources are not mandatory for exact addition, although they may be used to scaffold math performance in less competent calculators. Evidence of phonological mediation of performance in aphasic participants may provide insight into the integrity or otherwise of inner speech in severe aphasia.

  9. Effect of diet supplementation with the addition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae upon stress response in slaughter lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Sowińska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study included 2 groups of lambs (GL: control (C and experimental (E which since day 11 of life was receiving an addition of dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae preparation. At the age of 100 days, 12 lambs from each group were weaned from mothers for 12-h pre-slaughter fasting, and transported to a slaughter house. Blood was sampled for analyses: before weaning from mothers (BST 1, before and after transport (BST 2 and 3. Blood samples were assayed for: values of neutrophils and lymphocytes, N:L (neutrophils to lymphocytes ratio, cortisol and glucose. After 24-h chilling of lamb carcasses, musculus longissimus dorsi was subjected to measurements of final acidity (pH24 and colour (CIE Lab, and muscle samples were collected for evaluation of water absorption and shear force. The GL and BST had a significant effect on the N:L ratio. No significant differences were found in the cortisol concentration between groups of lambs. This indicator was significantly different in the analyzed blood sampling time (P < 0.01. In the entire period of pre-slaughter handling, in group C cortisol concentration increased × 8.5, whereas in group E it increased × 4.3 compared to the baseline value. In both groups, the study showed an increase (P < 0.01 in glucose concentration in BST 3 compared to BST 1 and BST 2. Meat of lambs from group E was characterized by lower (P < 0.05 values of pH24, WHC, SF, and indicator a*. The obtained results suggest the advisability of applying a preparation of dried brewer’s yeast in rearing slaughter lambs in order to strengthen their immunity and to alleviate effects of pre-slaughter stress.

  10. Additives aided composting of green waste: effects on organic matter degradation, compost maturity, and quality of the finished compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabhane, Jagdish; William, S P M Prince; Bidyadhar, Rajnikant; Bhilawe, Priya; Anand, Duraisamy; Vaidya, Atul N; Wate, Satish R

    2012-06-01

    The effect of various additives such as fly ash, phosphogypsum, jaggery, lime, and polyethylene glycol on green waste composting was investigated through assessing their influence on microbial growth, enzymatic activities, organic matter degradation, bulk density, quality of finished compost including gradation test, heavy metal analysis, etc. A perusal of results showed that addition of jaggery and polyethylene glycol were helpful to facilitate composting process as they significantly influenced the growth of microbes and cellulase activity. The quality of finished compost prepared from jaggery and polyethylene glycol added treatments were superior to other composts, wherein reduction in C/N ratio was more than 8% in jaggery treatment. All other parameters of compost quality including gradation test also favored jaggery and polyethylene glycol as the best additives for green waste composting. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of arginine and phytogenic additive supplementation on performance and health of brown-egg layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Barbosa Fascina

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study was performed to evaluate the effects of the association of different digestible arginine and phytogenic additive dietary levels on performance and health status of brown-egg layers. In this study, a total of 504 33-week-old Hisex Brown layers were distributed into a completely randomized experimental design to a 4 × 3 factorial arrangement (dietary digestible arginine levels: 880, 968, 1056, or 1144 mg/kg of feed × phytogenic additive levels: 0, 100, and 200 mg/kg of feed with six replicate cages of seven birds per cage. The phytogenic additive was composed of extracts of Baccharis dracunculifolia (40%, Astragalus membranaceus lipopolysaccharides (20%, cinnamon, and grape seed (20%. Feed intake was reduced when diets containing 1056 mg of arginine were supplemented with 100 or 200 mg phytogenic additive per kg. Feed conversion ratio was improved when diets were supplemented with 100 mg of phytogenic additive or with 1056 mg of arginine per kg of feed. Egg mass was increased when diets were supplemented with 1056 mg arginine per kg of feed. Arginine supplementation quadratically increased albumen percentage and reduced yolk percentage. Higher arginine and phytogenic additive levels reduced heterophyl:lymphocyte ratio and blood uric acid, total cholesterol, very-low density lipoprotein, and triglyceride levels. Dietary supplementation of 100 mg of phytogenic additive associated with high arginine levels increased nitric oxide production by peritoneal macrophages and 1056 mg of arginine increased antibodies titers against Newcastle disease virus. Blood and intestinal malonaldehyde levels were reduced when 200 mg of the phytogenic additive was added. Dietary supplementation of 968 mg of arginine or 100 mg of a phytogenic additive (40% Baccharis dracunculifolia, 20% Astragalus membranaceus, 20% cinnamon, and 20% grape seed extracts per kilogram of diet improves the feed conversion ratio and associated inclusion of 1144 mg of

  12. The positive effects of waste leachate addition on methane fermentation from food waste in batch trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wanli; Zhang, Lei; Li, Aimin

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the effect of waste leachate (WL) addition on batch anaerobic digestion of food waste (FW), and to examine the influence of mixture ratio on the co-digestion process. The results showed that anaerobic digestion of FW was greatly enhanced by WL addition, as indicated by the higher methane yield, higher methane content, more volatile solids (VS) destruction, and higher stability. Although WL was rich in volatile fatty acids (VFA), its addition did not cause VFA inhibition. It was found that WL addition was beneficial to accelerate the start-up and shorten the long reaction time of the batch anaerobic process. The time to reach the peak methane yield was reduced by 1, 2, and 4 days with WL addition. The optimum FW to WL ratio was 77.9:22.1 with the highest methane yield (416 mL/g VS), the highest methane content (64.3%), the greatest VS removal (77.6%), and stable performance. These results confirmed the positive effects of WL addition on methane fermentation from FW.

  13. The effect of tailor-made additives on crystal growth of methyl paraben: Experiments and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhihui; Liu, Yong; Song, Yang; Guan, Guoqiang; Jiang, Yanbin

    2017-03-01

    In this study, methyl paraben (MP) was selected as the model component, and acetaminophen (APAP), p-methyl acetanilide (PMAA) and acetanilide (ACET), which share the similar molecular structure as MP, were selected as the three tailor-made additives to study the effect of tailor-made additives on the crystal growth of MP. HPLC results indicated that the MP crystals induced by the three additives contained MP only. Photographs of the single crystals prepared indicated that the morphology of the MP crystals was greatly changed by the additives, but PXRD and single crystal diffraction results illustrated that the MP crystals were the same polymorph only with different crystal habits, and no new crystal form was found compared with other references. To investigate the effect of the additives on the crystal growth, the interaction between additives and facets was discussed in detail using the DFT methods and MD simulations. The results showed that APAP, PMAA and ACET would be selectively adsorbed on the growth surfaces of the crystal facets, which induced the change in MP crystal habits.

  14. A comprehensive approach to the design of ethanol supply chains including carbon trading effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarola, Sara; Shah, Nilay; Bezzo, Fabrizio

    2012-03-01

    The optimal design of biofuels production systems is a key component in the analysis of the environmental and economic performance of new sustainable transport systems. In this paper a general mixed integer linear programming modelling framework is developed to assess the design and planning of a multi-period and multi-echelon bioethanol upstream supply chain under market uncertainty. The optimisation design process of biofuels production systems aims at selecting the best biomass and technologies options among several alternatives according to economic and environmental (global warming potential) performance. A key feature in the proposed approach is the acknowledgement of an economic value to the overall GHG emissions, which is implemented through an emissions allowances trading scheme. The future Italian biomass-based ethanol production is adopted as a case study. Results show the effectiveness of the model as a decision making-tool to steer long-term decisions and investments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Multiple Crack Growth Prediction in AA2024-T3 Friction Stir Welded Joints, Including Manufacturing Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlone, Pierpaolo; Citarella, Roberto; Sonne, Mads Rostgaard

    2016-01-01

    boundary element method (FEM-DBEM) procedure, coupling the welding process simulation to the subsequent crack growth assessment, is proposed and applied to simulate multiple crack propagation, with allowance for manufacturing effects. The friction stir butt welding process of the precipitation hardened AA......2024-T3 alloy was simulated using a thermo-mechanical FEM model to predict the process induced residual stress field and material softening. The computed stress field was transferred to a DBEM environment and superimposed to the stress field produced by a remote fatigue traction load applied...... on a notched specimen. The whole procedure was finally tested comparing simulation outcomes with experimental data. The good agreement obtained highlights the predictive capability of the method. The influence of the residual stress distribution on crack growth and the mutual interaction between propagating...

  16. Specificity of psychomotor reactions in the conditions of support deprivation including effects of countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichiporuk, Igor; Ivanov, Oleg

    Activity of the cosmonaut demands high level of psychomotor reactions (PMR) which can vary during space flight under the influences of psychophysiological state’s variability and unusual inhabitancy that causes the necessity of PMR estimation’s inclusion into quality monitoring of capacity for work (CW). A main objective of research was a study of features of visual-motor reactions (VMR) and elements of CW of the person within simulation of microgravity effects via 7-day dry immersion (DI) in healthy male-volunteers 20-35 years old. The experimental data were received which testified to peculiarities of VMR and recognition of simple figures of main colors of a visible spectrum (red, green, blue, the RGB-standard) in the conditions of the DI characterized by support deprivation and decreased proprioceptive afferentation - in a control series and in a series with use of mioelectrostimulation as a countermeasure.

  17. Estimating eligibility for lung cancer screening in an Australian cohort, including the effect of spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manners, David; Hui, Jennie; Hunter, Michael; James, Alan; Knuiman, Matthew W; McWilliams, Annette; Mulrennan, Siobhain; Musk, Arthur W Bill; Brims, Fraser Jh

    2016-06-20

    To estimate the proportion of ever-smokers who are eligible for lung cancer screening in an Australian cohort, and to evaluate the effect of spirometry in defining chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) when assessing screening eligibility. Cross-sectional study of 3586 individuals aged 50-68 years who live in the Busselton Shire of Western Australia. Proportion of ever-smokers eligible for lung cancer screening based on United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) criteria, and PLCOm2012 lung cancer risk > 1.5%. The effect of using self-reported COPD, symptoms consistent with COPD, or spirometry to define COPD for screening eligibility according to the PLCOm2012 criteria. Of ever-smokers aged 55-68 years, 254 (20.1%) would be eligible for screening according to USPSTF criteria; fewer would be eligible according to PLCOm2012 criteria (225, 17.9%; P = 0.004). This is equivalent to 8.9-10.0% of the total population aged 55-68 years, which suggests about 450 000 individuals in Australia may be eligible for lung cancer screening. The proportions of eligible participants were not significantly different whether spirometry results or symptoms consistent with COPD were used to determine PLCOm2012 risk. The proportion of ever-smokers in this population who were eligible for lung cancer screening was 17.9-20.1%. Using symptoms to define COPD is an appropriate surrogate measure for spirometry when determining the presence of COPD in this population. There are significant challenges for policy makers on how to identify and recruit these eligible individuals from the wider population.

  18. Effect of GdL Addition on Physico-chemical Properties of Fermented Sausages during Ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Dong-Gyun; Jang, Kyoung-Hwan; Chung, Ku-Young

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of glucono-δ-lactone (GdL) addition on physicochemical and microbiological characteristics of fermented sausages during ripening and drying. Five batches of sausages were produced under ripening conditions: without GdL and with 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75% of GdL addition. Samples from each treatment were taken for physicochemical and microbiological analyses on the 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20 and 25th day of ripening. Chemical analysis showed a significant decrease in moisture content of sausages with increasing amounts of GdL added (psausages showed the highest in T4 (psausages were increased on the 25th day compared to day 0 (psausages. The addition of 0.75% GdL was effective in controlling bacteria counts. Addition of GdL in sausages resulted in the physicochemical and microbiological attributes equal to or better than no addition of GdL without any harmful effect.

  19. The Blazhko Effect and Additional Excited Modes in RR Lyrae Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkő, J. M.; Szabó, R.

    2015-08-01

    Recent photometric space missions, such as CoRoT and Kepler, revealed that many RR Lyrae stars pulsate—beyond their main radial pulsation mode—in low-amplitude modes. Space data seem to indicate a clear trend that, namely, overtone (RRc) stars and modulated fundamental (RRab) RR Lyrae stars ubiquitously show additional modes, while non-Blazhko RRab stars never do. Two Kepler stars (V350 Lyr and KIC 7021124), however, apparently seemed to break this rule: they were classified as non-Blazhko RRab stars showing additional modes. We processed Kepler pixel photometric data of these stars. We detected a small amplitude (but significant) Blazhko effect for both stars by using the resulting light curves and O-C diagrams. This finding strengthens the apparent connection between the Blazhko effect and the excitation of additional modes. In addition, it yields a potential tool for detecting Blazhko stars through the additional frequency patterns, even if we have only short but accurate time series observations. V350 Lyr shows the smallest amplitude multiperiodic Blazhko effect ever detected.

  20. The effect of plastic addition on coal caking properties during carbonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiji Nomura; Kenji Kato; Tomoyuki Nakagawa; Ikuo Komaki [Nippon Steel Corporation, Chiba (Japan). Environment & Process Technology Center, Ironmaking R & D Division

    2003-10-01

    The recycling process of waste plastics using coke ovens is now being studied. The effect of plastic addition on coal caking property was investigated. It was revealed that thermal decomposition products of plastics interacted with bituminous coal during carbonization in coke ovens. The effect of plastic addition on coal caking property varied with types of plastics. The addition of aliphatic polymers such as polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP) and poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) had only a small effect on coal caking property and coke strength and in some cases PE addition increased coke strength. On the other hand, the addition of polystyrene (PS), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and terephtalic acid (TFA) inhibited coal expansion and fusion, decreased maximum fluidity and total dilatation, and deteriorated the coke strength. These differences were discussed from the viewpoint of the interaction between thermal decomposition products of plastics and hydrogen in coal. It was suggested that the radical formed as a result of PS or PET thermal decomposition abstracted hydrogen from coal, which resulted in the decrease in coal caking property. 13 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Effect of dispersing and stabilizing additives on rheological characteristics of the upgraded brown coal water mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umar, Datin Fatia; Muta'alim; Usui, Hiromoto; Komoda, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    Upgraded brown coal water mixture (UBCWM) preparation by using an Indonesian upgraded coal produced by upgraded brown coal (UBC) process, was carried out to study the effect of dispersing and stabilizing additives on rheological behavior of the UBCWM. Three kinds of anionic dispersing additives, naphthalene sulfonic formaldehyde condensate (NSF), poly (meth) acrylate (PMA) and poly styrene sulfonic acid (PSS) and three kinds of stabilizing additives, carboxyl methyl cellulose (CMC), rhansam gum (S-194) and gellan gum (S-60) were used in this study. Results indicate that the addition of NSF 0.3 wt.% together with S-194 0.01 wt.% is effective in preparing UBCWM with good slurryability and stability, based on its rheological characteristics with the apparent viscosity at shear rate of 100 s - 1 and yield stress at zero point of shear rate. The rheological behavior of all of the UBCWM that prepared, exhibits non-Newtonian Bingham plastic. From the economical point of view, the price of S-194 is expensive. On the other hand, CMC is cheap and abundant. Therefore, the addition of CMC 0.01 wt.% together with NSF 0.3 wt.% is also effective in preparing UBCWM with good fluidity and stability. (author)

  2. Effect of H2 addition on combustion characteristics of dimethyl ether jet diffusion flame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yinhu; Lu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Quanhai; Gan, Lu; Ji, Xuanyu; Wang, Hu; Guo, Qiang; Song, Decai; Ji, Pengyu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • DME- and H 2 -dominated combustion regimes were quantitatively characterized. • The flame structure changed significantly when H 2 addition was above 60 vol.%. • An empirical correlation for normalized flame entrainment rate was developed. • The optimal H 2 addition to DME was 60 vol.% in the practical engineering. - Abstract: In this paper, experiments and numerical calculations were conducted to investigate the effect of H 2 addition on dimethyl ether (DME) jet diffusion flame behaviors, in terms of thermal and chemical structures, reaction zone size, flame entrainment, and NOx and CO emission indices. A wide range of H 2 additions from pure DME to pure H 2 were involved herein, while maintaining the volumetric flow rate of fuel mixture constant. The results indicate that when H 2 mole fraction in the fuel mixture exceeded 60%, the blended fuel was converted to H 2 -dominated. Besides, the flames behaved rather distinctly at the DME- and H 2 -dominated regimes. With the increment in H 2 addition, flame temperature, H 2 , H, O, and OH concentrations increased gradually, but concentrations of the intermediate hydrocarbons (such as CO, CH 2 O, CH 2 , and CH 3 ) decreased on the contrary. Additionally, after the flame became H 2 -dominated, the species concentrations varied increasingly quickly with H 2 addition. The reaction zone length and width decreased nearly linearly with H 2 addition at the DME- and H 2 -dominated regimes. But the decreasing speed of reaction zone length became faster after the flame was converted to H 2 -dominated. At the DME-dominated regime, the dependence of flame entrainment coefficient (C e ) on H 2 addition was rather small. While at the H 2 -dominated regime, C e increased increasingly quickly with H 2 addition. Moreover, with the increment in H 2 addition, NOx emission index increased and CO emission index decreased gradually. In addition, at the DME-dominated regime, NOx emission index increased fairly slowly

  3. Isogeometric analysis of free-form Timoshenko curved beams including the nonlinear effects of large deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Farhad; Hashemian, Ali; Moetakef-Imani, Behnam; Hadidimoud, Saied

    2018-03-01

    In the present paper, the isogeometric analysis (IGA) of free-form planar curved beams is formulated based on the nonlinear Timoshenko beam theory to investigate the large deformation of beams with variable curvature. Based on the isoparametric concept, the shape functions of the field variables (displacement and rotation) in a finite element analysis are considered to be the same as the non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) basis functions defining the geometry. The validity of the presented formulation is tested in five case studies covering a wide range of engineering curved structures including from straight and constant curvature to variable curvature beams. The nonlinear deformation results obtained by the presented method are compared to well-established benchmark examples and also compared to the results of linear and nonlinear finite element analyses. As the nonlinear load-deflection behavior of Timoshenko beams is the main topic of this article, the results strongly show the applicability of the IGA method to the large deformation analysis of free-form curved beams. Finally, it is interesting to notice that, until very recently, the large deformations analysis of free-form Timoshenko curved beams has not been considered in IGA by researchers.

  4. Turbulent inflow and wake of a marine hydrokinetic turbine, including effects of wave motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, Toby; Rowell, Matthew; Decew, Judson; Baldwin, Ken; Swift, Rob; Wosnik, Martin

    2012-11-01

    A research program to investigate the spatio-temporal structure of turbulent flows relevant to marine hydrokinetic (MHK) energy conversion, including turbulent inflow and turbine wakes, has been initiated at UNH. A scale model MHK turbine was deployed from a floating platform at two open water tidal energy test sites, one sheltered (Great Bay Estuary, NH) and one exposed (Muskeget Channel, MA). The inflow upstream of the turbine under test was characterized using an acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), which vary considerably in temporal and spatial resolution as well as practical applicability in this environment. The turbine was operated at previously determined peak efficiency for a given tidal current. The wake of the turbine was measured with a second, traversing ADV during ramp-up and at peak tidal current velocities, at two to six shroud diameters downstream. An inertial motion unit installed near the turbine hub is used to correct for platform motion. A platform-mounted wave-staff and an independently taut-moored pressure sensor were used to measure wave climate. Together, these data are used to validate theoretical and tank model results for utilizing surface-based platforms for MHK turbine deployments.

  5. Effects of continuous addition of nitrate to a thermophilic anaerobic digestion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    The biodegradation of complex organic matter is regulated partially by the ability to dump electrons which build up in the form of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). The effects of the continuous addition of the oxidant, nitrate, were investigated on a single-stage, thermophilic, anaerobic digester. The digester acclimated rapidly to nitrate addition. The continuous addition of nitrate resulted in a constant inhibition of total gas (30%) and methane production (36%). Reduction in total gas and methane production was accompanied by increases in sludge pH and acetate, propionate, and ammonium ion pools. Effluent particle size distribution revealed a shift to smaller particle sizes in the nitrate-pumped sludge. The continuous addition of nitrate resulted in lower numbers of methanogens and sulfate reducers in the sludge, with increases in nitrate-reducing and cellulose-degrading microorganisms. These findings indicate that added nitrate underwent dissimilatory reduction to ammonium ion, as determined from gas analysis, ammonium pools, and 15 N-nitrate-label experiments. Continuous nitrate addition to a single-phase digestion system was determined to inhibit methane production from biomass and wastes. Thus for the single-stage digestion system in which maximum methane production is desired, the addition of nitrate is not recommended. However, in a multistage digestion system, the continuous addition of nitrate in the primary stage to increase the rate and extent of degradation of organic matter to volatile fatty acids, which then would serve as feed to a second stage, may be advantageous

  6. Effect of SiO2 addition and gamma irradiation on the lithium borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, A. P.; Deshpande, V. K.

    2018-01-01

    The physical properties like density, glass transition temperature (Tg), and ionic conductivity of lithium borate (LB) glasses with SiO2 addition were measured before and after gamma irradiation. Remarkable changes in properties have been obtained in the physical properties of LB glasses with SiO2 addition and after gamma irradiation. The increase in density and glass transition temperature of LB glasses with SiO2 addition has been explained with the help of increase in density of cross linking due to SiO4 tetrahedra formation. The increase in ionic conductivity with SiO2 addition was explained with the help of ‘mixed glass former effect’. The increase in density and Tg of LB glasses with SiO2 addition after gamma irradiation has been attributed to fragmentation of bigger ring structure into smaller rings, which increases the density of cross linking and hence compaction. The exposure of gamma irradiation has lead to decrease in ionic conductivity of LB glasses with SiO2 addition. The atomic displacement caused by gamma irradiation resulted in filling of interstices and decrease in trapping sites. This explains the obtained decrease in ionic conductivity after gamma irradiation of glasses. The obtained results of effect of SiO2 addition and gamma irradiation on the density, Tg and ionic conductivity has been supported by FTIR results.

  7. The effect of additives on the radiation-induced coloration of photochromic dithienylethene derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Setsuko; Irie, Masahiro

    2002-01-01

    The effect of the addition of metal complexes and aromatic compounds on the radiation-induced coloration of poly-styrene films containing 1,2-bis (2-methyl-5-phenyl-3-thienyl) perfluorocyclopentene was examined to develop a sensitive reusable color plastic dosimeter. By the addition of metal complexes, the radiation sensitivity increased along with an increase in the atomic numbers. When aromatic compounds, such as naphthalene, biphenyl, and acenaphthene, were added to the polymer film, the coloration sensitivity increased, while the addition of anthracene and pyrene decreased the sensitivity. Excitation energy transfer from the sensitizers to the dithienylethene is considered to play an important role in the radiation-induced coloration in polystyrene films containing the additives. (author)

  8. Additive Effect on the Electrochemical Performance of Lithium–Sulfur Battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azimi, Nasim; Xue, Zheng; Hu, Libo; Takoudis, Christos; Zhang, Shengshui; Zhang, Zhengcheng

    2015-02-01

    Lithium difluoro(oxalato) borate (LiDFOB) was investigated as an electrolyte additive for the Li-S battery. This additive was identified to be an efficient electrolyte additive to suppress the polysulfide shuttling effect existing in the conventional Li-S chemistry. To detect the positive impact of the new additive, oligo (ethylene glycol) functionalized silane was employed as the electrolyte solvent due to its high solvation capability with the lithium polysulfides. The electrochemical results and the SEM data of Li-S battery using the new electrolyte confirmed the role of the LiDFOB as a critical component to eliminate the shuttling of the dissolved polysulfides thus enabling a high coulombic efficiency. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of mineral additives on structure and properties of concrete for pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Khrystyna; Markiv, Taras; Hunyak, Oleksii

    2017-12-01

    Concrete pavements is an attractive alternative to asphalt pavements because of its lower cost and higher durability. Major contribution to sustainable development can be made by partial replacement of cement in concrete pavement with supplementary cementitious materials of different nature and origin. In this paper, the effect of natural zeolite and perlite additives in complex with chemical admixtures on the structure and properties of concrete for pavement was studied. Compressive and flexural strength test was used to study the mechanical behavior of designed concrete under load. Generally, the compressive strength of both control concrete and concrete containing mineral additives levels at the later ages of hardening. The microstructure analysis of concrete with mineral additives of different nature activity showed the formation of additional amount of hydration products such as tobermorite type calcium hydrosilicate which provide self-reinforcement of hardening concrete system.

  10. Effect of mineral additives on structure and properties of concrete for pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobol Khrystyna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Concrete pavements is an attractive alternative to asphalt pavements because of its lower cost and higher durability. Major contribution to sustainable development can be made by partial replacement of cement in concrete pavement with supplementary cementitious materials of different nature and origin. In this paper, the effect of natural zeolite and perlite additives in complex with chemical admixtures on the structure and properties of concrete for pavement was studied. Compressive and flexural strength test was used to study the mechanical behavior of designed concrete under load. Generally, the compressive strength of both control concrete and concrete containing mineral additives levels at the later ages of hardening. The microstructure analysis of concrete with mineral additives of different nature activity showed the formation of additional amount of hydration products such as tobermorite type calcium hydrosilicate which provide self-reinforcement of hardening concrete system.

  11. The Effect of Some Additives on the Bioproductive Performances of SilkWorm Bombyx mori L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Benţea

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowdays, worldwide in sericulture domain, researches are aimed to find new efficient alternatives for the feeding of mulberry silk worm through the use of some fodder additives which allow the improvement of bioproductive parameters and silk line quality. The present work represents a review of the use of such substances (mineral and vitamin additives and of the experiments carried out to point out their effects on silkworms (Bombyx mori L.. Research conducted worldwide revealed the fact that the use of mineral and vitamin additives in silkworm Bombyx mori L., improve the growth rate of larvae, protein and mineral content of haemolymph, the protein content, DNA and RNA content of the sericigen glands, and the quality parameters of cocoon and silk line. Researches showed that the use of these additives doesn’t affect the quality of the silk.

  12. Additive Neuroprotective Effect of Borneol with Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Ischemic Stroke in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Guang Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous stem cell transplantation initiates neuroprotection related to the secretion of trophic factor. Borneol, a potential herbal neuroprotective agent, is a penetration enhancer. Here, we aimed to investigate whether they have additive neuroprotective effect on cerebral ischemia. Borneol was given to mice by gavage 3 days before middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO induction until the day when the mice were sacrificed. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs were intravenously injected at 24 h after MCAO induction. Neurological deficits, infarct volume, cell death, and neurogenesis were evaluated. Combined use of MSCs and borneol could more effectively reduce infarction volume and cell apoptosis, enhance neurogenesis, and improve the functional recovery than that of MSCs alone. The findings showed that combined use of borneol and stem cells provided additive neuroprotective effect on cerebral ischemia. However, the supposed effect of borneol on the improved MSC penetration still needs further direct evidence.

  13. Effects from additives on deacetylation of chitin; Efeito de aditivos na desacetilacao de quitina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campana Filho, Sergio P.; Signini, Roberta [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: scampana@iqsc.sc.usp.br

    2001-12-01

    Deacetylation reactions of commercial chitin were carried out in aqueous sodium hydroxide solution at 115 deg C for 6 hours. The effect from additives (sodium borohydride or anthraquinone) and of bubbling inert gas (nitrogen or argon) on the characteristics of deacetylated samples were evaluated. Average degrees of acetylation and intrinsic viscosity were determined by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy and capillary viscometry, respectively. X-ray diffraction was employed to evaluate changes in crystallinity and infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor structural changes due to deacetylation. The bubbling of inert gas during the deacetylation reaction resulted in more crystalline samples of chitosan. Deacetylation carried out without any additive produced slightly more deacetylated chitosan but they were severely depolymerized. The depolymerization process was much less important when sodium borohydride was added to the reaction medium but the addition of anthraquinone and the bubbling of nitrogen, or argon, did not have any effect, this suggests that oxygen is not required for depolymerization. (author)

  14. Effect of Sr Additive Amount and Holding Time on Microstructure of A390 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J. H.; Xing, S. M.; Han, Q. Y.; Guo, Q.; Wang, R. F.

    2017-11-01

    The microstructure of A390 alloy under different Sr additive amounts and holding times was studied by means of direct reading spectrum analysis, energy spectrum analysis, optical microscope and electron microscope. The results show that Sr has a good modification to eutectic Si, while it has a negative effect on primary silicon. The Sr addition will increase the size of primary silicon. When the addition amount of Al-10Sr alloy is 0.6%, the modification of eutectic silicon is the optimum. The Sr has a short incubation period and a fine modification at 10min, but it is more serious burning rate in small furnace smelting, and the modification effect disappears basically after 100min.

  15. Effect of fluoride addition on the properties of dental alginate impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun; Lim, Bum-Soon; Kim, Cheol-We

    2004-03-01

    Fluoride-containing dental alginate impression materials can exert a considerable reduction in enamel solubility. The objective was to evaluate the effects of fluoride addition in the alginate impression materials on the properties and subsequent release of fluoride. Four experimental alginate impression materials were studied. Materials were mixed with distilled water (control) or 100-ppm fluoride solution. One or two percent NaF, or 1% SnF2 was added to the materials, which were mixed with distilled water. Fluoride release, flexibility, recovery from deformation, setting time, compressive strength and elastic modulus were determined in accordance with the ISO 1563 and ANSI/ADA Spec. 18. Fluoride release increased after addition of fluoride, and the released amount was 0.762-14.761 ppm. Addition of NaF or SnF2 resulted in higher fluoride release than the control group (p alginate impression material may result in effective release of fluoride without deteriorating the properties of material itself.

  16. EFFECT OF DELAYING ADDITION TIME OF SMF SUPERPLASTICIZER ON HYDRATION CHARACTERISTICS OF BLENDED CEMENT PASTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. EL-DIDAMONY

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the effect of delaying addition time of sulphonate melamine formaldehyde superplasticizer (SMF on the rheology and hydration characteristic of blended cement pastes up to 90 days. The optimum dosage of superplasticizer was chosen as 1.0 mass %, this dosage gives the higher compressive strength and bulk density as well as lower total porosity. The optimum delaying time of superplasticizer was 7.5 min which gives the highest fluidity, bulk density, compressive strength and chemically combined water contents of cement pastes, whereas, the delaying addition time of 15.0 min shows the lower values of bulk density, compressive strength and combined water contents. This is attributed to the reduction of hydration rate of cement, due to the formation of a polymer film around the cement particles and/or hydrated products. The superplasticizing effect improved with a delayed sulphonate melamine formaldehyde superplasticizer addition time.

  17. Synthetic Effect of Vivid Shark Skin and Polymer Additive on Drag Reduction Reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawei Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural shark skin has a well-demonstrated drag reduction function, which is mainly owing to its microscopic structure and mucus on the body surface. In order to improve drag reduction, it is necessary to integrate microscopic drag reduction structure and drag reduction agent. In this study, two hybrid approaches to synthetically combine vivid shark skin and polymer additive, namely, long-chain grafting and controllable polymer diffusion, were proposed and attempted to mimic such hierarchical topography of shark skin without waste of polymer additive. Grafting mechanism and optimization of diffusion port were investigated to improve the efficiency of the polymer additive. Superior drag reduction effects were validated, and the combined effect was also clarified through comparison between drag reduction experiments.

  18. Additional Interventions to Enhance the Effectiveness of Individual Placement and Support: A Rapid Evidence Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Boycott

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Topic. Additional interventions used to enhance the effectiveness of individual placement and support (IPS. Aim. To establish whether additional interventions improve the vocational outcomes of IPS alone for people with severe mental illness. Method. A rapid evidence assessment of the literature was conducted for studies where behavioural or psychological interventions have been used to supplement standard IPS. Published and unpublished empirical studies of IPS with additional interventions were considered for inclusion. Conclusions. Six published studies were found which compared IPS alone to IPS plus a supplementary intervention. Of these, three used skills training and three used cognitive remediation. The contribution of each discrete intervention is difficult to establish. Some evidence suggests that work-related social skills and cognitive training are effective adjuncts, but this is an area where large RCTs are required to yield conclusive evidence.

  19. [The real-world effectiveness of personal protective equipment and additional risks for workers' health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, É I; Morozova, T V; Adeninskaia, E E; Kur'erov, N N

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of personal protective equipment (PPE) of hearing, respiratory organs and hands is considered. It is shown that real effect of PPE is twice lower than declared by supplier; this presumes some derating system. The aspects of discomfort and additional risks are analyzed. The hygienic and physiologic evaluation of PPE is required along with elaboration of an official document (OSH standard or sanitary regulation) on selection, personal fit, organization of use and individual training of workers and their motivation.

  20. Effects of embedment including slip and separation on seismic SSI response of a nuclear reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, Navjeev; Paul, D.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Both the slip and separation of reactor base reduce with increase in embedment. ► The slip and separation become insignificant beyond 1/4 and 1/2 embedment respectively. ► The stresses in reactor reduce significantly upto 1/4 embedment. ► The stress reduction with embedment is more pronounced in case of tensile stresses. ► The modeling of interface is important beyond 1/8 embedment as stresses are underestimated otherwise. - Abstract: The seismic response of nuclear reactor containment building considering the effects of embedment, slip and separation at soil–structure interface requires modeling of the soil, structure and interface altogether. Slip and separation at the interface causes stress redistribution in the soil and the structure around the interface. The embedment changes the dynamic characteristics of the soil–structure system. Consideration of these aspects allows capturing the realistic response of the structure, which has been a research gap and presented here individually as well as taken together. Finite element analysis has been carried out in time domain to attempt the highly nonlinear problem. The study draws important conclusions useful for design of nuclear reactor containment building.

  1. Optical potentials derived from microscopic separable interactions including binding and recoil effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siciliano, E.R.; Walker, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    We first consider a projectile scattering from a nucleon bound in a fixed potential. A separable Galilean invariant projectile-nucleon interaction is adopted. Without using the fixed scatterer approximation or using closure on the intermediate target nucleon states we obtain various forms for the projectile-bound nucleon t matrix. Effects due to intermediate target excitation and nucleon recoil are discussed. By making the further approximations of closure and fixed scatterers we make connection with the work of previous authors. By generalizing to projectile interaction with several bound nucleons and examining the appropriate multiple scattering series we identify the optical potential for projectile elastic scattering from the many-body system. Different optical potentials are obtained for different projectile-bound nucleon t matrices, and we study the differences predicted by these dissimilar optical potentials for elastic scattering. In a model problem, we study pion-nucleus elastic scattering and compare the predictions obtained by adopting procedures used by (1) Landau, Phatak, and Tabakin and (2) Piepho-Walker to the predictions obtained in a less restrictive, but computationally difficult treatment

  2. Theory of energy harvesting from heartbeat including the effects of pleural cavity and respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yangyang; Lu, Bingwei; Lü, Chaofeng; Feng, Xue

    2017-11-01

    Self-powered implantable devices with flexible energy harvesters are of significant interest due to their potential to solve the problem of limited battery life and surgical replacement. The flexible electronic devices made of piezoelectric materials have been employed to harvest energy from the motion of biological organs. Experimental measurements show that the output voltage of the device mounted on porcine left ventricle in chest closed environment decreases significantly compared to the case of chest open. A restricted-space deformation model is proposed to predict the impeding effect of pleural cavity, surrounding tissues, as well as respiration on the efficiency of energy harvesting from heartbeat using flexible piezoelectric devices. The analytical solution is verified by comparing theoretical predictions to experimental measurements. A simple scaling law is established to analyse the intrinsic correlations between the normalized output power and the combined system parameters, i.e. the normalized permitted space and normalized electrical load. The results may provide guidelines for optimization of in vivo energy harvesting from heartbeat or the motions of other biological organs using flexible piezoelectric energy harvesters.

  3. Interpretation of vector magnetograph data including magneto-optic effects. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, E.A.; Hagyard, J.; National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, the presence of Faraday rotation in measurements of orientation of a sunspot's transvese magnetic field is investigated. Using observations obtained with the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) vector magnetograph, the derived vector magnetic field of a simple, symmetric sunspot is used to calculate the degree of Faraday rotation in the azimuth of the transverse field as a function of wavelength from analytical expressions for the Stokes parameters. These results are then compared with the observed rotation of the field's azimuth which is derived from observations at different wavelengths within the Fe sub(I) 5250 A spectral line. From these comparisons, we find: the observed rotation of the azimuth is simulated to a reasonable degree by the theoretical formulations if the line-formation parameter eta 0 is varied over the sunspot; these variations in eta 0 are substantiated by the line-intensity data; for the MSFC system, Faraday rotation can be neglected for field strengths less than 1800 G and field inclinations greater than 45 0 ; to minimize the effects of Faraday rotation in sunspot umbrae, MSFC magnetograph measurements must be made in the far wings of the Zeeman-sensitive spectral line. (orig.)

  4. Ontogeny of additive and maternal genetic effects: lessons from domestic mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Alastair J; Reale, Denis

    2006-01-01

    Evolution of size and growth depends on heritable variation arising from additive and maternal genetic effects. Levels of heritable (and nonheritable) variation might change over ontogeny, increasing through "variance compounding" or decreasing through "compensatory growth." We test for these processes using a meta-analysis of age-specific weight traits in domestic ungulates. Generally, mean standardized variance components decrease with age, consistent with compensatory growth. Phenotypic convergence among adult sheep occurs through decreasing environmental and maternal genetic variation. Maternal variation similarly declines in cattle. Maternal genetic effects are thus reduced with age (both in absolute and relative terms). Significant trends in heritability (decreasing in cattle, increasing in sheep) result from declining maternal and environmental components rather than from changing additive variation. There was no evidence for increasing standardized variance components. Any compounding must therefore be masked by more important compensatory processes. While extrapolation of these patterns to processes in natural population is difficult, our results highlight the inadequacy of assuming constancy in genetic parameters over ontogeny. Negative covariance between direct and maternal genetic effects was common. Negative correlations with additive and maternal genetic variances indicate that antagonistic pleiotropy (between additive and maternal genetic effects) may maintain genetic variance and limit responses to selection.

  5. Effect of graded levels of Saccharum officinarum as an additive to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of graded levels of sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum) as an additive to Guinea grass (Panicum maximum) silage. A previously established guinea grass plot, totaling an area of 625m2 was cut back and fertilized with urea at the rate of 200 kgN/ha. The pasture was then ...

  6. Effect of chromium and aluminum addition on anisotropic and microstructural characteristics of ball milled nanocrystalline iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajiv, E-mail: rajiv06484met@gmail.com [IITB-Monash Research Academy, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, VIC 3800 Australia (Australia); Joardar, Joydip [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Hyderabad (India); Singh Raman, R.K. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, VIC 3800 Australia (Australia); Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University, VIC 3800 Australia (Australia); Raja, V.S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Joshi, S.V. [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy and New Materials, Hyderabad (India); Parida, S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2016-06-25

    Prior studies on synthesis of nanocrystalline elements have discussed the effect of ball milling on lattice parameter, crystallite size, and micro-strain. For elemental milled powders, the anisotropic peak broadening does not change with increasing milling time. However, the effect of alloying addition on the anisotropic behavior of ball milled nanocrystalline powders remains an unexplored area. Here we report the effect of chromium and aluminum addition on the anisotropic behavior of iron in nanocrystalline Fe–20Cr–5Al (wt%) alloy powders synthesized by ball milling. The experimental results show that the anisotropic behavior of iron changes towards isotropic with milling. This change was also correlated to the theoretically calculated anisotropic factor from the change in elastic constant of iron due to milling. Addition of alloying elements exhibited a monotonic rise in the lattice parameter with crystallite size, which was attributed to the excess grain boundary interfacial energy and excess free volume at grain boundaries. Transmission electron microscopy image confirmed the crystallite size and nature of dislocation obtained using modified Williamson-Hall method. - Highlights: • Structural evolution in Fe–20Cr–5Al alloy during ball milling is reported. • Effect of alloying addition on the anisotropic behavior of iron was studied. • Agreement in anisotropic factor calculated theoretically and experimentally.

  7. Effect of addition of organic and inorganic combinations to soil on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ComputerCity

    2012-05-08

    May 8, 2012 ... Effect of addition of organic and inorganic combinations to soil on growing property of greenhouse cucumber. Ahmad Mohamadi Ghehsareh1*and Mahmoud Kalbasi2. 1Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Islamic Azad University, Khorasgan Branch, Isfahan, P.O.Box. 81595-158, Iran.

  8. Effect of Drilling Fluid Additives on the Niger Delta Environment: -A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of drilling fluid additives on the Soku oil fields environment has been examined. Soil and reserve pits in various locations were assessed for some physico-chemical characteristics and heavy metal content using standard methods for water and wastewater analysis. Plant growth and other biomass were also ...

  9. The Effectiveness of an Additional Stretching Exercise Program in Improving Flexibility Level among Preschool Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wee Akina Sia Seng; Rengasamy, Shabeshan A/L; Raju, Subramaniam A/L

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of a two minutes' additional stretching exercise program in a 30 minutes games teaching lesson in improving the flexibility level of 6 year old preschool boys (M = 5.92, SD = 0.27) in a preschool in Malaysia. Fifty (50) preschool boys were selected for the study based on the intact sampling…

  10. Effects of talc and clay addition on pressureless sintering of porous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 32; Issue 2. Effects of talc and clay addition on pressureless sintering of porous Si3N4 ceramics. Yu Fangli Yang Jianfeng Xue Yaohui Du Jun Lu Yuan Gao Jiqiang. Ceramics and Glasses Volume 32 Issue 2 April 2009 pp 177-181 ...

  11. Major genes with additive effects for seed size in kabuli chickpea ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Major genes with additive effects for seed size in kabuli chickpea. (Cicer arietinum L.) H. D. UPADHYAYA. ∗. , SHIVALI SHARMA and C. L. L. GOWDA. International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Patancheru, Hyderabad 502 324, India. [Upadhyaya H. D., Sharma S. and Gowda C. L. L. 2011 ...

  12. An investigation of the effect of pit latrine additives on VIP latrine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-07-04

    Jul 4, 2015 ... trials nor field trials provided any evidence that the use of pit additives has any beneficial effect on pit contents. .... diagram showing how measurements were taken using the infrared laser meter (Bakare, 2014). Laser Tape Measure. Pedestal Top. Wall Support to the pit. Cylindrical rings / concrete walls. P1.

  13. Additive and Interactive Effects of Stimulus Degradation: No Challenge for CDP+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Johannes C.; Perry, Conrad; Zorzi, Marco

    2009-01-01

    S. O'Malley and D. Besner (2008) showed that additive effects of stimulus degradation and word frequency in reading aloud occur in the presence of nonwords but not in pure word lists. They argued that this dissociation presents a major challenge to interactive computational models of reading aloud and claimed that no currently implemented model is…

  14. effects of zinc powder addition to villa gloss and silka lux marine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Effect of zinc powder addition to Villa Gloss and Silka Lux Marine Enamel paints on corrosion resistance of mild steel was studied. ... The corrosion rate stabilized at approximately 0.10 mmpy when zinc powder added was above 15 %, independent of the exposure time. ..... Alloy Reinforced With Steel Particles. Nigerian.

  15. Effect of filler addition on the compressive and impact properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Effect of filler addition on the compressive and impact properties of glass fibre reinforced epoxy. NIKHIL GUPTA*, BALRAJ SINGH BRAR† and EYASSU WOLDESENBET. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA. †Baba Banda Singh Engineering College, Fateh Garh ...

  16. Effects of novel feed additives in wheat based diets on performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of the supplementation of an antibiotic growth promoter or novel feed additives with or without a xylanase-based enzyme complex to wheat-based diets on the growth performance, carcass yields and quality and intestinal characteristics (length of the total and small ...

  17. Effect of CuO addition on structure and electrical properties of low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3Sb2/3)0·06(Ni1/2W1/2)0·02-. (Zr0·49Ti0·51)0·92]O3. Effect of the addition on sintering temperature, structure and electrical properties of ceramics was investigated. The piezoelectric ceramics was prepared by solid-state reaction. Sintering ...

  18. A comprehensive study on the effect of Ru addition to Pt electrodes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A comprehensive study on the effect of Ru addition to Pt electrodes for direct ethanol fuel cell ... Catalysis Volume 32 Issue 6 December 2009 pp 643-652 ... Abstract. The electro-oxidation of ethanol was studied over nanosized Pt and different compositions of PtRu catalysts synthesized by the borohydride reduction method.

  19. The cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination in addition to screening : a Dutch perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Setiawan, Didik; Luttjeboer, Jos; Westra, Tjalke Arend; Wilschut, Jan C.; Suwantika, Auliya A.; Daemen, Toos; Atthobari, Jarir; Wilffert, Bob; Postma, Maarten J.

    2015-01-01

    Addition of the HPV vaccine to available cytological screening has been proposed to increase HPV-related cancer prevention. A comprehensive review on this combined strategy implemented in the Netherlands is lacking. For this review, we therefore analyzed all relevant studies on cost-effectiveness of

  20. Effects of addition of adipic acid to a limestone-gypsum FGD installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middlekamp, J.; Broek, S.; Kock, A.F.J.M. [KEMA, Arnhem (Netherlands)

    1995-08-01

    Addition of organic buffers such as adipic acid to the scrubber liquor of limestone-sludge Flue Gas Desulphurization (FGD) installations is common practice in the USA. Major effects are an increased SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, better limestone utilization and improved operational performance of the FGD installations. For application of these organic buffers under Western European conditions, where lime stone-gypsum FGD systems are installed for desulphurization, the impact of these compounds on both the gypsum quality and the performance of the wastewater treatment systems is an important issue. From research work on pilot-plant scale performed at the laboratories of KEMA on behalf of the Dutch Electricity Production Companies, the addition of organic buffers also showed positive effects on the limestone-gypsum process. Adipic acid was found to be the most promising additive. At Hoogovens Technical Services (HTS E&E) adipic acid was considered to be a good additive in limestone-gypsum FGD installation of the 600 MWe coal fired Amer-9 power station of the Production Company EPZ was carried out to establish the following items: effect on SO{sub 2} absorption; effect on net power consumption of the FGD installation; influence on the gypsum quality; influence on the wastewater quality and performance of the wastewater treatment system; influence on process control of the FGD installation; loss of adipic acid through chemical degradation and wastewater discharge. This paper describes the highlights of this program. 4 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Effects of carbohydrate addition on production in extensive shrimp culture systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hari, B.; Kurup, B.M.; Varghese, J.T.; Schrama, J.W.; Verdegem, M.C.J.

    2004-01-01

    One indoor and one on-farm trial were conducted to evaluate the effect of control of carbon/ nitrogen ratio (C/N ratio) by addition of carbohydrate to the water column in extensive types of shrimp culture systems. In the indoor experiment, 25% and 40% dietary protein ('P25' and 'P40') with or

  2. Enhancing crude oil degradation in a sandy soil: Effects of addition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Natural restoration of crude oil polluted soils takes a long time, hence various soil treatments have been used to hasten the process. This study investigated the effects of the addition of poultry manure alone and in combination with surfactant (Goldcrew or Corexit) and/or alternate carbon substrate (glucose or starch) on ...

  3. Anthelmintic effects of phytogenic feed additives in Ascaris suum inoculated pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krimpen, van M.M.; Binnendijk, G.P.; Borgsteede, F.H.M.; Gaasenbeek, C.P.H.

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments were performed to determine the anthelmintic effect of some phytogenic feed additives on a mild infection of Ascaris suum in growing and finishing pigs. Usually, an infection of A. suum is controlled by using conventional synthetic drugs. Organic farmers, however, prefer a

  4. Effect of fructose addition in skim milk based extender on semen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This experiment is designed to study the effect of fructose addition as energy source in skim milk extender on the quality fertility of white leghorn's spermatozoa stored at 4 °C. The treatments (T) in semen quality experiment were Tl (0% fructose + Modified Ringers Solution (MRS), T2 (5mM fructose + 1 % (w/v) skim milk ...

  5. Effects of pH and additives on aqueous wetting films stabilized by a triblock copolymer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eliseeva, O.V.; Besseling, N.A.M.; Koopal, L.K.; Stuart, M.A.C.

    2007-01-01

    Effects of pH and additives (NaCl, Na2SO4, NaSCN and urea) on the adsorption of an ABA triblock copolymer (F127) with polyethylene oxide as the A blocks and polypropylene oxide as the B blocks, at the interfaces of wetting films, on film drainage and on the interaction forces in these films are

  6. Effects of whey and molasses as silage additives on potato hash ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p2492989

    Abstract. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of whey or molasses on the fermentation quality when added to potato hash silage. In addition, lamb performance, digestibility and feed intake of diets containing potato hash silage were compared with a diet containing maize silage (MSd). Potato hash silage.

  7. Effects of zinc powder addition to Villa Gloss and Silka Lux marine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti - corrosion properties of paints can be optimised when adequate proportion of the paint constituents are used. Effect of zinc powder addition to Villa Gloss and Silka Lux Marine Enamel paints on corrosion resistance of mild steel was studied. Quantitative Analysis and Potentiodynamic Polarisation Technique were ...

  8. Low to No Effect: Application of tRNS During Two-Digit Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke M. Bieck

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial electric stimulation such as transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS have been used to investigate structure-function relationships in numerical cognition. Recently, tRNS was suggested to be more effective than tDCS. However, so far there is no evidence on the differential impact of tDCS and tRNS on numerical cognition using the same experimental paradigm. In the present study, we used a two-digit addition paradigm for which significant—albeit small—effects of tDCS were observed previously to evaluate the impact of parietal and frontal tRNS on specific numerical effects. While previous studies reported a modulation of numerical effects of this task through tDCS applied to parietal areas, we did not observe any effect of parietal tRNS on performance in two-digit addition. These findings suggest that tRNS seemed to influence concurrent mental arithmetic less than tDCS at least when applied over the IPS. These generally small to absent effects of tES on actual arithmetic performance in the current addition paradigm are in line with the results of a recent meta-analysis indicating that influences of tES may be more pronounced in training paradigms.

  9. Probabilistic and deterministic soil structure interaction analysis including ground motion incoherency effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkhoraibi, T., E-mail: telkhora@bechtel.com; Hashemi, A.; Ostadan, F.

    2014-04-01

    Soil-structure interaction (SSI) is a major step for seismic design of massive and stiff structures typical of the nuclear facilities and civil infrastructures such as tunnels, underground stations, dams and lock head structures. Currently most SSI analyses are performed deterministically, incorporating limited range of variation in soil and structural properties and without consideration of the ground motion incoherency effects. This often leads to overestimation of the seismic response particularly the In-Structure-Response Spectra (ISRS) with significant impositions of design and equipment qualification costs, especially in the case of high-frequency sensitive equipment at stiff soil or rock sites. The reluctance to incorporate a more comprehensive probabilistic approach is mainly due to the fact that the computational cost of performing probabilistic SSI analysis even without incoherency function considerations has been prohibitive. As such, bounding deterministic approaches have been preferred by the industry and accepted by the regulatory agencies. However, given the recently available and growing computing capabilities, the need for a probabilistic-based approach to the SSI analysis is becoming clear with the advances in performance-based engineering and the utilization of fragility analysis in the decision making process whether by the owners or the regulatory agencies. This paper demonstrates the use of both probabilistic and deterministic SSI analysis techniques to identify important engineering demand parameters in the structure. A typical nuclear industry structure is used as an example for this study. The system is analyzed for two different site conditions: rock and deep soil. Both deterministic and probabilistic SSI analysis approaches are performed, using the program SASSI, with and without ground motion incoherency considerations. In both approaches, the analysis begins at the hard rock level using the low frequency and high frequency hard rock

  10. The effect of additives on properties, performance and emission of biodiesel fuelled compression ignition engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashedul, H.K.; Masjuki, H.H.; Kalam, M.A.; Ashraful, A.M.; Ashrafur Rahman, S.M.; Shahir, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fuel additives significantly improve the quality of biodiesel and its blends. • Fuel additives used to enhance biodiesel properties. • Fuel saving from optimized vehicle performance and economy with the use of additives. • Emission reduction from fuel system cleanliness and combustion optimization. - Abstract: With growing concern over greenhouse gases there is increasing emphasis on reducing CO 2 emissions. Despite engine efficiency improvements plus increased dieselization of the fleet, increasing vehicle numbers results in increasing CO 2 emissions. To reserve this trend the fuel source must be changed to renewable fuels which are CO 2 neutral. As a renewable, sustainable and alternative fuel for compression ignition engines, biodiesel is widely accepted as comparable fuel to diesel in diesel engines. This is due to several factors like decreasing the dependence on imported petroleum, reducing global warming, increasing lubricity, and reducing substantially the exhaust emissions from diesel engine. However, there is a major disadvantage in the use of biodiesel as it has lower heating value, higher density and higher viscosity, higher fuel consumption and higher NO X emission, which limits its application. Here fuel additives become essential and indispensable tools not only to minimize these drawbacks but also generate specified products to meet the regional and international standards. Fuel additives can contribute towards fuel economy and emission reduction either directly or indirectly. Their use enable vehicle performance to be maintained at, or near, optimum over the lifetime of the vehicle. A variety of additives are used in automotive biodiesel fuel to meet specification limits and to enhance quality. For example, metal based additives, oxygenated additives, antioxidants, cetane number improvers, lubricity improvers and cold flow improvers are used to meet specifications and quality. This article is a literature review of the effect

  11. Caffeine and opening the eyes have additive effects on resting arousal measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Robert J; Clarke, Adam R; Johnstone, Stuart J

    2011-10-01

    Studies indicate that the change from closed to open eyes in a resting condition results in an increase in skin conductance level (SCL) and a global decrease in EEG alpha activity, both indicative of increased arousal. Other studies show that ingestion of caffeine also produces SCL increase and alpha reduction. This study investigated the additivity of the effects of these two independent arousing variables. EEG activity and SCL were recorded from 22 university students during both eyes-closed and eyes-open resting conditions, under the action of both caffeine and placebo, in a counterbalanced randomised double-blind study. SCL increased significantly from eyes-closed to eyes-open conditions, and from placebo to caffeine, with no interaction. Global reductions in EEG alpha amplitude were apparent with opening of the eyes and caffeine ingestion; again, there was no interaction. Caffeine had a larger effect than opening the eyes on SCL, but their relative effect sizes were reversed in alpha. The two dependent measures showed the predicted negative correlation in both eyes-closed placebo and eyes-open caffeine conditions, with the latter substantially reduced relative to the former. Caffeine and opening the eyes have additive effects on two measures of arousal, increasing SCL and reducing global EEG alpha. However, the independent variable effects are not equivalent, suggesting that one or both measures reflect additional non-arousal processes. As caffeine is widely used by both children and adults, knowledge of the additivity of arousal effects of caffeine and opening the eyes is important in controlling participant state in EEG studies. The current results confirm the use of mean global alpha amplitude as a measure of resting-state arousal, but also point to non-arousal effects of visual input. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of steam and oil sludge ash additive on the products of oil sludge pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Shuo; Wang, Yuhua; Fumitake, Takahashi; Kouji, Tokimatsu; Li, Aimin; Kunio, Yoshikawa

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyrolysis of oil sludge with steam or/and oil sludge ash was carried out. • Oil product yield was increased by steam and oil sludge ash presence. • Steam injection and oil sludge ash addition improved the oil product quality. • Synergetic effect of steam and oil sludge ash on the oil product was reported. • A possible catalytic mechanism was proposed. - Abstract: In this study, a strategy of combining steam injection with oil sludge ash addition to improve the yield and quality of the oil products of oil sludge pyrolysis process is proposed. Oil sludge pyrolysis with the addition of different amounts of steam and oil sludge ash was conducted under inert conditions at 450 °C by employing a stirred tank reactor. This procedure was performed to investigate the effect of steam injection and oil sludge ash addition on the distribution and quality of the oil products. The possible catalytic mechanism occurring during the pyrolysis process was proposed. The quality of the oil product was determined based on the results of the boiling point distribution, the carbon residue, the ultimate analysis, the Saturates, Asphaltenes, Resins and Aromatics (SARA) composition and the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) analysis. The results indicate that both steam injection and oil sludge ash addition caused the oil yield to increase. Steam injection increased the proportions of the heavy and middle fractions in the oil product and reduced the carbon residue by improving the stability of the oil system. Oil sludge ash addition reduced the carbon residue and lessened the decrease in the light oil/heavy oil ratio by converting the heavy fraction or coke precursors to lighter fractions. The synergetic effect of steam injection and oil sludge ash addition can further reduce the carbon residue of the oil product. The presence of oil sludge ash significantly reduced the S, N, and O mobilities from the oil sludge feedstock to the oil product. These performances can be

  13. Effects of vitamins, including vitamin A, on HIV/AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Saurabh; Fawzi, Wafaie

    2007-01-01

    increase lymphoid cell differentiation, which leads to an increase in CCR5 receptors. These receptors are essential for attachment of HIV to the lymphocytes and therefore, an increase in their number is likely to increase HIV replication. Vitamin A supplementation in HIV-infected children, on the other hand, has been associated with protective effects against mortality and morbidity, similar to that seen in HIV-negative children. The risk for lower respiratory tract infection and severe watery diarrhea has been shown to be lower in HIV-infected children supplemented with vitamin A. All-cause mortality and AIDS-related deaths have also been found to be lower in vitamin A-supplemented HIV-infected children. The benefits of multivitamin supplementation, particularly vitamins B, C, and E, have been more consistent across studies. Multivitamin supplementation in HIV-infected pregnant mothers has been shown to reduce the incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes such as fetal loss and low birth weight. It also has been shown to decrease rates of MTCT among women who have poor nutritional or immunologic status. Further, multivitamin supplementation reduces the rate of HIV disease progression among patients in early stage of disease, thus delaying the need for ART by prolonging the pre-ART stage. In brief, there is no evidence to recommend vitamin A supplementation of HIV-infected pregnant women; however, periodic vitamin A supplementation of HIV-infected infants and children is beneficial in reducing all-cause mortality and morbidity and is recommended. Similarly, multivitamin supplementation of people infected with HIV, particularly pregnant women, is strongly suggested.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Cross-Flow Axis Marine Hydrokinetic Turbines, Including Effects of Waves and Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2011-12-01

    A new test bed for Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines at the Center for Ocean Renewable Energy at the University of New Hampshire (UNH-CORE) was used to evaluate the performance of different cross-flow axis hydrokinetic turbines, and investigate the effects of waves and turbulence on these devices. The test bed was designed and built to operate in the UNH tow and wave tank, which has a cross section of 3.67m (width) x 2.44m (depth). In the present configuration, tow speeds of up to 3 m/s can be achieved for smaller turbine models, and up to 1.5 m/s for large turbine models with low gear ratio. It features a flap style wave maker at one end that is capable of producing waves with 1-5 s periods up to 0.4 m wave height. Turbine thrust (drag) and mechanical power output (torque, angular velocity) were measured at tow speeds of 0.6-1.5 m/s for two cross-flow axis MHK turbines: a Gorlov Helical Turbine (GHT) and a Lucid spherical turbine (LST). Both were provided by Lucid Energy Technologies, LLP, and have frontal areas of 1.3 (GHT) and 1.0 (LST) square meters, respectively. GHT performance was also measured in progressive waves of various periods, grid turbulence, and in the wake of a cylinder, installed upstream at various cross-stream locations. Overall, the GHT performs with higher power and thrust (drag) coefficients than the LST. A 2nd law efficiency, or kinetic exergy efficiency, was defined to calculate what fraction of the kinetic energy removed from the flow is converted to usable shaft work by each turbine. The exergy efficiency varies with tip speed ratio but approaches 90% for the optimum operating conditions for each turbine. The fraction of kinetic energy removed from the fluid that is not converted to shaft work is redistributed into turbulent kinetic energy in the wake. Quantifying the kinetic energy flowing out of the turbine is important for modeling of environmental transport processes and for predicting performance when turbines are used in arrays

  15. Towards understanding the effects of additives on the vermicomposting of sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Meiyan; Lv, Baoyi; Zhao, Chunhui; Yang, Jian

    2015-03-01

    This work evaluated the effects of additives on the chemical properties of the final products (vermicompost) from vermicomposting of sewage sludge and the adaptable characteristics of Eisenia fetida during the process. An experimental design with different ratios of sewage sludge and the additives (cattle dung or pig manure) was conducted. The results showed that the vermicomposting reduced total organic carbon and the quotient of total organic carbon to total nitrogen (C/N ratio) of the initial mixtures and enhanced the stability and agronomical value of the final products. Notably, principal component analysis indicated that the additives had significant effects on the characteristics of the vermicomposts. Moreover, the vermibeds containing cattle dung displayed a better earthworm growth and reproduction than those with pig manure. Additionally, redundancy analysis demonstrated that electrical conductivity (EC), pH, and C/N ratio played crucial roles on earthworm growth and reproduction. In all, the additives with high C/N ratio, pH buffering capacity, and low EC are recommended to be used for vermicomposting of sewage sludge.

  16. Effect of the Addition of Powder on the Physico-chemical Characteristics of Sausage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Jin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The individual and interactive effects of Schisandra chinensis powder (SCP and sodium nitrite additions on color, pH, water holding capacity, residual nitrite, 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, volatile basic nitrogen, texture properties, fatty acids, amino acids and sensory evaluation of cooked pork sausages were investigated after 20 d of storage at 4°C. The powders (0, 0.5 and 1.0% were added to sausages either alone or in combination with nitrite (0 and 100 ppm. SCP added-sausages showed lower L* (lightness and W (whiteness values, and higher b* (yellowness values than sausage containing no nitrite, and exhibited the highest a* values at a 0.5% addition (p<0.05. Residual nitrite and TBARS values were found to be significantly reduced as the addition levels of SCP increased (p<0.05. As the addition of SCP increased, the sausage showed gradually decreased brittleness, cohesiveness, springiness, gumminess and chewiness, while adhesiveness increased. Polyunsaturated fatty acid, n-6 and n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio concentrations were significantly higher in sausages containing SCP (p<0.05. The addition of SCP to sausage significantly (p<0.05 increased the ammonia content (by 0.5% SCP and aromatic amino acid concentrations (by 1.0% SCP (p<0.05. Inclusion of SCP in sausage meat resulted in a significant deterioration in quality characteristics of flavor, springiness, juiciness and overall acceptability (p<0.05. As expected, the observed changes in a*, W, pH, shear force, texture property, TBARS, fatty acid, amino acid and sensory score of sausages, depended on the rate of addition of nitrite (p<0.05. These results suggest that SCP addition is not an effective way of improving the sensory evaluation of sausages, but may beneficially affect TBARS, nitrite scavenging activity, fatty acid and amino acid content in pork sausages.

  17. Categorical and continuous - disentangling the neural correlates of the carry effect in multi-digit addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dressel Katharina

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently it was suggested that the carry effect observed in addition involves both categorical and continuous processing characteristics. Methods In the present study, we aimed at identifying the specific neural correlates associated with processing either categorical or continuous aspects of the carry effect in an fMRI study on multi-digit addition. Results In line with our expectations, we observed two distinct parts of the fronto-parietal network subserving numerical cognition to be associated with either one of these two characteristics. On the one hand, the categorical aspect of the carry effect was associated with left-hemispheric language areas and the basal ganglia probably reflecting increased demands on procedural and problem solving processes. Complementarily, the continuous aspect of the carry effect was associated with increased intraparietal activation indicating increasing demands on magnitude processing as well as place-value integration with increasing unit sum. Conclusions In summary, the findings suggest representations and processes underlying the carry effect in multi-digit addition to be more complex and interactive than assumed previously.

  18. Effects of Bi Addition on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nanocrystalline Ag Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the effects of Bi addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of an electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ag coating. Microstructural features were investigated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The results indicate that the addition of Bi introduced nanometer-scale Ag-Bi solid solution particles and more internal defects to the initial Ag microstructures. The anisotropic elastic-plastic properties of the Ag nanocrystalline coating with and without Bi addition were examined with nanoindentation experiments in conjunction with the recently-developed inverse method. The results indicate that the as-deposited nanocrystalline Ag coating contained high mechanical anisotropy. With the addition of 1 atomic percent (at% Bi, the anisotropy within Ag-Bi coating was very small, and yield strength of the nanocrystalline Ag-Bi alloy in both longitudinal and transverse directions were improved by over 100% compared to that of Ag. On the other hand, the strain-hardening exponent of Ag-Bi was reduced to 0.055 from the original 0.16 of the Ag coating. Furthermore, the addition of Bi only slightly increased the electrical resistivity of the Ag-Bi coating in comparison to Ag. Results of our study indicate that Bi addition is a promising method for improving the mechanical and physical performances of Ag coating for electrical contacts.

  19. Comparative Evaluation of Small Molecular Additives and Their Effects on Peptide/Protein Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Zhong, Shaoyun; Zhou, Yanting; He, Han; Peng, Shuying; Zhu, Zhenyun; Liu, Xing; Zheng, Jing; Xu, Bin; Zhou, Hu

    2017-06-06

    Detergents and salts are widely used in lysis buffers to enhance protein extraction from biological samples, facilitating in-depth proteomic analysis. However, these detergents and salt additives must be efficiently removed from the digested samples prior to LC-MS/MS analysis to obtain high-quality mass spectra. Although filter-aided sample preparation (FASP), acetone precipitation (AP), followed by in-solution digestion, and strong cation exchange-based centrifugal proteomic reactors (CPRs) are commonly used for proteomic sample processing, little is known about their efficiencies at removing detergents and salt additives. In this study, we (i) developed an integrative workflow for the quantification of small molecular additives in proteomic samples, developing a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-based LC-MS approach for the quantification of six additives (i.e., Tris, urea, CHAPS, SDS, SDC, and Triton X-100) and (ii) systematically evaluated the relationships between the level of additive remaining in samples following sample processing and the number of peptides/proteins identified by mass spectrometry. Although FASP outperformed the other two methods, the results were complementary in terms of peptide/protein identification, as well as the GRAVY index and amino acid distributions. This is the first systematic and quantitative study of the effect of detergents and salt additives on protein identification. This MRM-based approach can be used for an unbiased evaluation of the performance of new sample preparation methods. Data are available via ProteomeXchange under identifier PXD005405.

  20. Effect of Ingredient Loading on Surface Migration Kinetics of Additives in Vulcanized Natural Rubber Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan B. Pajarito

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Surface migration kinetics of chemical additives in vulcanized natural rubber compounds were studied as function of ingredient loading. Rubber sheets were compounded according to a 212-8 fractional factorial design of experiment, where ingredients were treated as factors varied at two levels of loading. Amount of migrated additives in surface of rubber sheets was monitored through time at ambient conditions. The maximum amount and estimated rate of additive migration were determined from weight loss kinetic curves. Attenuated total reflection–Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and optical microscopy were used to characterize the chemical structure and surface morphology of sheet specimens during additive migration. ANOVA results showed that increased loading of reclaimed rubber, CaCO3, and paraffin wax signif icantly decreased the maximum amount of additive migration; by contrast, increased loading of used oil, asphalt, and mercaptobenzothiazole disulphide (MBTS increased the maximum amount. Increased loading of sulfur, diphenylguanidine (DPG, and paraffin wax significantly decreased the additive migration rate; increased loading of used oil, asphalt, and stearic acid elicited an opposite effect. Comparison of ATRFTIR spectra of migrated and cleaned rubber surfaces showed signif icant variation in intensity of specif ic absorbance bands that are also present in infrared spectra of migrating chemicals. Paraffin wax, used oil, stearic acid, MBTS, asphalt, and zinc stearate were identified to bloom and bleed in the rubber sheets. Optical micrographs of migrated rubber surfaces revealed formation of white precipitates due to blooming and of semi-transparent wet patches due to bleeding.

  1. Effect of indium addition in U-Zr metallic fuel on lanthanide migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Wiencek, T.; O'Hare, E.; Fortner, J.; Wright, A.; Cheon, J. S.; Lee, B. O.

    2017-02-01

    Advanced fast reactor concepts to achieve ultra-high burnup (∼50%) require prevention of fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). Fission product lanthanide accumulation at high burnup is substantial and significantly contributes to FCCI upon migration to the cladding interface. Diffusion barriers are typically used to prevent interaction of the lanthanides with the cladding. A more active method has been proposed which immobilizes the lanthanides through formation of stable compounds with an additive. Theoretical analysis showed that indium, thallium, and antimony are good candidates. Indium was the strongest candidate because of its low reactivity with iron-based cladding alloys. Characterization of the as-fabricated alloys was performed to determine the effectiveness of the indium addition in forming compounds with lanthanides, represented by cerium. Tests to examine how effectively the dopant prevents lanthanide migration under a thermal gradient were also performed. The results showed that indium effectively prevented cerium migration.

  2. Effect of indium addition in U-Zr metallic fuel on lanthanide migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Wiencek, T.; O' Hare, E.; Fortner, J.; Wright, A.; Cheon, J. S.; Lee, B. O.

    2017-02-01

    Advanced fast reactor concepts to achieve ultra-high burnup (~50%) require prevention of fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). Fission product lanthanide accumulation at high burnup is substantial and significantly contributes to FCCI upon migration to the cladding interface. Diffusion barriers are typically used to prevent interaction of the lanthanides with the cladding. A more active method has been proposed which immobilizes the lanthanides through formation of stable compounds with an additive. Theoretical analysis showed that indium, thallium, and antimony are good candidates. Indium was the strongest candidate because of its low reactivity with iron-based cladding alloys. Characterization of the as-fabricated alloys was performed to determine the effectiveness of the indium addition in forming compounds with lanthanides, represented by cerium. Tests to examine how effectively the dopant prevents lanthanide migration under a thermal gradient were also performed. The results showed that indium effectively prevented cerium migration.

  3. Effect of Addition of Cereal Based Beta-glucan on Technological and Functional Properties of Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihal Şimşekli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays usage of dietary fibers in foods has been increasing duo to revealing of health benefits. Beta-glucans found especially in oats and barley, are polysaccharide and source of water-soluble dietary fiber. Positive effects of beta-glucans like healing coronary-heart disease, lowering blood cholesterol level, balancing blood sugar level and preventing obesity, made beta-glucans widespread functional food components for producing various foods. In addition to beneficial physiological effects of beta-glucans, they texturize, gelatinize, emulsify and stabilize the foods. They increase viscosity, replace fat and enhance rheological properties in cereal, meat and dairy products. They are also used to produce packing material depending on their mechanical properties and molecular weights. In this review, effects of addition of cereal based beta-glucans on technological and functional properties of various foods are revealed based on previous studies.

  4. Effects of water and nitrogen addition on species turnover in temperate grasslands in northern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuwen Xu

    Full Text Available Global nitrogen (N deposition and climate change have been identified as two of the most important causes of current plant diversity loss. However, temporal patterns of species turnover underlying diversity changes in response to changing precipitation regimes and atmospheric N deposition have received inadequate attention. We carried out a manipulation experiment in a steppe and an old-field in North China from 2005 to 2009, to test the hypothesis that water addition enhances plant species richness through increase in the rate of species gain and decrease in the rate of species loss, while N addition has opposite effects on species changes. Our results showed that water addition increased the rate of species gain in both the steppe and the old field but decreased the rates of species loss and turnover in the old field. In contrast, N addition increased the rates of species loss and turnover in the steppe but decreased the rate of species gain in the old field. The rate of species change was greater in the old field than in the steppe. Water interacted with N to affect species richness and species turnover, indicating that the impacts of N on semi-arid grasslands were largely mediated by water availability. The temporal stability of communities was negatively correlated with rates of species loss and turnover, suggesting that water addition might enhance, but N addition would reduce the compositional stability of grasslands. Experimental results support our initial hypothesis and demonstrate that water and N availabilities differed in the effects on rate of species change in the temperate grasslands, and these effects also depend on grassland types and/or land-use history. Species gain and loss together contribute to the dynamic change of species richness in semi-arid grasslands under future climate change.

  5. Sound propagation in narrow tubes including effects of viscothermal and turbulent damping with application to charge air coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsson, Magnus; Åbom, Mats

    2009-02-01

    additionally calculated for corresponding circular cross-sections for comparison and discussion. The two-ports are thereafter combined with numerically obtained multi-ports, representing the connecting tanks, in order to obtain the transmission properties for the charged air when passing the complete CAC. An attractive formalism for representation of the multi-ports based on the admittance relationship between the ports is presented. From this the first linear frequency domain model for CACs, which includes a complete treatment of losses in the cooling tubes and 3D effects in the connecting tanks is extracted in the form of a two-port. The frequency dependent transmission loss is calculated and compared to the corresponding experimental data with good agreement.

  6. THE ADDITION EFFECT OF SULPHANILIC ACID TO THE SYNTHESIS OF 3,4-METHYLENEDIOXYBENZALDEHYDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feti Fatimah

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available It was conducted a research about the addition effect of sulphanilic acid to the synthesis 3,4-methylenedioxybenzaldehyde from the isosafrole using reagents of sodium dichromate, sulphuric acid, and sulphanilic acid. The separation and purification of product were performed using the chromatography column. The purity of the result was tested using thin layer chromatography and determination of the melting point. Furthermore, it was identified its structure using infrared spectrophotometer, 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, and mass spectrometry. The experimental result showed that the percentage yield of 3,4-methylenedioxybenzaldehyde with addition sulphanilic acid was 79.54%.

  7. Solvent additive effects on small molecule crystallization in bulk heterojunction solar cells probed during spin casting

    KAUST Repository

    Pérez, Louis A.

    2013-09-04

    Solvent additive processing can lead to drastic improvements in the power conversion efficiency (PCE) in solution processable small molecule (SPSM) bulk heterojunction solar cells. In situ grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering is used to investigate the kinetics of crystallite formation during and shortly after spin casting. The additive is shown to have a complex effect on structural evolution invoking polymorphism and enhanced crystalline quality of the donor SPSM. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. The Effects of Various Additive Components on the Sound Absorption Performances of Polyurethane Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuming Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flexible polyurethane (PU foams comprising various additive components were synthesized to improve their acoustic performances. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of various additive components of the PU foams on the resultant sound absorption, which was characterized by the impedance tube technique to obtain the incident sound absorption coefficient and transmission loss. The maximum enhancement in the acoustic properties of the foams was obtained by adding fluorine-dichloroethane (141b and triethanolamine. The results showed that the acoustic absorption properties of the PU foams were improved by adding 141b and triethanolamine and depended on the amount of the water, 141b, and triethanolamine.

  9. The effect of Y2O3 addition on thermal shock behavior of magnesium aluminate spinel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pošarac Milica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of yttria additive on the thermal shock behavior of magnesium aluminate spinel has been investigated. As a starting material we used spinel (MgAl2O4 obtained by the modified glycine nitrate procedure (MGNP. Sintered products were characterized in terms of phase analysis, densities, thermal shock, monitoring the damaged surface area in the refractory specimen during thermal shock and ultrasonic determination of the Dynamic Young modulus of elasticity. It was found that a new phase between yttria and alumina is formed, which improved thermal shock properties of the spinel refractories. Also densification of samples is enhanced by yttria addition.

  10. EFFECT OF METALLOID COMPOUND AND BIO-SOLUTION ADDITIVES ON BIODIESEL ENGINE PERFORMANCE AND EXHAUST EMISSIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Karoon Fangsuwannarak; Kittichai Triratanasirichai

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to perform comparative analysis of the effect of the different fuel additives as polymer based-bio-solution, natural organic based-bio-solution and nano-titanium metalloid (TiO2) compound on the performance parameters and exhuast emissions of a pickup Diesel engine, operating on commercial Diesel fuel (D) and B5 palm biodiesel (95% D+5% palm oil). The basic properties of the fuel blended with TiO2 metalloid compound and bio-solution based additives were measured a...

  11. Effect of additional speed endurance training on performance and muscle adaptations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Thomas; Christensen, Peter Møller; Holse, Kris

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present study examined the effect of additional speed-endurance training during the season on muscle adaptations and performance of trained soccer players. METHODS: Eighteen sub-elite soccer players performed one session with 6-9 30-s intervals at an intensity of 90-95 % ofmaximal...... intensity (speed endurance training; SET) a week for 5 weeks (SET-intervention). Before and after the SET-intervention the players carried out the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 2 (Yo- Yo IR2) test, a sprint test (10- and 30-m) and an agility test. In addition, seven of the players had a resting muscle...

  12. Additive effects of climate and fisheries drive ongoing declines in multiple albatross species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Deborah; Forcada, Jaume; Wood, Andrew G; Tuck, Geoff N; Ireland, Louise; Pradel, Roger; Croxall, John P; Phillips, Richard A

    2017-12-12

    Environmental and anthropogenic factors often drive population declines in top predators, but how their influences may combine remains unclear. Albatrosses are particularly threatened. They breed in fast-changing environments, and their extensive foraging ranges expose them to incidental mortality (bycatch) in multiple fisheries. The albatross community at South Georgia includes globally important populations of three species that have declined by 40-60% over the last 35 years. We used three steps to deeply understand the drivers of such dramatic changes: ( i ) describe fundamental demographic rates using multievent models, ( ii ) determine demographic drivers of population growth using matrix models, and ( iii ) identify environmental and anthropogenic drivers using ANOVAs. Each species was affected by different processes and threats in their foraging areas during the breeding and nonbreeding seasons. There was evidence for two kinds of combined environmental and anthropogenic effects. The first was sequential; in wandering and black-browed albatrosses, high levels of bycatch have reduced juvenile and adult survival, then increased temperature, reduced sea-ice cover, and stronger winds are affecting the population recovery potential. The second was additive; in gray-headed albatrosses, not only did bycatch impact adult survival but also this impact was exacerbated by lower food availability in years following El Niño events. This emphasizes the need for much improved implementation of mitigation measures in fisheries and better enforcement of compliance. We hope our results not only help focus future management actions for these populations but also demonstrate the power of the modelling approach for assessing impacts of environmental and anthropogenic drivers in wild animal populations.

  13. Does progressive resistance strength training as additional training have any measured effect on functional outcomes in older hospitalized patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Andersen, Christina W.; Pedersen, Sigrid F

    2014-01-01

    . PARTICIPANTS: A sample of 71 patients were successively included and randomized either to the treatment group (TG) (n = 36) or the control group (CG) (n = 35). Fifteen participants dropped out (TG n = 7; CG n = 8), leaving 56 participants with a mean age of 79 (SD 7). INTERVENTION: Participants...... = 0.05). Analysis by the mixed-effects model showed that the treatment group improved more than the control group in all outcome variables. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that for older hospitalized patients progressive resistance strength training as additional training may have an effect compared......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of progressive resistance strength training as additional training measured on functional outcomes in older hospitalized patients. DESIGN: A single-blinded randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Department of Geriatric Rehabilitation in university hospital...

  14. The Evaporation and Survival of Cluster Galaxy Coronae. I. The Effectiveness of Isotropic Thermal Conduction Including Saturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayaraghavan, Rukmani; Sarazin, Craig, E-mail: rukmani@virginia.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Rd., Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

    2017-05-20

    We simulate the evolution of cluster galaxy hot interstellar medium (ISM) gas that is a result of the effects of ram pressure and thermal conduction in the intracluster medium (ICM). At the density and temperature of the ICM, the mean free paths of ICM electrons are comparable to the sizes of galaxies, therefore electrons can efficiently transport heat that is due to thermal conduction from the hot ICM to the cooler ISM. Galaxies consisting of dark matter halos and hot gas coronae are embedded in an ICM-like “wind tunnel” in our simulations. In this paper, we assume that thermal conduction is isotropic and include the effects of saturation. We find that as heat is transferred from the ICM to the ISM, the cooler denser ISM expands and evaporates. This process is significantly faster than gas loss due to ram pressure stripping; for our standard model galaxy, the evaporation time is 160 Myr, while the ram pressure stripping timescale is 2.5 Gyr. Thermal conduction also suppresses the formation of shear instabilities, and there are no stripped ISM tails since the ISM evaporates before tails can form. Observations of long-lived X-ray emitting coronae and ram pressure stripped X-ray tails in galaxies in group and cluster environments therefore require that thermal conduction is suppressed or offset by some additional physical process. The most likely process is anisotropic thermal conduction that is due to magnetic fields in the ISM and ICM, which we simulate and study in the next paper in this series.

  15. The Evaporation and Survival of Cluster Galaxy Coronae. I. The Effectiveness of Isotropic Thermal Conduction Including Saturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayaraghavan, Rukmani; Sarazin, Craig

    2017-01-01

    We simulate the evolution of cluster galaxy hot interstellar medium (ISM) gas that is a result of the effects of ram pressure and thermal conduction in the intracluster medium (ICM). At the density and temperature of the ICM, the mean free paths of ICM electrons are comparable to the sizes of galaxies, therefore electrons can efficiently transport heat that is due to thermal conduction from the hot ICM to the cooler ISM. Galaxies consisting of dark matter halos and hot gas coronae are embedded in an ICM-like “wind tunnel” in our simulations. In this paper, we assume that thermal conduction is isotropic and include the effects of saturation. We find that as heat is transferred from the ICM to the ISM, the cooler denser ISM expands and evaporates. This process is significantly faster than gas loss due to ram pressure stripping; for our standard model galaxy, the evaporation time is 160 Myr, while the ram pressure stripping timescale is 2.5 Gyr. Thermal conduction also suppresses the formation of shear instabilities, and there are no stripped ISM tails since the ISM evaporates before tails can form. Observations of long-lived X-ray emitting coronae and ram pressure stripped X-ray tails in galaxies in group and cluster environments therefore require that thermal conduction is suppressed or offset by some additional physical process. The most likely process is anisotropic thermal conduction that is due to magnetic fields in the ISM and ICM, which we simulate and study in the next paper in this series.

  16. Classification of suppressor additives based on synergistic and antagonistic ensemble effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broekmann, P.; Fluegel, A.; Emnet, C.; Arnold, M.; Roeger-Goepfert, C.; Wagner, A.; Hai, N.T.M.; Mayer, D.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Three fundamental types of suppressor additives for copper electroplating could be identified by means of potential transient measurements. → These suppressor additives differ in their synergistic and antagonistic interplay with anions that are chemisorbed on the metallic copper surface during electrodeposition. → In addition these suppressor chemistries reveal different barrier properties with respect to cupric ions and plating additives (Cl, SPS). - Abstract: Three fundamental types of suppressor additives for copper electroplating could be identified by means of potential transient measurements. These suppressor additives differ in their synergistic and antagonistic interplay with anions that are chemisorbed on the metallic copper surface during electrodeposition. In addition these suppressor chemistries reveal different barrier properties with respect to cupric ions and plating additives (Cl, SPS). While the type-I suppressor selectively forms efficient barriers for copper inter-diffusion on chloride-terminated electrode surfaces we identified a type-II suppressor that interacts non-selectively with any kind of anions chemisorbed on copper (chloride, sulfate, sulfonate). Type-I suppressors are vital for the superconformal copper growth mode in Damascene processing and show an antagonistic interaction with SPS (Bis-Sodium-Sulfopropyl-Disulfide) which involves the deactivation of this suppressor chemistry. This suppressor deactivation is rationalized in terms of compositional changes in the layer of the chemisorbed anions due to the competition of chloride and MPS (Mercaptopropane Sulfonic Acid) for adsorption sites on the metallic copper surface. MPS is the product of the dissociative SPS adsorption within the preexisting chloride matrix on the copper surface. The non-selectivity in the adsorption behavior of the type-II suppressor is rationalized in terms of anion/cation pairing effects of the poly-cationic suppressor and the anion

  17. Effect of lubricant extreme-pressure additives on surface fatigue life of AISI 9310 spur gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scibbe, H. W.; Townsend, D. P.; Aron, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Surface fatigue tests were conducted with AISI 9310 spur gears using a formulated synthetic tetraester oil (conforming to MIL-L-23699 specifications) as the lubricant containing either sulfur or phosphorus as the EP additive. Four groups of gears were tested. One group of gears tested without an additive in the lubricant acted as the reference oil. In the other three groups either a 0.1 wt % sulfur or phosphorus additive was added to the tetraester oil to enhance gear surface fatigue life. Test conditions included a gear temperature of 334 K (160 F), a maximum Hertz stress of 1.71 GPa (248 000 psi), and a speed of 10,000 rpm. The gears tested with a 0.1 wt % phosphorus additive showed pitting fatigue life 2.6 times the life of gears tested with the reference tetraester based oil. Although fatigue lives of two groups of gears tested with the sulfur additive in the oil showed improvement over the control group gear life, the results, unlike those obtained with the phosphorus oil, were not considered to be statistically significant.

  18. Aflatoxin effect on erythrocyte profile and histopathology of broilers given different additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimy, M. F.; Sutrisno, B.; Agus, A.; Suryani, A. E.; Istiqomah, L.; Damayanti, E.

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate erythrocyte profile and microscopic changes effect of AF induces by low level (57.18 ppb) and chronic exposure (34 days) with administration of additive (Lactobacillus plantarum G7 and methionine). Aflatoxin-contaminated corn was prepared by inoculate Aspergillus flavus FNCC 6002 on corn. Total number of 576 broiler Lohman strain (MB202) unsexed DOC were allocated completely randomized into four treatments and 12 replicates, with 12 broiler chicks each. The treatments as follows: T1 = aflatoxin-contaminated diet, T2 = aflatoxin-contaminated diet + 1% of LAB (w/w), T3 = aflatoxin-contaminated diet + 0.8% of methionine (w/w), and T4 = aflatoxin-contaminated diet + 1% of LAB + 0.8% of methionine (w/w). The effect of treatments was evaluated using ANOVA and the difference among mean treatments were analyzed using DMRT. The result showed that administration of additives had no significant effect (P>0.05) on erythrocyte profile, liver, and bursa of Fabricius. The dose of additive in each treatment (T2, T3, T4) were insufficient to reduce adverse effect of chronic aflatoxicosis. It was concluded that the LAB dose for binding AF (57.18%) should be evaluated and the dose for methionine should be reduced for chronic treatment of aflatoxicosis.

  19. Increased Walking's Additive and No Substitution Effect on Total Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bumjoon; Moudon, Anne V; Hurvitz, Philip M; Saelens, Brian E

    2018-03-01

    We assessed the associations between a change in time spent walking and a change in total physical activity (PA) time within an urban living adult sample to test for additive or substitution effects. Participants living in the greater Seattle area were assessed in 2008-2009 and again 1-2 yr later (2010-2011). At each time point, they wore accelerometers and GPS units and recorded trips and locations in a travel diary for seven consecutive days. These data streams were combined to derive a more objective estimate of walking and total PA. Participants also completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire to provide self-reported estimates of walking and total PA. Regression analyses assessed the associations between within-participant changes in objective and self-reported walking and total PA. Data came from 437 participants. On average, a 1-min increase in total walking was associated with an increase in total PA of 1 min, measured by objective data, and 1.2-min, measured by self-reported data. A similar additive effect was consistently found with utilitarian, transportation, or job-related walking, measured by both objective and self-reported data. For recreational walking, the effect of change was mixed between objective and self-reported results. Both objective and self-reported data confirmed an additive effect of utilitarian and total walking on PA.

  20. Effect of additives in the shelflife extension of chilled and frozen stored Indian octopus (Cistopus indicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimaran, Uthaman; Shakila, Robinson Jeya; Shalini, Rajendran; Sivaraman, Balasubramanian; Sumathi, Ganesan; Selvaganapathi, Rajendran; Jeyasekaran, Geevarathnam

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the effect of commercial additives viz. cafodos and altesa employed to treat Indian octopus (Cistopus indicus) was examined during chilled and frozen storage. Shelf lives of treated and untreated octopus in ice were 6 and 8 days, respectively in ice. Treated and untreated frozen octopus had a shelf life of 40 days. Autolytic and microbiological changes were not controlled by the additives, as evidenced through rapid reduction in non-protein nitrogen (NPN) and α-amino nitrogen (α-AN) compounds; as well as accumulation of water soluble ammoniacal nitrogen and total volatile base- nitrogen (TVB-N) compounds. Loss of texture and colour were the major quality defects noticed in treated octopus as a result of enhanced protein solubility. Therefore, the additives approved for use in octopus neither enhanced the shelf life nor improved the sensory quality.

  1. Effect of Manganese Additions and Wear Parameter on the Tribological Behaviour of NFGrey (8 Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Olatunji

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of manganese and wear parameter on the abrasive wear behaviour of NFGREY8 cast iron composition under dry lubrication conditions was investigated. The wear parameters studied are sliding speed, applied load, time and percentage of ferro-manganese additions. The experimental data were taken in a controlled way. Scanning electron microscope was used to examine the morphology of the samples. The results from linear regression equation and analysis of variances (ANOVA shows that manganese additions, load and speed variable are more pronounced on the wear behaviour of the NFGrey (8 cast iron. The result showed that the additions of the 75 % ferro manganese grade decreases the carbon equivalent CE and fortify the matrix with the formation of tough (FeMn3C inter-metallic leading to increased wear resistance of the examined composition.

  2. Effects of different additives on bimetallic Au-Pt nanoparticles electrodeposited onto indium tin oxide electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballarin, Barbara, E-mail: ballarin@ms.fci.unibo.i [Dipartimento di Chimica Fisica ed Inorganica, Universita di Bologna, V.le Risorgimento, 4, 40136-Bologna (Italy)] [INSTM, UdR Bologna (Italy); Gazzano, Massimo [ISOF-CNR, V. Selmi, 40126-Bologna (Italy); Tonelli, Domenica [Dipartimento di Chimica Fisica ed Inorganica, Universita di Bologna, V.le Risorgimento, 4, 40136-Bologna (Italy)] [INSTM, UdR Bologna (Italy)

    2010-09-01

    Bimetallic Au-Pt nanoparticles (Au-Pt{sub NPs}) have been synthesized using an electrochemical reduction approach. The effects of the addition of different additives in the electrodeposition bath namely KI, 1-nonanesulfonic acid sodium salt and Triton X-100 have been investigated. The structural characterization of the bimetallic nanoparticles has been carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The Au-Pt{sub NPs} prepared in the presence of KI and Triton X-100 characterized by a relatively narrow size distribution as well as a higher particle density and surface coverage whereas no changes in the morphology were observed. These results suggest a dependence of the size and distribution of the bimetallic nanoparticles from the type and concentration of the additives employed.

  3. Effects of nitrogen and water addition on trace element stoichiometry in five grassland species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Jiangping; Weiner, Jacob; Wang, Ruzhen

    2017-01-01

    A 9-year manipulative experiment with nitrogen (N) and water addition, simulating increasing N deposition and changing precipitation regime, was conducted to investigate the bioavailability of trace elements, iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) in soil, and their uptake by plants...... alleviated the effect of N addition. Forbs are more likely to suffer from Mn toxicity and Fe deficiency than grass species, indicating more sensitivity to changing elemental bioavailability in soil. Our results suggested that soil acidification due to N deposition may accelerate trace element cycling...... and lead to elemental imbalance in soil–plant systems of semi-arid grasslands and these impacts of N deposition on semi-arid grasslands were affected by water addition. These findings indicate an important role for soil trace elements in maintaining ecosystem functions associated with atmospheric N...

  4. Effect of hot pressing additives on the leachability of hot pressed sodium hydrous titanium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentine, T.M.; Sambell, R.A.J.

    1980-01-01

    Sodium hydrous titanium oxide is an ion exchange resin which can be used for immobilizing medium level waste (MLW) liquors. When hot pressed, it undergoes conversion to a ceramic. Three low melting point materials (borax, bismuth trioxide, and a mixture of PbO/CuO) were added to the (Na)HTiO and the effect that each of these had on aiding densification was assessed. Hot pressing temperature, applied pressure, and percentage addition of hot pressing aid were varied. Percentage open porosity, flexural strength, and leachability were measured. There was a linear relationship between the percentage open porosity and the logarithm of the leach rate for a constant percentage addition of each additive

  5. Effect of additives on the antiknock properties and Reid vapor pressure of gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosangela da Silva; Renato Cataluna; Eliana Weber de. Menezes; Dimitrios Samios; Clarisse M. Sartori Piatnicki [Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (Brazil). Department of Physical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry

    2005-05-01

    An evaluation was made of the effect produced by the addition of oxygenates such as ethanol, ETBE and MTBE and nonoxygenates such as isooctane and toluene on the Reid vapor pressure (RVP) and octane number of two types of gasoline with different chemical compositions. Locally produced gasoline was blended with five different percentages (v/v) of the additives, i.e. 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25%. Ethanol and MTBE increased significantly the RVP of the mixtures, but ETBE, and particularly toluene and isooctane, decreased the RVP of the original fractions when mixed with gasoline. The octane rating of gasoline was found to increase continuously and linearly with the addition of the oxygenated compounds toluene and isooctane. Moreover, the mixture octane number of the oxygenated compounds was superior to the octane number of the same compounds of high purity grade. 37 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Effect of heater material and coolant additives on CHF for a downward facing curved surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hae Min; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Heo, Sun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Critical heat flux experiment for a downward facing curved surface was conducted. • We investigate the effect of heater material and coolant additives. • Critical heat flux is affected by the steel oxidation. - Abstract: The critical heat flux (CHF) in the vicinity of an inclination angle of 90° for the reactor vessel lower head external wall was measured on a downward facing curved surface. Two test sections having radii of curvature 0.15 m and 0.5 m were used. The objective was to investigate the effect of heater material and the combined effect of the heater material and additives on flow boiling CHF to assess the CHF enhancement under accident conditions. The heater material SA508 (low alloy steel) and the additive solutions of boric acid and tri-sodium phosphate (TSP, Na 3 PO 4 ·12H 2 O) were used. An enhancement of CHF with the SA508 heater was confirmed in comparison with stainless steel reference heaters, which have negligible steel oxidation. As a result of the combined effect tests, the CHF with a TSP solution was reduced and the CHFs with a boric acid and a mixed solution (boric acid and TSP) were enhanced in comparison with the deionized water reference case. The CHF results are discussed in terms of steel oxidation according to the pH of the working fluid. Steel oxidation is also affected by local flow conditions as shown in the R = 0.5 m tests in which the boric acid and mixed solution had negligible effects on CHF enhancement. Under a relatively high concentration of boric acid (2.5 wt%), additive deposition as well as steel oxidation were observed and resulted in CHF enhancement

  7. Effect of rhenium addition on tungsten fuzz formation in helium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Aneeqa; De Temmerman, Gregory; Morgan, Thomas W.; Ward, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the addition of rhenium to tungsten on the formation of a nanostructure referred to as ‘fuzz’ when exposed to helium plasmas at fusion relevant ion fluxes was investigated in the Magnum and Pilot PSI devices at the FOM Institute DIFFER. The effect rhenium had on fuzz growth was seen to be dependent on time, temperature and flux. Initial fuzz growth was seen to be highly dependent on grain orientation, with rhenium having little effect. Once the fuzz was fully developed, the effect of grain orientation disappeared and the rhenium had an inhibiting effect on growth. This could be beneficial for inhibiting fuzz growth in a future fusion reactor, where transmutation of tungsten to rhenium is expected. It also appears that erosion or annealing of the fuzz is limiting growth of fuzz at higher temperatures in the range of ∼1340 °C.

  8. The toxic effects of cigarette additives. Philip Morris' project mix reconsidered: an analysis of documents released through litigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia S Wertz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2009, the promulgation of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA tobacco regulation focused attention on cigarette flavor additives. The tobacco industry had prepared for this eventuality by initiating a research program focusing on additive toxicity. The objective of this study was to analyze Philip Morris' Project MIX as a case study of tobacco industry scientific research being positioned strategically to prevent anticipated tobacco control regulations.We analyzed previously secret tobacco industry documents to identify internal strategies for research on cigarette additives and reanalyzed tobacco industry peer-reviewed published results of this research. We focused on the key group of studies conducted by Phillip Morris in a coordinated effort known as "Project MIX." Documents showed that Project MIX subsumed the study of various combinations of 333 cigarette additives. In addition to multiple internal reports, this work also led to four peer-reviewed publications (published in 2001. These papers concluded that there was no evidence of substantial toxicity attributable to the cigarette additives studied. Internal documents revealed post hoc changes in analytical protocols after initial statistical findings indicated an additive-associated increase in cigarette toxicity as well as increased total particulate matter (TPM concentrations in additive-modified cigarette smoke. By expressing the data adjusted by TPM concentration, the published papers obscured this underlying toxicity and particulate increase. The animal toxicology results were based on a small number of rats in each experiment, raising the possibility that the failure to detect statistically significant changes in the end points was due to underpowering the experiments rather than lack of a real effect.The case study of Project MIX shows tobacco industry scientific research on the use of cigarette additives cannot be taken at face value. The results demonstrate that toxins in

  9. The toxic effects of cigarette additives. Philip Morris' project mix reconsidered: an analysis of documents released through litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, Marcia S; Kyriss, Thomas; Paranjape, Suman; Glantz, Stanton A

    2011-12-01

    In 2009, the promulgation of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tobacco regulation focused attention on cigarette flavor additives. The tobacco industry had prepared for this eventuality by initiating a research program focusing on additive toxicity. The objective of this study was to analyze Philip Morris' Project MIX as a case study of tobacco industry scientific research being positioned strategically to prevent anticipated tobacco control regulations. We analyzed previously secret tobacco industry documents to identify internal strategies for research on cigarette additives and reanalyzed tobacco industry peer-reviewed published results of this research. We focused on the key group of studies conducted by Phillip Morris in a coordinated effort known as "Project MIX." Documents showed that Project MIX subsumed the study of various combinations of 333 cigarette additives. In addition to multiple internal reports, this work also led to four peer-reviewed publications (published in 2001). These papers concluded that there was no evidence of substantial toxicity attributable to the cigarette additives studied. Internal documents revealed post hoc changes in analytical protocols after initial statistical findings indicated an additive-associated increase in cigarette toxicity as well as increased total particulate matter (TPM) concentrations in additive-modified cigarette smoke. By expressing the data adjusted by TPM concentration, the published papers obscured this underlying toxicity and particulate increase. The animal toxicology results were based on a small number of rats in each experiment, raising the possibility that the failure to detect statistically significant changes in the end points was due to underpowering the experiments rather than lack of a real effect. The case study of Project MIX shows tobacco industry scientific research on the use of cigarette additives cannot be taken at face value. The results demonstrate that toxins in cigarette smoke

  10. The Toxic Effects of Cigarette Additives. Philip Morris' Project Mix Reconsidered: An Analysis of Documents Released through Litigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, Marcia S.; Kyriss, Thomas; Paranjape, Suman; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2009, the promulgation of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tobacco regulation focused attention on cigarette flavor additives. The tobacco industry had prepared for this eventuality by initiating a research program focusing on additive toxicity. The objective of this study was to analyze Philip Morris' Project MIX as a case study of tobacco industry scientific research being positioned strategically to prevent anticipated tobacco control regulations. Methods and Findings We analyzed previously secret tobacco industry documents to identify internal strategies for research on cigarette additives and reanalyzed tobacco industry peer-reviewed published results of this research. We focused on the key group of studies conducted by Phillip Morris in a coordinated effort known as “Project MIX.” Documents showed that Project MIX subsumed the study of various combinations of 333 cigarette additives. In addition to multiple internal reports, this work also led to four peer-reviewed publications (published in 2001). These papers concluded that there was no evidence of substantial toxicity attributable to the cigarette additives studied. Internal documents revealed post hoc changes in analytical protocols after initial statistical findings indicated an additive-associated increase in cigarette toxicity as well as increased total particulate matter (TPM) concentrations in additive-modified cigarette smoke. By expressing the data adjusted by TPM concentration, the published papers obscured this underlying toxicity and particulate increase. The animal toxicology results were based on a small number of rats in each experiment, raising the possibility that the failure to detect statistically significant changes in the end points was due to underpowering the experiments rather than lack of a real effect. Conclusion The case study of Project MIX shows tobacco industry scientific research on the use of cigarette additives cannot be taken at face value. The

  11. Effect of the addition of glycosaminoglycans on bone and cartilaginous development of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgavioli, Sarah; Santos, Elaine T; Borges, Liliana L; Andrade-Garcia, Giuliana M; Castiblanco, Diana M C; Almeida, Vitor R; Garcia, Rodrigo G; Shimano, Antônio C; Nääs, Irenilza A; Baraldi-Artoni, Silvana M

    2017-09-01

    Locomotion issues in broiler production may decrease performance (carcass yield and traits) and lead to high financial losses. This study evaluates the addition of glucosaminoglycans in broiler diets to minimize the lack of proper bone development and joint weakening. The experiment was conducted using 2,160 broilers randomly distributed in a factorial pattern (3 × 3) using 3 levels of glucosamine sulfate (0, 0.12, and 0.24%) and 3 levels of chondroitin sulfate addition (0, 0.08, and 0.16%). Eight repetitions were used for each treatment, distributed in 72 pens with 30 broilers each. There was a quadratic effect on feed conversion for broilers from 1 to 42 d old (P = 0.0123) for the addition of chondroitin, and better feed conversion was obtained by adding 0.08% of chondroitin. The relative tibia weight, the width of the proximal epiphysis and diaphysis presented a linear increased effect in broilers at 42 d old. An interaction was found between the amount of chondroitin × glucosamine and the number of chondrocytes in the proximal cartilage of the tibia (P = 0.0072). There was a quadratic effect of glucosamine levels (P = 0.0107) in the birds that had received the 0.16% addition of chondroitin, and the presence of 0.18% glucosamine increased the number chondrocytes in the cartilage of broilers. These results provide the first evidence that broilers may benefit from increased dietary chondroitin sulfate. These results indicate that the addition of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfates in broiler feed rations might alleviate leg conditions and decrease financial losses in the broiler industry. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  12. Effects of titanium addition to the niobium core on the composite-processed Nb3Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Toshihisa; Iijima, Yasuo; Itoh, Kikuo; Tachikawa, Kyoji

    1986-01-01

    Effects of titanium addition to the niobium core on the composite-processed Nb 3 Sn superconductor have been investigated. Composites consisting of a Nb-0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 at% Ti alloy core and a Cu-7 at% Sn alloy matrix were fabricated into single-core and 16-core multifilamentary wires, and then heattreated to form Nb 3 Sn layers. An enhanced formation rate of Nb 3 Sn layer with increasing titanium content has been observed, while the Nb 3 Sn grain size slightly increases with the titanium addition. The titanium addition of 1 - 2 at% to the niobium core produces a small increase in T c , and further titanium addition decreases it. The addition of titanium to the core increases H c2 by 4 T in accordance with the increase in the normal state resistivity. H c2 of about 25 T has been obtained at 4.2 K by the titanium addition. J c 's of Nb 3 Sn at high fields (H > 13 T) are remarkably increased by the titanium addition, which is mainly attributed to the enhancement in H c2 . J c of 1.1 x 10 9 A/m 2 and overall J c of 2.0 x 10 8 A/m 2 have been obtained at 4.2 K and 16 T for a single core wire and a 160-core multifilamentary wire, respectively. The Nb-Ti/Cu-Sn composite wire seems to be quite promising for applications in high magnetic fields ranging from 12 to 16 T. (author)

  13. Effect of Nb addition on the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen for Zr and Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masato; Ko, Kazuhira; Muta, Hiroaki; Uno, Masayoshi; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    2007-01-01

    The terminal solid solubility of hydrogen (TSS) for pure Zr, Zr-Nb binary alloys with different Nb concentrations, and Nb added Zircaloy-4 was examined from the view point of the integrity of new-type nuclear fuel cladding. These alloys were hydrogenated by a modified UHV Sieverts' apparatus at 973 K. The hydrogen concentration and the hydride dissolution temperature of specimen were measured by using a hydrogen analyzer and a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), respectively, and then the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen was determined. The TSS of the α single-phase Zr-0.3Nb (Zr-0.3 wt.% Nb) specimen appeared to be almost same as that of pure Zr. On the contrary, the TSS of the Zr-1.0Nb and Zr-2.5Nb alloys, which were α + β biphasic specimens, were larger than that of pure Zr and slightly increased with Nb concentration. The increment of TSS by Nb addition was slightly larger than that by the traditional additive elements of Sn, Ni, and Cr in Zircaloys. The Nb added Zircaloy-4 had higher TSS than the Zircaloy-2 and -4, which was attributed to the further additive effect by βZr precipitation in Zircaloy besides the traditional additive element effects

  14. Effect of Pro-Degradation Additive on Photo-Oxidative Aging of Polypropylene Film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor Zalikha Mohamed Islam; Nadras Othman; Zulkifli Ahmad; Hanafi Ismail

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of pro-degradation additives (PDA) on photo-oxidative aging of polypropylene (PP) films after being time accelerated in UV-weathering chamber. Thin films (0.12 mm) containing these additives were prepared by sheeting process. The effect of UV on PP films in the presence of these additives was investigated. Changes in the PP films appearance, tensile properties and carbonyl index (CI) were used to investigate the degradation behavior. The films became completely pulverised after 100 h of photo-oxidative treatment and could not be tested further. Films containing PDA showed rapid loss in tensile properties within 100 h of photo-oxidative aging. In addition, the CI results of photo-oxidative films increased with increasing PDA amount within the time interval of aging and the activity was due to the mechanism reaction of PP with PDA particles. During the aging process the material becomes denser due to tighter packing and incorporation of oxygen into the amorphous regions of the polymer. The results indicated that the presence of PDA contributed to the photo degradation and the activity was very much influenced by the amount PDA. (author)

  15. The Effect of Tannins and Additional Peg on In Vitro Gas Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irawan Sugoro

    2004-01-01

    Agro-wastes such as sugar cane straw are potential sources as feed. Sugar cane straw contains tannins, an anti-nutrient, which could effect feed quality. The effect of tannins by in vitro gas production was compared to maize straw which has low tannins. Tannin concentration was measured by using PEG which is labelled by 14 C. The result showed that the tannins concentration of sugar cane straw is 10.88 % dry matter. The others are digestibility of dry matter and organic matter, VFA, ammonia and pH. The gas production is 48.83 ml/500 mg after 24 h incubation. It is lower than the control i.e. 100.64 ml/500 mg. Additional PEG increase the gas production i.e. 30.5 %, because tannins is bounded by it. The concentration of ammonia, VFA, dry matter and organic matter digestibility on sugar cane straw with additional PEG is higher than without PEG, i.e 28.29 mg/100 ml, 15.56 nmol/100 ml, 52.18 % and 47.54 %. pH of sugar cane without PEG i.e. 6.62 is higher than additional PEG, i.e. 6.54. It could be concluded, tannins decrease of gas production, ammonia, VFA, dry matter, and organic matter digestibility and additional PEG increase gas production of sugar cane. (author)

  16. Effect of additional holes on transient thermal fatigue life of gas turbine casing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bazvandi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Gas turbines casings are susceptible to cracking at the edge of eccentric pin hole, which is the most likely position for crack initiation and propagation. This paper describes the improvement of transient thermal fatigue crack propagation life of gas turbines casings through the application of additional holes. The crack position and direction was determined using non-destructive tests. A series of finite element patterns were developed and tested in ASTM-A395 elastic perfectly-plastic ductile cast iron. The effect of arrangement of additional holes on transient thermal fatigue behavior of gas turbines casings containing hole edge cracks was investigated. ABAQUS finite element package and Zencrack fracture mechanics code were used for modeling. The effect of the reduction of transient thermal stress distribution around the eccentric pin hole on the transient thermal fatigue crack propagation life of the gas turbines casings was discussed. The result shows that transient thermal fatigue crack propagation life could be extended by applying additional holes of larger diameter and decreased by increasing the vertical distance, angle, and distance between the eccentric pin hole and the additional holes. The results from the numerical predictions were compared with experimental data.

  17. Effect of cerium addition on the corrosion behaviour of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, S.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Mungole, M.N.; Bharagava, S.; Baligidad, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of Ce addition on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of carbon-alloyed iron aluminides Fe-20.0Al-2.0C, Fe-18.5Al-3.6C and Fe-19.2Al-3.3C-0.07Ce (in at.%) has been studied. The potentiodynamic polarization behaviour of the alloys was evaluated in freely aerated 0.25 mol/l H 2 SO 4 . A 0.05% C steel was used for comparison purposes. All the alloys exhibited active-passive behaviour in the acidic solution. The addition of Ce destroyed passivity as indicated by lower breakdown potentials in polarization studies. This has been related to the finer distribution of the carbides in the microstructure. Corrosion rates were evaluated by immersion testing. The iron aluminide with Ce addition exhibited a lower corrosion rate compared to the aluminides without Ce addition. This has been attributed to modifications in surface film with Ce addition. Scanning electron microscopy of corroded surfaces indicated that the carbon-alloyed intermetallics were susceptible to localized galvanic corrosion due to the presence of carbides in the microstructure

  18. Effect of Incubation Time and Sucrose Addition on the Characteristics of Cheese Whey Yoghurt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhartadi, E.; Utami, R.; Nursiwi, A.; Sari, A. M.; Widowati, E.; Sanjaya, A. P.; Esnadewi, E. A.

    2017-04-01

    The effect of incubation time and concentration of sucrose addition on the characteristics of cheese whey yogurt (lactic acid content, pH, total lactic acid bacteria, antioxidant activity, viscosity) and sensory characteristics (color, odor, flavor, consistency, and overalls) were investigated. The cheese whey yogurt fermentation process was carried out for 24h and 36h with the addition of sucrose 8, 10, and 12% (w/w) of total solid, respectively. The results showed that the lactic acid content, total lactic acid bacteria, antioxidant activity, and viscosity of cheese whey yogurt were affected by the incubation time and sucrose addition. The level of pH of yogurt which was incubated at 24h and 36h were relatively in the same levels, which were 4.51 up to 4.63. Due the sensory characteristic of cheese whey yogurt the panellists gave the high score for the cheese whey yogurt which was incubated at 24h and sucrose addition 12% (w/w) of total solid. The cheese whey yogurt has 0.41% lactic acid content; pH 4.51; 7.09 log total lactic acid bacteria cells / ml; 5.78% antioxidant activity; and 5.97 cP viscosity. The best sensory and physico-chemical characteristic of cheese whey yogurt was achieved by 24h incubation time and 12% concentration of sucrose addition.

  19. Effects of Water and Nitrogen Addition on Ecosystem Carbon Exchange in a Meadow Steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunbo; Jiang, Qi; Yang, Zhiming; Sun, Wei; Wang, Deli

    2015-01-01

    A changing precipitation regime and increasing nitrogen deposition are likely to have profound impacts on arid and semiarid ecosystem C cycling, which is often constrained by the timing and availability of water and nitrogen. However, little is known about the effects of altered precipitation and nitrogen addition on grassland ecosystem C exchange. We conducted a 3-year field experiment to assess the responses of vegetation composition, ecosystem productivity, and ecosystem C exchange to manipulative water and nitrogen addition in a meadow steppe. Nitrogen addition significantly stimulated aboveground biomass and net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), which suggests that nitrogen availability is a primary limiting factor for ecosystem C cycling in the meadow steppe. Water addition had no significant impacts on either ecosystem C exchange or plant biomass, but ecosystem C fluxes showed a strong correlation with early growing season precipitation, rather than whole growing season precipitation, across the 3 experimental years. After we incorporated water addition into the calculation of precipitation regimes, we found that monthly average ecosystem C fluxes correlated more strongly with precipitation frequency than with precipitation amount. These results highlight the importance of precipitation distribution in regulating ecosystem C cycling. Overall, ecosystem C fluxes in the studied ecosystem are highly sensitive to nitrogen deposition, but less sensitive to increased precipitation. PMID:26010888

  20. Effect of organic additives on positive electrolyte for vanadium redox battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Sha [Department of Functional Materials and Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Huang Kelong, E-mail: lisha_csu@163.com [Department of Functional Materials and Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Liu Suqin; Fang Dong; Wu Xiongwei; Lu Dan; Wu Tao [Department of Functional Materials and Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2011-06-30

    Highlights: > Four organics as electrolyte additives of vanadium redox battery. > Changes are examined in the electrochemical properties of vanadium redox battery. > D-sorbitol is a suitable additive to the electrolyte for the vanadium redox battery. > The mechanism of improvement is discussed in detail. - Abstract: Fructose, mannitol, glucose, D-sorbitol are explored as additives in electrolyte for vanadium redox battery (VRB), respectively. The effects of additives on electrolyte are studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV), charge-discharge technique, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that the vanadium redox cell using the electrolyte with the additive of D-sorbitol exhibits the best electrochemical performance (the energy efficiency 81.8%). The EIS results indicate that the electrochemical activity of the electrolyte is improved by adding D-sorbitol, which can be interpreted as the increase of available (-OH) groups providing active sites for electron transfer. The Raman spectra show that VO{sup 2+} ions take part in forming a complex with the D-sorbitol, which not only improve solubility of V(V) electrolyte, but also provide more activity sites for the V(IV)/V(V) redox reaction.

  1. Effect of conductive carbon additives on electrochemical performance of LiCoPO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeyoshi, Yuta; Miyamoto, Shohei; Munakata, Hirokazu; Kanamura, Kiyoshi

    2018-02-01

    The effect of conductive carbon additives (acetylene black with various specific surface areas and ketjen black) on the electrochemical performance of LiCoPO4 is investigated to develop 5 V-class lithium-ion batteries with good cyclability. The irreversible reactions between electrolyte and LiCoPO4 electrode can be kept small in addition to realizing reversible and a small amount of intercalation/deintercalation of PF6- into/from the graphite structure of carbon when using acetylene black with a low surface area as a conductive additive. However, the low surface area reduces the utilization of LiCoPO4, and degrades its cycle performance owing to the decrease of contact area between LiCoPO4 and carbon during charge and discharge cycles. On the other hand, ketjen black with a high surface area enhances the capacity of LiCoPO4, while it induces a large amount of irreversible reactions and the anion intercalation, leading to the rapid capacity fading. By using acetylene black with a moderate surface area as a conductive additive for LiCoPO4 electrode, the superior cycle performance can be achieved, which is attributed to the formation of good conductive network among LiCoPO4 particles by the carbon additive with an appropriate surface area to minimize the irreversible decompose reactions of electrolyte and the anion intercalation.

  2. Effect of additives on enhanced sintering and grain growth in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, L.

    1992-06-01

    The use of sintering additives has been the most effective way of promoting grain growth of uranium dioxide. We have established a same mechanism for additives which belongs to corundum structure: chromium, aluminium, vanadium and titanium sesquioxides. Study of thermodynamical stabilities of dopants has lead to define suitable sintering atmospheres in order to enhance grain growth. Low solubility limits have been defined at T=1700 deg C for four additives, from variations of final grain size versus initial dopant concentration Identification of second phase after cooling has been done from electronic diffraction patterns. It appears that these solubilities decrease sharply as positive deviation from stoichiometry of uranium dioxide increases. Dilatometric analysis of sintering of doped uranium dioxide has shown in certain cases some enhancement in densification rates, at the point of onset of abnormal grain growth, which is believed to be the source. Nevertheless, the following growth is accompanied with pores coalescence mechanisms and pores entrapment inside grains. Increased thermal stability, during standard annealing, is expected, limiting thereby redensification of nuclear fuel in reactors. Finally, from investigations of additives vaporizations, Al 2 O 3 and Cr 2 O 3 , oxygen exchanges between additives and matrix are believed to occur, which should lead to enhance pore mobility. (Author)., refs., figs., tabs

  3. The effects of additives on the crystal habit of monosodium L-glutamate monohydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Chiaki; Nagashima, Nobuya; Kawakita, Tetsuya; Iitaka, Yoichi

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various amino acids and organic acids on the habit of MSG crystals have been investigated. The addition of L-alanine (L-Ala) and L-lysine (L-Lys) made the MSG crystals short and thick, but D-glutamic acid (D-Glu), γ-amino butylic acid (γ-ABA) and L-pyrrolidone carboxylic acid (L-PCA) made the crystals long and thin. HPLC analysis of the end and the side faces of the MSG crystals grown with the additives revealed that the concentrations of L-Lys and L-Ala were higher at the end faces than at the side faces; but those of D-Glu, γ-ABA and L-PCA were higher at the side faces than at the end faces. The facts indicate that habit modifications of the MSG crystals, brought about in the presence of these additives, are due to stereo-selective adsorption of the additives on the crystal faces. Finally, the cause leading to the differences in adsorption of the additives on the crystal faces of MSG is discussed in relation to the stacking density of L-Glu molecules and Na ions on each face using the results of the X-ray structure analysis.

  4. Additive effects of repetition and predictability during comprehension: evidence from event-related potentials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing-Yee Chow

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that neural responses to words during sentence comprehension are sensitive to both lexical repetition and a word's predictability in context. While previous research has often contrasted the effects of these variables (e.g. by looking at cases in which word repetition violates sentence-level constraints, little is known about how they work in tandem. In the current study we examine how recent exposure to a word and its predictability in context combine to impact lexical semantic processing. We devise a novel paradigm that combines reading comprehension with a recognition memory task, allowing for an orthogonal manipulation of a word's predictability and its repetition status. Using event-related brain potentials (ERPs, we show that word repetition and predictability have qualitatively similar and additive effects on the N400 amplitude. We propose that prior exposure to a word and predictability impact lexical semantic processing in an additive and independent fashion.

  5. Effect of Fruit Addition on the Quality Characteristics of Tahini Halva

    OpenAIRE

    SOYDİNÇ, Hülya; BAŞYİĞİT, Bülent; HAYOĞLU, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to make Tahini Halva which incorporated with 10, 15 and 20% fruits (raisins and apricots) and to investigate effect on sensory and chemical properties of Tahini halva of addition of fruit during storage. Moreover, tahini halva produced plain compared with halva that added fruits.  Dry matter, ash, crude fiber, protein, sugar, fat, acidity in oil which was extracted, peroxide and refractive index determinations were analyzed in Halva.  According to statistical eva...

  6. Academic self-concept, autonomous academic motivation, and academic achievement : mediating and additive effects

    OpenAIRE

    Guay, Frédéric; Ratelle, Catherine; Roy, Amélie; Litalien, David

    2010-01-01

    Three conceptual models were tested to examine the relationships among academic self-concept, autonomous academic motivation, and academic achievement. This allowed us to determine whether 1) autonomous academic motivation mediates the relation between academic self-concept and achievement, 2) academic self-concept mediates the relation between autonomous academic motivation and achievement, or 3) both motivational constructs have an additive effect on academic achievement. A total of 925 hig...

  7. The Effect of Sawdust Addition to Physical Body of Kidul Clay Based Earthware Ceramic

    OpenAIRE

    Sundari, Komang Nelly

    2016-01-01

    The research on "The Effect of the addition of sawdust on the physical properties of ceramic body of Kidul clay-based Earthenware " has been performed with different percentages. The sawdust used is wood shavings waste ofbuilding materials. Based on the results ofehemical analysis, sawdust is known to have a tendency as a fuser, whereas Kidul clay contain enough clay substance / loam, feldspar and quartz minerals. This study aims to determine the physical properties of the composite body peri...

  8. Filtration of harmonics in traction transformer substations, positive side effects on the additional harmonics

    OpenAIRE

    Kolář, Václav; Kocman, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    The article deals with harmonics filtration in railway traction transformer substations. In traction transforms substations in the Czech Republic there are filters of 3rd and 5th harmonics. The article discuses side effect of these filters – suppression of additional harmonics. The article is based on measurement and simulation results. Przedstawiono metodę filtracji harmonicznych w trakcyjnej podstacji transformatorowej. Przedfstawiono wyniki symulacji i pomiarów. Web of Science ...

  9. Effect of Ternary Addition of Iron on Shape Memory Characteristics of Cu-Al Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, T. N.; Sampath, V.

    2011-07-01

    The effect of alloying Cu-Al alloys with Fe on their transformation temperatures and shape memory properties was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and bend test. It was found that the minor additions of iron resulted in change of transformation temperatures and led to excellent shape memory properties of the alloys. Since the transformation temperatures are high, they are an ideal choice for high-temperature applications.

  10. 50 CFR 23.15 - How may I travel internationally with my personal or household effects, including tourist souvenirs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... personal or household effects, including tourist souvenirs? 23.15 Section 23.15 Wildlife and Fisheries..., including tourist souvenirs? (a) Purpose. Article VII(3) of the Treaty recognizes a limited exemption for... if one of the following applies: (1) The Management Authority of the importing, exporting, or re...

  11. Effects of dietary addition of synbiotic on the performance, carcass traits, and serum parameters of Japanese quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuncay Tufan

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to evaluate the effects of different levels of synbiotic (Syn on the growth performance, carcass traits, and serum parameters of Japanese quails. A total of 1,500 (750 male and 750 female Japanese quails were assigned to five treatments, including the control (basal diet and basal diets with the addition of 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4% Syn according to a completely randomized design. Each treatment in the male and female experiment groups consisted of five replicates, with 30 chicks for each replicate. The addition of Syn had no effect on body weight (BW, while the BW of female quails was higher than that of male quails at day 42. The addition of Syn reduced feed intake (FI and improved the feed conversion ratio (FCR (P<0.000. The daily body weight gain and FI were significantly higher in female than in male quails and Syn also improved the FCR in the overall experiment. The effect of the addition of Syn on carcass parameters (except for abdominal fat was not determined. The addition of Syn decreased abdominal fat weight and percentage when compared with the control group. Male quails were found to have higher carcass yield, wing, neck, and other percentages than female quails. However, female quails were found to have higher breast, breast skin, abdominal fat, and visceral organ percentages. The addition of 0.1% Syn to quail ration reduced serum aspartate aminotransferase, high-density lipoprotein (HDL, total protien (TP, and albumin (ALB levels at day 42 of the trial. The addition of Syn decreased the serum total cholesterol level. Gender was found to have an effect in that female quails were found to have higher total cholesterol, HDL, TP, and ALB levels than male quails. In both genders, the addition of Syn improved the BWG, FC, and FCR in the overall experiment, reduced abdominal fat, decreased the total cholesterol levels, improved the HDL levels, and increased the TP and ALB levels at day 42. The addition of 0.3 and

  12. Effect of the chlortetracycline addition method on methane production from the anaerobic digestion of swine wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lu; Wen, Xin; Wang, Yan; Zou, Yongde; Ma, Baohua; Liao, Xindi; Liang, Juanboo; Wu, Yinbao

    2014-10-01

    Effects of antibiotic residues on methane production in anaerobic digestion are commonly studied using the following two antibiotic addition methods: (1) adding manure from animals that consume a diet containing antibiotics, and (2) adding antibiotic-free animal manure spiked with antibiotics. This study used chlortetracycline (CTC) as a model antibiotic to examine the effects of the antibiotic addition method on methane production in anaerobic digestion under two different swine wastewater concentrations (0.55 and 0.22mg CTC/g dry manure). The results showed that CTC degradation rate in which manure was directly added at 0.55mg CTC/g (HSPIKE treatment) was lower than the control values and the rest of the treatment groups. Methane production from the HSPIKE treatment was reduced (pproduction under different antibiotic addition methods might be explained by the microbial activity and the concentrations of antibiotic intermediate products and metabolites. Because the primary entry route of veterinary antibiotics into an anaerobic digester is by contaminated animal manure, the most appropriate method for studying antibiotic residue effects on methane production may be using manure from animals that are given a particular antibiotic, rather than adding the antibiotic directly to the anaerobic digester. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Effect of Addition of Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare L. on the Quality of Protein Bread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed-Ahmad Bouchra

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare L. is an aromatic plant belonging to Apiaceae family widely cultivated elsewhere for its strongly flavoured leaves and seeds. Fennel seeds are of particular interest as a rich source of both vegetable and essential oils with high amounts of valuable components. However, residual cakes after oil extraction were typically considered as byproducts, in the present framework, the potential added value of these cakes was studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of addition of fennel cake and seeds to protein bread quality. In the current research, a single-screw extruder, which is a solvent-free technique, was used for fennel seed oil extraction. For the protein bread making, fennel seed and cake flour in concentrations from 1 to 6% were used. Moisture, colour L*a*b*, hardness, total phenolic concentration, DPPH radical scavenging activity, and nutritional value of protein bread were determined. The addition of fennel cake and seeds had significant (p < 0.05 effect on bread crumb colour and hardness attribute, whereby the bread became darker and harder in texture than the control. Moreover, higher antioxidant activity and total phenolic concentration were observed for both protein breads enriched with fennel cake and seed flour. The overall results showed that addition of fennel cake and seed had beneficial effects on phenolic concentration, antioxidant activity and quality of protein bread. This result suggests also that added value of fennel seeds oil by-products could be increased by their utilisation in bread production.

  14. Combined effects of additive elements on the magnetic properties of Fe-Nd-B sintered magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonowicz, M.; Kaszuwara, W.

    1996-01-01

    Combined effects of additional elements on the magnetic properties of sintered Fe-Nd-B magnets were studied for two systems: containing both Al or Co and Al and Mo, respectively. It was found that the magnets containing Al and Co exhibit substantially higher coercivities than those with additions of only Al or Co. The improved coercivity for the alloys containing Al and Co, when compared with the quaternary alloys, we attribute to a reduced proportion of the soft magnetic inclusions in the grain boundary area. The investigation of combined effects of Al and Mo additions on the magnetic properties revealed that although both Al and Mo when added separately enhance the properties, their combined effect brought about deterioration of the coercivity. X-ray microanalysis detected Mo, Fe, Nd and Al rich inclusions, existence of which was considered to be the reason for a poor magnetic decoupling of the hard magnetic grains and drop of the coercivity. The magnetic, properties were discussed in the light of phase constitution and their possible influence on the magnetization reversal. Three dimensional diagrams of the magnetic properties versus composition were composed. (author)

  15. Effect of the addition of fibreglass waste on the properties of dried and fired clay bricks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzlena, S.; Sakale, G.; Certoks, S.; Grase, L.

    2017-10-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the addition of fibreglass waste on the properties of the dried and fired clay bricks. Different amounts of waste glass (0 – 10 wt %) were added to the original brick clay and fired at 1000 °C. The effects on the technological properties of the bricks such as compressive strength, water absorption and density after firing were investigated. Also cracks and fibreglass influence in dried and fired samples were analysed by digital camera and SEM-EDX analysis.

  16. Effects of V addition on recrystallization resistance of 7150 aluminum alloy after simulative hot deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Jing; Shi, Cangji; Chen, X.-Grant, E-mail: xgrant_chen@uqac.ca

    2014-10-15

    The effects of different V contents (0.01 to 0.19 wt.%) on the recrystallization resistance of 7150 aluminum alloys during post-deformation heat treatment were investigated. The microstructural evolutions at as-cast, as-homogenized conditions and after post-deformation annealing were studied using optical, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes and using the electron backscattered diffraction technique. The precipitation of Al{sub 21}V{sub 2} dispersoids was observed in alloys containing 0.11 to 0.19 wt.% V after homogenization. The dispersoids were mainly distributed in the dendrite cells, and the precipitate-free zones occurred in the interdendritic regions and near grain boundaries. V addition could significantly enhance the recrystallization resistance during post-deformation annealing, particularly in the presence of a great number of Al{sub 21}V{sub 2} dispersoids. Recrystallized grain growth was effectively restricted because of the dispersoid pinning effect. The alloy containing 0.15 wt.% V exhibited the highest recrystallization resistance amongst all V-containing alloys studied. - Highlights: • Investigated the effect of V level on microstructure and flow stress of 7150 alloys • Characterized microstructures using optical microscopy, SEM, TEM and EBSD • Described the precipitation behavior of V-dispersoids in the dendritic structure • Studied the V effect on recrystallization resistance during post heat treatment • V addition greatly enhanced the recrystallization resistance during annealing.

  17. Rating of Included Trials on the Efficacy–Effectiveness Spectrum : development of a new tool for systematic reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieland, L. Susan; Berman, Brian M.; Altman, Douglas G.; Barth, Jürgen; Bouter, Lex M.; D'Adamo, Christopher R.; Linde, Klaus; Moher, David; Mullins, C. Daniel; Treweek, Shaun; Tunis, Sean; van der Windt, Danielle A.; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Witt, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective Randomized trials may be designed to provide evidence more strongly related to efficacy or effectiveness of an intervention. When systematic reviews are used to inform clinical or policy decisions, it is important to know the efficacy–effectiveness nature of the included

  18. The Additive Effects of Core Muscle Strengthening and Trunk NMES on Trunk Balance in Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eun Jae; Chun, Min Ho; Kim, Dae Yul; Yi, Jin Hwa; Kim, Won; Hong, Jayoung

    2016-02-01

    To investigate an additive effect of core muscle strengthening (CMS) and trunk neuromuscular electrical stimulation (tNEMS) on trunk balance in stroke patients. Thirty patients with acute or subacute stroke who were unable to maintain static sitting balance for >5 minutes were enrolled and randomly assigned to 3 groups, i.e., patients in the CMS (n=10) group received additional CMS program; the tNMES group (n=10) received additional tNMES over the posterior back muscles; and the combination (CMS and tNMES) group (n=10) received both treatments. Each additional treatment was performed 3 times per week for 20 minutes per day over 3 weeks. Korean version of Berg Balance Scale (K-BBS), total score of postural assessment scale for stroke patients (PASS), Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS), and Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI) were evaluated before and after 3 weeks of therapeutic intervention. All 3 groups showed improvements in K-BBS, PASS, TIS, and K-MBI after therapeutic interventions, with some differences. The combination group showed more improvements in K-BBS and the dynamic sitting balance of TIS, as compared to the CMS group; and more improvement in K-BBS, as compared to the tNMES group. The results indicated an additive effect of CMS and tNMES on the recovery of trunk balance in patients with acute or subacute stroke who have poor sitting balance. Simultaneous application of CMS and tNMES should be considered when designing a rehabilitation program to improve trunk balance in stroke patients.

  19. Assessing the effect, on animal model, of mixture of food additives, on the water balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Mariola; Kuchlewska, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, on the animal model, the effect of modification of diet composition and administration of selected food additives on water balance in the body. The study was conducted with 48 males and 48 females (separately for each sex) of Wistar strain rats divided into four groups. For drinking, the animals from groups I and III were receiving water, whereas the animals from groups II and IV were administered 5 ml of a solution of selected food additives (potassium nitrate - E 252, sodium nitrite - E 250, benzoic acid - E 210, sorbic acid - E 200, and monosodium glutamate - E 621). Doses of the administered food additives were computed taking into account the average intake by men, expressed per body mass unit. Having drunk the solution, the animals were provided water for drinking. The mixture of selected food additives applied in the experiment was found to facilitate water retention in the body both in the case of both male and female rats, and differences observed between the volume of ingested fluids and the volume of excreted urine were statistically significant in the animals fed the basal diet. The type of feed mixture provided to the animals affected the site of water retention - in the case of animals receiving the basal diet analyses demonstrated a significant increase in water content in the liver tissue, whereas in the animals fed the modified diet water was observed to accumulate in the vascular bed. Taking into account the fact of water retention in the vascular bed, the effects of food additives intake may be more adverse in the case of females.

  20. Liraglutide, leptin and their combined effects on feeding: additive intake reduction through common intracellular signalling mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoski, S E; Ong, Z Y; Fortin, S M; Schlessinger, E S; Grill, H J

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the behavioural and intracellular mechanisms by which the glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, liraglutide, and leptin in combination enhance the food intake inhibitory and weight loss effects of either treatment alone. We examined the effects of liraglutide (a long-acting GLP-1 analogue) and leptin co-treatment, delivered in low or moderate doses subcutaneously (s.c.) or to the third ventricle, respectively, on cumulative intake, meal patterns and hypothalamic expression of intracellular signalling proteins [phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (pSTAT3) and protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B)] in lean rats. A low-dose combination of liraglutide (25 µg/kg) and leptin (0.75 µg) additively reduced cumulative food intake and body weight, a result mediated predominantly through a significant reduction in meal frequency that was not present with either drug alone. Liraglutide treatment alone also reduced meal size; an effect not enhanced with leptin co-administration. Moderate doses of liraglutide (75 µg/kg) and leptin (4 µg), examined separately, each reduced meal frequency, cumulative food intake and body weight; only liraglutide reduced meal size. In combination these doses did not further enhance the anorexigenic effects of either treatment alone. Ex vivo immunoblot analysis showed elevated pSTAT3 in the hypothalamic tissue after liraglutide-leptin co-treatment, an effect which was greater than that of leptin treatment alone. In addition, s.c. liraglutide reduced the expression of PTP1B (a negative regulator of leptin receptor signalling), revealing a potential mechanism for the enhanced pSTAT3 response after liraglutide-leptin co-administration. Collectively, these results show novel behavioural and molecular mechanisms underlying the additive reduction in food intake and body weight after liraglutide-leptin combination treatment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Synergistic effect between nano-ceramic lubricating additives and electroless deposited Ni-W-P coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Cheng, Wushan; Zhao, Zuxin; Huang, Xiaobo

    2013-01-01

    The major solving ways for the material wear are surface modification and lubrication. Currently, the researches at home and abroad are all limited to the single study of either nano-lubricating oil additive or electroless deposited coating. The surface coating has high hardness and high wear resistance, however, the friction reduction performance of the coating with high hardness is not good, the thickness of the coating is limited, and the coating can not regenerate after wearing. The nano-lubricating additives have good tribological performance and self-repair function, but under heavy load, the self-repair rate to the worn surface with the nano-additives is smaller than the wearing rate of the friction pair. To solve the above problems, the Ni-W-P alloy coating and deposition process with excellent anti-wear, and suitable for industrial application were developed, the optimum bath composition and process can be obtained by studying the influence of the bath composition, temperature and PH value to the deposition rate and the plating solution stability. The tribological properties as well as anti-wear and friction reduction mechanism of wear self-repair nano-ceramic lubricating additives are also studied. The ring-block abrasion testing machine and energy dispersive spectrometer are used to explore the internal relation between the coating and the nano-lubricating oil additives, and the tribology mechanism, to seek the synergetic effect between the two. The test results show that the wear resistance of Ni-W-P alloy coating (with heat treatment and in oil with nano-ceramic additives) has increased hundreds times than 45 steel as the metal substrate in basic oil, the friction reduction performance is improved. This research breaks through the bottleneck of previous separate research of the above-mentioned two methods, and explores the combination use of the two methods in industrial field.

  2. The effect of the humic acid and herbal additive supplement on production parameters of broiler chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Pistová

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study the effect of humic acids and dietary herbal additive (clove (Syzygium aromaticum, lavender (Lavendula angustifolia and black pepper (Piper nigrum L. on production parameters of broiler chicken were studied.  A total of 60 Ross 308 broiler chicken were divided into 3 treatments (n=20. The control group of chickens was fed with complete feed mixtures without any additives. Chicken in treatment T1 were fed a diet containing 1% of humic acid and drank a water containing 150 mg/l of herbal additive. Chicken in treatment T2 were fed with complete feed mixture without any additives and drank a water containing 150 mg/l of herbal additive. The body weight, feed intake and feed conversion were evaluated. The results shout that the body weight was significantly higher (P≤0.05 in treatments groups compared to the control group (the order of the groups: 1796.4±188.1; 2052.9±197.9 and 2140.4±300.4 g±SD. The feed intake was in the control group 3.11 kg, in the treatment T1 3.00 kg and in the treatment T2 3.12 kg. Feed conversion for the entire fattening period was in control group 2.19 kg/kg complete feed mixture, in the treatment T1 1.83 kg/kg complete feed mixture and in the treatment T2 1.84 kg/kg complete feed mixture with no significant different (P≥0.05 compared to control group. In conclusion, supplement by humic acid and herbal additive can improve production parameters of broiler chicken.

  3. Additive effects of physical exercise and environmental enrichment on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Fabel

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary physical exercise (wheel running, RUN and environmental enrichment (ENR both stimulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis but do so by different mechanisms. RUN induces precursor cell proliferation, whereas ENR exerts a survival-promoting effect on newborn cells. In addition, continued RUN prevented the physiologically occurring age-related decline in precursor cell in the dentate gyrus but did not lead to a corresponding increase in net neurogenesis. We hypothesized that in the absence of appropriate cognitive stimuli the potential for neurogenesis could not be realized but that an increased potential by proliferating precursor cells due to RUN could actually lead to more adult neurogenesis if an appropriate survival-promoting stimulus follows the exercise. We thus asked whether a sequential combination of RUN and ENR (RUNENR would show additive effects that are distinct from the application of either paradigm alone. We found that the effects of 10 days of RUN followed by 35 days of ENR were additive in that the combined stimulation yielded an approximately 30% greater increase in new neurons than either stimulus alone, which also increased neurogenesis. Surprisingly, this result indicates that although overall the amount of proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus is poorly predictive of net adult neurogenesis, an increased neurogenic potential nevertheless provides the basis for a greater efficiency of the same survival-promoting stimulus. We thus propose that physical activity can “prime” the neurogenic region of the dentate gyrus for increased neurogenesis in the case the animal is exposed to an additional cognitive stimulus, here represented by the enrichment paradigm.

  4. Effect of Additional Incentives for Aviation Biofuels: Results from the Biomass Scenario Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vimmerstedt, Laura J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Newes, Emily K [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-12-05

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory supported the Department of Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office, with analysis of alternative jet fuels in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration. Airlines for America requested additional exploratory scenarios within FAA analytic framework. Airlines for America requested additional analysis using the same analytic framework, the Biomass Scenario Model. The results were presented at a public working meeting of the California Air Resources Board on including alternative jet fuel in the Low Carbon Fuel Standard on March 17, 2017 (https://www.arb.ca.gov/fuels/lcfs/lcfs_meetings/lcfs_meetings.htm). This presentation clarifies and annotates the slides from the public working meeting, and provides a link to the full data set. NREL does not advocate for or against the policies analyzed in this study.

  5. Effects of Ag addition on the microstructures and properties of Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li-zi; Cao, Yi-heng; Zhou, Yi-zhou; Cui, Jian-zhong

    2018-01-01

    Effects of Ag addition on the microstructures, aging characteristics, tensile properties, electrochemical properties, and intergranular corrosion (IGC) properties of Al-1.1Mg-0.8Si-0.9Cu-0.35Mn-0.02Ti alloy were investigated using scanning electronic microscopy and transmission electronic microscopy. The aging process of Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloys was accelerated by the addition of Ag. The strength of peak-aged Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloys was enhanced by Ag addition because of the high density of β″- and L-phase age-hardening precipitates. The corrosion performance of the Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy is closely related to the aging conditions and is independent of the Ag content. The IGC susceptibility is serious in the peak-aged alloy because of the continuous distribution of Cu-rich Q-phase precipitates along grain boundaries. Ag addition reduces the size of the grain-boundary-precipitate Q phase and the width of the precipitate-free zone and thus results in decreased IGC susceptibility of Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloys.

  6. Effects of beta-glucan addition to a probiotic containing yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiljevic, T; Kealy, T; Mishra, V K

    2007-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of addition of beta-glucan from 2 different cereal sources (oat and barley) on growth and metabolic activity of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis (Bb-12) as determined by plating on a selective medium in yogurt during prolonged cold storage. These yogurt batches were compared to unsupplemented and inulin supplemented controls. All batches were also assessed for syneresis. Oat beta-glucan addition resulted in improved probiotic viability and stability comparable to that of inulin. It also enhanced lactic and propionic acid production. The barley beta-glucan addition suppressed proteolytic activity more than that from oat. These improvements were hindered by greater syneresis caused likely by thermodynamic incompatibility. Small amplitude oscillatory measurements of acidified model mixture of beta-glucan/skim milk solids showed formation of casein gel within the beta-glucan network. Binary mixtures of beta-glucan and skim milk solids had apparent pseudoplastic and non-Newtonian behavior governed mainly by beta-glucan contribution. Above critical concentrations, the mixtures underwent phase separation with the lower phase rich in protein. The phase diagram also showed that the addition of beta-glucan may be possible at or below 0.24 w/w%.

  7. Effects of emulsifier addition on the crystallization and melting behavior of palm olein and coconut oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Jessica Mayumi; Soares, Fabiana Andreia Schafer De Martini; D'Agostinho, Natalia Roque; Gonçalves, Maria Inês Almeida; Gioielli, Luiz Antonio; da Silva, Roberta Claro

    2014-03-12

    Two commercial emulsifiers (EM1 and EM2), containing predominantly monoacylglycerols (MAGs), were added in proportiond of 1.0 and 3.0% (w/w) to coconut oil and palm olein. EM1 consisted of approximately 90% MAGs, whereas EM2 consisted of approximately 50% MAGs. The crystallization behavior of these systems was evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and microscopy under polarized light. On the basis of DSC results, it was clear that the addition of EM2 accelerated the crystallization of coconut oil and delayed the crystallization of palm olein. In both oils EM2 addition led to the formation of smaller spherulites, and these effects improved the possibilities for using these fats as ingredients. In coconut oil the spherulites were maintained even at higher temperatures (20 °C). The addition of EM1 to coconut oil changed the crystallization pattern. In palm olein, the addition of 3.0% (w/w) of this emulsifier altered the pattern of crystallization of this fat.

  8. Effect of Refiner Addition Level on Zirconium-Containing Aluminium Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaradeh, M M R; Carlberg, T

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that in aluminium alloys containing Zr, grain refiner additions do not function as desired, producing an effect often referred to as nuclei poisoning. This paper investigates the structure of direct chill-cast ingots of commercial AA3003 aluminium alloys, with and without Zr, at various addition levels of Al5Ti1B master alloy. In Bridgman experiments simulating ingot solidification, Zr-containing alloys were studied after the addition of various amounts of Ti. It could be demonstrated, in both ingot casting and simulation experiments, that Zr poisoning can be compensated for by adding more Ti and/or Al5Ti1B. The results confirm better refinement behaviour with the addition of Ti + B than of only Ti. The various combinations of Zr and Ti also influenced the formation of AlFeMn phases, and the precipitation of large Al 6 (Mn,Fe) particles was revealed. AlZrTiSi intermetallic compounds were also detected.

  9. Effect of Refiner Addition Level on Zirconium-Containing Aluminium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaradeh, M. M. R.; Carlberg, T.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that in aluminium alloys containing Zr, grain refiner additions do not function as desired, producing an effect often referred to as nuclei poisoning. This paper investigates the structure of direct chill-cast ingots of commercial AA3003 aluminium alloys, with and without Zr, at various addition levels of Al5Ti1B master alloy. In Bridgman experiments simulating ingot solidification, Zr-containing alloys were studied after the addition of various amounts of Ti. It could be demonstrated, in both ingot casting and simulation experiments, that Zr poisoning can be compensated for by adding more Ti and/or Al5Ti1B. The results confirm better refinement behaviour with the addition of Ti + B than of only Ti. The various combinations of Zr and Ti also influenced the formation of AlFeMn phases, and the precipitation of large Al6(Mn,Fe) particles was revealed. AlZrTiSi intermetallic compounds were also detected.

  10. Soluble organic additive effects on stress development during drying of calcium carbonate suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedin, Pär; Lewis, Jennifer A; Bergström, Lennart

    2005-10-01

    The effect of polymer, plasticizer, and surfactant additives on stress development during drying of calcium carbonate particulate coatings was studied using a controlled-environment apparatus that simultaneously monitors drying stress, weight loss, and relative humidity. We found that the calcium carbonate coatings display a drying stress evolution typical of granular films, which is characterized by a sharp capillary-induced stress rise followed by a rapid stress relaxation. The addition of a soluble polymer to the CaCO3 suspension resulted in a two-stage stress evolution process. The initial stress rise stems from capillary-pressure-induced stresses within the film, while the second, larger stress rise occurs due to solidification and shrinkage of the polymeric species. Measurements on the corresponding pure polymer solutions established a clear correlation between the magnitude of residual stress in both the polymer and CaCO3-polymer films to the physical properties of the polymer phase, i.e. its glass transition temperature, T(g), and Young's modulus. The addition of small organic molecules can reduce the residual stress observed in the CaCO3-polymer films; e.g., glycerol, which acts as a plasticizer, reduces the drying stress by lowering T(g), while surfactant additions reduce the surface tension of the liquid phase, and, hence, the magnitude of the capillary pressure within the film.

  11. Experimental Investigations on the effect of Additive on the Tensile Properties of Fiber Glass Fabric Lamina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava Sai Divya, A.; Raghu Kumar, B., Dr; Lakshmi Narayana, G., Dr

    2017-09-01

    The main objective of this work is to investigate the effect of additives on tensile behaviour of fiber glass fabric at lamina level to explore an alternative skin material for the outer body of aerospace applications and machines. This experimental work investigates the effect of silica concentration in epoxy resin lapox L-12 on the tensile properties of glass fabric lamina of 4H-satin weave having 3.6 mm thickness. The lamina was prepared by using hand lay-up method and tests were conducted on it. Various tensile properties values obtained from experimentation were compared for four glass fiber lamina composites fabricated by adding the silica powder to resin bath. The effect of variations in silica concentration (0% SiO2, 5% SiO2, 10% SiO2 and 15% SiO2) on the tensile properties of prepared material revealed that maximum stiffness was obtained at 15% and yield strength at 10% SiO2 concentration in glass fiber lamina. Increasing the silica concentration beyond 10% had led to deterioration in the material properties. The experimentation that was carried out on test specimen was reasonably successful as the effect of silica powder as an additive in glass fiber lamina enhanced the mechanical properties up to certain limit. The underpinning microscopic behaviour at the source of these observations will be investigated in a follow up work.

  12. Additive effect of cysteinyl leukotriene or thromboxane modifiers to inhaled corticosteroids in asthmatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeharu Myou

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchial asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the conducting airways. Current asthma treatment guidelines recommend inhaled corticosteroids (ICS as the first-line maintenance therapy for mild to severe persistent asthma, because ICS are the most efficacious anti-inflammatory medication. Despite treatment with ICS, suppression of inflammation is often incomplete and blockade by ICS of cysteinyl leukotriene (CysLT and thromboxane (TX A2 biosynthesis is limited. The addition of a CysLT1 receptor antagonist to an ICS represents a reasonable alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of asthma patients whose symptoms remain uncontrolled on ICS alone. Indeed, CysLT1 receptor antagonists are demonstrated both to have an additive effect to ICS therapy and to allow the reduction of ICS dosage. Thromboxane modifiers also have an additive effect with low- to moderate-dose ICS. Although the long-term usefulness of add-on therapy of CysLT or TX modifiers (vs long-acting β2-adrenergic receptor agonists to ICS is unclear, these alternatives are worthy of further consideration.

  13. Effects of boron addition on tensile and Charpy impact properties in high-phosphorous steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seokmin; Lee, Junghoon [Center for Advanced Aerospace Materials, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyong Su [Next Generation Products Research Group, Technical Research Laboratories, POSCO, Pohang 790-785 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sunghak, E-mail: shlee@postech.ac.kr [Center for Advanced Aerospace Materials, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide a new possibility for improving the steel-making productivity by fabricating plain carbon steels containing high phosphorous (P), effects of microstructures on tensile and Charpy impact properties were investigated in this study. Nine plain carbon steels were fabricated by controlling the addition of P and boron (B), and isothermal or quench heat-treatments were conducted on these steels to make ferrite–bainite-based or martensite-based microstructures. The addition of B positively influenced the grain refinement and the formation of bainites, thereby leading to the increase in strength. The upper shelf energy (USE) decreased with increasing P content, while the energy transition temperature (ETT) increased, in all the steels. The B addition beneficially affected both the USE and ETT as the dimpled ductile fracture mode prevailed in the B-added steels. This was because B preferentially covered grain boundaries, which reduced the grain boundary segregation of P. Thus, it effectively suppressed the intergranular fracture due to the segregation of P. According to the fractographic results, the increased tendency of intergranular fracture mode was observable in the 20-ppm-B-added steels rather than in the 10-ppm-B-added steels. When an excess amount of B, e.g., 20 ppm of B, was added, the severe segregation of B on grain boundaries occurred, and led to the precipitation of boro-carbides, which could act as intergranular crack initiation sites.

  14. Individual and combined in vitro (anti)androgenic effects of certain food additives and cosmetic preservatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Anca; Drugan, Tudor; Gutleb, Arno C; Lupu, Diana; Cherfan, Julien; Loghin, Felicia; Kiss, Béla

    2016-04-01

    The individual and combined (binary mixtures) (anti)androgenic effect of butylparaben (BuPB), butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and propyl gallate (PG) was evaluated using the MDA-kb2 cell line. Exposing these cells to AR agonists results in the expression of the reporter gene (encoding for luciferase) and luminescence can be measured in order to monitor the activity of the reporter protein. In case of the evaluation of the anti-androgenic effect, the individual test compounds or binary mixtures were tested in the presence of a fixed concentration of a strong AR agonist (1000 pM 5-alpha-dihydrotestosterone; DHT). Cell viability was assessed using a resazurin based assay. For PG, this is the first report in the literature concerning its (anti)androgenic activity. In case of both individual and mixture testing none of the compounds or binary combinations showed androgenic activity. When tested in the presence of DHT, BuPB, BHA and BHT proved to be weak anti-androgens and this was confirmed during the evaluation of binary mixtures (BuPB+BHA, BuPB+BHT and BHA+BHT). Besides performing the in vitro testing of the binary combinations, two mathematical models (dose addition and response addition) were evaluated in terms of accuracy of prediction of the anti-androgenic effect of the selected binary mixtures. The dose addition model guaranteed a good correlation between the experimental and predicted data. However, no estimation was possible in case of mixtures containing PG, due to the lack of effect of the compound in case of the individual testing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of Wait Time When Communicating with Children Who Have Sensory and Additional Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicole; Parker, Amy T.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study utilized wait-time procedures to determine if they are effective in helping children with deafblindness or multiple disabilities that include a visual impairment communicate in their home. Methods: A single subject with an alternating treatment design was used for the study. Zero- to one-second wait time was utilized…

  16. The effects of addition of citric acid on the morphologies of ZnO nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zao; Liu Quanhui; Yang Lei

    2007-01-01

    ZnO nanorods of 25-100 nm in diameter and 0.2-1 μm in length were fabricated through citric acid assisted annealing process. The microstructure of ZnO nanorods was characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy, respectively. As a result, it was found that ZnO nanorods were single crystalline and pure. The effects of the growth conditions such as addition of citric acid, annealing temperature on the morphologies of ZnO nanostructures have also been investigated. At the given temperature the length decreased but the diameter increased with addition of the mass of citric acid. With the rising of the calcining heat, the shape of ZnO changed from rod to granule for a given amount of citric acid. Finally, the mechanism for citric acid assisted annealing synthesis of the ZnO nanostructure is discussed

  17. Effect of degassing addition on the solidification segregation of nickel aluminum bronze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syazwan, F.; Kavinjr, M.; Maghribi, S.; Ashraf, N.; Hadi, A.; Shayfull, Z.; Rashidi, M. M.

    2017-09-01

    The effect of degassing agent addition on the solidification segregation of Nickel Aluminum Bronze was investigated. The complex relationship between the development of the solidification microstructures and buildup of microsegregation in Nickel Aluminum Bronze was obtained by using microstructure analysis and EDS analysis. This experiment describes the characterization of microsegregation in Nickel Aluminum Bronze which was made using point to count microanalysis along the microstructure. With this method, the differences of elements distribution in alloys solidified in the microstructure were clearly evidenced. The results show a microstructure directly affected by segregation of elements in Nickel Aluminum Bronze matrix. There is segregation of elements in the Late To Freeze (LTF) region after solidification from melting. As for degassing treatment, higher degassing addition on the Nickel Aluminum Bronze increased the elements segregation.

  18. The Effectiveness of the Additional Vocational Education and Staff Development for Industrial Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. S. Kalabina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the course of the Russian economy modernization, developing the effec- tive system of vocational training and further professional training appears to be the main condition for the dynamic competitive advantage of industrial enterprises. The paper inves- tigates the urgent issue of developing the system of additional vocational training and staff development with the reference to the ever-changing institutional logic controlling the em- ployee – employer relations. The paper presents the review of theoretic approaches to the system of additional vocational training, as well as the economic analysis and estimates of return on investment in different forms of vocational training. The methodological approach to the system efficiency estimation is given along with the factors determining the forma- tion and development of vocational training system. Based on the research findings, the recommendations integrating the staff development policy are given aimed at promoting the effectiveness of the employee – employer relations. 

  19. Effects of phosphourus addition on the physical properties and surface condition of tungsten-copper composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyoshi, N.; Nakada, K.; Nakayama, M.; Kohda, K.

    2001-01-01

    Tungsten-copper composites containing a small amount of phosphorus prepared using conventional P/M method. Cu 3 P powder was used as phosphorous source. The effects of phosphorus addition on the physical properties and the surface condition were investigated and the existing form of phosphorus was specified on the tungsten-copper composites The results are summarized as follows. The tungsten-copper composite containing 10 % copper, for example, demonstrated optimum thermal conductivity at the phosphorus addition of 0.02 %. The density of the composites was almost 100 % and the surface of the sintered body was flat and smooth after sintering at a temperature between 1100 and 1150 o C. It was shown that phosphorus exists as Co 2 P. (author)

  20. Effect of lysine addition on growth of black iguana (Ctenosaura pectinata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Juan José Ortiz; Luis, Arcos-García José; Martínez, Germán D Mendoza; Pérez, Fernando Xicoténcatl Plata; Mascorro, Gisela Fuentes; Inzunza, Gabriela Ruelas

    2013-01-01

    The effects of the addition of lysine to commercial feed given to captive black iguana (Ctenosaura pectinata) were evaluated in terms of growth and feed digestibility. Twenty-eight-day-old black iguana with an initial weight of 5.5 ± 0.3 g were housed individually in cages measuring 45 × 45 × 45 cm. The experiment lasted 150 days. The ambient temperature ranged from 28 to 35°C with a relative humidity of 60 to 95%. Treatments consisted of the addition of different percentages of lysine to the feed (0.0, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3%, dry matter [DM] base). There was a linear response (P iguana diet in the first months of life is important to stimulate growth and intake. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.