WorldWideScience

Sample records for include active sensors

  1. Particle fallout/activity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Ihlefeld M. (Inventor); Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Moerk, John S. (Inventor); Rose, Kenneth A., III (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A particle fallout/activity sensor measures relative amounts of dust or other particles which collect on a mirror in an area to be monitored. The sensor includes a sensor module and a data acquisition module, both of which can be operated independently of one another or in combination with one another. The sensor module includes a housing containing the mirror, an LED assembly for illuminating the mirror and an optical detector assembly for detecting light scattered off of the mirror by dust or other particles collected thereon. A microprocessor controls operation of the sensor module's components and displays results of a measurement on an LCD display mounted on the housing. A push button switch is also mounted on the housing which permits manual initiation of a measurement. The housing is constructed of light absorbing material, such as black delrin, which minimizes detection of light by the optical detector assembly other than that scattered by dust or particles on the mirror. The data acquisition module can be connected to the sensor module and includes its own microprocessor, a timekeeper and other digital circuitry for causing the sensor module to make a measurement periodically and send the measurement data to the data acquisition module for display and storage in memory for later retrieval and transfer to a separate computer. The time tagged measurement data can also be used to determine the relative level of activity in the monitored area since this level is directly related to the amount of dust or particle fallout in the area.

  2. Radiation-activated sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nirschl, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    A sensing system is described for use in a remote location which detects electromagnetic radiation energy, the system being self-activating, turning itself automatically on and off, as a function of radiation intensity across the detector. In essence, when no radiation is present across the detector, the system will consume no power, the switches and MOSFET discriminator being essentially in an ''off'' position. Radiation across the detector provides a current to an input capacitance which when charged turns on the switch and the MOSFET discriminator. A switch driver produces an output pulse showing the presence of radiation; the system then shuts off awaiting the next radiation input. Since the sensor system uses virtually no power unless radiation is present, it is ideally suited for use in remote environments where battery power and size is a predominant consideration. 2 claims, 3 drawing figures

  3. Active thermal isolation for temperature responsive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Scott D. (Inventor); Gray, David L. (Inventor); Carraway, Debra L. (Inventor); Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The detection of flow transition between laminar and turbulent flow and of shear stress or skin friction of airfoils is important in basic research for validation of airfoil theory and design. These values are conventionally measured using hot film nickel sensors deposited on a polyimide substrate. The substrate electrically insulates the sensor and underlying airfoil but is prevented from thermally isolating the sensor by thickness constraints necessary to avoid flow contamination. Proposed heating of the model surface is difficult to control, requires significant energy expenditures, and may alter the basic flow state of the airfoil. A temperature responsive sensor is located in the airflow over the specified surface of a body and is maintained at a constant temperature. An active thermal isolator is located between this temperature responsive sensor and the specific surface of the body. The total thickness of the isolator and sensor avoid any contamination of the flow. The temperature of this isolator is controlled to reduce conductive heat flow from the temperature responsive sensor to the body. This temperature control includes (1) operating the isolator at the same temperature as the constant temperature of the sensor; and (2) establishing a fixed boundary temperature which is either less than or equal to, or slightly greater than the sensor constant temperature. The present invention accordingly thermally isolates a temperature responsive sensor in an energy efficient, controllable manner while avoiding any contamination of the flow.

  4. Zebrafish homologs of genes within 16p11.2, a genomic region associated with brain disorders, are active during brain development, and include two deletion dosage sensor genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Blaker-Lee

    2012-11-01

    Deletion or duplication of one copy of the human 16p11.2 interval is tightly associated with impaired brain function, including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs, intellectual disability disorder (IDD and other phenotypes, indicating the importance of gene dosage in this copy number variant region (CNV. The core of this CNV includes 25 genes; however, the number of genes that contribute to these phenotypes is not known. Furthermore, genes whose functional levels change with deletion or duplication (termed ‘dosage sensors’, which can associate the CNV with pathologies, have not been identified in this region. Using the zebrafish as a tool, a set of 16p11.2 homologs was identified, primarily on chromosomes 3 and 12. Use of 11 phenotypic assays, spanning the first 5 days of development, demonstrated that this set of genes is highly active, such that 21 out of the 22 homologs tested showed loss-of-function phenotypes. Most genes in this region were required for nervous system development – impacting brain morphology, eye development, axonal density or organization, and motor response. In general, human genes were able to substitute for the fish homolog, demonstrating orthology and suggesting conserved molecular pathways. In a screen for 16p11.2 genes whose function is sensitive to hemizygosity, the aldolase a (aldoaa and kinesin family member 22 (kif22 genes were identified as giving clear phenotypes when RNA levels were reduced by ∼50%, suggesting that these genes are deletion dosage sensors. This study leads to two major findings. The first is that the 16p11.2 region comprises a highly active set of genes, which could present a large genetic target and might explain why multiple brain function, and other, phenotypes are associated with this interval. The second major finding is that there are (at least two genes with deletion dosage sensor properties among the 16p11.2 set, and these could link this CNV to brain disorders such as ASD and IDD.

  5. Activity Recognition Invariant to Sensor Orientation with Wearable Motion Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtman, Aras; Barshan, Billur

    2017-08-09

    Most activity recognition studies that employ wearable sensors assume that the sensors are attached at pre-determined positions and orientations that do not change over time. Since this is not the case in practice, it is of interest to develop wearable systems that operate invariantly to sensor position and orientation. We focus on invariance to sensor orientation and develop two alternative transformations to remove the effect of absolute sensor orientation from the raw sensor data. We test the proposed methodology in activity recognition with four state-of-the-art classifiers using five publicly available datasets containing various types of human activities acquired by different sensor configurations. While the ordinary activity recognition system cannot handle incorrectly oriented sensors, the proposed transformations allow the sensors to be worn at any orientation at a given position on the body, and achieve nearly the same activity recognition performance as the ordinary system for which the sensor units are not rotatable. The proposed techniques can be applied to existing wearable systems without much effort, by simply transforming the time-domain sensor data at the pre-processing stage.

  6. Resource Discovery in Activity-Based Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucur, Doina; Bardram, Jakob

    This paper proposes a service discovery protocol for sensor networks that is specifically tailored for use in humancentered pervasive environments. It uses the high-level concept of computational activities (as logical bundles of data and resources) to give sensors in Activity-Based Sensor Networks...... (ABSNs) knowledge about their usage even at the network layer. ABSN redesigns classical network-level service discovery protocols to include and use this logical structuring of the network for a more practically applicable service discovery scheme. Noting that in practical settings activity-based sensor...

  7. Intruder Activity Analysis under Unreliable Sensor Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tae-Sic Yoo; Humberto E. Garcia

    2007-09-01

    This paper addresses the problem of counting intruder activities within a monitored domain by a sensor network. The deployed sensors are unreliable. We characterize imperfect sensors with misdetection and false-alarm probabilities. We model intruder activities with Markov Chains. A set of Hidden Markov Models (HMM) models the imperfect sensors and intruder activities to be monitored. A novel sequential change detection/isolation algorithm is developed to detect and isolate a change from an HMM representing no intruder activity to another HMM representing some intruder activities. Procedures for estimating the entry time and the trace of intruder activities are developed. A domain monitoring example is given to illustrate the presented concepts and computational procedures.

  8. Physical Activity Recognition from Smartphone Embedded Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prudêncio, João; Aguiar, Ana; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquity of smartphones has motivated efforts to use the embedded sensors to detect various aspects of user context to transparently provide personalized and contextualized services to the user. One relevant piece of context is the physical activity of the smartphone user. In this paper, we...... propose a novel set of features for distinguishing five physical activities using only sensors embedded in the smartphone. Specifically, we introduce features that are normalized using the orientation sensor such that horizontal and vertical movements are explicitly computed. We evaluate a neural network...

  9. Development of SERS active fibre sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Polwart, E

    2002-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is sensitive and selective and when coupled with fibre-optics could potentially produce an effective chemical sensing system. This thesis concerns the development of a single-fibre-based sensor, with an integral SERS-active substrate. A number of different methods for the manufacture of SERS-active surfaces on glass substrates were investigated and compared. The immobilisation of metal nanoparticles on glass functionalised with (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane emerged as a suitable approach for the production of sensors. Substrates prepared by this approach were characterised using UV-visible spectroscopy, electron microscopy and Raman mapping. It was found that exposure of substrates to laser radiation led to a decrease in the signal recorded from adsorbed analytes. This speed of the decrease was shown to depend on the analyte, and the exciting wavelength and power. SERS-active fibre sensors were produced by immobilisation of silver nanoparticles at the distal end of a...

  10. Radiation effects on active pixel sensors (APS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.; David, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Active pixel sensor (APS) is a new generation of image sensors which presents several advantages relatively to charge coupled devices (CCDs) particularly for space applications (APS requires only 1 voltage to operate which reduces considerably current consumption). Irradiation was performed using 60 Co gamma radiation at room temperature and at a dose rate of 150 Gy(Si)/h. 2 types of APS have been tested: photodiode-APS and photoMOS-APS. The results show that photoMOS-APS is more sensitive to radiation effects than photodiode-APS. Important parameters of image sensors like dark currents increase sharply with dose levels. Nevertheless photodiode-APS sensitivity is one hundred time lower than photoMOS-APS sensitivity

  11. Monitoring system including an electronic sensor platform and an interrogation transceiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzel, Robert L.; Sheets, Larry R.

    2003-09-23

    A wireless monitoring system suitable for a wide range of remote data collection applications. The system includes at least one Electronic Sensor Platform (ESP), an Interrogator Transceiver (IT) and a general purpose host computer. The ESP functions as a remote data collector from a number of digital and analog sensors located therein. The host computer provides for data logging, testing, demonstration, installation checkout, and troubleshooting of the system. The IT transmits signals from one or more ESP's to the host computer to the ESP's. The IT host computer may be powered by a common power supply, and each ESP is individually powered by a battery. This monitoring system has an extremely low power consumption which allows remote operation of the ESP for long periods; provides authenticated message traffic over a wireless network; utilizes state-of-health and tamper sensors to ensure that the ESP is secure and undamaged; has robust housing of the ESP suitable for use in radiation environments; and is low in cost. With one base station (host computer and interrogator transceiver), multiple ESP's may be controlled at a single monitoring site.

  12. A militarily fielded thermal neutron activation sensor for landmine detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifford, E.T.H. [Bubble Technology Industries, Chalk River (Canada); McFee, J.E. [Defence R and D Canada-Suffield, Medicine Hat (Canada)], E-mail: john.mcfee@drdc-rddc.gc.ca; Ing, H.; Andrews, H.R.; Tennant, D.; Harper, E. [Bubble Technology Industries, Chalk River (Canada); Faust, A.A. [Defence R and D Canada-Suffield, Medicine Hat (Canada)

    2007-08-21

    The Canadian Department of National Defence has developed a teleoperated, vehicle-mounted, multi-sensor system to detect anti-tank landmines on roads and tracks in peacekeeping operations. A key part of the system is a thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensor which is placed above a suspect location to within a 30 cm radius and confirms the presence of explosives via detection of the 10.835 MeV gamma ray associated with thermal neutron capture on {sup 14}N. The TNA uses a 100{mu}g{sup 252}Cf neutron source surrounded by four 7.62cmx7.62cm NaI(Tl) detectors. The system, consisting of the TNA sensor head, including source, detectors and shielding, the high-rate, fast pulse processing electronics and the data processing methodology are described. Results of experiments to characterize detection performance are also described. The experiments have shown that anti-tank mines buried 10 cm or less can be detected in roughly a minute or less, but deeper mines and mines significantly displaced horizontally take considerably longer time. Mines as deep as 30 cm can be detected for long count times (1000 s). Four TNA detectors are now in service with the Canadian Forces as part of the four multi-sensor systems, making it the first militarily fielded TNA sensor and the first militarily fielded confirmation sensor for landmines. The ability to function well in adverse climatic conditions has been demonstrated, both in trials and operations.

  13. Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Pigorsch, Enrico

    1997-01-01

    This is the 5th edition of the Metra Martech Directory "EUROPEAN CENTRES OF EXPERTISE - SENSORS." The entries represent a survey of European sensors development. The new edition contains 425 detailed profiles of companies and research institutions in 22 countries. This is reflected in the diversity of sensors development programmes described, from sensors for physical parameters to biosensors and intelligent sensor systems. We do not claim that all European organisations developing sensors are included, but this is a good cross section from an invited list of participants. If you see gaps or omissions, or would like your organisation to be included, please send details. The data base invites the formation of effective joint ventures by identifying and providing access to specific areas in which organisations offer collaboration. This issue is recognised to be of great importance and most entrants include details of collaboration offered and sought. We hope the directory on Sensors will help you to find the ri...

  14. Physical Human Activity Recognition Using Wearable Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhat Attal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review of different classification techniques used to recognize human activities from wearable inertial sensor data. Three inertial sensor units were used in this study and were worn by healthy subjects at key points of upper/lower body limbs (chest, right thigh and left ankle. Three main steps describe the activity recognition process: sensors’ placement, data pre-processing and data classification. Four supervised classification techniques namely, k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN, Support Vector Machines (SVM, Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM, and Random Forest (RF as well as three unsupervised classification techniques namely, k-Means, Gaussian mixture models (GMM and Hidden Markov Model (HMM, are compared in terms of correct classification rate, F-measure, recall, precision, and specificity. Raw data and extracted features are used separately as inputs of each classifier. The feature selection is performed using a wrapper approach based on the RF algorithm. Based on our experiments, the results obtained show that the k-NN classifier provides the best performance compared to other supervised classification algorithms, whereas the HMM classifier is the one that gives the best results among unsupervised classification algorithms. This comparison highlights which approach gives better performance in both supervised and unsupervised contexts. It should be noted that the obtained results are limited to the context of this study, which concerns the classification of the main daily living human activities using three wearable accelerometers placed at the chest, right shank and left ankle of the subject.

  15. Active Sensor Configuration Validation for Refrigeration Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Tobias Gybel; Blanke, Mogens; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Major faults in the commissioning phase of refrigeration systems are caused by defects related to sensors. With a number of similar sensors available that do not differ by type but only by spatial location in the plant, interchange of sensors is a common defect. With sensors being used quite...... identify the sensor configuration. The method as such is generic and is shown in the paper to work convincingly on refrigeration systems with significant nonlinear behaviors...

  16. Active Pixel Sensors: Are CCD's Dinosaurs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD's) are presently the technology of choice for most imaging applications. In the 23 years since their invention in 1970, they have evolved to a sophisticated level of performance. However, as with all technologies, we can be certain that they will be supplanted someday. In this paper, the Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology is explored as a possible successor to the CCD. An active pixel is defined as a detector array technology that has at least one active transistor within the pixel unit cell. The APS eliminates the need for nearly perfect charge transfer -- the Achilles' heel of CCDs. This perfect charge transfer makes CCD's radiation 'soft,' difficult to use under low light conditions, difficult to manufacture in large array sizes, difficult to integrate with on-chip electronics, difficult to use at low temperatures, difficult to use at high frame rates, and difficult to manufacture in non-silicon materials that extend wavelength response.

  17. Towards Activity Context using Software Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Taj Pathan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Service-Oriented Computing delivers the promise of configuring and reconfiguring software systems to address user's needs in a dynamic way. Context-aware computing promises to capture the user's needs and hence the requirements they have on systems. The marriage of both can deliver ad-hoc software solutions relevant to the user in the most current fashion. However, here it is a key to gather information on the users' activity (that is what they are doing. Traditionally any context sensing was conducted with hardware sensors. However, software can also play the same role and in some situations will be more useful to sense the activity of the user. Furthermore they can make use of the fact that Service-oriented systems exchange information through standard protocols. In this paper we discuss our proposed approach to sense the activity of the user making use of software.

  18. Simulation tool for optical design of PET detector modules including scintillator material and sensor array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jatekos, B.; Erdei, G.; Lorincz, E. [Budapest Univ. of Technology and Economics, Dept. of Atomic Physics, Budafoki ut 8, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-07-01

    The appearance of single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) in the field of PET detector modules made it necessary to apply more complex optical design methods to refine the performance of such assemblies. We developed a combined simulation tool that is capable to model complex detector structures including scintillation material, light guide, light collection optics and sensor, correctly taking into account the statistical behavior of emission of scintillation light and its absorbance in SPADs. As a validation we compared simulation results obtained by our software and another optical design program. Calculations were performed for a simple PET detector arrangement used for testing purposes. According to the results, deviation of center of gravity coordinates between the two simulations is 0.0195 mm, the average ratio of total counts 1.0052. We investigated the error resulting from finite sampling in wavelength space and we found that 20 nm pitch is sufficient for the simulation in case of the given spectral dependencies. (authors)

  19. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomu Luo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process.

  20. A method to determine validity and reliability of activity sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerema, Simone Theresa; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2013-01-01

    METHOD Four sensors were securely fastened to a mechanical oscillator (Vibration Exciter, type 4809, Brüel & Kjær) and moved at various frequencies (6.67Hz; 13.45Hz; 19.88Hz) within the range of human physical activity. For each of the three sensor axes, the sensors were simultaneously moved for

  1. First Results from Cherwell, a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor for Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Nooney, Tamsin; Borri, Marcello; Crooks, Jamie; Headspith, Jon; Inguglia, Gianluca; Kolya, Scott; Lazarus, Ian; Lemmon, Roy; Mylroie-Smith, James; Turchetta, Renato; Velthuis, Jaap; Wilson, Fergus

    2014-01-01

    Cherwell is a CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) developed for digital calorimetry and charged particle tracking applications. Here, we outline the initial tests carried out to charac- terise the performance of Cherwell, give details of the test beam carried out at CERN and include the first results from this analysis. Three variations of the chip were tested; Type A, a high re- sistivity, low noise sensor, Type B, a standard resisivity, low noise sensor and Type C, a standard resistivity, standard noise sensor. The sensors yield an average RMS noise value per pixel of 9.6 e

  2. Motion Sensor Use for Physical Activity Data: Methodological Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Margaret; Grey, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Physical inactivity continues to be a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and only one half of adults in the United States meet physical activity (PA) goals. PA data are often collected for surveillance or for measuring change after an intervention. One of the challenges in PA research is quantifying exactly how much and what type of PA is taking place-especially because self-report instruments have inconsistent validity. The purpose is to review the elements to consider when collecting PA data via motion sensors, including the difference between PA and exercise, type of data to collect, choosing the device, length of time to monitor PA, instructions to the participants, and interpretation of the data. The current literature on motion sensor research was reviewed and synthesized to summarize relevant considerations when using a motion sensor to collect PA data. Exercise is a division of PA that is structured, planned, and repetitive. Pedometer data include steps taken and calculated distance and energy expenditure. Accelerometer data include activity counts and intensity. The device chosen depends on desired data, cost, validity, and ease of use. Reactivity to the device may influence the duration of data collection. Instructions to participants may vary depending on the purpose of the study. Experts suggest pedometer data be reported as steps-because that is the direct output-and distance traveled and energy expenditure are estimated values. Accelerometer count data may be analyzed to provide information on time spent in moderate or vigorous activity. Thoughtful decision making about PA data collection using motion sensor devices is needed to advance nursing science.

  3. Predictive simulations and optimization of nanowire field-effect PSA sensors including screening

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgartner, Stefan

    2013-05-03

    We apply our self-consistent PDE model for the electrical response of field-effect sensors to the 3D simulation of nanowire PSA (prostate-specific antigen) sensors. The charge concentration in the biofunctionalized boundary layer at the semiconductor-electrolyte interface is calculated using the propka algorithm, and the screening of the biomolecules by the free ions in the liquid is modeled by a sensitivity factor. This comprehensive approach yields excellent agreement with experimental current-voltage characteristics without any fitting parameters. Having verified the numerical model in this manner, we study the sensitivity of nanowire PSA sensors by changing device parameters, making it possible to optimize the devices and revealing the attributes of the optimal field-effect sensor. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  4. Everglades National Park Including Biscayne National Park. Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruehrwein, Dick

    Intended to help elementary school children learn about the resources of the Everglades and Biscayne National Parks, this activity book includes information, puzzles, games, and quizzes. The booklet deals with concepts related to: (1) the seasons; (2) fire ecology; (3) water; (4) fish; (5) mammals; (6) mosquitos; (7) birds; (8) venomous snakes;…

  5. Wearable Wide-Range Strain Sensors Based on Ionic Liquids and Monitoring of Human Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Hui; Wang, Feng-Xia; Li, Jia-Jia; Peng, Hong-Dan; Yan, Jing-Hui; Pan, Ge-Bo

    2017-01-01

    Wearable sensors for detection of human activities have encouraged the development of highly elastic sensors. In particular, to capture subtle and large-scale body motion, stretchable and wide-range strain sensors are highly desired, but still a challenge. Herein, a highly stretchable and transparent stain sensor based on ionic liquids and elastic polymer has been developed. The as-obtained sensor exhibits impressive stretchability with wide-range strain (from 0.1% to 400%), good bending properties and high sensitivity, whose gauge factor can reach 7.9. Importantly, the sensors show excellent biological compatibility and succeed in monitoring the diverse human activities ranging from the complex large-scale multidimensional motions to subtle signals, including wrist, finger and elbow joint bending, finger touch, breath, speech, swallow behavior and pulse wave. PMID:29135928

  6. Wearable Wide-Range Strain Sensors Based on Ionic Liquids and Monitoring of Human Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Hui Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Wearable sensors for detection of human activities have encouraged the development of highly elastic sensors. In particular, to capture subtle and large-scale body motion, stretchable and wide-range strain sensors are highly desired, but still a challenge. Herein, a highly stretchable and transparent stain sensor based on ionic liquids and elastic polymer has been developed. The as-obtained sensor exhibits impressive stretchability with wide-range strain (from 0.1% to 400%, good bending properties and high sensitivity, whose gauge factor can reach 7.9. Importantly, the sensors show excellent biological compatibility and succeed in monitoring the diverse human activities ranging from the complex large-scale multidimensional motions to subtle signals, including wrist, finger and elbow joint bending, finger touch, breath, speech, swallow behavior and pulse wave.

  7. Evaluation of accelerometer based multi-sensor versus single-sensor activity recognition systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Bourke, A K; Nelson, John

    2014-06-01

    Physical activity has a positive impact on people's well-being and it had been shown to decrease the occurrence of chronic diseases in the older adult population. To date, a substantial amount of research studies exist, which focus on activity recognition using inertial sensors. Many of these studies adopt a single sensor approach and focus on proposing novel features combined with complex classifiers to improve the overall recognition accuracy. In addition, the implementation of the advanced feature extraction algorithms and the complex classifiers exceed the computing ability of most current wearable sensor platforms. This paper proposes a method to adopt multiple sensors on distributed body locations to overcome this problem. The objective of the proposed system is to achieve higher recognition accuracy with "light-weight" signal processing algorithms, which run on a distributed computing based sensor system comprised of computationally efficient nodes. For analysing and evaluating the multi-sensor system, eight subjects were recruited to perform eight normal scripted activities in different life scenarios, each repeated three times. Thus a total of 192 activities were recorded resulting in 864 separate annotated activity states. The methods for designing such a multi-sensor system required consideration of the following: signal pre-processing algorithms, sampling rate, feature selection and classifier selection. Each has been investigated and the most appropriate approach is selected to achieve a trade-off between recognition accuracy and computing execution time. A comparison of six different systems, which employ single or multiple sensors, is presented. The experimental results illustrate that the proposed multi-sensor system can achieve an overall recognition accuracy of 96.4% by adopting the mean and variance features, using the Decision Tree classifier. The results demonstrate that elaborate classifiers and feature sets are not required to achieve high

  8. Active polymer materials for optical fiber CO2 sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysokiński, Karol; Filipowicz, Marta; Stańczyk, Tomasz; Lipiński, Stanisław; Napierała, Marek; Murawski, Michał; Nasiłowski, Tomasz

    2017-04-01

    CO2 optical fiber sensors based on polymer active materials are presented in this paper. Ethyl cellulose was proven to be a good candidate for a matrix material of the sensor, since it gives porous, thick and very sensitive layers. Low-cost sensors based on polymer optical fibers have been elaborated. Sensors have been examined for their sensitivity to CO2, temperature and humidity. Response time during cyclic exposures to CO2 have been also determined. Special layers exhibiting irreversible change of color during exposure to carbon dioxide have been developed. They have been verified for a possible use in smart food packaging.

  9. Measuring glottal activity during voiced speech using a tuned electromagnetic resonating collar sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D. R., III; Keenaghan, K.; Desimini, S.

    2005-11-01

    Non-acoustic speech sensors can be employed to obtain measurements of one or more aspects of the speech production process, such as glottal activity, even in the presence of background noise. These sensors have a long history of clinical applications and have also recently been applied to the problem of denoising speech signals recorded in acoustically noisy environments (Ng et al 2000 Proc. Int. Conf. on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing (ICASSP) (Istanbul, Turkey) vol 1, pp 229-32). Recently, researchers developed a new non-acoustic speech sensor based primarily on a tuned electromagnetic resonator collar (TERC) (Brown et al 2004 Meas. Sci. Technol. 15 1291). The TERC sensor measures glottal activity by sensing small changes in the dielectric properties of the glottis that result from voiced speech. This paper builds on the seminal work in Brown et al (2004). The primary contributions of this paper are (i) a description of a new single-mode TERC sensor design addressing the comfort and complexity issues of the original sensor, (ii) a complete description of new external interface systems used to obtain long-duration recordings from the TERC sensor and (iii) more extensive experimental results and analysis for the single-mode TERC sensor including spectrograms of speech containing both voiced and unvoiced speech segments in quiet and acoustically noisy environments. The experimental results demonstrate that the single-mode TERC sensor is able to detect glottal activity up to the fourth harmonic and is also insensitive to acoustic background noise.

  10. Planar optical waveguide based sandwich assay sensors and processes for the detection of biological targets including early detection of cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jennifer S [Santa Fe, NM; Swanson, Basil I [Los Alamos, NM; Shively, John E [Arcadia, CA; Li, Lin [Monrovia, CA

    2009-06-02

    An assay element is described including recognition ligands adapted for binding to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) bound to a film on a single mode planar optical waveguide, the film from the group of a membrane, a polymerized bilayer membrane, and a self-assembled monolayer containing polyethylene glycol or polypropylene glycol groups therein and an assay process for detecting the presence of CEA is described including injecting a possible CEA-containing sample into a sensor cell including the assay element, maintaining the sample within the sensor cell for time sufficient for binding to occur between CEA present within the sample and the recognition ligands, injecting a solution including a reporter ligand into the sensor cell; and, interrogating the sample within the sensor cell with excitation light from the waveguide, the excitation light provided by an evanescent field of the single mode penetrating into the biological target-containing sample to a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide thereby exciting any bound reporter ligand within a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide and resulting in a detectable signal.

  11. Recognizing Multi-user Activities using Body Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Tao; Wang, Liang; Chen, Hanhua

    2011-01-01

    activity classes of data—for building activity models and design a scalable, noise-resistant, Emerging Pattern based Multi-user Activity Recognizer (epMAR) to recognize both single- and multi-user activities. We develop a multi-modal, wireless body sensor network for collecting real-world traces in a smart......The advances of wireless networking and sensor technology open up an interesting opportunity to infer human activities in a smart home environment. Existing work in this paradigm focuses mainly on recognizing activities of a single user. In this work, we address the fundamental problem...... of recognizing activities of multiple users using a wireless body sensor network, and propose a scalable pattern mining approach to recognize both single- and multi-user activities in a unified framework. We exploit Emerging Pattern—a discriminative knowledge pattern which describes significant changes among...

  12. CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Technology and Reliability Characterization Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan; Guertin, Steven M.; Pain, Bedabrata; Kayaii, Sammy

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the technology, design features and reliability characterization methodology of a CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. Both overall chip reliability and pixel reliability are projected for the imagers.

  13. Pulse-driven magnetoimpedance sensor detection of cardiac magnetic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsuke Nakayama

    Full Text Available This study sought to establish a convenient method for detecting biomagnetic activity in the heart. Electrical activity of the heart simultaneously induces a magnetic field. Detection of this magnetic activity will enable non-contact, noninvasive evaluation to be made. We improved the sensitivity of a pulse-driven magnetoimpedance (PMI sensor, which is used as an electric compass in mobile phones and as a motion sensor of the operation handle in computer games, toward a pico-Tesla (pT level, and measured magnetic fields on the surface of the thoracic wall in humans. The changes in magnetic field detected by this sensor synchronized with the electric activity of the electrocardiogram (ECG. The shape of the magnetic wave was largely altered by shifting the sensor position within 20 mm in parallel and/or perpendicular to the thoracic wall. The magnetic activity was maximal in the 4th intercostals near the center of the sterna. Furthermore, averaging the magnetic activity at 15 mm in the distance between the thoracic wall and the sensor demonstrated magnetic waves mimicking the P wave and QRS complex. The present study shows the application of PMI sensor in detecting cardiac magnetic activity in several healthy subjects, and suggests future applications of this technology in medicine and biology.

  14. The Sandia MEMS passive shock sensor : FY07 maturation activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houston, Jack E.; Blecke, Jill; Mitchell, John Anthony; Wittwer, Jonathan W.; Crowson, Douglas A.; Clemens, Rebecca C.; Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Epp, David S.; Baker, Michael Sean

    2008-08-01

    This report describes activities conducted in FY07 to mature the MEMS passive shock sensor. The first chapter of the report provides motivation and background on activities that are described in detail in later chapters. The second chapter discusses concepts that are important for integrating the MEMS passive shock sensor into a system. Following these two introductory chapters, the report details modeling and design efforts, packaging, failure analysis and testing and validation. At the end of FY07, the MEMS passive shock sensor was at TRL 4.

  15. Molecular detection by active Fano-sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Yifei; Guo, Zhongyi [School of Computer and Information, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, 230009 (China)

    2017-04-15

    The optical properties and sensing performances of the molecular sensors based on plasmonic Fano-resonance (PFR) nanostructures have been numerically investigated in detail. The on-resonance sensor, in which the Fano-resonance position is overlapping with the absorption-band of the detected molecules perfectly, reveals a powerful ability to detect the molecules with a low concentration or thin thickness. By the bias-modulation of a single-layer graphene, the Fano-resonance position of the nanostructures can be tuned effectively. On being modulated properly, the PFR sensor shows an ultrahigh performance because of the unprecedentedly high overlap of the Fano-resonance position with the absorption-band of molecules, which is enabling superior signal strength in the molecular detections based on their vibrational fingerprints. Our proposed strategy may enable the development of dynamic sensors and open exciting prospects for bio-sensing. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. MAPLE activities and applications in gas sensors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Remsa, Jan; Kocourek, Tomáš; Kubešová, B.; Schůrek, J.; Myslík, V.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 3 (2011), 643-649 ISSN 0947-8396 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : MAPLE * gas sensors * biomedicine * thin films Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.630, year: 2011

  17. Thickness characterisation of oil spills using active microwave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, Michael; Shuchman, Robert A.; Kletzli, D. W., Jr.; Johannessen, Johnny A.; Digranes, Gunar; Berg, Sverre; Dalland, Kjell

    1994-12-01

    Oil thickness is a crucial parameter in the characterization of oil spills for environmental impact. The feasibility of using active microwave sensors to measure thickness was addressed in a series of microwave scatterometer experiments performed by Simrad Marine A/S in a wave tank at the Nansen Environmental Remote Sensing Center. The thickness of the oil layer was maintained at levels similar to the thick part of an oil spill (0.1 - 1 mm). The measurements showed the capability of active microwave sensors to measure oil spill thickness when the oil type is known. In addition to thickness characterization, the experiment studied the effects of oil viscosity, incidence angle, wind speed, wind angle, microwave frequency, and polarization. The backscatter contrast was observed to be greater for lower incidence angles which indicates that the ERS-1 viewing geometry is optimum for the detection and measurement of thick oil slicks. A thickness-dependent backscatter model was developed which included the effects of oil viscosity, composite surface effects, and oil-water reflectivities. The model viscous effects saturated when the oil thickness was greater than the viscous boundary layer thickness. This explained the observed C-VV backscatter contrast saturation for low viscosity diesel oil at thicknesses greater than 0.15 mm. The model predicted contrast saturation at greater thicknesses for the higher viscosity oils. The data showed this trend but the measurements did not extend to thicknesses which tested the model completely.

  18. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): Developments and future outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchetta, R.; Fant, A.; Gasiorek, P.; Esbrand, C.; Griffiths, J. A.; Metaxas, M. G.; Royle, G. J.; Speller, R.; Venanzi, C.; van der Stelt, P. F.; Verheij, H.; Li, G.; Theodoridis, S.; Georgiou, H.; Cavouras, D.; Hall, G.; Noy, M.; Jones, J.; Leaver, J.; Machin, D.; Greenwood, S.; Khaleeq, M.; Schulerud, H.; Østby, J. M.; Triantis, F.; Asimidis, A.; Bolanakis, D.; Manthos, N.; Longo, R.; Bergamaschi, A.

    2007-12-01

    Re-invented in the early 1990s, on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging devices, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started with low-end applications, for example web-cams, and is slowly pervading the high-end applications, for example in prosumer digital cameras. Higher specifications are required for scientific applications: very low noise, high speed, high dynamic range, large format and radiation hardness are some of these requirements. This paper will present a brief overview of the CMOS Image Sensor technology and of the requirements for scientific applications. As an example, a sensor for X-ray imaging will be presented. This sensor was developed within a European FP6 Consortium, intelligent imaging sensors (I-ImaS).

  19. Better physical activity classification using smartphone acceleration sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Muhammad; Bilal, Mohsin; Kattan, Ahmed; Ahamed, S Iqbal

    2014-09-01

    Obesity is becoming one of the serious problems for the health of worldwide population. Social interactions on mobile phones and computers via internet through social e-networks are one of the major causes of lack of physical activities. For the health specialist, it is important to track the record of physical activities of the obese or overweight patients to supervise weight loss control. In this study, acceleration sensor present in the smartphone is used to monitor the physical activity of the user. Physical activities including Walking, Jogging, Sitting, Standing, Walking upstairs and Walking downstairs are classified. Time domain features are extracted from the acceleration data recorded by smartphone during different physical activities. Time and space complexity of the whole framework is done by optimal feature subset selection and pruning of instances. Classification results of six physical activities are reported in this paper. Using simple time domain features, 99 % classification accuracy is achieved. Furthermore, attributes subset selection is used to remove the redundant features and to minimize the time complexity of the algorithm. A subset of 30 features produced more than 98 % classification accuracy for the six physical activities.

  20. Developing sensor activity relationships for the JPL electronic nose sensors using molecular modeling and QSAR techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevade, A. V.; Ryan, M. A.; Homer, M. L.; Jewell, A. D.; Zhou, H.; Manatt, K.; Kisor, A. K.

    2005-01-01

    We report a Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) study using Genetic Function Approximations (GFA) to describe the polymer-carbon composite sensor activities in the JPL Electronic Nose, when exposed to chemical vapors at parts-per-million concentration levels.

  1. A novel bicistronic sensor vector for detecting caspase-3 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagner, Tatyana; Mouravlev, Alexandre; Young, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is involved in pathological cell death of a wide range of human diseases. One of the most important biochemical markers of apoptosis is activation of caspase-3. Ability to detect caspase-3 activation early in the pathological process is important for determining the timing for interfering with apoptosis initiation and prevention of cell damage. Techniques allowing detection of caspase-3 activity at a single cell level show increased sensitivity, compared to biochemical assays; therefore, we developed a novel bicistronic caspase-3 sensor vector enabling detection of caspase-3 activity in individual cells. We employed green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter for caspase-3 activation in our constructs and assessed the functionality of the generated constructs in transiently transfected Neuro2A and HEK293 cells under basal conditions and following application of okadaic acid (OA) or staurosporine (STS) to induce apoptosis. To ensure responsiveness of the new sensor vector to active caspase-3, we co-transfected the sensor with plasmid(s) overexpressing active caspase-3 and quantified GFP fluorescence using a plate reader. We observed an increase in GFP expression in cells transfected with the new bicistronic caspase-3 sensor in response to both OA and STS. We also showed a significant increase in GFP fluorescence intensity in cells co-expressing the sensor with the plasmid(s) encoding active caspase-3. We generated a novel bicistronic caspase-3 sensor vector which relies on a transcription factor/response element system. The obtained sensor combines high sensitivity of the single cell level detection with the possibility of automated quantification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Monolithic carbon structures including suspended single nanowires and nanomeshes as a sensor platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yeongjin; Heo, Jeong-Il; Madou, Marc; Shin, Heungjoo

    2013-11-20

    With the development of nanomaterial-based nanodevices, it became inevitable to develop cost-effective and simple nanofabrication technologies enabling the formation of nanomaterial assembly in a controllable manner. Herein, we present suspended monolithic carbon single nanowires and nanomeshes bridging two bulk carbon posts, fabricated in a designed manner using two successive UV exposure steps and a single pyrolysis step. The pyrolysis step is accompanied with a significant volume reduction, resulting in the shrinkage of micro-sized photoresist structures into nanoscale carbon structures. Even with the significant elongation of the suspended carbon nanowire induced by the volume reduction of the bulk carbon posts, the resultant tensional stress along the nanowire is not significant but grows along the wire thickness; this tensional stress gradient and the bent supports of the bridge-like carbon nanowire enhance structural robustness and alleviate the stiction problem that suspended nanostructures frequently experience. The feasibility of the suspended carbon nanostructures as a sensor platform was demonstrated by testing its electrochemical behavior, conductivity-temperature relationship, and hydrogen gas sensing capability.

  3. Phosphatase activity tunes two-component system sensor detection threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Brian P; Palanki, Rohan; Dyulgyarov, Nikola; Hartsough, Lucas A; Tabor, Jeffrey J

    2018-04-12

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are the largest family of multi-step signal transduction pathways in biology, and a major source of sensors for biotechnology. However, the input concentrations to which biosensors respond are often mismatched with application requirements. Here, we utilize a mathematical model to show that TCS detection thresholds increase with the phosphatase activity of the sensor histidine kinase. We experimentally validate this result in engineered Bacillus subtilis nitrate and E. coli aspartate TCS sensors by tuning their detection threshold up to two orders of magnitude. We go on to apply our TCS tuning method to recently described tetrathionate and thiosulfate sensors by mutating a widely conserved residue previously shown to impact phosphatase activity. Finally, we apply TCS tuning to engineer B. subtilis to sense and report a wide range of fertilizer concentrations in soil. This work will enable the engineering of tailor-made biosensors for diverse synthetic biology applications.

  4. Adhesive disbond detection using piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, William; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2015-04-01

    The aerospace industry continues to increase the use of adhesives for structural bonding due to the increased joint efficiency (reduced weight), even distribution of the load path and decreases in stress concentrations. However, the limited techniques for verifying the strength of adhesive bonds has reduced its use on primary structures and requires an intensive inspection schedule. This paper discusses a potential structural health monitoring (SHM) technique for the detection of disbonds through the in situ inspection of adhesive joints. This is achieved through the use of piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS), thin unobtrusive sensors which are permanently bonded to the aircraft structure. The detection method discussed in this study is electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS), a local vibration method. This method detects disbonds from the change in the mechanical impedance of the structure surrounding the disbond. This paper will discuss how predictive modeling can provide valuable insight into the inspection method, and provide better results than empirical methods alone. The inspection scheme was evaluated using the finite element method, and the results were verified experimentally using a large aluminum test article, and included both pristine and disbond coupons.

  5. Annotating smart environment sensor data for activity learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewcyzk, S; Dwan, K; Minor, B; Swedlove, B; Cook, D

    2009-01-01

    The pervasive sensing technologies found in smart homes offer unprecedented opportunities for providing health monitoring and assistance to individuals experiencing difficulties living independently at home. In order to monitor the functional health of smart home residents, we need to design technologies that recognize and track the activities that people perform at home. Machine learning techniques can perform this task, but the software algorithms rely upon large amounts of sample data that is correctly labeled with the corresponding activity. Labeling, or annotating, sensor data with the corresponding activity can be time consuming, may require input from the smart home resident, and is often inaccurate. Therefore, in this paper we investigate four alternative mechanisms for annotating sensor data with a corresponding activity label. We evaluate the alternative methods along the dimensions of annotation time, resident burden, and accuracy using sensor data collected in a real smart apartment.

  6. Active Design Method for the Static Characteristics of a Piezoelectric Six-Axis Force/Torque Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jun; Li, Min; Qin, Lan; Liu, Jingcheng

    2014-01-01

    To address the bottleneck issues of an elastic-style six-axis force/torque sensor (six-axis force sensor), this work proposes a no-elastic piezoelectric six-axis force sensor. The operating principle of the piezoelectric six-axis force sensor is analyzed, and a structural model is constructed. The static-active design theory of the piezoelectric six-axis force sensor is established, including a static analytical/mathematical model and numerical simulation model (finite element model). A piezo...

  7. Compositions of graphene materials with metal nanostructures and microstructures and methods of making and using including pressure sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ye

    2017-01-26

    Composition comprising at least one graphene material and at least one metal. The metal can be in the form of nanoparticles as well as microflakes, including single crystal microflakes. The metal can be intercalated in the graphene sheets. The composition has high conductivity and flexibility. The composition can be made by a one-pot synthesis in which a graphene material precursor is converted to the graphene material, and the metal precursor is converted to the metal. A reducing solvent or dispersant such as NMP can be used. Devices made from the composition include a pressure sensor which has high sensitivity. Two two- dimension materials can be combined to form a hybrid material.

  8. Active sensing system with in situ adjustable sensor morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurzaman, Surya G; Culha, Utku; Brodbeck, Luzius; Wang, Liyu; Iida, Fumiya

    2013-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of sensors in engineering systems like robots and automation systems, the common paradigm is to have fixed sensor morphology tailored to fulfill a specific application. On the other hand, robotic systems are expected to operate in ever more uncertain environments. In order to cope with the challenge, it is worthy of note that biological systems show the importance of suitable sensor morphology and active sensing capability to handle different kinds of sensing tasks with particular requirements. This paper presents a robotics active sensing system which is able to adjust its sensor morphology in situ in order to sense different physical quantities with desirable sensing characteristics. The approach taken is to use thermoplastic adhesive material, i.e. Hot Melt Adhesive (HMA). It will be shown that the thermoplastic and thermoadhesive nature of HMA enables the system to repeatedly fabricate, attach and detach mechanical structures with a variety of shape and size to the robot end effector for sensing purposes. Via active sensing capability, the robotic system utilizes the structure to physically probe an unknown target object with suitable motion and transduce the arising physical stimuli into information usable by a camera as its only built-in sensor. The efficacy of the proposed system is verified based on two results. Firstly, it is confirmed that suitable sensor morphology and active sensing capability enables the system to sense different physical quantities, i.e. softness and temperature, with desirable sensing characteristics. Secondly, given tasks of discriminating two visually indistinguishable objects with respect to softness and temperature, it is confirmed that the proposed robotic system is able to autonomously accomplish them. The way the results motivate new research directions which focus on in situ adjustment of sensor morphology will also be discussed.

  9. Active sensing system with in situ adjustable sensor morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya G Nurzaman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the widespread use of sensors in engineering systems like robots and automation systems, the common paradigm is to have fixed sensor morphology tailored to fulfill a specific application. On the other hand, robotic systems are expected to operate in ever more uncertain environments. In order to cope with the challenge, it is worthy of note that biological systems show the importance of suitable sensor morphology and active sensing capability to handle different kinds of sensing tasks with particular requirements. METHODOLOGY: This paper presents a robotics active sensing system which is able to adjust its sensor morphology in situ in order to sense different physical quantities with desirable sensing characteristics. The approach taken is to use thermoplastic adhesive material, i.e. Hot Melt Adhesive (HMA. It will be shown that the thermoplastic and thermoadhesive nature of HMA enables the system to repeatedly fabricate, attach and detach mechanical structures with a variety of shape and size to the robot end effector for sensing purposes. Via active sensing capability, the robotic system utilizes the structure to physically probe an unknown target object with suitable motion and transduce the arising physical stimuli into information usable by a camera as its only built-in sensor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The efficacy of the proposed system is verified based on two results. Firstly, it is confirmed that suitable sensor morphology and active sensing capability enables the system to sense different physical quantities, i.e. softness and temperature, with desirable sensing characteristics. Secondly, given tasks of discriminating two visually indistinguishable objects with respect to softness and temperature, it is confirmed that the proposed robotic system is able to autonomously accomplish them. The way the results motivate new research directions which focus on in situ adjustment of sensor morphology will also be discussed.

  10. Development of ERK Activity Sensor, an in vitro, FRET-based sensor of Extracellular Regulated Kinase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberola-Ila José

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Study of ERK activation has thus far relied on biochemical assays that are limited to the use of phospho-specific antibodies and radioactivity in vitro, and analysis of whole cell populations in vivo. As with many systems, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET can be utilized to make highly sensitive detectors of molecular activity. Here we introduce FRET-based ERK Activity Sensors, which utilize variants of Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein fused by an ERK-specific peptide linker to detect ERK2 activity. Results ERK Activity Sensors display varying changes in FRET upon phosphorylation by active ERK2 in vitro depending on the composition of ERK-specific peptide linker sequences derived from known in vivo ERK targets, Ets1 and Elk1. Analysis of point mutations reveals specific residues involved in ERK binding and phosphorylation of ERK Activity Sensor 3. ERK2 also shows high in vitro specificity for these sensors over two other major MAP Kinases, p38 and pSAPK/JNK. Conclusion EAS's are a convenient, non-radioactive alternative to study ERK dynamics in vitro. They can be utilized to study ERK activity in real-time. This new technology can be applied to studying ERK kinetics in vitro, analysis of ERK activity in whole cell extracts, and high-throughput screening technologies.

  11. Wideband CMOS low noise amplifier including an active balun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaakmeer, S.C.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Leenaerts, D.M.W.; Nauta, Bram

    2007-01-01

    An inductorless LNA with active balun is proposed for multi-standard radio applications between 100MHz and 6GHz [1]. It exploits a combination of a common-gate (CG) stage and an common-source (CS) stage with replica biasing to maximize balanced operation, while simultaneously canceling the noise and

  12. Active Magnetic Shielding with magneto-impedance sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Yasuo; Yanase, Shunji; Sugimoto, Noriko

    2002-01-01

    Active shielding effect was examined in a negative feedback circuit system consisting of a magneto-impedance effective sensor, an amplifier and a canceling coil to compensate external magnetic field noise. The phase difference between the input and output sensor signals in a loop was less than 90 degree up to 20,000 Hz. An excellent frequency characteristic of active shielding effectiveness, 48 dB was obtained for the external magnetic field at the frequency of 0 - 2,000 Hz. (Author)

  13. Monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) in a VLSI CMOS technology

    CERN Document Server

    Turchetta, R; Manolopoulos, S; Tyndel, M; Allport, P P; Bates, R; O'Shea, V; Hall, G; Raymond, M

    2003-01-01

    Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) designed in a standard VLSI CMOS technology have recently been proposed as a compact pixel detector for the detection of high-energy charged particle in vertex/tracking applications. MAPS, also named CMOS sensors, are already extensively used in visible light applications. With respect to other competing imaging technologies, CMOS sensors have several potential advantages in terms of low cost, low power, lower noise at higher speed, random access of pixels which allows windowing of region of interest, ability to integrate several functions on the same chip. This brings altogether to the concept of 'camera-on-a-chip'. In this paper, we review the use of CMOS sensors for particle physics and we analyse their performances in term of the efficiency (fill factor), signal generation, noise, readout speed and sensor area. In most of high-energy physics applications, data reduction is needed in the sensor at an early stage of the data processing before transfer of the data to ta...

  14. Information for Teachers (Including Classroom Activities), Skylab Student Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This program is intended to directly involve the educational community in space experiments, many of which can be related to existing curricula. Included in this first packet are: 1) a brief description of the Skylab Program and the National Science Teachers Association-National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NSTA-NASA) Skylab Student…

  15. New sensor for study of ULF magnetic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marusenkov, Andriy; Dudkin, Fedir; Pronenko, Vira; Korepanov, Valery

    2010-05-01

    Ultra low frequency (ULF) variations (0.001-3 Hz) of natural magnetic field are very important for ground study of magnetospheric and ionospheric magnetohydrodynamic waves and solar-terrestrial interaction. Besides it a lithospheric ULF magnetic activity is recently considered as very promising candidate for application to short-time earthquake (EQ) forecasting. Present progress in spectral analysis methods and data processing instrumentation allows studying of signal fine structure almost in real-time operation condition, which is of great importance, particularly, for short-time prediction problem. Usually the lithospheric ULF EQ magnetic precursors are much weaker than magnetospheric signals and their frequency ranges are completely overlapped. At present for measurement of ULF magnetic field variations the magnetometers with fluxgate and induction sensors are used. Fluxgate sensors are very compact (pencil-shaped form at length ~ 3 cm) with SND in ULF band about 10-500 pT/Hz0.5 (here and further a maximum SND value relates to a lower part of frequency range). ULF induction (or search-coil) sensors usually have comparatively large dimensions (length 0.8-1.2 m, diameter 10-15 cm) and weight (few kilograms) but essentially lower SND (about 0.1-200 pT/Hz0.5). At 3-component magnetic field measurement it is necessary to provide spacing between them about 1-2 m for avoiding mutual influence. This requirement creates problems caused by non-rigidity of 3-sensors construction and their space instability relatively ground surface (or horizontal plane). In addition, for such a long sensor a ratio of length/diameter is big enough, what leads to increased sensor sensitivity to variety mechanical deformations of sensor body. These factors cause additional noise appearance due to induction effect in the Earth's magnetic field what creates heavily recognized artefacts at signal processing. Simple calculations show that sensitivity to changing of sensor axis direction can

  16. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): developments and future outlook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turchetta, R.; Fant, A.; Gasiorek, P.; Esbrand, C.; Griffiths, J.A.; Metaxas, M.G.; Royle, G.J.; Speller, R.; Venanzi, C.; van der Stelt, P.F.; Verheij, H.; Li, G.; Theodoridis, S.; Georgiou, H.; Cavouras, D.; Hall, G.; Noy, M.; Jones, J.; Leaver, J.; Machin, D.; Greenwood, S.; Khaleeq, M.; Schulerud, H.; Østby, J.M.; Triantis, F.; Asimidis, A.; Bolanakis, D.; Manthos, N.; Longo, R.; Bergamaschi, A.

    2007-01-01

    Re-invented in the early 1990s, on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging devices, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started with low-end

  17. Simultaneous Indoor Tracking and Activity Recognition Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomu Luo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Indoor human tracking and activity recognition are fundamental yet coherent problems for ambient assistive living. In this paper, we propose a method to address these two critical issues simultaneously. We construct a wireless sensor network (WSN, and the sensor nodes within WSN consist of pyroelectric infrared (PIR sensor arrays. To capture the tempo-spatial information of the human target, the field of view (FOV of each PIR sensor is modulated by masks. A modified partial filter algorithm is utilized to decode the location of the human target. To exploit the synergy between the location and activity, we design a two-layer random forest (RF classifier. The initial activity recognition result of the first layer is refined by the second layer RF by incorporating various effective features. We conducted experiments in a mock apartment. The mean localization error of our system is about 0.85 m. For five kinds of daily activities, the mean accuracy for 10-fold cross-validation is above 92%. The encouraging results indicate the effectiveness of our system.

  18. Fusion of Smartphone Motion Sensors for Physical Activity Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shoaib, M.; Bosch, S.; Durmaz, O.; Scholten, Johan; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2014-01-01

    For physical activity recognition, smartphone sensors, such as an accelerometer and a gyroscope, are being utilized in many research studies. So far, particularly, the accelerometer has been extensively studied. In a few recent studies, a combination of a gyroscope, a magnetometer (in a supporting

  19. Towards physical activity recognition using smartphone sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shoaib, M.; Scholten, Johan; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the use of a smartphone accelerometer in physical activity recognition has been well studied. However, the role of a gyroscope and a magnetometer is yet to be explored, both when used alone as well as in combination with an accelerometer. For this purpose, we investigate the role of

  20. Electronic dosimetry and neutron metrology by CMOS active pixel sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanstalle, M.

    2011-01-01

    This work aims at demonstrating the possibility to use active pixel sensors as operational neutron dosemeters. To do so, the sensor that has been used has to be γ-transparent and to be able to detect neutrons on a wide energy range with a high detection efficiency. The response of the device, made of the CMOS sensor MIMOSA-5 and a converter in front of the sensor (polyethylene for fast neutron detection and 10 B for thermal neutron detection), has been compared with Monte Carlo simulations carried out with MCNPX and GEANT4. These codes have been before-hand validated to check they can be used properly for our application. Experiments to characterize the sensor have been performed at IPHC and at IRSN/LMDN (Cadarache). The results of the sensor irradiation to photon sources and mixed field ( 241 AmBe source) show the γ-transparency of the sensor by applying an appropriate threshold on the deposited energy (around 100 keV). The associated detection efficiency is satisfactory with a value of 10 -3 , in good agreement with MCNPX and GEANT4. Other features of the device have been tested with the same source, like the angular response. The last part of this work deals with the detection of thermal neutrons (eV-neutrons). Assays have been done in Cadarache (IRSN) with a 252 Cf source moderated with heavy water (with and without cadmium shell). Results asserted a very high detection efficiency (up to 6*10 -3 for a pure 10 B converter) in good agreement with GEANT4. (author)

  1. Learning Activity Predictors from Sensor Data: Algorithms, Evaluation, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Bryan; Doppa, Janardhan Rao; Cook, Diane J

    2017-12-01

    Recent progress in Internet of Things (IoT) platforms has allowed us to collect large amounts of sensing data. However, there are significant challenges in converting this large-scale sensing data into decisions for real-world applications. Motivated by applications like health monitoring and intervention and home automation we consider a novel problem called Activity Prediction , where the goal is to predict future activity occurrence times from sensor data. In this paper, we make three main contributions. First, we formulate and solve the activity prediction problem in the framework of imitation learning and reduce it to a simple regression learning problem. This approach allows us to leverage powerful regression learners that can reason about the relational structure of the problem with negligible computational overhead. Second, we present several metrics to evaluate activity predictors in the context of real-world applications. Third, we evaluate our approach using real sensor data collected from 24 smart home testbeds. We also embed the learned predictor into a mobile-device-based activity prompter and evaluate the app for 9 participants living in smart homes. Our results indicate that our activity predictor performs better than the baseline methods, and offers a simple approach for predicting activities from sensor data.

  2. Photodiode area effect on performance of X-ray CMOS active pixel sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M. S.; Kim, Y.; Kim, G.; Lim, K. T.; Cho, G.; Kim, D.

    2018-02-01

    Compared to conventional TFT-based X-ray imaging devices, CMOS-based X-ray imaging sensors are considered next generation because they can be manufactured in very small pixel pitches and can acquire high-speed images. In addition, CMOS-based sensors have the advantage of integration of various functional circuits within the sensor. The image quality can also be improved by the high fill-factor in large pixels. If the size of the subject is small, the size of the pixel must be reduced as a consequence. In addition, the fill factor must be reduced to aggregate various functional circuits within the pixel. In this study, 3T-APS (active pixel sensor) with photodiodes of four different sizes were fabricated and evaluated. It is well known that a larger photodiode leads to improved overall performance. Nonetheless, if the size of the photodiode is > 1000 μm2, the degree to which the sensor performance increases as the photodiode size increases, is reduced. As a result, considering the fill factor, pixel-pitch > 32 μm is not necessary to achieve high-efficiency image quality. In addition, poor image quality is to be expected unless special sensor-design techniques are included for sensors with a pixel pitch of 25 μm or less.

  3. Autonomous star tracker based on active pixel sensors (APS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, U.

    2017-11-01

    Star trackers are opto-electronic sensors used onboard of satellites for the autonomous inertial attitude determination. During the last years, star trackers became more and more important in the field of the attitude and orbit control system (AOCS) sensors. High performance star trackers are based up today on charge coupled device (CCD) optical camera heads. The Jena-Optronik GmbH is active in the field of opto-electronic sensors like star trackers since the early 80-ties. Today, with the product family ASTRO5, ASTRO10 and ASTRO15, all marked segments like earth observation, scientific applications and geo-telecom are supplied to European and Overseas customers. A new generation of star trackers can be designed based on the APS detector technical features. The measurement performance of the current CCD based star trackers can be maintained, the star tracker functionality, reliability and robustness can be increased while the unit costs are saved.

  4. Use of polyurethane foam deformation sensor to record respiratory activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredov, V. I.; Baranov, V. S.

    1980-05-01

    The sensor developed has some substantial advantages over other known types. It is highly sensitive over a wide range of strain loads. The level of the output signal is linearly related to the force exerted on it, and it is sufficient for direct recording without using amplifiers of electric signals. The sensor is based on elastic, spongy material, polyurethane foam (porolon) with current-conducting material on the pore surface, current-conducting carbon black or electrode paste. The elastic properties of the sensor are built in the actual base of the strain-sensitive element, which simplifies the construction substantially and increases the reliability of the unit. In order to test the possibility of using this sensor to examine respiratory function, human pneumograms were recorded with the subject in a calm state along with the respiratory activity of experimental animals (dogs). Samples of the respiratory curve are shown. The simplicity of design of the sensor makes it possible to use it in various physiological experiments.

  5. Sensor Fusion for Nuclear Proliferation Activity Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adel Ghanem, Ph D

    2007-03-30

    The objective of Phase 1 of this STTR project is to demonstrate a Proof-of-Concept (PoC) of the Geo-Rad system that integrates a location-aware SmartTag (made by ZonTrak) and a radiation detector (developed by LLNL). It also includes the ability to transmit the collected radiation data and location information to the ZonTrak server (ZonService). The collected data is further transmitted to a central server at LLNL (the Fusion Server) to be processed in conjunction with overhead imagery to generate location estimates of nuclear proliferation and radiation sources.

  6. Active resonant subwavelength grating for scannerless range imaging sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Nellums, Robert O.; Boye, Robert R.; Peters, David William

    2006-11-01

    In this late-start LDRD, we will present a design for a wavelength-agile, high-speed modulator that enables a long-term vision for the THz Scannerless Range Imaging (SRI) sensor. It takes the place of the currently-utilized SRI micro-channel plate which is limited to photocathode sensitive wavelengths (primarily in the visible and near-IR regimes). Two of Sandia's successful technologies--subwavelength diffractive optics and THz sources and detectors--are poised to extend the capabilities of the SRI sensor. The goal is to drastically broaden the SRI's sensing waveband--all the way to the THz regime--so the sensor can see through image-obscuring, scattering environments like smoke and dust. Surface properties, such as reflectivity, emissivity, and scattering roughness, vary greatly with the illuminating wavelength. Thus, objects that are difficult to image at the SRI sensor's present near-IR wavelengths may be imaged more easily at the considerably longer THz wavelengths (0.1 to 1mm). The proposed component is an active Resonant Subwavelength Grating (RSG). Sandia invested considerable effort on a passive RSG two years ago, which resulted in a highly-efficient (reflectivity greater than gold), wavelength-specific reflector. For this late-start LDRD proposal, we will transform the passive RSG design into an active laser-line reflector.

  7. Active Control of Noise Using Actuator/Sensor Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Winder, Patrice; Kirby, George

    1996-01-01

    Current research in smart structures is directed toward the integration of many actuators and sensors into a material. In this paper we investigate the possibility of using this instrumentation for active noise control from a vibrating structures. Current technology for reducing radiated sound is limited by the instrumentation for the control system. These control systems employ relatively small numbers of sensors and actuators. Hence, these control systems must rely on a model of the structure to estimate and control the global vibrations that contribute to the far field pressure. For complex, realistic structures the development of such a model is a formidable task. The model is a limiting factor in the continuing development of structural acoustics. In this paper we propose to increase the number of actuators and sensors of a smart material to offset the complexity of the model used for control design. The sensor arrays will be used to directly sense the shape of the structure rather than using a model of the structures to indirectly sense the shape of the structure. The actuator array is used to apply distributed forces to the structure, rather than using the structure itself as a load path. A control system for the active cancellation of sound is derived from standard control system methodologies.

  8. IMPLEMENTATION OF ACTIVE WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK MONITORING USING ZIGBEE PROTOCOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHMOOD F. MOSLEH

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs are used in enormous applications with different aspects of modern life due to the extensive services that shorten the time and reduce the effort with lower cost. Optimum design leads to better performance, low cost and long network lifetime. The aim of this paper is to design hardware and implements a flexible and active WSN depending on Arduino Uno and ZigBee for controlling and communication respectively. The designed network contains three sensors (lighting, temperature and gas have been adopted as a sample of sensors for this network. It has been experimented a multi-hope network to get an efficient coverage for target building and can be an extension for a large area. Also, the proposed network is flexible in responding to the user's desire to get the information on his request or at selected times by the user, or in the case of an emergency to achieve full controlling of the facility which is under probation. The results confirm that the proposed network gives the best performance for three cases; first when the user need show the building environment at any time in addition to checking the network activity. Second, the results show that the network is records the reading of all sensors at a regular period to show the overall daily and weekly cases of an area under control. Third, the user can set various thresholds values, to adapt the work of the network to shoot an alarm or enable self-protection devices.

  9. Improved thermal neutron activation sensor for detection of bulk explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFee, John E.; Faust, Anthony A.; Andrews, H. Robert; Clifford, Edward T. H.; Mosquera, Cristian M.

    2012-06-01

    Defence R&D Canada - Suffield and Bubble Technology Industries have been developing thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensors for detection of buried bulk explosives since 1994. First generation sensors, employing an isotopic source and NaI(Tl) gamma ray detectors, were deployed by Canadian Forces in 2002 as confirmation sensors on the ILDS teleoperated, vehicle-mounted, multi-sensor anti-tank landmine detection systems. The first generation TNA could detect anti-tank mines buried 10 cm or less in no more than a minute, but deeper mines and those significantly displaced horizontally required considerably longer times. Mines as deep as 30 cm could be detected with long counting times (1000 s). The second generation TNA detector is being developed with a number of improvements aimed at increasing sensitivity and facilitating ease of operation. Among these are an electronic neutron generator to increase sensitivity for deeper and horizontally displaced explosives; LaBr3(Ce) scintillators, to improve time response and energy resolution; improved thermal and electronic stability; improved sensor head geometry to minimize spatial response nonuniformity; and more robust data processing. This improved sensitivity can translate to either decreased counting times, decreased minimum detectable explosive quantities, increased maximum sensor-to-target displacement, or a trade off among all three. Experiments to characterize the performance of the latest generation TNA in detecting buried landmines and IEDs hidden in culverts were conducted during 2011. This paper describes the second generation system. The experimental setup and methodology are detailed and preliminary comparisons between the performance of first and second generation systems are presented.

  10. Sensor Data Acquisition and Processing Parameters for Human Activity Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian D. Bersch

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known that parameter selection for data sampling frequency and segmentation techniques (including different methods and window sizes has an impact on the classification accuracy. For Ambient Assisted Living (AAL, no clear information to select these parameters exists, hence a wide variety and inconsistency across today’s literature is observed. This paper presents the empirical investigation of different data sampling rates, segmentation techniques and segmentation window sizes and their effect on the accuracy of Activity of Daily Living (ADL event classification and computational load for two different accelerometer sensor datasets. The study is conducted using an ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA based on 32 different window sizes, three different segmentation algorithm (with and without overlap, totaling in six different parameters and six sampling frequencies for nine common classification algorithms. The classification accuracy is based on a feature vector consisting of Root Mean Square (RMS, Mean, Signal Magnitude Area (SMA, Signal Vector Magnitude (here SMV, Energy, Entropy, FFTPeak, Standard Deviation (STD. The results are presented alongside recommendations for the parameter selection on the basis of the best performing parameter combinations that are identified by means of the corresponding Pareto curve.

  11. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor; Redmond, James M.; Roach, Dennis P.; Rackow, Kirk

    2000-06-01

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance technique are cited and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high frequency E/M impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acousto- ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens, (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  12. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GIURGIUTIU,VICTOR; REDMOND,JAMES M.; ROACH,DENNIS P.; RACKOW,KIRK A.

    2000-02-29

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance technique are cited and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high-frequency E/M impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acousto-ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  13. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GIURGIUTIU,VICTOR; REDMOND,JAMES M.; ROACH,DENNIS P.; RACKOW,KIRK A.

    2000-03-08

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (NM) impedance technique are sighted and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high-frequency EIM impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acoustic-ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens, (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  14. Precursor experiment for an active true airspeed sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahm, S

    2001-03-15

    The feasibility of an active optical true airspeed sensor was demonstrated with a coherent short-range Doppler lidar. Even at the long wavelength of 10.6 mum , aerosol events at the high altitude of 12, 000 m were measured. A comparison of the line-of-sight velocity obtained by lidar measurements with a conventional five-hole probe on an aircraft showed an excellent coincidence in the average value, although the lidar detected turbulence effects much more sensitively.

  15. Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, H. [PBI-Dansensor A/S (Denmark); Toft Soerensen, O. [Risoe National Lab., Materials Research Dept. (Denmark)

    1999-10-01

    A new type of ceramic oxygen sensors based on semiconducting oxides was developed in this project. The advantage of these sensors compared to standard ZrO{sub 2} sensors is that they do not require a reference gas and that they can be produced in small sizes. The sensor design and the techniques developed for production of these sensors are judged suitable by the participating industry for a niche production of a new generation of oxygen sensors. Materials research on new oxygen ion conducting conductors both for applications in oxygen sensors and in fuel was also performed in this project and finally a new process was developed for fabrication of ceramic tubes by dip-coating. (EHS)

  16. Application of activity sensors for estimating behavioral patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Caleb P.; Cain, James W.; Cox, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing use of Global Positioning System (GPS) collars in habitat selection studies provides large numbers of precise location data points with reduced field effort. However, inclusion of activity sensors in many GPS collars also grants the potential to remotely estimate behavioral state. Thus, only using GPS collars to collect location data belies their full capabilities. Coupling behavioral state with location data would allow researchers and managers to refine habitat selection models by using diel behavioral state changes to partition fine-scale temporal shifts in habitat selection. We tested the capability of relatively unsophisticated GPS-collar activity sensors to estimate behavior throughout diel periods using free-ranging female elk (Cervus canadensis) in the Jemez Mountains of north-central New Mexico, USA, 2013–2014. Collars recorded cumulative number of movements (hits) per 15-min recording period immediately preceding GPS fixes at 0000, 0600, 1200, and 1800 hr. We measured diel behavioral patterns of focal elk, categorizing active (i.e., foraging, traveling, vigilant, grooming) and inactive (i.e., resting) states. Active behaviors (foraging, traveling) produced more average hits (0.87 ± 0.69 hits/min, 4.0 ± 2.2 hits/min, respectively; 95% CI) and inactive (resting) behavior fewer hits (−1.1 ± 0.61 95% CI). We differentiated active and inactive behavioral states with a bootstrapped threshold of 5.9 ± 3.9 hits/15-min recording period. Mean cumulative activity-sensor hits corresponded with observed diel behavioral patterns: hits increased during crepuscular (0600, 1800 hr) observations when elk were most active (0000–0600 hr: d = 0.19; 1200–1800 hr: d = 0.64) and decreased during midday and night (0000 hr, 1200 hr) when elk were least active (1800–0000 hr: d = −0.39; 0600–1200 hr: d = −0.43). Even using relatively unsophisticated GPS-collar activity sensors, managers can

  17. Recognition of Human Activities Using Continuous Autoencoders with Wearable Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukun Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an approach for recognizing human activities with wearable sensors. The continuous autoencoder (CAE as a novel stochastic neural network model is proposed which improves the ability of model continuous data. CAE adds Gaussian random units into the improved sigmoid activation function to extract the features of nonlinear data. In order to shorten the training time, we propose a new fast stochastic gradient descent (FSGD algorithm to update the gradients of CAE. The reconstruction of a swiss-roll dataset experiment demonstrates that the CAE can fit continuous data better than the basic autoencoder, and the training time can be reduced by an FSGD algorithm. In the experiment of human activities’ recognition, time and frequency domain feature extract (TFFE method is raised to extract features from the original sensors’ data. Then, the principal component analysis (PCA method is applied to feature reduction. It can be noticed that the dimension of each data segment is reduced from 5625 to 42. The feature vectors extracted from original signals are used for the input of deep belief network (DBN, which is composed of multiple CAEs. The training results show that the correct differentiation rate of 99.3% has been achieved. Some contrast experiments like different sensors combinations, sensor units at different positions, and training time with different epochs are designed to validate our approach.

  18. Spectral characterisation and noise performance of Vanilla—an active pixel sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Andrew; Bates, R.; Bohndiek, S. E.; Clark, A.; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Greenshaw, T.; Laing, A.; Maneuski, D.; Turchetta, R.; O'Shea, V.

    2008-06-01

    This work will report on the characterisation of a new active pixel sensor, Vanilla. The Vanilla comprises of 512×512 (25μm 2) pixels. The sensor has a 12 bit digital output for full-frame mode, although it can also be readout in analogue mode, whereby it can also be read in a fully programmable region-of-interest (ROI) mode. In full frame, the sensor can operate at a readout rate of more than 100 frames per second (fps), while in ROI mode, the speed depends on the size, shape and number of ROIs. For example, an ROI of 6×6 pixels can be read at 20,000 fps in analogue mode. Using photon transfer curve (PTC) measurements allowed for the calculation of the read noise, shot noise, full-well capacity and camera gain constant of the sensor. Spectral response measurements detailed the quantum efficiency (QE) of the detector through the UV and visible region. Analysis of the ROI readout mode was also performed. Such measurements suggest that the Vanilla APS (active pixel sensor) will be suitable for a wide range of applications including particle physics and medical imaging.

  19. 16 CFR 1211.13 - Inherent force activated secondary door sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... sensors. 1211.13 Section 1211.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT... § 1211.13 Inherent force activated secondary door sensors. (a) Normal operation test. (1) A force activated door sensor of a door system installed according to the installation instructions shall actuate...

  20. Activity Recognition Using Fusion of Low-Cost Sensors on a Smartphone for Mobile Navigation Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Saeedi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Low-cost inertial and motion sensors embedded on smartphones have provided a new platform for dynamic activity pattern inference. In this research, a comparison has been conducted on different sensor data, feature spaces and feature selection methods to increase the efficiency and reduce the computation cost of activity recognition on the smartphones. We evaluated a variety of feature spaces and a number of classification algorithms from the area of Machine Learning, including Naive Bayes, Decision Trees, Artificial Neural Networks and Support Vector Machine classifiers. A smartphone app that performs activity recognition is being developed to collect data and send them to a server for activity recognition. Using extensive experiments, the performance of various feature spaces has been evaluated. The results showed that the Bayesian Network classifier yields recognition accuracy of 96.21% using four features while requiring fewer computations.

  1. Novel Flexible Wearable Sensor Materials and Signal Processing for Vital Sign and Human Activity Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servati, Amir; Zou, Liang; Wang, Z Jane; Ko, Frank; Servati, Peyman

    2017-07-13

    Advances in flexible electronic materials and smart textile, along with broad availability of smart phones, cloud and wireless systems have empowered the wearable technologies for significant impact on future of digital and personalized healthcare as well as consumer electronics. However, challenges related to lack of accuracy, reliability, high power consumption, rigid or bulky form factor and difficulty in interpretation of data have limited their wide-scale application in these potential areas. As an important solution to these challenges, we present latest advances in novel flexible electronic materials and sensors that enable comfortable and conformable body interaction and potential for invisible integration within daily apparel. Advances in novel flexible materials and sensors are described for wearable monitoring of human vital signs including, body temperature, respiratory rate and heart rate, muscle movements and activity. We then present advances in signal processing focusing on motion and noise artifact removal, data mining and aspects of sensor fusion relevant to future clinical applications of wearable technology.

  2. PUMA amplifies necroptosis signaling by activating cytosolic DNA sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongshi; Tong, Jingshan; Yang, Liheng; Wei, Liang; Stolz, Donna B; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Jianke; Zhang, Lin

    2018-04-10

    Necroptosis, a form of regulated necrotic cell death, is governed by RIP1/RIP3-mediated activation of MLKL. However, the signaling process leading to necroptotic death remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that PUMA , a proapoptotic BH3-only Bcl-2 family member, is transcriptionally activated in an RIP3/MLKL-dependent manner following induction of necroptosis. The induction of PUMA, which is mediated by autocrine TNF-α and enhanced NF-κB activity, contributes to necroptotic death in RIP3-expressing cells with caspases inhibited. On induction, PUMA promotes the cytosolic release of mitochondrial DNA and activation of the DNA sensors DAI/Zbp1 and STING, leading to enhanced RIP3 and MLKL phosphorylation in a positive feedback loop. Furthermore, deletion of PUMA partially rescues necroptosis-mediated developmental defects in FADD -deficient embryos. Collectively, our results reveal a signal amplification mechanism mediated by PUMA and cytosolic DNA sensors that is involved in TNF-driven necroptotic death in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  3. A CMOS Active Pixel Sensor for Charged Particle Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matis, Howard S.; Bieser, Fred; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Rai, Gulshan; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, Hans George; Singh, Kunal; Wurzel, Samuel E.; Wieman, Howard; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2002-12-02

    Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology has shown promise for next-generation vertex detectors. This paper discusses the design and testing of two generations of APS chips. Both are arrays of 128 by 128 pixels, each 20 by 20 {micro}m. Each array is divided into sub-arrays in which different sensor structures (4 in the first version and 16 in the second) and/or readout circuits are employed. Measurements of several of these structures under Fe{sup 55} exposure are reported. The sensors have also been irradiated by 55 MeV protons to test for radiation damage. The radiation increased the noise and reduced the signal. The noise can be explained by shot noise from the increased leakage current and the reduction in signal is due to charge being trapped in the epi layer. Nevertheless, the radiation effect is small for the expected exposures at RHIC and RHIC II. Finally, we describe our concept for mechanically supporting a thin silicon wafer in an actual detector.

  4. Detection of Cardiopulmonary Activity and Related Abnormal Events Using Microsoft Kinect Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Al-Naji

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of cardiopulmonary activity is a challenge when attempted under adverse conditions, including different sleeping postures, environmental settings, and an unclear region of interest (ROI. This study proposes an efficient remote imaging system based on a Microsoft Kinect v2 sensor for the observation of cardiopulmonary-signal-and-detection-related abnormal cardiopulmonary events (e.g., tachycardia, bradycardia, tachypnea, bradypnea, and central apnoea in many possible sleeping postures within varying environmental settings including in total darkness and whether the subject is covered by a blanket or not. The proposed system extracts the signal from the abdominal-thoracic region where cardiopulmonary activity is most pronounced, using a real-time image sequence captured by Kinect v2 sensor. The proposed system shows promising results in any sleep posture, regardless of illumination conditions and unclear ROI even in the presence of a blanket, whilst being reliable, safe, and cost-effective.

  5. Dealing with the Effects of Sensor Displacement in Wearable Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oresti Banos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Most wearable activity recognition systems assume a predefined sensor deployment that remains unchanged during runtime. However, this assumption does not reflect real-life conditions. During the normal use of such systems, users may place the sensors in a position different from the predefined sensor placement. Also, sensors may move from their original location to a different one, due to a loose attachment. Activity recognition systems trained on activity patterns characteristic of a given sensor deployment may likely fail due to sensor displacements. In this work, we innovatively explore the effects of sensor displacement induced by both the intentional misplacement of sensors and self-placement by the user. The effects of sensor displacement are analyzed for standard activity recognition techniques, as well as for an alternate robust sensor fusion method proposed in a previous work. While classical recognition models show little tolerance to sensor displacement, the proposed method is proven to have notable capabilities to assimilate the changes introduced in the sensor position due to self-placement and provides considerable improvements for large misplacements.

  6. Active design method for the static characteristics of a piezoelectric six-axis force/torque sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Li, Min; Qin, Lan; Liu, Jingcheng

    2014-01-02

    To address the bottleneck issues of an elastic-style six-axis force/torque sensor (six-axis force sensor), this work proposes a no-elastic piezoelectric six-axis force sensor. The operating principle of the piezoelectric six-axis force sensor is analyzed, and a structural model is constructed. The static-active design theory of the piezoelectric six-axis force sensor is established, including a static analytical/mathematical model and numerical simulation model (finite element model). A piezoelectric six-axis force sensor experimental prototype is developed according to the analytical mathematical model and numerical simulation model, and selected static characteristic parameters (including sensitivity, isotropic degree and cross-coupling) are tested using this model with three approaches. The measured results are in agreement with the analytical results from the static-active design method. Therefore, this study has successfully established a foundation for further research into the piezoelectric multi-axis force sensor and an overall design approach based on static characteristics.

  7. Sensor to detect endothelialization on an active coronary stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coffey Arthur C

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A serious complication with drug-eluting coronary stents is late thrombosis, caused by exposed stent struts not covered by endothelial cells in the healing process. Real-time detection of this healing process could guide physicians for more individualized anti-platelet therapy. Here we present work towards developing a sensor to detect this healing process. Sensors on several stent struts could give information about the heterogeneity of healing across the stent. Methods A piezoelectric microcantilever was insulated with parylene and demonstrated as an endothelialization detector for incorporation within an active coronary stent. After initial characterization, endothelial cells were plated onto the cantilever surface. After they attached to the surface, they caused an increase in mass, and thus a decrease in the resonant frequencies of the cantilever. This shift was then detected electrically with an LCR meter. The self-sensing, self-actuating cantilever does not require an external, optical detection system, thus allowing for implanted applications. Results A cell density of 1300 cells/mm2 on the cantilever surface is detected. Conclusions We have developed a self-actuating, self-sensing device for detecting the presence of endothelial cells on a surface. The device is biocompatible and functions reliably in ionic liquids, making it appropriate for implantable applications. This sensor can be placed along the struts of a coronary stent to detect when the struts have been covered with a layer of endothelial cells and are no longer available surfaces for clot formation. Anti-platelet therapy can be adjusted in real-time with respect to a patient's level of healing and hemorrhaging risks.

  8. Got Point Clouds: Characterizing Canopy Structure With Active and Passive Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, S. C.; Malambo, L.; Sheridan, R.; Putman, E.; Murray, S.; Rooney, W.; Rajan, N.

    2016-12-01

    Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) provide the means to acquire highly customized aerial data at local scale with a multitude of sensors. UAS allow us to obtain affordably repeated observations of canopy structure for agricultural and natural resources applications by using passive optical sensors, such as cameras and photogrammetric techniques, and active sensors, such as lidar (Light Detection and Ranging). The objectives of this presentation are to: (1) offer a brief overview of UAS used for agriculture and natural resources studies, (2) describe experiences in conducting agriculture phenotyping and forest vegetation measurements, and (3) give details on the methodology developed for image and lidar data processing for characterizing the three dimensional structure of plant canopies. The UAS types used for this purpose included rotary platforms, such as quadcopters, hexacopters, and octocopters, with a payload capacity of up to 19 lbs. The sensors that collected data over two crop seasons include multispectral cameras in the visible color spectrum and near infrared, and UAS-lidar. For ground reference data we used terrestrial lidar scanners and field measurements. Results comparing UAS and terrestrial measurements show high correlation and open new areas of scientific investigation of crop canopies previously not possible with affordable techniques.

  9. Design of a high-lift experiment in water including active flow control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beutel, T; Schwerter, M; Büttgenbach, S; Leester-Schädel, M; Sattler, S; El Sayed, Y; Radespiel, R; Zander, M; Sinapius, M; Wierach, P

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the structural design of an active flow-control experiment. The aim of the experiment is to investigate the increase in efficiency of an internally blown Coanda flap using unsteady blowing. The system uses tailor-made microelectromechanical (MEMS) pressure sensors to determine the state of the oncoming flow and an actuated lip to regulate the mass flow and velocity of a stream near a wall over the internally blown flap. Sensors and actuators are integrated into a highly loaded system that is extremely compact. The sensors are connected to a bus system that feeds the data into a real-time control system. The piezoelectric actuators using the d 33 effect at a comparable low voltage of 120 V are integrated into a lip that controls the blowout slot height. The system is designed for closed-loop control that efficiently avoids flow separation on the Coanda flap. The setup is designed for water-tunnel experiments in order to reduce the free-stream velocity and the system’s control frequency by a factor of 10 compared with that in air. This paper outlines the function and verification of the system’s main components and their development. (technical note)

  10. High-sensitivity active pixel sensor with variable threshold photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sung-Hyun; Bae, Myunghan; Choi, Byoung-Soo; Lyu, Hong-Kun; Shin, Jang-Kyoo

    2015-05-01

    A novel high-sensitivity active pixel sensor (APS) with a variable threshold photodetector has been presented and for the first time, a simple SPICE model for the variable threshold photodetector is presented. Its SPICE model is in good agreement with measurements and is more simpler than the conventional model. The proposed APS has a gate/body-tied PMOSFET-type photodetector with an overlapping control gate that makes it possible to control the sensitivity of the proposed APS. It is a hybrid device composed of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET), a lateral bipolar junction transistor (BJT) and a vertical BJT. Using sufficient overlapping control gate bias to operate the MOSFET in inversion mode, the variable threshold photodetector allows for increasing the photocurrent gain by 105 at low light intensities when the control gate bias is -3 V. Thus, the proposed APS with a variable threshold photodetector has better low-light-level sensitivity than the conventional APS operating mode, and it has a variable sensitivity which is determined by the control gate bias. The proposed sensor has been fabricated by using 0.35 μm 2-poly 4-metal standard complementary MOS (CMOS) process and its characteristics have been evaluated.

  11. A Micro-Fabricated Force Sensor Using an All Thin Film Piezoelectric Active Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junwoo Lee

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability to measure pressure and force is essential in biomedical applications such as minimally invasive surgery (MIS and palpation for detecting cancer cysts. Here, we report a force sensor for measuring a shear and normal force by combining an arrayed piezoelectric sensors layer with a precut glass top plate connected by four stress concentrating legs. We designed and fabricated a thin film piezoelectric force sensor and proposed an enhanced sensing tool to be used for analyzing gentle touches without the external voltage source used in FET sensors. Both the linear sensor response from 3 kPa to 30 kPa and the exact signal responses from the moving direction illustrate the strong feasibility of the described thin film miniaturized piezoelectric force sensor.

  12. R and D on monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS): Towards large-area CMOS sensors for particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allport, P.P.; Bates, R.; Casse, G.; Crooks, J.; Evans, A.; Jones, L.; O'Shea, V.; Turchetta, R.; Tyndel, M.; Velthuis, J.J.; Villani, G.; Zakopoulos, F.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for particle physics. A family of sensors, RAL H EPAPS, has been developed. The first three sensors of this family were parametric test sensors, on which different types of pixel architectures were integrated. These sensors were designed, manufactured and tested and recent results obtained by our collaboration will be briefly reviewed. The latest sensor in the family, RAL H EPAPS4, is the first step towards a large-area sensor as required for particle physics. It has 1026x384 pixels with a pixel pitch of 15 μm, for a total sensing area of 15.39x5.76 mm 2 . The line rate can be in excess of 5 MHz, which, for column parallel readout, would yield an equivalent 76 μs full frame readout time. Three different versions of the RAL H EPAPS4 were produced, with the same global architecture but with different diode structures. The design and simulated performances will be reviewed

  13. Planar optical waveguide based sandwich assay sensors and processes for the detection of biological targets including protein markers, pathogens and cellular debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jennifer S [Santa Fe, NM; Swanson, Basil I [Los Alamos, NM; Grace, Karen M [Los Alamos, NM; Grace, Wynne K [Los Alamos, NM; Shreve, Andrew P [Santa Fe, NM

    2009-06-02

    An assay element is described including recognition ligands bound to a film on a single mode planar optical waveguide, the film from the group of a membrane, a polymerized bilayer membrane, and a self-assembled monolayer containing polyethylene glycol or polypropylene glycol groups therein and an assay process for detecting the presence of a biological target is described including injecting a biological target-containing sample into a sensor cell including the assay element, with the recognition ligands adapted for binding to selected biological targets, maintaining the sample within the sensor cell for time sufficient for binding to occur between selected biological targets within the sample and the recognition ligands, injecting a solution including a reporter ligand into the sensor cell; and, interrogating the sample within the sensor cell with excitation light from the waveguide, the excitation light provided by an evanescent field of the single mode penetrating into the biological target-containing sample to a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide thereby exciting the fluorescent-label in any bound reporter ligand within a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide and resulting in a detectable signal.

  14. Vector Disparity Sensor with Vergence Control for Active Vision Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco, Francisco; Diaz, Javier; Gibaldi, Agostino; Sabatini, Silvio P.; Ros, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture for computing vector disparity for active vision systems as used on robotics applications. The control of the vergence angle of a binocular system allows us to efficiently explore dynamic environments, but requires a generalization of the disparity computation with respect to a static camera setup, where the disparity is strictly 1-D after the image rectification. The interaction between vision and motor control allows us to develop an active sensor that achieves high accuracy of the disparity computation around the fixation point, and fast reaction time for the vergence control. In this contribution, we address the development of a real-time architecture for vector disparity computation using an FPGA device. We implement the disparity unit and the control module for vergence, version, and tilt to determine the fixation point. In addition, two on-chip different alternatives for the vector disparity engines are discussed based on the luminance (gradient-based) and phase information of the binocular images. The multiscale versions of these engines are able to estimate the vector disparity up to 32 fps on VGA resolution images with very good accuracy as shown using benchmark sequences with known ground-truth. The performances in terms of frame-rate, resource utilization, and accuracy of the presented approaches are discussed. On the basis of these results, our study indicates that the gradient-based approach leads to the best trade-off choice for the integration with the active vision system. PMID:22438737

  15. Real-time Human Activity Recognition using a Body Sensor Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Liang; Gu, Tao; Chen, Hanhua

    2010-01-01

    Real-time activity recognition using body sensor networks is an important and challenging task and it has many potential applications. In this paper, we propose a realtime, hierarchical model to recognize both simple gestures and complex activities using a wireless body sensor network...

  16. Recognizing Multi-user Activities using Wearable Sensors in a Smart Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Liang; Gu, Tao; Tao, Xianping

    2010-01-01

    The advances of wearable sensors and wireless networks oer many opportunities to recognize human activities from sensor readings in pervasive computing. Existing work so far focuses mainly on recognizing activities of a single user in a home environment. However, there are typically multiple inha...

  17. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shoaib, M.; Bosch, S.; Durmaz, O.; Scholten, Johan; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such

  18. Wearable Sensor Data Classification for Human Activity Recognition Based on an Iterative Learning Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Davila

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The design of multiple human activity recognition applications in areas such as healthcare, sports and safety relies on wearable sensor technologies. However, when making decisions based on the data acquired by such sensors in practical situations, several factors related to sensor data alignment, data losses, and noise, among other experimental constraints, deteriorate data quality and model accuracy. To tackle these issues, this paper presents a data-driven iterative learning framework to classify human locomotion activities such as walk, stand, lie, and sit, extracted from the Opportunity dataset. Data acquired by twelve 3-axial acceleration sensors and seven inertial measurement units are initially de-noised using a two-stage consecutive filtering approach combining a band-pass Finite Impulse Response (FIR and a wavelet filter. A series of statistical parameters are extracted from the kinematical features, including the principal components and singular value decomposition of roll, pitch, yaw and the norm of the axial components. The novel interactive learning procedure is then applied in order to minimize the number of samples required to classify human locomotion activities. Only those samples that are most distant from the centroids of data clusters, according to a measure presented in the paper, are selected as candidates for the training dataset. The newly built dataset is then used to train an SVM multi-class classifier. The latter will produce the lowest prediction error. The proposed learning framework ensures a high level of robustness to variations in the quality of input data, while only using a much lower number of training samples and therefore a much shorter training time, which is an important consideration given the large size of the dataset.

  19. Wearable Sensor Data Classification for Human Activity Recognition Based on an Iterative Learning Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Juan Carlos; Cretu, Ana-Maria; Zaremba, Marek

    2017-06-07

    The design of multiple human activity recognition applications in areas such as healthcare, sports and safety relies on wearable sensor technologies. However, when making decisions based on the data acquired by such sensors in practical situations, several factors related to sensor data alignment, data losses, and noise, among other experimental constraints, deteriorate data quality and model accuracy. To tackle these issues, this paper presents a data-driven iterative learning framework to classify human locomotion activities such as walk, stand, lie, and sit, extracted from the Opportunity dataset. Data acquired by twelve 3-axial acceleration sensors and seven inertial measurement units are initially de-noised using a two-stage consecutive filtering approach combining a band-pass Finite Impulse Response (FIR) and a wavelet filter. A series of statistical parameters are extracted from the kinematical features, including the principal components and singular value decomposition of roll, pitch, yaw and the norm of the axial components. The novel interactive learning procedure is then applied in order to minimize the number of samples required to classify human locomotion activities. Only those samples that are most distant from the centroids of data clusters, according to a measure presented in the paper, are selected as candidates for the training dataset. The newly built dataset is then used to train an SVM multi-class classifier. The latter will produce the lowest prediction error. The proposed learning framework ensures a high level of robustness to variations in the quality of input data, while only using a much lower number of training samples and therefore a much shorter training time, which is an important consideration given the large size of the dataset.

  20. First tests of a novel radiation hard CMOS sensor process for Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernegger, H.; Bates, R.; Buttar, C.; Dalla, M.; van Hoorne, J. W.; Kugathasan, T.; Maneuski, D.; Musa, L.; Riedler, P.; Riegel, C.; Sbarra, C.; Schaefer, D.; Schioppa, E. J.; Snoeys, W.

    2017-06-01

    The upgrade of the ATLAS [1] tracking detector for the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN requires novel radiation hard silicon sensor technologies. Significant effort has been put into the development of monolithic CMOS sensors but it has been a challenge to combine a low capacitance of the sensing node with full depletion of the sensitive layer. Low capacitance brings low analog power. Depletion of the sensitive layer causes the signal charge to be collected by drift sufficiently fast to separate hits from consecutive bunch crossings (25 ns at the LHC) and to avoid losing the charge by trapping. This paper focuses on the characterization of charge collection properties and detection efficiency of prototype sensors originally designed in the framework of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS) upgrade [2]. The prototypes are fabricated both in the standard TowerJazz 180nm CMOS imager process [3] and in an innovative modification of this process developed in collaboration with the foundry, aimed to fully deplete the sensitive epitaxial layer and enhance the tolerance to non-ionizing energy loss. Sensors fabricated in standard and modified process variants were characterized using radioactive sources, focused X-ray beam and test beams before and after irradiation. Contrary to sensors manufactured in the standard process, sensors from the modified process remain fully functional even after a dose of 1015neq/cm2, which is the the expected NIEL radiation fluence for the outer pixel layers in the future ATLAS Inner Tracker (ITk) [4].

  1. Human movement activity classification approaches that use wearable sensors and mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaghyan, Sahak; Sarukhanyan, Hakob; Akopian, David

    2013-03-01

    Cell phones and other mobile devices become part of human culture and change activity and lifestyle patterns. Mobile phone technology continuously evolves and incorporates more and more sensors for enabling advanced applications. Latest generations of smart phones incorporate GPS and WLAN location finding modules, vision cameras, microphones, accelerometers, temperature sensors etc. The availability of these sensors in mass-market communication devices creates exciting new opportunities for data mining applications. Particularly healthcare applications exploiting build-in sensors are very promising. This paper reviews different approaches of human activity recognition.

  2. Multi-Sensor Fusion for Enhanced Contextual Awareness of Everyday Activities with Ubiquitous Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Guiry

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors investigate the role that smart devices, including smartphones and smartwatches, can play in identifying activities of daily living. A feasibility study involving N = 10 participants was carried out to evaluate the devices’ ability to differentiate between nine everyday activities. The activities examined include walking, running, cycling, standing, sitting, elevator ascents, elevator descents, stair ascents and stair descents. The authors also evaluated the ability of these devices to differentiate indoors from outdoors, with the aim of enhancing contextual awareness. Data from this study was used to train and test five well known machine learning algorithms: C4.5, CART, Naïve Bayes, Multi-Layer Perceptrons and finally Support Vector Machines. Both single and multi-sensor approaches were examined to better understand the role each sensor in the device can play in unobtrusive activity recognition. The authors found overall results to be promising, with some models correctly classifying up to 100% of all instances.

  3. Ammonia sensor and antibacterial activities of green zinc oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khaleel Basha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide nanoparticles was synthesized by alginate (A through a rapid and a facile step in the aqueous solution condition at room temperature. Fabrication of zinc oxide nanoparticles was characterized by ATR-FTIR, TEM and XRD. ATR-FTIR analysis confirmed that the A/ZnO NPs were encapsulated by the polymerized alginate. Their shape, structure and composition were assessed by SEM. TEM and XRD analysis indicated that the A/ZnO NPs give evidence of the crystalline nature of ZnO and hybrid NPs structure, which is suitable for ammonia gas sensor development. The controlled size of the A/ZnO NPs obtained using this innovative synthesis strategy minimizes the response time of 2–3 s to sense the ammonia gas significantly with a detection limit of 1 ppm were found at room temperature. The antibacterial tests revealed that the A/ZnO NPs exhibits a potent activity against gram positive and gram negative bacteria.

  4. Confronting passive and active sensors with non-Gaussian statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, Pablo; Garcia-Gago, Jesús; Gomez-Lahoz, Javier; González-Aguilera, Diego

    2014-07-30

    This paper has two motivations: firstly, to compare the Digital Surface Models (DSM) derived by passive (digital camera) and by active (terrestrial laser scanner) remote sensing systems when applied to specific architectural objects, and secondly, to test how well the Gaussian classic statistics, with its Least Squares principle, adapts to data sets where asymmetrical gross errors may appear and whether this approach should be changed for a non-parametric one. The field of geomatic technology automation is immersed in a high demanding competition in which any innovation by one of the contenders immediately challenges the opponents to propose a better improvement. Nowadays, we seem to be witnessing an improvement of terrestrial photogrammetry and its integration with computer vision to overcome the performance limitations of laser scanning methods. Through this contribution some of the issues of this "technological race" are examined from the point of view of photogrammetry. A new software is introduced and an experimental test is designed, performed and assessed to try to cast some light on this thrilling match. For the case considered in this study, the results show good agreement between both sensors, despite considerable asymmetry. This asymmetry suggests that the standard Normal parameters are not adequate to assess this type of data, especially when accuracy is of importance. In this case, standard deviation fails to provide a good estimation of the results, whereas the results obtained for the Median Absolute Deviation and for the Biweight Midvariance are more appropriate measures.

  5. Virtual sensors for active noise control in acoustic-structural coupled enclosures using structural sensing: robust virtual sensor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Dunant; Cheng, Li; Su, Zhongqing

    2011-03-01

    The work was aimed to develop a robust virtual sensing design methodology for sensing and active control applications of vibro-acoustic systems. The proposed virtual sensor was designed to estimate a broadband acoustic interior sound pressure using structural sensors, with robustness against certain dynamic uncertainties occurring in an acoustic-structural coupled enclosure. A convex combination of Kalman sub-filters was used during the design, accommodating different sets of perturbed dynamic model of the vibro-acoustic enclosure. A minimax optimization problem was set up to determine an optimal convex combination of Kalman sub-filters, ensuring an optimal worst-case virtual sensing performance. The virtual sensing and active noise control performance was numerically investigated on a rectangular panel-cavity system. It was demonstrated that the proposed virtual sensor could accurately estimate the interior sound pressure, particularly the one dominated by cavity-controlled modes, by using a structural sensor. With such a virtual sensing technique, effective active noise control performance was also obtained even for the worst-case dynamics. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  6. Prototype Active Silicon Sensor in 150 nm HR-CMOS Technology for ATLAS Inner Detector Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Rymaszewski, Piotr; Breugnon, Patrick; Godiot, Stépahnie; Gonella, Laura; Hemperek, Tomasz; Hirono, Toko; Hügging, Fabian; Krüger, Hans; Liu, Jian; Pangaud, Patrick; Peric, Ivan; Rozanov, Alexandre; Wang, Anqing; Wermes, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The LHC Phase-II upgrade will lead to a significant increase in luminosity, which in turn will bring new challenges for the operation of inner tracking detectors. A possible solution is to use active silicon sensors, taking advantage of commercial CMOS technologies. Currently ATLAS R&D programme is qualifying a few commercial technologies in terms of suitability for this task. In this paper a prototype designed in one of them (LFoundry 150 nm process) will be discussed. The chip architecture will be described, including different pixel types incorporated into the design, followed by simulation and measurement results.

  7. Optimal Sensor Placement in Active Multistatic Sonar Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    As b→ 0, the Fermi function approaches the cookie cutter model. 1Discovered in 1926 by Enrico Fermi and Paul Dirac when researching electron...s ,r cookie cutter sensor Fermi b = 0.1 Fermi b = 0.25 Fermi b = 0.5 Exponential Figure 1.3: Sensor Models - The probability curves for the three...sensor models cookie cutter, Fermi and exponential function are displayed. Range is expressed as multiples of the range of the day ρ0. All models have a

  8. MIMU-Wear: ontology-based sensor selection for real-world wearable activity recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villalonga, Claudia; Pomares, Hector; Rojas, Ignacio; Banos Legran, Oresti

    2017-01-01

    An enormous effort has been made during the recent years towards the recognition of human activity based on wearable sensors. Despite the wide variety of proposed systems, most existing solutions have in common to solely operate on predefined settings and constrained sensor setups. Real-world

  9. An Active Sensor Algorithm for Corn Nitrogen Recommendations Based on a Chlorophyll Meter Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    In previous work we found active canopy sensor reflectance assessments of corn (Zea mays L.) N status acquired at two growth stages (V11 and V15) have the greatest potential for directing in-season N applications, but emphasized an algorithm was needed to translate sensor readings into appropriate N...

  10. Iron oxide reference electrodes in solid electrolyte sensors designed to control the thermodynamic activity of oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynov, P.N.; Askhadullin, R.Sh.; Ivanov, K.D.; Chernov, M.E.; Ul'yanov, V.V.; Shelemet'ev, V.M.; Sadovnichij, R.P.; Cheporov, R.Yu.; Niyazov, S.-A.S.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents results on the use of iron oxide reference electrode in the oxygen activity sensors used to measure the oxygen activity in heavy liquid metal coolants. The specific features of the operation of the sensor with iron oxide reference electrode are established and comparative characteristics with respect to other applicable reference electrodes are presented. Conclusions on the reasonability of its use for measurement of oxygen activity in liquid metal media are drawn [ru

  11. A Hierarchical Approach to Real-time Activity Recognition in Body Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Liang; Gu, Tao; Tao, Xianping

    2012-01-01

    Real-time activity recognition in body sensor networks is an important and challenging task. In this paper, we propose a real-time, hierarchical model to recognize both simple gestures and complex activities using a wireless body sensor network. In this model, we rst use a fast and lightweight...... algorithm to detect gestures at the sensor node level, and then propose a pattern based real-time algorithm to recognize complex, high-level activities at the portable device level. We evaluate our algorithms over a real-world dataset. The results show that the proposed system not only achieves good...

  12. Inductive Displacement Sensors with a Notch Filter for an Active Magnetic Bearing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seng-Chi Chen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Active magnetic bearing (AMB systems support rotating shafts without any physical contact, using electromagnetic forces. Each radial AMB uses two pairs of electromagnets at opposite sides of the rotor. This allows the rotor to float in the air gap, and the machine to operate without frictional losses. In active magnetic suspension, displacement sensors are necessary to detect the radial and axial movement of the suspended object. In a high-speed rotating machine equipped with an AMB, the rotor bending modes may be limited to the operating range. The natural frequencies of the rotor can cause instability. Thus, notch filters are a useful circuit for stabilizing the system. In addition, commercial displacement sensors are sometimes not suitable for AMB design, and cannot filter the noise caused by the natural frequencies of rotor. Hence, implementing displacement sensors based on the AMB structure is necessary to eliminate noises caused by natural frequency disturbances. The displacement sensor must be highly sensitive in the desired working range, and also exhibit a low interference noise, high stability, and low cost. In this study, we used the differential inductive sensor head and lock-in amplifier for synchronous demodulation. In addition, an active low-pass filter and a notch filter were used to eliminate disturbances, which caused by natural frequencies. As a consequence, the inductive displacement sensor achieved satisfactory linearity, high sensitivity, and disturbance elimination. This sensor can be easily produced for AMB applications. A prototype of these displacement sensors was built and tested.

  13. Inductive displacement sensors with a notch filter for an active magnetic bearing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Seng-Chi; Le, Dinh-Kha; Nguyen, Van-Sum

    2014-07-15

    Active magnetic bearing (AMB) systems support rotating shafts without any physical contact, using electromagnetic forces. Each radial AMB uses two pairs of electromagnets at opposite sides of the rotor. This allows the rotor to float in the air gap, and the machine to operate without frictional losses. In active magnetic suspension, displacement sensors are necessary to detect the radial and axial movement of the suspended object. In a high-speed rotating machine equipped with an AMB, the rotor bending modes may be limited to the operating range. The natural frequencies of the rotor can cause instability. Thus, notch filters are a useful circuit for stabilizing the system. In addition, commercial displacement sensors are sometimes not suitable for AMB design, and cannot filter the noise caused by the natural frequencies of rotor. Hence, implementing displacement sensors based on the AMB structure is necessary to eliminate noises caused by natural frequency disturbances. The displacement sensor must be highly sensitive in the desired working range, and also exhibit a low interference noise, high stability, and low cost. In this study, we used the differential inductive sensor head and lock-in amplifier for synchronous demodulation. In addition, an active low-pass filter and a notch filter were used to eliminate disturbances, which caused by natural frequencies. As a consequence, the inductive displacement sensor achieved satisfactory linearity, high sensitivity, and disturbance elimination. This sensor can be easily produced for AMB applications. A prototype of these displacement sensors was built and tested.

  14. Including students with moderate and severe intellectual disabilities in school extracurricular and community recreation activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, Harold L; Miracle, Sally; Sheppard-Jones, Kathy

    2007-02-01

    We conducted an online statewide survey of teachers of students with moderate and severe intellectual disabilities to determine the extent to which their students were included in school extracurricular and community recreation activities. For the 252 teacher respondents who indicated that their primary caseload consisted of students with significant intellectual disabilities, we report the numbers of students participating in school and community activities and the primary type of support students required to participate in each activity. Finally, we identify implications for practitioners who want to increase the participation of students with significant disabilities in school and community activities.

  15. Integrating Multiple Space Ground Sensors to Track Volcanic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Steve; Davies, Ashley; Doubleday, Joshua; Tran, Daniel; Jones, Samuel; Kjartansson, Einar; Thorsteinsson, Hrobjartur; Vogfjord, Kristin; Guomundsson, Magnus; Thordarson, Thor; hide

    2011-01-01

    Volcanic activity can occur with little or no warning. Increasing numbers of space borne assets can enable coordinated measurements of volcanic events to enhance both scientific study and hazard response. We describe the use of space and ground measurements to target further measurements as part of a worldwide volcano monitoring system. We utilize a number of alert systems including the MODVOLC, GOESVOLC, US Air Force Weather Advisory, and Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) alert systems. Additionally we use in-situ data from ground instrumentation at a number of volcanic sites, including Iceland.

  16. Detection of daily activities and sports with wearable sensors in controlled and uncontrolled conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermes, M; Pärkka, J; Mantyjarvi, J; Korhonen, I

    2008-01-01

    Physical activity has a positive impact on people's well-being, and it may also decrease the occurrence of chronic diseases. Activity recognition with wearable sensors can provide feedback to the user about his/her lifestyle regarding physical activity and sports, and thus, promote a more active lifestyle. So far, activity recognition has mostly been studied in supervised laboratory settings. The aim of this study was to examine how well the daily activities and sports performed by the subjects in unsupervised settings can be recognized compared to supervised settings. The activities were recognized by using a hybrid classifier combining a tree structure containing a priori knowledge and artificial neural networks, and also by using three reference classifiers. Activity data were collected for 68 h from 12 subjects, out of which the activity was supervised for 21 h and unsupervised for 47 h. Activities were recognized based on signal features from 3-D accelerometers on hip and wrist and GPS information. The activities included lying down, sitting and standing, walking, running, cycling with an exercise bike, rowing with a rowing machine, playing football, Nordic walking, and cycling with a regular bike. The total accuracy of the activity recognition using both supervised and unsupervised data was 89% that was only 1% unit lower than the accuracy of activity recognition using only supervised data. However, the accuracy decreased by 17% unit when only supervised data were used for training and only unsupervised data for validation, which emphasizes the need for out-of-laboratory data in the development of activity-recognition systems. The results support a vision of recognizing a wider spectrum, and more complex activities in real life settings.

  17. Measuring and Classifying Land-Based and Water-Based Daily Living Activities Using Inertial Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Kaneda

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study classified motions of typical daily activities in both environments using inertial sensors attached at the chest and thigh to determine the optimal site to attach the sensors. Walking, chair standing and sitting, and step climbing were conducted both in water and on land. A mean, variance and skewness for acceleration data was calculated. A Neural Network and Decision Tree algorithm was applied for classifying each motion in both environments. In total, 126 and 144 samples of thigh and chest data sets were obtained for analysis in each condition. For the chest data, the algorithm correctly classified 80% of the water-based activities, and 90% of the land-based. Whilst the thigh sensor correctly classified 97% of water-based and 100% of land-based activities. The inertial sensor placed on the thigh provided the most appropriate protocol for classifying motions for land-based and water-based typical daily life activities.

  18. Organic magnetic field sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCamey, Dane; Boehme, Christoph

    2017-01-24

    An organic, spin-dependent magnetic field sensor (10) includes an active stack (12) having an organic material with a spin-dependence. The sensor (10) also includes a back electrical contact (14) electrically coupled to a back of the active stack (12) and a front electrical contact (16) electrically coupled to a front of the active stack (12). A magnetic field generator (18) is oriented so as to provide an oscillating magnetic field which penetrates the active stack (12).

  19. Characterization and re-activation of oxygen sensors for use in liquid lead-bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Yuji; Abe, Yuji; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Oigawa, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Control of oxygen concentration in liquid lead-bismuth is one of the most important tasks to develop accelerator driven systems. In order to improve the reliability of oxygen sensors, re-activation treatments were investigated as well as characterization of oxygen sensors for use in liquid lead-bismuth. The oxygen sensor with a solid electrolyte of yttria-stabilized zirconia and a Pt/gas reference electrode showed almost the same electromotive force values in gas and liquid lead-bismuth, respectively, as the theoretical ones at temperatures above 400 deg. C or 450 deg. C. After long-term use of 6500 h, the outputs of the sensor became incorrect in liquid lead-bismuth. The state of the sensor that indicated incorrect outputs could not be recovered by cleaning with a nitric acid. However, it was found that the oxygen sensor became a correct sensor indicating theoretical values in liquid lead-bismuth after re-activation by the Pt-treatment of the outer surface of the sensor.

  20. A Secure Behavior Modification Sensor System for Physical Activity Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Today, advances in wireless sensor networks are making it possible to capture large amounts of information about a person and their interaction within their home environment. However, what is missing is how to ensure the security of the collected data and its use to alter human behavior for positive benefit. In this research, exploration was…

  1. Heat-activated Plasmonic Chemical Sensors for Harsh Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, Michael [SUNY Polytechnic Inst., Albany, NY (United States); Oh, Sang-Hyun [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    A passive plasmonics based chemical sensing system to be used in harsh operating environments was investigated and developed within this program. The initial proposed technology was based on combining technologies developed at the SUNY Polytechnic Institute Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) and at the University of Minnesota (UM). Specifically, a passive wireless technique developed at UM was to utilize a heat-activated plasmonic design to passively harvest the thermal energy from within a combustion emission stream and convert this into a narrowly focused light source. This plasmonic device was based on a bullseye design patterned into a gold film using focused ion beam methods (FIB). Critical to the design was the use of thermal stabilizing under and overlayers surrounding the gold film. These stabilizing layers were based on both atomic layer deposited films as well as metal laminate layers developed by United Technologies Aerospace Systems (UTAS). While the bullseye design was never able to be thermally stabilized for operating temperatures of 500oC or higher, an alternative energy harvesting design was developed by CNSE within this program. With this new development, plasmonic sensing results are presented where thermal energy is harvested using lithographically patterned Au nanorods, replacing the need for an external incident light source. Gas sensing results using the harvested thermal energy are in good agreement with sensing experiments, which used an external incident light source. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the wavelength parameter space from 665 variables down to 4 variables with similar levels of demonstrated selectivity. The method was further improved by patterning rods which harvested energy in the near infrared, which led to a factor of 10 decrease in data acquisition times as well as demonstrated selectivity with a reduced wavelength data set. The combination of a plasmonic-based energy harvesting

  2. Sensor-based Human Activity Recognition in a Multi-user Scenario

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Liang; Gu, Tao; Tao, Xianping

    2009-01-01

    from sensor readings in a smart home environment. We develop a multimodal sensing platform and present a theoretical framework to recognize both single-user and multi-user activities. We conduct our trace collection done in a smart home, and evaluate our framework through experimental studies. Our......Existing work on sensor-based activity recognition focuses mainly on single-user activities. However, in real life, activities are often performed by multiple users involving interactions between them. In this paper, we propose Coupled Hidden Markov Models (CHMMs) to recognize multi-user activities...

  3. Sensor-based Human Activity Recognition in a Multi-user Scenario

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Liang; Gu, Tao; Tao, Xianping

    2009-01-01

    Existing work on sensor-based activity recognition focuses mainly on single-user activities. However, in real life, activities are often performed by multiple users involving interactions between them. In this paper, we propose Coupled Hidden Markov Models (CHMMs) to recognize multi-user activities...... from sensor readings in a smart home environment. We develop a multimodal sensing platform and present a theoretical framework to recognize both single-user and multi-user activities. We conduct our trace collection done in a smart home, and evaluate our framework through experimental studies. Our...

  4. X-ray imaging characterization of active edge silicon pixel sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponchut, C; Ruat, M; Kalliopuska, J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was the experimental characterization of edge effects in active-edge silicon pixel sensors, in the frame of X-ray pixel detectors developments for synchrotron experiments. We produced a set of active edge pixel sensors with 300 to 500 μm thickness, edge widths ranging from 100 μm to 150 μm, and n or p pixel contact types. The sensors with 256 × 256 pixels and 55 × 55 μm 2 pixel pitch were then bump-bonded to Timepix readout chips for X-ray imaging measurements. The reduced edge widths makes the edge pixels more sensitive to the electrical field distribution at the sensor boundaries. We characterized this effect by mapping the spatial response of the sensor edges with a finely focused X-ray synchrotron beam. One of the samples showed a distortion-free response on all four edges, whereas others showed variable degrees of distortions extending at maximum to 300 micron from the sensor edge. An application of active edge pixel sensors to coherent diffraction imaging with synchrotron beams is described

  5. Probing active-edge silicon sensors using a high precision telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiba, K. [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Artuso, M. [Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY (United States); Beveren, V. van; Beuzekom, M. van; Boterenbrood, H. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Buytaert, J.; Collins, P.; Dumps, R. [CERN, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Heijden, B. van der [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hombach, C. [University of Manchester, Manchester, Lancashire (United Kingdom); Hynds, D. [Glasgow University, Glasgow, Lanarkshire (United Kingdom); Hsu, D. [Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY (United States); John, M. [University of Oxford, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Koffeman, E. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Leflat, A. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Li, Y. [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Longstaff, I.; Morton, A. [Glasgow University, Glasgow, Lanarkshire (United Kingdom); Pérez Trigo, E. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Plackett, R. [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-03-21

    The performance of prototype active-edge VTT sensors bump-bonded to the Timepix ASIC is presented. Non-irradiated sensors of thicknesses 100–200 μm and pixel-to-edge distances of 50 μm and 100 μm were probed with a beam of charged hadrons with sub-pixel precision using the Timepix telescope assembled at the SPS at CERN. The sensors are shown to be highly efficient up to a few micrometers from the physical edge of the sensor. The distortion of the electric field lines at the edge of the sensors is studied by reconstructing the streamlines of the electric field using two-pixel clusters. These results are supported by TCAD simulations. The reconstructed streamlines are used to study the field distortion as a function of the bias voltage and to apply corrections to the cluster positions at the edge.

  6. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... activity including the handler's name or brand, or the words “California Almonds”, the amount allowed for... the handler's name, the handler's brand, or the words “California Almonds” on the primary, face label... payment on these dates, handler claims must be submitted, with all required elements, at least one month...

  7. Implementation of the Project "Including Disabled Senior Citizens in Creative Activities in 2013-2015"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploch, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    This paper made an attempt to indicate the findings of the author's research from the experiences of the implementation of the project "Including disabled senior citizens in creative activities in 2013-2015". The issues of disabled senior citizens have been an object of interest over the recent years though it still has not had a proper…

  8. Active photonic sensor communication cable for field application of optical data and power transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthau, Eike; Rieske, Ralf; Zerna, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Omitting electrically conducting wires for sensor communication and power supply promises protection for sensor systems and monitored structures against lightning or high voltages, prevention of explosion hazards, and reduction of susceptibility to tampering. The ability to photonically power remote systems opens up the full range of electrical sensors. Power-over-fiber is an attractive option in electromagnetically sensitive environments, particularly for longterm, maintenance-free applications. It can deliver uninterrupted power sufficient for elaborate sensors, data processing or even actuators alongside continuous high speed data communication for remote sensor application. This paper proposes an active photonic sensor communication system, which combines the advantages of optical data links in terms of immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), high bandwidth, hardiness against tampering or eavesdropping, and low cable weight with the robustness one has come to expect from industrial or military electrical connectors. An application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is presented that implements a closed-loop regulation of the sensor power supply to guarantee continuous, reliable data communications while maintaining a highly efficient, adaptive sensor supply scheme. It is demonstrated that the resulting novel photonic sensor communication cable can handle sensors and actuators differing orders of magnitude with respect to power consumption. The miniaturization of the electro-optical converters and driving electronics is as important to the presented development as the energy efficiency of the detached, optically powered sensor node. For this reason, a novel photonic packaging technology based on wafer-level assembly of the laser power converters by means of passive alignment will be disclosed in this paper.

  9. Geant4-based simulations of charge collection in CMOS Active Pixel Sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, M.; Allinson, N.M.; Price, T.; Anaxagoras, T.

    2017-01-01

    Geant4 is an object-oriented toolkit for the simulation of the interaction of particles and radiation with matter. It provides a snapshot of the state of a simulated particle in time, as it travels through a specified geometry. One important area of application is the modelling of radiation detector systems. Here, we extend the abilities of such modelling to include charge transport and sharing in pixelated CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs); though similar effects occur in other pixel detectors. The CMOS APSs discussed were developed in the framework of the PRaVDA consortium to assist the design of custom sensors to be used in an energy-range detector for proton Computed Tomography (pCT). The development of ad-hoc classes, providing a charge transport model for a CMOS APS and its integration into the standard Geant4 toolkit, is described. The proposed charge transport model includes, charge generation, diffusion, collection, and sharing across adjacent pixels, as well as the full electronic chain for a CMOS APS. The proposed model is validated against experimental data acquired with protons in an energy range relevant for pCT.

  10. Toward transparent and self-activated graphene harmonic transponder sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haiyu Harry; Sakhdari, Maryam; Hajizadegan, Mehdi; Shahini, Ali; Akinwande, Deji; Chen, Pai-Yen

    2016-04-01

    We propose the concept and design of a transparent, flexible, and self-powered wireless sensor comprising a graphene-based sensor/frequency-modulator circuitry and a graphene antenna. In this all-graphene device, the multilayered-graphene antenna receives the fundamental tone at C band and retransmits the frequency-modulated sensed signal (harmonic tone) at X band. The frequency orthogonality between the received/re-transmitted signals may enable high-performance sensing in severe interference/clutter background. Here, a fully passive, quad-ring frequency multiplier is proposed using graphene field-effect transistors, of which the unique ambipolar charge transports render a frequency doubling effect with conversion gain being chemically sensitive to exposed gas/molecular/chemical/infectious agents. This transparent, light-weight, and self-powered system may potentially benefit a number of wireless sensing and diagnosis applications, particularly for smart contact lenses/glasses and microscope slides that require high optical transparency.

  11. Sensor readout detector circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, D.D.; Thelen, D.C. Jr.

    1998-08-11

    A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems. 6 figs.

  12. Triple Active Antiretroviral Regimen Including Enfuvirtide Via the Biojector is Effective and Safe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Loutfy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available For full HIV virological suppression, three fully active antiretroviral agents are required. New drug classes should be included to ensure that agents are fully active. The addition of enfuvirtide and efavirenz to the present patient’s new antiretroviral regimen ensured that two fully active agents were in use in the setting of a moderate degree of nucleoside resistance and a high level of protease resistance, and where non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were still fully active. Both viral load and CD4 count responded favourably to this regimen. The patient received support from physicians and clinic staff in the introduction and use of enfuvirtide. To reduce injection site reactions, a needle-free injection system (Biojector proved effective.

  13. Volcanic eruption source parameters from active and passive microwave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montopoli, Mario; Marzano, Frank S.; Cimini, Domenico; Mereu, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    It is well known, in the volcanology community, that precise information of the source parameters characterising an eruption are of predominant interest for the initialization of the Volcanic Transport and Dispersion Models (VTDM). Source parameters of main interest would be the top altitude of the volcanic plume, the flux of the mass ejected at the emission source, which is strictly related to the cloud top altitude, the distribution of volcanic mass concentration along the vertical column as well as the duration of the eruption and the erupted volume. Usually, the combination of a-posteriori field and numerical studies allow constraining the eruption source parameters for a given volcanic event thus making possible the forecast of ash dispersion and deposition from future volcanic eruptions. So far, remote sensors working at visible and infrared channels (cameras and radiometers) have been mainly used to detect, track and provide estimates of the concentration content and the prevailing size of the particles propagating within the ash clouds up to several thousand of kilometres far from the source as well as track back, a-posteriori, the accuracy of the VATDM outputs thus testing the initial choice made for the source parameters. Acoustic wave (infrasound) and microwave fixed scan radar (voldorad) were also used to infer source parameters. In this work we want to put our attention on the role of sensors operating at microwave wavelengths as complementary tools for the real time estimations of source parameters. Microwaves can benefit of the operability during night and day and a relatively negligible sensitivity to the presence of clouds (non precipitating weather clouds) at the cost of a limited coverage and larger spatial resolution when compared with infrared sensors. Thanks to the aforementioned advantages, the products from microwaves sensors are expected to be sensible mostly to the whole path traversed along the tephra cloud making microwaves particularly

  14. 2D-Visualization of metabolic activity with planar optical chemical sensors (optodes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, R. J.; Liebsch, G.

    2015-12-01

    Microbia plays an outstandingly important role in many hydrologic compartments, such as e.g. the benthic community in sediments, or biologically active microorganisms in the capillary fringe, in ground water, or soil. Oxygen, pH, and CO2 are key factors and indicators for microbial activity. They can be measured using optical chemical sensors. These sensors record changing fluorescence properties of specific indicator dyes. The signals can be measured in a non-contact mode, even through transparent walls, which is important for many lab-experiments. They can measure in closed (transparent) systems, without sampling or intruding into the sample. They do not consume the analytes while measuring, are fully reversible and able to measure in non-stirred solutions. These sensors can be applied as high precision fiberoptic sensors (for profiling), robust sensor spots, or as planar sensors for 2D visualization (imaging). Imaging enables to detect thousands of measurement spots at the same time and generate 2D analyte maps over a region of interest. It allows for comparing different regions within one recorded image, visualizing spatial analyte gradients, or more important to identify hot spots of metabolic activity. We present ready-to-use portable imaging systems for the analytes oxygen, pH, and CO2. They consist of a detector unit, planar sensor foils and a software for easy data recording and evaluation. Sensors foils for various analytes and measurement ranges enable visualizing metabolic activity or analyte changes in the desired range. Dynamics of metabolic activity can be detected in one shot or over long time periods. We demonstrate the potential of this analytical technique by presenting experiments on benthic disturbance-recovery dynamics in sediments and microbial degradation of organic material in the capillary fringe. We think this technique is a new tool to further understand how microbial and geochemical processes are linked in (not solely) hydrologic

  15. SVM-based multimodal classification of activities of daily living in Health Smart Homes: sensors, algorithms, and first experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Anthony; Vacher, Michel; Noury, Norbert

    2010-03-01

    By 2050, about one third of the French population will be over 65. Our laboratory's current research focuses on the monitoring of elderly people at home, to detect a loss of autonomy as early as possible. Our aim is to quantify criteria such as the international activities of daily living (ADL) or the French Autonomie Gerontologie Groupes Iso-Ressources (AGGIR) scales, by automatically classifying the different ADL performed by the subject during the day. A Health Smart Home is used for this. Our Health Smart Home includes, in a real flat, infrared presence sensors (location), door contacts (to control the use of some facilities), temperature and hygrometry sensor in the bathroom, and microphones (sound classification and speech recognition). A wearable kinematic sensor also informs postural transitions (using pattern recognition) and walk periods (frequency analysis). This data collected from the various sensors are then used to classify each temporal frame into one of the ADL that was previously acquired (seven activities: hygiene, toilet use, eating, resting, sleeping, communication, and dressing/undressing). This is done using support vector machines. We performed a 1-h experimentation with 13 young and healthy subjects to determine the models of the different activities, and then we tested the classification algorithm (cross validation) with real data.

  16. Development of a smartphone application to measure physical activity using sensor-assisted self-report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunton, Genevieve Fridlund; Dzubur, Eldin; Kawabata, Keito; Yanez, Brenda; Bo, Bin; Intille, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Despite the known advantages of objective physical activity monitors (e.g., accelerometers), these devices have high rates of non-wear, which leads to missing data. Objective activity monitors are also unable to capture valuable contextual information about behavior. Adolescents recruited into physical activity surveillance and intervention studies will increasingly have smartphones, which are miniature computers with built-in motion sensors. This paper describes the design and development of a smartphone application ("app") called Mobile Teen that combines objective and self-report assessment strategies through (1) sensor-informed context-sensitive ecological momentary assessment (CS-EMA) and (2) sensor-assisted end-of-day recall. The Mobile Teen app uses the mobile phone's built-in motion sensor to automatically detect likely bouts of phone non-wear, sedentary behavior, and physical activity. The app then uses transitions between these inferred states to trigger CS-EMA self-report surveys measuring the type, purpose, and context of activity in real-time. The end of the day recall component of the Mobile Teen app allows users to interactively review and label their own physical activity data each evening using visual cues from automatically detected major activity transitions from the phone's built-in motion sensors. Major activity transitions are identified by the app, which cues the user to label that "chunk," or period, of time using activity categories. Sensor-driven CS-EMA and end-of-day recall smartphone apps can be used to augment physical activity data collected by objective activity monitors, filling in gaps during non-wear bouts and providing additional real-time data on environmental, social, and emotional correlates of behavior. Smartphone apps such as these have potential for affordable deployment in large-scale epidemiological and intervention studies.

  17. Development of a Smartphone Application to Measure Physical Activity Using Sensor-Assisted Self-Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve Fridlund Dunton

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the known advantages of objective physical activity monitors (e.g., accelerometers, these devices have high rates of non-wear, which leads to missing data. Objective activity monitors are also unable to capture valuable contextual information about behavior. Adolescents recruited into physical activity surveillance and intervention studies will increasingly have smartphones, which are miniature computers with built-in motion sensors. Methods: This paper describes the design and development of a smartphone application (app called Mobile Teen that combines objective and self-report assessment strategies through (1 sensor-informed context-sensitive ecological momentary assessment (CS-EMA and (2 sensor-assisted end-of-day recall.Results: The Mobile Teen app uses the mobile phone’s built-in motion sensor to automatically detect likely bouts of phone non-wear, sedentary behavior, and physical activity. The app then uses transitions between these inferred states to trigger CS-EMA self-report surveys measuring the type, purpose, and context of activity in real time. The end of the day recall component of the Mobile Teen app allows users to interactively review and label their own physical activity data each evening using visual cues from automatically-detected major activity transitions from the phone’s built-in motions sensors. Major activity transitions are identified by the app, which cues the user to label that chunk, or period, of time using activity categories.Conclusions: Sensor-driven CS-EMA and end-of-day recall smartphone apps can be used to augment physical activity data collected by objective activity monitors, filling in gaps during non-wear bouts and providing additional real-time data on environmental, social, and emotional correlates of behavior. Smartphone apps such as these have potential for affordable deployment in large scale epidemiological and intervention studies.

  18. Development and Integration of Hardware and Software for Active-Sensors in Structural Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overly, Timothy G.S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) promises to deliver great benefits to many industries. Primarily among them is a potential for large cost savings in maintenance of complex structures such as aircraft and civil infrastructure. However, several large obstacles remain before widespread use on structures can be accomplished. The development of three components would address many of these obstacles: a robust sensor validation procedure, a low-cost active-sensing hardware and an integrated software package for transition to field deployment. The research performed in this thesis directly addresses these three needs and facilitates the adoption of SHM on a larger scale, particularly in the realm of SHM based on piezoelectric (PZT) materials. The first obstacle addressed in this thesis is the validation of the SHM sensor network. PZT materials are used for sensor/actuators because of their unique properties, but their functionality also needs to be validated for meaningful measurements to be recorded. To allow for a robust sensor validation algorithm, the effect of temperature change on sensor diagnostics and the effect of sensor failure on SHM measurements were classified. This classification allowed for the development of a sensor diagnostic algorithm that is temperature invariant and can indicate the amount and type of sensor failure. Secondly, the absence of a suitable commercially-available active-sensing measurement node is addressed in this thesis. A node is a small compact measurement device used in a complete system. Many measurement nodes exist for conventional passive sensing, which does not actively excite the structure, but there are no measurement nodes available that both meet the active-sensing requirements and are useable outside the laboratory. This thesis develops hardware that is low-power, active-sensing and field-deployable. This node uses the impedance method for SHM measurements, and can run the sensor diagnostic algorithm also developed here

  19. Development of isoform-specific sensors of polypeptide GalNAc-transferase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Lina; Bachert, Collin; Schjoldager, Katrine T

    2014-01-01

    Humans express up to 20 isoforms of GalNAc-transferase (herein T1-T20) that localize to the Golgi apparatus and initiate O-glycosylation. Regulation of this enzyme family affects a vast array of proteins transiting the secretory pathway and diseases arise upon misregulation of specific isoforms....... Surprisingly, molecular probes to monitor GalNAc-transferase activity are lacking and there exist no effective global or isoform-specific inhibitors. Here we describe the development of T2- and T3-isoform specific fluorescence sensors that traffic in the secretory pathway. Each sensor yielded little signal...... when glycosylated but was strongly activated in the absence of its glycosylation. Specificity of each sensor was assessed in HEK cells with either the T2 or T3 enzymes deleted. Although the sensors are based on specific substrates of the T2 and T3 enzymes, elements in or near the enzyme recognition...

  20. Comparison of hip extensor muscle activity including the adductor magnus during three prone hip extension exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Han-I; Jeon, Seung-Yeon; Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Kyue-Nam

    2018-03-30

    This study compared the role of the adductor magnus muscle (Amag) as a hip extensor while performing active prone hip extension (PHE), PHE with hip adduction (PHE-ADD), and PHE with hip abduction (PHE-ABD) with the gluteus maximus (Gmax) and hamstrings. The study recruited 22 healthy participants. Electromyography data were recorded from the Amag, Gmax, and medial and lateral hamstrings during PHE, PHE-ADD, and PHE-ABD. Normalized electromyographic data were examined using one-way, repeated-measures analyses of variance. The magnitude of the Amag, Gmax, and hamstring activations did not differ significantly while performing PHE (p = 0.41). Furthermore, the Amag and hamstring activations were significantly greater than the Gmax activation when performing PHE-ADD (p < 0.05). The Gmax showed significantly greater activation during PHE-ABD than the Amag and medial and lateral hamstrings (p < 0.05). Based on these results, we advocate including the Amag as a hip extensor during the PHE test or exercise. Our preliminary results have the potential to be applied directly to the PHE test, for investigating the muscle-activation pattern of the Amag with the Gmax and hamstrings in patients with hip or lower back pain.

  1. Sensor-derived physical activity parameters can predict future falls in people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, Michael; Hauer, Klaus; Zieschang, Tania; Englert, Stefan; Mohler, Jane; Najafi, Bijan

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for simple clinical tools that can objectively assess the fall risk in people with dementia. Wearable sensors seem to have the potential for fall prediction; however, there has been limited work performed in this important area. To explore the validity of sensor-derived physical activity (PA) parameters for predicting future falls in people with dementia. To compare sensor-based fall risk assessment with conventional fall risk measures. This was a cohort study of people with confirmed dementia discharged from a geriatric rehabilitation ward. PA was quantified using 24-hour motion-sensor monitoring at the beginning of the study. PA parameters (percentage of walking, standing, sitting, and lying; duration of single walking, standing, and sitting bouts) were extracted using specific algorithms. Conventional assessment included performance-based tests (Timed Up and Go Test, Performance-Oriented Mobility Assessment, 5-chair stand) and questionnaires (cognition, ADL status, fear of falling, depression, previous faller). Outcome measures were fallers (at least one fall in the 3-month follow-up period) versus non-fallers. 77 people were included in the study (age 81.8 ± 6.3; community-dwelling 88%, institutionalized 12%). Surprisingly, fallers and non-fallers did not differ on any conventional assessment (p = 0.069-0.991), except for 'previous faller' (p = 0.006). Interestingly, several PA parameters discriminated between the groups. The 'walking bout average duration', 'longest walking bout duration' and 'walking bout duration variability' were lower in fallers, compared to non-fallers (p = 0.008-0.027). The 'standing bout average duration' was higher in fallers (p = 0.050). Two variables, 'walking bout average duration' [odds ratio (OR) 0.79, p = 0.012] and 'previous faller' (OR 4.44, p = 0.007) were identified as independent predictors for falls. The OR for a 'walking bout average duration' risk and may have higher diagnostic accuracy in persons with

  2. USING PASSIVE AND ACTIVE MULTISPECTRAL SENSORS ON THE CORRELATION WITH THE PHENOLOGICAL INDICES OF COTTON

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Heloisa B.; Baio, Fabio H. R.; Neves, Danilo C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The investment in precision agriculture technologies has been growing as well the investment in vegetation index sensors with different types of data collection. This study aimed to evaluate the NDVI potential use obtained from passive and active multispectral sensors as phenological parameters indicator of cotton growth. The experiment was conducted in cultivated cotton fields during the harvest seasons of 2013/14 and 2014/15. The phenological variables analyzed in the field, were ...

  3. Measuring Outcomes in Adult Weight Loss Studies That Include Diet and Physical Activity: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Millstein, Rachel A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Measuring success of obesity interventions is critical. Several methods measure weight loss outcomes but there is no consensus on best practices. This systematic review evaluates relevant outcomes (weight loss, BMI, % body fat, and fat mass) to determine which might be the best indicator(s) of success. Methods. Eligible articles described adult weight loss interventions that included diet and physical activity and a measure of weight or BMI change and body composition change. Resu...

  4. Silicon strip sensor R and D activities in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the development of the double sided silicon, DC-coupled detectors (DSSD) for tracking applications. The DSSD are being fabricated with experience of producing the Silicon Charge Detector (SCD) which consists of 182 silicon PIN diode sensors for the charge identification of the incoming particles in the CREAM (Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass) experiment. A DSSD consists of 512 readout channels and the implanted strips are orthogonal to each other on opposite sides of the detector wafer. The design of the DSSD and its various components are presented. Very preliminary measurement results from the first batch run are also discussed. (author)

  5. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS): New ‘eyes’ for science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchetta, R.; Allport, P. P.; Casse, G.; Clark, A.; Crooks, J.; Evans, A.; Fant, A.; Faruqi, A. R.; French, M. J.; Henderson, R.; Morrissey, Q.; Prior, D.; Prydderch, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Villani, G.; Waltham, N.; Willmore, B.; Willmore, P.

    2006-05-01

    Re-invented in the early 1990s on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology have slowly invaded the world of consumer imaging and are now on the edge of becoming the first technology in this field, previously dominated by Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). Thanks to the advantages brought by the use of standard CMOS technology, MAPS have great potential in many areas including function integration, leading to the concept of a camera-on-a-chip, pixel size, random access to selected region-of-interest, low power, higher speed and radiation resistance. In many ways, MAPS have introduced a new way of doing imaging. Despite their success in the consumer arena, MAPS are still to make a definitive impact in the world of scientific imaging. This paper first briefly reviews the way radiation is detected by a CMOS sensor, before analysing the main noise source and its relationship with the full well capacity and the dynamic range. This paper will also show first examples of scientific results, obtained in the detection of low-energy electrons.

  6. Joint torque and angle estimation by using ultrasonic muscle activity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Yoichiro; Tanaka, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shun'ichi; Feng, Maria Q.

    2005-12-01

    We have proposed a brand-new noninvasive ultrasonic sensor for measuring muscle activities named as Ultrasonic Muscle Activity Sensor (UMS). In the previous paper, the authors achieved to accurately estimate joint torque by using UMS and electromyogram (EMG) which is one of the most popular sensors. This paper aims to realize to measure not only joint torque also joint angle by using UMS and EMG. In order to estimate torque and angle of a knee joint, muscle activities of quadriceps femoris and biceps femoris were measured by both UMS and EMG. These targeted muscles are related to contraction and extension of knee joint. Simultaneously, actual torque on the knee joint caused by these muscles was measured by using torque sensor. The knee joint angle was fixed by torque sensor in the experiment, therefore the measurement was in isometric state. In the result, we found that the estimated torque and angle have high correlation coefficient to actual torque and angle. This means that the sensor can be used for angle estimation as well torque estimation. Therefore, it is shown that the combined use of UMS and EMG is effective to torque and angle estimation.

  7. Passive radiation detection using optically active CMOS sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosiek, Luke; Schalk, Patrick D.

    2013-05-01

    Recently, there have been a number of small-scale and hobbyist successes in employing commodity CMOS-based camera sensors for radiation detection. For example, several smartphone applications initially developed for use in areas near the Fukushima nuclear disaster are capable of detecting radiation using a cell phone camera, provided opaque tape is placed over the lens. In all current useful implementations, it is required that the sensor not be exposed to visible light. We seek to build a system that does not have this restriction. While building such a system would require sophisticated signal processing, it would nevertheless provide great benefits. In addition to fulfilling their primary function of image capture, cameras would also be able to detect unknown radiation sources even when the danger is considered to be low or non-existent. By experimentally profiling the image artifacts generated by gamma ray and β particle impacts, algorithms are developed to identify the unique features of radiation exposure, while discarding optical interaction and thermal noise effects. Preliminary results focus on achieving this goal in a laboratory setting, without regard to integration time or computational complexity. However, future work will seek to address these additional issues.

  8. Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Including resource material full text CD-ROM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    The present CD-ROM summarizes some activities carried out by the Departments of Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Safety and Security in the area of nuclear knowledge management in the period 2003-2005. It comprises, as open resource, most of the relevant documents in full text, including policy level documents, reports, presentation material by Member States and meeting summaries. The collection starts with a reprint of the report to the IAEA General Conference 2004 on Nuclear Knowledge [GOV/2004/56-GC(48)/12] summarizing the developments in nuclear knowledge management since the 47th session of the General Conference in 2003 and covers Managing Nuclear Knowledge including safety issues and Information and Strengthening Education and Training for Capacity Building. It contains an excerpt on Nuclear Knowledge from the General Conference Resolution [GC(48)/RES/13] on Strengthening the Agency's Activities Related to Nuclear Science, Technology and Applications. On the CD-ROM itself, all documents can easily be accessed by clicking on their titles on the subject pages (also printed at the end of this Working Material). Part 1 of the CD-ROM covers the activities in the period 2003-2005 and part 2 presents a resource material full text CD-ROM on Managing Nuclear Knowledge issued in October 2003

  9. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, M; Evans, P M; Wells, K; Anaxagoras, T; Konstantinidis, A C; Zheng, Y; Speller, R D; Allinson, N M

    2014-01-01

    Recently CMOS active pixels sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous silicon and selenium flat panel imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However, despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non-uniformity of stitched sensors can arise from a number of factors related to the manufacturing process, including variation of amplification, variation between readout components, wafer defects and process variations across the wafer due to manufacturing processes. This paper reports on an investigation into the spatial non-uniformity and regional variations of a wafer scale stitched CMOS APS. For the first time a per-pixel analysis of the electro-optical performance of a wafer CMOS APS is presented, to address inhomogeneity issues arising from the stitching techniques used to manufacture wafer scale sensors. A complete model of the signal generation in the pixel array has been provided and proved capable of accounting for noise and gain variations across the pixel array. This novel analysis leads to readout noise and conversion gain being evaluated at pixel level, stitching block level and in regions of interest, resulting in a coefficient of variation ⩽1.9%. The uniformity of the image quality performance has been further investigated in a typical x-ray application, i.e. mammography, showing a uniformity in terms of CNR among the highest when compared with mammography detectors commonly used in clinical practice. Finally, in order to compare the detection capability of this novel APS with the technology currently used (i.e. FPIs), theoretical evaluation of the detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at zero-frequency has been performed, resulting in a higher DQE for this

  10. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, M; Anaxagoras, T; Konstantinidis, A C; Zheng, Y; Speller, R D; Evans, P M; Allinson, N M; Wells, K

    2014-07-07

    Recently CMOS active pixels sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous silicon and selenium flat panel imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However, despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non-uniformity of stitched sensors can arise from a number of factors related to the manufacturing process, including variation of amplification, variation between readout components, wafer defects and process variations across the wafer due to manufacturing processes. This paper reports on an investigation into the spatial non-uniformity and regional variations of a wafer scale stitched CMOS APS. For the first time a per-pixel analysis of the electro-optical performance of a wafer CMOS APS is presented, to address inhomogeneity issues arising from the stitching techniques used to manufacture wafer scale sensors. A complete model of the signal generation in the pixel array has been provided and proved capable of accounting for noise and gain variations across the pixel array. This novel analysis leads to readout noise and conversion gain being evaluated at pixel level, stitching block level and in regions of interest, resulting in a coefficient of variation ⩽1.9%. The uniformity of the image quality performance has been further investigated in a typical x-ray application, i.e. mammography, showing a uniformity in terms of CNR among the highest when compared with mammography detectors commonly used in clinical practice. Finally, in order to compare the detection capability of this novel APS with the technology currently used (i.e. FPIs), theoretical evaluation of the detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at zero-frequency has been performed, resulting in a higher DQE for this

  11. Recognition of Walking Activities Using Wireless Inertial and Orientation Sensors: A Performance Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yalçin, Ç.; Marin Perianu, Mihai; Marin Perianu, Raluca; Havinga, Paul J.M.; Augusto, J.C.

    In this paper, we evaluate experimentally several methods for recognizing walking activities using on-body wireless nodes equipped with inertial and orientation sensors. The walking activities (walking on flat surfaces, uphill and downhill, upstairs and downstairs) are selected by healthcare experts

  12. Noise Parameters of CW Radar Sensors Used in Active Defense Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Jenik

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Active defense represents an innovative way of protecting military vehicles. It is based on the employment of a set of radar sensors which detect an approaching threat missile and activate a suitable counter-measure. Since the radar sensors are supposed to detect flying missiles very fast and, at the same time, distinguish them from stationary or slow-moving objects, CW Doppler radar sensors can be employed with a benefit. The submitted article deals with a complex noise analysis of this type of sensors. The analysis considers the noise of linear and quasi-linear RF components, phase-noise of the local oscillator as well as the noise of low-frequency circuits. Since the incidence of the phase-noise depends strongly upon the time delay between the reference and the cross-talked signals, a new method of measuring noise parameters utilizing a reflecting wall has been developed and verified. The achieved results confirm potentially high influence of the phase-noise on the noise parameters of the mentioned type of radar sensors. Obtained results can be used for the analysis of noise parameters of the similar but even more complex sensors.

  13. Piezoelectric Active Humidity Sensors Based on Lead-Free NaNbO3 Piezoelectric Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of micro-/nano-scaled energy harvesters and the self-powered sensor system has attracted great attention due to the miniaturization and integration of the micro-device. In this work, lead-free NaNbO3 piezoelectric nanofibers with a monoclinic perovskite structure were synthesized by the far-field electrospinning method. The flexible active humidity sensors were fabricated by transferring the nanofibers from silicon to a soft polymer substrate. The sensors exhibited outstanding piezoelectric energy-harvesting performance with output voltage up to 2 V during the vibration process. The output voltage generated by the NaNbO3 sensors exhibited a negative correlation with the environmental humidity varying from 5% to 80%, where the peak-to-peak value of the output voltage generated by the sensors decreased from 0.40 to 0.07 V. The sensor also exhibited a short response time, good selectively against ethanol steam, and great temperature stability. The piezoelectric active humidity sensing property could be attributed to the increased leakage current in the NaNbO3 nanofibers, which was generated due to proton hopping among the H3O+ groups in the absorbed H2O layers under the driving force of the piezoelectric potential.

  14. Role of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase in renal physiology and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallows, Kenneth R.; Pastor-Soler, Núria M.; Power, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The ultrasensitive energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) orchestrates the regulation of energy-generating and energy-consuming pathways. AMPK is highly expressed in the kidney where it is reported to be involved in a variety of physiological and pathological processes including ion transport, podocyte function, and diabetic renal hypertrophy. Sodium transport is the major energy-consuming process in the kidney, and AMPK has been proposed to contribute to the coupling of ion transport with cellular energy metabolism. Specifically, AMPK has been identified as a regulator of several ion transporters of significance in renal physiology, including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), the Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC), and the vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase). Identified regulators of AMPK in the kidney include dietary salt, diabetes, adiponectin, and ischemia. Activation of AMPK in response to adiponectin is described in podocytes, where it reduces albuminuria, and in tubular cells, where it reduces glycogen accumulation. Reduced AMPK activity in the diabetic kidney is associated with renal accumulation of triglyceride and glycogen and the pathogenesis of diabetic renal hypertrophy. Acute renal ischemia causes a rapid and powerful activation of AMPK, but the functional significance of this observation remains unclear. Despite the recent advances, there remain significant gaps in the present understanding of both the upstream regulating pathways and the downstream substrates for AMPK in the kidney. A more complete understanding of the AMPK pathway in the kidney offers potential for improved therapies for several renal diseases including diabetic nephropathy, polycystic kidney disease, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:20181668

  15. IR Sensor Synchronizing Active Shutter Glasses for 3D HDTV with Flexible Liquid Crystal Lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong In Han

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available IR sensor synchronizing active shutter glasses for three-dimensional high definition television (3D HDTV were developed using a flexible liquid crystal (FLC lens. The FLC lens was made on a polycarbonate (PC substrate using conventional liquid crystal display (LCD processes. The flexible liquid crystal lens displayed a maximum transmission of 32% and total response time of 2.56 ms. The transmittance, the contrast ratio and the response time of the flexible liquid crystal lens were superior to those of glass liquid crystal lenses. Microcontroller unit and drivers were developed as part of a reception module with power supply for the IR sensor synchronizing active shutter glasses with the flexible liquid crystal lens prototypes. IR sensor synchronizing active shutter glasses for 3D HDTV with flexible liquid crystal lenses produced excellent 3D images viewing characteristics.

  16. An Ambulatory Gait Monitoring System with Activity Classification and Gait Parameter Calculation Based on a Single Foot Inertial Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minsu; Kim, Jonghyun

    2018-04-01

    For healthcare and clinical use, ambulatory gait monitoring systems using inertial sensors have been developed to estimate the user gait parameters, such as walking speed, stride time, and stride length. However, to adapt the systems effectively to daily-life activities, they need to be able to classify the gait activities of daily-life to obtain the parameters for each activity. In this study, we propose a simple classification algorithm based on a single inertial sensor for ease of use, which classifies three major gait activities: leveled walk, ramp walk, and stair walk. The classification can be performed with gait parameter estimation simultaneously. The developed system that includes classification and parameter estimation algorithms was evaluated with eight healthy subjects within a gait lab and on an outdoor daily-life walking course. The results showed that the estimated gait parameters were comparable to existing studies (range of walking speed root mean square error: 0.059-0.129 m/s), and the classification accuracy was sufficiently high for all three gait activities: 98.5% for the indoor gait lab experiment and 95.5% for the outdoor complex daily-life walking course experiment. The proposed system is simple and effective for daily-life gait analysis, including gait activity classification and gait parameter estimation for each activity.

  17. A Pattern Mining Approach to Sensor-based Human Activity Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Tao; Wang, Liang; Wu, Zhanqing

    2011-01-01

    that describes significant changes between classes of data—to identify sensor features for classifying activities. Different from existing learning-based approaches which require different training datasets for building activity models, our activity models are built upon the sequential activity trace only......Recognizing human activities from sensor readings has recently attracted much research interest in pervasive computing due to its potential in many applications such as assistive living and healthcare. This task is particularly challenging because human activities are often performed in not only...... a simple (i.e., sequential), but also a complex (i.e., interleaved or concurrent) manner in real life. Little work has been done in addressing complex issues in such a situation. The existing models of interleaved and concurrent activities are typically learning-based. Such models lack of flexibility...

  18. Using Spread Spectrum Transform for Fast and Robust Simultaneous Measurement in Active Sensors with Multiple Emitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harbo, Anders La-Cour; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2002-01-01

    We present a signal processing algorithm for making robust and simultaneous measurements in an active sensor, which has one or more emitters and a receiver, and which employs some sort of signal processing hardware. Robustness means low sensitivity to time and frequency localized disturbances......, and to white noise. This is achieved partly by using a orthogonal spread spectrum transform for modulating the signals transmitted from the emitters to the receiver, and partly by using a number of transmission channels. The method is fast since the signals are short, and since the method does not rely......-cost active sensors....

  19. Active vibration reduction by optimally placed sensors and actuators with application to stiffened plates by beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daraji, A H; Hale, J M

    2014-01-01

    This study concerns new investigation of active vibration reduction of a stiffened plate bonded with discrete sensor/actuator pairs located optimally using genetic algorithms based on a developed finite element modeling. An isotropic plate element stiffened by a number of beam elements on its edges and having a piezoelectric sensor and actuator pair bonded to its surfaces is modeled using the finite element method and Hamilton’s principle, taking into account the effects of piezoelectric mass, stiffness and electromechanical coupling. The modeling is based on the first order shear deformation theory taking into account the effects of bending, membrane and shear deformation for the plate, the stiffening beam and the piezoelectric patches. A Matlab finite element program has been built for the stiffened plate model and verified with ANSYS and also experimentally. Optimal placement of ten piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs and optimal feedback gain for active vibration reduction are investigated for a plate stiffened by two beams arranged in the form of a cross. The genetic algorithm was set up for optimization of sensor/actuator placement and feedback gain based on the minimization of the optimal linear quadratic index as an objective function to suppress the first six modes of vibration. Comparison study is presented for active vibration reduction of a square cantilever plate stiffened by crossed beams with two sensor/actuator configurations: firstly, ten piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs are located in optimal positions; secondly, a piezoelectric layer of single sensor/actuator pair covering the whole of the stiffened plate as a SISO system. (paper)

  20. Chemical Sensor Platform for Non-Invasive Monitoring of Activity and Dehydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Solovei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A non-invasive solution for monitoring of the activity and dehydration of organisms is proposed in the work. For this purpose, a wireless standalone chemical sensor platform using two separate measurement techniques has been developed. The first approach for activity monitoring is based on humidity measurement. Our solution uses new humidity sensor based on a nanostructured TiO2 surface for sweat rate monitoring. The second technique is based on monitoring of potassium concentration in urine. High level of potassium concentration denotes clear occurrence of dehydration. Furthermore, a Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN was developed for this sensor platform to manage data transfer among devices and the internet. The WBAN coordinator controls the sensor devices and collects and stores the measured data. The collected data is particular to individuals and can be shared with physicians, emergency systems or athletes’ coaches. Long-time monitoring of activity and potassium concentration in urine can help maintain the appropriate water intake of elderly people or athletes and to send warning signals in the case of near dehydration. The created sensor system was calibrated and tested in laboratory and real conditions as well. The measurement results are discussed.

  1. Bio-Inspired Carbon Monoxide Sensors with Voltage-Activated Sensitivity

    KAUST Repository

    Savagatrup, Suchol

    2017-09-27

    Carbon monoxide (CO) outcompetes oxygen when binding to the iron center of hemeproteins, leading to a reduction in blood oxygen level and acute poisoning. Harvesting the strong specific interaction between CO and the iron porphyrin provides a highly selective and customizable sensor. We report the development of chemiresistive sensors with voltage-activated sensitivity for the detection of CO comprising iron porphyrin and functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (F-SWCNTs). Modulation of the gate voltage offers a predicted extra dimension for sensing. Specifically, the sensors show a significant increase in sensitivity toward CO when negative gate voltage is applied. The dosimetric sensors are selective to ppm levels of CO and functional in air. UV/Vis spectroscopy, differential pulse voltammetry, and density functional theory reveal that the in situ reduction of FeIII to FeII enhances the interaction between the F-SWCNTs and CO. Our results illustrate a new mode of sensors wherein redox active recognition units are voltage-activated to give enhanced and highly specific responses.

  2. An active alignment scheme for the MPTS array. [contour sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, R.

    1980-01-01

    In order to achieve and maintain required flatness of the antenna array, a rotating laser beam used for leveling applications on earth was utilized as a reference system. A photoconductive sensor with a reflective collecting surface determines the displacement and polarity of any misalignment and automatically engages a stepping motor to drive a variable-length mechanism to make the necessary corrections. Once aligned, little power is dissipated since a nulling bridge circuit that centers on the beam is used. A three-point subarray alignment arrangement is described which independently adjusts, in the three orthogonal directions, the height and tilt of subarrays within the MPTS array and readily adapts to any physical distortions of the secondary structure (such as that resulting from severe temperature extremes caused by an eclipse of the Sun). It is shown that only one rotating laser system is required since optical blockage is minimal on the array surface and that it is possible to incorporate a number of redundant laser systems for reliability without affecting the overall performance.

  3. Fault Diagnosis Based on Chemical Sensor Data with an Active Deep Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng; Hu, Zhixin; Liu, Jun; Yu, Shanen; Wu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Big sensor data provide significant potential for chemical fault diagnosis, which involves the baseline values of security, stability and reliability in chemical processes. A deep neural network (DNN) with novel active learning for inducing chemical fault diagnosis is presented in this study. It is a method using large amount of chemical sensor data, which is a combination of deep learning and active learning criterion to target the difficulty of consecutive fault diagnosis. DNN with deep architectures, instead of shallow ones, could be developed through deep learning to learn a suitable feature representation from raw sensor data in an unsupervised manner using stacked denoising auto-encoder (SDAE) and work through a layer-by-layer successive learning process. The features are added to the top Softmax regression layer to construct the discriminative fault characteristics for diagnosis in a supervised manner. Considering the expensive and time consuming labeling of sensor data in chemical applications, in contrast to the available methods, we employ a novel active learning criterion for the particularity of chemical processes, which is a combination of Best vs. Second Best criterion (BvSB) and a Lowest False Positive criterion (LFP), for further fine-tuning of diagnosis model in an active manner rather than passive manner. That is, we allow models to rank the most informative sensor data to be labeled for updating the DNN parameters during the interaction phase. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated in two well-known industrial datasets. Results indicate that the proposed method can obtain superior diagnosis accuracy and provide significant performance improvement in accuracy and false positive rate with less labeled chemical sensor data by further active learning compared with existing methods. PMID:27754386

  4. Fault Diagnosis Based on Chemical Sensor Data with an Active Deep Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng; Hu, Zhixin; Liu, Jun; Yu, Shanen; Wu, Feng

    2016-10-13

    Big sensor data provide significant potential for chemical fault diagnosis, which involves the baseline values of security, stability and reliability in chemical processes. A deep neural network (DNN) with novel active learning for inducing chemical fault diagnosis is presented in this study. It is a method using large amount of chemical sensor data, which is a combination of deep learning and active learning criterion to target the difficulty of consecutive fault diagnosis. DNN with deep architectures, instead of shallow ones, could be developed through deep learning to learn a suitable feature representation from raw sensor data in an unsupervised manner using stacked denoising auto-encoder (SDAE) and work through a layer-by-layer successive learning process. The features are added to the top Softmax regression layer to construct the discriminative fault characteristics for diagnosis in a supervised manner. Considering the expensive and time consuming labeling of sensor data in chemical applications, in contrast to the available methods, we employ a novel active learning criterion for the particularity of chemical processes, which is a combination of Best vs. Second Best criterion (BvSB) and a Lowest False Positive criterion (LFP), for further fine-tuning of diagnosis model in an active manner rather than passive manner. That is, we allow models to rank the most informative sensor data to be labeled for updating the DNN parameters during the interaction phase. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated in two well-known industrial datasets. Results indicate that the proposed method can obtain superior diagnosis accuracy and provide significant performance improvement in accuracy and false positive rate with less labeled chemical sensor data by further active learning compared with existing methods.

  5. Transparent Stretchable Self-Powered Patchable Sensor Platform with Ultrasensitive Recognition of Human Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Byeong-Ung; Lee, Ju-Hyuck; Trung, Tran Quang; Roh, Eun; Kim, Do-Il; Kim, Sang-Woo; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2015-09-22

    Monitoring of human activities can provide clinically relevant information pertaining to disease diagnostics, preventive medicine, care for patients with chronic diseases, rehabilitation, and prosthetics. The recognition of strains on human skin, induced by subtle movements of muscles in the internal organs, such as the esophagus and trachea, and the motion of joints, was demonstrated using a self-powered patchable strain sensor platform, composed on multifunctional nanocomposites of low-density silver nanowires with a conductive elastomer of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate/polyurethane, with high sensitivity, stretchability, and optical transparency. The ultra-low-power consumption of the sensor, integrated with both a supercapacitor and a triboelectric nanogenerator into a single transparent stretchable platform based on the same nanocomposites, results in a self-powered monitoring system for skin strain. The capability of the sensor to recognize a wide range of strain on skin has the potential for use in new areas of invisible stretchable electronics for human monitoring. A new type of transparent, stretchable, and ultrasensitive strain sensor based on a AgNW/PEDOT:PSS/PU nanocomposite was developed. The concept of a self-powered patchable sensor system integrated with a supercapacitor and a triboelectric nanogenerator that can be used universally as an autonomous invisible sensor system was used to detect the wide range of strain on human skin.

  6. Sensors for the Senses: Meaning-making via self-active entertainment experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Brooks

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In his ACM Computers in Entertainment article, titled "Artist and Audience: Emerging the Nano-entertainment experience", the author posited on how Inhabited Information Spaces, created as core catalyst of research, may be questioned as a multisensory future virtual work of art. This themed Human-Computer Interaction for Entertainment contribution for the EAI INTETAIN 2015 conference builds upon the earlier work by questioning meaning making from such self-active entertainment experiences. Contextually, self-active relates to actor empowerment via ICT, whilst entertainment refers to HCI paradigms that are fun, engaging, and enjoyable. Conceptualizing, designing and realizing alternative digital media entertainment situations in stage performance, interactive installations and exhibitions at leading Museums for Modern Art, National and International major events, contributed to development of a sensor-based system conceived as a platform to investigate meaning making having societal impact beyond art. The system involves arrays of selectable sensor profiles mixed and matched according to requirements. Sensing of human input can be through worn (biosignal e.g. EEG, ECG, EMG, GSR, held, and/or non-worn sensors (volumetric, linear and planar interface profiles. Mapping of sourced human data is to a variety of digital content including art-based (music making, digital painting, lighting effects, video games, Virtual Reality and robotic devices. System adaptability promotes participant profile matching e.g. according to desired outcome. All ages and abilities are potential users. Preceding the commonly known camera-based game controllers such as EyeToy, Wii, and Kinect; the SoundScapes Virtual Interactive Space system has been used in institutes, hospitals and clinics to empower people with impairment to unconsciously push their limits of functionality via creative and playful expression. Rehabilitation is less mundane and boring, where variety of ICT

  7. NprR, a moonlighting quorum sensor shifting from a phosphatase activity to a transcriptional activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Perchat

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of biological functions requires factors (proteins, peptides or chemicals able to sense and translate environmental conditions or any circumstances in order to modulate the transcription of a gene, the stability of a transcript or the activity of a protein. Quorum sensing is a regulation mechanism connecting cell density to the physiological state of a single cell. In bacteria, quorum sensing coordinates virulence, cell fate and commitment to sporulation and other adaptation properties. The critical role of such regulatory systems was demonstrated in pathogenicity and adaptation of bacteria from the Bacillus cereus group (i.e. B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. Furthermore, using insects as a model of infection, it was shown that sequential activation of several quorum sensing systems allowed bacteria to switch from a virulence state to a necrotrophic lifestyle, allowing their survival in the host cadaver, and ultimately to the commitment into sporulation. The chronological development of these physiological states is directed by quorum sensors forming the RNPP family. Among them, NprR combines two distinct functions connecting sporulation to necrotrophism in B. thuringiensis. In the absence of its cognate signaling peptide (NprX, NprR negatively controls sporulation by acting as a phosphatase. In the presence of NprX, it acts as a transcription factor regulating a set of genes involved in the survival of the bacteria in the insect cadaver.

  8. Should singing activities be included in speech and voice therapy for prepubertal children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinta, Tiija; Welch, Graham F

    2008-01-01

    Customarily, speaking and singing have tended to be regarded as two completely separate sets of behaviors in clinical and educational settings. The treatment of speech and voice disorders has focused on the client's speaking ability, as this is perceived to be the main vocal behavior of concern. However, according to a broader voice-science perspective, given that the same vocal structure is used for speaking and singing, it may be possible to include singing in speech and voice therapy. In this article, a theoretical framework is proposed that indicates possible benefits from the inclusion of singing in such therapeutic settings. Based on a literature review, it is demonstrated theoretically why singing activities can potentially be exploited in the treatment of prepubertal children suffering from speech and voice disorders. Based on this theoretical framework, implications for further empirical research and practice are suggested.

  9. ZigBee-based wireless multi-sensor system for physical activity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Lingfei; Liu, Shaopeng; Gao, Robert X; John, Dinesh; Staudenmayer, John; Freedson, Patty

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is important for assessing human exposure to the environment. This paper presents a ZigBee-based Wireless wearable multi-sensor Integrated Measurement System (WIMS) for in-situ PA measurement. Two accelerometers, a piezoelectric displacement sensor, and an ultraviolet (UV) sensor have been used for the physical activity assessment. Detailed analysis was performed for the hardware design and embedded program control, enabling efficient data sampling and transmission, compact design, and extended battery life to meet requirements for PA assessment under free-living conditions. Preliminary testing of the WIMS has demonstrated the functionality of the design, while performance comparison of the WIMS with a wired version on an electromagnetic shaker has demonstrated the signal validity.

  10. An Activity Recognition Model Using Inertial Sensor Nodes in a Wireless Sensor Network for Frozen Shoulder Rehabilitation Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Chun Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a model for recognizing motions performed during rehabilitation exercises for frozen shoulder conditions. The model consists of wearable wireless sensor network (WSN inertial sensor nodes, which were developed for this study, and enables the ubiquitous measurement of bodily motions. The model employs the back propagation neural network (BPNN algorithm to compute motion data that are formed in the WSN packets; herein, six types of rehabilitation exercises were recognized. The packets sent by each node are converted into six components of acceleration and angular velocity according to three axes. Motor features such as basic acceleration, angular velocity, and derivative tilt angle were input into the training procedure of the BPNN algorithm. In measurements of thirteen volunteers, the accelerations and included angles of nodes were adopted from possible features to demonstrate the procedure. Five exercises involving simple swinging and stretching movements were recognized with an accuracy of 85%–95%; however, the accuracy with which exercises entailing spiral rotations were recognized approximately 60%. Thus, a characteristic space and enveloped spectrum improving derivative features were suggested to enable identifying customized parameters. Finally, a real-time monitoring interface was developed for practical implementation. The proposed model can be applied in ubiquitous healthcare self-management to recognize rehabilitation exercises.

  11. Characteristics of an β-N-Acetylhexosaminidase from Bacillus sp. CH11, Including its Transglycosylation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurakake, Masahiro; Amai, Yukari; Konishi, Mizuki; Ikehira, Kaho

    2018-04-06

    β-N-Acetylhexosaminidase was identified from Bacillus sp. CH11 and found to have relatively high transferring activity. In this study, its enzymatic properties and transglycosylation activity including its acceptor specificity were investigated. Its molecular weight was estimated to be 90 kDa by SDS-PAGE and its optimal pH was approximately 7 with good stability from pH 6 to 8. Its optimal temperature was 40 °C, and its activity was stable at temperatures of up to 40 °C. To analyze its acceptor specificity for transglycosylation, N, N'-diacetylchitobiose was used as a donor substrate and alcohols, sugar alcohols, sugars and polyphenols were used as acceptors. Dialcohols, which have 2 hydroxyl groups on the outside of the carbon chains, were good acceptors. The molecular size of the acceptor did not influence the transglycosylation up to at least 1,5-pentanediol (carbon number: C5). Glycerin (C3), erythritol (C4), and xylitol (C5), all small molecular weight sugar alcohols, had high acceptor specificity. Transglycosylation to mono- and disaccharides and polyphenols was not observed except for L-fucose. For the β-N-acetylhexosaminidase-catalyzed transglycosylation of chitin oligosaccharides and xylitol, the transfer product was identified as 1-O-β-D-N-acetylglucosaminyl xylitol. The optimal ratio of xylitol was 24% to 2% N, N'-diacetylchitobiose and 226 mg per 1 g N, N'-diacetylchitobiose was produced. CH11 β-N-acetylhexosaminidase efficiently produced 1-O-β-D-N-acetylglucosaminyl xylitol via transglycosylation. The new transfer products including 1-O-β-D-N-acetylglucosaminyl xylitol are attractive compounds for their potential physiological functions. 1-O-β-D-N-Acetylglucosaminyl xylitol was produced effectively from chitin-oligosaccharides and xylitol by β-N-acetylhexosaminidase from Bacillus sp. CH11. This enzyme may be useful for the development of food materials for health-related applications such as oligosaccharides with intestinal functions and

  12. Monitoring active volcanoes and mitigating volcanic hazards: the case for including simple approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoiber, Richard E.; Williams, Stanley N.

    1990-07-01

    Simple approaches to problems brought about eruptions and their ensuing hazardous effects should be advocated and used by volcanologists while awaiting more sophisticated remedies. The expedients we advocate have all or many of the following attributes: only locally available materials are required; no extensive training of operators or installation is necessary; they are affordable and do not require foreign aid or exports; they are often labor intensive and are sustainable without outside assistance. Where appropriate, the involvement of local residents is advocated. Examples of simple expedients which can be used in forecasting or mitigating the effects of crises emphasize the relative ease and the less elaborate requirements with which simple approaches can be activated. Emphasis is on visual observations often by untrained observers, simple meteorogical measurements, observations of water level in lakes, temperature and chemistry of springs and fumaroles, new springs and collapse areas and observations of volcanic plumes. Simple methods are suggested which can be applied to mitigating damage from mudflows, nuées ardentes, tephra falls and gas discharge. A review in hindsight at Ruiz includes the use of both chemical indicators and simple mudflow alarms. Simple expedients are sufficiently effective that any expert volcanologist called to aid in a crisis must include them in the package of advice offered. Simple approaches are a critical and logical complement to highly technical solutions to hazardous situations.

  13. Derivation of a regional active-optical reflectance sensor corn algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Active-optical reflectance sensor (AORS) algorithms developed for in-season corn (Zea mays L.) N management have traditionally been derived using sub-regional scale information. However, studies have shown these previously developed AORS algorithms are not consistently accurate when used on a region...

  14. Dirichlet Process Gaussian Mixture Model for Activity Discovery in Smart Homes with Ambient Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Thuong; Le Viet Duc, Duc Viet; Zhang, Quing; Karunanithi, Mohan

    2017-01-01

    Most of the existing approaches to activity recognition in smart homes rely on supervised learning with well annotated sensor data. However obtaining such labeled data is not only challenging but sometimes also an unobtainable task, especially for senior citizens who may suffer various mental health

  15. 77 FR 52317 - Record of Decision for Surveillance Towed Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active Sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... Sonar AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice of decision and availability. SUMMARY: The... Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active (SURTASS LFA) sonar systems with certain geographical.... This decision, which pertains to the employment of up to four SURTASS LFA sonar systems (as originally...

  16. A multi-band shunt hybrid active filter with reduced sensor count

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A Shunt Hybrid Active Filter (SHAF) is an attractive option for realiz- ing low-cost harmonic compensation solutions. This paper proposes a SHAF with multiple harmonic compensation capability using a single Voltage Source Inverter and reduced sensor count. This strategy is apt for harmonic filtering solutions ...

  17. Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Force Estimation Errors Using Active Magnetic Bearings with Embedded Hall Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt, Andreas Jauernik; Santos, Ilmar

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives an original theoretical and experimental contribution to the issue of reducing force estimation errors, which arise when applying Active Magnetic Bearings (AMBs) with pole embedded Hall sensors for force quantification purposes. Motivated by the prospect of increasing the usabili...

  18. A multi-band shunt hybrid active filter with reduced sensor count

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Shunt Hybrid Active Filter (SHAF) is an attractive option for realizing low-cost harmonic compensation solutions. This paper proposes a SHAF with multiple harmonic compensation capability using a single Voltage Source Inverter and reduced sensor count. This strategy is apt for harmonic filtering solutions where low cost ...

  19. Improving the performance of active-optical reflectance sensor algorithms using soil and weather information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Active-optical reflectance sensors (AORS) use corn (Zea mays L.) plant tissue as a bioassay of crop N status to determine future N requirements. However, studies have shown AORS algorithms used for making N fertilizer recommendations are not consistently accurate. Thus, AORS algorithm improvements s...

  20. Fluorogenic MMP activity assay for plasma including MMPs complexed to α2-macroglobulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, B.; Drijfhout, J.W.; Ronday, H.K.; TeKoppele, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Elevated MMP activities are implicated in tissue degradation in, e.g., arthritis and cancer. The present study was designed to measure MMP enzyme activity in plasma. Free active MMP is unlikely to be present in plasma: upon entering the circulation, active MMP is expected to be captured by the

  1. New generation of monolithic active pixel sensors for charged particle detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deptuch, G.

    2002-09-01

    Vertex detectors are of great importance in particle physics experiments, as the knowledge of the event flavour is becoming an issue for the physics programme at Future Linear Colliders. Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) based on a novel detector structure have been proposed. Their fabrication is compatible with a standard CMOS process. The sensor is inseparable from the readout electronics, since both of them are integrated on the same, low-resistivity silicon wafer. The basic pixel configuration comprises only three MOS transistors and a diode collecting the charge through thermal diffusion. The charge is generated in the thin non-depleted epitaxial layer underneath the readout electronics. This approach provides, at low cost, a high resolution and thin device with the whole area sensitive to radiation. Device simulations using the ISE-TCAD package have been carried out to study the charge collection mechanism. In order to demonstrate the viability of the technique, four prototype chips have been fabricated using different submicrometer CMOS processes. The pixel gain has been calibrated using a 55 Fe source and the Poisson sequence method. The prototypes have been exposed to high-energy particle beams at CERN. The tests proved excellent detection performances expressed in a single-track spatial resolution of 1.5 μm and detection efficiency close to 100%, resulting from a SNR ratio of more than 30. Irradiation tests showed immunity of MAPS to a level of a few times 10 12 n/cm 2 and a few hundred kRad of ionising radiation. The ideas for future work, including on-pixel signal amplification, double sampling operation and current mode pixel design are present as well. (author)

  2. Submersible microbial fuel cell sensor for monitoring microbial activity and BOD in groundwater: Focusing on impact of anodic biofilm on sensor applicability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    A sensor, based on a submersible microbial fuel cell (SUMFC), was developed for in situ monitoring of microbial activity and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in groundwater. Presence or absence of a biofilm on the anode was a decisive factor for the applicability of the sensor. Fresh anode was req....../L (∼233 ± 1 mA/m2), with a response time of...

  3. Approach for the Development of a Framework for the Identification of Activities of Daily Living Using Sensors in Mobile Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Ivan Miguel; Garcia, Nuno M; Pombo, Nuno; Flórez-Revuelta, Francisco; Spinsante, Susanna

    2018-02-21

    Sensors available on mobile devices allow the automatic identification of Activities of Daily Living (ADL). This paper describes an approach for the creation of a framework for the identification of ADL, taking into account several concepts, including data acquisition, data processing, data fusion, and pattern recognition. These concepts can be mapped onto different modules of the framework. The proposed framework should perform the identification of ADL without Internet connection, performing these tasks locally on the mobile device, taking in account the hardware and software limitations of these devices. The main purpose of this paper is to present a new approach for the creation of a framework for the recognition of ADL, analyzing the allowed sensors available in the mobile devices, and the existing methods available in the literature.

  4. Approach for the Development of a Framework for the Identification of Activities of Daily Living Using Sensors in Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pombo, Nuno

    2018-01-01

    Sensors available on mobile devices allow the automatic identification of Activities of Daily Living (ADL). This paper describes an approach for the creation of a framework for the identification of ADL, taking into account several concepts, including data acquisition, data processing, data fusion, and pattern recognition. These concepts can be mapped onto different modules of the framework. The proposed framework should perform the identification of ADL without Internet connection, performing these tasks locally on the mobile device, taking in account the hardware and software limitations of these devices. The main purpose of this paper is to present a new approach for the creation of a framework for the recognition of ADL, analyzing the allowed sensors available in the mobile devices, and the existing methods available in the literature. PMID:29466316

  5. Sensor scheme design for active structural acoustic control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    Efficient sensing schemes for the active reduction of sound radiation from plates are presented based on error signals derived from spatially weighted plate velocity or near-field pressure. The schemes result in near-optimal reductions as compared to weighting procedures derived from eigenvector or

  6. Characterisation of Vanilla—A novel active pixel sensor for radiation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, A.; Bates, R.; Laing, A.; Maneuski, D.; O'Shea, V.; Clark, A.; Prydderch, M.; Turchetta, R.; Arvanitis, C.; Bohndiek, S.

    2007-10-01

    Novel features of a new monolithic active pixel sensor, Vanilla, with 520×520 pixels ( 25 μm square) has been characterised for the first time. Optimisation of the sensor operation was made through variation of frame rates, integration times and on-chip biases and voltages. Features such as flushed reset operation, ROI capturing and readout modes have been fully tested. Stability measurements were performed to test its suitablility for long-term applications. These results suggest the Vanilla sensor—along with bio-medical and space applications—is suitable for use in particle physics experiments.

  7. Fast calcium sensor proteins for monitoring neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badura, Aleksandra; Sun, Xiaonan Richard; Giovannucci, Andrea; Lynch, Laura A; Wang, Samuel S-H

    2014-10-01

    A major goal of the BRAIN Initiative is the development of technologies to monitor neuronal network activity during active information processing. Toward this goal, genetically encoded calcium indicator proteins have become widely used for reporting activity in preparations ranging from invertebrates to awake mammals. However, slow response times, the narrow sensitivity range of Ca 2+ and in some cases, poor signal-to-noise ratio still limit their usefulness. Here, we review recent improvements in the field of neural activity-sensitive probe design with a focus on the GCaMP family of calcium indicator proteins. In this context, we present our newly developed Fast-GCaMPs, which have up to 4-fold accelerated off-responses compared with the next-fastest GCaMP, GCaMP6f. Fast-GCaMPs were designed by destabilizing the association of the hydrophobic pocket of calcium-bound calmodulin with the RS20 binding domain, an intramolecular interaction that protects the green fluorescent protein chromophore. Fast-GCaMP6f-RS06 and Fast-GCaMP6f-RS09 have rapid off-responses in stopped-flow fluorimetry, in neocortical brain slices, and in the intact cerebellum in vivo . Fast-GCaMP6f variants should be useful for tracking action potentials closely spaced in time, and for following neural activity in fast-changing compartments, such as axons and dendrites. Finally, we discuss strategies that may allow tracking of a wider range of neuronal firing rates and improve spike detection.

  8. Advanced Gas Sensors Using SERS-Activated Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascola, Robert; McWhorter, Scott; Murph, Simona Hunyadi

    2010-08-01

    non-specific interactions between the surface coating and additional nanoparticles suspended in solution to which the analyte had been coupled. Clearly, for a gas sensor, such a scheme is not feasible, and in any event the reliance on the random configuration of the nanoparticles and the analyte is not expected to lead to efficient enhancement. Here, we report the creation of capillary coatings of self-assembled, aggregated high aspect ratio metallic nanoparticles (e.g. rod, wires) with a solution-phase technique. Self-assembly offers the possibility for a high density of SERS hot spots, which are often observed at the junction of adjacent particles. Shaped nanoparticles also enhance self-assembled deposition, and allow further control of the optical properties of the coating through manipulation of the morphology. SERS enhancements for gases are reported relative to mirrored capillaries and free-space measurements.

  9. PML is a ROS sensor activating p53 upon oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa-Kawakita, Michiko; Ferhi, Omar; Soilihi, Hassane; Le Bras, Morgane; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie; de Thé, Hugues

    2017-11-06

    Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) recruit partner proteins, including p53 and its regulators, thereby controlling their abundance or function. Investigating arsenic sensitivity of acute promyelocytic leukemia, we proposed that PML oxidation promotes NB biogenesis. However, physiological links between PML and oxidative stress response in vivo remain unexplored. Here, we identify PML as a reactive oxygen species (ROS) sensor. Pml -/- cells accumulate ROS, whereas PML expression decreases ROS levels. Unexpectedly, Pml -/- embryos survive acute glutathione depletion. Moreover, Pml -/- animals are resistant to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity or fasting-induced steatosis. Molecularly, Pml -/- animals fail to properly activate oxidative stress-responsive p53 targets, whereas the NRF2 response is amplified and accelerated. Finally, in an oxidative stress-prone background, Pml -/- animals display a longevity phenotype, likely reflecting decreased basal p53 activation. Thus, similar to p53, PML exerts basal antioxidant properties but also drives oxidative stress-induced changes in cell survival/proliferation or metabolism in vivo. Through NB biogenesis, PML therefore couples ROS sensing to p53 responses, shedding a new light on the role of PML in senescence or stem cell biology. © 2017 Niwa-Kawakita et al.

  10. Active control of environmental noise, VIII: increasing the response to primary source changes including unpredictable noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, S. E.; Atmoko, H.; Vuksanovic, B.

    2004-07-01

    Conventional adaptive cancellation systems using traditional transverse finite impulse response (FIR) filters, together with least mean square (LMS) adaptive algorithms, well known in active noise control, are slow to adapt to primary source changes. This makes them inappropriate for cancelling rapidly changing noise, including unpredictable noise such as speech and music. Secondly, the cancelling structures require considerable computational processing effort to adapt to primary source and plant changes, particularly for multi-channel systems. This paper describes methods to increase the adaptive speed to primary source changes in large enclosed spaces and outdoor environments. A method is described that increases the response to time varying periodic noise using traditional transverse FIR filters. Here a multi-passband filter, with individual variable adaptive step sizes for each passband is automatically adjusted according to the signal level in each band. This creates a similar adaptive response for all frequencies within the total pass-band, irrespective of amplitude, minimizing the signal distortion and increasing the combined adaptive speed. Unfortunately, there is a limit to the adaptive speed using the above method as classical transverse FIR filters have a finite adaptive speed given by the stability band zero bandwidth. For rapidly changing periodic noise and unpredictable non-stationary noise, a rapid to instantaneous response is required. In this case the on-line adaptive FIR filters are dispensed with and replaced by a time domain solution that gives virtually instantaneous cancellation response (infinite adaptive speed) to primary source changes, and is computationally efficient.

  11. Measuring Outcomes in Adult Weight Loss Studies That Include Diet and Physical Activity: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A. Millstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Measuring success of obesity interventions is critical. Several methods measure weight loss outcomes but there is no consensus on best practices. This systematic review evaluates relevant outcomes (weight loss, BMI, % body fat, and fat mass to determine which might be the best indicator(s of success. Methods. Eligible articles described adult weight loss interventions that included diet and physical activity and a measure of weight or BMI change and body composition change. Results. 28 full-text articles met inclusion criteria. Subjects, settings, intervention lengths, and intensities varied. All studies measured body weight (−2.9 to −17.3 kg, 9 studies measured BMI (−1.1 to −5.1 kg/m2, 20 studies measured % body fat (−0.7 to −10.2%, and 22 studies measured fat mass (−0.9 to −14.9 kg. All studies found agreement between weight or BMI and body fat mass or body fat % decreases, though there were discrepancies in degree of significance between measures. Conclusions. Nearly all weight or BMI and body composition measures agreed. Since body fat is the most metabolically harmful tissue type, it may be a more meaningful measure of health change. Future studies should consider primarily measuring % body fat, rather than or in addition to weight or BMI.

  12. Macroenvironmental factors including GDP per capita and physical activity in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cameron, Adrian J.; van Stralen, Maartje M.; Kunst, Anton E.; te Velde, Saskia J.; van Lenthe, Frank J.; Salmon, Jo; Brug, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Socioeconomic inequalities in physical activity at the individual level are well reported. Whether inequalities in economic development and other macroenvironmental variables between countries are also related to physical activity at the country level is comparatively unstudied. We examined the

  13. Diaper-Embedded Urinary Tract Infection Monitoring Sensor Module Powered by Urine-Activated Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Weeseong; Yu, Wuyang; Tan, Tianlin; Ziaie, Babak; Jung, Byunghoo

    2017-06-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infections in humans. UTI is easily treatable using antibiotics if identified in early stage. However, without early identification and treatment, UTI can be a major source of serious complications in geriatric patients, in particular, those suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. Also, for infants who have difficulty in describing their symptoms, UTI may lead to serious development of the disease making early identification of UTI crucial. In this paper, we present a diaper-embedded, wireless, self-powered, and autonomous UTI monitoring sensor module that allows an early detection of UTI with minimal effort. The sensor module consists of a paper-based colorimetric nitrite sensor, urine-activated batteries, a boost dc-dc converter, a low-power sensor interface utilizing pulse width modulation, and a Bluetooth low energy module for wireless transmission. Experimental results show a better detection of nitrite, a surrogate of UTI, than that of conventional dipstick testing. The proposed sensor module achieves a sensitivity of 1.35 ms/(mg/L) and a detection limit of 4 mg/L for nitrite.

  14. A Sensor Web and Web Service-Based Approach for Active Hydrological Disaster Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Zhai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advancements in Earth-observing sensor systems have led to the generation of large amounts of remote sensing data that can be used for the dynamic monitoring and analysis of hydrological disasters. The management and analysis of these data could take advantage of distributed information infrastructure technologies such as Web service and Sensor Web technologies, which have shown great potential in facilitating the use of observed big data in an interoperable, flexible and on-demand way. However, it remains a challenge to achieve timely response to hydrological disaster events and to automate the geoprocessing of hydrological disaster observations. This article proposes a Sensor Web and Web service-based approach to support active hydrological disaster monitoring. This approach integrates an event-driven mechanism, Web services, and a Sensor Web and coordinates them using workflow technologies to facilitate the Web-based sharing and processing of hydrological hazard information. The design and implementation of hydrological Web services for conducting various hydrological analysis tasks on the Web using dynamically updating sensor observation data are presented. An application example is provided to demonstrate the benefits of the proposed approach over the traditional approach. The results confirm the effectiveness and practicality of the proposed approach in cases of hydrological disaster.

  15. CMOS active pixel sensor type imaging system on a chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nixon, Robert (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A single chip camera which includes an .[.intergrated.]. .Iadd.integrated .Iaddend.image acquisition portion and control portion and which has double sampling/noise reduction capabilities thereon. Part of the .[.intergrated.]. .Iadd.integrated .Iaddend.structure reduces the noise that is picked up during imaging.

  16. First tests of CHERWELL, a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor: A CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) using 180 nm technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mylroie-Smith, James, E-mail: j.mylroie-smith@qmul.ac.uk [Queen Mary, University of London (United Kingdom); Kolya, Scott; Velthuis, Jaap [University of Bristol (United Kingdom); Bevan, Adrian; Inguglia, Gianluca [Queen Mary, University of London (United Kingdom); Headspith, Jon; Lazarus, Ian; Lemon, Roy [Daresbury Laboratory, STFC (United Kingdom); Crooks, Jamie; Turchetta, Renato; Wilson, Fergus [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, STFC (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-11

    The Cherwell is a 4T CMOS sensor in 180 nm technology developed for the detection of charged particles. Here, the different test structures on the sensor will be described and first results from tests on the reference pixel variant are shown. The sensors were shown to have a noise of 12 e{sup −} and a signal to noise up to 150 in {sup 55}Fe.

  17. Development of Sensor Cells Using NF-κB Pathway Activation for Detection of Nanoparticle-Induced Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyoshi Taniguchi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The increasing use of nanomaterials in consumer and industrial products has aroused concerns regarding their fate in biological systems. An effective detection method to evaluate the safety of bio-nanomaterials is therefore very important. Titanium dioxide (TiO2, which is manufactured worldwide in large quantities for use in a wide range of applications, including pigment and cosmetic manufacturing, was once thought to be an inert material, but recently, more and more studies have indicated that TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs can cause inflammation and be harmful to humans by causing lung and brain problems. In order to evaluate the safety of TiO2 NPs for the environment and for humans, sensor cells for inflammation detection were developed, and these were transfected with the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 gene and Nuclear Factor Kappa B (NF-κB reporter gene. NF-κB as a primary cause of inflammation has received a lot of attention, and it can be activated by a wide variety of external stimuli. Our data show that TiO2 NPs-induced inflammation can be detected by our sensor cells through NF-κB pathway activation. This may lead to our sensor cells being used for bio-nanomaterial safety evaluation.

  18. Bio-optical sensor for brain activity measurement based on whispering gallery modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amir R.; Massoud, Yasmin M.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a high-resolution bio-optical sensor is developed for brain activity measurement. The aim is to develop an optical sensor with enough sensitivity to detect small electric field perturbations caused by neuronal action potential. The sensing element is a polymeric dielectric micro-resonator fabricated in a spherical shape with a few hundred microns in diameter. They are made of optical quality polymers that are soft which make them mechanically compatible with tissue. The sensors are attached to or embedded in optical fibers which serve as input/output conduits for the sensors. Hundreds or even thousands of spheres can be attached to a single fiber to detect and transmit signals at different locations. The high quality factor for the optical resonator makes it significantly used in such bio-medical applications. The sensing phenomenon is based on whispering gallery modes (WGM) shifts of the optical sensor. To mimic the brain signals, the spherical resonator is immersed in a homogeneous electrical field that is created by applying potential difference across two metallic plates. One of the plates has a variable voltage while the volt on the other plate kept fixed. Any small perturbations of the potential difference (voltage) lead to change in the electric field intensity. In turn the sensor morphology will be affected due to the change in the electrostriction force acting on it causing change in its WGM. By tracking these WGM shift on the transmission spectrum, the induced potential difference (voltage change) could be measured. Results of a mathematical model simulation agree well with the preliminary experiments. Also, the results show that the brain activity could be measured using this principle.

  19. Rail Sensor Testbed Program: Active Agents in Containers for Transport Chain Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    applied to a variety of regimes, including virtual communities [14], email [15] and ecommerce [16] and [17], and sensor networks [18]. These approaches...effective anti- spam tool. 2004(http://www.arxiv.org/abs/cond-mat/0402143). 16. Melnik, M., Alm, J., Does a seller’s eCommerce reputation matter

  20. Nanoparticle cluster gas sensor: Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticles for NH3 detection with ultrahigh sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Chen, Nan; Han, Bingqian; Xiao, Xuechun; Chen, Gang; Djerdj, Igor; Wang, Yude

    2015-09-28

    Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters were synthesized by a simple solvothermal method. The structure, morphology, chemical state and specific surface area were analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and N2-sorption studies, respectively. The SnO2 nanoparticle cluster matrix consists of tens of thousands of SnO2 nanoparticles with an ultra-small grain size estimated to be 3.0 nm. And there are abundant random-packed wormhole-like pores, caused by the inter-connection of the SnO2 nanoparticles, throughout each cluster. The platinum element is present in two forms including metal (Pt) and tetravalent metal oxide (PtO2) in the Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters. The as-synthesized pure and Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters were used to fabricate gas sensor devices. It was found that the gas response toward 500 ppm of ammonia was improved from 6.48 to 203.44 through the activation by Pt. And the results indicate that the sensor based on Pt activated SnO2 not only has ultrahigh sensitivity but also possesses good response-recovery properties, linear dependence, repeatability, selectivity and long-term stability, demonstrating the potential to use Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters as ammonia gas sensors. At the same time, the formation mechanisms of the unique nanoparticle clusters and highly enhanced sensitivity are also discussed.

  1. Active buckling control of smart plate as diaphragm with PZT5 sensor/actuator patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viliani, N. S.; Pourrostami, H.; Mostafavi, S. M.; Hashemizadeh, F.; Safian, M. R.; Hashemi, M.

    2014-12-01

    In current study, buckling analyses of smart plate is presented. The various types of piezoelectric materials are under investigation for petrochemical industry and other applications. The PZT sensor output is used to determine the input to the PZT actuator using the feedback control algorithm for buckling control of FG plate. This study investigated the governing differential equations of motion of smart plate which includes FG plate as the membrane and PZT5 patches as actuator and sensor. The Fourier series method adopted to obtain the solution for the equation of motion. Also the effects of feedback gain and FGM volume fraction exponent on the critical buckling load for PZT-5A are studied. The potential application of current study can be found in optimal design of sensor's diaphragm. The variation of critical buckling load vs. feedback gain indicates that by increasing the feedback gain, the buckling load increases.

  2. Mining Emerging Sequential Patterns for Activity Recognition in Body Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Tao; Wang, Liang; Chen, Hanhua

    2010-01-01

    Body Sensor Networks oer many applications in healthcare, well-being and entertainment. One of the emerging applications is recognizing activities of daily living. In this paper, we introduce a novel knowledge pattern named Emerging Sequential Pattern (ESP)|a sequential pattern that discovers...... signicant class dierences|to recognize both simple (i.e., sequential) and complex (i.e., interleaved and concurrent) activities. Based on ESPs, we build our complex activity models directly upon the sequential model to recognize both activity types. We conduct comprehensive empirical studies to evaluate...

  3. Alternative Sensor System and MLP Neural Network for Vehicle Pedal Activity Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Wefky

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available It is accepted that the activity of the vehicle pedals (i.e., throttle, brake, clutch reflects the driver’s behavior, which is at least partially related to the fuel consumption and vehicle pollutant emissions. This paper presents a solution to estimate the driver activity regardless of the type, model, and year of fabrication of the vehicle. The solution is based on an alternative sensor system (regime engine, vehicle speed, frontal inclination and linear acceleration that reflects the activity of the pedals in an indirect way, to estimate that activity by means of a multilayer perceptron neural network with a single hidden layer.

  4. Alternative sensor system and MLP neural network for vehicle pedal activity estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefky, Ahmed M; Espinosa, Felipe; Jiménez, José A; Santiso, Enrique; Rodríguez, José M; Fernández, Alfredo J

    2010-01-01

    It is accepted that the activity of the vehicle pedals (i.e., throttle, brake, clutch) reflects the driver's behavior, which is at least partially related to the fuel consumption and vehicle pollutant emissions. This paper presents a solution to estimate the driver activity regardless of the type, model, and year of fabrication of the vehicle. The solution is based on an alternative sensor system (regime engine, vehicle speed, frontal inclination and linear acceleration) that reflects the activity of the pedals in an indirect way, to estimate that activity by means of a multilayer perceptron neural network with a single hidden layer.

  5. Observational Constraints on Cloud Feedbacks: The Role of Active Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winker, David; Chepfer, Helene; Noel, Vincent; Cai, Xia

    2017-11-01

    Cloud profiling from active lidar and radar in the A-train satellite constellation has significantly advanced our understanding of clouds and their role in the climate system. Nevertheless, the response of clouds to a warming climate remains one of the largest uncertainties in predicting climate change and for the development of adaptions to change. Both observation of long-term changes and observational constraints on the processes responsible for those changes are necessary. We review recent progress in our understanding of the cloud feedback problem. Capabilities and advantages of active sensors for observing clouds are discussed, along with the importance of active sensors for deriving constraints on cloud feedbacks as an essential component of a global climate observing system.

  6. Towards using a Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor for in vivo beam monitoring of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, R.F., E-mail: ryan.page@bristol.ac.uk [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Abbott, N.L.; Davies, J.; Dyke, E.L.; Randles, H.J. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Velthuis, J.J. [H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre, University Hospitals Bristol, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Fletcher, S.; Gregory, S.D.; Hall, C.; John, A.; Lawrence, H.; Stevens, P.H. [Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre, University Hospitals Bristol, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Hugtenburg, R.P.; Tunbridge, V. [Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-11

    The use of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) for cancer treatments is entering wider use. These treatments involve using a complex configuration of field modifying components, known as Multileaf Collimators (MLC), to dynamically shape the beam. A treatment consists of a sequence of irregular shaped fields, which means real time monitoring and verification is essential. In the current framework the treatment plans are verified before the patient is treated, but not during. The aim of our collaboration is to monitor the treatment being given to the patient. This is achieved by placing a camera system using an ultra-thin Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) upstream of the patient. -- Highlights: •A Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor was used to measure the shape of an IMRT field. •The sensor was positioned upstream of the patient causing only a ∼ 0.1% attenuation. •Edges of Multileaf Collimators were determined using edge reconstruction techniques. •The reconstructed edge precision was measured to be 52±4μm for a single frame. •Edge positions from the sensor and film are compared and found to be within error.

  7. Flexible piezoelectric nanogenerator in wearable self-powered active sensor for respiration and healthcare monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Zhang, S.; Jin, Y. M.; Ouyang, H.; Zou, Y.; Wang, X. X.; Xie, L. X.; Li, Z.

    2017-06-01

    A wearable self-powered active sensor for respiration and healthcare monitoring was fabricated based on a flexible piezoelectric nanogenerator. An electrospinning poly(vinylidene fluoride) thin film on silicone substrate was polarized to fabricate the flexible nanogenerator and its electrical property was measured. When periodically stretched by a linear motor, the flexible piezoelectric nanogenerator generated an output open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current of up to 1.5 V and 400 nA, respectively. Through integration with an elastic bandage, a wearable self-powered sensor was fabricated and used to monitor human respiration, subtle muscle movement, and voice recognition. As respiration proceeded, the electrical output signals of the sensor corresponded to the signals measured by a physiological signal recording system with good reliability and feasibility. This self-powered, wearable active sensor has significant potential for applications in pulmonary function evaluation, respiratory monitoring, and detection of gesture and vocal cord vibration for the personal healthcare monitoring of disabled or paralyzed patients.

  8. Training Classifiers with Shadow Features for Sensor-Based Human Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Fong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel training/testing process for building/using a classification model based on human activity recognition (HAR is proposed. Traditionally, HAR has been accomplished by a classifier that learns the activities of a person by training with skeletal data obtained from a motion sensor, such as Microsoft Kinect. These skeletal data are the spatial coordinates (x, y, z of different parts of the human body. The numeric information forms time series, temporal records of movement sequences that can be used for training a classifier. In addition to the spatial features that describe current positions in the skeletal data, new features called ‘shadow features’ are used to improve the supervised learning efficacy of the classifier. Shadow features are inferred from the dynamics of body movements, and thereby modelling the underlying momentum of the performed activities. They provide extra dimensions of information for characterising activities in the classification process, and thereby significantly improve the classification accuracy. Two cases of HAR are tested using a classification model trained with shadow features: one is by using wearable sensor and the other is by a Kinect-based remote sensor. Our experiments can demonstrate the advantages of the new method, which will have an impact on human activity detection research.

  9. Does limited virucidal activity of biocides include duck hepatitis B virucidal action?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauerbrei Andreas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is agreement that the infectivity assay with the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV is a suitable surrogate test to validate disinfectants for hepatitis B virucidal activity. However, since this test is not widely used, information is necessary whether disinfectants with limited virucidal activity also inactivate DHBV. In general, disinfectants with limited virucidal activity are used for skin and sensitive surfaces while agents with full activity are more aggressive. The present study compares the activity of five different biocides against DHBV and the classical test virus for limited virucidal activity, the vaccinia virus strain Lister Elstree (VACV or the modified vaccinia Ankara strain (MVA. Methods Virucidal assay was performed as suspension test according to the German DVV/RKI guideline. Duck hepatitis B virus obtained from congenitally infected Peking ducks was propagated in primary duck embryonic hepatocytes and was detected by indirect immunofluorescent antigen staining. Results The DHBV was inactivated by the use of 40% ethanol within 1-min and 30% isopropanol within 2-min exposure. In comparison, 40% ethanol within 2-min and 40% isopropanol within 1-min exposure were effective against VACV/MVA. These alcohols only have limited virucidal activity, while the following agents have full activity. 0.01% peracetic acid inactivated DHBV within 2 min and a concentration of 0.005% had virucidal efficacy against VACV/MVA within 1 min. After 2-min exposure, 0.05% glutardialdehyde showed a comparable activity against DHBV and VACV/MVA. This is also the case for 0.7% formaldehyde after a contact time of 30 min. Conclusions Duck hepatitis B virus is at least as sensitive to limited virucidal activity as VACV/MVA. Peracetic acid is less effective against DHBV, while the alcohols are less effective against VACV/MVA. It can be expected that in absence of more direct tests the results may be extrapolated to HBV.

  10. A monolithic active pixel sensor for particle detection in 0.25 μm CMOS technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velthuis, J.J.; Allport, P.P.; Casse, G.; Evans, A.; Turchetta, R.; Villani, G.

    2006-01-01

    We are developing CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) for High Energy Physics applications. We have successfully produced 3 test structures. They feature several different pixel types including: standard 3MOS, 4MOS allowing Correlated Double Sampling (CDS), charge amplifier pixels and a flexible APS (FAPS). The FAPS has a 10 deep pipeline on each pixel. This is specifically designed with the beam structure of the TESLA proposal for the Linear Collider in mind. Results of a laser test on our first device and source test results on two more recent test structures will be presented

  11. Telemetered sensors for dynamic activity and structural performance monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Christopher P.; Hamel, Michael J.; Arms, Steven W.

    2001-08-01

    The development of improved structures requires knowledge of their dynamic behavior. Minimally intrusive wireless systems, capable of monitoring vibration and impact, are needed in order to provide this knowledge. Our objective was to design, build, and test a high speed data collection and wireless data communications system, including microsensors, and capable of being embedded or externally worn. Our previous transmitter designs were small and could be used to transmit multichannel digital data, but they were not capable of fast data transmission rates. The addition of a remotely triggered datalogger allowed us to overcome the limitations of our earlier designs. A bi-directional RF communications link was used to trigger a sample to be logged (from 30 meters), as well as to request data to be transmitted to the host PC for data acquisition/analysis. Sweep rates of 2000 Hz were successfully demonstrated from a triad of MEMs accelerometers. The remote datalogger and transceiver and accelerometer package measured 12 mm by 24 mm by 6 mm thick; these were mounted to the feet of thoroughbred horses to study their impact levels. These small, fast, wireless data recording systems can be used to monitor rotating/ vibrating machinery and civil/automotive/aerospace structures.

  12. Visual sensor fusion for active security in robotic industrial environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robla, Sandra; Llata, Jose R.; Torre-Ferrero, Carlos; Sarabia, Esther G.; Becerra, Victor; Perez-Oria, Juan

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a method of information fusion involving data captured by both a standard charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and a time-of-flight (ToF) camera to be used in the detection of the proximity between a manipulator robot and a human. Both cameras are assumed to be located above the work area of an industrial robot. The fusion of colour images and time-of-flight information makes it possible to know the 3D localization of objects with respect to a world coordinate system. At the same time, this allows to know their colour information. Considering that ToF information given by the range camera contains innacuracies including distance error, border error, and pixel saturation, some corrections over the ToF information are proposed and developed to improve the results. The proposed fusion method uses the calibration parameters of both cameras to reproject 3D ToF points, expressed in a common coordinate system for both cameras and a robot arm, in 2D colour images. In addition to this, using the 3D information, the motion detection in a robot industrial environment is achieved, and the fusion of information is applied to the foreground objects previously detected. This combination of information results in a matrix that links colour and 3D information, giving the possibility of characterising the object by its colour in addition to its 3D localisation. Further development of these methods will make it possible to identify objects and their position in the real world and to use this information to prevent possible collisions between the robot and such objects.

  13. Relationship between clinical results of total hip replacement and postoperative activities including weeding and snow shovelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijima, Hiroaki; Yamada, Shin; Konishi, Natsuo; Kubota, Hitoshi; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Tani, Takayuki; Suzuki, Norio; Kamo, Keiji; Okudera, Yoshihiko; Sasaki, Ken; Kawano, Tetsuya; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi

    2017-09-07

    Weeding or snow shovelling is indispensable for life in farm villages of northern countries. Clarifying the relationships between the degrees of these activities after total hip replacement (THR) and the clinical results of THR may enable us to predict the results of THR for high-level activity patients. The relationships between work activities after THR and the results were investigated. The subjects were 95 post-THR patients, who consulted 6 hospitals in August 2012. First, the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Hip-Disease Evaluation Questionnaire (JHEQ) and a questionnaire on postoperative activity were administered. Then, the Japanese Orthopaedic Association hip score (JOA score) was evaluated. The subjects' average age was 68 years. The average period after surgery was 4 years and 5 months. Weeding and snow shovelling were performed after THR in 44.2% and 40.0% of cases, respectively. The rate of farming after surgery (25.6%) was greater than that of swimming (21.1%). Both the JOA score and JHEQ were higher in those who played sports after THR than in those who did not (p = 0.003, p = 0.0046). The JOA score of those who performed work activities after THR was higher than that of those who did not (p = 0.0295). Nearly half of patients performed weeding or snow shovelling after THR, and about 1/4 of the patients engaged in farming after THR. The clinical results in cases doing sports and work activities after THR were better than those of cases not doing such activities. Therefore, these activities may be positively recommended.

  14. FM-CW radar sensors for vital signs and motor activity monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian Adrian Postolache

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes on-going research on vital signs and motor activity monitoring based on radar sensors embedded in wheelchairs, walkers and crutches for in home rehabilitation. Embedded sensors, conditioning circuits, real-time platforms that perform data acquisition, auto-identification, primary data processing and data communication contribute to convert daily used objects in home rehabilitation into smart objects that can be accessed by caregivers during the training sessions through human–machine interfaces expressed by the new generation of smart phones or tablet computers running Android OS or iOS operating systems. The system enables the management of patients in home rehabilitation by providing more accurate and up-to-date information using pervasive computing of vital signs and motor activity records.

  15. CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) for scientific applications: Some notes about radiation hardness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchetta, R.

    2007-12-01

    Invented in the early 1990s on both sides of the Atlantic, Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in a CMOS technology are today the most sold solid-state imaging device, overtaking the traditional technology of Charge-Coupled Devices (CCD). The slow uptake of CMOS MAPS started from low-end applications, like for example web cams and is slowly pervading the high-end applications, like for example in prosumer digital cameras. Higher specifications are required for scientific applications: very low noise, high speed, high dynamic range, large format and radiation hardness are some of these requirements. This paper will briefly review the main results on radiation hardness for monolithic active pixel sensors.

  16. Active Bio-sensor System, Compatible with Arm Muscle Movement or Blinking Signals in BCI Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Mehrkanoon

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a bionic active sensor system for the BCI application. Proposed system involves analog and digital parts. Two types of accurate sensors are used to pickup the blinking and muscle movement signals. A precision micro-power instrumentation amplifier with the adjustable gain, a sixth order low pass active filter with cutoff frequency 0.1 Hz, and a sixth order band pas filter with the bandwidth of 2-6 Hz are constructed to provide the clean blinking and arm muscle movement signals. TMS320C25 DSP processor is used for independent and unique command signals which are prepared for BCI application by a power amplifier and driver.

  17. A novel source–drain follower for monolithic active pixel sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, C.; Aglieri, G.; Hillemanns, H.; Huang, G.; Junique, A.; Keil, M.; Kim, D.; Kofarago, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Mager, M.; Marin Tobon, C.A.; Martinengo, P.; Mugnier, H.; Musa, L.; Lee, S.; Reidt, F.; Riedler, P.; Rousset, J.; Sielewicz, K.M.; Snoeys, W.

    2016-01-01

    Monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) receive interest in tracking applications in high energy physics as they integrate sensor and readout electronics in one silicon die with potential for lower material budget and cost, and better performance. Source followers (SFs) are widely used for MAPS readout: they increase charge conversion gain 1/C eff or decrease the effective sensing node capacitance C eff because the follower action compensates part of the input capacitance. Charge conversion gain is critical for analog power consumption and therefore for material budget in tracking applications, and also has direct system impact. This paper presents a novel source–drain follower (SDF), where both source and drain follow the gate potential improving charge conversion gain. For the inner tracking system (ITS) upgrade of the ALICE experiment at CERN, low material budget is a primary requirement. The SDF circuit was studied as part of the effort to optimize the effective capacitance of the sensing node. The collection electrode, input transistor and routing metal all contribute to C eff . Reverse sensor bias reduces the collection electrode capacitance. The novel SDF circuit eliminates the contribution of the input transistor to C eff , reduces the routing contribution if additional shielding is introduced, provides a way to estimate the capacitance of the sensor itself, and has a voltage gain closer to unity than the standard SF. The SDF circuit has a somewhat larger area with a somewhat smaller bandwidth, but this is acceptable in most cases. A test chip, manufactured in a 180 nm CMOS image sensor process, implements small prototype pixel matrices in different flavors to compare the standard SF to the novel SF and to the novel SF with additional shielding. The effective sensing node capacitance was measured using a 55 Fe source. Increasing reverse substrate bias from −1 V to −6 V reduces C eff by 38% and the equivalent noise charge (ENC) by 22% for the standard

  18. A novel source–drain follower for monolithic active pixel sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, C., E-mail: chaosong.gao@mails.ccnu.edu.cn [Central China Normal University, Wuhan (China); Aglieri, G.; Hillemanns, H. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Huang, G., E-mail: gmhuang@phy.ccnu.edu.cn [Central China Normal University, Wuhan (China); Junique, A.; Keil, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Kim, D. [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kofarago, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Mager, M.; Marin Tobon, C.A.; Martinengo, P. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Mugnier, H. [Mind, Archamps (France); Musa, L. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Lee, S. [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Reidt, F. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Ruprecht-Karls-Universitat Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Riedler, P. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Rousset, J. [Mind, Archamps (France); Sielewicz, K.M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Snoeys, W. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); and others

    2016-09-21

    Monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) receive interest in tracking applications in high energy physics as they integrate sensor and readout electronics in one silicon die with potential for lower material budget and cost, and better performance. Source followers (SFs) are widely used for MAPS readout: they increase charge conversion gain 1/C{sub eff} or decrease the effective sensing node capacitance C{sub eff} because the follower action compensates part of the input capacitance. Charge conversion gain is critical for analog power consumption and therefore for material budget in tracking applications, and also has direct system impact. This paper presents a novel source–drain follower (SDF), where both source and drain follow the gate potential improving charge conversion gain. For the inner tracking system (ITS) upgrade of the ALICE experiment at CERN, low material budget is a primary requirement. The SDF circuit was studied as part of the effort to optimize the effective capacitance of the sensing node. The collection electrode, input transistor and routing metal all contribute to C{sub eff}. Reverse sensor bias reduces the collection electrode capacitance. The novel SDF circuit eliminates the contribution of the input transistor to C{sub eff}, reduces the routing contribution if additional shielding is introduced, provides a way to estimate the capacitance of the sensor itself, and has a voltage gain closer to unity than the standard SF. The SDF circuit has a somewhat larger area with a somewhat smaller bandwidth, but this is acceptable in most cases. A test chip, manufactured in a 180 nm CMOS image sensor process, implements small prototype pixel matrices in different flavors to compare the standard SF to the novel SF and to the novel SF with additional shielding. The effective sensing node capacitance was measured using a {sup 55}Fe source. Increasing reverse substrate bias from −1 V to −6 V reduces C{sub eff} by 38% and the equivalent noise charge

  19. Using assistive technology adaptations to include students with learning disabilities in cooperative learning activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, D P; Bryant, B R

    1998-01-01

    Cooperative learning (CL) is a common instructional arrangement that is used by classroom teachers to foster academic achievement and social acceptance of students with and without learning disabilities. Cooperative learning is appealing to classroom teachers because it can provide an opportunity for more instruction and feedback by peers than can be provided by teachers to individual students who require extra assistance. Recent studies suggest that students with LD may need adaptations during cooperative learning activities. The use of assistive technology adaptations may be necessary to help some students with LD compensate for their specific learning difficulties so that they can engage more readily in cooperative learning activities. A process for integrating technology adaptations into cooperative learning activities is discussed in terms of three components: selecting adaptations, monitoring the use of the adaptations during cooperative learning activities, and evaluating the adaptations' effectiveness. The article concludes with comments regarding barriers to and support systems for technology integration, technology and effective instructional practices, and the need to consider technology adaptations for students who have learning disabilities.

  20. Three Peaks of 2011 Draconid Activity Including that Connected with Pre-1900 Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koten, Pavel; Vaubaillon, Jeremie; Tóth, Juraj; Margonis, Anastasios; Ďuriš, František

    2014-08-01

    A Draconid meteor shower outburst was observed from on board two scientific aircraft deployed above Northern Europe on 8th October 2011. The activity profile was measured using a set of photographic and video cameras. The main peak of the activity occurred around 20:15 ± 0:0.5 UT which is consistent with the model prediction as well as with the IMO network visual observations. The corrected hourly rates reached a value of almost 350. The brighter meteors peaked about 15-20 min earlier than the dimmer ones. This difference can be explained by different directions of the ejection of the meteoroids from the parent comet. One of the instruments was even able to detect meteors connected with the material ejected from the parent comet before 1900 and thus confirmed the prediction of the model, although it was based on uncertain pre-1900 cometary data. Another small peak of the activity, which was caused by material ejected during the 1926 perihelion passage of the parent comet, was detected around 21:10 UT. The mass distribution index determined using the narrow field-of-view video camera was 2.0 ± 0.1. This work shows that the observation of meteor outbursts can constrain the orbital elements, outgassing activity and existence of jets at the surface of a comet.

  1. Absence of a Classically Activated Macrophage Cytokine Signature in Peripheral Spondylarthritis, Including Psoriatic Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandooren, Bernard; Noordenbos, Troy; Ambarus, Carmen; Krausz, Sarah; Cantaert, Tineke; Yeremenko, Nataliya; Boumans, Maartje; Lutter, Rene; Tak, Paul P.; Baeten, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Peripheral spondylarthritis (SpA) is characterized by macrophages that express CD163, a marker of alternative activation (M2). The purpose of this study was to assess whether this differential infiltration with macrophage subsets was associated with a different local inflammatory milieu

  2. Sixty Minutes of Physical Activity per Day Included within Preschool Academic Lessons Improves Early Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Stacie M.; Kirk, Erik P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The effects of increases in physical activity (PA) on early literacy skills in preschool children are not known. Methods: Fifty-four African-American preschool children from a low socioeconomic urban Head Start participated over 8 months. A 2-group, quasi-experimental design was used with one preschool site participating in the PA…

  3. 76 FR 10385 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Various Contract Related Forms That Will be Included in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Agency Information Collection Activities: Various Contract Related... that was indicated is the estimated annualized cost to the respondents for the hour burden for... additional 30-days for public comments and to correct the cost from $236,253.00 to zero. DATES: Comments are...

  4. Functional characterization of planar sensors with active edges using laser and X-ray beam scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povoli, M.; Bagolini, A.; Boscardin, M.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Giacomini, G.; Hasi, J.; Oh, A.; Zorzi, N.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the functional characterization of planar sensors with active edges fabricated at Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Trento, Italy. The measurements here reported were performed by means of laser and X-ray beam scans mainly focusing on the signal efficiency of the edge region of the devices. Results are very encouraging and show very good sensitivity up to few microns away from the device physical edge

  5. Functional characterization of planar sensors with active edges using laser and X-ray beam scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Povoli, M., E-mail: povoli@disi.unitn.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Università di Trento, Via Sommarive, 14, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento),Via Sommarive, 14, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); Bagolini, A.; Boscardin, M. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi (FBK-CMM), Via Sommarive, 18, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); Dalla Betta, G.-F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Università di Trento, Via Sommarive, 14, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento),Via Sommarive, 14, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); Giacomini, G. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi (FBK-CMM), Via Sommarive, 18, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy); Hasi, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025-7015 (United States); Oh, A. [The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Zorzi, N. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi (FBK-CMM), Via Sommarive, 18, I-38123 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    We report on the functional characterization of planar sensors with active edges fabricated at Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Trento, Italy. The measurements here reported were performed by means of laser and X-ray beam scans mainly focusing on the signal efficiency of the edge region of the devices. Results are very encouraging and show very good sensitivity up to few microns away from the device physical edge.

  6. Nanoparticle cluster gas sensor: Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticles for NH3 detection with ultrahigh sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Chen, Nan; Han, Bingqian; Xiao, Xuechun; Chen, Gang; Djerdj, Igor; Wang, Yude

    2015-09-01

    Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters were synthesized by a simple solvothermal method. The structure, morphology, chemical state and specific surface area were analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and N2-sorption studies, respectively. The SnO2 nanoparticle cluster matrix consists of tens of thousands of SnO2 nanoparticles with an ultra-small grain size estimated to be 3.0 nm. And there are abundant random-packed wormhole-like pores, caused by the inter-connection of the SnO2 nanoparticles, throughout each cluster. The platinum element is present in two forms including metal (Pt) and tetravalent metal oxide (PtO2) in the Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters. The as-synthesized pure and Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters were used to fabricate gas sensor devices. It was found that the gas response toward 500 ppm of ammonia was improved from 6.48 to 203.44 through the activation by Pt. And the results indicate that the sensor based on Pt activated SnO2 not only has ultrahigh sensitivity but also possesses good response-recovery properties, linear dependence, repeatability, selectivity and long-term stability, demonstrating the potential to use Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters as ammonia gas sensors. At the same time, the formation mechanisms of the unique nanoparticle clusters and highly enhanced sensitivity are also discussed.Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters were synthesized by a simple solvothermal method. The structure, morphology, chemical state and specific surface area were analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and N2-sorption studies, respectively. The SnO2 nanoparticle cluster matrix consists of tens of thousands of SnO2 nanoparticles with an ultra-small grain size estimated to be 3.0 nm. And there are abundant random-packed wormhole-like pores, caused by the inter

  7. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance agreement...

  8. Activity behavior of a HPLC column including α-chymotrypsin immobilized monosized-porous particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilici, Z.; Camli, S.T.; Unsal, E.; Tuncel, A.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a polymer-based, α-chymotrypsin (CT) immobilized HPLC column was prepared as a potential material for affinity-HPLC and chiral separation applications. Monosized-macroporous particles were synthesized as the support material by a relatively new polymerization protocol, the so-called, 'modified seeded polymerization'. The particles were obtained in the form of styrene-glycidyl methacrylate- divinylbenzene terpolymer approximately 11 μm in size. The particles were treated with aqueous ammonia to have primary amine groups on the porous surface. The amine functionalized particles were reacted by glutaraldehyde and the enzyme, CT, was covalently attached. CT carrying monosized-porous particles were slurry packed into the HPLC column 50 mmx4.6 mm in size. Since the activity behavior of immobilized CT played an important role in the enantiomeric separations performed by similar columns, the enzymatic activity behavior of the column produced by our protocol was determined. For this purpose, HPLC column was used as a packed bed reactor and the enzymatic reaction was continuously followed by measuring the absorbance of the output flow by the UV-detector of HPLC. S-shaped absorbance-time curves were obtained by monitoring the reactor output both in dynamic and steady-state periods. The columns with relatively lower immobilized enzyme content were more sensitive to the changes in the operating conditions and responded with more appreciable substrate conversion changes. The maximum reaction rate of the immobilized enzyme was estimated as approximately 25% of the free one by the mathematical model describing the activity behavior of the column. No significant loss was observed in the activity of the immobilized enzyme during the course of the experiments

  9. Testing the effectiveness of automated acoustic sensors for monitoring vocal activity of Marbled Murrelets Brachyramphus marmoratus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragg, Jenna L.; Burger, Alan E.; Piatt, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptic nest sites and secretive breeding behavior make population estimates and monitoring of Marbled Murrelets Brachyramphus marmoratus difficult and expensive. Standard audio-visual and radar protocols have been refined but require intensive field time by trained personnel. We examined the detection range of automated sound recorders (Song Meters; Wildlife Acoustics Inc.) and the reliability of automated recognition models (“recognizers”) for identifying and quantifying Marbled Murrelet vocalizations during the 2011 and 2012 breeding seasons at Kodiak Island, Alaska. The detection range of murrelet calls by Song Meters was estimated to be 60 m. Recognizers detected 20 632 murrelet calls (keer and keheer) from a sample of 268 h of recordings, yielding 5 870 call series, which compared favorably with human scanning of spectrograms (on average detecting 95% of the number of call series identified by a human observer, but not necessarily the same call series). The false-negative rate (percentage of murrelet call series that the recognizers failed to detect) was 32%, mainly involving weak calls and short call series. False-positives (other sounds included by recognizers as murrelet calls) were primarily due to complex songs of other bird species, wind and rain. False-positives were lower in forest nesting habitat (48%) and highest in shrubby vegetation where calls of other birds were common (97%–99%). Acoustic recorders tracked spatial and seasonal trends in vocal activity, with higher call detections in high-quality forested habitat and during late July/early August. Automated acoustic monitoring of Marbled Murrelet calls could provide cost-effective, valuable information for assessing habitat use and temporal and spatial trends in nesting activity; reliability is dependent on careful placement of sensors to minimize false-positives and on prudent application of digital recognizers with visual checking of spectrograms.

  10. Detection of protease activity by fluorescent protein FRET sensors: from computer simulation to live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryashchenko, Alexander S.; Khrenova, Maria G.; Savitsky, Alexander P.

    2018-04-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensors are widely used for the detection of protease activity in vitro and in vivo. Usually they consist of a FRET pair connected with a polypeptide linker containing a specific cleavage site for the relevant protease. Use of the fluorescent proteins as components of the FRET pair allows genetic encoding of such sensors and solves the problem of their delivery into live cells and animals. There are several ways to improve the properties of such sensors, mainly to increase FRET efficiency and therefore the dynamic range. One of the ways to achieve this is to use a non-fluorescent chromoprotein as an acceptor. Molecular dynamic simulations may assist in the construction of linker structures connecting donor and acceptor molecules. Estimation of the orientation factor κ 2 can be obtained by methods based on quantum theory and combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approaches. The linker can be structured by hydrophobic interactions, bringing it into a closed conformation that shortens the distance between donor and acceptor and, consequently, increases FRET efficiency. We analyzed the effects of different linker structures on the detection of caspase-3 activity using a non-fluorescent acceptor. Also we have constructed the Tb3+- TagRFP sensor in which a complex of the terbium ion and terbium-binding peptide is used as a donor. This allowed us to use the unique property of lanthanide ions—fluorescence lifetime up to milliseconds—to perform measurements with time delay and exclude the nanosecond-order fluorescence. Using our systems as a starting point, by changing the recognition site in the linker it is possible to perform imaging of different protease activity in vitro or in vivo.

  11. FREQUENCY OF FLAME SENSOR ACTIVATION IN PUBLIC PLACES AFTER ADMINISTRATION OF RADIOACTIVE IODINE TO TREAT GRAVES DISEASE: A RECENT SURVEY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Junichi; Hamada, Katsuhiko; Maruta, Tetsushi; Mizokami, Tetsuya; Higashi, Kiichiro

    2016-08-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-perception-type flame sensors detect gamma rays emitted from iodine 131 ((131)I). Explaining the possibility of flame sensor activation to patients when they receive (131)I to treat Graves disease or other ablative purposes is important. We investigate the current situation of flame sensor activation after radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy. A total of 318 patients (65 males and 253 females) with Graves disease who received RAI therapy at our clinic between November 2007 and June 2014 participated in this study. Patients were given both written and oral explanations regarding the possibility of flame sensor activation. Participants were surveyed with a questionnaire. The following question was asked: "Did the fire alarm (flame sensor) go off when you used a restroom in places like shopping centers within a few days after your isotope therapy?" To those who answered "yes," we asked where the fire alarm had gone off. Of the 318 patients, 19 (6.0%) answered "yes," 2 of whom were male while 17 were female. Of the 299 (94.0%) patients who answered "no," 63 were male and 236 were female. As to the place of restroom sensor activation, shopping centers were reported by 9 patients; supermarkets by 5; airports by 2; and a bookstore, the Kyushu Shinkansen (bullet train), and a hospital by 1 each. Explaining to patients the possibility of flame sensor activation after RAI therapy is important to avoid some complications, especially in security-sensitive areas. (131)I = iodine 131 RAI = radioactive iodine UV = ultra-violet.

  12. In vitro activity of Inula helenium against clinical Staphylococcus aureus strains including MRSA.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Shea, S

    2009-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the bactericidal activity (specifically antistaphylococcal) of Inula helenium. The antimicrobial activity of the extract is tested against 200 clinically significant Irish Staphylococcus aureus isolates consisting of methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and -sensitive (MSSA) S. aureus using a drop test method and a microbroth dilution method. The antibacterial effect is evaluated by measuring the area of the inhibition zone against the isolates. Results proved I. helenium to be 100% effective against the 200 staphylococci tested, with 93% of isolates falling within the ++ and +++ groups. The minimum bactericidal concentration of I. helenium was examined on a subset of isolates and values ranged from 0.9 mg\\/mL to 9.0 mg\\/mL. The extract was equally effective against antibiotic-resistant and -sensitive strains. This plant therefore possesses compounds with potent antistaphylococcal properties, which in the future could be used to complement infection control policies and prevent staphylococcal infection and carriage. This research supports other studies wherein herbal plants exhibiting medicinal properties are being examined to overcome the problems of antibiotic resistance and to offer alternatives in the treatment and control of infectious diseases.

  13. Active immunisation of horses against tetanus including the booster dose and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liefman, C E

    1981-02-01

    Successful active immunisation of horses against tetanus is dependent on a number of factors of which the toxoid preparation used, its method of application and the ability of the individual horse to respond are fundamental. Two immunisation schedules using an aluminium-based toxoid preparation were examined and the protection determined by monitoring the level of antitoxin afforded by each schedule. The results obtained demonstrated that 2 doses of this toxoid are necessary to ensure 12 months protection in all horses. These results are discussed in relation to the factors involved in active immunisation against tetanus. Reference is also made to the occurrence of a transient phase of reduced levels of antitoxin following booster doses of toxoid in immunised horses during which it is considered these horses could become more susceptible to tetanus. The effect of a booster dose on immunised horses was examined and while there can be a reduction in the level of antitoxin in some immunised horses following this dose its effect is minimal, short-lived and for all practical purposes can be disregarded. The application of the booster dose in practice is also discussed.

  14. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-01-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release

  15. Sixty Minutes of Physical Activity per Day Included Within Preschool Academic Lessons Improves Early Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Stacie M; Kirk, Erik P

    2016-03-01

    The effects of increases in physical activity (PA) on early literacy skills in preschool children are not known. Fifty-four African-American preschool children from a low socioeconomic urban Head Start participated over 8 months. A 2-group, quasi-experimental design was used with one preschool site participating in the PA intervention and a second site participating as the control site. The PA program was designed to promote 300 minutes/week of moderate to vigorous PA academic lessons. Academic achievement related to early literacy and phonological awareness in the areas of rhyming and alliteration were assessed at baseline, 4 and 8 months. Over 8 months, rhyming significantly (p literacy. © 2016, American School Health Association.

  16. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-09-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

  17. Active control of natural frequencies of FGM plates by piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaeifar, R.; Bahai, H.; Shahab, S.

    2008-08-01

    An optimization strategy is presented for modifying the dynamic characteristics of functionally graded material (FGM) plates which are actively controlled by piezoelectric sensor/actuator (S/A) pairs. A finite element (FE) model is developed for static and dynamic analysis of FGM plates with collocated piezoelectric sensors and actuators. In this model, the feedback signal to each actuator patch is implemented as a function of the electric potential in its corresponding sensor patch in order to provide active control of the FGM plate in a closed loop system. Using the proposed FE model, a method based on the first-order and second-order approximations in a Taylor expansion is developed to calculate the corresponding changes in the parameters which characterize the piezoelectric patches (i.e. the patch thickness and the feedback gain in each S/A pair) in order to achieve the desired eigenfrequency shifts in the FGM plate. An FGM plate with eight separate S/A pairs is considered as a case study. A sensitivity analysis is initially performed to identify the S/A pairs which have the most influence on the natural frequencies of the plate. The proposed method is used to find a sequence of feedback gains for shifting the natural frequencies to the desired level.

  18. Steady-state analysis of activated sludge processes with a settler model including sludge compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, S; Zambrano, J; Carlsson, B

    2016-01-01

    A reduced model of a completely stirred-tank bioreactor coupled to a settling tank with recycle is analyzed in its steady states. In the reactor, the concentrations of one dominant particulate biomass and one soluble substrate component are modelled. While the biomass decay rate is assumed to be constant, growth kinetics can depend on both substrate and biomass concentrations, and optionally model substrate inhibition. Compressive and hindered settling phenomena are included using the Bürger-Diehl settler model, which consists of a partial differential equation. Steady-state solutions of this partial differential equation are obtained from an ordinary differential equation, making steady-state analysis of the entire plant difficult. A key result showing that the ordinary differential equation can be replaced with an approximate algebraic equation simplifies model analysis. This algebraic equation takes the location of the sludge-blanket during normal operation into account, allowing for the limiting flux capacity caused by compressive settling to easily be included in the steady-state mass balance equations for the entire plant system. This novel approach grants the possibility of more realistic solutions than other previously published reduced models, comprised of yet simpler settler assumptions. The steady-state concentrations, solids residence time, and the wastage flow ratio are functions of the recycle ratio. Solutions are shown for various growth kinetics; with different values of biomass decay rate, influent volumetric flow, and substrate concentration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. High-fidelity optical reporting of neuronal electrical activity with an ultrafast fluorescent voltage sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Pierre, François; Marshall, Jesse D; Yang, Ying; Gong, Yiyang; Schnitzer, Mark J; Lin, Michael Z

    2015-01-01

    Accurate optical reporting of electrical activity in genetically defined neuronal populations is a long-standing goal in neuroscience. Here we describe Accelerated Sensor of Action Potentials 1 (ASAP1), a novel voltage sensor design in which a circularly permuted green fluorescent protein is inserted within an extracellular loop of a voltage-sensing domain, rendering fluorescence responsive to membrane potential. ASAP1 demonstrates on- and off- kinetics of 2.1 and 2.0 ms, reliably detects single action potentials and subthreshold potential changes, and tracks trains of action potential waveforms up to 200 Hz in single trials. With a favorable combination of brightness, dynamic range, and speed, ASAP1 enables continuous monitoring of membrane potential in neurons at KHz frame rates using standard epifluorescence microscopy. PMID:24755780

  20. porewater chemistry experiment at Mont Terri rock laboratory. Reactive transport modelling including bacterial activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournassat, Christophe; Gaucher, Eric C.; Leupin, Olivier X.; Wersin, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. An in-situ test in the Opalinus Clay formation, termed pore water Chemistry (PC) experiment, was run for a period of five years. It was based on the concept of diffusive equilibration whereby traced water with a composition close to that expected in the formation was continuously circulated and monitored in a packed off borehole. The main original focus was to obtain reliable data on the pH/pCO 2 of the pore water, but because of unexpected microbially- induced redox reactions, the objective was then changed to elucidate the biogeochemical processes happening in the borehole and to understand their impact on pH/pCO 2 and pH in the low permeability clay formation. The biologically perturbed chemical evolution of the PC experiment was simulated with reactive transport models. The aim of this modelling exercise was to develop a 'minimal-' model able to reproduce the chemical evolution of the PC experiment, i.e. the chemical evolution of solute inorganic and organic compounds (organic carbon, dissolved inorganic carbon etc...) that are coupled with each other through the simultaneous occurrence of biological transformation of solute or solid compounds, in-diffusion and out-diffusion of solute species and precipitation/dissolution of minerals (in the borehole and in the formation). An accurate description of the initial chemical conditions in the surrounding formation together with simplified kinetics rule mimicking the different phases of bacterial activities allowed reproducing the evolution of all main measured parameters (e.g. pH, TOC). Analyses from the overcoring and these simulations evidence the high buffer capacity of Opalinus clay regarding chemical perturbations due to bacterial activity. This pH buffering capacity is mainly attributed to the carbonate system as well as to the clay surfaces reactivity. Glycerol leaching from the pH-electrode might be the primary organic source responsible for

  1. Education outcomes related to including genomics activities in nursing practice in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestka, Elizabeth; Lim, Swee Hia; Png, Hong Hock

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the impact of a genomic educational intervention by measuring the extent participants could apply the class content to practice. A sample of 76 nurses employed by Singapore Health Services, Singapore, participated in a nursing genomics seminar in 2008 and completed a survey form with a response rate of 89%. Every respondent was able to identify use of a genomic assessment or intervention item with a patient from their clinical practice. The mean use of genomic assessment and intervention items was 5.8 out of a possible 10. The most frequently used items were assessment of family history information, environmental factors and genomic physical findings. Findings provide evidence that nurses are able to include genomic assessments and interventions in their practice following targeted education. This study highlights how informed nurses are able to apply genomic assessments and interventions to individualize patient care.

  2. Comparative antimicrobial activity of gatifloxacin tested against Campylobacter jejuni including fluoroquinolone-resistant clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, C L; Erwin, M E; Barrett, M S; Jones, R N

    1999-06-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is an important pathogen that causes gastroenteritis, as well as other disease states such as meningitis and septic arthritis. In this study, the Etest (AB BIODISK, Solna, Sweden) results were compared to a reference agar dilution method using gatifloxacin, a new 8-methoxyfluoroquinolone. A total of 53 strains of C. jejuni initially isolated from patients in California and Mexico were tested. Results demonstrated a high correlation (r = 0.88) between the two utilized in vitro dilution methods. In addition, gatifloxacin activity was compared to that of ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, amoxicillin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole using the Etest. Gatifloxacin (MIC90, 4 micrograms/ml) was approximately eight- to 16-fold more potent than ciprofloxacin (Mic90, > 32 micrograms/ml), a commonly used fluoroquinolone for Campylobacter infections. Eight strains highly resistant to ciprofloxacin (MIC90, > 32 micrograms/ml) were tested for cross resistance against the newer fluoroquinolones (gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, trovafloxacin) and the rank order of potency was: gatifloxacin (MIC50, 16 micrograms/ml) > trovafloxacin = levofloxacin (MIC50, > 32 micrograms/mL). However, only 25% ciprofloxacin-resistant strains were inhibited by < or = 1 microgram/mL of gatifloxacin or trovafloxacin. These results for gatifloxacin against C. jejuni strains must be further assessed in the context of in vivo trials before the clinical role of this new fluoroquinolone can be determined. The Etest appears to be a simple and precise susceptibility test method for testing C. jejuni isolates against fluoroquinolones and other alternative therapeutic agents.

  3. Active packaging of chicken meats with modified atmosphere including oxygen scavengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirhan, B; Candoğan, K

    2016-10-19

    The effects of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP-70% CO 2 /30%N 2 ) and iron-based oxygen scavengers (OS) with various absorption capacities (Ageless ® ss100, ss300, and ss500) as an active packaging system on microbiological and oxidative changes in chicken thigh meats were evaluated during refrigerated storage (4°C) for 19 d at 3-day intervals. Total aerobic mesophilic bacteria counts exceeded the acceptability limit at d 7 in the control group without MAP (AIR), and at d 19 in MAP and OS containing samples. OS utilization resulted in around 1.5 and 1.0 log unit reductions in Pseudomonas spp. counts at d 7 and d 10 of storage, respectively, as compared with AIR and MAP groups (P < 0.05). MAP and OS groups had fewer (P < 0.05) coliform counts than did the AIR group, with an approximately 1.0 log reduction observed at d 10. Although in some cases OS utilization resulted in lower TBARS values and carbonyl and sulphydryl contents, particularly during later stages of refrigerated storage as compared to AIR and MAP groups, in general, these effects were not always apparent. The results of this study suggested that MAP suppressed microbiological growth and retarded lipid and protein oxidation in chicken thigh meats, with a 9-day shelf-life extention with insignificant effects of OS. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  4. Multifunctional colloidal nanofiber composites including dextran and folic acid as electro-active platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzayev, Zakir M O; Bunyatova, Ulviye; Şimșek, Murat

    2017-06-15

    This work presents the fabrication and characterization of novel colloidal multifunctional polymer nanofiber composites (NFCs) from water dispersion blends of intercalated silicate layered nanocomposites of poly (2-vinyl-N-pyrrolidone)/octadecyl amine-montmorillonite (ODA-MMT) and dextran/ODA-MMT as matrix and partner polymer intercalated nanocomposites in the presence of NaOH and folic acid (FA) as doping agents by green reactive electrospinning. Chemical and physical structures, surface morphology and electrical properties were investigated. Effects of matrix/partner polymer ratios, doping agents, absorption time of NaOH, and temperature on electrical parameters of NFCs were evaluated. The presence of FA and increasing dextran fraction in NFCs resulted in reducing fiber diameter and improving diameter distribution. High complexing behaviors of matrix/partner polymer chains, organoclay, FA, and NaOH significantly improved conductivity parameters, especially 5-min of absorption time (≈10 -2 -10 - 3 Sm -1 ). The conductivity of the samples decreased with increasing temperature. NFCs fabricated for the first time are promising candidates for various biomedical, electrochemical and electronic applications as electro-active platforms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. An Active Cooperation-Aware Spectrum Allocation Mechanism for Body Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A cognitive radio-based spectrum allocation scheme using an active cooperative-aware mechanism is proposed in this paper. The scheme ensures that the primary user and secondary users cooperate actively for their own benefits. The primary user releases some spectrum resources to secondary users to actively stimulate them to actively join the cooperative transmission of the primary user, and secondary users help the primary user to relay data in return, as well as its self-data transmission at the same time. The Stackelberg game is used to evenly and jointly optimize the utilities of both the primary and secondary users. Simulation results show that the proposed active cooperation-aware mechanism could improve the body sensor network performance.

  6. An active cooperation-aware spectrum allocation mechanism for body sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fu; Guo, Ying; Peng, Jun; Hu, Jiankun

    2015-01-28

    A cognitive radio-based spectrum allocation scheme using an active cooperative-aware mechanism is proposed in this paper. The scheme ensures that the primary user and secondary users cooperate actively for their own benefits. The primary user releases some spectrum resources to secondary users to actively stimulate them to actively join the cooperative transmission of the primary user, and secondary users help the primary user to relay data in return, as well as its self-data transmission at the same time. The Stackelberg game is used to evenly and jointly optimize the utilities of both the primary and secondary users. Simulation results show that the proposed active cooperation-aware mechanism could improve the body sensor network performance.

  7. Beyond activity tracking: next-generation wearable and implantable sensor technologies (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Patrick

    2017-05-01

    Current-generation wearable devices have had success continuously measuring the activity and heart rate of subjects during exercise and daily life activities, resulting in interesting new data sets that can, though machine learning algorithms, predict a small subset of health conditions. However, this information is only very peripherally related to most health conditions, and thus offers limited utility to a wide range of the population. In this presentation, I will discuss emerging sensor technologies capable of measuring new and interesting parameters that can potentially offer much more meaningful and actionable data sets. Specifically, I will present recent work on wearable chemical sensors that can, for the first time, continuously monitor a suite of parameters like glucose, alcohol, lactate, and electrolytes, all while wirelessly delivering these results to a smart phone in real time. Demonstration platforms featuring patch, temporary tattoo, and mouthguard form factors will be described, in addition to the corresponding electronics necessary to perform sensor conditioning and wireless readout. Beyond chemical sensors, I will also discuss integration strategies with more conventional electrophysiological and physical parameters like ECG and strain gauges for cardiac and respiration rate monitoring, respectively. Finally, I will conclude the talk by introducing a new form of wireless communications in body-area networks that utilize the body itself as a channel for magnetic energy. Since the power consumption of conventional RF circuits often dominates the power of wearable devices, this new magnetic human body communication technique is specifically architected to dramatically reduce the path loss compared to conventional RF and capacitive human body communication techniques, thereby enabling ultra-low-power body area networks for next-generation wearable devices.

  8. Predicting mountain lion activity using radiocollars equipped with mercury tip-sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janis, Michael W.; Clark, Joseph D.; Johnson, Craig

    1999-01-01

    Radiotelemetry collars with tip-sensors have long been used to monitor wildlife activity. However, comparatively few researchers have tested the reliability of the technique on the species being studied. To evaluate the efficacy of using tip-sensors to assess mountain lion (Puma concolor) activity, we radiocollared 2 hand-reared mountain lions and simultaneously recorded their behavior and the associated telemetry signal characteristics. We noted both the number of pulse-rate changes and the percentage of time the transmitter emitted a fast pulse rate (i.e., head up) within sampling intervals ranging from 1-5 minutes. Based on 27 hours of observations, we were able to correctly distinguish between active and inactive behaviors >93% of the time using a logistic regression model. We present several models to predict activity of mountain lions; the selection of which to us would depend on study objectives and logistics. Our results indicate that field protocols that use only pulse-rate changes to indicate activity can lead to significant classification errors.

  9. The Pediatric SmartShoe: Wearable Sensor System for Ambulatory Monitoring of Physical Activity and Gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Nagaraj; Zhang, Ting; Uswatte, Gitendra; Taub, Edward; Barman, Joydip; McKay, Staci; Taylor, Andrea; Morris, David M; Griffin, Angi; Sazonov, Edward S

    2018-02-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of nonprogressive neuro-developmental conditions occurring in early childhood that causes movement disorders and physical disability. Measuring activity levels and gait patterns is an important aspect of CP rehabilitation programs. Traditionally, such programs utilize commercially available laboratory systems, which cannot to be utilized in community living. In this study, a novel, shoe-based, wearable sensor system (pediatric SmartShoe) was tested on 11 healthy children and 10 children with CP to validate its use for monitoring of physical activity and gait. Novel data processing techniques were developed to remove the effect of orthotics on the sensor signals. Machine learning models were developed to automatically classify the activities of daily living. The temporal gait parameters estimated from the SmartShoe data were compared against reference measurements on a GAITRite mat. A leave-one-out cross-validation method indicated a 95.3% average accuracy of activity classification (for sitting, standing, and walking) for children with CP and 96.2% for healthy children. Average relative errors in gait parameter estimation (gait cycle, stance, swing, and step time, % single support time on both lower extremities, along with cadence) ranged from 0.2% to 6.4% (standard deviation range = 1.4%-9.9%). These results suggest that the pediatric SmartShoe can accurately measure physical activity and gait of children with CP and can potentially be used for ambulatory monitoring.

  10. Gait training assist system of a lower limb prosthetic visualizing muscle activation pattern using a color-depth sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Kunihiro; Mita, Tomoki; Tsuji, Toshiaki; Matsumoto, Yoshio

    2017-07-01

    Some unilateral lower-limb amputees load the intact limb more than the prosthetic limb. This can cause chronic pains, fatigue, lumbago, and joint diseases, including knee osteoarthritis. To avoid and counteract these symptoms it is necessary to improve their asymmetric gait. Increasing the function of the hip abductor muscle is important to maintaining symmetrical weight distribution. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop a training assist system, which estimates and visualizes an abductor muscle by using a color-depth sensor. To estimate the muscle activation, first, the floor reaction force is calculated using a simple dynamic model. Then, the hip torque is calculated using joint angles. The floor reaction force and, the muscle length are calculated based on a human musculoskeletal model. Muscle activity is estimated by these parameters. Evaluation experiments of this proposed method were performed on healthy persons and unilateral trans femoral amputees, and the effectiveness of this proposed algorithm has been confirmed.

  11. Extracting aerobic system dynamics during unsupervised activities of daily living using wearable sensor machine learning models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrame, Thomas; Amelard, Robert; Wong, Alexander; Hughson, Richard L

    2018-02-01

    Physical activity levels are related through algorithms to the energetic demand, with no information regarding the integrity of the multiple physiological systems involved in the energetic supply. Longitudinal analysis of the oxygen uptake (V̇o 2 ) by wearable sensors in realistic settings might permit development of a practical tool for the study of the longitudinal aerobic system dynamics (i.e., V̇o 2 kinetics). This study evaluated aerobic system dynamics based on predicted V̇o 2 data obtained from wearable sensors during unsupervised activities of daily living (μADL). Thirteen healthy men performed a laboratory-controlled moderate exercise protocol and were monitored for ≈6 h/day for 4 days (μADL data). Variables derived from hip accelerometer (ACC HIP ), heart rate monitor, and respiratory bands during μADL were extracted and processed by a validated random forest regression model to predict V̇o 2 . The aerobic system analysis was based on the frequency-domain analysis of ACC HIP and predicted V̇o 2 data obtained during μADL. Optimal samples for frequency domain analysis (constrained to ≤0.01 Hz) were selected when ACC HIP was higher than 0.05 g at a given frequency (i.e., participants were active). The temporal characteristics of predicted V̇o 2 data during μADL correlated with the temporal characteristics of measured V̇o 2 data during laboratory-controlled protocol ([Formula: see text] = 0.82, P system dynamics can be investigated during unsupervised activities of daily living by wearable sensors. Although speculative, these algorithms have the potential to be incorporated into wearable systems for early detection of changes in health status in realistic environments by detecting changes in aerobic response dynamics. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The early detection of subclinical aerobic system impairments might be indicative of impaired physiological reserves that impact the capacity for physical activity. This study is the first to use wearable

  12. Assessment of laboratory and daily energy expenditure estimates from consumer multi-sensor physical activity monitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enhad A Chowdhury

    Full Text Available Wearable physical activity monitors are growing in popularity and provide the opportunity for large numbers of the public to self-monitor physical activity behaviours. The latest generation of these devices feature multiple sensors, ostensibly similar or even superior to advanced research instruments. However, little is known about the accuracy of their energy expenditure estimates. Here, we assessed their performance against criterion measurements in both controlled laboratory conditions (simulated activities of daily living and structured exercise and over a 24 hour period in free-living conditions. Thirty men (n = 15 and women (n = 15 wore three multi-sensor consumer monitors (Microsoft Band, Apple Watch and Fitbit Charge HR, an accelerometry-only device as a comparison (Jawbone UP24 and validated research-grade multi-sensor devices (BodyMedia Core and individually calibrated Actiheart™. During discrete laboratory activities when compared against indirect calorimetry, the Apple Watch performed similarly to criterion measures. The Fitbit Charge HR was less consistent at measurement of discrete activities, but produced similar free-living estimates to the Apple Watch. Both these devices underestimated free-living energy expenditure (-394 kcal/d and -405 kcal/d, respectively; P<0.01. The multi-sensor Microsoft Band and accelerometry-only Jawbone UP24 devices underestimated most laboratory activities and substantially underestimated free-living expenditure (-1128 kcal/d and -998 kcal/d, respectively; P<0.01. None of the consumer devices were deemed equivalent to the reference method for daily energy expenditure. For all devices, there was a tendency for negative bias with greater daily energy expenditure. No consumer monitors performed as well as the research-grade devices although in some (but not all cases, estimates were close to criterion measurements. Thus, whilst industry-led innovation has improved the accuracy of consumer monitors

  13. Assessment of laboratory and daily energy expenditure estimates from consumer multi-sensor physical activity monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Enhad A; Western, Max J; Nightingale, Thomas E; Peacock, Oliver J; Thompson, Dylan

    2017-01-01

    Wearable physical activity monitors are growing in popularity and provide the opportunity for large numbers of the public to self-monitor physical activity behaviours. The latest generation of these devices feature multiple sensors, ostensibly similar or even superior to advanced research instruments. However, little is known about the accuracy of their energy expenditure estimates. Here, we assessed their performance against criterion measurements in both controlled laboratory conditions (simulated activities of daily living and structured exercise) and over a 24 hour period in free-living conditions. Thirty men (n = 15) and women (n = 15) wore three multi-sensor consumer monitors (Microsoft Band, Apple Watch and Fitbit Charge HR), an accelerometry-only device as a comparison (Jawbone UP24) and validated research-grade multi-sensor devices (BodyMedia Core and individually calibrated Actiheart™). During discrete laboratory activities when compared against indirect calorimetry, the Apple Watch performed similarly to criterion measures. The Fitbit Charge HR was less consistent at measurement of discrete activities, but produced similar free-living estimates to the Apple Watch. Both these devices underestimated free-living energy expenditure (-394 kcal/d and -405 kcal/d, respectively; P<0.01). The multi-sensor Microsoft Band and accelerometry-only Jawbone UP24 devices underestimated most laboratory activities and substantially underestimated free-living expenditure (-1128 kcal/d and -998 kcal/d, respectively; P<0.01). None of the consumer devices were deemed equivalent to the reference method for daily energy expenditure. For all devices, there was a tendency for negative bias with greater daily energy expenditure. No consumer monitors performed as well as the research-grade devices although in some (but not all) cases, estimates were close to criterion measurements. Thus, whilst industry-led innovation has improved the accuracy of consumer monitors, these devices

  14. Gas Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Luebke, Ryan

    2015-01-22

    A gas sensor using a metal organic framework material can be fully integrated with related circuitry on a single substrate. In an on-chip application, the gas sensor can result in an area-efficient fully integrated gas sensor solution. In one aspect, a gas sensor can include a first gas sensing region including a first pair of electrodes, and a first gas sensitive material proximate to the first pair of electrodes, wherein the first gas sensitive material includes a first metal organic framework material.

  15. Evaluation of fatigue cracks using nonlinearities of acousto-ultrasonic waves acquired by an active sensor network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Chao; Hong, Ming; Su, Zhongqing; Wang, Qiang; Cheng, Li

    2013-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in using the nonlinear features of acousto-ultrasonic (AU) waves to detect damage onset (e.g., micro-fatigue cracks) due to their high sensitivity to damage with small dimensions. However, most existing approaches are able to infer the existence of fatigue damage qualitatively, but fail to further ascertain its location and severity. A damage characterization approach, in conjunction with the use of an active piezoelectric sensor network, was established, capable of evaluating fatigue cracks in a quantitative manner (including the co-presence of multiple fatigue cracks, and their individual locations and severities). Fundamental investigations, using both experiment and enhanced finite element analysis dedicated to the simulation of nonlinear AU waves, were carried out to link the accumulation of nonlinearities extracted from high-order AU waves to the characteristic parameters of a fatigue crack. A probability-based diagnostic imaging algorithm was developed, facilitating an intuitive presentation of identification results in images. The approach was verified experimentally by evaluating multi-fatigue cracks near rivet holes of a fatigued aluminum plate, showing satisfactory precision in characterizing real, barely visible fatigue cracks. Compared with existing methods, this approach innovatively (i) uses permanently integrated active sensor networks, conducive to automatic and online health monitoring; (ii) characterizes fatigue cracks at a quantitative level; (iii) allows detection of multiple fatigue cracks; and (iv) visualizes identification results in intuitive images. (paper)

  16. Electrochemical DNA sensor-based strategy for sensitive detection of DNA demethylation and DNA demethylase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qingming; Fan, Mengxing; Yang, Yin; Zhang, Hui

    2016-08-31

    DNA demethylation and demethylase activity play important roles in DNA self-repair, and their detection is key to early diagnosis of fatal diseases. Herein, a facile electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensor was developed for the sensitive detection of DNA demethylation and demethylase activity based on an enzyme cleavage strategy. The thiol modified hemi-methylated hairpin probe DNA (pDNA) was self-assembled on a Au electrode surface through the formation of AuS bonds. The hemi-methylated pDNA served as the substrate of DNA demethylase (using methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2 (MBD2) as an example). Following demethylation, the hairpin stem was then recognized and cleaved by BstUI endonuclease. The ferrocene carboxylic acid (FcA)-tagged pDNA strands were released into the buffer solution from the electrode surface, resulting in a significant decrease of electrochemical signal and providing a means to observe DNA demethylation. The activity of DNA demethylase was analyzed in the concentration ranging from 0.5 to 500 ng mL(-1) with a limit of detection as low as 0.17 ng mL(-1). With high specificity and sensitivity, rapid response, and low cost, this simple E-DNA sensor provides a unique platform for the sensitive detection of DNA demethylation, DNA demethylase activity, and related molecular diagnostics and drug screening. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Detection of Early Morning Daily Activities with Static Home and Wearable Wireless Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vanderpool

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a flexible, cost-effective, wireless in-home activity monitoring system for assisting patients with cognitive impairments due to traumatic brain injury (TBI. The system locates the subject with fixed home sensors and classifies early morning bathroom activities of daily living with a wearable wireless accelerometer. The system extracts time- and frequency-domain features from the accelerometer data and classifies these features with a hybrid classifier that combines Gaussian mixture models and a finite state machine. In particular, the paper establishes that despite similarities between early morning bathroom activities of daily living, it is possible to detect and classify these activities with high accuracy. It also discusses system training and provides data to show that with proper feature selection, accurate detection and classification are possible for any subject with no subject specific training.

  18. Should Physical Activity Be Included in Nutrition Education? A Comparison of Nutrition Outcomes with and without In-Class Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer-Keenan, Debra M.; Corda, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Limited-resource adults' dietary intakes and nutrition behaviors improve as a result of Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)/Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) participation; however, physical activity education is needed for improved health. The experimental study reported here assessed if spending time…

  19. Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-01

    A novel catalase activity assay was developed for biological samples (liver and kidney tissue homogenates) using a rapid and low-cost optical sensor-based ‘cupric reducing antioxidant capacity' (CUPRAC) method. The reagent, copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, was immobilized onto a cation-exchanger film of Nafion, and the absorbance changes associated with the formation of the highly-colored Cu(I)-Nc chelate as a result of reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was measured at 450 nm. When catalase was absent, H2O2 produced the CUPRAC chromophore, whereas catalase, being an effective H2O2 scavenger, completely annihilated the CUPRAC signal due to H2O2. Thus, the CUPRAC absorbance due to H2O2 oxidation concomitant with Cu(I)-Nc formation decreased proportionally with catalase. The developed sensor gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of H2O2 (0.68-78.6 μM). This optical sensor-based method applicable to tissue homogenates proved to be efficient for low hydrogen peroxide concentrations (physiological and nontoxic levels) to which the widely used UV method is not accurately responsive. Thus, conventional problems of the UV method arising from relatively low sensitivity and selectivity, and absorbance disturbance due to gaseous oxygen evolution were overcome. The catalase findings of the proposed method for tissue homogenates were statistically alike with those of HPLC.

  20. Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-11

    A novel catalase activity assay was developed for biological samples (liver and kidney tissue homogenates) using a rapid and low-cost optical sensor-based 'cupric reducing antioxidant capacity' (CUPRAC) method. The reagent, copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, was immobilized onto a cation-exchanger film of Nafion, and the absorbance changes associated with the formation of the highly-colored Cu(I)-Nc chelate as a result of reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was measured at 450 nm. When catalase was absent, H2O2 produced the CUPRAC chromophore, whereas catalase, being an effective H2O2 scavenger, completely annihilated the CUPRAC signal due to H2O2. Thus, the CUPRAC absorbance due to H2O2 oxidation concomitant with Cu(I)-Nc formation decreased proportionally with catalase. The developed sensor gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of H2O2 (0.68-78.6 μM). This optical sensor-based method applicable to tissue homogenates proved to be efficient for low hydrogen peroxide concentrations (physiological and nontoxic levels) to which the widely used UV method is not accurately responsive. Thus, conventional problems of the UV method arising from relatively low sensitivity and selectivity, and absorbance disturbance due to gaseous oxygen evolution were overcome. The catalase findings of the proposed method for tissue homogenates were statistically alike with those of HPLC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Electrospun conducting polymer nanofibers as the active material in sensors and diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Nicholas J.

    2013-03-01

    Polyaniline doped with camphorsulfonic acid (PANi-HCSA) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with polystyrene sulfonic acid (PEDOT-PSSA) were electrospun separately to obtain individual nanofibers which were captured on Si/SiO2 substrates and electrically characterized. The fiber resistance was recorded as a function of time in the presence of vapours of aliphatic alcohols of varying sizes. Due to the large surface to volume ratio, uniform diameter and small quantity of active material used in the construction, these sensor responses are very quick. Sensors made from individual fibers also show true saturation upon exposure to and removal of the sensing gas. A Schottky diode was also fabricated using an n-doped Si/SiO2 substrate and a single PANi-HCSA fiber and tested in vacuum and in ammonia gas. The diode response was instantaneous upon exposure to ammonia with nearly complete recovery of the current upon pumping out the ammonia, thereby making it a reusable sensor with rectifying behaviour i.e. multifunctional.

  2. A substrate sensor chip to assay the enzymatic activity of Botulinum neurotoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévêque, Christian; Ferracci, Géraldine; Maulet, Yves; Grand-Masson, Chloé; Blanchard, Marie-Pierre; Seagar, Michael; El Far, Oussama

    2013-11-15

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) induces muscle paralysis by enzymatically cleaving the presynaptic SNARE protein SNAP-25, which results in lasting inhibition of acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction. A rapid and sensitive in vitro assay for BoNT/A is required to replace the mouse lethality assay (LD50) in current use. We have developed a fully automated sensor to assay the endoprotease activity of BoNT/A. We produced monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that recognize SNAP-25 neo-epitopes specifically generated by BoNT/A action. Recombinant SNAP-25 was coupled to the sensor surface of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) system and samples containing BoNT/A were injected over the substrate sensor. Online substrate cleavage was monitored by measuring binding of mAb10F12 to a SNAP-25 neo-epitope. The SNAP-25-chip assay was toxin serotype-specific and detected 55 fM BoNT/A (1 LD50/ml) in 5 min and 0.4 fM (0.01 LD50/ml) in 5h. Time-course and dose-response curves were linear, yielding a limit of quantification of 0.03 LD50/ml. This label-free method is 100 times more sensitive than the mouse assay, potentially providing rapid read-out of small amounts of toxin for environmental surveillance and the quality control of pharmaceutical preparations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Integrated X-ray and charged particle active pixel CMOS sensor arrays using an epitaxial silicon sensitive region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinfelder, Stuart; Bichsel, Hans; Bieser, Fred; Matis, Howard S.; Rai, Gulshan; Retiere, Fabrice; Weiman, Howard; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2002-07-01

    Integrated CMOS Active Pixel Sensor (APS) arrays have been fabricated and tested using X-ray and electron sources. The 128 by 128 pixel arrays, designed in a standard 0.25 micron process, use a {approx}10 micron epitaxial silicon layer as a deep detection region. The epitaxial layer has a much greater thickness than the surface features used by standard CMOS APS, leading to stronger signals and potentially better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). On the other hand, minority carriers confined within the epitaxial region may diffuse to neighboring pixels, blur images and reduce peak signal intensity. But for low-rate, sparse-event images, centroid analysis of this diffusion may be used to increase position resolution. Careful trade-offs involving pixel size and sense-node area verses capacitance must be made to optimize overall performance. The prototype sensor arrays, therefore, include a range of different pixel designs, including different APS circuits and a range of different epitaxial layer contact structures. The fabricated arrays were tested with 1.5 GeV electrons and Fe-55 X-ray sources, yielding a measured noise of 13 electrons RMS and an SNR for single Fe-55 X-rays of greater than 38.

  4. Wearable Sensor-Based Human Activity Recognition Method with Multi-Features Extracted from Hilbert-Huang Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huile Xu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Wearable sensors-based human activity recognition introduces many useful applications and services in health care, rehabilitation training, elderly monitoring and many other areas of human interaction. Existing works in this field mainly focus on recognizing activities by using traditional features extracted from Fourier transform (FT or wavelet transform (WT. However, these signal processing approaches are suitable for a linear signal but not for a nonlinear signal. In this paper, we investigate the characteristics of the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT for dealing with activity data with properties such as nonlinearity and non-stationarity. A multi-features extraction method based on HHT is then proposed to improve the effect of activity recognition. The extracted multi-features include instantaneous amplitude (IA and instantaneous frequency (IF by means of empirical mode decomposition (EMD, as well as instantaneous energy density (IE and marginal spectrum (MS derived from Hilbert spectral analysis. Experimental studies are performed to verify the proposed approach by using the PAMAP2 dataset from the University of California, Irvine for wearable sensors-based activity recognition. Moreover, the effect of combining multi-features vs. a single-feature are investigated and discussed in the scenario of a dependent subject. The experimental results show that multi-features combination can further improve the performance measures. Finally, we test the effect of multi-features combination in the scenario of an independent subject. Our experimental results show that we achieve four performance indexes: recall, precision, F-measure, and accuracy to 0.9337, 0.9417, 0.9353, and 0.9377 respectively, which are all better than the achievements of related works.

  5. Study of prototypes of LFoundry active CMOS pixels sensors for the ATLAS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigani, L.; Bortoletto, D.; Ambroz, L.; Plackett, R.; Hemperek, T.; Rymaszewski, P.; Wang, T.; Krueger, H.; Hirono, T.; Caicedo Sierra, I.; Wermes, N.; Barbero, M.; Bhat, S.; Breugnon, P.; Chen, Z.; Godiot, S.; Pangaud, P.; Rozanov, A.

    2018-02-01

    Current high energy particle physics experiments at the LHC use hybrid silicon detectors, in both pixel and strip configurations, for their inner trackers. These detectors have proven to be very reliable and performant. Nevertheless, there is great interest in depleted CMOS silicon detectors, which could achieve a similar performance at lower cost of production. We present recent developments of this technology in the framework of the ATLAS CMOS demonstrator project. In particular, studies of two active sensors from LFoundry, CCPD_LF and LFCPIX, are shown.

  6. High resistivity silicon active pixel sensors for recording data from STEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.; De Geronimo, G.; Li, Z.; O' Connor, P.; Radeka, V.; Rehak, P. E-mail: rehak2@bnl.gov; Smith, G.C.; Wall, J.S.; Yu, B

    2003-10-11

    An X-ray Active Matrix Pixel Sensor (XAMPS) for recording Data from the Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) was designed, produced and tested. The reason for measuring scattering angle of all STEM electrons is given together with the requirement on the performance of the XAMPS. Principles of the measurement of the number of STEM electrons scattered in a particular direction are summarized. Results of tests performed on a produced detector are described and the problem with the formation of an insulation layer between silicon and aluminum is identified. A change in the design of the pixel is proposed which results in a fully functioning XAMPS even with the insulation layer present.

  7. Tests of monolithic active pixel sensors at national synchrotron light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deptuch, G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)]. E-mail: deptuch@ieee.org; Besson, A. [IPHC, CNRS-IN2P3/ULP, 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex 02 (France); Carini, G.A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Siddons, D.P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Szelezniak, M. [IPHC, CNRS-IN2P3/ULP, 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex 02 (France); Winter, M. [IPHC, CNRS-IN2P3/ULP, 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex 02 (France)

    2007-01-01

    The paper discusses basic characterization of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) carried out at the X12A beam-line at National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Upton, NY, USA. The tested device was a MIMOSA V (MV) chip, back-thinned down to the epitaxial layer. This 1M pixels device features a pixel size of 17x17{mu}m{sup 2} and was designed in a 0.6{mu}m CMOS process. The X-ray beam energies used range from 5 to 12keV. Examples of direct X-ray imaging capabilities are presented.

  8. Analysis of test beam data of ALPIDE, the Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Lazareva, Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    The ALICE experiment has scheduled a major upgrade of its experimen- tal apparatus for the Long Shutdown 2 of LHC in 2019-2020. Within this enterprise, CERN is strongly involved in the development of a novel Inner Tracking System (ITS). The ITS will be based on Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), a cutting-edge technology that will allow to improve the detector performance signicantly. The nal sensor, called ALPIDE, is in production since December 2016. This project is focused on the characterization of irradiated ALPIDE sensors.

  9. X-ray metrology of an array of active edge pixel sensors for use at synchrotron light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plackett, R.; Arndt, K.; Bortoletto, D.; Horswell, I.; Lockwood, G.; Shipsey, I.; Tartoni, N.; Williams, S.

    2018-01-01

    We report on the production and testing of an array of active edge silicon sensors as a prototype of a large array. Four Medipix3RX.1 chips were bump bonded to four single chip sized Advacam active edge n-on-n sensors. These detectors were then mounted into a 2 by 2 array and tested on B16 at Diamond Light Source with an x-ray beam spot of 2um. The results from these tests, compared with optical metrology demonstrate that this type of sensor is sensitive to the physical edge of the silicon, with only a modest loss of efficiency in the final two rows of pixels. We present the efficiency maps recorded with the microfocus beam and a sample powder diffraction measurement. These results give confidence that this sensor technology can be used effectively in larger arrays of detectors at synchrotron light sources.

  10. Novel electrochemical sensor system for monitoring metabolic activity during the growth and cultivation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescheck, M; Schrader, J; Sell, D

    2005-09-01

    A novel amperometric sensor system is presented which directly reflects the metabolic activity of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells during cultivation. The principle of an externally mounted sensor is current measurement using a three-electrode system. Only living cells are detected since the current signal is based on a redox mediator. Added to a culture sample in its oxidized form, the mediator is reduced by cellular metabolism and subsequently re-oxidized at the anode. The spontaneous immobilisation of the cells in the reaction vessel of the sensor by swelling dextrane polymers (Sephadex) prior to measurement is the key to a fast, consistent signal. Even metabolically less active mammalian cells produce a reliable signal within a few minutes; this may open up future applications of the electrochemical sensor in closed loop process control not only for bacterial and fungal bioprocesses, but also in cell culture technology.

  11. Design, synthesis and structure of new potential electrochemically active boronic acid-based glucose sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrild, Jens Chr.; Søtofte, Inger

    2002-01-01

    In the course of our investigations on new boronic acid based carbohydrate sensors three new boronic acids 3, 7 and 11 containing a ferrocene moiety were synthesised. Their design includes an intramolecular B-N bonding motif in order to facilitate binding at physiological pH. We report...... with structures obtained of 2,4,6-tris[2-(N,N-dimethylaminomethyl)phenyl]boroxin (14) and 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-diyl[2-(N,N-dimethylaminomethyl)phenyl]boronate (15). The structure of 13 shows the existence of intramolecular B-N bonds in the solid phase....

  12. Multi trace element analysis of dry biological materials by neutron activation analysis including a chemical group separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weers, C.A.

    1980-07-01

    Multi-element analysis of dry biological material by neutron activation analysis has to include radiochemical separation. The evaporation process is described in terms of the half-volume. The pretreatment of the samples and the development of the destruction-evaporation apparatus are described. The successive adsorption steps with active charcoal, Al 2 O 3 and coprecipitation with Fe(OH) 3 are described. Results obtained for standard reference materials are summarized. (G.T.H.)

  13. Tropical cloud and precipitation structures and regimes from multiple space-borne active sensors: New insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H.; Luo, Z. J.; Rossow, W. B.; Anderson, R.

    2017-12-01

    Nearly five years of satellite observations provide a total of 15,986 intersect lines between TRMM and CloudSat/CALIPSO with all measurements made within 20 min of each other. This presents a rare opportunity for studying tropical cloud and precipitation regimes and their internal vertical structure from space-borne active sensors. We apply k-mean cluster analysis to these simultaneous observations and identify repetitive cloud/precipitation patterns and regimes. These radar-lidar based cloud regimes are then compared with ISCCP Weather States (WSs) for the extended tropics; results are generally positive with small discrepancies which can be attributed to the different sampling strategies between ISCCP and active sensors. In this presentation, we emphasize new insights and lessons learned from the study. First, the synergy between TRMM PR (Ku band) and CloudSat CPR (W-band) in depicting tropical convective cloud structures is revealed through the clustering analysis of the joint Height-Reflectivity Histograms. This finding has important implications for future satellite mission designs. Second, we explored a new data analysis approach, namely, a nested cluster analysis or sub-cluster. It is interesting to see that this new way of conducting cluster analysis yield fresh new insights into the structure and distribution of tropical clouds and precipitation. We will also discuss follow-up research that grows from this initial study.

  14. Wireless patch sensor for remote monitoring of heart rate, respiration, activity, and falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Alexander M; Selvaraj, Nandakumar; Ferdosi, Nima; Narasimhan, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Unobtrusive continuous monitoring of important vital signs and activity metrics has the potential to provide remote health monitoring, at-home screening, and rapid notification of critical events such as heart attacks, falls, or respiratory distress. This paper contains validation results of a wireless Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) patch sensor consisting of two electrocardiography (ECG) electrodes, a microcontroller, a tri-axial accelerometer, and a BLE transceiver. The sensor measures heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV), respiratory rate, posture, steps, and falls and was evaluated on a total of 25 adult participants who performed breathing exercises, activities of daily living (ADLs), various stretches, stationary cycling, walking/running, and simulated falls. Compared to reference devices, the heart rate measurement had a mean absolute error (MAE) of less than 2 bpm, time-domain HRV measurements had an RMS error of less than 15 ms, respiratory rate had an MAE of 1.1 breaths per minute during metronome breathing, posture detection had an accuracy of over 95% in two of the three patch locations, steps were counted with an absolute error of less than 5%, and falls were detected with a sensitivity of 95.2% and specificity of 100%.

  15. Accuracy of a novel multi-sensor board for measuring physical activity and energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Glen E; Lester, Jonathan; Migotsky, Sean; Goh, Jorming; Higgins, Lisa; Borriello, Gaetano

    2011-09-01

    The ability to relate physical activity to health depends on accurate measurement. Yet, none of the available methods are fully satisfactory due to several factors. This study examined the accuracy of a multi-sensor board (MSB) that infers activity types (sitting, standing, walking, stair climbing, and running) and estimates energy expenditure in 57 adults (32 females) 39.2 ± 13.5 years. In the laboratory, subjects walked and ran on a treadmill over a select range of speeds and grades for 3 min each (six stages in random order) while connected to a stationary calorimeter, preceded and followed by brief sitting and standing. On a different day, subjects completed scripted activities in the field connected to a portable calorimeter. The MSB was attached to a strap at the right hip. Subjects repeated one condition (randomly selected) on the third day. Accuracy of inferred activities compared with recorded activities (correctly identified activities/total activities × 100) was 97 and 84% in the laboratory and field, respectively. Absolute accuracy of energy expenditure [100 - absolute value (kilocalories MSB - kilocalories calorimeter/kilocalories calorimeter) × 100] was 89 and 76% in the laboratory and field, the later being different (P calorimeter. Test-retest reliability for energy expenditure was significant in both settings (P type in laboratory and field settings and energy expenditure during treadmill walking and running although the device underestimates energy expenditure in the field.

  16. Evaluation of Feature Extraction and Recognition for Activity Monitoring and Fall Detection Based on Wearable sEMG Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xugang; Tang, Minyan; Miran, Seyed M; Luo, Zhizeng

    2017-05-27

    As an essential subfield of context awareness, activity awareness, especially daily activity monitoring and fall detection, plays a significant role for elderly or frail people who need assistance in their daily activities. This study investigates the feature extraction and pattern recognition of surface electromyography (sEMG), with the purpose of determining the best features and classifiers of sEMG for daily living activities monitoring and fall detection. This is done by a serial of experiments. In the experiments, four channels of sEMG signal from wireless, wearable sensors located on lower limbs are recorded from three subjects while they perform seven activities of daily living (ADL). A simulated trip fall scenario is also considered with a custom-made device attached to the ankle. With this experimental setting, 15 feature extraction methods of sEMG, including time, frequency, time/frequency domain and entropy, are analyzed based on class separability and calculation complexity, and five classification methods, each with 15 features, are estimated with respect to the accuracy rate of recognition and calculation complexity for activity monitoring and fall detection. It is shown that a high accuracy rate of recognition and a minimal calculation time for daily activity monitoring and fall detection can be achieved in the current experimental setting. Specifically, the Wilson Amplitude (WAMP) feature performs the best, and the classifier Gaussian Kernel Support Vector Machine (GK-SVM) with Permutation Entropy (PE) or WAMP results in the highest accuracy for activity monitoring with recognition rates of 97.35% and 96.43%. For fall detection, the classifier Fuzzy Min-Max Neural Network (FMMNN) has the best sensitivity and specificity at the cost of the longest calculation time, while the classifier Gaussian Kernel Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (GK-FDA) with the feature WAMP guarantees a high sensitivity (98.70%) and specificity (98.59%) with a short

  17. Evaluation of Feature Extraction and Recognition for Activity Monitoring and Fall Detection Based on Wearable sEMG Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xugang Xi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As an essential subfield of context awareness, activity awareness, especially daily activity monitoring and fall detection, plays a significant role for elderly or frail people who need assistance in their daily activities. This study investigates the feature extraction and pattern recognition of surface electromyography (sEMG, with the purpose of determining the best features and classifiers of sEMG for daily living activities monitoring and fall detection. This is done by a serial of experiments. In the experiments, four channels of sEMG signal from wireless, wearable sensors located on lower limbs are recorded from three subjects while they perform seven activities of daily living (ADL. A simulated trip fall scenario is also considered with a custom-made device attached to the ankle. With this experimental setting, 15 feature extraction methods of sEMG, including time, frequency, time/frequency domain and entropy, are analyzed based on class separability and calculation complexity, and five classification methods, each with 15 features, are estimated with respect to the accuracy rate of recognition and calculation complexity for activity monitoring and fall detection. It is shown that a high accuracy rate of recognition and a minimal calculation time for daily activity monitoring and fall detection can be achieved in the current experimental setting. Specifically, the Wilson Amplitude (WAMP feature performs the best, and the classifier Gaussian Kernel Support Vector Machine (GK-SVM with Permutation Entropy (PE or WAMP results in the highest accuracy for activity monitoring with recognition rates of 97.35% and 96.43%. For fall detection, the classifier Fuzzy Min-Max Neural Network (FMMNN has the best sensitivity and specificity at the cost of the longest calculation time, while the classifier Gaussian Kernel Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (GK-FDA with the feature WAMP guarantees a high sensitivity (98.70% and specificity (98.59% with a

  18. Comportamento do NDVI obtido por sensor ótico ativo em cereais Behavior of NDVI obtained from an active optical sensor in cereals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Pinheiro Povh

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar, com um sensor ótico ativo, o comportamento do índice de vegetação por diferença normalizada (NDVI - "normalized difference vegetation index", nas culturas de trigo, triticale, cevada e milho. Cinco experimentos foram conduzidos no Paraná e São Paulo, com variação de classes de solo, doses e fontes de N, e variedades de trigo. As seguintes variáveis foram avaliadas: NDVI, teor de N foliar, matéria seca e produtividade das culturas. Análises de regressões foram realizadas entre as doses de N aplicadas e NDVI, teor de N foliar, matéria seca e produtividade. Análises de correlação entre as variáveis foram realizadas. O trigo, triticale e cevada apresentaram resposta às aplicações de doses crescentes de N, pelo aumento nas leituras do NDVI, no teor de N foliar e na produtividade. Medido pelo sensor ótico ativo utilizado, o NDVI apresenta alto potencial para manejo do N nas culturas do trigo, triticale e cevada, e baixo potencial para a cultura do milho. Há interferência das variedades de trigo nas leituras do sensor ótico ativo.The objective of this work was to evaluate the behavior of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, with an active optical sensor, in wheat, triticale, barley and corn crops. Experiments were conducted in Paraná and São Paulo, comparing different soil classes, N rates and sources, and wheat varieties. The following variables were determined: NDVI, N foliar content, dry mass and crop yield. Regression analyses were performed between NDVI and applied N rates, N foliar content, dry mass and yield. Correlation analyses among the variables were performed. Wheat, triticale and barley crops showed response to increasing N rates by the increase in the NDVI readings, to N foliar content and to yield. Measured by the used active optical sensor the NDVI shows high potential for N management wheat, triticale and barley crops, and low potential for corn crops. There

  19. Smart sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Carlo

    2006-08-01

    The term "Smart Sensors" refer to sensors which contain both sensing and signal processing capabilities with objectives ranging from simple viewing to sophisticated remote sensing, surveillance, search/track, weapon guidance, robotics, perceptronics and intelligence applications. In a broad sense, they include any sensor systems covering the whole electromagnetic spectrum: this paper deals specifically with a new class of smart sensors in infrared spectral bands whose developments started some years ago, when it was recognized that the rapid advances of "very large scale integration" (VLSI) processor technology and mosaic infrared detector array technology could be combined to develop new generations of infrared smart sensor systems with much improved performance. So, sophisticated signal processing operations have been developed for these new systems by integrating microcomputers and other VLSI signal processors within or next to the sensor arrays on the same focal plane avoiding complex computing located far away from the sensors. Recently this approach is achieving higher goals by a new and revolutionary sensors concept which introduce inside the sensor some of the basic function of living eyes, such as dynamic stare, dishomogenity compensation, spatial and temporal filtering. New objectives and requirements of these new focal plane processors are presented for this type of new infrared smart sensor systems. This paper is concerned with the processing techniques for only the front end of the focal plane processing, namely, the enhancement of target-to-noise ratio by background clutter suppression and the improvement in target detection by "smart" and pattern correlation threshold.

  20. Low-power priority Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder data-driven readout for Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for tracker system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, P.; Aglieri, G.; Cavicchioli, C.; Chalmet, P. L.; Chanlek, N.; Collu, A.; Gao, C.; Hillemanns, H.; Junique, A.; Kofarago, M.; Keil, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.; Lattuca, A.; Marin Tobon, C. A.; Marras, D.; Mager, M.; Martinengo, P.; Mazza, G.; Mugnier, H.; Musa, L.; Puggioni, C.; Rousset, J.; Reidt, F.; Riedler, P.; Snoeys, W.; Siddhanta, S.; Usai, G.; van Hoorne, J. W.; Yi, J.

    2015-06-01

    Active Pixel Sensors used in High Energy Particle Physics require low power consumption to reduce the detector material budget, low integration time to reduce the possibilities of pile-up and fast readout to improve the detector data capability. To satisfy these requirements, a novel Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder (AERD) asynchronous circuit for a fast readout of a pixel matrix has been developed. The AERD data-driven readout architecture operates the address encoding and reset decoding based on an arbitration tree, and allows us to readout only the hit pixels. Compared to the traditional readout structure of the rolling shutter scheme in Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), AERD can achieve a low readout time and a low power consumption especially for low hit occupancies. The readout is controlled at the chip periphery with a signal synchronous with the clock, allows a good digital and analogue signal separation in the matrix and a reduction of the power consumption. The AERD circuit has been implemented in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor (CIS) process with full complementary CMOS logic in the pixel. It works at 10 MHz with a matrix height of 15 mm. The energy consumed to read out one pixel is around 72 pJ. A scheme to boost the readout speed to 40 MHz is also discussed. The sensor chip equipped with AERD has been produced and characterised. Test results including electrical beam measurement are presented.

  1. Low-power priority Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder data-driven readout for Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for tracker system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, P.; Aglieri, G.; Cavicchioli, C.; Chalmet, P.L.; Chanlek, N.; Collu, A.; Gao, C.; Hillemanns, H.; Junique, A.; Kofarago, M.; Keil, M.; Kugathasan, T.; Kim, D.; Kim, J.; Lattuca, A.; Marin Tobon, C.A.; Marras, D.; Mager, M.; Martinengo, P.; Mazza, G.

    2015-01-01

    Active Pixel Sensors used in High Energy Particle Physics require low power consumption to reduce the detector material budget, low integration time to reduce the possibilities of pile-up and fast readout to improve the detector data capability. To satisfy these requirements, a novel Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder (AERD) asynchronous circuit for a fast readout of a pixel matrix has been developed. The AERD data-driven readout architecture operates the address encoding and reset decoding based on an arbitration tree, and allows us to readout only the hit pixels. Compared to the traditional readout structure of the rolling shutter scheme in Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), AERD can achieve a low readout time and a low power consumption especially for low hit occupancies. The readout is controlled at the chip periphery with a signal synchronous with the clock, allows a good digital and analogue signal separation in the matrix and a reduction of the power consumption. The AERD circuit has been implemented in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor (CIS) process with full complementary CMOS logic in the pixel. It works at 10 MHz with a matrix height of 15 mm. The energy consumed to read out one pixel is around 72 pJ. A scheme to boost the readout speed to 40 MHz is also discussed. The sensor chip equipped with AERD has been produced and characterised. Test results including electrical beam measurement are presented

  2. Low-power priority Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder data-driven readout for Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for tracker system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, P., E-mail: yangping0710@126.com [Central China Normal University, Wuhan (China); Aglieri, G.; Cavicchioli, C. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Chalmet, P.L. [MIND, Archamps (France); Chanlek, N. [Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima (Thailand); Collu, A. [University of Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); INFN (Italy); Gao, C. [Central China Normal University, Wuhan (China); Hillemanns, H.; Junique, A. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Kofarago, M. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); University of Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Keil, M.; Kugathasan, T. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Kim, D. [Dongguk and Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J. [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lattuca, A. [University of Torino, Torino (Italy); INFN (Italy); Marin Tobon, C.A. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Marras, D. [University of Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); INFN (Italy); Mager, M.; Martinengo, P. [CERN, 1210 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Mazza, G. [University of Torino, Torino (Italy); INFN (Italy); and others

    2015-06-11

    Active Pixel Sensors used in High Energy Particle Physics require low power consumption to reduce the detector material budget, low integration time to reduce the possibilities of pile-up and fast readout to improve the detector data capability. To satisfy these requirements, a novel Address-Encoder and Reset-Decoder (AERD) asynchronous circuit for a fast readout of a pixel matrix has been developed. The AERD data-driven readout architecture operates the address encoding and reset decoding based on an arbitration tree, and allows us to readout only the hit pixels. Compared to the traditional readout structure of the rolling shutter scheme in Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), AERD can achieve a low readout time and a low power consumption especially for low hit occupancies. The readout is controlled at the chip periphery with a signal synchronous with the clock, allows a good digital and analogue signal separation in the matrix and a reduction of the power consumption. The AERD circuit has been implemented in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS Imaging Sensor (CIS) process with full complementary CMOS logic in the pixel. It works at 10 MHz with a matrix height of 15 mm. The energy consumed to read out one pixel is around 72 pJ. A scheme to boost the readout speed to 40 MHz is also discussed. The sensor chip equipped with AERD has been produced and characterised. Test results including electrical beam measurement are presented.

  3. Comparison of Surface and Column Variations of CO2 Over Urban Areas for Future Active Remote CO2 Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yonghoon; Yang, Melissa; Kooi, Susan; Browell, Edward

    2015-01-01

    High resolution in-situ CO2 measurements were recorded onboard the NASA P-3B during the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) Field Campaign, to investigate the ability of space-based observations to accurately assess near surface conditions related to air quality. This campaign includes, Washington DC/Baltimore, MD (July 2011), San Joaquin Valley, CA (January - February 2013), Houston, TX (September 2013), and Denver, CO (July-August 2014). Each of these campaigns consisted of missed approaches and approximately two hundred vertical soundings of CO2 within the lower troposphere (surface to about 5 km). In this study, surface (0 - 1 km) and column-averaged (0 - 3.5 km) CO2 mixing ratio values from the vertical soundings in the four geographically different urban areas are used to investigate the temporal and spatial variability of CO2 within the different urban atmospheric emission environments. Tracers such as CO, CH2O, NOx, and NMHCs are used to identify the source of CO2 variations in the urban sites. Additionally, we apply nominal CO2 column weighting functions for potential future active remote CO2 sensors operating in the 1.57-microns and 2.05-microns measurement regions to convert the in situ CO2 vertical mixing ratio profiles to variations in CO2 column optical depths, which is what the active remote sensors actually measure. Using statistics calculated from the optical depths at each urban site measured during the DISCOVER-AQ field campaign and for each nominal weighting function, we investigate the natural variability of CO2 columns in the lower troposphere; relate the CO2 column variability to the urban surface emissions; and show the measurement requirements for the future ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) in the continental U.S. urban areas.

  4. Diehl weapons lab works on sensors, lasers, flight control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flume, W.

    1986-06-01

    The Diehl Weapons Laboratory activities include: warheads, ballistics, sensor technology, mensuration technology, and simulation. The facilities at the laboratory are described. Research projects are summarized.

  5. Effects of Leisure Education Programme Including Sportive Activities on Perceived Freedom in Leisure of Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertuzun, Ezgi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this experimental study is to determine the effect of leisure education programme including sportive activities on the perceived freedom in leisure of adolescents with mild intellectual disabilities. The research was designed with an experimental group (n = 37) and a control group (n = 34), and was conducted among a total of 71…

  6. Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on the International Space Station (ISS): Launch, Installation, Activation, and First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Christian, H. J., Jr.; Mach, D. M.; Buechler, D. E.; Koshak, W. J.; Walker, T. D.; Bateman, M. G.; Stewart, M. F.; O'Brien, S.; Wilson, T. O.; Pavelitz, S. D.; Coker, C.

    2016-12-01

    Over the past 20 years, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and their partners developed and demonstrated the effectiveness and value of space-based lightning observations as a remote sensing tool for Earth science research and applications, and, in the process, established a robust global lightning climatology. The observations included measurements from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and its Optical Transient Detector (OTD) predecessor that acquired global observations of total lightning (i.e., intracloud and cloud-to-ground discharges) spanning a period from May 1995 through April 2015. As an exciting follow-on to these prior missions, a space-qualified LIS built as a flight-spare for TRMM will be delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) for a 2 year or longer mission, flown as a hosted payload on the Department of Defense (DoD) Space Test Program-Houston 5 (STP-H5) mission. The STP-H5 payload containing LIS is scheduled launch from NASA's Kennedy Space Center to the ISS in November 2016, aboard the SpaceX Cargo Resupply Services-10 (SpaceX-10) mission, installed in the unpressurized "trunk" of the Dragon spacecraft. After the Dragon is berth to ISS Node 2, the payload will be removed from the trunk and robotically installed in a nadir-viewing location on the external truss of the ISS. Following installation on the ISS, the LIS Operations Team will work with the STP-H5 and ISS Operations Teams to power-on LIS and begin instrument checkout and commissioning. Following successful activation, LIS orbital operations will commence, managed from the newly established LIS Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) located at the National Space Science Technology Center (NSSTC) in Huntsville, AL. The well-established and robust processing, archival, and distribution infrastructure used for TRMM was easily adapted to the ISS mission, assuring that lightning

  7. Sensor web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delin, Kevin A. (Inventor); Jackson, Shannon P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A Sensor Web formed of a number of different sensor pods. Each of the sensor pods include a clock which is synchronized with a master clock so that all of the sensor pods in the Web have a synchronized clock. The synchronization is carried out by first using a coarse synchronization which takes less power, and subsequently carrying out a fine synchronization to make a fine sync of all the pods on the Web. After the synchronization, the pods ping their neighbors to determine which pods are listening and responded, and then only listen during time slots corresponding to those pods which respond.

  8. Intrusion detection sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.D.

    1978-07-01

    Intrusion detection sensors are an integral part of most physical security systems. Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Safeguards and Security, Sandia Laboratories has conducted a survey of available intrusion detection sensors and has tested a number of different sensors. An overview of these sensors is provided. This overview includes (1) the operating principles of each type of sensor, (2) unique sensor characteristics, (3) desired sensor improvements which must be considered in planning an intrusion detection system, and (4) the site characteristics which affect the performance of both exterior and interior sensors. Techniques which have been developed to evaluate various intrusion detection sensors are also discussed

  9. Noise activated bistable sensor based on chaotic system with output defined by temporal coding and firing rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneta, Wojciech; Gomes, Iacyel

    2017-11-01

    Traditional bistable sensors use external bias signal to drive its response between states and their detection strategy is based on the output power spectral density or the residence time difference (RTD) in two sensor states. Recently, the noise activated nonlinear dynamic sensors driven only by noise based on RTD technique have been proposed. Here, we present experimental results of dc voltage measurements by noise-driven bistable sensor based on electronic Chua's circuit operating in a chaotic regime where two single scroll attractors coexist. The output of the sensor is quantified by the proportion of the time the sensor stays in one state to the total observation time and by the spike-count rate with spikes defined by crossings between attractors. The relationship between the stimuli and particular observable for different noise intensities is obtained, the usefulness of each coding scheme is discussed, and the optimal noise intensity for detection is indicated. It is shown that the obtained relationship is the same for any observation time when population coding is used. The optimal time window for both detection and the number of units in population coding is found. Our results may be useful for analyses and understanding of the neural activity and in designing bistable storage elements at length scales where thermal fluctuations drastically increase and the effect of noise must be taken into consideration.

  10. Noise activated bistable sensor based on chaotic system with output defined by temporal coding and firing rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneta, Wojciech; Gomes, Iacyel

    2017-11-01

    Traditional bistable sensors use external bias signal to drive its response between states and their detection strategy is based on the output power spectral density or the residence time difference (RTD) in two sensor states. Recently, the noise activated nonlinear dynamic sensors driven only by noise based on RTD technique have been proposed. Here, we present experimental results of dc voltage measurements by noise-driven bistable sensor based on electronic Chua's circuit operating in a chaotic regime where two single scroll attractors coexist. The output of the sensor is quantified by the proportion of the time the sensor stays in one state to the total observation time and by the spike-count rate with spikes defined by crossings between attractors. The relationship between the stimuli and particular observable for different noise intensities is obtained, the usefulness of each coding scheme is discussed, and the optimal noise intensity for detection is indicated. It is shown that the obtained relationship is the same for any observation time when population coding is used. The optimal time window for both detection and the number of units in population coding is found. Our results may be useful for analyses and understanding of the neural activity and in designing bistable storage elements at length scales where thermal fluctuations drastically increase and the effect of noise must be taken into consideration.

  11. Sensing capabilities of piezoelectric wafer active sensors in extreme nuclear environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal Haider, Mohammad; Lin, Bin; Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2017-04-01

    There is considerable demand for structural health monitoring (SHM) at locations where there are substantial radiation fields such as nuclear reactor components, dry cask storage canister, irradiated fuel assemblies, etc. Piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) have been emerged as one of the major SHM sensing technologies. In order to use PWAS to perform SHM in nuclear environment, radiation influence on sensor and sensing capability needs to be investigated to assure the reliability of the PWAS based method. Radiation may cause degradation or even complete failure of sensors. Gamma radiation is one of the major radiation sources near the nuclear source. Therefore, experimental investigation was completed on the gamma radiation endurance of piezoelectric sensors. The irradiation test was done in a Co-60 Gamma Irradiator. Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) and Gallium Orthophosphate (GaPO4) PWAS were exposed under gamma radiation at 100 Gy/hr rate for 20 hours. Electro-mechanical (E/M) admittance signatures and electrical capacitance were measured to evaluate the PWAS performance before and after every 4 hours exposure to gamma radiation. PWAS were kept at room temperature for 6 days after each 4 hours radiation exposure to investigate the effect of time on PWAS by gamma radiation. It was found that, PZT-PWAS show variation in resonance frequency for both in plane and thickness mode E/M admittance. Where, the changes in resonance amplitudes are larger for PZT-PWAS. GaPO4-PWAS E/M impedance/admittance spectra don't show any reasonable change after gamma irradiation. A degradation behavior of electrical properties in the PZT-PWAS was observed. Capacitance value of PZT-PWAS decreases from 3.2 nF to 3.07 nF after exposing to gamma radiation for 20 hours at 100Gy/hour. This degradation behavior of electrical properties may be explained by the pinning of domain walls by some radiation induced effect. GaPO4-PWAS doesn't show reasonable degradation in electrical properties

  12. Performance of Optimized Actuator and Sensor Arrays in an Active Noise Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, D. L.; Padula, S. L.; Lyle, K. H.; Cline, J. H.; Cabell, R. H.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted in NASA Langley's Acoustics and Dynamics Laboratory to determine the effectiveness of optimized actuator/sensor architectures and controller algorithms for active control of harmonic interior noise. Tests were conducted in a large scale fuselage model - a composite cylinder which simulates a commuter class aircraft fuselage with three sections of trim panel and a floor. Using an optimization technique based on the component transfer functions, combinations of 4 out of 8 piezoceramic actuators and 8 out of 462 microphone locations were evaluated against predicted performance. A combinatorial optimization technique called tabu search was employed to select the optimum transducer arrays. Three test frequencies represent the cases of a strong acoustic and strong structural response, a weak acoustic and strong structural response and a strong acoustic and weak structural response. Noise reduction was obtained using a Time Averaged/Gradient Descent (TAGD) controller. Results indicate that the optimization technique successfully predicted best and worst case performance. An enhancement of the TAGD control algorithm was also evaluated. The principal components of the actuator/sensor transfer functions were used in the PC-TAGD controller. The principal components are shown to be independent of each other while providing control as effective as the standard TAGD.

  13. Mouse preimplantation embryo responses to culture medium osmolarity include increased expression of CCM2 and p38 MAPK activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanisms that confer an ability to respond positively to environmental osmolarity are fundamental to ensuring embryo survival during the preimplantation period. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK occurs following exposure to hyperosmotic treatment. Recently, a novel scaffolding protein called Osmosensing Scaffold for MEKK3 (OSM was linked to p38 MAPK activation in response to sorbitol-induced hypertonicity. The human ortholog of OSM is cerebral cavernous malformation 2 (CCM2. The present study was conducted to investigate whether CCM2 is expressed during mouse preimplantation development and to determine whether this scaffolding protein is associated with p38 MAPK activation following exposure of preimplantation embryos to hyperosmotic environments. Results Our results indicate that Ccm2 along with upstream p38 MAPK pathway constituents (Map3k3, Map2k3, Map2k6, and Map2k4 are expressed throughout mouse preimplantation development. CCM2, MAP3K3 and the phosphorylated forms of MAP2K3/MAP2K6 and MAP2K4 were also detected throughout preimplantation development. Embryo culture in hyperosmotic media increased p38 MAPK activity in conjunction with elevated CCM2 levels. Conclusion These results define the expression of upstream activators of p38 MAPK during preimplantation development and indicate that embryo responses to hyperosmotic environments include elevation of CCM2 and activation of p38 MAPK.

  14. Chemical sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, C.W.; Gordon, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    The revolution in analytical chemistry promised by recent developments in the field of chemical sensors has potential for significant positive impact on both research and production activities conducted by and for the Department of Energy. Analyses which were, in the past, performed only with a roomful of expensive equipment can now be performed with miniature solid-state electronic devices or small optical probes. Progress in the development of chemical sensors has been rapid, and the field is currently growing at a great rate. In accordance, Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a survey of recent literature so that contributors to active programs in research on analytical methods could be made aware of principles and applications of this new technology. This report presents the results of that survey. The sensors discussed here are divided into three types: micro solid-state devices, optical sensors, and piezoelectric crystal devices. The report is divided into three corresponding sections. The first section, ''Micro Solid-State Devices,'' discusses the design, operation, and application of electronic sensors that are produced in much the same way as standard solid-state electronic devices. The second section, ''Optrodes,'' covers the design and operation of chemical sensors that use fiber optics to detect chemically induced changes in optical properties. The final section, ''Piezoelectric Crystal Detectors,'' discusses two types of chemical sensors that depend on the changes in the properties of an oscillating piezoelectric crystal to detect the presence of certain materials. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of sensor are summarized in each section

  15. Design and testing of monolithic active pixel sensors for charged particle tracking, pt. 1

    CERN Document Server

    Deptuch, G; Claus, G; Colledani, C; Dulinski, W; Goerlach, U; Gomoushkin, Yu; Hu, Y; Husson, D; Orazi, G; Turchetta, R; Riester, J L; Winter, M

    2000-01-01

    A Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) for charged particle tracking based on a novel detector structure was proposed, simulated, fabricated and tested. The detector designed accordingly to this idea is inseparable from the readout electronics, since both of them are integrated onto the same, standard for a CMOS process, low- resistivity silicon wafer. The individual pixel is comprised of only 3 MOS transistors and a photodiode collecting the charge created in a thin undepleted epitaxial layer. This approach provides the whole detector surface sensitive to radiation (100% fill factor) with reduced pixel pitch (very high spatial resolution). This yields a low cost, high resolution and thin detecting device. The detailed device simulations using ISE-TCAD package have been carried out in order to study a charge collection mechanism and to validate the proposed idea. Consequently, two prototype chips have been fabricated using 0.6 mu m and 0.35 mu m CMOS processes. Special radiation tolerant layout techniques we...

  16. Comparison of POLDER Cloud Phase Retrievals to Active Remote Sensors Measurements at the ARM SGP Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedi, J.; Goloub, P.; Marchand, Roger T.

    2001-01-01

    In our present study, cloud boundaries derived from a combination of active remote sensors at the ARM SGP site are compared to POLDER cloud top phase index which is derived from polarimetric measurements using an innovative method. This approach shows the viability of the POLDER phase retrieval algorithm, and also leads to interesting results. In particular, the analysis demonstrates the sensitivity of polarization measurements to ice crystal shape and indicates that occurrence of polycrystalline ice clouds has to be taken into account in order to improve the POLDER phase retrieval algorithm accuracy. Secondly, the results show that a temperature threshold of 240 K could serve for cloud top particle phase classification. Considering the limitations of the analysis, the temperature threshold could be biased high, but not by more than about 5 degrees

  17. Finite element analysis of actively controlled smart plate with patched actuators and sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yaqoob Yasin

    Full Text Available The active vibration control of smart plate equipped with patched piezoelectric sensors and actuators is presented in this study. An equivalent single layer third order shear deformation theory is employed to model the kinematics of the plate and to obtain the shear strains. The governing equations of motion are derived using extended Hamilton's principle. Linear variation of electric potential across the piezoelectric layers in thickness direction is considered. The electrical variable is discretized by Lagrange interpolation function considering two-noded line element. Undamped natural frequencies and the corresponding mode shapes are obtained by solving the eigen value problem with and without electromechanical coupling. The finite element model in nodal variables are transformed into modal model and then recast into state space. The dynamic model is reduced for further analysis using Hankel norm for designing the controller. The optimal control technique is used to control the vibration of the plate.

  18. Study of plasma charging-induced white pixel defect increase in CMOS active pixel sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokashiki, Ken; Bai, KeunHee; Baek, KyeHyun; Kim, Yongjin; Min, Gyungjin; Kang, Changjin; Cho, Hanku; Moon, Jootae

    2007-01-01

    Plasma process-induced 'white pixel defect' (WPD) of CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) is studied for Si3N4 spacer etch back process by using a magnetically enhanced reactive ion etching (MERIE) system. WPD preferably takes place at the wafer edge region when the magnetized plasma is applied to Si3N4 etch. Plasma charging analysis reveals that the plasma charge-up characteristic is well matching the edge-intensive WPD generation, rather than the UV radiation. Plasma charging on APS transfer gate might lead to a gate leakage, which could play a role in generation of signal noise or WPD. In this article the WPD generation mechanism will be discussed from plasma charging point of view

  19. A radiation-hardened two transistor memory cell for monolithic active pixel sensors in STAR experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, X; Dorokhov, A; Hu, Y; Gao, D

    2011-01-01

    Radiation tolerance of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) is dramatically decreased when intellectual property (IP) memories are integrated for fast readout application. This paper presents a new solution to improve radiation hardness and avoid latch-up for memory cell design. The tradeoffs among radiation tolerance, area and speed are significantly considered and analyzed. The cell designed in 0.35 μm process satisfies the radiation tolerance requirements of STAR experiment. The cell size is 4.55 x 5.45 μm 2 . This cell is smaller than the IP memory cell based on the same process and is only 26% of a radiation tolerant 6T SRAM cell used in previous contribution. The write access time of the cell is less than 2 ns, while the read access time is 80 ns.

  20. Nanomaterial-Enabled Wearable Sensors for Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shanshan; Swetha, Puchakayala; Zhu, Yong

    2018-01-01

    Highly sensitive wearable sensors that can be conformably attached to human skin or integrated with textiles to monitor the physiological parameters of human body or the surrounding environment have garnered tremendous interest. Owing to the large surface area and outstanding material properties, nanomaterials are promising building blocks for wearable sensors. Recent advances in the nanomaterial-enabled wearable sensors including temperature, electrophysiological, strain, tactile, electrochemical, and environmental sensors are presented in this review. Integration of multiple sensors for multimodal sensing and integration with other components into wearable systems are summarized. Representative applications of nanomaterial-enabled wearable sensors for healthcare, including continuous health monitoring, daily and sports activity tracking, and multifunctional electronic skin are highlighted. Finally, challenges, opportunities, and future perspectives in the field of nanomaterial-enabled wearable sensors are discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. A Personalised, Sensor-Based Smart Phone Intervention for Physical Activity and Diet – PRECIOUS N-of-1 Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Nurmi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is an urgent need for interventions which can effectively change behaviours, in order to prevent and reduce the impact of costly chronic conditions such as Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (WHO, 2014. Smartphones offer a platform for cost-effective and broad implementation, and at the same time, via real-time tracking and sensor data, offer unprecedented possibilities for personalising interventions (Jovanov & Milenkovic, 2011. While a great number of health-related applications exist already, the content of these is rarely based on behaviour change theory, and, consequently, evidence for the effectiveness of digital behaviour change applications is minimal (Webb, Joseph, Yardley, & Michie, 2010. Even when health-related applications are theory-based, users will likely not achieve behavioural changes if they do not engage with the applications. This lack of engagement is supported by statistics: a quarter of downloaded apps were only used once (Leger, 2011. A major challenge of health care research is therefore the identification of personal treatment response, and factors which mitigate engagement and effectiveness within individuals. To address these issues, our research group, an EU-funded multi-disciplinary consortium has developed the PREventitive Care Infrastructure based On Ubiquitous Sensing (PRECIOUS mobile application. This app targets behavioural changes in physical activity, diet, and stress, and includes both motivational and action components for each. The service design draws from evidence-based techniques in self-determination theory (SDT, Deci & Ryan, 2000, motivational interviewing (MI, Miller & Rollnick, 2002, and social cognitive theories (e.g. Schwarzer, 2008, to enhance engagement with the process of behaviour change. Through integrating sensor data, self-reported responses, and self-monitoring records, the system provides each user with a dynamic, personalised trajectory through the app

  2. Highly sensitive multi-layer pressure sensor with an active nanostructured layer of an organic molecular metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laukhin, V; Lebedev, V; Laukhina, E; Rovira, C; Veciana, J

    2016-01-01

    This work addresses to the modern technologies that need to be instrumented with lightweight highly sensitive pressure sensors. The paper presents the development of a new plain flexible thin pressure sensor using a nanostructured layer of the highly sensitive organic piezoresistive metal β-(BEDT-TTF) 2 I 3 as an active component; BEDT-TTF=bis (ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene. The original construction approach permits one to operate the developed sensor on the principle of electrical resistance variations when its piezoresistive layer is elongated under a pressure increase. The pressure sensing element and a set of gold electrodes were integrated into one compact multi-layer design. The construction was optimized to enable one generic design for pressure ranges from 1 to 400 bar. The pressure tests showed that the sensor is able to control a small pressure change as a well definite electrical signal. So the developed type of the sensors is very attractive as a new generation of compact, lightweight, low-cost sensors that might monitor pressure with a good level of measurement accuracy. (paper)

  3. Chromospheric activity of periodic variable stars (including eclipsing binaries) observed in DR2 LAMOST stellar spectral survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyun; Lu, Hongpeng; Han, Xianming L.; Jiang, Linyan; Li, Zhongmu; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Cao, Zihuang

    2018-05-01

    The LAMOST spectral survey provides a rich databases for studying stellar spectroscopic properties and chromospheric activity. We cross-matched a total of 105,287 periodic variable stars from several photometric surveys and databases (CSS, LINEAR, Kepler, a recently updated eclipsing star catalogue, ASAS, NSVS, some part of SuperWASP survey, variable stars from the Tsinghua University-NAOC Transient Survey, and other objects from some new references) with four million stellar spectra published in the LAMOST data release 2 (DR2). We found 15,955 spectra for 11,469 stars (including 5398 eclipsing binaries). We calculated their equivalent widths (EWs) of their Hα, Hβ, Hγ, Hδ and Caii H lines. Using the Hα line EW, we found 447 spectra with emission above continuum for a total of 316 stars (178 eclipsing binaries). We identified 86 active stars (including 44 eclipsing binaries) with repeated LAMOST spectra. A total of 68 stars (including 34 eclipsing binaries) show chromospheric activity variability. We also found LAMOST spectra of 12 cataclysmic variables, five of which show chromospheric activity variability. We also made photometric follow-up studies of three short period targets (DY CVn, HAT-192-0001481, and LAMOST J164933.24+141255.0) using the Xinglong 60-cm telescope and the SARA 90-cm and 1-m telescopes, and obtained new BVRI CCD light curves. We analyzed these light curves and obtained orbital and starspot parameters. We detected the first flare event with a huge brightness increase of more than about 1.5 magnitudes in R filter in LAMOST J164933.24+141255.0.

  4. Estimating physical activity energy expenditure with the Kinect Sensor in an exergaming environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, David; Huynh, Du Q; Rubenson, Jonas; Rosenberg, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Active video games that require physical exertion during game play have been shown to confer health benefits. Typically, energy expended during game play is measured using devices attached to players, such as accelerometers, or portable gas analyzers. Since 2010, active video gaming technology incorporates marker-less motion capture devices to simulate human movement into game play. Using the Kinect Sensor and Microsoft SDK this research aimed to estimate the mechanical work performed by the human body and estimate subsequent metabolic energy using predictive algorithmic models. Nineteen University students participated in a repeated measures experiment performing four fundamental movements (arm swings, standing jumps, body-weight squats, and jumping jacks). Metabolic energy was captured using a Cortex Metamax 3B automated gas analysis system with mechanical movement captured by the combined motion data from two Kinect cameras. Estimations of the body segment properties, such as segment mass, length, centre of mass position, and radius of gyration, were calculated from the Zatsiorsky-Seluyanov's equations of de Leva, with adjustment made for posture cost. GPML toolbox implementation of the Gaussian Process Regression, a locally weighted k-Nearest Neighbour Regression, and a linear regression technique were evaluated for their performance on predicting the metabolic cost from new feature vectors. The experimental results show that Gaussian Process Regression outperformed the other two techniques by a small margin. This study demonstrated that physical activity energy expenditure during exercise, using the Kinect camera as a motion capture system, can be estimated from segmental mechanical work. Estimates for high-energy activities, such as standing jumps and jumping jacks, can be made accurately, but for low-energy activities, such as squatting, the posture of static poses should be considered as a contributing factor. When translated into the active video gaming

  5. Estimating physical activity energy expenditure with the Kinect Sensor in an exergaming environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Nathan

    Full Text Available Active video games that require physical exertion during game play have been shown to confer health benefits. Typically, energy expended during game play is measured using devices attached to players, such as accelerometers, or portable gas analyzers. Since 2010, active video gaming technology incorporates marker-less motion capture devices to simulate human movement into game play. Using the Kinect Sensor and Microsoft SDK this research aimed to estimate the mechanical work performed by the human body and estimate subsequent metabolic energy using predictive algorithmic models. Nineteen University students participated in a repeated measures experiment performing four fundamental movements (arm swings, standing jumps, body-weight squats, and jumping jacks. Metabolic energy was captured using a Cortex Metamax 3B automated gas analysis system with mechanical movement captured by the combined motion data from two Kinect cameras. Estimations of the body segment properties, such as segment mass, length, centre of mass position, and radius of gyration, were calculated from the Zatsiorsky-Seluyanov's equations of de Leva, with adjustment made for posture cost. GPML toolbox implementation of the Gaussian Process Regression, a locally weighted k-Nearest Neighbour Regression, and a linear regression technique were evaluated for their performance on predicting the metabolic cost from new feature vectors. The experimental results show that Gaussian Process Regression outperformed the other two techniques by a small margin. This study demonstrated that physical activity energy expenditure during exercise, using the Kinect camera as a motion capture system, can be estimated from segmental mechanical work. Estimates for high-energy activities, such as standing jumps and jumping jacks, can be made accurately, but for low-energy activities, such as squatting, the posture of static poses should be considered as a contributing factor. When translated into the

  6. Sensor Monitoring of Physical Activity to Improve Glucose Management in Diabetic Patients: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Ding

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic individuals need to tightly control their blood glucose concentration. Several methods have been developed for this purpose, such as the finger-prick or continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGMs. However, these methods present the disadvantage of being invasive. Moreover, CGMs have limited accuracy, notably to detect hypoglycemia. It is also known that physical exercise, and even daily activity, disrupt glucose dynamics and can generate problems with blood glucose regulation during and after exercise. In order to deal with these challenges, devices for monitoring patients’ physical activity are currently under development. This review focuses on non-invasive sensors using physiological parameters related to physical exercise that were used to improve glucose monitoring in type 1 diabetes (T1DM patients. These devices are promising for diabetes management. Indeed they permit to estimate glucose concentration either based solely on physical activity parameters or in conjunction with CGM or non-invasive CGM (NI-CGM systems. In these last cases, the vital signals are used to modulate glucose estimations provided by the CGM and NI-CGM devices. Finally, this review indicates possible limitations of these new biosensors and outlines directions for future technologic developments.

  7. Study of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for the Upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00531401

    The upgrade of the ALICE vertex detector, the Inner Tracking System (ITS), is scheduled to be installed during the next long shutdown period (LS2 in 2019-2020) of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The current ITS will be replaced by seven concentric layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) with total active surface of $\\sim$10 m$^2$, thus making ALICE the first LHC experiment implementing MAPS detector technology on a large scale. The scope of this thesis is twofold; to report on the activity on the development and the characterisation of a MAPS for the ITS upgrade and to study the charge collection process using a first-principles Monte Carlo simulation. The performance of a MAPS depends on a large number of design and operational parameters, such as collection diode geometry, reverse bias voltage, and epitaxial layer thickness. I have studied this dependence by measuring the INVESTIGATOR chip response to X-rays emitted by an $^{55}$Fe source and to minimum ionising particles. In particular, I ha...

  8. High sensitive trypsin activity evaluation applying a nanostructured QCM-sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoytcheva, M; Zlatev, R; Cosnier, S; Arredondo, M; Valdez, B

    2013-03-15

    The medical diagnostic, the industry, and the biotechnology require rapid, sensitive, and easy to use methods for trypsin activity determination. A simple approach, which meets all these requirements, based on Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) was developed, analytically characterized and described in the present work. QCM application allows rapid trypsin activity evaluation by real time monitoring of the enzymatic degradation of the substrate. The new approach suggested in this work takes advantage of nanoparticles loaded gelatin employment as a trypsin substrate, deposited on the QCM crystal. The heavy nanoparticles leave the substrate layer together with the products of its enzymatic degradation provoking thus a greater decrease of the total QCM crystal mass compared with the non charged substrate. As a result, a higher sensor frequency response occurs. A 10 fold improvement of the LOD was achieved for trypsin activity evaluation applying the proposed method with Ag nanoparticles loaded gelatin (7.5×10(-4) U mL(-1) vs. 7.5×10(-3) U mL(-1) obtained by the "classic" QCM method). The approach subject of this work can be applied with any substrate degrading enzyme. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Direct electron imaging in electron microscopy with monolithic active pixel sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deptuch, G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)], E-mail: deptuch@ieee.org; Besson, A. [IPHC, CNRS-IN2P3/ULP, 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 02 (France); Rehak, P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Szelezniak, M. [IPHC, CNRS-IN2P3/ULP, 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 02 (France); Wall, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Winter, M. [IPHC, CNRS-IN2P3/ULP, 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 02 (France); Zhu, Y. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    A new imaging device for dynamic electron microscopy is in great demand. The detector should provide the experimenter with images having sufficient spatial resolution at high speed. Immunity to radiation damage, accumulated during exposures, is critical. Photographic film, a traditional medium, is not adequate for studies that require large volumes of data or rapid recording and charge coupled device (CCD) cameras have limited resolution, due to phosphor screen coupling. CCD chips are not suitable for direct recording due to their extreme sensitivity to radiation damage. This paper discusses characterization of monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) as well as in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The tested devices were two versions of the MIMOSA V (MV) chip. This 1 M pixel device features pixel size of 17x17 {mu}m{sup 2} and was designed in a 0.6 {mu}m CMOS process. The active layer for detection is a thin (less than 20 {mu}m) epitaxial layer, limiting the broadening of the electron beam. The first version of the detector was a standard imager with electronics, passivation and interconnection layers on top of the active region; the second one was bottom-thinned, reaching the epitaxial layer from the bottom. The electron energies used range from a few keV to 30 keV for SEM and from 40 to 400 keV for TEM. Deterioration of the image resolution due to backscattering was quantified for different energies and both detector versions.

  10. Hydra Rendezvous and Docking Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Fred; Carrington, Connie

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. technology to support a CEV AR&D activity is mature and was developed by NASA and supporting industry during an extensive research and development program conducted during the 1990's and early 2000 time frame at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development and demonstration of a rendezvous/docking sensor was identified early in the AR&D Program as the critical enabling technology that allows automated proxinity operations and docking. A first generation rendezvous/docking sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor (VGS) was developed and successfully flown on STS 87 and again on STS 95, proving the concept of a video-based sensor. Advances in both video and signal processing technologies and the lessons learned from the two successful flight experiments provided a baseline for the development of a new generation of video based rendezvous/docking sensor. The Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) has greatly increased performance and additional capability for longer-range operation. A Demonstration Automatic Rendezvous Technology (DART) flight experiment was flown in April 2005 using AVGS as the primary proximity operations sensor. Because of the absence of a docking mechanism on the target satellite, this mission did not demonstrate the ability of the sensor to coltrold ocking. Mission results indicate that the rendezvous sensor operated successfully in "spot mode" (2 km acquisition of the target, bearing data only) but was never commanded to "acquire and track" the docking target. Parts obsolescence issues prevent the construction of current design AVGS units to support the NASA Exploration initiative. This flight proven AR&D technology is being modularized and upgraded with additional capabilities through the Hydra project at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Hydra brings a unique engineering approach and sensor architecture to the table, to solve the continuing issues of parts obsolescence and multiple sensor integration. This paper presents an approach to

  11. The underappreciated in vitro activity of tedizolid against Bacteroides fragilis species, including strains resistant to metronidazole and carbapenems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Leoncio, Elisa S; Merriam, C Vreni

    2017-02-01

    Because Bacteroides fragilis has the ability to develop mechanisms of resistance to almost all antibiotics, we studied the comparative in vitro activity of tedizolid against 124 Bacteroides group species clinical isolates, including carbapenem, metronidazole and piperacillin-tazobactam resistant strains. Tedizolid had an MIC 90 of 2 μg/ml (range, 0.5-4 μg/ml) and was 1-4 times more active than linezolid that had an MIC 90 of 8 μg/ml (range, 2-16 μg/ml). It was also active (MICs 0.5-2 μg/ml) against the 27 ertapenem, 2 metronidazole and 12 piperacillin-tazobactam resistant strains tested. This suggests that tedizolid may be useful treating infections, including bacteremias, due to resistant B. fragilis group species, as well as, mixed skin and soft tissue infections such as diabetic foot infections caused by Gram-positive aerobes and B. fragilis group species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A market based active/reactive dispatch including transformer taps and reactor and capacitor banks using Simulated Annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Mario Helder; Saraiva, Joao Tome

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an optimization model to be used by System Operators in order to validate the economic schedules obtained by Market Operators together with the injections from Bilateral Contracts. These studies will be performed off-line in the day before operation and the developed model is based on adjustment bids submitted by generators and loads and it is used by System Operators if that is necessary to enforce technical or security constraints. This model corresponds to an enhancement of an approach described in a previous paper and it now includes discrete components as transformer taps and reactor and capacitor banks. The resulting mixed integer formulation is solved using Simulated Annealing, a well known metaheuristic specially suited for combinatorial problems. Once the Simulated Annealing converges and the values of the discrete variables are fixed, the resulting non-linear continuous problem is solved using Sequential Linear Programming to get the final solution. The developed model corresponds to an AC version, it includes constraints related with the capability diagram of synchronous generators and variables allowing the computation of the active power required to balance active losses. Finally, the paper includes a Case Study based on the IEEE 118 bus system to illustrate the results that it is possible to obtain and their interest. (author)

  13. A market based active/reactive dispatch including transformer taps and reactor and capacitor banks using Simulated Annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Mario Helder [Departamento de Engenharia Electrotecnica, Instituto Politecnico de Tomar, Quinta do Contador, Estrada da Serra, 2300 Tomar (Portugal); Saraiva, Joao Tome [INESC Porto, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, Campus da FEUP, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

    2009-06-15

    This paper describes an optimization model to be used by System Operators in order to validate the economic schedules obtained by Market Operators together with the injections from Bilateral Contracts. These studies will be performed off-line in the day before operation and the developed model is based on adjustment bids submitted by generators and loads and it is used by System Operators if that is necessary to enforce technical or security constraints. This model corresponds to an enhancement of an approach described in a previous paper and it now includes discrete components as transformer taps and reactor and capacitor banks. The resulting mixed integer formulation is solved using Simulated Annealing, a well known metaheuristic specially suited for combinatorial problems. Once the Simulated Annealing converges and the values of the discrete variables are fixed, the resulting non-linear continuous problem is solved using Sequential Linear Programming to get the final solution. The developed model corresponds to an AC version, it includes constraints related with the capability diagram of synchronous generators and variables allowing the computation of the active power required to balance active losses. Finally, the paper includes a Case Study based on the IEEE 118 bus system to illustrate the results that it is possible to obtain and their interest. (author)

  14. Review of the IAEA nuclear fuel cycle and material section activities connected with nuclear fuel including WWER fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, F.

    2001-01-01

    Program activities on Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Materials cover the areas of: 1) raw materials (B.1.01); 2) fuel performance and technology (B.1.02); 3) pent fuel (B.1.03); 4) fuel cycle issues and information system (B.1.04); 5) support to technical cooperation activities (B.1.05). The IAEA activities in fuel performance and technology in 2001 include organization of the fuel experts meetings and completion of the Co-ordinate Research Projects (CRP). The special attention is given to the advanced post-irradiation examination techniques for water reactor fuel and fuel behavior under transients and LOCA conditions. An international research program on modeling of activity transfer in primary circuit of NPP is finalized in 2001. A new CRP on fuel modeling at extended burnup (FUMEX II) has planed to be carried out during the period 2002-2006. In the area of spent fuel management the implementation of burnup credit (BUC) in spent fuel management systems has motivated to be used in criticality safety applications, based on economic consideration. An overview of spent fuel storage policy accounting new fuel features as higher enrichment and final burnup, usage of MOX fuel and prolongation of the term of spent fuel storage is also given

  15. Magnetic enzyme membranes as active elements of electrochemical sensors: specific amino acid enzyme elctrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvot, C; Berjonneau, A M; Gellf, G; Thomas, D

    1975-11-15

    The basic principle of the described magnetic enzyme electrodes is a kinetic accumulation of CO2 at the active layer electrode interface. The local pCO2 level is linked to three simultaneous phenomena: substrate diffusion in, enzyme reaction CO2 diffusion out. After a transient state there is a stationary state between the quantity of CO2 produced by the enzyme reaction and the CO2 diffusing from the active membrane to the bulk solution. Continuous determination of free amino acids in biological media is useful in biological processing, fermentation, medicine, pharmaceutical industries and biological research. No methods are presently available for any specific continuous measurement of lysine which is of nutritional importance in protein industrial syntheses; of phenylalanine and tyrosine which have to be monitored in several inborn diseases (phenylketonuria being the most important of them); of arginine and histidine which play a still imperfectly understood part in neurochemistry. The use of decarboxylase bearing membranes as sensors in such measurements could offer several novel advantages: (a) a simple device made of a currently manufactured electrode slightly modified by the use of an enzyme membrane; (b) The absence of any enzymic consumption due to the immobilization and the negligible consumption of substrate during the measurements; (c) The sensitivity which can be sharpened by a systematic study of the membrane parameters; (d) the continuous response of the electrode as long as it is in contact with the substrate solution; (e) the further feasibility as a miniature sensor. The magnetic device introduced allows obviously a convenient use of the enzyme electrode, the active part can be removed and replaced without disturbance for the pCO2 electrode itself. The enzyme electrodes are not only useful at the applied point of view but also at the fundamental point of view by allowing a direct measurement of an intra membrane concentration. The influence of

  16. A New Electrochemical Sensor Based on Task-Specific Ionic Liquids-Modified Palm Shell Activated Carbon for the Determination of Mercury in Water Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abu Ismaiel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a potentiometric sensor composed of palm shell activated carbon modified with trioctylmethylammonium thiosalicylate (TOMATS was used for the potentiometric determination of mercury ions in water samples. The proposed potentiometric sensor has good operating characteristics towards Hg (II, including a relatively high selectivity; a Nernstian response to Hg (II ions in a concentration range of 1.0 × 10−9 to 1.0 × 10−2 M, with a detection limit of 1 × 10−10 M and a slope of 44.08 ± 1.0 mV/decade; and a fast response time (~5 s. No significant changes in electrode potential were observed when the pH was varied over the range of 3–9. Additionally, the proposed electrode was characterized by good selectivity towards Hg (II and no significant interferences from other cationic or anionic species.

  17. Physical activity interventions in Latin America: what value might be added by including conference abstracts in a literature review?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehner, Christine; Soares, Jesus; Parra, Diana C; Ribeiro, Isabela C; Pratt, Michael; Bracco, Mario; Hallal, Pedro C; Brownson, Ross C

    2010-07-01

    This review assessed whether conference abstracts yield useful information on the types and effectiveness of community-based physical activity (PA) interventions in Latin America, beyond that from interventions included in a recent systematic review of peer-reviewed literature. Abstracts from 9 conferences were searched for community-based interventions to promote PA in Latin America and summarized. Three reviewers classified and screened abstracts. Evaluated interventions that were not included in the previous review were assessed. Search of abstracts from 31 proceedings of 9 conferences identified 87 abstracts of studies on community-based interventions focused on increasing PA. Only 31 abstracts reported on studies with a control group and an outcome related to PA. Ten of these abstracts represented interventions that had not been included in the previous review of peer-reviewed literature, but the abstracts were insufficient in number or detail to make a practice recommendation for any single intervention. This review highlighted the challenges and low added value of including conference abstracts in a systematic review of community PA interventions in Latin America. Stronger evaluation design and execution and more published reports of evaluated interventions are needed to build an evidence base supporting interventions to increase PA in Latin America.

  18. Real-time method for establishing a detection map for a network of sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D; Koch, Mark W; Giron, Casey; Rondeau, Daniel M; Russell, John L

    2012-09-11

    A method for establishing a detection map of a dynamically configurable sensor network. This method determines an appropriate set of locations for a plurality of sensor units of a sensor network and establishes a detection map for the network of sensors while the network is being set up; the detection map includes the effects of the local terrain and individual sensor performance. Sensor performance is characterized during the placement of the sensor units, which enables dynamic adjustment or reconfiguration of the placement of individual elements of the sensor network during network set-up to accommodate variations in local terrain and individual sensor performance. The reconfiguration of the network during initial set-up to accommodate deviations from idealized individual sensor detection zones improves the effectiveness of the sensor network in detecting activities at a detection perimeter and can provide the desired sensor coverage of an area while minimizing unintentional gaps in coverage.

  19. Automotive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Jiri; Illing, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    Sensors are an essential component of most electronic systems in the car. They deliver input parameters for comfort features, engine and emission control as well as for the active and passive safety systems. New technologies such as silicon micromachining play an important role for the introduction of these sensors in all vehicle classes. The importance and use of these sensor technologies in today"s automotive applications will be shown in this article. Finally an outlook on important current developments and new functions in the car will be given.

  20. Activity classification and dead reckoning for pedestrian navigation with wearable sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zuolei; Mao, Xuchu; Tian, Weifeng; Zhang, Xiangfen

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses an approach which integrates activity classification and dead reckoning techniques in step-based pedestrian navigation. In the proposed method, the pedestrian is equipped with a prototype wearable sensor module to record accelerations and determine the headings while walking. To improve the step detection accuracy, different types of activities are classified according to extracted features by means of a probabilistic neural network (PNN). The vertical acceleration data, which indicate the periodic vibration during gait cycle are filtered through a wavelet transform before being used to count the steps and assess the step length from which the distance traveled is estimated. By coupling the distance with the azimuth, navigation through pedestrian dead reckoning is implemented. This research provides a possible seamless pedestrian navigation solution which can be applied to a wide range of areas where the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) signal remains vulnerable. Results of two experiments in this paper reveal that the proposed approach is effective in reducing navigation errors and improving accuracy.

  1. Active site of mycobacterial dUTPase: Structural characteristics and a built-in sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, Balazs; Barabas, Orsolya; Takacs, Eniko; Nagy, Nikolett; Nagy, Peter; Vertessy, Beata G.

    2008-01-01

    dUTPases are essential to eliminate dUTP for DNA integrity and provide dUMP for thymidylate biosynthesis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis apparently lacks any other thymidylate biosynthesis pathway, therefore dUTPase is a promising antituberculotic drug target. Crystal structure of the mycobacterial enzyme in complex with the isosteric substrate analog, α,β-imido-dUTP and Mg 2+ at 1.5 A resolution was determined that visualizes the full-length C-terminus, previously not localized. Interactions of a conserved motif important in catalysis, the Mycobacterium-specific five-residue-loop insert and C-terminal tetrapeptide could now be described in detail. Stacking of C-terminal histidine upon the uracil moiety prompted replacement with tryptophan. The resulting sensitive fluorescent sensor enables fast screening for binding of potential inhibitors to the active site. K d for α,β-imido-dUTP binding to mycobacterial dUTPase is determined to be 10-fold less than for human dUTPase, which is to be considered in drug optimization. A robust continuous activity assay for kinetic screening is proposed

  2. Implementation of Activity Sensor Equipment in the Homes of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillis, William; Bond, William F; Svendsen, Jessica; Guither, Sheila

    2017-11-01

    Telemedicine care models for managing advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may benefit from the addition of motion sensing, spirometry, and tablet-based symptom diary tracking. We conducted a feasibility study of telemedicine in the home setting using multiple activity sensor monitoring equipment. Deployment and monitoring were supported by home health nurses with technical advice from the equipment makers as needed. Data analytics for motion sensing was provided by the research sponsor, but was not used for care decisions. On study intake, a health risk assessment, Quality of Life (SF-36) survey, and the St. George Respiratory Questionnaire were administered to assess patients' self-perception of quality of life, activities of daily life function, and difficulty living with COPD. Twenty-eight patients were enrolled and data were gathered for a minimum of 6 months and maximum of 9 months. The researchers demonstrated that augmentation of traditional telemedicine methods with motion sensing, spirometry, and symptom diaries appears feasible. The technical, process, logistics barriers, and solutions required for system deployment are described. The researchers demonstrated that augmentation of traditional telemedicine methods with motion sensing, spirometry, and symptom diaries appears feasible. Further exploration will be needed to determine the value of this information in preventing outcomes relevant to patients.

  3. Cross-layer active predictive congestion control protocol for wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jiangwen; Xu, Xiaofeng; Feng, Renjian; Wu, Yinfeng

    2009-01-01

    In wireless sensor networks (WSNs), there are numerous factors that may cause network congestion problems, such as the many-to-one communication modes, mutual interference of wireless links, dynamic changes of network topology and the memory-restrained characteristics of nodes. All these factors result in a network being more vulnerable to congestion. In this paper, a cross-layer active predictive congestion control scheme (CL-APCC) for improving the performance of networks is proposed. Queuing theory is applied in the CL-APCC to analyze data flows of a single-node according to its memory status, combined with the analysis of the average occupied memory size of local networks. It also analyzes the current data change trends of local networks to forecast and actively adjust the sending rate of the node in the next period. In order to ensure the fairness and timeliness of the network, the IEEE 802.11 protocol is revised based on waiting time, the number of the node's neighbors and the original priority of data packets, which dynamically adjusts the sending priority of the node. The performance of CL-APCC, which is evaluated by extensive simulation experiments. is more efficient in solving the congestion in WSNs. Furthermore, it is clear that the proposed scheme has an outstanding advantage in terms of improving the fairness and lifetime of networks.

  4. Cross-Layer Active Predictive Congestion Control Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinfeng Wu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In wireless sensor networks (WSNs, there are numerous factors that may cause network congestion problems, such as the many-to-one communication modes, mutual interference of wireless links, dynamic changes of network topology and the memory-restrained characteristics of nodes. All these factors result in a network being more vulnerable to congestion. In this paper, a cross-layer active predictive congestion control scheme (CL-APCC for improving the performance of networks is proposed. Queuing theory is applied in the CL-APCC to analyze data flows of a single-node according to its memory status, combined with the analysis of the average occupied memory size of local networks. It also analyzes the current data change trends of local networks to forecast and actively adjust the sending rate of the node in the next period. In order to ensure the fairness and timeliness of the network, the IEEE 802.11 protocol is revised based on waiting time, the number of the node‟s neighbors and the original priority of data packets, which dynamically adjusts the sending priority of the node. The performance of CL-APCC, which is evaluated by extensive simulation experiments. is more efficient in solving the congestion in WSNs. Furthermore, it is clear that the proposed scheme has an outstanding advantage in terms of improving the fairness and lifetime of networks.

  5. Atmospheric Chemistry Measurements in Schools and Outreach Activities with Low-cost Air Quality Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Z.; Monks, P. S.; McKenzie, K.

    2014-12-01

    The increasing range of low cost air quality sensors entering the market-place or being developed in-house in the last couple of years has led to many possibilities for using these instruments for public outreach activities or citizen science projects. A range of instruments sent out into local schools for the children to interpret and analyse the data and put the air quality in their area into context. A teaching package with tutorials has been developed to bring the data to life and link in with curriculum.The instruments have also been positioned around the city of Leicester in the UK to help understand the spatial variations in air quality and to assess the impact of retro-fitting buses on a busy bus route. The data is easily accessible online on a near real time basis and the various instruments can be compared with others around the country or the world from classrooms around the world.We will give an overview of the instrumentation with a comparison with commercial and cutting edge research instrumentation, the type of activities that were carried out and the public outreach forums where the data can be used.

  6. 14C autoradiography with a novel wafer scale CMOS Active Pixel Sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, M; Wells, K; Anaxagoras, T; Allinson, N M; Larner, J

    2013-01-01

    14 C autoradiography is a well established technique for structural and metabolic analysis of cells and tissues. The most common detection medium for this application is film emulsion, which offers unbeatable spatial resolution due to its fine granularity but at the same time has some limiting drawbacks such as poor linearity and rapid saturation. In recent years several digital detectors have been developed, following the technological transition from analog to digital-based detection systems in the medical and biological field. Even so such digital systems have been greatly limited by the size of their active area (a few square centimeters), which have made them unsuitable for routine use in many biological applications where sample areas are typically ∼ 10–100 cm 2 . The Multidimensional Integrated Intelligent Imaging (MI3-Plus) consortium has recently developed a new large area CMOS Active Pixel Sensor (12.8 cm × 13.1 cm). This detector, based on the use of two different pixel resolutions, is capable of providing simultaneously low noise and high dynamic range on a wafer scale. In this paper we will demonstrate the suitability of this detector for routine beta autoradiography in a comparative approach with widely used film emulsion.

  7. Increasing resource allocation and research into tobacco control activities: a comprehensive approach including primary prevention, treatment and brief intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, R

    1993-01-01

    The range of tobacco control activities should be viewed as essential parts of a complex multi-component puzzle. Intervention strategies designed to address tobacco control should be comprehensive and include both primary and secondary prevention activities and be multi-faceted and capable of bringing about change at both the individual and broader social and cultural levels. In this paper I argue for a mutually inclusive framework in which the various components contribute in important and different ways. I examine the prevalence of smoking and identify the high risk groups, then I examine the range of available strategies and present the evidence for their success. I discuss the primary prevention approaches such as warning labels, taxes, price increases, workplace bans, education in schools, mass media and self-help materials, as well as brief interventions and treatment strategies which are conducted at the worksite, general practice and specialized cessation clinics. The areas for future research are delineated for increased resource allocation and include: the best ways to disseminate brief interventions to smokers, methods to motivate smokers; training of health professionals to deliver brief interventions; enhancing quitting and access to existing treatment resources among specific disadvantaged minority groups, e.g. migrants, unemployed youth, the effect on smoking prevalence of warning labels on cigarette packets and price rises on cigarettes.

  8. An Antimicrobial Metabolite from Bacillus sp.: Significant activity against pathogenic bacteria including multidrug-resistant clinical strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJAY GHOSH CHALASANI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the cell free modified trypticase soya broth (pH 7.4+0.2 of Bacillus subtilis URID 12.1 showed significant antimicrobial activity against multidrug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Streptococcus pyogenes and Enterococcus faecalis. The partially purified antimicrobial molecule was found to be resistant to extremes of pH and temperatures and also to higher concentrations of trypsin and proteinase K. The antimicrobial molecule was purified by a three-step method that included reverse-phased high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values were determined for 11 species of bacteria using a microbroth dilution technique. The HPLC-purified fraction showed the MICs ranging from 0.5 to 1 µg/ml for methicillin and vancomycin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MVRSA and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE strains. The molecular mass of the antimicrobial compound was determined to be 842.37 Da. The same antimicrobial fraction showed negligible haemolytic activity against human red blood cells even at a concentration as high as 100µg/ml. Because of its significant antimicrobial activity at low MIC values coupled with its non-haemolytic property, it may prove to be a novel antimicrobial lead molecule.

  9. The NLP toxin family in Phytophthora sojae includes rapidly evolving groups that lack necrosis-inducing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Suomeng; Kong, Guanghui; Qutob, Dinah; Yu, Xiaoli; Tang, Junli; Kang, Jixiong; Dai, Tingting; Wang, Hai; Gijzen, Mark; Wang, Yuanchao

    2012-07-01

    Necrosis- and ethylene-inducing-like proteins (NLP) are widely distributed in eukaryotic and prokaryotic plant pathogens and are considered to be important virulence factors. We identified, in total, 70 potential Phytophthora sojae NLP genes but 37 were designated as pseudogenes. Sequence alignment of the remaining 33 NLP delineated six groups. Three of these groups include proteins with an intact heptapeptide (Gly-His-Arg-His-Asp-Trp-Glu) motif, which is important for necrosis-inducing activity, whereas the motif is not conserved in the other groups. In total, 19 representative NLP genes were assessed for necrosis-inducing activity by heterologous expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Surprisingly, only eight genes triggered cell death. The expression of the NLP genes in P. sojae was examined, distinguishing 20 expressed and 13 nonexpressed NLP genes. Real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction results indicate that most NLP are highly expressed during cyst germination and infection stages. Amino acid substitution ratios (Ka/Ks) of 33 NLP sequences from four different P. sojae strains resulted in identification of positive selection sites in a distinct NLP group. Overall, our study indicates that expansion and pseudogenization of the P. sojae NLP family results from an ongoing birth-and-death process, and that varying patterns of expression, necrosis-inducing activity, and positive selection suggest that NLP have diversified in function.

  10. Active Pixel Sensors in ams H18/H35 HV-CMOS Technology for the ATLAS HL-LHC Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Ristic, Branislav

    2016-09-21

    Deep sub micron HV-CMOS processes offer the opportunity for sensors built by industry standard techniques while being HV tolerant, making them good candidates for drift-based, fast collecting, thus radiation-hard pixel detectors. For the upgrade of the ATLAS Pixel Detector towards the HL-LHC requirements, active pixel sensors in HV-CMOS technology were investigated. These implement amplifier and discriminator stages directly in insulating deep n-wells, which also act as collecting electrodes. The deep n-wells allow for bias voltages up to 150V leading to a depletion depth of several 10um. Prototype sensors in the ams H18 180nm and H35 350nm HV-CMOS processes have been manufactured, acting as a potential drop-in replacement for the current ATLAS Pixel sensors, thus leaving higher level processing such as trigger handling to dedicated read-out chips. Sensors were thoroughly tested in lab measurements as well as in testbeam experiments. Irradiation with X-rays and protons revealed a tolerance to ionizing doses o...

  11. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 8: Aerothermodynamics Automation and Robotics (A/R) systems sensors, high-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings presented at the SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) on aerothermodynamics, automation and robotics systems, sensors, and high-temperature superconductivity are included. Topics covered include: aerothermodynamics; aerobraking; aeroassist flight experiment; entry technology for probes and penetrators; automation and robotics; artificial intelligence; NASA telerobotics program; planetary rover program; science sensor technology; direct detector; submillimeter sensors; laser sensors; passive microwave sensing; active microwave sensing; sensor electronics; sensor optics; coolers and cryogenics; and high temperature superconductivity

  12. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 8: Aerothermodynamics Automation and Robotics (A/R) systems sensors, high-temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings presented at the SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) on aerothermodynamics, automation and robotics systems, sensors, and high-temperature superconductivity are included. Topics covered include: aerothermodynamics; aerobraking; aeroassist flight experiment; entry technology for probes and penetrators; automation and robotics; artificial intelligence; NASA telerobotics program; planetary rover program; science sensor technology; direct detector; submillimeter sensors; laser sensors; passive microwave sensing; active microwave sensing; sensor electronics; sensor optics; coolers and cryogenics; and high temperature superconductivity.

  13. A New Generation of FRET Sensors for Robust Measurement of Gαi1, Gαi2 and Gαi3 Activation Kinetics in Single Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakobus van Unen

    Full Text Available G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs can activate a heterotrimeric G-protein complex with subsecond kinetics. Genetically encoded biosensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET are ideally suited for the study of such fast signaling events in single living cells. Here we report on the construction and characterization of three FRET biosensors for the measurement of Gαi1, Gαi2 and Gαi3 activation. To enable quantitative long-term imaging of FRET biosensors with high dynamic range, fluorescent proteins with enhanced photophysical properties are required. Therefore, we use the currently brightest and most photostable CFP variant, mTurquoise2, as donor fused to Gαi subunit, and cp173Venus fused to the Gγ2 subunit as acceptor. The Gαi FRET biosensors constructs are expressed together with Gβ1 from a single plasmid, providing preferred relative expression levels with reduced variation in mammalian cells. The Gαi FRET sensors showed a robust response to activation of endogenous or over-expressed alpha-2A-adrenergic receptors, which was inhibited by pertussis toxin. Moreover, we observed activation of the Gαi FRET sensor in single cells upon stimulation of several GPCRs, including the LPA2, M3 and BK2 receptor. Furthermore, we show that the sensors are well suited to extract kinetic parameters from fast measurements in the millisecond time range. This new generation of FRET biosensors for Gαi1, Gαi2 and Gαi3 activation will be valuable for live-cell measurements that probe Gαi activation.

  14. Energy Efficient Routing and Node Activity Scheduling in the OCARI Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saoucene Mahfoudh

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Sensor nodes are characterized by a small size, a low cost, an advanced communication technology, but also a limited amount of energy. Energy efficient strategies are required in such networks to maximize network lifetime. In this paper, we focus on a solution integrating energy efficient routing and node activity scheduling. The energy efficient routing we propose, called EOLSR, selects the route and minimizes the energy consumed by an end-to-end transmission, while avoiding nodes with low residual energy. Simulation results show that EOLSR outperforms the solution selecting the route of minimum energy as well as the solution based on node residual energy. Cross-layering allows EOLSR to use information from the application layer or the MAC layer to reduce its overhead and increase network lifetime. Node activity scheduling is based on the following observation: the sleep state is the least power consuming state. So, to schedule node active and sleeping periods, we propose SERENA that colors all network nodes using a small number of colors, such that two nodes with the same color can transmit without interfering. The node color is mapped into a time slot during which the node can transmit. Consequently, each node is awake during its slot and the slots of its one-hop neighbors, and sleeps in the remaining time. We evaluate SERENA benefits obtained in terms of bandwidth, delay and energy. We also show how cross-layering with the application layer can improve the end-to-end delays for data gathering applications.

  15. Study protocol: Rehabilitation including Social and Physical activity and Education in Children and Teenagers with Cancer (RESPECT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsson, Troels; Helms, Anne Sofie; Adamsen, Lis; Andersen, Lars Bo; Andersen, Karen Vitting; Christensen, Karl Bang; Hasle, Henrik; Heilmann, Carsten; Hejgaard, Nete; Johansen, Christoffer; Madsen, Marianne; Madsen, Svend Aage; Simovska, Venka; Strange, Birgit; Thing, Lone Friis; Wehner, Peder Skov; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Larsen, Hanne Baekgaard

    2013-11-14

    During cancer treatment children have reduced contact with their social network of friends, and have limited participation in education, sports, and leisure activities. During and following cancer treatment, children describe school related problems, reduced physical fitness, and problems related to interaction with peers. The RESPECT study is a nationwide population-based prospective, controlled, mixed-methods intervention study looking at children aged 6-18 years newly diagnosed with cancer in eastern Denmark (n=120) and a matched control group in western Denmark (n=120). RESPECT includes Danish-speaking children diagnosed with cancer and treated at pediatric oncology units in Denmark. Primary endpoints are the level of educational achievement one year after the cessation of first-line cancer therapy, and the value of VO2max one year after the cessation of first-line cancer therapy. Secondary endpoints are quality of life measured by validated questionnaires and interviews, and physical performance. RESPECT includes a multimodal intervention program, including ambassador-facilitated educational, physical, and social interventions. The educational intervention includes an educational program aimed at the child with cancer, the child's schoolteachers and classmates, and the child's parents. Children with cancer will each have two ambassadors assigned from their class. The ambassadors visit the child with cancer at the hospital at alternating 2-week intervals and participate in the intervention program. The physical and social intervention examines the effect of early, structured, individualized, and continuous physical activity from diagnosis throughout the treatment period. The patients are tested at diagnosis, at 3 and 6 months after diagnosis, and one year after the cessation of treatment. The study is powered to quantify the impact of the combined educational, physical, and social intervention programs. RESPECT is the first population-based study to examine the

  16. Pipeline Structural Health Monitoring Using Macro-fiber Composite Active Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thien, Andrew B. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2006-01-10

    The United States economy is heavily dependent upon a vast network of pipeline systems to transport and distribute the nation's energy resources. As this network of pipelines continues to age, monitoring and maintaining its structural integrity remains essential to the nation's energy interests. Numerous pipeline accidents over the past several years have resulted in hundreds of fatalities and billions of dollars in property damages. These accidents show that the current monitoring methods are not sufficient and leave a considerable margin for improvement. To avoid such catastrophes, more thorough methods are needed. As a solution, the research of this thesis proposes a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for pipeline networks. By implementing a SHM system with pipelines, their structural integrity can be continuously monitored, reducing the overall risks and costs associated with current methods. The proposed SHM system relies upon the deployment of macro-fiber composite (MFC) patches for the sensor array. Because MFC patches are flexible and resilient, they can be permanently mounted to the curved surface of a pipeline's main body. From this location, the MFC patches are used to monitor the structural integrity of the entire pipeline. Two damage detection techniques, guided wave and impedance methods, were implemented as part of the proposed SHM system. However, both techniques utilize the same MFC patches. This dual use of the MFC patches enables the proposed SHM system to require only a single sensor array. The presented Lamb wave methods demonstrated the ability to correctly identify and locate the presence of damage in the main body of the pipeline system, including simulated cracks and actual corrosion damage. The presented impedance methods demonstrated the ability to correctly identify and locate the presence of damage in the flanged joints of the pipeline system, including the loosening of bolts on the flanges. In addition to damage

  17. Human Activity Recognition from Smart-Phone Sensor Data using a Multi-Class Ensemble Learning in Home Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Soumya; Mitra, Jhimli; Karunanithi, Mohan; Dowling, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Home monitoring of chronically ill or elderly patient can reduce frequent hospitalisations and hence provide improved quality of care at a reduced cost to the community, therefore reducing the burden on the healthcare system. Activity recognition of such patients is of high importance in such a design. In this work, a system for automatic human physical activity recognition from smart-phone inertial sensors data is proposed. An ensemble of decision trees framework is adopted to train and predict the multi-class human activity system. A comparison of our proposed method with a multi-class traditional support vector machine shows significant improvement in activity recognition accuracies.

  18. Pitch dependence of the tolerance of CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors to non-ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, D.; Deveaux, M.; Domachowski, M.; Fröhlich, I.; Koziel, M.; Müntz, C.; Scharrer, P.; Stroth, J.

    2013-12-01

    CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) have demonstrated excellent performance as tracking detectors for charged particles. They provide an outstanding spatial resolution (a few μm), a detection efficiency of ≳ 99.9 %, very low material budget (0.05 %X0) and good radiation tolerance (≳ 1 Mrad, ≳1013neq /cm2) (Deveaux et al. [1]). This makes them an interesting technology for various applications in heavy ion and particle physics. Their tolerance to bulk damage was recently improved by using high-resistivity (∼ 1 kΩ cm) epitaxial layers as sensitive volume (Deveaux et al. [1], Dorokhov et al. [2]). The radiation tolerance of conventional MAPS is known to depend on the pixel pitch. This is as a higher pitch extends the distance, which signal electrons have to travel by thermal diffusion before being collected. Increased diffusion paths turn into a higher probability of loosing signal charge due to recombination. Provided that a similar effect exists in MAPS with high-resistivity epitaxial layer, it could be used to extend their radiation tolerance further. We addressed this question with MIMOSA-18AHR prototypes, which were provided by the IPHC Strasbourg and irradiated with reactor neutrons. We report about the results of this study and provide evidences that MAPS with 10 μm pixel pitch tolerate doses of ≳ 3 ×1014neq /cm2.

  19. Design and testing of monolithic active pixel sensors for charged particle tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Deptuch, G; Claus, G; Colledani, C; Dulinski, W; Gornushkin, Y; Husson, D; Riester, J L; Winter, M

    2002-01-01

    A monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) for charged particle tracking based on a novel detector structure has been proposed, simulated, fabricated and tested. This detector is inseparable from the readout electronics, since both of them are integrated on the same, low- resistivity silicon wafer standard for a CMOS process. The individual pixel is comprised of only three MOS transistors and a photodiode collecting the charge created in the thin undepleted epitaxial layer. This approach provides a low cost, high resolution and thin device with the whole detector area sensitive to radiation (100% fill factor). Detailed device simulations using the ISE-TCAD package have been carried out in order to study the charge. collection mechanism and to validate the proposed idea. In order to demonstrate viability of the technique, two prototype chips were successively fabricated using 0.6 mu m and 0.35 mu m CMOS processes. Both chips have been fully characterized. The pixel conversion gain has been calibrated using a /sup...

  20. The Cancer Cell Oxygen Sensor PHD2 Promotes Metastasis via Activation of Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kuchnio

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Several questions about the role of the oxygen sensor prolyl-hydroxylase 2 (PHD2 in cancer have not been addressed. First, the role of PHD2 in metastasis has not been studied in a spontaneous tumor model. Here, we show that global PHD2 haplodeficiency reduced metastasis without affecting tumor growth. Second, it is unknown whether PHD2 regulates cancer by affecting cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs. We show that PHD2 haplodeficiency reduced metastasis via two mechanisms: (1 by decreasing CAF activation, matrix production, and contraction by CAFs, an effect that surprisingly relied on PHD2 deletion in cancer cells, but not in CAFs; and (2 by improving tumor vessel normalization. Third, the effect of concomitant PHD2 inhibition in malignant and stromal cells (mimicking PHD2 inhibitor treatment is unknown. We show that global PHD2 haplodeficiency, induced not only before but also after tumor onset, impaired metastasis. These findings warrant investigation of PHD2’s therapeutic potential.

  1. Comparison of Feature Learning Methods for Human Activity Recognition Using Wearable Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Frédéric; Shirahama, Kimiaki; Nisar, Muhammad Adeel; Köping, Lukas; Grzegorzek, Marcin

    2018-02-24

    Getting a good feature representation of data is paramount for Human Activity Recognition (HAR) using wearable sensors. An increasing number of feature learning approaches-in particular deep-learning based-have been proposed to extract an effective feature representation by analyzing large amounts of data. However, getting an objective interpretation of their performances faces two problems: the lack of a baseline evaluation setup, which makes a strict comparison between them impossible, and the insufficiency of implementation details, which can hinder their use. In this paper, we attempt to address both issues: we firstly propose an evaluation framework allowing a rigorous comparison of features extracted by different methods, and use it to carry out extensive experiments with state-of-the-art feature learning approaches. We then provide all the codes and implementation details to make both the reproduction of the results reported in this paper and the re-use of our framework easier for other researchers. Our studies carried out on the OPPORTUNITY and UniMiB-SHAR datasets highlight the effectiveness of hybrid deep-learning architectures involving convolutional and Long-Short-Term-Memory (LSTM) to obtain features characterising both short- and long-term time dependencies in the data.

  2. Comparison of Feature Learning Methods for Human Activity Recognition Using Wearable Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Getting a good feature representation of data is paramount for Human Activity Recognition (HAR using wearable sensors. An increasing number of feature learning approaches—in particular deep-learning based—have been proposed to extract an effective feature representation by analyzing large amounts of data. However, getting an objective interpretation of their performances faces two problems: the lack of a baseline evaluation setup, which makes a strict comparison between them impossible, and the insufficiency of implementation details, which can hinder their use. In this paper, we attempt to address both issues: we firstly propose an evaluation framework allowing a rigorous comparison of features extracted by different methods, and use it to carry out extensive experiments with state-of-the-art feature learning approaches. We then provide all the codes and implementation details to make both the reproduction of the results reported in this paper and the re-use of our framework easier for other researchers. Our studies carried out on the OPPORTUNITY and UniMiB-SHAR datasets highlight the effectiveness of hybrid deep-learning architectures involving convolutional and Long-Short-Term-Memory (LSTM to obtain features characterising both short- and long-term time dependencies in the data.

  3. Nitrophenol chemi-sensor and active solar photocatalyst based on spinel hetaerolite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sher Bahadar; Rahman, Mohammed M; Akhtar, Kalsoom; Asiri, Abdullah M; Rub, Malik Abdul

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution, a significant catalyst based on spinel ZnMn2O4 composite nanoparticles has been developed for electro-catalysis of nitrophenol and photo-catalysis of brilliant cresyl blue. ZnMn2O4 composite (hetaerolite) nanoparticles were prepared by easy low temperature hydrothermal procedure and structurally characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-visible spectroscopy which illustrate that the prepared material is optical active and composed of well crystalline body-centered tetragonal nanoparticles with average size of ∼ 38 ± 10 nm. Hetaerolite nanoparticles were applied for the advancement of a nitrophenol sensor which exhibited high sensitivity (1.500 µAcm(-2) mM(-1)), stability, repeatability and lower limit of detection (20.0 µM) in short response time (10 sec). Moreover, hetaerolite nanoparticles executed high solar photo-catalytic degradation when applied to brilliant cresyl blue under visible light.

  4. Second-Generation Thermal Neutron Activation Sensor for Confirmatory Land-Mine Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edward Clifford; Harry Ing; John McFee; H. Robert Andrews; Tom Cousins

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Improved Land-Mine Detector System (ILDS), a vehicle-mounted nonmetallic land-mine detector. The ILDS consists of a custom teleoperated vehicle carrying an infrared imager, an electromagnetic induction detector, and a ground probing radar-which scan the ground in front of the vehicle. Custom navigation and data fusion software combine information from scanning sensors and navigation systems to detect and automatically track suspect targets until the confirmation detector at the rear of the system is positioned to within 30 cm of the target location. The confirmation detector, using thermal neutron activation (TNA) to detect bulk nitrogen in explosives, then dwells over the target for 10 to 120 s. In U.S. government tests (summer 1998), the ILDS advanced development model (ADM) placed first or second out of five competitors on every test. The construction of the second-generation TNA detector and preliminary testing should be complete by March 2000. Testing on real mines is expected to start in summer 2000

  5. CMOS Active Pixel Sensors as energy-range detectors for proton Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, M.; Waltham, C.; Allinson, N.M.; Anaxagoras, T.; Evans, P.M.; Poludniowski, G.; Green, S.; Parker, D.J.; Price, T.; Manolopoulos, S.; Nieto-Camero, J.

    2015-01-01

    Since the first proof of concept in the early 70s, a number of technologies has been proposed to perform proton CT (pCT), as a means of mapping tissue stopping power for accurate treatment planning in proton therapy. Previous prototypes of energy-range detectors for pCT have been mainly based on the use of scintillator-based calorimeters, to measure proton residual energy after passing through the patient. However, such an approach is limited by the need for only a single proton passing through the energy-range detector in a read-out cycle. A novel approach to this problem could be the use of pixelated detectors, where the independent read-out of each pixel allows to measure simultaneously the residual energy of a number of protons in the same read-out cycle, facilitating a faster and more efficient pCT scan. This paper investigates the suitability of CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) to track individual protons as they go through a number of CMOS layers, forming an energy-range telescope. Measurements performed at the iThemba Laboratories will be presented and analysed in terms of correlation, to confirm capability of proton tracking for CMOS APSs

  6. CMOS Active Pixel Sensors as energy-range detectors for proton Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, M; Anaxagoras, T; Evans, P M; Green, S; Manolopoulos, S; Nieto-Camero, J; Parker, D J; Poludniowski, G; Price, T; Waltham, C; Allinson, N M

    2015-06-03

    Since the first proof of concept in the early 70s, a number of technologies has been proposed to perform proton CT (pCT), as a means of mapping tissue stopping power for accurate treatment planning in proton therapy. Previous prototypes of energy-range detectors for pCT have been mainly based on the use of scintillator-based calorimeters, to measure proton residual energy after passing through the patient. However, such an approach is limited by the need for only a single proton passing through the energy-range detector in a read-out cycle. A novel approach to this problem could be the use of pixelated detectors, where the independent read-out of each pixel allows to measure simultaneously the residual energy of a number of protons in the same read-out cycle, facilitating a faster and more efficient pCT scan. This paper investigates the suitability of CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) to track individual protons as they go through a number of CMOS layers, forming an energy-range telescope. Measurements performed at the iThemba Laboratories will be presented and analysed in terms of correlation, to confirm capability of proton tracking for CMOS APSs.

  7. A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS-active optical fiber sensor based on a three-dimensional sensing layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyu Liu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To fabricate a new surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS-active optical fiber sensor, the design and preparation of SERS-active sensing layer is one of important topics. In this study, we fabricated a highly sensitive three-dimensional (3D SERS-active sensing layer on the optical fiber terminal via in situ polymerizing a porous polymer material on a flat optical fiber terminal through thermal-induced process, following with the photochemical silver nanoparticles growth. The polymerized polymer formed a 3D porous structure with the pore size of 0.29–0.81 μm, which were afterward decorated with abundant silver nanoparticles with the size of about 100 nm, allowing for higher SERS enhancement. This SERS-active optical fiber sensor was applied for the determination of 4-mercaptopyridine, crystal violet and maleic acid The enhancement factor of this SERS sensing layer can be reached as about 108. The optical fiber sensor with high sensitive SERS-active porous polymer is expected for online analysis and environment detection.

  8. Design of an osmotic pressure sensor for sensing an osmotically active substance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ch, Nagesh; Paily, Roy P

    2015-01-01

    A pressure sensor based on the osmosis principle has been designed and demonstrated successfully for the sensing of the concentration levels of an osmotically active substance. The device is fabricated using the bulk micro-machining technique on a silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate. The substrate has a square cavity on the bottom side to fill with the reference glucose solution and a silicon (Si) membrane on the top side for the actuation. Two sets of devices, having membrane thicknesses of 10 µm and 25 µm, but the same area of 3 mm ×3 mm, are fabricated. The cavity is filled with a glucose solution of 100 mg dL −1 and it is sealed with a semi-permeable membrane made up of cellulose acetate material. The glucose solution is employed to prove the functionality of the device and it is tested for different glucose concentration levels, ranging from 50 mg dL −1 to 450 mg dL −1 . The output voltage obtained for the corresponding glucose concentration levels ranges from −6.7 mV to 22.7 mV for the 10 µm device and from −1.7 mV to 4 mV for the 25 µm device. The device operation was simulated using the finite element method (FEM) and the finite volume method (FVM), and the simulation and experimental results match closely. A response time of 40 min is obtained in the case of the 10 µm device compared to one of 30 min for the 25 µm device. The response times obtained for these devices are found to be small compared to those in similar works based on the osmosis principle. This pressure sensor has the potential to provide controlled drug delivery if it can be integrated with other microfluidic devices. (paper)

  9. Cytosolic nucleic acid sensors and innate immune regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ori, Daisuke; Murase, Motoya; Kawai, Taro

    2017-03-04

    During viral and bacterial infections, pathogen-derived cytosolic nucleic acids are recognized by the intracellular RNA sensors retinoic acid-inducible gene I and melanoma-differentiated gene 5 and intracellular DNA sensors, including cyclic-di-GMP-AMP synthase, absent in melanoma 2, interferon (IFN)-gamma inducible protein 16, polymerase III, and so on. Binding of intracellular nucleic acids to these sensors activates downstream signaling cascades, resulting in the production of type I IFNs and pro-inflammatory cytokines to induce appropriate systematic immune responses. While these sensors also recognize endogenous nucleic acids and activate immune responses, they can discriminate between self- and non-self-nucleic acids. However, dysfunction of these sensors or failure of regulatory mechanisms causes aberrant activation of immune response and autoimmune disorders. In this review, we focus on how intracellular immune sensors recognize exogenous nucleic acids and activate the innate immune system, and furthermore, how autoimmune diseases result from dysfunction of these sensors.

  10. An Autonomous Sensor System Architecture for Active Flow and Noise Control Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M, Jr.; Culliton, William G.

    2008-01-01

    Multi-channel sensor fusion represents a powerful technique to simply and efficiently extract information from complex phenomena. While the technique has traditionally been used for military target tracking and situational awareness, a study has been successfully completed that demonstrates that sensor fusion can be applied equally well to aerodynamic applications. A prototype autonomous hardware processor was successfully designed and used to detect in real-time the two-dimensional flow reattachment location generated by a simple separated-flow wind tunnel model. The success of this demonstration illustrates the feasibility of using autonomous sensor processing architectures to enhance flow control feedback signal generation.

  11. High-End CMOS Active Pixel Sensors For Space-Borne Imaging Instruments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bogaerts, Jan; Lepage, Gerald; Dantes, Didier

    2005-01-01

    ...) offer great promise for use in space-borne imaging instruments. This paper highlights present-day high-end CMOS APS sensors and sketches their advantages with respect to their CCD counterparts...

  12. Film-based Sensors with Piezoresistive Molecular Conductors as Active Components Strain Damage and Thermal Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Laukhina

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is addressed to the development of flexible all-organic bi layer (BL film-based sensors being capable of measuring strain as a well-defined electrical signal in a wide range of elongations and temperature. The purpose was achieved by covering polycarbonate films with the polycrystalline layer of a high piezoresistive organic molecular conductor. To determine restrictions for sensor applications, the effect of monoaxial strain on the resistance and texture of the sensing layers of BL films was studied. The experiments have shown that the maximum strain before fracture is about 1 %. A thermal regeneration of the sensing layer of the BL film-based sensors that were damaged by cyclic load is also described. These sensors are able to take the place of conventional metal-based strain and pressure gages in low cost innovative controlling and monitoring technologies.

  13. A Finger-Shaped Tactile Sensor for Fabric Surfaces Evaluation by 2-Dimensional Active Sliding Touch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haihua Hu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sliding tactile perception is a basic function for human beings to determine the mechanical properties of object surfaces and recognize materials. Imitating this process, this paper proposes a novel finger-shaped tactile sensor based on a thin piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF film for surface texture measurement. A parallelogram mechanism is designed to ensure that the sensor applies a constant contact force perpendicular to the object surface, and a 2-dimensional movable mechanical structure is utilized to generate the relative motion at a certain speed between the sensor and the object surface. By controlling the 2-dimensional motion of the finger-shaped sensor along the object surface, small height/depth variation of surface texture changes the output charge of PVDF film then surface texture can be measured. In this paper, the finger-shaped tactile sensor is used to evaluate and classify five different kinds of linen. Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT is utilized to get original attribute data of surface in the frequency domain, and principal component analysis (PCA is used to compress the attribute data and extract feature information. Finally, low dimensional features are classified by Support Vector Machine (SVM. The experimental results show that this finger-shaped tactile sensor is effective and high accurate for discriminating the five textures.

  14. A Physical Activity Reference Data-Set Recorded from Older Adults Using Body-Worn Inertial Sensors and Video Technology—The ADAPT Study Data-Set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Kevin Bourke

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity monitoring algorithms are often developed using conditions that do not represent real-life activities, not developed using the target population, or not labelled to a high enough resolution to capture the true detail of human movement. We have designed a semi-structured supervised laboratory-based activity protocol and an unsupervised free-living activity protocol and recorded 20 older adults performing both protocols while wearing up to 12 body-worn sensors. Subjects’ movements were recorded using synchronised cameras (≥25 fps, both deployed in a laboratory environment to capture the in-lab portion of the protocol and a body-worn camera for out-of-lab activities. Video labelling of the subjects’ movements was performed by five raters using 11 different category labels. The overall level of agreement was high (percentage of agreement >90.05%, and Cohen’s Kappa, corrected kappa, Krippendorff’s alpha and Fleiss’ kappa >0.86. A total of 43.92 h of activities were recorded, including 9.52 h of in-lab and 34.41 h of out-of-lab activities. A total of 88.37% and 152.01% of planned transitions were recorded during the in-lab and out-of-lab scenarios, respectively. This study has produced the most detailed dataset to date of inertial sensor data, synchronised with high frame-rate (≥25 fps video labelled data recorded in a free-living environment from older adults living independently. This dataset is suitable for validation of existing activity classification systems and development of new activity classification algorithms.

  15. A single parameter representation of hygroscopic growth and cloud condensation nucleus activity – Part 2: Including solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Petters

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability of a particle to serve as a cloud condensation nucleus in the atmosphere is determined by its size, hygroscopicity and its solubility in water. Usually size and hygroscopicity alone are sufficient to predict CCN activity. Single parameter representations for hygroscopicity have been shown to successfully model complex, multicomponent particles types. Under the assumption of either complete solubility, or complete insolubility of a component, it is not necessary to explicitly include that component's solubility into the single parameter framework. This is not the case if sparingly soluble materials are present. In this work we explicitly account for solubility by modifying the single parameter equations. We demonstrate that sensitivity to the actual value of solubility emerges only in the regime of 2×10−1–5×10−4, where the solubility values are expressed as volume of solute per unit volume of water present in a saturated solution. Compounds that do not fall inside this sparingly soluble envelope can be adequately modeled assuming they are either infinitely soluble in water or completely insoluble.

  16. Antimicrobial Active Packaging including Chitosan Films with Thymus vulgaris L. Essential Oil for Ready-to-Eat Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Quesada

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An active packaging system has been designed for the shelf life extension of ready to eat meat products. The package included an inner surface coated with a chitosan film with thyme essential oil (0%, 0.5%, 1%, and 2% not in direct contact with the meat. Our aim was to reduce the impact of thyme essential oil (EO on meat sensory properties by using a chemotype with low odor intensity. The pH, color parameters, microbial populations, and sensory properties were assessed during 4 weeks of refrigerated storage. The presence of EO films reduced yeast populations, whereas aerobic mesophilic bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, and enterobacteria were not affected by the presence of the EO in the films. Meat color preservation (a * was enhanced in the presence of EO, giving a better appearance to the packaged meat. The presence of the chitosan-EO layer reduced water condensation inside the package, whereas packages containing only chitosan had evident water droplets. Thyme odor was perceived as desirable in cooked meat, and the typical product odor intensity decreased by increasing the EO concentration. Further studies should point towards developing oil blends or combinations with natural antimicrobial agents to be incorporated into the film to improve its antimicrobial properties.

  17. A novel membrane sensor controls the localization and ArfGEF activity of bacterial RalF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Folly-Klan

    Full Text Available The intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila (Lp evades destruction in macrophages by camouflaging in a specialized organelle, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV, where it replicates. The LCV maturates by incorporating ER vesicles, which are diverted by effectors that Lp injects to take control of host cell membrane transport processes. One of these effectors, RalF, recruits the trafficking small GTPase Arf1 to the LCV. LpRalF has a Sec7 domain related to host ArfGEFs, followed by a capping domain that intimately associates with the Sec7 domain to inhibit GEF activity. How RalF is activated to function as a LCV-specific ArfGEF is unknown. We combined the reconstitution of Arf activation on artificial membranes with cellular expression and Lp infection assays, to analyze how auto-inhibition is relieved for LpRalF to function in vivo. We find that membranes activate LpRalF by about 1000 fold, and identify the membrane-binding region as the region that inhibits the Sec7 active site. It is enriched in aromatic and positively charged residues, which establish a membrane sensor to control the GEF activity in accordance with specific lipid environments. A similar mechanism of activation is found in RalF from Rickettsia prowazekii (Rp, with a different aromatic/charged residues ratio that results in divergent membrane preferences. The membrane sensor is the primary determinant of the localization of LpRalF on the LCV, and drives the timing of Arf activation during infection. Finally, we identify a conserved motif in the capping domain, remote from the membrane sensor, which is critical for RalF activity presumably by organizing its active conformation. These data demonstrate that RalF proteins are regulated by a membrane sensor that functions as a binary switch to derepress ArfGEF activity when RalF encounters a favorable lipid environment, thus establishing a regulatory paradigm to ensure that Arf GTPases are efficiently activated at

  18. High Classification Rates for Continuous Cow Activity Recognition using Low-cost GPS Positioning Sensors and Standard Machine Learning Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godsk, Torben; Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun

    2011-01-01

    changes, affects the behavior of the individual animal, e.g., changes in time spend on activities like standing, lying, eating or walking. Low-cost and infrastructure-less GPS positioning sensors attached to the animals’ collars give the opportunity to monitor the movements of cows and recognize cow...... and their activities manually logged to serve as ground truth. For our dataset we managed to obtain an average classification success rate of 86.2% of the four activities: eating/seeking (90.0%), walking (100%), lying (76.5%), and standing (75.8%) by optimizing both the preprocessing of the raw GPS data...

  19. A Comparison of Two Motion Sensors for the Assessment of Free-Living Physical Activity of Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Cuberek

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed and compared the daily step counts recorded by two different motion sensors in order to estimate the free-living physical activity of 135 adolescent girls. Each girl concurrently wore a Yamax pedometer and an ActiGraph accelerometer (criterion measure every day for seven consecutive days. The convergent validity of the pedometer can be considered intermediate when used to measure the step counts in free-living physical activity; but should be considered with caution when used to classify participants’ step counts into corresponding physical activity categories because of a likelihood of ‘erroneous’ classification in comparison with the accelerometer.

  20. X-RAY ACTIVE MATRIX PIXEL SENSORS BASEDON J-FET TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPED FOR THE LINAC COHERENT LIGHT SOURCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CARINI,G.A.; CHEN, W.; LI, Z.; REHAK, P.; SIDDONS, D.P.

    2007-10-29

    An X-ray Active Matrix Pixel Sensor (XAMPS) is being developed for recording data for the X-ray Pump Probe experiment at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Special attention has to be paid to some technological challenges that this design presents. New processes were developed and refined to address problems encountered during previous productions of XAMPS. The development of these critical steps and corresponding tests results are reported here.

  1. Vapour-induced solid-state C-H bond activation for the clean synthesis of an organopalladium biothiol sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monas, Andrea; Užarević, Krunoslav; Halasz, Ivan; Kulcsár, Marina Juribašić; Ćurić, Manda

    2016-10-27

    Room-temperature accelerated aging in the solid state has been applied for atom- and energy-efficient activation of either one or two C-H bonds of azobenzene and methyl orange by palladium(ii) acetate. Organopalladium complexes are prepared in quantitative reactions without potentially harmful side products. Dicyclopalladated methyl orange is water-soluble and is a selective chromogenic biothiol sensor at physiologically-relevant micromolar concentrations in buffered aqueous media.

  2. Research and Development of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for the Detection of the Elementary Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.

    2007-09-01

    In order to develop high spatial resolution and readout speed vertex detectors for the future International Linear Collider (ILC), fast CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) are studied on this work. Two prototypes of MAPS, MIMOSA 8 and MIMOSA 16, based on the same micro-electronic architecture were developed in CMOS processes with different thickness of epitaxial layer. The size of pixel matrix is 32 x 128: 8 columns of the pixel array are readout directly with analog outputs and the other 24 columns are connected to the column level auto-zero discriminators. The Correlated Double Sampling (CDS) structures are successfully implemented inside pixel and discriminator. The photo diode type pixels with different diode sizes are used in these prototypes. With a 55 Fe X-ray radioactive source, the important parameters, such as Temporal Noise, Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN), Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), Charge-to-Voltage conversion Factor (CVF) and Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE), are studied as function of readout speed and diode size. For MIMOSA 8, the effect of fast neutrons irradiation is also. Two beam tests campaigns were made: at DESY with a 5 GeV electrons beam and at CERN with a 180 GeV pions beam. Detection Efficiency and Spatial Resolution are studied in function of the discriminator threshold. For these two parameters, the influences of diode size and SNR of the central pixel of a cluster are also discussed. In order to improve the spatial resolution of the digital outputs, a very compact (25 μm x 1 mm) and low consumption (300 μW) column level ADC is designed in AMS 0.35 μm OPTO process. Based on successive approximation architecture, the auto-offset cancellation structure is integrated. A new column level auto-zero discriminator using static latch is also designed. (author)

  3. HDOMO: Smart Sensor Integration for an Active and Independent Longevity of the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontoni, Emanuele; Pollini, Rama; Russo, Paola; Zingaretti, Primo; Cerri, Graziano

    2017-11-13

    The aim of this paper is to present the main results of HDOMO, an Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) project that involved 16 Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) and 2 research institutes. The objective of the project was to create an autonomous and automated domestic environment, primarily for elderly people and people with physical and motor disabilities. A known and familiar environment should help users in their daily activities and it should act as a virtual caregiver by calling, if necessary, relief efforts. Substantially, the aim of the project is to simplify the life of people in need of support, while keeping them autonomous in their private environment. From a technical point of view, the project provides the use of different Smart Objects (SOs), able to communicate among each other, in a cloud base infrastructure, and with the assisted users and their caregivers, in a perspective of interoperability and standardization of devices, usability and effectiveness of alarm systems. In the state of the art there are projects that achieve only a few of the elements listed. The HDOMO project aims to achieve all of them in one single project effectively. The experimental trials performed in a real scenario demonstrated the accuracy and efficiency of the system in extracting and processing data in real time to promptly acting, and in providing timely response to the needs of the user by integrating and confirming main alarms with different interoperable smart sensors. The article proposes a new technique to improve the accuracy of the system in detecting alarms using a multi-SO approach with information fusion between different devices, proving that this architecture can provide robust and reliable results on real environments.

  4. The effects of rotator cuff tears, including shoulders without pain, on activities of daily living in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Osawa, Toshihisa; Shitara, Hitoshi; Ichinose, Tsuyoshi; Takasawa, Eiji; Takagishi, Kenji

    2012-03-01

    Few reports have so far evaluated the possible restrictions of activities of daily living (ADL) in patients with asymptomatic rotator cuff tears (RCTs). The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of RCTs, including shoulders without pain, on ADL in the general population. We performed medical checkups on 462 individuals (924 shoulders). All participants completed a questionnaire regarding their background and medical history. We then assessed their shoulder functions with the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) and performed US (US) examinations of both shoulders to diagnose RCTs. We divided participants into tear and nontear groups and performed statistical analysis to compare total SST scores and each SST item between groups. Furthermore, we performed the same examinations for participants identified as having shoulders without pain. Among participants, those in the tear group showed significantly lower total SST scores than those in the nontear group. After examining each SST item, a significant difference was observed regarding the ability to sleep comfortably and to lift 3.6 kg to shoulder level. In shoulders without pain, the tear group showed significantly lower total SST scores than the nontear group. A significant difference was observed only regarding the ability to lift 3.6 kg to shoulder level. In the general population, ADL were restricted in participants with RCTs; they experienced night pain in the shoulder and muscle weakness during shoulder elevation. Furthermore, participants with RCTs, even if the condition itself did not induce any pain, tended to experience muscle weakness during shoulder elevation, thus resulting in restrictions of ADL.

  5. Poor oral health including active caries in 187 UK professional male football players: clinical dental examination performed by dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needleman, Ian; Ashley, Paul; Meehan, Lyndon; Petrie, Aviva; Weiler, Richard; McNally, Steve; Ayer, Chris; Hanna, Rob; Hunt, Ian; Kell, Steven; Ridgewell, Paul; Taylor, Russell

    2016-01-01

    The few studies that have assessed oral health in professional/elite football suggest poor oral health with minimal data on impact on performance. The aim of this research was to determine oral health in a representative sample of professional footballers in the UK and investigate possible determinants of oral health and self-reported impact on well-being, training and performance. Clinical oral health examination of senior squad players using standard methods and outcomes carried out at club training facilities. Questionnaire data were also collected. 8 teams were included, 5 Premier League, 2 Championship and 1 League One. 6 dentists examined 187 players who represented >90% of each senior squad. Oral health was poor: 37% players had active dental caries, 53% dental erosion and 5% moderate-severe irreversible periodontal disease. 45% were bothered by their oral health, 20% reported an impact on their quality of life and 7% on training or performance. Despite attendance for dental check-ups, oral health deteriorated with age. This is the first large, representative sample study in professional football. Oral health of professional footballers is poor, and this impacts on well-being and performance. Successful strategies to promote oral health within professional football are urgently needed, and research should investigate models based on best evidence for behaviour change and implementation science. Furthermore, this study provides strong evidence to support oral health screening within professional football. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Using Motion-Sensor Games to Encourage Physical Activity for Adults with Intellectual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Michael J; Taylor, David; Gamboa, Patricia; Vlaev, Ivo; Darzi, Ara

    2016-01-01

    Adults with Intellectual Disability (ID) are at high risk of being in poor health as a result of exercising infrequently; recent evidence indicates this is often due to there being a lack of opportunities to exercise. This pilot study involved an investigation of the use of motion-sensor game technology to enable and encourage exercise for this population. Five adults (two female; 3 male, aged 34-74 [M = 55.20, SD = 16.71] with ID used motion-sensor games to conduct exercise at weekly sessions at a day-centre. Session attendees reported to have enjoyed using the games, and that they would like to use the games in future. Interviews were conducted with six (four female; two male, aged 27-51 [M = 40.20, SD = 11.28]) day-centre staff, which indicated ways in which the motion-sensor games could be improved for use by adults with ID, and barriers to consider in relation to their possible future implementation. Findings indicate motion-sensor games provide a useful, enjoyable and accessible way for adults with ID to exercise. Future research could investigate implementation of motion-sensor games as a method for exercise promotion for this population on a larger scale.

  7. Sensors an introductory course

    CERN Document Server

    Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2013-01-01

    Sensors: An Introductory Course provides an essential reference on the fundamentals of sensors. The book is designed to help readers in developing skills and the understanding required in order to implement a wide range of sensors that are commonly used in our daily lives. This book covers the basic concepts in the sensors field, including definitions and terminologies. The physical sensing effects are described, and devices which utilize these effects are presented. The most frequently used organic and inorganic sensors are introduced and the techniques for implementing them are discussed. This book: Provides a comprehensive representation of the most common sensors and can be used as a reference in relevant fields Presents learning materials in a concise and easy to understand manner Includes examples of how sensors are incorporated in real life measurements Contains detailed figures and schematics to assist in understanding the sensor performance Sensors: An Introductory Course is ideal for university stu...

  8. A CMOS active pixel sensor system for laboratory- based x-ray diffraction studies of biological tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohndiek, Sarah E; Cook, Emily J; Arvanitis, Costas D; Olivo, Alessandro; Royle, Gary J; Clark, Andy T; Prydderch, Mark L; Turchetta, Renato; Speller, Robert D

    2008-01-01

    X-ray diffraction studies give material-specific information about biological tissue. Ideally, a large area, low noise, wide dynamic range digital x-ray detector is required for laboratory-based x-ray diffraction studies. The goal of this work is to introduce a novel imaging technology, the CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) that has the potential to fulfil all these requirements, and demonstrate its feasibility for coherent scatter imaging. A prototype CMOS APS has been included in an x-ray diffraction demonstration system. An industrial x-ray source with appropriate beam filtration is used to perform angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD). Optimization of the experimental set-up is detailed including collimator options and detector operating parameters. Scatter signatures are measured for 11 different materials, covering three medical applications: breast cancer diagnosis, kidney stone identification and bone mineral density calculations. Scatter signatures are also recorded for three mixed samples of known composition. Results are verified using two independent models for predicting the APS scatter signature: (1) a linear systems model of the APS and (2) a linear superposition integral combining known monochromatic scatter signatures with the input polychromatic spectrum used in this case. Cross validation of experimental, modelled and literature results proves that APS are able to record biologically relevant scatter signatures. Coherent scatter signatures are sensitive to multiple materials present in a sample and provide a means to quantify composition. In the future, production of a bespoke APS imager for x-ray diffraction studies could enable simultaneous collection of the transmitted beam and scattered radiation in a laboratory-based coherent scatter system, making clinical transfer of the technique attainable

  9. MEMS Sensor Technologies for Human Centred Applications in Healthcare, Physical Activities, Safety and Environmental Sensing: A Review on Research Activities in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuti, Gastone; Ricotti, Leonardo; Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades the increased level of public awareness concerning healthcare, physical activities, safety and environmental sensing has created an emerging need for smart sensor technologies and monitoring devices able to sense, classify, and provide feedbacks to users’ health status and physical activities, as well as to evaluate environmental and safety conditions in a pervasive, accurate and reliable fashion. Monitoring and precisely quantifying users’ physical activity with inertial measurement unit-based devices, for instance, has also proven to be important in health management of patients affected by chronic diseases, e.g., Parkinson’s disease, many of which are becoming highly prevalent in Italy and in the Western world. This review paper will focus on MEMS sensor technologies developed in Italy in the last three years describing research achievements for healthcare and physical activity, safety and environmental sensing, in addition to smart systems integration. Innovative and smart integrated solutions for sensing devices, pursued and implemented in Italian research centres, will be highlighted, together with specific applications of such technologies. Finally, the paper will depict the future perspective of sensor technologies and corresponding exploitation opportunities, again with a specific focus on Italy. PMID:25808763

  10. HEPS Inventory Tool: An Inventory Tool Including Quality Assessment of School Interventions on Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadaczynski, Kevin; Paulus, Peter; de Vries, Nanne; de Ruiter, Silvia; Buijs, Goof

    2010-01-01

    The HEPS Inventory Tool aims to support stakeholders working in school health promotion to promote high quality interventions on healthy eating and physical activity. As a tool it provides a step-by-step approach on how to develop a national or regional inventory of existing school based interventions on healthy eating and physical activity. It…

  11. 25 CFR 170.137 - What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and trails program include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... Eligibility Recreation, Tourism and Trails § 170.137 What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... may perform under a recreation, tourism, and trails program: (1) Transportation planning for tourism...

  12. Comparison of Self-Report Versus Sensor-Based Methods for Measuring the Amount of Upper Limb Activity Outside the Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Kimberly J; Lang, Catherine E

    2018-03-10

    To compare self-reported with sensor-measured upper limb (UL) performance in daily life for individuals with chronic (≥6mo) UL paresis poststroke. Secondary analysis of participants enrolled in a phase II randomized, parallel, dose-response UL movement trial. This analysis compared the accuracy and consistency between self-reported UL performance and sensor-measured UL performance at baseline and immediately post an 8-week intensive UL task-specific intervention. Outpatient rehabilitation. Community-dwelling individuals with chronic (≥6mo) UL paresis poststroke (N=64). Not applicable. Motor Activity Log amount of use scale and the sensor-derived use ratio from wrist-worn accelerometers. There was a high degree of variability between self-reported UL performance and the sensor-derived use ratio. Using sensor-based values as a reference, 3 distinct categories were identified: accurate reporters (reporting difference ±0.1), overreporters (difference >0.1), and underreporters (difference sensor-based assessment. Participants did not consistently or accurately self-report UL performance when compared with the sensor-derived use ratio. Although self-report and sensor-based assessments are moderately associated and appear similar conceptually, these results suggest self-reported UL performance is often not consistent with sensor-measured performance and the measures cannot be used interchangeably. Copyright © 2018 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Stochastic Method to Manage Delay and Missing Values for In-Situ Sensors in an Alternating Activated Sludge Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stentoft, Peter Alexander; Munk-Nielsen, Thomas; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen

    2017-01-01

    In the alternating activated sludge process with rule-based control, online N-measurements are of great importance for maintaining good control. These measurements can be delayed due to sensor processing time, turbulence at the location in the aeration tank where the sensor is placed, etc....... The measurements may also be temporarily unavailable because of recalibration, communication faults or other errors. Here we present a method that handles such delay and missing observations. The model is based on zero order hold stochastic differential equations which use binary signals for influent flow...... and aeration to determine the state of the alternating process. It also uses measured ammonium and nitrate concentrations, which are shifted to account for delay. The method is developed and tested with data from a WWTP located in Kolding, Denmark. Results indicate that even though the model is simple...

  14. Development of a Large-Format Science-Grade CMOS Active Pixel Sensor, for Extreme Ultra Violet Spectroscopy and Imaging in Space Science

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Waltham, N. R; Prydderch, M; Mapson-Menard, H; Morrissey, Q; Turchetta, R; Pool, P; Harris, A

    2005-01-01

    We describe our programme to develop a large-format science-grade CMOS active pixel sensor for future space science missions, and in particular an extreme ultra-violet spectrograph for solar physics...

  15. Real-time investigation of human topoisomerase I reaction kinetics using an optical sensor: a fast method for drug screening and determination of active enzyme concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Emil L.; Jørgensen, Line A.; Franch, Oskar; Etzerodt, Michael; Frøhlich, Rikke; Bjergbæk, Lotte; Stougaard, Magnus; Ho, Yi-Ping; Knudsen, Birgitta R.

    2015-05-01

    Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using camptothecin derivatives. These drugs convert the hTopI activity into a cellular poison, and hence the cytotoxic effects of camptothecin derivatives correlate with the hTopI activity. Therefore, fast and reliable techniques for high throughput measurements of hTopI activity are of high clinical interest. Here we demonstrate potential applications of a fluorophore-quencher based DNA sensor designed for measurement of hTopI cleavage-ligation activities, which are the catalytic steps affected by camptothecin. The kinetic analysis of the hTopI reaction with the DNA sensor exhibits a characteristic burst profile. This is the result of a two-step ping-pong reaction mechanism, where a fast first reaction, the one creating the signal, is followed by a slower second reaction necessary for completion of the catalytic cycle. Hence, the burst profile holds information about two reactions in the enzymatic mechanism. Moreover, it allows the amount of active enzyme in the reaction to be determined. The presented results pave the way for future high throughput drug screening and the potential of measuring active hTopI concentrations in clinical samples for individualized treatment.Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using

  16. Applications of a nanocomposite-inspired in-situ broadband ultrasonic sensor to acousto-ultrasonics-based passive and active structural health monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Menglong; Zeng, Zhihui; Xu, Hao; Liao, Yaozhong; Zhou, Limin; Zhang, Zhong; Su, Zhongqing

    2017-07-01

    A novel nanocomposite-inspired in-situ broadband ultrasonic sensor previously developed, with carbon black as the nanofiller and polyvinylidene fluoride as the matrix, was networked for acousto-ultrasonic wave-based passive and active structural health monitoring (SHM). Being lightweight and small, this kind of sensor was proven to be capable of perceiving strain perturbation in virtue of the tunneling effect in the formed nanofiller conductive network when acousto-ultrasonic waves traverse the sensor. Proof-of-concept validation was implemented, to examine the sensor performance in responding to acousto-ultrasonic waves in a broad frequency regime: from acoustic emission (AE) of lower frequencies to guided ultrasonic waves (GUWs) of higher frequencies. Results have demonstrated the high fidelity, ultrafast response and high sensitivity of the sensor to acousto-ultrasonic waves up to 400kHz yet with an ultra-low magnitude (of the order of micro-strain). The sensor is proven to possess sensitivity and accuracy comparable with commercial piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers, whereas with greater flexibility in accommodating curved structural surfaces. Application paradigms of using the sensor for damage evaluation have spotlighted the capability of the sensor in compromising "sensing cost" with "sensing effectiveness" for passive AE- or active GUW-based SHM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Vibration Isolation by an Actively Compliantly Mounted Sensor Applied to a Coriolis Mass-Flow Meter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Ridder, Bert; Hakvoort, Wouter; van Dijk, Johannes; Lötters, Joost Conrad; de Boer, Andries

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a vibration isolated design of a Coriolis mass-flow meter (CMFM) is proposed by introducing a compliant connection between the casing and the tube displacement sensors, with the objective to obtain a relative displacement measurement of the fluid conveying tube, dependent on the tube

  18. Personalized feedback based on automatic activity recognition from mixed-source raw sensor data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    op den Akker, Harm; Jones, Valerie M.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2009-01-01

    We present a data set consisting of multiple wireless sensors that monitor movement and various types of bio signals, recorded from patients that suffer from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). From this data, the goal is to derive appropriate feedback to the patient that will motivate

  19. Single-current-sensor-based active front-end-converter-fed four ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joseph Kiran Banda

    fast acting digital signal processors, which has created a revolution in the area of electrical drives. Even though ... using a dsPIC30F6010A digital signal controller. Reducing a current sensor on the FEC helps in .... angle of transformation obtained, a reference voltage at desired phase is generated using a voltage source ...

  20. Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on the International Space Station (ISS): Launch, Installation, Activation, and First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Christian, H. J., Jr.; Mach, D. M.; Buechler, D. E.; Wharton, N. A.; Stewart, M. F.; Ellett, W. T.; Koshak, W. J.; Walker, T. D.

    2017-12-01

    Over two decades, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and their partners developed and demonstrated the effectiveness and value of space-based lightning observations as a remote sensing tool for Earth science research and applications, and, in the process, established a robust global lightning climatology. The Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) provided global observations of tropical lightning for an impressive 17 years before that mission came to a close in April 2015. Now a space-qualified LIS, built as the flight spare for TRMM, has been installed on the International Space Station (ISS) for a minimum two year mission following its SpaceX launch on February 19, 2017. The LIS, flown as a hosted payload on the Department of Defense Space Test Program-Houston 5 (STP-H5) mission, was robotically installed in an Earth-viewing position on the outside of the ISS, providing a great opportunity to not only extend the 17-year TRMM LIS record of tropical lightning measurements but also to expand that coverage to higher latitudes missed by the TRMM mission. Since its activation, LIS has continuously observed the amount, rate, and radiant energy lightning within its field-of-view as it orbits the Earth. A major focus of this mission is to better understand the processes which cause lightning, as well as the connections between lightning and subsequent severe weather events. This understanding is a key to improving weather predictions and saving lives and property here in the United States and around the world. The LIS measurements will also help cross-validate observations from the new Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) operating on NOAA's newest weather satellite GOES-16. An especially unique contribution from the ISS platform will be the availability of real-time lightning data, especially valuable for operational forecasting and warning applications over data sparse regions such

  1. An Internet-based program for depression using activity and physiological sensors: efficacy, expectations, satisfaction, and ease of use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botella C

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cristina Botella,1,2 Adriana Mira,1 Inés Moragrega,2,3 Azucena García-Palacios,1,2 Juana Bretón-López,1,2 Diana Castilla,1,2 Antonio Riera López del Amo,1 Carla Soler,1 Guadalupe Molinari,1 Soledad Quero,1,2 Verónica Guillén-Botella,2,3 Ignacio Miralles,1,2 Sara Nebot,1 Berenice Serrano,1,2 Dennis Majoe,4 Mariano Alcañiz,2,5 Rosa María Baños2,31Department of Basic, Clinical Psychology and Psychobiology, Universitat Jaume, Castellón, Spain; 2CIBER Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition, CIBERobn, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; 3Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatment, Universidad de Valencia, Valencia, Spain; 4Native Systems Institute, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 5Human-Centered Technology Institute, Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, Valencia, Spain Purpose: Computerized cognitive behavioral therapy (CCBT has been shown to be efficacious. Moreover, CCBT can be enhanced by using physiological and activity sensors, but there is no evidence about the acceptability of all these tools. The objective of this study is to examine the efficacy, expectations, satisfaction, and ease of use of an Internet-based CCBT program for preventing depression, with and without sensors (electroencephalography, electrocardiograhpy ECG, and actigraphy, in a high-risk population (unemployed men.Patients and methods: Sixty participants at risk of depression (unemployed men were randomly assigned to three experimental conditions: 1 intervention program (N=22, 2 intervention program plus sensors (N=19, and 3 control group (N=19. Participants completed depression, anxiety, positive and negative affect, and perceived stress measures. Furthermore, they also completed the measures for expectation, satisfaction, and the ease of use of the program.Results: Results showed that the two intervention groups improved significantly more than the control group on the clinical variables, and the improvements

  2. A Fuzzy Logic Prompting Mechanism Based on Pattern Recognition and Accumulated Activity Effective Index Using a Smartphone Embedded Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Tse Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Sufficient physical activity can reduce many adverse conditions and contribute to a healthy life. Nevertheless, inactivity is prevalent on an international scale. Improving physical activity is an essential concern for public health. Reminders that help people change their health behaviors are widely applied in health care services. However, timed-based reminders deliver periodic prompts suffer from flexibility and dependency issues which may decrease prompt effectiveness. We propose a fuzzy logic prompting mechanism, Accumulated Activity Effective Index Reminder (AAEIReminder, based on pattern recognition and activity effective analysis to manage physical activity. AAEIReminder recognizes activity levels using a smartphone-embedded sensor for pattern recognition and analyzing the amount of physical activity in activity effective analysis. AAEIReminder can infer activity situations such as the amount of physical activity and days spent exercising through fuzzy logic, and decides whether a prompt should be delivered to a user. This prompting system was implemented in smartphones and was used in a short-term real-world trial by seventeenth participants for validation. The results demonstrated that the AAEIReminder is feasible. The fuzzy logic prompting mechanism can deliver prompts automatically based on pattern recognition and activity effective analysis. AAEIReminder provides flexibility which may increase the prompts’ efficiency.

  3. A Fuzzy Logic Prompting Mechanism Based on Pattern Recognition and Accumulated Activity Effective Index Using a Smartphone Embedded Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chung-Tse; Chan, Chia-Tai

    2016-08-19

    Sufficient physical activity can reduce many adverse conditions and contribute to a healthy life. Nevertheless, inactivity is prevalent on an international scale. Improving physical activity is an essential concern for public health. Reminders that help people change their health behaviors are widely applied in health care services. However, timed-based reminders deliver periodic prompts suffer from flexibility and dependency issues which may decrease prompt effectiveness. We propose a fuzzy logic prompting mechanism, Accumulated Activity Effective Index Reminder (AAEIReminder), based on pattern recognition and activity effective analysis to manage physical activity. AAEIReminder recognizes activity levels using a smartphone-embedded sensor for pattern recognition and analyzing the amount of physical activity in activity effective analysis. AAEIReminder can infer activity situations such as the amount of physical activity and days spent exercising through fuzzy logic, and decides whether a prompt should be delivered to a user. This prompting system was implemented in smartphones and was used in a short-term real-world trial by seventeenth participants for validation. The results demonstrated that the AAEIReminder is feasible. The fuzzy logic prompting mechanism can deliver prompts automatically based on pattern recognition and activity effective analysis. AAEIReminder provides flexibility which may increase the prompts' efficiency.

  4. Antimicrobial (including antimollicutes, antioxidant and anticholinesterase activities of Brazilian and Spanish marine organisms – evaluation of extracts and pure compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éverson Miguel Bianco

    Full Text Available Abstract This work describes the antimicrobial, antioxidant and anticholinesterase activities in vitro of organic extracts from fourteen seaweeds, eleven sponges, two ascidians, one bryozoan, and one sea anemone species collected along the Brazilian and Spanish coast, as well as the isolation of the diterpene (4R, 9S, 14S-4α-acetoxy-9β,14α-dihydroxydolast-1(15,7-diene (1 and halogenated sesquiterpene elatol (2. The most promising antimicrobial results for cell wall bacteria were obtained by extracts from seaweeds Laurencia dendroidea and Sargassum vulgare var. nanun (MIC 250 μg/ml, and by the bryozoan Bugula neritina (MIC 62.5 μg/ml, both against Staphylococcus aureus. As for antimollicutes, extracts from seaweeds showed results better than the extracts from invertebrates. Almost all seaweeds assayed (92% exhibited some antimicrobial activity against mollicutes strains (Mycoplasma hominis,Mycoplasma genitalium,Mycoplasma capricolum and Mycoplasma pneumoniae strain FH. From these seaweeds, A1 (Canistrocarpus cervicornis, A11 (Gracilaria sp. and A4 (Lobophora variegata showed the best results for M. pneumoniae strain FH (MIC 250 μg/ml. Furthermore, compounds 1 and 2 were also assayed against mollicutes strains M. hominis,M. genitalium,M. capricolum,M. pneumoniae strain 129 and M. pneumoniae strain FH, which showed MIC > 100 μg/ml. Antioxidant activities of extracts from these marine organisms were inactive, except for E7 (from sponge Ircinia sp., which exhibited moderated antioxidant activities for two methods assayed (IC50 83.0 ± 0.1 μg/ml, and 52.0 ± 0.8 mg AA/g, respectively. Finally, for the anticholinesterase activity, all the 29 samples evaluated (100% exhibited some level of activity, with IC50 < 1000 μg/ml. From these, seaweeds extracts were considered more promising than marine invertebrate extracts [A10 (IC50 14.4 ± 0.1 μg/ml, A16 (IC50 16.4 ± 0.4 μg/ml and A8 (IC50 14.9 ± 0.5 μg/ml]. The findings of this work are useful

  5. Research on Chemical Composition and Biological Properties Including Antiquorum Sensing Activity of Angelica pancicii Vandas Aerial Parts and Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileski, Ksenija S; Trifunović, Snežana S; Ćirić, Ana D; Šakić, Željana M; Ristić, Mihailo S; Todorović, Nina M; Matevski, Vlado S; Marin, Petar D; Tešević, Vele V; Džamić, Ana M

    2017-12-20

    The essential oil, different extracts, and isolated compounds of Angelica pancicii Vandas (Apiaceae) were investigated for the first time. The GC-FID and GC-MS analyses revealed sesquiterpenoids as the main constituents of A. pancicii essential oil of aerial parts with bornyl acetate (8.08%), n-octanol (5.82%), kessane (4.26%), and β-selinene (4.26%) as the main constituents. Analysis of methanol extracts, using an HPLC-DAD/ESI-ToF-MS system, showed a total of 52 compounds in the aerial parts and 53 in the roots, indicating coumarins as the main constituents. In addition, new chromone (1) and six known furanocoumarins (2-7) were isolated from the roots and structurally elucidated by combined spectroscopic methods. The aerial part extracts exhibited higher polyphenolic contents and antioxidant activity evaluated by three radical scavenging assays. Using a microwell dilution method, the strongest antibacterial activity profiles were determined for ethanol and methanol root extracts (minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) = 0.25-3.00 mg/mL), which were comparable to the activity of streptomycin (MBCs = 0.34-1.24 mg/mL), while the strongest antibacterial compound of A. pancicii was oxypeucedanin hydrate (MBCs = 0.50-8.00 mg/mL). Antifungal potential was in moderate extent, and the highest activity was obtained for root methanol extract (minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFCs) = 4.00-14.00 mg/mL). Tested sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (subMICs) of the extracts and isolated compounds inhibited selected Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 virulence determinants. The most reduced growth of P. aeruginosa colony was in the presence of isolated oxypeucedanin. Ethanol (17.36-46.98%) and methanol (34.54-52.43%) root extracts showed higher anti-biofilm activity compared to streptomycin (49.40-88.36%) and ampicillin (56.46-92.16%).

  6. Pre-Processing Effect on the Accuracy of Event-Based Activity Segmentation and Classification through Inertial Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benish Fida

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Inertial sensors are increasingly being used to recognize and classify physical activities in a variety of applications. For monitoring and fitness applications, it is crucial to develop methods able to segment each activity cycle, e.g., a gait cycle, so that the successive classification step may be more accurate. To increase detection accuracy, pre-processing is often used, with a concurrent increase in computational cost. In this paper, the effect of pre-processing operations on the detection and classification of locomotion activities was investigated, to check whether the presence of pre-processing significantly contributes to an increase in accuracy. The pre-processing stages evaluated in this study were inclination correction and de-noising. Level walking, step ascending, descending and running were monitored by using a shank-mounted inertial sensor. Raw and filtered segments, obtained from a modified version of a rule-based gait detection algorithm optimized for sequential processing, were processed to extract time and frequency-based features for physical activity classification through a support vector machine classifier. The proposed method accurately detected >99% gait cycles from raw data and produced >98% accuracy on these segmented gait cycles. Pre-processing did not substantially increase classification accuracy, thus highlighting the possibility of reducing the amount of pre-processing for real-time applications.

  7. Weight management including dietary and physical activity advice provided by Australian physiotherapists: a pilot cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Carter, Amy E; Guest, Maya; Collins, Clare E; James, Carole; Kable, Ashley K; Ashby, Samantha E; Plotnikoff, Ronald C

    2014-08-01

    Physiotherapists may have an impact on obesity prevention and treatment by providing nutrition and physical activity advice to overweight or obese clients; yet little is known about physiotherapists' beliefs and practices related to client weight management. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the practices, beliefs, attitudes and knowledge of physiotherapists regarding the provision of weight management advice to overweight or obese clients. Physiotherapists (n = 65) working in multiple practice settings completed a self-administered questionnaire. Logistic regression determined factors associated with the provision of dietary and physical activity advice for weight management. The majority of physiotherapists (n = 53 [81.5%]) believed providing weight management advice was within their scope of practice, yet only a minority had received training during their professional entry level education (n = 13 [20%]) or through professional development (n = 7 [11%]). Most physiotherapists (n = 55 [84.6%]) provided physical activity advice for weight management, but a minority (n = 27 [41.5%]) provided dietary advice. Having received training in weight management during their professional entry level education was associated with providing dietary advice (Odds ratio 8.8, 95% confidence interval 2.0-38.9, p = 0.004). Training in weight management may increase the likelihood of physiotherapists providing dietary advice, improving physiotherapists' management of obesity.

  8. Using motion-sensor camera technology to infer seasonal activity and thermal niche of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Mickey; Augustine, Benjamin; Lovich, Jeffrey E; Delaney, David; Sinervo, Barry; Murphy, Mason O; Ennen, Joshua R; Briggs, Jessica R; Cooper, Robert; Price, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relationships between environmental variables and wildlife activity is an important part of effective management. The desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii), an imperiled species of arid environments in the southwest US, may have increasingly restricted windows for activity due to current warming trends. In summer 2013, we deployed 48 motion sensor cameras at the entrances of tortoise burrows to investigate the effects of temperature, sex, and day of the year on the activity of desert tortoises. Using generalized estimating equations, we found that the relative probability of activity was associated with temperature (linear and quadratic), sex, and day of the year. Sex effects showed that male tortoises are generally more active than female tortoises. Temperature had a quadratic effect, indicating that tortoise activity was heightened at a range of temperatures. In addition, we found significant support for interactions between sex and day of the year, and sex and temperature as predictors of the probability of activity. Using our models, we were able to estimate air temperatures and times (days and hours) that were associated with maximum activity during the study. Because tortoise activity is constrained by environmental conditions such as temperature, it is increasingly vital to conduct studies on how tortoises vary their activity throughout the Sonoran Desert to better understand the effects of a changing climate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Using motion-sensor camera technology to infer seasonal activity and thermal niche of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Mickey; Augustine, Benjamin; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Delaney, David F.; Sinervo, Barry; Murphy, Mason O.; Ennen, Joshua R.; Briggs, Jessica R.; Cooper, Robert J.; Price, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relationships between environmental variables and wildlife activity is an important part of effective management. The desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii), an imperiled species of arid environments in the southwest US, may have increasingly restricted windows for activity due to current warming trends. In summer 2013, we deployed 48 motion sensor cameras at the entrances of tortoise burrows to investigate the effects of temperature, sex, and day of the year on the activity of desert tortoises. Using generalized estimating equations, we found that the relative probability of activity was associated with temperature (linear and quadratic), sex, and day of the year. Sex effects showed that male tortoises are generally more active than female tortoises. Temperature had a quadratic effect, indicating that tortoise activity was heightened at a range of temperatures. In addition, we found significant support for interactions between sex and day of the year, and sex and temperature as predictors of the probability of activity. Using our models, we were able to estimate air temperatures and times (days and hours) that were associated with maximum activity during the study. Because tortoise activity is constrained by environmental conditions such as temperature, it is increasingly vital to conduct studies on how tortoises vary their activity throughout the Sonoran Desert to better understand the effects of a changing climate.

  10. Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on the International Space Station (ISS): Launch, Installation, Activation and First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Christian, H. J.; Mach, D. M.; Buechler, D. E.; Wharton, N. A.; Stewart, M. F.; Ellett, W. T.; Koshak, W. J.; Walker, T. D.; Virts, K.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Mission: Fly a flight-spare LIS (Lightning Imaging Sensor) on ISS to take advantage of unique capabilities provided by the ISS (e.g., high inclination, real time data); Integrate LIS as a hosted payload on the DoD Space Test Program-Houston 5 (STP-H5) mission and launch on a Space X rocket for a minimum 2 year mission. Measurement: NASA and its partners developed and demonstrated effectiveness and value of using space-based lightning observations as a remote sensing tool; LIS measures lightning (amount, rate, radiant energy) with storm scale resolution, millisecond timing, and high detection efficiency, with no land-ocean bias. Benefit: LIS on ISS will extend TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) time series observations, expand latitudinal coverage, provide real time data to operational users, and enable cross-sensor calibration.

  11. Sensors and actuators, Twente

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergveld, Piet

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the organization and the research programme of the Sensor and Actuator (S&A) Research Unit of the University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands. It includes short descriptions of all present projects concerning: micromachined mechanical sensors and actuators, optical sensors,

  12. High temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1982-01-01

    A high temperature sensor includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1,000 to 2,000 K.). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  13. Automotive vehicle sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.; Moscynski, M.J.

    1995-09-01

    This report is an introduction to the field of automotive vehicle sensors. It contains a prototype data base for companies working in automotive vehicle sensors, as well as a prototype data base for automotive vehicle sensors. A market analysis is also included.

  14. Active Fault-Tolerant Control for Wind Turbine with Simultaneous Actuator and Sensor Faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to show a novel fault-tolerant tracking control (FTC strategy with robust fault estimation and compensating for simultaneous actuator sensor faults. Based on the framework of fault-tolerant control, developing an FTC design method for wind turbines is a challenge and, thus, they can tolerate simultaneous pitch actuator and pitch sensor faults having bounded first time derivatives. The paper’s key contribution is proposing a descriptor sliding mode method, in which for establishing a novel augmented descriptor system, with which we can estimate the state of system and reconstruct fault by designing descriptor sliding mode observer, the paper introduces an auxiliary descriptor state vector composed by a system state vector, actuator fault vector, and sensor fault vector. By the optimized method of LMI, the conditions for stability that estimated error dynamics are set up to promote the determination of the parameters designed. With this estimation, and designing a fault-tolerant controller, the system’s stability can be maintained. The effectiveness of the design strategy is verified by implementing the controller in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s 5-MW nonlinear, high-fidelity wind turbine model (FAST and simulating it in MATLAB/Simulink.

  15. Nonlinear-Based MEMS Sensors and Active Switches for Gas and Acceleration Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-11-25

    In this talk, we demonstrate the realization of smart sensors and actuators through the exploitation of principles of nonlinear dynamics at the micro scale. Specifically, we demonstrate combining sensing and actuation into a single device through what is called smart switches triggered by the detection of a desirable physical quantity. The concept aims to reduce the complexity of systems that rely on controllers and complex algorithms to realize on-demand trigger actions. In the first part of the talk, we discuss the category of switches triggered by the detection of gas. Toward this, electrostatically microbeams resonators are fabricated, then coated with highly absorbent polymers (MOFs), and afterward are exposed to gases. Such devices can be useful for instant alarming of toxic gases. In the second part, we demonstrate switches triggered by shock and acceleration. The concept is demonstrated on a millimeter-scale capacitive sensor. The sensor is tested using acceleration generated from shakers. Such devices can be used for the deployment of airbags in automobiles.

  16. Extended automated separation techniques in destructive neutron activation analysis; application to various biological materials, including human tissues and blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjioe, P.S.; Goeij, J.J.M. de; Houtman, J.P.W.

    1976-09-01

    Neutron activation analysis may be performed as a multi-element and low-level technique for many important trace elements in biological materials, provided that post-irradiation chemical separations are applied. This paper describes a chemical separation consisting of automated procedures for destruction, distillation, and anion-chromatography. The system developed enables the determination of 14 trace elements in biological materials, viz. antimony, arsenic, bromine, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, gold, iron, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, and zinc. The aspects of sample preparation, neutron irradiation, gamma-spectrum evaluation, and blank-value contribution are also discussed

  17. Age-related changes in trunk neuromuscular activation patterns during a controlled functional transfer task include amplitude and temporal synergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, D Adam; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L

    2014-12-01

    While healthy aging is associated with physiological changes that can impair control of trunk motion, few studies examine how spinal muscle responses change with increasing age. This study examined whether older (over 65 years) compared to younger (20-45 years) adults had higher overall amplitude and altered temporal recruitment patterns of trunk musculature when performing a functional transfer task. Surface electromyograms from twelve bilateral trunk muscle (24) sites were analyzed using principal component analysis, extracting amplitude and temporal features (PCs) from electromyographic waveforms. Two PCs explained 96% of the waveform variance. Three factor ANOVA models tested main effects (group, muscle and reach) and interactions for PC scores. Significant (pactivity, demonstrated continuous activation levels in specific muscle sites despite changing external moments, and had altered temporal synergies within abdominal and back musculature. In summary both older and younger adults recruit highly organized activation patterns in response to changing external moments. Differences in temporal trunk musculature recruitment patterns suggest that older adults experience different dynamic spinal stiffness and loading compared to younger adults during a functional lifting task. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Biologically-inspired robust and adaptive multi-sensor fusion and active control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Deepak; Dow, Paul A.; Huber, David J.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we describe a method and system for robust and efficient goal-oriented active control of a machine (e.g., robot) based on processing, hierarchical spatial understanding, representation and memory of multimodal sensory inputs. This work assumes that a high-level plan or goal is known a priori or is provided by an operator interface, which translates into an overall perceptual processing strategy for the machine. Its analogy to the human brain is the download of plans and decisions from the pre-frontal cortex into various perceptual working memories as a perceptual plan that then guides the sensory data collection and processing. For example, a goal might be to look for specific colored objects in a scene while also looking for specific sound sources. This paper combines three key ideas and methods into a single closed-loop active control system. (1) Use high-level plan or goal to determine and prioritize spatial locations or waypoints (targets) in multimodal sensory space; (2) collect/store information about these spatial locations at the appropriate hierarchy and representation in a spatial working memory. This includes invariant learning of these spatial representations and how to convert between them; and (3) execute actions based on ordered retrieval of these spatial locations from hierarchical spatial working memory and using the "right" level of representation that can efficiently translate into motor actions. In its most specific form, the active control is described for a vision system (such as a pantilt- zoom camera system mounted on a robotic head and neck unit) which finds and then fixates on high saliency visual objects. We also describe the approach where the goal is to turn towards and sequentially foveate on salient multimodal cues that include both visual and auditory inputs.

  19. Geographically distributed environmental sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Patrick; Veatch, Brad; O'Connor, Mike

    2006-10-03

    The present invention is directed to a sensor network that includes a number of sensor units and a base unit. The base station operates in a network discovery mode (in which network topology information is collected) in a data polling mode (in which sensed information is collected from selected sensory units). Each of the sensor units can include a number of features, including an anemometer, a rain gauge, a compass, a GPS receiver, a barometric pressure sensor, an air temperature sensor, a humidity sensor, a level, and a radiant temperature sensor.

  20. Improvements on GPS Location Cluster Analysis for the Prediction of Large Carnivore Feeding Activities: Ground-Truth Detection Probability and Inclusion of Activity Sensor Measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A Blecha

    Full Text Available Animal space use studies using GPS collar technology are increasingly incorporating behavior based analysis of spatio-temporal data in order to expand inferences of resource use. GPS location cluster analysis is one such technique applied to large carnivores to identify the timing and location of feeding events. For logistical and financial reasons, researchers often implement predictive models for identifying these events. We present two separate improvements for predictive models that future practitioners can implement. Thus far, feeding prediction models have incorporated a small range of covariates, usually limited to spatio-temporal characteristics of the GPS data. Using GPS collared cougar (Puma concolor we include activity sensor data as an additional covariate to increase prediction performance of feeding presence/absence. Integral to the predictive modeling of feeding events is a ground-truthing component, in which GPS location clusters are visited by human observers to confirm the presence or absence of feeding remains. Failing to account for sources of ground-truthing false-absences can bias the number of predicted feeding events to be low. Thus we account for some ground-truthing error sources directly in the model with covariates and when applying model predictions. Accounting for these errors resulted in a 10% increase in the number of clusters predicted to be feeding events. Using a double-observer design, we show that the ground-truthing false-absence rate is relatively low (4% using a search delay of 2-60 days. Overall, we provide two separate improvements to the GPS cluster analysis techniques that can be expanded upon and implemented in future studies interested in identifying feeding behaviors of large carnivores.

  1. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Matthew Mahoney

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation.

  2. Technical note: Validation of an ear-tag accelerometer sensor to determine rumination, eating, and activity behaviors of grazing dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, G M; Heins, B J; Endres, M I

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to validate an ear-tag accelerometer sensor (CowManager SensOor, Agis Automatisering BV, Harmelen, the Netherlands) using direct visual observations in a grazing dairy herd. Lactating crossbred cows (n = 24) were used for this experiment at the University of Minnesota West Central Research and Outreach Center grazing dairy (Morris, MN) during the summer of 2016. A single trained observer recorded behavior every minute for 6 h for each cow (24 cows × 6 h = 144 h of observation total). Direct visual observation was compared with sensor data during August and September 2016. The sensor detected and identified ear and head movements, and through algorithms the sensor classified each minute as one of the following behaviors: rumination, eating, not active, active, and high active. A 2-sided t-test was conducted with PROC TTEST of SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) to compare the percentage of time each cow's behavior was recorded by direct visual observation and sensor data. For total recorded time, the percentage of time of direct visual observation compared with sensor data was 17.9 and 19.1% for rumination, 52.8 and 51.9% for eating, 17.4 and 11.9% for not active, and 7.9 and 21.1% for active. Pearson correlations (PROC CORR of SAS) were used to evaluate associations between direct visual observations and sensor data. Furthermore, concordance correlation coefficient (CCC), bias correction factors, location shift, and scale shift (epiR package of R version 3.3.1; R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria) were calculated to provide a measure of accuracy and precision. Correlations between visual observations for all 4 behaviors were highly to weakly correlated (rumination: r = 0.72, CCC = 0.71; eating: r = 0.88, CCC = 0.88; not active: r = 0.65, CCC = 0.52; and active: r = 0.20, CCC = 0.19) compared with sensor data. The results suggest that the sensor accurately monitors rumination and eating behavior of grazing dairy

  3. Laser deposited thin organic and inorganic active layers for low temperature ozone sensors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fryček, R.; Myslík, V.; Vrňata, M.; Vysloužil, F.; Jelínek, Miroslav; Náhlík, J.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 98, - (2004), s. 233-238 ISSN 0925-4005 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/03/0406; GA ČR GP106/03/P061; GA AV ČR IAA1010110 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GP106/01/P089 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914; CEZ:MSM 223400007 Keywords : pulsed laser deposition * In 2 O 3 * WO 3 and InAcAc basic materials * ozone and NO x * low temperature sensitivity Subject RIV: JB - Sensor s, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 2.083, year: 2004

  4. Contact stress sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotovsky, Jack [Oakland, CA

    2012-02-07

    A contact stress sensor includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a thermal compensator and a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  5. Self-Powered Active Sensor with Concentric Topography of Piezoelectric Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuh, Yiin Kuen; Huang, Zih Ming; Wang, Bo Sheng; Li, Shan Chien

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we demonstrated a flexible and self-powered sensor based on piezoelectric fibers in the diameter range of nano- and micro-scales. Our work is distinctively different from previous electrospinning research; we fabricated this apparatus precisely via near-field electrospinning which has a spectacular performance to harvest mechanical deformation in arbitrary direction and a novel concentrically circular topography. There are many piezoelectric devices based on electrospinning polymeric fibers. However, the fibers were mostly patterned in parallel lines and they could be actuated in limited direction only. To overcome this predicament, we re-arranged the parallel alignment into concentric circle pattern which made it possible to collect the mechanical energy whenever the deformation is along same axis or not. Despite the change of topography, the output voltage and current could still reach to 5 V and 400 nA, respectively, despite the mechanical deformation was from different direction. This new arbitrarily directional piezoelectric generator with concentrically circular topography (PGCT) allowed the piezoelectric device to harvest more mechanical energy than the one-directional alignment fiber-based devices, and this PGCT could perform even better output which promised more versatile and efficient using as a wearable electronics or sensor.

  6. Cognitive impairment categorized in community-dwelling older adults with and without dementia using in-home sensors that recognise activities of daily living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urwyler, Prabitha; Stucki, Reto; Rampa, Luca; Müri, René; Mosimann, Urs P.; Nef, Tobias

    2017-02-01

    Cognitive impairment due to dementia decreases functionality in Activities of Daily Living (ADL). Its assessment is useful to identify care needs, risks and monitor disease progression. This study investigates differences in ADL pattern-performance between dementia patients and healthy controls using unobtrusive sensors. Around 9,600 person-hours of activity data were collected from the home of ten dementia patients and ten healthy controls using a wireless-unobtrusive sensors and analysed to detect ADL. Recognised ADL were visualized using activity maps, the heterogeneity and accuracy to discriminate patients from healthy were analysed. Activity maps of dementia patients reveal unorganised behaviour patterns and heterogeneity differed significantly between the healthy and diseased. The discriminating accuracy increases with observation duration (0.95 for 20 days). Unobtrusive sensors quantify ADL-relevant behaviour, useful to uncover the effect of cognitive impairment, to quantify ADL-relevant changes in the course of dementia and to measure outcomes of anti-dementia treatments.

  7. Dynamic Sensor Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schott, Brian

    2004-01-01

    ...: Declarative Languages and Execution Environment includes topographical soldier interface and a sensor network simulation environment for algorithm development, deployment planning, and operational support. Finally, Task 3...

  8. High water-stressed population estimated by world water resources assessment including human activities under SRES scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiguchi, M.; Shen, Y.; Kanae, S.; Oki, T.

    2009-04-01

    In an argument of the reduction and the adaptation for the climate change, the evaluation of the influence by the climate change is important. When we argue in adaptation plan from a damage scale and balance with the cost, it is particularly important. Parry et al (2001) evaluated the risks in shortage of water, malaria, food, the risk of the coast flood by temperature function and clarified the level of critical climate change. According to their evaluation, the population to be affected by the shortage of water suddenly increases in the range where temperature increases from 1.5 to 2.0 degree in 2080s. They showed how much we need to reduce emissions in order to draw-down significantly the number at risk. This evaluation of critical climate change threats and targets of water shortage did not include the water withdrawal divided by water availability. Shen et al (2008a) estimated the water withdrawal of projection of future world water resources according to socio-economic driving factors predicted for scenarios A1b, A2, B1, and B2 of the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). However, these results were in function of not temperature but time. The assessment of the highly water-stressed population considered the socioeconomic development is necessary for a function of the temperature. Because of it is easy to understand to need to reduce emission. We present a multi-GCM analysis of the global and regional populations lived in highly water-stressed basin for a function of the temperature using the socioeconomic data and the outputs of GCMs. In scenario A2, the population increases gradually with warming. On the other hand, the future projection population in scenario A1b and B1 increase gradually until the temperature anomaly exceeds around from +1 to +1.5 degree. After that the population is almost constant. From Shen et al (2008b), we evaluated the HWSP and its ratio in the world with temperature function for scenarios A1B, A2, and B1 by the index of W

  9. Coiled-Coil Antagonism Regulates Activity of Venus Flytrap-Domain-Containing Sensor Kinases of the BvgS Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesne, Elodie; Dupré, Elian; Lensink, Marc F; Locht, Camille; Antoine, Rudy; Jacob-Dubuisson, Françoise

    2018-02-27

    Bordetella pertussis controls the expression of its virulence regulon through the two-component system BvgAS. BvgS is a prototype for a family of multidomain sensor kinases. In BvgS, helical linkers connect periplasmic Venus flytrap (VFT) perception domains to a cytoplasmic Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain and the PAS domain to the dimerization/histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domain of the kinase. The two linkers can adopt coiled-coil structures but cannot do so simultaneously. The first linker forms a coiled coil in the kinase mode and the second in the phosphatase mode, with the other linker in both cases showing an increase in dynamic behavior. The intervening PAS domain changes its quaternary structure between the two modes. In BvgS homologues without a PAS domain, a helical "X" linker directly connects the VFT and DHp domains. Here, we used BvgS as a platform to characterize regulation in members of the PAS-less subfamily. BvgS chimeras of homologues with natural X linkers displayed various regulation phenotypes. We identified two distinct coiled-coil registers in the N- and C-terminal portions of the X linkers. Stable coil formation in the C-terminal moiety determines the phosphatase mode, similarly to BvgS; in contrast, coil formation in the N-terminal moiety along the other register leads to the kinase mode. Thus, antagonism between two registers in the VFT-DHp linker forms the basis for activity regulation in the absence of the PAS domain. The N and C moieties of the X linker play roles similar to those played by the two independent linkers in sensor kinases with a PAS domain, providing a unified mechanism of regulation for the entire family. IMPORTANCE The whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis uses the BvgAS sensory transduction two-component system to regulate production of its virulence factors. BvgS serves as a model for a large family of multidomain bacterial sensor kinases. B. pertussis is virulent when BvgS functions as a kinase and avirulent when it

  10. The activation loop of PIP5K functions as a membrane sensor essential for lipid substrate processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aizhuo; Sui, Dexin; Wu, Dianqing; Hu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K), a representative member of the phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPK) family, is a major enzyme that biosynthesizes the signaling molecule PI(4,5)P2 (phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate) in eukaryotic cells. The stringent specificity toward lipid substrates and the high sensitivity to the membrane environment strongly suggest a membrane-sensing mechanism, but the underlying structural basis is still largely unknown. We present a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study on a peptide commensurate with a PIP5K’s activation loop, which has been reported to be a determinant of lipid substrate specificity and subcellular localization of PIP5K. Although the activation loop is severely disordered in the crystal structure of PIP5K, the NMR experiments showed that the largely unstructured peptide folded into an amphipathic helix upon its association with the 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC) micellar surface. Systematic mutagenesis and functional assays further demonstrated the crucial roles of the amphipathic helix and its hydrophobic surface in kinase activity and membrane-sensing function, supporting a working model in which the activation loop is a critical structural module conferring a membrane-sensing mechanism on PIP5K. The activation loop, surprisingly functioning as a membrane sensor, represents a new paradigm of kinase regulation by the activation loop through protein-membrane interaction, which also lays a foundation on the regulation of PIP5K (and other PIPKs) by membrane lipids for future studies. PMID:28138522

  11. A comparative study of pattern recognition classifiers to predict physical activities using smartphones and wearable body sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouris, Ioannis; Koutsouris, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a wireless body area network platform that performs physical activities recognition using accelerometers, biosignals and smartphones. Multiple classifiers and sensor combinations were examined to identify the classifier with the best recognition performance for the static and dynamic activities. The Functional Trees classifier proved to provide the best results among the classifiers evaluated (Naive Bayes, Bayesian Networks, Support Vector Machines and Decision Trees [C4.5, Random Forest]) and was used to train the model which was implemented for the real time activity recognition on the smartphone. The identified patterns of daily physical activities were used to examine conformance with medical advice, regarding physical activity guidelines. An algorithm based on Skip Chain Conditional Random Fields, received as inputs the recognized activities and data retrieved from the GPS receiver of the smartphone to develop dynamic daily patterns that enhance prediction results. The presented platform can be extended to be used in the prevention of short-term complications of metabolic diseases such as diabetes.

  12. Preparation, Characterization and Activity of a Peptide-Cellulosic Aerogel Protease Sensor from Cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J Vincent; Fontenot, Krystal R; Prevost, Nicolette T; Pircher, Nicole; Liebner, Falk; Condon, Brian D

    2016-10-26

    Nanocellulosic aerogels (NA) provide a lightweight biocompatible material with structural properties, like interconnected high porosity and specific surface area, suitable for biosensor design. We report here the preparation, characterization and activity of peptide-nanocellulose aerogels (PepNA) made from unprocessed cotton and designed with protease detection activity. Low-density cellulosic aerogels were prepared from greige cotton by employing calcium thiocyanate octahydrate/lithium chloride as a direct cellulose dissolving medium. Subsequent casting, coagulation, solvent exchange and supercritical carbon dioxide drying afforded homogeneous cellulose II aerogels of fibrous morphology. The cotton-based aerogel had a porosity of 99% largely dominated by mesopores (2-50 nm) and an internal surface of 163 m²·g -1 . A fluorescent tripeptide-substrate (succinyl-alanine-proline-alanine-4-amino-7-methyl-coumarin) was tethered to NA by (1) esterification of cellulose C6 surface hydroxyl groups with glycidyl-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (FMOC), (2) deprotection and (3) coupling of the immobilized glycine with the tripeptide. Characterization of the NA and PepNA included techniques, such as elemental analysis, mass spectral analysis, attenuated total reflectance infrared imaging, nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy and bioactivity studies. The degree of substitution of the peptide analog attached to the anhydroglucose units of PepNA was 0.015. The findings from mass spectral analysis and attenuated total reflectance infrared imaging indicated that the peptide substrate was immobilized on to the surface of the NA. Nitrogen adsorption revealed a high specific surface area and a highly porous system, which supports the open porous structure observed from scanning electron microscopy images. Bioactivity studies of PepNA revealed a detection sensitivity of 0.13 units/milliliter for human neutrophil elastase, a diagnostic biomarker for inflammatory diseases. The

  13. Preparation, Characterization and Activity of a Peptide-Cellulosic Aerogel Protease Sensor from Cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vincent Edwards

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanocellulosic aerogels (NA provide a lightweight biocompatible material with structural properties, like interconnected high porosity and specific surface area, suitable for biosensor design. We report here the preparation, characterization and activity of peptide-nanocellulose aerogels (PepNA made from unprocessed cotton and designed with protease detection activity. Low-density cellulosic aerogels were prepared from greige cotton by employing calcium thiocyanate octahydrate/lithium chloride as a direct cellulose dissolving medium. Subsequent casting, coagulation, solvent exchange and supercritical carbon dioxide drying afforded homogeneous cellulose II aerogels of fibrous morphology. The cotton-based aerogel had a porosity of 99% largely dominated by mesopores (2–50 nm and an internal surface of 163 m2·g−1. A fluorescent tripeptide-substrate (succinyl-alanine-proline-alanine-4-amino-7-methyl-coumarin was tethered to NA by (1 esterification of cellulose C6 surface hydroxyl groups with glycidyl-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (FMOC, (2 deprotection and (3 coupling of the immobilized glycine with the tripeptide. Characterization of the NA and PepNA included techniques, such as elemental analysis, mass spectral analysis, attenuated total reflectance infrared imaging, nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy and bioactivity studies. The degree of substitution of the peptide analog attached to the anhydroglucose units of PepNA was 0.015. The findings from mass spectral analysis and attenuated total reflectance infrared imaging indicated that the peptide substrate was immobilized on to the surface of the NA. Nitrogen adsorption revealed a high specific surface area and a highly porous system, which supports the open porous structure observed from scanning electron microscopy images. Bioactivity studies of PepNA revealed a detection sensitivity of 0.13 units/milliliter for human neutrophil elastase, a diagnostic biomarker for inflammatory

  14. Measurements on HV-CMOS Active Sensors After Irradiation to HL-LHC fluences

    CERN Document Server

    Ristic, B

    2015-01-01

    During the long shutdown (LS) 3 beginning 2022 the LHC will be upgraded for higher luminosities pushing the limits especially for the inner tracking detectors of the LHC experiments. In order to cope with the increased particle rate and radiation levels the ATLAS Inner Detector will be completely replaced by a purely silicon based one. Novel sensors based on HV-CMOS processes prove to be good candidates in terms of spatial resolution and radiation hardness. In this paper measurements conducted on prototypes built in the AMS H18 HV-CMOS process and irradiated to fluences of up to $2\\cdot10^{16}\\,\\text{n}_\\text{eq}\\text{cm}^{-2}$ are presented.

  15. D-A type sensor array for differentiation and identification of white wine varieties based on specific solvent effect activated by CT-LE transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jingqi; Zhang, Xin; Li, Hao; Hou, Yue; Hou, Jingdan; Li, Zhongfeng; Yang, Feng; Liu, Yang; Han, Tianyu

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we synthesize a series of compounds with electron donor (D) and acceptor (A) units. They show general solvent effect in aprotic solvents, suggesting a charge transfer (CT) process. While in protic solvents including water, ethanol and methanol, the spectra exert no polarity-dependence but a remarkable hypochromatic shift together with the fading of CT band. Dynamic analysis implies that intermolecular hydrogen bond will be formed between carboxylic acid and protic solvent, boosting another deactivation pathway that jumps off a bigger energy gap, in other words, favoring the locally excited (LE) state emission. The CT-LE transition involves variations in both absorption and emission spectra, and further poses competition with other mechanisms including activated/restricted intramolecular rotation (IR/RIR). Inspired by the cross-reactivity, we turn our attention to the development of sensor array, in order to identify white wine varieties. The differential spectral responses are recorded, generating multiple factors including absorption wavelength (λab), emission wavelength (λem), absorbance (Abs.) and emission intensity (Int.). These factors are processed with principal component analysis (PCA), creating a three-dimensional fingerprint data base for white wines. The data points in the coordinate system are clustered into 10 different groups, demonstrating a clear differentiation of all the white wines. More importantly, as our final test for whether the sensor array can identify the counterfeits, an adulterated liquor sample, which is provided by police officers, is fingerprinted on the three-dimensional diagram. Its canonical factors fall into an area distinct from the adulterated wine, indicating a clear identification.

  16. A process modification for CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors for enhanced depletion, timing performance and radiation tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeys, W.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Hillemanns, H.; Kugathasan, T.; Mager, M.; Musa, L.; Riedler, P.; Reidt, F.; Van Hoorne, J.; Fenigstein, A.; Leitner, T.

    2017-11-01

    For the upgrade of its Inner Tracking System, the ALICE experiment plans to install a new tracker fully constructed with monolithic active pixel sensors implemented in a standard 180 nm CMOS imaging sensor process, with a deep pwell allowing full CMOS within the pixel. Reverse substrate bias increases the tolerance to non-ionizing energy loss (NIEL) well beyond 1013 1 MeVneq /cm2, but does not allow full depletion of the sensitive layer and hence full charge collection by drift, mandatory for more extreme radiation tolerance. This paper describes a process modification to fully deplete the epitaxial layer even with a small charge collection electrode. It uses a low dose blanket deep high energy n-type implant in the pixel array and does not require significant circuit or layout changes so that the same design can be fabricated both in the standard and modified process. When exposed to a 55 Fe source at a reverse substrate bias of -6 V, pixels implemented in the standard and the modified process in a low and high dose variant for the deep n-type implant respectively yield a signal of about 115 mV, 110 mV and 90 mV at the output of a follower circuit. Signal rise times heavily affected by the speed of this circuit are 27 . 8 + / - 5 ns, 23 . 2 + / - 4 . 2 ns, and 22 . 2 + / - 3 . 7 ns rms, respectively. In a different setup, the single pixel signal from a 90 Sr source only degrades by less than 20% for the modified process after a 1015 1 MeVneq /cm2 irradiation, while the signal rise time only degrades by about 16 + / - 2 ns to 19 + / - 2 . 8 ns rms. From sensors implemented in the standard process no useful signal could be extracted after the same exposure. These first results indicate the process modification maintains low sensor capacitance, improves timing performance and increases NIEL tolerance by at least an order of magnitude.

  17. CREB and the CRTC co-activators: sensors for hormonal and metabolic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarejos, Judith Y; Montminy, Marc

    2011-03-01

    The cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) is phosphorylated in response to a wide variety of signals, yet target gene transcription is only increased in a subset of cases. Recent studies indicate that CREB functions in concert with a family of latent cytoplasmic co-activators called cAMP-regulated transcriptional co-activators (CRTCs), which are activated through dephosphorylation. A dual requirement for CREB phosphorylation and CRTC dephosphorylation is likely to explain how these activator-co-activator cognates discriminate between different stimuli. Following their activation, CREB and CRTCs mediate the effects of fasting and feeding signals on the expression of metabolic programmes in insulin-sensitive tissues.

  18. Tests of small X-ray Active Matrix Pixel Sensor prototypes at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carini, G. A.; Chen, W.; Dragone, A.; Fried, J.; Jakoncic, J.; Kuczweski, A.; Li, Z.; Mead, J.; Michta, R.; Pratte, J.-F.; Rehak, P.; Siddons, D. P.

    2009-03-01

    X-ray Active Matrix Pixel Sensors (XAMPS) were designed and fabricated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Devices based on J-FET technology were produced on 100 mm high-resistivity silicon, typically 400 μm-thick. The prototypes are square matrices with n rows and n columns with n = 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512. Each pixel of the matrix is 90 × 90 μm2 and contains a JFET switch to control the charge readout. The XAMPS is a position sensitive ionization detector made on high resistivity silicon. It consists of a pixel array detector with integrated switches. Pixels are isolated from each other by a potential barrier and the device is fully depleted by applying a high voltage bias to the junction on the entrance window of the sensor. The small features of the design presented some technological challenges fully addressed during this production. The first prototypes were tested at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) with a monochromatic beam of 8 keV and millisecond readout and exhibit good performances at room temperature.

  19. Tests of small X-ray Active Matrix Pixel Sensor prototypes at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carini, G A; Chen, W; Fried, J; Jakoncic, J; Kuczweski, A; Li, Z; Mead, J; Michta, R; Pratte, J-F; Rehak, P; Siddons, D P [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, 11973 NY (United States); Dragone, A [SLAC National Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, 94025 CA (United States)], E-mail: carini@bnl.gov

    2009-03-15

    X-ray Active Matrix Pixel Sensors (XAMPS) were designed and fabricated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Devices based on J-FET technology were produced on 100 mm high-resistivity silicon, typically 400 {mu}m-thick. The prototypes are square matrices with n rows and n columns with n = 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512. Each pixel of the matrix is 90 x 90 {mu}m{sup 2} and contains a JFET switch to control the charge readout. The XAMPS is a position sensitive ionization detector made on high resistivity silicon. It consists of a pixel array detector with integrated switches. Pixels are isolated from each other by a potential barrier and the device is fully depleted by applying a high voltage bias to the junction on the entrance window of the sensor. The small features of the design presented some technological challenges fully addressed during this production. The first prototypes were tested at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) with a monochromatic beam of 8 keV and millisecond readout and exhibit good performances at room temperature.

  20. Comparison of forest aboveground biomass estimates from passive and active remote sensing sensors over Kayar Khola watershed, Chitwan district, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Waqas A.; Baig, Shahbaz; Gilani, Hammad; Waqar, Mirza Muhammad; Dhakal, Ashwin; Ammar, Ahmad

    2017-04-01

    We use passive optical high-resolution GeoEye-1 imagery and active synthetic aperture radar (SAR) Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS-1) phased array type L-band synthetic aperture radar (PALSAR) L-band horizontal-horizontal-polarization imagery to estimate forest aboveground biomass (AGB) of the tropical mountainous forest test site in Kayar Khola watershed, Chitwan district, Nepal. Object-based tools were used to delineate tree crowns from the orthorectified pan-sharpened GeoEye-1 optical imagery. AGB modeling with crown projection area extracted from the optical imagery shows a good linear relationship with R2=0.76. The terrain-corrected, radiometrically calibrated, and speckle-filtered ALOS-1 PALSAR backscatter image was utilized for AGB modeling; the nonlinear modeling of AGB with the SAR backscatter (dB) shows R2=0.52. The validation R2 values for AGB estimates from GeoEye-1 and ALOS-1 PALSAR are 0.83 and 0.44, respectively. The direct comparison of AGB estimates from both sensors is made possible by the utilization of the same set of ground survey points for both training and validation of the statistical models for both datasets. The final AGB output maps from both sensors show that the spatial patterns of AGB are in reasonable agreement at lower elevation, while SAR seems to underestimate AGB values as compared with optical-based estimates in the higher elevation zones.

  1. A Design of a New Column-Parallel Analog-to-Digital Converter Flash for Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakir, Mostafa; Akhamal, Hicham; Qjidaa, Hassan

    2017-01-01

    The CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) for the International Linear Collider (ILC) vertex detector (VXD) expresses stringent requirements on their analog readout electronics, specifically on the analog-to-digital converter (ADC). This paper concerns designing and optimizing a new architecture of a low power, high speed, and small-area 4-bit column-parallel ADC Flash. Later in this study, we propose to interpose an S/H block in the converter. This integration of S/H block increases the sensitiveness of the converter to the very small amplitude of the input signal from the sensor and provides a sufficient time to the converter to be able to code the input signal. This ADC is developed in 0.18  μ m CMOS process with a pixel pitch of 35  μ m. The proposed ADC responds to the constraints of power dissipation, size, and speed for the MAPS composed of a matrix of 64 rows and 48 columns where each column ADC covers a small area of 35 × 336.76  μ m 2 . The proposed ADC consumes low power at a 1.8 V supply and 100 MS/s sampling rate with dynamic range of 125 mV. Its DNL and INL are 0.0812/-0.0787 LSB and 0.0811/-0.0787 LSB, respectively. Furthermore, this ADC achieves a high speed more than 5 GHz.

  2. Development of CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for the ALICE-ITS Outer Barrel and for the CBM-MVD

    CERN Document Server

    Deveaux, Michael

    2015-01-01

    After more than a decade of R&D;, CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS or CPS) have proven to offer concrete answers to the demanding requirements of subatomic physics experi- ments. Their main advantages result from their low material budget, their very high granularity and their integrated signal processing circuitry, which allows coping with high particle rates. Moreover, they offer a valuable radiation tolerance and may be produced at low cost. Sensors of the MIMOSA series have offered an opportunity for nuclear and particle physics exper- iments to address with improved sensitivity physics studies requiring an accurate reconstruction of short living and soft particles. One of their major applications is the STAR-PXL detector, which is the first vertex detector based on MAPS. While this experiment is successfully taking data since two years, it was found that the 0.35 m CMOS technology used for this purpose is not suited for upcoming applications like the CBM micro-vertex detector (MVD) and the ...

  3. Balance between Coiled-Coil Stability and Dynamics Regulates Activity of BvgS Sensor Kinase in Bordetella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesne, E; Krammer, E-M; Dupre, E; Locht, C; Lensink, M F; Antoine, R; Jacob-Dubuisson, F

    2016-03-01

    The two-component system BvgAS controls the expression of the virulence regulon of Bordetella pertussis. BvgS is a prototype of bacterial sensor kinases with extracytoplasmic Venus flytrap perception domains. Following its transmembrane segment, BvgS harbors a cytoplasmic Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain and then a predicted 2-helix coiled coil that precede the dimerization-histidine-phosphotransfer domain of the kinase. BvgS homologs have a similar domain organization, or they harbor only a predicted coiled coil between the transmembrane and the dimerization-histidine-phosphotransfer domains. Here, we show that the 2-helix coiled coil of BvgS regulates the enzymatic activity in a mechanical manner. Its marginally stable hydrophobic interface enables a switch between a state of great rotational dynamics in the kinase mode and a more rigid conformation in the phosphatase mode in response to signal perception by the periplasmic domains. We further show that the activity of BvgS is controlled in the same manner if its PAS domain is replaced with the natural α-helical sequences of PAS-less homologs. Clamshell motions of the Venus flytrap domains trigger the shift of the coiled coil's dynamics. Thus, we have uncovered a general mechanism of regulation for the BvgS family of Venus flytrap-containing two-component sensor kinases. The two-component system BvgAS of the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis regulates the virulence factors necessary for infection in a coordinated manner. BvgS is the prototype of a family of sensor kinase proteins found in major bacterial pathogens. When BvgS functions as a kinase, B. pertussis is virulent, and the bacterium shifts to an avirulent phase after BvgS senses chemicals that make it switch to phosphatase. Our goal is to decipher the signaling mechanisms of BvgS in order to understand virulence regulation in Bordetella, which may lead to new antimicrobial treatments targeting those two-component systems. We discovered that the

  4. Silicon Sensors for Trackers at High-Luminosity Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Peltola, Timo

    2015-01-01

    The planned upgrade of the LHC accelerator at CERN, namely the high luminosity (HL) phase of the LHC (HL-LHC foreseen for 2023), will result in a more intense radiation environment than the present tracking system was designed for. The required upgrade of the all-silicon central trackers at the ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments will include higher granularity and radiation hard sensors. The radiation hardness of the new sensors must be roughly an order of magnitude higher than the one of LHC detectors. To address this, a massive R&D program is underway within the CERN RD50 collaboration "Development of Radiation Hard Semiconductor Devices for Very High Luminosity Colliders" to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation tolerance. Research topics include the improvement of the intrinsic radiation tolerance of the sensor material and novel detector designs with benefits like reduced trapping probability (thinned and 3D sensors), maximized sensitive area (active edge sensors) and enhanced charge ...

  5. Working Group Report: Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  6. Wireless Biological Electronic Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue

    2017-10-09

    The development of wireless biological electronic sensors could open up significant advances for both fundamental studies and practical applications in a variety of areas, including medical diagnosis, environmental monitoring, and defense applications. One of the major challenges in the development of wireless bioelectronic sensors is the successful integration of biosensing units and wireless signal transducers. In recent years, there are a few types of wireless communication systems that have been integrated with biosensing systems to construct wireless bioelectronic sensors. To successfully construct wireless biological electronic sensors, there are several interesting questions: What types of biosensing transducers can be used in wireless bioelectronic sensors? What types of wireless systems can be integrated with biosensing transducers to construct wireless bioelectronic sensors? How are the electrical sensing signals generated and transmitted? This review will highlight the early attempts to address these questions in the development of wireless biological electronic sensors.

  7. An Improved Azimuth Angle Estimation Method with a Single Acoustic Vector Sensor Based on an Active Sonar Detection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Anbang; Ma, Lin; Ma, Xuefei; Hui, Juan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an improved azimuth angle estimation method with a single acoustic vector sensor (AVS) is proposed based on matched filtering theory. The proposed method is mainly applied in an active sonar detection system. According to the conventional passive method based on complex acoustic intensity measurement, the mathematical and physical model of this proposed method is described in detail. The computer simulation and lake experiments results indicate that this method can realize the azimuth angle estimation with high precision by using only a single AVS. Compared with the conventional method, the proposed method achieves better estimation performance. Moreover, the proposed method does not require complex operations in frequency-domain and achieves computational complexity reduction. PMID:28230763

  8. Finite element piezothermoelasticity analysis and the active control of FGM plates with integrated piezoelectric sensors and actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, K. M.; He, X. Q.; Ng, T. Y.; Kitipornchai, S.

    An efficient finite element model is presented for the static and dynamic piezothermoelastic analysis and control of FGM plates under temperature gradient environments using integrated piezoelectric sensor/actuator layers. The properties of an FGM plate are functionally graded in the thickness direction according to a volume fraction power law distribution. A constant displacement-cum-velocity feedback control algorithm that couples the direct and inverse piezoelectric effects is applied to provide active feedback control of the integrated FGM plate in a closed loop system. Numerical results for the static and dynamic control are presented for the FGM plate, which consists of zirconia and aluminum. The effects of the constituent volume fractions and the influence of feedback control gain on the static and dynamic responses of the FGM plates are examined.

  9. An Improved Azimuth Angle Estimation Method with a Single Acoustic Vector Sensor Based on an Active Sonar Detection System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Anbang; Ma, Lin; Ma, Xuefei; Hui, Juan

    2017-02-20

    In this paper, an improved azimuth angle estimation method with a single acoustic vector sensor (AVS) is proposed based on matched filtering theory. The proposed method is mainly applied in an active sonar detection system. According to the conventional passive method based on complex acoustic intensity measurement, the mathematical and physical model of this proposed method is described in detail. The computer simulation and lake experiments results indicate that this method can realize the azimuth angle estimation with high precision by using only a single AVS. Compared with the conventional method, the proposed method achieves better estimation performance. Moreover, the proposed method does not require complex operations in frequencydomain and achieves computational complexity reduction.

  10. A diaper-embedded disposable nitrite sensor with integrated on-board urine-activated battery for UTI screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, W; Seo, W; Tan, T; Jung, B; Ziaie, B

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports a low-cost solution to the early detection of urinary nitrite, a common surrogate for urinary tract infection (UTI). We present a facile method to fabricate a disposable and flexible colorimetric [1] nitrite sensor and its urine-activated power source [2] on a hydrophobic (wax) paper through laser-assisted patterning and lamination. Such device, integrated with interface circuitry and a Bluetooth low energy (BLE) module can be embedded onto a diaper, and transmit semi-quantitative UTI monitoring information in a point-of-care and autonomous fashion. The proposed nitrite sensing platform achieves a sensitivity of 1.35 ms/(mg/L) and a detection limit of 4 mg/L.

  11. Active-Optical Sensors Using Red NDVI Compared to Red Edge NDVI for Prediction of Corn Grain Yield in North Dakota, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Lakesh K; Bu, Honggang; Denton, Anne; Franzen, David W

    2015-11-02

    Active-optical sensor readings from an N non-limiting area standard established within a farm field are used to predict yield in the standard. Lower yield predictions from sensor readings obtained from other parts of the field outside of the N non-limiting standard area indicate a need for supplemental N. Active-optical sensor algorithms for predicting corn (Zea mays, L.) yield to direct in-season nitrogen (N) fertilization in corn utilize red NDVI (normalized differential vegetative index). Use of red edge NDVI might improve corn yield prediction at later growth stages when corn leaves cover the inter-row space resulting in "saturation" of red NDVI readings. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of red edge NDVI in two active-optical sensors (GreenSeeker™ and Holland Scientific Crop Circle™) improved corn yield prediction. Nitrogen rate experiments were established at 15 sites in North Dakota (ND). Sensor readings were conducted at V6 and V12 corn. Red NDVI and red edge NDVI were similar in the relationship of readings with yield at V6. At V12, the red edge NDVI was superior to the red NDVI in most comparisons, indicating that it would be most useful in developing late-season N application algorithms.

  12. Active-Optical Sensors Using Red NDVI Compared to Red Edge NDVI for Prediction of Corn Grain Yield in North Dakota, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Lakesh K.; Bu, Honggang; Denton, Anne; Franzen, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Active-optical sensor readings from an N non-limiting area standard established within a farm field are used to predict yield in the standard. Lower yield predictions from sensor readings obtained from other parts of the field outside of the N non-limiting standard area indicate a need for supplemental N. Active-optical sensor algorithms for predicting corn (Zea mays, L.) yield to direct in-season nitrogen (N) fertilization in corn utilize red NDVI (normalized differential vegetative index). Use of red edge NDVI might improve corn yield prediction at later growth stages when corn leaves cover the inter-row space resulting in “saturation” of red NDVI readings. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of red edge NDVI in two active-optical sensors (GreenSeeker™ and Holland Scientific Crop Circle™) improved corn yield prediction. Nitrogen rate experiments were established at 15 sites in North Dakota (ND). Sensor readings were conducted at V6 and V12 corn. Red NDVI and red edge NDVI were similar in the relationship of readings with yield at V6. At V12, the red edge NDVI was superior to the red NDVI in most comparisons, indicating that it would be most useful in developing late-season N application algorithms. PMID:26540057

  13. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase rapidly suppresses multiple pro-inflammatory pathways in adipocytes including IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mancini, Sarah J; White, Anna D; Bijland, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation of adipose tissue in obesity is associated with increased IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α secretion and proposed to contribute to insulin resistance. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates nutrient metabolism and is reported to have anti-inflammatory actions in adipose tissue, yet the m...

  14. KCNE3 acts by promoting voltage sensor activation in KCNQ1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barro-Soria, Rene; Perez, Marta E; Larsson, H Peter

    2015-12-29

    KCNE β-subunits assemble with and modulate the properties of voltage-gated K(+) channels. In the colon, stomach, and kidney, KCNE3 coassembles with the α-subunit KCNQ1 to form K(+) channels important for K(+) and Cl(-) secretion that appear to be voltage-independent. How KCNE3 subunits turn voltage-gated KCNQ1 channels into apparent voltage-independent KCNQ1/KCNE3 channels is not completely understood. Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the effect of KCNE3 on KCNQ1 channels. Here, we use voltage clamp fluorometry to determine how KCNE3 affects the voltage sensor S4 and the gate of KCNQ1. We find that S4 moves in KCNQ1/KCNE3 channels, and that inward S4 movement closes the channel gate. However, KCNE3 shifts the voltage dependence of S4 movement to extreme hyperpolarized potentials, such that in the physiological voltage range, the channel is constitutively conducting. By separating S4 movement and gate opening, either by a mutation or PIP2 depletion, we show that KCNE3 directly affects the S4 movement in KCNQ1. Two negatively charged residues of KCNE3 (D54 and D55) are found essential for the effect of KCNE3 on KCNQ1 channels, mainly exerting their effects by an electrostatic interaction with R228 in S4. Our results suggest that KCNE3 primarily affects the voltage-sensing domain and only indirectly affects the gate.

  15. Smart sensors and systems innovations for medical, environmental, and IoT applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yasuura, Hiroto; Liu, Yongpan; Lin, Youn-Long

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the technology used for effective sensing of our physical world and intelligent processing techniques for sensed information, which are essential to the success of Internet of Things (IoT). The authors provide a multidisciplinary view of sensor technology from materials, process, circuits, and big data domains and showcase smart sensor systems in real applications including smart home, transportation, medical, environmental, agricultural, etc. Unlike earlier books on sensors, this book provides a “global” view on smart sensors covering abstraction levels from device, circuit, systems, and algorithms. Profiles active research on smart sensors based on CMOS microelectronics; Describes applications of sensors and sensor systems in cyber physical systems, the social information infrastructure in our modern world; Includes coverage of a variety of related information technologies supporting the application of sensors; Discusses the integration of computation, networking, actuation, database...

  16. Sodium ionization detector and sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrizo, J.; Bauerle, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    Work conducted on a basic technology development effort with the Westinghouse Sodium Ionization Detector (SID) sensor is reported. Included are results obtained for three task areas: (1) On-line operational response testing - in-situ calibration techniques; (2) Performance-reliability characteristics of aged filaments; and (3) Evaluation of chemical interference effects. The results showed that a calibrator filament coated with a sodium compound, when activated, does supply the necessary sodium atoms to provide a valid operational in-situ test. The life time of new Cr 2 0 3 -protected SID sensor filaments can be extended by operating at a reduced temperature. However, there also is a reduction in the sensitivity. Non-sodium species, such as products from a smoldering fire and organic aerosols, produce an interference response from the sensor comparable to a typical sodium response

  17. Perimeter intrusion sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    To obtain an effective perimeter intrusion detection system requires careful sensor selection, procurement, and installation. The selection process involves a thorough understanding of the unique site features and how these features affect the performance of each type of sensor. It is necessary to develop procurement specifications to establish acceptable sensor performance limits. Careful explanation and inspection of critical installation dimensions is required during on-site construction. The implementation of these activities at a particular site is discussed

  18. Large area CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray imager for digital breast tomosynthesis: Analysis, modeling, and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Chumin; Kanicki, Jerzy; Konstantinidis, Anastasios C.; Patel, Tushita

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Large area x-ray imagers based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology have been proposed for various medical imaging applications including digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). The low electronic noise (50–300 e − ) of CMOS APS x-ray imagers provides a possible route to shrink the pixel pitch to smaller than 75 μm for microcalcification detection and possible reduction of the DBT mean glandular dose (MGD). Methods: In this study, imaging performance of a large area (29 × 23 cm 2 ) CMOS APS x-ray imager [Dexela 2923 MAM (PerkinElmer, London)] with a pixel pitch of 75 μm was characterized and modeled. The authors developed a cascaded system model for CMOS APS x-ray imagers using both a broadband x-ray radiation and monochromatic synchrotron radiation. The experimental data including modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were theoretically described using the proposed cascaded system model with satisfactory consistency to experimental results. Both high full well and low full well (LFW) modes of the Dexela 2923 MAM CMOS APS x-ray imager were characterized and modeled. The cascaded system analysis results were further used to extract the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for microcalcifications with sizes of 165–400 μm at various MGDs. The impact of electronic noise on CNR was also evaluated. Results: The LFW mode shows better DQE at low air kerma (K a < 10 μGy) and should be used for DBT. At current DBT applications, air kerma (K a ∼ 10 μGy, broadband radiation of 28 kVp), DQE of more than 0.7 and ∼0.3 was achieved using the LFW mode at spatial frequency of 0.5 line pairs per millimeter (lp/mm) and Nyquist frequency ∼6.7 lp/mm, respectively. It is shown that microcalcifications of 165–400 μm in size can be resolved using a MGD range of 0.3–1 mGy, respectively. In comparison to a General Electric GEN2 prototype DBT system (at MGD of 2.5 m

  19. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  20. Robust, Brillouin Active Embedded Fiber-Is-The-Sensor System in Smart Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chung

    1996-01-01

    Extensive review of our proposed sensing scheme, based mainly on the forward Guided Acoustic Wave Brillouin Scattering (GAWBS) with backward stimulated Brillouin scattering (sBs) as an auxiliary scheme for system fault tolerance has been completed during this project period. This preliminary study is conducted for a number of reasons. The most significant reasons lie in the essential capability of the system to measure temperature and pressure. These two measurands have been proposed to be sensed by sBs in our proposal. Temperature and pressure/strain are important measurands in structural monitoring, so that the effectiveness of sensing by sBs needs to be further examined. It has been pointed out initially that sBs shift will be dependent on temperature and pressure/strain simultaneously. The shift versus temperature or strain is linear. Now, the question is how can these two measurands be separated when sBs is used to sense an environment, in which both temperature and strain are changing simultaneously. Typical sBs shift plotted versus strain and varying temperature is shown in Fig. 1. As is clear, a fiber initially stressed will relax with rising temperature. This is verified by a displacement to the right with rising temperature of the sBs shift vs strain curves in the figure. A way to circumvent this ambiguity is by employing two fibers, one pre-stressed and the other is a free fiber. The latter will measure temperature and subtracting data in the latter fiber from those of the former will give us net strain readings. This is a laborious approach, since it involves the use of two identical fibers, and this is hard to accomplish, especially when many sensors are needed. Additional multiplexing of the data stream for data subtraction becomes a necessity.

  1. Accuracy-energy configurable sensor processor and IoT device for long-term activity monitoring in rare-event sensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Daejin; Cho, Jeonghun

    2014-01-01

    A specially designed sensor processor used as a main processor in IoT (internet-of-thing) device for the rare-event sensing applications is proposed. The IoT device including the proposed sensor processor performs the event-driven sensor data processing based on an accuracy-energy configurable event-quantization in architectural level. The received sensor signal is converted into a sequence of atomic events, which is extracted by the signal-to-atomic-event generator (AEG). Using an event signal processing unit (EPU) as an accelerator, the extracted atomic events are analyzed to build the final event. Instead of the sampled raw data transmission via internet, the proposed method delays the communication with a host system until a semantic pattern of the signal is identified as a final event. The proposed processor is implemented on a single chip, which is tightly coupled in bus connection level with a microcontroller using a 0.18 μm CMOS embedded-flash process. For experimental results, we evaluated the proposed sensor processor by using an IR- (infrared radio-) based signal reflection and sensor signal acquisition system. We successfully demonstrated that the expected power consumption is in the range of 20% to 50% compared to the result of the basement in case of allowing 10% accuracy error.

  2. Including Youth with Intellectual Disabilities in Health Promotion Research: Development and Reliability of a Structured Interview to Assess the Correlates of Physical Activity among Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Carol; Bandini, Linda G.; Must, Aviva; Phillips, Sarah; Maslin, Melissa C. T.; Lo, Charmaine; Gleason, James M.; Fleming, Richard K.; Stanish, Heidi I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The input of youth with intellectual disabilities in health promotion and health disparities research is essential for understanding their needs and preferences. Regular physical activity (PA) is vital for health and well-being, but levels are low in youth generally, including those with intellectual disabilities. Understanding the…

  3. A novel position and time sensing active pixel sensor with field-assisted electron collection for charged particle tracking and electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Geronimo, G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Deptuch, G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Dragone, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Radeka, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Rehak, P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Instrumentation Division, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)]. E-mail: rehak@bnl.gov; Castoldi, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. Ingegneria Nucleare, 20133 Milan (Italy); INFN Sez. Milano, 20133 Milan (Italy); Fazzi, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. Ingegneria Nucleare, 20133 Milan (Italy); INFN Sez. Milano, 20133 Milan (Italy); Gatti, E. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. Elettronica e Informazione, 20133 Milan (Italy); INFN Sez. Milano, 20133 Milan (Italy); Guazzoni, C. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. Elettronica e Informazione, 20133 Milan (Italy); INFN Sez. Milano, 20133 Milan (Italy); Rijssenbeek, M. [Physics Department of State University of New York at Stony Brook, NY 11790 (United States); Dulinski, W. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, 23 rue du Loess BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex (France); Besson, A. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, 23 rue du Loess BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex (France); Deveaux, M. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, 23 rue du Loess BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex (France); Winter, M. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, 23 rue du Loess BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex (France)

    2006-11-30

    A new type of active pixel sensors (APSs) to track charged particles for particle physics experiments or to count number of electrons that cross any pixel at the focal plane of electron microscopes is described. The electric field of desirable shape is created inside the active volume of the pixel introducing the drift component in the movement of the signal electrons towards charge collecting electrodes. The electric field results from the flow of {approx}100 mA/cm{sup 2} hole currents within individual pixels of the sensor. The proposed sensor is produced using a standard industrially available complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) process. There are two main advantages of the proposed detectors when compared to the present (February 2005) state-of-the-art, i.e. field-free APS sensors. The first advantage of a field-assisted transport mechanism is the reduction of the charge collection time and of the sharing of the signal electrons between adjacent pixels by diffusion. The second advantage is the freedom to use both kinds of MOS transistors within each pixel of the sensor. Thus, the full functional power of CMOS circuits can be embedded in situ. As an example, 16-bit scalers will be implemented in each pixel of the sensor for electron microscopy. The reduced collection time combined with the state-of-the-art electronics within each pixel provides the most complete information about the position and the timing of incident charged particles for particle physics experiments. Position resolution of new sensors was computationally simulated to be a few microns, that is, the same as the resolution of standard APSs. Moreover, the active depth of the sensor and the associate electronics is less than about 20 {mu}m and a thinned down sensor together with its beryllium backing can have a total thickness of less than 0.1% of one radiation length. The reduction of the thickness of the detector reduces the amount of multiple scattering within the detector. The

  4. A novel position and time sensing active pixel sensor with field-assisted electron collection for charged particle tracking and electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geronimo, G.; Deptuch, G.; Dragone, A.; Radeka, V.; Rehak, P.; Castoldi, A.; Fazzi, A.; Gatti, E.; Guazzoni, C.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Dulinski, W.; Besson, A.; Deveaux, M.; Winter, M.

    2006-11-01

    A new type of active pixel sensors (APSs) to track charged particles for particle physics experiments or to count number of electrons that cross any pixel at the focal plane of electron microscopes is described. The electric field of desirable shape is created inside the active volume of the pixel introducing the drift component in the movement of the signal electrons towards charge collecting electrodes. The electric field results from the flow of ˜100 mA/cm 2 hole currents within individual pixels of the sensor. The proposed sensor is produced using a standard industrially available complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) process. There are two main advantages of the proposed detectors when compared to the present (February 2005) state-of-the-art, i.e. field-free APS sensors. The first advantage of a field-assisted transport mechanism is the reduction of the charge collection time and of the sharing of the signal electrons between adjacent pixels by diffusion. The second advantage is the freedom to use both kinds of MOS transistors within each pixel of the sensor. Thus, the full functional power of CMOS circuits can be embedded in situ. As an example, 16-bit scalers will be implemented in each pixel of the sensor for electron microscopy. The reduced collection time combined with the state-of-the-art electronics within each pixel provides the most complete information about the position and the timing of incident charged particles for particle physics experiments. Position resolution of new sensors was computationally simulated to be a few microns, that is, the same as the resolution of standard APSs. Moreover, the active depth of the sensor and the associate electronics is less than about 20 μm and a thinned down sensor together with its beryllium backing can have a total thickness of less than 0.1% of one radiation length. The reduction of the thickness of the detector reduces the amount of multiple scattering within the detector. The determination of the

  5. Digital Sensor Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Ken D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Quinn, Edward L. [Technology Resources, Dana Point, CA (United States); Mauck, Jerry L. [Technology Resources, Dana Point, CA (United States); Bockhorst, Richard M. [Technology Resources, Dana Point, CA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy and reliability. This paper, which refers to a final report issued in 2013, demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. Improved accuracy results from the superior operating characteristics of digital sensors. These include improvements in sensor accuracy and drift and other related parameters which reduce total loop uncertainty and thereby increase safety and operating margins. An example instrument loop uncertainty calculation for a pressure sensor application is presented to illustrate these improvements. This is a side-by-side comparison of the instrument loop uncertainty for both an analog and a digital sensor in the same pressure measurement application. Similarly, improved sensor reliability is illustrated with a sample calculation for determining the probability of failure on demand, an industry standard reliability measure. This looks at equivalent analog and digital temperature sensors to draw the comparison. The results confirm substantial reliability improvement with the digital sensor, due in large part to ability to continuously monitor the health of a digital sensor such that problems can be immediately identified and corrected. This greatly reduces the likelihood of a latent failure condition of the sensor at the time of a design basis event. Notwithstanding the benefits of digital sensors, there are certain qualification issues that are inherent with digital technology and these are described in the report. One major qualification impediment for digital sensor implementation is software common cause failure (SCCF).

  6. Ambient Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Börner, Dirk; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This software sketches comprise two custom-built ambient sensors, i.e. a noise and a movement sensor. Both sensors measure an ambient value and process the values to a color gradient (green > yellow > red). The sensors were built using the Processing 1.5.1 development environment. Available under

  7. Magnetic actuators and sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Brauer, John R

    2014-01-01

    An accessible, comprehensive guide on magnetic actuators and sensors, this fully updated second edition of Magnetic Actuators and Sensors includes the latest advances, numerous worked calculations, illustrations, and real-life applications. Covering magnetics, actuators, sensors, and systems, with updates of new technologies and techniques, this exemplary learning tool emphasizes computer-aided design techniques, especially magnetic finite element analysis, commonly used by today's engineers. Detailed calculations, numerous illustrations, and discussions of discrepancies make this text an inva

  8. High-temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  9. A Design of a New Column-Parallel Analog-to-Digital Converter Flash for Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Chakir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS for the International Linear Collider (ILC vertex detector (VXD expresses stringent requirements on their analog readout electronics, specifically on the analog-to-digital converter (ADC. This paper concerns designing and optimizing a new architecture of a low power, high speed, and small-area 4-bit column-parallel ADC Flash. Later in this study, we propose to interpose an S/H block in the converter. This integration of S/H block increases the sensitiveness of the converter to the very small amplitude of the input signal from the sensor and provides a sufficient time to the converter to be able to code the input signal. This ADC is developed in 0.18 μm CMOS process with a pixel pitch of 35 μm. The proposed ADC responds to the constraints of power dissipation, size, and speed for the MAPS composed of a matrix of 64 rows and 48 columns where each column ADC covers a small area of 35 × 336.76 μm2. The proposed ADC consumes low power at a 1.8 V supply and 100 MS/s sampling rate with dynamic range of 125 mV. Its DNL and INL are 0.0812/−0.0787 LSB and 0.0811/−0.0787 LSB, respectively. Furthermore, this ADC achieves a high speed more than 5 GHz.

  10. Ambulatory Activity Components Deteriorate Differently across Neurodegenerative Diseases: A Cross-Sectional Sensor-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenk, Jochen; Srulijes, Karin; Schatton, Cornelia; Schwickert, Lars; Maetzler, Walter; Becker, Clemens; Synofzik, Matthis

    2016-01-01

    Reduced ambulatory activity is a major burden in neurodegenerative disease (NDD), leading to severe restrictions in social participation and further deterioration of motor capacities. However, objective evidence on walking behavior patterns and components underlying this impairment and its decline with disease progression is scarce for many NDDs. We aimed to unravel the detailed metrics underlying the reduced ambulatory activity in selected NDDs, and their relation to disease duration. We hypothesized that progressively reduced ambulatory activity is a feature shared across different NDDs, characterized by changes in both common and distinct components. Sixty-five subjects with NDD (n = 34 degenerative ataxia; n = 15 progressive supranuclear palsy, and n = 16 Parkinson's disease) and 38 healthy older adults (total n = 103) wore a three-axial accelerometer (activPAL3™) for 7 consecutive days. Detailed metrics of ambulatory activity were calculated. The average daily walking duration was significantly decreased in all three NDDs, yet characterized by a differential pattern of changes in number and length of walking bouts and sit-to-stand transfers. Decline in walking duration progressed with increased disease duration in all three NDDs, yet at a differing rate. This decline was associated with progressive reductions in walking bout length and walking behavior pattern diversity in all three NDDs. These findings provide objective evidence that reduced ambulatory activity is a shared feature across different NDDs. Moreover, they reveal that several underlying walking behavior components change with increasing disease duration, yet at a differing rate in different NDDs. This indicates that metric analysis of ambulatory activity might provide ecologically relevant and disease-specific progression and outcome markers in several NDDs. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Resistive flex sensors: a survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saggio, Giovanni; Riillo, Francesco; Sbernini, Laura; Quitadamo, Lucia Rita

    2016-01-01

    Resistive flex sensors can be used to measure bending or flexing with relatively little effort and a relatively low budget. Their lightness, compactness, robustness, measurement effectiveness and low power consumption make these sensors useful for manifold applications in diverse fields. Here, we provide a comprehensive survey of resistive flex sensors, taking into account their working principles, manufacturing aspects, electrical characteristics and equivalent models, useful front-end conditioning circuitry, and physic-bio-chemical aspects. Particular effort is devoted to reporting on and analyzing several applications of resistive flex sensors, related to the measurement of body position and motion, and to the implementation of artificial devices. In relation to the human body, we consider the utilization of resistive flex sensors for the measurement of physical activity and for the development of interaction/interface devices driven by human gestures. Concerning artificial devices, we deal with applications related to the automotive field, robots, orthosis and prosthesis, musical instruments and measuring tools. The presented literature is collected from different sources, including bibliographic databases, company press releases, patents, master’s theses and PhD theses. (topical review)

  12. Resistive flex sensors: a survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggio, Giovanni; Riillo, Francesco; Sbernini, Laura; Quitadamo, Lucia Rita

    2016-01-01

    Resistive flex sensors can be used to measure bending or flexing with relatively little effort and a relatively low budget. Their lightness, compactness, robustness, measurement effectiveness and low power consumption make these sensors useful for manifold applications in diverse fields. Here, we provide a comprehensive survey of resistive flex sensors, taking into account their working principles, manufacturing aspects, electrical characteristics and equivalent models, useful front-end conditioning circuitry, and physic-bio-chemical aspects. Particular effort is devoted to reporting on and analyzing several applications of resistive flex sensors, related to the measurement of body position and motion, and to the implementation of artificial devices. In relation to the human body, we consider the utilization of resistive flex sensors for the measurement of physical activity and for the development of interaction/interface devices driven by human gestures. Concerning artificial devices, we deal with applications related to the automotive field, robots, orthosis and prosthesis, musical instruments and measuring tools. The presented literature is collected from different sources, including bibliographic databases, company press releases, patents, master’s theses and PhD theses.

  13. Evaluation of physical properties of different digital intraoral sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawi, Wisam; Teich, Sorin

    2013-09-01

    Digital technologies provide clinically acceptable results comparable to traditional films while having other advantages such as the ability to store and manipulate images, immediate evaluation of the image diagnostic quality, possible reduction in patient radiation exposure, and so on. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the evaluation of the physical design of eight CMOS digital intraoral sensors. Sensors tested included: XDR (Cyber Medical Imaging, Los Angeles, CA, USA), RVG 6100 (Carestream Dental LLC, Atlanta, GA, USA), Platinum (DEXIS LLC., Hatfield, PA, USA), CDR Elite (Schick Technologies, Long Island City, NY, USA), ProSensor (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland), EVA (ImageWorks, Elmsford, NY, USA), XIOS Plus (Sirona, Bensheim, Germany), and GXS-700 (Gendex Dental Systems, Hatfield, PA, USA). The sensors were evaluated for cable configuration, connectivity interface, presence of back-scattering radiation shield, plate thickness, active sensor area, and comparing the active imaging area to the outside casing and to conventional radiographic films. There were variations among the physical design of different sensors. For most parameters tested, a lack of standardization exists in the industry. The results of this study revealed that these details are not always available through the material provided by the manufacturers and are often not advertised. For all sensor sizes, active imaging area was smaller compared with conventional films. There was no sensor in the group that had the best physical design. Data presented in this paper establishes a benchmark for comparing the physical design of digital intraoral sensors.

  14. Sensor for metal detection

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2014-06-26

    NOVELTY - The sensor has a microfluidic flow channel that is provided with an inlet port, an outlet port, and a detection chamber. The detection chamber is provided with a group of sensing electrodes (4) having a working electrode (8), a counter electrode (9), and a reference electrode (10). A flow sensor is configured to measure flow in the channel. A temperature sensor (6) is configured to measure temperature in the channel (3). An electrical connection is configured to connect the sensor to a sensing device. USE - Sensor for detecting metal such as toxic metal in sample such as clinical sample such as stool, saliva, sputum, bronchial lavage, urine, vaginal swab, nasal swab, biopsy, tissue, tears, breath, blood, serum, plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, peritoneal fluid, pleural fluid, pericardial fluid, joint fluid, and amniotic fluid, water sample, food sample, air sample, and soil sample (all claimed). ADVANTAGE - The sensor for use with the portable analytical instrument is configured for detection of metalsin samples. The sensor can provide the excellent solution for on-site metal detection, including heavy metal detection. The sensors can provide significant advantages in higher throughput, lower cost, at the same time being less labor intensive and less dependent on individual skills. The disposable design of the sensor, the enhanced reliability and repeatability of measurements can be obtained. The sensors can be widely applied in various industries. DETAILED DESCRIPTION - INDEPENDENT CLAIMS are included for the following: (1) a system for detecting metal in sample; and (2) a method for using sensor for detecting metal in sample. DESCRIPTION OF DRAWING(S) - The drawing shows a schematic view of the sensor prototype. Channel (3) Sensing electrodes (4) Temperature sensor (6) Working electrode (8) Counter electrode (9) Reference electrode (10)

  15. New generation of monolithic active pixel sensors for charged particle detection; Developpement d'un capteur de nouvelle generation et son electronique integree pour les collisionneurs futurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deptuch, G

    2002-09-01

    Vertex detectors are of great importance in particle physics experiments, as the knowledge of the event flavour is becoming an issue for the physics programme at Future Linear Colliders. Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) based on a novel detector structure have been proposed. Their fabrication is compatible with a standard CMOS process. The sensor is inseparable from the readout electronics, since both of them are integrated on the same, low-resistivity silicon wafer. The basic pixel configuration comprises only three MOS transistors and a diode collecting the charge through thermal diffusion. The charge is generated in the thin non-depleted epitaxial layer underneath the readout electronics. This approach provides, at low cost, a high resolution and thin device with the whole area sensitive to radiation. Device simulations using the ISE-TCAD package have been carried out to study the charge collection mechanism. In order to demonstrate the viability of the technique, four prototype chips have been fabricated using different submicrometer CMOS processes. The pixel gain has been calibrated using a {sup 55}Fe source and the Poisson sequence method. The prototypes have been exposed to high-energy particle beams at CERN. The tests proved excellent detection performances expressed in a single-track spatial resolution of 1.5 {mu}m and detection efficiency close to 100%, resulting from a SNR ratio of more than 30. Irradiation tests showed immunity of MAPS to a level of a few times 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} and a few hundred kRad of ionising radiation. The ideas for future work, including on-pixel signal amplification, double sampling operation and current mode pixel design are present as well. (author)

  16. 3D Orthogonal Woven Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Effective Biomechanical Energy Harvesting and as Self-Powered Active Motion Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Kai; Deng, Jianan; Zi, Yunlong; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Xu, Cheng; Zou, Haiyang; Ding, Wenbo; Dai, Yejing; Gu, Bohong; Sun, Baozhong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-10-01

    The development of wearable and large-area energy-harvesting textiles has received intensive attention due to their promising applications in next-generation wearable functional electronics. However, the limited power outputs of conventional textiles have largely hindered their development. Here, in combination with the stainless steel/polyester fiber blended yarn, the polydimethylsiloxane-coated energy-harvesting yarn, and nonconductive binding yarn, a high-power-output textile triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) with 3D orthogonal woven structure is developed for effective biomechanical energy harvesting and active motion signal tracking. Based on the advanced 3D structural design, the maximum peak power density of 3D textile can reach 263.36 mW m -2 under the tapping frequency of 3 Hz, which is several times more than that of conventional 2D textile TENGs. Besides, its collected power is capable of lighting up a warning indicator, sustainably charging a commercial capacitor, and powering a smart watch. The 3D textile TENG can also be used as a self-powered active motion sensor to constantly monitor the movement signals of human body. Furthermore, a smart dancing blanket is designed to simultaneously convert biomechanical energy and perceive body movement. This work provides a new direction for multifunctional self-powered textiles with potential applications in wearable electronics, home security, and personalized healthcare. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Structural basis for constitutive activity and agonist-induced activation of the enteroendocrine fat sensor GPR119

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelstoft, Maja Storm; Norn, C; Pedersen, Maria Hauge

    2014-01-01

    the centre of the receptor out to extracellular loop-2b. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: The high constitutive activity of GPR119 should be taken into account in future drug discovery efforts, which can now be guided by the detailed knowledge of the physiochemical properties of the extended ligand...

  18. Wearable strain sensors based on thin graphite films for human activity monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takanari; Kihara, Yusuke; Shirakashi, Jun-ichi

    2017-12-01

    Wearable health-monitoring devices have attracted increasing attention in disease diagnosis and health assessment. In many cases, such devices have been prepared by complicated multistep procedures which result in the waste of materials and require expensive facilities. In this study, we focused on pyrolytic graphite sheet (PGS), which is a low-cost, simple, and flexible material, used as wearable devices for monitoring human activity. We investigated wearable devices based on PGSs for the observation of elbow and finger motions. The thin graphite films were fabricated by cutting small films from PGSs. The wearable devices were then made from the thin graphite films assembled on a commercially available rubber glove. The human motions could be observed using the wearable devices. Therefore, these results suggested that the wearable devices based on thin graphite films may broaden their application in cost-effective wearable electronics for the observation of human activity.

  19. Vehicle Mode and Driving Activity Detection Based on Analyzing Sensor Data of Smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dang-Nhac; Nguyen, Duc-Nhan; Nguyen, Thi-Hau; Nguyen, Ha-Nam

    2018-03-29

    In this paper, we present a flexible combined system, namely the Vehicle mode-driving Activity Detection System (VADS), that is capable of detecting either the current vehicle mode or the current driving activity of travelers. Our proposed system is designed to be lightweight in computation and very fast in response to the changes of travelers' vehicle modes or driving events. The vehicle mode detection module is responsible for recognizing both motorized vehicles, such as cars, buses, and motorbikes, and non-motorized ones, for instance, walking, and bikes. It relies only on accelerometer data in order to minimize the energy consumption of smartphones. By contrast, the driving activity detection module uses the data collected from the accelerometer, gyroscope, and magnetometer of a smartphone to detect various driving activities, i.e., stopping, going straight, turning left, and turning right. Furthermore, we propose a method to compute the optimized data window size and the optimized overlapping ratio for each vehicle mode and each driving event from the training datasets. The experimental results show that this strategy significantly increases the overall prediction accuracy. Additionally, numerous experiments are carried out to compare the impact of different feature sets (time domain features, frequency domain features, Hjorth features) as well as the impact of various classification algorithms (Random Forest, Naïve Bayes, Decision tree J48, K Nearest Neighbor, Support Vector Machine) contributing to the prediction accuracy. Our system achieves an average accuracy of 98.33% in detecting the vehicle modes and an average accuracy of 98.95% in recognizing the driving events of motorcyclists when using the Random Forest classifier and a feature set containing time domain features, frequency domain features, and Hjorth features. Moreover, on a public dataset of HTC company in New Taipei, Taiwan, our framework obtains the overall accuracy of 97.33% that is

  20. Vehicle Mode and Driving Activity Detection Based on Analyzing Sensor Data of Smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dang-Nhac Lu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a flexible combined system, namely the Vehicle mode-driving Activity Detection System (VADS, that is capable of detecting either the current vehicle mode or the current driving activity of travelers. Our proposed system is designed to be lightweight in computation and very fast in response to the changes of travelers’ vehicle modes or driving events. The vehicle mode detection module is responsible for recognizing both motorized vehicles, such as cars, buses, and motorbikes, and non-motorized ones, for instance, walking, and bikes. It relies only on accelerometer data in order to minimize the energy consumption of smartphones. By contrast, the driving activity detection module uses the data collected from the accelerometer, gyroscope, and magnetometer of a smartphone to detect various driving activities, i.e., stopping, going straight, turning left, and turning right. Furthermore, we propose a method to compute the optimized data window size and the optimized overlapping ratio for each vehicle mode and each driving event from the training datasets. The experimental results show that this strategy significantly increases the overall prediction accuracy. Additionally, numerous experiments are carried out to compare the impact of different feature sets (time domain features, frequency domain features, Hjorth features as well as the impact of various classification algorithms (Random Forest, Naïve Bayes, Decision tree J48, K Nearest Neighbor, Support Vector Machine contributing to the prediction accuracy. Our system achieves an average accuracy of 98.33% in detecting the vehicle modes and an average accuracy of 98.95% in recognizing the driving events of motorcyclists when using the Random Forest classifier and a feature set containing time domain features, frequency domain features, and Hjorth features. Moreover, on a public dataset of HTC company in New Taipei, Taiwan, our framework obtains the overall accuracy of 97

  1. Kernel-Based Sensor Fusion With Application to Audio-Visual Voice Activity Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dov, David; Talmon, Ronen; Cohen, Israel

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of multiple view data fusion in the presence of noise and interferences. Recent studies have approached this problem using kernel methods, by relying particularly on a product of kernels constructed separately for each view. From a graph theory point of view, we analyze this fusion approach in a discrete setting. More specifically, based on a statistical model for the connectivity between data points, we propose an algorithm for the selection of the kernel bandwidth, a parameter, which, as we show, has important implications on the robustness of this fusion approach to interferences. Then, we consider the fusion of audio-visual speech signals measured by a single microphone and by a video camera pointed to the face of the speaker. Specifically, we address the task of voice activity detection, i.e., the detection of speech and non-speech segments, in the presence of structured interferences such as keyboard taps and office noise. We propose an algorithm for voice activity detection based on the audio-visual signal. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms competing fusion and voice activity detection approaches. In addition, we demonstrate that a proper selection of the kernel bandwidth indeed leads to improved performance.

  2. Study on the Sensing Coating of the Optical Fibre CO2 Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysokiński, Karol; Napierała, Marek; Stańczyk, Tomasz; Lipiński, Stanisław; Nasiłowski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Optical fibre carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors are reported in this article. The principle of operation of the sensors relies on the absorption of light transmitted through the fibre by a silica gel coating containing active dyes, including methyl red, thymol blue and phenol red. Stability of the sensor has been investigated for the first time for an absorption based CO2 optical fiber sensor. Influence of the silica gel coating thickness on the sensitivity and response time has also been studied. The impact of temperature and humidity on the sensor performance has been examined too. Response times of reported sensors are very short and reach 2–3 s, whereas the sensitivity of the sensor ranges from 3 to 10 for different coating thicknesses. Reported parameters make the sensor suitable for indoor and industrial use. PMID:26694412

  3. Study on the Sensing Coating of the Optical Fibre CO₂ Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysokiński, Karol; Napierała, Marek; Stańczyk, Tomasz; Lipiński, Stanisław; Nasiłowski, Tomasz

    2015-12-17

    Optical fibre carbon dioxide (CO₂) sensors are reported in this article. The principle of operation of the sensors relies on the absorption of light transmitted through the fibre by a silica gel coating containing active dyes, including methyl red, thymol blue and phenol red. Stability of the sensor has been investigated for the first time for an absorption based CO₂ optical fiber sensor. Influence of the silica gel coating thickness on the sensitivity and response time has also been studied. The impact of temperature and humidity on the sensor performance has been examined too. Response times of reported sensors are very short and reach 2-3 s, whereas the sensitivity of the sensor ranges from 3 to 10 for different coating thicknesses. Reported parameters make the sensor suitable for indoor and industrial use.

  4. Smart sensors and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kyung, Chong-Min; Yasuura, Hiroto; Liu, Yongpan

    2015-01-01

     This book describes for readers technology used for effective sensing of our physical world and intelligent processing techniques for sensed information, which are essential to the success of Internet of Things (IoTs).  The authors provide a multidisciplinary view of sensor technology from MEMS, biological, chemical, and electrical domains and showcase smart sensor systems in real applications including smart home, transportation, medical, environmental, agricultural, etc.  Unlike earlier books on sensors, this book will provide a “global” view on smart sensors covering abstraction levels from device, circuit, systems, and algorithms.  .

  5. Microfabricated Formaldehyde Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen C. Cheung

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde is a volatile organic compound that is widely used in textiles, paper, wood composites, and household materials. Formaldehyde will continuously outgas from manufactured wood products such as furniture, with adverse health effects resulting from prolonged low-level exposure. New, microfabricated sensors for formaldehyde have been developed to meet the need for portable, low-power gas detection. This paper reviews recent work including silicon microhotplates for metal oxide-based detection, enzyme-based electrochemical sensors, and nanowire-based sensors. This paper also investigates the promise of polymer-based sensors for low-temperature, low-power operation.

  6. Evaluation of Yield and Drought Using Active and Passive Spectral Sensing Systems at the Reproductive Stage in Wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Elisabeth; Schmidhalter, Urs

    2017-01-01

    Active and passive sensors are available for ground-based, high-throughput phenotyping in the field. However, these sensor systems have seldom been compared with respect to their determination of plant water status and water use efficiency related parameters under drought conditions. In this study, five passive and active reflectance sensors, including a hyperspectral passive sensor, an active flash sensor (AFS), the Crop Circle, and the GreenSeeker, were evaluated to assess drought-related d...

  7. Ultra-Sensitive Nano Optical Sensor Samarium-Doxycycline Doped in Sol Gel Matrix for Assessment of Glucose Oxidase Activity in Diabetics Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharwat, Marwa M; Attia, M S; Alghamdi, M S; Mahros, Amr M

    2017-09-01

    A low cost and very sensitive method for the determination of the activity of glucose oxidase enzyme in different diabetics serum samples was developed. The method based on the assessment of the H 2 O 2 concentration produced from the reaction of the glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme with glucose as substrate in the serum of diabetics patients by nano optical sensor Sm-doxycycline doped in sol gel matrix. H 2 O 2 enhances the luminescence intensity of all bands of the nano Sm-doxycycline complex [Sm-(DC) 2 ] + doped in sol-gel matrix, especially the 645 nm band at λ ex  = 400 nm and pH 7.0 in water. The influence of the different analytical parameters that affect the luminescence intensity of the nano optical sensor, e.g. pH, H 2 O 2 concentration and foreign ions concentrations were studied. The remarkable enhancement of the luminescence intensity of nano optical sensor [Sm-(DC) 2 ] + complex in water at 645 nm by the addition of various concentrations of H 2 O 2 was successfully used as an optical sensor for the assessment of the activity of the glucose oxidase enzyme in different diabetics serum samples. The calibration plot was achieved over the activity range 0.1-240 U/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.999 and a detection limit of 0.05 U/L.

  8. A general fluorescent sensor design strategy for "turn-on" activity detection of exonucleases and restriction endonucleases based on graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Kong, De-Ming

    2013-11-07

    Using graphene oxide (GO) as a nanoquencher, a universal sensor design strategy was developed on the basis of significantly different binding affinities of GO to single-stranded DNAs (ss-DNAs) with different lengths. The proposed sensors could be used for the activity detection of both exonucleases and restriction endonucleases. To achieve this, a single-labeled fluorescent oligonucleotide probe, which had a single-stranded structure or a hairpin structure with a long single-stranded loop, was used. Such a probe could be efficiently absorbed on the surface of GO, resulting in the quenching of the fluorescent signal. Excision of the single-stranded probe by exonucleases or site-specific cleavage at the double-stranded stem of the hairpin probe by restriction endonuclease released fluorophore-labeled nucleotide, which could not be efficiently absorbed by GO, thus leading to increase in fluorescence of the corresponding sensing system. As examples, three sensors, which were used for activity detection of the exonuclease Exo 1 and the restriction endonucleases EcoR I and Hind III, were developed. These three sensors could specifically and sensitively detect the activities of Exo 1, EcoR I and Hind III with detection limits of 0.03 U mL(-1), 0.06 U mL(-1) and 0.04 U mL(-1), respectively. Visual detection was also possible.

  9. Clementine sensor suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledebuhr, A.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    LLNL designed and built the suite of six miniaturized light-weight space-qualified sensors utilized in the Clementine mission. A major goal of the Clementine program was to demonstrate technologies originally developed for Ballistic Missile Defense Organization Programs. These sensors were modified to gather data from the moon. This overview presents each of these sensors and some preliminary on-orbit performance estimates. The basic subsystems of these sensors include optical baffles to reject off-axis stray light, light-weight ruggedized optical systems, filter wheel assemblies, radiation tolerant focal plane arrays, radiation hardened control and readout electronics and low mass and power mechanical cryogenic coolers for the infrared sensors. Descriptions of each sensor type are given along with design specifications, photographs and on-orbit data collected.

  10. An Introduction to LANL Mixed Potential Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brosha, Eric Lanich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kreller, Cortney [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-26

    These are slides for a webinar given on the topics of an introduction to LANL mixed potential sensors. Topics include the history of LANL electrochemical sensor work, an introduction to mixed potential sensors, LANL uniqueness, and an application of LANL mixed potential sensors. The summary is as follows: Improved understanding of the mixed-potential sensor mechanism (factors controlling the sensor response identified), sensor design optimized to maximize sensor sensitivity and durability (porous electrolyte/dense electrodes), electrodes selected for various specific applications (CO, HC, H2), sensor operating parameters optimized for improved gas selectivity (NOx, NH3).

  11. Final Report-Rail Sensor Testbed Program: Active Agents in Containers for Transport Chain Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    information. These trust approaches have been applied to a variety of regimes, including virtual communities [14], email [15] and ecommerce [16...2004(http://www .arxiv.org/abs/cond-mat/0402143). 16. Melnik, M., Aim, J., Does a seller’s eCommerce reputation matter? evidence from eBay auctions

  12. Sensor-enabled Activity Class Recognition in Preschoolers: Hip versus Wrist Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, Stewart G; Cliff, Dylan P; Ahmadi, Matthew N; Tuc, Nguyen VAN; Hagenbuchner, Markus

    2018-03-01

    Pattern recognition approaches to accelerometer data processing have emerged as viable alternatives to cut-point methods. However, few studies have explored the validity of pattern recognition approaches in preschoolers, and none have compared supervised learning algorithms trained on hip and wrist data. Purpose of this study was to develop, test, and compare activity class recognition algorithms trained on hip, wrist, and combined hip and wrist accelerometer data in preschoolers. Eleven children 3-6 yr of age (mean age, 4.8 ± 0.9 yr) completed 12 developmentally appropriate physical activity (PA) trials while wearing an ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer on the right hip and nondominant wrist. PA trials were categorized as sedentary, light activity games, moderate-to-vigorous games, walking, and running. Random forest (RF) and support vector machine (SVM) classifiers were trained using time and frequency domain features from the vector magnitude of the raw signal. Features were extracted from 15-s nonoverlapping windows. Classifier performance was evaluated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Cross-validation accuracy for the hip, wrist, and combined hip and wrist RF models was 0.80 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.79-0.82), 0.78 (95% CI, 0.77-0.80), and 0.82 (95% CI, 0.80-0.83), respectively. Accuracy for hip, wrist, and combined hip and wrist SVM models was 0.81 (95% CI, 0.80-0.83), 0.80 (95% CI, 0.79-0.80), and 0.85 (95% CI, 0.84-0.86), respectively. Recognition accuracy was consistently excellent for sedentary (>90%); moderate for light activity games, moderate-to-vigorous games, and running (69%-79%); and modest for walking (61%-71%). Machine learning algorithms such as RF and SVM are useful for predicting PA class from accelerometer data collected in preschool children. Although classifiers trained on hip or wrist data provided acceptable recognition accuracy, the combination of hip and wrist accelerometer delivered better performance.

  13. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David H [Redondo Beach, CA

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  14. Performance Evaluation of State of the Art Systems for Physical Activity Classification of Older Subjects Using Inertial Sensors in a Real Life Scenario: A Benchmark Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awais, Muhammad; Palmerini, Luca; Bourke, Alan K; Ihlen, Espen A F; Helbostad, Jorunn L; Chiari, Lorenzo

    2016-12-11

    The popularity of using wearable inertial sensors for physical activity classification has dramatically increased in the last decade due to their versatility, low form factor, and low power requirements. Consequently, various systems have been developed to automatically classify daily life activities. However, the scope and implementation of such systems is limited to laboratory-based investigations. Furthermore, these systems are not directly comparable, due to the large diversity in their design (e.g., number of sensors, placement of sensors, data collection environments, data processing techniques, features set, classifiers, cross-validation methods). Hence, the aim of this study is to propose a fair and unbiased benchmark for the field-based validation of three existing systems, highlighting the gap between laboratory and real-life conditions. For this purpose, three representative state-of-the-art systems are chosen and implemented to classify the physical activities of twenty older subjects (76.4 ± 5.6 years). The performance in classifying four basic activities of daily life (sitting, standing, walking, and lying) is analyzed in controlled and free living conditions. To observe the performance of laboratory-based systems in field-based conditions, we trained the activity classification systems using data recorded in a laboratory environment and tested them in real-life conditions in the field. The findings show that the performance of all systems trained with data in the laboratory setting highly deteriorates when tested in real-life conditions, thus highlighting the need to train and test the classification systems in the real-life setting. Moreover, we tested the sensitivity of chosen systems to window size (from 1 s to 10 s) suggesting that overall accuracy decreases with increasing window size. Finally, to evaluate the impact of the number of sensors on the performance, chosen systems are modified considering only the sensing unit worn at the lower back

  15. Quality control on planar n-in-n pixel sensors — Recent progress of ATLAS planar pixel sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingenberg, R.

    2013-01-01

    To extend the physics reach of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), upgrades to the accelerator are planned which will increase the peak luminosity by a factor 5–10. To cope with the increased occupancy and radiation damage, the ATLAS experiment plans to introduce an all-silicon inner tracker with the high luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). To investigate the suitability of pixel sensors using the proven planar technology for the upgraded tracker, the ATLAS Upgrade Planar Pixel Sensor (PPS) R and D Project was established. Main areas of research are the performance of planar pixel sensors at highest fluences, the exploration of possibilities for cost reduction to enable the instrumentation of large areas, the achievement of slim or active edges to provide low geometric inefficiencies without the need for shingling of modules and the investigation of the operation of highly irradiated sensors at low thresholds to increase the efficiency. The Insertable b-layer (IBL) is the first upgrade project within the ATLAS experiment and will employ a new detector layer consisting of silicon pixel sensors, which were improved and prototyped in the framework of the planar pixel sensor R and D project. A special focus of this paper is the status of the development and testing of planar n-in-n pixel sensors including the quality control of the on-going series production and postprocessing of sensor wafers. A high yield of produced planar sensor wafers and FE-I4 double chip sensors after first steps of post-processing including under bump metallization and dicing is observed. -- Highlights: ► Prototypes of irradiated planar n-in-n sensors have been successfully tested under laboratory conditions. ► A quality assurance programme on the series production of planar sensors for the IBL has started. ► A high yield of double chip sensors during the series production is observed which are compatible to the specifications to this detector component.

  16. Active control of aircraft engine inlet noise using compact sound sources and distributed error sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdisso, Ricardo (Inventor); Fuller, Chris R. (Inventor); O'Brien, Walter F. (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Dungan, Mary E. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An active noise control system using a compact sound source is effective to reduce aircraft engine duct noise. The fan noise from a turbofan engine is controlled using an adaptive filtered-x LMS algorithm. Single multi channel control systems are used to control the fan blade passage frequency (BPF) tone and the BPF tone and the first harmonic of the BPF tone for a plane wave excitation. A multi channel control system is used to control any spinning mode. The multi channel control system to control both fan tones and a high pressure compressor BPF tone simultaneously. In order to make active control of turbofan inlet noise a viable technology, a compact sound source is employed to generate the control field. This control field sound source consists of an array of identical thin, cylindrically curved panels with an inner radius of curvature corresponding to that of the engine inlet. These panels are flush mounted inside the inlet duct and sealed on all edges to prevent leakage around the panel and to minimize the aerodynamic losses created by the addition of the panels. Each panel is driven by one or more piezoelectric force transducers mounted on the surface of the panel. The response of the panel to excitation is maximized when it is driven at its resonance; therefore, the panel is designed such that its fundamental frequency is near the tone to be canceled, typically 2000-4000 Hz.

  17. Wearable sensors for human health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, H. Harry; Reisner, Andrew

    2006-03-01

    Wearable sensors for continuous monitoring of vital signs for extended periods of weeks or months are expected to revolutionize healthcare services in the home and workplace as well as in hospitals and nursing homes. This invited paper describes recent research progress in wearable health monitoring technology and its clinical applications, with emphasis on blood pressure and circulatory monitoring. First, a finger ring-type wearable blood pressure sensor based on photo plethysmogram is presented. Technical issues, including motion artifact reduction, power saving, and wearability enhancement, will be addressed. Second, sensor fusion and sensor networking for integrating multiple sensors with diverse modalities will be discussed for comprehensive monitoring and diagnosis of health status. Unlike traditional snap-shot measurements, continuous monitoring with wearable sensors opens up the possibility to treat the physiological system as a dynamical process. This allows us to apply powerful system dynamics and control methodologies, such as adaptive filtering, single- and multi-channel system identification, active noise cancellation, and adaptive control, to the monitoring and treatment of highly complex physiological systems. A few clinical trials illustrate the potentials of the wearable sensor technology for future heath care services.

  18. The bile acid sensor FXR is required for immune-regulatory activities of TLR-9 in intestinal inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Renga

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Toll like receptors (TLRs sense the intestinal microbiota and regulate the innate immune response. A dysregulation of TLRs function participates into intestinal inflammation. Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR is a nuclear receptor and bile acid sensor highly expressed in entero-hepatic tissues. FXR regulates lipid metabolism and innate immunity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we have investigated whether FXR gene expression/function in the intestine is modulated by TLRs. We found that in human monocytes activation of membrane TLRs (i.e. TLR2, 4, 5 and 6 downregulates, while activation of intracellular TLRs (i.e. TLR3, 7, 8 and 9 upregulates the expression of FXR and its target gene SHP, small heterodimer partner. This effect was TLR9-dependent and TNFα independent. Intestinal inflammation induced in mice by TNBS downregulates the intestinal expression of FXR in a TLR9-dependent manner. Protection against TNBS colitis by CpG, a TLR-9 ligand, was lost in FXR(-/- mice. In contrast, activation of FXR rescued TLR9(-/- and MyD88(-/- mice from colitis. A putative IRF7 response element was detected in the FXR promoter and its functional characterization revealed that IRF7 is recruited on the FXR promoter under TLR9 stimulation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Intestinal expression of FXR is selectively modulated by TLR9. In addition to its role in regulating type-I interferons and innate antiviral immunity, IRF-7 a TLR9-dependent factor, regulates the expression of FXR, linking microbiota-sensing receptors to host's immune and metabolic signaling.

  19. Nonlinear-Based MEMS Sensors and Active Switches for Gas Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Bouchaala, Adam M.

    2016-05-25

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the integration of a MOF thin film on electrostatically actuated microstructures to realize a switch triggered by gas and a sensing algorithm based on amplitude tracking. The devices are based on the nonlinear response of micromachined clamped-clamped beams. The microbeams are coated with a metal-organic framework (MOF), namely HKUST-1, to achieve high sensitivity. The softening and hardening nonlinear behaviors of the microbeams are exploited to demonstrate the ideas. For gas sensing, an amplitude-based tracking algorithm is developed to quantify the captured quantity of gas. Then, a MEMS switch triggered by gas using the nonlinear response of the microbeam is demonstrated. Noise analysis is conducted, which shows that the switch has high stability against thermal noise. The proposed switch is promising for delivering binary sensing information, and also can be used directly to activate useful functionalities, such as alarming.

  20. The inflammatory/cancer-related IL-6/STAT3/NF-κB positive feedback loop includes AUF1 and maintains the active state of breast myofibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrayani, Siti-Fauziah; Al-Harbi, Bothaina; Al-Ansari, Mysoon M; Silva, Gabriela; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2016-07-05

    The IL-6/STAT3/NF-κB positive feedback loop links inflammation to cancer and maintains cells at a transformed state. Similarly, cancer-associated myofibroblats remains active even in absence of cancer cells. However, the molecular basis of this sustained active state remains elusive. We have shown here that breast cancer cells and IL-6 persistently activate breast stromal fibroblasts through the stimulation of the positive IL-6/STAT3/NF-κB feedback loop. Transient neutralization of IL-6 in culture inhibited this signaling circuit and reverted myofibrobalsts to a normalized state, suggesting the implication of the IL-6 autocrine feedback loop as well. Importantly, the IL-6/STAT3/NF-κB pro-inflammatory circuit was also active in cancer-associated fibroblasts isolated from breast cancer patients. Transient inhibition of STAT3 by specific siRNA in active fibroblasts persistently reduced the level of the RNA binding protein AUF1, blocked the loop and normalized these cells. Moreover, we present clear evidence that AUF1 is also part of this positive feedback loop. Interestingly, treatment of breast myofibroblasts with caffeine, which has been previously shown to persistently inhibit active breast stromal fibroblasts, blocked the positive feedback loop through potent and sustained inhibition of STAT3, AKT, lin28B and AUF1. These results indicate that the IL-6/STAT3/NF-κB positive feedback loop includes AUF1 and is responsible for the sustained active status of cancer-associated fibroblasts. We have also shown that normalizing myofibroblasts, which could be of great therapeutic value, is possible through the inhibition of this procarcinogenic circuit.

  1. Characterisation of a monolithic active pixel sensor for electron detection in the energy range 10-20 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matheson, J.; Moldovan, G.; Clark, A.; Prydderch, M.; Turchetta, R.; Derbyshire, G.; Kirkland, A.; Allinson, N.

    2009-01-01

    As part of a feasibility study into the use of novel electron detectors for X-ray photoelectron emission microscopes (XPEEM), we have characterised the imaging performance of a back-illuminated monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) operating under both integrating and counting modes for electrons in the energy range 10-20 keV. For integrating mode, we present the detective quantum efficiency (DQE), which shows marked improvements over conventional indirect detectors based on microchannel plates. We also present the modulation transfer function (MTF) and noise power spectrum (NPS), again demonstrating significantly improved performance. For counting mode, we present the quantum efficiency (QE) as a function of incident electron energy. We have evaluated the charge collection efficiency (CCE) and we thereby demonstrate the presence of a ∼200 nm thick dead layer that is linked with reduced CCE at low electron energies. Based on our findings, we believe that the MAPS technology is well matched to future XPEEM instruments using aberration correction.

  2. Preparation, electrochemical behavior and electrocatalytic activity of chlorogenic acid multi-wall carbon nanotubes as a hydroxylamine sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zare, Hamid R., E-mail: hrzare@yazduni.ac.ir; Nasirizadeh, Navid; Ajamain, Hamideh; Sahragard, Ali

    2011-07-20

    Electrochemical characteristics of an electrodeposited chlorogenic acid film on multi-wall carbon nanotubes glassy carbon electrode (CGA-MWCNT-GCE) and its role as a sensor for electrocatalytic oxidation of hydroxylamine are described. Cyclic voltammograms of the CGA-MWCNT-GCE indicate a pair of well-defined and nearly reversible redox couple with the surface confined characteristics at a wide pH range of 2.0-12.0. The charge transfer coefficient, {alpha}, and the charge transfer rate constant, k{sub s}, of CGA adsorbed on MWCNT were calculated 0.48 and 44 {+-} 2 s{sup -1} respectively. The CGA-MWCNT-GCE shows a dramatic increase in the peak current and/or a decrease in the overvoltage of hydroxylamine electrooxidation in comparison with that seen at a CGA modified GCE, MWCNT modified GCE and activated GCE. The kinetic parameters of electron transfer coefficient, {alpha}, the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant, k', and exchange current, i{sub 0}, for oxidation of hydroxylamine at the modified electrode surface were determined using cyclic voltammetry. Four linear calibration ranges and high repeatability with relative standard deviation of 4.6%, for a series of four successive measurements in 17.7 {mu}M hydroxylamine, are obtained at the CGA-MWCNT-GCE using an amperometric method. Finally, the modified electrode was successfully used for determination of spiked hydroxylamine in two water samples.

  3. Analysis of test beam data of ALPIDE, the final Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) prototype for the ALICE ITS upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Emriskova, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    The ALICE collaboration is currently preparing a major upgrade of its apparatus, planned for installation during the second long shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider in 2019-20. The main pillar of the upgrade is the replacement of the current Inner Tracking System (ITS) with a new, low-material, high resolution silicon pixel detector, made of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). This technology, combining front-end circuitry and sensitive layer in a single device, will lead to a higher granularity of the detector and therefore a better pointing resolution. The silicon pixel chips, called ALPIDEs, developed specifically for the new ITS, are currently characterized using test beams. A part of this characterization is presented in this work. The project involves the very first analysis of test beam data with inclined tracks. The tested ALPIDE is rotated with respect to the beam, hence the particles cross the chip with an inclined incidence angle. The influence of these rotations on the efficiency profile...

  4. The APSEL4D Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor and its Usage in a Single Electron Interference Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Alberghi, Gian Luigi

    We have realized a Data Acquisition chain for the use and characterization of APSEL4D, a 32 x 128 Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor, developed as a prototype for frontier experiments in high energy particle physics. In particular a transition board was realized for the conversion between the chip and the FPGA voltage levels and for the signal quality enhancing. A Xilinx Spartan-3 FPGA was used for real time data processing, for the chip control and the communication with a Personal Computer through a 2.0 USB port. For this purpose a firmware code, developed in VHDL language, was written. Finally a Graphical User Interface for the online system monitoring, hit display and chip control, based on windows and widgets, was realized developing a C++ code and using Qt and Qwt dedicated libraries. APSEL4D and the full acquisition chain were characterized for the first time with the electron beam of the transmission electron microscope and with 55Fe and 90Sr radioactive sources. In addition, a beam test was performed at ...

  5. Corrosion of bare carbon steel as a passive sensor to assess moisture availability for biological activity in Atacama Desert soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Luis; Davila, Alfonso F; Soliz, Alvaro; Saldivia, Jessica

    2018-02-28

    Here we consider that the corrosion of polished bared metal coupons can be used as a passive sensor to detect or identify the lower limit of water availability suitable for biological activity in Atacama Desert soils or solid substrates. For this purpose, carbon steel coupons were deposited at selected sites along a west-east transect and removed at predetermined times for morphological inspection. The advantage of this procedure is that the attributes of the oxide layer (corrosion extent, morphology and oxide phases) can be considered as a fingerprint of the atmospheric moisture history at a given time interval. Two types of coupons were used, long rectangular shaped ones that were half-buried in a vertical position, and square shaped ones that were deposited on the soil surface. The morphological attributes observed by SEM inspection were found to correlate to the so-called humectation time which is determined from local meteorological parameters. The main finding was that the decreasing trend of atmospheric moisture along the transect was closely related to corrosion behaviour and water soil penetration. For instance, at the coastal site oxide phases formed on the coupon surface rapidly evolve into well-crystallized species, while at the driest inland site Lomas Bayas only amorphous oxide was observed on the coupons.

  6. Preparation, electrochemical behavior and electrocatalytic activity of chlorogenic acid multi-wall carbon nanotubes as a hydroxylamine sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zare, Hamid R.; Nasirizadeh, Navid; Ajamain, Hamideh; Sahragard, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemical characteristics of an electrodeposited chlorogenic acid film on multi-wall carbon nanotubes glassy carbon electrode (CGA-MWCNT-GCE) and its role as a sensor for electrocatalytic oxidation of hydroxylamine are described. Cyclic voltammograms of the CGA-MWCNT-GCE indicate a pair of well-defined and nearly reversible redox couple with the surface confined characteristics at a wide pH range of 2.0-12.0. The charge transfer coefficient, α, and the charge transfer rate constant, k s , of CGA adsorbed on MWCNT were calculated 0.48 and 44 ± 2 s -1 respectively. The CGA-MWCNT-GCE shows a dramatic increase in the peak current and/or a decrease in the overvoltage of hydroxylamine electrooxidation in comparison with that seen at a CGA modified GCE, MWCNT modified GCE and activated GCE. The kinetic parameters of electron transfer coefficient, α, the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant, k', and exchange current, i 0 , for oxidation of hydroxylamine at the modified electrode surface were determined using cyclic voltammetry. Four linear calibration ranges and high repeatability with relative standard deviation of 4.6%, for a series of four successive measurements in 17.7 μM hydroxylamine, are obtained at the CGA-MWCNT-GCE using an amperometric method. Finally, the modified electrode was successfully used for determination of spiked hydroxylamine in two water samples.

  7. Development and characterisation of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor prototypes for the upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    CERN Document Server

    Collu, Alberto

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is dedicated to the study and characterisation of the Quark-­‐Gluon Plasma (QGP), exploiting the unique potential of ultrarelativistic heavy-­‐ion collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The increase of the LHC luminosity leading up to about 50 kHz Pb-­‐Pb interaction rate after the second long shutdown (in 2018-­‐2019) will offer the possibility to perform high precision measurements of rare probes over a wide range of momenta. These measurements are statistically limited or not even possible with the present experimental set up. For this reason, an upgrade strategy for several ALICE detectors is being pursued. In particular, it is foreseen to replace the Inner Tracking System (ITS) by a new detector which will significantly improve the tracking and vertexing capabilities of ALICE in the upgrade scenario. The new ITS will have a barrel geometry consisting of seven layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) with high granularity, which will...

  8. Fast matching of sensor data with manual observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, Biswas; Maniyeri, Jayachandran; Louis, Shue; Philip, Yap Lin Kiat

    2009-01-01

    In systems and trials concerning wearable sensors and devices used for medical data collection, the validation of sensor data with respect to manual observations is very important. However, this is often problematic because of feigned behavior, errors in manual recording (misclassification), gaps in recording (missing readings), missed observations and timing mismatch between manual observations and sensor data due to a difference in time granularity. Using sleep activity pattern monitoring as an example we present a fast algorithm for matching sensor data with manual observations. Major components include a) signal analysis to classify states of sleep activity pattern, b) matching of states with Sleep Diary (SD) and c) automated detection of anomalies and reconciliation of mismatches between the SD and the sensor data.

  9. Improved laser-based triangulation sensor with enhanced range and resolution through adaptive optics-based active beam control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Syed Azer; Khwaja, Tariq Shamim; Mazhar, Mohsin Ali; Niazi, Haris Khan; Nawab, Rahma

    2017-07-20

    Various existing target ranging techniques are limited in terms of the dynamic range of operation and measurement resolution. These limitations arise as a result of a particular measurement methodology, the finite processing capability of the hardware components deployed within the sensor module, and the medium through which the target is viewed. Generally, improving the sensor range adversely affects its resolution and vice versa. Often, a distance sensor is designed for an optimal range/resolution setting depending on its intended application. Optical triangulation is broadly classified as a spatial-signal-processing-based ranging technique and measures target distance from the location of the reflected spot on a position sensitive detector (PSD). In most triangulation sensors that use lasers as a light source, beam divergence-which severely affects sensor measurement range-is often ignored in calculations. In this paper, we first discuss in detail the limitations to ranging imposed by beam divergence, which, in effect, sets the sensor dynamic range. Next, we show how the resolution of laser-based triangulation sensors is limited by the interpixel pitch of a finite-sized PSD. In this paper, through the use of tunable focus lenses (TFLs), we propose a novel design of a triangulation-based optical rangefinder that improves both the sensor resolution and its dynamic range through adaptive electronic control of beam propagation parameters. We present the theory and operation of the proposed sensor and clearly demonstrate a range and resolution improvement with the use of TFLs. Experimental results in support of our claims are shown to be in strong agreement with theory.

  10. [Antibacterial actin of vinegar against food-borne pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli O157:H7 (Part 2). Effect of sodium chloride and temperature on bactericidal activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entani, E; Asai, M; Tsujihata, S; Tsukamoto, Y; Ohta, M

    1997-05-01

    Bactericidal effects of various kinds of AWASEZU (processed vinegar, 2.5% acidity) on food-borne pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other bacteria were examined. the order of bactericidal activities was NIHAIZU (3.5% NaCl was added) > SANBA-IZU (3.5% NaCl and 10% sucrose were added) > plain vinegar (spirit vinegar) > AMAZU (10% sucrose was added). This indicates that their activities were enhanced by the addition of sodium chloride and suppressed by the addition of sugar. On the other hand, when soy sauce was used instead of sodium chloride, the order of bactericidal activities was plain vinegar > AMAZU > NIHAIZU > SANBAIZU. This is mainly because their activities were suppressed by the increase in the pH value. The effect of sodium chloride (0.01-15%) and temperature (10-50 degrees C) on bactericidal activities against E. coli O157:H7 in spirit vinegar (0.5-2.5% acidity) was further examined. When vinegar was used in combination with sodium chloride, predominant synergism on the bactericidal activity was observed. Their activities were markedly enhanced by the addition of sodium chloride in proportion to the concentration. In addition to this, at higher temperatures spirit vinegar killed bacteria much more rapidly. It should be noted that the bactericidal activity of spirit vinegar was extremely enhanced by the combined use of the addition of sodium chloride and the rise of temperature. For example, in 2.5% acidity vinegar, the time required for 3 log decrease in viable cell numbers at 20 degrees C was shortened to 1/140-fold by the addition of 5% sodium chloride, shortened to 1/51-fold by the rise of the reaction temperature at 40 degrees C, and shortened to 1/830-fold; 0.89 minutes by both the addition of 5% sodium chloride and the rise of temperature at 40 degrees C. In order to propose the methods to prevent food poisoning by bacterial infection, bactericidal activities of vinegar solution containing sodium chloride on cooking tools and

  11. Applying the Model of Goal-Directed Behavior, Including Descriptive Norms, to Physical Activity Intentions: A Contribution to Improving the Theory of Planned Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Gabriele; van Bavel, René; Baranowski, Tom; Duch-Brown, Néstor

    2016-08-01

    The theory of planned behavior (TPB) has received its fair share of criticism lately, including calls for it to retire. We contribute to improving the theory by testing extensions such as the model of goal-directed behavior (MGDB, which adds desire and anticipated positive and negative emotions) applied to physical activity (PA) intention. We also test the inclusion of a descriptive norms construct as an addition to the subjective norms construct, also applied to PA, resulting in two additional models: TPB including descriptive norms (TPB + DN) and MGDB including descriptive norms (MGDB + DN). The study is based on an online survey of 400 young adult Internet users, previously enrolled in a subject pool. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) showed that TPB and TPB + DN were not fit for purpose, while MGDB and MGDB + DN were. Structural equation modelling (SEM) conducted on MGDB and MGDB + DN showed that the inclusion of descriptive norms took over the significance of injunctive norms, and increased the model's account of total variance in intention to be physically active. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Integrated Active Fire Retrievals and Biomass Burning Emissions Using Complementary Near-Coincident Ground, Airborne and Spaceborne Sensor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Wilfrid; Ellicott, Evan; Ichoku, Charles; Ellison, Luke; Dickinson, Matthew B.; Ottmar, Roger D.; Clements, Craig; Hall, Dianne; Ambrosia, Vincent; Kremens, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Ground, airborne and spaceborne data were collected for a 450 ha prescribed fire implemented on 18 October 2011 at the Henry W. Coe State Park in California. The integration of various data elements allowed near coincident active fire retrievals to be estimated. The Autonomous Modular Sensor-Wildfire (AMS) airborne multispectral imaging system was used as a bridge between ground and spaceborne data sets providing high quality reference information to support satellite fire retrieval error analyses and fire emissions estimates. We found excellent agreement between peak fire radiant heat flux data (less than 1% error) derived from near-coincident ground radiometers and AMS. Both MODIS and GOES imager active fire products were negatively influenced by the presence of thick smoke, which was misclassified as cloud by their algorithms, leading to the omission of fire pixels beneath the smoke, and resulting in the underestimation of their retrieved fire radiative power (FRP) values for the burn plot, compared to the reference airborne data. Agreement between airborne and spaceborne FRP data improved significantly after correction for omission errors and atmospheric attenuation, resulting in as low as 5 difference between AquaMODIS and AMS. Use of in situ fuel and fire energy estimates in combination with a collection of AMS, MODIS, and GOES FRP retrievals provided a fuel consumption factor of 0.261 kg per MJ, total energy release of 14.5 x 10(exp 6) MJ, and total fuel consumption of 3.8 x 10(exp 6) kg. Fire emissions were calculated using two separate techniques, resulting in as low as 15 difference for various species

  13. Autonomous wireless radar sensor mote integrating a Doppler radar into a sensor mote and its application in surveillance and target material classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftekharuddin, Khan; Khan, Muhammad M. R.; McCracken, Ernest; Wang, Lan; Kozma, Robert

    2011-09-01

    An autonomous wireless sensor network that consists of different types of sensor modalities is a topic of intense research due to its versatility and portability of applications. Typical autonomous sensor networks commonly include passive sensor nodes such as infrared, acoustic, seismic, and magnetic. However, fusion of another active sensor such as Doppler radar in the integrated sensor network may offer powerful capabilities for many different sensing and classification tasks. In this work, we demonstrate the design and implementation of an autonomous wireless sensor network integrating a Doppler sensor into wireless sensor node with commercial off the shelf components. Then we demonstrate two applications of the newly integrated radar mote in a wireless sensor network environment where other sensor motes are supporting the integrated radar mote for autonomous triggering and data collection. At first we use the integrated system to detect the range and velocity of a toy train effectively to demonstrate its capability as a surveillance tool. Then we classify different types of non-conducting target materials based on their reflected signal response to newly built radar mote. Different types of materials can usually affect the amount of energy reflected back to the source of an electromagnetic wave. For investigating this observation we simulate models for the reflectivity of different homogeneous non-conducting materials using a mathematical model and later classify the types of target materials using real experimental data collected through our autonomous radar-mote sensor network.

  14. Metamaterial Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jing Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metamaterials have attracted a great deal of attention due to their intriguing properties, as well as the large potential applications for designing functional devices. In this paper, we review the current status of metamaterial sensors, with an emphasis on the evanescent wave amplification and the accompanying local field enhancement characteristics. Examples of the sensors are given to illustrate the principle and the performance of the metamaterial sensor. The paper concludes with an optimistic outlook regarding the future of metamaterial sensor.

  15. USGS VDP Infrasound Sensor Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slad, George William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Merchant, Bion J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested and evaluated two infrasound sensors, the model VDP100 and VDP250, built in-house at the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory. The purpose of the infrasound sensor evaluation was to determine a measured sensitivity, self-noise, dynamic range and nominal transfer function. Notable features of the VDP sensors include novel and durable construction and compact size.

  16. Interfacing Sensors To Micro Controllers

    KAUST Repository

    Norain, Mohamed

    2018-01-15

    This lecture will cover the most common interface and interface techniques between sensors and microcontrollers. The presentation will introduce the pros and cons of each interface type including analogue, digital and serial output sensors. It will also cover the basic required electronics knowledge to help you in selecting and designing your next sensor to microcontroller interface.

  17. Active Submarine Volcanoes and Electro-Optical Sensor Networks: The Potential of Capturing and Quantifying an Entire Eruptive Sequence at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, J. R.; Kelley, D. S.; Proskurowski, G.; Fundis, A. T.; Kawka, O.

    2011-12-01

    The NE Pacific Regional Scale Nodes (RSN) component of the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative is designed to provide unprecedented electrical power and bandwidth to the base and summit of Axial Seamount. The scientific community is engaged in identifying a host of existing and innovative observation and measurement techniques that utilize the high-power and bandwidth infrastructure and its real-time transmission capabilities. The cable, mooring, and sensor arrays will enable the first quantitative documentation of myriad processes leading up to, during, and following a submarine volcanic event. Currently planned RSN instrument arrays will provide important and concurrent spatial and temporal constraints on earthquake activity, melt migration, hydrothermal venting behavior and chemistry, ambient currents, microbial community structure, high-definition (HD) still images and HD video streaming from the vents, and water-column chemistry in the overlying ocean. Anticipated, but not yet funded, additions will include AUVs and gliders that continually document the spatial-temporal variations in the water column above the volcano and the distal zones. When an eruption appears imminent the frequency of sampling will be increased remotely, and the potential of repurposing the tracking capabilities of the mobile sensing platforms will be adapted to the spatial indicators of likely eruption activity. As the eruption begins mobile platforms will fully define the geometry, temperature, and chemical-microbial character of the volcanic plume as it rises into the thoroughly documented control volume above the volcano. Via the Internet the scientific community will be able to witness and direct adaptive sampling in response to changing conditions of plume formation. A major goal will be to document the eruptive volume and link the eruption duration to the volume of erupted magma. For the first time, it will be possible to begin to quantify the time-integrated output of an underwater